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Dominica herald
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102878/00039
 Material Information
Title: Dominica herald
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 42 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Allfrey, P. Shand ( Phyllis Shand )
Allfrey, P. Shand ( Phyllis Shand )
Publisher: Dominica Herald
Place of Publication: Roseau, Dominica
Roseau, Dominica
Publication Date: October 12, 1963
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Dominica -- Newspapers   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Dominica
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1955? Cf. caption.
General Note: Editor, <1963-1964>: Phyllis Shand Allfrey.
General Note: "For the General Welfare of the People of Dominica, the further advancement of the West Indies and the Caribbean Area as a whole."
General Note: Description based on: Jan. 12, 1963; title from caption.
General Note: Last issue consulted: December 31, 1964.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 82144654
lccn - 2007229365
sobekcm - UF00102878_00039
System ID: UF00102878:00039

Full Text



tZ- tARCH JT-
OR THE STU-JY OF MAN
,r.o FA3T 5 8 STREET


NEW YOptl2


The Finest People
(For the Genera Welf, re of t ,e Pe ple of Dominica, the further advancement


* p"s~sq:L6" i3 J '"- ;r
-,$~


LI~i.' S:


of the West Indies


and te Caribbean Areas a wh le
and the Caribbean Area as a wh iel


ESTABLISHED 1955


SATURDAY, OCTOBER M, ,,


BRITISH P. M. TO RESIGN

Who Will Succeed Him P Death By
SHORTLY BEFORE HE entered hospital for removal of Misadventure
his prostate gland by operation last Thursday, Mr.
Harold Macmillan, Prime Minister of Great Britain and Child Killed At Fond Cole
leader of he ruling Conservative Party which has been
holding its annual conference this week, informed the On Tuesday this week at around
Queen and also wrote his Party that he could not carry on s p.m. Miss Muriel Troterwithree
sisters was driving past the Beach
and would resign before the next general election. Club at Fond Cole when she saw
This is the sad but face two small boys and a girl playing in
saving solution to the dilem- the road. The boys ran out of the
ma in which Mr. Macmil way, and, thinking the road was
ma in which Mr o Macmil clear, she dr o v e on but pulled up
lan was placed through sharply when she heard a knock on
ex-War Minister Profumo's he ofride of the car, Five-year-old
dishonourable behaviour and Bernice Mitchell was lying in the road
the ensuing scandal over with injuries to her head and chest.
state security and Ch pristine This was the evidence given by
state security and Christine Miss Trotter, who had been driving
Keeler. The big question her father's car No. 954, at the cor
now is,, which of ith ree oner's inquest next day. After hear-
popular likely Ministers is to ing the evidence.of two children, one
succeed the ailing P. M.? eleven, the other twelve and police
evidence that there was no defect in.
Three Hopeful Men. the car, Miss Trotter was exonerated


Those in the running for i
Britain's top political pest
are Science Minister Lord M
Hailsham, who is abdicating
from the House of Lords and standing
election as plain Quintin Hogg, which
would enable him to qualify for the
Prime Ministership. Then there is Mr.
Reginald Maudling, Chancellor of the
Exchequer, and Mr. R. A. Butler
First Secretary of State, who is Acting
Prime Minister at present.

Sir Gerald Nabarro, Conservative
M. P., urged the Tory Conference to
replace Macmi!-n by Lord Hailsham,
who "has fire in his, nerve fibre and
burning patriotism,"

Flood Disasters in Malaya


3,000 Missing In Italy
Terror struck in North-east Italy
on Wednesday night when the 873
ft. high Viamont concrete dam col-
lapsed sending food waters boiling
down the upper reaches of the
Plave River. to inundate :tn com-
munities. So far more than 9oo
bodies have been recovered and a-
bout 2, no persons are still missing,
believed uried under the mud and
rocks carried down by the millions
of gallons of water released.
Cause of the dam break
was a mountainous landslide
which :-had been threatening for
some time and had already caused
the authorities to start emptying the
reservoir; third highest in the world,
the dam was completed in r96o.
Four towns with 4,300 residents in
the padt.ofthe flood were virtually
wiped out,


r. Macmillan

for next general


Mr. B.A Butler

S- 8,000 Homeless


On the other side ot the world
the Malayan capital of Kuala
Lumpur is isolated from the South by
raging flood waters which swept over
one end of the town leaving four
dead and more than 8,0oo home-
less. Cause was the breaking of an
earth dam which sent an eight-foot
wall of water across the city.
1924 Roseau Flood
Remembered
Older residents of Roseau will sym-
pathise with such sufferers as they
remember the flood of October 24th
1.924, whcn a landslide at Trafalgar
caused the Roseau river to flood
those parts of Bath Estate which are
now Windsor Park & the Grammar
School, right up to the Botanical
Gardens, with water pouring down
New Street and River Street. Ter,
rifed inhabitants took refuge on the
high ground around the Cathedral,
and the whole family of Damsel was
wiped out.


trom blame and a verdict of "deata
by misadventure" was broughtlinlby
the jury,
The Coroner on this occasion'did
not reprimand any professional man
for informality of dress. Dr. P.N,
Griffin performed the post mortem.

Colombie And
Ascania
Migrants Escape The
Winter
Returning from Britain on the
Ascania and the Colombie, both of
which anchored in Roseau Harbour
this week, were thirty-six adults and
a number of children. Most prom:-
nent passenger landing from the Co,
loambie was Portsmouth Magistrate
Aurelius V. Marie, returning from
leave. Also from the Colombie was
Ohio University student Mr. Nagib
Mechour Abraham who flew from
Damascus to Paris to join the ship.
Mr. Abraham (son of Mr. Mechour
George Abraham of Marigot) is vis-
iting his mother and brothers before
returning to the United'States to re
sume his studies
A Lebanese family of six landed
from the Ascania to visit relatives
here and ex-P.W.D. driver Bunty
Shillingford and Vivian (."He Did
It Himself") Grell returned to their
homeland on the same ship.
The other passengers from both
ships were mostly from the country
and had, in many cases, spent several
years in England where their children,
clad in bright English woollens and
with experiive prams and tricycles,
had learnt "Buckingham Palace"
manners, though still chattering in
patois.
Leaving by S,S.'Colombie was
well-lked Dr. O. Stubsgaard with
_Jis.if- and family. -


"EDITH" MASSACRED MARTINIQUE
(By Our Special Correspondent)
D'AMAGE estimated at 30 milliards of francs was sus-
tained by our neighbour Martinique through hurricane
Edith. Twenty people were killed by drowning in their
homes, or by flying debris; 99 per cent of the banana and
Scanefield cultivations have been utterly destroyed. About


25,000 people are without
schools etc.


lodging and are camping in


Such are the facts of the terrible tra d cs
catastrophe which overtook Mar to strain communities by
tinique early on Wednesday Septem, helicopter.
ber 25. Fort de France did not President de Gaulles' Gift
sustain great damage but in a
suburb called "Volga Plage" built At a meeting of the
by poor people on mud near the mayo.al general assembly,
sea, havoc ensued: 2,500 people M. Messmer gave an assur,
of the district had to shelter in dance in the name. of the
schools. In another new suburb,
five kilometres from the capital, French Government of the
about 2,000 persons living in a new entire collaboration of the
housing area had their roof blown people of France 'bth on
offor caved in. The schools have morale and financial planes.
been putting'up a struggle to reopen He presented Prefect Grolle/
at beginning of term. mund, with President de
mund with President de
Gaulle's personal contribu,
Speedy- Help~.from France tionf io million old frfics
and the initial help of his
The A r my immediately Government of too million
began to clear and restore new francs. A touching
damaged, roads, and corn, relief donation was madq by
munications were operated little Montserrat, boxes of
by Police radio. Hot meals clothing having been flown
were distributed to refugees to Martinique from that
by the Army. Many villages island on October 2.
were isolated, and contact
was established by Army PEOPLE IN THE NEWS
helicopters. B y September DAWBINEY Club's new President
29 all roads near the city isC. A. Maynard, Francis Severin
were opened p. All kinds takes over from Julian Johnson as
were opened up. secretary MINISTER Dureay left
of construction materials are Monday for U.K. for rehabilitation
needed by the Martinique discussions after hurricane Edith *
Government to protect the MRS E. Dalton-James. President
population from the elements. Caribbean Union of Teachers, here
last week for a short visit and dis-
cussions with local branch of cuT r
VIPs To Rescue PAFACHUTIST Pfc. CecilJohnson
ex-SMA pupil was one of 60,000 in
NATO exercise in Turkey CLEM
Prefect Grollemund flew Dupigny left Sunday to attend con-
back from holiday in France ferences in Puerto Rico and British
with three consignments of Honduras on Caribbean Food
first aid and five million new Crops GEORGE Derrick Asst.
francs. On c t o e r Man. British American Life, left
francs.On cofor conference Sunday returned Fri- ,
Minister of War Messmer day from Trinidad JAyczES
flew in, deputising for French launched Tobago relief fund this
Overseas Minister Jacquimot week-donors should contact J. B-
(now in Africa), who will Yankey. J.N. Liburd, A. White
-arrive next week. M. orLeoRoberts
Messmer was. accompanied HURRICANE DAMAGE
by M. Moulin, Secretary ELSEWHERE "
for Overseas Affairs, and M. Reports of the situation in 'oba-
Le Thelliers, as well as five go, which ,wds iserelybttrek by
consultants on agricultir, Hurricanef loa, and ofircefb
national educ a t io n a surs tken,& have beenaocntnttd
finance. T h e'se gentlemen bthe Trinidad Gv
i ..tvisied the sces we shall publish some detailet
immediately vsted thecenes k. uba has 'also sffetd -re
of devastation caused by mendous damage, a sunia sf
wirfds df I i s m. o. h. Thfln, ..-';- -"- -







