Group Title: Buccaneer (Vero Beach, Florida)
Title: The buccaneer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102950/00015
 Material Information
Title: The buccaneer
Uniform Title: Buccaneer (Okinawa Island, Japan)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Army Air Forces. -- Air Force, 10th
United States -- Army Air Forces. -- Air Force, 10th
Publisher: I & E Section, Hq Co, Tenth Army for the members of Hq, Hq Co, and Sp Trs
Place of Publication: Okinawa Island, Japan
Okinawa Island, Japan
Publication Date: January 11, 1945
Frequency: daily
regular
 Subjects
Subject: World War, 1939-1945 -- Newspapers   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okinawa Island (Japan)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Japan -- Okinawa Island -- Okinawa-shi
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1945. Ceased on Oct. 15, 1945.
General Note: "Scoops for the troops."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 116 (Sept. 5, 1945).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102950
Volume ID: VID00015
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 42868813
lccn - sn 99064069

Full Text








The BUCCANEERS..

U. S. NAVAL AIR STATION


VOL. 1-NO. 19


VERO BEACH, FLORIDA,


JANUARY 11, 1945


WAVES' CAPTAIN McAFEE HERE


FORMER VERO-ITES
LEAD AIR GROUP 14
TO GALLANT RECORD

Comdr. Blitch And Lt. Comdr.
Downing Return To
The States

This Station's first and second
Chief Flight Instructors, Comdr.
J. D. Blitch, USN, and Lt. Comdr.
Art Downing, USNR, have re-
turned to the states after several
months' duty with Air Group 14, a
super-battling organization which
shot down 158 Jap planes and sank
92 Jap ships-during its tour of
duty.
Comdr. Blitch, a Helldiver ex-
pert, was skipper of this famous
squadron which blasted the Nips
from Wake to the'Philippines dur-
ing May to November 1944.
Lt. Comdr, Downing's most not-
able achievement was a damaging
hit on a YAMATO class battleship
in the Philippines Sea battle. Dra-
(Continued on. Page 3)


VERO TO SUPPORT
"MARCH OF DIMES"

"The March of Dimes" boxes
placed throughout the Station
are the first step in Vero's sup-
port of the annual fund-raising
campaign of the National Foun-
dation for Infantile Paralysis.
The campaign runs Jan. 14
through 31.
The second step is to fill the
boxes with dimes for the worthy
organization which "carries on
the fight against poliomyelitis,
its causes, prevention and treat-
ment."
From President Roosevelt, all
hands, received this message:
"There is no more worthy un-
dertakaig than the fight against
infantile paralysis, and it is my
belief that the personnel of the
Navy, Marine Corps and Coast
Guard, both uniformed and civ-
ilian, will welcome the oppor-
tunity for voluntary participa-
tion in this appeal for funds."


'OFF THE RECORD,' USO-CAMP SHOW,
TO PLAY AT STATION THEATRE MONDAY


"Off the Record," the third of
the popular USO-Camp shows to
play here, will be seen at the Sta-
tion auditorium next Monday night,
15 January, at 1830 and 2030.
Featuring six different acts,
"Off the Record" promises its Vero
audience a versatile show of com-
edy, song, dance and novelty num-
bers. In addition, a different type
of audience participation is on tap.
A change from the usual "MC"
line is indicated in advance public-
ity which advises that the Mistress
of Ceremonies will be Lynn Rus-
sell, a "vivacious blond beauty just
five feet tall." Miss Russell, and
red-headed Marion Farrar who
have starred together at New York
night clubs for the past four sea-
sons, will. appear together in song
and patter numbers.
The "Three Crandall Sisters"
will be a big hit if their songs are
on a par with their pioture, which
is printed in this issue of the 'BucJ


This trio had appeared at the New
York's Stage Door Canteen and
has been on a number of network
radio programs.
Other promised stars of "Off
the Record," are the "Trumpet
Twins," who have appeared three
times on the Fred Allen show;
Howard Klein, a comedy mental-
ist, who may try to put an unsus-
pecting sailor to sleep; Al Serar,
whose novelty act has made a big
hit at other stations; and Michael
Loran, pianist and musical con-
ductor.


PRAISES WORK OF VERO
WAVES AFTER TOUR

OF INSPECTION

"I think I come as near to envy-
ing you in your assignment here at
Vero Beach as I have envied any-
one in any assignment anywhere,"
commented Captain Mildred Mc-
Afee, senior WAVE officer, in her
short talk to WAVES at the
Beachland Barracks Tuesday. "You
have all the advantages of home
service and those of foreign serv-
ice too. I'm going to have a hard
time going back to..Washington
from Florida," she added. '
Captain McAfee spent fotr hours
on a tour of the station and
WAVES installation -lere. Lunch
served at Beachland in honor of
Captain McAfee was climaxed by
a short talk to all WR personnel.
She commented that WAVES on
this station are fortunate in be-
ing able to feel themselves in con-
tact with the war. "Certainly'you
people who are as obviously in con-
tact with the training of the men
who fight the war can feel yourself
in the front lines."
SWAVE Quota Of 80,000
She explained that the original
Wave quota of 100,000 ,ad been
stopped at the present 80,000 mark
since the attrition rate for men
was much lower than anyone dared
hope. She also announced that
Hunter college, Wave boot school,
will not close, that 500 girls a
month will go through schooling
for replacement purposes. "Future
quotas for the WAVES will be
determined by the future size of
the Navy, the number of ships and
future rotatoin," she said.
In regard to WAVES in service
after the war, Captain McAfee
smiled and said, "Certainly it would


BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMPS take different legislation to take
____ care of it. But Admiral McIntyre


What has the Navy cost us?
Congress since 1 July, 1940, has
authorized the Navy to spend for
defense and war $118,000,000,000.

This Navy life is beginning to
tell on me. I am beginning to look
more like my I. D. card every day.


of BuMed has gone on record as
saying that he wants women corps-
men whatever happens."
Captain McAfee feels that wo-
men should take their turn on de-
mobilization, yielding seniority to
men who have been in longer. Prob-
ably though," she added, "women
(Continued on Page 4)


CITED AGAIN


LT. HENRY A. CAREY, JR.,
USNR, winner of many other
commendations, recently awarded
the Air Medal by Capt. Peck.
Lt. Henry A. Casey, Jr., USNR,
was awarded the Air Medal and
an accompanying Citation from
Adm. Chester W. Nimitz in a spe-
cial ceremony held by Capt. E. R.
Peck on Friday, 22 December.
The citation, signed by the
Commander-in-Chief of the Pa-
cific Fleet, reviewed a flight made
by Lt. Casey on 16 February
1944 in the Carolines Islands area.
Veteran of three and a half
years' service in the Navy, Lt.
Casey served at the Jacksonville
and Miami Naval Air Stations be-
fore reporting to the fleet. He
served aboard the USS Enterprise,
the USS Monterey, the USS Su-
(Continued on Page 6)

First Come, First Served
Civilians aren't the only ones
singing the "scarcity blues."
Ship's Service has its hard-to-
get merchandise, too, but items
must be sold on a first-come-first-
served basis.
Employees at Ship's Service have
been ordered not to "save" items
for their friends. Don't put these
employees on the spot by asking
special favors.






