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Dominica herald
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102878/00046
 Material Information
Title: Dominica herald
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 42 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Allfrey, P. Shand ( Phyllis Shand )
Allfrey, P. Shand ( Phyllis Shand )
Publisher: Dominica Herald
Place of Publication: Roseau, Dominica
Roseau, Dominica
Publication Date: December 21, 1963
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Dominica -- Newspapers   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Dominica
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1955? Cf. caption.
General Note: Editor, <1963-1964>: Phyllis Shand Allfrey.
General Note: "For the General Welfare of the People of Dominica, the further advancement of the West Indies and the Caribbean Area as a whole."
General Note: Description based on: Jan. 12, 1963; title from caption.
General Note: Last issue consulted: December 31, 1964.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 82144654
lccn - 2007229365
sobekcm - UF00102878_00046
System ID: UF00102878:00046

Full Text



I- I


*


-*-


- Thk Finest People .. The Riche~t Soul
(For the Genera IWeiN iie of tihe People of Dominica, the fi'rtier advancement of their West Indies and the Caribean Area as a whole)
ESTABLISHEDD 1955 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1963 P1KIC io


THERE


BE


PEACE


ON


EARTH


Star Of Wonder, Star Of Might, Star With Royal Beauty Bright *
THIS CHRISTMASTIDE there is less warfare in the world than for many years. Peace has come to Algeria and the Congo, the Cuban threat has faded:
disputes are increasingly being settled around the conference tables of the United Nations. Despite setbacks and dissensions, the omens are fair.
l Blessed are the peacemakers.


S1
I




-
























Ar infant dreams like astral petals ying
j 9..



I 1
























Or is your slumber-time so deep and golden
That even dreams hav.* been withholden?
I .


















A mother to all mothers I adore


Or is your slumbertime so deep and golden.
Your eyes and lips are innocent of dread

A mother o all mothers, I adore




The whAround your heace encompassed in your sleep;ligh
ThOr is your slumbrsake I'llme sorrow eep and golden



Tonight, tonight I smile and cannot weep.


Christmas Messages


From The Administrator
It is with pleasure that I
take tle opportunity afforded
me at this time to send on
behalf of my wife and nmy,
self a Christmas message to
the people of Dominica.
In the latter part of the
year which is now closing,
we in Dominica and in the
other Windward Isla n d s
have suffered a severe set,
back and I am sure that we
all realise that supreme efforts
are required if we are to re,
establish our economy after
the widespread damage by
hurricane. In the great task
before us we shall need to
be tolerant, generous and
understanding to each other.
In fact, at this Christmas time
as never before, we must be
motivated by the spirit of
Christmas which is goodwill
to our neighbours and we
should be ever ready to help
and encourage.
Christmas is a season for
family reunions when we
remember the sick, the aged
and those who are far from
home. Let us during this
season and throughout the
coming year recall the message
of Christmas "Glory to
God in the highest and on
earth, peace to men of good.-
will." A Happy Christmas
to you all.

RT. -


Phyllis Shani Allfrey-Editr


The. DOMINICA HEIRALD Wishes All
Friends and Patrons a VERY GOOD
CHRISTMAS AND JOY IN 1963.







'0
/
'0'ss






J. Margartson Charles--Proprietor
Wines On "Maple"
Last week at the invitation of
Messrs A.C. Shillingford and Co,
and Mr. Mackay of Emu Wi.cs, a
small number of interested persons
took part in a wine-tasting on board
the Ftderal Maple. Initiated into the
rites of the wine-taster by Mr. Mac-
kay, the guests worked their way
through mouthfuls of fine Australian
wines most of which are obtainable
in Dominica at prices well below
most European wines.
Starting off with lighter Hough-
ton table wines, Riesling, Sauterne,
Cabernet (a claret) and Hermitage,
they then sampled the Emu Sherries,
"Dryad" and "Sir John Sack" and
later passed on to the famous best
sellers, the Emu Ports. The white
fruity port (444), and 999 tawny
aud the 333 Rich Ruby were all in
turn tasted and commented on. The
session finished with a glass all
round of the very excellent Emu
Vintage Tawny Port and a .'ote 6f,
thanks to Mr. and Mrs. Mackay,
Messrs Shillingiord and the Federal
Shipping agent Mr. John Cham-
bers, for a very interesting arid in-
structive. afternoon's entertainment.
We shall be publishing an account
of Dominica' s Finance and Legislative
Council meetings on Dec. 28 with a sub-
head: '"'Dullness relieved by Trivia,"
It is neither Christmassy nor urgent
enoughh fr present ptiblication. Repo;s'"
"laid, questions. partially' nswtcredi DV
creay's now ancient visit to Canada, non,
rehabilitated lepersr master kicks schoolboy
(with racial overtones), the Registrar's
salary, secrecy over Presmont, secrecy
ever Little Seven, Loblack's solution for
malnutrition ...


The Dominica Trade Union
Executive to Members iid
Workers
A review of activities in spite ot
disappointment, will" certainly de-
scribe our achievements as many.
For this we are s u r.e1 y grateful.
However as 1963 is drawing to a
close we reaffirm our desire'to pro-
mote the well-being of our members
and the people of Dompnica.
Meanwhile our, nmegbers are'.-
being joined together in the common,
bond of the Organisation and in i e
awareness of common. .destiny.
The way the world is-going we_
shall.have to grow. bigin s'piri, its
tolerance and frateihitv. We 'shall
have to trach 'odr~lsves to cointr'-
mpulsei. to profit from experience,
o concentrate our attention on mem-
bcrs and their welfare, atnd to ac-;
quire means, not of dominating,th'em,
but by winning them over to noble
deas. It is in this spirit the Exc-
:utive Council sends the Best of
Wishes for a Happy Christmas and a
Prosperous New Yea'r.
R. P. JOSEPH
General Secretary, Dominica Trade
Unic".
ADMINISTRATOR TO GO ON LEAVE
H. H. Col. Lovelace goes on
eave Dec. 26th, Mr. Hugh Bur-
owes will act until end of February.

1963 Deb.
Elegant, Graceful, Charming
Jacqueline Letang of the Convent
High School was adjudged Debut-
ante of the year 1963 at the
Junior Chamber ofCommerce spon-
sored contest at the St. Gerard's Hall
last Saturday evening.






? ;


R, E. Allfrey-Manger


LET


Harold Joseph Reprieved

Official


.


I.A1i i^J sii.iAtj i




* .



PG- r1v a
..


I ,, O.IBt1iAT m Iirriei to M,. Pcter L
U r '. "-,Henry, at present Heat
LEONITNA VlRY : Teacher of Petit- Savanne, or
In lovin memory of Mrs.December 27, 1956. Sh
Leenetta Henry who breathed was loved by all who knew
her last at 9.15 a.m. on her both in her native village
Thursday, December 5, 1963 Grand Bay, and the sur,
at the Princess Margaret Hos, rounding villages. She leaves
pital where she had been ail, to mourn her loss, her hus.
ing for the past three weeks. band, Peter L. Henry, he
She was born on the 9th mother, Mrs. Maselin
of January 1927. After leav/ Charles, and relatives and
ing school, she was employed friends. The funeral was
in the service of teaching at conducted in the Sain
Village Infant School, Grand Patrick Rom an Catholic
Bay, conducted by Mrs. L. Church, Grand Bay, a
Jangoudoux, h e r cousin. 9 a.m. on Friday Decembe
From this school, she got the 6.
pop u lar name "Teacher "She is gone but not for
Baby," a name which reigns gotten.'
up to this day. Later on, Paragon woman, beloved
she was employed on the wife
Geneva Estate where she Loving daughter, peaceful
served for ten long years, in lady;
keeping the books. She got May the spirit of God pilo
THE "VARIETY" STORE)
C. PHILLIP & CO. LTD.
LATEST ARRIVALS:-
JIroning Boards, Iron Rods, Celotex,
Chairs ot all kinds; Water Piping, Plastic
jLamfp shades, Lamps and Chimneys;
ectrical Fittings, Electrical Appliances
of all Descriptions, Refrigerators of all
(sizes, at the best possible prices on the
market.


DOMINICA HERALD
her;-
A May the angels of God,
n ,protect her;
S May the Lord have his
r light to shine upon her;
S May the shield of God It is J
defend her; days:
s And may she have a place -
of rest and happiness; D.STI
r Where she may sleep in Guadeloup
e peace. Amen. Montserra
s CARD OF THANKS ALL OTH
t Mr. Peter L. Henry, Mrs.
c Maseline Charles and relatives
t wish to thank through this me, GENERA
r dium all those who sent them DO
cards, wreaths .and any other 12ih De
S tokens of sympathy during their G. 0. 128.
recent sad bereavement.
d


e, Antigua, TUESDAYS
t, St Kilts FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS
IER PLACES SATURDAYS
TUESDAYS
FRIDAYS
L POST- OFFICE.
MINICA.
december. 1963.
-Dec 21, 28


REGISTRATION ORDINARY


9.00 a.m. 10.00 a.m.
9.00 a.m. 10.00 a m.
11.00 a.m. 12.00 noon
11.00 a.m. 12.00 noon
3.00 p.m. 4.00 p.m.
3.00 p.m. 4.00 p m.
N W. ROYER.
Colonial Postmaster.


-


AMSTEL


-- THE


BEST BRINGS


NAME WHICH STA
YOU A SPECIAL


NDS FOR BEER AT iTS


OFFER:---


FREE


SHIRT


AGAINST EVERY PURCHASE OF ONE CARTON OF BEER FROM
THE FOLLOWING DISTRIBUTORS :---


E. NASSIEF & CO.
Messrs. CHARLES SELF-SERVICE,
,, MARIE DECHAUSAY,
,, MABFL DELSOL,
,, F. JOSEPH & O0.,
,, ,JOSEPHINE OABRIEL,
,, J. E. NASSIEF,
,, H. H. V. WHITCHURCH


Market Square
33, Gt. George St.
do.
20, do.
12, do.
Old Street
Hanover Street
New Street.


