Group Title: Buccaneer (Vero Beach, Florida)
Title: The buccaneer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102950/00012
 Material Information
Title: The buccaneer
Uniform Title: Buccaneer (Okinawa Island, Japan)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Army Air Forces. -- Air Force, 10th
United States -- Army Air Forces. -- Air Force, 10th
Publisher: I & E Section, Hq Co, Tenth Army for the members of Hq, Hq Co, and Sp Trs
Place of Publication: Okinawa Island, Japan
Okinawa Island, Japan
Publication Date: November 30, 1944
Frequency: daily
regular
 Subjects
Subject: World War, 1939-1945 -- Newspapers   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okinawa Island (Japan)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Japan -- Okinawa Island -- Okinawa-shi
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1945. Ceased on Oct. 15, 1945.
General Note: "Scoops for the troops."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 116 (Sept. 5, 1945).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102950
Volume ID: VID00012
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 42868813
lccn - sn 99064069

Full Text









The BUCCANEER

U. S. NAVAL AIR STATION


VOL. 1-NO. 16


VERO BEACH, FLORIDA,


NOVEMBER 30, 1944


BOND


DRIVE


OPENS


WHO will be f


a Xurse a
PEARL HARBOR
WAR BOND CAMPAI$

158" .DECEMBER'


WHAT'S A FELLOW TO DO?
J. E. Davis, BK2c, is faced with a problem that will be
common aboard the Station next week. Who is to get his vote in
the Vero Victory Queen" contest?
Norma Miles, Sp (T)2c; Sgt. Margaret Franzer, USMWR;
Ens. Dorothy Richards. USN(NC); and Civilian Flo Garth put on
their Sunday smiles to entice the votes that can win them the
Queen's crown and a $50 War Bond.
ANY OF THE STATION'S MORE THAN 300 WOMEN ARE
ELIGIBLE FOR THE CONTEST
THE RULES:
I. Each dollar of a bond's maturity value counts as a vote.
A $25 bond equals 25 votes, etc.


-Photo by Lov.y
2. Every person buying a bond receives a ballot for the
Vero Victory Queen. Any WAVE, Women Marine, Nurse or Sta- -
tion civilian is eligible.
3. If you have already bought a bond, but have not voted,
see Mrs. Harper in the War Bond Office in the Hangar for your
ballot.
THE PRIZES:
S 1. To the Vero Victory Queen, a $50 War Bond. To the
two runners-up, her Maids.of-Honor, $25 War Bonds each.
2. Presentation to winner of the Quetn's crown and the
bond awards by Captain Peck at 2030 Friday 8 December in the
Auditorium. Introduction of the Queen and the Maids-of-Honor
at a recreation hall dance following the presentation.


THREE S H O W S SLED C 0. Urges Bond Help ALL DEPARTMENTS JOIN IN RAISING
FOR V ER 0 VARIETIES This station along with $54,000 PEARL HARBOR DAY GOAL
every other U. S. Naval ae-
Talent Plus "Varga Gals" tivity in all parts of the world, It starts tomorrow!
I n Wednesday's will take an active part in the This station's effort to meet an ambitious goal of $54.000
Production War Bond Campaign between in extra cash sales for the Pearl Harbor Day War Bond cam-
7 ^~~" Y--*~ulrarv U I~ VII~ll


Although certain informed
sources insist that things are tough
all over, others equally informed,
promise that everyone on the sta-
tion will be able to attend the
Variety Show 6 December.
(continued on Page 4)


December I anda ueember .
This special Navy cash drive,
commemorating Pearl Harbor
Day is part of the nationwide
Sixth War Loan Campaign.
The Navy asks each of us to
buy at least ONE EXTRA
(continued on Page 6)


paign will swing into action. The drive will continue until
8 December.
Early indications from the War Bond committee, already
hard at work in an effort to contact personally every per-
son aboard, are that support for the campaign will come
from all activities and from every department.
(Continued on Jage 4)










PAGE TWO


THE BUCCANEER


THE BUCCANEER
UNITED STATES NAVAL AIR STATION
Vero Beach. Florida
AnActivity Of The Naval Air Operational Training Command
VOL. I-NO. 16 VERO BEACH, FLORIDA NOVEMBER 23, 1944


COMMANDING OFFICER --.....-...........
SUPT. AVIATION TRAINING ...........---
EXECUTIVE OFFICER -............... -:LT. C


IN CHARGE OF PUBLICATION -----. --
MANAGING EDITOR --... ..-------..--
FEATURE EDITOR _-_ ...........-- ---.
SPORTS EDITORS --.......... -....-- --
AMUSEMENT EDITOR .__._.-.
DEPARTMENT EDITOR........--.. .-.---.
"INQUIRING REPORTER".. ...... ....--
COPY EDITOR__' ........ ........
ADVISOR ON PHOTOGRAPHY .......---


STAFF
MARJORIE THOMSEN, Sp 1C
PFC J. E. CRACRAFT, USMCR
HARRIET ROBERTS, Sp (Y) Sc


...----_-- -----_.CAPT. E. R. PECK, USN
---..--... COMDR. R.E. HARMER, USN
OMbR. BAXTER M. HAYNES, USNR


-..-------. LT. R. A. BENJAMIN, USNR
-.....J. R. BALDWIN, RdM2c, USNR
....---...SALLY JACKMAN, SSc, USNR
..HARRY "POP" BELL, CSp(D)USCG
P. E. TEHANEY, SE2, USNR
_......W. E. PENTECOST, Sfc, USNR
......-.--...-..OLIN TICE, S2c, USNR
--....... JEAN SPOON, Sp(T)3c, USNR
-.......E. C. WHITEHEAD, Ylc, USNR
._......_.. ENS. M. E. GROSS, USNR