PAG TW THE BUCNE s1e 'T AH N


THE BUCCANEER
UNITED STATES NAVAL AIR STATION
Vero Beach. Florida
An Activity Of The Naval Air Operational Training Command


VOL. 1-NO. 19 VERO BEACH, FLORIDA. JANUARY 11, 1945
COMMANDING OFFICER ..... R.-...CAPT. E. R. PECK, USN
SUPT. AVIATION TRAINING __ ..-...COMDR. E. HAnME, USN
EXECUTIVE OFFICER ....... LT. COMR. BAXTER M. HAYNES, USNR
IN CHARGE or PUBLICATION .--- .LT. R. A. BENJAMIN, USNR
MANAGING EDITOR _J. BALDWIN, RdMSo, USNR
FzATUtR EDITOR .__._ ...SALLY JACKMAN, S8c, USNR
SPORTS EDITORS -. .HARRY "POP" BELL, CSp(D)USCG
P. E. TEHANEY, SSc, USNR
AMUSEMENT-EDITOR __W. E. PENTECOST, S2c, USNR
DEPARTMENT EDITOR ..__..__. ..._.._OLIN TICE, S2c, USNR
"INQuRING REPORT"ER__. JEAN SPOON, Sp(T)Sc, USNR
COPY EDITOR ..E. C. WHITEHEAD, Ylc, USNR
ADvISOR ON PHOTOGRAPHY __ENS. M. E. GROSS, USNR
STAFF WRITERS
MARJORIn THOMSIN, Sp 1o JACK LAWSON, S2c
PFC J. E. CRAcRAFT, USMCR DOROTHY BUCK, Sc
HARRIET ROBERTS, Sp (Y) 3S T. J. WHITTAKER, RdMJs
The Buccaneer is published without cost to the U. S. Government and is
distributed free to all hands aboard the Naval Air Station, Vero Beach.
This is not an official Navy Department publication and no article
contained herein should be construed as representing the opinion of the
Navy Department. This paper is printed in the interest of the station
personnel and will welcome all contributions and criticisms from mem-
bers of the Base. The Buccaneer receives Camp Newspaper Service
material. The republication of credited matter is prohibited without
permission of CNS, 205 E. 42St. N. Y. C. 17.


"FORMER VERO-ITES. ."
You'll be reading more and more accounts like the story
about Comdr. Blitch and Lt. Comdr. Downing on page. 1,
. -Ore1more- i nre "alumni" of eNAS- Vero Beach, go iHto
Pacific action. ~
Many of yZu w-on't be reading the accounts because you
will be out making them.
The line drawn between practice and the real thing is
not so wide as you might suppose. The NAS student or in-
structor of today is the battling carrier pilot of tomorrow.
Such accounts should spur us all to the realization that
these hard-won victories are prepared for in this country,
that skill and efficiency born of superior training are a major
part of the battle.

"THE MARC H OF DIMES
You can't make a better investment than the dime (or
dimes) you drop in the boxes which are the Station's part
of the fund-raising campaign for the National Foundation
for Infantile Paralysis, Inc.
It should be inspiring to us that in this war year when
tens of billions are being spent for weapons of destruction,
there continues an organization which can, with a drop in
the bucket of war expenses, immeasurably further the battle
against one of nature's cruelest diseases.

HOW YOU PAY FOR CARELESSNESS

A Navy truck is smashed. A piece of machinery is
broken. There's a fire in the warehouse. All the result of
carelessness.
And who pays for this carelessness. Good old Uncle Sam,
you say. Wrong. You pay! Those strained-for War Bonds,
instead of buying guns and ammunition that will end the
war quicker, must go to replace equipment killed by care-
lessness.
Those bottomless money bags of your Uncle Sam are
a myth, mate. When he puts dollars on the line, it's your
money. It's earned the hard way. Let's not squander it.


CHAPLAIN'S CORNER

services in the Chapel on Sun-
day:
1000 Catholic Mass.
1100 Protestant Service.
One of the most destructive
weapons to be used in this war is
the "booby-trap." Other wars
have used the principle of the land
mine, but never before has its use
been so deceptive or its effect so
destructive.
Retreating armies
leave in their wake
hundreds of fiend-
ish traps to kill
1 their pursuers and
retard their prog-
ress. The lifting of
a harmless souve-
nir helmet would
set off a charge
i that could blow off
e a man's hand.Clos-
ing a door would
Chaplain Lowden detonate a charge
that would explode
a whole house. Craftiness has been
used to make the traps innocent-
looking and almost inviting. Yet
the destruction they deal is mur-
derous.
The principle that works these
traps is certainly not new. Indeed,
from the beginning of the race,
sin has been a "booby-$rap" in the
life of mankind. The experience of
Adam and Eve in the Garden
seemed harmless in itself, but it set
off an explosion that has never
stopped re-echoing through the
years. And you will find that all
kinds of evil carry along this same
pattern.
Do you remember your first ex-
perience at stealing? It looked so
innocent and you wanted it so
badly-but it set off a charge that
might have really hurt you had
it not been for some wise person
who knew you would learn by the
experience. Some young people
have felt that they could get by
without getting caught by other
types of immorality, but they
learned too late that what had
seemed so inviting to them was a
booby-trap and their lives have
become crippled by it.
What is the answer to it? How
can we keep from being "mined"
by wrong? Of course, the best way
is to keep away from the mine-
fields! Booby-traps only hurt
those who are near them. But if
it is necessary that you go where
the danger is the best defense
against traps is a full knowledge
of them and their consequences. If
you know that certain things are
wrong and that they carry with
them a certain penalty, you have
taken a big step toward saving
yourself from being caught by
them.
One thing is certain-there are
very few "duds" in the booby-
traps of sin. What we think are