This Offer Holds Good As Long As Supplies Last!
Serve The Best This Sg --- Serve AMSTEL
E. Nassief & Co.


JAY, DECEMBER a. as,
POST OFFICE NOTICE
AIR MAIL
notified for general Information that as from Sunday the'
nber, 1963, Air Mail will be closed or ti following


--


~wu~~ ~~c~rcc~-------------- --~ -


DOlmlr-upr~r-


"--iL----


s


NATION






SA, ,,,JAY, DECEMBER 2at,


1964 SHORT STORY CONTEST
A short story contest, open only to residents of Domn
inica is sponsored by the DOMINICA HERALD. You might
win $1o extra for the New Year! Just write a short story
with q' local background, put it in an envelope together
with the form below filled in and forward it to the DOMINICA
HERALD, 31 New Street, Roseau.
RULES
I) Your envelope must be sealed and headed "Short
Story Competition", and must reach the HERALD
office not later than January 7, 1964.
2) Your story must not be over I,ooo words.
3) A prize of $o1 will be awarded to the writer cf the
best story accepted, which story will be published
in the HERALD of January 18.
4) Entries sent in without the prescribed form will not
be adjudged, and the judges' decision will be final.
5) An award of $5 will be made to the writer of the
second best story; runner/up will receive honourable
mention.
6) Copyright of the stories printed will be vested in the
HERALD.

NAME---- ----------- --- -
(Capitals)
ADDRESS: ------- ---
TITLE OR NAME OF STORY:------------


DATE:------------ -
DATE:-- ---- -- -

Tourist Cruiser Meteor
The Norwegian Bergen Line ship Meteor visited
Dominica on Dec. 12 with 107 holidaying members of
the fiararad,-Yale, Princeton and New York City Yacht
Clubs. The ship had been chartered by well-known
U. S, firm Raymond & Whitcomb, and L. Rose & Co.
took charge of local tour arrangements. These included
a drive to Portsmouth and Dominica handicrafts and
lunch en route at London, the famous Convent woven
derry beach for x9passengers, products. The Meteor col-
a shorter drive for many of elected those tourists who had
the others to Pond Cassee via chosen to remain near port
the Transinsular Road, .re, and picked up the others in
turning via Layou, and a Portsmouth (in brilliant san-
somewhat rainy exploration shine), leaving Dominica at
of Roseau and its environs
by several of the visitors, who 2. p. m. to visit theSaintes.
were particularly impressed "
by our scenery as well as FOLLOW THE STAR *


London
Britain's General Medical Coun-
cil has agreed that the "special rela-
tionship" between the Universities
of the West Indies and of London
should continue. This means that
medical students of the University
of the West Indies will continue to
be abl to take the University of
London's degrees of M.B. anb B,S.
(Bachelor of Medicine and Bachel,
lot of Surgery).
The Medical Council's concui-
rence in this agreement was reached
at its latest meeting, and is reported
in tomorrow's (Saturday) issue of
the British Medical Journal-
The Journal reports tnat Lord
Cohen of Birkenhead, President of
the General Medical Council, stated
at the meeting that the University of
London had for several years inspect,
ed the facilities in the University
College of the West Indies and
had accepted these facilities as
appFropriate for its degree.
The Univeisity of the West
Indies had now become an indepen,
dent university, with its own media,
cal school, and would later give its
own degrees. It would, however, be
a matter for further consideration
and possibly inspection and visit,
ation before the Council accepted
the degrees of that University for
reciprocity with degrees of universi-
ties of Britain.
The Council approved that in
the meanwhile the "special relation-
ship" should remain in force.

Trinidad's Debt
To Federal Govt.

Britain has agreed to lend Tri-
nidad and Tobago $2,487,6o0 for
two years. The loan will bear in.
terest. The amount is to cover the
final settlement of the little publicised
indebtedness of the Trinidad Gov-
ernment to the old West Indies Fed-
eral Government (now represented by
the Interim Commissioner,) This
information was given by Mr. Nigel
Fisher in answer to a question in the
House of Commons last week,


Mr. Cecil Bellot arrived
back from a successful tour
of London and West Ger,
many with other members of
the tourist board, and' said
that plans for an Eastern
Caribbean Tourist Associa-
tion were maturing. He
added that Dominica's handi-
craft industry impressed
European circles immensely.

Astaphan and
Nassief Draw
Result
In the two exciting Shopping
Draws by E. Nassief and J. Astm-
phan recently, the prizes were well
distributed between towi. and
country. Nassiel's $100 prizes went
to Rudoph Thomas of Portsmouth,
Aliia Jervier of Scot's Head and
Jonathan Eusebe of Newtown,
thirty o:her prizes went to the
country and eight to Roseauand
district.
Astaphan's $ooo1000 prize was
won by Maria Joseph ol Newtown
who was allowed to make her own
selection. The $630 set of furniture
went to Flora Joseph of Queen Mary
Street and the bed to John Charles of
L(oodwill. Six other prizes went to
townspeople and seven out to the
country. Space does not permit us
print all the names.
Astaphan's will be having a final
bumper draw for a $rooo prize at
the end of December.

-------f-------
FAO Excludes
South Africa
The United Nations Food and
Agriculture Organisation, meeting in
Rome last week, voted to exclude
South Africa from all future meet/
ings or conferences in Afiica. The
decision was taken in plenary session
of the world conference with only
South Africa dissenting.


r

A
k
a


Nestle's, a name you've learned to trust, make
sure that every tin of Nestle's Condensed Milk
contains only the finest ingredients available in
the world-richest full cream nilk, purest sugar,
and to this far-"i"s milk, 1 style's have added
--tra. vit


I NESTLE'S

(0INDENSE

MILKM


; :.~. ,a
~-~~ccn~r. S.


DOMINIC.A HERALD PACE THREE

Special Relationship Tourist k ;rts Drug Store Open
Between Universities Active At Night
nf Wp.qt IndiA And /In Antiana


1 C~lPII/


Antigua's Legislative Council at
its last session passed a resolution
that Government negotiate with drug
store propr.etors to open a drug store
nightly in the city of St. John's;
This would benefit the gener i
public and country people in parti-
cular. The Minister of Social Services
pointed out that Government
would eventually fill the need through
an out-patients department.

An Apology
On the 29th November I
took part in the Jaycee Talent
Show and certain persons
have concluded that the
words of one of my calypsoes
referred to Acting Deputy
Superintendent Symes in a
manner most derogatory to
Mr. Symes.
This is to inform the pub,
lc that my words were not
intended to refer to Mr. Symes
and I did not consider that
they could have had such an
interpretation.
I offer my sincere apologies
to Mr. Symes.
Yours truly,
HERMAN JAMES
Dec. 14-21

Don't

Cough
Your
Head Off...
TAKE


THE COUGH REMEDYthat checks coughs at the
very first sip because its warm-
Ingsoothinglngredientsspread
Instantly through throat, chest /imtu.,I
and tubes.t's completemedi-
cat:o:l-stops the tickle that /4.l-"//tS
make you cough In sec- /C.n/
bonds. That's why Buckley's /..4/i
Mixture has outso'd all
others for 30 years.






PA Qq .O -.R _- -,)AY,, -ECEMdBEJR -u, -.








NOTICE TO BANANA GROWERS




FREE DISTRIBUTION OF FERTILIZERS



THE Board of Management ihas now approved a second free issue of I Ib per ratoon rMat based, as before,
on the mat count stated in growers' Hurricane Insurance Assessors' reports.
This will be followed by a free issue of Ib per plant mat.
The processing of Free issue Vo:chers has been very seriously hampered and delayed by the large
numbers of growers making personal applications and enquiries at Head Office, Roseau concerning their
allocations. In each case n inordinate amount of time must be wasted in sometimes useless
investigation.
To expedite and accelerate the work the following arrangements will be effective from Monday,
16th December, 1965.
FREE ISSUE VOUCHERS
Vouchers will be delivered ONLY upon the production of a letter of advice,
Vouchers for Northern District growers will be delivered at Portsmouth Branch Office.
Vouchers for Southern and Eastern Districts and the Coast (including area) will be de!ivered-at---
Head Office, Roseau.
LETTERS OF ADVICE
Letters for Northern District will be sent to the District Branch Secretaries for personal delivery
to the Growers.
Letters for Southern and Eastern Districts and the Coast will similarly be sent to the District
Branch Secretaries for delivery excepting those for the following areas which will be posted directly
to growers:-
Roseau Branch District
Copt Hall, Riviere Claire, Morne Prosper, Wotton Waven, Trafalgar, Laudat, Cochrane,
Fond Cole and Loubiere.
ENQUIRIES AND COMPLAINTS
Growers whose banana cultivations have suffered more than 10% damage and who have not
received fertilizers should make application for an allocation to their District Branch Secretaries.
Growers whose allocations have fallen short of their actual requirements on the basis of I Ib per
ratoon mat should submit to their Branch Secretaries on the prescribed form (obtainable from Branch
Secretaries), a return of their banana sales during August and September 1963 accompanied by the
relevant dockets.
in the case of growers in the areas of the Roseau Branch District specified above, applications
for fertilizer allocations and returns of banana sales with dockets must be submitted to the Officer-in-
Charge, Free Fertilizer Distribution, Head Office.
A.D. BOYD,
General Manager.
DOMINICA BANANA GROWERS ASSOCIATION.
IIth December, 1963.






