• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 History
 Site
 City wall
 Building program
 Design
 Zoning
 City master plan






San Agustin Antiguo orientation center
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102906/00001
 Material Information
Title: San Agustin Antiguo orientation center
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: Bessette, Ted
Publisher: Ted Bessette
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1977
Copyright Date: 1977
 Subjects
Genre:
Spatial Coverage:
Coordinates: 29.897508 x -81.314504
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00102906:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Title Page
        Title page
    Table of Contents
        Page i
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    History
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Site
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    City wall
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Building program
        Page 64
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Design
        Page 82a
        Page 82b
        Page 82c
        Page 82d
        Page 82e
        Page 82f
        Page 82g
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Zoning
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
    City master plan
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 130a
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
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        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
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        Page 164
        Page 165
Full Text






TED BESSETTE


SAI


N AGUSTIN
ORIEN A 10N


AN IGUO
(ENTER
















SAN AGUSTIN ANTIGUO ORIENTATION CENTER


by
Ted Bessette





A Terminal Project ,Presented To The Graduate
Council Of The University Of Florida In Partial
Fulfillment Of The Requirements For The Degree Of
Master Of Arts In Architecture





University Of Florida
1977












INTENTSS

INTRODUCTION 1

HISTORY

SITE 8

CITY WALL 5 4.

SLIDES 64

BUILDING PROGRAM 69

DESIGN 83

ZONING 94

MASTER PLAN 107











INTRODUCTION











A visit to St. Agustine in 1971 was the start of an unending
fascination with the city that can be identified as the beginning of
this project. The friendly human scale of the early city created by
the scale and compactness of its architectural forms and street plan
give it a quality that one immediately wants to become a part of. It
is hoped that through continued studies and experiences in St. Agustine
an understanding of the fine qualities of the city will be gained
that will be reflected in all future work.
The survey of Historic Zone 1 in St. Agustine by Peter Dessauer
and myself in 1975 further introduced me to the area. This survey
enabled me to locate the information sources and helpful knowledgable
people necessary to begin the work on this project.
A visit to the office of Bob Stienbeck of the Historic St.
Agustine Preservation Board brought the need for the Orientation
Center to my attention. The Orientation Center is a part of the San
Agustin Antiguo Master Plan which is included in this report. The
building program is based on the information in the Master Plan,
talks with Bob Stienbeck, a survey of existing exhibits in St.
Agustine, and research on the basic building functions.
The site of the orientation center was selected by the St.
Agustine Preservation Board. Because many changes were required to
create the site it was first necessary to study the early street
plan and relocate Tolomato Lane seventy feet to the south and turn
Spanish Street to the northwest at the new junction. It was then
necessary to find out what the City Wall and San Domingo Redoubt


























would look like so the design of the Orientation Center would relate
to these major elements.
What follows is a collection of information pertinent to the
design of the San Agustin Antiguo Orientation Center.











HISTORY








The story of the founding of St. Augustine
cannot be told without including the story of
colonization of the southeast section of the
United States. Known today as the nation's
oldest continuously occupied city, St.
Augustine's history is firmly interwoven with the
fates and fancies of many nations and people,
The discoverer of Florida was Don Juan Ponce
de Leon, a former governor of Puerto Rico.
Ponce de Leon sighted the eastern coast of
Florida on Easter Sunday, March 27, 1513
while on a trip in search of gold and silver. Ponce
claimed the land for Spain and named it La
Florida.

In the following half century, the government
of Spain launched no less than six expeditions
attempting to settle Florida but all failed. In 1564
the French succeeded in establishing a fort and
colony near the mouth of the St. Johns River
and in doing so, threatened Spain's treasure
fleets which sailed along Florida's shorelines. As
a result of this incursion into Florida King Philip II
named Don Pedro Menendez de Aviles, Spain's
most experienced admiral, governor of Florida,
and instructed Menendez to explore and to
colonize the territory. King Philip also instructed
him to drive out any corsairs or settlers of other
nations if they should be found in Florida.
On September 8, 1565, with banners flying,
trumpets sounding, artillery booming and 600
voyagers cheering, Menendez set foot on the
shores of St. Augustine. In honor of the Saint
whose feast day it was when Menendez first
sighted shore, he named the town St.
Augustine.
Menendez quickly set to work following the
instructions of King Philip. With brilliant military
maneuvers and a tremendous amount of good
fortune, Menendez did away with the French
garrisons. Following these successes he set to
work establishing a permanent colony, as well as
establishing Indian missions for the church and
perimeter fortifications for the town.
Forty-two years before the English colonized
Jamestown and fifty-five years before the
Pilgrims landed .at Plymout Rock, St.


Augustine was founded and she remains to this
day the oldest permanent European settlement
in the continental United States.
Maintaining St. Augustine as a permanent
colony and military base, however, was a mighty
task. Without the courage, perseverance, and
tenacity of the early pioneers, it is very doubtful
that the community would have survived.
Sir Francis Drake. the English corsair, pillaged
and burned the town in 1586, and then in 1668
another pirate, Captain John Davis and his
English buccaneers, plundered the homes and
left 60 persons dead in the streets. Clashes
between the Spaniards and the British became
more frequent when the English colonies were
established in Georgia and the Carolinas.
The year 1672 saw work begun on the stone
fortress now called Castillo de San Marcos. The
fort was nearly completed in 1696 but not
officially dedicated until 1756. Attesting to the
strength of the Fort, in 1792 Governor James
Moore of Carolina led a two-month siege without
success and in 1740 an even stronger attack by
British General James Oglethorpe of Georgia
was beaten off.
Iln 1763, the stroke of a pen accomplished what
pitched battles had failed to do. Spain gave
Florida to Great Britain in exchange for newly
conquered Havana and St. Augustine came
under British rule for the first time. England ruled
over the city and territory for 20 years which
inchided the period of the American Revolution.
The citizens of the city remained loyal to the
crown throughout the span. In 1783, under the
terms of a treaty signed by England, France and
Spain, East Florida and St. Augustine returned
to the rule of Spain, which lasted for 37 years.
In this period of the world's history, many
changes were taking place in Europe and as a
result, 255 years after Menendez set foot on the
shores of St. Augustine, Spain sold Florida to
the United States of America. At a colorful
military ceremony on July 10, 1821. troops of
the United States took possession of the territory
and the Spanish soldiers departed, never to
return again.
The new regime found the town in a pathetic
condition, devoid of progress and with great








apathy among its citizens. Much of this had been
created in the closing years of the second
Spanish period due primarily to the general
poverty of the area. Many of the buildings were
run-down, some almost in ruins. After the
American occupation speculators arrived in the
city to take advantage of the situation. A yellow
fever epidemic in 1821, however, carried off
many of these newcomers. Despite the condition
of the city it was said to have possessed a mellow
charm with the scent of orange blossoms in the
air, the narrow streets with latticed gates that led
into cool courtyards, and a lack of industry or
commerce to disturb the serenity of the scene.
Although St. Augustine of the early 1800's was
difficult to reach, many distinguished visitors
such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, noted poet and
philosopher, as well as Prince Napoleon Achille
Murat, son of the King of Naples and nephew of
the great Napoleon, made the arduous journey.
The Seminole war of 1836 called a halt to this
new awakening temporarily, as the Indians
made a desperate attempt to regain control of
Florida from the Americans. In 1837, two
prominent Seminole leaders, Osceola and
Coacoochee, with a number of warriors were
captured just south of St. Augustine where they
had come under a white flag for a parley with the
Americans. All were imprisoned in the Castillo
from which Coacoochee and 20 of his
companions managed to escape. Osceola
however was transferred to Fort Moultrie at
Charleston, S.C., where he died. Remnants of
the Seminole Indians continued battling
American forces until most of them were either
killed or had surrendered for transfer to
reservations in the West-
The end of the Seminole war made Florida safe
once again for visitors, who among other
reasons came to take advantage of the fine
climate. In 1845 Florida became the twenty-
seventh state of the Union with Tallahassee
selected as the state capital. This was a
compromise between St. Augustine and
Pensacola, both of which were difficult to reach
from most parts of the state.
St. Augustine continued to prosper until it was
interrupted by another conflict, the Civil War.
Slaves in this area had played a minor role in thy


