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Group Title: Correspondence, Business and Legal Papers
Title: Correspondence, Business and Legal Papers: June, 1906
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102912/00030
Finding Guide: A Guide to the Napoleon Bonaparte Broward Papers
 Material Information
Title: Correspondence, Business and Legal Papers: June, 1906
Series Title: Correspondence, Business and Legal Papers
Physical Description: Archival
Publication Date: 6/1/1906
Physical Location:
Box: 4
Folder: Correspondence, Business and Legal Papers
 Subjects
Subject: Broward, Napoleon Bonaparte, 1857-1910.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102912
Volume ID: VID00030
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Full Text

PoONE CENT




Current Literature Publishing Co.

34~ West 26th Street

.. New York City, N. Y.





CURRENT LITERATURE PUBLISHING CCO.
94 Wesr 26th Street, New Yorkr City
Dear Sirs:
I accept pour offer to send He, for examnination, transportation charges prepaid,
your new Edition de L~uxe of six volumes of Theodore Roose~velt's The Winning of
Sthe West," bourid in khakti and buckskin. If I retain them, I will send you within one week
the sum of $3*4o in full payment for one year's siubscription for CURRENT LI T E:RATU RE
and the transportation charges on the books; after the payment of which the set of The
SWinning of the Wlest becomes my absolute property with no further payment. If I do
not dealre to keep the booked, I agree to return them within three days at your expense.


Signature in fulL------ ------............______ ....... .. .. ..........


Post O~ce Address-l -------................ .................


B e sure tostatePnsearest rss Offic.................................. .























--~-- C --ii~--~~~--~--


Cur rent :

Literature

W Mhat -It Is


Ais told by
The Publishers,
The Editor,
Thie Prees and
Well known People'






"The most widely ectedtic magartue now published."
--Newo Orleana Plcayune.


"You are certainly to be congratulated upon having
secured the services of Mr. Wheeler-than whom it
would be dif~cult to End a better men for the condudt of
a magazinea such as Current Lieratsure."-- E. C. bsedmanl.


Current

Literature





Edited by

Edward J. Wheeler
assisted by
.Mr. Alexainder Harvey and Mr. Leonard D. Abbott








Published monthly by
The.Current Literature Publishing Co.
34 West 16th St., New Yark City, N. Y.





It takes hold from the first page and doesn't let go till
te last."--Joseph B. Gider, Literary Agenrt, Nezo York.



Announcement--A New Editor

CURRENT LITERATURE has been
Fortunate in securing the services of Mr.
E~dward J. Wheeler as its. Editor-in-Chief.
He has come to us from the Literary
Digest, of which he has been the ]Editor
.for the past ten years. It was under his
editorship that that publication advanced
aceadily to a position of national importance.
Two of: his mont able assistants, Mr. Alex-
ander Harvey and Mr. Leonard D. Abbott,
come with him from the Literary Digent to
the editorial Staff of Current Literature, to
which latter periodical they are now devot-
ing their entire time.
SWe have in Mr. Wheeler a man of ripe
experience, a broad-minded, trained ob-
server, able to sele(St, concentrate and present
to our view al that is mont interesting in the
life and thought of the day. He is giving
to Current Literature a strength and a vigor.
that place it at once in a class by itself, with
an individuality among magazines that makes
it recognized by all who see it as an indis-

No magazine published on either side of the Atlanti-
gives a larger quantity, better quality, and more laterest-
ing reading matter."--&& Louis Globe Democrat.





One of the most interesting ana valuable of ededtic
magazines."-Harper's' Weekly.

CURRENT LIT-rERATURE

r* pensable feature in every home and library
throughout the country.
The statement from Mi. Wheeler which
follows, telling you of his plans and purposes
for Current Literature, will convince you of
his power to make this magazine the mont
in~trudtive and entertaining magazine ever
published, not merely one of many desirable
periodic als, but the mont essential of all maga-
zines to every man and woman who wishes
a clear and guick comprehension of what is
taking place in the world, both in the realm
of action and of thought,--in politics, ~in-
dusty, religion, science. literature, draa and
the fine arts.
Read the description of the departments,
and what has already been written about
Current Literature, and you will understand
why it is the one magazine, vital on every
page, which you must have; the moAt in-
tensely interesting magazine published today
--one that you will eagerly watch for each
month, and, having read, will talk about to
your friends.
THE PUBLISHERS.

*- The Home Addvocate, Philadelphia.





!'How you have lifted it."--Loutee Morngan Bill (f
4 Trper's Maogazine.

CURRENT LITERATURE



A Letter from the Editor

IN assuming editorial control of Current
SLiterature, founded seventeen years ago
by Frederick M. Somers, I and my: associates
purpose to make a magazine with as noble
a mission as any periodical ever had.
Nothing will sooner bring harmony into
an the jarring discords of life than a clear
and just and general unider~tanding of what
one another's thoughts and feelings and pur-
poses at.tually are. To bring about such an
undersanding, which is the mission of Current
Literature, is- more possible today than it
ever has been before. Not the scholars and
the bookmen alone are finding expression
for their thoughts on the printed page, buit
al classes of nearly all countries now find in
the press a medium for such expression.
There is a current literature, of science,
a current literature of religion, of politics, of
belle lettres, of art; of every business and
profession and trade; of every school of
"Resembles the Review of Reviews as it was before It
drifted from its original purpose and fell into line with the
conventional msagrine "- The I~~i~rdrywere.,.Y New Yorkr






''I find life, human Iurerest, force and method in It."--
Vitor.5.~ Yanc,v U.4fe ldago R cord-Hetla d.

CURR E NT LITE:RAsTURE

()thought, progressive or conservative, radical
or reactionary,. that has become a iador of
consequence. The title Current Literature
embraces all these, and the magazine wvill
live up to its title. it is NOT simply a
magazine of literary criticism and book re-
Sviews, as its title might seem to some to indi-
i Icate. It is an epitome of all kinds of current
literature.
It has the greatest force of editors and
contributors and reporters ev'er seen, for its
foc com,,,prises all editors, all authors, all
, contributors and all reporters.
In such a magazine as this the principle of
selection is everything. Our principle of
selection is bes't expressed in one word of
five letters the word v i tal .
The vital things said and done, those that
really count, those that have power for good
or ill in direaing the alreams of tendency,
,are what Current Literature deals with.
This does not mean the heavy and abalruse.
They are seldom vital. It means the things
that have life in them, the thoughts that have

"Clear, concise, and masterly is the way in which the
review of the world as handled. Current Literaure la
dealing with the vital issues."~-- TYa~nkngton 1984.





"A ronounced change and a chage for the better."--
Phc 8PatIt Larke Tribulne.

CUR RENT LITERATURE

feeling and purpose behind them, the events
that affect human dentinies, the hopes and
aspirations that are proving contagious.
Not to tell what its editor thinks, or what
he thinks others should think, but to tell
what they think and to tell it for the most
part in their owvn words--to place the reader
in direct contadt with the spokesmen of all
nations, Jl classes and al schools,--that is
tihe plan of Current Literature.
Its editors translate, seledt, introduce; brit
the? reader gets the writer's own thoughts in
his own words, without any color imparted
.by another.
This magazine is not and wil not be an
organ of personal views or partisan interests.
It is an organ of general information. It is
absolutely independent of any trammels that
might interfere with the most impartial pre-
r-sentation of the truth as seen and enunciated
from many points of: view and in all civilized
countries.
It does not appeal to prejudice or passion,
except as the love -of truth becomes a passion.
"h My lIiking for Current Literature is bes~t expr~sased by
th atthat I havi again subscribed for itafe alps
of several l years."- Lloyd M~iffin.






S"It Is the ne plus ultra of coanaeneation and seemed to
sever everryhlug."-- Prrof. GOl. If Schddi. C~olunduu. ,O

CURRENT LITERATURE

rI It does not, consequently, call to its aid the
self-interest of the narrow partisan or the
enthusiasm of the man dominated by one
idea. It depends for its support upon those
who believe in breadth of culture and those
who Imow that real power comes from
knowledge not only of one's own convictions
and one's own side of a case, but of the con-
viations of others and their reasons therefore.
No minute spent in reading such a magazine
will ever be felt, even by the busies man or
woman, as a minute wasted.
It will broaden the mind and enlarge the
sympathies. It comes to the specialist with
just that vital information of specialties other
than his own that he mofl needs. It will in-
crease the sense of universal brotherhood by
increasing the general knowledge of one
another s point of view.
It brings to its readers the thought-harvest
of two hemispheres. And what the world
thinks today determines what it will do Lo-
IDOFFOW.
THE EDITOR.


"It seems to me altogether admirable well bnalanced,
e baustive, and Interesting from beginumg to end."--
Cla mark II Rvberrl*.





..It [Curret ~Lteraure] to g~oodd, OM GOOD- beltte
th anth best of its kind and bound to win."--Florence
Mon hs Xngelle.

CU RR ENT L I T ER A T UR E

A Review of the World

TIthe first department in Current
Literature, consisting of 32 pages, is
anillustrated review of the b6ig events of the
motthe world over, and the interpretation
ofthese events from the mant authoritative
ouesavailable. This department alone'
inovsthe close scrutiny of hundreds of
peidiasdailyr, including those printed in
France, Germny Italy, Russia, China,
Jaaand all other countries in which the
prnigpress has been established. It is not
medley of scraps of thought and unrelated
fat.It is an orderly, interesting, immensely
itlpresentation of fats in their relations to
Each other. It is different from any siiar
department in any other periodical. You
willsay so when you read it. The nmeous
illu~rations cartoons, portraits, etc.- illum-
Iinate as well as adorn.
Literature and Art

THIS is one of the mont important de-
Spartments of the magazine. The book
and periodical literature of many- countries is
"All of the old gladness of rceting is back a~~lgain ~PI r
aty g ith the old ti gling attenltion, eln si
Osmi ~~~~from full and refres Ing fountains of the spirst."
Ct~~e Markham, Lfteray Edlitor of T7he Cosmaopoilfarr






" The religi ous and ethical sedlion contains some deep.
ly lateresting matter gathered from all quartersr Tilr
Church Standard. Phdludstphalr

CURRENT, LITERATURE

drawn upon to furnish the most interesting
articles on everything that has to do with
creative literature or with painting, sculpture
and the allied arts. All phases of creative
and critical literary activity are treated. The
world-figures in art arid letters are interpreted.
Numerous illustrations accompany the text.