SATURDAY, DECEMBER


DOMINICA HERALD


-- PAGE FIVE.


Environment On
Character
Talk By Jeff Charles
By Herald Literary Club Reporter
"The character of an indi,
vidual is the organisation of
his way of thinking and act,
ing where values and voli,
tional factors predominate",
was ths definition given by
Mr. Jefferson Charles B.Sc.,
in his talk on the effect cf
"environment on character",
after showing that there could
be chaos if one accepts the
various definitions of charac,
ter. Instincts, habits, im/
pulses, desires sentiments all
belong to it. The biologist
calls it "the product of genes
and environment"; colloqui/
ally character is interpreted to
mean "reputation, nature or
outlook on life".
Quoting one Briish ency,
clopaedia, Mr. Charles outr
lined the stages of character
which correspond to three
levels of mental development.
(r) The instinctive (2)
The emotional (3) The level
of sentiment. These three,
he continued are represent,
tive of (a) The life of the
animal, (b) The life of a child
and (c) The life of the adult
human being.,
Such research, the speaker
said, allowed one to treat this
psycho-bio/analysis from the
viewpoint of the influence of
environment on c h ar ac t e r
building- in the formative
years of life; character shap,
ing and moulding-at adoles-
cence; character fortification-
at aulthood.
Parents, guardians and the
home play a tremendous role
in the first case since they
constitute the child's imme-
diate environment, and irs
impressions of the world and
its mysteries is largely condi,
tioned by their interpretation
of it to the child. "Hence,"
Mr. C h a r les emphasised,
"their attitudes, race, nation-
ality, social and income class;
their economic position, reli,
gious practices and beliefs
and the interplay of such
forces as schooling, disease
and nutrition constitute the
factors which influence cha,
racter 'at this stage". This
statement was well illustrated
with reference to child psy,
chologists and their expert
work. ,
Adolescence
Turning to the adolescent
stage he' said "Here the level
of mental development is
-ce as can discern rit
;n a truer mt


poseful sense. Allied with
the greater organisation and
development of the mind
comes, not an inherited or
parent itterpretated, but PER/
SONAL interpretation of the
mysteries of nature, life, love,
time, destiny, sexes, immo,
reality and religion, to mention
a few."

Social Trends
Youth in the period is
very prone to assess tastes and
standards according to the
trends which exist in the
society in which he lives.
Using this as a central theme,
the speaker in characteristic
manner, developed the argu,
ment thar the type of youth
is usually a product of his
type of environment. "If a
frivolous oatlojA irt habit
and behaviour is rampant, if
delinquency is high, if mar,
rage is regarded as a tempo,
rary institution from which
you can graduate or degra,
dudts whenever you wish, :t
crimes of sex and passion,
murder, suicide and arson are
pievalent, these mus: have an
influence on youth's beha,
viour and even if he coesn'c
toe the line, he may quite
easily emerge a bitter and
disappointed 2dult instead
of an active individual, ready
to conuibaue to the nuclear
might of the U. S. A., the
increased industrial growth
of Britain, the co-operatives
of Denmark, the scientific
progress of Russia, the resus,
citauon of Germany, the
industries of Switzerland, the
economic u pl i ftm e nt of
China and India and Pakis,
tan, the resources of the mid/
die East, the social and econo,
mic betterment of the West
Indies or to add political
stabihty to Latin and Cen,
tral America."

Heredity

With frequent references
to the works of Dr. Ashley
M o n t agu anthropologist,-
philosopher and Dr. Julian
Huxley, biolo istauthor, Mr.
Charles assessed environment,
tal factors on character forti,
fiction. Physical, political,
social, religious and cultural
aspects of env i r o nme nt
received adequate treatment.
Tnere were a series of ques,
tions and comments from the
floor and particularly a 15
minute verbal crossfire be,
tween the speaker and certain
floor members on the ques-
tion that Environment plays
-more p.o ical part than
trcF


Members expressed the
vi-w that the Club would
take notice of comments or
remarks regarding the affairs
of the Club or on topics that
were discussed, unless these
were informed and of a cer,
tain intellectual ev e 1.
Remarks which were based
o n unprofitable delusions
would b e disregarded as
recent statements about the
Club have been.
---- --e- -
Portsmouth
Electricity
Th'. Honourable Chief
Minister and Minister of
Finance, Mr, E. O. LeBlanc
visited Portsmouth on Friday
6th December to meet the
twentyr or more p e rs o n s
affected by the recent opera/
tional incident at the Ports
mouth Electricity Supply
Station which resulted in
damage, in one form or
anotherr, to their radios, trans,
former, one refrigerator and
a small electrical motor
belonging to Messrs. Geest
Industries. The matter was
satisfactorily settled and the
Chief Minister undertook to
see that they would be comr
pensated for damages suffered.
- G. I. S.

ROSE'S IN COLOUR
A splendid full-page advertise,
ment of Rose's Lime juice products,
with three tiers of tempting-looking
drinks in fashionable glasses,appeared
in the Daily Telegraph, Britain, on
Thursday December 12. The B.B.C.
announced that cost of this full-page
colour spread-first of its kind in the
history of the newspaper-was over
k9 oco, and that the Daily Express
would shortly be publishing another.

Barrow Says
Something
ON his way back through
New York from Independ-
ence celebrations in Kenya,
which were also attended by
Sir Alexander Bustamente
and Dr. Patrick Solomon,
the Premier of Barbados
(Hon. Errol Barrow) was
quoted as saying that there is
not muc h prospect of a
further conference of the
"Seven" until May or June
of next year. Mr. Barrow
would not reveal the nature
of his talks with Mr. Dun,
can Sandys, whom he met
in Kenya, describing them
as-private.
DON f DEPEND ON YOUR
NEIGHBOUR'S BUY
YOUR ..OWN DOMINICA
HEI '


V AT'S HAPPENING IN

JANUARY 1964 P

WELL I'LL TELL YOU: -

ASTAPHANS SHOPPING CENTRE
DESIGNED FOR YOUR SHOPPING
PLEASURE ARE CONTINUING THE
"FREE" GIVE-AWAY "DRAW." EVERY
BUSINESS DAY IN JANUARY; WE SHALL
DRAW ONE WINNING TICKET. EACH
WINNER TO RECEIVE A $10.00 PRIZE.
ALL PRIZES WILL BE DISTRIBUTED ON
SATURDAY, 1ST. FEBRUARY.
SUPPORT THE STORE THAT GIVES YOU MORE:

J. ASTAPHAN & CO. LTD.
Dec. 21, 28-Jan. 4, 18



Have you looked over our

assortment of Biscuits

and Confectionery P

You will find CARR'S Sweet Biscuits in beauti-
fully lithographed tins,
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in boxes of gorgeous design (including
the fabulous BLAC K MAGIC
Chocolates)
HORNER'S and BLUE BIRD Toffee in
useful tins and decorated canisters.
SELESTA Whipped Jellies, orange &
lemon slices, Fondants, etc.
CALLARD & BOWSERS Nougats in
boxes and tins.
And if you cross over to our Cosmetic
Department, you will find exciting Gift
items by ELIZABETH ARDEN, YARDLEYS, COTY,
GOYA and (for the men) by SEAFORTH and
SHULSON (Old Spice).

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I MI I1- It







PAGE SIX


*


OME, FRIENDS wish you a merry
Christmas; others wish you a happy
one. There is a sparkle of difference
between the two words. Children, for
example, are sublimely merry at Christ,
mas/time; everything t h e coloured
lights, the lovely carols, the bells, the ex/
citement, the bounding high spirits of
young contemporaries seem to have
been especially created, like a rainbow,
miracle, for their delectation. "Merry"
makes us think of Good King Wenceslaus,
of the crisp snow under the feet of our
migrants in northern lands who stare in at
brilliantly lighted windows (doubtless
thinking of dear hot little Dominica), of
holly-berries and kisses under the mistletoe;
we are certain that the "merry gentl-men",
in the old carol had fa:taken of several
grogs (known in New Street, Rosexu, as
"stepups") before they finally laid them,
selves down to rest, full of turkey or chick,
en and plumpudding.
Happy, on the other hand, is a more
thoughtful grown-up condition. Beth
words imply cheerfulness, but 'happy' has
a deeper ring of prolonged wellbeing. It
can also mean blessed. It contains the
implication of beatitude, and lacks the
brittle transcience of sheer merriment.
Make no mistake; we like to see merry
people, particularly little people. But
happy people carry their own radiance,
and share that radiance with others.
What are the essentials for being merry
and happy at Christmastime. Some
would say, a home with children in it;
others would wisely declare that as Christ.
mas celebrates the birthday of Jesus Christ,
happiness must first be attained through
devotion or it is meaningless; some say it
is impossible to be merry without a full
purse and security and if merriment
means only gift/giving and prolonged festi,
vity, that may well be so. But some of the
happiness of Christmas is so simple that
it is free for everybody. It is simply the
spirit of goodness.