economy as compared with the rest of the state
and there was considerable Union sentiment in
the city due to the number of northern-born
Residents. Florida, however, seceded from the
Union and according to letters of the time, "It
was announced here by the firing of cannon and
'musketry, and much shooting. A large flag made
by the ladies wve~d on the square. By order of
the Governor of the state;the fort, barracks and
federal property were taken possession of.
Cannons are mounted on the ramparts of the
fort to defend it if any attempt should be made to
retake it." The temporary joy of the inhabitants
was soon replaced with sadness. Many of the
young men from the city served in the
Confederate armies while the majority of the
northern-born citizens returned north for the
duration of the war. In March of 1862 a Union
blockading squadron appeared off the inlet and
demanded the city's surrender. During the night,
the small Confederate garrison withdrew and the
next morning the city was occupied by Union
forces who remained until the end of the conflict.
At the conclusion of the War, in 1865, St.
Augustine was three centuries old. The effects of
the war and the privation it had caused took
some time to wear off, but the winter visitors
began their return almost immediately. Facilities
were bad to say the least, so work was begun on
improving the travel arrangements and
accommodations. In 1883 the Jacksonville, St.
Augustine and Halifax River railway was
completed giving the city a link with its neighbor
to the north, Jacksonville.
During the winter of 1883-84 Henry M.
Flagler, one of the co-founders of the Standard
Oil Company, visited the city and was impressed
with the charm and possibilities of the area. As a
result of his interest, the magnificent Ponce de
Leon Hotel was built, as were the Alcazar and
Cordova Hotels. With the opening of these three
the wealthy and fashionable flocked to St.
Augustine, soon to become known as the
"Southern Newport." Flagler purchased the
surrounding railroads at the same time as he
started his hotels, marking the beginning of the
Florida East Coast railroad. Eventually he
extended the FEC down the east coast of
Florida, first creating Palm Beach and then







Miami in 1896.
The progress engendered by men such as
Flagler also took its toll. The old and storied
inevitably gave way to the then new and
modern. Many old houses and the remaining
sections of the defense lines were uprooted to
make way for new buildings. In those days these
changes were hailed as a great improvement.
Construction wasn't the only enemy St.
Augustine had, however; fire did its share of
damage. In 1887 flames swept the Cathedral
and much of the block north of the plaza.*In
1914, a disastrous fire wiped out many of the
buildings in the older section of the city between
the city gates and the plaza.
St. Augustine, weathering the storms of World
War I and II, has undergone a rebirth with the
quaint Spanish charm being re-instilled through
:he dedication of its citizens. Major areas of the
city have undergone facelifting to return it to the
appearance of the first Spanish period. As a
result of this, St. Augustine has again beibome a
major point of interest for tourists. Now,
however, instead of just a winter playground, St.
Augustine. rich with the heritage of the past, has
become an important center for visitors all year
long.











SITE










7 ~ 7 'Z, ? 'N I C 'E e, 1\L
A-1-AMOR~TH TO POWT7E VEDRA


INLET co cH (S AN 5 owdor s
vitANO 8a *C H I,.hlhou se Bonean
o SALT RUN I=.,hanq Pie





WYAC




MA~~ N AA A E UE as ONY oos cuo ae


0~r sId aLOC I A






U 0 a 5E
C~ro O.. C~umen d,' : 0For,, ur
URR. Sa 1 "ray"' HMEMORCH LS OFFCEHiso
To~ 010 N ION L Ou RtI *y ERAN L.co t A g u t n
SCONCE DEa lH LEO N P O KER r d

kSAN- s 548ASTIA RI r OR "'":'"mlN
I~~AFLBUM)I or OF~ Ir0 "~ ,1 L nianEor N h











SIll


r II
iC. *cjo~--;=~-


Aerial pDhotographs of site. See slides for more clarity.








The proposed site for the San Agustin Antiguo Orientat-
ion Center is located on the two blocks, presently known as
blocks 11 and 11A, directly inside the City Gate to the sou-
thwest. This site was chosen by the Historic St. Agustine
Preservation Board and is a part of the Master Plan.
For the site to accommodate the proposal it was necces-
sary to make changes in the street plan. These included the
closing of a section of Orange Street, moving Tolomato Lane
seventy feet to the south, and rerouting Spanish to the north-
west. can be seen on the site plan and are explained here
with a study of the early maps.
All of the buildings on the site accept the Old School
are to be removed. As many as six reconstructed buildings
are being considered for the site but evidence of their ap-
pearance is lacking. For this reason it is recommended that
archeological work be closely coordinated with preparation
of the site for construction. The information needed from
the archeologists includes evidence of the appearance and
location of all of all early buildings, roads, the City
Wall, and all lesser features of the site that would aid in
the interpretive presentation of the area. It is this evid-
ence that the reconstructions on the site will be based on.
It is further recommended that excavations be conducted with
the thought that a significant excavation area will be
preserved to demonstrate the excavation process to the visitor.
















wnddntl/ NIcf~ comRPkId atthallf Suit~q....

OLDEST WOODEN SCHOOL HOUSE
BUILT BEFORE THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR
SEE THE OLD-TFAHIOND K/TCHn,. SEPARATED FROM THE MAIN
BUILD/HG. WITH THE OLD COOKING UTENSILS IN USE BEFORE
THE REWVOLTIONAIRY WAR. STROLL THROUGH THE BEAUTIFUL
OLD GARDEN. OMCE THE SCHOOL PLAYGROUND. WITH ITS
OLD-FASHIONED FLOWERS AND TREES --SIT AT THE WISHING
WELL WITH ITS OLD-T/ME WELL SWEEP. TAIE BACK WITH
YOU A MEMORY, TO TREASURE IN YOUR HART OF THIS
OLD GARDEN WITH ITS UNTOLD WEALTH OF ANCIENT LORE
WORDS CANNOT DESCRIBE THE INTERIOR OF THE OLD
SCHOOL HOUSE. INS/DE YOU W/LL SEE THE OLD CLASSROOM,
WITH LIFE-SIZEDFIGURES OF THE TEACHER AND PUPILS
RARE OLD SCHOOL BOOKS. OLD-FASHIONED SLATES AND
ISLATE PENCILS AND OLD MAPS. UPSTAIRS IS SHOWN
THE LIVING OUARTERS OF THE OLD SCNOOL-MASTER.
MANY ITEMS OF OLD FURNWITURE, FIREARMS. TC.,


m ~"Built of Cedarni


di
sti3 C









tmas t-llis

iigl~ as1

I z
























Indicators of what the archeologist is to look for can
be found in the following maps and writings about the area
of the proposed San Agustin Antiguo Orientation Center. The
following sequence traces the evolution of the site with
some of the most significant early maps. This information
is is from the files of the Historic St. Augustine Preserva-
tion Board.








































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i~ i

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~~r '7


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~ 15-1
:
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-


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Models of San Agustin Antiguo found in Government House.










BLOCK 11-A
Lots 1-6

Official ;iap of the ;;ity of Saint Kugustine, r'lorida, June 12, 1923. District iEo. L,
Block 11-A, Lots 1-6.


1764 PUENTE hWIP ANDi KCEY

Block A;

Lot Ir ? # 32 Lsorenza Sanchez, tabby and frame house 20 varas IIS &r 17 varas i;;
Dart ofP
Perh~aps a fraction of # 32 is on present-day lot Ir, block 11-A, thle
remainder is outside the block.


