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Dominica herald
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102878/00074
 Material Information
Title: Dominica herald
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 42 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Allfrey, P. Shand ( Phyllis Shand )
Allfrey, P. Shand ( Phyllis Shand )
Publisher: Dominica Herald
Place of Publication: Roseau, Dominica
Roseau, Dominica
Publication Date: July 18, 1964
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Dominica -- Newspapers   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Dominica
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1955? Cf. caption.
General Note: Editor, <1963-1964>: Phyllis Shand Allfrey.
General Note: "For the General Welfare of the People of Dominica, the further advancement of the West Indies and the Caribbean Area as a whole."
General Note: Description based on: Jan. 12, 1963; title from caption.
General Note: Last issue consulted: December 31, 1964.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 82144654
lccn - 2007229365
System ID: UF00102878:00074

Full Text

LIBRARY
RESEARCH INSTITUTE
)R THE STUDY OF MAN
162 EAST 8 ST
NEW YORKI21, M


''& 'In- -
t~ L.~ ~... '


,IThn Finest Paoplc I-- V V ..t i The'Picxc Sotl .
(For the General Welfaic of the People of Domibi, n. the further edrancement of the West Indies and the Caribbean Area as a whole),
ESTABLISHED 1955 C TURDAY, JULY 18, 1964 PRICE 10ro


CRIME AND PUNISHMENT IN DOMINICA


POLICE CHIEF SEEKS TRUTH Family Home
Smashed


Shock In Mahaut
POLICE APPEAL Only four concrete pillars
P AP A and four cement steps remain
HE DOMINICA POLICE are inquiring into af;er :he three-room family
the circumstances which led to the house of Mr. Reville
SDesmoulins was destroyed by
death of BENOIT MATTHEW of Soufri3re at w workmen led by a bailiff on
P Roseau on the 29th of June 1964. Juiy I5, while Mrs. Desmou,
The Chief of Police wishes to appeal lins and six small children
to any member of the public who has were in occupation.
( information concerning this matter to This drastic action, which
..come forward and assist the Police in left the housestructure in a
Shev on the seashore, was the
Their inquiries. result of a land dispute be,
.' --- --,--.... f tween the Desmoulins and
...... R iv i e r e families. .The
THE inquest on Benoit Trafilgar Road, was fund children involved are now
Matthew continued yesT guilty and sentenced to four being sheltered by their
terdiv. months' imprisonment. maternal grandmother at
Sa cowtheft charge, was found The houseowner w as
In. the Supreme Court guilty: sentence, 18 months first notified' b y tekphone
(Critninal Jurisdiction), this hard about Henry David, on J u 1 y ist th a t the
week, Simon 'Williams cf 16, was put on probation for house would be broken
Salybia, charged with four three years after he pleaded down; he was teaching at
offences concerring uttering guil:y to entering a ,shop ani Salisbury when the demoli,
fal.e instruments and collect- taking goods value $2. tion took place,
ing. money through forgery. B ii
was found guilty and sen- Other News Guts Briiqsh Guiana
tenced to two years on each Developments
count to run concurrently. U.S. Sen.tor Barry Goldwater Thirteen hundred people
Previously a nolle prosequi had won the Republican nomination ie pe
been entered in the case of overwhelmingly and has chosen a have been charged with
Fos t e r Claudius. Phillip catholic (Miller) as his Ist aide. offences concerning the recent
The Party is no-v closing its ranks* disturbances in B. G. Two
Jones, also charged with Mr. Mikayan is now President of little children were burned
forgery, pleaded guilty, and the U.S.S.R.* St. Vincent Civil o death
Addie Blanc (forgery of $48) Service Assoc. A.G.M. collapsed to death Juy 14 when
likewise -oleaded guilty. Their for lack of a quorum* Rev. Garnet their home was destroyed by
sentences were deferred. C. Spinger has been banned from a firebomb. Police had to
Sr entering Jamaica* Dominican Civil control excited crowds when
Benoit Roberts did not Servants attended a trade union ,he children's father, Mr.
appear in Courn, and a Bench seminar at C.S.A. centre this week* Mohammed Khan, saw the
Warrant was issued for him. Recent UNICEF gifts to Dominica b od i
All prosecutions were con, total $40,000 part of their con, bodies.
ducted by Mr. V. C. Josse, tributbi to the Integrated Health Three people were killed
who had been briefed for programmed. Latest items to arrive and nine others seriously
who had been briefed for are two land rovers and one truck, injured on July 1o, when a
the purpose, for conveying skimmed milk and terrorist bomb exploded .n
transport of personnel* A gift crane -exploded In
Lady Borrmwer Acquitted from Canada is being landed in Se the Rio cinema in a thickly
Miss Yvette Severin of Lucia today, by Saguenay Line populated section of George,
Queen Mar; Street, Roseau, MV Silvia for transshipment to town South. Three of the
charged with stealing a tran, Dominica* ~-Third W.I. "Big injured were critically .hurt.
sistor record-changer from the Four" Summit meeting takes place
home of her friend Eline in Barbados next week. LANDSLIDE DEATH
Barre, was cleared of the OTTrO Y :Charlie Bruno of Salis,
charge after lengthy delibera, BAY DISCOVERY bury was found on July 15
tions by the jury, one jury, A report from Vieille Case by .archers who heard feeble
man disagrteting. that a small decomposed cries,.buried up to his head
Girl atack ed At Trafalgar body (perhaps an infants) in a: local landslide. Help,
Girl attacked At Trafalar was found by a Convent ers dug him out, but he died
Vernon St. J e a n, 18, schoolgirl on the beach at on the way to hospital of
charged with indecent assault Otto Bay has not yet beer, injuries sustained in the mis/
on RamonaR.olle (20o) on the authenticated by the Police. adventure,


Successful P. M.'s Conference


The British Prime Minister declared in Parliament
last Thursday that remarkable progress had been -made
through the Commonwealth Prime Ministers' conferer2e in
London, considering the diversity ot\ peoples and viewpoints.
Australian P. M. Menzies stated that the Commonwealth
'has emerged stronger from the conference. Labour .Leader
Harold Wilson said "the Commonwealth Conference has
ben very useful. The proposal for a conference on Southern
Rhodesia should have been put forward much earlier."*.(
nominia Nulsires Meanwhile ~h e4. M. ,of
Domi nica NUrSes S. Rhodesia said he had no
ASSOCiation intention of adhering to any
conference decision regarding;
At the last meeting of the Domi- his country and oL4LJ tAole
mca Nurses Ass, on. July 8th. Mrs. rte o ter eer in S.
Mary Splsbury gave an interesting Rhodesa's aff~ as ind .t
tAik on Life in Sweden, where she -,esa 's affairs indlc.. te
has been concerned in Adult Educa- by the P. .AI- confer,.ce.
tion for nearly 40 years: She illus- Only di-agireaBle hfAident
treated her talk with some colourful in Londo. waIs w.en smi -
slides. .-1 v- 'o. ,
and she was specially glad to see for P. M.. of Kenya:---.and the
herEelf the good use to which the Br itis h P.,M. personally
Projector, which was a gift from her apologised for this-incident.'In
three years ago, was put in the Nurs, their joirt. communidqe ei he
ing School. This was Mrs.-Spils Prime Ministers 'agreed that
bury's third visit to Dominica; shewealth served a
has now returned to the U.K, before the Commonwealth served a
going back to Sweden.[, useful role in solving. inter,
racial problems and applying
Queen To Visit democratic principles.
Queen To Visit Poet
Sudan W.I. Poet
Honouted


H.M. The Queen and
Prince Philip will pay a
state visit to Khartoum in
the Sudan next year from
February 8 --12, Bucking,
ham Palace announced on
July 13. The announcement
said that they had accepted
"with much pleasure" an
invitation from President
Abboud, but it gave no
further details. The Royal
.couple will travel to the
Sudan from Ethiopia, where
they are already scheduled to
pay a state visit starting from
February.
---,got----

Andrew Rose--
Operation
Mr. Andrew Rose, High Comrn
missioner for Trinidad is in a satis-
factory condition in Ottawa's Civic
Hospital following an operation for
bursitis in the shoulder. He was
operated upon on Friday l~t week
and remained in hospital for a, few
days.


Derek Walcott, St, Lucia born
writer and poet, is one of 15
English-speaking poers from all
parts of the world who have been
commissioned by the Arts Council
of Great Britain to write poems as
part of this year's celebrations of the
400 anniversary of Shakespeare's
birth.
This was announced by the
Arts Council in London recently,
Sharing this honour with Mr.
Walcott are such famous names in
the world of poetry as India's Dom
Moraes, Britain's Stephen Spender,
Hugh MacDiarmid, Thom Gunn
and Laurie Lee.
The poems not less in length
than a sonnet and containing as
epigraph a Shakespearean quotation
- were read at the opening of the
Stratfordon-Avon Festival of Peot,
,ry on July 5.
Mr. alcott has also been invite
ed by the Congress for Cultural
Freedom to attend the Berlin Ats
Festival in September.


Postal Strike In Britain,
British postal services are recover-
ing from a strike of postioffice
workers which paralysed all mail
deliveries (or over 24 hours. Mil,
lions of letters filed u..


