• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Plates
 Appendix
 Bibliography






Title: Building materials and craftsmen of Charleston, South Carolina 1732-1739
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102601/00001
 Material Information
Title: Building materials and craftsmen of Charleston, South Carolina 1732-1739
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: Harper, Doyle R.
Publisher: Doyle R. Harper
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: December, 1977
Copyright Date: 1977
 Notes
General Note: Course number: AE681
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102601
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Title page
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Plates
        Plate 1
        Plate 2
        Plate 3
        Plate 4
        Plate 5
        Plate 6
        Plate 7
        Plate 8
        Plate 9
        Plate 10
        Plate 11
        Plate 12
        Plate 13
        Plate 14
        Plate 15
        Plate 16
        Plate 17
        Plate 18
        Plate 19
        Plate 20
        Plate 21
        Plate 22
        Plate 23
    Appendix
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Bibliography
        Page 50
        Page 51
Full Text
BUILDING MATERIALS AND CRAFTSMEN

OF CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA

1732-1739




Doyle R. Harper
University of Florida


AE 681
December, 1977




History


South Carolina in 1700 was highly advanced and

developed as a colonial settlement. The development

of the rice trade brought undreamed-of wealth to a rising

aristocracy of planters as the colony entered its

great era of plantation building. Exports of meat,.

lumber, tat, turpentine and skins made the meachants profit.,

In twenty short years Charleston had grown to a population

of 2,000 and settlements had reached inland thirty miles..

Because the land was swampy and damp, transportation to

the inland areas was by boat on the extensive rivers

and creeks.

In 1719, South Caro lina became a Crown Colony

and the generation that followed (1720-1740) was the First

Augustan Age of South Carolina plantations.

Charleston was the #ourth largest American colonial

city by the mid-eighteenth century. It had been founded

in 1670, but moved to its present location on the Ashley

and Cooper Rivers in 1680. It was the first American

city laid out in a grid-iron pattern before any building

construction began and by 1704 it had filled its trapezoidal

fortifications.

After tragic fires in 1689 and 1704, the Assembly

ruled that all chimneys be built of brick or stone.

A 1713 hurricane brought a further ruling that houses

should be built of brick, but this law was hard to enforce.

The Great Fire of 1740 brought more building regulations







from the Assembly. Three hundred thirty-four dwellings,

and uncounted shops and warehouses were destroyed. As

a result, the Assembly required all new buildings to be

of brick or stone and that all wood buildings be torn down

and removed within five years. Thus Charleston became

a city of brick, stone, tile and stucco.

With the establishment of the indigo crop by 1760

a second T;eriod of wealth came to Sough Carolina. This

second eraof building lasted until 1776 and the revolution.



Scope of Study


The intent of this study is to investigate the building

materials of Charleston in the First Augustan Age and

Great Building Period (1720-1740). I intend to show the

development and character of the building fields by following

printed evidence found in the South Carolina Gazette

(1732-1775). This evidence appeared as advertisements,,

public notices, and articles, and is listed in chronological

order in the appendix.


*



Land was a means of obtaining building materials.

Early settlers in South Carolina valued land above most other

goods. Land and subsequently, the plantations, provided

for most all of a family's needs. It provided food for




3
the owners and for the-market, and it supplied the materials

for construction of dwellings and dependencies, Land

supplied everything except the important manpower that was

needed so badly. We shall see though, that these early

colonists solved this problem by importing slave labor

to fill this need.

The importance of on site building materials in

consideration of buying tracts of land to be sold can be

seen in the early advertisements. All of them list the

available resources and most go into some detail as to

their suggested uses.

March 18, 1732
A tract of Land containing 70 acres, most
part of it oak and hickory joining on Mr. Codnor,
and Mr. Johan Daniel; on Daniel's Island to be
sold. Any person who wants frame of a house
or any other sawed timber, or boards for ex-
portation, may agree with Mr. Charles King at
Cainhoy, or hear more particular from Mr. Robert
Austin in Charlestown.

January 11, 1735
To be Sold a plantation 200 acres of land,
scituate (sic) in the Parish of Christ Church
near Habkaw, with a good dwelling house in a
manner new and well finished with cellars, barns,
outhouses, etc., also a brick lime kiln...Any
person inclin'd to buy the whole or part, may
treat with the owner Jacob Bond.

March 30, 1734
A plantation called Epsom Wells situated
in St. John's Parish on the western branch of
Cooper River, containing...the remainder 260
acres is well stor'd with good oake (sic)
timber proper for making of staves and like-
wise a great quanity (sic) of hop poles. It
also affords good stone for building a quarry
being now open'd, where any person may be
supplied; there is a good dwelling house with
two brick chimneys (word unreadable) out of
repair...






August 4, 1733
To Be Sold very reasonably, a tract of
land containing 750 acres, lying on Berris-
ford's Creek on Wando River, being good for
rice, corn, turpentine, bricks, and very good
sawing timber, not above 12 miles from Charles-
town, with a good new house, a barn, corn house,
and several out houses, with a good garden
and orchard. If any person hath the mind to
purchase the same, they may treat with Mr. Henry
Bodon in Charlestown or Thomas Bagitt in the
country.

August 24, 1734
A plantation very pleasantly situated on
Ashley River within a mile of Dorchester, con-
taining 50 acres of very good land, with a
very good brick house lately finished with
gardens and orchards, planted with several
young trees of the best sort. Likewise a
very good wooden dwelling house, a shop
very well fitted up, and a store, with a
good barn, stable and stock houses. It has
a very good landing, and is very convenient
for keeping store, etc. Making bricks,
there being very good clay close to the
landing whoever has a mind to purchase the same
may treat with Daneil Pepper at the said
plantation...

Lumber as a land resource was particularly important

in early South Carolina. It was very valuable as an

export item being shipped to the West Indies and to Eng-

land. But it was perhaps even more important in its use

locally as a building material in the homes in and around

Charleston. Early lumbermen advertised their goods some

to the extent of hiring themselves out as carpenters to

erect the buildings for which they sold the lumber.

April 1, 1732
To Be Sold by Mr. William Dry, or freighted
from his plantation by the quarter house for
any of the islands, as much sawed pine lumber,
etc. of different dimensions and qualities, as
will be sufficient to load 300 tons, about
half of which is already at his landing.






February 2, 1734
This is to give notice that if any
gentleman in Charlestown w&ats any cypress
timber for any sort buildings, they maybe sup-
plied by Joseph Mackey, with the provisor to
let him have the building of the same.

November 8, 1735
These are to acquaint all persons, that
they may be supplied by Thomas Walker, who lives
about 6 miles from Charlestown up Wando River,
with pine timber, boards & plank of what
dimensions they please, for vessels and houses,
and the best sort of pine, likewise good masts
and yards of what dimensions they please, at
a reasonable price.

By 1736 demand for pre-cut lumber was sufficient

enough to demand a lumber yard. This is the earliest

indication of a lumber yard or any business specializing

in retail sales limited to a single building material.

September 25, 1736
A timber yard kept in Bedon Street by
Henry Bedon, where any person may be supplied
with all sorts of boards, scantling, laths,
cedar posts for gardens, and games for houses
giving him the dimensions. The price is for
inch boards 2s, 6d, 3 quarters ditto at ditto,
half inch at 25s, featheredge at 25s one inch
& a quarter at 32s 6d. Scantling at 45s, laths
at 35s.

There has been many records kept that indicate that

brick in early days was most always produced on the site

where it was to be used. Many advertisements for planta-

tions indicate the importance of a good clay supply for

the making of bricks. However, there are also indications

that brick and lumber were also imported. This is

quite interesting as it is usually considered that bricks

and lumber were too massive for shipping to any area that

could provide their own. Thus, one would suggest that







South Carolina, of all places, with its supply of timber

and clay, would not need these items imported. Although

these ads illustrate that the reverse was true.

February 15,. 1735
Just Imported and to be sold by Beale and
Cooper...oats, hampers of stoneware, axes, a
parcel of New England lumber...

May 15, 1736
Just Imported in the Dragon,, from Boston.
rum, single refined loaf sugar, molasses,
cheese, cut uobacco, bricks & hay...and to be sold
very reasonable by Robert Pringle.

December 21, 1738
Just Imported...by Peter Horry
N. B. He has also good New England rum,,
axes, cowbells, onions, and bricks.

During this early colonial period, few products

were manufactured in South Carolina. Yet, like any growing

society, the people demanded many products that they had

been accustomed to in Europe. To fill this need for the

latest products and conveniences the importing and

retailing businesses were quite numerous and profitable

Importers usually carried a full line of products that .

ranged from high quality yard goods, and negro cloth to

kitchen pans and silver and gold ware. The ads placed by

the merchants listed every item that they carried, and

often times they included desired means of payment. The

following selections are typical advertisements that included

building tools and materials.

February 2, 1734
Lately Imported and to be sold by Peter
Horry in his store at Mrs. Remsey's on the Bay
...milled lead in rolls, 4d, 6d, 8d, 10d, 20d,
30d, 40d, nails, 2 and 2 and-a-half seating







(sic) nails in casks forsed (sic), and almost
all sorts of other iron ware wellsorted as
carpenters joyners (sic) coopers and shoemakers
tools, etc. Like wise several other sorts of
merchandise all which, as he intends to depart out
of this province by the first of April next,.
he will sell for very reasonable payment
within that time.

September 7, 1734
Just Imported in the William Capt. Fr.
Baker from London, and to be sold by Robert
Pringle at his store on the Bay, 3 quarter
and yard wide linen, checks...brass and wrought iron,
cast iron, wrought pewter, fire buckets....

December 28, 1734
Imported by Capt. Pick from London and to be
sold by James Crokatt, Sundry sorts of European and
East India goods...linseed oyl (sic) and colours
ready ground, window glass...

Just Imported and to be sold by Jenys
and Baker...women and children's stockings,,
gloves, window glass ready cutt (sic) in
boxes...pewter,, barr iron and steel...several
sorts of wrought iron and nails of most sorts
...New England axes at 13 1. per dozen or
at 14 1. warranted for 1 years services,, etc.

July 19, 1735
Imported in Capt. Pollixen from London
and to be sold by James Crokatt...blue and red tiles
for pavements, black and white marbles
for beneath, and white or painted tiles
for chimnies...