# 33 F-edro hieto, stone house 60 varas E\S &c h$ varas EU

Probably on present-day lot 3, block 11-h.


Lot 3


~3L Lorenza Sa~nchez, lot

Present-day lot 2, block 11-


67 "i varas Ns E: So : varas EU


Lot 2





iLot 6
a nart
of lot


#1 36 Barbara Santoyo, 28 m varas NuS &: 26 varas j7E +400~7 s~Can

Present-day lot 6 and part of lot 5 / block 11-A.







LIST 0_ PRIOPERTIES SOLD) BY P~ivTE; TO F~ISHI AND~i OrTHR IN 1766, PAP;JLLS
DE CUBAi, rJJ3AJO 372, SEVLLE, SPAINl.

Lot 6 #Y 211 (Puente A-35)
c; heart The house of B3irbara Sant yo 30 Fesos
of lot Sold to Jesse Fish



Lot 3 I 212 (Puente A-33)
Another Ihouse] of P3edro N;ieto 25 Pesos
Sold to Jesse Fish



1L7611 LAST FSOIIDA PAPERS, BUND~LE 319, JE3SSE FISH NCCO~UIN LIST

Lot 2 # 57 (Puente A #~320r 36 or c 3 56r ?)
or b Lorenzo Sanchez
oart of (no entry)


Lot 6 # 62 (puente A #~35 ?)
a part Barbara Sant~oo
of Lot (no entry)
5 177



1765 1rcusC IF myci

All of Property of Mr. Fish
bock







1788 O0~CUE; MAP AED:i K~Y


All of Square $ South # 19
blozk Apnarently G 19 includes all of present btock 11-A and part of
11-A block 11; however, the only structure is on w~hat is now block 11.

Timb~er-frame house, in bad condition, palm thatch roof, ownmed
by Mriguel Villalonga; its lot as well as the adjacent; lot shown
on said block owned by the 3rown.




1790 QUE~tSADAi

All of Square 11 # 93
block (Add 720 rr)
11-A House of Mi~guel Villalonga on K~ing rs lot, bounded: north by the line
of ':Puerta de Tierra,r' ea~rt by F'rancisco Arnau, west byr the cemetery
of Tolomato, south by the street that foes to the cemetery.
65 (E-Ws) X 32 v. a b rr per sq. v.



1303 LSCRIITURA~S, 1786-1821, Rialusj 371r, p.76v, iMARCH 18, 1'r3n3 ,E
AiT SAINT~ AiUGUSTIN;E HIISTORIIDAL SOCIETY.

All of Governor 'hite to Migiuel Villalonga lot 93 Block 11 a little
block house EN 65 varas NJS 32 varas bounded front which is South by
11-A a lane North line of the City Gates East lot of Francisco Arnau
dest Tolomato Street. #93 Biastion







LIST OF APPRASISAL


Block 11 # 93
douse of ;liguel Villalonga on the King's land, bounded at the front
by the lane leading to the Demetery of Tolomato, on the North by
the line of the land, on the East by Francisco Arnau, and on the
.\est by the said Cemoeter~y; its measurement at the front hast/idest,
forty-five yards which at the rate of half a real a yard, and its
increase amounts to ---------------------------------- 1LL ;reates

L~ote
That this day was issued title of possession and ownership in
peroetuity, by the Government, to H-iguel Villalonga of the soove
lot, in virtue of the R2oyal ce'dula of 17th June 1801, remitting
to those in debb for quitrents the payment of capital. and rents
for the houses and lots thley acquired that had been returned to
the IRoyal domain. Saint Aiugustine, M'arch 31, 1803.




CLENENhTS SURIVE;Y


Al~l of
block
11-A


1836


Fart of lot # ii
Idichael Villalonga
lMichael Villalonga

All1 of lot #S 5
Michael Villalonga
Bennet & Pomner


All of
block
11-A


Original claimant (1800)
Present claimant


Original claimant (1800)
Present claimant


190$

Lot 1


OFF"I3IAL SITY MA?~ AND;i SUPPLENENT~ TO


P. HIonson, Heirs


Dwelling








Block 11-A
Lots 1-6
cont.

1905
Lot 2 F. M~onson, Hieirs Dwelling

Lot 3 F. M'onson, Hieirs Dwell.ing

Lot b i. D. WJrigEht Dwelling

Lot 5 w~. D. Wright Stor-e

Lot 6 F. M;onson, neirs D~welling










Joyce E~lizabeth H-arm~an
Hiistorian
Hiistoric Saint Augustine
Preservation Board
July, 1971







S
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1764 PUENTE MAP KEY


uorth to east to
cout (vaas)west (v s

00 00


INSIDE THLE FORTIFICATIONJ tALLS




22. K~ing's ~home~-, used as a forge .

23. Taobby an1Jd fr~r:m house of the heirs of B~artolol

Montes do Oca

24. Ston~e ho~use of the Kingl, used ais the main GUar~d house

25, Heirs of Do~r. Nicolic Ponice de Ledn, lot

26. Stone wallsl of a church built for a larger prrrish '

27. Stone church~, ued as a pai~fsh church


25

,00

35

J5

47


BLOCK A


Scebsti~an eo la Crus, lot

DonVenuraDiss, Cabby anld frameOO houses

T~oms 52mca, frame ho0use.

Josd Garcia 3arazonna,.stone houses

Lorenza SE*3i1:che to~bby and frame house .

Pedr-o ::o 'l., a tnc house

Loreza :;Sinche, lot

E'iftbra Sanltoyc, tanb'y house


28.

29,

30.

31.

32.

33.



35.


12

281

19

20

20

40

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-120

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KEYi TO TH5IE DETAILEDT PLAN O'F THE~ CI~TY

OF SAN A1GUSTIN OF EArST FLOIRIDA

25'APRiIL 17~88



Mariano de ~la Rocque


Tranlsla~ted 'oy

\ Eugenia B, Arana



The S~t;, Augustin Fe Historical Socie~ty


1961


Block ~uner 5

Timbbr-~fram~e house, jin bad condition, palm thatch

roof, owned by M~iguel Viillal3onga; its lot as well

as the adjacent lot shown on said block owned by

thle Crown.

House, half wat-tled and rouGhly plastered (cuje yr

embarrado), with some masonr~y pillars, and the

other half of wood, in bad condition, shingle

roof; owned br Juan Yenabst; whose lot; is said

to belong to Mlr, Fish,

House, szme as the previous one, in samE condition,

owned by Mairgarita Capela; lot ow~ned by Mr. Pish.

Timber-fraome house, in good condition, orated by

Fran.o Arau; lot owned by the Crown.


South


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/**&sle~j 1~~.-in5 AnThoon Prdeone
"' J7L den
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Micae arelaam .?? (- e..q .a
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'Jl' M rs? W cm pbe/ -- --- ----- p HeirOa jC Ma u / o e o b** t

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MLEENTS


1183re








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MAP DRAWN BY ROBERT RANSON, JANUARY 1, 1905.


___








5 Blook at Otty Gates
Oliveros made much Bqey from the rose tree as people frequently gave
him from 25 cents t< n,. for the pr)vilege of themselves cutting a blaoc.
He also had an orangerva covering much of the lot. The trees
were seedlings and Yory large described as big as 'oak trees'.
No descendants .tt the rose tree exist that have been traced.
Oliveros was a catal worker Rad a shop on the St. George St. face
of the middle 10% He was known as a locksmith, a copperemith and
a blacksmith. He repaired watches un~s also. Said he learned his
trade in Spain ree an eev h~as
His slavee refused to leave when fedadh aeteNn
a house on the~ Spanish street end of the lot where now is the Under
taking concern on the west side of St. Ueorge.