Inquiring Reporter I

QUESTION OF THE WEEK:
What have you gained from your
time in the service?
Anne Moyer, Sp(Y)2c: About
five pounds that I don't want.
Art Seppi, AOM2c: A greater
appreciation of civilian life.
Mary Burri, Sp(S)2c: A husband,
and a chief at that.
Marty Wilson, Sic: Three months
of yeoman school in order to be-
come a storekeeper on this base.
H. H. Libcke, MAM2c: That's a
silly question (long low laugh).
Everyone knows the answer to
that.
Pat Wagenseller, Slc: A great
desire to get out of Florida.
Cpl. L. F. Hobaica, USMC:
FLAT FEET!!!!
Isabel Nelson, Y2c: A nice little
corn on the third toe from the left.
Cpl. Jerry Cohen, USMC: Around
twenty pounds.
Virginia MlacCambell, Sk2c: The
opportunity and ability to take or-
ders.
H. R. Durham, SClc: The chance
to meet new people and to see the
world (even this lovely garden spot
of Vero).
Minerva Gross, Sic: Lots of lei-
sure time has been my greatest
gain in the service.
C. L. King ACMM: A greater
knowledge of aviation and a chance
to become chief in four years.
Ruth Hook, Slc: The undeniable
and inalienable right to wear navy
blue.
L. E. Hand, S2c: A chance to go
to boot school, get my hair cut
short by someone else fpr free, and
to catch H -.
Esther Hildreth, Cpl. MCWR:
The chance to meet people from
all over the country and to see lots
of new places.

Rating Earns Every
Other Month In 1945
During 1945 regular examina-
tions for advancement will be held
every two months in January,
March, May, July, September, and
November. Exceptions to this rule
will be Sic, Flc, and other ratings
in which special examinations may
be necessary from time to time.
Announcement will be made in
the Plan of the Day when such
special examinations are to be
given.
duds are merely delayed-action
bombs which will go off when we
least expect them. There's no use
fooling yourself any longer. From
the beginnings of humanity, the
violation of God's laws has carried
a severe penalty. It may look
harmless and inviting but it is in
reality a booby-trap with a danger-
ous concussion.


__________


PAin. Two


tjig DVCdANEkj?


qP61 III )oavrfixyir












JANAR ii 145 HEBUCANERPAG TRE


BEHIND THE SCENES
AT NAS, VERO BEACH
TWENTY-TWO WAVES AND WR's INSTRUCT IN LINK TRAINERS


WAVES, WR'c and Pilots study
,nk records of Link hops made by
"planes" at right.

The Link building on Main street
iext to the education building is
mother storehouse of synthetic
:raining devices. And it would
-ake no S. Holmes to deduce, from
.he name of the building, that
amongg the devices are the famous
'ink trainers.
The Link trainer looks like a
,unchy headless bird and is de-
digned to teach instrument flying.
the pilot operates his "plane" with
i standard instrument panel, and
(he Link is able to bank, turn, gain
)r lose altitude, simulating almost
:very condition a pilot will run into.
Operators can even synthesize
oughh weather conditions.
Waves And WR's
Operated by 22 Waves and
Marines (WR), work in the Link
trainers serves as a training phase
for night fighter pilots schooling
here. Although most flyers aug-
ment the basic schedule with syn-
thetic range hops of their own,
diine training hops are scheduled
for each pilot,
A Marine or Wave operates the
outside controls and is in radio
touch with the pilot. She watches
the track made by the "crab," an
instrument which marks the record
of the "flight" upon a chart. Pilots
'an-and do occasionally write
their names with this marker ((all
ny headings and mileage, not by
penmanship) One of the cartoons
,n the Link building shows a start-
.ed Wave operator looking at a
frantic "lost" spelled by the crab
on her chart.
Wave and Marine operators are
ible to simulate CAA code beacons
to give pilots practice in flying
regular plotted airways. This syn-
thetic flight practice dovetails
with the pilot's theory classes and
his actual night flying.
"One of the funniest things that


FORMER VERO-ITES
(Continued from Pago 1)
mnatie photograph@ of this action
were widely published in October.


Station pioneers will remember
Comdr. Blitch as Vero's first Chief
i Flight Instructor in Dec. 1942, who
became the Station's second Train-
ing Officer a few months later. Lt.
Comdr. Downing succeeded Comdr.
S Blitch as Chief Flight Instructor
when the latter moved into the top
training spot. Both officers were
,w cLieutenants when aboard here.
Although Air Group 14 struck
tremendous blows at the enemy,
Sthe squadron's own losses were
St high. Seventy-two pilots and air-
crewmen are on the honor roll of
dead and missing in the gallant
S group which, Navy officials say,
"has paid more heavily for its raids
on enemy ships and islands than
Sby Staplerany other carrier air group of the
-Photos by Stapler war."
S The first two Group skippers
OXYGEaion MASKS A i rao preceding Comdr. Blitch are listed
conversation more difficuMlt, but g r first tw oup skippe
pilots practice the art in their Link as "missing in action," and the
classesformer Vero-ite survived what has
been termed "one of the most
ca n happen," commented one fantastic incidents of the war,"
Marine, "Iis to have the electric after his Helldiver crashed into the
power go off." She explained that sea.
the Link trainers are based on a "During the action in which five
bellows arrangement and are bat- enemy fighters were destroyed,
tened down when not in use. When Comdr. Blitch received a machine
the trainer is in use and the power gun bullet crease in the back of his
goes off, "the trainers flop over on scalp," the official Navy report
their side, the cover is jerkel open shows. "For 280 miles he fought
and a terribly startledpilot scram- against losing consciousness, pilot-
bles out. It's an unexpected crash ing his plane by what flight surg-
landing." eons later termed "instinct." Fin-
Also in the Link building are ally, with his fuel exhausted, he
microphone, headset and code send- crashed into the sea from an alti-
ing outfits. These are used to tude of 700 feet and was reported
perfect a pilot in his R/T pro- -by his squadron mates as "prob-
cedure, and in his use of the mike, ably killed."
to check his voice and to teach .. "But Comdr. Blitch survived.
him code. Another use for these The shock of cold sea water re-
devices is in training pilots to talk vived him, he was able to free him-
while wearing oxygen masks. self from his cockpit and inflate
Records are made of each trans- his life raft and a cruiser seaplane
mission, so that the pilot can hear rescued him 40 hours later and re-
his own voice and how he sounds. turned him to his carrier. Beyond
the slight wounds he had sustained
Waitress: I have stewed kid- in the crash, and the Jap machine
neys, fried liver, boiled tongue, Y gun bullet increase in his scalp, he
and pig's feet. DOROTHY OMPSON, Sp(T)2c,was nhurt."
Gob: Gad, girl, you should get explains to a pilot the object of an --nL u
a survey! ; advanced assignment in the trainer. Temperance Lecturer: And in
conclusion, I will now give you a
practical demonstration of the
evils of Demon Rum. I have two
glasses here on the table. One is
filled with whiskey, one with wa-
ter. I will now place a worm in the
glass of whiskey. Witness how it
curls up, writhes in agony, then
dies. Now then, what moral do you
get from this demonstration?
CBM: If you don't want worms,
II Drink whiskey.