. I








DOMINICA HERALD SATURDAY, JULY 18, 1964


People's Post Impressions
rresWpodentsa .e asKed to fbmtt theirfll' names and addresses as nmin a
agu0I.ee Jf faith. bt not necessarily for puicaltin. Letters should
as, shots pasible Controversial political u.-tte'rt will not be pub-
fished anonymouslv. Views expressed in Peoplr's P.,. do not necessarily By Colin Dohe
.sfleit the policy of the Ed.tor or the Ir prietor.
G.C.E. Exam -- IPrice Control Needed! A, era nineoh nm
Complaint Madam Editor. the place and the
Dear Editor Permit me space in quite well. The pla
Permit me space in your valuable columns to tell the live for 1t long time
your paper to bring to light an in, ministry concerned that we need a meniory:the luxurious:
cident which occurred at oneofth. "Fixed Price" to control the value landscape is most in
Secondary Schools during the time of foods in the market. pcially i h
that the senior pepali were sitting It's rather a pity, more or less a especially in t h e
the exam for the General Certificate disgrace, to watch housewives going where the wildness
of education. I write this because I up and down the market with empty rich green peaks and
feel a great wrong. .nd if I may say, baskets. Not that they want it to be would fill any newcoi
injustice has been done to those so, but thy just can't afford to buy awe. By far the mos
pupil and that puts the,. at a dis' at the price demanded. They have t m
advantage. I do not for one moment to return home with empty bags and ing part of Dominic
profess to know about, ot criticize to face back the shops for rice and ever is the east coast
the working of the school, or the flour. the Atlantic pounds
procedure whereby the pupils are Isn't it hard Lo buy a small dash- santly at the bases of
prepared for that exam. een weighing about 3 to 4 pounds cliffs and over the
What I do know is that these for $1.oo? Housewives can no longerocks that re D
pupils were made to study forgeo- get a 50o dasheen at the market! rocks that ,re Do
grapby the continent of Europe The little that could be got for 500 is beaches. Those w
and Jo and behold, when the ques- now on demand for $1.oo. This is along that coast li,
tion-papers were handed out to them exhorbitant. I believe that every other nature at its mno t brill
the questions were based on the island has a control price per pound brillapce man can
study d4-, Continent of Arica! for each quality of food; why emulate
The jlm'wce- amazed,. but they couldn't Dominica be favoured wh te.
"w' Id'e|t they were to answer such measures. When I first dro
th~ iaem~ o set. They eitbhi left I am sure that many citizens will Roseau the though
them unanswered or 4wte utter agree with me that we need a/'Price jumped immediate
nonstese.i. A-istake was made by Control" and I trust that the ministry mp
someone (prsutnably at the school) concerned should take' immediate numind was 'the enti
ana unfeomnadty these pupils are steps to rectify this situation. Is it needs a good Wat o
made'to bear the bunt of it. possible that all our provisions are that thought has n,
_ThijsU- a 7--tter of sn,'t ir' going to Barbados? me. Roseau would
tswlive it~hi canly ahows carl ----- s SPYGLASS, Co -
liv*sr it certainly shows carelessness SPYGLASS, Cork St. Li ;v ,


and lak of proper supervision, a;
there must be a syllabus to be
roihwed.
A Aowr. Roseau.


(Other letters are held over
Jot next week. Ed.)


reminders of death
struction, the burnt
of buildings, were


Of Fortunat~ly however the
friendliness of the people
tends to overshadow the
rty unfortunate picture the town
rty presents. Whereever I have
h sojourn been on :he island, and I
I know have been to most pzrts, I
people have been made welcome
ace will and this is the most gratifying
in my feature that a stranger can
s verdant find sa a strange country.
npressive Dominicans and West In,-
interior, dians generally possess a
of those tremendous capacity fo r
valleys enjoying themselves, fhis
mer with was adequately proven to me
st excit, during Carnival and the
ca how- cricket tournament. People
t where in a highly developed society
s inces, have lost or are losing, this
towering gift. They h a ve to be
smooth determined to enjoy themselves
Dminica's before they can in fact do so.
'ho live Here I find spontaneity in
ve with people's laughter, a vital jaie
lliant, a de vivre which I hope will
n never not disappear as the coni,
munity develops, and Dom,
inica really needs to develop.
ht that There is, it wouldseem one
ly intodrawback in the warmhearted
y i Dominican character which
f place restricts movement towards a
f p .aint better standard of living.
ver lefi This is the overcasual or
be an laissez-faire attitude which

and de; community and which must
out shells hinder the efforts of those
removed, progressive a n d energetic


sections who rightly wait to
see Dominica de ve lop.
There can be ro progress if
people are not willing to
contribute towards it.
Watching cricket in Dom.
inica has been an education
in itself. Coming from a
co'intry which appreciates its
cricket rather cold-blocded!y,
it has been a revelation to see
the way both players and
spectators throw themselves
heat and soul into the game
here. I begin to :understand
now why the West Indies
has produced so many great
players. During the last
West Indian tour of England,
the English were shown how
to enjoy cricket by the thou,
sands of West Indian specta-
tors: I hove they (the
English) take note of the
lesson and lose some of their
traditional reserve!
I will remember Dominica
for a combination of four
t h i n g s, cricket, sunshine
scenery and a friendly, hospi,
table people.


CARD OF THANKS
Miss Alfreda Georges and family
bel through this medium '
those who sent cards, wreaths and
showed their sympathy in other
ways on the occasion of the death
of their sister, Victoria.


Aboxofdu MAURIER

carries beautifully packed
quality filter tip cigarettes made
from the finest Virginia tobacco
that money can buy


.1 -'
A ~


fl -,


p ~
I'


.].!

I


The world's finest filter tip cigarette


p


4 -* ** ""* .


mom


IAGB TWO








SATU1.D:\Y. JILY 18. 1964 DOMINICA HERALD PAGE THREE


Eric Richards
Retired
aul
P. W. D. Office Managcr be
Mr, Eric Richards received
several gifre from col'cagnes
and friends in the Depart F,
ment when he retired some,
what unexpectedly on June
ii after seven years servi.:e
there. Mr. Richar, s was due
for long leave. The P.W.D.
jeep drivers of the garage
gave him a special present.
At the retirement present,
tion last Saturday the Direc-
tor of Works said a few
words and P. W. D. staff in
their letter of goodbye ce,-
dared:-
"What makes us all the
more grateful is the fact tha:
although the problems if
you- office were many, diffi-
cult and sometimes vexing,
you did your best at all times
to keep on an even keel.
Your devotion to duty, your
high ideals, uncompromising
principles and a sense of duty
that is not found on the
everyday market are sonie of
the qualities which yo u
brought to bear in your task.
Yoi were indeed a strong
_ionk ijn that chain whieh h-el
t he staff firmly .together.
The link is not broken, for
although you are away from
us in body yet you are still
with us in spirit.
We wish to tell you that
wherever we are you will be
most welcome and we send
you all our wishes for a fuller,
a richer, a nobler, a happier
and a more abundant life in
the future."
You can now get your Pri
HERALD at J. G. Royer's wh
Supermarket in K in g last
George V Street! we


Bestselling Author Sells N1
WLST B E R L I N -- BcstselinP Berlin's Kurfuerstendamn. In doing
thor Guenter G.ass, could recently so, the 36-year old bearded author of
seen selling newspapers jn West The Tin Drum, Dogs' Years and Cat

QUIZ CORNER by TOM FROST
first prize for complete correct solution $2.oo, Second prize $i.oo
I. What do we mean when we say a person is "gregarious"?
2. What is the name of the strait or sea-passage between the "boot"
of the Italian mainland and the island of Sicily?
3, What is a groL.W
4. Why is a raincoat often called a macintosh or mackintosh
5. Name the three highest mountain peaks in Dominica.
Reoresentihq H, M. The Oueen


If


Central Housing & Planning Authority
It is notified for general information that the following
Resolution was unanimously passed at a meeting of the
Centra Housing & Plannipg Authority held on Friday 3rd
July, 1964.
Sgd. HUBERT N, JOSEPH
Ag. Secretary & Execut.e Office0 : -
Central Housing & Platining Authority -
RESOLUTION
BE IT RESOLVED and it is hereby resolved that a rate
if 30' of bthe Assessed Vauhel evipd on alm Liaos-a
- a sDdeTinder Apeindix 0 to the Goodwill First Supple-
mentary Scheme for the half year ending 31st December,
1964.
July i8
Banana Shipment of 9th July, 1964:


H.R.H. Princess Margaret
Westminster Abbey Service
For Malawi
^ *'


Divine Service at Westminster Abbey at which
incess Margaret represented H. M. the Queen, and in
which the Prime Minister of Malawi assisted, took place
t Sunday. Prayers were offered for the new Common,
alth a Co'untry.