Citations-

1764 E11ixio de la Puente map and translations- Photostate Webb
Memorial Library Bistorical Society St. tug~ustine from Buckingham
Smith collection .n New York Historical Society.
1788 Mariano de la RoQue map and translation, photostats Webb
Memoriacl Library Historical Society ,6t. Augustine, from Buckingham
Smih cllctin n New York Historical Society.
1834 Clement Survey St. Augustine Photostate of blocks in
Webb Yemorial Lib~ary Historical Society, St. Augustine,
Clement Survey Notes in Public Library ,Florida "asee,
Historical Room bt. Augustine.
1787 Spatish Escrituras Translation Webb Ilemorial Library
Building ,Historical Soiety St. Augustine.
1801 Spanish Eacrhturas Same location.
1785 "" sor rsw r
Oliveros family No. 9 Saragosea St.







raoritdds~, 14 July 1704
SS February 1707


p. 18977 sale July 1 'Phomas Orr repsreenting; Bale. Eacqueenr
r old to LAntonio ~leanter. (signla~ture Antoni Canter)
wooden housesr on lot in Charlotte St., bounded E., by
Le Et~ria, W by said street, S by Simon ~estere &r
others, I by Jo'sef Ponse (Cert~ified to be'lot sold in
1772 by Wsh, Yilaan to "Lobert- Bonsall being 1/5 of a lot
size not specified. Dood 1779 from AleX. Pill & wife'
(daughter A, heir of Bonsall) of part of a lot supposedd
to be above 3/3 known as Ilo. 1 Ogilvie BlookL, bie~
central part of said lot, 353 t. 6 inc on E sides of
Charlotte St., and SS ft. 3 in. on Bay side, B &e S 185rt.

Blook 5, Reequ~e 150


Tax c 1800
Square 5

29. House of coquina snd lot of Jose In?e with~ deed.




guesada's List
rear of 1790
Inventories, assessments and Flor ida
sale at public auction of the
houses and lots of the King

Square No. 5
No. 29 Rubble-wrork masonry house wi 1f lo* of
Jose Ponse wjt- '-rd, ~

29 Street of San Carlos






1793
Census CkLatp et.
Indori
No, 51. Mariana intakidaughter of #hfael and of Ant~onia Casanovas,
widow of 34 years.
M~arcos Andreu son of the said and of her cdeceased husband
of 11 years.
Antonia daughter of the said of 9 yeats.
Rafael her brother of 7 years.
Antonia Purcel, daughter of the. first, husband of th~e
said Mariana of 13 yeats.
1 1 slave, not Baptised.
Pedro Purnelles son of Juanl and of JuanH Huntana of 33
years, bachelor. Associated.
1 Francisco Pons son of Josef and of hraria Capella bachelor,
of 38 years. Associated. 8








Qnanda's List /f2
rear of 1790
Florida
Inventories, assessments, and
sale at public auction of the
houses and lots of the King.

Square No. 5

No. 51 Wooden house of Eu~roos Andrus on King's Realea
lot bounded: N. by house of Antonio "I
Caner 8.bya house of the King, E. by the
Main St. %(-)x1 .@ir e Q 4









max c 1800
Sau:are 5


370. Fodel~ house c\d lot. of it orlc 'In"*(PTC') '" 'ed.



Quesada's List
Year of 1790
Florida
Inventories, assessments, and
sale at public auction of the
houses and lots of the King.

Square No. 5

No. 370 Wooden house writh lot, of Antonio Canter
writh deed.



1783
Spanish Consus
Ph. #125 Sheet 12
RESIDENTS OF THE SETTLIEMENT.

Alexander Mlacquinr Native of Sootland, his will to avail of Span-
ish protection and retire to the British Dominions, he has a wife and
three sons (or children) his profession merchant of dfiy hides, he
has nine hundred acres of land in three divisions on t.Mary's
River, with documaents, eighty miles from this City, he has four
houses on one lot, his property, in this City above the parsonage,
he inhabits one of them, he has twro slaves, (Note) B~e retired with
his efoteat October 20th. Don Thomnas Orr abipped two pieces slaves
pertaining to hia (Mdacquin) that he had left fugitives.

Blook 5








Esorit~urest 12 January 1799
222 Noverber 1800

1800

pc5287 ~omAkoooooo~~~~~~~nowl g at o dowrry be~ Nov. 22e Pedtro Fornells married
-- ghr; 19, 1'P94 to Eariana Tdaorina, gidow of Maroca Andrew
(Bld marrriage) br~ought as dowry & capital, wooden house
n Calle Real, a smEall shop & a slave womnant all valued
at 1000 peses. Fornells promised to pay that sumr to wife
or her four obildrenP (by~ two former mr~riages) in case
their union abatnd be annaulled for any legat rbason.~

BLook 5, Assessr's Inventort 51




Xeorituras, 12 January 1791
20 'December 1792
1791

p. 2457 Mortgage July 19 Mark Andrewsr woaoden house on KIing's
lot #31 &e another on Calle Marina (whitten Maria-
is there such a street in this locality,) Blook 22,
#1~701 pledged for payment.
Blook 5, Asseasor's Inventory 31, Block 22, Assessor'r


Tar: c 1~00
SqluaRe 5
31. WPooden ho se of Marcos Andrews on the KlingL's lot bounded in
font by the aelle M:ayor, NJ by the house of Antonio Cantro,
and S by' the King's house ; its me:asurerment in f-ont N;-S six
yards and a ha~lf, depth fourteen ditto which amounts to (1)9(1)







Note. By the death of t~o arcresaid J'arcos Anldrew the abovae
holEse and. lot (passed ?) to his -:idtow EMaria A2ndorina (?)
children (remained living in it until a daughte- ?) contracted
mariragre with Pedro ...? Dow~ry c-yital on '.he ... N~ovember 1800
... to restore it.
Note April 16, 1803 (?) was issued by this Goveirnm~ent title
TE perpetuity to the aforesaid Pediro "orne(ells) *:h~ich ..
inherit~ by virtcue of th~e codula of 17th .Tar.e 1"01








.Escrituras, 3 February 1803
29 December 1804

1803

91 Sale with Paotb Pedro Fornells to Don Bernardo Segui 2 houses
and retro ane stone one wood both in a lot fronting the
first on Royal St. the second la Playa boundalboth an the
North by the house and lot of the heirs of Antonio Aloantar
South by another of Don Pedro Cooifacio between two on the
front Royal dt, 6) varas on the Miarina 9 varas North and
South on the aide East and West 25 varas the stone house
was built at myg expense another little house of wood from
my wife Mdariana Tuldorina and her children (some account
followse that I cannot translate) 22 Nov. 1800 that of wood
sold to Don M~anuel Veles entered 22 April 1801 in Archives.

Blook 5, Asasesor's Inventory 31, 35









Eacrituras, 9 February 1803
29 December 1804

1803

89v April 16 Governor W~hite to Pedro Fornells lot 21(should be 31)
Block B belonged to h'aria and Andrew house of wood 19th
July 1791 Earriana Tudorina his widow with children m7arried
Fornells. Pront North to South six varas East and West
fourteen bounded on, the front by Calle M-ayior h'orth house
and lot of Antonio Canrtar E~ast another house and lot of
Fornells South another of Don Pedro Cocifacio.

Blook 5, Assessor's Invcntory 31



Escrituras, 3 February 1803
29 December 1804
1803

254v Return sale (Oct. 10P) D. Bernardo Segui to Pedro Fornells by
deed 18 April of'this year house of stone another of wood
on the lot fronting Royal St. the second the beach, both
boudedNorth with lot of Antonio Alcacntar South Donl Pedro
Cocifacio measuring from on Royral St 6h varas on the Bay
(t) varas North to South on the side East to east 25 varas
the whole for 1254 pesos contains reference to a mortgage.