PAGE TWO


People's Post
COrrespondents are asked tc submit their fdll names and addresses as
aguaranee of good faith, bu, not necessarily for publication. Letters should
beas short as possible Con:roversiai political letters will not be pub-
lished anonymously. Views expressed in People's Post do not necessarily
reflect the policy ot the Ed.tor or the Proprietor.
Keep A-Goin'
Dear Editor and Readers,--I had the privilege to be
one of many invitees at the opening of the new Grammar
School (What! you did not go; too bad! you missed some,
thirg, the speakers were tops). There were a few this and
that spirited talks, all in fun of course: it w-s a very enjoy-
able afternoon with our Cadets presenting the new Gram,
mar School shield, they were very smarc looking young
men, well trained. I really wart you to share with me.
There was a poem read by Mr. Leonard J. Shield. It was
very inspiring: after asking for it, it was given to me very
kindly and 1 was also allowed to publish it. At this stage
we beg to thank you, Madame Editor, for valuable srace.
Let us also give this kind gentleman a big hand ar;d all
the other speakers and last but not least we raise our hats to
Lieutenant Johnson and his smart looking boys. Now
here's your poem, take it away it's all yours, and in so doing
we share the good things of life:-
To the boys of the new Gramma, School in Roseau
I would like to direct these last few remarks. In ordcr to
be a success in completing your courses you will have to
keep going to school. This may not be easy, but little of
importance was ever accomplished without perseverance
and effort. Inspiration is generally about 90% perspiration
so keep on going. You will never finish your present job
unless you keep on going!. These homely little verses will
illustrate my point.
Keep A-Goin'
If you strike a thorn or rose
Keep a/goin'
If it rains or if it blows,
Keep a-goin'!
It's no use to sit and whine
When the fish ain't on your line,
Bait your hook and keep atryin'
Keep agoin'!
When the weather kills your crop,
Keep agoin'!
Though 'tis work to reach the top
Keep agoin'!
S'pose you're out of every dime;
Gittin' broke ain't any crime;
Tell the world you are feeling' prime--
Keep a/goin'!
When it looks like all is up,
Keep a-goin'!
Drain the sweetness from the cup,
Keep a-goin'!
See the wild birds on the wing,
Hear the bells that sweetly ring
When you fel like sighin', sing -
Keep agoin"!
FRANK L. STANTON
This was the part of the address given hy Leonard I. Shields, Canadian
Teacher, Trainer assigned to Dominica through iAe courtesy of the Canadian
Government. I hope you like it.


BYSTANDER, Koseau
Cont. on p. 6


MaShould Quit BeBella seizes
Says Adenauer Frenh Farm
Federal German Chancellor Kon F n F m
rad Ademan now only a fobrtight
away fiom retirment as head of ALGIBRS CP:- President
West German Govrnmnt told re Ahmed Ben Blla announced last
tris on.,lMnday thatHarald Mac wete the seizure of .all farmland in
allsboild. have quit leadership Ftench hands in what -observers
fl*is,,;i[.overpmmt. a longtime :ane at..an cba to: rally the
7C Pij f peasanast niasses aroundi.,


DOMINICA ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ - HBtAL SAUDY COE z g


Dawbiney Hears
Socialism Talk
By HERALD Lilerary Club Reporter
"In Britain today there, are three
well divided classes the Capital-
ist class headed by the Royal Person
(comprising five per cent of the po-
pulation owning eighty per c,.nt of the
country's wealth); the Middle vacil-
lating class making up fifteen per cent
of the ai ulation and the working
class-pr le ariar -- t h e most im-
portant class from an economic point
of view, stated Mr. H. Didier D.G.S.
Student, dressed in flamboyant red
shirt (colkur of Communist flag),
addressing a meeting of the Da'vbin-
ey Literary Club on Thursday last
week.
Socialised Medicine
"The National Health Service In-
stiuted by the British Labour Party
is the most significant. piece of So-
cialsm in Britain, but at present the
parasitic, pernicious Tories are at'
tempting to destroy it by raising the
subscription for its services. Educa-
tion is still not entirely socialised, for
there are still public schools for the
children of the* idle rich, for the
children of those who exploit the
working class, exclusively. How-
ever the children of the proletarian
class can obtain University educa-
tion through National Grants add-
ed the speaker on Socialism in Bri-
tain.
Labour
Commenting on the Labour sit-
uation in Britain, the bespectacled
Mr. Didier said that there are 12
million organised workers out of a
241 million working population
with 485,000 unemployed. This
unemployment the Conservative
Party claims has come about be,
cause the Communist and Labour
parties organise the workers!
Way Forward
Ending his political harangue
the speaker said that for Britain to
be fully socialised there must be a
Labour Party victory, more Nation-
alistion, especially of the Giants
such as LC.I,, the Banks and Insur-
ance Companies; renationalisation
of steel and the disappearance of the
stock exchange. By this wide-scale
nationalisation the means of produc-
tion, distribution and exchange will
be centrally controlled.
The following unusual replies in
answer to questions were made by
Mr. Didier to Dawbinits.
(1) Britishers are more hypocri-
talthan other European people but
they are honest (a paradox)
(2) Common Market-a
bourgeois organisation provides
for the destruction of Parliament.
Its only Socialist good is that it
will bring everyone together for the
destruction and liqidisation of Capi-
talism!
(3) Mr. Didier also stated that
Mr. Hugh Gaitskll wanted to as
bolsh clause 4 of the Labour Party
Constitution because it is identical
with the British Communist Patty's
Manifesto!,
(4) He also said that in time
the Commuuist Party and Labour
Party will be one, for they embrace
broadly the same principles!


IC


Date------ --
Age


Name of Beneficiary_
Relationship of Beneficiary __
AGENTS WANTED TO SELL INSURANCE
Sept. 28 Oct 5
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-SUPPORT THE HERALD
SUPPORT THE HERALD


1 ACCIDENT INSURANCE

Protect yourself for only pennies a day!!
S If you are Disabled, Killed or injured while
(1) Driving or Riding in a car,
(2) Riding in a Truck, Taxi, Bus or Ship,
i (3) Flying as a Passenger in a Scheduled Air, liner,
] (4) Walking when struck by a car:- .
| YOU CAN RECEIVE 1

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Sandringham House, Nassau, Bahamas; o.i
Co Dominica Herald.


SATURDAY, OCTOBER zi, 196


DOMINICA HERALD


SName --
,Address









SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1963


Caribbean Council Taking Long Fallout Danger In
Hard Look At Bank Needs Britain


San Juan, September 26 "A large number of the
countries in the Caribbea, area don't need, aren't interested
In, or couldn't participate in a regional development bank"
was the substance of a report delivered to the Caribbean
Courcil here this morning.
The report, which con- toward the concept of the bank it.
eluded that the area at pre- self.
sent hadn't "sufficient favora, Some of the countries would on,
ble, econoinic conditions to ly agree to participate to the extent
Sthesablishment of that their own dependencies would
warrantthestablisment of benefit and this would defeat the
a Caribbean development bank.
bank" was mad: jointly by Others notably France have
a pair of experts in the field i iicated that they wouldn't partici-
of development financing on pate even if finds they contributed
oantothe Caribbean Or- were reserved for the use of thein
o.vn dependen.tes.
ganization by tie Agency for lot Cedit-WorIhy
International Development. of the cotntris
They are Dr. Alfred Cleve- early baf o
They are Dr. Alfred Cleve- involved, the team discovered, at
land and Paul Athan of the not creditwortay in their own rnghi.
-Stanford Research Institute. Ihey cannot service loans internal,
The team has spent the past and therefore must rely on grants.
three weeks touring the coun, rhis group, sald the team, is not
tried in the area in an effort even likely to become credit-worthy
tries in the area an effort n the nar future. Since te bank,
to determine the feasibility of to be sacce.:fl must be as nearly au,
establishing such a bank in tonomous as is possible tnere sii.uld
order to step. up economic be no great imbalance between deb-
deelopme.t in the Carib, tor and ce'itor coantnes and ths
bean as a whole through the would almost certainly result under
present conditons since less than
ki i d of industiahzation halfofthe countries would be able
which has been so successful io contribute.
in Puerto Rico. Another actor which influen:ts
Dr. Carlos Lastra, delegate the decision is the question c.f the
from Puerto Rico, termed exlstece of financial and develop,
mint institutions which can perform
this report as the same "Puerto investigatory functions for the formu-
FRico used to receive" in the Lrcon of sound projects to present to
early 40's "when the island the bank, Only a small number
had no tourism, no markets, of the counties in tae area nave
io crop other than sugar such facilints.
o crop In a breakdown of the various coun,
cane." "We had only one tries, grouped by their mernpoJlan
thing," he said, "a will to origins, tne team found:
develop." Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin
He pointed out that the islands don't need a new source of
team had found six areas external financing because they now
which are capable of develop- have highly developed sources in ad-
which arecapableof develop- dit.on to tax advantages and other
ment and predicted that these Federal assist..nce. The Virgin Is-
could provide a starting point lands need diversity but have no
which could lead to addition, capital shortage their need is tor
al development on a regional projects.
Sur nam and the Netber hands
basis. He stressed that what r na a th th a
.basis. He stressed that what Antilles have adequate financing a,
is needed is not an invest, available. Their deveiopincnL agent,
ment bank but an institution cics are short on experience but two
similar to the Puerto Rican to three years will remedy this.
Economic Administration, Foor Economcies
commonly known as "Fo The British West Indies are, for
mento", which will find the most part, not viable economies
financial sources for develop, d ad re unable to balance their bud,
gets. Since their need is for rants for


ment projects, capital developments, they would be
The Stanford team stressed unable to paracipate in the bank.Out,
the lack of infrastructural side capital is not available to them
bdeveecause of a lack of infra-atructure.
development power Federation might improve their pos,
facilities, roads and similar itionand ifa federation is established,
public w o r k s projects there is an agreement to establish a
which must be established bank within the federation itsc f
before a real program of The French departments provided
economic development can only sketchy information because the
o e governments didn't find it convene,
be undertaken in many of tent to receive a formal visit from tEe
the most underdeveloped team at this time.
islands. More than half the Trinidad, Jamaica and the Dom-
islands, they found, are not inican ReFublic have generated con-
of size to permit develop, siderable momentum by themselves
ar and have ambitious projects for
ment. which t :cy have access to a numie
Another stumbling block which ber of international financial agencies,
makes the bank and an impractical which would seem to eliminate
idea in their view is the varying at., them as potential borrowers from the
titude of the metropolitan countries bank. (US1S)