November 8, 1735
A list of sundry goods to be sold by
Henning & Shute at their store, in Elliot's
Street Charlestown...prepared oyl (sic) for
paint, blacking, white lead ground fine red
paint, fine yellow stone oker (sic) ground,
Prussian blue...

September 11, 1736
This day imported in the King George
Capt. Ayres from London, and to be sold very
reasonable by Peter Horry...chimney tiles...

August 13, 1737
Lately imported from London, and to be




sold reasonably for ready money,, by Peter
Dallas in Church Street...carpenter, joyner
(sic), and coopers tools, nails of all sorts,.
iron riddles, glew (sic), all sorts of brass,
locks, hinges, bolts, iron screws, brass
knobes for windows, etc...

Notices of public work projects throughout the

first Augustan Age reveal the extent of building, en-

larging, and repairing of public buildings and

fortifications. These notices oftentimes listed the

materials and labor required for each project. It is

interesting to note the unusual and irregular dimensions

desired in the second example to follow. Lumber of such

dimension is entirely unheard of today.

April 6, 1734
Charlestown. On Tuesday last the 17 following
bills were ratified when the Honourable
the Commons House of Assembly invited His
Excellancy the Governor, with His Majesty's
Honourable Council, and James Oglethorpe, Esq.;
to an elegant super; there were likewise sign-
ed an Addres (sic) Petition and Remonstance
to His Majesty in Council: and on the day
following the Assembly adjourned to Tuesday
the 14th May next.
...13. An act for repairing, enlarging,
and pewing the Parochial Church of St. George's
Parish in Dotchester.

Whereas the public are about to mount the
Oridiance and repair the Platforms in the Fort
Bastions. Notice is hereby given that stuff
of the following dimensions is wanted for the
usses aforehand:
Good Live oak for trucks.
Plank 2 feet board and 6 inches thick of
2, 4, 6, or feet long.
Forty pieces 6 and a half feet long, 2 and
a half feet broad at one end and 1 and a quarter
the other end, 3 inches thick.
80 pieces, 5 and a half feet long, 2 and
a half feet broad at one end and one and a
quarter the other, 4 inches thick.







2o pieces of good heart Live Oak,, 5 and
a half feet long and eight inches square.
80 pieces of ditto, 5 feet long and 7
inches square.
20,000 feet of cypress plank, 15 feet long.
1,000 good cedar pieces,, ten feet long
or upwards and not less than 6 inches diameter
at the small end.
All such persons as are inclined to fur-
nish any quality of the above mentioned stuff,
and also such workers as are inclined to
undertake the making of carriages are desired
to by (sic) their several proposals in writing
on or before the 5th day of May next before the
Honourable John Fenwicke and John Wragg; Esqrs..
Charles Pickney, Gabriel Manigault, Robert
Brewton, Othniel Beale, and Benjamin D'Harriette,
who are a Committee of both Houses appointed
to receive all such proposals and to agree with
such persons as offer terms most advantageous
to this public.
N.B. That all such workman as are employ-
ed in this affair will be punctually paid of
the finishing their work and like payment
will be make on receiving the stuff contracted
for.

May 25, 1734
For the use of the Public is wanted
Good live oak.
Plank 22 inches broad three inches thick;
Also plank 15 andl6 inches broad three inches
thick.
20 pieces of good hart (sic) live oak 5
and a half feet and eight inches square. 80
pieces ditto five feet seven inches square.
Of good black cypress:
40 pieces 6 and a half feet long, 15 or 18 inches
broad 6 inches thick.
40 pieces ditto 4 and a half feet long,
15 or 17 inches broad, 6 inches thick
80 pieces ditto 4 feet, 3 and 3 qu long,
15 or 16 inches broad,, 5 inches thick
80 ditto 5 and a half feet long 15 or 17
inches broad, 5 and a half inches thick.
A quantity of cypress plank 22 or 24
inches wide, 3 inches thick of any length.
A quantity of plank 2 and a half inches
thick of different length and breadth.
A quantity of cedar pieces of ten feet long
not less than 6 inches diameter at the small
end.
All such persons as are inclinedcto...







August 23, 1735
For the use of public is wanted a large
quantity of bricks, lime, and workmanship to
repair (sic) and build up the fortifications
before the Bay of Charlestown.,

June 12, 1736
The Commissioners appointed by a law pass-
ed the 29th day of May, 1736 for building and
repairing the fortifications within the harbour
of Charlestown, do give this public (sic)., notice
that it is resolved forthwith to rebuild the
battery before Johnson's Fort for which there
will be wanted a large quantity of bricks, lime,
piles, mud, earth and ballast stones, to be
carried to the place with masonry and other
workmanship to complete (sic) & finish the some,
and that if any person or persons are
inclinable to furnish any or all the said materials,
and will undertake the said workmanship,,
they are desired to give their proposals
to the said commissioners, in writing, on the
23rd day of this instant June at Capt. William
Pickney's by four of the clock in the after-
noon, and in the mean time they may have the
perusal of the plan, and be better informed
of the particulars by Mr. Gabriel Berrard,,
engineer, who will give attendance at his
house every day from 7 o'clock inithe morning
to the hour of twelve. By Order of the
Commissioners, Alexander Cramahe,, Sec.

July 7, 1739
Whereas the Commissioners of Fortifications
(having received his Honour the lieutenant
Governor's Directions) are about to erect a
building of about 82 feet long, 19 feet wide,
10 the first and 8 and-a-half the second story
on the South side of the old church yard in
Charlestown...
Therefore the Commissioners do hereby
desire that any person or persons who are inclined
to furnish, brick, lime, timber, plank (for
the lower floors) boards,. shingles or other
materials, which may be wanted, or who will
undertake the bricklayer or carpenter work...
Phillip Prioleon, sec.

It is easy to understand why there were no important

names in the labor and design fftld in South Carolina

at this time. The labor force was almost entirely







comprised of slave or indentured labor. Oftentimes the

the owner of slaves would rent out their slave labor

or he eightt sell the slave when he had finished his own

project. Dealings in slave and indentured labor

was very popular as the following examples indicate.

January 25, 1735
To Be Sold four Negro men sawyers that
can whet, set, and lay timbers for half ready
money, the other to be paid in May next,
enquire (sic) Griffith Bullard, Hatter in
Charlestown.

April 26, 1735
Any person that has sawyers to be let
to hire may find employment for them at the
plantation 6f Benjamin Witakers, Esq. on
Asherpor River.

August 2,, 1735
To be sold a very good Negro bricklayer
and plaisterer by trade, his master is leaving
off business, inquire of John Phype over
against the Quakers Ketting, or the Printer.

November 4,. 1735
There is wanting a good carpenter either to
hire by the year or to buy his time: anyone
that wants employ, may enquire (sic) of Mr. William
Yeomans, and meet with good encouragement. Who
ever has'a good large canoe to dispose of,
may enquire (sic) at the same place.

January 17, 1736
To Be Sold a young negro man who is a bricklayer
and a plaisterer belonging to John Phipps,
He may be seen at Mr. Edward Scullon in Green
in Charlestown.

July 23,. 1737
A Negro bricklayer and playsteter (sic)
to be lett by the month, quarter, or more
or less time. Whoever in town or country hath
ocassion, may agree with John Simmons living
on the Bay at Capt. Scott's.

If anyone could be classified as an architect it

might be either of two men that first ran advertisements







in 1734 and 1735. They were Samuel Holmes and Peter Chaffereau

respectively. Of thes& two, probably Mr. Chaffereau was

closer to the actual role of architect. One would assume

that he had training in the areas that he worked. Samuel

Holmes, however, first calls himself "bricklayer" and states

that "if required" he will draw draghts of houses. His

Febuary"2, 1734 ad is his only one to mention this

service. Later advertisements indicate that he had other

interests in beer making and merchantilism.

February 2, 1734
Samuel Holmes of Charlestown, Bricklayer,
undertakes and performs inaubrkmanlike manner all
sorts of brickwork, and plastering at reasonable
rates: He-likewise if required draws draughts of
houses and measures and values all sorts of workmanship
in houses or buildings.
January 4, 1735
Mr. Peter Chaffereau, newly come from London,,
surveys land, and makes maps thereof, draws plans
and elevations of all kinds of buildings whatforever,
both civil and military likewise perspective views or
prospects of towns or gentlemens houses or plantations,,
he calculates estimates for buildings or repairs,
inspects and measures artificers works, sets out
ground for gardens or parks, in a grand and rural
manner, and takes levels; Young gentlemen and Ladys
will be attended at their own houses to be thought
drawing. To be heard of at Mr. Shephard's in
Broad Streett,. or at Mr. Lawrence's Sadler.

March 1, 1735
This is to give notice that Samuel Holmes, Brick-
layer and plaisterer, undertakes all manner of business,.
belonging to the trade aforesaik, and performs the
same (God Willing) in a workmanlike manner and with
expedition.

Beginning in 1735 advertisements were placed for

specialized services of craftsman. These included

joiners, carpenters, glaziers, bricklayers, stone masons,







painters, braziers and blacksmiths. Some of the skill of

these early craftmen dan be seen in the plantation homes

that survive today.

September 27, 1735
House-Sign and Ship Fainting, also glazing work
done after the best manner by Richard Marten,
next door but two to Mr. Brand's in Charlestown.

February 21, 1736
John Bedon, son of Stephon Bedon gives notice
that he being lately free he now undertades for
himself, house carpenters and house joyners work,.
and also makes coffins. Any peron that has a mind to
employ him may treat with him at his father's house,,
and may deTrend on faithful work.

July 10, 1736
House, Sign,,and ship painting and glazing work
done after the best manner, imitation of marble,
walnut, oac (sic), cedar, etc. at five shillings a yard,,
also planin painting, as cheap as any one shall
without using of chaulk which is practis'd (sic) very
much in Carolina, also people to work plain painting
by the day, also Gentlemen in the country may be furnished
with all sorts of colours ready mixt (sic) and
directions how to use them by Richard Marten.