Blook 5, Assaesor's Invenitory 31, 33








Eccritures, 2 January 1801
30 December 1802
1802

p. 292 July 7 Chite confirms title of Pedro Fornells tcrlot 33
blondk 5. Manuel Velez having built on it sold to For-
Dolls Apr. 22, 1801. Mecaurear N S 9 yds, E W 11 da,
Bounded E by la Marina, W by house of Fornella, by
Josye limonez, 8 by Pedro Cocifacio.
Block 5, Asseassr's Inventory 33




Enorituras, 3 February 1803
29 December 1804

1803
Oct, p_) PedM~roorll to Dc Miguel Croaby priest of Parish
2567SalChurch as described in previous deed above they belonged
to Mariana Tudorina his wife and her four children in
archi~ves 22 Nov. 1800 that of wood from D. tlanuel Veles
by deed 22 April 1801.
Block 5, Asasessor's Inventory 31, 35










Escrituras, 10 January 1805
6 December 1806

1806

235r 9tate Sale July 28 Miguel Crosby-Bryan Connors twro houses on
one lot~ one of atone the other of wood, the first frontingl on
Calle Real, the other on the Beach. Both bounded N by heirs of
Antoni Alcantara, S 'by Pedro Cociiacio. L~ot measures on Calle
Real 6 yds., and on the 4%erina 9 yde. N S; denth E & W. 25 yds.
Bought of Fedro Fernella Oct. 31, 1803.




Escrituras, 2 January 1801
30 December 1802
1801

p* 41 Sale Ap 22 V~anuel Fernandes Velae- Pedro Pornells house on
gnga lot Calle de la Qiarina which forms E boundary


15,Grut 179 .,,y~, ** i' ;? 'a ;1 Jds, No. 33, Jun










ear of 1790
Florida


Inventories, assessments, and
sale at public auction of the
houses and lots of the King.


S9ua~re Ho. 5


Wooden house wit~h lot of Joseph Ponze
Maones with deed.


No. 35


?ay c 1800
squ re5


,,,, -hae~d .


,~ tot ~cl"C -C.c~f~


--
~IC ;


~;t ~-


Tar c 1800
Sqa~~re


.~ ..,,C~1 'r:e C Fa 'n*-orio -,l0 tnr, '.itt 3and.













Q~uesada's List
Year of 1790
Florida
Inventories, assessments, and
sale at public auction of the
houses and lots of the Kin~g.

Square No. 5
No. 34 W~ooden house with lot of Antonic Alcantar
wnith deed.


1793 24 Street of San Carlos
Census efauf ]feC~s .

No. 52 Antonio Canter son of Agustin and' of Prarides.Venen~t of
39 years, absent.
Catalina Coast his wife daughter of Doming-ro and of
Maria Ambros of 30 years.
sgutin son of the said of 17. years, absent.
Uoming~o his brother of li7 years,
~aria sister of 8 years,
'atricio brbther of 7 years
4 slaves 2 of these baptised.
/O





















CALLED 50 T TO AN INCH 11 S 1~~iJ BRIOAWAY.NEW YORKX



The evolution of the site can be further traced between June 1888 and
April 1930 with the Sanborn Insurance Maps. The information on these maps
will aid the archeologist in determining the history of the site.


_4~rJo"~.
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Sanborn Map, June 1888.


Dwc~~t:,;




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One of St. Augustines most valuable assets is the remaining
original city plan. This original city plan which was recorded
on many early maps, some of whi-ch have been included here, has
remained unchanged in much of the city. However in areas where
it hase changed through time it is desirable to return the streets
to their original location during the restoration process.
The formation of the site of the Orientation Center required
many changes in the street pattern to return it to its early form.
These changes included the closing of a section of Orange Street,
moving Tolomato Lane seventy feet to the south, and rerouting
Spanish Street to the northwest.
To further explain the reason for these changes a study
done by the Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board follows:






Analysis of Street Plan and Lot Elements
Between the City Gate and Cuna St.


1. PURPOSE: This study is an attempt to reconcile the discrepancies in the
location of streets, lots and structures which occur between various historical
maps, archaeologically located foundations, existing historic structures, and
the present survey.

2. METHODOLOGY: Comparative. The basic assumption in this study is
that tbe distance from fbe NW corner of block 7 lot 5 (Avero House) and the
SW corner of the east pylon of the City Gate has remained constant (546').
These points were chosen because they could be identified on all maps studied.







3. TECHNIQZUE: Photographic enlargement or reduction of the following
pertinent maps to a common scale.

DeSolis 1764?
Puente 1764
Moncrief 1765
Rocque 1788
Clements 1834

A scale of 1:100 (One inch = one hundred feet) was chosen because
it came closest to matching the scale on the majority of historic maps.

InI the case of the Puente map, the lot dimensions were reconstructed
on a modern base using 33. 372" to the vara as a conversion factor. (Breed
1966:141), since the map accompanying the key is obviously simply a sketch.

Photography was done with a standard 4"x5" view camera on a high
contra st orthographi c film.

4. COMPARISON OF STREET ALIGNMENT AND BLOCK LENGTH.

4. 1 Clements Both street alignment and block length are basically
the same as the present. Some slight discrepancies can be
corrected by referring to the field notes for exact distances.

4. 2 Rocque Street alignment and block length are basically the
same as the present. Some minor discrepancies could have
been caused by errors in drafting, an unstable base, etc.

4. 3 Moncrief

4. 3. 1 The length of blocks 6 and 7 along St. George St. is
approx. the same as the present.

4. 3. 2 Tolomato Lane appears to be approx. 70' south of
its present location at St. George St.








4. 3. 3 Spanish St. is approx. 15' to the east of its present
location where it intersects Cuna Street.

4. 3. 4 Traveling north, Spanish St. angles to the west and
by the time it reaches Tolomato Lane it is approx.
40' to the west of its present location.

4. 3. 5 Spanish St. and Tolomato Lane combine to form one
street angling to the northwest corner of the town.

4. 4 DeSolis

4. 4. 1 Block 6 is approx. the same length.

4. 4.2 Block 7 is approx. 35' longer.

4. 4. 3 Fort Alley is approx. 30' north of its present location
at St. George St.

4.4.4 Tolomato Lane is approx. 55' south of its present
location'at St. George St.

4. 4. 5 Cuna St. is approx. 5' south of its present location
at St. George St.

4. 4. 6 Spanish St. is approx. 18' to the west of its present
location at Cuna St.

4. 4.7 Spanish St. trends to the west as you move north and
is 90' west of the present location at the interse action
of Tolomato Lane.

4. 4. 8 Spanish St. and Tolomato Lane combine to form one
street which angles to the northwest and terminates
behind the San Domingo bastion.








4. 4. 9 Cuna St. between St. George St. and Spanish St. follows
the present alignment fairly well.

4. 4. 10 Cuna St. is approx. 40' south of its present location
at the Cordova St. intersection.

4. 5 Puente

4. 5.1 Reconstruction of property lines in blocks 6, 7,11, and
12 indicate that St. George St., Cuna St., Spanish St.,
and Fort Alley were in approximately the same location
as they are now.




4. 5. 2 Tolomato Lane extended through to the area of Cordova
St. and was approx. 70' south of its present location

5. COMPARISON OF LOT AND STRUCTURE LOCATION.

5.1 Clements A detailed analysis of lot lines was not made due
to lack of time, however it seems that the Clements lines
correspond closely to the present situation. In lots where
lines were preserved by the presence of historic structures,
there is a definite correlation between Clements and the present.

5. 2 Rocque

5. 2.1 Represented surviving historic structures align with
their present location t 3'.