*


We say goodness rather than good will
because much of the Christmas season is
taken up by artificial attempts to pretend a
bonhomie which does not really exist, and
which too often does not last. When we
read Christmas stories, we cannot help
*wondering how the characters in these
tales, who showed such a suddenly gene,
rous spirit, behaved to the other characters
by the middle of July. Scrooge, for
example, would have made an excellent
Government Minister: he was thrifty to
the point of frugality. Did he revert to
his miserly lack of human/kindness after
Timy Tim had said, "God bless us, every
one"? Was he really converted by the
aims and objects of the Christmas season,
engrave, eternally by another hand in th'
constitution cf the human race We
wonder.
What is this cloud that blows across
the star as Christmas draws near? It is
the veil of absence, of missing people who
are far away or who are no longer there,
and fortunately the merriest of our citizens
the little children -- are safely unaware
of the loss. This year the world lost three
of its greatest leaders: an Englishman at
the gateway to highest office; a very old
venerable Italian who broke down religious
barriers, and a stillyoung American who
was doing the same thing for race. We
miss them very much, and in the midst
ofou, merriment and our happiness, we
remember them: their candles still burn on
the evergreen tree. We know they would
have agreed with our conviction that
Christmas on earth will never be wholly
happy until every hungry person is included
in the feast and every lonely soul is comrn
forced.
So instead of wishing our readers a
merry Christmas, or even a happy Christ,
mas (although we hope they will enjoy
both) we would wish for all those who
are our friends and even those who call
themselves our opponents: A GOOD
CHRISTMAS.


People's Post
Correspondents are asked tc submit their f ll names and addresses as
a guarantee of good faith, but not necessarily for publication. Letters should
ibe as short as possible. Controversial political letter's will not be pub-
rshed anonymously. Views expressed in People's Postdo not necessarily
leflect the policy of the Editor or the Proprietor.


Praising Bob &
Ray
Dear Editor, -- Please allow, me
some space in your ever-filled-col-
umns to congratulate Bob & Ray in
their articles entitled "So They Say".
In my humble opinion, I think
Bob & Ray have been doing an ex-


cellent job. Everyone who is un-
biased can say truthfully that their
information or criticism is very timely.
They produce facts and very vital
statistics in most of their topics.
I shall be looking forward in the
coming year (D.V.) to continue read-
ing "So They Say", and may I end
by quoting this self-made quotation.
"Ifone fears reactions ofwrong,don't


do wrong".
Thanking you for space,
Very truly yours,
J. J. KING, Massacre.

Tourists & Taxis
Dear Madam, You remember
that you published my letter about
an incident with a Dominican Taxi-
driver and a passenger from Trini-
dade Since then the Grer da Tour,
ist Board have given tal. :to taxi,
drivers before the first tourist ship for
the season arrived. I am not taking
credit for it but I think it -"as a good
idea to talk tr L


D QMI I C HERALD
AN INDEPEN .T WEEKLY
31 New Street, Roseau. Tel. 307
Published by j. MARGARTSON CHARLES, Proprietor
Editor .MRS. PHYLLIS SHAND ALLFREY
U.K. & European Representative Colin Tur'er (London) Ltd.
122, Shaftesburv Ave, London W. I
Annual S',bscriptions : Town 85.00 Country S6.00
Overseas (Surface Mail) S7.50
SAT URDAY, DECEMBEkR 2, I9g3


A GOOD CHRISTMAS


was not very longlived.
It did not really offer an
opening to the future for
territories with such entirely
different problems from those
of France except for the
many Martiniquans who got
jobs in France, where there
are quite a number of white/
collar workers, policemen,
and even dentists and doctors


Free Expression
The Court has argued
back and forth over these
papers. Which weae genuine?
Which were to be take seri,
ously? Was the organisation
clandestine. Was it uncon-
stitutional; Did the young
people represent a strong
(Cont. on page 7)


University Of The West Indies
APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Assistant
Librarian Grade I in the U.W.I. Library at St. Augus,
tine, Trinidad. Candidates should preferably be graduates
(Natural Sciences preferred) and Associates of the Library
Association or Fellows of the Library Association or hold
similar qualifications. The person appointed will probably
take charge of the Cataloguing Department at St. Augus,
tine, and experience in this work and' with the Library of
Congress classification will be an asset.
Salary scale /1,o5o x 50 1I,200: 1I,300 x 60
1,660 per annum; point of entry according to age and
experience. Child allowance, limited to three children,
150o for first child, 10oo for second child, 50o for third
child. F.S.S.U. Up to five full passages on appointment
and on normal termination.
Detailed applications (six copies) giving particulars of
qualifications and experience, date of birth and the names
of three referees by January 15, 1964, to the Registrar,
University of the West Indies, Kingston 7, Jamaica, W.I.,
from whom further particulars may be obtained.
Dec. 21
For years I have thought that the ways anxious to know about the
tourist bureaux in all these islands things that grow in each place.
should have good coloured pictures If there was a nice clean, cool room
and models of all fruit and other where they could buy local jams,
things grown in the particular island, ginger beer, crabbacks etc. etc. and
Also if there w e r e small bottles where they could see a large-scale
(baby food size) -'jams and jellies fr- ofthe island, I think it would
for sale, I think ie tourists ell.
be glad t" bu, M. G,, Grer'


Martiniquans Sentenced
By Darsie Gillie, "Guardian", Britain
The trial of 18 young Martiniquans for plotting against
the integrity of French territory that has dragged on for a
fortnight ended in Paris on December io with the sentenc-
ing of three of them to terms of imprisonment, one of three
years, one of two years, and one of 18 months.
The remaining 5s were in country districts.
acquitted but were roundly As discontent grew, there
told by the Court that they were riots and strikes, on two
ought to be grateful to the occasions with serious casual,
police. If they had not been ties. The island police were
arrested so soon, they were alarmed a year ago to find
told, they would have got posters proclaiming the policy
themselves into much more "Martinque for the Martini-
serious trouble. Most of the quans" posted round the
young men and women had capital by nn association call,
spent some Io months in ing itself"The Organisation
prison before being pro/ of th e A nt iColonialist
nounced innocent. Youth of Martin iq ue"
Changed Status (OJAM).
Neither the nonplussed
Martinique and Guade police nor the OJAMists
loupe both changed their sta/ seem to have been very com,
tus from that of colony to that peten,. The former failed
of department after the war. to find out who the OJAM/
Although they enjoy to a ists were until one of the
much fuller degree the same OTAM st leaders had lost a
status as a metropolitan de satchel crammed with papers
apartment than did the depart, which could be interpreted
ments of Algeria, where there as proving either the intention
we,-e still two classes of citi ,o plan an armed rebellion or
zens, the rejoicing that this else a constitutional move,
change had at first caused ment.


DOMINICA HERALD


URDAY, DECEMBER 2r, xs6,






DC -.TR,.n, HERALD


Martiniquans course of these procee irgs
about France, who (despite
(Cont. from page 6) her failings)'has done a great
movement in the island- deal for Martinique.
The defence claimed that. "Nevertheless, because of
there was no evidence that the youth and honourable
the accused had actually gone s ending of the accused, it has
beyond the free expression of appeared desirable to apply
their ideas. The Court de/ our penal law moderately".


cided that the activities of the
five principal organizers fell
between the free expression of
ideas, which was legal, and
the beginning of a plot. On
this rather ambiguous ground
it reached its conclusions.
Monsieur Cesaire, the de-
puty for Martinique, com-
mented on hearing the ver/
dict: "This closes the door
on dialogue. I hope that on
appeal the Judges will revise
it." So will a good many
other Frenchmen.

Martinique
Report
Mean w h i 1 e Martinique/
Catholic newspaper LA PAIX
published the folio.ving last
week:
Henri Armongon, Felix
Lamotte and IHrnii Flcrent
were each condemned to three
years in prison and five years
deprivation of -ivil rights.
RodolphenD e s i r e w a s
sentenced to two years in
prison and Victor Lessort to
18 months. The 13 other
accused were released.
The large audience (a: the
public hearing in Paris-Ed.)
the majority of them Antil,
lean, maintained excellent
order and received the verdict
calmly.
The accusation against the
18 young men charged all
members of the Organisation
of Anticolonialist Youth of
Martinique) that they wished
to achieve secession (from
France) was not pressed by
the President of the Court
who estimated that a desire to
change the statutes of Martini/
que because of c h e c ks
(failures) in administration
was not contrary to the Con-
stitution.
However, matters h e 1 d
against the five sentenced men
were their underground acti,
vity and their intention of
violence, of which document,
tary proof had been found in
Armongon's portfolio and,
in searching an isolated house
at Grand Fonds, their
escape,route plans, notably to
the British island of Domi-
nica.,
In this affair, th: President
concluded, firmness is impe
A lot of falsehoods
'ressed in the


--,,l ...
Report From
Paris
Aime C6saire Speaks For
Youth
It may be recalled that the
DOMINICA HERALD was lh:
hrst British newspaper to give
the story of the young Mar,


tiniquans' "revolt" a front,
page spead. In our issue of
March 9 this year, the full
story of the i r socalled
February rising was printed,
and the names of leading
O. J. A. M. members was
ou blish e d. The distur/
bance; took place early in
February, although the exis,
,cnce of their organisation had
been known since the pre-
vious December, and should
not be confused with the
Caribbean Friendship Club,
of,,which Monsieur Pierre
Lucette is founderpresident.
Shortly after their arrest the
accused young persons who
were said to have been build-


ing a boat in which to escape
to Dornirica, /were quietly
Removed to Pais, where they
have been in prison pending
trial, At the trial, world
famous poet-politician Aim6
CUsaire, Martinique's n.em,
ber of parliament in the
French Assembly, spoke up
so brilliantly or their behalf
that the Paris newspaper
Monde declared his deposition
to have "une force incontesta,
ble."

