• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Chart
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Occupational opportunities and...
 Tasks common to occupations in...
 Exploratory experiences
 Occupational outlook
 Evaluation of individual interests...
 Bibliography
 Back Cover














Group Title: Bulletin / Florida Dept. of Education ;
Title: A Resource guide for home furnishings, equipment and service occupations
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102631/00001
 Material Information
Title: A Resource guide for home furnishings, equipment and service occupations
Series Title: Bulletin / Florida Dept. of Education ;
Alternate Title: Exploration of home furnishings, equipment and service occupations
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Division of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education. -- Home Economics Education Section
Florida -- Division of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education. -- Home Economics Education Section
Publisher: The Division
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla
Tallahassee, Fla
 Subjects
Subject: House furnishings industry and trade -- Vocational guidance   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: State of Florida, Dept. of Education, Division of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, Home Economics Education Section.
General Note: Cover title: Explorations of home furnishing, equipment and service occupations.
General Note: "Florida pre-vocational home ecomonics education."
General Note: "October 1973 ... reprint 1974."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102631
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 22331356

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
        Front Cover 3
        Front Cover 4
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page i-a
    Introduction
        Page ii
        Page ii-a
    Chart
        Page iii
        Page iii-a
    Acknowledgement
        Page iv
        Page iv-a
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Occupational opportunities and requirements
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Tasks common to occupations in housing, home furnishings, equipment and service occupations
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Exploratory experiences
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Occupational outlook
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Evaluation of individual interests in housing, home furnishings, equipment, and services
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 57a
    Bibliography
        Page 58
        Page 58a
        Page 59
        Page 59a
        Page 60
        Page 60a
        Page 61
        Page 61a
        Page 62
        Page 62a
    Back Cover
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
Full Text

































3 5" o? P 7P





















L L __


UNIVERSITY













EXPLORATION OF HOME FURNISHINGS,
EQUIPMENT AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


FLORIDA


OCTOBER 1973






































This reprint of a public document was promulgated at an annual cost of
$221.19 or $.24 per copy to provide direction and resource materials
for Florida Home Economics teachers who are instructing in the pre-
vocational program.

FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS BULLETIN MAY BE SECURED THROUGH
MISS ALLIE FERGUSON, ADMINISTRATOR, HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION, KNOTT
BUILDING, TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32304


A RESOURCE GUIDE


FOR

HOME FURNISHINGS,

EQUIPMENT AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS





STATE OF FLORIDA

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL AND ADULT EDUCATION

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION SECTION






































Accreditator Title:


Accreditator Code No.


Course Objective: To provide students with opportunities to explore
and Services.

Course Description : Thscusisdsgetoepoeeloet



furnishings, equipment and service enterprises.

Teacher-Student Ratio:1to2


Exploration of Home Furnishings, Equipment and


INTR 0 DCTI 0 N


The pre-vocational program in Florida has three major purposes:


To provide students with an orientationto the many career opportunities
available in the world of work.

To assist students in developing personal competencies important to

success in almost any occupation.

To provide studeAss with exploration experiences in occupational clusters
according to their choice.


This gudie, Exploration of Home Furnishings, Equipment and Services, has

been designed to provide assistance inoteaching course code #2789.


COURSE STANDARDS


Section: Home Economics Education









RECOMMENDED PRE-VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION


*
A STUDENT
SEVENTH GR


The Schema below follows the Vocational, Technical and Adult Education
Division guidelines for pre-vocational education
AND MAY E
NINTH GR
T AT THE AND MAY ELECT AT THE
ACCOR
ADE LEVEL EIGHTH GRADE LEVEL


LECT AT THE
ADE LEVEL'
DING TO


'
ACCORDING TO SCHOOL
OFFERINGS


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
FOR CAREERS
(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR
*EXPLORATION OF ANY
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTERS)
(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR
**EXPLORATION OF HOME
ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS
(12-18 WEEKS)


CS HOOL OFFERINGS'
ANY OF THESE NOT
PREVIOUSLY ENROLLED IN


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
FOR CAREERS
(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR
*EXPLORATION OF ANY
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTERS)
(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR
**EXPLORATION OF HOME
ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS
(12, 18 or 36 WEEKS)


MAY ENROLL IN


ORIENTATION
T
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONS
(6-9 WEEKS)

AND MAY ALSO ENROLL IN
PERSONAL
CAREER ORIENTATION
(6-9 WEEKS)
Course is a part of
co m.prehe nsive
orientation involving
other occupational
categories and may be
a segment of a wheel.
(see note)


* COURSE TITLES FOR HOME ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTERS:



EXPLORATION OF HOME FURNISHINGS, EQUIPMENT AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
EXPLORATION OF INSTITUTIONAL AND HOME MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORTIVE


SEPTEMBER 1973


** EXLRTOOFHMECNMCOCUAIN


Note: A combination of these two courses could be equal to one semester of home economics reported under











ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


PARTIC I PANTS:


Karen Simpson, Home Economics
Teacher, S. Sumter Middle School,
Webster, Florida

Sharon Cunningham, Home
Economics Teacher, Crescent
City Jr. Sr. High School,
Crescent City, Florida


EDITOR:


Martha Lemons


DIRECTOR:


TYPIST:

























TABLE OF CONTENTS


Introduction . . . . * * * * * . . . .


. . ii


. .


- Occupational Opportunities and Requirements . .

- Tasks Common to Occupations in Housing, Home . .
Furnishings, Equipment and Service Occupations

- Exploratory Experiences . . . . . . .

- Occupational Outlook . . . . . . . .

- Evaluation of Individual Interests in Housing, . .
Home Furnishings, Equipment and Service Occupations


Concept I

Concept II


Concept III

Concept IV

Concept V


. .


. .


Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .




CONCEPT I Occupational Opportunities and Requirements


1. The students will
identify specific
job opportunities
in the housing
and home furnish-
ings cluster.


1. Use bulletin board idea, "Nestle into
Home Furnishings." Appendix #1

2. Take Pretest. Appendix #2

3. Write jobs on slips of paper. Play "What's
My Line?" Divide into teams. Ask only
yes or no questions. Examples:
Are you on the professional level?
Do you wear a uniform?
Do you go to college?
Do you use a ?
4. Pantomine job activities.

5. Invite resource people from the surrounding
area who are employed in housing and home
furnishing occupations.
6. Use the "Career Possibilities" Scramble
Gram. Appendix #3





I


Appendix #1
bulletin Board
Nestle into Home
Furnishings

Appendix #2
Pretest
Gu a -
i e.
Lovejoy's Career and
Vocational School Guide

Hopke, William E., (ed.).
Enedyclopedia of careers
a Vocational Guidance.

Resource Persons:
1. Florist
2. Editor
3. Appliance Demonstrator
4. Carpet Layer

Appendix #3
Scramble Gram
Career Possibilities"


CONCEFI


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


PROFESSIONAL
1. Interior Designer
2. Journalist
5. Research Specia-
list for Fabric,
Rug or Equipment
Companies
4. Teacher in High
School or College
5. Extension Home
Economist
6. Merchandising
Specialist
7. Buyer for Home
Furnishings and
Equipment
8. Utility Home
Economist
9. Kitchen Planner
0. Consumer Consulta
1. Furniture Designer
2. Window Display
Person
3. Architect
4. Landscaper
5. City Planner
6. Movie Set Designer
7. Real Estate Agent
8. Building Inspector


SUPPORTIVE
1. Appliance
Demonstrator
2. Aide on Home
Furnishings
Department
3. Aide in
Specialty Shop
4. Drapery, Slip-
cover or Reup-
holsterer's
Assistant
5. Florist's Aide
6. Decorator's
Aide
7. Commercial
Machine
Operator
8. Supervisor in
nt Related
Factories
9. Housekeeper in
Hotels, Motels
Institutions, '
Homes
10. Gift Wrapper
11. Furniture
Refinishing
Specialist
12. Floor Covering
Consultant
13. Moving Company
Consultant
14. Color
Consultant
15. Management
Aide for Public
Housing
16. Custom Home
Furnishings
Seamstress
17. Homemaker
18. Household
Products
Technician
19. Drapery and
Upholstery
Estimator
20. Gift Wrap
Manager


1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1
1


21.
22.
25.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.

29.
SO.
31.


Carpenter
Nurseryman
Florist
Cabinetmaker
Furniture
Assembler
Gardener
Housemother
Mobile Home
Dealer
Craftsman
Painter
Maker and Seller
of Handmade Home
Craft Articles




CONCEPT I Occupational Opportunities and Requiremaents


I


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


OBJECT IVES


2. The students
will identify
different levels
of training or
education
necessary for
specific job
opportunities.


1. Discuss how information, knowledge and
skills gained in home economics classes
are helpful not only in a home situation,
but also in the world of work.
2. Become informed about positions which use
knowledge and skills in housing. Examples:
a. Salesperson in furniture department
b. Demonstrator of appliances
c. Drapery or slipcover seamstress
d. Housing and home furnishings teacher
e. Interior decorator
f. Housekeeper for a hotel, motel or
apartment building
g. Draftsman for an architect
h. Florist shop assistant
i. Interior decorator's assistant

5. Place each occupation on a strip of poster
paper. Attach these to a flannel board,
door or other large surface. Choose an
occupation and place it under one of these
headings according to preparation needed:
Appendix #4
a. High School
b. Vocational School
c. Junior College
d. Four Year College
e. Specialty Courses
f. Apprenticeship, Internship
g. On-the-job Training
4. Invite a resource person to present in-
formation about local institutions which
provide schooling for students.
5. Use the want ad section of a newspaper.
Select five jobs related to the housing
and home furnishings area. Illustrate
two of the five job advertisements that
were selected by drawing or by using
magazine pictures.