5. 2.2 Some correlation with property lines can be made based
on the fence lines shown on Rocque.






5. 3 Moncrief

5. 3. 1 It is difficult to make direct comparisons between
this map and the present configuration because of
gross errors in the drafting of this map.

5. 3. 2 Judicious shifting will produce alignments that lead
to tentative identification of structures when super-
imposed on the modern base.

5. 4 DeSolis. Above remarks apply to this map also.

5. 5 Puente. There is a very definite relationship between the plotted
property lines of this map and the location of historic structures.
In almost every case, the ar chaeological/archite ctural evidence
is supported by the key to the map both in dimension of the lot
and by the building material. There are, however, several
discrepancies.

5. 5. 1 Puente's lot #75 is approx. 6 varas short of what it
should be. Because of the almost exact match in the
rest of the block, we must assume that this is an
error in recording the N-S dimension of the lot.

5. 5. 2 Puente's key states that #78 is a stone house, however
the archaeology would seem to indicate a tabby one,

6. CONCLUSIONS

6.1 Both DeSolis and Monc~rief show considerable error in the align-
ment of the streets as well as the locations of structures. They
do support the location of Tolomato Lane to the south of its present
lo cation.

6. 2 The Puente key and the Rocque map are the only two reliable
sources and even those should be used with some caution.

6. 3 The Gonzales House is incorrectly identified. It should be the
Florencia House. (#78 on Puente).







7. BIBLIOGRAPHY


7.1 Books

Breed, Charles B., Elementary Surveying. John Wiley & Sons,
Inc. New York 1966.

7, 2 Maps

Clements, Benjamin and I. B. "Plan of the City of St.
Augustine" MS. map with detailed field notes. St. Augustine,
1835. Trustees of the Internal Improvement Trust Fund,
Bureau of Records.

DeSolis, John. "A New & Accurate Plan of the Town of St.
Augustine. .. to which is added a Corre ct Map of East Florida. .. "
1764? Library of Congress G3934. 52, 1764. S6Valt.

Elixio de la Puente, Juan Joseph de. "Plano de la Real Fuerza,
Baluarte, y Lina de la Plaza de Sn. Agustin de la Florida...."
MS. map with detailed key [ St. Augustine] 1764. Museo Noval,
Madrid.

Moncrief, James. Map of land ownership, St. Augustine, Florida
(no title). [St. Augustine, 1765) Public Record Office, London,
Colonial Office, Florida 8.

Rocque, Mariano de la. "Plano Particular de la Ciudad de Sn.
Agustin de la Florida, MS. map with detailed key, St. Augustine,
1788. Library of Congress, East Florida Papers.







RHS
9/75













TICKET WINDOW


The ticket window is presently located
on St. George Street to the south of the
proposed San Agustin Antiguo Orientation
Center site. This service would be relocated
to become a part of the new Center.


AGUSTI
jTIGUO


1-~-~a






11~











CITY WALL








Because the Master Plan for San Agustin Antiguo includes a
proposal for the continuation of the City Wall to the West of the
City Gate and the reconstruction of the San Domingo Redoubt it
was necessary to define these major elements before designing the
Orientation Center. Research produced insufficient evidence to
gain the understanding of the form necessary to relate to it in
a design concept. This led to the gathering of what information
was available and based on this a conjectural model was produced.
A collection of information used follows:












































ii~


KIl


CITY GATE
A PA RT OF
CASTIU0O n SAN MARCOS
I" NATIONAL MONUMENT

kp MAIN GATEWAY TO
COLONIAL SAINT AUGUSTINI

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Florida Park Service plans of City Gate restoration-adaptive use.

























defense was U im n prove an eted


around the town t. Thereatier no attackt:.*.

The rsh in depen th oe d wal ase for loe bu 8




addiExistin sections ofe thes Cit Wall
be hre ntt ee ntd o e woki

the Cit Gatead ad connec tot the recnst
deferucte San Domingo Redoubt.de


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CENEI2AL VIeW oF 52EDOUBT
Sw olvrNG 5 PAN ISM BAYONElfT
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BUILDING PROGRAM









The BUILDING PROGRAM for SAN AGUSTIN ANTIGU0 ORIENTATION CENTER
is a product of the combination of the Historic St. Agustine Master
Plan, talks with Bob Stienbeck, a survey of existing exhibits in St.
Agustine, and research on the basic building functions.
The starting point and most important information comes from
the Historic St. Agustine Master Plan. The Orientation section follows:


Cluster One Orientation

Recognizing that the quality of the visit-or's total experience will depend to

a considerable degree on the orientation he receives prior to entering the balance

of the interpretive area, we believe that a combination of graphics, exhibits, and

audio-visual techniques will be necessary to provide this orientation, with the

basic message conveyed by means of an audio-visual presentation.

The cluster contains a maximum of six reconstructable historic structures, all

of them small and unsuitable for an audio-visual program. They would be suitable,

however, for ticket sales and other orientation functions. WIe propose that the

house located in the northeast corner of the cluster be used as an entry and ticket-

sales area and that the two structures immediately to the southwest contain graphic

orientation exhibits. These two buildings will also function as holding areas dur-

ing periods when the visitor load might exceed the capacity of the theater building,

which will be the focal point of the cluster. The theater will stand to the west








of the aforementioned structures and will be concealed behind masonry garden walls

so as not to intrude visually upon the historic scene. It will be divided into

three sections: a lobby-exhibition area, a pair of small theaters designed to pro-

vide easy entry and exit, and a third area immediately behind the theaters devoted

to optional audio-visual orientation exhibits. The remaining historic structures

will house various free-choice exhibits reflecting a variety of themes. While all

visitors will see the basic audio-visual program, each visitor will then avail him-

self of the optional exhibits according to his time and interest.


In respect to the design of the theater, wie have concluded that two small

automated theaters, each seating sixty people and showing a ten-minute program,

provide the best arrangement for our pur-poses. This conclusion is based on the

following considerations:

1. Since we can expect seasonal, daily, and even hourly variations in

visitor load, two theaters will provide greater flexibility in ad-

justing to these variations. During times of low visitation, only

one theater might be needed. The second could be brought into ser-

vice to accommodate heavier loads.

2. Since we will often be addressing special audiences, such as educa-

tional groups, we could use one theater to show programs suited to

their needs while continuiing to serve the general public with the

other.









3. Space being a factor, the theaters cannot be too large.

4. The theaters will serve as a valve regulating the flow of visitor

traffic into the area. Two theaters showing staggered programs and

discharging smaller groups at brief intervals will provide a more

even flow than a single theater releasing larger groups at longer

intervals.

S. Since group visitation through both commercial and educational tour

services can be expected to increase, the theaters must be large

enough to accommodate a busload of visitors. The proposed seating

capacity of sixty would accommodate the average busload of forty to

fifty, leaving ten to twenty seats -to handle casual visitors.

6. Automation of theaters will save staff positions.

7. It is widely recognized in the museum profession that the optimum

length for an audio-visual presentation, based on the attention spa~

of the audience, is ten minutes. Given a five-minute recycle time,

each theater could run four ten-minute shows per hour. The two to-

gether could run eight shows per hour, one every seven and a half

minutes, thus reducing waiting time to a minimum.

8. Based on the information given above, each theater will have an houi

capacity of 240. For a six-hour period, the capacity of the two


n


rly







theaters will be 2,880, well above th~e estimated interpretive capacity

of the area (see Section VII below). The orientation center should

therefore be able to handle our projected visitation.

We recommend that the theater building contain rest room facilities and a

small sales desk for dispensing film, postcards, and similar items.


This information was discussed with Bob Stienbeck and his infor-
mation was combined with research on the building type to formulate the
following FUNCTIONAL DIAGR~AM OF PROPOSED AREAS FOR SAN AGUSTIN ANTIGUO
ORIENTATION CENTER,and BUILDING" PROGRAM.