Roseau
Portsmouth
Coast


Exports Jan. Ist to 2nd July, 1964
Total exports to 9th July, 1964
Total exports to 9th July, 1963
Decrease 1964 compared with 1963


STEMS
36,601
52,620
3,591


92,812
1,197,883
1,290,695
1,485,686
194,991


TONS


435
644
39

13,403
14,5a1
18,84q
4,319


NOTICE

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
LIVESTOCK DEVELOPMENT PROJECT
Farmers interested in the rearing of livestock and who
are in possession of suitable land, are invited to make
application to tha Agricultural Superintendent for assistance
under the Livestcck Development Project. Appiiation
forms are available through the field staff of the Department
of Agriculture.
Provision is made so that farmers can be offered
subsidies in respect of:
Establishment and improvement of pastures.
Fencing.
Laying down water supply.
Erection of building for livestock.
Persons having less than two acres of land availa,
ble for pasturage and less than two mature cows should
not apply for assistance under the scheme.
STANLEY 0. PRINGLE
Acting Agricultural Superintendent,
GO. 69. July, 4 18.


AVAILABLE

AT

TQ VIaIIIN(9


GALVANIZE SHEET S, CELOTEX,
5-8 IRON RODS, GALVANIZE PIPING,
PAINTS, WIRE NETTING, CHAIRS,
BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, TYPE-


WRITERS, AND TYRES 5.50-12,
RECORD CHANGERS.


ALL AT MODERATE PRICES
July i8-Aug. 8


ALSO


I


newspapers I&-itish T.U.G. On
and Mouse wasn't out to make an lEducation
addi onal dollar, but rather to wage
a selling-ca mwpaign fbr the
"Spandauer Vclksblatt", his favour- By C.H. Hartwell Of Britain's Trades
ite newspaper, (circulation about Union Congress
30,000ooo). Grass said "it's the one British tra3 e unionists are n-w
West Berlin newspaper that gives me Brtish trade unoits r nyv
infoWest Berlin newspapertha tryinggivescalling for reforms at the grass-roots
informatione. rather than trying to i, of education. The call is made in
fluence me".. Sales have skyrocket, evidence to a Government-appointed
In an additional endeavor t committee now investigating all as-
In an additional endeavour to pects of primary education, which
promote the paper's continued objec, in Britain begins with compulsory
thive reporting and to protect it from attendance at school at the age of
the alleged standardd opinions" of five and nds when, at eleven, the
the big publishing concerns, author children pass into the secondary
Grass and other artists are also con- school.
tibuting regular articles. For a re-,
muneration of less than $o.08 per Interests Of The Family
line, they have been writing literary
reviews, humorous comments and The evidence was submitted by
political commentaries which any the Trades Union Congress
other publisher would have to pay for which, though intent enough on
rather dearly. German Features. (Cont. n p.'y)








DOMINICA HERALD SA'ILRDAY, JULY r 8, 1964


*


DOMINbIA iiEDALAD
AN i.DEfKNDENT WEEKLY
31 New Street, Roseau. Tel. 307
Published by j. MA.GARTSON CHARLES, Proprietor
Editor MRS. PHYLLIS SHAND ALLFREY
U.K & European Representative Colin Turner (London) Ltd.
122, Shaftesburv A ve, L )mdon W. I
Annual Subscriptions: Town $5.00 Country S6.00
Overseen3 (,2.-rrace Mail) $7.50
SATURDAY, JULY 18, 1964

TEN A G ITY


TO HOLD on long enough, if the cause
or the aim is good enough, is definitely
is the only way to defeat discouragement or
the laissez-fairev.ism so gently put forward
by a young departing visitor as one of
Dominica's failings. (See p 2).
We may therefore express our satisfac-
tion when certain people refuse to be
discouraged. Take for example t h e
students of St. Mary's Academy who had
planned an educational excursion to
Martinique for this month. After the
enthusiastic planning of this holiday
scheme, such obstacles as lack of finance
and demi-offical disparagement of the
sponsoring rmsts rose tp to deter the
youthful aspirants. Tenaciously, t h e y
went ahead with their fund raising drive;
like young gentlemen ofgood will educated
in a religious atmosphere, they ignored
_g9 The result so far,amply justifies
their attitudei 'rinenps aa' .scp.=-.
"have not let them down, and the golden
6p portunity to meet and mingle with
students speaking a n o't h e r language,
although postponed, will take place next
month, to the great satisfaction of those'
who love both liberty and youthful
enterprise.


*


Another example of tenacity also con,
cerns AngloFrench relations: an exceed,
ingly important matter not only for the
cultivated citizen or the ambitious scholar
but for the mulilingual, multi-racial peo,
pie of this hemisphere. This week the
Cercle Francais of Dominica celebrated for
the second tinge France's national day,
under pleasant circumstances enlivened by
a bond of mutual goodfellowsh;p. And
(since Dominica has been rather class,
conscious of late) it may be said that
although the gathering was small, every
type and class in this island was represented
there, from the workingman to the pro,
fessional intellectual,
Now this little French Club has had a
hard jcb to survive since its foundation in
August 1962. Some people joined for
the flush of novelty, then dropped out;
others were not prepared' to make the little
--c .. -tmsso03aty-f tatte n ce_..Qr conversa,
tion (since a Club cannot be an inanimate
body); but a few loyal, dogged spirits had
the teracity to keep up the Cercle Francais
and to'save Dominica from the disgrace
of being an uncultivated land disinterested
in the eternal glories of the French lan,
guage and literature. We salute them!


SHOULD LOVELACE GO P


THE HERALD did not send a reporter to
the recent political meeting of the
D.U.P.P. in Roseau. We were (for a few
days) so dreadfully shortstaffed that there
was nobody to send. We therefore
applied to D.U.P.P. leader F.A. Baron
for the script notes of his speech in order
to get the statement in perspective. Ac,
cording to his notes, what Mr. Baron said
was (in part) the following:-
"The Administrator is representative of
H.M. the Queen and as such is above
politics, also he is head of the Civil Ser-
vice and should not brook the interference
of politicians in establishment matters.. ."
"Too often within the recer.t past has
there been direct interference by Ministers
iq the departments..." (instances given)
"Civil servants get all the blame for Min,
isteis' mistakes... And here the speak,
er said flatly that Ministers' recent occupa,'
tion was to draw up a list of top Civil
Servants who "must go before the end
of the year". The speaker said that His
Honour has allowed the politicians to use
him, while they reviled and abused him.


(We must recall that during his own
term of office as Chief Minister, Mr. Baron
was extremely friendly with the. Admin,
istrator).

Omittinrt any smears and opprobrium
which may have been tacked on to this
unusual address, including those directed
against Magistrate Copland, whether cor,
rectly reported elsewhere or not, we reflect
ruefully upon one of our own editorials in
which we stated that absolute impartiality
is a prerequisite for any Administrator in
the dwindling confines of colonialism.
No longer is there the hopeful alternative -
"Go out and govern New South Wales!"
In the old days, any Administrator who
blotted his copy book could be rapidly
promote], perhaps even giv-n a knight,
hood, and sent far afield. Dominica
appears to be stuck with- Colonel Love,
lace, who may appear to many people to
have outstayed his term of office. We ask
our readers, and the general public, to
answer the qu estio n: SHOULD
LOVELACE GO?


French National Day
Martinique Interchange
France's National Day was cele,- home of Cercle Francais President Mueller, Mrs. Ronald Clarke, Miss
berated in Deminica by the holding Mrs. Roxane Issa. Among guests at M. Beswick B.A., Mr. John Thomrn
of an successful reception at the the i4th July party were Dr. E. as (Vice-President), Mr. & Mrs.


PAGE FOUR


Charles Bul!y and Miss Barbara Bully students working for the
(Hon. Sec.), Mr. R. H. Lockhart medical degrees cf the Uni,
and the Misses S. and H. Lockhart versit of London under the
(Hon. Treas), Mrs. W. Astapha, r
Mrs. Alfrey and other members direction of the Professor of
and students. Mr. Louis 'Sanford Pathology.
was welcomed to t.ie Cercle. Salary scales: Senior Lec,
A few wordt by some of the r s S Lc
guests, notably a short weli-deliver,-' r x 120 -
ed address by Mr. Leevy. and the C3,630 x 70 -- 3,700,
singing of the Marseillaise led by Lecturer 1,750 x 12o -
Mr. i'hoi.as rounded off the 42,590 x 60 Z2,650 per
celebration. atnum, Child allowance
In Martinique, the "7aribbean (limited to three children)
Friends Club entertained Professor i5 i for the fistchildr
Orville MacShine of Queens College, for the first child,
Mr. Pete, Bellot (1964 Island Scho, ,Ioo for the second child,
lar, also sub-editor, D o m i n i c a F.S.S.U. Housing allowance
HERALD) and representatives from of 10%o of salary. Up to
other islands as far north as St. Ktt., five full passages on appoint-
This week Mr. Bellot addressed a full
gathering of students and adults in ment on normal termination,
Maitinique on "life in Dominica". and on study leave (once
During the month of August Mr. every three years).
Jones Murphy, St. Mary's academy Detaled application (ten
teacher, will lead a group of 20o-25 .s pi, t
students on an educational tour of copies) giving full particulars
Martinique under the auspices of the of qualifications and experi-
Caribbean Friends Club, leaving ence, date of birth and the
this island on August s15. names of three referees should
0_be sent by August 24th
University Of The 1964, by persons living in
the Americas and Carib.
West IndieS bean area to the Registrar,
University of the 'West
Applications are invited Indies, Kingston 7, Jamaica,
for two posts, one of Senior and by all other persons to
Lecturer or Lecturer and one t- ecrctary to the Senate
of Lecturer in Haematology Committee on Colleges
in the Department of Path. Overseas in Special Relation,
ology, now vacant. The University of L o n do n,
dunes rt haemaE ro-ial-
clude routine haematological particulars may be obtained
work in the University similarly.
College Hospital and in- July,
structions in haemawology to Juy
international Labour Conference
48th Session
From CCL News
The Fortyeighth Session of the International Labour
Conference, supreme deliberative body of the International
Labour Organisation, began at the Pslais des Nations on
the x7th June, 1964.
More than i,ioo delegates and technical advisers from
ninetynine countries were present at the opening sitting.
Cabinet Ministers responsible for labour affairs in thirty five
countries led their respective delegations.
Ambassador Andres Aguilar, Permanent Dekgate of
Venezuela to the Eu.ropean Office of the United Nations
and the Specialised Agencies in Geneva, 1 was elected
unanimously as President of the Conference.
Opening Sitting
The session was declared open by Emilio Calderon
Puig, UnderSecretary for Foreign Affairs of the Govern,
ment of Mexico, in his capacity as Chairman of the
Governing Body of ihe ILO.
Mr. Calderon Puig recalled that the maintenance of
peace and social justice has been the constant preoccupation
of governments, employers and workers who have met at
the Conference year after year for nearly fifty years. He
said that never had we becn so close to putting an end to the
"alarming situation which is called the Cold War". "If
this is successful," he said, "if once m:re the nations can
unite their forces around the common ideal of universal
brotherhood, the unlimited means v.hich modern technology
has placed in our service will make it possible to create
throughout the world conditions of life which will justify
the hopes of man."
(Cont. on page 7)