"Taught To Thirk"
Mr. CUsiire began, said
Le Monde, by saying that he
knew most of the accused


persons o r their families;
above all, they were intellec-
tuals, with reasoning and
reasonable attrib u t e s. He
knew that in certain circles
the word 'intellectual' had a
prejudicial ring. It did not
have rhat effect upon him,
self. "These youn- people",
he said, "are those whom
France has taught to think."
After referring to their criti-
cal and enquiring attitude,
he said "I see no reason why
they should be treated from
the start as adventurers or
even assassins.
Cont. rn page ii
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PAGE SEVEN


SATURDAY DECEMBER 21, 1,







PAGE EIGHT .. ,DOMINICA' RArLj.
-+- -,. -. -


SATURpAY, DECEhMBR 2r, x96


o6erman
Christmas, 1963

by Erik Korte
Christmas in Germany is
a family celebration with a
Christmas tr e e, candles,
Christmas carols: a few sort
hours of peace in a troubled
world. The nervous excite,
ment his died down. A
thin layer of snow covers the
deserted streets. It is 6:20 p.m.
The first lighted Christmas
trees can be seen. And in
some windows, candles burn
brightly in the dark: a silent
token of remembrance for
the people on the other side
of the Iron Curtain and in
memory of the prisoners and
missed persons who have still
not returned home.
A small group of people
sit around a lighted Christ-
mas tree in the waiting room
of a station in a big city.
They seem to shiver- and
the emptiness of the room un.
declines t h e i r loneliness.
Slowly more people enter the
waiting room; travellers who
were not able to reach their
families in time for the
Christmas celebration,railroad
officials who must work on
Christmas Eve, old people
without families and people


who have .no homes at all
and just wander about aim-
lessly. Suddenly, the drab
room is filled with people.
A soft voice begins to sing,
the others join in: "Silent
night .. ." The ban is brok,
en. Complete strangers start
talking to one another.
Every town and village in
Germany has its own Christ,
mas customs. In one small
town the children bring can/
dles along to the afternoon
church service. On leaving
the church, they light their
candles by the candles of the
church Christmas tree. They
carefully carry their candles
home to light up their own
Christmas trees. Each Christ/
mas tree is decorated in "just
the right way": with bright
ornaments or with yellow
straw stirs and shiny red
apples. Many families make
their own decorations. The
sick and aged are not forgotten
at this time; youth groups go
singing from room to room
and deliver small gifts.
Even the harsh reality of
the zonal border loses its as,
pect of desolation for several
hours. A small Christmas
tree is placed in the middle
of no man's land near the
border at Hanover. The light
of its candles flickers in the


wiiAd. No one knows if this
promising sy mbol comes from
the West or from the East. .
----~s--
Tropical Sunset
Ball
Secondary Schools Celebrate
On Friday evening December
13 the Secondary Schools held their
Second Annual Prom. Dance--
THE TROPICAL SUNSET BALL--
under the auspices of His Honour
the Administrator and Mrs. Love-
lace at the St. Gerard's Hall from
7 o'clock until midnight.
After dinner, which was prepared
and served by the Alumnae of the
Convent High School, Colonel
Alec Lovelace gave a short didac-
tic talk, which was addressed partld
cularly to the forty boys and girls
who "graduated out of the small
school society into the larger
society of the community and who
will have to play their part in the
development of Dominica". Certifi-
cate; were then presented to all the
school-leavers by Mrs. E. Lovelace,
The lady school-leavers were clad
in immaculate white relieved by a
corsage.
During dinner entertainment was
provided by the St. Mary's "drifters"
(Severin Loblack and Alexander
Stevenson singing Perry Como's
"Angry") and a dance demonstra-
tion by Miss Connie Hill (C.H.S)
and Roosevelt Richards. The Hall
was decorated with banana stems
and trees: the lighting was by can-
dles u ader dark painted tins; two
spotlights radiating light obliquely
towards the ceiling gave a sunset
effect. All those attending the ball


were given souven rs.
The Ball, organised by -the
Secondary Schools Dance Commit-
tee, was one of the few occasions
when the principals staffs and stu-
dents of the four secondary schools
in Dominica exclusively came
together in a noneompetitive atmqs-
phere. The Committee was founded
less than two years ago at the initia-
tive of Br. Estrada who has been
hitherto working with indefatigable
interest foe the improvement of
dances among the schools.

School "Break-
ing-Up" At
Giraudel

An appreciative gathering of
parents, children and other villagers
turned out to witness the entertain'
ing breaking-up function of the Gir-
audel School on the r5th. inst.
On addressing the parents, Head
Teacher Jules exhorted them to re-
inforce th. work of the school by en-
couraging pupils to read and study
at home and by giving the school
their whole-hearted cooperation.
Highlights of the orogramme were
a dance performed by infants and the
Nativity Story rendered by senior pu,
pils and teachers, consisting of ap-
propriate readings a nd beautifully
rendered Christmas Carols,
Towards the end of the function
terminal reports on pupils' progress
were presented to parents, and t-wo
successful candidates in this year's
school-leaving exam also received
their' certificates amidst tumultuous
a p p laui s e. Mr. Alphonso Bell,
Chairman of the recently formed
P.F.A., chaired the function. Contr.


higel Fisher's
New Year Tour
Mr. Nigel Fisher, Parliamen.ary
Under-Secretary of State for the
Colonies, will pay a v i s i t to the
British Virgin Islancs, the Bahamas
and British Honduras during the
Chri.tmas Recess, the Colonial Of-
fice has announced. He will arrive
in the Biitish Virgin Islands on
2nd January, and will le a v e on
the th January 1964. The
Minister w 11 study at first hand the
economic and political problems of
the territory, which has never prev.
iouusly been visited by a Britrsh Min-
ister.
From the Virgin Islands, Mr.
Fisher will fly to Nassau, Bahamas
until Friday, Ioth January, where he
will attend the celebrations connect-
rd with the introduction of the new
Bahamian Constitution.
Mr. Fisher will arrive in British
Honduras on Saturday, IIth January,
and remain until Thursday, 16th
January. He will attend the cele-
brations connected with the intro-
duction of the new Constitution for
British Honduras.
Mrs, Nigel Fisher recently recov-
ered from an alarming accident in
London when a bottle of cleaning
fluid exploded into her eyes as she
removed the cork, One eye had to
be treated by a specialist.

Literary
La Plane

First two entries for the
HERALD short story -
tition came from La Plaine.


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SATURDAY, DECEMBER zr, i CA HERALD PAGE NINE.



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JRDAY, DECEMBER ar, -ige


COaribo Nutrition
Evaluation
Specialist To Visit
Dominica


nutrition, Ind held the post
of Director of the Nutrition
Division of FAo 1946-60.

Kenya's Gover-
nor-General
Mr. Malcolm MacDonald, (lately
Governor ofKeny,,) was put forward
to be the first Governor-General ,)f
Kenya at the request of the Prime
Minister of Kenya, Mr. Jomo Keny-
atta, who asked the Secretary of
State for Commonwealth Relations
and for the Colonies, Mk. Duncan
Sandys, to submit Mr. MacDonald's
name to the Queen when the Bills
granting independence had received
Royal Assent.
Mr. MacDonald, who succeeded
Sir Patrick Renison as Goverror in
January. is long experienced in
Co nmonwealth affairs, having been
British High Commissioner in India
and Commissioner-General for Brit-
ain in SouthEast Asia.


NOTICE
Dominica Co-1perative
Bank Ltd.

The Directors have
decided that from
1st January, 1964.
the rate of interest
will be 4% per an-
num on Depcsits up
to $5,000.00 on the
minimum quarterly
balance and on
amounts over 5,000.
00, 2L% per annum
on the minimum
quarterly balance.
JNO. B. CHARLES,
Managing Director.
2nd Dec., 1963.
Dec. 14-2-


San Juan, Puerto Rico,
December 2, 1963 Dr.
Wallace Aykroyd, j oi n t
WHO/FAO Consultant on
Food and Nutrition, will
visit several Caribbean coun,
t'r i e s including Dominica
during the period December,
1963 to Ftbruary, 1964, in
order to evaluate the need to
set up a Caribbean Nutrition
Institute. The evaluation is
being made by the joint
WHOFAO Consultant at the
request o f the Caribben
Organization which has its
headquarters in San Juan.
At its First Meeting in
November, 1962, the Stand-
ing Advisory ''Commttee on
Food and Nutrition
(SACFAN), one of the spe,
cialized Committees of the
Caribbean Pla n, recom,
mended that the Orga'ization
should seek the assistance of
the international and other
agencies concerned with food
and nutridon in the area io
provide the personnel and
equipment required to esta/
blish the institute. SACFAN'S
membership is composed of
scientists and technical officers
working in the fields of food
and nutrition in the countries
served by the Organization.
It receives the advice of the
international a nd other
agencies concerned with food
and nutrition in the Canb,
bean area.
SACFAN recomm e n d e d
that the Consultant should
prepare a pla. for expanded
nutrition activities in the area.
He should assess the nutri-
tional problems of the area
and recommend priorities;
determine existing resources
and facilities for the study
and solution of these pro,
blems; determine the most
suitable means of coordinating
the activities of these resources
and recommend the most
effective means of strengthen,
ing and expanding nutrition
programmes in the a r e a.
Dr. Wallace Aykroyd has
now taken up duties as WHO,
FAO Consultant and will pay
visits to Puerto Rico, the
U. S. Virgin Islands,
Surinam, British Guiana,
Grenada, Barbados, St. Lu,
cia, Martinique, Dominica,
Antigua, St. K it t s, 't h e
Netherlands Antilles, Trini,
dad and Jamaica.
Dr. Aykroyd is a :distin,
guished author of books on


This pretty girl from Norway rides a penny-farthing bicycle
which was auctioned in aid of the Freedom from Hunger campaign
in Britain.