-ME(ANICAL


EXIT


ENTER
















AREA NO. DESCRIPTION AREA REQUIRED


SAN AGUSTIN ANTIGU0 ORIENTATION CENTER


ST. AGUSTINE, FLORIDA

BUILDING PRO0GRAM OUTLINE


LOBBY

General: To provide for functions
which will introduce visitors to the
orientation center, aid them in selecting
areas of interest, and provide necessary
service facilities.

Lobby

Function: Control of entrance area
for all visitors.

Equipment: Information desk and sp-
ace for introduction exhibits.

Finish: Materials which relate to
the character of San Agustin Antiguo.

Relationship: Direct I-B, I-C, I-D,
II; Indirect III.

Sales

Function: Display books, periodicals,
prints, slides, film, and related objects
for sale.


600


I-A


I-B


100









AREA NO. DESCRIPTION AREA REQUIRED


Equipment: Counter and display cases,
cash register, chair for attendant.

Finish: In harmony with related fa-
cilities.

Relationship: Direct I.

Note: Sales counter and information
desk should be combined to be operated by
one person.

I-C Orientation

Function: Provide general informat-
ion about the building, exhibits, programs,
and to explain the center's purpose and
facilities.

Equipment: Furnishings for presenta-
tion of orientation displays in two and
three dimensional form.

Finish: In harmony with related
facilities.

Relationship: Direct I.

I-D Public service 340

Function: To provide restrooms for
persons visiting the center that are imm-
ediately visible and convenient upon entry.

Equipment: As required by volume
of visitor flow and building code.









AREA NO. DESCRIPTION AREA REQUIRED


Finish: Durable and easily maintained.

Relationship: Direct I-A; Indirect
all areas.

II. GENERAL EXHIBITION AREA THEATER WAITING

General: To provide the visitor a
complete general overview of San Agustin
Antiguo. Every visitor will experience
this area but may choose not to visit
the more specific optional exhibits.
This area will also serve as a holding
area for the theaters.

II-A Exhibition Area 2000

Function: To provide a variety of
exhibit experiences within one space
allowing for great flexibility in the
arrangement and types of exhibits to be
presented. Because the area is to pro-
vide a sequence of exhibits leading to a
theater presentation diminishing lighting
levels should be provided.

Equipment: Large display cases,
free standing exhibits, and display
panels. Adequate means of direct and in-
direct lighting with conveniently placed
electrical outlets to increase the flex-
ibility of spatial rearangement.

Finish: Materials which indicate









AREA NO. DESCRIPTION AREA REQUIRED


the character of San Agustin Antiguo.

Relationship: Direct I-A, III-A.
II-B Theater Waiting 240

Function: To provide an area to
gather groups of sixty people for entrance
to either theater. The space should provide
an exhibit relating to the movie to hold
the visitors interest during the waiting
period.

Equipment: Display case and some-
thing to control flow.

Finish: Sound absorbing surfaces to
prevent disturbance to the theaters.

Relationship: Direct II-A, III.

III. THEATERS

General: Two small automated
theaters, each seating sixty people and
alternately showing a ten-minute program
every fifteen minutes.

III-A Two Theaters 2000

Function: A pair of theaters each
seating sixty persons, designed to prov-
ide easy entry and exit, for presenting
ten-minute audio visual presentations
with a five-minute recycle time. The









AREA NO. DESCRIPTION AREA REQUIRED


theaters will be automated to require
a minimum number of personal.

Equipment: -Theater seating for sixty
persons in each theater; raised platform,
screen, permanent projection and sound
equipment, and storage.

Finish: Good quality acoustically
designed.

Relationship: Direct I, III-B, IV,
exit.

III-B Projection Hoom 250

Function: Automated projection for
two theaters and storage.

Equipment: Two permanent movie
projectors, slide projectors, sound
equipment, and storage space.

Finish: Dark, sound absorbant, and
durable .

Relationship: Direct III-A.

IV. OPTIONAL EXHIBITS

General: Various free-choice exhibits
reflecting a variety of themes.

IV-A Ex~hibit Area 1000









AREA NO. DESCRIPTION AEEA REQUIRED


Function: This area is to follow the
theater experience and be an alternative
to direct exit from the complex. This will
provide a smooth flow into the historic
district eliminating the full theater surge.

Finish: Suitable for a variety of
display types.

Relationship: Direct III-A, exit;
Indirect I.

V. REFRZESHM~nENT 120

General: To provide areas for visi-
tors to relax and refresh. For many the
orientation center will be the first stop
after a very long drive.

V-A Vending Service

Function: Provide drinks, ice-cream,
and munchies.

Equipment: Vending machines, drink-
ing fountain, and trash disposal.

Finish: In harmony with exterior
spaces.

Relationship: Direct V-B; Indirect
I-A, exit.

V-B Sitting Area 1000









AREA NO. DESCRIPTION AREA REQUIRED


Function: Shaded area to sit, relax,
and have refreshments.

Equipment: Benches.

Finish: In harmont with building and
well shaded.

Relationship: Direct V-A.

VI. GENERAL SERVICES

General: The space required for
handling incoming and outgoing materials.
Maintenance activity. Mechanical equip-
ment space.

VI-A General Storage 60

Function:' Organized area for miscel-
laneous materials.

Equipment: Shelving, deep sink.

Finish: Basic and durable.

Relationship: Indirect all spaces.

VI-B Service 350

Function: To provide an area for
miscellaneous materials to be received.
Collection area for trash. Storage of
maintenance equipment.









AREA NO. DESCRIPTION AREA REQUIRED


Equipment: Shelter, shelving.

Finish: Durable.

Relationship: Indirect all spaces.

VI-C M~echanical Equipment 70

Function: Climate control.

Equipment: Heating and cooling unit.
Finish: Basic and durable.

Relationship: Serves all interior
spaces.






TOTAL INTERIOR SPACE 5620

TOTAL EXTERIOR SPACE 2 70

TOTAL 8090











DESIGN













(0ttt~ aliITA -


(OMEI(IALII af51DENIA--


SAN AGUSTIN ANTIGUO


TED 8ESSETTE
University of Florida
Spring of 1977


SAN
ORIE


AGU ST IN
N TA T I ON


ANTIG UO
CENTER













AREA


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1


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FLOOR AND SITF PLAN


TED BESSETTE
University of Florida
Spring of 1977


SAN AGUSTIN ANTIGUO

ORIEN TAT ION CENTER





SECTION A-A


SECTION B-B


SLAB AND BEAM PLAN


SECTION C-C


TED BESSETTE
University of Florida
Spring of l977


SAN AGUST IN ANT IG UO
ORIEN TA TION CENTER
























































NONBEARING WALL -ROOF DETAIL TYP.


BEAM AND SKYLIGHT DETAIL d-d


BEARING WALL- ROOF DETAIL TYP.


,-- SUILT UP 100F
SMO1OTH SIlfACE --

--- ALUYINUMY FlAHING -----

224' Nllttl----- -----


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TED BESSETTE
University of Florida

Spring of 1977


SAN AGU STIN ANTIGUO

ORIEN TAT ION CENTER









I


TED ESSETE SN AUSTI ANTGUOSHEET


Spr~ing~ ofd~ 1977OSL O ORIEN STATION CENTER 5O


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Typical structures on
St. George Street. The whi-
te stucco exterior is the
expression to be used new
Orientation Center.


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ZONING





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~St.


Zoning Orbinance


cjity of
hSlugustine, floriba







Section 6-6. Historic Preservation Districts: HP-1, HP-2,

HP-3, HP-4, HP-5.

Intent.