Wave: You'd better watch that
arm of yours.
S2c: Oh, it knows its way
around.
LINK OPERATORS' Ready Room
or where the gals retire between
classes. Note the knitter.


JANUA4RY 11, 1945


THE BUCCANEER


PAGE THREE







WHAT'S THIS? SANTA CLAUS BEING GRILLED ?


After landing here, and even before he had dis- -Photo by Lewis
tribute his gifts to breathless kids, Santa Claus, gent for information on North Pole installations
from the looks of the above picture, was inter- or a description of the latest model reindeers.
viewed by one of the Station's ACI officers. Lt. After the interview, Santa (Lt. H. F. Cade, Jr.,)
F. C. Withers, true to the traditions of Air Com- went on with his business of presenting hundreds
bat Intelligence, is evidently grilling the bearded of toys to Vero kiddies.


CORP. H. R. PORTER GETS AWARD HERE

FOR FIGHTING BLAZE ON BOUGAINVILLEA

Unofficial holder of champion overseas fire fighter on the sta-
tion is Corporal H. R. Porter, USMCR, who was recently awarded the
-Soldier's Medal for fighting fires at Boughinville, Solomon Islands.
Porter had been attached to the station only five days when he
was awarded the medal by Major J. E. Decher, USMC, on 29 Decem-
ber, 1944. Corp. Porter, a native of Avon Park, Florida, enlisted in
the Marine Corps Reserve on 14
October 1941. He served with the
First Marine Air Wing, Fleet
Marine Force in the South Pacific
and has seen action in the Bou-
gainville and Bismarck Archipel.
ago Operations,


CORP. H. R. PORTER, USMCR

SPECIAL EXAMS

Special rating examination in ad-
dition to the regular exams held
on 10 January 1945 will be given
as follows:
(1) Sp(X)3c(QM), at 0900 on
Monday 15 January 1945.
(2) RM3c, at 0900 on Wednes-
day 17 January 1945.
Candidates must check in all
books and instructional material
on the day of the examinations and
in advance of the scheduled time.
Those who do not check in all ma-
terial will not be permitted to take
the examinations.

Most popular GI corsage: Four
roses.


The citation, awarded by d
tion of the President, and
sented by the Commanding
eral, United Statse Army F
in the South Pacific area, reai
follows:
"For heroism at Bougain
Solomon Islands on 20 M
1944. When fire broke out
threatened to destroy a 1,000
ammunition dump, he respo
immediately to a call for
fighters, accompanying his un
maneuvering their equipment
a strategic though perilous
tion in the midst of exploding
munition. Disregarding per
safety, Corporal Porter
working until the blaze was
der control and finally e
guished."
Porter was again come
with his crew for successfully
tinguishing a gasoline dump
while under enemy shell fir
the evening of 12 April 1944
13 June 1944 another come
tion was made for similar a
when a fire broke out in the
nation gasoline tank farm.


irec-
pre-
Gen-
orces
ds as

ville,
arch
and
Iton
ended
fire
lit in
into
posi-
am-
sonal
kept
un-
xtin-

nded
y ex-
fire
e on
. On
enda-
ction
avi-


Praises Work of WAVES
(Continued from Page 1)

will be demobilized in term of the
women's service, not in terms of
the Navy as a whole."
Inspired By Navy Uniflrms
"I am tremendously inspired by
the fact that "by putting on a Navy
uniform we are having an oppor-
tunity which ought to make us hap-
pier citizens. For the first time in
history, women have shared the
military experience of the men.
The fact that we women are hav-
ing this experience means that we
will know what war has meant to
our men, and this ought to make
us much better citizens. By be-
ing better and more intelligent cit-
izens, you may avoid having your
daughter do this 20 years from
now," she concluded.
Captain McAfee commented that
probably no woman will be sta-
tioned permanently in the Carib-
bean Islands or in Alaska, that at
least this will be held in abeyance
until further developments de-
termine the question.
Captain McAfee was introduced
by Lt. Com. Edith Stallings,
WAVES Administrator for
NAOTC.

Buy, Sell, Lost, Found
And Trade Department
BUY-Good used car, any make or model.
wanted by Capt Thomas Morris. BOQ,
telephone 248.
JOBS-Work is available for wives of
servicemen. Call Chaplain. 311.
LOST-WAVE'S coat by Lois Wolf. Sic.
recently on Beachland bun. Finder please
call Officer's Records, Admin. Bldg.

"How dare you kiss me! I don't
kiss strange sailors. And besides
you forgot to lock the door."


ADVANCEMENTS

IN RATING

I, JAN. 1945

CCM(T): Bealor, C. A,
AMMIc; Davis, H. C., Weimer. D. B.
AEM3c: Goepfert. W. H.. Gorday, Jame4
H,, Himes, Reuben L., Johnston, Jesse J.
Fie: Cash, C. B., Davidson, William F.
Sic: Anderson, Phyllis B., Bailey, Ruth
C., Bertrand, Bertha (n), Bolen, Mildred,
Buck, Dorothy L., Burnett, Eleanor J.,
Butler. Emma L., Carter, Joe T., Cunliffe,
Lillian P.. DIRocco, Lucille M.. Forester,
Marion F., Gay, H. (n), Hastings, Rich-
ard 0, Hogue, Ellen R., Hke, lmer .,
Jay. Grant L.. Johnson, Cleo (n). Kat-
eenberger, Margaret M., Kennedy. J. M..
King, E. J., Kimball,. Marion. Leger, Bea-
rice J.. Lucke. Marie A.. Markvad, Helen
J., Moss. Gloria Y., McGee, Barbara J.,
Needham, Lois (n), Poitras. Rena, Ran.
dell, Priscilla (n), Roberts. Anne M.,
Schultz, Virginia M., Scott, Adelaide M.,
Rocheleam, Elsie S.. Stice, Rosalie N..
Sturman, June D., Suiter. Golden C.,
Tornow, Betty J., Vaughn. Nannie V.,
Wagonseller. Patricia K., Wambold, LQ-
cllle (n). Webb, Jane E.. Wichrowski,
Beverly B., Williams, Martha. Witt, Mar.
jorie. Zink. Hope J.
RdM2c: Atkins, Leonard C.
Y3c: Mack. Harold R.
StMle; Martin. H. H.. Moore, S.. Mor-
gan, A. E.. Newby, C. R.
S(X)3c(QM)(T): Hall, L. W., Hirsch.
G. W., Leggett, D. R., Nordberg, A. M.
Sie (Arguar Urit 24); Anderson, R S..
Bishop, V. R., Criger, R. L.. Gomez. A.
Russell, H. C.


