Title: University of Florida wildlife inventory and monitoring program : one year survey results and data summary
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Title: University of Florida wildlife inventory and monitoring program : one year survey results and data summary
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Dawson, Daniel
Publisher: Office of Sustainability, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
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Bibliographic ID: UF00102926
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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University of Florida Wildlife Inventory and Monitoring Program:
One Year Survey Results and Data Summary































Daniel Dawson, Graduate Student
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Mark Hostetler
Dept. of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
University of Florida
8/29/05












Contents

Background...................................... ... ......................... ........ 4

Overall Report on Sampling Program and Final Update of Sampling Protocols
Birds .................................................................. ...........
H erps .................. ............................................. ...........
Mammals
Small Mammals .....................................................................
Meso-Mammals ..........................................8

Sampling Results and Summary of One Year's Data
Birds ............................................................ ...........
Herps ....................................................... ................. 9
Mammals
Small Mammals ............... .................. ...... ............
M eso-M am m als ............... ............................ ........ 10

N ote on volunteer effort .................. ............... ............................... ..........10
Management Recommendations........................ ................... ........................10
Site-Specific Recommendations .............. .... .....................................12
Notes on sampling effort in UF Conservation Areas for future researchers.......................13


Tables

Over-all

Table 1: Numbers of sample locations per Area for each sampling technique ........... 16
Table 2: Conservation Area name abbreviations ................... .... ..............17
Table 3: Total Number of Surveys per sampling point per taxa per season in
the University of Florida Conservation Areas................... .... ............... 17


Birds
Table 4: GPS locations of Annual Group avian point counts ................ ............22
Table 5: GPS locations of Migrant Group avian point counts ........... ................22
Table 6: 4-letter avian species abbreviations ................ ... .... .......... ........ 23
Table 7: All bird species detected per area between October 2004 and August
2005 in the University of Florida Conservation Areas ...................................24
Table 8: For each conservation area, the maximum abundances of each bird species
detected at each point during one survey within a 40m sample radius over all dates
sampled in the University of Florida Conservation Areas
a. H arm onic W oods.................................................... ........ ... 29









b. Fraternity W etlands......... .. ................................. ..... ...... 30
c. Graham W oods.................. ................. .................. ............ 31
d. Health Center Park.................................. ............ .............. 32
e. M cCarty W oods.................................................................. 33
f. Lake Alice South.................. ................................... ......... 34
g. Biven's Rim Forest........... ....... ......................... ............ 36
h. Biven's Forest East........... ....... ......................... ............ 37
i. Lake A lice M ain....................................................... ........ 40
j. Surge W etlands...................................... .......................... 42



Herps
Table 9: GPS locations of Herpetofaunal arrays within the University of Florida
Conservation Areas........................................ ............ .... ........ ... .. 44
Table 10: All herp species detected between October 2004 and August 2005
in the University of Florida Conservation Areas; grouped by taxa..........................45
Table 11: Species of herps detected per conservation area between October 2004
and August 2005 in the University of Florida Conservation Areas........................46
Table 12: Total number of individuals per species of herps captured per herpetofaunal
trapping array over all trapping dates from 5/2005 through August 2005 in the
University of Florida Conservation Areas:
a. Harmonic W oods .................. ....... ........................ ......... 50
b. Fraternity W etlands.................. ................. ................... ....... 50
c. Graham W oods ............. ... ..... .. ...... .................... ......... 50
d. Health Center Park.................................. ............ .............. 51
e. Lake Alice South.................. ................................... ...........51
f. Biven's Rim Forest.................. ............................... ........... 51
g. Biven's Forest East.................. ............... .. ............ ........... 52
h. Lake Alice M ain...................................................... ......... 52
i. Surge W etlands...................................... .......................... 53
j. M cCarty W oods.................. ................ .................... ........ ..53



Mammals
Table 13: GPS coordinates of edge-starting points of small mammal trapping grids in the
University of Florida Conservation Areas............. ... ...... ...... ..... .. ..........55
Table 14: GPS coordinates of meso-mammal sampling locations within the
University of Florida Conservations Areas............... .......... ................... 57
Table 15: Total mammal species detected between October 2004 and August 2005 in the
University of Florida Conservation Areas.............................. ......... .............. 57
Table 16: Total mammal species detected per area between October 2004 and August
2005 in the University of Florida Conservation Areas.............. ................57









Table 17: Small mammal captures per area in the University of Florida
Conservation Areas over all trapping methods and dates................. ...................58



Figures

Birds
Figure 1: Avian point count locations surveyed on an annual basis in the University
of Florida Conservation Areas ..................... ... .... ........................ ...20
Figure 2: Avian point count locations added to capture migrant diversity in the
University of Florida Conservation Areas............ ......... ................... ............21
Figure 3: All sampled conservation areas depicted in terms of detected avian species
richness (darker color indicates more species) in the University of Florida
Conservation Areas between October 2004 and August 2005........... .............28

Herps
Figure 4: Locations of herpetofaunal arrays within the University of Florida
Conservation Areas ........... .. .............. ................... ........... ....44
Figure 5: All sampled conservation areas depicted in terms of detected herpetofaunal
species richness (darker color indicates more species) in the University of Florida
Conservation Areas between October 2004 and August 2005........... .............49

Mammals
Figure 6: Locations of small mammal trapping grids within the University of Florida
Conservation Areas .............. ............ ... ..... .. ............ 54
Figure 7: Meso-mammal sampling locations within the University of Florida
Conservation Areas ......................................... .....56






Background

Facilities Planning & Construction (FP&C), as part of UF's Master Plan, has backed the creation
of a program aimed at monitoring wildlife populations in several selected conservation areas on
the UF campus. This program was established during fall 2004, and was conducted through
August 20, 2005. This report details the results of the monitoring of birds, herps, and mammals
in those selected conservation areas, and presents a summary of collected data.

Selected areas included in the program are: Harmonic woods, Fraternity Wetlands, Graham
woods, Health Center Park, McCarty Woods, Lake Alice Conservation Area, Lake Alice South,
Biven's Rim Forest, Biven's Forest East, and Surge Wetlands. The project started on 23 August
2004 and is scheduled to end on 20 August 2005.










Final Report on Wildlife Monitoring Design and Protocols

The main focus of the sampling design was to measure species richness within the conservation
areas, but relative abundance information was collected for as many taxa as possible. After
approximately 9 months of sampling, meaningful relative abundance information is available for
both birds and herps. Mammals were only able to be sampled for species detection.

In order to assure that sampling effort be applied to each taxa in each area as equally as possible,
I placed proportionately more sample points in larger areas. As indicated in the two previous
reports, I placed sampling points within an edge-interior sampling regime, with edge for all taxa
designated as the first forty meters from the boundary to the inside of the area. All sample
locations have been made in ArcView GIS 3.2. Appendix 1 gives abbreviations used in tables for
each conservation area name. Table 1 gives the number of sampling points for all taxa in each
conservation area. Table 2 gives the number of surveys made per taxa per sampling point per
season of sampling effort (Fall 2004, and Winter, Spring, and Summer 2005).

Birds

In the fall of 2004, I initially established 24 bird points throughout all 10 conservation areas.
During the remainder of the fall (11/2004), and the winter (12/2004 through 3/2005), the points
were regularly sampled. In order to increase my ability to sample for spring migrants, between
3/2005 and 4/2005 I increased the number of points sampled within the conservation areas,
resulting in a total of 46 points. The majority of the additional points were considered a separate
group that I deemed as "migrant", while the original group of points was deemed "annual". The
addition of the "migrant" group was made possible by sampling on different days than "annual"
points, allowing me to place "migrant" points much closer to "annual" points to meet area
restrictions. Area restrictions between points within the "migrant" group were the same as
between points within the "annual" group. The "migrant" group did not include any locations in
Lake Alice Conservation Area or Surge wetlands because my sampling schedule already
includes the approximate maximum number for those areas. Also, because of a horse disease in
the adjacent pastures, I could only include 1 point in Lake Alice South within the "migrant
group". Due to size requirements, an edge versus interior comparison can be made in 7 of the 10
areas. Avian sampling took precedence during the entire month of April and first week of May to
capture the spring migration. During this period, all points were sampled once a week, every
week.
After this period, I reverted back to the original bird sampling schedule, in which birds
were sampled every other week, and only at points in the "annual group". I also further modified
this schedule for the summer by only sampling bird points once during sampling weeks due to
the lower diversity and lower abundances of avian species during the summer months, and a
greater emphasis on herp and mammal sampling. During the Fall of 2005, I will resume a bird
sampling schedule similar to the spring migration period, including both "annual" and "migrant"
groups in order to capture the fall migration. Out of courtesy to the Facilities Construction and
Planning department, the department will be updated on species detected within conservation
areas during this period, and it will receive a report updating detected species abundances. See









figures 1 & 2 for the locations of the annual and migrant group point counts, respectively. See
table 2 for GPS locations of all sample points.


Herps


Herpetofaunal trapping arrays have been used to sample herps within the conservation areas.
Positions for 18 trapping arrays were established within a GIS, and arrays were installed at or
near those positions by myself and a few others between November 2004 and early May 2005.
Initially, herp arrays were planned to be sampled for 1 week out of a sampling month for four
successive nights, with traps being opened on for four nights, checked every day, and then closed
after sampling after the fourth night of that week. After a preliminary sampling session in
December, however, sampling was suspended due to cold weather until a session in March,
which was again met with limited success. Sampling was again halted until May in order to
capture the spring avian migration. Herp sampling was then resumed in May and continued
through August. Because of the lack of activity during the winter and spring, and the potential of
more herp activity during summer, I decided to operate the herpetofaunal arrays for two weeks
per month over summer instead of the initially planned one week per month. Herpetofaunal
sampling was often combined with avian sampling during a given sampling week to increase
sampling efficiency.

There have been some difficulties in array installation and maintenance, especially in low-lying
and/or wetland areas. In general, pitfall trap buckets have a tendency to fill with water after rain-
fall. Though one solution is to drill holes in the bucket bottom for drainage, in wetland or low-
lying areas, the high water-table may push water up through the holes. This was generally the
case after it rained recently and/or frequently. In buckets with holes in this situation, I was forced
to either close the buckets until water levels receded, or floating material was placed inside
buckets to prevent drowning. Buckets could also be placed without holes in the bottom, and then
could be simply drained of collected water on a daily basis with a scoop to prevent drowning.
However, in this situation, water pressure from below would often push buckets out of the
ground. A solution to this was to use iron rebar stakes to hold the buckets in the ground against
the water pressure. However, this also failed to prevent to buckets from pushing out of the
ground when soil was soft, or when very heavy or very frequent rain intensified ground water
pressure. In general, re-installation of buckets was a weekly occurrence in at least a few areas.
Also, the wood stakes used to erect fences tended to rot extremely fast during the hot, wet
summer months. Stakes frequently broke and had to be replaced with additional wood stakes, or
held in place by materials found near the site, i.e. sticks and branches.