The historical heritage of the City of St. Augustine is

one of its most valued and important assets. It is therefore

the purpose of the Historic District regulations:

1. to safeguard the heritage of the City of St. Augustine

by preserving the districtss, which reflect noteworthy

elements of the cultural, educational, social, economic,

political, and/or architectural history;

2. to educate the citizen to realizing, understanding,

and appreciating the city's rich heritage;

3. to stimulate a greater awareness and sense of pride

in the founding of the City and the contributions it

has made to the state and nation;

4. to develop an atmosphere and feeling of old, historic

St. Augustine by encouraging the preservation and

restoration of historic structures within the districts;

5. to improve the environmental quality and overall

liveability of the historic section of St. Augustine;

6. to stablize and improve property values in the district;

7. to promote the use and preservation of the district








Article 6. Dist Reg



for the education, welfare, and pleasure of residents

of St. Augustine and St. Johns County--and of the state

and nation as well;

8. that these aforementioned goals and objectives of the

Historic District be achieved and implemented through

the establishment of and enforcement of the general

district guidelines and specific district regulations.


Area District HP-1.

North -


This district. is bounded as follows:

Easterly along a line running parallel to

and sixty-five feet north of Palm Row

for a distance of one-hundred ninety

feet; thence northerly along a line

running parallel to St. George Street

for seventy feet; thence easterly to

St. George Street; thence southerly

along St. George Street to Cadiz Street;

thence easterly along Cadiz Street to

Marine Street; thence southerly along








Marine Street to Bridge Street; thence

easterly along Bridge Street to the

Matanzas River or Bay.

Matanzas River or Bay.

Cemetery Lane westerly to Charlotte Street;

thence southerly to San Salvador Street;

thence westerly to St. George Street and

continuing a westerly projection line to

Cordova Street.

and laundry pick-up stations, providing

that no processing be done on the premises.

Cocktail lounge or tavern

Museums

Multiple family dwellings

Indoor theaters

Governmental or municipal off ice uses.

This district is bounded as follows:

Grove Avenue easterly to San Marco Avenue;

thence southerly along San .Marco Avenue to

the intersection of the projection of a


East -

South -
















j.

k.

1.

m.

Area District HP-3.

North -







line running along the northern boundary

of the Castillo de San Marcos National

Monument Reservation; thence easterly along

this projection line to Matanzas River or Bay.

East Matanzas River or Bay

South Hypolita Street easterly to Charlotte

Street; thence northerly along Charlotte

Street to Cuna Street; thence easterly

along Cuna Street to the Matanzas River

or Bay.

West Cordova Street between Hypolita Street

and Castillo Orive; thence westerly along

Castillo Drive to Ribera Street; thence

southerly along Riberia Street to Orange

Street, thence westerly along Orange Street

to U.S. Highway 1; thence northerly along

U.S. Highway 1 to Grove Avenue.


6.3 HP-3 Permitted Uses and Structures.

a.~ Single family dwellings

b. Antique, souven-ir, gift or craft -shops


100








related to the historic character of St.

Augustine.

c. Restaurants (but not drive-in restaurants),

taverns, or cocktail lounges

d. Museums

e. Reconstructed historic buildings with related

uses. Related uses shall mean historical uses

or permitted uses as listed in this section.

(Article 6, Section' 6-6, sub-section 6.3.)

f. Professional offices

g. Reception and Information Center

h. Governmental or municipal office uses

i. Multiple family dwellings.

Area District HP-4. This district is bounded as follows:

North Valencia Street between Sevilla Street

and Cordova Street.

East Cordova Street, between Valencia Street

and Bridge Street.


101








Article 7. Sup1 Reg
Sec 7-1, 7-2



ARTICLE 7. SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS

Section 7-1. Fences, Walls and Hedges.

Notwithstanding other provisions of this Zoning Ordinance,

fences, walls, and hedges may be permitted in any required yard

or along the edge of any yard to include the rear yard; provided

that no fence or wall in excess of eight feet shall be permitted

in any residential district, and further provided that no fence

in excess of four feet in height shall be permitted to encroach

into the required front yard of any lot in a residential district

except as provided in Section 18.1 (d), page 111. No fence,

wall, hedge, or other visual b-arrier exceeding 30 inches in

height shall be permitted within 25 feet of any intersection.


Section 7-2. Modification of Height Regulations.

The height limitations contained in Article 6, District

Regulations, do not apply to spires, belfries, cupolas, antennas,

water tanks, ventilators, chimneys, elevator shafts or other

appurtenances usually required to be placed above the roof

level and not intended for human occupancy; provided however,


102







that notwithstanding the permitted maximum height limitations

allowed in the various zoning districts, no structure (including

appurtenances and structures normally erected above roof level)

shall be erected to a height above adjacent ground level

exceeding the most restrictive of the following:

a. Fifty five feet; or


Article 10. Adm
Sec 10-11


Section 10-11. Zoning Exceptions, Variances and Appeals.

11.1 Zoning Exceptions

a. In General. In the granting of zoning exceptions

the Zoning Board may provide such conditions and

safeguards as may be appropriate and in harmony

with the purpose and intent of the Zoning Code.

(See Article 4, item 35, page 10.)

b. Written Application. All. applications for an

exception under the Zoning Code shall be in

writing in such form as may be prescribed by

the Zoning Board.

c. Public Hearing. Unless a longer time shall be


107







agreed upon by the applicant and the Zoning Board

in the particular case, a public hearing shall be

held by the Zoning Board to consider any application

for a zoning exception within not more than thirty

days from the date of filing of the completed

application. Notice of public hearing shall be

made as provided in Article 10, Sec 10-6.1 and 10-6.2,

page 132, and any party shall be heard in person or by

agent or attorney.

d. Violations of Exceptions. 'The violation of the

terms of an exception, including any conditions

and safeguards which may be made a part thereof

shall be deemed a violation of the Zoning Code

and.punishable as provided in the Zoning Code.


11.2 Variances

a. Requirements for Grant of Variance.

The Zoning Board m.ay grant a variance only under

circumstances where practical difficulty or un-

necessary hardship is so substantial, serious and

compelling that relaxation of the general restric-
tions ought to be granted. No variance shall be


104







granted unless the applicant shall show and the
Board shall find that:

1. The particular property, because of size,

shape, topography or other physical conditions,

suffers singular disadvantage through the

operation of this section, which disadvantage

does not apply to other properties in the

vicinity; and

2. Because of this disadvantage, the owner is unable

to make reasonable use of the affected property;

and

3. This disadvantage does not exist because of

conditions created by the owner or applicant;
and

4. Grant of the variance (a) will not be contrary

to the public interest, (b) will not adversely

affect other property in the vicinity, and

(c) will be in harmony with the spirit, intent

and purpose of this section.

In passing upon a request for variance, the Board

shall not consider prospective financial~ loss or gain


105






to the owner or applicant, nor shall the Board by

variance permit to be established or carried on in

any use district an activity, business, or operation

which is not otherwise allowed in such district by a

specific provision of this ordinance. (See Article 4,

item 102, page 30.)

b. Written Application. All applications for a variance

to the Zoning Code shall be in writing and in

such form as may be determined by the Zoning Board.

c. Public Hearing. Unless a longer time shall be

agreed upon by the applicant and the Zoning Board

in the particular case, a public hearing shall

be held by the Zoning B8oard to consider an

application for a zoning variance within not

more than thirty days from the date of filing

of the completed application. Notice of such

public hearing shall be made as provided in Article

10, Sec 10-6.1 and 10-6.2, page 132, and any party

shall be heard in person or by agent or attorney.

d. Violations of Variances. The violation of the

terms of a variance, including any conditions and

safeguards which may be made a part thereof shall

be deemed a violation of the Zoning Code and punish-

able as provided in the Zoning Code.


794




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