WRITERS
JACK LAWSON, SIc
DOROTHY BUCK, S2c
T. J. WHITTAKER, RdMSc


The Buccaneer is published without cost to the U. S. Government and is
distributed free to all hands aboard the Naval Air Station, Vero Beach.
This is not an official Navy Department publication and no article
contained herein should be construed as representing the opinion of the
Navy Department. This paper is printed in the interest of the station
personnel and will welcome all contributions and criticisms from mem-
bers of the Base. The Buccaneer receives Camp Newspaper Service
material. The republication of credited matter is prohibited without
permission of CNS, 205 E. 42St. N. Y. C. 17.

PEARL HARBOR AND BONDS

A lot of fellows just like the guys who sat across from
___ v _at thecow hall today went out of this j&a before our
VOWTAA- ev aLe "iteIi-AM -t.Thcy -ot--Ss Sa Pearl
Harbor!

We don't celebrate Pearl Harbor Day. We don't com-
memorate it. We deplore it, view it as a stain not erased until
the Japs are finally and totally defeated.

We mark this solemn and not-so-proud occasion with the
purchase of "extra" War Bonds. Sure, we've got allotments
and'we've got commitments and we've got Christmas just
around the corner. But we've also got an unforgettable re-
sponsibility to those shipmates who died before they even
had a chance to fight.

Most of us have had or soon will have the oppor-
tunity to take a more active part in the war, than duty at
Vero permits. Meanwhile, from the relative comfort and
safety of this station, we owe it to those who have really
"given," to dip deep and buy bonds.


"LETTER TO THOSE WHO KNEW BILLY"

Poetry often scores a bulls-eye where prose misses the
target entirely. Even the toughest and most skilled of our
fighting men frequently get inspiration from reading poetry,
or relief through writing it.

The following haunting lines were written in the Pacific
by Captain T. H. Brown, III, a Marine Corps fighter pilot.
His father, in charge of the Central Office, is one of the Sta-
tion's leading civilian employes. Mr. Brown originally sug-
gested for the "Buc" another poem by his son, called "Sna-
fu." "It might give the boys a laugh," Mr. Brown said; and
it would, for it's a clever, fun-poking verse. So "Snafu"
comes next time.

We think, however, you will agree the following is un-
usually appropriate as our thoughts turn to Pearl Harbor


S CHAPLAIN'S CORNER

Services in the Chapel on Sunday
1000 Catholic Mass
1100 Protestant Communion
We are getting very near to the
anniversary of our entrance into
the war. Pearl Harbor Day is not
far off and with it come thoughts
of peace. There is not one of us
who enjoys the business we are in,
and no one would be so foolish as
to want to see his sons in another
such conflict. Because of this it is
well for us to give some thought
to the steps which must be taken
if peace is to be permanent.
Many of these
steps are of a poli-
tical nature. They
concern interna-
tional organiza-
"? i tions. armaments.


handling of war The ladies of the First Church of
criminals. These God will offer for sale, in the Vero

S.tle to do with di- assortment of hand-made articles
/ I rectly. We can give for Christmas presents, Mrs. Wins-
Sour encouragement ton Montague has announced.
to them and should There will be such things as vanity
Chaplain Lodn have an under- sets, aprons, stuffed animals, etc.,
standing of them, and the proceeds of the sale will
but in the main, they are done by be used for the benefit of the
higher minds than ours. There is Church.
a way, though, that every citizen
can have a large part in the build- But if there is always friction be-
ing of a permanent peace. The im- tween ourselves and those who dis-
perialism that fostered Pearl Har- agree with us, we cannot expect
bor would not have been present our countries to do better. The
if there had not first been that more brotherhood youilive'4n your
grasping spirit in the hearts of the own life, the more there will be
Japanese people. The hatred and released in the world at large.
treachery that have come into the But how can we get these things
open since that day had to be pres- into the minds of men and women?
ent first in the minds of those who A little of it can be done by edu-
now express it nationally. In other cation, but most of it can be done
words, the only guarantee of peace only by religion. A firm faith in
in our world is to have people with God as the Father of all men will
peace in their hearts. Take hatred do more toward engendering this
and villainy out of the hearts of spirit than anything else. This
people and you'have made the big- means that one of the most potent
gest stride toward having it erased forces in bringing a permanent
from the world, peace is religion and the Church.
Preparation for peace, then, is Yet so many of us who want peace
largely a personal thing that has will have nothing to do with reli-
to do with the preparation of our gion and withhold our support
own hearts. If we can work out our from the church. It is time that
individual differences in a mature we saw the real origin of these
and sane way, there is a good needed things. Why not start the
chance that our national differ- thing by going to chapel this Sun-
ences can be similarly cared for. day?
Day. First of all, Captain Brown in this poem scores an im-
pressive and most difficult bulls-eye. More to the point, Cap-
tain Brown himself was killed,,in action at Bougainville.
shortly after he wrote this:
"LETTER TO THOSE WHO KNEW BILLY"
Dear Mother, Father, Sister, Wife and Friend
Of that boy who flew away to die,
Who fought for right and freedom in the sky,
And fighting, proved his worth and met his end;
I write this message Billy asked I send.
The bravery of his words and feelings my
Poor efforts can't convey: but still I'll try.
"If I should go, this favor you can lend:"
He said, "Please tell them life was not in vain,
For all its riches it has showered on to me.
I've worked and played; I've loved, was loved. The pain
Death leaves with them my one regret will be.
They've made my life complete, though short its span."
He died for his beliefs. He died a man.