See figure 3 for location of Arrays. See Table 6 for GPS positions of all existent and scheduled
arrays.


I have also performed one time-constrained visual assessment of herp diversity in McCarty
Woods(8/10/05), in which I searched for one hour for herpetofaunal species. I have not been
able to conduct night-time surveys for frog diversity due to time constraints, but I may perform









such surveys before the onset of cooler, dryer weather. Out of courtesy to the Facilities
Construction and Planning department, the department will be updated on species detected
within conservation areas during these surveys, should they occur.



Mammals


Small Mammals: Beginning in 11/2004, I established trapping transects in 8 of the 10 areas to
sample for small-mammal diversity, with one transect in each area. McCarty woods and Biven's
Rim Forest were not included in effort. Trapping transects were originally scheduled to be run
for 5 successive nights, four times a year. During the fall and winter, I ran three trapping sessions
(11/30/2004-12/03/2004, 1/25/2005-1/29/2005, 3/22/2005-3/26/2005), but I had had very limited
success due to direct interference with traps by raccoons. Overall, raccoon interference led to
very low capture rates, stolen traps, and an otherwise frustrating experience. My attempts to
reduce interference during these times by covering traps with debris, and wearing protective
gloves when baiting, failed. Because of these difficulties, and the small amount of data I had
collected, I decided to change my approach to sampling this taxa over the summer months by
using trapping grids instead of transects.

Rectangular trapping grids were established in each area except McCarty woods between June
and August 2005. When possible, grids were established by incorporating the original trapping
transect and simply extending two additional transects of equal length adjacent to it, each twenty
meters apart. When previous transects could not be used for the basis of grids because of area
constraints, or in order to avoid wetlands, new starting points were selected within the GIS
environment. This resulted in 8 grids that contained 3 times the number of locations of original
transects. In one area, Biven's Rim Forest, only one transect was able to be added because the
shape and size of the area was not conducive to the placement of a grid.

Unlike the original transects, which were intended to begin at an edge and end within an interior
location to assess edge affects of rodent diversity and abundances, the trapping grids were simply
intended to assess diversity in general. Therefore transects within grids were only required to
start 20m from an edge for consistency, and only had to end with conservation area boundaries.
Also, grids could not be placed in inundated or partially inundated wetland areas for safety.

Grids were sampled once, in two groups. The first group included Harmonic Woods, Fraternity
Wetlands, Graham Woods, Health Center Park, and Lake Alice Conservation Area. The second
group included Lake Alice South, Biven's Rim Forest, Biven's Forest East, and Surge Wetlands.
Due to time constraints, each group was only sampled for, four-night period each (7/12/2005-
7/16/2005, and 8/10/2005-8/14/2005).

See figure 4 for location of transects and starting points. See table 8 for GPS positions of all
transect start points.









Meso-mammals: Formal sampling for meso-mammals was attempted by way of scent-track traps
distributed randomly thorough the areas within the same edge-to-interior scheme that was used
for the other two taxa. A total of 24 sampling points were established within a GIS environment
within all 10 areas, and a total 22 sampling points were installed by me within those areas. 2
locations within Lake Alice South proved to be inaccessible, and it became impractical to install
additional points.

Meso-mammal track stations consisted of a circle of sand (area=0.5m2), in the center of which
was a stake with a container of scent attached to it. I attempted to use both human urine and
sardines as scent baits. Originally, meso-mammal stations were to be sampled for four successive
nights, one week per month, starting in May 2005. Stations would be monitored for mammal
tracks each day, than raked smooth for the next night, and unidentifiable tracks could be
photographed and/or duplicated with plaster molds to be identified at a later time. However, due
to weather, substrate difficulties, and time issues, very little data was collected in this manner.

When I initially settled upon the summer to try meso-mammal traps due to increased mammal
activity, I failed to take into account the increased and often daily rainfall that accompanies the
season. Unfortunately, rainfall effectively "dis-arms" a foot-print trap, erasing most to all signs
of activity. During the two sessions that I attempted this technique, frequent and heavy rainfall
occurred throughout the weeks. Attempts to work around the generally predictable nature of
summer weather in Florida, that is, afternoon rain-showers, were foiled by unpredictable weather
activity, namely morning and night rain. In addition to rainfall, the substrate I used, sand, often
did not provide a recognizable print; usually just an un-interpretable blob. Attempts to use
hydrated lime as a substrate enhancer failed due to high humidity. Lastly, in trying out new
substrates, including lime and simply adding more sand, as well as running the rest of the
sampling program, I ran out of time to actually sample meso-mammal diversity in this manner.
However, despite the failure to gather data effectively in this technique, I feel that through
incidental observations and/or captures, and because the expected diversity of meso-mammals
was very low to begin with, I have been able to garner a good approximation of the meso-
mammal diversity present in the conservation areas.

Results


Birds


As of August, I have detected with certainty, 94 bird species within, flying-over, or within close
proximity of the 10 areas that I have been sampling. The conservation area with the greatest
number of species detected is Biven's Forest East (BFE) with 65 positively detected species
(69% of total avifaunal richness detected), and the area with least number of species detected is
McCarty Woods (MW) at 26 positively detected species (27% of the total avifaunal richness
detected). A more complete picture of the avian community will be drawn from the upcoming
Fall migration, which was largely missed during Fall 2004. See figure 3 for a visual comparison
of the avian species richness detected per conservation area. See table 3 for a list of species
detected and their associated four-letter codes. See table 4 for lists of species detected within,









flying-over, or shortly outside of each conservation area. Birds were sampled within an edge
versus interior frame-work. Because edge points were located 20m from area edges, and
abundances were recorded within a distance of 40m from the point location, some birds counted
outside the area boundaries are included in the reported abundances. See table 5 for the
maximum abundances of species detected during one survey within 40 m distance of sampling
locations over all sampled dates.


Herps


The summer 2005 sampling season for herps was successful, with a total of 767 captures of 20
species, and incidental observations or array-associated observations of an additional 15 species,
for a total of 35 species detected overall during a period of 23 trap nights. Some species,
especially tree frogs in PVP, maybe repeat captures, so the total number of captures is not
necessarily a good indicator of the total number of animals present. When tree frog captures via
PVP pipe refugia are excluded, a total of 558 captures have been made via array traps. In
addition there have been 34 observations of species on or near arrays, and multiple observations
of species unassociated with arrays. I have detected the most species in Lake Alice Conservation
Area, with a total of 23 species. I have detected the least species in Graham Woods, with a total
of 2 species. The number of species for Graham Woods maybe misleading, however, because I
had substantial difficulties in maintaining herp array in that area. The Cuban Brown anole is the
most commonly detected species, having been informally or formally detected in all areas. See
Table 8 for species and abundances detected thus far in each conservation area.

Mammals

Small mammals
I had moderate success in detecting the diversity of the small-mammal community after I
switched trapping methodologies. With the grid methodology, I detected both previously
detected species (Rattus rattus and Peromyscus gossypinus), and a new species, Rattus
norvegicus, in three areas (HW, HCP, GW). I also detected cotton mice in two new areas (LAM,
BRF). Through informal means, I also detected Oldfield mouse (Peromyscus polionotus) in two
areas, and Eastern Gray Squirrel (Sciurius carolinenisis) in all areas. In addition, cotton rat
(Sigmidon hispidus) was noted in a herp array pitfall at Lake Alice Conservation Area. The total
number of small mammal species detected was 6, with only 3 of those detected by formal means.
The area with the highest number of species was Harmonic Woods with 5, and area with the
lowest is Lake Alice South, with 1.

In general, the raccoon interference experienced during the grid methodology trapping session
was far less than the transect methodology, and even virtually non-existant in some areas, which
may suggest that indeed, raccoons may have been satiated by the number of traps available.
However, this may also have been due to the increased food availability for raccoons during the
summer that was not present during the winter and spring. Overall, though, I would suggest that
the grid methodology is more effective than the transect methodology used previously, even
though several grid "lines' were previous single transects. It may be that in urban areas, where









densities of native rodents may be low, it might be more relevant to cover larger areas, than to try
to exploit territoriality behavior that might be altered non-existent in the system.


Meso-mammals
Only two formal meso-mammal trapping sessions were attempted, and both only resulted in
armadillo sign and raccoon tracks. I made far more incidental observations of meso-mammals
than I did by way of footprint traps. Procyon lotor ( accoon) are the most commonly detected
species, with tracks, visual observations, or raccoon-related small mammal trap activity in every
area. Didelphis virgianus (Virginia opossum) would be expected in all areas as well, though few
signs have been present. It should be noted, however, that caught baby opossums in small
mammal traps in HCP, as well as in a herp pitfall trap at LAM. It would seem that most areas
also have Dasypus novemcincus (9-banded armadillo), with armadillo holes and live
observations made throughout many conservation areas. I have detected the most species of
meso-mammalss in Biven's Forest East, with four species. A few areas only have P. lotor as
being the only meso-mammal officially detected. However, I would be very surprised to not find
either D. virginianus or D. novemcinctus with a more thorough search. I also expect that feral
cats may be more prominent than my detections of them would indicate. See table 10 for species
and abundances detected thus far in each conservation area for both small and meso-mammals.


Volunteer Effort


Only a small group of students from the UF Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society that have
accompanied me while conducting point counts, herp, and small mammal trapping during the
course of the year. I believe this was due to both extremely busy schedules, prohibitively time
consuming and irrelevant prerequisites to volunteering required by the UF IACUC, and general
apathy on the part of most undergraduates. However, those who did help often helped more than
once and were generally in good spirits about it. I had planned to pass the project along to the UF
Student Chapter of TWS, so that perhaps small amounts of data may be collected in the years
elapsing between times this study was to be replicated. Depending upon student interest, this
may or may not happen. I will continue my involvement in this organization, and strive to see
that at least in part, data can continue to be collected.

Management Recommendations

No areas sampled contained threatened or endangered species, with the exception of Biven's
Forest East, which occasionally was used by Bald Eagles to perch in. This species also been seen
flying near or over other areas as well. However, the University of Florida Conservation Areas
do play host to a variety of other wildlife species, including a large number of migratory and
winter-resident bird species with a smaller subset of annual resident avian species, a moderate
diversity of herpetofauna, and a few small mammal and meso-mammal species. Therefore,
Conservation Areas should be managed in order to maintain and increase that diversity of over
time, in addition to their maintaining their roles as passive recreation areas. The following









management recommendations were already suggested in a previous report, but have been
updated with additional information gained since then:




Invasive/Exotic Plant Control: For almost all of the sites we recommend
invasive/exotic plant control, either by manual and/or chemical means. Particularly, we
would target Air Potato (Dioscorea bulbefera), Coral Ardesia (Ardesia crenata), and
White-flowered Wandering Jew (Tradescantiaflumenisis) for this effort. They are all
common and numerous in almost all of the 10 areas, and the latter two are significant
parts of the under-story of many of the upland areas. Of the three, Coral Ardesia interacts
with wildlife the most. Dan has observed birds eating Ardesia berries and large amounts
of berries are present in raccoon scat. Therefore, both of these taxa help to spread Coral
Ardesia.