Radioactive fallou: over Britain in-
creased buritrg nineteen 1962 accor-
ding to the report by the Radio-
Biological Labortory of Britain's
Agricultural Research Coucil. (CP)

Pope's Birthday
Pope Paul was 66 last week-
(CP)


Labour Party
AGM In Britain

The British Labour Party's an'
nual conference was held at Black'
pool lat week, its main topic
being economic planning. tM r.
Harold Wilson spoke on the role
of science in a socialist society, and
proposed a Ministry of Disarmament
to cope with the many problems a'
Rising out of reduction of nuclear
and other weapons. In the


opening speech of the conafece,
it was declared that the Con,
servative Party h a d lost fith
in its leader Mr. MacMillan, th.it
the country had Icst faith in the
Tones and as a result the well
was losing faith in Britain An,
thony Greenwood topped the pol!
on the executive,

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HERALD ! !


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_ -~---------J~3L~B


DOMINICA HERALD


PAGE THREE


:~6~e~OC~


. I


ON THE


"ls~af

... ..:..






PAGE FOUR DOMINtCA HERALD SATURDAY, OCTOBER iz, i 63
,------ ,. x-- ~~pr--1'. -~----- im~Cl~~-----~--p -


SORRY



NO PRIZES!


F O LKS!



NO GIFTS


NO SALES GIMMICKS


BUT


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Beans with Bacon, Cream of Chicken
Canadian Sardines
Cap Meat Balls 1 Ib. tin
Chef Corned Beef Loaf 7 oz. & 12 oz. tins at 40 & 55 cents
Cheese Trix & Bacon Krisps
Dutch Rindless Cheese
Fancy Pink Salmon 2 tb & 1 tb tins at 60 cents & $1.20
Irish Chopped Ham Loaf 12 oz. tins
Jubilee Corned Beef 12 oz. tins
:Kam & Klik 12 oz. tins
Kraft Sliced Carrots 15 oz. tins
Lyons Tea Bags
Mon Jardin Medium Garden Peas 7 oz. & 15 oz. tin
S Mixed Vegetables 15 oz. tins
Peas & Carrots 7 oz. & 12 oz. tins at 20 cents & 37 cents
Morey Vienna Sausages 4 oz. tins
Ham Paste 31 oz. tins
Meat Paste 3- oz. tins
Miracle Shortening lbt Pkt.
Plum Cocktail Sausages 8 oz, tins
Robinson's Patent Barley & Patent Groats 8 oz. tins
Ravioli With Beef & Tomato Sauce Ready To Serve 1 lb tin
Supper Club Shoestring Potatoes
Smac Luncheon Meat 7 oz. & 12 oz. tins at 40 cents & 55 cents per tin
Salada Tea 4 oz. & 2 oz. pkts, 35 cents & 20 cents
Table Butter (Australian) 12 oz. tins 77 cents 1 lb tins
Fresh New Zealand itb pkt,
Unox Boneless Cooked Smoked Cottage Butt 1 lb tin
Fillet Of Ham 4 tb tin
Hunting Sausage 7 oz. & 12 oz, tins at 35 cents & 50 cents
Meat Balls In Gravy 7 oz. tins
Liver Paste 3i oz, tins
York Fancy Keta Salmon i tb tin
Yeatman's Jams Apricot, Blackcurrant, Raspberry, Strawberry


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35 cents per box
27 cents
30 cents


30 cents
20 cents
15 cents
25 cents
35 cents
50 cents
60 cents
35 cents per tin

$1.00
25 cents
$1,00
$5 -


cents
cents
cents
cents per jar


EVERYDAY


in the purchases of food items.


Oct, 5-12


LT b








SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1963


60 THk Y SAY"-- Y. C. W. Boys' Boy's Brigade WANTED
BY BOB & R Y Debate Clerk with kno w led e
BY BOB & RAY Debate Mr. Hewlet Andrew Secretary and experience in shipping matters,
Exactly fcurhunded and seventy-on? years 'ago today, a look-out Messrs. R. St. John ar.d of the Boy's Brigade and also lieu, salary according to qualifications-
high on the foremast of the Pinta, called out: 'i..and-Ho" or its Spanish C. Savarin (Masters of S. M. tenant of the Ist Dominica Boy's Apply in writing with copies of re-
equivalent. The land was a tiny island only four-hundred feet high now A. and D.G.S. respectiv), Brigade Mariot, off to the U.K. lerence to Geest Industries (W.I.)
B eby T.V. Arcanio 9fo.to where e ne Ltdo, Rosea st.
called San Salvador in the central Bahamas, the sailor who first saw it e'rp Y, by T.V. Ascania 9 10.63 where he Ltd., Roseau.
worked for Queen Isabella of Spain. Christopher Columbus, captain of representing the Y. C. W. will join his brother Irwin Andrew Oc. 12-
the Pinta, was asleep in his bank! So they say. Boys Section of Roseau, were and cousin Lund4l Edwards both
We drove all about the island alier Edith's visit to assess the damage adjudged winners in a Debate at Coventry. Remember
and as we saw the terrible condition of the telephone cables with break held at the Y. C. W. Centre It is hoped that among other
after break, mile after mile, we estimated it would take until after ChristI o Thursday evening. The things Mr. Andrew 'ill pursue spe YOUr
mas to repair these lines. As we drove further and saw more telephone c: al Boy's Brigade courses du:ng
ve n me otn l Boy's Brigade courses Subscripti os
lines down, we revised our estimate and said: "nope, it will be Easter victors supported the motion his stay in Britan. Subsc ti
before the telephone service' miserable as it was is restored completely!" that "the Evils of Modern
But now less than two weeks after the storm, we must praise the work of Commnunications outweigh
the telephone Department. We have out our time back to before Cristmas the advantages", while the ~
again-and may even uFpdate this iftheir progress continues. Misses Lola Shillingford and
Telephone is a very vital factor in the progress of any community. Jean James repre-enting the
To many Dominicans, it is a frill, a luxury, a new-fangled gadget type of Jea Jams (epeenting the
thing and no doubt there are these who begrudge the expenditure of a Girls Section) opposed the M 0 f E D
telephone system. But a telephone system's main claim to importance is the motion. The del ate which l
fact that it SAVES TIME. Instead of journeying miles and miles to visit a was judged by girls' President OP
friend only to find when you reach his home that he is out (trying to visit Miss Verna Williams, Messrs. ADIO ENGINEERING W KSHOP
you, perhaps!), you simply call him up. He' -c'irf, Food, E. Lambert and J. Johnson,
then make a date to see him, or, if it is a quick decision on business or mber ad Joh
social events, thin on the spot, settle it QUICKLY Yes, the telephone saves was won by a narrow margin TO: 64, NEW STREET
TIME. It can Save LIVES, too. Call the doctor. Call the hcspital- Call for -proposers 304 to oppOSei'r
help. A wonderful instrument, the telephone. And, when it saves time 296. AD O AIE GRAD.
it is saving money. If we driveway up to Portsmouth to visit Bob ADI LAIR I..R..
Garraway, for example, and find Bob has gone to Grandbay, well, we No More Blood
have spent our time, our gasoline, worn out tyres, all for nothing But
if we had telephoned Bob the night before, lets say, and he told us he BOMBAY, INDIA, CP:- A five.- -i
was going to be in Grand Bay, well, then, we'd have SAVED all that day strike by 3000 professional ................
time, money, wear & tear. So they say. blood donors has caused a crisis:
time, money, wear & tear. So they say. Bombay's hospital and blood supp, I DOMINICA BANANA
We discovered an interesting thing the other day. When we Bombaylie s hospital and blood supp are
inquired of a shopkeeper why he didn't stay open for business between es are dangerously iaw. Donors are GROWERS ASSOCIATION
one and two, or, until five or six in the afternoon, he replied: "There's demanding highai prices, calming
a law against it Something to do with hardware, I believe, "he said. hat the hospitals charge patients ten
If this chap maintained strictly a food store, it seems he can stay open, but to twenty times the amount paid to NO T1 ICE
if he is selling pois, pans and cutlasses as well as food -- no, the law donors. n n
says he must only remain open during the standard 8,to.I, 2-to14 day. DON'T LET Banana Growers in the COLIHAUT Area are hereby
We ofcourse leveled out blunderbuss (Reader: that's a sort of old,- informed that, in consequence of the breakdown of the,
(fashioned shot-gun), at such a law that is, in effect, (i) inconveniencing COUGHS COLDS Colihat Jetty and the inability of the Purchasing.-Cm-L
the people and (2) helping to drive this poor chap out of business since pany to lift the fruits by lighter, the RECEIVING STATIONP
he needs this extra selling time to beat his competition. ROB atCohaut wil be closed down unt the etty can be
What we assume to be a "free way of life" or "free enterprise YOUR at olihaut be closed down ntil the can
system" turns out to have some rather restrictive blind-alleys. Undoubted' LITTLE ONES I repaired.
ly when such a law was passed, we had much more lifesure time than V In the meantime the Association will operate a tem-
we have today. Life was indeed more simple and the scrabbling met- OF NEEDED porary BUYING POINT at the Colihaut Shed from which!
chant was a bore We had to curb the chap with some sot of laws or the fruit ill be transported by road to Batalie.
he'd foolishly remain open for 24'hours This would ruin his health BEST .. The Price payable at the temporary buying point
and cause great concern to his wife and children so we passed a law to
prohibit this sort of thing and its still on the books. There are lots When such fast relief comes with the first hall be the current Southern District Buying Point Price;
of laws like this that have become out-of-date. There is a law still on dies' veJK ow L CrmedOUGH ts .he -k at present 4.1 per lb with the additional .250
the books in London that says, in effect? "Horses and carriages may not they lck the spoon. learns up those pesky per lb for fruit that qualify for the 1t bonus.
S coughs so fast that it is cherished by de-
cross London Bridge during the hours of 7 and 9 in the mornings, voted Mothers in every Province. Contains B
This law was enacted in T912 when the heavy motor traffic over the that all-important Vitamin C that kiddies J. P. BUNEY
bridge frightened the horse, causing a serious traffic siari. But today you eed more of in feverish conditions. 8.10.63 Ag. General Manager
can't find a horse in all of London unless its over at Buckingham Palace u&Mi S CO H o. 1
Guard S Yo R (O ct. 12
where they are sometimes used by the Coldszream Guards.ITAMI
However, the Merchant's Law in Dominica is causing great hard- .. __. __WIH V N C .......,*, ,-,n--a
ship and if Legco has the good of the island's p-ogress in mind, they Wear Your Hat Straight
would strike it off the books at once. While they are at it, why not
look through the laws for other out-dated pieces of legislation that now,
because this is 1963, no longer apply. Wasn't this one of the jobs
Q. C. Alleyne was doing between plane trips to and from England ?
So They Say.
Will we have some of:he larger pot holes filled in before the
Kungsholm tourist ship arrives October 21st, Roseau streets, the main
routes in and out, are in a terrible condition. Edith's rainfall didn't help aa
any but can't a few hundred dollars be budgeted to patch the larger
holes a So they wonder!