NOVEMBER 23, 1944

Christian Science Minister

Aboard Each Wednesday

All men and women who are in-
terested in Christian Science will
be glad to hear that a Wartime
Minister will be available for con-
sultation in the Chaplain's Office
every Wednesday from 1400 to
1700.
Mr. John J. Torpey, who is con-
nected with the Camp Welfare Ac-
tivities of that Church, is on the
base each Wednesday to serve
members of his faith. Anyone
wishing to contact him at any
other time can do so by calling Ft.
Pierce 184-W or the Chaplain's
Office on the station.

Hand-Made Xmas Gifts












Behind the Scenes
At NAS, Vero Beach
THE TOWER IS FIELD'S TRAFFIC COP


-. 'iiAL.


-Photo by Troup
TEAM OF TOWER EXPERTS GUIDE
PLANES IN TAKE-OFFS AND LANDINGS


Here are typical scenes in
the round-the-clock duties of
Control Tower life. Instruct-
ing planes on take-offs and
landings, signalling them in
emergencies, monitoring the
crash frequencies, giving spe-
cial information and advice-
Sit's all in the daily duties of
Tower personnel.

Friday Night Dances
Now At New 'Rec' Hall
Plans were recently completed
to present the Enlisted Men's
Dance aboard the station in the
new Recreation Hall. The fire at
the Service Center has prevented
the holding of the weekly dances
there.
The first in the series of dances
got off to a successful start last
Friday, November 24th, and the
next one is scheduled on Friday,
December 8th. The dances will be
held every two weeks on Fridays
until the Service Center is re-
paired and refurnished.

Telephone operator to new girl
she is breaking in: "No, honey,
you say, 'Just a moment, please,'
not. 'Hang on to your pants, mis-
ter.' "


By Sally Jackman, 82c
A black well of a stairway, then
a large and infinitely spacious
room the control tower, super
air traffic cop for NAS Vero
Beach.
Space, color and sound are
dominant: Through the tinted
green windows, slanted to prevent
glare, the entire field is visible,
and at night colorful lights wink
Christmas tints. Constant sound is
woven around the coded click of
the homing beacon, voices from
pilots or voices from the control-
lers in the tower, giving and re-
ceiving information and orders,
Six or seven persons are on duty
in the tower 24 hours every day.
Two controllers, either WAVE or
enlisted 'man, are on duty all day;
during the busy hours, 1800 to
2400, this number is increased to
three.
Upon the controllers fall the
traffic duties. They give instruc-
tions and orders to pilots desiring
take off and landing, give informa-
tion, and in general, serve as a
clearing house for trouble. Con-
trollers notify the proper depart-
ments in cast of a crash or in case
of trouble of any sort. They are in
constant contact with flight, train-
ing, the line, pilots' lounge, the
crash trucks and all other depart-
ments on the hangar or on the line
which would be of help to a pilot
in trouble.
Lookout Is On the Job
The lookout, an enlisted man, is
just what his name implies. He
keeps his eye. on the field and is
another safety check to avoid
pileups on the runway. He calls
the attention of the controllers to
any trouble on the runways,


watches the runway lights and
keeps on the lookout for taxi and
landing accidents.
Another man in the tower is
maintained to monitor 'the crash
frequency. He works with the
heady duty pilot, officer on_duty-
in the tower, and in case of a
crash, directs this pilot to the
scene of the crash and keeps in
radio contact with him. The moni-
tor also calls and directs the crash
boats from Ft. Pierce.
Two ACC girls in the tower
keep the necessary logs and keep
in contact with the Air Control
center. These two WAVES keep
a taxi log during the day which
tells the time of takeoff and time
of landing for each flight. Another
log lists bat number, plane number,
type of flight, exact time the plane
is airborne and exact landing time
plus any additional information. If
a plane returns with some trouble,
that is logged also. "
In case of a crash on the run-
way or in the country surrounding
the field, also under the tower's
watchful eyes, the controllers have
all planes stand by. They then no-
tify the proper persons and de-
partments and send out the ambu-
lance and crash trucks.
Constant Vigilance Necessary
Constant vigilance is the obvi-
ous keynote, and the main duty
of everyone in the tower is to keep
a ceaseless lookout over the field,
the runways and the air over them.
(During the invasion this month,
this vigilance of tower personnel
was responsible for the capture of
seven raiders. When raiders were
spotted on the field, proper persons
were notified, and the raiders were
picked up.)