I


Guide*
Loven y's Enc clo edia of
focat onal Guidance, Vol. II,
pp. 29-$1

Poster Paper and Masking Tape



Appendix #4






Resource Persons:
1. Local Employment Officer
2. Possible Employer
3. Guidance Counselor
4. Occupational Specialist

Classified advertisements
from the Sunday newspapers,
scissors, magazines, crayons,
paper, newsprint, markers,
staplers


CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


The range of job opportunities available
to a person is limited by the kind and
level of his training and/or education.

Basic and general education and employ-
ment education are essential for an
individual to qualify for jobs today.

One's choice of vocation suggests the
amount of education or training he will
need.

Individuals may prepare for employment
opportunities in
1. General Education
2. Employment Education
a. High Schools
b. Vocational Schools
c. Technical Schools
d. Colleges
e. Special Courses
f. Adult Education
g. Apprenticeships
h. Internships
i. On-the-Job Training

Opportunities for employment are enhanced
through education and/or training.

In general, the more education or
training a person has the higher his/her
Income'

More jobs for the highly skilled worker |
and fewer job opportunities for the
unskilled worker have increased the
importance of acquiring training for a
job.





I


CUCPTII Tasks Common to Occupations in Housing, Home Furnishings,


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


OBJECTIVES


1. The students
will identify
and demonstrate
ability to
perform tasks in
the area of
housing and home
furnishings.


1. Use a transparency of the "Tools and Skills"
scramble gram. Divide the class into teams
to compete in finding hidden words. If a
team member identifies an already discovered
word his team forfeits its turn. Keep
score on the number of words found by each
team. The scramble gram can also be handed
out in mineographed form. Appendix #5

2. Incorporate the terms identified in the
above exercise to solve the following
problem. A bricklayer wishes to build a
10'x20' brick patio. Answer the following
questions that need to be answered before
the patio is started:
a. What are a brick's dimensions?
b. A square foot of brick paying contains
how many bricks?
c. How can bricks be arranged to form a
square as shown in Appendix #6? (leave
space for mortar)
d. How long are the sides of the square?
e. What is its area in square feett
f. How big would 4 sections of bricks be?
g. How many bricks are needed in f?
h. How many sections would be needed for
a 10'x20' patio?
i. How are they arranged for strength?
j. How many bricks will he need for a
10'z20' patio?

3. Research to find different kinds or sizes
and designs of brick. Either bring the
bricks to class or draw pictures of them.
4. Measure the difference between brick,
cinderblock, cement, stone, or tar seams
or openings. Discuss possible reasoning
for the differences in width.

5. Discuss reasons for substituting one of
the above building materials for another.
6. Invite a bricklayer to class as a resource
person to describe job tasks involved in
his occupation.





I


Appendix i95















Appendix #66
"How Does a Bricklayer
Plan His Work?"

(Idea taken from S.R.A.
Mdath Kit)
8 standard bricks,
4F boards 2" x 4C" x 18"
ruler, five reference cards


Morton, Geuther and Guthrie.


CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


Note to teacher: Discuss words found in
the scramble gram, Appendix #8






This exercise is a class introduction to
problem solving activities that will be
individually assigned to each student
during later class activities.

Any other general problem can be
developed as the teacher sees fit.


Understand the
words:
1. compare
2. compute
3. measure
4. design
5. assemble
6. supervise
7. ruler
8. tape
9. dray
10. study
11. research
12. analyze
13. 2-hole
14. 10-hole


meaning of the following


15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.


shoe
coloring
creased type
cost
availability
color
durability
aesthetic qualities
purpose


Building codes differ.Epasorais





(-OCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home


I


I __


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


OB JECT IVES


1. Take Housing Pretest. Appendix #7
2. Use a transparency of the "Values" scramble
gram. Divide the class into teams to compete
in finding hidden words. (They may also be
used as handout material.) A team must be
able to define the word before being allowed
to answer. Appendix #8


1. Divide into four groups and assign each
group one stage in the cycle. Each group
will discover the housing needs and problems
in its stage; what forms of housing are
used and why they are used. Each group will
make a list of occupations in housing and
home furnishings relating to each stage.
For example:
a. young couple small apartment good
because of economy, ease of upkeep,
little furniture required.
b. young couple mobile home economical,
pride in ownership, ease of upkeep,
furniture included, mobile and useful.
2. List on the board some of the different family
compositions that would affect housing, for
example:
a. age ranges
b. number in the family
3. Divide into groups of 3 or 4. Each group
will take a particular family composition.
Write short skits in which the special
housing needs in each case are presented.
Include a member of this occupational cluster:
realtor, broker, salesman, trailer salesman,
public housing personnel.
4. Use the chalk board to make a chart showing
the approximate amount families with different
incomes should spend for renting a house.
Use the standard guide of one fourth the
monthly income for housing.
5. Use the chalkboard. Make a chart showing the
approximate amount families with different
incomes should spend for buying a home. When
the chart is completed, use the brainstorming
technique to compile a list of variables that
might suggest more or less money for housing.


1. The students will
recognize words
associated with
values and
housing that he
will find useful
in making deci-
slons in later
life.

2. The students will
relate housing
needs to a
variety of
opportunities
available in
housing and home
furnishings
occupations.









Appendix #7
"Housing Pretest"
Appendix #8
"Values Scramble Gram"
Sherwood, Ruth F.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow,
pp. 419-430.
Morton, Geutherand Guthrie.
The Home Its Furnishings
and Equipment, pp. 31-51.
Raines, Margaret.
Consumers' Management,
pp. 199-198, 183-199.

Craig, Hazel T.
Homes with Character,
pp. 21-85.
Garrett, Fauline.
Consumer Housing,
pp. 200-230.
Reiff, Florence.
Steps in Home Living,
pp. 88-91.
Cassette Kit:
The Home, An Environment
for Human Growth.

Sherwood, Ruth P.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow.
pp. 97-69.

Craig Hazel T.
Homes with Character,
pp. $9-69.
Garrett, Pauline G.
Consumer Housing,
pp. 221-226.
Film:
House of Man Our Crowded
Environment (Part 2)
Faulkner and Faulkner.
Inside Today's Home,
pp. 18-53,


The structure of a family is a major
factor in the selection of a home.
The four stages of the family life cycle:
1. early years
2. crowded years
3. peak years
4. later years
















ECONOMIC FACTORS
The income of the family is a major
determinant in the housing a family
chooses.

A standard guide in determining the
amount to spend for housing is helpful
when making a decision.













9





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home


I


OBJECT IVES


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


6. Evaluate the list to select those variables
that might have the greatest influence.
For example:
a. A very small family could have fewer
expenses in other areas and might
afford more for housing.
b. A family with many members could have
large expenses in other areas and might
need to economics on some aspects of
their housing.
7. Invite resource people to come and talk to
the class concerning their occupations:
a. Lawyer
b. Social worker
c. Landlord
d. Real at

1. Collect abd define examples of the following
types of housing.
a. condominiums
b. 1, 1%, and 2 story houses
c. split-level houses
d. ranch style houses
e. shell houses
f. expensive custom-built houses
g. travel trailers
h. old houses (Victorian, Gothic)
i. campers
j. mobile homes (various sizes)
k. tract or development houses (Levittown)
1. duplex apartment houses
m. prefab houses
n. tents
o. ultramodern styles


3. The students
will identify
and describe
different kinds
of living spaces
and the occu-
pations involved
in their
selection.


10











I


Craig, Hazel T.
Homes with Character,
pp. 115-135
Garrett, Pauline G.
Consumer Housing,
pp. 8-14, 226-243.
Faulkner and Faulkner.
Inside Today's Home,
pp. 20-71.
Hatcher and Andrews.
Today's Home Living,
pp. 257-259.






Illustrations from Books
and Magazines






Film*
.
Home Sweet Mobile Home


CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


Each home is different. However, most
housing can be classified as one of
three major types: houses, apartments,
mobile homes.





Using illustrations, identify each type
of housing found.


As these living spaces are identified
and compared, have students also
distinguish how family goals affect
the choice of living space.

Certain societal changes are having a
great influence on shelter in America
today. For example:
1. population increases
2. population shifts
a. rural to urban
b. urban to suburban
c. suburban to urban
d. constant mobility
3. population changes
a. more young people
b. more older people







I


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


OBJECT IVES


2. Refer to the pictures of homes selected.
Go to the blackboard and list occupations
involved in the selection (purchase or
rental), upkeep, maintenance and repair,
or remodeling of living quarters.













1. Conduct a three minute debate on whether
to rent or buy. Consider these factors:
a. mobility of the family
b. investment capital available
c. the attitude toward upkeep and maintenance
work
d. interest on mortgage money
e. pride of ownership


4. The students will
investigate the
various methods
of securing
housing,
including reasons
each method might
be selected.





I


Extra Activities:
Students may do research into re-
lated occupations using references
similar to
Finding Your Job. Listed below are
sample occupations from Pinding Your Job.