Maintaining Trails: The recent hurricanes have caused many large trees to fall in
several of the conservation areas. The affect of this has been generally positive for
wildlife because of the increased structure on the ground. However, to maintain the
passive recreation goal for some of the areas, we recommend clearing hurricane-felled
trees off of established trails, as well as actively maintaining established trails. This
should discourage people from making new trails and further disturbing wildlife and
wildlife habitat. In areas such as Health Center Park, which is fragmented by criss-
crossing trails, we recommend actively maintaining the most used trails and discouraging
use on the others. Posted signs would greatly help this effort.


Creating a Heterogeneous Environment: Though increased vegetative structure
generally makes for better wildlife habitat (for some species), areas with both open
understory and dense vegetation make the conservation areas more heterogeneous. A
heterogeneous environment will support a more diverse number of wildlife species.
Several of the areas are (or will become) choked over time with large amounts of
vegetation, particularly vines. With a lengthy drought, these regions could turn into
potential fire hazards. To reduce this threat, as well as to maintain the heterogeneity of
the conservation areas, we recommend periodic, selective thinning out of vines and
woody-shrub vegetation in some dense upland areas (either with fire or by mechanical
means).

Water Quality Monitoring: Though its already being done in some areas, we
recommend increased water-quality monitoring for areas containing wetlands, namely
Graham Woods, Lake Alice South, Surge Wetlands, and Biven's Forest East. These areas
contain many small pools in which Dan has noticed tadpoles, and there are sizeable
numbers of frogs present. These areas also contain the highest overall diversity of avian
and herpetofaunal species, and the continuance of the presence of habitable wetlands in
these areas may be important in maintaining this diversity. All of these areas subject to
run-off from road and/or agricultural contaminants. In addition, Dan has noted that on
one occasion, a nearby swimming pool was drained into Graham Woods. Perhaps









chemical testing sites and silt-traps in some creek areas that drain into these conservation
areas would be appropriate.

Trash: Most of the areas are littered with trash, though some are worse than others. If
only for aesthetic reasons, we would recommend some concerted effort to clean up the
trash in several of the areas, the placing of trashcans, or the posting of signs prohibiting
trash dumping. Graham Woods and Biven's Forest East are particularly littered with
human garbage of various sorts. Graham woods is very near several sports stadiums and
dorm areas, so perhaps placing more trash cans along its edge will prevent so much trash
from being dumped into it. In Biven's Forest East, a large amount of the trash has washed
in from Biven's Arm Lake when it has flooded. Also, the large drainage canal that leads
from 13th St. to the eastern border of Biven's Forest East brings a lot of trash from 13th st.
into the area, distributing garbage throughout system of streams in the area. Perhaps the
posting signs or placing trashcans can prevent so much trash from ending up in that
conservation area.

General Maintenance of Nearby Facilities & Land: All of the conservation areas are
located near human habitation. We suggest informational signs and/or maintenance
restrictions for any conservation areas next to land maintained or frequented by people.
In particular, limit pesticides or on turf next to conservation areas. Also, bright lights
should be avoided near conservation areas (i.e., it can disturb wildlife). Signage should
inform people about the nearby conservation area (e.g., species found, type of habitat,
etc.) and impacts people could have on it (e.g., going off or making new trails; littering;
releasing exotic pets; loud human disturbances, etc.). For any conservation areas that are
right next to turf or any type of impervious surface, we suggest creating a vegetative
buffer (e.g., bushes or tall grass) that will prevent people from entering these areas and
also help filter out pollutants in runoff.

Acquisition of adjacent land: Biven's Rim Forest, Biven's Forest East, and Health
Center Park conservation areas are adjacent to wooded habitat that is continuous with
wooded habitat contained in the areas. To make a buffer more consistent with the
boundaries of these conservation areas, we recommend that the boundaries be expanded
to include such habitat.

Site Specific Recommendations

Harmonic Woods: Removal of Ardesia, maintaining of established trails.
Fraternity Wetlands: Removal of White-flower Wandering Jew along stream.
Graham Woods: Removal of Air Potato, White-flower Wandering Jew. Extensive trash cleanup.
Health Center Park: Removal of multiple exotic plants. Reduction of trails. Because this is very
open habitat in some places, plant some buffer shrubs around the more open edges. Expansion of
boundaries to include adjacent portions of continuous wooded habitat, particularly the wooded
habitats bordering the northwest and southwest boundaries of the property.
McCarty Woods: Exotic plant removal, maintenance of trails.
Lake Alice Conservation Area: Trash removal
Lake Alice .N,,mh Trash removal. Water-quality monitoring.









Surge Wetlands: Trash removal. Water-quality monitoring.
Biven 's Rim Forest: Expansion of boundaries to include portions of continuous wooded habitat
adjacent to its borders, particularly the wooded habitat adjacent to the south-western portion that
borders Biven's Arm lake.
Biven's Forest East: Exotic plant removal. Water-quality monitoring. Extensive trash cleanup.
Would recommend either the placement of trash cans, or the posting of signs near the large
drainage canal leading from 13th street to the eastern border that prohibit the dumping of trash
dumping near canal or on UF property. Expansion of boundaries to include portions of
continuous wooded habitat adjacent to its borders, particular the wooded habitat in the
southwestern portion between the Veterinary school horse pastures and Biven's Arm Lake.



NOTES ON SAMPLING WITHIN UF CONSERVATION AREAS


Sampling conditions within the UF conservation areas can be of varied complication and
success depending upon the topography, the condition of the vegetation, and the presence or
absence of wetlands. Most sites with primarily upland habitat, such as HW, FW, HCP, MW,
BRF, SW, and most of sampled LAM are relatively easily sampled for all taxa. Main concerns in
these areas are the increasingly thick under- and mid-story vegetation, large fallen trees,
occasional flooding during heavy rain, and open-ness in places. These issues become most
relevant with the installation of herp trapping arrays, small mammal transects, and meso-
mammal traps. Generally, suitable sites within these upland areas for the theses sampling
methods can be found relatively easily, however, thick vegetation and fallen trees can pose a
substantial challenge to site location and installation of sample methods, depending upon the
circumstance. Occasional flooding may cause herp buckets to come up out of the ground, and
hasten the deterioration of wooden fence stakes. Openness of habitat can become a problem for
both herp array installation and small mammal trapping grid placement if exposure to the public
is high. I have not personally experienced any vandalism or larceny by the public concerning
trapping arrays, but I have also intentionally positioned herp and mammal traps in vegetation so
as not to be noticed by the general public. However, this concern can limit the number of
locations available for the installation of traps, particularly in HW and HCP which have high
openness in places and higher public exposure than other areas.

Most sampling difficulties that I have experienced have been faced in areas that are
constituted by a sizeable percentage of bottom-land hardwood-type forest or swamp wetlands,
namely in GW, LAS, parts of LAM, and BFE. GW is more or less bowl-shaped, and is
essentially a drainage area for much of the surrounding areas. So, there are a number of streams
that pour into it from the surrounding development. Because of this, stream levels can fluctuate
enough to flood the ground in the parts of the "bottom" of bowl into very mucky, very lose soil. I
would definitely recommend re-locating the edge herp array in this area to a place with firmer
soil. As it is, the pitfall trap could not be held in the ground, even with rebar stakes, because the
ground was just too soft after rain. This area can also be challenging in general because the
vegetation is thick, and with the large number of sizeable fallen trees, there are parts that are very
difficult to get around in, establish herp arrays in, and run mammal transects through. In terms of









small mammal traps, once a transect is established, it is usually easy enough to find dry land to
place it on. Lastly, the topography in this area is unusual in that since its bowl shaped, there is
some relatively steep terrain towards the northern edge, which effectively make large permanent
structures there impractical. Also, because of the drainage streams, there are small ravine-like
crevices that can make north-south movement a bit perilous and sampling a bit difficult.

Lake Alice South is an unusual area in that around half of it is horse pasture, so it was
difficult to decide how to sample it area-wise. Like GW, it acts like a drainage area for
surrounding development and horse pastures, with water levels fluctuating widely with rains.
Again, with more rain, the streams tend to flood over a bit into the already soggy land, creating
pretty mucky conditions in lower-lying parts, which constitute majority of the wooded area.
Consequently, the selection of herp array and mammal trap transect locations can be difficult.
Also, installation can be challenging due to the seemingly vast abundance of briars and black-
berry bushes, as well as thick vegetation, and fallen trees (which tend to leave small ponds at
their bases). Lastly, there are several old barbed-wire topped fences in this area that must be
traversed and dealt with in various locations. The entire area is surrounded by fences in various
states of repair; some old fences with wholes that can be used for access, and some newer, tall
fences that have to be either avoided or jumped over. Consequently, access to this area can be
somewhat limited. I have generally accessed it by parking behind a cattle fence east of the Jiffy
Lube and just west of the Jimmy Johns on Archer road. After the cattle fence is jumped, I
usually get into the area by heading away from the adjacent horse pasture, and towards the
forested canopy, where I use a hole in an old, short barbed-wire fence made by a fallen tree.
Another way to access this area is to go through a gated fence directed next to the WEC/SFRC
vehicle compound which will lead you the aforementioned hole in the fence. If one was to gain a
key to this fence, access would probably be more convenient than it is now.

Lake Alice Main is what I call the northern portion of the Lake Alice Conservation Area.
The southern portion of that is a large freshwater marsh that I had initially intended upon
targeting for sampling, but after several traverses into it, I decided it was inaccessible enough to
prohibit sampling it due to time concerns. Lake Alice Main, however, is a relatively large,
reasonably-open, upland patch of habitat that is comparatively easy to sample. The two main
concerns with LAM are people and flooding in parts. Unlike other areas, LAM receives a good
number of visitors and its trails are frequently used by dog-walkers. Therefore, I would
recommend that herp arrays again be conscientiously built away from the open view of people
for the safety of captured specimens. Also, one of the "interior" herp arrays is in a clear-cut that
is dominated by tall, weedy species. I would recommend that if arrays are built there again, plans
for the field be investigated so that any herp array to be installed isn't accidentally destroyed by
Bush-hog or a prescribed fire. In addition, because it is so open at this location, I would
recommend raised shade boards over both pitfall and funnel traps to prevent desiccation. The
second concern, flooding, is really only applicable to the far western portion that is a bit lower
and has several streams that run through it. Herp array pitfall traps have had a tendency to pop
out of the ground after rain, even with rebar stakes, and I would advise caution when installing
traps there. However, I would say that despite the problems with arrays in wetland areas, the far
west LAM herp array has produced the only salamanders caught over the entire field season, so I
consider the effort worthwhile.