SATURDAY. JULY 18. 964 DOMINICA HERALD PAOE..TIVE


BRITAIN AND THE COMMUNIST WORLD
by EARL ATTLEE
(Labo:r Prime Minister of Britaii from 1945 to 51)
PART II
Kh;ushchwv's Rejection Of The pzsi'ion of the free
Stalin peoples is still that of con,
training militant Commu,
Me -nwh.le the rejection nism, but the rift in the
by Kh:ushchev of the old Communist fro-'t consider,
Stzlinist policy and his ad- ably eares the tension and
vocacy of pe ccfiil co-exist makes the pres-nt portion
ence has resulted in a mere wvey different from hat which
liberal policy ihe satellite obtained in the immediate
countries. Russian policy in post-Warld War II p-riod.
Europe has been dictated -
partly by the hope of Cprea,- Britair': Position Today
ing Ccimmunsm, but also What then is the position
by a desire to bvild up be, of Britain tody.y?
tween Russia and tl-e West Wiih the Commonweaith
a zone of friendly States. to now freed from the reproach
that end conditions of life of imperialisrim nd with tLe
r ust be made mcre endura, removal of the incubus of the
ble. Seen thus the Berlin presence in it of the Repu-
wall is not so much directed blic cfSSoith Africa, Britain
to the elimination of Berlin is able to assume her rightful
as an outpost of the West as position cf leadership in the
ic l;midirg Western influence Free World. Although rot
and to preventing any unifi, equal in wealth /and power
cation of Germany except as to ihe, U. S. A., she still his
a Russian satellite. a unique pcsiticn as having
It may well be that the led the way towards racial
' Chinese adventure in Korea equality.
-vas not really welcome in WVith the stalemate n the
China as guarding Russia's enter into play. If a measure
backdoor was one thing, but of disarmament should set
as a rival for the leadership free resources for raining the
of the Communist world ana standard of life in1 the less,
of Asia against Europe qdi-e developed parts of the world,
a n o t h e r. Similarly, the she will be able to supple,
Chinese attack on the north, ment with greater material!
ern borders of India has not assistance the kind of help in
evoked any enthusiasm in personnel whtch her great
Moscow. experience ani long-standing
I recall visiting Moscow in connections give her in Asia
I9S4 before Khrushchev's and Africa. Russia will no
attainment of power, when I doubt be taking up the com,
was about to visit Peking. petition in this field, but apart
Malenkov or Molctov, just from the fact thit much of
before I left, said: "Remem, her own resources will be
be. we are only 200,000,000 required at home, she has not
and China has 600,000,000." the experience or the exper,
Thus early there were signs tise to deal effectively which
of apprehension. Since then emergent democracies.
a serious ideological difference !n my view any attempt
has emerged between Russia to hold on to Empire in the
and China. This may well present age would have been
have ben a major factor in bound tc fail ignominiously
inducing Khrushchev to but, in fact, as the head and
adopt a more liberal policy in centre of a free Common,
the satellite States and in wealth, Britain is still a great
bringing about his adheren-e power and, standing together
to the treaty, now happily with the United States and
signed, limiting nuclear tests. the free countries of Europe,
There would seem to be a can meet the ideological
tendency to try to make challenge of the Communists.
n.f.l fc covexistencer in -End.


Europe a reality in view of
the danger to Russia of the
rising power of China. This,
however, is unlikely to curb
in any way Russian attempts
to infiltrate into fhe newly
independent States in Africa
and elsewhere.


CLEARANCE SALE
Household Goods and Appliances
Including electric Hammond Organ
and electric Sewing Machine
Inquire at Christian Literature
Centre between 8 a. i. & 4 p. m.
only,
July 4 -- 18
i


W. I. Chiefs
Abroad
Dr. Eric Williams, Trini-
dad's P. M., left for Switzer-
land f o r economic talks
following the Prime Ministtrs
Conference in Londo:n.
M r. Donald Sangster,
Deputy P. M., Jamaica,
spent ene night as the gueat of
Mr. Dur can Sandys and
another as the guest cf British
P. M. Sir' Alec Douglas,
Home, last week end.
Our Friend
Canada
Canada's Trade Co-nmisioner
in the West Indics,Mr. St. nierr-,
sjd in Aarbados last week-end that
a Trade mission from these islands
should go to Canada so-.n. Hi
stated that "tropical fruits" from
Dorrini-a and or'er islands sh;,u;d
find a ready market in his Domin-
ion.


Two Outstanding Preparations! 1

S GREEN'S BEEF, iRON & WINE
i Guaranteed to contain a therapeutic
i amount' cf non-irritating iron, rein- '
forced wih Vitamin B1 and Beef Ex- .
tract, in a base of fine sherry.
Will combat the i ron deficiency i
anaemia which doctors will tell you is i
so prevalent in Dominica today.
S8oz. & i2 oz. bottles at 81.00 and $1.40
GREEN S CREOSOTED COUGH COMPOUND
Based on a formula given to us by the [
late Dr. Keith M. B. Simon, this com-
pound is un.jrpassed for the treat-
ment of colds, coughs and 'b-onchitis,
4 oz. & 6 oz. bottles at 75 anrd )1.00

THE DOMINICA DISPENSARY GCO, LTD.
July 11-18
"'"' '"'" "'" '"'' "'


HU G HG Al TS K ELL : New immigration
DE AUCTION His kIemorial 18WS


A F UND TO
w establish a
memorial with
Commonw-21thl
education s its
aim, in r ueory:
tish Lab RoIu r
leader iH t g h
Gaitskell (who
died a year ago)
has been y pon,
scored by chiefs
of all political
parties in rn-
tain, aid b, the
Churches, Uni ,
versities an d
Trade Unioa.s.
The memorial"
will take the firm ot scholarships, and no limit has been
fixed to donations. As Hugh Gaitskell was vitally inter,
ested in adult education, the scholarships emanating ,from.
this memorial fund will cover a wide range of opportuni-
tis for st.tdy, fromn university courses to social welfare.


SSEE CARNIVAL IN ANTIGUA

S IN AUGUST
BY JOINING THE JAYCEES IN THEIR

GRAND EXCURSION
SLeaving Dominica by the M.V. RIPONon
Saturday 1st August and returningi
Daylight on Tuesday 4th August.
Fare:-
CABIN $20.00
DECK $16.00
Tickets can be obtained from
MR. CARLTON PETERS at thel
D ominica Dispensary Co. Ltd. and MR. ARTHUR WILLIAMS
at corner Hillsborough and Hanover Streets.
STuJvi4--4 -


Secretary of State Ruk, urging
Congress to adopt inew immigration
la-vs to replace the system that. has
bce" in' force since 1924, made a
st ong plea'for .thet.- two newly ;nl,.
9nodent English-ispeaking nations
of the Western 'Ierisphere,-Tri,
ha; always been the. policy *of the
C )ngress ta recognize the common
bo:d uniiing the u.mericas by ex-
em ting from any quota restrictions
th se immigrants who were both in
independent countries of the-West,
tern Hemisphere", he said.


FOR SALE
CNE SINGER SEWING
?Foot) MACHiNE
Apply:
St.l fphonsus
Credit Union Ltd.,
Steber Street,
Pbttersville.
July 11.-18

JUST RECEIVED
A LIMITED
QUANTITY/ OF
VESTA PI OPANE
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WITH AND
WITHOUT ELEC-
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A.C.SHILLIHGFORD & 00.
Car Aecessories Dept.
June 27--Tuy 18

DON'T DEPEND ON YOUR
NEIGHBOUR'S -- BUY
YOUR OWN DOMINICA
HERALD! !!!