Religion an~d Ethics

A T the very bottom of everyhng that
C a man is or does lies his conception of
his relations to the universe and the eternal
verities. Every educated man and woman
is interested in keeping in touch w~ith the
new and large developments in religion. The
aim in this department is to present every
vital tendency and point of: view dispassion-
ately and without bias or semarian feeling.
Eac school of thought -whether Moham-
medan, Buddhiat, Protentant, Roman Catholic
or Agnostic-is represented from time to
time by its ablest spokesmen. Theological
movements and controversies in al parts of
the world are intelligently treated.

"'The department of L Religion and Ethics' is the best
thing of the kind I have ever seen. To me It has suggested
more than one sermon."-- Rev R. H Achaeon, Pdathde
Aod. United Presbuterran Chiurch. Westl Hobohn. 9 J





"A masterly resume.* * The very best things may.
safely be said of it."- Zion's H~erald, Boston.

C U RR EN T, LITrE R AT UR E

Science and Discovery

NTO one needs to be told how closely
I Science in these days comes to all. It
is changing the face of the world much as the
cataclysms and the glaciers of the padt ages
chiseled out the surface of the earth. A
department of this kind can be made up of
snippy bits of curious faats, on the museum-
of-curiosities plan, or it may be made up of
the great and.hard-to-come-at developments
that are wroughit out by the leaders of science
.and authoritatively described in the recog-
nized organs of scientific men in all countries.
This department is conducted on the latter
plan. It draws its material from authoritative
sources and presents the results as free as
possible from technical phraseology.

Music and the Drama
~HIS is a department rich in emotional
1 interest. Allthe important books and
articles on music and the drama are treated.
New operas and plays, both in Europe and
this county, are described, and the estimates

It la packed with the essence of current literature front
all over the world, and the condensation is done without
spoiling the flavor, '-BC. Louts Mi~rror.






It should certainly make a subscriber of almost every
mne who has his attention called to it.'"- Thre Boslon Olobc

CURRE NT LITERATURE

of leading critics given. A unique feature of
this department is the publication each month
of the strongest scene or adt in a new play
of -diStintion,- not a descriptrion of the scene,
but the scene itself.

People ~in the Fioreground

rTHE persnlty of an important man or
Woman, when we can really come at
it, is always of human interest and of central
importance. Thi department is not acollec-.
tion of gossipy bits. It contains real life-
stories of people who are doing important
things, and occupying important podsts It is
more interesting than fiction, and is full of
drimulation and information.

.Recent Poetry

WJTHETHER he likes poetry or not, a
VVcultured man must read some of it.
It represents too much in the history of litera-
ture and of national development~ to be
ignored. Much of: it is simply verbal sym-
nastics. Some of it strikes deep and carries
far. The best that is being done in the

"Both in appearance and in subject matter, the maga.
sine under its new editor is far in advance of anything
the magazine has ever done."-- F. P. Delgodo, f~ormely on
the staff q ('anlentll LIteMlratr





A year's issue of Current Literature will make a
lubelibrary."- The Naskvile American.



English language from month to month, on
both sides of the sea, is presented here, to-
gether with items of information or unob-
trusive comment that aid the reader in quick
conception of the poet's purpose. You may
not read this department first; but you are
likely to saVe the magazine for years because
of it, and to read it again and again.

Recent Fiction. alnd the Critics

TrHIS` is something new. You know
What book-reviews frequently are: con-
ventional phrasing and perfundtory comment.
. IBut not always. In this department the
comments that count are separated from the
mass of perfundtory stuff, and you get in a
brief compass the verdidt of the bes ~critics
on the novels of special significance,--not
one man's or woman's view of a novel, but
the; views of many.

Our Short Stories
CACH number of Current Literature con
I~tains at leakt one complete Story the
best obtainable from writers of many nations.

Good taste, tact and ingenuity of arrangement have
n =de this publication a literary wonder."-- The Ossuege
'tmes.




Y-` ---------- -- ----1-----


CURRENT LITERATURE


SClean Advertising


T~HE advertising pages of Current Litera-
Sture are clean. \e admit nothing that

any father or mother need hesitate to place
in the hands of a boy or girl. There are not

liquor advertisements, and this exclusion ex-
tends also to all those proprietary medicmes
that are simply alcoholic bquars in disguise.
Here is a lift of some of our principal adver-
tisers for 190)5. It wdll help show the fugh
characer maintained mn our adverzsing pages.


~:~,,~-.:- .~-;--~----~------------- --- ---- ii ;


BurTala Lithis LWater
Baedr & l aylor Co.
Chickering Planos
Century hingazine
Christian Herald
Cha's. 5cribner s Bons
Crystal Domino Sugar
Daus DupitCaLtor
Dentacuira
Dodd, Mead & Co.
Equitable Life Ins.
Pitcher Pianos
Ford Motor
Fleming H. Revell Co.
Geo. Frost
Gae Nuts
Hyer's Chocolates
aorford's Acid Phosphate
Houghton, Mifflin & Co.
Harper &p Bros.
Ivory Soap
Dr. Jaeger's Underwear
Liebig Beef Extract
Lowney's Chocolates
J. B. LipplncottCo.
Little, Brown &t Co.


Melln's Food
Fhle nnen'r Talc. Powder
John D. Morris & Co
N YI Central R. R.
Oldjm ob lie
Ojtermoor Mattress
W l. Ostrander
Outlook
Pearsj Boap
Penn Mutual Life:
Pope Mfg. Co.
Ed. Pinaud
Postum Food Coffee
Prudential Ins. Co,
Pearine
Remington Typewriter
Sapolio
Tiffany & Co.
The Independent
Vapo Cresolone
Vose Piano
Univ. of Chicago Presse
University Society
Waterman Pen
Whitman's Chocolates
Youth's Companion










From, the rzlstor of the' Largest Metho.
dist Church In the World'"-
I have always highly esteemed Current Litera. l
tur~e, but it seems to me, from a careful examination
of each department, that it is very much better than
before. It fills its own umique place among the
monthly publications, as especially valuable to the
busy man. I shall take very particular interest in
the magazine from this time forward, and I shall
turn to its pages each months looking for valuable
sermonic material."-- Charles Edward Lockce, Iranson
Place Metbhodifst Episcopal Chanch, Brooklyn.

A Remarkable Tour de Force
"L The farat number under the new management
strikes me as a remarkable tour de force, gathering
so much of the world's thought in so interesting a
way. ....If the succeeding numbers keep up
to this very high level, Current Literature must
become indispensable to all who desire to follow the
thought of the world on all subjects, literary, reli.
gious, scientific, and artistic.- Joseph Jacob~s, M1an-
agying EdItor of the Jewish ~Encyclopedia.

Fromt one of Amnerica's Mlost Noted
Inventors
The busy man, in these busy times, finds in
Current Literature a service similar to that of a
valuable private secretary, in getting the essentials
of current scientific and literary topics which he has
neither the ability nor the opportunity to cull from
the great mass of periodicals."-H ludson Excm;


Current Literature
la published monthly. The subscription price is
$3.co0 a year: single copies 15 cents each. Subscrip-
tions may be sent direct to the publishers or through
booksellers, subscription agencies or postmasters.

Thle Current Literature Publishing Co.
34 West26hth Street New York Cit3




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W. MV. BOSTWICK, JR.
ATTORNEYNE AT LAW
GUnasums 'I'nver Ann S~rMee Co. Burrrse
Conan~ Bin Aan OGEANi SWREMES,
SJACsso~NvILLE, FLA.

( Personal )


June 4th, 1906.


Got.; N. B. BrowaR~d,
Tallahassee, Fla.

My dear Governor:--

I have not as yet received the deed you wuere to send

me on your return to Tallahassee on the 28th of May. W~ill you kindly

send it to me in. accordance ~with your agreement.

Yours very truly,

















daC 60/W/ /, /d.~, June4 th. 06

Hone N. P. Broward,
Tall eRassee, Fla.


DeW beg to nfom ou ha we have. just received the Dean

Duplex Pum which isl in good orders has 4#' suction, 5# disobarge. This
3ump is already loaded on the car and we could ship out promptly. Web

will make a price of $250.00) We could probably get you up another one

very shortly


Kiindly advifse and oblige,




Very tnlrl Yours,






















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-------:' PR 0 GR8AMM aE :------

For DADE CITY ]BARBECUE, Dade City, Fla., June 6, 1908.

Ronocr of Governior N. P. BROWARD.

-.-"-000i-L- -- -----------------1.--------000-1--


BAND mseets- at Hotel, caCcoimpanlied by MAIYOR and other at 9.55

and esc'ortri the "GOVTERNOR to the Speakrer's Stand.

10.00 MBusiorbySthe BAND.

10.10 address by W~ov. N. P. BROWARD>.

1 .~15 address by Hbn. DAUGHERTPY-aned reply by. the GOVIERNOR.


'-'; DIN; NER~ -r s ea ----



1.00o Museic by th~e BAND.

P1.0Address by Hon. FORREST EBANSTON.

1,9903 Address by Hon. R. Jd. .MO CUTCHEON.

1,50 M~usic by the BAND.

S.00 WTOODMlEN arssemble at, Hall.

2.10 WOODMEN .arch to Cametery asnd decorate~ graves.










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At~tlank. June 7., 1906.~

W.E.IRVIN. P~ivATE ScRETARY.