Article II munication and n a t u r e.
Mans fears, aspirations, lives
Movement and hopes are all expressed
in movement of sound and
With the advent of the body, man revels himself
new concept physical Educa- through movement. T h i s
tion; there was born also a high flown theory can be
philosophy which became brought down to a practical
known quite simply a s teaching level. It is a simple
Movement: Movement is philosophy which we live
This pretty gil fr om Norway rides a pennythink.g bicycle






experience and living as most not try to define man and
philosophies are. Its beauty his relationship to God and
which in its auctioned in ad of theniv Freedom from Hunger campaigninterest
in Bmain.







Article to the very ed educationalists looked atr e






business of living, human life and behaviour
We e in a worldofMans fears, aspr nations, lives
movement,the ent and hopes are all expressed







i s incessantly i motion. axiomnatic truth frori which
Moeenitin movement of theyco of sound and
Withumanthe adve of t he body, man reveals himself
new concept physical Educa, through movement. T h i s
tion; there was born also a high flown theory can be
philosophy which became brought down to a practical
known quite simply a s teaching level. It is a simple
Movement: Movement is philosophy which we live
not detached from human rather than think. It does
experience and living as most not try to define man and
philosophies are. Its beauty his relationship to God and
lies in. its .practical and posi, .the.universe. Some interest,
tive application to the very ed educationalists looked at
business of living. human life and behaviour
We lie in a, .world: of not-to-question or speculate
movement,-the eritire universe buit to'find so m e ,b a s i c
is incessantly i motion. axiofnatic truth frot' which
Movement is at,4 -te*.of the could b.*'"' a solind
-urman expressis -, tao; physical


PAGE TEN


Education. They found th :
movement was'at the heart of
our physical life.
Movements is not a system
as was Swedish gymnastics.
Every teacher interprets the
fundamental ideas in his or
her own individual way and
lessons of different teachers
can differ vastly yet the same
basic themes can be observed
running through all. Not
only i s Movement highly
individualistic for the teacher
however, but for the pupil
also. A stereotyed child can
never be its product. On
the contrary it allows a child
to develop his or own inte,
rests, individuality, and per,
sonality further than any
other teaching approach can.
The child's development
in movement is multidirec,
tional. He learns to move
his body with grace and
develops a firm control over
it in whatever position it
might be. He learns the full
movemel:t potential of his
body and he is aware of its
limitation;,not only it. isola-
lion but in relation to other
bodies a nd objects also.
Gaining this knowledge and
experience calls for no little
intelle-tual activity.
The child is presented
with tasks and problems con,
cerning the movement of his
body which he must work
out for herself according to
his own ability. Because he
works out much of his own
activity !he child is always
working at a level at which
he can succeed and success is
an essential part of learning.
There are some educationalists
who even go so far as to assert
that the child should never
be allowed to fail.
The encouragement of stylish,
fluid movement (in sequences
or dance) refines the aesthetic
sense of the pupils: they learn
t he meaning of beautiful
movement by learning to
create it themselves and by.
watching others also learning.
There may be many a pects
of beauty but there is only
one essence, and nebulous
and indefinable though it may
be, it can be perceived in all
those aspects. I would ven,
ture to say therefore that there
is a considerable transfer of
training taking place in this
work. That they are in fact
developing a keen apprecia,
tive sense which will lead
them to love goodart.
One ca n continue to
theorize on- the possibilities
of movement but in article III
I will view it in -
priactical I;-'


DOMINIC.,


.Lb


100-year-old Bicycle


: A feature of all develop-
ing nations is the great priority
they attach to the education
of their young. A sound
balanced and forward look,
ing educational system is the
key to their success. Physi,
cal Education and Movement
can contribute much to such
a system of education. It
can help produce a sensible,
independent, well adjusted
and cultured person whose
personality has been fully
developed according to those
desirable trails it revealed in
the beginning of its formation.

No Bomb Sharing
By France
Premier Pompidou of France la-
belled as "bizarre advice" any sugges-
tion that France should integrate her
nuclear force with NATO.

NOTICE
CARIBBEAN ORGANISA-
TION FELLOWSHIPS
A number of fellowships are
being provided in 1964 through the
aegis of the Caribbean Oreanisation
to persons interested in and qualified
to pursue studies in the fields of
Agriculture, coromics, Engineer-
ing, Public Administration and
Teacher Education"
2. These fellowships are tenable
at Universities in Continental
United States' Puerto Rico, ad-the-
University of the West Indies and
will cover travel, tuition, subsistence,
books and incidental expenses.
Th,' will be granted on an annual
basis renewable annually at the
discretion of the Secretary General
of the Caribbean Organisation.
3 It is expected that successful
applicants will continue to meet all
local obligations including, family
commitments, for which they are
responsible, as such charges are ni,
an element of the value of the
fellowships. They will also be ex-
pected to be able to comply with
the health and immigration regula-
tions of the host country, and to
return to Dominica on completion
of their training.
4. Persons wishing to apply may
obtain the requisite forms from the
Establishment Division, Ministry of
Finance, and return them duly com-
pleted to The Chief Secretary,
Administrator's Office, Roseau, not
later than Friday 3rdJanuary, 1964.
G.O. Dec 14--8
DON'T LET

COUGHS COLDS

ROB YOUR
LITTLE ONES
OF NEEDED

REST
When such fast relief comes with the first
sip of JACK & JILL COUGH SYRUP, the kid-
dies' very own remedy. It tastes so good,
their lick the spoon. Clears .up those pesky,.
coughs so fast that It is cherished by de-'
voted Mothers In eyery Provlnc Contilns a
that all-lmportant Vitamin C that kiddies
need more of In feverish condition's.

)WITH VITAMIN C ,





ADPAiGE ELEV EN
-- ..- _____ ~ ~ __ - j '


OChidren's, (Factual T71a Corner


ROSEAU TOWN COUNCIL


Dear Girs and Boys, Christmas is the great feast for children. It- is. *
a time of joy and happiness. Mary and Joseph were happy at the birth of LL own
their Son. It is a time of giving and getting of gifts. The Baby Jesus was A o
a gift to mankind; and the Three Wise Men and the shepherds brought parties
Him gifts. nected to
The angels sang at His Birth; we too sing carols--some of the Sewerage
carols were written long ag> b u t they are still songs of joy and being rent
never seem to grow old. notified th
Nowadays, we sing only English carols. The French occup ed
our i-land for a number of years, and on more than one occasion January,
50 years ago, in the country particularly, t h e people sang French will be he
carols only. These carols have their o w n beauty. A any French the paymel
customs, too, were handed down. The "'revaisyon" or carol sing' and not t
song was kept during Advent. French "Cantiqucs Noel" or French heretofore.
carols were sung at those parties. The most p o pu 1 a r carol was
"Allez, Allez, mois voisin." Strong, black coffee (to keep the sing,
ers awake) and rum punches were passed around. Office of the I
The "gateau" was the special Christmas cake. Grains of corn Town Cou
or a sixpence were put in each cake. The finder of these, when the Roseau,
cake was cut, was supposed to keep them for good luck. I3th Dec., 19
All countries have their special Christmas goods. What was Dec. 21-28
the menu for Christmas, in the country in those days? Pork, and
pigeon peas and wild yam (what in some parts is called "carpla- N
we" and in others "babawoula".) The ham, French wi"e, ver- i
mouth, brandy, rum, sweet drinks, black pudding and cakes completed IT no
the menu.
There was the "mess" eaten after midnight mass, as no meat information
could be eaten on Christmas eve-in those days, a day of fasting following
and abstinence for Roman Catholics -Dominica was 90o R. C. then. missions of'
Christmas Day was a day of feasting and merrymaking a 2ble on sal
time for visiting friends. People hardly exchanged cards then but tractor's O
paid visits instead. A time of exchange ofgifs-fruits of the earth.tra s
The orange was a favcurite gift-the seeds were kept for good luck. quoted:
A time of kissing and well-wishing. Every one was happy,
all forgot grudges and became loving friends.
Boxing Day, was, as it still is, a d'y of picnicing, family re-
unions, feasting- and merry-making.
SMusicians went .about with their accordions, guitar;, mando-
lirna and, mUtb organs. These instruments were common then and
many young people could play them very well.
Today, a lot of this has changed. The old lady who made
the gateau, is. dead. The young people do not make it in the same
way and it has not the same taste.
Today, we do less visiting-instead we send cards ani presents
from the store.. We spend a lot cf money; very often we have
-'it it to spend und' we are not so happy. In the old days,
they gave what they had and both giver and receiver were made
happy.
When we grow up, we remember most of all the happiness
of Christmases of childhood days. I hope Mama and Daddy make
Christmas a happy time for you. Expensive presents alone do not
make for happiness. The atmosphere of a happy home is th.. most
unforgettable one.
Christmas too will be the time you will miss home the most,
when you are grown-up and far away.
Remember to pray for your parents wh:n you go to church on
Christmas Day. Here's a nice little prayer from a card:
Our Father Who art in Heaven
Look down on Dad and Mother
And grant them many blessings
To share with one another;
And may this holy Christmas Day
Be filed with joy and cheer,
Enough to fill their loving hearts
With happiness all year.
Well, a merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to all of you.
Love from, AUNTIE FRAN
REPORT FROM PARIS (Cont.from page 7)
Speaking of certain regrettable t yu
incident of violence in 1959 and Mariniquans. Certainly these young
1961, Cisaire declared that General people are French," said M. Cdsaire
de Gaulle himself had spoken of later, "but their history derives from
proportional autonomy for Ca, Africa. it begin in the slave,
yenne... "The word autonomy", he ships". He wasireplying to a ques-
said, "was released; above all, it ton from Monsieur Dennery, who
was heard." After that, nothing questioned him "not as a poli,
happened. .. the door was somehow tician but as a professor, writer and
hut. poet" asking i, there a Martiniquan
ct. culture? "Culture is in effect the
Youth And Crabbed Age manner of being, it is one's style
Mentioning the extreme youth of of walking, laughing, singing. I
the accused, Cisaire said: "There is think there is a definite Martinique
an Old Martinique, and there is a culture and the present departmen-
Young Martinique: they don't under, al system inhibits its development..."
stand one anoihr.. The young The Deputy wound up by speak, A PAIL
are suffering from frustration". He ing of the great-need for information
spoke of the increasing independence ,and technical knowledge and outlets
of African Statis (uine.pidemirdekd, for young people in Martinique, so
colonisaion) and asked why things that the young would not be driven.
'-hich were possible for "' Afrique ration and feel obliged to
-- not possible for young t '