Biven's Forest East is by far the most challenging area to sample in the entire group of
sampled areas. It is shaped like a large N-S oriented bowl, with a thinner "pan-handle" that
stretches E-W along Biven's Arm Lake. The terrain of the bowl glades from mixed pine-
hardwoods forest on the northern, western, and eastern edges, to a hardwood swamp in the
northern bowl bottom, to stream-crossed bottom-land hardwood forest in the middle, and back
towards hardwood swamp towards the southern end as it approaches the lake. This area poses
many challenges because of the varied topography and corresponding vegetation. Though the
edges and southern panhandle of this area are mainly upland habitat, the majority of habitat in
this area is some form of wetland. Again, this causes problems for herp array installation, meso-
mammal trap installation, and small-mammal trapping transect placement. The placement of
herp arrays in this area definitely takes some knowledge of current conditions, including
vegetation density, which is often high, access to the site, and soil type, which can be extremely
mucky. Also, the hurricanes of 2004 caused significant damage to these areas, causing massive
tree-fall and effectively creating "walls" of vegetation that must be circumvented or in which
paths must be discovered or cut through. In general, the vegetation itself varies with topography,
and during spring and summer months, the vegetation growth, especially of wild taro and
elderberry plants, can make what was relatively open bottom-land swamp into very thickly
vegetated habitat in a matter of weeks. In fact, during the height of summer, commonly used
paths in these areas can become overgrown with plants in a matter of days. Lastly, this area, like
the previous ones, serves for drainage purposes for the surrounding area, and thus has a number
of streams. There is also a large canal built on the central eastern border of the property built
expressively for this purpose. I would advise caution during rainstorms in BFE. Water
accumulates extremely fast, and small streams only inches deep can become running creeks
several feet deep very quickly during rain-storms. Naturally, flooding also is an issue, and care
must be taken when planning small mammal trapping locations so that traps are not placed in
potentially floodable locations. In fact, because of the variation in water level, especially over the
spring and summer, I would recommend that small mammal trapping be done in the southern
panhandle area, which is more reliably upland. So, notwithstanding, the challenges of the terrain,
which can range from fairly solid ground to extraordinarily mucky ground over a short distance,
and the variable vegetation and fallen trees, can make the establishment of sampling points and
sampling in general difficult, and travel within BFE very time consuming and slow.
In addition, the shape, size, and position of the conservation area make access an issue. It
is situated mainly south of the Veteran hospital and residential areas, and east of horse pastures
owned by the school of veterinary medicine. Because it is long and relatively thin, and
surrounded by intact fences on all sides, access to it is limited to two main locations within the
UF campus boundaries. The best access point by road is a grass path between the adjacent horse
pastures that ends in a small turn around area directly next to the conservation area boundaries.
There are several holes in the barb-wire fences in this location, and it is central to the
conservation area in general. An access key has to be acquired from Vet Med in order to use this
access point. The other location, which I began to use after the aforementioned pastures were
quarantined due to a horse disease, is the Winn-Dixie Hope Lodge. Parking is restricted here, and
a parking permit must be obtained. This location, though also at the conservation area boundary
is at the northern end of the property, and therefore the entire length of the area must usually be
traversed to get to sampling points. Other access points include private property locations on 13th
St., which must be investigated further prior to their use. There is also an access point to the
southern panhandle by taking another road in between horse pastures to the conservation area









boundary. However, a ladder is recommended to scale the fence safely. Despite the challenges,
because of its heterogeneity, BFE offers habitat for a wide number of wildlife species, and
should be sampled as best as possible to capture that diversity.

Lastly, I offer a note for herp sampling. I experienced a number of amphibian deaths in pitfall
traps and funnel traps due to desiccation, iso-tonic water conditions, and predation. I would
recommend that water always be added to sponges in pitfall and funnel traps. Captured
specimens may still not use them, and crawl into a corer to desiccate, but it is worth it for the
species that are more apt to use the sponges. I would also recommend that when water is not able
to drain, either soil or something large enough to float out of the water be put in the bucket. I
experienced a large number of bronze frog juvenile deaths that I believe were due to isotonic
water conditions. Soil, especially with minerals in it, or floating debris generally alleviates the
problem. Unfortunately, nothing can be done to prevent predation on pit-fall captured specimens.
However, one idea may be to place a raised cover over the open bucket. Such a cover, as
mentioned before, may be placed over the pitfall trap of sun-exposed arrays to prevent
desiccation, as well to prevented further predation events from occurring, at least by mammalian
predators. If predation events become frequent, it might be worth it to prevent needless loss of
specimens.







Tables




Table 1: Numbers of sample locations per Area for each sampling technique.


Conservation Area No. of Total no. of No. of Herp Length of No. of
Hectares avian point Arrays Small meso-
(reported by count mammal mammal
FC&P and locations transects(m) scent/track
verified by stations
calculation
in ArcView
3.2)
Harmonic Woods 3.670 5 2 60 2
Fraternity Wetlands 2.572 4 1 60 2
Graham Woods 3.043 4 2 60 2
Health Center Park 3.519 4 2 80 2
McCarty Woods 1.153 2 0 1
Lake Alice Main 48.14 6 4 240 4










Table 1: continued
Lake Alice South 6.606 4 1 80 1
Biven's Rim Forest 3.308 4 1 2
Biven's Forest East 16.592 10 4 240 4
Surge Wetlands 4.964 3 1 80 2


Table 2: University of Florida Conservation Area name abbreviations.


BFE=Biven's Forest East HW= Harmonic Woods
BRF=Biven's Rim Forest LAM=Lake Alice Conservation Area
FW=Fraternity Wetlands LAS=Lake Alice South
GW=Graham Woods MW=McCarty Woods
HCP=Health Center Park SW=Surge Wetlands


Table 3: Total Number of Surveys per sampling point per taxa per season in the University
of Florida Conservation Areas.



Number of Surveys Conducted per Season
Total # of

Sample Fall Winter Spring Summer Surveys
Taxa Area Point ID (11/04-12/04) (12/04-4/04) (4/05-5/05) (5/05-8/05)
Birds HW 1 4 16 5 7 32
HW 2 4 14 4 6 28
FW 3 4 16 5 7 32
FW 4 4 16 5 7 32
GW 5 4 15 5 7 31
GW 6 4 15 5 5 29
HCP 7 4 15 5 7 31
HCP 8 3 15 5 7 30
MW 9 4 15 5 7 31
LAS 10 3 17 5 6 31
LAS 11 3 17 4 7 31
LAS 12 2 16 4 7 29
BRF 14 3 16 4 6 29
BRF 15 3 16 4 6 29
BFE 16 3 15 4 7 29
BFE 17 3 15 4 7 29
BFE 18 3 14 4 7 28
BFE 19 3 14 4 7 28











Table 3: Continued
LAM 2(
LAM 21
LAM 22
LAM 23
SW 24
SW 25
HW 2
BFE 31
LAM 33
LAM 34
SW 35
HW 10
HW 10
FW 10
FW 10,
GW 10
GW 10
HCP 10
HCP 10
MW 10
LAS 11
BRF 11
BRF 11.
BFE 11
BFE 11
BFE 11
BFE 11
BFE 20


+ + F +


HW
HW
FW
GW
GW
LAM
LAM
LAM
SW
HCP
HCP
LAS
BRF
BFE
BFE
BFE
BFE
LAM
MW


18
14
14
17
17
15
15
12
9
9
8
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3


Herps


Small
Mammals HW N/A 1 2 3










Table 3: Continued
TRANSECT N/A
METHOD FW 1 2 3
GW N/A 1 2 3
HCP N/A 1 2 3
LAS N/A 1 2 3
SW N/A 1 2 3
BRF N/A 1 2 3
BFE N/A 1 2 3
LAM N/A 1 2 3
Small
Mammals HW 1 1
GRID
METHOD FW 1 1
GW 1 1
HCP 1 1
LAS 1 1
SW 1 1
BRF 1 1
BFE 1 1
LAM 1 1
Meso-
Mammals HW 8 8
FW 8 8
GW 8 8
HCP 8 8
LAS 8 8
SW 8 8
BRF 8 8
BFE 8 8
LAM 8 8












Annual Group Avian Point

Count Locations






# #r













1 118
# 3 1
4 19

SPcpointsmarch05.shp
Reportwlinv.shp
| Bivens Rim East
| Bivens Rim South
- Fraternity WL
| Graham woods
M Harmonic woods
SHealth Center Pk
l Lake Alice South
l Lake Alice north
McCarty woods
M Surge Wetlands


FIGURE 1: Avian point count locations surveyed on an annual basis.











Migrant Group Avian Point
Count Locations


5 6


11
12


Migrantpcmarch05.shp
Reportwlinv.shp
| Bivens Rim East
S Bivens Rim South
[ Fraternity WL
I | Graham woods
SHarmonic woods
SHealth Center Pk
SLake Alice South
SLake Alice north
McCarty woods
SSurge Wetlands


4


Figure 2: Avian point count locations added to capture migrant diversity.


Tp













Table 4: GPS locations of Annual Group avian point counts.


Long: 82deg W
21'34.73"
21'30.90"
21'20.41"
21'22.52"
21'6.07"
21'9.54"
20' 41.28"
20' 43.60"
20' 39.29"
21'18.76"
21'14.76"
21'13.05"
21' 14.25"
21'12.72
20' 37.39"
20' 41.21"
20' 35.41"
20' 37.12"
21'20.16"
21' 18.14"
21'19.94"
21'8.26"
21' 10.16"
21'6.52"
21'32.46"
20' 36.40"
21'13.58"
21'31.32
21.55.90"


Lat: 29deg N
38' 44.33"
38' 44.49"
38' 45.66"
38' 49.16"
38" 47.33"
38' 49.87"
38' 43.67"
38' 34.23"
38' 34.49"
38' 15.93"
38' 15.00"
38' 11.95"
37' 43.88"
37' 39.66"
37' 57.29"
37' 51.35"
37' 51.90"
37' 43.19"
38' 39.02"
38' 32.43"
38' 29.42"
38' 32.44"
38" 24.20"
38' 21.39"
38' 48.33"
37' 47.08"
38' 31.20"
38' 35.90"
37' 59.56"


Table 5: GPS locations of Migrant Group avian point counts.


Area
HW
HW
FW
FW
GW
GW
HCP
HCP
MW
LAS
LAS
LAS
BRF
BRF
BFE
BFE
BFE
BFE
LAM
LAM
LAM
LAM
SW
SW
HW
BFE
LAM
LAM
SW


Long: 82deg W Lat: 29deg N Area
1* 21' 29.13" 38' 42.82" HW
2* 21' 32.90" 38' 45.88" HW
3* 21' 22.01 38' 46.23 FW
4* 21'22.21 38'50.16" FW
5* 21'10.34 38' 52.97" GW
6* 21'7.93" 38' 49.09" GW
7* 20' 47.28" 38' 33.80" HCP











Table 5 continued:
8* 20' 42.10" 38' 34.43" HCP
9* 20'42.17" 38'43.10" MW
11* 21' 13.56" 38' 9.20" LAS
14* 21'13.02 37'46.03 BRF
15* 21' 11.82" 37' 38.19" BRF
16* 20' 40.87" 37' 58.49" BFE
17* 20' 47.39" 37' 45.92" BFE
18* 20' 36.10" 37' 54.12" BFE
19* 20' 38.24" 37' 49.09" BFE
20* 20' 40.4" 37' 45.9" BFE


Table 6: 4-letter avian species abbreviations.