Blackboard, Chalk, Erasers,
Magazines, Illustrations














.
Slides:
Finding Your Job


Morton, Guether and Guthrie.
The Home Its Furnishings
and Equipment,
99. 50-51, 72-97.
Sherwood, Ruth F.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow,
pp. 209-218, 399-416, 419-451.

Craig, Hazel T.
Homes with Character,


CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


Many occupational choices are influenced
by the goals of various persons when
choosing their homes. For example, a
maid would not be employed by a couple
living in a travel trailer. Some of the
occupations involved might be


7. painters


real estate agents
landlords
gardeners
landscapers
interior designers
carpenters


No. 8 Fainter's Helper
No. 2 Household Aide
No. 9 Roofer's Helper
No. 1 Awning Hanger's
Helper


Uni 1 l.V


There are other references.




The values of a family affect their
decisions in all areas of housing. A
family must decide what things theY
value most in order to make choices
pertaining to housing.
Values are established early but are
never static.

When buying a house, examine the
structural condition of the house*

The floor plan and construction of any
housing a family or individual is
considering must be evaluated in light
of family needs and values.






13






CUOCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home


I


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


OB JECT IVES


2. Develop a scorecard in class to evaluate
existing houses. Take a field trip for
experiences in actual evaluation. If field
trips are not possible, use carefully
selected pictures. Appendix #9

3. Go through the local phone directory yellow
pages listing different people who could
help in the following projects:
a. Enclosing a porch and converting it
to a family room
b. Landscaping an older home
c. Buying a ready-built home

4. Divide into groups. Give each group a family
situation. Decide whether the family should
rent, buy, build, or remodel. Reasons should
be given for choices made. Appendix #10

5. Draw a simple sketch of your house. If you
live in a two-story house, draw only the first
floor. Find the area of each room. What is
the total area? Locate the "house-for-sale"
section of a newspaper. Look for houses that
list both square feet and price. Find the
typical cost of a house per square foot. What
would you estimate the cost of your house to
be? What additional cost would there be if
there were another bedroom?

6. Divide into four teams named "Buy," "Rent,"
"Build," "Remodel." For each occupation
that can be related to a team name which the
members of that team select, the group will
receive one point. The team with the most
related occupations wins.

1. Divide into groups of two to five students.
Write words on the board. Hand out word
definitions to each group. Identify words
and give examples of their use on the job.
A team gains points by proper identification
as its turn comes.
2. Use mimeograph handouts or use overhead
projector. Compete in finding and identifying
words of Real Estate and Landscaping for a
scramble gram.


5. The students
will recognize
occupations and
considerations
necessary in the
selection and
purchase of
property.











I


Appendix #9
"Housing Scoreboard"


Sherwood, Ruth F.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow,
pp. 394-398.






Appendix #10
"Family Situations and
Methods of Securing
Housing"


Resource Persons:
1. Banker
2. Broker
3. Building Contractor
4. Lawyer
5. PHA Representative
6. VA Representative


Appendix #11
"Comparison Chart"

Resource Persons:
1. Lawyer
2. Realtor
5. County Clerk
4. Registrar of Deeds
5. Banker

Morton, Geuther, Guthrie.
The Home Its Furnishings
and E uipment'
'
Raines, Margaret.
Consumers' Management,
pp. 170-173.
Sherwood, Ruth F.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow,
pp. 150-152, 407-410.


CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


See sample scorecard in Appendix #9.
Students should be able to develop a
fairly good one themselves.

The project in Activity #5 will vary
according to the size of the directory.
Include as many related occupations as
possible.





The following are questions which the
students should be able to answer after
doing Activity #5:
1. How does a builder make the first
estimate of the price of a new home?
2. How does he plan a house to sell for
a certain price?
5. How does an appraiser decide on the
value of a house?
















For activity #6 review the occupations
previously listed. The team that wins
can be awarded some special prize
or privilege.





CUNCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home


I


___ll______C____I__I


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


OB JECT IVES


5. Look at the title on the bulletin board,
"Who's Who in Housing." Discuss professionals
who may be of service to families looking
for housing. Examples:
a. lawyer
b. real estate broker
c. architect
4. Prepare strips of paper listing three or
four of the services rendered by each person.
Briefly discuss each item as it is mounted
on the board under the appropriate picture.

1. Work alone or in small groups. The drawing
given you illustrates a plot of land which
will become a housing project. To prepare
the land for sale, the subdivided separates
it into lots. Using scale, divide the land
into one acre plots. A lot must have one
side along the street and be shaped so that
a house may be built on it. How many lots
are possible? How many square feet is each?
Appendix #12
2. A plot of land this size may cost $40,000 -
$60,000. It costs $2,000 per lot to put
in water lines, sewers, and to pave the
street. What would a subdivided charge for
the lots to make a 50 percent profit on the
resale of this property?
3. Using fifty words or less write a newspaper
ad for the sale of a piece of property.
Include a picture or drawing.
4. Explore the math-engineering skills required
for various jobs related to this activity.
How much education is necessary?


6. The students
will become
involved in an
activity of land
developing and
manipulate
measurements to
meet stated
requirements.





I


Appendix #12
"Land Division Project"





Resource Persons:
1. Realtor
2. Math Teacher
3. Building Contractor







Newspapers
Magazines
Scissors


Hopke, William E. (ed.).
Enc clo edia of Careers
7 P s
and Vocational Guidance,


vol. 1 and 901. 11.


CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


There are certain professional services
available to the individual or family
buying a home.





See Appendix #12 for Activity #1.
















Jobs to aid in Activity #3:
1. Architect
2. Civil Engineer
3. Designer
4. Surveyor
5. Draftsman
6. Land Developer


17





cONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home


1. Use a large map of the local community or
county. Locate government buildings, local
institutions and stores. Identify the
different areas on the map. Discuss needed
facilities. Decide which zones are in the
community.


2. Identify specific problem areas such as
a. garbage dumps
b. drainage ditches
c. Quiet zones

3. Discuss better use or improvement of each
problem. Invite a county commissioner in
to discuss the problems involved in reaching
satisfactory solutions to the above problems.


4. Divide into groups to plan a city. Zone
specific areas. Include shopping centers,
churches, schools, residential and recrea-
tional areas. Keep in mind traffic congestion,
noise, pollution, incoming routes. Decide
what to look for in selecting individual
homes. Discuss reasons offered by class
members.





5. Select a house and complete the house
evaluation form. Appendix #13


7. The students
will evaluate
communities and
select zoning
for property.





Newsprint or large sheets of
paper Rulers Paint, Crayons,
Yellow Pages of Phone Book


Resource Persons:
1, Realtors for County
2. Policemen
3. Councilmen


Morton, Geuther and Guthrie.
The Home Its Furnishings
and Equipment, Chap. 3.

Craig, Hazel T.
Homes With Character,
chap. 8.

Resource Persons:
1. City Planner
2. Zoning Official
3. Local Business Person







Appendix #13
"House Evaluation"

Sherwood, Ruth F.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow,
Chap. 2.

Craig, Hazel T.
Homes with Character,
ihap. 3.


CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


Locate for Activity #1


the following:
police station
fire station
law firms
banks
industries
agricultural
areas


major roads
railroads
grocery stores
clothing stores
post office
court house
schools


8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.


Sites, available services and zoning
laws are important factors to consider
when buying a house.















1. Available services
2. Police and Fire Protection
3. Schools and Churches
4. Transportation Facilities
5. Shopping Areas
6. Utilities
7. Mail Delivery
8. Pest Control
9. Zoning
10. Plot Being Considered
11. Adjacent Plots
12. general Area





CUCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home
Furnishings, Equipment, and Service Occupations.
SUB-CONCEPT


OB JECT IVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


8. The students will 1. Use the bulletin board and explain reasons
work on problems for landscaping. Discuss types of plants.
and solutions in Appendix #14
landscaping.
2. Use overlays in the appendix to show the
differences in house appearances.

3. Name the components of the surroundings of
the home to develop an understanding of what
is included in landscaping such as: lawns,
walkways, drives and shrubs. Point out
that landscaping is a means of fitting the
house to its environment to achieve harmony
and unity.
4. Conduct a round table discussion on how
landscaping can contribute to
a. increased value of property.
b. additional privacy.
c. increased living space for family
activities.

5. Use an opaque projector. Show pictures of
a yard before and after landscaping to
illustrate what possibilities exist. Consult
books, magazines and newspapers to discover
the advantages of landscaping a house.
6. Identify yard areas and their uses. List
the activities that go on in the yard and
categorize areas of activity:
a. public the area directly visible from
the street or road
b. private the area for the outdoor use
of the family
c. service the area including the kitchen
entrance, garage, clothesline and
garbage containers. On the farm include
barns and other buildings.

7. Show examples of small lots to illustrate that
it is possible to plan a landscape to fit the
space available. Pictures may be shown on
opaque projector.
8. Make a sketch of a house and yard and locate
the public, private and service areas.
9. View transparencies. Appendix #15, "Land-
scaping Homestead," I, II, III.
LO.-Use Appendix #16, "Student Landscape Project"
to sketch the landscaping suitable for that
house. Discuss each other's drawings.
Ll. Plan and paint group terrariums. Appendix #17
20





CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


Evergreen Ground Cover
Deciduous Ground Cover
Perennial Ground Cover
Trees
Shrubs
Fences
Stones
Chip Fillers


Morton, Geuther and Guthrie.
The Home Its Furnishings
and Equipment, pp. 199-150.