TIAIk BUCCANEER


NOVEMBER 23, 1944


PAGE THREE

SICK BAY ANNOUNCES

'OUT-PATIENT' RULES

Clarification of rules for the
dispensary's "Out-patient Depart-
ment" has been announced by Lt.
Comdr. B. H. Pollock, Station Sen-
ior- Medical Officer.
First, the Department is for de-
pendents of station service per-
sonnel only.. The Department is
conducted by Dr. E. P. Williamson.
Appointments are necessary, ex-
cept in cases of emergency. Call
Ext. 287, between 1330 and 1700
Monday through Friday, and ask
for out-patient nurse for appoint-
ments.
If possible, in emergencies,'a call
should first be made to the dis-
pensary to prepare the way.
If patients are unable to meet
their appointments, they are urged
to notify the dispensary so that
someone else may be given the
open time.
Records cannot be given to pa-
tients. If the patient moves to an-
other locality, the doctor there
should write for the records.
Certain drugs and medications
are not supplied by the Navy for
out-patients. These must be bought
on the open market by the patient.
Chief among these is diphtheria
toxoid and certain other injectable
materials.
Days and hours for the various
dptrtrment-a--are -as
Prenatal clinic
Friday 0900 to 1200
Baby clinic (to 12 years)
Saturday 1000 to 1230
Patients for injections and in-
noculations
Saturday at 1400
All other patients
Mon. thru Thurs. 1000 to 1200
(Certain patients may be seen
between 0800 and 0900 on any
day at the discretion of the
doctor.)

A team composed of Bluejackets
was playing a soccer game with
a team composed of Marines. A
sailor was outlining the principles
of the contest. "If you can't kick
the ball," he said, "kick one of the
men on the other team. Now
where's the ball?"
"Never mind the ball," shouted
a big Marine. "Let's get on with
the game."
"Uncle 23, you may scramble
now" . "Status board, Love
12 is airborne" . "Peter 3,
pancake runway 7-easy; you are
number 3 to land" . "Hello,
citrus, this is Yoke 7, switching to
Jackpot over-" . Behind these
words sputtered from the radio or
snapped by the tower operators,
lie the important business of a
naval air station flight training.
It is the control tower which serves
as the safety check for the pilots in
training.











PAGE FOUR TIlE BUCCANEER NOVEMBER 30, 1944


"RED" RINGS THE BELL AT THE FIRE HOUSE


The father of this happy little family of eight
puppies is "Red," a meek-looking old fellow who,
like Papa Dionne, really produced when the chips
were down.
Attached to the Fire Department for the past
year-and-a-half, "Red" (in spite of his deceptive
appearance) previously had the reputation of
many of his ship-mates a vagabonding, love-
'em-and-leave-'em wolf in dog's clothing.
Then, about six months ago, a shy girl-dog
(we'd say the word if we were Hemingway)


ture of police-hound, etc., etc. The eight soft,
brown and lively offspring seem to retain most
of the characteristics of the parents, etc., etc.
If "Red" were any kind'of a father he'd be
out grubbing for his sizeable family. However,
he has no more conscience than a dog, though,
and the result is that the paternal responsibilities
have been thrust on the shoulders of Assistant
Fire Chief C. L. Fisher, MoMMlc. Fishe-i-as
carried on as god-father, wet nurse, caterer and
personnel officer. He reports that the entire crew


named auy, walake into the Mie of our nero nas already oeen assigned.
and the Fire Department. "Red," when last seen, was giving an evil
You see the results above. "Red" is a corn- canine eye to a young female poodle slinking near
bination spitz-collie, etc., etc. "Lady" is a mix- the A. & R. Building. The dog!

All Departments Join Station Talent To Be Three Shows Slated
- ~In P**Prl Harbor Drive In Vero Bond Show For Vero Varieties
(-Cunitnre'd from Page 1) Our station has been asked to n Pearl ar r Day
Captain Peck keynoted the goal present another Bond Rally Show
of the committee in his message to at the Florida Theatre in Vero. (Continued from Page 1)
all hands, stating: ". . individual The last show was proclaimed a They add that three shows will
purchases, in addition to your reg- huge success and was enjoyed by be given, one at 1400 for the night
ular allotment will constitute still all. shift, the other two at 1830 and
another voluntary act you are mak- Olin Tice, who will serve again 2030, definitely enabling every-
ing toward winning the war in the as Master of Ceremonies, says the one to attend.
shortest possible time." show will be a musical revue fea- As it draws into its last Week of
A highlight of the campaign will turning all service talent. Complete rehearsals, the enlisted personnel
be the election of the "Vero Vic- plans have not been made as yet variety show indicates better than
tory Queen." Each bond purchaser but should be announced early in better talent, funnier than funny
will have an opportunity to vote December. routines and lovelier than lovely
for some WAVE, Woman Marine girls. Of course Varga girls help.
Nurse or civilian employee. Each "Wh t Up Do" Dept This last week, station personnel
dollar of a bond's maturity value as D voted and selected Gretchen
will count as a vote. (Wohan Marine Division) Waldo as Miss 1945 and WAVES
The Queen will be presented to Lorraine Mullaney, Cleo Johnston,
the station at the theatre at 2030 The following item was listed Freda Bulot, Lois Needham, Gloria
on 8 December. She will be given a under "LOST" in last Thursday's Moss, Norma Miles, Marion Nixon,
crown and a $50 War Bond by Plan of the Day: Adelia Sellman, Lorraine Soard,
Captain Peck. Later in the evening "PFC Ann Vargo, USMCWR, Margaret Glenn, Mary Jane Klep-
she will be presented as the "Vic- lost a Marine hat, a pair of brown per and Betty Callender to repre-
tory Queen" at a dance in the new shoes and a strap to her pocket sent Varga's January-through-De-
recreation hall. Two runners-up book. If found, please return cember.
will each receive $25 War Bonds etc. Also in the lovely-lovely section
and will be introduced as her (Editor's note. Is this what you are Margaret Glenn and Bett y
Maids of Honor, call, in the Marine lingo, the aban- Buck, both singers. Miss Buck
The Pearl Harbor Day campaign donment of equipment in a stra- does an imitation of Betty Hutton
falls within the scope of the Treas- tegic retreat to previously prepared and is the duo of a double act
ury's Sixth War Loan Drive. The positions?) with Bob Weekley, imitating Frank
goal throughout the nation has "Men back from the fleet have Sinatra.
been set at 14 billion dollars. promised to ive their support this t h e r featured acts for the
Lt. C. E. Smith, chairman of the week. We expect good results from evening include "Shorty" Som-
Bond committee, reported wide- the WAVES at the Beachland, mers, formerly with Gene Krupa
spread enthusiasm from the sta- from the civilian employes and as Johnny Desmond, singing a
tion. from all other departments." medley of popular ballads; L. H.
"From student pilots to men on Thompson, assisted by his guitar
the line have come early indica- In the spring the boys turn gal- and a clump of sagebrush, singing
tions of bond buying," he said. lant and the girls turn buoyant, a group of cowboy numbers; F. W.