Abbreviation
AMCR
AMGO
AMRE
AMRO
ANHI
BAEA
BAOR
BAWW
BBWD
BDOW
BEKI
BGGC
BHCO
BHVI
BLJA
BLVU
BOBO
BPWA
BRTH
BTBW
BTGR
CACH
CARW
CEWA
CHSP
CHSW
COGR
COHA
COYE
DCCO
DOWO
EABL
EAPH


Common Name
American Crow
American Goldfinch
American Redstart
American Robin
Anhinga
Bald Eagle
Baltimore Oriole
Black and White Warbler
Black-Bellied Whistling Duck
Barred Owl
Belted Kingfisher
Blue-Gray gnatcatcher
Brown-headed cowbird
Blue-headed Vireo
Blue Jay
Black Vulture
Bobolink
Blackpoll Warbler
Brown Thrasher
Black Throated Blue Warbler
Boat-tailed Grackle
Carolina Chickadee
Carlolina Wren
Cedar Waxwing
Chipping Sparrow
Chimney Swift
Common Grackle
Cooper's Hawk
Common Yellowthroat
Double-Crested Cormorant
Downy Woodpecker
Eastern Bluebird
Eastern Phoebe


Abbreviation
MODO
NOCA
NOFL
NOMO
NOPA
NOWA
OCWA
OROR
OSPY
OVEN
PABU
PAWA
PIWA
PIWO
PROW
PRWA
PUMA
RBGU
RBWO
RCKI
REVI
RHWO
RODO
RSHA
RTHA
RTHU
RWBB
SACR
SNEG
SSHA
SUTA
SWWA
TRSW


Common Name
Mourning Dove
Northern Cardinal
Northern Flicker
Northern Mockingbird
Northern Parula
Northern Waterthrush
Orange Crowned Warbler
Orchard Oriole
Oprey
Ovenbird
Painted Bunting
Palm Warbler
Pine Warbler
Pileated Woodpecker
Prothonotary Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Purple Martin
Ring-billed Gull
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Red-eyed Vireo
Red-headed Woodpecker
Rock Dove
Red-Shouldered Hawk
Red-Tailed Hawk
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Red-winged Blackbird
Sandhill Crane
Snowy Egret
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Summer Tanager
Swainson's Warbler
Tree Swallow











Table 6: Continued


ETTI
EUST
FICR
GBHE
GCFL
GRCA
GREG
GRHE
HETH
HOFI
HOSP
HOWR
INBU
KILL
LBHE
LOSH
MIKI


Eastern Tufted Titmouse
European Starling
Fish Crow
Great Blue Heron
Great Crested Flycatcher
Gray Catbird
Great Egret
Green Heron
Hermit Thrush
House Finch
House Sparrow
House Wren
Indigo Bunting
Killdeer
Little Blue Heron
Loggerhead Shrike
Mississipi Kite


TUVU
UNID-duck
UNID-egret
UNID-gull
UNID-sparrow
UNID-warbler
UNID-waterbird
WEVI
WEWA
WHIB
WITU
WTSP
YBCH
YBSA
YRWA
YTVI
YTWA


Table 7: All bird species detected per area between October 2004 and August 2005 in the
University of Florida Conservation Areas.


Harmonic Woods
AMCR
AMGO
AMRE
AMRO
BAWW
BGGC
BHCO
BHVI
BLJA
BRTH
BTBW
BTGR
CACH
CARW
CEWA
CHSW
DCCO
DOWO
EAPH
ETTI
FICR
GCFL
GRCA
HETH
HOFI
HOWR


Fraternity Wetlands
AMCR
AMGO
AMRE
AMRO
BAWW
BGGC
BHCO
BHVI
BLJA
BRTH
BTBW*
CACH
CARW
CEWA
CHSP
CHSW
COHA
DOWO
EAPH
ETTI
FICR
GCFL
GRCA
HOFI
HOWR
MODO


Graham Woods
AMCR
AMGO
AMRE
AMRO
BAOR
BAWW
BGGC
BHVI
BLJA
CACH
CARW
CEWA
CHSW
COGR
COYE
DCCO
DOWO
EAPH
ETTI
EUST
FICR
GBHE
GCFL
GRCA
HOFI
HOWR


Health Center Park
AMCR
AMGO
AMRO
BAWW
BEKI
BGGC
BHCO
BHVI
BLJA
BRTH
BTGR
CACH
CARW
CEWA
CHSW
COGR
DOWO
EAPH
ETTI
FICR
GCFL
GRCA
HETH
HOFI
LOSH
MODO


Turkey Vulture
Unidentified duck
Unidentified egret
Unidentified gull
Unidentified sparrow
Unidentified warbler
Unidentified wader/waterbird
White-eyed Vireo
Worm-eating Warbler
White Ibis
Wild Turkey
White-Throated Sparrow
Yellow-breasted Chat
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Yellow-throated Vireo
Yellow-throated Warbler











Table 7: Continued
INBU NOCA HOSP NOCA
MODO NOFL MODO NOFL
NOCA NOMO NOCA NOMO
NOMO NOPA NOFL NOPA
NOPA OSPY NOMO PAWA
OSPY PAWA NOPA PIWA
OVEN PIWO OCWA PIWO
PAWA PROW* OROR RBWO
PIWA PRWA* OSPR RCKI
PIWO RBWO PIWO RODO
RBWO RCKI RBWO RSHA
RCKI REVI RCKI RWBB
REVI RODO REVI SACR
RSHA RSHA RODO SACR
RWBB RWBB RSHA TUVU
SUTA SUTA RWBB UNID-egret
TRSW TUVU SUTA UNID-gull
TUVU UNID-gull UNID-gull WEVI
UNID-gull YBCH WEVI WHIB
WEVI YRWA YBSA YBSA
YBSA YTWA YRWA YRWA
YRWA YTWA YTWA
YTWA


Table 7: Continued
Lake Alice South
AMCR
AMGO
AMRO
ANHI
BAEA
BAOR
BAWW
BEKI
BGGC
BHCO
BHVI
BLJA
BLVU
BRTH
BTGR
CACH
CARW
CEWA
CHSW
COGR
DCCO
DOWO
EABL


Biven's Rim Forest
AMCR
AMGO
AMRO
ANHI
BAEA
BAWW
BEKI
BGGC
BHCO
BLJA
BRTH
BTGR
CACH
CARW
CHSW
COGR
COHA
COYE
DCCO
DOWO
EABL
EAPH
ETTI


Bivens Forest East
AMCR
AMGO
AMRE
AMRO
ANHI
BAEA
BAOR
BAWW
BBWD
BDOW
BEKI
BGGC
BHCO
BHVI
BLJA
BPWA
BRTH
BTBW
BTGR
CACH
CARW
CEWA
CHSW


Lake Alice Main
AMCR
AMGO
AMRO
BAOR
BAWW
BDOW
BGGC
BHCO
BHVI
BLJA
BOBO
BRTH
BTGR
CACH
CARW
CEWA
CHSW
COGR
DOWO
EAPH
ETTI
EUST
GBHE










Table 7: Continued
EAPH FICR COGR FICR
ETTI GBHE COYE GCFL
EUST GCFL DCCO GRCA
FICR GRCA DOWO GREG
GCFL GREG EAPH HETH
GRCA HETH ETTI HOFI
GREG HOFI FICR HOWR
HETH HOWR GBHE KILL
HOFI IBIS GCFL MODO
HOSP KILL GRCA NOCA
HOWR LBHE GRHE NOFL
INBU LOSH HETH NOMO
KILL MODO HOFI NOPA
LOSH NOCA HOWR NOWA
MODO NOFL INBU OSPY
NOCA NOMO KILL PAWA
NOFL NOPA MIKI PIWA
NOMO OSPR MODO PIWO
NOPA PABU NOCA RBGU
OSPR PAWA NOFL RBWO
PAWA PIWA NOMO RCKI
PIWA PIWO NOPA REVI
PIWO PROW* OSPY RSHA
PUMA PRWA OVEN RWBB
RBGU RBWO PAWA SACR
RBWO RCKI PIWA SWWA
RCKI RODO PIWO SUTA
REVI RSHA PRWA TUVU
RHWO RTHA RBWO WEVI
RODO RWBB RCKI WHIB
RSHA SACR REVI WITU
RTHA SNEG RSHA YBSA
RWBB TUVU RTHA YRWA
SACR UNID-sparrow RTHU YTWA
SSHA WEVI RWBB
TRES WHIB SACR
TUVU YRWA SNEG
UNID-duck YTVI* SUTA
WHIB YTWA TRES
WTSP TUVU
YBSA WEVI
YRWA WHIB
YBSA
YRWA
YTVI*
YTWA











Table 7: Continued
McCarty Woods
AMCR
AMGO
AMRE
AMRO
BAWW
BHCO
BLJA
BRTH
BPWA
CACH
CARW
CEWA
COGR
DOWO
ETTI
FICR
GCFL
GRCA
HETH
HOFI
MODO
NOCA
NOMO
PROW
RBWO
RCKI
REVI
UNID-gull
WEWA
YBSA
YRWA


Surge Wetlands
AMCR
AMGO
AMRO
BAWW
BGGC
BHCO
BHVI
BLJA
BTGR
CACH
CARW
CEWA
CHSW
COGR
COYE
DOWO
EAPH
ETTI
FICR
GCFL
GRCA
HETH
HOSP
HOWR
LBHE
MODO
NOCA
NOMO
NOPA
OSPY
PAWA
PIWA
PIWO
PRWA
RBWO
RCKI
REVI
RHWO
RSHA
RTHU
RWBB
SUTA
TUVU
WEVI
YRWA
YTVI










Avian Species Richess by Area

a Q C C


"N


Speciesrichness.shp
- 10
- 1 30
W 31 48
M 49 61
M 62 69


Figure 3: All sampled conservation areas depicted in terms of detected avian species
richness (darker color indicates more species) in the University of Florida Conservation
Areas between October 2004 and August.