BOAT FACLITItS MAN

RECEIVES COMMENDATION

Coxswain Leon S. Bednarzeyk
has been recommended for an ad-
vancement in rating to BM2c as an
added reward for a commendation
ribbon presented to him Saturday
at the Ft. Pierce Boat Facilities by
his O-in-C, Lt.-Comdr. C. H. Brown.
The citation was "for heroic and
meritorious service, the nature of
which cannot be revealed at this
time," and was received for an act
Bednarzcyk performed last Sep-
tember while serving with the At-
lantic fleet.
A native of New Haven, Conn.,
the 26-year-old coxswain is now
assigned to one of the Boat Facili.
ties' crash boats.


JANUARY 11, 1945


PAGE FOUR


THE BUCCANEER


NEW EMBLEM FOR THOSE

HONORABLY DISCHARGED

A new honorable discharge em-
blem has been adopted by the
Navy, Army, Marine Corps and
Coast Guard, under a joint agree-
ment signed by Secretary of War
Henry L. Stimson and SecNav
James Forrestal. The emblem is
a cloth device with the same de-
sign as the honorable discharge
service lapel button and will be
worn on the uniform of all hon-
orably discharged personnel.
The basic design of the emblem
will be embroidered in gold, with
the background material varying
to match the color of the uniform
on which it is to be worn. Sup-
plies of the emblem are not yet
available for distribution.






JANUTARPVY 11 ln~ THE B -UCCANEER PAEIV


COMMENDED FOR WAR BOND WORK



_ l ^t .
WA, .



-, 11"x


man .7-
'ni~s~, '-


Here are star salesmen of the Pearl Harbor Day War Bond drive
commended last week by Capt. Peck. Left to right are Ens. W. W.
Woody. Jr., Eloise Knight, Lt. (jg) J. F. Donnelly, Elsie Fehon,
Lt. (jg) G. F. Ronan, Lt. Elizabeth L. Towle, and Lt. Irving Levine.
Chairman of the Campaign was Lt. C. E. Smith and Assistant
Chairman was Lt. R. A. Benjamin.

Chief Elwood For Personnel Must Turn
Nelson In Personnel In Educational Material
It's L. Elwood, CY, USN, in For purposes of inventory all
for B. M. Nelson, CY, USNR, as enlisted personnel are requested to
one of the key men in the Person- turn in to the Educational Office
nel Office. all books and materials in- their
Nelson, a real Vero pioneer possession not later than 1200 on
it's been his home for 20 years- 15 January 1945.
left last week for Seattle and fur- No material may be checked out
their westward travel, after serv- during the week from 15 to 20'Jan-
ing aboard since Nov. 1942. uary. No progress tests or as-
Elwood began his 4 years in signments may be submitted dur-
the Navy as an apprentice seaman ing this period.
and was made Chief last July in the g ts peod
Marshall Islands. After 22 January, strikers for
A native of Durand, Mich., El- all aviation branch ratings will
wood's last tourof 19 months in- check out all books and materials
eluded a year aboard the new at Aviation Training Personnel Of-
Yorktown and seven months in fice in the Hanger. Strikers for
the Marshalls. He hit Roi-Namur all other ratings will continue to
just two days after D-day, while check out materials at the Educa-
thle Marines were still doing busi- tion Office in the Instruction
iness with the Japs. Building.
Before the Pacific tour, he had
2% years aboard the Texas in the I sneezed, a sneeze into the air;
Atlantic, and on this ship he took It fell to earth I know not where,
part in the North African landings. But hard and cold were the looks
_____ of those
Buy War Bonds and Stamps In whose vicinity I snoze.


NAVY NOW ....

BUT IN THE OLD DAYS


Ensign M. E. Gross
Taught Advertising

Ens. Milton E. Gross, USNR, the
Station's Photographic officer and
assistant Special Devices officer,
was teaching advertising at the
University of Missouri when the
Navy nabbed hm in November,
1943.
A Missouri graduate with a Mas-
ter's degree in Journalism, Ensign
Gross studied Special Devices a'
Quonset, Detroit and Washington
before coming to Vero.
Now an enthusiast over gunair
structors, links and other practical
Special Devices aids, he says:
"Any operational phase can be
synthesized. Pilots in the Fleet
have found they are much better
prepared for combat duty because
of these aids. Special Devices have
saved much time and numerous'
lives during the training period."
'Born in Pacific, Mo., a town oa
1,500, Ensign Gross has not ye;
buckled under the strain of metro
politan Vero Beach life.
Before teaching at his alma
mater, Ensign Gross had a year';
fling at instructing journalism il
the Texas College of Mines and
Metallurgy in El Paso.
After the war, he hopes to gc
back to teaching at Missouri. IH
"doubts" if he'll write a book.

Time Limit Set On
Education Books

As of 22 January 1945 a time
limit will be placed on all books
and instructional materials check-
ed out at the Educational Office.
-The limit will be a period of one
(1) week for aviation training
course books (BuPers Blue Man-
uals) and two (2) weeks for all
other books, manuals, pools, and
instructional materials. Such books
and materials may be rechecked
for not more than two additional
periods in each case. Those who
retain books or materials over the


Jimmy Payne, Sic,
Was A Jockey

James W. Payne, Sic, known
to his friends as "Jockey," comes
by the name honestly.
The 100-pound Personnel Office
worker put in seven .years before
the war with race horses, working
with such outstanding sprinters as
Signator and Sylvestra, jockeying
in "several hundred" races on
smaller tracks, and exercising
countless horses from Florida to
Massachusetts.
"Galloping the horses," which
means to give them early-morning
exercise, was Payne's principal job
before coming into the Navy.
Wages were larger and more de-
oendable than in the chance rac-
ing side of the field.
"I could make 15 or 20 dollars
for working four hours, from 5 to
9 each day," he recalls. And no
matter how you pun it, that ain't
hay.
Payne worked for some of the
country's biggest stables, including
Woolford Farms and the Louis B.
Mayer stables, for whom he broke--
a number of frisky colts.
Hailing from Lexington, Ky.,
Payne has four brothers in the
Navy, three of them at sea.
After the war, he hopes to go
back in the "hoss business." In
spite of the recent ban on horse
racing, he thinks it will be in for
plenty of prosperous post-war sea-
sons.
"I may try training," Payne
says, "or I may even go back to
riding. Maybe I can even pick up
a horse or two and start the
"Payne Stables." I don't want to
make a million dollars, not the
first year anyway."

time limit will be placed on report.
All personnel who are to be de-
tached from the station are remind-
ed that they must check out with
the Educational Officer and check
in all books and materials for
which they are charged.