Competition For "Buc"!

Beachland Prints Paper

By a Beachland Foreign Cor-
respondent
This is to inform you that
the Buccaneer has a competi-
tor!
A Women's Reserve paper,
put out for WR's and manned
by WR's only, will appear
every two weeks on Fridays.
This new sheet will have two
mimeographed pages of infor-
mation about WR affairs of
state, choice tid-bits of news
and the latest and best items
of gossip. As yet it is un-
named, but a contest will be
held to decide a proper title.
No editor has been named
but there are many contribu-
tors, from the Station barracks
as well as the Beachland. The
first issue will be out tomor-
row. Big plans are under way
for a special Christmas issue.
This new paper promises to
rock the until now undisputed
Buccaneer on its no doubt firm
foundation.
(Editor's Note: The no
doubt firm foundation of the
"Bue" is a-tremble and a-
quiver, but the challenge is
accepted. It's typewriters at
20 pacesl)

Girls, when they went out to swim
Once dressed like Mother Hubbard.
Now, they have a bolder whim;
They dress more like her.cupboard.

The reason they call a sailboat
"she" is that she makes her best
showing in the wind.

Phillippi and Hugh Glassford, re-
spectively, tap dancing and play-
ing the piano accordian; J. T. La-
Rue and Olivia Eastus presenting
"My I.ero," duet from The Choco-
late Soldier.
Two serious numbers have been
planned for the program, one a
marine drill team, and the other
a dramatic sequence. Rod Smith,
Tom Whittaker and Olin Tice will
present a tribute to Pear Harbor
Day. During this sketch, the
"Pearl Harbor Prayer" Will be
featured.
Lt. (jg) Herb McDonald is chief
director for the show; his as-
sistants are Betty May, assistant
director; H an k Rattazzi, stage
manager; Reggie Feeback, makeup
director; Peggy Morris and Sally
Jackman, publicity directors; Elise
White and Gerry Walters, assist-
ing with production.
Forming a choral background to
the entire show, the newly-formed
station choir will also take part in
the Pearl Harbor Day tribute. En-
sign Florence MacNair is director
for the group.


PAGE FOUR


THE BUCCANEER


NOVEMBER 30, 1944






























MARGARET GLENN

















GJLORIA MOSS


M, .E.RA LDNE WALTER$S L.OW M .L. .,:'

SOME OF THE VARIETY SHOW'S "VARGA GIRL" CANDIDATES-(FOR NAMES OF WINNERS, SEE STORY BEGINNING ON PAGE ONE)


E' .
















h 1
-^1








NOVEMBER 23, 1944


THESE DIDN'T GET AWAY'


These Post Office fisher- Beach.
men didn't have to pile it on The largest of the highly-
when reporting the results of prized, hard-to-catch sail fish
their recent deep sea expedi- pictured above measured 84
tion. Shown above, left to inches and was caught by Sha-
r i g h t, are H. H. Libcke, steen. The two others, landed
MaM3c; Irvin Clyatt, Sc; J. by Clyatt and Libcke, were
W. Adair, MaM3c; A. A. Pick- 78 inches and 54 inches in
ering, S2c; and S. J. Sha- length. Also included in the
steen, MaMic, with the scaled day's fine catch were shark
trophies snagged off Palm and dolphin.


7" -,an W ith-Th Be-

Will Be Coming Soon

Don't look now but that "old
man" is right around the corner
. . yep, Santa Claus is heading
this way and will make his appear-
ance sometime in December a few
days before Christmas.
Plans will soon be announced for
a gay and festive Christmas Party
aboard the station.
We hear tell that even the kid-
dies of the enlisted and officer per-
sonnel who are here in Vero Beach,


Santa Claus is the only guy we
know who can monkey around
women's stockings and still be
called a saint.

Self-made man: A horrible ex-
ample of unskilled labor.

The wabbit has a funny face
Its pwivate life is a disgwace
You'd be surprised if you but knew
The awful things that wabbits do-
And often, too!
will be invited . in fact, don't
be surprised if most of the party
turns out to be a "kiddie show."