Club News C. S. A. Centre on Mon,
By HERALD Literary Club Reporter day evening,
Dawbinites Leave Island Mr. Lawrence, hitherto
Director of Works, left the
Mr. Wendell Lawrence island for U. W. I. Jamaica
President of the Dawbiney on Thursday by the Fedeal I .
Literary Club and immediate Palm to pursue an eleven, ,s
past President of the Civil month course in public
Service Association, was given administration. Also leav,
a bon voyage send-off at a ing by the Palm were Messrs.
small gettogether P a r ty M. White, (2nd year Econo-
sponsored jointly by membe:. mic student) E. Moranci e
of the club and the Executive and D. Shillingfoid All
of the Association at the D. G. S. students. Straw Hats in London and Paris this year. -BIS.


PAGE FIVE
.._._ _- 9


DOMINICA HERALD







SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1963


PAGE SIX D


DOMINIGA HERALD
AN INDEPENDENT WEEKLY

31 New Street, Roseau. Tel. 307
Published by J. MARGARTSON CHARLES, Propiielor
Editor MRS. PHYLLIS SHAND ALLFREY
U.K. & European Representative Colin Turnier (Lotnon) Ltd.
122, Shaftesblwv A'e ,. iouonI W. I
Annual ,'ibscriptioons: brown 85 00 Country 86.00
Overseas (Surface Mail) $7.50
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, rI93


NEW ADVENTURERS


IN COLONISING DAYS and for many year category, these
thereafter the only kind of adventurers have) some s
or explorers who came voluntarily to these ture and rate
shores were persons of wealth and proper, h. v altered 1,
ty. Many of them had their backers in of incoming
European countries: the classic example of the new w
being Columbus himself, whose expenses fact that we s
were underwritten by a Spanish Queen. shall not be
A long procession of gentleman-adven, everybody wl
turers followed: only the unconsulted ideal of ihe C
slaves landed on these shores without any- stantial docile
thing in their pockets and indeed without Moreover,
any pockets at all. It was a tradition who rve arc
that those who visited the West Indies for beautiful leg
profit or pleasure started out as men of and the Mapl
substance or as parts of an expeditionary spirited than
force. the past. T
Even up to recent years, travel to and they bring w
from the West Indies has been limited to their fresh id
persons with means or at least savings; it like other ref
was only when the great migrantrush to us at times ct
England swelled to a flood that the trend can take refu,
was historically and obviously reversed; of humour a
_-many of our younger travellers nowadays tain whon
are students on travel grants; seeing the exemplar o
rest of the world is no longer regarded as suffered fools
the prerogative of the rich. wisdom fror
Many people will remember when there There is n
was only one American living on this new adventu
island, a certain Mr. Andrew Green who themselves as
was spoken of kindly in the town as "the or unconvent
American". Now there are several Ame- who dart in
ricans here and although most Dominicans our ideas ma
still hope that newcomers from the U.S. starting us th
will fall into the conservative millionaire by being con


PEOPLE'S POST
(Cont. from page 2)

Salary Headache at Delices. Consider the
high Cost of living today!


Dear Mrs. Editor,-Please
allow me a little space in
your valuable columns to
publish this article.
I notice our Policemen are
starving and about to run
away from responsibilities, I
understand that when they
draw their little pittance the
high cost of living swallows
it up with a balance of credit
pending for the next month,
so that nothing can stay in
hand in case of emergency,
especially when most of these
men are living miles away
from their families.
A policeman is getting
$90-$loo per month, they
are sometimes stationed at
Capuchin and their family


I would like to ask the
Authorities one question.
Are the Administrator and
the Police Chief alive? Are
they taking an interest in the
welfare of the men?
What about the local
Government are they do,
ing something to improve
this miserable life? If they
cannot do anything, will they
please refer the matter to the
Secretary of State?
Wake up Mr. Adminis-
trator. Wake up Mr. Chief
of Police. Let me remind
you all of this little hint:
"Prevention is, better than
cure".
A MERCHANT WHO GIVES
CREDIT, Portsmouth.


Shave had (and are liable to
!: prises. For just as the na,
gory of our new adventurers
so also has the type or category
explorers from tne larger mass
orld changed. This is a
hall have to accept, for we
able to deport or subdue
io does not conform to our
uict American or the sub,
SBritisher.
our fellowWest Indians
>und these waters in those
acies of Federalism, the Palm
e, are different and more
the average local voyager of
hey too are seldom rich but
ith them their talents and
eas. If some of those ideas,
l:ctions from abroad, seem to
larlatanlike or specious, we
ge in our Dominican sense
nd in the knowledge that Bri/
n we sdll use as the grand
f democracy has always
tolerantly, sifting grains of
Their random utterances.
o doubt that many of these
rers to our island regard
Ambassadors (self-appointed)
ional missionaries. But those
like archangels to change all
y simply do us a service by
inking hard, and may end up
averted themselves, sometimes.


Music Is Love

Love may be very base, in which
case is called VANDALISED'LOvE,and
so MUSIC may take that trend; but
in my opinion GOOD MUSIC is VIR-
TUOUS-LOVE:-hence the controver.-
sial topic signed by "WEST-INDIAN"
in his "WE WANT CREOLISM" versus
MRS MARIE DAVIS PIERRE outstand,
ing performer and the only singer
of her class in Dominica should not
have been atall replied to by the
said Mrs Pierre, as the writer West
Indian is a Nationalist and Racist,
and not a Musician.
Looking up Musical Histories
and authoritative writings on the
subject:- CREOLISM is nowhere to
be found, and hence I interpret
"West Indian's" LOVE for Music as
Vandalism (Base-Love) and that it
was good for him to be there on
that occasion to reflect on the subject
Music and how to interpret it in
SONG.
However I say "HAVE
CREOLISM"; the world is free to
have and do anything; your ad,
mirers are teeming in numbers but
still have NOT known you, only by


mere WORDS which is no contri-
bution even though with a dis-
torted' view on the great art of
Music. We Musicians who are
true to the ART know nothing els,
but (hat great CULTURE which has
been handed down through its
LONG CONTINUOUS anJ UNIVER-
SAL .ISTORY.
"HAS THE WEST/INDIES A
CULTURE, MUSIc AND
HERITAGE ? is a serious bone
ofcont:ntion and since Music Is
LOVE I guard Music against
RACISTS and NATIONALISTS who
seek to destroy ART by hatred and
vices through base ignorance.
ALCOHOL, NARCOTICS, and FREN-
ZIED DANCING have raken heir toll
in MENTAL ILLNESS throughout the
nations o5 the world. CRE'ULISM
is the nexr factor which is creeping
slowly and surely (imagine that
cartoon) over you and yo'ir
admirers.
Thanks for an early heed.
L. M. CHRISTIAN, i'oweau.