4


eC













Table 8: For each conservation area, the maximum abundances of each bird species
detected at each point (during one survey) within a 40m sample radius over all dates
sampled in the University of Florida Conservation Areas (Note: *=Migrant Point Count,
UNID=Unidentified Species, and High UNID values generally indicate unidentifiable flocks).

a. Harmonic Woods


Point ID 1 2 101* 102* 28
Edge/Interior Edge Interior Edge Interior Edge
# of
observations 32 29 4 4 15
# # # # #
Species individuals individuals individuals individuals individuals
AMCR 1 1
AMGO 3 30
AMRE 2 1
AMRO 15 29
BAWW 1 1 1 1 1
BGGC 1 2 2
BHCO 2 1 1
BHVI 1
BLJA 2 2 1 3
BRTH 2
BTGR 1
CACH 3 1 1
CARW 11 6 3 1 7
CEWA 1 2
CHSW 1 1 2 1
DCCO 10
DOWO 2 2 2 1 1
EAPH 1 1 1
ETTI 2 4 2 2
GCFL 2 2 1 1 2
GRCA 1 3 2 1
HOFI 1 3 1
HOWR 1 1 1
INBU 1
MODO 1 1
NOCA 3 6 2 3 5
NOMO 1 1 2
NOPA 1 3 1 1 2
OSPR 1 1
PAWA 1
PIWA 1 1 2
PIWO 1
RBWO 3 2 2 1 2


Table 8a: Continued
SRCKI 5


2











REVI
RWBB
SUTA
TRES
TUVU
UNID
WEVI
YBSA
YRWA
YTWA


b. Fraternity Wetlands


Point ID 3 4 103* 104*
Edge/Interior Edge Interior Edge Interior
# of
observations 32 32 4 4
# # # #
Species individuals individuals individuals individuals
AMCR 2 2 1
AMGO 18 7
AMRE 2
AMRO 22 23
BAWW 1
BGGC 3 1
BHCO 10 4 1
BLJA 3 4 1 2
BRTH 3 1
CACH 2 2 2
CARW 3 5 2 3
CEWA 6 22
CHSW 16 3 1 1
DOWO 1 1 1
EAPH 3
ETTI 3 1 2 1
FICR 1
GCFL 3 2 3 1
GRCA 1 1 1
HOFI 5 2 1
HOWR 1 1 1 1
MODO 3 3 1
NOCA 3 4 5 5
NOFL 1
NOMO 3 3 1
NOPA 2 2 1
OSPR 2 1











Table 8b: Continued
PAWA
PIWO 2
RBWO 2
RCKI 3
REVI 1
RODO 1
RWBB 20
SUTA
TRES 1
TUVU
UNID 4
YBCH 1
YRWA 5
YTWA 1


2


c. Graham Woods

Point ID 5 6 105* 106*
Edge/Interior Edge Interior Edge Interior
# of
observations 31 29 4 4
# # # #
Species individuals individuals individuals individuals
AMCR 6 16 3
AMGO 2 2 1
AMRE 3 1
AMRO 28 60
BAOR 2 1 6
BAWW 2 1
BGGC 1 1
BHCO 2 1
BLJA 2 2 1
CACH 1 2
CARW 6 6 1 6
CEWA 3 1 1
CHSW 2
COGR 3
COYE 1 1
DCCO 1 2
DOWO 3 1
EAPH 1
ETTI 1 4 1
FICR 1 1 1
GBHE 1
GCFL 3 3 2 2
GRCA 2 2 1 1
HOFI 2 1











Table 8c: Continued
HOSP 1
HOWR 1 1
MODO 1 2
NOCA 4 4 2 5
NOFL 1
NOMO 2 2 3
NOPA 1
OCWA 1
OROR 1
OSPR 1 2
PIWO 1
RBWO 2 2 1 1
RCKI 2 3 1 2
REVI 1
RODO 1
RSHA 2
RWBB 3 1
SUTA 1
UNID 14 7 5 1
WEVI 1
YBSA 1 1 1
YRWA 5 3


d. Health Center Park


Point ID 7 8 107* 108*
Edge/Interior Interior Edge Interior Edge
# of
observations 31 30 4 4
Species # individuals # individuals # individuals # individuals
AMCR 2 6 2
AMGO 4 1 1
AMRO 63 119
BAWW 1 1 1
BEKI 1
BGGC 2 2
BHCO 3 5 5
BLJA 4 4 2 2
BRTH 1 1 1
BTGR 1 2
CACH 1 2
CARW 4 4 3 2
CEWA 2 3
CHSW 1 2
COGR 1
DOWO 2 1 1











Table 8d: Continued
EAPH 1
ETTI 3 2 1
FICR 1
GCFL 3 4 3 2
GRCA 1 1
HETH 1
HOFI 1 2 1
LOSH 1
MODO 10 2
NOCA 5 4 2 3
NOFL 1
NOMO 2 4 3 2
NOPA 1 1
PAWA 3 3
PIWA 2
PIWO 1
RBWO 3 3 1 1
RCKI 3 2 1 1
RODO 2 3
RSHA 1
RWBB 2 30
SACR 1
TUVU 1
UNID 4 11 1
WEVI 1
WHIB 1
YBSA 1
YRWA 4 6
YTWA 2


e. McCarty Woods


Point ID 9 109*
Edge/Interior N/A N/A
# of
observations 31 4
Species # individuals # individuals
AMCR 12 1
AMGO 2
AMRE 1
AMRO 109
BAWW 1
BHCO 1
BLJA 2
BRTH 2 2
CACH 1











Table 8e: Continued
CARW 3 3
CEWA 9
COGR 1
DOWO 1
ETTI 3 3
FICR 2
GCFL 2 3
GRCA 1
HETH 1
HOFI 3 1
MODO 3 1
NOCA 4 3
NOMO 4 2
PROW 1
RBWO 1
RCKI 1 1
REVI 1 1
UNID 5
YBSA 1
YRWA 5


f. Lake Alice South


Point ID 10 11 12 111*
Edge/Interior Edge Interior Edge Interior
# of
observations 30 30 29 3
Species # of individuals # of individuals # of individuals # of individuals
AMCR 1 1 2 1
AMGO 11 5 1
AMRO 7 25 13
ANHI 2
BAEA 1 1
BAOR 1 1
BAWW 1 1
BEKI 3
BGGC 2 2
BHCO 20 2
BHVI 1 1
BLJA 2 2 3 1
BLVU 5
BRTH 1 1
BTGR 2 1 1
CACH 1 2
CARW 2 4 2 2
CHSW 6 1 2











Table 8f: Continued
COGR 2
DCCO 1 5
DOWO 1 2 1
EABL 2 3
EAPH 1 1
ETTI 2 1 1 1
EUST 3
FICR 1
GCFL 3 2 2 4
GRCA 6 2 3
GREG 1
HETH 1
HOFI 4 8 2 1
HOWR 1 1
INBU 1
KILL 4
LOSH 3
MODO 18 5 10 1
NOCA 3 5 1 2
NOFL 1 1
NOMO 2 2 4
NOPA 2 1
OSPR 2 1 2
PAWA 2 13
PIWA 1 1
PIWO 1 1 1
PUMA 1 1
RBGU 5 2
RBWO 1 2 1 1
RCKI 2 2 1
RHWO 1 2
RODO 3 4
RSHA 2
RTHA 1
RWBB 30 6 30
SACR 60
SSHA 1
TRES 3
TUVU 1 2 1
UNID 10 21 29 1
WHIB 1 1
YBSA 1 1
YRWA 5 3 2











g. Biven's Rim Forest


Point ID 14 15 114* 115*
Edge/Interior N/A N/A N/A N/A
# of
observations 30 29 3 3
Species # of individuals # of individuals # of individuals # of individuals
AMCR 5 1
AMGO 4 5
AMRO 7 11
ANHI 1 2
BAEA 1 1
BAWW 1
BEKI 1 2
BGGC 1 1
BHCO 1 1 1 2
BLJA 2 2
BRTH 1 1
BTGR 1 2 1
CACH 3 2
CARW 1 2 2
CHSW 2 1
COGR 1 1
COYE 2 2
DCCO 2 7
DOWO 3 2
EABL 1
EAPH 1
ETTI 1 1 1
FICR 2
GBHE 1 2
GCFL 1
GRCA 1 2 1
GREG 2 2
HOFI 2
HOWR 2 1
KILL 1
LBHE 2
MODO 5 2 1
NOCA 4 3 3 1
NOFL 1
NOMO 2 1 1
NOPA 1 1 1
OSPR 2 3 1
PABU 1
PAWA 1 3
PIWO 1
RBWO 3 1 1 1
RCKI 3 3 1 2
REVI 1 1











Table 8g: Continued
RODO 5 2
RSHA 2 1 1
RWBB 3 11 2
SACR 4
SNEG 1
TUVU 3 1
UNID 15 7 1 2
WEVI 1 2 1 1
WHIB 1
YRWA 15 3
YTWA 1


h. Biven's Forest East


Point ID 16 17 18 19 31
Edge/Interior Edge Edge Interior Interior Interior
# of
observations 29 29 28 27 11
Species # of individuals # of individuals # of individuals # of individuals # of individuals
AMCR 1 2 3 1
AMGO 1 3 8 1
AMRE 2 1 2
AMRO 2 5 10 1
ANHI 2 1 1
BAEA 3 2 1
BAOR 1
BAOW 2
BAWW 1 1 1
BEKI 2
BGGC 1 1 1 2
BHCO 1 3
BHVI 1 1
BLJA 3 4 4 1 2
BPWA 1
BRTH 2 1
BTBW 2
BTGR 2
CACH 1 1 2
CARW 3 4 3 4 4
CEWA 20 3 2
CHSW 1
COGR 1
COYE 1
DCCO 2 1 3
DOWO 1 1 1 1
EAPH 1 2 2











Table 8h: Continued
ETTI 2 2 2 2 1
FICR 2 1
GBHE 1 1
GCFL 2 2 2 2 1
GRCA 1 2 1 1 1
HETH 1 1
HOFI 1 1 1
HOWR 2
MODO 2 3 2
NOCA 6 4 3 3 3
NOFL 1 1
NOMO 2 2 2 1
NOPA 1 1 2 1 2
OSPR 1 1 1 1
OVEN 1
PAWA 6 1 1
PIWA 1
PIWO 1 1 2 1
PRWA 1
RBWO 2 3 3 1 1
RCKI 3 4 1 2
REVI 1 1 1 1
RSHA 3 1 1
RTHA 1
RWBB 20 11 15
TRES 1
TUVU 1 1 1
UNID 3 4 23 4 2
WEVI 1 1 1
WHIB 3
YBSA 1 2 1
YRWA 4 20 10 15 2
YTWA 2 1


h. Biven's Forest East continued:


Point ID 116* 117* 118* 119* 200*
Edge/Interior Edge Edge Interior Interior Edge
# of
observations 3 3 3 3 3
Species # of individuals # of individuals # of individuals # of individuals # of individuals
AMCR
AMGO
AMRE
AMRO
ANHI













Table 8h: Continued
BAEA
BAOR
BAOW
BAWW 1
BEKI 1
BGGC
BHCO 1
BHVI
BLJA 1 1 1 2
BPWA
BRTH
BTBW
BTGR
CACH 1 1
CARW 2 2 1 2 2
CEWA 1 5
CHSW
COGR
COYE
DCCO
DOWO 1 1 1
EAPH
ETTI 1
FICR
GBHE
GCFL 1 2 4 1
GRCA 1 1 3 1
HETH
HOFI
HOWR
MODO
NOCA 2 3 3 2
NOFL
NOMO
NOPA 2 1 1
OSPR
OVEN
PAWA
PIWA
PIWO 1
PRWA
RBWO 2 2 1
RCKI 1
REVI 1
RSHA
RTHA
RWBB