Appendix #14
Bulletin Board
"How Does Your
Landscape Grow?"

Sherwood, Ruth F.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow,
pp. 396 & 4/3.


Housing Magazines

Faulkner and Faulkner.
Inside Today's Home,
pp. 537-545.











Appendix #15
Transparencies
"Landscaping Homestead,
Parts I, II, III."

Appendix #16
"Student Landscape Project"

Appendix #17
"Planning and Flanting
a Terrarium."





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home


I


2. Discuss and show pictures or slides depicting
how people have been and are housed, for
example:
a. in the past caves, cliffs, castles
with moats and drawbridges
b. in early American period dugouts,
lean-to's, log cabins, salt box with
front overhang for defense, houses with
Southern porches for climatic reasons
c. in other places around the world -
igloos, sampans, tents, pagodas, grass
huts. Appendix #18

3. Match the following building materials with
the country in which they are widely used:
1) Ice a. Arabia (Desert)
2) Brick b. Japan
5) Adobe c. Africa (Jungle)
4) Skins d. Alaska
5) Paper e. Germany
6) Grass f. Mexico
4. Discuss possible job opportunities related
to all housing styles pictured. Discuss how
these jobs have become more or less technical
or complicated through the years as different
styles have been developed.

5. View film, A Is for Architecture.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


OBJECT IVES


I1.


Collect pictures that showexeireaus


9. The students
will demonstrate
an understanding
of changing job
opportunities
and necessary
skills to meet
modern architec-
tural styles.





I


Greer and Gibson.




House Types

Waugh, Alice.
House Design.


Appendix #18
Bulletin Board
"Early Housing in America"











Film:
A is for Architecture


CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


From earliest times certain
environmental conditions have influenced
shelter choices. These are
1. culture.
2. climate.
3. building materials.

Many of the styles of the past have been
adapted to present day use in order to
add interest and a certain mood to
homes.

Use the opaque or overhead projector to
show pictures or transparencies of
trends and characteristics of arch-
itecture:
1. Southern Colonial
2. Northern Colonial
3. Dutch Golonial
4. Salt Box
5. Cape Cod
6. English Half-Timber
7. Georgian
8. Federal
9. Victoria
10. Adobe
11. Monterey
12. Banch
15. Organic (Falling Waters by Lloyd
Wright)
14. Homes built inside protective walls
or forts


15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.


Cave Dwellings *
Cliff Dwellings
Dugouts
Castles with Moats and Drawbridges
Log Cabins
Igloos
Sampans
Tents
High Rise Apartments
Condominiums
Tenements
Mobile Homes


23





CUCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home
SUB-CONCEPT Furnishings, Equipment, and Service Occupations.


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


10. The students 1. Examine a handout of a floor plan.
will study and
evaluate floor 2. Use grease pencils to identify each area:
plans in rela- a. rest
tion to certain b. storage
occupations. c. work
d. recreation
e. entertainment

3. Discuss how well these areas are grouped and
how they relate to each other.

4. Use the hanouts or transparencies in the
Appendix. Evaluate them in reference to
a. reception of visitors and entertaining.
b. family recreation and hobbies.
c. study and meditation.
d. rest and sleep.
e. food preparation, serving meals, washing
dishes, laundering, and storing of
household cleaning supplies.
f. guests.
g. family dining
h. bathing and dressing
i. storage space.

5. Use colored pencils or crayons. Draw in
traffic lanes on floor plan. Evaluate to
see if the traffic pattern provides for both
circulation and privacy by
a. going between zones and not through them.
b. having doors close together and near
corners to save steps and allowing for
furniture arrangement.
c. providing entrances that distribute
traffic to all areas.
d. locating bathroom doors to provide
privacy.
6. Collect various floor plans from newspapers
and magazines. Evaluate them according to
the above experiences.

7. Make a chart from poster paper and a floor
plan. Around the plan glue or write job
titles of people in occupations that need to
know how to evaluate floor plans.

8. Pretend to be engaged in one of the above
occupations. Using a case study, evaluate
the problem according to that occupation.










CONTENTREOCS


Grease Pencils or colored
Pencils or re1t-tip markers

Morton, Geuther, authrie.
The Home Its Furnishings
and Equipment.

Hatcher and Andrews.
Today's Home Living,
pp. 277-289.
Ehrenkrans and Inman.
Equipment in the Home,
pp. 116-145.
Faulkner and Faulkner.
Inside Today's Home,
pp. 391-425,

Sherwood, Ruth F.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow,
pp. 195-306.

Newspapers, Magazines,
Scissors










Sherwook, Ruth F.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow,
p. 21.


CONCEPT


Adequate housing for an individual or
family must meet certain space require-
ments in some form.

Floor plans that are well designed have
short, direct traffic lanes that do not
cut through the main part of the rooms.



















Many occupations require a knowledge of
floor plans and their evaluations. The
following occupations might be included:
1. carpentry
2. interior designing
3. housekeeping
4. homemaking
5. carpet laying
6. construction work
7. electrical work
8. floor covering
9. estimating
10. kitchen planning

bee Homes: Toda and Tomorrow for a
sample case stu 7.





cDCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home
Furnishings, Equipment, and Service Occupations.
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES

11. The students 1. Bring pictures to class of rooms with fur-
will study, niture that might have been selected by the
demonstrate following family members:
skills, and a. outdoor type e. economy minded
evaluate fur- b. wealthy f. intellectual
nature arrange- c. sports minded g. artistic
ment in relation d. mobile h. socially oriented
to occupations. Give your preference from the collection.
2. Collect and evaluate furniture ads as to
value to the consumer. Try to discriminate
between accurate information and the emotional
appeal and general claims made by the adver-
tiser. What persons would have to be able to
evaluate adequately advertisements in order
to perform their job well? (interior
designers, upholsters, etc.)
3. View the transparency on basic furniture
joints. Discuss the durability features.
What persons would have to understand all
about furniture joints to perform their job
adequately? (furniture refinishers and
designers, interior designers) Appendix #19
4. Illustrate on a chalkboard the relationship
of income to expenditure for house furnishings.
Use the recommended guide of one fourth the
value of the house.
(Value of the home $12,000 furnishings 95,000.
5. View a film on furniture buying to give a
background on amounts and pieces of furniture
to buy as basics. Use a specified budget
(such as $2,000) within which to choose and
select furniture for a young couple moving
into a new apartment with no furniture. Use
ads, magazines, catalogues and other available
resources. Find examples and list the costs
for the furniture they will buy. Include the
reasons for the choices.
6. As the above activities are completed, discuss
occupations in which knowledge and skills
learned in each would be useful.








CONTENTREOCS


Pepis, Betty.
Interior Decoration A to Z.

Sherwood, Ruth F.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow,
pp. 303-310.
Morton, Geuther, Guthrie.
The Home Its Furnishings
and Equipment,


Craig, Hazel T.
Homes with Character,
pp. 197-161, 279-289,
399-417.
Greer and Gibbs.
Your Home and You,
pp. 408-411.

Appendix #19


Filmstrips:
1. Decorating Made Easy

2. Basic Furniture for
Newlyweds
3. How to Select Furniture


CONCEPT


The personal considerations of furniture
selection are those that relate to
individuals and their families.

The total effect of the furniture
selected usually reflects the family
interests and pattern of living.

Labels provide the information needed to
guide the consumer in the selection of
furniture.

Furniture must be pleasing in design as
well as of quality construction to be
acceptable.
Write to furniture companies to obtain
booklets. Check with the local
furniture stores.


In furniture the type of joints used
affects the quality of the furniture.
Some different types of joints are as
follows:
1. butt
2. mitered
5. dovetail
4. mortise and tenon
5. dowel



Furniture reflects the personality of the
family that uses it and represents a
large investment. Therefore, it is well
to plan the pieces that will be purchas-
ed and to compare values in order to get
the best buy in terms of money and needs.

The portion of income available for
furnishings influences the kind of
furniture to be purchased.


27





CUCEPT ill Exploratory Experiences Melating to Housing, home
SUB-CONCEPT Murnishings, Equipment, and service Occupations.


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES

7. Use the opaque projector to show a group
of non-sequential pictures of traditional,
provincial and contemporary furniture styles.
Categorize the pictures into three groups.
Analyze each group to determine the common
characteristics as
a. Traditional
usually rich in appearance
sometimes very elaborate or
ornamental in design
graceful
b. Provincial
rustic
simplified
less ornamental
c. Contemporary
simple
functional
multiple purpose
8. Show pictures of rooms where furniture of
different styles has been successfully
combined. Examples:
a. styles within the same category
(Queen Anne and Chlffendale in
traditional)
b. styles of different categories
(contemporary with Shaker) (straight
modern with Jacobean) (curved modern
with curved traditional, as Queen Anne.)

9. List furniture and furnishings desirable for
each of the activities listed below:
a. viewing television
b. reading
c. studying
d. entertaining friends
e. conversing
f. listening to records
10. Refer to the bulletin board and determine
activities for each of the above settings.
11. Use the opaque projector. Show illustrations
of identical rooms with different arrangements
of furniture to point out that arrangement
can provide or eliminate additional floor
space.
12. Use flannel board to demonstrate and discuss
different arrangements.