Gove mor N.B.Broward,
Tallahassee, Fla.
D~ear Giovernaor:-
I am in, receipt of your letter of the 4th instant,
and in reply will say that I do not knowR of" say auch book as
"White's History of Georg~ia." A great many years ago a man by
thie name of White wrote a book which he called "Whitfe's 'Statia-
ties of' Georgia", and a few years thereafter he enlarg~ed upon.
this andi called his aeoond edition "White's Historical Colleo-
tionar"n Both of these volumes have long aince been out of print.
iThey are very rare and can only be obtained occasionally from
some dealer in old booked. MEaot of th"e public libraries in the-
State have copies of` ~them. we have both in the State Library, and
It have iu my private library a copy of "White's Statiatics of
Ge o rgia **
I[ do not exactly understand from your letter wrhat informa-
tion it is that you wish. HowRever, there is not~hii~g in either
of White's books relative to Political integrity or lack of
integrity amongs~t the voters Of Georg~ia in the early days of"
the 8tate. He, however, deals fully with the Yascoo fraud expos-
uret, atnd I thought it possible thlat it is this exposure you
have in mind. In 1794 .the General Assambly passed an Act with: a
title indicating that thetr Actt was for the benefit of the soldiers
of the Revolutionary W~art th the body of the Act the.Legislature
disposed of a large t'racrtof land than belongingf to Georgia,
lying west~ of` the Ohattahoochee River, and being over two-
thirds 01 the territory new comprisingS the States (of Alabama




I__ _


State of (Grania.
Executium Brpalrrtent, N.B BY -2-

J.M.TERRELL, OENR
W.C IRVIN, PRIVATE SECRETARY.



and Mississippi. This was than known as the Yaz~oo country,
taking: its nman from the Yasco River. This sale was mada8 by the
Legislature to a company composed of James Gann, who at that time
was one of Georgia's Senators in Congreas: General Hanpton, of
South Carolinal a U.S.Judg~e from Pennsylvania, and a number of
other ann of" prominence. This sale was repudiated by the people
as soon as it was known, sad was called the Yasco fraud? General
Jackson, Gwun's colleague in the U.S.8Senate, resigned his seat and
returned to GSeorgiea for the purpose of becoming a candidate for
the General Assembly.Q He was elected, and introduced wh~at was
called. a Reachidin; Act-, which provided for the destruction by
fire of every record in connection wi b th~e Act. As soon as this
Beacinding Act was passed the General Assembly adjourned to meet
in front of the old Acpital at Louieville, where every record or
-scrap of paper connected width the fraud were piled in front of
the Capitol and the same were consumed by fire kindled by a
sun glass. The glass which was used was held by General David
Mderiweth~er, one of the memboers of the Legislature at that time,
ard one of my anoeabors, for whom I was named. This fraud so
thoroughly aroused the people of this State that no member of
the Legislature who voted for the original BillI was returned to
the nexit Legi~slature, nor ever afterwards elected to any other
office. The evidence seemed sufficient to satisfy the people
that Stenator Guma and his associated bought the members either
with mIoney or shares of stock in the corporation'. I do not recall
the exact armount~ that this company was to pay the State for this
land, but it was less than one cent per acre.' A few yrearsr after
,its passage a Constitutional Convention was held, and a` provision










Atlaua. .B.B. -3-
J. M.TERRELL, GovER NOR.
W. E.IRVIN, PRIVATE SECRETARY.



was incorporated inr the Conatitutioni to the effect that the
General Assemblyg should not thereafter passe acn Act the subject
matter off which was not covered by the title, and a similar
provision has been incorporated into each of our Constitutions
since that time.
I do not know of any statement in any history of Georgia,
anrd I think I have read them all', to the effect thLat the people
at any time woi~thin her history showed a lack of integrity, sad
this was the only Legislature wpithin her history, except the
Republican Legislature directly after the War, w~hicrh was ever
condemned by the pe-ople of the State for lack of integrity'.
The feeling of the people against the public men connected
with this fraud wRas in numerous instances transmitted from father
to ,son, for hte people freqluently defeated the children and
even the grandchildren of those who sought to rob the State
in such an unholy manner.
I do nrot know that this is the matter upon wh-ichi you
desired informations if not, please inform me and I will take
pleasure in rendering you any assistance that I can',
With kind regards, I am ,.






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THE WE~SCTERN\ UNJ~IONI TMILGRLEGRAP COnTIWTPAN
---~--- INCORPORATED ~~
23,000 OFFlOES INY AMERICA. CABLE SERVICE TO ALL THE WOR~Y
T3hes Company TRANSHI~TS and DEIJVERS messages only on conditions lunituog its iarbdit~, which base been amseened to by thef *Ig mesa
Erors can be guanied against only bymneeating a message bacik to rheseandmg station for comparison. and the Company will noteold if or errors or delu
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ROBERT C. CLOWRY. Precedent andan er
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S STATES AND CANADA. C
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graph '0 ~, incluctng Branch
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in tha ~ed etiata Canada and
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communIcation with Germany and
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connecting with the Medcan Tef t aphd
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Telegraph Co., for allpoints in 19*Azlco
.and CentrraLanifkth America.
Direct Wlres abd Cables to Ha tens
Cuba, and all points to the West Iidies,.
and to the Bermudas and Bahama.
Pacific Cables to Austra-
lia, New Zealaqd, Honolulu,Ilns
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China, Japan, etc. ,-3
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FEATHERSTONE FOUNDRY & MACHINE CO.
CHICAGO, ILL..

Postal Teleg a~,~~!~fo TELEGRAM SENT YOU THIS DAY ad





Chicago, June 11, 1906.
Hon. N. B. Broward,~
Harrington Hotel,
Port Huron, Mich.

Regret that I was unable to see you Mbonday or Tuesday; had to be in New York
Monday; will be back latter part of week; hope you will call on us before returning
to Criba.


F. H. Niles.










T. G. MCCONKEY, HONORARY PRESIDENT, G. H. ALLEN, PRESIDENT, W. S. MILNE, SECRETARY. F. H. HEATH, TREASURER,
SUP'T or AGENClES, NORTH AMERICAN LIFE MUTUAL LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY (MONEY AND RISKS CONFEDERATION LIFE,
ASSURANCE CO.. TORONTO, ONT, OF CANADA, MONTREAL, QUE TORONTo, ONT. LONDON, ONT.



Elyt (iift 'junermriters Assariation of Manaba

t. F. CONROD, VICE-PRES. For) NOVA ScoTIA, H. C. Cox, VICE-PRES. FOR ONTARIO, E. R. MACHUM, VICE-PRES. Fon NEW BRUNSWICK.
NEW YORK LIFE INS. CO., HALIFAX, N. S. CANADA LIFE, TORONTO, ONT. MANUFACTURERS' LIFE, ST. JOHN, N.B. ;
H. WORSLEY, VICE*PRES. FOR MANITOBA, J. O. HYNDMAN, VICE.PRES. Pon PRINCE EDW. ISL'D, GEO. T. MARSH, VICE-PRES. FOn SASKIATCHEWAN,
CONFEDERATION LIFE, WINNIPEG, MAN. STANDARD LIFE, CHARLOTTETOWN, P. E. I. GREAT WEsT LIFE, REGINA, SASK.
G. H. SIMPsoN, VICE-PRES. POR QUEBEC, R. J. STEWART, VICE-PRES. Fon ALBERTA, J. D. BREEZE. VICE.PRES. FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA,
NORTH AMERICAN LIFE, MONTREAL, QUE. SUN LIFE OF CANADA, CALGARY, At.A. CONFEDEflATION LIFE Ass*N, VANCOUVER, B.C.

~lExtrtitP C~re (lla itter:
A. H. VIPONDo, NEW YORK LIFE, MONTREAL; OscAR GAGNON, CANADA LIFE, QUEBEO; W. H. PENWARDEN, FEDERAL LIFE, KINasTON.
A. S. McGREGOR, SUN LIFE, LONDON; al. R. REID, SUN LIFE, OTTAWA; DR. W. H. RICHARDSON,
CONFEDERATION LIFE, WINoson ; C. O. PALMER, MANUFACTURERS' LIFE, 6HERBROOKE ;
W. H. SEYMOUR, IMPERIAL LIFE, HAMILTON.

PRESIDENT S OFFICE:
171 #t. jlamrap S3t., SttantreakL



693 6tZ 1I June, 1906

To thqi~I LifeIsurance Agents
of the Dominzon of Canada.

GEN'rlEMN :-

As you no doubt have seen in the press, the! above Association was formed on the 4th June
in Toronto and an adjourned meeting will be held on the 25th inst.
The Executive OBicers are anxious to interest every Agent in the Dominion in the work of
forming a local Association in his City, Town or District.
In Montreal, Toronto, H~alifax, L~ondon and Sherbrooke, Associations have already been organised
and in other centres the movement is already assuming shape. They are formed for the purpose of
promoting harmony and friendliness amongst all field-men representing old-lin~e, legal reserve
companies and to devise means for the protection and, imoprovement of their common interests.
All these local Associations will be invited to join the Dominion ILife Underwriters Association
and to send delegates to the Semi-Annulal meetings and particularly to the meeting called
for the 25th June.
A brief history of these Associations in the United States will not be without value. For 23
years they have been working for the improvement of the conditions of the field-mnen--Agents, Genieral
Agents, M~anagers, etc.--bringing together into friendly conference mnen whio, otherwise would nevr\c
have met except as competitors and possibly antagonists, but who, meeting thus, found mnuchi in each
other to commend and admire. This has, naturally, led to less bitterness of feeling and opened the
way to discuss measures for the improvement of the business as a whole.
The climax of their usefulness was reached w~hen the Armstrong Legislative Commrittee was in
session at Albany, and the New Y'ork Associations-representing 18,000o Agents, sent a delegation
of I,ooo men to attend the Committee and request a hearing. Members of that Committee acknowledged
that they were chiefly indebted to the Agents for proving to them that changes w~ere necessary in
the proposed clauses limiting loadings and expenses, and that such changes were necessary for
the public good. This fact alone justifies the 23 y.ears work of the Associationls, to say nothing
of thle other benefits conferred.