OTI IE


(r) Re
mission o
D,,M; V


ers of those Pro- of Domin
wilich are cot'
the "Water and I962)--
Systems and are per copy.
:ed arc hereby
at as from Ist
1964, Landlords
Id responsible for
nt of these rates
he Tenant as
AT r


[OWN CLERK,
.oseau
ncil,
63.
^---- yv.
TWICE
tified for general
that copies of the
Reports of Cornm
Inquiry Lre avail,
at the Adminis,
ice at the prices


port of the Cornm
If Inquiry ,into the
Vorks Department
ica (dated October,
Price 50 cents


(2) Report of the Coim
mission of Inquiry into the
working of the Government
Fruit Packing andMarketing
Depot (dated Jantiary, 1963)
- Price 50 cents per copy.
Dec. 21


. ROSE & CO. LTD.

SHIPPING DEPARTMENT


"CD f'- ''T7TKT C' L,'f


.1LL.. D KJI%.I N O r' %-j
MAPLE" SOUTHBOUND,
1963, WILL CLOSE AT 12
DECEMBER 23rd.


THE "FEDERAL
DECEMBER 26,
NOON MONDAY,


THIS OFFICE WILL CLOSE AT 12 NOON
TUESDAY DECEMBER 24TH AND REOPEN
AT 0830 FRIDAY DECEMBER 27TH. BOOK-
INGS FOR THE "FEDERAL PALM" Ist.
JANUARY 1964 WILL CLOSE AT 12 NOON
MONDAY DECEMBER 30TH.
THIS OFFICE WILL CLOSE AT 12 NOON
TUESDAY DECEMBER 3IST AND REOPEN
AT 0830 THURSDAY 2ND JANUARY 1964.


ABLE AT THE FOLLOWING HARDWARE STORkS

L. A. DUPIGNY Esq.,
J. W. EDWARDS
C0. .LIP COMPANY
,T.D IROFORDP


JAY, DECEMBER 2z, 1963


DOMI


B.I






,VfAGE TWELVE

SP!'RTLIGHT
By Eddie Robinson
Dominican To Play F
Middlesex
Patrick Lawrence, better kn
to local cricket fans as "Pat
signed a two-year contract with
famous Middlesex County Cri
Club of England.
Patrick represented Dominic
the 1960 Goodwill Tournamen
the Bortanic Gaedeus when he
a lad of 17. In those early days
was a lively medium pace off-cu
He never set the Thames on
during that I tournament, but F.
Mason of St. Vincent commer
that he was a very promising yol
bowler.
Patri k, whose sister Celia ir
island netb.lhr, left Dominicadu'
the second half of 196o and
been employed as a cleaner at L
don's Natural History Museum.
joined the Museum Cricket C
and was recommended to Middli
C.C.C. by one of his fellow me
bears.
Classified Advt.
SEMPERIT TYRES
and
TUBES IN STOCK
750 x 20 825 x 20
650 x 16 520 X 13
600 x 16 520 x 14
750 x 16 590 x 14
700 x 20 500 x 15
640 x 13 560 x 15
670 x15 590 x 15
Very Attractive Prices.
S. P. MUSSON SON
& CO. LTD.
Te!. 360
1O SALE
McCALLS' PATTERNS
WIDEST ASSORTMENT
J,. ASTAPHAN & CO. LTD
Nov. 30-Jal-. 18
EXTRA FANGY RED
DELICIOUS APPLES
Wholesale- $15.00 Per Crt
Retail .15o Each
J. ASTAPHAN & CO. LTD.
Dec. 7-28tb.
FOR SALE
BEDFORD TRUCK 1I T
Licence No. 324
Contact:
Mr. FITZ SHILLINGFOR
River Estate.
Dec. 14-28
I-NFORMATION
WE WISH TO INFORM THE GENE
PUBLIC THAT OUR DRUGS DEPAI
MENT IS UPSTAIRS, WHERE YO
PRESCRIPTIONS ARE PROMPT
HANDLED.
ASTAPHAN'S SHOPPING CENT
Dec. 2I-Feb, 29.
ANTED TO PURCHASE
Director of British fi
shortly visiting Domini
wishes to purchase lar
collections and accumulation
of stamps. Please air m;
details now to Proud-Bail
Company Limited, 98, Quee
Ro a d, Brighton, Susse
England.


D-AY,' DECEMBER 2t, !po.


or

own
to ,
the
cket
a in
it at
was
he
nter,
fire
0-
nted
ung

ring
has


IN MEMORIAL 1937)
thins
THOMAS ERIC SHILLING- Hours
FORD, died ist. March, 1963 0. NI
who would have been amenc
28 years today. the b
This Christmas the children of R
will be denied your interest. beyon
ing gifts and unique charm, bounc
but YOUR SPIRIT will Portsi
remain with us all. beyond

NOTICE to re
custom
SHOP HOURS Tuesd
Under the provisions of 1963.
Section 5 of the Shop Hours
Ordinance, 1937 (No. IS of

NOTICE TO BANANA


,notwithstanding any, 1963.
contained 1i the Shop
Order, 1937 (S. R. & In th
0o. 14 of 1937) as
led, all shops within
boundaries of the town
oseau and one mile
d and within t h e Betwe
aries of the town of
nouth and one mile
d are hereby authorised
nain open for serving
rers up to 7.00 p.m. on
lay 24th December,


ALiC LOVELACE,
Administrator,

GROWERS


on-
He FREE FERTILIZERS- SOUFRIERE AREA
lub
esex WITH reference to Notice to Banana Growers of IIth
em- December, 1963, growers in the Soufriere district are
informed that Miss Monica Pemberton of Soufriere has been
appointed as the Association's agent for the free distribution
of ertilizers.
Miss Pemberton will deliver letters of advice for free
issues and will deal with other matters concerning f'-rtilzer
distribution delegated to Branch Secretaries in the notice
under reference.
A. D. BOYD
General ManageF'.
DOMINICA BANANA GROWERS ASSN.
ioth December, r963.
Dec, 21



BARGAIN

WE HAVE JUST RECEiVED A SHIPMENT OF:-

MANSFIELD SUPER TRUCK TYRES

i Size 750: 16

QUALITY AND PRICE CANNOT BE MATCHED

I P. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
on iNoV. 30-DCC. 1

COLONY OF DOMINICA
TITLE BY REGISTRATION ACT
D REGISTRY OF TITLES ISLAND OF DOMINIC/
Schedule of Application for Certificate of Title and Noting
thereon and Caveats for the week ending the 14th day of Dec., 1963
Nature of Request whether
Date of Request Person Presenting for Certificate of Title
Notings thereon or Caveat.
AL Request for the issue of a firs
RT, Request dated Edith Constance Certificate of Title (with Plat
Julien formerly attached) in respect of tha
UR llthDec, 1963 Samuel portion of land situate in th
FLY Town of Rose au
Presented by her Solicitor in ihe Parish of St. Georg
in the Colony of Dominic
RE 13th Dec, 1963 Cilma A.M. Dupigny containing 1150 sq.ft amn
at 2.30 p.m. bounded as tollows:-On th
North-West by land of Mrs
Flora Winston; On the North-East by land of James M. Joseph; .
the South-West by land of P.H. Williams and Or, the South-East b:
rI'm Great Marlborouah Street.
ca Registrar's Office, (Sgd) J. V. JEAN PIERRE
ge Roseau. 13th Dec. 1963 Registrar of Titles,
ns NOTE:-Any person who desires to object to the issuing of
Certificate of Title on the above application may enter a Caveat a
all the above office within six weeks from the date of the first appear
ey ance of the above Schedule in the DOMINICA HERALD news
nS paper published in this Island or from the date when 'the notice
, prescribed by law was last'served on any owner or occupier o
9, adjoining land in re'-'ect of which the application is made,
R Dec .21--.28 : ,


. *.* .No.43

e Supreme Court of the Windwaird
Islands and Leeward islands
Colony of Dominica
en
Stephen Cadman Smith
Manager, Barclays Bank D.C.O.
Plaintiff
and
Morris Telemacque
Defendant


AUCTION NOTICE

To be sold pursuant to an Order made by His Honourable
Mr. Justice E.L. St. Bernard on the 18th day of July, 1963,
in the Colony of Dominica, in Suit No. 43 of 1963, between
Stephen Cadman Smith, Manager, Barclays Bank D.,O,., and
Morris Telemaque Upon the Application of the above-named
Plaintiff for the sale of the Defendant's land under Section
4 of the Judgements Act at Public Auction by the Provost
Marshal of Dominica, at the Court House, Roseau, at 11.00
a.m. on Thursday the 16th day of January, 1964.
All that piece or parcel of land with buildings thereon situ-
ate in the Village of Marigot in the Parish of St. Andrew in
the Colony of Dominica containing 22064 square feet and
bouiided as follows:-- Northerly by land of Seibey Joseph,
Southerly by lands of Joseph James and Lundell Edwards,
SouthEasterly by a Public Road and Westerly by land of
Adolphus George, Recorded in Book of Deeds Z No, 7 folios
.644-645.
Particllars and conditions 0f sale may be obtained
From Miss Vanya Dupigny of Chambers, New Street, Roseau,
Dominica the Solicitor having the carriage of the sale and
at the place of sale.
Dated the 1st day of August, 1963.
(Sgd) JOSEPH A. MARCANO
Registrar and Provost Marshall.
Dec. 21 -Jan. i