CONTENTREOCS


Pamphlet:


CONCEPT


Since present-day furniture has been
influenced by the past, a brief study of
period styles of furniture provides a
basis for identifying and understanding
personal preferences.
Furniture styles usually fit into three
main categories:
1. traditional--products of important
historic periods
2. provincial--simplifies adaptations
of traditional styles
3. contemporary--recent designs

Various furniture styles can be combined
successfully, even though they may be of
different styles or periods, if careful
consideration is given to such things as
the following:
1. elements of design
2. principles of design
3. upholstery and fabric
4. formality and informality
5. wood finishes
6. paint finishes
Related occupations:
1. Furniture designing
2. Interior designing

The proper arrangement of furniture must
follow certain definite principles if the
result is to provide beauty, comfort
and convenience.

For maximum effectiveness, furniture
should be grouped according to use,
activities served, and the general mood
of the room.

The first step in making a successful
workable plan for furniture arrangement
is to draw to scale on paper the room to
be arranged. This gives opportunity for
experimenting in arrangements.
The structural features of a room are
very often a determining factor in the
arrangement of furniture groups as they
are ready-made centers of interest.


Magazines,


Books, Scissors


Bulletin Board
"Where the Action Is"
(Display pictures of
settings for various
activities, such as a
chair and lamp; a study
area; a television room)
Flannel Board:
(Cover a large piece of
cardboard with flannel
(such as a light-weight
blanket) and mark off the
flannel into one inch
squares. Cut strips to
serve as walls (black
flannel) and shapes for
furniture (another color).
These can be used to form
any floor plan.
Bulletin Board:
"Don't Be a Square"




























14. Name features that may be used as centers of
interest. These may also include items that
are not related to the structure of the house,
such as bookshelves, pictures, pieces of
furniture or displays.
15. Use the bulletin board to identify the
centers of interest shown.
16. Draw several room shapes on the chalkboard.
Place entrances to the rooms at different
locations. Draw lines connecting the doors
in each room to show the paths that will be
taken. Discuss which are poorly planned
and why.
17. Use furniture cutouts for furniture arrange-
ments. Use a floor plan for furniture ar-
rangement, traffic pattern and a description
of activities for each room. Examine the
traffic patterns in the floor plan and list
the problems that may be encountered as a
result of the placement of the doors.
18. Complete the case study on furnishing a
room with a given budget. List the people
who would need to know how to furnish a
room on that budget.
19. Complete the Post Test on buying Furniture.
Appendix #20


CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to H~ousing, Home


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


OBJECT IVES


13.


Draw three rooms on the chalkboard --
square, rectangular, L-shaped. Divide into
three groups. Assign one of the rooms to
each group to determine advantages and dis-
advantages pertaining to furniture arrange-
ment. Decide which shapes are the most
suitable for the various rooms of the house.
Examples:


a. square rooms present problems in fur-
niture arrangements and are usually
best suited for dining rooms and bed-
rooms.
b. rectangular rooms with 1x1% relation-
ship (10'x15') allow for ease in
arrangements and are suitable for most
rooms.
c. L-shaped rooms are best suited for
multiple purpose rooms.





The mext major consideration is the
planning for the arrangement of furniture
in the space within the room to best
provide for comfort, convenience, safety,
an:1 beauty. Consider the following:
1. traffic patterns
2. size of furniture groupings
3. open spaces between groupings


In the actual spacing of furniture on
the floor plan, placement of large
pieces should be determined first and
the smaller pieces added.

Use suggested case study in Homes:
Today and Tomorrow or develop other
related case studies.


Sherwood, Ruth F.


CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


Appendix #20





cONCEPTIII Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home


1. Collect and share pictures and ideas for
different kinds of storage facilities.
2. Study the storage space at home and make
suggestions for improvement. Try to
implement them. Examples:
a. Arrange a closet or cleaning center
for cleaning supplies.
b. Improve a closet by adding rods,
shelves, shoe-bags.
c. Arrange belongings attractively and
conveniently in your own room.
3. Design and/or construct simple, inexpensive
storage spaces:. Examples:
a. Book shelves from bricks and boards
b. Covered shoe boxes with contact paper
c. Toy chest from large box
4. Plan storage space for toys and books for
a young child.
5. Choose and plan efficient storage spaces
and list articles to be stored for one of
the following persons:
a. Florist's workroom 9'x6'
b. Reupholster's workroom 20' wall
c. Housekeeper's utility closet 4'x5'
d. Interior designer's work area in
9'x12' room
6. On a poster board on which there is a floor
plan, identify all of the possible types of
storage space. Use colored yarn to color
code and outline various living areas (rest,
recreation, work).
7. Prepare a display of articles or pictures
showing the results of improper storage.
Examples:
a. yellowed white garment
b. moth eaten garment
c. crushed article
d. valuable papers or books eaten by
silver-fish
e. mildewed article
f. garment rusted by wire hanger
g. sunfaded article


12. The students
will plan
adequate storage
space for
housing related
occupational
work areas.





I


Morton, Geuther and Guthrie.
The Home Its Furnishings
and Equipment,
pp. 98-114.
Reiff, Florence M.
Steps in Home Living,
pp. 292-303.
Raines, Margaret.
Consumer Management,
pp. 178-180.
Reiff, Florence M.
Steps in Home Living,
pp. 88-90.


Filmstrip:
New Room in Your Kitchen


CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


There are many kinds of storage spaces
possible for the home and related job
locations. Many things can be stored
and organized efficiently with careful
planning. Don't forget to include the
many storage problems found in the
kitchen*















Many situations may be developed to
plan storage.
Related occupations:
1. Carpentry
2. Plumbing
3. Architectural designing


There are numerous places in the home
in which storage can be located such as
the kitchen, laundry, family room,
living and dining room


Graph Paper






Poster Board
Colored Yarn
Glue
Scissors
Magic Markers





cONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home


I


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


OB JECT IVES


1. Introduce the elements of design. Explain
their meaning. Write them on the board.
2. Exhibit selected pictures and identify the
most outstanding elements used in each
picture.
3. Select pictures from magazines to show
these elements of design.
4. Explain that elements are tools used by
the decorator and principles are rules used
by the decorator. Show pictures of these.
5. Construct a "fun-test." Submit a picture
displaying one or more principles. Mount
and number the pictures. Decide with a
partner which principles are represented.
Discuss the decisions.



1. Color room drawings and place the finished
pictures on the bulletin board.
2. Discuss the feelings reflected in various
rooms. (restful, bright, relaxing,
depressing, sunny, happy.)

3. Discuss the color wheel in terms of room
color and accents. Brainstorm for a list
of possible origins of a room's color
scheme. Some suggestions are
a. picture.
b. couch
c. favorite color
d. patterned wall paper
e. draperies
f. natural scene from nature
g. various color harmonies
4. Identify activities of a color consultant,
cloth salesman, carpet and drapery clerk,
or interior designer. How do they help a
client select what he needs?


13. The students
will be intro-
duced to the
elements and
principles of
design.













14. The students
will select
colors for room
decorating and
manipulate color
for changes in
mood.





Sherwood, Ruth F.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow,
pp. 224-299.
Morton, Guether and Guthrie.
The Home Its Furnishings
and Equipment,
pp. 164-201.

Craig, Hazel T.
Homes with Character,
pp. 187-219.


Magazines, Scissors,
Construction Paper




Craig, Hazel T.
Homes with Character,
Chap. 12.


Morton, Guether and Guthrie.
The Home Its Furnishings

andapEquipment,
Sherwood Ruth F.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow,
PP. 237-259.

Pepis Betty.
Interior Decoration from A
to Z.

Faulkner and Faulkner.
Inside Today's Home.


CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


Tools for Designers:
1. Space
2. Line
3. Form
4. Texture
5. Color
Use magazine pictures mounted on
construction paper.

6. Proportion
7. Balance
8. Scale
9. Rhythm
10. Emphasis







Color is an important factor in a room.
It affects the mood and the apparent
size of the room.

Color can be used to modify the
psychological effect of a north, south,
east or west exposure.

Warm colors make a room appear smaller,
sunny and bright.
Cool colors make a room appear larger'
calm and restful.

Color schemes are chosen for different
reasons:
1. Family interests
2. Style of home
3. Family style of living
4. Activities in the home
5. Sunlight in the home
6. Family income


Waugh, Alice.





cONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Bome


I


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


OBJECTIVES


1. choose a room. Identify the background
areas of that room.
2. Use the blackboard. List a variety of
floor coverings. Group them as follows:
a. soft textured
1) rugs
2) carpets
5) cushioned vinyl
4) linoleum
b. hard textured
1) concrete
2) stone
3) wood
3. Divide class members into a "soft" team
and a "hard" team. Each team member will
report to his team captain one occupation
related to soft floor covering or hard
floor covering depending on his team. The
team that has the largest job varieties with
the most complete descriptions wins.
4. Use the chalkboard. List and discuss some
factors to consider when selecting floor
covering. Examples:
a. durability
b. ease and cost of maintenance
c. resiliency
d. insulating effect
e. light reflected
f. beauty
g. acoustics
5. Display samples and discuss the merits and
uses of various carpets, linoleum, and
tiles, versus wood, stone, or terrazo flooring.

1. Use the blackboard or a transparency. List
the structural finishes of walls, such as:
a. plaster f. concrete block
b. tile g. glass brick
c. brick b. wallboard
d. wood i. stone'
e. vinyl J. paper
k. decorative concrete
2. List all the various wall coverings used
in students' homes.


15. The students
will identify
floor coverings
and investigate
the occupational
opportunities
connected with
these products.

