1




'... i II1~C


-- 1


Now, here in Canada, we are confronted with a situation demanding great care and sound
judgment and, although we have every reason to believe that legislation in Canada will be considered
under more normal and less excited conditions than prevailed in Albany and is, therefore, likely to
avoid most of the evils which, it is generally conceded, yet exist in parts of the A~rm~strong legislation,
it is, nevertheless, the fact that we must be on the watch, lest changes in the laws should be suggested
which would be inimical to the best interests of the insuring public.
No body of men come into closer touch with the insuring public than the Agents. Our duty to
them--to the men we have insured--to the men we hope to insure--demands that wc~e should carefully
watch and guard against any measures which would militate against their interests. Their interests
are our interests and, in our mutual interests, we must be prepared to act unitedly and with
effect when the time comes.
That our opinions carry weight and are valued, is evidenced by the fact that President Roosevelt
specially invited the National ~Life Underwriters Association to join in conference with the Govern~ors,
Attorney-Generals and In~surance Commissioners in Convention assembled at Chicago last February
and that Chairman O'Brien, in proposing a resolution of thanks to them, said "I feel particularly
grateful to the members of this Association of L~ife Underwriters wcho have attended this Convention
and wgho have acted in so fair a manner."
Nowl, we ask you as a personal favor and in your own and your clients' interests to do all you
can, in your own neighborhood, to form an Association, and shall be pleased to send you a sample
Constitution and to give you all the advice and assistance in our power.
Should you, personally, be so isolated as to be unable to join a local Association, then we have
made provision for you to join the Dominion Association as an Associate Member, for a fee of $1.00,
which can be remitted direct to WC. S. Milne, Secretary, Money and Risks, Toronto.
If, in a short time, we find that there are a number of men in your vicinity wh~o are Associate
Members we would advise each of you of the names and addresses of the others and help you to form
a District ~Association.
M~ush time, thought and money have been spent by our executive in accomplishing the work
already done, and is prepared to continue doing so, in the hope that every part of the Dominion will be
supplied with a strong Association and we now appeal to you field-men to take up the good work
and to carry it through to a successful issue. Constitute yourself a Committee of one to engender
enthusiasm for this work.
You are practical men; many of you with. high ideals of the work you are engaged in. and with
broad statesman-like views of what the future may have in store for the ZLife Insurance business, and
we appeal to you as practical men to help to realise your own ideals and to bring about the acceptance
of your views. Association-Co-operation--will hasten this realisation.
We~ should be honored and pleased to receive a reply fronr you and to have a candid
expression of your opinions on, this matter, and we particularly ask you and ~all life insurance men to
attend the meeting at Toronto on Monday 25th June, we remain,

Very sincerely yours,







President.



P.S.-W~e enclose you a card of invlitation to mueet Mr. C. W. Scovel of Pittsburg, Pa., President of
the National Association of L~ife Underwriters, and author of "'The Primal Duty'," etc., etc.







~ n. E Wn TIERnl NIIO TELEGRAPHH COIWPANT.
I ~~INCORPORATED -~
00OF ICES IN AMERICA. CABLE SERVICE TO ALL THE WORLD.
'150sO ANalT8aid DELTVEBB message only on conduosnitio lng~~ ireallabilithich have been assened to by thesender ofthbefolowingtmessage
Error be e against (nly by repeatmog a message back u, the sending station for comparison.aend the Companp will not hold itself able for epnr or delays
fataeisoor erot Unrepieated Meassges, beyond the amount of tells -paid thereon, c ma many came where the elarm is not prsesemed in w~ratg wsuins susy days
atra the m with the L~oman for transrmiselon. ec
This lsen TIED RE sA r., and is delivered by request of the sender, under the conditions named above.
ROBERT C. CLOWRY, President and General Manager.


5-De AP Ko 18 Paid.


T all ahaestl g Pla ., June 12, 0 6


War. N., B. Browrard,


Ludington, Rich.


mroving smoothlL no Ispecial news


Every body well offloo wrort


receitved bryan writes dredg~e ready 2Sth,


J. ~Sametlt Wolfe,
G.S.


2 28pm.





The Western vl
Union Telegraph 0TEI
Company m
THE LARGEST TELEGRAPHIC
SSYSTEM IN THE WORLD.O
OVER ONE MILLION MLES
OF WIRE IN THE UNITED C
STAES AND CANlADA. 3
It has over 24,000 Tele-
graph Onlces, including Branch m
Offices. It has also Direct Con- 1
nection by Telegraph or *Tele-
phone with as many more re- I la Et
mote and smaller stations,-mak. Il~ i V
ing a total list of over 48,000
in the United States, Canada and .
Mexico, and this number is rapid- t
ly mecreasmng.

The Western Union Company has
Two American Atlantic Ocean Cables I II~ u=t
from New York Cfty to Penzance,
England, direct a both Cables duplexed. II11 =~ 4 O
Four Anglo-American Cables, and one
Direct United States Cable. Direct;
communication with Germany andz
France.
Direct Wires to Galveston, Texas,
connecting with the M~excan Telegraph CI
Co. and the Central &e South Amercan ,4
Telegraph Co., for all points in Mexico i
and Central and South America. -
Direct Wires and Cables to Havana,
Cuba, and all points in the West Indles,
and to the Bermudas and Bahamas.
Pacific Cables to Austra-
Ifa, New Zealand, HIonolulu, C
Guam, Philippine Islands, '
China, Japan, etc' 1% .,*-
Connects with U. S. Gov-
erinent Lines and Cables to w. u T. co. OTHEr CDS.
and in Alaska. c~00 o 's

Domestic anti Foreign Money Orders by Telegraph and Cable


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THE. BIRTHPLACE OF MACCABEEISM







The Mammoth Street Parade
WILL TAKE PLACE ON ARRIVAL OF ALL EXCURSION TRAINS
Headed by the Port Huron National Guards and the City Band who will act as escort to the Governor of Michigan with his
tunrnteil fa~aanrl @n the imrzvner~ n~ ifnrela worn waill he mrrrenu in test Mnabb a tan;aRWuxtBiniotL.inAI E hall DO~rT~e T eamIs. Of




--both Orders, toethe~-er with Sir Kn~ights an~d Ladies of th~e hW~dern lua~cabees, L oat s~ represendtug heats Ives~- es, Ber
chants and Manufacturers of the city, besides Bands, Uniform Rank Divisions and Sir Knights and Ladies in Fancy Costume.
The Following Prizes are Offered:
Knights of the Moderbn Maccabees for the best appearing Degree Team in line of march:
First ]Prize, $20.00 ..Second Prize, $10.00
Ladies of the Modern Maccabees for the best appearing Degree Team in line of march:
First Prize, $20.00 Second Prize, $10.00
For the best appearing Floats representing the Order of the Maccabees, Mlerchants and Manufacturers:
$10.00 for Best Sir Knight's Float $10.00 for Best Merchant's Float
$10.00 for Best Ladies' Float -$10.00 for Best Manufacturer's Float

1:30 p. m.--Dedication of New Temple
By the Great Camp K~nights of the Modern Maccabees, ceremonies conducted by t he Great Camp Officers. After the Dedica-
tory Ceremonies, short addresses will be made by Governor N. B. Broward, of Florida, Governor Fred MI. Warner, oF M~ich-
igan, Mayor Whitlock, of Toledo, Great Commander Francis E. Burns and Great Commander M~ajor N. S. Boynton, together
with other noted speakers.

3 p. m.-Prize Drills in Pine Grove Park
The following prizes are offered the Sir Knights and Ladies of the Modern ]Maceabee~s for Competitive Degree Team Drills
Sir Knight's First Prize, $15.oo Ladies' First Prize, $15.oo
Second Prize, $5.oo Second Prife, $5.oo
Time alloted each Degree Team for drill in 15 minutes. In awarding prices the Judges will be governed on a basis of 16
persons to a team, but more than that number will be allowed to par~ticipate. Prize money will be paid in gold to
Winners immediately after decision of Judges.

BASE, BALL GAMES and Other Field Sports


Toledo's Famous Modern Maccabee Minstrels


THEC HERALD PUBLISHING CO.. UP-TO.DATE PRINTERS, PORT HIURON. MICH.


There will be something doing every mintite.


There will be no keep


Police wvill be on their vacation.


off .the grass signs or don't pick the flowers.


GOV. WARNERI,
of Michigan


GOV. BROWARD,
of Florida


Oreat Commander MAJOR N. S. BOYMION


Great (comnder IRAkCots E. BLitNS


ALL TRAINS RUN TO PINE GROVE PAR~K. ,
Bicycles and lunch baskets will be carried free on Excursion Trains at owner's rlsh. Owner must attend
to loading and unloading of same. Baggage will be checked free and properly cared for at the Park
SILVER AN N IViERS ARY C OM MITT~EE


Will be with us.


All the above attractions


Bear in mind the City Doors will be wide open.


ABSOLUTELY


F R EE


FREE




__ ____ __


International Policyholders Committee

30 BROAD STREET, NEW YORK







You will serve this Committee in its,
campaign in the interest of policyholders
if you will sign the enclosed card, giving your
full address and mark with a cross the names
of the Companies in which you are insured
and forward the same in the return envelope.
We desire to have your card in our
index so that we may keep you informed
from time to time regarding the progress of
the international campaign which is being
conducted to secure for policyholders what
they are by law entitled to; namely, a voice
in the management of the affairs of their
Companies.
We shall not bother you with circulars,
but if you are a policyholder in either the
New York Life or the M~utual Life of New
York we have some information regarding
the forthcoming elections for Directors which
you ought to have immediately. Each
policyholder will have one vote and these
Insurance elections will be the most impor-
tant held in the United States this year.
Over a million voters will cast ballots.






Secretary

Please return the Card promptly. There are
now more than one hundred thousand policyholders
actively interested in the success of this international
movement and among them many thousands of the
most prominent people of the United States.