S.J -- 1- -









kCTUJRDAY, JULY I8, 1964


PAGE SIX DOMINIC A. HERALD


Dawbiney Public
i Debate

On Value Of Middle Glass
About 0oo people from all
sections of the community
found their way to t h e
D. G. S. on Thursday, July
9 to hear Mr. Ronald
Armour and Miss Jean James
defend the resolution:
"That the Middle C!ass in
Dominica h.as made no
significant contribution to
the S-cial, Economic, and
Political Development o f
Dominica,", against opposic
tion Messrs. Jeff Charies and
F. Severin iT one of the
highlights of the Dawbiney
Literary and De beating
Society's Trinity Term, the
Public Debate.
In his 20 minute opening
address, Mr. R. Armour
pointed out the tendency of
the middle class to be more
concerted w i t h copying
European d r ess s fashions
("white mentalil'1) than with
making significant contribu-
tions either in the line of
politics or c u 1t u r e. He
quoted. fro m Professor
- arthur L zwia1'- 6- lt -Mat-;. -t
culation Address to show the
lack of initiative which was
so typical of a fearful middle
'class.
In reply, Mr. Jeff Charles.
eloquently rebuked the elo,
quence which he felt the
previous speaker had substi,
tuted for lbgic! Then running
swiftly through the ranks of
the Jaycees, the Dominica
Sports Association, village
councils, etc., Mr. Chailes
showed that 90 percent of the
personnel on these organisa,
tions wete of the middle class,
and felt that iy virtue of th;
existence and constructive
function of the same organisa,
tion they were making a
significant contribution to the
general development of
Dominica.
Miss Jean James, as the support-
iog member ot the Proposition
showed without' too much convki
tion that most of our social kaders
came either from the lower class
(Trade Unions for example) or from
expatriates. She was more effective
when she mentioned that the middle
class was often selfish in its motives
and more attracted to rum than cul-
tural .advancement.
Suppoting Mr. Charles, Mr. F.
Seven mentioned various cases of
gencrousity shown by Middle Class
gentlemen towards the poorer classes.
On this point he was sharply taken
to task by Mr. Armour in his final
rebuttal who declared that false,charity
such as that shown by those organi-
sers of the tenant system wasla favorite
trick of the Middle Class and he felt
that what Dominica needed was not


philanthrophy but a renewed sincere Overheard In
effort from the Middle Class. I O ve In
The questions following the Deb j New Street
ate were all orientated towards estab-
lishing a clear definition of Mid lie T i
Class, one gentleman declaring that ted conversation were taken .
the meagre nature of the Upper Class b a
really exempted them from classifica and y the Edtor.
tion which in turn made the existence "You den'c evtn say
of a middle class impossible. In that ing. You are an old silen
light Chairman Wendel Lawrence's ,
summing up of the "difficult areas"
of the debate was verve welcome. Mr. "If you was h "norgetic,
Lawrence mentioned' the tendency for make a way for yoVtrdf".
present-day W.I, sociologists to clas- *
sify W. I. societies into different "It's not me to abuse
groups such as the Administrative amily amnotCast
groups, working groups, etc., in pre-
ference to the higher, middle and
lower classes, thus making examina- rRepublicane
tion of a cioss section of any W. I. i W
community much easier. Cannot Wil


THE "VARIETY" STORE 1


'it ain anima,
own in short,

;':od-morn-
t picture".

you could


(mnal-parler)
:to's sister".


Following his concluding talk, Says Coldwater
Mr. Lawrence announced that the Gvernor William Scranton's
Judges Miss E. Charles, Mr. R. Loc- b h oerso Wdn Snt s
khart and E. Watty had unanimously backes wasted no time n rum Bpinry
agr ed, that the motion had been Goldwater that no Republicm "as
lost--Mr. J. Charles and F. Severin of now" can beat President Johon
having won the debate. P.A.B.in the November General elections
_and tried to pin a defeatist "Cannot
SVin" lbel on Goldwater in his
QUOTE OF THE WEEK bid for the Republican presidential
normination..- CP.
"And here again, let me stress ---
what I stress at every opportunity, Mrs. Jlgan Upset
and which I make no apologies for
dressingg again. We must all of us, Mrs. Janet Jagan, Secre,
in every walk of life, make it a very tary of the People's .Po..lical
part of our being that we should Party of British Guiana, said
BUY LOCAL. No excuses and last week that she was "a
no evasions. It is our duty to our lit
country- and wemust i. litt le disappointcda tie e i
-H ..... .," ,R f -tak ooi^BA. by .thi. Primc-,-...-
Agriculture, Industry and Commerce of Ministers' Conference 1i n
TRINIDAD, Britain,"

"Do-It-Yourself" BoysRun The
Weather Station


G. G. PHILLIP & CO. LTD.
LATEST ARRIVALS:--


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Agencies, Roseau

ir Own Weather Station


Sow would you like to hve a
share in a weather station? The
boys and girls at a secondary school
at Trying, in Hertfordshire, England,
have not only helped to build one,
but are running it themselves.
Their teachers say that it is of s
great benefit to those studying ge o
graphy and science.
Grant From School Fures
The idea was that of the school's
geography maitar, Mr. Henry Blake.
When he proposed it 7o the head,
master, he wa. given immediate
support -- including a substantial
grant from school funds.
Mr. Blake bought a Stevenson
screen oa form of housing to protect
the instruments), a barometer, ther-
mometers and a rain guage, but he
was still without two essential pieces P_3m
of equipment an electrical wind
direction indicator and an anemo-
meter for i.easuring the force of the a a ..
wind. generator and aluminum basins students as possible a chance to because they have helped to
The last two items were made in were used as wind scoo.s. operve th station. track them.
the school workshop, m a i n ly
through the efforts of a Fifth Form Part f Sho1if Mr. Blake says the boys and girls Extension Planned
through the efforts of a Fifh Form Part Of School Life feel they are taxing part in a Mr. Blake hopes in the future to,
tures of p-ofessinal models as his As may be imagined, the station genuinely scientific operation which extend the school's records to the
guide, Alan built them up fom a at first created excited interest among they can equate with the official measurement of the hours of sun-
variety of odds and ends. the pupils. hut it has become esta- weather reports on the radio. shine by the construction of a
The wind director: indicator was blished as part of school life. Their observations have also special recorder and a simple baro,-
made from part of an old vacuum Both staff and students like to proved most useful outside the graph (an instrument for recording
cleaner, some old aero-engine bear- look in for checks on remperatures school, and information hes been atmospheric p r e s s u r e), although
ings, steel tubing and abbut 500 and rainfall, and, as Philip Mitchell, supplied to a local newspaper and these are sti!l only on the drawing
yards of bell wire. aged 13, says: "We can estimate to British Waterways when their board.
More steel tubing and old bear, rairfalls and know when to take a own local system broke down. The moral would seem to be
ings were used in the construction raincoat." Meteorology is no longer a long that if you want to be well up in
of the anemometer, which is still There are two full-time and two and rather difficult word to the weather lore and improve your
experimental. A small direct cur, temporary observers who are changed school's pupils. They know all geography build you r s e If a
rent motor was conuerted into a every fortnight to give as many about anti-cyclones land depressions Iweather station! BIS