16. The students
will investigate
the various
skills and job
opportunities
in the area of
wall coverings.





I


Craig, Hazel TP.






a Equipment i h oe


pp. 182-192, 1822


pp 416-4c17.


Raines, Margaret.
Consumers' Management,
pp. 96-102.
Reiff, Florence M.
Steps in Home Living,
pp. 84-86.


Hopke, William E. (ed.).




Lovejoy's Career &
Vocational Guide.

Transparency:
Floor Coverings: TPheir
Selection and Care.

Pepis, Betty.
interior Decoration


CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


The background areas in a room are the
floors, walls and openings.

Flooring materials are basically
either soft or hard.









Examples for the "Hard" Team:
1. concrete mixer
2. concrete pourer
3. terrazzo mixer
4. carpenter

Extra Activities: Students may do
research into jobs finding out what to
expect and what duties they would be
expected to do. Use various references,
A good reference is Finding Your Job:
Unit 4 A Vol. I, No. 1
Rug and Carpet Cleaner's Assistant

Unit 1 A Vol. 5, No. 6
Carpet Layer's Helper

Unit 7 Z Vol. 5, No. 4
Rug Braider

Other similar references may be used.


There are many occupational
opportunities available in the area of
wall coverings*

The decorator has a variety of
structural and decorative choices for
wall treatments; so there are a variety
of jobs involved in these choices.


Filmstrip:


New Carpet





CUCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home
sus-cONCEPT Purnishings, Equipment, and Service Occupations.


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


5. Discuss the training and skills involved in
each occupation. Resource persons involved
in the above occupations may be used.

4. Display samples of wallpaper, paint and
wall paneling.

5. List on the chalkboard some of the ways in
which the wall treatment can alter a room:
a. suggesting formality or informality
b. making it appear closed or open
c. emphasizing vertical or horizontal
lines
d. making it appear active or passive
e. reflecting or absorbing light
f. causing furniture to recede or advance
g. reflecting or absorbing sound
h. providing insulation against cold or
heat
6. Secure a large piece of cardboard and
wallpaper with a design that must be
matched. As a demonstration, make wall-
paper paste. Apply a piece of wallpaper
to the cardboard. Emphasize smoothing,
perfectly matching and seaming, importance
of correct amount of paste, and accurate
measuring.









CONTENTRESOURCES


Booklets:


Howto elet Pintand


CONCEPT


A large cardboard carton serves well as
a wall to be papered. Enough inexpen-
sive wallpaper should be secured to
give each student enough wallpaper in
one sheet to measure 1 square foot plus
extra for trimming and matching
purposes.


Large box
Wallpaper
Paste
Rulers
Pencils
Brushes






SU-CNCEPT Frihns qimnadSrieOcptos


1. Illustrate the factors to consider when
choosing textiles for a home. For example:
a. style of furnishings
b. activity or purpose
c. climate
d. personal preference
e. temperature desired
f. durability
g. cost
h. care
j. pattern
2. Write names of occupations on small slips
of paper and place in a fish bowl or other
container. Draw a slip and give reasons why
one would need to know about fabrics used
in the home and the skills needed in using
these fabrics.

3. Show samples of fabrics used in the home,
such as drapery and curtain materials, rug
and carpet squares, upholstery materials.
Discuss and practice manual skills such as
sewing, pinning, and tacking, that might
relate to each fabric.

4. List the various activities involved in
a drapery construction and the related
occupations involved.


17. The students
will describe
occupations and
investigate
skills related
to occupations
involving the
selection of
textiles for the
home.








1


I


Morton, Geuther and Guthrie.
The Home Its Furnishings
and Equipment,
pp. 276-288.

Bergen, John.
All about Upholstering,
pp. 131-152, 169.


CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


The style of furniture will affect the
fabrics chosen. For example, widewale
curduroy upholstery and burlap draperies
would not be appropriate in a Victorian
period room. Silk as an upholstery fabri
would not be used in a family room where
a sofa would receive much wear. If a
family lives in a warm climate, heavy,
thick fabrics probably would not be used
extensively in decorating. Other factors
to be considered (personal, preference
atmosphere desired, durability cost '
care and pattern) may be discussed. '

In choosing textiles for a home, one
should remember that no more than one-
third of a room should be patterned.
Plain areas set off patterned areas.
Patterned fabrics must be scaled to the
size of the room and furniture.


Filmstrip:


Some occupations related to the
selection, use, and care of fabrics
the home are as follows.
1. housekeeping
2. being a housemother
5. upholstering
4. reupholstering
5. carpet laying
6. fabric designing
7. furniture designing
8. carpet manufacturing
9. researching
10. being a drapery consultant
11. being a color consultant
12. being a sales clerk
13. slip covering
14. interior designing
15. fabric finishing


for


Pins, Needles, Tacks, Hammer


Skills needed might include knowledge of
special fabric finishes, care and clean-
ing techniques, quality, durability,
special sewing techniques, and relation-
ship of fabrics to other parts of the
room.





(:ON:EPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home


18. The students
will discuss
and explore the
job opportuni-
ties, knowledge,
and skills
needed for .
occupations in
the area of
windows and
window treatment


1. Use a blackboard or flannel board to display
the first letters of the 5 basic functions
of windows. Through class discussion supply
the rest:
a. beauty
b. light
c. ventilation
d. view
e. privacy
2. Discuss the factors that may influence
window treatments.

3. View transparencies depicting types of
windows as an introduction. Define each
type. Find magazine illustrations of the
following terms pertaining to windows:


a. Design
1) dormer
2) bay
5) clerestory
4) picture
5) window wall


b. Construction
1) double hung
2) casement
3) fixed
4) jalousie
5) awing


4. Show film, filastrip, and/or transparencies
and discuss window treatment. Consider
rules, such as:
a. Window treatment may be three lengths:
1) sill
2) apron
3) floor
b. Groups of windows or corner windows
are treated as one window.
c. Window treatment may be used as accented
or part of the background.
d. Well-proportioned windows may be
accented or emphasized.
e. Poorly proportioned windows may be
camouflaged and used as background.
5. Complete a project in windows and window
treatments. For example, draw or make
cardboard window or doorway (20. tall);
then design and construct suitable drapery.





--* I


Transparencies:


Oraig, Hazel T.
Homes with Character,
pp. 240-253, 460-461.
Morton, Geuther and Guthrie.
The Home Its Furnishings
and E ui ment,


Hatcher and Andrews.
Guide for Today's Home
Living,
pp. 267-272.


Greer and Gibbs.
Your Home and You.
pp. 413-415.
Garrett, Pauline G.
Consumer Housing,
pp. 102-109.


Sherwood, Ruth F.






Howm to elect W~u~ B~indow.r


BeauLtifu]l


CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


Windows may serve several functions.

They can be categorized according to
design and construction.

Knowledge of the rules of window treat-
ment makes decorating easier.

Window treatment is influenced by the
following:
1. type
2. placement
5. number and size of windows
4. style of room
5. privacy
6 v wt (amount and direction)





CDCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home
Furnishings, Equipment, and Service Occupations.
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


19. The students 1. Define the term accessories and list or
will explore display examples.
the occupations
made available 2. Classify thb list of accessories according
from the use of to use:
accessories in a. decorative
the home. b. functional
c. combination of decorative and functional

3. Locate an accessory, or picture of an
accessory and classify according to use.
Defend according to the art principles.

4. Show pictures of rooms that illustrate the
following impressions:
a. cluttered from too many accessories
b. impersonal, bare because of too few
accessories
c. beauty and individuality
d. ordinary room made more interesting

5. Complete a project of making one (or as
many as time allows) accessory for the
home. Projects that could be included
are
a. wastebaskets from round chicken or
ice cream buckets.
b. lampshades from plain white ones.
c. pillow scraps of materials.
d. accent rug hook a rug, etc.
e. lamp base from figurine, vase,
bottle, etc.
f. painting original art work.
g. picture frames.
h. candles can use old stubs and crayons.
i. artificial flower arrangement -
renovate old artificial flowers.
j. appliqued pillows, curtains, etc.
k. wall hangings egg mosiacs, seed
pictures, etc.








1


I


Craig, Hazel TP.
Homes with Character,


Greer and Gibbs.


Garrett, Pauline G.
Consumer Housing,
pp. 110-119.

Pepis, Betty.
Interior Decoration A to Z

Comstock, Nanina.
The McCalls Book of Handcrafts.


CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


Small accessories can add beauty and
individuality to a room.

Accessories may be functional and/or
decorative.

Functional accessories should fulfill
their intended use as well as be
aesthetically pleasing.

Accessories may give different
impressions in a room.
The many types of accessories involve
several job opportunities. Some are as
follows:
1. flower arranging (florist)
2. candle making
3. working with pottery
4. making ceramics
5. working in a factory
6. making custom-made furnishings
7. framing pictures
8. doing art work
9. photography
10. designing and/or decorating lamps
11. designing and/or making accent rugs
12. being a salesperson
13. doing applique work
14. being a seamstress


Magazine Illustrations


materials for projects:
Yarn
Glue
Scissors
Tissue Paper
Construction Paper
Felt
Seeds
Egg Shells
Crayons
Magic Markers
Old Artificial Flowers
Old Vases
Scraps of Material





CUNCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home


I


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


OBJECT IVES


20. The students
will identify
energy sources
in the home,
and relate them
to job opportu-
nities.


















21. The students
will list major
appliances in
the home and
compare differ-
ences in similar
products. They
will demonstrate
efficiency in
arrangement.