IN THE CABINET
By Phyllis Shand Allfrey
From Chapter IV


My father was gallantly involved as a combatant in
the first world war, and I (like many other young women
then living in the battle area of Europe) became more
hazardously involved in the second world war than the chi-
valrous men of his generation might have dreamed possi-
ble: some of them survived to engage in both struggles, but
he did not.
What I learned during my war II occupational risks
was an excellent training for the harsh realities of politics,
and it gave me an insight into welfare organisation which
I could no. have gained so quickly otherwise. I learned
to endure incredible hardships and horrible food, and the
only thing which nearly smashed my morale was groping
about on broken glass in pitch darkness, but that again
gave me an immense sympathy with the helplessness of the
blind. The noise of crashing bombs was sufficiently like
the holocaust of hurricane to seem like a major childhood
nightmare, and bearable.
It was during those days that I reflected endlessly and
also debated with many wiser people than myself the nature
of war and the struggles confronting all mankind.
I say 'struggles' in the plural, since it became evident
to me that the battle was three-dimensional-the
struggle for national supremacy or survival; the struggle of
the West against the East, sometimes called the struggle of
the Free World versus Communism or the struggle of
Communism versus Christianity; and thirdly the struggle
of the people of good will against each other, not just
regarding the goal of peace and a good life, but over the
ways and means of attaining it. Interwoven into all these
contests was the most illogical struggle of all segments
of global populations hating or despising each other on
racial grounds. This illogicality had reached its sinister
depth during the Nazi regime in Germany; after it was
crushed by determined resistance it reared its head in South,
Africa, and not in that country alone.
From childhood I was totally unable to believe that all white men
were superior to all black .or brown men; but I was never deluded, ike
some of my anti-raclst do-gooder friends, into thinking that all black or
brown men are invariably right today, simply because they have been
oppressed in the past or are just emerging from oppression. There are
real villains in both camps. And worst of all are the villains who keep
those camps in existence. That was one fine thing about the Cabinet of
the old Federal Government: its members were entirely devoid (in my
presence at any rate) of colour, bitterness.
They were free dignified men conscious of the liberal trends of their
century, and I only one. heard a fellow Minister speak of "our people"
to indicate solely those of African descent. In those days we all had a
vision of the tremendous partour small, scattered, tolerant budding
nation might play by precept and inspiration in 'the, councils nf the
world. Let nme admit- thati-living in Trinidad was important in this
regard: Trinidad seemed with every living specimen of West 'Indian
humanity.


--


DOMINICA HERALD


PAGE SIX


Learners Or
LunaticsP
Dear Madam Editor.
Please permit n:c space in your
paper to voice a matter of serious
concern which seems to be going
unnoticed by the authorities.
I am referring to the dozens of
learner drivers now crowding the
highways and main streets of the
town. 1 cannot see how it is prac-
ticable fr a driver who has himself
only a few weeks or months before
qualified as a licensed driver (and
perhaps not before failing the qualify-
ing tests once or twice) to be a
competent instructor to a learner-
driver. Yet this seems to be the
order of the day. These aren't Learn
ers. they're LUNATICS!
Further, I believe it's high time
something is done about this parade
of learners which goes on long after
Cont. en page 7

-- j







SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1963

eo e's Post ent time to complete the over delay-
People's Post ed job.
Cont. from pa[e 6 Despite the fact that there is not yet
a proper olace fir recreation the boys
6 p.m. No learner has any business seem to be practising in their back,
on the ro d after sunset. Apart from yards and are always invited to play
the imposibilicy of d s.,rnin an in neighbouriag villages. On Sun'
'L' at any reasonable distance at day 6th Oct they defeated a St.
night, one can hardly show the Joseph xi at St, Joseph. Scoes:-
necessary courtesy to leirnecs under Mahlut 103. St. Joseph 52.
sucn circumstances. Yours fithful;y,
And wo ic oi tne question of "L" A. Burroi, Mahaut
signs: Isn't it a real nalco the marer ___ __
-of-fact way in which "Ls" arc dis-
played! All shapes and size mostly Report Of Carib-
in some faded colur and hardly
discern ble for more than 25 yards; bean TU. Course
sometimes even hung on n reverse.
I am told that there is a Traffic BSy Paul Balnis. Deleg-
Board functioning in this island. In ate, @ astle BIrCe
view therefore of tne tremendous in-
crease in the numoer of learners on This Course w a s sponsored by
the road these days I would ii.< the Labour Educat:on Advisory
to offer three suggestions ntat would -.ommnittee of the Department of
greatly alleviate the situation Extra Mural Studies from the U ni,
I. fnat a regulation be made versYy of the West Indies, at the
whereby all perspective learners I cquatic Club in Barbados,
would be required to state at the Tne Course commenced from July
Traffic Dept., at the time ofootainm 15th August 3ist, 1963. I was
ing a learner's licence, the name or indeed happy when I knew that 1
names of persons by whom th-y will vas selected to atted tne Course,
be instructed. This same regula- which afforded me the opportunity
tion should authorise the police to of meeung many othe: Trade Un'
approve and sanction such nominees ionists from different Islands of the
as driving instructors and at the Caribbean area, and in order to
same time stop this nd scriminate know the respec'tve Territories and
abuse of traffic now pracuced. the successes achieved through the
2. That a regulation be made various Trade Un.ons in the West
limiting learner driving to daylight Indies.
hours. The Training of Labour Leaders
3. That a standard size "L" is very essential, it .elps them to
be established and painted in bright know their duties in leading a group,
red on a white background, after a and also h e p in having a larger
pattern used in more advanced membership. a u c h Leadership
countries. These "Ls" should be Training will enable all the Trade
affixed in a conspicuous position on Union movements in the different
the right half of the vehicle. Thee Territories to improve much better
should be presented at the time of than at present. Trade Unionis-s
application for a learner licence for in their respective Territories are very
approval. And please insist that essential to bring about so~idarny.
Motor cycle learner riders carry This should apply apart from the
iLs". Communicating units, the Carlbbe-
It is not enough to put the lea-n, ,an Congress of Labour with its affi-
er through a rigid qualifying test. liation.
It is all the more important to ensure The timetable of the Course was
that while giving him or her the well planned. Collective Bargaining
freedom of the road as a learner the was highly appreciated as being one
lives and safety of other road users of the foundations of the Trade Un'
are not endangered in any way. ion movement, but a little m o r e
CONCERNED DRIVER, practical exercise should be handled.
Goodwill. On the subject of the West Indian
constitution, I was very much im-
Spressed by the Lectures on this sub-
Mahaut Iject, because it enabled me to know
what is being done in the West In-
dies.
Playground dies.
In future I would recommend to
have the courses in different Territo-
Sir, ries, and to try and have more Trade
Following a letter sent to Unionists to attend, that all may
the Minister of Social Services, Hon. know the proper means of handling
W. S, Stevens, by the Secretary of the Trade Unon movement.
the St. Paul Educational and Sports The Historical Background on
Association, the Minister accompan- Social and Economic theories, In'
ied by the leader of the Opposition dustral Relations, Techniques and
Hon. E.B. Henry visited on Mon- methods, were properly and distinct-
day 7th Oct. the uncompleted play, ly imparted unto us, and we have
ground on which work had began grasped the principles, especially the
since last year. theory on wages. This has enabled
Indeed the Minister showed com- me to know in Collective Bargaining
plete disatsfaction over the work al- how to seek a proper wage for the
ready done such as the northeastern workers.
portion which was cut in a sloppish The Officers of the University or
manner and hence increased the ra- the West Indies, the International
pidity of running water and as a Labour Organisation, the Barbados
result washed away the soil and sa, Workers's Union, the Ministers of
vannah grass planting more so Labour and Education of Workers,
during the hurricane season, and, the Dominican Governmtent
The Honourable Minister then must by highly complimented for
advised the members that now is the their generosity in making, this
time to replant the grass, and assured course a success.
them that he would do all in his Although Dr. George Eaton, the
powzr to arrage for the sending of appointed Dean of the Course, had
a bulldozer at the earliest conveni, to leave during the Course on his


DOMINIC -' HERALD


promotion, special appreciation
goes unto him, and Brother Kenv
neth Mayero, the Secretary of the
Course. The Assistance co-opera-
nlon and friendship that the students
showed, were of great value. Altho-
ugh it was the first time we had ever
met together, but there was no bar,
ner indicating that we were strangers
to each other.
Our Language could compare,
and we lived in unity fir the seven
weeks, is though we were brothers
lot one Lmily.) I wish that in fut-
ure I would have the opportunity of
getting a scholarship in Trade Uni-
onism through the I. L. O. Other
extensive courses may enable us to go
further into the History of Trade
Unions. My intention hereafter is
to go and impart what I have learnt
to all my unionists; that we can have
a better Trade Union with more
trained members.
---- 1-- ---

"W. 1. Dress
Patterns"