MirU.,M~
LAVATORY SAITIZE
^^^^^*^ - --- --- 1^^^


.4


i









DOMINICA HERALD


International Labour Conference The T.U.C. believes that the
Iway to these gates of opportun'hy is
(Continued from page 4) still impeded by handicaps imposed
on many children in their earlier
"Our Organisation has always set cooperation above years. A process of selection often
fighting, ideals above rancour and the general interest above begins at the age of seven cr eight,
pardicdlar interest, "Mr. Caideron Puig said, strzssiag that children being "streamed" by their
the struggle against poverty is one of the fundamental tasks teachers' assessment of what they are
f h hch -capable of achieving. There is
of the ILO. "Now, in this epoch, in which new nations some evidn.e to suggest that place
are claiming their place in the sun and in which more ing a child in the lower stream
nations are insisting upon their share of world wealth, the tends ro retard his development and
ILO plays a privileged role in conciliation and the setting of as, at eleven, selection for varying
international standards to ensure international equilibrium" grades of secondary education takes
place, "streaming" can affect the
Participatior In Opening Sitting whole future educational perform
mane of the child.
A total of ninety-nine of the one hundred and ten For reasons o socil si an
member countries of the Internatioral Labour Organisa, to reduce a possible waste of talent,
nion were represented at the opening hittingg of the Con- the T.U.C. would therefore like a
ference, thorough examination to be made
A national delegation is normally comprised of two Gov, into the possibilities of abandoning
ernment delegates, one Employers' delegate and one --or at least modifying the
Workers' delegate. The attendance breakdown was: sch of streaming in pmary
191 Government delegates
94 < Employers' delegates Value O New Buildings
94 Workers' delegates many new
6 Technical Advisers Morecve,, jalrhough many new
736 Technical Advisers school buildings are an architectural
1,115 delight, the building programme has
not yet been able to replace a!l the
Four territories British Guiana, Malta, Northern out-of-date buildings, and provide
Rhodesia an'd Southern Rhodesia were represented by very physical facility ]for teaching
tripartite observer delegations. These are still colonial pos,
sessions. Observers also were sent by these intergovern,
mental'organisations: United Nations, Office of the High
.Commissioner for Refugees, Food and Agriculture. Organ- U e i
adn U.N.E.S.C.O., World ,Health Organisation, sed thrOI
*General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, Organisation of
.American States, Council of Europe, Intergovernmental
Committee for Eurooean Migration. Lea ue of ra t -t
and the Commission for Technical Co;opeiation in Afr ca.
Observers from a number of non-governmental organ-
isations, notably international Emil y:rs' and Worlers'
organizations, were als present.
The Agenda
The Agenda of the Conference is as follows:
1. Report of the Director-General.
2. Financial and budgetary questions.
3. Informnion and reports on the application of Conventions and
Recommendations.
4. Hygiene in commerce and office (second discussion).
5,. Benefits in case of industrial accidents and occupational diseases (sec,
ond discussion).
6. Women workers in a changing world. T U
7. The employment of young persons in underground work in mines of ANDLF LIG
all kinds.
8. Employment policy, with particular reference to the employment
problems of developing countries (for single discussion with a view to
the possible adoption of an appropriate instrument or instruments on
this question).
9. Substitution for Article 35 of the Constitution of the ILO of the
proposals referred to the Conference by the Governing Body at its
i57tb Session.
10. Propt sed declaration concerning the policy of apartheid of the Repub-
lic of South Africa.
ia. Inclusioh in tne Constitution of the ILO of a provision empower-
ing the Conference to expel or suspend from membership any Mem-
ber which has been expelled or suspended from membership of the
United Nations.
12. Inclusion in the Constitution of the International Labour Organisa-
tron of a provision empowering the Conference to suspend from
participation in the International Labour Conference any Member of
which has been found by the United Nations to be flagrantly and
persistently pursuing by its legislation a declared policy of racial dis-
crimination such as apartheid.


by the most modern methods. In methods which encourage creative
the T.U.C's view it is important activity by the children rather than
to ensure that children living in passive learning by meais of more
poor housing conditions in neigh- formal instruction. Warmly comm-
bourbcods that are deficient in cul- ending this, the T.U.C., while
tural and material amenities should ready to leave th: specialists to de-
NOTsuffer the additional disadvan, cide the detailed content of the
tige of going to schools that are school curricula, puts in a special
sub-standard, plea for every means to be used to
New buildings would help to develop the ability of children to
ensure that no more than 40 chiJld .exprers their thoughts and feelings
ren are in one cliss-room anywhere, through the. confident harndiing of
but the reduction of the over-size tbeir own language.
class depends even more on over- Children should also become
coming the shortage of teachers. familiar at an early age with the
Supporting the plans for enlarging use of numbers for reasons of gener,
the teachers, training colleges, the al education and because of the
T.U.C. stresses that the expansion shift towards .science-based studies
should be rapid and continuous in the late: stages of education,
and wants a renev.ed effort to be There is a welcome, too, for the
made :o persuade married woman readiness of some primary schools
who are qualified teachers to return to experiment with subjects foreign
to schools for part-time as well as languages, for instance) which in
full-time service. the past have been taught only in
At the same time the trade secondary schools.
union spokesmen want the training :All it'all, however, the T.U.C.
of teachers, especially .those who are is against. rigid ,subject-divisions
to work with young-r. children, to which -"have -ge. sigpificance for
be centred on the study of children younger .childrefi, and decides in
and the proZeses of education rath/ favour' of flexibility.. and for the
er than upon the tra iitional, acadq.' fostering of general intelligence and
mic disciplines. individual an4 social skills rather
Already in many primary schools than thib'acciinulation.of a mass of
emphasis is placed on teaching unorganised factual knowledge.


British T.U.C. On Education
Cont. from page 3
creating conditions that will yield Nearly 70 years ago delegates at
speedy and direct advances in the the Trades Union Congress we-e
material well-being of the members insieting that "in this question of the
of its affiliated unions (more than education of the nation's children
8,ooo ooo manual and white-collar the workers should ever keep in
workers now), has campaigned in 'mind as their ideal the democratic
the long-term interests of the family, principles of equality of opportun,
too. ity".


AVAILABLE AT THE FOLLOWING HARDWARE STORES

L. A. DUPIGNY Esq.,
J. W. EDWARDS
C. G. PHILLIP & COMPANY
T. D. SHILLINGFORD


SATURDAY, JULY 18, 1964


PAGE SEVEN








PAGE EIGHT

THE DISCIPLINE OF LANGUAGE
SOME INTERESTING EXTRACTS FROM THE JULY MONTHLY LETTER OF
THF ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
SOME quite intelligent people have been lured into
thinking that a concern for words is out of date.
Others allow themselves to believe that to speak and write
sloppily is somehow an emblem of the avant-garde. A
glance at our environment will show that our high standard
of living, brought about by our mastery of science and
technology, is menaced by the faulty use of signals between
men, between ideologies and between nations. By misin,
terpreting signals (which is all that words are) we create
disorder in human affairs.
Communication of ideas is ,an important human
activity. When we invented writing we laid the f'ounda,
tionstone of civilization. In the beginning the power of
words must have seemed like sorcery, and we are compell,
ed to admit that the miracles which verbal thinking have
wrought justified the impression.
Importance in Business
The workmen engaged in building the Tower of
Babel were craftsmen, skilled in their trades. Take away
their tools: they will replace iem. Take away their skills:
they will learn anew. But tlke away the;r means of com,
munication with one another and their building of the
Tower has to be abandoned. What counts is simply this:
to say what you mean with precision and accuracy in plain
language. A true definition of style is "proper words in
proper places with the thoughts in proper order." A.
scrupulous writer will ask "What am I trying to say. Do
these words express it.e" A word does not serve well which
does not excite in the reader the same idea which it stands
for in the mind of the writer.
There is no easy way of choosing words. They must
-0i-t btso general in meaning 's-t-rinthrde- thoughts not
intended, nor so narrow as to eliminate thoughts that are
intended. Let the meaning select the word.
What Words Are
Words are the only currency in which we can ex,
change thought even with ourselves. It is through words,
which are the names for things and actions, that we per,
ceive the events of the world.
Because of this universal importance, we need to be
as clear-cut as we can in their use. Inexactness to some de,
gree is inevitable, because: thought c(.n never be precisely or
adequately expressed in verbal symbols. Words are not
like iron and wood, coal and water, things we see and
touch. Words are merely indicators, but they are the
only sensible signs we have, enabling us to describe things
and think about them. In the darkness of night we talk of
the sun, knowing that the word "sun" presents a picture to
our hearer; we write about the "sparkling ripples" caused
by the stone we cast into a pool, knnwing that our de,
scription presents a motion picture to our reader. Know-
ledge of words is not burdensome. Words are pleasant
companions, delighting in what they can do for you
whether in earnest or in fun, in business or in love. The
true dimension of your vocabulary is not, however, the
number of words you can identify but the number of words
you can use, each with its appropriate area of meaning.
Study the different shades of meaning expressed by the
synonyms of a general word like "said". When should
you use "maintained"? Under what conditions would
"claimed" be more appropriate a Look at the different
effects produced in your mind by substitution of these and
o:her words for "said" in this sentence: "He said (assert,
ed, implied, assumed, insisted, suggested) "that the police
wete doing a good job." And try the substitutes for
"looked" m the sentence "John looked at Mary" ....
glared, gazed, leered, glanced.
This discrimination may appear trifling to some and
tiresome to others. The writer who wishes to think clear,
ly and express his thoughts clearly and is there anyone
who will idmit that he wishes to be a bungler in thought
and speech ? will see its virtues.
To he concluded


C kTURDAY, JULY 18 1964


Outstanding Student
F. 0. Riviere
By Our Jamaican Correspondent
A son of Mr L.A. Riv;ere of Goodwill and Portsmoudh
(retired teacher) Mr. Franc's Riviere was first educated z.t
Dominica Grammar School and may L-e remembered as a
force to reckon with at games; when he left school, he joined
the Notre Dame sports club and represented Dominica both
in cricket and football. He may also he recalled as a
youthful and pleasant civil servant during this interim period.
In 1962 Francis left Dom,
inIca for the University of the
West Indies, and was elected
editor of the campus maga,
zinc PELICA N for 1962,3.
He is reading economics at
the Unive sity, and recently
travelled from U, W. I. to
New York with two other
students (from B. G. and
Jamaica) for the third W. I.
International Students' New
conference there; he presented -.
a paper on educational deve-, . .
lopment and regional co-operation ia the Caribbean.
In 1963 the publication PELICAN befame a weekly
newsletter for students: Mr. Riviere also became editor of
Chancellor Hall's weekly paper, THE LION. Francis
was then elected second vicepresident of the Guild of
Undergraduates, which makes him automatically chairman
of the UWI's External affairs commission, "Popular,
realistic and affable" are the words his co-students apply to
him. /
At the end of this month, Mr. Riviere will lead the
U -W. L-rLk-eamp,-- Antignar-whre-they-willp aii the-
recently renovated Antigua Grammar School. Readers


may remember .he volunteer
effort done on the Infirmary
wall last year! His as ociates
look to Francis to achieve
his B. S'. Hons. in Ecoro,
mics with flying colours, and
Ms family may be congratula,
Sed on what he has done so far.