INTERNATIONAL POLICYHOLDERS COM1~MITTEEE

30 BROAD S-TREET, NEW YORK

OFFICE OF
TH E SECRET RY
ROOMl 310


June 12th, 1906.
My dear Governor Broward:
We have been making excellent progress in the formation
of our Committee. I have been able personally to secure the
enthusiastic co-operation of Governor Pennyrpacker, Gover nor Hanly
of Indians and of Governor Roberts of Connecticut; also Ex-Postmaster
General Charles Emory Smith and President Angell of Michigan Univer-
sity. I have hope of securing Senator La Follette and Robert C.
Ogden. You know, of course, that Hon. Hicholas Longworth (after
consultation with the President) consented to serve. He will
return from abroad in time to meet with the Committee at its second
mee ti ng. Judge Gray, Judge Alton B. Parker and Hon. Richard 01ney
are with us. The movement has now a very formidable front and its
success is practically assured.
I am outlining a general plan of campaign ano now have
favorable correspondence from~ over five hundred of the largest and
most influential policyholders of the country, each of whom is ready
to publicly endorse this movement when the time is ripe for the
r. preliminary announcements to be made.
The one thing above all others which I am particularly
concerned about is that we conduct this campaign with as little
muck-raking as possible. I take it that this Comrmittee has been
gotten together to represent the policyholders in the election of
clean men, not to denounce the present management for its unfaith-
fulness in the past or for i ts lack of sincerity at present. The
people are sick and tired of insurance scandals and even if the half
has never been told whichh is probably true) it is good public policy
not to tell it. The faith of the people has suffered sufficient
ear thquake. It would be very unfortunate to consume it utterly
with fire.
I know the average policyholder and I know that he simply
needs to be told th:at now for the first time in his life he can cast
an insurance vote which has not been chloroformed in advance; that
twenty-five rep~resehtative men will act for him in choosing a
"Licket" whose members are men of unquestioned financial standing
and business integrity; and that he as one of the owners of the
Company has a perfect right to exercise his own individual judgment
in the choice of the management. This is the cornerstone upon
which our American Institutions are built. A clean, dignified
campaign along these general lines with vigorous and enthusiastic
work it seems to me should make the winning of the elections a fore-
gone conclusion.
I shall be very glad indeed if you can spare the time to
write me giving your ideas along these lines. It is necessary to
do some work in advance of the initial Meeting of the Conunittee and
in mapping out these preliminary campaign principles I want to be
sure that I am working inl harmony with the wish of the members.
The farther I have gotten into the work the more convinced I as that
in assuming this responsibility of representing policyholders at










I NTERNAT IONAL PO LICYH OLDE RS C OM MITTEE

30 BROAD STREET, NEW YORK

OFFICE OF
THE SECRETARY
ROOM J IO



Governor Broward, 2.

this time the gentlemen of this Cornaittee are undei~taking a public
service of the very highest type and of the very widest range.
It is for tunate for the policyholders that so many men of positive
convictions and of undaunted courage have been secured.
Thanking you in advance for the favor of a reply, I am,


Yours most cordial











International Policyhoklers


Committ-ee


30 BROtAD STREET


FOR THE
;;.SECRETARY





POLICYHOLDER'S CARD


NAME .....


FULL ADDRESS ............................


IMPORTANT:-- '
PLEASE PUT AN X BEFORE
THE NAME OF THE COMPANY
IN WHICH YOU ARE INSURED.
SEE LIST ON THE BACK















































RETURN THIS CARD PROMPTLY


LIFE INSURANCE: COMPANIES

PLEASE PUT A CROSS BEFORE
THE NAMES OF THE COMPANIES
IN WH-ICH YOU ARE INSURED


~1~__~___~_____~~~_


I


llI_~___


z
0
0)

o
z
a
Pl


.~~~~~~ New York Life Insurance Company
~~~~~~~Mutual Life Insurance Company
~~~~~~ Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company
...... Berkshire Life Insurance Company
Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company
.~~~~~~ Fidelity Mutual Life Insurance Company
.~~~~~~ John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company
~~~~~ Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company
~~~~~~~Michigan Mutual Life Insurance Company
~~~~~~~ Mutual Reserve Life Insurance Company
~~~~~~~~~National Life Insurance Company
.~~~~~~~ Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company
~~~~~~~~~Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company
Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Company
.~~~~~~ Security Mutual Life Insurance Company
~~~~~~~Union Mutual Life Insurance Company







~ABLE ADDRESS,J~ISt ,NEw Y E sTdL BS H ED IN 1878. TLPO




JLME S.T.WHITE &c CO., PUBLISHERS

'E:DIT.O.ZIAL DEPARTMENT
THE NATION L CY LOJPEDIA
OF PM ERIC 4N BIOGRapHY
A CYCLOPR.DIA OF 8220 FIFTH- ~AVE, GENEA
AMERICANP INDUSTRIES.
WHITE'S GENEALOGICAL CH= EWYO K
AND FAMILY REGISTER.








.Dear Sir:-


L, 4442 MADISONrkSQ


rLOQIlCAL RESEARCHES
A SPECIALTY.


After devoting over fifteen years to the compilation of T.

National Cyclopedia of American BiogErkahy, the pub'lirLed volumes are

to-dayg recognizedr~ as the ~t.atescad l ier raphical. auth~ority~ in' America.

In ec;crdance. with the Fle~r. RE1 Scups of thes works it should contain

a `tiogreE.by of yo~uraslf, and~ I be~g to r~equEstt that y~ou kindly send us

the6 matitrlal to presa&re a F=uit.E.tl3e b.Iogeh o.I1;* r tesll us where it m~ay be

obtained,

Theo aimn Ihe besren. io present, in additjlion to the life

reer..rCT of the .:t'*--%, an aaeomn t of the morvemnesnt;, the institut-ion,

tihe, Indur~; Er or Ithe, Tpro~FeSsiC;. with which hil; lif has 'beer: iden~tiied,

and our biographp~ies~ are cor-.iderabl~y longer than in any other ref'elrnce

book. Such dat~a, as well as yourr American ancestry, ar~e not to be f~undi

in other references books, ~an so we apply to yo~u directly for them.

The National Cyclopedia of Ameri~can Bjography is to be~c a

permanent, national work ofl referene, and the publi;sbe3 vO1lumes may~

be .found in acl1 the leading libraries and new.papear ofPi~cse s ,..bloth alt

home and abroad. I~ trust y~ou will not co~nfuse it wi b some, local.

piubieations that charge a fee as a condition of p@ .Aation, an~d hoping
to hear from youl at anl early date, I amn, I