By HERALD Literary Club Reporter
rhe Carib Cinema's present (if
odd) policy of preventing persons
'who dc not have ties' from entering
the Balcony or Box Galleries of the
Cinema was aiimadverted at a meet,
ing of the Dawbiney Literary Club
last week when a Panel--Miss Jean
James and Messrs. E Armour and
A, B. Lazare -discussed PRESS
PATTERNS IN 'HE WEST INDIES.
On the question of Crigins of
dress the Panel agreed that climate,
modesty and vanity are the elements
responsible for a people's choice of
dress. However one member ex,
pressed the view that dress has no-
thing to do with modesty.
In answer to the question to what
extent does tradition play a part in
determining the Fresent day trend in
West Indian dress, one member
traced the history of W. I. dress
pattern from Columbus to slavery to
emancipation to the zoth Century
"If slaves had been permitted to
wear what they were accustomed to
before the transatlantic voyage we
would have a more comfortable
wear today", he added.
Religion Bedevils?
In answer to the next question
put by the Moderator Mr. R. St.
Havis Shillingford concerning the
effect of foreign influence and reli,
gion on W. I. dress, the panel aired
views that the West Indians have
copied in toto the English pattern of
dress, that as long as W. I. Dress is
patterned on that of Europeans and
Americans, change is dubious, that
Churches have played a part in
helping to preserve in the communi-
ty patterns of dress quite unsuitable
to the area due to the great emphasis
they lay on hiding parts of the body.
Nudist Colony
The members of the Panel unani-
mously agreed that long pants,
shirt, tie, shoes and socks, and
jacket were not the ideal wear for
the W. I., taking into account the
climate, temperament and tradition
of the region. This present wear is
uncomfortable, expensive and un-
necessary. A gentleman member
of the Panel expressed 'the opinion
that the W. I. has the ideal climate
etc., for a Nudist Colony. How-
ever it was generally agreed that
short pants, sandals, with or with-
out socks aid long shirt inade in


PAGE SEVEN


"Dippo" fashion worn over the
shorts would be the ideal wear for
the tropical area. In conclnsion-the
Panel expressed the optimism that
if the region Iecomcs an independ,
ent Nation, within 5o years this type
of dress would be established.
Other points were:--,
(1) When invited to a function
and asked to wear his National
Dress, the West Indian dresses like
a European.
(2) In present day society a
man is considered a gentleman
(irrespective of his behaviour or
character) especially by the
"functionally illiterate Middle Class"
simply because he is properly attired.
(3) People dislike ptesent mode
of dress but will not change for fear
of being called 'radicals'.
(4) Present dress makes serious
inroads into economy of people.
The view was expressed that the
recent liberal trend in the Civil Ser-
vice whereby Civil Servants have
been given the option to wear a tie
was a step in the right direction.


The Dawbimites felt that the
dress restrictions of the Carib Cinema
was far from realistic and observed
that it was perhaps without pre-
c:dent anywhere for a tie or coat to
be stipulated as a requirement to
enter a particular area of a Cinema.
This should be challenged.

V.I.P. From C.D.C.

Visiting Dominica on Sunday
6th October was Mr. GI. Firmston'
Williams, Regional Controller o:
the Commonwealth Development
Corporation. He was met on arrival
by Mr. A.L.E" Pugh, Manager of
the Corporatiou's Agriculiual Estates
in Dominica. Mr. Firmston-Wil-
liams inspected M e I v i I I e Hall
and Castk Bruce estates and called
on His Honour The Administrator
and Mrs. Lovelace at their country
residence at Pent Cassee.
During his overnight stay in
Dominica, Mr" Firmston-Williams
was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Pugh
at Melville Hall Estate.


Children's (Factual Test) Corner
Dear Girls and Boys,
Here I am again. "Edith" threw everything
out of gear, hence no letter from me last week. f
ell I am sure that most of you now have a fair impression what
a hurricane is. What you experienced gave you an idea what a severe
one can do we were very lucky to have excaped so lightly. Of
course, our banar.as crop is ruined and this will be a great set-back to
the island, but we were fortunate that there was no loss of life.
Tobago, Martinique, Haiti and Cuba got the worst of both "Edith"
and "Flora" and suffered great loss of lives and property.
Today, we are generally given advanced notice of the approach of
a hurricane.
Even up to a fec years ago, people in the country parts had to de-
pend on their own experience and observation to do so.
Then they watched the movements of birds, the setting sun and the
clouds. On a dark night, not a single star would be seen in the sky
and the air would be hot and still.
Aeroplanes on the look-out for hurricanes can today spot them
as soon as they start forming in the Altaatic, east of the Eastern Carib-
bean islands, Then as they move in a no;th-westerly direction people are
kept informed by radio of the paths of the approaching storm aud are
told what precautions they must take.
It was rather alarming to oldsters to watch the teen-agers during
the storm. Yet youth will always crave for experience. When one con-
siders that the last hurricane took place thirty-three years ago. it was not
surprising, Some of your parents might not have been bon yet. As
a tee.-ager then. I too was just as excited. It was fun watching co-
conut trees bend,'g like bows to the force of the wind.
In the midst of the 1928 hurricane, a terrific earthquake shook the
building where I was, and down on her knees went an old lady, praying a-
loud, much to the amusement of us teen-agers. Of course when she rose
up, she rebuked us and explained the great danger; we quickly sobered
down. That year Guadeloupe and Montserrat were very badly hit with
great loss of life.
(Cont. on p. 12)


.------------_ ------a------




M I BM^ BS 0

$100 JACK POT

$25 PINK SLIP SPECIAL

OTHER CASH PRIZES

ST. GERARD'S HALL SAT. OCT. 12, 1965

TIME 8:30 P.M.
ADMISSION: $1.00
Oct. 12
.- -










24 0, $135

S@i9
Burp &Iffe
$W-99


GRAPE JUICE ho8t,



-1=-\ Til



Luncheon Meat


& 000
$4,20


Smoked Salami
SaMusages :+_it, $2, 2:
C~oktil ,49g 0 & $1f0
Hot Dog 4 & &90
H-nlaMH., Relith ) 700
Bar = ,p ., 5 I _
SEEDLESS GRAPES 47
PLUMROSEi FRL -l MiLK)
Co@ 40 x 10 oa $14.90 )
0 Ti n)
Shrimp Tin#e tbo $1.80
Libbys Evaporratd Milk
Co. 48 x 141 oz. $12.2 )
300 Tin
Pre.Oooked Picnic
Hams (4-5 lhs. at $1.25 tb
-PEAR NECTAR 60
Pan Cake Mix, =Pkt. 48,
Pan Cake Syrup. Bot. 80o
Cornrmeal Pkt. 45;
Royal Drink Choc. 60
Wheat Gcri-r. Bol. $1 10
MiWnutP T 1plocia t
Shredded Wheat 760;
Span RiCe Mix 87f
Table Prunes 1-lt Pki, $1,00
TOMATO SAUCE 400
Apple Rings 14 oz. Jar $1.00
Anchovy Paste 2 oz. 50V
Apple Juice 40 J 50 & $1.00


IWO


I


HONImGm BOUILLON

Oubae Titn 208. $IO0


i"( /6 w


Yellow htdwte
at so# & M1At th

Swift 5 lft.. Ti WN
Danish ^- te^ Bo@ $

Round Boxes 6 Portioas

Cort i O il N & $1.4
Pe-amut Oil 900 & $1M69


Apple Ring~
BRAND'S
~Esgenoe of


NU-CHOC. DRINK


414P

420
4,6B0


$1 .40


Soo
450 & $00


Frozen Ducks at $1.00 per lb.


PRUNE JUICE -- 7 es per To


Mussels in Briin $iB & I
Cor Flour Sea.. A1
Tuijrbar' Dats 7
HEINrZ Chick r r /
MAXWEILL Hovu ff @@
DENNY tew@d ftek
L @ gbRUUN anih
-Tafle i uttrF 7l
PlafInt Pogut Buttfp 6
CAMEM09RT Ch@@@


40 4,
4Oli~&SO4r


0o & u,0
00 & ",M
m$~~saa


ITUNA fISH ~ Tin
rapes < e1ditsb a f. 4/'/


THE


"PHOENIX"


A.l 8HILLINFOW 6 '-. .id.


___________________________. ___ mrg-Tnff___-_ ..^"_ -- -


~-lii~


knrvav~ rIu .r-,-Pui


------------


4afAuVb @@%BmR 1t. 166


Bb~P~a3~4tB~ ~t~r~a


?


Chicken
Maevf


--i! lT-




PA '. -C NINE


SATURDAY, OCTO3SER i- i.;,' POANICA HERALD



LIFE HAS A HAPPY FLAVOUR
1.A


Drink sustaining OVALTINE and enjoy a wonderful sense of
well-being. OVALTINE contains all thie goodness of Nature's
finest foods-- Malt, Milk and Eggs-- plus lots of extra vitamins.
Helps the whole family grow strong and healthy-- keeps them
brimful of vitality. EVERYBODY LOVES

OVALTI E
NOTHING ELSE IS JUST AS GOOD







SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1963


PA IOINC II T EA


Entry Of Rum & Other Potable

Spirits Into The United Kingdom

As a result of the concern felt by Her Majesty's Cus-
toms and Excise about the number of apparent attempts to
smuggle spirits into the United Kingdom, this Govern,
meant has been asked by the Secretary of State for the Colo,
nies and has agreed to issue the following warning locally
so as to reduce the number of such attempts and particu,
larly the disappointments resulting from the seizure of the
spirits:-

Important Warning Postal Packages Sent To Britain

If you are posting a package (e. g. a gift parcel) to
Britain you should make quite sure that all the contents are
declared and are correctly described on the Customs declara-
tion form. If this is not done the whole package may be
confiscated by the British Customs, thus causing disappoint/
ment and lose for tie person who was to receive it.
Rum and other spirits from over 18oo packages sent
from the West Indies and British Guiana were confiscated
in 1962 by the British Customs. This was done because
the contents had not been properly declared.
Issued by authority of
H. M. Customs and Excise, London.