1. List on the board or flip chart the numerous
appliances in the home today and the variety
in power since their first use. (List jobs
rarely found today.)







2. List jobs on the board that are now found,
such as electrician, repairman, mechanic,
drycleaner, gasman. Discuss type of training
required for each.





3. Discuss pollution and ecology in relation
to the power source.



1. Collect pictures of major appliances. Expound
on reasons why a person should buy his brand
rather than another person's brand. (Class
debate could be used)

2. Discuss arrangement of major appliances.
Walk out the activity between stove, refrig-
erator, and sink in L-shaped, wall, U-shaped,
and island kitchens.


3. Take sheets of paper and tape to desks to
represent work areas. Try cooking carrots
for example.



4. Discuss WORK TRIANGLE.










CONTENTREOCS


Ehrenkranz and Inman,
Equipment in the Home.














Morton Geuther and Guthrie.
The Home Its Furnishin a
and Equipment,
Chapters 18 & 20.

Craig, Hazel T.
Homes with Character,
Chap. 10, pp. 114-119.
Sherwood, Ruth F.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow,
pp. 106-121, 535-347,
357-360, 584-585.






Morton, Geuther and Guthrie.
The Home Its Furnishings
and Equipment,
Chapters 18 & 20, pp. 107-114.

Craig, Hazel T.
Homes with Character,
Chap. 10, pp. 114-149.
Sherwood, Ruth F.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow,
pp. 106-121, 635-347,
557-560, 384-385.


CONCEPT


1. electric range or electronic oven -
wood stove
2. refrigerator well house, ice box,
spring
3. modern plumbing, modern bath rooms -
chamber pots, outdoor toilets, wells
or cisterns for water
4. air-conditioning fans, open windows
5. electric blankets heavy quilts and
warming pans
6. electric washers tubs and scrub
boards
7. electric dryers clothes lines
8. television and radio town crier
9. automobiles horses, wagons,
buggies


Use of coal nuclear reactors, natural
gas bottled gas, fuel oil






Customer Service
Home Delivery
Service Calls
Features of Product






Count Your Steps:
1. Remove carrots from refrigerator
2. Rinse at sink
3. Get pan from storage
4. Go to sink for water
5. Put water on range
6. Scrape and dice carrots at sink
7. Go to range to cook carrots
8. Get salt and pepper and seasoning
for carrots




!'OCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home


1. List on the board at least 30 appliances
and/or services required in home mainte-
nance and repair.
2. Compare care and maintenance instruction
booklets for different household appliances.
If an appliance does not work correctly,
how many people are involved in the
notification and service call for the repair?

1. Use word matching lists. Work in groups
using texts and dictionaries. See which
person or group has the most correct answers
by the end of 15 minutes. Identify the words
correctly. Suggest the possible jobs in the
area related to the word lists. What kind of
training did each job require?


2. Use a transparency or scramble gram to
review the terms.

3. Divide into two teams. Select a captain for
each team who will call on team members one
at a time. During a timed period have team
members tell the captain a tool or piece of
equipment used in home repair. 'Draw the
item on one portion of the board. The team
with the most pieces of equipment on the
board wins. No repetions are permitted.


22. The students
will identify
household
appliances and
services related
to housing and
furnishings.


23. The students
will identify
tools and terms
useful in under-
standing basic
home repairs.





Craig, Hazel T.


Sherwood, Ruth F.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow.
Chapters 26 & 27.

Hopke, William E.
Encyclopedia of Careers and
Vocational Guidance,
Vol. I & Vol. II.

Cassidy, Bruce.
Practical Home Repair
-for Women.


CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
15.
14.


hammer
screw driver
plunger
coping saw
vacuum
phillips screw
driver
broom
blender
dustmop
refrigerator
washing machine
range
saw
waffle iron


15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
50.


toaster
home freezer
dryer
electric skillet
electric beater
dish washer
electric iron
lawn nower
dust pan
garbage can
wet mop
electric broom
sewing machine
television
disposal
electric lamp


HO IE REPAIR WORD LIST
1. caulking to stop up; to make water-
proof a seam, ie, bathroom tub,
window
2. flagstone a type of stone when split
breaks flat to be used for paying
5. mortar a building material (cement,
lime, plaster with sand and water)
that hardens in masonry or plastering
4. mosaic surface decoration made by
inlaying small pieces of variously
colored material to form a design
5. terrazzo a mosiac flooring made b7
embedding small pieces of stone into
mortar and polishing
6. auger a tool for drilling holes
with a crosswise handle
7. chisel a metal tool with cutting
edge on the end used to cut and shape
8. epoxy a resin that hardens when
mixed; used in coatings and adhesives
9. glaze a smooth, clear coating to
change effect of a surface
10. pumice a volcanic glass used to
smooth and polish
11. awl painted instrument used for
marking and piercing
12. miter a joint made by cutting pieces
at an angle to match


Morton, GuhradGtre





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences Relating to Housing, Home


- I


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


OBJECTIVES


4. List the rooms of a house. Make a list of
all problems that could require repair in
each room.


5. Discuss repairs and qualifications for
repairmen. If anyone objects to a woman
doing repair work, give your objections.




6. Collect several faucets, plugs, wood scraps,
loose legs on tables and chairs, shades,
glass, stuck drawers, discarded telephones,
radios, broken appliances, small pieces of
furniture. Provide a class examination
time when students can take apart, examine
and explore the basis of small home repair
jobs. Stress safety first.





7. Observe the custodian as he replaces a
broken window.



8. Ask a plumber to demonstrate fixing a
leaky faucet and then talk to the class
about the problems of plumbing. Appendix #21





I


Blackboard
Chalk
Magic Markers
Paper





Resource People:
Janitor
Plumber



Odds and Ends of Home
Equipment


Gladstone, Bernard.
The New York Times Book
of Home Repair.





















Appendix #21
"How to Replace a Washer


CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


Kitchen
1. leaky faucet
2. stopped up drain
3. stuck drawers
4. leaking windows
5. cracked enamel
6. dirty walls


Unplug all electric appliances
Wear correct clothinM

Keep hair back
Use the correct tools

Draw or write down assembly process








How to Replace a Washer
Often one main cause of constant
dripping is a worn washer; a new washer
is needed.
1. Shut off water at main source
2. Remove handle and bonnet cap with
screw driver.
3. Twist the stem with a wrench or pliers
and remove it.
4. Remove the screw from the washer at
the bottom of the stem.
5. Replace the washer and the screw
if necessary.
6. Reassemble the faucet, open and shut
valve a few times before turning on
water.
7. Turn on water

See Appendix #21 for drawing.





CONCEPT IV -. Occupational Outlook in Housing, Home Furnishings,


I


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


OBJECT IVES


1. Make a bulletin board collage of future
ideas in housing materials and designs.
Browse through magazines and select
illustrations. Discuss findings and new
job possibilities.



2. Brainstorm concerning possible jobs
involved in the development of new materials
in housing.

3. Discuss environmental pollution and ecology.
Does this brinS to mind any jobs involved
technically in environmental planning?

4. Design, draw, or discuss new ideas for power,
water, transportation, furniture and
materials.




5. Study the present space program's housing
and furniture designs. Who designed them?
Who built, installed, and repaired them?
How do these new ideas change basic job
skills? What is planned for future space
flights and extended living in space?
Would you like to be the interior designer
for a spaceship?



6. Consider and make a list on the board of all
the job opportunities now open that were
non-existant to workers in the early 1900's.


1. The students
will evaluate
and predict
future job
movements in the
area of housing.








1


I


Periodical:
Psychology Today,
January, 1993.

Craig, Hazel T.
Homes with Character'
Chap. 35.


Morton, Gwuther and Guthrie.
The Home Its Furnishings
and Equipment,
pp. 6-19.

Sherwood, Ruth F.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow,
Chap. 17.

Faulkner and Faulkner.
Inside Today's Home.
Part III.

Sherwood, Ruth F.
Homes: Today and Tomorrow,
pp. 24-27, 45-46.

Periodical:
Co-ed/Forecast'
March, 1972.

Birren Faber.
Selling Color to People,
pp. 186-199.


CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


Some new possibilities in housing include
1. plastics
2. foam
5. glass
4. modular buildings
5. mushroom or pedestal homes
6. prefab housing units
7. dome cities

Some different tasks might include:


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.







1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.


child care
printing
kitchen work
auto repairing
wood working
designing dormitories
managing
bookkeeping







chrome workers
plastics molders
fiberglass workers
foam spreaders
poured cement designers
special latex painters
lathe workers
workers with prefab materials
.
architectural ceramic workers
paneling installers


Periodical:
Co-ed/Porecast
4. *
March 1972.


53





~`WtPlt' V tvaluation of Individual Interests in Housing,


_ ___ ~I


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


OnBJECTIVWS


1. The students will
discuse their
opinions of the
relationship
between values
and homes.





d. The students will
compare various
Job opportunities
in the housing
sad home furnish-
ings area and
be given an
opportunity to
express then-
solves about
these opportu-
alties,


1. Divide into groups of two's or three's.
Decide on one family description. Do the
exercise on "Evaluating a House Plan" with
that family in mind. Appendix #22
2. Select two class members to read the script
for each minute drama. Allow class members
to exhibit their feelings about each couple's
conversation. Appendix #23



1. List on the board the various places of
work available in the geographical area.
Catagorize according to "Inside Jobs" and
"Outside Jobs."
2. Take a poll on the number of students who
would like to work in each of the places
named.