December 4, 1736
Any person who wants letters to be cut on tomb
stones or chimney pieces to be cut and laid of
marble or free stone, may have the same done by
David Murry at Mr. Townsend's Shoemaker in Elliot's
Street.
January 25,. 1739
This is to give notice, that George Bridge
living in 'Tradd Street, Turner of brass,, iron or
ivory, makes and sells screws of all sizes, presses
of any sort, tea biards of all sizes, pestils and
mortars, billiard balls, nine pins and bowls
banisters arter the best manner, He likewise mends
prospective glasses, coffee mills, and fits up canes,
sells cut tobacco by the hundred weight, or any smaller
quantity, and hand engines for extinguishing
fire in chimneys.

May 12, 1739
Stone and wood carving and carpenters and
joyners work, done by Richard Baylis, from London
who has two very good tabacco engines to dispose of,..







December 22, 1739
All sorts of bricklayer's and stone work done by
Isaac Younge, enquire (sic) at the sign of the
King's Arms, at north end of the Bay.

The importance of each labor field can be seen by

comparing average daily compensation (R. & J. Dodsley,

1761). Prices of labor: For a
Taylor 5 shillings per day
Shoemaker 2s. 6p per day
Smith 7s. 6p per day
Weaver 3s. per day
Bricklayer 6s. per day
Cooper 4s. per day
Carpenter and Joiner 3-5s. per day
Overseers of Plantation 15 to 40 pounds/annum

Local education opportunities were few and usually

limited to the wealthy. The craftsmer-sttrades were learned

by apprenticeships and the arts and sciences by tutoring.

indications of Private educationfor the wealthy can be seen

in Peter Chaffereau's advertisement of 1735 an in the

following two advertisements.

May 12, 1733
At the house of Mrs. Dalamare in Broad Street,,
is taught these sciences,,
Arithmetic Surveying Asteonomy
Algebra Dialing Gauging
Geometry Navigation Fortification
Trigonometry
The stereographic and orthographis projection of the
sphere of the use of the globes, and the Italian Method
of bookkeeping by John Miller.

January 11, 1735
Arithmithick (sic), in whole numbers and fractions,
vulgar,,decimal and instrumental; merchants
accompts (sic), navigation, surveying, gaugeing, dialing,
geometry, trigonometry and other parts of the
mathimaticks (sic), profess'd (sic) and taught by
a person under confinement for his fees, amounting to
45 1. due to Robert Hale Esq. Provolt Marshall.






The fear and. problems of fires in Charleston can

be seen by this series of notices:

August 31, 1734
This is to give notice that S. John Wilson
have left a very good fire engin (sic) with John
Laurens, Sadler, of Charlestown, to be sold (for
the use of the said town) by subscription: about
80 pounds is already subscribed, the price of the
whole is twoo hundred and seventy pounds. Any
person that has mind to encourage the keeping of
so beneficial an instrument, may apply to the said
John Laurens, who has the subscription list and the
said engin (sic) to be view'd, has also engaged besides
his subscription, to keep the engin (sic) in re-
pair, and upon all occasions to have it ready and
in order to be us'd.

December 6, 1735
The Gentlemen who are willing to enter into the
society of the mutual insurance of their houses
against fire, as mentioned in this Gazette number
94 are desired to meet at the house of Capt. Wm.
Pinckney on the Bay, on Tuesday next at 5 o'clock
in the afternoon, in order to enter into the articles
therein mentioned, and carry that design into
execution.

October 30, 1736
Enacted, That every owner or tenant of every
dwelling house in Charlestown, shall on or before
the 5th Day of March, 1736, provide and keep in this
or her house one leather bucket containing 6 quarts
at least for every fire hearth in such dwelling
house, to be always ready in case of fire: And every
owner, tenant or tenants of every dwelling house
shall also provide one ladder of a convenient length


December 7, 1738
Notice Is Hereby Given to all the inhabitants
of Charlestown, that the fire masters intend with-
in a few days to make a thorough search for buckets
and ladders and that they will admit of no excuse
for want of either, having already in their former
searches admonished every defaulter to be provided as
the law directs. Buckets may be had of John Lurens,
Sadler, at 30s each.

Fire was a great problem because it could spread

so quickly in a closely settled area. By 1734 the city






had acquired a fire engine. One wonders what type of

device this could have been at such an early date. All

things indicate, however, that this was unsatisfactory

in sauelchinr fear, for in 1735 an insurance society was

formed. The following year ordinances were passed conern-

ing the fire safety equipment and inspections to enforce

those ordinances were common. The fear of fire must have

been legitimate for in 1740 much of Charleston was destroyed

by a great conflagration.

Of special interest to me throughout this study was

the finding of unusual or unexpected surprises. Two

primary examples include a receipt for rust-proofing

iron, and an advertisement for the sale of pre-fabricated

frames for houses. This ready to erect framenust be one

of the earliest examples of modern day methods.

November 24, 1737
An infalliable receipt how to keep iron from
rust. Communicated to the Fublick (sic) by the
Soceity for Imrroving in the Knowledge of Agriculture
at Edenburgh.
Take 8 pounds of hogs grease, throw the skinny
part away, cut it small and with a little water
melt it well over a gentle fire, in a new glazed
pot, then strain the liquor thro' a cloth, set it again
over a gentle fire, putting into it 4 ounces of
cmphire in powder, let it boyl (sic) gently, till
the camphire is well dissolved, take it off the fire,
and while it is hot put into it as much of the powder
of plumbbarge of which leaden pencils are made, as
will give it a leaden colour, then put it hot on
your irons, and let it stay on them two days, then
wipe it clean off.

March 2, 1734
To Be Sold by John Lining in Broad Street:
Citron-water at 7 1. per gallon, cinnamon water at
4 1. per gallon, spirit of wine at 3 1. 10s per gal-
long...Also a pine frame of a Dutch roof'd house,
four rooms on a floor, and ready to raise.






After studying the building materials and craftsmen

of Charleston, one begins to wonder what the homes of these

people were like. Little remains of the early homes of

Charleston because of the 1740 fire. However, the planta-

tion homes of nearby and rural areas provide some clue

to the quality of the homes of this period. An

advertisement in the Gazette describes vividly a fine

plantation of the Carolina Low Country.

June 5, 1736
To Be Sold a plantation containing 200 acres
of land on Goose Creek, about 12 miles from Charles-
town, lyine between the plantation of Landgrave
Smith and the deceas'd Mr. Splat. On this plantation
is built a very handsome large dwelling house, 50
feet by 25, neatly and comnleatly (sic) finished,
with brick cellars seven feet and a half high, divided
into three rooms by brick partitions; in two of the
rooms are fire places, ard they are fit for dwelling
rooms in the summer: On the first floor are three
large rooms with fire places, 12 feet high, with
raised cornishes and two handsome beausets (sic)
made after the newest fashion: There are three larg-
er upper rooms 10 feet high, and one fire place
and several convenient closets: A cupola 9 feet
square, neatly wrought, and commands the prospect of
Goose Creek and the low lands several miles round.
About 20 yards from the dwelling house is a
kitchen 22 feet by 16 and 8 feet high, neatly boarded
and painted, with a good brick chimney, oven and other
conveniences: opposite to the kitchen, and about
20 yards from the dwelling house, is a stable and
chaise house of like form and dimensions with the
kitchen. A house 20 by 12 with two rooms plaister'd
(sic) and a brick chimney fit for an overseer: A
corn house with rice mill and mortars: Negro houses
capable of lodgin 40 Negros: A necessary house
neatly built, and above it a dove house with nests for
50 pair of pigeons: An artificial fish pond, always
surTlied by fresh water springs, and well stored with
several sorts of fish: An orchard well planted with
reach, a-ple, cherry, fig, pomegranate, and plums;
a vineyard of about 2 years growth, planted with 1300
vines; a nursery; 5 or 600 mulberry about two years
old, fit to plant out: About 60 acres of cleared
land, extraordinary good pasture, and the whole
tract fit for pasturage, rice, or corn. Whoever has






a mind to purchase may treat with -r. Whitaker in
Charlestown and on payment of 1000 1. currency on the
first of January next, for the remainder of the
purchase money, may have any reasonable credit,
paying interest to Daniel Welshuysen.

Several plantation homes still exist and can be

viewed and anpreciated yet today. Three of these homes are

fine illustrations of the craftsmenship of this time

Period. They are Fenwick Hall (1730), Hampton Hall

(1735), and Drayton Hall (1738). The photos and plates

that follow illustrate the quality, luxury and fine

craftsmenship of this period.

It is auite amazing that these early craftsmen

achieved such fine quality of work. It is hard to imagine

that many of these men were slave and/or indentured

servants. One easily realizes that we have lost much in

our inability to create work of equal quality today.



This investigation should only be considered as a

start to further research. Possible areas of continued

study might include the second preat Deriod of Charleston

(1760-1776) or comparison studies with other port-colonial

cities of the same period.



































* 1W"
j :TL


T1iY~ 7


I
K.. A


' 4 ~t~;t;i i'


d
~a~l" ~"
rl.


liUS I'i`~E
U,
~t~ ~
--- i.
I---






.A. -~







ta
low'' I







-AI NIi
loxp






lag

1~ --
7-i*C..



It --
i-~~ '' e-














-C -.
Ar~~ * ; *t ? C












..c4 h 4! I
F4 ral


FENWICK HALL





126 PLANTIO\ (NS ()F1" THE' C AR)L IN A LOW COUNTRY







,~ .- " _. ~ -%, ~ ~ rl iC .s~-q r
T
~ .: ,"











J'



,N.











I/'I


















FENWICK HALL) Nor th East ioo F. B.""
d-, ,: ,
I $.