XourP very truly,




~~~ _. 1


Hon. Hapoleon~j Bonapsl~ 'e-: .(~..-1-v'ru I;overnor, 1-'n: b Lorn- on a
fP~rm in !Pay.-il County, Floridan, ?Dril, 19th',.1859j; can of Ils.,oleon Son,9-
p-rte -:rol.iard andl iar; rore-s oironr: 3ro\;nrd; lost both pa~rents;P when
tl. elve yeers old; tte-nded coun' :;-i hool.; married iat ::e\ Berlin, 'lorida,
Janueeri y 10th, 1883, to :Liss~ Carolinef ;Teorga "emps, who diiet Octo'ber
30th, 1RPC~i; married~ to :isan n~nie '~L, Tri:Clene' "t: JacksCCLonnille, :'lorid: 7,
IIP.y 5tih, 188?:; hby t~his marr'iage? 41re: weivn cla~nghters; fron't ~ely; to
fou~rtee w?~LVorTri. the1C hometrolC'`~ oQ a~ 7h(lderi1 unc~le, wi~th yonne--!l_; Tre.C.lor3;
ar :: "- ~neigh;bor wans i o ntlR dist- nt, E ni6 uncle was soldenc home as his
business ier ra;t a istatenccrF R r 'Oat fourtr *: n worke in rr!hat lo Ar for1-~~_n1 aLn
uzncl, 1-.i~er farm hai~nd5, ae osauto tnbotcofihm
on t~he7 "ra~ni: Bnks onl renar!n on dlzirs ~lir- -er:1R andI fishi:n-- to-4fa; .cto .m-
boat; haFnd, a~ni on yer bar pilot; on't;. Johnf BaT, Florida; t~hen joint
ow~ner.of9 ni ..mbloatF, p7'l'inP be~tio n .:ryport rni -i 1.n!:, F loridas, uzn~til
1E..07~, ithenl propr-l'ori of s va oodyard~ in Joo~ck:-:onville, Fla.

,~~ cine 18! r-pointf.F 1889~, tnl afte~rvRpads elelct-
ed~ and rn-elec+ed; Iheiffo of8' Tnua Cony -lrauti 9^; o-ae
of loid lo-ilaureirn .uvel 0:u~n~ty, .'lorida, 1900; nontber of ''cte
Board of --;eles1h, 19~ In-0; rlectedF~ 1P`'4 rri-nvern ;t "l.nirl~ f-r t 0 al

i n .r~!.tenhboat; business flP no a~ r-nor 7- 4;h:- ''?Tc.- in:, -_' ,
,:h!ich inr 1.'::> > an.il' 1 98: !- .*o.:;.n:?nl~l on skir -!t ?r;ips; conv-y n : u r
181 to _lthe~ clnte~ns: ~ ; irnle? f7.' T in --e-- ena we --hi._ FT": bud cn- Jt3-!
son1 illeA, g .0 :.























i ; r




I


W. M. BOSTWFCICK JR.
SATTONE AT LAWV,
G~aauArAN r'aosC aND 8AVINGB CO; BIL1IZDING,
~O CoWan BP A\N~D OCEArN STEETS
JACKsonVIILTB,, FlaA.
June 14th, 1906.
( Personal.


Gov; N. B. Broward,
Tallahassee, Fla.

Myr dear Governor:--

I have not as yet received the deed which you porom-

.rited to send me on the ~25th of May. If this paper has been mislaid,

I will send you a newn deed to execute, I have written you several let-

ters ainee that time, but have had no reply. I therefore am very much

impressed with the idea that the mail delivery in Tallahrassee is de-

footive.

Youre truly ~x'





THE tWESTIER~N UNION TELEGRAPH: CO1WVPA .I
-------INCORPORATED -
28,000i OFFICES IN AMERICA. CABLE SERVICE TO ALL THE WORLD.
This Company TRANSHITS and DELIVERSB messages only on Conditions6 limiting fra iability, which hav~e been assented to by the sender of the followtng meanage.
Error can be guarded against only by roueaung a message back to the sending station for comparison.aend the Companp will not hold itself liable for errorsor delays
latranmiseln or delivery of Unrepeated Messages, beyond the amount of tolls paid themeon, nor mo any case where one claun is not pmaeanted in wnting witrhm sixt days
after the msa Is filed with the Comoany for transrmission.
Thds is an UNLPEATED MLESSAik., and is delivend by request of the sender, under the conditions named above.
ROBERT C. CLOWRY, President and General IVanager.

RECEIVEDys J.rne i.L 1Jrias~r

-De P Ko 5 paith

Tallabr~assey 91o.r Jtun lo, 08

Oov. I. A, Bedwrd'lPsId

hstbington, Mich.

All Wesll amL beasasse qu~iei,
J. ma~bett Wolle.
o saw









The Western V
Union Telegraph
Company
THE LARGEST TELEGRAPHIC
SYSTEM IN THE WORLD. ,,O
OVER ONE MILLION SMILES
OF W~IRE IN THE UNITED C
STATES AND CANaDA. 3
It has' over 24,000 Tele-
graph Offices, including Branch
Offices. It has also Direct Con- a~
nection by' Telegraph or Tele-
phone with as many more re-,
mote and smaller stations, mak- E PV
ing a total list of or er 48,000
In the United States, Canada and
Mlexico, and this number is rapid- t
ly increasing. e

The Western U~nion Com~pany has
Two American Atlantic Ocean Cables (t n
from New York City to Penzance,
England, direct both Cables duplexed. o
Four Anglo-American Cables, and one o a
Direct United States Cable. Direct
communication with Germany and
France. zo
Direct Wires to Galveston, Texas, c
connecting with the Mexican Telegraph
Co. and the Central & South America I T
Telegraph Co., for all points in MexicoI
and Central and South America.
Direct Wires and Cables to Havana,
Cuba, and all polots in the edst Indiesm
and to the Bermudas and Babamas.
Pacific Cables to Austra- C
lia, New Zealand, Honolulu, \,4
SGuam, Philippine Islandst \'
Conet snt U. S. Gov-
ernmoent Lines and Cables to w. u.*r. co. OTHIS COB.."
and in Alaska. cm00 a '? a
Domestic and Foreign Iloney Orders by Telegraph and Cable


~1


1 0






jY~'iC~m.tR ESTEN UNION TELEGRAPH CO1WPANT.T
~INCORPORATED ~~ r
28,000 OFFICES IN AMERICA. CABLE SERVICE TO ALL THE WORLD.,
This Oampany TANSHIMTS and DELIV~ERS meslsages only on conditions Il unig its liability,. which have been assented to by he sender of the following mesage.a
Erore canl be guarded agaulst only by reveaung a message back to the sending stanron for comparison.and t~he Company wrill not hold Itself able for errors or delays
Latr~agmission or aelivery of Unrepeared ille~asaes, beyond the amounor tollso pani theraon. nor to any case where the claim is otr psweenrad in wnting wnhan sixty days
ofter the iesag faled with the Comoany for transmlsslon.
This La an LN& EATED MIESSAOr., and is delivemed by request of the sender, under the condicions named above.
ROBERT C. CLOWRY1 President and General Mlanager.

RECE IV ED at


a: Ch Fq KD~ 6 gaid.,

BakRRacatille, 710., -Jun 15, 06

Iron. NQ. B. Browrarbs

L~udington, MIcfh.

Your fan-py well everything all righ~t.
gi. Bsroward.
9 05P










The Western
SUnion Telegraph

Company
THE LARGEST TELEGRAPHIC IY
SYSTEM IN THE WORLD.
OVER ONE MILLION MILES
OF WIRE IN1 THE UNITED
STATES AND CANADA~.

It has over -24,000 Tele-
graph Offices, including Branch
Offices. It has also Direct Con-
nection by Telegraph or Tele-
phone with as many more re-
mote and smaller stations, mak-
ing a total list of over 48,000
in the United States, Canada and
Mexico, and this number is rapid--
ly increasing.

The Western Union Compaoy ilaS
Two American Atlantic Ocean Cables
from New Yorkr Ctyr to Penzance,
England, direct; both Cables duplexed.
Four Anglo-American Cables, and one
Direct United States Cable. Direct
communication with Germany and
France.


O


Direct Wires to Galveston, Texas,
connecting with the Mexican Telegraph
Co.an the Central & South American
Telegraph Co., for all points in Mexicoti
and Central and South Amerka. r
Direct Wires and Cables to Havana,L
Cuba, and all points in the West Indies,
and to the Bermudas and Bahamas. i
lia, New Zealand, Honolulu,~cl als oAsr-C
Guam, Philippine Islands, '
China, Japan, etc. ,,..
Connects with U. S. Gov-
ernment Lines and Cables to w. ur. T. o. OTHER COB.
and In Alaska. nrco or a3

Domestic and Foreign lioney Orders by Telegraph and Cable




k es l..le 188
THE~ WeEsSnCTER UNIO TELI~OBEGRP OO1[~MPAN
~------INCORPORATED --
28,000 OFFICES IN AMERICA.~ CABLE SERVICE TO ALLL THE WORLD.
'This 0ampang TRANSHEITB and D EIJVEES messagen onlg on condiaona linuting has liabihty, which baeR been essented tD by the sender of thetollowingmeae
Errors can be guarded agauntl only ny repearing a message back to he spending stanon for companion. and the Company willnotholditself liable for errorsor dly
(in tanmisson or dell very or repeat ed ]keasraes, beyond the amount of tous pad thereon, nor m any csasewhere the caimis nt presentedinwting within iy
GLfter the mesg is fled with the Cmeom for trnasmission.
This is an LNB A~TED Ji[ES ~ac, and is delivered by request of the sender, under the conditionanamed above.
ROBERT C. CLOWRY, President and General M~anager.


: 14-oh Sv no 9 pale.

Ij Jacksonville. Pte., Tn 6'


Hen. B. B. Ib~rewrd,

iudillg ten, Miah.


friends hous(


Itave not bought materials for


)It Br~oward.
11 8 8 a


RECEIVED at





The Western
Union Telegraph
Company
THE LARGEST TELEGRAPHIC
SYSTEM IN THE WORLD.
OVER ONE MILLION MILES
OF WIRE IN THE UINITED)
STATES AND CANA4DA.

It has over 24,00(
graph Offices, including
Offices. It hhs also Ilire
nection by Telegraph ol
phone w~ith as many m
mote and smaller station
in. .... ..st of .v.,
in the United States, Cane
Mexico, add this number i
ly increasing.

The Western Union Compa
Two American Atlantic Ocei
from New York: City to E
England, direct a both Cables (
Four Anglo-American Cabl~s,
Direct United States Cable.
communication with Germa
France*


L~L


0










O




t-







t




u


0 Tele-
Branch ,
~ct Con--
,r Tele- z-O
ore re- z t
Is, mak- E
....0O
ada and WL
s rapid- (

ny has

an Cables ( l
Penzance, N
duplexed. E
,and one o a
Direct a
Iny andz
z x o


V)
m

O









O


Direct Wires to Galveston, Texas, C
connecting with the Mexican Telegraph
Co. and the Central &r South American yg
TJelegraph Co., for all points in M~exio i
and Central and South America.
Direct Wires and Cables to H~.vana,
Cuba, and all points in the West Indles,
"Wand o c.15tmuaandS Bhanas.
Ha, Nif hidfia~ od, ul~ionolu
Guam, Philippine kIsa~
China, Japan, etc.
Conarcts with U. ~ -r ;
ernment Llaes and CBL w. u.*. c. TR CO B ~r o. 2
and in Alaska. so .e
OFFICci OFFICES
Domestic and Foreign Money Orders by Teligraph and Cable






I Fl. s: THE WETERN UNION TEZL~EGRAP GOO1WPANT.Y
------INCORPORATED -
28,000 OFFICES IN AMERICA. CABLE SERVICE TO ALL THIE WORLD.
'Ihl 00mpany TRA~NSIMITB and D& ZEIJVR messages only on conditions limitmg its liability, which have been assented to by thesenderot theollowingmecssage
Errors can be guanied agamnsr only by meeearng a message bade to the sending satrion for companion, and the Comany ~willnothold itself lIabletor er deay
in trnLsmssion or delivery or Unrepent ed Jlesages, beyond the amount of tolls paid thamon, nor m any case wRhere theclaim isnotpresentedin writing itthin daysr
oaft the mesg is fled with the Comoany for cransmission.
This le an LNEAgTED ]KESBA~r., and is dellwomd by request of the sender, under the conditions nae above.
_ROBERT C. CLOWRY, President and General Manager.

RECEIVED at


17--0% Sv 1Cb LS l~

O~thicgo Jun 16 6

Hon. N. B. Board, i

Try Hiotels,

Lud~ington, Mich.

Have fast returned home wrill 94 gle Cf~ t o-.H see yo ton~gh~t.

F. RZ. NEtles.
1 085L











































U1
U1


- ~. ,,,~-~


-- ~*


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;11




e


The Western *
SUnion Telegraph ~
onlpally
0 TH L~~EST TELEGRAPHIC ~~~~~
-SYSTEM IN THE WORLD-

OF IRE INI TH UNITED
STATES AND CANADA.
LU It has over 24,000~ Tele-
~graph 0mces, including Branch