ALL SERVICEMEN WHO GO HUNTING
MUST ADHERE TO RULES AND REGS


SHIP'S SERVICE GIFT SUGGESTIONS FOR XMAS
For Your Best Girl
Necklaces Bracelets Spray Pins Manicure Sets
Dresser Sets Gift Sets, Cologne & Dusting Powder
Perfumes Compacts Pajamas-Gowns
Slips Handkerchiefs Alligator Handbags

For Dad Or Your Bud Back Home
Fitted Leather Travel Cases Golf Balls
Wallets (Folding & Breast Pocket Type)
Cigarette Cases Shaving Sets, Seaforth
Handkerchiefs

General Gifts
Luncheon Sets--Tablecloths & Napkins (Damask)

Toys Of All Kinds And For All Ages


PAGE SIX


THE BUCCANEER


C.O. Urges Bond Help By Lt. Winston Montague, USNR
(Continued from Page 1) With the Florida hunting season
WAR BOND during this cam- now in full swing many of the
paign. That individual pur- officers and men will no doubt
chase, in addition to your reg- want to tty their luck for duck,
ular allotment will constitute doves or quail.
still another voluntary act you In the limited space assigned to
are making toward winning me I cannot begin to tell you
the war in the shortest time where to go or give you any hints
possible. (in case you need any) about some
U. S. Naval Air Station, of the finer points of hunting. I
Vero Beach, is proud of its would, however, like to point out
War Bond Record, We are one or two things which every
particularly proud that ours is, officer and man on the station
the opportunity to answer de- should know if he is planning to
cisively the call of our Navy hunt locally.
and our Nation during the First and foremost, you MUST
Pearl Harbor Day Drive and have a license. Being in the Navy
to lend our fullest support to does not give you the privilege of
the final phase of this war. hunting without a license. The
Your Commanding Officer fact that you are a serviceman
urges you to make 'every ef- does, however (in Florida, as well
fort to purchase at least ONE as many other states), entitle you
EXTRA BOND during the Na- to purchase a resident license in-
vy's Pearl Harbor Day Drive stead of the much more expensive
between December 1 and De- non-resident type which costs $25.
member 7. A county license, which is suffi-
E. R. PECK, cient for most of us, costs a Navy
Commanding. Officer. man only $1.25. If you want a
state license the Navy man can buy
Vero Service Center this for $5.50.
e e If you hunt ducks you must also
Is Being Repaired have a Federal duck stamp. This
The Vero Service Center, re- costs one dollar and is only needed
cently damaged by fire, hopes to be by duck hunters.
ready with all its facilities some Hunting licenses are sold in the
time in December, it is announced county court house. Duck stamps
by H. W. Damerow, city engineer, may be purchased at the Post Of-
The lounge and writing room, fice.
however, have already been re-op- You may hunt ducks every day
ened to servicemen, in the week (if you can get away)
An expenditure of $6,500 will be and this includes Sunday. On most
needed to put the Center back into other types of hunting, however,
operating condition on a full-time hunting is prohibited on Monday
basis. The ball room, which suffer- aid Tuesday of each week; except
ed most from the fire, will require Christmas and New Year's day,
extensive repair. which are open. This rule is ap-
plicable to quail and doves, among
Marine Raider-Catcher other types of game.
And His Horse-Partner There are many things I would
like to tell you about hunting'in
this vicinity but unfortunately
'." space is limited. However, I can-
'' o not close without a word of warn-
ing. It is this:
Hunting is a fascinating sport
S but it can be a dangerous game.
S"' The same gun which makes a clean
kill on a duck or dove at 30 yards
will kil the hunter just as dead if
the charge should hit him. There
is only one sensible rule for all
4 hunters, both novice and expert
alike: Remember that a gun is a
Very deadly weapon.
NEVER, under any conditions,
-Photo by Goldston point a gun, loaded or not loaded,
Champion raider-catcher during at anyone. ALWAYS treat your
the recent "invasion" by the Ft. gun as if it were loaded.
Pierce Scout and Raiders was Ma- Have a good time when you hunt
rine Corporal J. D. Shelby of Tex- but never forget that you have in
as. Nobly assisted by "Dixon," a your hands a deadly weapon. One
raider-sniffing horse-genius, Shel- minute of carelessness might cause
by snagged 28 of the invaders to a lifetime of regret.
cop the $5 award put up by WeJ-
fare. 1 Have you written home lately?













25 Teams Compete In Station's Bowling Leagues

175 GUYS AND GALS

VIE IN TEN-PIN SPORT

Twenty-five different teams -
the men on Thursday night and
the gals on Tuesday nights-com-
pete in the ten-pin sport when
NAS takes over the local bowling
alleys.
Sponsored 'by the Welfare De-
partment, the boiling competi-
tion is proving one of the most
heavily-supported of all the de-
partment's activities.
The leagues have been under
way for three weeks and some wild
and wooly alley battles have been
seen.
Chief "Pop" Bell, one of the
Station's better bowlers, has urged
all contestants to adhere strictly
to tournament and alley rules.
"We should watch particularly -Photos by Rible
that bowling balls are not lofted," Scenes such as the above occur every Thursday night when
he reminds bowlers. "Lofting is the Welfare Department's Bowling League is going full force.
very harmful to the alleys and On Tuesday nights it's the same thing, except with WAVES roll-
should be discontinued." ing them down the alley. The scene at the left, fortunately, is
not common. It shows Chief Joe Charvat doing an honest night's
work. He filled in when the pin-boy shortage hit the alleys. In
Spoilers X-1 Loom case other Chiefs are fearful, it has been announced there will in
Volleyball Contenders the future be plenty of pin-boys on hand.
S.. ~ . Vero Boxers Have THREE WAY TIE IN