.... ,,f ....

f . L'P ,,~ .
FENWCK HLI, No th ast oom[:.




























i -- -- -_ I







-- -- -- i




![ J^.LL, ;_ _!
c--- luuiren/l


South Glevalion
ScaleENWICK HA


FENWICK HALL


I II' _

iaI e e' in
as] i le c t,

Si i
=--~ : ji~-
ga t gele~tt'on


'Wfst Ceze,'atzon
S;~c ae Zeta~is


Secton Jamb & ash i'tinye



W adoI w e lai

ofII



Part Ele? of Sill Sec lio. of Sill





128 PLAN'J'A'I'I ONS OF 'I'HE CAROLINA LOW COt


FENWICK


y .. ~ f P.! 'C*' s',, -
I4f # 7t~t 9i^ a J
I

^ -;- ."' \:> -
",.,
-. -.a. J..s:a- .. 9**- k *
.^C' j ta ai l niiL- 1' s. I 4 ~:-* *;
HAi.a S E as Room'
HALL, South E-,ast lRoom











N


U11


JVorIh leiaiion

jta. -ml-a^ w sx~sv srv ~ a


(asi Zeleahion


Door Zffelail


I-- j ,________ --jj I --- r--- ) -I- -l----^ -i^/'
-7 ___ d 1l


S1 i i LJ^i L[
?7cr 50> de Shut Mrs

ii'i _I ii i I ibU.
i i! I P


South Elevation
Scale- -leatons


FENWICK HALL


q'sl lZetalion


South ~east oom


TJnside Shutters


-Measured by Albert Simons
'ratnj by"
Jferberi J.Sarety
Yra.nk .Seel


kch lan
S~tefh Plan


I___ __


-------


~IIIIL~CI


-C~l -L -L -


L-


. I


,/Main Cornice

T.,


r 3 Z a/











... .. ,... ...iit ~n en *


i '

?'1 F-


I*3<,;%


Irv

"




7\ 7'Ji

,.6


44


;i N *; ..
r? ~rI I*1~



^' -* *.:. ..: -
r i"' V p. ;. .*
'p -
V


.r


-I-i
-




-tr c r*r 4w... .wra.rrLf.


F. B. TI


FENWICK HALL, Entrance Hall


-----_
~ws~-~i~i


cll~Slrs~


















































































17e aia of JYVeuel


"
~and JEa
/"
~B
u
/-


J anteZ

-Z7e tail


FENWICK HALL en&drance W, Yll. .i. 7,nr&S


___


c a'


Scale ~levoi;ons
.n
,,,--


1nn sF






-C -. ."-
N.-;.'

--


aR~~. ia~~
-a *-~




I,


'li


srk -ab ~CI~I
6'
3~L~:~
j

,e


FENWICK HALL, South West Room, Octagonal Wing


"- 2,," .7 V ...- .


L ,


--. .. .
* \,i. ----- -






..,; *- I - ./' "
.. *' "! i -.", '. ., i :. r. 7 ;-
, ; ,.,





;;; --4 ; : .



-f vs-


5'~
1- ~


r

.."'" ~


1
i

t
t


F. B. J.



















asi Elevation


Sou~lh ZlevaZioz2 (vWest 6leiatiozl


/2 60 / 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 /0
ScaIe of J eei


FENWICK HALL


&levalionos ofSouth Jw~sl foom Octagonal W3n m f

























ro l -- ""
.--J ..- . .*.. -- ,.
1 ------ -4 ....
dl "r I "' .i -
mu a 'C
.2- 1 I- J14 9
I
"__ _- '". ."''" " .-T :.
-
; c . . . . . : . .. :. '..__ _ _
.; ' ... ...... . . -. . --.&V
.- -., .--- -. .
,. ., . .. ,' :..". -
T r"'-f" !- .- ' -7 A, --"'- .._ . tol
-- .-a -
.-, _. .-
-'--.... .. .- .- .'
. -- "" ":" :-_-, .'_z_ ..


HAMPTON, 1735


F. B. J.











a--k

K .,;'.. t- "W*- "-


i '. -.-.' -, .:. -. ... - -.

"<.v".- f ; = ," i" .^** a^ ^. f." -'**- *^ -
' I tt . *. '
JI';

' .. i. -
*-' "" ..** *** (-" **^.- "; '- .... ..


S. .-,* ^ ^ i .: : .*h '. .- -; *:?*^ ', *.:..
^**".'^^ Y.^.^^^ ^'::'^?^: .~V41~
I -. -_

T.-..... .


|.a ..


i


S.1?


I

4/;


S- .- -



3w. --- .. --


'- '- '.


2 A>


HAMPTON


HAMPTON


B. J. L.


F. B. J.





































N ~'-'tt"7CL- --- --


II- -
- II . -


--------.- __-L-~~~r=

4--- ----Tv

I- __ .- --- -.-, ~~--1j A--

iEELII 12h K H Y. 1


Scae o'f3ee2?


HAM PTON Sondh CZej~cdion Tra 1,ez-z S3/y -, rz A-. 5. &eZ


' .1


Ii,


-in


~---ii-iii--i--,i-;--i --------i~----


i


-
I


I 'L


-- -- -~


i I





142 PLANTATIONS OF THE CAROLINA LOW COUNTRY














4 *,.


HAMPTON, Ball Room


B. J. ,L.



























OW-est EZev7aZlon


J~Yor Ze-atZion


Cast Ze1ation 2o J S 6 7 8 9
ScaZe of Jee


Sounih levaitiozz


HA MPTON farZZ ?oom cJ:easu,5ed :J SJ-mas & -GS-orey
HAMPTONl 1l"21"c~d Al_____L fc: &J{-.,JGa-re & J SSe eZ


f1___


o



>-
>





>
0
L
z




z
^3



0
-I
z




0
r-)


O-
tl.


1






146 PLANTATIONS OF THE CAROLINA LOW COUNTRY


























". c. *' ,r,
1 A









la .


* .
s "'...-: .' -.


DRAYTON HALL, 1738, Land Side


B. J. L.

























3.>


* r ~ arrz rnrrr-h C


,I-- ,-


I I


- - - -
- -.Z .. .. t. - -


7,


,--_:r- -~~--~=~~-~:--~--'I


H i i}I____


363O 34$ 22 9,6,, ,24,4
Scafe of geei--i


DRAYTON HALL cW e creation ieas b Slep n omas SarnTfapm
LT O-,n by Stephen 9boas B,& 5rank & See"


r -'


1


L_
i~-i~
r_

;L------3
--i-
_ _.__.__.__._._...~s~.


r

r= ~




--


'~C~F~F~ZI-ji~ a

;r:


=i














n

= 0e



_LLU _-
mr-UH-f-MM HER-






[EFT I___ J1:'__E

0
z
MOM T



:;i.Ii Ii ___



ZF71 -







Scale of!ee?

RAYT N HA L Cse clegdioa J~lasurval by Stephen2 Cbozuas & Sandl CaphuzmA
DRAY ON ALL asteze,7aion -1%efoaby Stephen 97hozuas & Jrard~r & Seel





























'semenf rI/3organ


- Ji


'4

/~`


-~~3
~s


DRAYTON HALL f-oo r yfans--eeifi


KTT


~ "1

~~Ii/ ii
I K


I


o


''


ysf &- .- n W o * a
6o *
-J~ ~~ ,



Mi*



gf L ) qKfazz

I.I










216 L/~m II








',:-y r ^ :.9
N" -
4' 4v~ 4
- -- ^ *-.>e- '- f -- ^

.^ '~:~ ~ r~ .-t, b --
*^, 4 ^ " ,, -r.


r


I' -z .- -t


, ..-_ .. ,_ , . , ": ti

- . . .. . .
i, i ',, ., i !1

, -,-- I I ~, i p

l i ".- i -


DRAYTON HALL,


Ii:-_


I:(
LL~.wr'


Entrance Hall


--.7


:1..''.. .i i~
.I~i. I' : :
'" 1 C.S.--~
'"-
~ .. c'


'--a'-
N;


.44


I 4-e -.


z







cc




Au3
I;

fI
I'j


4$


a
"~


-~~
:
~6~;5


F. B. J.




















I


Di


yTeZails


i 3 2 3 C d 9e 's I
Scale of JInches


DRAYTON HALL sitarcaseJ ge


SouhL Ze'alion
















ill X_ _ _ _ _ _ _






JV'ori4 Pl/evafzion qwef /evazfion
gedimenis NbZw Aemnved Mantef(afer Addrfzon





~D ~ D ~ I I

I i~rII t[

SI ii





Lou/A ['fevay /on Casi [Yeve'fion
7 r/a*nd f 260 / 2 3 4 x 6 7 d 9 10
J'c4[e of~Jecf-


DRAYTON HALL 8fevaAi~onS sf mffa in-awinq oom Aeasuirdand OIrat by






































260 / 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
ScaZe of eee3


DR AYTON H ALL aleaiions of3razgoom-Secoudloo


JU

Io
LJ


F az





















__easured 3 yrJ ozs


--




AFFENDEX







January 8, 1732
Tarr 35s. per barrel
Turpentine 17s. 6d. to 20s. per hundred
Pitch 37s. per barrel

March 18, 1732
A tract of Land containing 70 acres, most
part of it oak and hickory joining on Mr. Codnor,
and Mr. John Daniel; on Daniel's Island to be
sold. Any person who wants frame of a house
or any other sawed timber, or boards for ex-
portation, may agree with Mr. Charles King at
Cainhoy, or hear more particular from Mr.
Robert Austin in Charlestown.

April 1, 1732
To Be Sold by Mr. William Dry, or freighted
from his plantation by the quarter house for
any of the islands, as much sawed pine lumber,
etc. of different dimensions and qualities,
as will be sufficient to load 300 tons, about
half of which is already at his landing.

June 10, 1732
A Negro man, named Tony, a bricklayer,
formerly belonging to Mrs. Mullins, but now
to Hugh Hext, any person that will employ the
said Negro, must first apply to Mr. John Bee
in Charlestown, who is empowered to hire the
said Negro and receive the wages.

July 1, 1732
Taken out of Mr. Stone's house in
Dorchester, about the first of September last,
a parcel of turning tools, 2 hand saws and
hammers, etc. The turning tools were made in
this country, and are very clumsy and may be
known by that...

August 5, 1732
Lately Imported and to be sold by Yeomans
and Escott, several trunks of haberdashery...
paint, sealing wax, cain (sic) chairs...

At the house of the late T. Holton,
chairmaker, on the green, the same business is
carried on, where chairs and couches are made
and. mended, after the same manner and at rea-
sonable rates.

August 12, 1732
At New-Market Plantation, about a mile from
Charlestown, will continue to be sold all sorts
of cabinet work, chest of drawers, and mahogony
tables and chairs, made after the best manner...