5. Divide into groups according to favorite
jobs. List places of employment and
occupations on supportive levels as well
as professional levels. See which group
can come up with the most. List all on
paper hanging on walls.
4. Discuse or draw a picture describing a
relationship existing between people/
housingleavironment.

5. Serve jobs available in the area and
state. Use a state road map.

6. L&entity kinds of education. Discuss the
aesalag of each.

7. Develop a questionnaire to use in locating
laterandon about working conditions. Use
the questionesire to investigate various


8. Itestity the positive an& assative aspects
of careers in the heasing, heae taraishtage,,
equgment,, am$ services elester.







1 ----P-----


__ _~


ShePrwood,, Ruth F.


Peri~odical :


CONCEPT


CONTENT


RESOURCES


Combine any of the following:

1. low, medium or high income ---
1, 2, 3, 4, or more children

2. young couple without children

3. One parent family
4. One older person living with family



Some examples might be as follows:


Appendix #22
"Evaluating a House Plan"


Appendix #23
"Minute Dramas"

Bulletin Board:
"What Business Is It of Youre?"
(Using list prepared for
learning experiences, place
these on bulletin board.
On the second day change the
headinS to "What As I Out
out to Be?" Fold and cut
rows of dolls from new-.p*sp en,


Outside Jobs
1. road department
2. construction
3. working land si
4. lawn work
5. tour guiding


Inside Jobs
1. office work
2. government desk
tes jobs
3. working in the
home
4. working in a
factory
5. working in a
shop or
laboratory


Review first concept in housing and
home furnishings



Values, goals, existing communities,
location, family background, family ages,
family size, family income, housing
available, weather, historical inclina-
tion, landscaping




May use Florida state asps or South-
eastern U.S. asps

1. High Schools
2. Yocational Schools
3. Junior Colleges
4. Fear Year Colleges
5. Specialty Courses
6. Apprenticeships
7. Internships
8. On-the-Job Training


Maps, Magic Markers





('OCEPT V Evaluation of Individual Interests in Housing,


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


OBJECTIVES


9. Write a paper entitled, "If I chose a field
in housing, home furnishings, equipment,
and/or services, I would like a job as
a because..........
(Discuss as many of the interest and
ability factors as possible.)







LO. Play "Occupational charades."


Ll. Complete CROSSWORD PUZZLE by mimeographed
handouts or on overhead projector.
Appendix #24









CONTENT RESOURCES


INTERESTS AND ABILITIES
Analysis of skills necessary for
employment in the housing field enables
the student to assess abilities and
qualifications such as:
1. attitudes
2. aptitudes
3. work traits
4. physical characteristics -- body size
and weight, health
5. educational requirements
6. interests
7. personality
Students may act out tasks associated
with various occupations.

Crossword Puzzle is found in the Appendix #24
Appendix. Crossword Puzzle
"Housing"


CONCEPT







BIBL IOGRAPHY


BOOKS

Barclay, Mariang Champion, Frances; Brinkley, Jeanne and
Funderburk, Kathleen. Teen Guide to Homemaking. New Yorks
McCall Book Company, 1972.

Bergen, John. All about Upholatering. New Yorks Hawthorn Books,
Inc., 1982.

Birren, Faber. Selling Color to People. New York: University
Books, 1958.

Cassidy, Bruce. Practical Home Repair for Women. New York:
Taplinger Publishing Company, 1988.

Comstock, Nanina. The McCalls Book of Handcrafts. New York:
Random House, 1972.

Craig, Hazel T. Homes with Character. Lexington, Massachusetts:
D.C. Heath and Company, 1970.

Ehrenkranz, Florence and Inmen, Lydia. Equipment in the Home.
New York: Harper and Row, 1988.

Faulkner, Ray and Faulkner, Sara. Inside Today's Home. New Yorks
Holt, Rinehart and Winaton, Inc., 1988.

Garrett, Pauline G. Consumer Housing. Peoria, Illinoiss Charles
A. Bennett Company, Inc., 1972.

Gibson, Mary Bass. The Family Circle Book of Careers at Home.
Chicagos Cowles Book Company, 1971.

Gladstone, Bernard. New York Times Book of Home Repair. New Yorks
The MacMillan Company, 1988.

Greer, Charlotte C and Gibbs, Ellen P. Your Home and You. Bostons
Allyn and Bacon, Inc., 1985.

Hatcher, Hazel M. and Andrews, Mildred E. Guide for Today's Home
Living. Boetons D.C. Heath and Company, 1968.

Herndon, Booton. Satisfootion Guaranteed-An Unconventional Report
to Today's Consumers. New Yorks McCraw Book Company, 1972.

Hopke, William E* led.). The Encyclopedia of Careers and Vocational
Guidance. Vol. II. Chicagas J.G. Ferguson Publishing
Company, 1972.

Lovejoy, Clarence E. Lovejoy's Career and Vocational School Guide.
New Yorks Simon and Schuster, 1967.







Marton, Ruth; Geuther, Hilde and Buthrie, Virginia. The Home -
Its Furnishings and Equipment. New Yorks MoGraw-Mill Book
Company, 1970.

O'Neill, Barbara P. and O'Neill, Richard W. The Unhandy Man's
Guide to Home Repair. New Yorks The MaoMillan Company, 1966.

Peple, Betty. Interior Decoration A to Z. Garden City, New Yorks
Doubleday and Company, Ino*, 1985.

Raines, Margaret. Consumers' Management. Pooria, Illinoiss Charles
A Bennett Company, Inc., 1973.

Relff, Florence M. Steps in Home Living. Peoria, Illinoies
Charles A. Bennett Company, Inc., 1971.

Sherwood, Ruth F. Homess Today and Tomorrow. Peoria, Illinates
Charles A. Bennett Company, Inc., 1972.


BULLETINS and PAMPHLETS

U.S.Government Bulletine. Superintendent of Documents, Washington,
D.C. 20402.
Career Opportunities for Auditore in Housing
Career Opportunitise for Community Plannere
Careere in Housing and Urban AFFaire
Employment Dutlook for Interior Designore and Decoratore
Field Representatives in Housing
Home Planning by Design
Docupational Outlook Handbook

A Department Store in the Clasercom. Seare Caneumer Information
Services, Dept. 703, Publio Relations, Chicago, Illinals. 80811.

DiMade by Drexel. The Drexel Furniture Company.


How to Select Paint and Wallauvering for Your Home. Sears Caneumer
Information Services Dept. 703, Public Relations, Chicago,
Illinoie. 80811.

WallooverinRe and You. United-DeSata, Division of DeSata, Inc.,
3101 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 60BES. (shows
colors, matching wallpaper and Febrios, estimating, do-it-
yourself instructions, 250 per copy)

Waugh, Allee. House Design. A Classroom Manual. Burgess
Publishing Company, 429 South Sixth Street, Minneapolis,
Minnesota. 55415.

Waugh, Allae. Interior Design. A Laboratory Manual for House
Furnishings. Burgess Publishing Company, 486 South Sixth
Street, Minneapolia, Minnesota. 55415.







What's Good Furniture? Consumer Education Series Book 4, Zerox,
800 Madison Avenue, New York, New York. 10022.

PERIODICALS

" A New Way to Live; A New Wey to Build," Co-edfForecast (Vol. 17,
No. 7, March, 1972).

" Apartments: The Big Hunt," Co-ed/Forecast (Vol. 17, No. 7,
March, 1972).

" A Walden-Two Experiment," Psychology Today (January, 1973).

" Equipment Trends and Forecasts," Co-ed/Forecast (Vol. No. 7,
March, 1972).

" Housing Today and Tomorrow," Co-ed/Farecast (Vol. 17, No. 7,
March, 1972).

" People and Their Housing," Journal of Home Economice (Vol. 64,
No. 7, October, 1972).

" Take a Tire and Make a Chair," Journal of Home Economics (Vol.
85, No. 1, January, 1973).

" The Expanding Service Arena in Home Economice," Journal of
Home Economics (Vol. 84, No. 2, February,1972).

"Today's Values," Co-ed/Forecast (Vol. 17, No. 7, March, 1973).


FILMS

A Is for Architecture. The Florida State University, Audio-Visual
Center, Tellahassee, Florida. 32308. (30min., Free loan)

Home Sweet Mobile Home. Modern Talking:Picture Service, 3 East 54th
Street, New York, New York.

House of Man, Our Changing Environment. [Part 1). University of
Iowa, Audio-Visual Center, Iowa City, Iowa. 52240. (17 min.,
color, $8.50 rental, 1985)

House of Man, Our Crowded Environment. (Part 2). University of
lowe, Audio-Visual Center, Iowa City, laws. 52240. 111 min.
color, $4.25 rental, 1985)

How to Make Your Windows Beautiful. Seare Consumer Information
Service, Department 703--Publio Relations, Chicago, Illinoie.
80811.

New Guidelines for the Well Landscaped Home. U.S. Government Film
Service, 245 West 55th Street, New York, New York. 10019.
114 min.zoolor)

The Tenement. University of Arizona, Bureau of Audia-Visual
Services, Tueson, Arizona. 85721. (40 min. colar, $4.00
rental, 1987)







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