nil a oVtlr game o VAo ey e lt
Spoilers knocked the Administra-
tion Officers out of the running
ror league honors In the first round
of the fall league.
After a close battle in which
each team won a game the Spoil-
ers finally eked out a win in the
third and deciding contest to keep
their undefeated record intact.
This puts the league scramble
squarely between X-1 and the
Spoilers. While both teams must
face other opponents before their
meeting Monday this game appears
to be the one that will decide the
title chase.

Maws Beat Bogies
To Gain Lead In
Touch Football Play

When the Maws scored a 15 to 7
victory over the Marine Bogies
Tuesday, they jumped into the lead
in the Touch Football league. The
two teams were tied for first place
when they met Tuesday afternoon.
With Lt. Grady Ray tossing the
ball into the arms of receivers, the
Maws gained an early advantage
and were never headed. Lt. Bate-
man and Cpl. Joe Wehmeier both
crossed the goal line on passes
from Lt. Ray. Two other points
were gathered when a Bogie play-
erer was caught behind the goal
line.
However the league is still wide
open with the Bogies, Night
Hawks, Mech Engineers and Yard
Birds pressing the leader.


Free Skating Night
For Vero Personnel

Good news for Vero station per-
sonnel. A free skating night for
all men and women of NAS Vero
Beach will be held the second Wed-
nesday of each month. The first
free night will be held Dec. 13 at
the Vero Beach skating rink. The
rink opens at 2000. Arrangements
for the free night were made by
the Welfare Committee for enlisted
personnel.

There's an old saying that Heav-
en will protect the working girl -
but then there's the question as to
who protects the poor guy she's
working on.

In the days of Queen Elizabeth,
'tis said, some of the ladies liked
to curl up with a book, while others
preferred simply to curl up with
one of the pages.


Return Engagement
With Sanford Team

Seeking revenge, the Vero box-
ing team will invade Sanford next
Wednesday for a return engage-
ment with the Sanford boxing
team.
Sanford boxers met the Vero
team here Nov. 22 and carried off
team honors with four bouts to
three. Both teams were evenly
matched and most of the fights
were close. Chief Sp. (A) Velez,
of Sanford, was pleased with the
reception his boxers received and
is now planning to greet the Vero
team in big time fashion.
Boxing instructor, Bob Seibold,
Sp.(A)lc, is putting his men
through heavy paces confident that
this time he can grab off the lion
share of victories. With inter-sta-
tion bouts starting, Seibold is
seeking additional boxing talent.
Any one interested in boxing
should contact Seibold at the Ath-
letic Office.
In the main event of the Sanford-
Vero meeting, Vince Carr of San-
ford shaded Jack Elsworth after a
careful, studied battle by both
boys. The heavyweights both
showed respect for each others
punching ppwer and took no
chances.
A. J. Hartley ran into a sharp
shooting heavyweight in Jack
Schafer of Sanford and dropped
the decision. Hartley twice caught
his man with terrific rights to the


'BUC' GRID CONTEST

Another tie resulted in the
final 'Buc' football contest with
three men finishing in a tie for
first 'prize with but three picks
wrong.
William Sorgen MMS3c, Harold
W. Libcke, MoM3c and Ward H.
Crowley of Ships Service were the
lucky grid pickers who will split
the $10 in War Stamps.
Since the regular football sea-
son has ended for most of the col-
lege teams, the grid contest closes
for another year.

button, but the outweighed Schafer
plodded in and outpointed the Vero
puncher.
Eddie McFadden scored a win
for Vero when he outpointed
George Holston of Sanford at 149
pounds. Holston had a big advan-
tage in reach but Eddie's rushing
tactics evened things up.
Max Wilkes scored for Vero
over John Stevens of Sanford. It
was a good fast bout with Wilkes
gaining the decision after trading
punches in numerous flurries.
Jimmy Gonzales took Jimmy
Cates of Sanford into camp in a
135 pound bout. Roy Olmstead of
Sanford outscored Bob Peterson in
a 135 pound go, and Harry Harvey
scored a Sanford victory over
Charlie Convertino in the midger
class.

MEN, walk on the left side of
the road, facing traffic, for safety.


PAGE SEVEN


NOVEMBER 23, 1944


THE BUCCANEER










PA~r EIHT TlE UCCNEERNOVMBER30,194


EIGHT ACTS FEATURE

NEWEST USO REVIEW

Following last week's well-
received "Have a Look" variety
review by less than a month, an-
other USO Victory Circuit unit,
"Jolly Times," will be presented
at the station 19 December, it has
been announced by the Welfare
Department.
"Jolly Times" will feature eight
different acts, promising a variety
of comedy, dancing, singing, music
and impersonations.
According to advance publicity
received from the show's enthu-
siastic press agents, "this show is
plenty hep with sparkling comedy,
smooth rhythm, and delightful,
amazing novelties, moving from
start to finish in a jive tempo cal-
culated to leave no room for bore-
dom."
If it's only half that good, it
should be a knockout. In fact, if
the show holds its own with "Have
a Look," there will be nothing but
praise from NAS theatre-goers.
Starring in "Jolly Times" are
Alfred Latell, comedy; Miriam,
Carle, singer; Nestor & Rollins,
comedy impressions; the Le
Shonnes, ballroom dancing; Lee
Simmons, comedian; Paula La
Varre & Brother, comedy, hand-
balancing; Saul Grauman & Co.,
--"ovelty-starattme act; Sherry Mc-
Clellan, mirimbaphone; and Her-
man Polikoff, pianist and musical
conductor.