September 16, 1732
To Be Sold by John and Alexander Rigg, a
complete sett (sic) of joiners tools, lately
imported.

December 9, 1732
Goods lately imported and to be sold by
Yeomans and Escott...sortments (sic) of iron
ware and nails.

John Porkis, Smith, of Lonaon, but last
from Providence, now liveth in Tread Street in
Charlestown. Where gentalmen (sic), merchants
planters and artiscers, may be supplied with
smith work for mills, engines (sic), or any
machines, shipping or plantation; tools for
goldsmiths, blacksmiths as vices, hammers,
beck irons, screws, and tools to make most
sort of screws that are, or may be wanted
in this province, with smith's bellows or
any size or form required, etc.

December 23, 1732
Fustinus Stoll, Blacksmith, next to
Granviles Bastian on the Bay. Maketh broad
and narrow axes, cooper's axes and addes (sic),
drawing knives and other sorts of edge tools
and warrents (sic) them also belk spikes
and small nails by wholesale or retail and
cuts steel mills and does other sorts of
smith works.


January 13, 1733
Customs House, Charlestown, Entered:
Ship Goodwill, Daniel Row from Boston, 100
bar of Snyder, 2900 bricks.
Ship Mary, Henry Glafz, from London, with 10
small casks of nails.

Just Imported, and to be sold very reason-
able by Peter Horry at his store in Mr. Wragg's
Alley...best cross-cut and whip saw, large
copper's joyners (sic) flocked with iron, all
sorts of nails and other ironware sorted in the
best manner...

January 20, 1733
F. Lambert, from England, has opened a
store at Mr. William Pinckey's on the Bay, where
any Gentlemen, or Planters may be supplied
with all sorts of iron-monger ware, as nails
and tools, etc. by wholesale or retail, very
reasonable, ready for money.








January 27, 1733
James McClellan, cabinet-maker, from London,
living next door to Mr. Joseph Massey in Church
Street, makes and sells all sorts of cabinet
are, desk and book cases, buroes (sic), tables
of all sorts, chairs, tea boxes, and new
fashioned shelfs (sic), etc. where may be had
looking glasses and joiners tools.

Goods Lately Imported, and to be sold by
Samuel Eveleigh, Royal, Demy Royal, post best
fool's cap, and ordinary writing paper; choice
Dutch quills and parchments; coopers, joiners;
carpenters and shoemakers tools, broad hoes,
and New England axes.

February 3, 1733
Francis leBrasseur has opened a store where
Mr. Rigg's lived in Elliots Street, with a
sortment (sic) of choice linen; garlic Scotch,
and Irish sheeting, blue linen, bag Hollands,
diapers and cambricks; choice plantation axes
and hoes to be sold by wholesale and retail:
great regard will be for ready money.

May 5, 1733
A Tract of Land to be sold, containing
900 acres joining on the Horse Shoe Savannah
in PonPon, three miles from a land: The land
is well timbered with good cypress. Enquire
(sic) of Joseph Mackey.

A Tract of Land to be sold, containing
500 acres, eight miles fromgveluster. The
land is well timbered and full of lightwood.
Enquire (sic) George Austin.

May 12, 1733
At the house of Mrs. Dalamare in Broad
Street, is taught there Sciences,
arithmetic surveying astronomy
algebra dialing gauging
geometry navigation fortification
trigonometry
The stereographic and orthographic projection
of the sphere of the use of the globes, and
the Italian Method of bookkeeping by John
Miller.

June 9, 1733
Lately Imported by Samuel Eveleigh...
sheet lead, florence and linseed oil; white
lead, and several other sorts of painting colours.







June 9, 1733
A large stone and swelling house at
Willtown to be let. Enquire (sic) of Mr. John
Dart in Charlestown.

August 4, 1933
To Be Sold very reasonably, a tract of
land containing 750 acres, lying on Berris-
ford's Creek on Wando River, being good for
rice, corn, turpentine, bricks, and very good
sawing timber, not above 12 miles from Charles-
town, with a good new house, a barn, corn house,
and several out houses, with a good garden
and orchard. If any person hath the mind to
purchase the same, they may treat with Mr. Henry
Bedon in Charlestown or Thomas Bagitt in the
country.

Whereas John Wainwright, apprentice to
Thomas Seston of Charlestown, joiner, did in
company with Richard Beack, apprentice to
Nathaniel Ford, shipwright at Hobkoy, runaway
from their said Masters on Thursday the 9th
Instant, this is to desire any person to
secure the said apprentices, and bring them
to either of the said Masters, and they shall
be reasonably rewarded: And all persons are
forbidden to entertain the said apprentices
as they will answer the same at their peril.

A Tract of Land to be sold containing
500 acres, it's good corn and rice land, with
cyprus (sic) swamp, about 2 miles from PonPon
Ferry, and Capt. Matthew's Store. Any person
having mind to purchase the said land, may
enquire (sic) of Wm. or Henry Livingstone, and
know further.

Whereas Thomas Livington, apprentice to
Henry Bedon of Charlestown, joiner hath lately
absented himself from his Master. All persons
are hereby forewarned from entertaining the
said apprentice, at their peril; and any per-
son who secures and brings him to his Master
above-mentioned shall be rewarded.
N.B. Good salt molaties, to be sold by said
Bedow.

August 25, 1733
Exported from this place since November
3, 1732 to August 31, 1733
pitch 13,442
tar 5,789
turpentine 2,227








February 2, 1734
Just Imported from London and to be sold
by Robert Pringle on the Bay, ironware, tools
and nails of all sorts...cooper and brass
ware...

Lately Imported and to be sold by Peter
Horry in his store at Mrs. Remsey's on the Bay
...milled lead in rolls, 4d, 6d, 8d, 10d, 20d,
30d, 40d nails, 2 and 2 and-a-half seating
(sic) nails in casks forsed (sic), and almost
all sorb of other iron ware wellsorted as
carpenters joyners (sic) coopers and shoemakers
tools, etc. Like wise several other sorts of
merchandise all which, as he intend to depart
out of this province by the first of April
next, he will sell for very reasonable payment
within that time.

Samuel Holmes of Charlestown, bricklayer
undertakes and performs in workmanlike manner
all sorts of brickwork, and plastering at
reasonable rates: He likewise if required draws
draughts of houses and measures and values
all sorts of workmanship in houses or build-
ings.

This is to give notice that if any
gentleman in Charlestown wants any cypress
timber for any sort buildings, they maybe sup-
plied by Joseph Mackey, with the provisor to
let him have the building of the same.

March 2, 1734
Exported from this place since November
1, 1733...pitch 13,077; tar 4,631; turpentine
1,395...
Prices of the following goods...
pitch 47s 6d per bar.
tar 37s 6d to 40 per bar
turpentine 25s per hundred

All.; Persons who have any demands on Jenys
and Baker...
N.B. They have sundry sorts of goods to
sell very reasonably and have occasion to pur-
hase a quantity of three 4th, and of 1 inch
boards, as also red oak staves for exportation.

To Be Sold by John Lining in Broad Street;
citron water at 7 1. per gallon, cinnamon water
at 4 1. per gallon, spirit of wine at 3 1. 10s
per gallon. Annisfeed, orange, and clover
waters, treeacle water and ratasia. Also a
pine frame of a Dutch roof'd house, four rooms
on a floor, and ready to raise.







20 pieces of good heart Live Oak, 5 and
a half feet long and eight inches square.
80 pieces of ditto, 5 feet long and 7
inches square.
20,000 feet of cypress plank, 15 feet long.
1,000 good cedar pieces, ten feet long
or upwards and not less than 6 inches diameter
at the small end.
All such persons as are inclined to fur-
nish any quality of the above mentioned stuff,
and also such workers as are inclined to
undertake the making of carriages are desired
to by (sic) their several proposals in writing
on or before the 5th day of May next before the
Honourable John Fenwicke and John Wragg; Esqrs.
Charles Pickney, Gabriel Manigault, Robert
Brewton, Othniel Beale, and Benjamin D'Harriette,
who are a Committee of both Houses appointed
to receive all such proposals and to agree with
such persons as offer terms most advantageous
to this public.
N.B. That all such workman as are employ-
ed in this affair will be punctually paid on
the finishing their work and like payment
will be made on receiving the stuff contracted
for.

To Be Sold by John Austin very reasonably
casks of ironware, casks of nails, etc. 2d 3d,
4d, 6d, 8d, 10d, 20d, 2s, 30d,3c, 40d, whip
saws, cross-cut saws and hand saws, steel
plates, spades...he intending speedily to
depart this Province.

April 17, 1734
Exported from this place since November
1, 1733--pitch 18,810; tar 6,241; turpentine
1,737...

May 4, 1734
A plantation two miles up the Path, containing
243 acres of good pasture. Likewise to be
sold a plantation on Wands River 12 miles from
town, containing 230 acres with a very good
house thereon, four rooms on a floor and out
houses with brick chimneys...inquire of Mr.
Stephen Miller.

May 18, 1934
Whereas I, Peter Vellepontous, having
after considerable trouble and experience
perfected an engine for the more expeditious,
yet well cleaning of rice and having obtained
(for the Encouragement of the Projection lately
completed, and on due inspection approved of







March 9, 1734
Lost sometime last week in Charlestown four
inch sissars (sic) and two points. Whoever
brings them to Edward Weston Mason at Mr. Scull's
at Charlestown shall be well rewarded.

March 30, 1734
A plantation called Epsom Wells situated
in St. John's Parish on the western branch of
Cooper River, containing...the remainder 260
acres is well stor'd with good oake (sic)
timber proper for making of staves and like-
wise a great quanity (sic) of hop poles. It
also affords good stone for building a quarry
being now open'd, where any person may be
supplied; there is a good dwelling house with
two brick chimneys (word unreadable) out of
repair...

To Be Sold for ready money or credit a
plantation upon Georgetown Neck, belonging to
Mr. Auther Forster, containing 1100 acres of
land...a considerable deal of timberland,
most part of the lightwood still remaining,
pine and cypress.