Offices. It has also hirqct Con-
nection by Telegraph or Tele-
phone with as many more re-
mote and smaller stations, mak-
O In* a to'a "^s o .ver 4s,00o
in the united States, Canada and
Mex ad;SPtit:his mimbes is rapid-


The Westora U~nion Comrpany has
STwo American Atlantic Ocnan Cables
from New York City to Penzance,
England, direct both Cables duplexed.
[OFor Anglo-American Cables, anid one


Direct UnitC JdedStates Cal. Dirct~
communication. with Germnany and
France.
Direct Wfres to Galvestlob, Texas,
cbnnecting with the Meri~can Telegraph
Co. and the Central &e South American
Telegraph Co., for all points in MJexico
and Gentral and South Amecrica.
Direct Wires and Cables to Havana,
Cuba, and all points in the West Indies,
and to the Bermudas and Bahamas.
Pacific Cables to Austra-
IfaNew Zealand, Honotlslu,'
Guam, Philippine Islands,
le wto U. S. Gov- --
ernmnent Lines and Cab'es to
and in Alaska. .


(1) D. omestic and Foreignl Iloney Orders by Telegraph and Cablt


wH. u. r. co. OTHER COB.
sroor a ecr
















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The followinC letter sent to:
fir. G. F". Scott, LawBtay3, Fla..
*V W. 0. eigjer, Glrean Gove Springs., Fla.
John Ea~rnes, 7)ade City, Fla.
; 0 A Fulferd, Pla.


June.~. IfJ u0


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~


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----- INCORPORATED
23,000 OFFICES IN AMERICA. CABLE SERVICE T HE WORLD.
The C'ompany T R A NSMITS and D EL I ERS messages only oin condia...ns Ino ung its Jlbrrat. pitywice e t nr ned r rby the sedera ofhefolowinmm~ ug m
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ROBERT C. CLOWRY, President and Gene~ral Manager. C
SIBR .'BY REC'D BI CH Er K



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THE LARGE5I TELEGRAPHIC `ii
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OVER ONE MILLION MILES
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STATES AND CANADA.

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graph Offices, including Branch
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from New York City to Penzance, I
England, direct; both Cables duplexed. .
Four Anglo-American Cables, and oneo
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communication with Germany and -
France. z x IU o
Direct Wires to Galveston. Texas,
connecting with the Mexican Telegraph
Co. and the Central &r South American
Telegraph Co., for all points in Mexico
and Central and South America.
Direct Wires and Cables to Havana,
Cuba, and all points in the West Indies,
and to-the Bermudas and Bahamnas.
Pacific Cables to Austra-
Hlia New Zealand, Honolulu,
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KNIGHT CROCK~ERY COMPANY,
...DEALERS IN...

CROCKEiRY, CHINA, GLASS, WOOD AND WE~~ZLOW WARE, TIINWARE, ETC.

12 ANVD 14 EAS BAY ST-R-EET.


RAYMON


)TREAS


, Jacksonville, Florida,..........J.REM sl.. ... .s.... 12Q3ie.... 190......









Gov. 'i. B., Broward,

Tallahassee, Fla.

--Dear Governor;

You lomo before th~e election I promi1sedi m;;r friendi

Judge Ha~ll:.!ak ~that wTe world do =ce...ething~i for h!im if you were elected.

Governor. So far there d~oes nlot seem to b~e or ythling: thlat, w could- givre

hiln to do Si:1 hze is nowr an applticanlt for thle posit-ion of Iles .ac~ CTPor

of State Convicts. There seems to be no person better fitt f,-~or this

posl~ition anid I '7' cornsIdJer i+, a p~ergon~al favor if yJou will thirs

a:~.l.. ontment. He seems to foocl tht eskyldgveh.: srTe atod

froma the promise I made him in yo-ur nam~e Isf'ore you w~ere: 0eC3lee.

?? j:..- ou orme;-couirts2L t- tht rouI can1 Bive I_.0 I ani,

Yours ver:; trulyr,






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59Tu8 CON8G~tESS, IIe. ~R. 20048.




IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTACTIVES.
JUNE 7', 1906.
Mr. CLARK(, of Florida, introduced the followingf bill; which was referred to the
Committee on Irrigation of Arid Lands and ordered to be printed.




A BI~LL
Providing for the use of three million -dollars of the money that
would otherwise become a part of the reclamation fund for
the drainage of certain lands in the State of Florida, and for
other purposes.
1. Be it Cwo-ted(~~ by the1 Senate7/C and HFouse of Rer.seallc~? la1-
2 tives of" the Unlited! Stainsl~ of Am~erica in Conlre.>.s, assembled,
3 That three million dollars of the money hereafter arisingf from
4 the sale of public lands, and which, under the Act of June
5 seventeenth, nineteen hundred and two, would otherwise
6 become a part of the reclamation fund, may be used for the
7 purpose of constructing a, suitable and comprehensive system
8 of drainage of the lands known as '' The' Everglades," in the
9 State of Florida, under the supervision of the Secretary of

10 Agriculture: Provided, Thatt all the expense of stich
11 construction, including salaries and the maintenance
12 of workrs for a period not exceeding ten years", shall be ats-








2-

1 sessed against the lands proposed to be drained in proportion

2 to benefits, said assessments to be levied and the money

3 to be paid in not to exceed ten annual installments, under such

4 laws and regulations duly enacted by the legislature of the State

5 of Florida as in the judgment of the. President of the United

6i States shall be adequate to insure the repayment to the United

7 State~s of all money expended under thle terms of this

83 Act: Pr~ovided ~frrther, That all mloney dlerived~from~ such

9 atssessmlents sha.ll b~e paid into the Treasury of t~he United

10 States by3 the said State of Florida, andl when so paid shall
11 be covered inrto the reclam~ationl fiid to be used under the

12 provisions of said Act of June seventeenlth, nineteen hundred
13; and two: Anld procvidedfr fhrther~, That anly mloney paid in by

14 said State of Florida. in excess of the total amount paid out

15 by the United States when the said works a~re completed,
16 including the min~iteunace of the works, shall be returned to
17 the said S~tate of Florida.







"~:TR 'A'".?;I~~ ) H. R. f20048.



A BILL
PIroiding for the nee~ of threeC million dollars. of
the muoney that woucld~ otheri\\i-se becomec a1
par~t of the echlulnatio n fundr for thle dratin-
age of certain lands in the State of F~lorida,
and for other purposes.

B\ Mr. CL'ums, of Florida.
JUsr:;, 190t;. -Referred to tbe Coomnittee on Irriention of
A ridJ Lanlds and- ord~redl to be printed.




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FLORIDA HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE All,.,.. letes f nqir ndal ohe Cresonene hol
7B. F. TVHI~TNER, SUrPER~INT~eNDE:NT, be addressed to the Superintendent.
frceight, Express and Telegraph Offices. AHI FREIGHT must be PREPAID and invoices made in
RIVE JUCTIO, FLORDA.DUPLICATB, to avoid delay in payment.

(Personal) June 17th"
CHAT AOHEE. F-LA., __ _______ _1906.
Hon. N'. B.; Broward, Governor,
Tallahassee, Floridaw
Dear Governor:
The Press dispa qes to the effect that Congressm~an larke
has introduced a bill approp eating a certain amount for the drainage of
the Ev~erglades has caused mie some~ concern as this move appears to me a
shrewd piece of political buncomb7e, and not anyr desire or present intention
._ of pushing the bill ~to a passages
Believing; that the Congressman mentioned as fathering this bill is
entirely dominated by the~ vera ~interests that are today so vigorously op-
posing: the drainage, I also believe that this bill was introduced to give
_:~them an argument against the adoption of the proposed Constitutional Am2end-
ment at this time. As this b 11 must necessarily lie over until the next
session of the Congress they fcan put out a very plausible argument to the
effect that,for the State to go ahead at this time will be but to antici-
pate the national Government andi to spend our money when a generous Nation
is only waiting to do it for us., Human nature is prone to procrastinate
anyhow and anh an argument would, I_ believe, oarry weight' I have no
doubot that, in the possible event of the railroads being awarded any
considerable portion of these lands in the courts,theyp wtould then apply in

all sincerety,for national aid~. I cannot think that this move Jla sincere";
My object in writing this is to Offer the suggestion that it might
prove good policy to anticipate their use of this thunder by showing up
the true objest of the moe Thab is, of course, if you agree with the
opinion I have formed I will be very gliad to contribute one or more ocM-
municationps to the Press friendly~ to the adoption of the Amendment, either







LDURIDB 11U01111L I 1R 1E HIJ 11R11Js All letters of Inquiry and all other Gorrespondence should
B. F WHINER SU ERITENDNT.be addressed to the Superintendent.
Freight, Expdress and Telegraph Offices. All PRElOHT must be PREPAID and invoices made in
DUPLICATE, to avoid delay in payment.
RIVER JUNCTION, FLORIDA.

CHATTAHOOCHEE. FLA,,___ __ __ _____ 1906..

signed as voicing my personal sent~iment~s or simply for use in the campaign.l
SOne thingJ is nsur; those favoring the adoption of the proposed amend-

me~nt should beatir themselves if it pass
I should be glad to be of service in this or any other manner, and

would be glad to have your views. I feel confident that within a month of
the adjournment of Congress, the; opposition papers will begin a campaign

along;' the lines I have suggested, although, of course, I may be wrong,~
With the assurance of my high personal regards,
Yout~rs very truly,


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~IN ACCOUNT WITHIN

THIE ]F3LO)RIDA IF~EMALEE COTILIE]G-E.


B;ased=an@Ledging feem.. 8ilc.47C. &: .au ~. h ~.Lu .' tlC . .

Registration Fee. ........ 4CZr. .4 4&...... ...... ... .... 8 Ji ...

Library Fee ................. ........R........... 2......0o

LaI~boratoryv, Biology, ('he(linitl\y, Domnestic Science Fee.......... ... ... ...... ......I:

Instrumental Musie. ...q ... . ............. ... .. .
Yocal Unllmi:-. .........,....... . . . . . . . . .. . ..


School of Art~e~. ........~C. ...... .. ... r.4........~. ... ..... 1/ S3)o~

Piano P'ractie . . . . . . .. . .

Iisce atneous. .. ... .....................~39 .CY ......


i ;* Total...... .. ...... ......

Receic'l met. ..................................... TreasurerCI.

Dato ..............r....... ..................... 100....




P- -~ ~-


ToE FLORIDA FEMALE COLLEGE
OFFICE OFTHE PRESIDENT


TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
Junet 263,1906.



M.; Dear Governor;



I am sending '_; the janitor eiigkht diplomas thnat

require :-cue signature. You will locate the place in the left