Male Call by Milton Canff. creator of Terry and the Pirates" Tetched-nition Fifth Grade rh. Welt by Senson
WEL,GENEAL,tU E,P'AT SUT oHTE Tw'N KEEPS A T.JU' D COMES AN'_r NEVEz AA
ear NOT ATED AND 4EES I WAVE, iODCNII' N ME. OHe i A AvI AID A-LEST I D FIND IWO
yOiU A2E WITH 1 IBON5 M LACE, ODAYPIHEA6' e. EN-l|E | -WE HICH-T TAILED T WoNAT 51
AN1 EVEyThIN6 !... I'LL DATs I TrASA AWF15EWAEIEI Fo THE DITCHES1. BATTLE -i
UETtY N AV8E PLENTVTD HAVE... LELTUIN'AT U5 AEUT EJ
WATN5LOO VERSE


PAGE FIVE


JANUARY 11 1945


THE BUCCANEER





PAGE SIX THE BUCCANEER JANUARY 11, 1945


16 CAGE TEAMS IN

STATION TOURNAMENT

With 16 teams entered in two
basketball leagues on the station,
itra-mural play got under way
irly this week. The teams are
divided into leagues of eight each
nd play a round robin schedule.
ames are played Monday through
hursday each league playing on
ame each day.
In the Red League are the fol-
)wing teams: Spoilers, A-T Of-
.cers, Mess Cooks, 8 Balls, Lin-
'n 5, Marine Bogies, Fort Pierce
and Sebastian. The boys from
ort Pierce were so anxious to
lay basketball the men had to be
ivided into two teams designated
s Fort Pierce I and II. These
sams have been placed in separ-
te leagues to enliven the rivalry.
In the Blue League are the fol-
'wing: Y-1, Upper 3, Gyrenes,
ir Control, Fox Trotters, MAWS,
ort Pierce II and X-l.
When the league play is com-
leted the winners will meet for
'he championship of the station.
11 games are played at 1545 with
ie exception of the Mess Cooks
ho play their games at 1430. The
vo courts in the enlisted men's
athletic Area are used for play.
Due to the length of the basket-
ill schedule the Athletic Depart-
ent warns team captains to make
iown their inability to appear for
scheduled game at least 24 hours
advance. Unless this is done the
:am failing to appear will de-
iult the game.

BOWLING LEAGUE
cam G W L PF Pts
dlar ........ 24 20 4 7 27
ech. Eng. .. 24 19 5 6 25
tersa ....... 24 19 5 S 25
I Bert ...... 24 17 7 7 24
ell HIa .... 24 16 8 3 19
.F ......... 24 13 11 5 18
S ........ 24 12 12 6 17
iffee Queens 24 12 12 5 17
1 .......... 24 12 12 4 16
Iprly ...... 24 12 12 3 16
-6 .......... 24 11 13 a 14
oat Office .... 24 10 14 2 12
i- Mobile .... 24 6 1 2 1
12 ... ...... 24 5 19 1 6
ir Control ... 24 6 1i 1 7
ast Guard .. 24 2 22 1 3
Seaman: "I'm not eating at the
ess hall anymore."
Cook: "Why not?"
Seaman: "You know that dog
'at's been eating at the door?"
Cook: "Sure, I've been feeding
m for weeks."
Seaman: "Well, today he went
:er to Ship's Service!"

CPO: Wadd'ya drink beer,
mi, gin, rye, wine?
Sic: Yes, sir.

A Navy couple were celebrating
'eir Nth wedding anniversary,
hen the wife asked: "Should we
! the turkey? ? "
The disgruntled reply was "Why
II him? He had nothing to do
ith it!"


OFFICERS ARE VOLLEYBALL CHAMPS


-Photo by Lowy
Champions of the Station Volleyball League are, left to right,
standing, Lt. S. B. Whintney, Jr., Ens. W. E. Stone, Lt. A. W.
Roark; kneeling, Lt. J. E. Schwencki, Lt. (jg) J. E. Smith, and Ens.


Stewart Crum.

WELFARE ADDS MORE F

48-HOUR CH

News of the addition of several
new rods and reels to the Welfare
Department's supply of fishing
tackle will be well received by
Station fishing enthusiasts.
At the same time, Lt. Winston
Montague, Welfare Officer, has
announced two new rules for tne
checking out of fishing tackle.
1. Tackle may be kept out no
more than 48 hours.
2. A fine of 50 cents will be
levied for each 24 hours longer
than the original 48.
"The Department regrets that
this drastic fine policy is neces-
sary," Lt. Montague said, "but it is
being inaugurated in fairness to
all hands.
"Recently there have been nu-
merous examples of lack of con-
sideration by men for their ship-
mates. We have always allowed
ample time to return the equip-
ment. When it is not returned,
other fishermen are disappointed.
"There is plenty of good fishing
in this area, both deep sea and
river, and the Department hopes
that as many men as possible can
take advantage of it."
Some of the added fishing tac-
kle was obtained for the Depart-


JERRY KERSCHNER,

SWIMMING CHAMP,

AT STUART FIELD

Jerry Kerschner, Sic, a world's
champion swimmer who broke one
of Johnny Weissmueller's records
in November, 1943, is now stationed
at Witham field in Stuart, one of
Vero's satellite fields.
Kerschner whizzed to the record
at Columbus, Ohio, in a meet be-
tween Great Lakes and Ohio State.
He swam the 150 yards in 1:21:4,
compared with Weissmueller's
mark of 1:22:8.
A native of Columbus, the star
swimmer has been in the Navy
since June, 1943. Before swimming
for Great Lakes NTS, Kerschner
had set several marks in prep
school and high school. He was
the national prep champ for the
220, setting the record at Trenton
while swimming for Mercersburg
Academy.
In August, 1944, he won the
National AAU championship for
the 100-metre and 200-metre free
style in a meet held at Great Lakes.
At this time he set an American
record for the 200, lowering Tom
Haynie's time of 2:14:4 to 2:12:9.
Kerschner was also a member
of the Great Lakes World's record
relay team for the 400-yard arid
800-yard distances.