April 6, 1734
Charlestown. On Tuesday last the 17 fol-
lowing bills were ratified when the Honourable
the Commons House of Assembly invited His
Excellancy the Governor, with His Majesty's
Honourable Council, and James Oglethorpe, Esq.;
to an elegant supper; there were likewise sign-
ed an Addres (sic) Petition and Remonstance
to His Majesty in Council: and on the day
following the Assembly adjourned to Tuesday
the 14th May next.
...13. An act for repairing, enlarging,
and pewing the Parochial Church of St. George's
Parish in Dotchester.

Whereas the public are about to mount the
Oridiance and repair the Platforms in the Fort
Bastions. Notice is hereby given that stuff
of the following dimensions is wanted for the
uses aforehand:
Good Live oak for trucks.
Plank 2 feet board and 6 inches thick of
2,4,6, or feet long.
Forty pieces 6 and a half feet long, 2 and
a half feet broad at one end and 1 and a quarter
the other end, 3 inches thick.
80 pieces, 5 and a half feet long, 2 and
a half feet broad at one end and one and a
quarter the other, 4 inches thick.







by several impartial and good judges; not to
mention its being grounded on experience,
answerable to the intention proposed) a Law,
whereby it is enacted that I am invested with
the sole property of erecting all machines
of a familiar frame during a certain term of
years...And that I, Peter Villepontoux, will
undertake to build the said machine, procurring
the ironwork at my own expense, on any Gentle-
man's Plantation so requiring for the considera-
tion 60 pounds currency of the Province, the
timber to be found by the employer.
...The wood seasoned must be oak plank
100 feet 5 inches thickness and four pieces
pine 12 feet in length six inches square.
There will moreover be necessary of pine 12
pieces of three feet long, 22 inches by 18,
3 pieces 30feet long, 7 inches by 5...

May 25, 1734
In the Happy Gilbert, Capt. William Paul
from London, and To Be Sold by Robert Pringle
...nails and ironwares...

For the use of the Public is wanted
Good live oak.
Plank 22 inches broad three inches thick;
Also plank 15 and 16 inches broad three inches
thick.
20 pieces of goo hart (sic) live oak 5
and a half feet and eight inches square. 80
pieces ditto five feet seven inches square.
Of good black cypress:
40 pieces 6 and a half feet long, 15 or 18 inches
broad 6 inches thick.
40 pieces ditto 4 and a half feet long,
15 or 17 inches broad, 6 inches thick.
80 pieces ditto 4 feet, 3 and 3 qu long,
15 or 16 inches broad, 5 inches thick
80 ditto 5 and a half feet long, 15 or 17
inches broad, 5 and a half inches thick.
A quantity of cypress plank 22 or 24
inches wide, 3 inches thick of any length.
A quantity of plank 2 and a half inches
thick of different length and breadth.
A quantity of cedar pieces of ten feet long
not less than 6 inches diameter at the small
end.
All such persons as are inclined to...

July 7, 1734
Exported from this place since November
1, 1733...pitch 25,561; tar 6,946; turpentine
2,577...







Prices of the following goods...
pitch 46s 6d per bar
tar 1 1. 10s per bar.
turpentine 17s 6d per hundred

August 3, 1734
Stuff Imported and to be sold by Eleazer
Phillips at the Corner Shop on Elliot's Wharf,
loaf sugar of several sorts, rum by the hnd...
New England axes per dozen...

August 10, 1734
To Be Sold by Richard Eagles for either
ready money or credit, giving security if
required. The following tracts of land, a
plantation...A two acre lott (sic)...A
plantation at Beach Hill containing 5,261 acres
about 400 acres excellent good rice land,
never subject to be overflown so as to hurt
the crop, about 70 acres of good pine, the
remainder large oak and heckory (sic),
high land, with a large new barn, a good over-
seer's house, about 125 acres cleared and 400
acres cleared but last year...

August 24, 1734
A plantation very pleasantly situated on
Ashley River within a mile of Dorchester, con-
taining 50 acres of very good land, with a
very good brick house lately finished with
gardens and orchards, planted with several
young trees of the best sort. Likewise a
very good wooden dwelling house, a shop
very well fitted up, and a store, with a
good barn, stable and stock houses. It has
a very good landing, and is very convenient
for keeping store, etc. Making bricks,
there being very good clay close to the
landing whoever has a mind to purchase the
same may treat with Daniel Pepper at the
said plantation...

To Be Sold a fine tract of land, belong-
ing to Mr. John Alston containing 575 acres
on Wando Swamp, 400 of it is riceland,
abounding with fine cypress and other valuable
timber, and lies continuous to Mr. Wiggsall's
and Mr. John Daniel's plantation. Whoever
has a mind to purchase the same, may treat
with Isaac Chardon, merchant in Charlestown,
or with the said Alston at Winyaw.







August 24, 1734
To Be Sold a tract of land containing
about 370 acres, very good for rice and corn,
being well timbered with oak, ash, and cypress.
Whoever is inclined to buy, may treat with
James Dolton, at his plantation near Dorchester.

August 31, 1734
This is to give notice that S. John Wil-
son have left a very good fire engin (sic) with
John Laurens, sadler (sic) of Charlestown, to
be sold (for the use of the said town) by
subscription; about eighty pounds is already
subscribed, the price of the whole is two
hundred and seventy pounds. Any person that
has mind to encourage the keeping of so
beneficial an instrument, may apply to the
said John Laurens, who has the subscription
list and the said engin (sic) to be view'd
and has also engaged besides his subscription
to keep the engin (sic) in repair, and upon
all occasions to have it ready and in order
to be us'd.

September 7, 1734
Stuff Imported in the William Capt. Fr.
Baker from London, and to be sold by Robert
Pringle at his store on the Bay, 3 quarter
and yard wide linen, checks...brass and
wrought iron, cast iron, wrought pewter,
fire buckets...

Michael Scanes of Charlestown, glazier.

Stuff Imported in Capt. Baker from
London, and to be sold by Beal and Cooper,
choice Welch plants and cottons for Negro
clothes...whipssaws, cross-cut and hand saws,
shovels and spades...New England axes...

To Be Sold by Yeomans and Escott at their
store, the following goods, viz. shirting and
sheeting hollands...ironware and assortments
of nails...New England axes...

September 21, 1734
To Be Sold by Thomas Buttler, a tract of
land on the North-side of Asapoo River about
40 miles from Charlestown, containing 1260
acres...Also a tract of land containing 580
acres near Spoon Savanna, some very good
swamp for rice and good corn land about
400 acres of pine land very full of good
lightwood for making of tar or pitch...







October 5, 1734
Just Imported and to be sold a large
quantity of Negro clothing and all sorts of
winter goods, also rum, sugar, and ironware
by Jenys & Baker.

October 19, 1734
To Be Sold by Henry Bedon, Merchant in
Charlestown, all sorts of gold and silver
trimmings, very good sperma citi, a pair of
large hand screws and a small horse cart;
likewise a little boy that sweeps chimneys.

October 26, 1734
Exported from this place since November
1, 1733 to November 1, 1734--
...pitch 28,874; tar 7,336; turpentine 4,552.
Prices of the following goods...
pitch 42s. 6d per barrel
tar 30s. per bar
turpentine 17s. 6d per hundred

November 2, 1734
Just Imported in the Karyann, Capt.
Thomas Shubrick from London, and to be sold
by Peter Horry at his store by Mr. Mott's
Viz...4d, 6d, 8d, 10d, 20d, nails, steel corn
mills, cross-cut and whip saws, spades...all
which he'll sell very reasonably, especially
for payment by the 15th December next.

To Be Sold to the highest bider (sic)
on Wednesday the 20 instant, at the Plantation
of Coll. John Herbert deceas'd, a stock
choice of cattle and working oxen; several
head of horses; as also a watch, several sets
of surveyorsand other.mathematical instruments,
by Thomas Clifford, Administrator of the Estate
of the said Colonel John Herbert.

Just Imported in the Maryann, Capt. Shubrick
from London and to be sold by Benjamin Godin
...Indian corn mills, nails and other sorts of
ironware...pewter, white lead ground in oyl (sic)
linseed oyl (sic), and sundry other sorts of
goods of use and commonly imported to this
Province.

Just Imported in the Maryann, Capt. Thomas
Shubrick from London, and to be sold by Yeomans
and Escott...all sorts of pewter and tinn (sic)
wares, all sorts of nails in casks and very
good assortments of iron wares, Indian corn
mills, brass candlesticks, Indian hatchets,
Carolina hoes, and axes...




November 23, 1734
Just Imported in the Matilda, John Saunders
Commander from Bristol and to be sold by James
Paine in Broad Street...best broad hoes, spades,
frying and drying pans, all sorts of nails...

December 28, 1734
Imported by Capt. Pick from London and
to be sold by James Crokatt, Sundry sorts of
European and East India goods...linseed oyl
(sic) and colours read ground, window glass...

Just Imported and to be sold by Jenys
and Baker...women and children's stockings,
gloves, window glass ready cutt (sic) in
boxes...pewter, barr iron and steel...several
sorts of wrought iron and nails of most sorts
...New England axes at 13 1. per dozen or
at 14 1. warranted for 1 years services, etc.




January 4, 1735
Mr. Peter Chaffereau, newly come from
London, surveys land, and makes maps there-
of, draws plans and elevations of all kinds
of buildings whatforever, both civil and
military, likewise perspective views or pros-
pects of towns or gentlemens houses or plantations,
he calculates estimates for buildings or
repairs, inspects and measures artificers
works, sets out ground for gardens or parks,
in a grand and rural manner, and takes levels;
Young gentlemen and ladys will be attended
at their own houses to'be taught drawing.
To be heard of at Mr. Shephard's in
Broad Street, or at Mr Lawrence's Sadler.

To Be Sold a tract of land containing
250 acres scituate (sic) on Wando Neck and
butting and bounding on Capt. Paine's land
and Mr. Benjamin Law's land, about 7 miles
from Charlestown, most part of it good rice
and corn land, the rest very good fire wood,
and on the head of Quelchs Creek very good
clay land. An persons being inclined to pur-
chase the same, may treat with the Owners on
Wando Neck, Rebecca Jones & Will Jones.

January 11, 1735
To Be Sold a plantation 200 acres of
land, scituate (sic) in the Parish of Christ
Church near Habkaw, with a good dwelling house
in a manner new and well finished with cellars,
barns, outhouses, etc., also a brick lime







kiln...Any person inclin'd to buy the whole or
part, may treat with the owner Jacob Bond.