GIFT TROPHIES FOR SCHOOLS
Two most welcome gift
of trophies have been made to
Government by the Hon,
curable Frooel Laville and
Mr. Austin Andre, both
residents in the north of the
Island, f o r intzrichools
northern cricket competitions.
Mr. Laville, who is the
elected representative for the
Eastern District on the Legis,
lative Council, gave $1oo for
the purchase of a shield for
Cricket in the Northern Dis-
trict, while Mr. Andre of
Portsmouth has given a silver
cup for the winning school
in the cricket competition in
the NouthWest Zone, viz:
Portsmouth, Dos d'A n e,
Clifton, Vieille Case and
Penville. The gifts were
made through the Education
department and have been
warmly acknowledged by
the Mini.trv of Labour and


Social Services.


Dull
Hair


For
Normal
Hair


Sxf GIBBS _iy
Sunsilk

SHAMPOO
.. ....


SunsulkM

SHAMPOO


Gets
Rid Of
Dandruff


For
Dry
Hair


THE DOMINICA DISPENSARY GO. LTD.
Distributor
July zz-25


GIVE YOUR IKAIR THAT

SHINING SUNSHINE LOOK!


... ......... Ir .. ...... .


DOMINJ'.A HERALD








SATURDAY, JULY 18, A96PE


St. Alphonsus
Co-op. A.G.M.
In spite of inclement
weather, some one hundred
and thirty members of the St.
A I o h o n s u s Co-operative
Credit Union I td., turned
out for the Twelf h Annual
General Meeting of the
Society held at th- former
premises of the D. G. S. on
loth July.
Reports of the Board of
Directors, the Treasurer, the-
Credit Comnmittee and the
Supervisory Committee for
the financial year ended 31st
December, 1963 were laid.
The audited balance sheet
presented revealed thatth e
five hundred tatd six member,
strong Credit Union boasted
assets in excess of Sgo,ooo;
personal loans outstanding
totalled more than $66,000.
On the recommendation
of the Board of Directors, the
meeting approved payment of
Dividends on shares at the
rate. of three percent and a
refund of ten percent of all
interest paid on loans, out of
the accumulated surplus of
some three thousand and
forty six dollars.
AElections brought in.
among others, Mr. Algernon
Fingal on the Board of
Directors, Mr. Garner Shil-
lingford and Mr. Jules Vidal
on the Credit Committee,
and on the Supervisory Comrn,
mittee Miss Dorothy Hender,-
son and Mr. Howard Shil,
lingford, all for their first
term of office.
Tribute was paid :o retired
committee members; on a
motion from the floor, it was
decided to honour those
members at a later date by
presentation of certificates.
The door prizes were won
by Mr. Jules Vidal and Mr:.
Cleo Williams. The meet,
ing ended with the showing
of a film entitled 'Good
Business."- Contrib.
Let U.N Run B.G
-Says Eric Williams
In the middle of the Prime Miz-
isters' conference in London, Hon.
Dr. bric Williams(P.M. of Trini-
dad and Tobago)put forward a pro-
posal that the British Government
should withdraw from British Gui-
ana and that the territory should be
ruled in the interim period before
independence by Australian and
New Zealand personnel. He discar-
ded the suggestion that Afro-Asians
should administer the territory, be-
cause of the difficulty of their being
uninvolved in such circumstances..
Comment from inside B.G. was
against anybody but Guianese run-
ning the country, and certain trade
unions in B.G protested against the
proposal through their representatives
in Britain.


Mr. Graham
Norton
Speaking ovcr a B.B.C.
pr,-ramme last Monday
evenm-g, Her.ld London ccr,
respondent Grabham Norton
(due in Dominica next
week) said be Lad been ask,
ed to present i tractor to the
people of St. Vincent hy the
Penzance, Cornwall "Free,
dom from Hunger" campaign
Mr. Norton said that the
boys of his oll school in
Co:nwall had staged a
'hunger march' and slept


out under spaitan conditions
in rough harn-, tramping the
streets to get funds for the
cause. The sum of (6oo
was collected.
hI addition to 1his ether
activities, Mr. Norton is a
Councillor of Penzance,

Minister's Home
Guarded
Police have been guarding the
isolated hill-top nome of Dr.
Patrick Solomon, deputy Prime
Minister of Trinidad, following
treats that gang violence would
break out around it.


Caribbean
Agencies,


Trading
Roseau


ASTAPHANS SHOPPING CENTRE


ON


LADIES PANTIES
REG. PRICE: 500 EACH"

5 FOR 99

LADIES PLEATED DRESSES
REG. PRICE: $5.50 EACH
DOOR SMASHERS PRICE
$2.98 EACH

LADIES HIGH-HEEL SHOES
REG. PRICE: $14.95 EACH
DOOR SMASHERS PRICE
$8.95 EACH

GENTS MGGREGOR PANTS
REG. PRICE: $17.50 EACH
DOOR SMASHERS PRICE
$12.50 EACH

GENTS KAY PANTS
REG, PRICE: $12.00 EACH
DOOR SMASHERS PRICE
$8.95 EACH

LADIES HANDBAGS
REG. PRICE: $8.50 EACH
DOOR SMASHERS PRICE
$3-98 EACH

ROBIN HOOD CAKE MIXERS
REG. PRICES: 98-$1.01-$1.13-$1.00
DOOR SMASHERS PRICE
88 EACH

LENTILS DRIED PEAS
REG. PRICE:, 33 PER LB.
DOOR SMASHERS PRICE
250 PER LB.


ROCKING CHAiRS
REG. PRICE: $72.00 EACH

$45.00 EACH


4'6" MATTRESSES (DOUBLE BEDS)
REG. PRICE: $65.00 EACH
DOOR SMASHERSIPRICE
$45.00EACH

3'6" MATTRESSES
REG. PRICE: $57.50 EACH
DOOR SMASHERS, PRICE
$39.98 EACH

ELECTRIC LAMPS
REG. PRICE: $4.95 AND $5.50 EACH
DOOR SMASHERS PRICE
$2.50 EACH

VONO BOX SPRING BED 2'6"
REG. PRICE: $185.oo EACH
DOOR SMASHERS PRICE
$99.oo EACH

MIRRORS IN OUR APPLIANCE DEPT.
DIFFERENT SIZES & PRICES
DOOR SMASHERS PRICE
25% DISCOUNT

TAROGONA WINE
REG. PRICE: $1.3s EACH
DOOR SMASHERS PRICE
98 EACH

PIGEON PEAS (IN TINS)
REG. PRICE: 64 PER TIN
DOOR SMASHERS PRICE
.520 PER TIN


FOR EIGHT HOURS ONLY

J SATURDAY 18TH JULY 1964

8 A.M. 4 PM,


i


MUSTMSm ONT mVVTASH6AYS ^^^
MO|OL IRONMOU I LD REMOV R
*3baJiFF DES,97 OEBLY CLOURS)
0 DRUMME AE ISINFECTANT~k^


DOMINICA HERALD


PAGE NINE









DOMINICA HERALD Cl. RDAY, JULY 18, 1964


SPOTLIGHT INTERNATIONAL CRICKET

Local Sportlight Dexter, O'Neil, Booth, Simpson
Lo iIn Form


NETBALL
THE team to represent Dcminica in-
the netball tournamaut in Trini'
dad scheduled to start early August
was selected last Moi:day evening.
The full team is:-
D. Didier Capt )
M Johnron V. Capi.)
J. Jules ) Rocke s
E. Josephs )
A. John )
F. Harris )
D. Hu-tault (Invincibles)
J. Dickson
A. Laronde
G. Tuit Hummingbirds
Stand-bys are K. Joseph, J. James
and J. Nicholas. The. team is a rela-
tively good one by local standard and
its attack is g-nerally better than def-
coce. Didier and Dickson are in
five form though they haven't put
forward their best efforts at recent trial
matches and practices. Johnson, Julks
and Harris form a ,fairly formidable
midcourt combination In their ab,
sence through injury Laronde and
Hurtault can adequately substitute.
Again, Harris is a third shoot, so
reducing the need to travel with a
third specialist shooter.
John, Joseph and Tuit are adept at
defence but this is. still the weakest
departmenton the side, Not because
o,'.ack 4 effort or skill for .John &c,
JIseph especially are veiv, alert, and
quick of foot buit techniqiin mark-
ing flignty shootersand collecting re-
bounders off the net or ring leaves
very much to be desired.,
Un-kr the watchful eye cf Havis,
Shillingford and the knowledge and
experience of Sylvia Bertrand the girls
are expected to improve in their vari-
ous departments of weakness. The
girls now practice on a hard court,
which is the type of condition under
which they are due to play in the
forthcoming tournament.