TRES
TUVU
UNID
WEVI
WHIB
YBSA
YRWA
YTWA


i. Lake Alice Conservation Area


Point ID 20 21 22
Edge/Interior Edge Interior Interior
# of
observations 19 15 15
Species # of individuals # of individuals # of individuals
AMCR 1 9 1
AMGO 1 5 2
AMRO 4 1 1
BAOL 1
BAOR
BAWW 1 1
BGGC 1 1 1
BHCO 1 1
BHVI 1
BLJA 1 2
BRTH 1
BTGR
CACH 1 2 2
CARW 6 7 3
CEWA 1
CHSW 1 4
COGR 2 2
DOWO 1 2
EAPH 2 1
ETTI 2 4 4
FICR 2
GBHE
GCFL 2 2 2
GRCA 2 1 1
GREG 1
HETH 1
HOFI 1
HOWR 1 1
MODO 2
NOCA 3 4 3
NOMO 2
NOPA 1 2 2
OSPR 1 1











PAWA I


Table 8i: Continued
PIWA 3
PIWO 1
RBWO 2 1 1
RCKI 2 2 3
REVI 2
RSHA
RWBB
SWWA 1
TUVU 1
UNID 2 1 131
WEVI 1 1 2
WHIB 2
WITU 1
YBSA 1 1 1
YRWA 4 3 6
YTWA 1 1




i. Lake Alice Conservation Area continued:

Point ID 23 33 34
Edge/Interior Edge Interior Edge
# of
observations 18 10 10
Species # of individuals # of individuals # of individuals
AMCR 1
AMGO 1
AMRO 30
BAOL 1
BAOR 1
BAWW 2 1
BGGC 2
BHCO
BHVI 1
BLJA 3 2 4
BRTH 1
BTGR 1
CACH 1 1
CARW 3 6 4
CEWA
CHSW 2 1
COGR 1
DOWO 1
EAPH 1
ETTI 2 1


2 I










FICR 2 2
GBHE 1

Table 8i: Continued
GCFL 4 1 2
GRCA 2 1 2
GREG
HETH
HOFI 3
HOWR 1
MODO 2
NOCA 4 4 3
NOMO 1
NOPA 1 1
OSPR 1 1
PAWA 2
PIWA
PIWO 1 1
RBWO 1 2 1
RCKI 2 1 2
REVI 1 1
RSHA 1
RWBB 3
SWWA
TUVU 1
UNID 11 1
WEVI 1 2
WHIB
WITU
YBSA 1 1
YRWA 9 10
YTWA

j. Surge Wetlands

Point ID 24 25 35
Edge/Interior N/A N/A N/A
# of
observations 18 16 9

Species # of individuals # of individuals # of individuals


AMCR
AMGO
AMRO
BAWW
BGGC
BHCO
BHVI
BLJA











BTGR 2 1 1
CACH 2 1



Table 8j: Continued
CARW 2 2 3
CEWA 2
CHSW 1
COGR 1 1
COYE 1
DOWO 2 2 1
ETTI 2 1 1
GCFL 1 3 1
GRCA 1 1 1
HOFI 1
HOSP 1
LBHE 1
MODO 1 1
NOCA 2 3 4
NOMO 1 2
NOPA 1 2
PAWA 1 1
PIWA 1 1 1
PIWO 1 1
RBWO 2 2 2
RCKI 1 2 1
REVI 1 1
RHWO 2
RSHA 1
RTHU 1
RWBB 1 1
SUTA 1 1
TUVU 1 1
UNID 5 1 7
WEVI 1
YRWA 6 5














Herp Array Locations





L ..


..


brpgps.shp
1Hrpsitesl.shp
m Bven's Rir(sout
S Bvens Forest Ea
SBvens RimFores
- FraternityWetla
SGrahamnwoods
IHamnmic Woods
SHealth Center Pa
- LakeAlice IVin
r Lake Alice Solth
| Surgewetlands


Figure 4: Locations of herpetofaunal arrays within the University of Florida Conservation
Areas.












Table 9: GPS locations of Herpetofaunal arrays within the University of Florida
Conservation Areas.


Edge/Interior/N/A
E
I
N/A
I
E
I
I
E
E
N/A
E
I
N/A
N/A
E
I
I
E


ID #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
19
9
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18


Latitude(29 deg N)
38' 48.2"
38' 44.7"
38' 47.2"
38' 49.8"
38' 48.0"
38' 35.6"
38' 36.5"
38' 34.5"
38' 35.6"
37'59.0"
38' 31.7"
38' 34.1"
38' 11.5"
37'39.9"
37'44.0"
37'50.1"
37'47.5"
37'55.1"


Longitude(82 deg W)
21' 31.6"
21' 32.4"
21'21.8"
21' 8.6"
21' 5.8"
21' 26.7"
21' 18.1"
21' 14.4"
21' 29.8"
21' 58.8"
20' 44.2"
20' 42.7"
21' 17.2"
21' 12.2"
20' 47.5"
20' 36.8"
20' 37.9"
20' 38.2"


Table 10: All herp species detected between October 2004 and August 2005 in the
University of Florida Conservation Areas; grouped by taxa.


Amphibians
Scientific name
Bufo terrestris
** Eleutherodactylus planirostris sp.
Gastrophryne carolinenis
Hyla cinera
Hyla gratiosa
Hyla squirella
Rana catesbiana
Rana clamitans
Rana grylio
Rana sphenocephalus
Scaphiopus holbrookii


Common name
Southern toad
Greenhouse frog
Eastern narrowmouth toad
Green treefrog
Barking treefrog
Squirrel treefrog
Bull frog
Bronze frog
Pig frog
Southern leopard frog
Eastern spadefoot toad


Eurycea quadrdigitata


Area
HW
HW
FW
GW
GW
LAM
LAM
LAM
LAM
SW
HCP
HCP
LAS
BRF
BFE
BFE
BFE
BFE


Frogs


Salamanders


Dwarf salamander

















Lizards






Snakes











Turtles


Table 10: Continued
Reptiles
Scientific name
Crocodillians Alligator mississipiensis


*=exotic
**=sited but not positively ID'd by sight


Table 11: Species of herps detected per conservation area between October 2004 and
August 2005 in the University of Florida Conservation Areas.


Harmonic Woods

Anolis sagrei
Bufo terrestris
Diadolphus punctatus
Eleutherodactylus planirostris sp.
Hyla cinera
Hyla squirella
Rana clamitans
Rhadinaea flavilata
Scincella lateralis
Thamnophis sirtalis


Fraternity Wetlands

Anolis sagrei
Eleutherodactylus planirostris sp.
Hyla squirrela
Rana clamitans
Scincella lateralis
Terrepene carolina bauri
Thamnophis sirtalis


Graham Woods

Anolis sagrei
Rana clamitans


Common name
American alligator

Green anole
Cuban brown anole
Five-lined skink
Broad-headed skink
Common ground skink

Eastern cottonmouth
Black racer
Southern ringneck snake
Mud Snake
Banded watersnake
Florida watersnake
Pinewoods Snake
Eastern ribbon snake
Eastern garter snake

Florida softshell turtle
Common snapping turtle
Chicken turtle
Striped mud turtle
Eastern mud turtle
Penisular cooter
Florida box turtle
Yellow-bellied slider


Anolis carolinensis
**Anolis sagrei
Eumeces fasciatus
Eumeces laticeps
Scincella lateralis

*Agkistrodon piscivorous
Coluber constrictor
Diadolphus punctatus
Farancia abacura
Nerodiafasciatafasciata
Nerodiafasciata pictiventris
Rhadinaeaflavilata
Thamnophis sauritus sp
Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis

Apaloneferox
Chelydra serpentina
Dierochlemys reticularia
Kinosternon baurii
*Kinosternon subrubrum
Pseudemysfloridana penisularis
Terrepene carolinana bauri
Trachemys scripta scripta











Table 11: Continued


Health Center Park

Alligator mississipiensis
Anolis sagrei
Eleutherodactylus planirostris sp.
Hyla cinera
Scincella lateralis









Lake Alice Main

Alligator mississipiensis
Anolis sagrei
Apalone ferox
Coluber constrictor
Eleutherodactylus planirostris sp.
Eumeces fasciatus
Eumeces fasciatus or inexpectatus
Eumeces laticeps
Eurycea quadrdigitata
Farancia abacura
Gastrophryne carolinenis
Hyla cinera
Hyla gratiosa
Hyla squirella
Nerodia fasciata fasciata
Nerodia fasciata pictiventris
Pseudemys floridana penisularis
Rana clamitans
Rana sphenocephalus
Scincella lateralis

Thamnophis sauritus sp.
Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis
Trachemys scripta scripta


McCarty Woods

Anolis sagrei
Eumece fasciata or inexpectatus
Hyla squirella
Diadolphus puctatus










Bivens' Forest East

Alligator mississipiensis
Anolis carolinensis
Anolis sagrei
Apalone ferox
Bufo terrestris
Chelydra serpentina
Coluber constrictor
Eleutherodactylus planirostris sp.
Eumeces fasciatus
Eumeces laticeps
Gastrophryne carolinenis
Hyla squirella
Kinosternon baurii
Rana catesbiana
Rana clamitans
Rana sphenocephalus
Scaphiopus holbrookii
Scincella laticeps
Terrepene carolinana bauri
Thamnophis sirtalis
UNID Kinosternid or Sternotherid
turtle


Lake Alice South

Anolis carolensis
Anolis sagrei
Chelydra serpentina
Gastrophryne carolinensis
Hyla squirella
Nerodia fasciata pictiventris
Rana clamitans
Rana grylio
Terrepene carolina bauri




Biven's Rim Forest

Anolis sagrei
Anolis carolinensis
Bufo terrestris
Coluber constrictor
Eleutherodactylus planirostris sp.
Eumeces fasciatus
Eumeces laticeps
Gastrophryne carolinenis
Hyla cinera
Hyla squirella
Rana catesbiana
Rana clamitans
Rana grylio
Rana sphenocephala










Table 11: Continued


Surge Wetlands

Anolis sagrei
Bufo terrestris
Gastrophryne carolinenis
Hyla cinera
Hyla squirella
Rana clamitans
Rana grylio
Rana sphenocephala
Scaphiopus holbrookii
Thamnophis sirtalis

















Species Richness of Herps by Area


N


I
Speciesrichness.shp
S10-2
13-5
-6 6-10
11 14
15 23


Figure 5: All sampled conservation areas depicted in terms of detected herpetofaunal
species richness (darker color indicates more species) in the University of Florida
Conservation Areas between October 2004 and August 2005.


clQ


I?


e14


















Table 12: Total number of individuals per species of herps captured per herpetofaunal
trapping array over all trapping dates between 5/2005 and 8/2005 in the University of
Florida Conservation Areas.