| CITED AGAIN
ISHING TACKLE; (Continued from Page 1)
ECK-OUT TIME LIMIT SET wanee and the USS Hornet. He
U was aboard the Hornet at the time
Sof the Doolittle raid on Tokyo
Intramural Basketball Sched. and other Japanese cities, made
Week Jan. 15 to 18 18 April 1942.
Lt. Casey holds the Distin-
Monday, Jan. 15, Fort Pierce I guished Flying Cross with Gold
vs. Mess Cooks, Court 1, at 1430. tar, the Purple Heart and two
Fort Pierce II vs. XX-1, Court 2 Presidential Unit Citations (award-
at 1545. ed the Enterprise and the 1st Ma-
Tuesday, Jan. 16, Sebastian vs. rine Division on Guadalcanal) in
Linton 5, Court 1, at 1545. Air addition to his latest decoration.
Control vs. Fox Trotters, Court 2, A volunteer for night fighter
at 15:45. training, Lt. Casey has been
Wednesday, Jan. 17, Spoilers vs. aboard NAS Vero for four months.
8 Balls, Court 1, at 1545. MAWS The citation, forwarded to
vs. Gyrenes, Court 2, at 1545. Capt. Peck via Rear Admiral A.
C. McFall, Chief of Naval Air
Thursday, Jan. 18 A-T Officers C. Mpe all, Chief of Naval Air
vs. Marint Bogies, Court 1 at 1545. low:
Y-1 vs. Upper 3, Court 2, at 7545. s. P Flet Flgship of the
Commander-in-Chief.
ment recently by Lt. Montague "In the name of the President of the
when he was home on leave in United States, the Commanderin-.Chief.
United States Pacific Fleet, takes pilea-
Richmond. He was invited to make re in presenting the Air Medal to Lt.
a sports broadcast over the local Henry Arthur Casey, Jr., USNR, for
ceri a set forth In the following
radio station, and he couldn't let citation:
pass the opportunity to add to the "For distingulshing himself by meritori-
Station's supply. o cvement while participating in
Station's supply, a erial flight as pilot in a carrier
His appeal for rods and reels based fighter airplane signed to air
cover over his Task Group on 16 Feb-
caused numerous Richmonders to ruary 19I4. He sighted and intercepted
dig in their attics. Some of the sa enemy bomber' i iit approach against
our Task Group and shot It down, +,hus
results of his appeal can be mastrially assisting the Task Group in
checked out at the Welfare De- earring out fi mission. is skill and
courage e wer at all time in keeping with
partmei t for a period of up to the highest tradttl s af the Naval Servie.
48 hours. c. w. NrfIz,
48 hours. Admiral. U. S. Navy."


-HIE BUCCANVEER


PAGE SIX


JANUARY 11, 1945









VERO BASKETBALL TEAM TO PLAY HERE FRIDAY


-Photos by Stapler
LINED UP before a practice ses-
sion are members of the Vero bas-
ketball squad. Coach Lt. (jg)
Frank Luzar is discussing confi-
dential information which he hopes
will help defeat Daytona Beach in
tomorrow's game here. Other shots
at the right show court shots being
taken.

BANANA -RIVER

BOXERS HERE

ON WEDNESDAY

Vero boxers will entertain the
mitt slingers from Banana River
at the Rec. hall next Wednesday
night, Jan. 17, as the highlight of
the station smoker.
The Vero boxing team is shap-
ing up well and as the boys get
more fights under their belts they
should prove a real menace to all
boxing teams on the Florida east
coast.
In their last intra-station meet-
ing, the Vero team downed Day-
tona by winning three out of five
bouts. The bouts at Daytona were
hotly contested and both Lt. Hen-
ry Bartos, and boxing coach Bob
Seibold, Sp(A)lc waxed enthusias-
tic over the showing of the Vero
fighters. Winners of the Daytona
bouts were: Max Wilkes, Jack
Elsworth and Charlie Gomez. The
losers, Red Nelson and Arnold Or-
mann staged close battles that
might have been called either way.
Banana River is expected to
bring at least 10 boxers here and
an evening of fast action is prom-
ised station boxing fans. The
bouts start at 2000.
Medical Officer: "Now really,
seaman in civilian life would
you come to me with a trivial com-
plaint like ths?"
Sick Seaman: "No, sir. I'd send
for you."


Throw Them Back, Mate

If you're a fisherman and have
been keeping trout less than 12
inches long. you're breaking the
law.
The Deputy Fish and Game
arden has been in the area recently
investigating reports that service
personnel have failed to abide by
the law.
Florida regulations say any
trout under 12 inches must be re-
leased, still alive. Minimum length
for blue fish is 10 inches.
Vero anglers are also warned
that a state license is required for
the use of rod and reel in fresh
water.

"Call the mess sergeant! I never
saw anything as tough as these
steaks "
"You will if I call the mess ser-
geant."

The intelligent girl is one who
knows how to refuse a kiss with-
out being deprived of it.


STATION MEETS

DAYTONA BEA CH

ON COURT HERE


By P. E. TEHANEY, S2c
An early season view of the
Vero Beach basketball team will
be afforded station personnel to-
morrow afternoon when the Vero
five tangles with Daytona Beach
in a regular league game. The
game will be played on the hard
surface court of the enlisted men's
athletic area starting at 1630.
Lt. (jg) Frank Luzar, coach of
the Vero squad, has been working
his men hard for league play and
expects to field enough rangy bas-
ket shooters to hold his own
against the other teams in the
Florida east coast league.
Nucleus of Good Players
Lt. Luzar has a nucleus of play-'
ers who should help his team de-
velop into a title threat. As they
open league play the team shapes
up in the following manner:
Greenfest, F., Brooklyn College,
5'11%", 165 pounds; Risser, F,
Kent State University, Ohio, 6',
185 pounds; Vocke, C, St. Johns
College, Akron pro team, 6'1", 170
pounds; Garvin, G, Washington &
Jefferson, 5'11", 195 pounds; Cur-
zon, G, Knox College, also semi-
pro, 5'11", 175 pounds; DeCamp,
F, high school, 5'11", 175 pounds;
Del Santo. G, Del Monte Pre-
Flight, 6'4", 200 pounds; Davis,
Loyola of East, 6'4", 200 pounds;
George, Perry 'High, Florida, 5'8",
140 pounds; Stone, W., semi-pro,
6', 180 pounds; Luecke, Illinois
high school, 6', 170 pounds; Vorse,
L, High School, semi-pro, 5'10",
165 pounds.
The Vero team has been prac-
ticing every day since the start of
the year. It is a little early as yet


to form an opinion as to how they
will shape up against the other
teams in the league, but Lt. Luzar
is hopeful.
"Team Shaping Up"
"We seem to have a fair team,"
said Lt. Luzar, "and considering
our handicap in practice facilities,
the team is shaping up well. What
we will do under fire can only be
determined when we are in actual
league play. I don't know the
strength of the other teams in the
league. I am hopeful but still pes-
simistic at this time. After about
four games I can tell more about
our chances for the league title."
Games will be played on the
hard surface courts at Vero each
Friday for the next five weeks.
Plans to hold the games in town
at the skating rink were dropped
when it was found the set-up did
not comply with all regulations.
A good rooting section will help
our boys to put forth their best
efforts. Get behind the Vero cag-
ers. Come on out and lend your
cheers for one afternoon. ,


<


.