January 11, 1735
Arithmithick (sic), in whole numbers and
fractions, vulgar, decimal and instrumental;
merchants accompts (sic), navigation, survey-
ing, gauging, dialing, geometry, trigonometry,
and other parts of the mathemathicks (sic),
profess'd and taught by a person under confinement
for his fees, amounting to 45 1. due to Robert
Hale, Esq. Provolt Marshall.

January 25, 1735
To Be Sold four Negro men sawyers that
can whet, set, and lay timbers for half ready
money, the other to be paid in May next,
enquire (sic) Griffith Bullard, Htter in
Charlestown.

Just Imported by Capt. Morgan, choice
madeira wines to be sold by John Watsone
who also has sundry sorts of European goods
...nails, hoes, axes, hinges, locks, saws,
plains, and other sundery sorts of iron ware
...Several of the above goods just imported
by Capt. Vittery from London.

Imported in the William, Capt. Vitry
from London and to be sold by William
Lasserre, casks of nails, viz. 2, 3, 4, 6, 8,
10, 20d, pit saws, cross cut saws, and hand saws;
all sorts of locks and padlocks, box iron
bolted, joiners and carpenter tools...sash
pulleys sorted...

February 15, 1735
Just Imported and to be sold by Beale
and Cooper...oats, hampers of stoneware, axes,
a parcel of New England lumber...

March 1, 1735
Exported from this place since November
1, 1734...tar 2551; turpentine 2468; pitch
7369...
Prices of the following goods--
pitch per barrel 45s
tar per bar 32s 6d
turpentine per C. 17s 6d

This is to give notice that Samuel
Holmes, bricklayer and plaisterer (sic),
undertakes all manner of business, belonging
to the trade aforesaid, and performs the same
(God willing) in a workmanlike manner and
with Expedition.







March 8, 1735
Any person understanding the sawing business
and wants an overseers place, may apply to
John Daniel, Esq. and find encouragement.

March 22, 1735
To Be Sold by Hugh Butler, Esq. the several
plantations following, viz. One called Mount
Pleasant...whereon is above 300 acres of
cypress trees fit for sawing; one other planta-
tion adjoining the former containing 50 acres
...One other tract lying at English Santee...
One other tract containing in the whole 2000
acres of pine land (divided into 4 parts)
very good for pitch, turpentine, tarr (sic),
etc. about 4 miles from a landing. The
particulars of each tract may be had of John
Celleton Esq., Mr. Dan Ravenell, Capt. Robert
Taylor, or Tho: Ellery.

April 19, 1735
To Be Sold a tract of land on the West
side of Pon Pon River, containing 2200 acres
most of it very good rice land...being well
stored with cypress for sawing, white oaks
for staves...Whoever has a mind to purchase
on the said plantation the same may treat
with Mr. James Ferguson on the said planta-
tion or Mr. Joh Champneys in Charlestown.

April 26, 1735
Imported in Capt. Baker and Capt Nicholson
from London and to be sold by James Crokatt
in Broad Street...all sizes of nails, locks,
hinges, and other ironware...

Any person that has sawyers to be let
to hire may find employment for them at the
plantation of Benjamin Witakers, Esq. on
Asherpor River.

May 10, 1735
To Be Sold an extraordinary good plantation
containing 1400 acres of land, 500 or thereabouts
being as good rice and corn land as any in the
Provine, the remainder very good etc. convienent
for pitch, turoentine...informations of the
place and terms and treat with William Lewis
at Winyaw, who is desired to dispose of it.

May 24, 1735
Just Imported in the Unity, Cha: Smith
Master from Bristol and to be sold by Benjamin
Savage and Comp...strouds and plains, 4, 6, 8,
10d nails, iron spades, broad howes (sic), axes,







anchors and grablings, new Cordage from 5 inches
to a Ratlin...white lead and linseed oyl (sic),
boxes of crown glass...

Just Imported and to be sold very reason-
ably by Beale and Cooper...nails, cut and whip
saws...

June 28, 1735
To Be Sold 2 tracts of land lying on
Chelaw River, one containing 1500 acres, bluff
to said river in 2 or 3 places, where a vessel
of 100 turns may load, and about 1500 acres
of hard marib (sic) adjoining; the other 480
acres at the head of said river, both tracts
but a tides work from Port Royal: also 2
other tracts, 1 of 500 acres on Cambohe River
near Mr. Mulrain's plantation the other 500
acres on Pon Pon River. All above lands
being at the Quitrent (sic) of 12 d. per
hundred acres, treat with William Livingston.

July 5, 1735
Exported from this place since November
1, 1734...pitch 20,457; tar 5,121; turpentine
4,578...
Prices of the following goods...
pitch per barrel 50 s
tar per bar 35 s
turpentine per C. 15 s

July 19, 1735
Imported in Capt. Pollixen from London
and to be sold by James Crokatt...blue and
red tiles for pavements, black and white
marbles for beneath, and white or painted
tiles for chimnies...

August 2, 1735
To Be Sold a very good Negro bricklayer
and plaisterer (sic) by trade, his master is
leaving off business. Inquire of John Phype
over against the Quakers Meeting or the
Printer.

August 9, 1735
Just Imported in the Hawkins and to be
sold by Jenys and Baker...window glass, boxes
of pipes, earthen ware...

August 23, 1735
For the use of public is wanted a large
quantity of bricks, lime, and workmanship to
repair (sic) and build up the fortifications
before the Bay of Charlestown.







September 13, 1735
Just Imported in the Ship Brook, from
London and to be sold by Peter Horry...4d,
6d, 8d, 10d, and 20d nails...fencing files,
spades, whip and cross cut saws...

Just Imported in the Ship Brook, John
Keet Commander from London and to be sold by
William Roper...joyners (sic) tools...

September 20, 1735
Just Imported and to be sold by William
Lasserre at his store over against the Court
House...fire shovels & tongs, neat bellows,
2d, 6d, 8d, 10d, and 20d nails, and hand &
cross cut saws, most sorts of brass & japaned
locks, with great variety of ironware,
whoesale and retail at very reasonable prices.

September 27, 1735
To Be Sold by Richard Wigg at his shop
on the Bay next door to Mr. John Allens:...
2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, & 20d nails, brads, pump
nails, locks, hinges, axes, planes of all
sorsts, house & ship carpenters tools...

House sign & ship painting, also glaz-
ing work done after the best manner by
Richard Marten, next door but two to Mr.
Brand's in Charlestown.

October 4, 1735
There is wanting a good carpenter either
to hire by the year or to buy his time: Any-
one that wants employ may enquire (sic) of
Mr. William Yeomans, and meet with good
encouragement. Whoever has a good large canoe
to dispose of, may enquire (sic) at the same
place.

About 20 miles from Charlestown upon the
Northwest branch of the Stono River a choice
tract of land containing 1038 acres, 700 acres
being as good rice land as ever was planted;
the other good oak and hickory, with sufficient
pine timber for fencing, and all other uses,
there is now standing on the said tract of
land...Richard Wright.

October 11, 1735
To Be Sold a tract of land on the west
side of the Pon Pon River, containing 2200
acres, most of it very good rice land...Hav-
ing a good dwelling house, stores and outhouses
thereon, being well stored with cypress for
sawing, white oak for staves...James Ferguson.







October 11, 1735
This is to give notice, that Mary
Stevenson, widow of John Stevenson deceased,
(glazier and painter) continues the same business
after the best manner and very reasonable. She
also hath two Negroes to hire out by the day
that understand painting, very well.

October 18, 1735
Just Imported per Capt. Bishop & Shoe-
brick, and to be sold by John Watsone at his
store over against Elloit's Bridge...stock
and other locks, hinges, handsaws, coopers &
carpenters tools, tacks and all sorts of
nails, dogs for chimneys, planes, with most
other sorts of ironware, lynseed oil...

Just Imported in Capt. Shubrick from
London, and to be sold by Cattell & Austin
...4, 6, 10, & 20d nails, whip & cross cut
saws, spades, sortments of iron ware, coffin
ware, joyners (sic) tools...

Run away the 17th September last, from
Joseph Williams carpenter and joyner (sic) in
Charlestown, an apprentise (sic) lad about
17 years of age...

October 25, 1735
Exported from this place since November
1, 1734...pitch 24,056; tar 5,636; turpentine
8,061...
Prices of the following goods...
pitch per barrel 45s
tar per barrel 30s
turpentine per C. 15s

November 1, 1735
Just Imported by Bishop & Shoebrick from
London, and to be sold by Beale & Cooper...
Crawly's hoes, 6, 8, 10, and 20d nails, as also
New England axes (Wallis' Make) and choice
Philadelphia flour...

To Be Sold by Benjamin Godin...nails and
other iron ware, white lead ground in oyl (sic),
linseed oyl (sic)...

Just Imported to be sold by Yeomans &
Escott...4, 6, 8, 10, & 20d nails, assortments
of such nails in small parcels, spades and
various sorts of iron mongery wares...

November 8, 1735
Forming of a insurance company to insure
freeholder's homes from loss by fire...







November 8, 1735
These are to acquaint all persons, that
they may be supplied by Thomas Walker, who
lives about 6 miles from Charlestown up Wando
River, with pine timber, boards & plank of
what dimensions they please, for vessels and
houses, and the best sort of pine, likewise
good masts and yards of what dimensions they
please, at a reasonable price.

A list of sundry goods to be sold by
Henning & Shute at their store, in Elliot's
Street Charlestown...prepared oyl (sic) for
paint, blacking, white lead ground fine red
paint, fine yellow stone oker (sicc ground,
Prussian blue...

To Be Sold by William Weekly 2000acres of
land, on the north side of Sampit River, a mile
fronting the said river, with very good river
swamp and back-swamp; and plenty of lightwood
& pine for sawing or turpentine. Enquire (sic)
of Mr. Robert Stewarts.

November 15, 1735
Just Imported to be sold by Peter Horry
viz. 4, 6, 8, 10 & 20d nails...German steel...