a. Harmonic Woods


b. Fraternity Wetlands


c. Graham Woods


Herp Array ID 1 2
Edge/Interior Edge Interior
# of Observations 24 24
Species # individuals # individuals
Anolis sagrei 3 2
Bufo terrestris 1
Eleutherodactylus planirostris sp. 4 3
Hyla cinera 2
Rana clamitans 9 7
Rana sphenocephalus 1
Rhadinaeaflavilata 1
Scincella lateralis 18 5
Thamnophis sirtalis 1


Herp Array ID 3
Edge/Interior N/A
# of Observations 24
Species # individuals
Anolis sagrei 1
Eleutherodactylus planirostris sp. 19
Rana clamitans 1
Scincella lateralis 4
Thamnophis sirtalis 1


Herp Array ID # 5 4
Edge/Interior Edge Interior
# of Observations 24 24











Table 10c: Continued
# #
Species individuals individuals
Anolis sagrei 1
Rana clamitans 6 1




d. Health Center Park



Herp Array ID # 11 12
Edge/Interior Edge Interior
# of Observations 23 23
# #
Species individuals individuals
Anolis sagrei 2 8
Eleutherodactylus planirostris sp. 2 2
Hyla cinera 4
Scincella lateralis 2 6


e. Lake Alice South


Herp Array ID # 13
Edge/Interior N/A
# of Observations 23

Species individuals
Anolis sagrei 3
Hyla squirella 8
Rana clamitans 7




f. Biven's Rim Forest

Herp Array ID # 14
Edge/Interior N/A
# of Observations 23

Species individuals
Anolis sagrei 1
Bufo terrestris 7
Eleutherodactylus planirostris sp. 5
Eumecesfasciatus 1
Gastrophryne carolinenis 2
Hyla cinera 1
Hyla squirella 6
Rana clamitans 4











Table 12f: Continued
Rana sphenocephalus 2
Scincella lateralis 3


g. Biven's Forest East


h. Lake Alice Conservation Area


Herp Array ID # 15 18 16 17
Edge/Interior Edge Edge Interior Interior
# of Observations 22 22 21 21
Species # individuals # individuals # individuals # individuals
Anolis carolinensis 1 1
Anolis sagrei 8
Bufo terrestris 1 14 8
Coluber constrictor 2
Eleutherodactylus planirostris sp. 3 5
Eumeces fasciatus 3
Eumeces laticeps 1
Gastrophryne carolinenis 2 5
Hyla squirella 116 25 8 21
Rana catesbiana 1
Rana clamitans 41 10 3 12
Rana sphenocephalus 1 1
Scaphiopus holbrookii 2 2
Scincella lateralis 3
Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis 1


Herp Array ID # 8 19 6 7
Edge/Interior Edge Edge Interior Interior
# of Observations 23 23 23 23
Species # individuals # individuals # individuals # individuals
Anolis sagrei 6 2 1
Coluber constrictor 1 1 1 1
Eleutherodactylus planirostris sp. 1
Eumeces fasciatus 3
Eurycea quadridigitata 2
Farancia abacura 1
Gastrophryne carolinenis 3 4 4 7
Hyla cinera 1 1 2
Hyla gratiosa 1
Hyla squirella 2 1 1
Rana clamitans 3 33 10 6











Table 12h: Continued
Rana sphenocephalus 17 14 9 3
Scincella lateralis 9 1 1 2


i. Surge Wetlands


k. McCarty Woods


McCarty Woods
Visual Survey
1
Species
Anolis sagrei
Diadolphus punctatus
Eumeces sp.


Herp Array ID # 9
Edge/Interior N/A
# of Observations 23
Species # individuals
Anolis sagrei 3
Bufo terrestris 123
Diadolphus punctatus 3
Eleutherodactylus planirostris sp. 5
Eumeces fasciatus 3
Gastrophryne carolinenis 5
Hyla cinera 1
Hyla squirella 12
Rana clamitans 6
Rana sphenocephalus 3
Scaphiopus holbrookii 3
Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis 1












Small mIVman l Traping Gridlines

( r^\
A '^ -^J


+ it


/ Sartranseds.shlp
z slids~ttpoints.slp
Conservationaeasshp
I BRS_soath
m given's RImFore
Bivens Forest Ea
m FraemityW~va
SGrdia m woods
aI-TDmnicvWods
Health Center Pa
[ LakeAliceSouth
l Lake Alice north
I -Cartyvwods
I srgevdelands


Figure 6: Locations of small mammal trapping grids within the University of Florida
Conservation Areas.


j













Table 13: GPS coordinates of edge-starting points of small mammal trapping grids.



Area LINE Long(82 deg W) Lat(29 deg N) No. trap stations Transect Bearing
Harmonic Woods A 21' 34.78" 38' 46.33" 12 124 deg
B 21' 34.73" 38' 46.98"
C 21' 34.82" 38' 45.68"

Fraternity Wetlands A 21" 21.07" 38' 48.54" 12 295 deg
B 21' 21.04" 38' 49.19"
C 21' 21.05" 38' 47.90"

Graham Woods A 21' 9.76" 38' 52.97" 12 163 deg
B 21' 10.52" 38' 52.97"
C 21' 9.02 38" 52.96"

Health Center Park A 20'41.98" 38'35.95" 15 207 deg
B 20' 42.57" 38' 36.36"
C 20'41.57" 38'35.63"

Lake Alice South A 21' 18.11" 38' 10.42" 15 335 deg
B 21' 17.37" 38' 10.39"
C 21' 21.63" 38' 10.38"

Biven's Rim Forest A 7 N/A

Bivens Forest East A 20' 53.44" 37' 43.65" 36 74 deg
B 20'53.22" 37" 43.02"
C 20' 53.02" 37" 42.36"

Lake Alice Main A 21' 16.04" 38' 36.47" 36 261 deg
B 21' 16.23"
C

Surge Wetlands A 22' 0.21" 37' 59.51" 15 90 deg
B 22' 0.23" 37' 58.26"
C 22' 0.24" 37" 58.21"
D 22' 0.28" 37' 57.55"











IMso-4amna Sam ling Pdnts


I. 1


I
w IVsormnfr pointsshp
Conservationareasshp
SBRS south
Bivers Rim Fore
Bivens Forest Ea
Fraternity Wetla
Gra[ a woods
Harrnnic woods
I| Health OenterPa
Lalealice South
Lale Aice north
a MbCartywoods
I SurgeV\etlands


rn-
*

>, I
^^?^


4


Figure 7: Meso-mammal sampling locations within the University of Florida Conservation
areas.













Table 14: GPS coordinates of meso-mammal sampling locations within the University of
Florida Conservation Areas.


ID LONG: 82 deg
1 21'33.0"
2 21'27.1"
3 21'22.5"
4 21'21.1"
5 21'8.5"
6 21' 10.8"
7 20' 47.4"
8 20'43.1"
9 20' 38.2"
10 21' 17.9"
11 21'26.2"
12 21'30.8"


LAT: 29 deg
38' 45.6"
38' 43.1"
38' 49.9"
38' 46.2"
38' 49.4"
38' 53.5"
38' 34.0"
38' 34.4"
38' 44.2"
38' 35.9"
38' 35.7"
38' 36.6"


ID LONG: 82 deg
13 21' 10.2"
14 21' 18.0"
15 21' 12.3"
16 21' 16.3"
17 21' 17.8"
18 21' 12.7"
19 20' 38.9"
20 20' 37.5"
21 20'40.1"
22 20' 40.9"
23 21'56.9"
24 21'57.0"


Table 15: Total mammal species detected between October 2004
University of Florida Conservation Areas.


and August 2005 in the


Scientific Name
Peromyscus gossypinus
Peromyscus polionotus
Rattus norvegicus
Rattus rattus
Sigmadon hispidus
Sciurus carolinensis


Dasypus novemcinctus
Didelphis virginiaus
Felis domesticus
Procyon lotor
Urocyon cinereoargenteus


Common Name
Cotton mouse
Oldfield Mouse
Norway Rat
Black Rat
Hispid Cotton Rat
Gray Squirrel


Armadillo
Virginia Oppossum
Feral Cat
Common Racoon
Grey Fox


LAT: 29 deg
38' 32.8"
38' 12.8"
38' 10.5"
38' 15.9"
37' 38.6"
37' 46.4"
37' 50.1"
37" 42.6"
37' 46.0"
37' 58.4"
37' 56.9"
37' 51.6"


Small mammals


Meso-mammals











Table 16: Total mammal species detected per area between October 2004 and August 2005
in the University of Florida Conservation Areas.

Harmonic Woods Fraternity Wetlands Graham Woods


*Peromyscus polionotus
Peromyscus gossypinus
Rattus norvegicus
Rattus rattus
Sciurus carolinensis

Dasypus novemcinctus
Procyon lotor




Health Center Park
Peromyscus gossypinus
Rattus norvegicus
Rattus rattus
Sciurus carolinensis

Didelphis virginiaus
Procyon lotor



Bivens Forest East
*Peromyscus polionotus
Rattus rattus
Sciurus carolinensis



Dasypus novemcinctus
Felis domesticus
Procyon lotor
Urocyon cinereoargenteus




Surge Wetlands
Sciurus carolinensis

Felis domesticus
Procvon lotor


Sciurus carolinensis
Rattus rattus


Dasypus novemcinctus
Procyon lotor




McCarty Woods
Sciurus carolinensis





Procyon lotor


Biven's Rim Forest
Peromyscus gossypinus
Sciurus carolinensis


Procyon lotor
Dasypus novemcinctus


Rattus norvegicus
Rattus rattus
Sciurus carolinensis


Felis domesticus
Procyon lotor




Lake Alice South
Rattus rattus
Sciurus carolinensis




Dasypus novemcinctus
Felis domesticus
Procyon lotor

Lake Alice Main
*Rattus rattus
Peromyscus gossypinus
Sciurus carolinensis
Sigmadon hispidus

Dasypus novemcinctus
Felis domesticus
Procyon lotor
Didelphis virginiaus




Legend
Red= Small Mammal
Blue=Meso-Mammal
* =Detected through dead
specimen found













Table 17. Small mammal captures per area in the University of Florida Conservation
Areas over all trapping methods and dates.



Grid Method- 1 attempt per area (7/12/2005- 7/16/2005; 8/10/2005-8/14/2005)

# of Individuals
Area Species Caught
HW Rattus norvegicus 1
Rattus rattus 2

GW Rattus norvegicus 1

HCP Peromyscus gossypinus 2
Rattus norvegicus 1
Rattus rattus 1

LAM Peromyscus gossypinus 9

BRF Peromyscus gossypinus 3


Transect Method- 3 attempts per area (11/30/2004
12/03/2004; 1/25/2005-1/29/2005; 3/22/2005-3/26/2005)
# of Individuals
Area Species Caught
HW Peromyscus gossypinus 1
Rattus rattus 3

FW Rattus rattus 3

GW Rattus rattus 2

HCP Peromyscus gossypinus 1
Rattus rattus 2

LAS Rattus rattus 1




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