FLORIDA THEATRE

FLORIDA THEATRE
Nov. 30
THREE LITTLE SISTERS and
CURSE OF THE CAT PEOPLE
Dec. 1 2
OUR HEARTS WERE YOUNG
AND GAY & TUCSON RAIDERS
Dec. 3 4
MARINE RAIDERS
Dec. 5 6
THE SEVENTH CROSS
Dec. 7
SING NEIGHBOR, SING and
CRIME SCHOOL
Dec. 8 9
HAIL THE CONQUERING IERO
and THE LAST HORSEMAN
Dec. 10 11
IN SOCIETY
Dec. 12
BETWEEN TWO WORLDS
Dec. 13
WAR BOND PREMIERE
Featuring a stage show which
will be conducted by Chaplain Low
den with Naval personnel. The
feature picture will be MARRIAGE
IS A PRIVATE AFFAIR.
Tickets for this premier may be
obtained by the purchase of a War
Bond of any denomination.

A radio program is only a. brief
interruption between commercials.


S Inquiring Reporter
By Jean Spoon Sp(T)2c
QUESTION: What are the qual-
ifications you look for in a date?
(Answers by WR's.)
Barbette Eierman, S2c: He must
be a good dancer, clean looking,
with a good personality.
Dorothy Thomson, Sp(T)2c:
Tall, blond, with mustache and he
should own a bicycle.
Janie Moye Sp(Y)3c: Be a fair-
ly good dancer, lots of fun, a good
conversationalist, above all a good
conversationalist.
Carmen Tramontana, PhM3c:
Poise, personality, good manners
and know how to behave himself.
Minerva Gross, Sic: Good dan-
cer, neat in appearance and cour-
teous.
Dorothy Fcrguson, Sgt: He must
have a sense of humor.
Margaret Franzen, Sgt.: Car,
$200 a month, shy-reticent, gulli-
ble. (Anybody qualifying call 314
and ask for Joe. Don't mind if you
get a frigid answer.)
A shy soul: Wellllllllll, he must
be a man.
Margurete Richards, PhM2c:
That's what I like, a screwball for
a date. At my age I can't afford
to be choosy.
Betty McClain, Rm3c: Tall, blond
and handsome as an after-
thought, blue eyes.


-Photos by Zagrackas
Here are scenes from Vero's first Victory Circuit show
which got an enthusiastic reception aboard last week. Upper left
is Muriel Lane, the neatly upholstered songsteress with the tanta-
lizing voice. Lower left are Borrah Minevich's Harmonica Ras-
cals, one of the hits of the show. Above, a wild-eyed group of
sailors and Marines stand by without protest as the Great Lester
saws his ravin-haired assistant in half. When asked to verify,
with handshake, the fact that the victim had survived the ordeal,
these noble Vero-ites planted long and loud kisses on the sur-
prised gal. (They afterward reported she was alive, alright.)
The show was the first to utilize the fine new stage and
curtain in the audtiorium, an improvement which will enable the
station to see many other outstanding presentations.
Special credit should go to the Station band which, with
only an hour's practice with the review, gave the show excellent
musical support.


Grace Statler, Sp(T)2c: He
must be able to do a perfect C in
the Link.
DOROTHY JENSEN, S2c:
Clothes, money, looks, automobile,
cattle ranches, oil wells, personal-
ity; but beyond that, I'm not par-
ticular.
LESLIE POWEL, S2c: Duhhhh!


What's a date?
D A ISY SANDERS, S2c: The
International Br other rho od of
Lonely Hearts keeps me well sup-
plied by male order.
WANDA AUDLIN, S2c: I can't
tell you right now; I've got three
raids on. (Caught in a busy mo-
ment at the A.C.C.)


1430, 1830 and 2030 Station Movies
Thursday I LAURA
30 Nov. I Gene Tierney Dana Andrews
Friday I THE VERY THOUGHT OF YOU
1 Dec. Dennis Morgan Fay Emerson
Saturday I To be announced in the
2 Dec. I Plan of the Day
Sunday To be announced in the
3 Dec. Plan of the Day
Monday I PRINCESS AND THE PIRATE
4 Dec. in Technicolor with Bob Hope Virginia Mayo
Tuesday WOMAN IN THE WINDOW
5 Dec. I Edward G. Robinson Joan Bennett
Wednesday To be announced in the
6 Dec. I Plan of the Day
Thursday THE CLIMAX
7 Dec. lin Technicolor with Susanna Foster Boris Karloff
Friday NAUGHTY MARIETTA (reissue)
8 Dec. I Jeanette MacDonald Nelson Eddy
Selected Shorts with Each Program
No 1430 Movie on Sundays


FIRST BIG-TIME SHOW A HOWLING SUCCESS


PAGE EIGHT


THE BUCCANEER


NOVEMBER 30, 1944




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