COLONY OF DOMPINICA
TITLE BY REGISTRATION ACT

NOTICE

In the Matter of the Application for iForeclosure of Mortgage
by Barclays Bank D.C.O. over 180 square feet of land in the
-Parish of St. George, in the Colony of Dominica, the property
of Karl Hector and Janet Serrant.
O To be sold pursuant to an Order made by His Honour Mr.
s Justice E.L. St. Bernard on the 15th day of July, 1963, in the
" Colony of Dominica uuder the Title by Registration Act
" Notice to Pay Off having been filed and served on the 3rd
day of December, 1962, on behalf of Barclays Bank D.C.O, at
t Public Auction by the Provost Marshal of Dominica, at the
; Court House, Roseau, at 3.00 p.m. on Thursday the 16th day
e of January, 1964
e All that portion of land known as Lot S 321 situate at Good,
Swill Parish of St. George containing 1800 square feet and
bounded as follows: On the North by Lot S 320, On the East
n by road C 25, On the South by Lot S 322, On the West by
y Lot S 330 the property of Karl Hector and Janet Serrant.
Particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained from
Clifton Alexander Herriot Dupigny of Chambers, New Street,
a Roseau, Dominica, the Solicitor having the carriage of the
t
Sale and at the place of sale.
Dated the 18th day of July, 1963.
: JOSEPH A. MARCANO,.
SRegistrar and Provost Marshal .:
Dec.l-ET, ROSEAU D': C. M ; -1...-.6 ,
STREET, ROSBEAU DO-' I BCBEmmg.t -'-M;-4 :;, 1


L^MINI-


PRITErD AND VPUBLMiBD BY J. MAOGAR


ARLES, THB HERALD'S P' :31 NBW








,.ILISTMAS


SUPPLY


Christmas
History
Is It Now 1963 Or 1968P
The word Christmas
comes from Christe and
"moesse", the old Saxon
word for a feast (still in use
in the Welsh language).
When the date of December
25th was fixed there were no
records to indicate the true
birthdate of Jesus. For
instance it is now known
that Herod was King of
Judaea from 40 B. C. to 4
B. C. so obviously Jesus
must have been born before
4 B. C. The actual dating
of Anno Domini was done
by a Scythian monk called
Dionysius Exiguus who, in
533, worked backwards
through the reigns of :he
Roman emperors to fix the
new era. He made two
mistakes, firstly he forgot to
put in the year nought and
secondly he left out the four
years when Emperor Augus,
tus reigned in his own name
Octavius.
The date of December 25
was fixed by Pope Julius I
(337-352) but the Greek
Orthodox Church still kept
January 6th as the, feast of
the nativity, and the Arme,
nians, January i8th. A
feast was first kept about 98
A. D. andabouttheyear 137
Pope Telesphorus made the
feast official. It is believed
that the date of December
25th was chosen to coincide
with the winter solstice pa,


gan feast of Saturnalia (either
because the Romans were too
busy to trouble the early
Christians or else to supplant
the festival of the pagans).
In either case the December
date is improbable since
shepherds have never been
known in recorded history in
Palestine to keep their flocks
out (or watch them) after the
middle of November-it is
much too cold!
Some say that the Christ,
mas tree was part of ihe
Roman h o u s e decoration
which always took place at
Saturnalia and which spread
from Germany to England at
the beginning of the nine,
teenth century. There is no
doubt that it was used at the
winter solstice m the Scandi,
navian mythology as The
Tree of Time, Yggdrasil,
whose roots (sic) penetrate to
Heaven, Niffheim (where
dwelt the great serpent Nid-
hogg), and also to Ginnun/
gagap where the forest giants
dwelt: this became later the
Paradeisbaunt (Paradise Tree)
of the German mystery play
in medieval times.
Holly or holy-tree is called
Christshorn in Germany and
Scandinavia, but the decor,
tion with e ver g r e e n s is
derived purely from Roman
usage at the soltice. Mistle-
toe was sacred to the Druids
and was a symbol of peace
to the Romans. The Pax
Romanus was sealed with
the ancient Briton by a kiss
under the mistletoe!


Rupert Thanks You All 1
Rupert Lance called personally at the HERALD
f office to express his heartfelt thanks to all kind friends
who sent him gifts. Latest list of donors is:-- Lucia)
IJames and Celia Elwyn-- two gailywrapped Christi
mas parcels; Mr. Mathias Durand, $i.oo; DGS Teach,/
ler, $1.oo; Two Policemen, Salybia, $i.oo each ($2.oo);l
SSympathisers, $1.oo; J. N. J., o5 cents; Paul Durand,l
25 cents; Selwyn James, 25 cents. Proceeds of collect,
ing tin, $8.oo. A happy Christmas to the generous[
Givers!

W.J.P. Bunche
I beg to thank all my customers for their kind
Patronage in both my Shop and Car Service during the
.Year 1963; and kindly ask that I may be patronized,
(with the same cordial feeling during the Year 1964.
. gSpecial thanks to the numerous Huxsters, Travell,-
ing and Commission Agents who patronized my Carj
Service to and from Melville Hall Air Port.
I I beg to wish you all a Merry Christmas and a.
'Happy New Year. Co.
r Yours Courteously,
, WILLIAMABUNCHA,

PRmflNTWD "ON CHARLOfi


The Star.in the West has
been calculated as a conjunc,
tion of Jupiter and Saturn
whi..h would be visible as
one brilliant star in Bethlehem
in November of the year 5
B. C. The Magi, or three
wise men, Caspar, Balthasar
and Melchior must have
joined forces to the East of
Bethlehem, because although


Melchior reputed to be a
Chaldean and Balthasar from
Nubia in Africa, Caspar is
supposed to have come from
Tarshish which was an old
town in Spain well West
of Palestine. Their t r u e
identity is, however, still one
of the many mysteries of
Christian history.


I 4t.4.t. tV~..4........ 4*4*..W............... *

j ASTAPHANS SHOPPING CENTREi
SDesigned For Your Shopping Pleasure
WE TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY ON THE
f OCCASION OF OUR 2ND. ANNIVERSARY
TO THANK YOU FOR YOUR MAGNIFI-
CENT SUPPORT AND BUSINESS. WE
LOOK FORWARD TO YOUR CONTINUED
PATRONAGE.
SWE WISH YOU, ONE AND ALL

I A Merry Xmas
AND

i A Prosperous And Happy New Year, i

| J. ASTAPHAN & CO. LTD.
'^"*"'' -"*-^*^" *->- '-* ~-* "-** --^
1
* I
JOUR WISH TO YOU---

SA CHRISTMAS of

Lighted Hearted Cheer .-

I Good Health, and a BRIGHT \


and Prosperous

NEW YEAR.

DOMINICA ELECTRICITY SERVICES.


Our FRIENDS

And CUSTOMERS

Bringing you the Season's Greetings

with a wish for Christmas Cheer

and to hope that hours of Gladness

Peace and Health
fill each day throughout the
New Year

A. C. Shillingford & Co. Ltd.
Phoenix (Head Office)


CHRISTMAS EVE -.
BAVARIA
SHRISTMAS is celebrated
following a centuries-old
custom in the Bavarian Alps.
At midnight the villagers,
dressed in their festive native
custumes and carrying torches
and lauteres, climb up to the
small mountain chapels for
Christmas services. They
resemble illuminated ribbons
as they ,slowly make their
way up and around the
slopes. The reflection of
their many torches and lan,
terns bathes the snowy white
winter landscape in a dream,
like festive light.



Walker's Group
Sings Carols
Fire Victim Missed
Less than a hundred persons,
including the Hon. Minister of
Labour and Social Services and
Mrs. Stevens, D.G.S Headmaster
R. Clarke, Miss Beswick, B.A.,
Principal ofW.HLS., anda few
sisters from C.H.S., listened to a
wonderful two-hour recital of
Christmas music organised by Edu-
cation Officer 0 A. Walker, at St.
Gerard's Hall on Tuesday.
The white/uniform choir started
with ', Come All Ye Faithful",
accompanied by the Music Lover's
Government Band and this was
followed by two anthems "Drop
Down Ye Heavens From Above"
and "Unto Us A Child Is Born"
sung unaccompanied.
Mrs. Marie Davis-Pierre was
tumultuously applauded for the solo,
"Rtjoice Greatly" .from Handel's
Messiah and then the Misses Paga-
nini and Palestrina Christian on
guitar and piano gave a classical
excerpt.
The "Gloria in Excelsis Deo" was
joined-in by the audience with solos
by Miss N. Mathew and Mrs.F.
Roberts.
APfter the Carol Recital, M.
Walker spoke of the two fire victims,
Eddie Martin and George Jamcs,
who wee greatly missed from this
choir. He gave an open invitation to
persons interested in singing to join
his group, who are planning a pro-
gramme for early in 1964.

La Plainer Back
For Christmas
43 Years In U. S.
Mr. Reilly Alexander of
La Plaine and his American
wife landed from S.S. Vanos
to spend Christmas here.
An interview with the wel,
come vacationers will bepub,
listed iiq our next issue,


.LNT


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S '*-" .l w SVrmtT. RaOSBAU, POMICA, 5 ,;.i1BAY DECBi MB 21, 19~8


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