The parcels in question arc usually personal gifts and
are said to come mainly from the We t Indies and neigh,
bouring territories. They are either wrongly declared, as
containing goods other thar. spirits or the spirits are simply
omitted from the Customs declarations al:ogethar. The
consequence is the samc in either case i. e. the insufficiently
declared or undeclared contents of the parcels are seized.
Wouldbe offenders would do well to pay special
attention to that section of the warning which states that the
United Kingdom Customs and Excise Authorities have
the power to seize the whole ,(repeat the whole) parcel.
Hence for these who are already also thinking of Christmas
gift parcels to friends and relations in the United Kingdom,
it is hoped that this warning will prove timely.
This warning will be given as wide publicity as possi,
ble by means of the press and radio and by being displayed
in as many local post offices and police stations as possible.
DOMINICA GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICE


FRESH as a breeze
with the fragrance of
Limacel, your favour-
ite toilet lotion.


I RI 1111 111 I


COOL and soothing to your
skin. Protects against pers-
piration. Gives you confi-
dence on the hottest day.

FINE as face powder. Clings
lovingly. Lightens the tone
of the skin. A member of
the famous Limacol family.


SUBSCRIBERS NOTICE

Subscribers are kindly requested to report before
12 noon on Saturday if their papers have not been
delivered. We may be sold out by that time.
PHONE CIRcULATIO DEPT. 307.O ,


Education Department,
Roseau,
Dominica.
2nd September, 1963.

School Leaving (Std VII) Examination Results 1963,


NO. SCHOOL


HEAD TEACHER


Atkinson Neva Edwards
Belle Vue Floss Christian
Boetica Daniel Jno. Bap
Castle Bruce Johnson Thoma
Calibishic Aborfield Rabe
Campbe'l Reynold St. Hi
Clifon Myrle Samuel (
Cockrane Alvin Bruney
Colihaut Bennett Jro. R
Coulibistrie Ruane Sebastia;
Delices Kinnard Leath"
Dos d'Ane Lucina Seraphi
Dublanc Maurice Joseph
Giraudel Weefers Jules (
Grand Bay Boys' Robelo Leitha
Grand Bay Cirls' Solange St. Jea
Grand Fond Gertrude Rober
Hampstead Eugene Samuel
La P; ine Bernard Jno. B
Laudat Mane Reid
Mahaut S. L. Jolly
Marigot Abraham Thor
Morne Jaune Leo B. Jones
Morne prosper Verna Seraphin
Penville Josephine Casey
Pointe Carib Angela James (.
Petite Savanne Peter L. Henry
Pichelin D. A. Nicholas
Portsmouth Balthazar Barrie
Roseau Boys' Harold E. A.
Roseau Boys' Snr. Carmen Wattle
Roseau G. & M. Jnr. Aileen Shillngf
Roseau Mixed Infants A. Robinson
Salisbury Lester J. Charl
Salybia Senford Hyacint
San Sauveur Benoit James
Scotts Head Theresa Simon
Soufriere C. H. E. Guist
St. Joseph Osmond J. Geo
Tete Morne M. F. Laurent
Thibaud Leonie Walter
Trafalgar Wayland Dani
Vieille Case Bernard Carbot
Warner J. J. King (A1
Wesley Mech.ch Lintor
Woodford Hill Mona Lewis
St. Martin's Sr. M. Borgia
St. John' (Portsmouth) Sr. M. Reiindis
St.Luke's (Pointe Michel) Sr. M. Olivier


(Ag)

ptiste
is
as
laire (A
Ag)

ose

im (Ag
n (Ag)

Ag)
m
n
;s
(Ag)
aptiste


nas

(Ag)
(Ag)
Ag)



Richards

brd

es
h (Ag)

(Ag)
e
rges


el
n (Ag)
g)
U


Totals (excluding R. M. Infants)


Oct. 12


NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER
ROLL ENTFRED SAT PASSED


175
85
126
384
216
g) 80
149
77
256
267
) 365
289
195
155
375
437
o1
16o
358
98
615
763
198
107
176
274
184
156
217
S455
152
358
699
413
215
311
254
265
726
357
157
90
350
62
430
165
1246
851
452


4
I
10
7
3
6
2

6
5
13
3
7
4
I
6
12
4
8
4
8
17
13

Nil
6
3
2
7
8
Nil
5
Not eligible
12
3
3
10
6
9
9
9
3
7
I
1
I
18
14
Nil


14,347 302 295 151
O. A. WALKER
Education Officer.


Britain's Gift Of Desks


A Tanganyika School received many gift desks from Britain recently. -Picture shows the High
Commissioner sitting at one of the desks chatting to the Principal cf St. Mary's Institute, Tanganyika.


f





I


,fc.,^.-^ Hrr~.... 1 ^*o .


-


DOMINICA HERALD


~rrrrc


rnrn


--uwu~~~llrr~~rru~rrrrrrr


---


P'i GE TEN






DOMINICA HERALD


From Th eFranch Vietn4mese people, and for them al-
1 HU rFF: I one, to chose the means of attaining
Ambassador, this. But every national effort to be
m a accomplishedd by Viet Nam will find
Trinidad France ready, within the measure of
h-r own potential, to orlanise cord,


We iiave been asked by His Ex-
cellency the French Ambassador in
Trinidad to publish t h e following
(translation of an) official release by
the French Government, since our
report of a U.S. radio news-item on
*September 14 does not, His Excel-
lency states, conform to the truth.
.Our reporter read:
"President de Gaulie supports the
Government's action in imposin
martial law (in Viet Nam) and is re,
ported to be playing an anti-Ameri-
can role."
We print below the French Gov-
ernment release, translated by the
Editor, .Dminica Herald.
PARIS, Council Of Minis,
ters 29th August 1963
The French Government follows
with attention and emotion the grave
events which are taking place in
Viet Nam. The work which France
has lately accomplished in Cochin
China, inAnnan and in Tonkin,
the attachment which she has pres-
erved towards the whole country, the
interest which she maintains in its
development, leads France to under-
.stand particularly. well and to share
sincerely the trials of the Vietnamese
people..
Furthermore, the knowledge that
France has of the value of those peo-
ple makes her comprehend what role
they are capable of enacting in the
-present situation confronting Asia,
both regarding their own progress
and to benefit international under,
standing, so soon as they can,branch
out and act independently in regard
to foreign affairs, peace and internal
unity. Today, more than ever, that
is what France wishes for the whole
of Viet Nam. It is naturally for the


al co-operation in tha country.


Nuclear Testban A
Treaty Ratifiad
On September 24 the United d
States Senate ratifi-d the Nucleat
Test Ban Treaty by 80 to 19, well
in e;rceis of the 2'3rds majority re,
quired. The next diy it was ratified
by the Presidium of the Supr:me So'
viets of the U.S.S.R.
The Foreign Ministers of the
U.S.A., U.S.S.R. and Great Briti
ain are now discussing in New York
plans for a further Treaty to ban the
use of nuclear weapons in outtr
space.


T- -

COUGH
%OT YOU

St;o tha coughinfg-
choklng-cycle
SUCKLEY'S
FAST-ACTING
MIXTURE
I'he tir t ~ila of BUCKLEY'S powerful
inedeatilion relieve' congestion. cases throat
Irritation, .tops the tickle that makes you
cough- -le't yoti breathe freely.
UIICKtEY'S is completely different--
ontanlna no habit-torning drgs .
,ugar- safe for diaectirs. Canada's beat
selling coulgh asnd cwid remedy lbr over 20
rAKE


sor


b
0
Y


October 5, 1963 is 25-45 years), to have had fairly.
substantial experience of working
COURSES FOR with adolescents and young adults,
YOUTH LEADERS either ina paid or a voluntary
capacity, and to have passed at
Applications are Invited for a least five subjects at Ordinary level
ursat in Youth Worke his s a in the General Certificata of Educa,
bursary in Youth Work, This is a or ea a
ne-year diploma course held at the tion or reached an equivalent Level
National CollPge for the Training o0 in their general education.
Nouth Leaders ir the United King, Applications should be addressed
south Leaders hi the United King, to the
lorn
The 1964 course commences in Soc;al Development Gfficer,
April and ends in May 1965. Social Development department,
Students are normally expected Hosezu,
o batleast 23 years of and sh d reach him not later
lo be at least 23 years of age than October 12th 1963.
the age range of present studentsha Octobe 2th 1963

LITTLE MOE


(Courtesy tUnited Stalis 1,' J, matior Service)


COUGH
MIXTURE


Dominica Banana Growers Association

Banana Shipment of 3rd Oct. 1963:
STEMS TONS

Roseau 12,805 162
Portsmouth 13,726 168
Coast 3,.591 44
30,122 374
Exports Ist Jan. to 27th Sept., 1963 2,179,493 27.465
Total Exports to 3rd Oct., 1963 2,209,615 27,839
Total Exports to 3rd Oct., 1962 1,917,625 22,257
Increase 291,990 5.582


1HE "VARIETf" STORE

i C.: G. PHILLIP & CO. LTD. 1

LATEST ARRIVALS:--
i Dressing Table Mirrors, Ice Creami
Ireezers, Saw Files, FloorJTiles,, Ready
ixed Putty, Turpentine, Linseed Oil,
G. I. Paints, Electric Wires Tools,
t -1 is.._........I. . .1


AVAILABLE AT THE FOLLOWING HARDWA

L. A. DUPIGNY Esq.,
J. W. EDWARDS -
C. G. PHILLUP& COMPANY
T.'D. SHLL !OWf tit


PAGE ELEVEN


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12 1963


r


WIFE NOTICE
I, TERRY TUITT bfRoseau,
hereby give notice that I am
no longer responsible for any
debts incurred by my wife
VERDUN TU I T T (n e e
LeBlanc) she having left my
house and home without m'
knowledge and consent. and
without any just cause.
Sgned: TEI Oct, 12---26
Advertise In
The HERALD
By Rideo