Table Tennis

Players Show Form But How?
Many of the expected 'seeded"
players are showing reasonable form
for the forthcoming table-tennis
tournament to be held in mid,
August. Their form though reason-
able is not very convincing, but
there is much time to buck up and
done up concentration and con,
fidence.
J. C. Joseph is good in attack
but not as skillful in defence as he
can be. Blackman is as usupl con,
sistently sound, fine defence being
his bread winning department.
Sylvester, a player with a lot of talent
is still too impetituous. Corriette's
displays but a relic of true for., but
.s still a potential champion. Win,-
ston moves around adeptly, placing
his shots well but is still vulnerable
to sensible attack. He is by no
means easy to defeat, however. Eilly
Armour just returned fiom U.W.I.
Mona is cracking with fore-arm
slams while still stolid in defence
but a back hand flick tco ofien
spells his undoing.
Generally, all the players show
merit, but deeper concentration and
hard practice with an eye on :the
tournament can surely raise the stan-
dard of play.


This trophy, a gold-plated figure
of a netball player mounted on a
marble blse,will be kept permanentiy
by the winner of next y.ar's series of
matches. Mr. Cleve Butler hopes to


A sparkling 124 by England award a trophy to the Champien
skipper Ted Dexter paying for netball team each year.
,Sussex versus the Australians matk.
ed the return to dominant form of CRICKET
this .most gifted and punitive bats- The St. Jchn's School having
man. This ;augurs well for England won all their matches in rhe north,
as their failure in the third test can west zone, will be presented with
be attributed in large measure to the the Andre cup F:iday night.
inability of their front-line batsmen ss
to collar the Aussies bo,~ling when
seemingly well on top on a relatively Pope's Holiday
easyp-ced wicket.
For Australia O'Ntil, Booth and Defe red
Simpson continue to show impress,
ive form :and the Old Trafford test Fope Paul was reported to have
should provide good c:icret. Grave- postponed his su..mer vacation
ney with a brilliant 78 not out again, possibly to finish writing of
against rival county Warwickshire document on birth c ntrol. The
\sounded a warning to the selectors Pontiff had been expected to go
that he is by no means over the early this mirth to his summer
mill and shcul'ri't be glossed over residence at Castel Gandolfo fifteen
so easily. m'lcs southh of home. Later Vati-
West Indians Do Well car sources said the trip had been
put.o. ir7 a w _- o ...tw. b.. a,


The West Indians professionals
are doing very well ii: the Lanca-
shire league cricke'. Roy Gilchrist
with 1o for 41 last week-end, sig-
nailed that he still has some penetra-
tion.
Kanhai's 196 not out for his club
was a brilliant performance. World
best all-rounder Sobers, has taken
a lot of wickets and scored' many
5os .,s his tops its zone. He:, has liji-
tie chance to score big figures since
invariably he helps to skittle the obp-
ponents rather cheaply so that therc

Top of the new is ot course
Charley Griffith who seems headed
for a league record. He has so far
taken 87 wickets at just ove: five
runs apiece. All in all this speaks
well for our professionals Lnd nis
good for them to remain active in
the game for the Australians should
not be taken for granted when they
tour next year.

PORTSMOUTH SPORTS

This year's series f netball matches
for the Butler trophy came to an end
on Monday 13th when Portsmouth
played the last match against Rarigot.
On the xoth the St. John's School
achieved two victories: Cahbishixe
were defeated by them 27 to 17, and
then Marigot went down to them
24 to 20. Monica Williams (Sonnet),
playing Goal At-.ack for the St. John's
School, excelled on the court.
Playing ag:.inst Vieille Case at
Vieille Case on the -3th, Marigot
fought valiantly, but were unable to
avoid defeat by one goal. Chief
architects of victory for Vieille Case
were Hettie Royer, Phyllis Roycr and
Francillia Frederick.
Final scores were 18-17, and
Portsmouth administered the second
defeat to Marigot 1 that day, Earnie
Jones scored 32 out of her .id: 34
goals. Marigot shot in 18 goals.
Mary Sylvester and Mary Bedminster
performed creditably for Marigot.
Earnie Jones has the distinction of
being the Champion .goal scorer in
district. She shot in 137 goals for
the season. The St. John's School,
winning all four matches played, be-
came the first winner of the Butler
trophy, whioh will be presented to the
school at its breaking up function on
Friday night the' 17th. It will be kept
for a year.


put on for a week o two. NOw va-
rican sources say it has been post-
poned until the end of the month.
- CP. -


Widow's Mistake

PATRAS, GREECE -- Police reported recently that 19 persons died
and 150o became seriously ill after eating the traditional Greic mourning
dish of boiled wheat-germ at a ine-norial service. The authorities said the
widow sprinkled the dish with insect poison instead of powdered sugac by
mistake. In Greece it is traditional to eat this mourning dish forty days
after a death. Police said r.o legal aciicn will be taken. CP.


Vacancy In Eastern Caribbean Commission,
Montreal, Canada

Applications, from nationals of the E-stern Caribbean, are invited for
the new p o s t of Admirnstrative Assistar.t to the Acting Commission-
er in Montreal Canada.
SALARY: In the scale: $5,904 x 192 6288 (W.I.)
ALLOWANCE: $3.000 (W.I.)
Details of the duties of the post, the required qualification:, and the
prescribed forms of application are obtainable from:
T-'e Chief Secretary,
Admini trator's Office, Roseau.

Windward Islands Banana Growers
Association


Press Release


__Y ._ou THE Board of Directors of WINBAN held a meeting at
You can now get your the Hotel Caribbee, Barbados, on' July 4th princi-
HERALD at J. G. Royer's pally to consider the appointment of its United Kingdom
Supermarket in K i ng representative who will take care of its interests in that
George V Street! country. Mr. Jack Spector, B.Sc., A. Inst. Phys,, F,R. Stat. S.
NOTIO--E was appointed out of a total of 138 applicants.
NOTICE Mr. Spector is at present heal of the Central Analytical
Custom &Ece Dt. Laboratories of the Regional Research Centre, University oi.
IT h uh1yi96e t, the West Indies; Trinidad. He has been concerned with.
_____,af t -: aricultural deveoiMent in the West Indies both at the tece'
According to sect ion 27 nical aad at the planning levels sinc i-b1i, and ialeiy ia!
(3) of the Trade and Revenue contributed significantly to the solution of banana cultivation
Ordinance No, 5 of 1959, if problems in the Windward islands. He is co-author of several
importers do not mak, full works on the soils and agriculture of the region. His keen
and perfect entry ,of goods interest in the Windward Islands and his experience of com-
within five days after landing, mercial advertising projects for several years were recog,
these,goods shall be taken to nised and will undoubtedly be of great value to the Wind-
the Queep's Werehouee or ward Islands banana trade in the United Kingdom and
such other place as the Finan- elsewhere.
cial Secretary directs. The meeting took the opportunity to make apptint-
Importers are hereby noti- ments to its research staff in the Windward Islands anj
flied that arrangements are generally reviewed the research programme.
being made to apply above It was also agreed that a meeting with the Jamaica
provision as from 27th July, Banana Board should take place soon to discuss matters of
19N4, and such goods will be muual interest.
sold for payment of duties j, it8 es
and charges if, not cleared
from the warehouse within COLONY OF DOMINICA
two months in accordance. TITLE BY REGISTRATION ACT
with section 27 (4) of the REGISTRY OF TITLES ISLAND. OF DOMINICA
said ordinance. Schedule of App!ication for Certifica e of Title 'and Notings
hsaid ordinance. ...... .- ,m f h ,,i,,= ,ow ni,; ,, thIe 18th dav nf Juliv 1964


F. V. M. JAMES
Acting Collector of Customs.


C.0.78
July R8-.Aug.i


FOR SALE
SEMPERIT TYRES
and
TUBES IN STOCK
750 x 20 825 x 20
650 x 16 520 x 13
600 x 16 520 x 14
750 x 16 590 x 14
700 x 20 500 x 15
640 x 13 560 x 15
670 x 15 590 x 15
Very Attractive Prices.
3. P. MUSSON SON
& CO. LTD.
Tel. 360


Nature of Request whether
Date of Request Person Presenting for Certificate of Title
Notings thereon or Caveat.
Requet for the issue of a first
Reque';t dated Delor Nicholas Certificate of Title (-ith plan
attached) in respect of a
21st May, 1964 portion of land known as
Morne Prosper, a part of Pavis
Presented by his Solicitor Estate, situate in the Parish
of St Josat h, in the Colony
13th July, 1964 CilniaA.M. Dupigny of Dominica, containing
at 2 45 p.m. 5.9500 acres, and bounded as
I follows;-On the North East,
by Davis Estate; On the South-East by Davis Estate; On, the North
by Davis Estate; On the West by land of Felton Amrantrading and
and on the South-West by Davis Estate.
Registrar's Office. (Sgd) JOSEPH V. JEAN PIERRE
Roseau, Dominica, 1964. Registrar of Titles.
NoTE:-Any person who desires to object to the issuing of a
Certificate of Title on the above application may enter a Caveat in
the above office within six weeks from the date of the first appear-
ance of the above Schedule in the DoMINICA HFR.ALD news-
paper published in this Island or from the date when the notice
prescribed by law was last served on any owner or occupier of
adjoining land in respect of which the application is made.
July. 18-25


PRINTED AND PUBLIC MED BY J.MARGARTSON CHARLES, THE HERALD'S PRINTER, 31 NEW STREET, ROSEAU. DOMINICA, SATURDAY, JULY 18, 1964


P AGE TE


L


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