hand lower corner of ea~ch. Kindly sign these~ whlile my manl waits,

as Mr.Muphree is anxiouLs to fo-\ce..ed1 them~r to the gSraduates.

I: am also enclosing heirew~ith a statement of

Doreas' explenses at the College last session. I have sent thlis

befores,but I guess you have been too busy to givea it attention.

I amn ruating~.todayr a final statement Lo ther Boar4 of Control,and

should like3 to indCLude this amlouf- ~ts 'n3 cash he.1.nt~lce instead of

among: bills payable. If con.0 i.j-'t eda so edf me chetck. With

warmest regardis,

'our or truly,






































































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~-NEW YORK SUKDAY M G, 3fARCIT 25, 1906.


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Co) hbt IB, Ue United States arid Great Britain
tar Curtis Brown~.
.A ll igte 8triclyU Resekwed.
ONDON, March 15.--There is more of
'*mt rst and importance than aP*
peas~ on the surface in the sanction
i.unt given by Mbr..I~ldane,the' ew Liberal
se ayof War, to the establishment of
:.1.8 go of Frogtiersmen. Apparently Its
e or operations.'Is to. be the whole wide
i';~ild, and ilts component parts the British
i-a' Fost vigorous and pleturesque
habtags-toseof' whom Kipling wrote:
The.~'~ilec'sr lgoIIth ~ever sas listedd,
i. But 8[ int la thogsand detachments..
l-;1a brreakB thie raid for the 191t-
~4 t is heretofore "'wholly
P 0ew arm I r Io t
time of _peacL hut
whP~:l~eneve ttletfaie a
te o a Isle:'~akl t e
chlizcLe me dznd rolid 8.
as oialas .b it~r~rde-:
illiefs is fol; llnd anywhere elses in te
'iitd'~i elhezforrnetlon -of a,.elm]a to -
irish n~rnd'tean wars t.whc d ae
Stid:l~ates ma becdm'e.engaged a
td~lYi ber of a kind thatewilllaiored a
Ed~:ellent~opportunities for te employmeo o
and.wc uarfoce, th~e romantic story of the
; foun lag.6 the' Legion of Pront~lersmen, its
li" pardri~- oa~e.-wl-be-wof great--latlerestto.
P~lhecn aders.
~a~ uia:of this newq~army .Is Roger
wy-~ -wntanow. *nuer anthur


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club of adventukrs would be good fun, and
that It might be extremely useful In bring-
ing together the sort of men who could $est
.serve~ the empire as guides, enouts aiid
raiders In warfare. Nothing, however, came
of Ir, and I started hunting trouble agaln as
captain of a pack train In the .West. Later,
as a BCOut In South Africa during the Boer
war. I happened to get punished for feeding
oeas to ah hor b eaw ooicer Imo eg n

ala ralized then that we Fronteramon
,.were beine; put to wrong uses, and my iaub-
seqluent experience in the campaign
s nbec~ est oUer h on ar too ake hhan
in*(hetlight. Outnumberlng th'e "&oem, we
'Frontlersmen of' the 'Emglre,- thieted of
bea~ting':Hiem at their own game;,"friered
away ~our strength',playing .at soldiers apd
Imitating Tommy. It Is.with no grudge,
but with loving admiration that we own
up* now how well' he knew his business.
But had we come, not as amateurs, but as
guides, as scouted, as pioneers, as horsemen
for flying raids; with our own leaders and
organization omur awnhmethods, t hlsand -

bring the war to a swifer, more decisive.
more, merclful ending. But it was the
Boers who served-as frontiersmen, with the


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Copyright, 100. byF. G.Idams.
nEAR ~R. BAE~~E-- do hope you will
stand firm against~the arrogant de-
mands-of the men wh6 have been
mining coal for you, and that you RWH not
again permit your sympanthetic nPture to be
*swayed by popular clamor
You must realize the weight -of the re-
aponsibility which rests on you, and I am
sure that you will sink your personal-In-
clination to let the workmen' have their
bwn way and consider only that y~ou are the
active trustee for the vested Inte~rests of our
beloved commonwealth. It is up to y'ou,
gear.Brother.Bned and I do pray. that.you


to share in these extra millions earned by I'watering places-is fact. they i~ould not
'your mines and y~our railroads? They. did help support any of the great, institutions
the work, of courser, but any one can woric allich keep money In circulation, and on
if he can find someone to pay: him wages. anilch our continued prosperity as a na-
You and your associates had -the judg- tron depends. This truth is so apparent
mcnt, the forethought and the money with that it needs no lucid argument.
which to acquire control of thle anrhracite The workman is a sort of necessary ecll
coal business of' the United "States, and no w~hicir will disappear as civilitallon adl-
reward Is~tc~o great for such a combina- vani~ces. Even" now one can I~ve in Nqw'
tlon. Whin they forced y~ou to pay more York city. for weeks' without encountering.
wnges, what did you do, Brother B~aer? one-unless you call a waiter a workman.i
You put up.the price of coal to the con- a"nd I do not class, him as such. We are i
sumer.~ Ah! that was a stroke of genius! /beginning to call~him a "steward'' in New
You did-not sulke in your onfce. Not a bit Y ork, biut I think that.**trustree" is a more
of It. With an intuition woqrthy~of Napolepn.ldignified and appropriate litle for him.
you perceived the road to victory. and you But as'I was --aying, the w~orkman should
took it. With one stroke of your pen yciu .be made to realize' that he is an anachrro-
tilted the price of edal A\ commonplace n1sm. It will not help his soelal statue by
man would have raised the price just .givilng him reore wages. Statistics prove
enough to have met the increased wage ,thlat he spends all that he receives, and the
fund, but you are not an ordinary man, constant fluctuation In wages only In-
Br,ther Bae-r. It Is this capacily to take ;crhases the work of boolkkeeping.
adv'antage-of an opportunity which distin. . ExYCUse this brief dissertation on the eco-
guishes the American business rnan above- nomic reatures of mne case. Like ybu, .1
all` others in the world, and.you haE.ve been on"ce worked for a Ilring, and am thus able
gifterd In a most remarkable degree. Ito take a calm and dispassionate view of
In looking ov.er y~our most, interesting those whlo are so unfit as to continue in
autobiography in "Who's Who Lq America" that class.
I note this signlicant paragraph: ""For Stad firm. Brother Baer! If-you are
years confidential legal advised* In Pennsyl- again compelled to~grant more wages aqd
\.anfit. to J. Pie-rpont Mlorgan." That tells shorter hours, EOslk up the price of coal,
the story:. W hile other young men of your Th'e public will stand it; they are used to
age frlrtere~d away their time in- studying It. They will not blame y.ou-they will
merdleine, arts, sciences and other non- l.Ent their wrath on the stupid coal miners
esserntials, you aimed stealght at the mlarks who are not content to submit tamely to
and now look at you! The emilnent position 'tne decrees of an all-wise Pfavidence. In
yoru have attained and which you so the meantime, cable for J. P. I am on the
w~orthily fill should aserve as a.lesson and a track of Ilfr. Rockefeller. Sincerely,
stimulus to the rising generation. FR'EDERICK UIPHAM ADAMIS.
OfP course, not every young mlan can ex-
pect to becomez .conrldential legal adviser EQUAL TO THEl CRISIS.
In Pennsy'lvania to J. Pierpont Mdorgan,"
but there are other States than Pennsy.l- An eilderly,man centeredd the third car et
vania, and mother great men than Mr. M~or- an Erie train in Jersey City one evening
gan, but I must say that It would be diffi- last week and selected a sear. In the centre
cult to select a mlore attractive combina.- of thie car. }te carried wirb care~a hair
rlon* which loo~kred as If It might have contained
if you are still confidental legal adv~iser fruit. Depositing the bag carefully onlthe
in Pennsy~l\'adia to J. Pierpont MorgaLn I seat besitle hiin. he drew a newspaper ifom
will suggest that you advise him to finish hils pociret and soon became so engrossed
his business with the Pope as soon as poess- In reading that ~he was lost to his attr*
.ble and come home. I presume he some- roundings...As the starting time of the traln
times advises you, and in such a'erslae as a approached the ear rapid~y filled up, untll
coal strike I can think of no one whose there was but'olie seat left vacant. That
advilce and moral support would be more was the seat nexrt to the old gentleman.
desirable. A nattily dressed young mart, carrying his
Don't you think St a good idea to tilt the overcoat on hla arm, entered the car, cast
price of coal a little right now? Then It his eye hurriedly around, apied the seat
the men go on edtike the public will have next til the old gentleman and made a b'ee
adjusted itself to higher prices for coal. line for it.
and if they do not go on strike there Is All this time the old gaintleman was ab-
nothing lost. sorbed In hle paelr. He failed to notIte
I have been making a careful study of the approach of the yourts 2an, who can~
the peoPle in my, section at the country, his overcoat ov~er "the seat .and plumjped
and 1 must say that I do not agree with himself down with a satistled grunt'. There
the~ theory that they will kick 1t you~put was an ominous-cracking iound, and thre
up the pifee at coal another notch or two. yohng man sprang up much pore quickly
Mlost of us, including all of our widows and than he had sat down. He lifted his ovea-
orphans, are owners of Reading stock, and coat to find the back of i Lsameised witi
we are willing to pay a little more for coal the yolks of eggs. The young' man gllardI
so long as R~eading continues to boom. fiercely.at the old gentledrian, '7ldstigPse
The only way in which money. Is absolute- eggs belong, to you?" he dagnade~dh fircelr.
ly lust to a commulnlr y rs by playing it out The elderly one-looked ~upN~grajsed the
in w~age 9 This is a fact well ktnown to all situation and replied innocently: "Why. nno
modern polite at economists L you were those -weren't my eggs. .They- were there I
to be so foolish as to double the wnges of when I sat down, and I.thought they. It@
creary mau. woman and child in your em- longed to some one-who would returnI 295
ploy--whlt good would it do the country? them later."
Not a bit. They would purchase no auto- "Well, if I ktnew who owned iLholts.~g
,mobles,8 th~e\ would not help supportL the* I'd wring his neck!" hlsse9.tlheylO 7,OSH
stock: market. rihey would build no costly through his teeth, looking~at his omelett <;
rcsidcn.:. :_ thecir daughters would have no oveprcoat.
~sL Rybl~~ kV.Elidings. thley ,would rent no "I wouldn't blame you," rap~lied tChe ao
bolxes at she operas, they,,would AQOCk-10solE ge.DLehag4. laR~tDE DBok-tPhS **~


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