---






PAC~i TWELVE DOMINICA HERALD

hi men's (Factual Test) Corner Caribs Lose Cases
S.-:(Coclude from p. 7) In the Supreme Court
Sometimes, too, a hurricane can be a tidal wave. The sea becomes very yesterday the last two judge,
rough, due to the great: force of the wind, and mountainous waves dash ments were delive ed against
onthe shot and destroy buildings and many people get drowned ..e ,,
Wel I think you have had your experience so the next time some the Caib squatters who
hear ofthe approach of a hurricane, you will know that there is no fun Will now be evicted from
to vpect. Instead you will join your parents to do all that is necessary to Miss Ideline Johnson's estate,
safeguard yourselves, and, most important, you will keep indoors during Concord.
the storm These Caribs (eight cases
Cherio till next week. Love from Auntie Fran. .wee h aribs (eight cases
QUESTIONS:- were heard in all) state that
QUESTIONShey had always understood
(1) So far 6 hurricanes have taken pace this year. Name them that this was part of the Carnb
Reserve and that the land
(2) Officially when does the Hurricane Season begin and ud had been worked by them,
their fathers and their fathers
fathers. Most of them have val-
(3) There is a joke about the word "hurricane". It was thought uable cultivations of bananas,
to be a corruption of Hurry canes, get ripe before the winds come and cocoa and coconuts and feei
blown you down", But the word is really an ------ word. aggreved that instead of being
NA -- -able to come to an under,


Blackburn 2


The scoreline sounds convincing
enough, but Blackburn's win does
not rate as one of their cent pun-
-chy displays, rhey never( produced
the. zestand direct mov:mets' that
shattered Thunderbirds two weeks
ago. It was not until the last fifteen
minutes that they finally crusned the
resistance of a poor Shamrock side
which played wiih ten men almost
thtougout the first half.
.Blackburn scored their first goal
atar nineteen minutes when a left
wing cross was neatly headed in by
Jocy Lartigue. Shamrock should
have got on level terms just before
ha ftie, but their lft-winger mis-
sd a sit er from five yards. Lartigue
made. it 2-o fifteen minutes before
the end when a defensive error allo-
wed him to score the easiest of goals..
A light ball was partly responsible
for this slow game.
S. M. A. 1 Spartans 1
Spartans had this game in their
pockts and le. a point slip at a time
when they should have been consoli-
dating. They were ahead after 35
minutes and should have got at least
two more but for their shot-shy for-
wards. S.M.A. equalized ten minute
from the end with a fine goal scored
by their inside left.
DOMINOES-
The Su noco Club of Layo0 re'
cently engaged the Success Clpb ;
Fond ColI in what turned out to
be a most exciting encounter. Play,
ig for oo000 points, the two teams
were neck and neck, and in the final
stages Success had scored 1870 point
to Sunoco's 1876. In two action,
packed sets, Success emer ged win-
ners by 44 points.
I have since received a Icter from
the Suuoco Club accusing theSuc-
cess players of gamesmanship. The
Success Club are accused of using
signals, and receiving hints from
spectators. The Success players have
most vehemently denied the accusa-
tion.
-BOXINB-
Cassius Clay, the leading center'
de for Sonny Liston's Heavyweight
Crown, has declared he will not
S4bt anyone until he meets Liston.


Negotiations were underway for
Clay to meet a Canadian Heavy,'
weight but Clay called off the fight
on Monday.
Eddie's Treble Chance
16
OCTOBER 26th.
Bolton vs Blackpool
Fulham vs Chelsea
Leicester vs Blackburn
Middlesborough vs Sunderland
Plymouth vs Swindon
Southampton vs Leeds
Swansea vs Rotherham
Bristol C. vs Hull
Crewe vs Q. P. R.
Listen vs Southend
Port Vale vs Bournemouth
Shrewsbury vs Barnsley
Walsall vs Oldham
Chester vs Gillingham
Chesterfield ,vs Aldershot
St. Mirren vs T. Lanark
Classified Advt.
SEMPERIT TYRES
and
TUBES IN STOCK
750 x 20
700 x 20
750 x 16
650 x 16
600 x 16
640 x 13
Very attractive prices
S.P. MUSSON, SON
& CO. LTD.
Corner Queen Mary &
King Geo. V Street
Roseau


July 27-

FOR SALE
.Kpusehold Furniture
including one Remington
Typewriter
Contact: 12 Gt. George St., Roseau
Oct. 5- 9
"Weeks" 43 tons All Metal
Dumping Trailers
Wit Duty --$120000
Witkot Duty -- $996.00
Other Size etc. are also avaiablc
J. ASTAPHAM. & G'O. LTDI
S Appliance Dept.
Aug. 4 -'Oct 12


standing with the estate
owner (who has not troubled
them these many years) and
receiving some compensation
for their standing produce,
they have had costs awarded
against them ranging fhoni
over $400 to $40.
SOne peasant proprietor
states that he as over 1,ooo
stems of bananas plus cocoa
and coconuts in bearing, all
of which were planted by
himself or members of his
family. Miss Johnson's title
to the land is, of course,
abundantly clear since Con-
cord Estate through which
the Lagl trace rans is shown
on the original Skeat map as
being not part of the 1903-
created Reserve. It is under ,
stood that a sale to Mr. A.
L. E. Pugh is probable.

REV. SPRINGER HERE
Rev. Garnet Sprnger of the
Ethiopian Church has been staying
in Dommnica for several days and
giving talks and prayer-meetings to
appreciative crowds at Roseau Girls
School, the market place, and a few
districts. (Story Next Week).

AMENITIES FOR NURSES HOSTEL
A GIs release states that the
Secretary of State has approved the
alteration to the relevant C.D.&W.
scheme to enable $3,907 to be spent
on a recreation room and to furnish
lecture, demonstration and library,
study rooms at the nurses hostel
P.M.H.


SPECIAL SALE
FOR
ANKER CASH REGISTERS
VALUE $800.00 EACH
BUY ONE GET ONE FREE
VERY LIMITED QUANTITY
J. ASTAPHAN & CO. LTD.
Oct. 5-Nov. 9
Applications are Invited for the
post of Banana Supervisor, Roseau-
Salary In accordance with qualifica-
tions and experience-Apply in
writing with copies of references
to Geest Industries (W.I,) Ltd,,
Roseau,
Oct--lz,9,26


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1963


SPEECH BY C.M.

The Following Broadcart Speech Was Made On Tuesday over WIBS
Roseau:-
Ladies & Gentlemen of Domirica,
I am addressing you in connection with the devastati-n cased by
Hurricane Edith on the 25 September, and to inform you of the steps
taken by Government in search of financial assistance and otherwise in an,
attempt to bring relief to those whose homes ha:'e been damaged and those
who have suffered loses in their cultivations.
As you know I was out of the tc ritory when Edith struck. I was in
Puerto Rico attending the Annual Meeting of the Ceribbean Organisation,
in the capacity of an observer. Having received official information giving
a rough estimate of the extent of damage done to this territory and having
learnt that St. Lucia and Martinique were in the same, if not worse, sorry
plight I addressed the Conference to the effect that although the Caribbean
Organisation has not got the means at its disposal to give relief it ought
to make an effort to get outside assistance in order to give a certain amount
of relief to the sufferers of these islands. On the strength of this
Dr. Lustra, Secretary of Commerce for Puerto Rico and the delegate
representing that island subsequently informed the Conferencethat his
Government had decided to donate five thousand dollars ($5,000.00) to
be divided among Dominica, Martinique and St. Lucia according to
need. I take it this amount will be in American currency which is equi-
valent to approximately $8 6oo dollars in our currency.
A memorandum has already been despatched to the Secretary of the
Laribbean Organi.ation indicating the extent of damage done to buildings
in support ofDominica's claim to a portion of that amount.
While I was doing my bit abroad the Government
was active cn the local scene and a committee was set up
to investigate and to ascertain the number of buildings
affected and the amounts required for repairs. I wish to
say, and I ask you to note, th.t while I am satisfied that
the committee performed an efficient job in this connection
there may be some of you who have genuine claims on
whatever assistance we may obtain but whose names do not
appear on the list. The short time available must be
blamed for any omission, but I am askingnow all those
who have not reported the damages done to their buildings
to send in a note indicating the extent of damage to the
Administrator, Administrator's Office.
(To be concluded next week)

*...................*.......... ........................* -..... ,,,.. .. ... ..

WANTED HOUSE TO RENT

Three bedrooms or more, long-term
tenancy, preferably in suburbs. T
\ |Attractive rental offered
Enquires to:
e Box 45, Dominica Herald,
Telephone 307.
Oct. 12, 9i
... ........................ ...... .......... ... ... o


iC


GRAND OPENING !!!

ASTAPHANS SHOPPING CENTREl
ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
THE OPENING OF THEIR
DRUGS DEPARTMENT
ON NOVEMBER 1ST.
Visit our DRUGS DEPARTMENT on the
first floor for a large variety of
Drugs and Patent Medicines
PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY
FREE!! GIFTS TO EVERY CUSTOMER
FOR A LIMITED PERIOD (
REMEMBER!! FOR DRUGS SEE

ASTAPHANS SHOPPING CENTRE
DESIGNED FOR YOUR SHOPPING PLEASURE
)rt. 12-Nov. 30,


SCHOOL- -

SP RTL IG H T--


BY EDDIE ROBINSON


Shamrock 0


PRINTED AND. PU Ij BD Y J. MA OA TSON CHAAuE, AmB 1ALD'S PRINTmRY, 31 NBW STREET, ROSEAU, DOMINCA, SATURDAY OCTOBER 12, 1963


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