PAGE SEVEN


JANUARY 11, 1945


THE BUCCANEER





PAGE EIGHT TIfl' BUCCANEER JANUARY 11, 1945


COMING TO VERO MONDAY
~l~pi--- I


NOT BAD, EH? Even if they WEREN'T coming to Vero Betch,
they'd be nice to look at. You can see them and hear them too-
the three Crandall Sisters-in the six-act USO-Camp Show, "Off
the Record," playing here Monday.
INSPECTION MADE Vero Beach. A rent committee,
P M including three townspeople and
OF VERO HOUSING Lt.(jg) Smith was appointed last
.month to investigate the situation.
Lt.(jg) Smith repeated his re-
Lt. Comdr. G. T. Korink, CEC, quest for all personnel affected to
USNR, and Mr. Fred Bamman of return the questionnaires im-
the AstSecNav's office visited mediately to their Division Of-
NAS Vero last week to investi- ficers, the Aviation Training Of-
gate the local rental situation and fice, or to the Civilian Personnel
to determine the need of addition- Relations Officer.
al housing facilities in this area
for married Naval personnel and "SUGGESTION SYSTEM"
their families.
Commenting on the survey in- ON RADIO PROGRAM
section. Lt.(ijg J. E. Smith.


USNR, Navy member of the city
Fir Rent Committee, said, "I feel
the survey party was convinced of
the need of additional housing
facilities in this area. The num-
ber of houses the survey party
will recommend for construction
will be determined by responses
to the housing questionnaire re-
cently distributed. A compilation
of the questionnaires will give us
the number of personnel not satis-
factorily housed and the number
who would bring their families
here If satisfactory housing were
available."
The survey party's tour of in-
spection followed stories of wide-
spread rental abuses in and near


"The First Line," a Navy radio
program dramatizing the work of
the "Beneficial Suggestion Sys-
tem" and sponsored by the Di-
vision of Shore Establishments and
Civilian Personnel will be aired
locally over stations WJNO, West
Palm Beach; WDBO, Orlando; and
WDAE, Tampa on 18 January
at 2200.
Purpose of the program is to
demonstrate the value of the
"Beneficial Suggestion System" to
the war effort. The suggestion of
a civilian employee at the Mare
Island Navy Yard in California
will be dramatized. All hands are
urged to listen in .


CAR OWNERS MUST

BUY LICENSE TAGS

Naval personnel owning cars
with expired license plates at-
tached are required to purchase
Florida plate to replace the ex-
pired tags, according to informa-
tion received from the Indian River
County Court House in Vero Beach.
Car owners may apply at the
Tax Collectors office in the court
building for expiration dates on
their home state licenses, and may
also buy new plates at that office.
According to the law any per-
son in the armed forces stationed
in Florida who operates his auto
on an expired license plate will


Station Movies 1430, 1830, 2030
No 1430 Movie Sunday

THURS. 11 Jan.
Aboard THREE CABALLEROS, Disney feature length cartoon
Ashore GILDERSLEEVE and THE MAN IN HALF MOON
STREET; Bowling, Men's League
FRIDAY 12 Jan.
Aboard CAN'T HELP SINGING, with Deanna Durbin; Basket-
ball; Vero vs. Daytona Beach, Athletic area. 1630
Ashore SWING IN THE SADDLE and HEAVENLY DAYS
SAT. 13 Jan.
Aboard Movie. See Plan of the Day
Ashore SWING IN THE SADDLE and HEAVENLY DAYS
SUN. 14 Jan.
Aboard Movie. See Plan of the Day
Aboard Church Services in the Chapel: 1000 for Catholics; 1100
for Protestants
Ashore KISMET in Technicolor
Ashore Civilian Church Services at 1100 and 2000. Social hour
for Service men and women in the Community Church at 2100.
MON. 15 Jan.
Aboard Movie at 1430: WINGED VICTORY with Army Cast;
USO Show at 1930 and 2030: OFF THE RECORD; "Recorded
Concert in Library at 1900
Ashore KISMET in Technicolor
TUES. 16 Jan.
Aboard MAIN STREET AFTER DARK with Edward Arnold
Ashore MASK OF DIMITROS; Bowling, WAVES and WR
League
WED. 17 Jan.
Aboard Movie. See Plan of Day; Choir practice, Chapel, 1845.
Boxing: Vero vs. Banana River, 2000
Ashore MASK OF DIMITROS
THURS. 18 Jan.
Aboard DANGEROUS PASSAGE with Phyliss Brooks
Ashore ROSIE THE RIVETER and CRIME BY NIGHT; Bowl-
ing, Men's League
FRI. 19 Jan.
Aboard BRAZIL with Virginia Bruce
Ashore TEXAS MASQUERADE and THREE MEN IN WHITE
NOTE: Holders of "Night Check passes" get first seating at 1430
movie


'k <'H

ID Ws>r~


us0 $HOWSI



11WQglE 6ASrISLL


be given 80 days in which to secure
a Florida plate or a license from
the state of which he Is a legal
resident.
Cost of Florida plates ranges
from $5 for cars under 2000 pounds
to $25 for those over 4500 pounds,
plus a 25 cents service charge.
Most cars call for plates costing
$15. If the vehicle is not yet
registered in Florida a new title
is required before Florida plates
are purchased. Fee for the title
is $1, plus a service charge of
twenty-five cents.
Florida drivers' licenses may be
obtained from the County Judge's
office, at the Court House, for $1.
Further information regarding
license plates may be obtained by
calling the Tax Collectors office,
telephone 2271, Vero Beach.


PAGE EIGHT


-THE BUCCANBER


JANUARY 11, 1945




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