November 22, 1735
Daniel Badger lately arrived from Boston
undertakes and compleates (sic) all sorts of
house and ship paintings very reasonable, and
after the best manner. He may be heard of at
Mr. Warham's joiner in Tradid Street

December 6, 1735
Anthony Corne Brasier lately come from
London and living in Elliot's Street, Charles-
town, maketh and selleth all sorts of brasier,
pewter & tinman's are. He also buyth any
old copper, brass, pewter, etc...

The Gentlemen who are willing to enter
into the society of the mutal insurance of
their houses against fire, as mentioned in
this Gazette, number 94 are desired to meet
at the house of Capt. William Pinckney on the
Bay on Tuesday next at 5 o'clock in the after-
noon, in order to enter into the articles
thereon mentioned, and carry that design in-
to execution.

Just Imported and to be sold by Cattell &
Austin...nails, sash glass, linseed oyl (sic)
and white lead, long & short pipes...






December 6, 1735
Just Imported in the Ship Embleton, Capt.
Payne from London, and to be sold by Henning
& Shute...ground paint of different colours,
paint oyl (sic)...


January 17, 1736
To Be Sold a young Negro man who is a
bricklayer and a plaisterer (sic) belonging
to John Bhipps, he may be seen at Mr. Edward
Scullon in Green in Charlestown.

January 24, 1736
On Thursday the 12th of February will be
opened the new Theatre in Dock Street, in
which will be performed the comedy called
The Recruiting Officer.

To Be Sold a good house wench, that
washes & cooks, also to be hired, very good
sawyers & arhandy Negro boy by Sarah Blaklwey.

January 31, 1736
Just Imported by Capt. Nicholson and some
others, lately arrived from London, and to be
sold by William Lasserre at his store in
Broad Street...a large assortment of nails, spades,
broad & narrow hoes, cooper adzes & axes...

Samuel Holmes designed to leave this
Providence.

February 7, 1736
To Be Sold on Tuesday the 24th of February
at Mr. Edward Keatings in Goose Creek by
C: Lowindes. For ready money or one year's
credit upon good security, one Negro man named
Fortune, a carpenter & sawyer...

Just Imported in the Pelham Capt. John
Nicholson from London and to be sold by Richard
Baker at Michael Moore's carpenter in Union
Street...

February 14, 1736
At the new Theater in Queen Street will
be acted on Monday next, attragedy called The
Orphan, or The Unhappy Marriage. Tickets to
had at Mr. Charles Shepheard's.

February 21, 1736
John Bedon, son of Stephon Bedon, gives
notice that he being lately free he now under-
takes for himself house carpenters & house
joyners (sic) work, and also makes coffins.







Any person that has a mind to employ him, may
treat with him at his father's house and may
depend on faithful work.

February 28, 1736
Exported from this place since November
1, 1735...pitch 3,572; tarr (sic) 422; turpentine
1,676...
Prices of the following goods...
pitch per barrel 35s
tarr (sic) per bar. 30s
turpentine per C. 14s

March 20, 1736
All person who have any demands against
the estate of William Scott joyner (sic)
deceased...

To Be Sold a plantation containing 500
acres of land, scituate (sic) in the Parish
of St. Thomas...Two thirds whereof being
extraordinary rice land, and the pine land,
well stored with lightwood, at 40s an acre...

March 27, 1736
All persons indebted to William Lithwaite
of Charlestown, brasier...he being resolved
to stay no longer.

April,3, 1736
...Mrs. Drayton ...(is mentioned)

April 10, 1736
John Watson requests (sic) all who are
indebted to him...
N.B. He has imported per Capt. Peircy,
broad hoes, 4, 6, 8, 10, 20, 24, 30, 40d and
spike nails, drawing knives, cross cut, whip
& hand saws, cooper adzes, axes, files, hamers
(sic), stock & livery locks, lanthorns (sic),
plains, and most sorts of iron ware which he
will sale wholesale or retail, he has also
variety of other European goods, and will take
rice in payment from his debtors at any time
at market price.

A tract of land scituated (sic) lying and
being in Christ Church Parish in Berkley County,
between the lands of Mr. George Hadrell & Elias
Hancock deceased, about half a mile facing
Charlestown, containing 416 acres, having about
100 cleared in pasture, and the rest very
good timber land for sawing, and fire wood, and
planting of provisions, being a pleasant
scituation(sic). Any one that hath a mind to
purchase the same may treat with Daniel Greene.







May 15, 1736
Just Imported in the Dragon, from Boston.
rum, single refined loaf sugar, molasses,
cheese, cut tobacco, bricks & hay...and to be
sold very reasonable by Robert Pringle.

May 22, 1736
Claudius Compaire gives notice, that he
mends all sorts of pewter, copper, and brass
work at reasonable prices; he likewise buys
any old pewter, copper or brass, and is to be
met with at Mr. Laurens, sadler.

June 5, 1736
To Be Sold a convenient dwelling house where
Mr. William Williamson now lives over against
Mr. Jeans glazier...Anyone may treat with
Theo: Weaver carpenter in Charlestown.

June 12, 1736
The Commissioners appointed by a law pass-
ed the 29th day of May, 1736 for building and
repairing the fortifications within the harbour
of Charlestown, do give this public (sic), notice
that it is resolved forthwith to rebuild the
battery before Johnson's Fort for which there
will be wanted a large quantity of bricks, lime,
piles, mud, earth and ballast stones, to be
carried to the place with masonry and other
workmanship to complete (sic) & finish the
same, and that if any person or persons are
inclinable to furnish any or all the said
materials, and will undertake the said work-
manship, they are desired to give their proposals
to the said commissioners, in writing, on the
23rd day of this instant June at Capt. William
Pinckney's by four of the clock in the after-
noon, and in the mean time they may have the
perusal of the plan, and be better informed
of the particulars by Mr. Gabriel Berrard,
engineer, who will give attendance at his
house every day from 7 o'clock in the morning
to the hour of twelve. By Order of the
Commissioners, Alexander Cramahe, Sec.

July 10, 1736
Exported from this place since November
1, 1735...pitch 7,225; tarr (sic) 730; turpen-
tine 2,917...
Prices of the following goods...
pitch 35s per barrel
tar 25s per barrel
turpentine 13s 9d








July 10, 1736
House, sign, & ship painting and glaz-
ing work done after the best manner, imitation
of marble, walnut, oac (sic), cedar, etc. at
five shillings a yard, also plain painting, as
cheap as any one shall without using of
chaulk which is practis'd (sic) very much in
Carolina, also people to work plain painting
by the day, also gentlemen in the country may
be furnished with all sorts of colours ready
mixt (sic) and directions how to use them by
Richard Marten.

July 17, 1736
Runaway from William Field an indented
servant boy, named Thomas Watts, he was
apprentice to Laurens Ryal, bricklayer...

July 24, 1736
John Vaughan and Ralph Rodda, brick-
layer having two Negro boys brought up to their
trade, which are employed by persons without
their masters leave or license...

To Be Sold 321 acres of choice cypress
swamp on the head of Ashley River by the
Ponds...William Fishborn.

August 7, 1736
Lately imported in sundry vessels, and
to be sold cheap by Cattel & Austin, viz...
iron ware, nails, coopers carpenters &
joyners (sic) tools, coffin ware & hardware.

To Be Sold by Charles Warham, joyner
(sic), next door to Mr. Moody in Tradd Street,
all sorts of table, chests, chests of drawers,
desks, book cases, cradles, etc. By whom
all persons may be supplied at reasonable
rates.
N.B. I intend likewise to prepare all
things necessary for & take care at funerals
in the same manner (sic) as Mr. Watson
deceased did, for all such as shall think
proper to apply themselves to me for that
purpose.

August 21, 1736
Just Imported in Capt. Scott, Seaman,
& Shoebrick, and to be sold by John Watsone...
White's whip & hand saws, all sorts of nails,
locks...

August 28, 1736
To Be Sold by John Bedon very good sashes
& bedsteds, or any sort of joyner's (sic) work...







September 11, 1736
This day imported in the King George
Capt. Ayres from London, and to be sold very
reasonable by Peter Horry...chimney tiles...

September 25, 1736
A timber yard kept in Bedon Street by
Henry Bedon, where any person may be supplied
with all sorts of boards, scantling, laths,
cedar posts for gardens, and frames for houses
giving him the dimensions. The price is for
inch boards 2s, 6d 3 quarters ditto at ditto,
half inch at 25s, featheredge at 25s one inch
& a quarter at 32s 6d. Scantling at 45s,
laths at 35s.

Imported per Capt. Ayres from London, and
to be sold by William Lasserre...all sorts of
nails in casks & assortments of ditto in casks,
crawleys board...coopers tools...

October 2, 1736
To Be Sold a plantation containing 280
acres...some carpenter & coopers tools, etc.
may treat with Joseph Roper...

October 23, 1736
Exported from this place since November
1, 1735...pitch 114736; tar 1,491; turpentine
5,192...
Prices of the following goods...
pitch per bar 35s
tar per bar 30s
turpentine 10s

October 30, 1736
Enacted: That every owner or tenant of
every dwelling house in Charlestown, shall on
or before the 5th Day of March, 1736, provide
& keep in his or her house one leather bucket
containing six quarts at least for every fire
hearth in such dwelling house, to be always
ready in case of fire: And every owner, tenant
or tenants of every dwelling house shall also
provide ladder of a convenient length...

To be lett (sic) a dwelling house, in
Union Street, belonging to Steven Miller, a
large room fit for an office & a bed-chamber
in the house where I now dwell, and to be
hired a very good Cooper, house wench, and
handy boy...Sarah Blakeway.

December 4, 1736
Any person who wants letters to be cut on
tomb stones, or chimney pieces to be cut & laid







of marble of free stone may have the same
done by David Murry.t Mr. Townsend's
shoemaker in Elliot's Street.

December 11, 1736
To Be Lett (6ic) the plantation belong-
ing to the estate of Richard Splatt deceased,
near Landgrave Smiths, also a Negro cooper &
several house wenches by Ann Le Rvrssrur.

A pair of sawyers & a cooper to be hired
by Sarah Blakeway.

December 18, 1736
To Be Sold two complete (sic) sawyers,
not exceeding 24 years of age apply to John
Watsone.

December 25, 1736
Imported by Cleland & Wallace in the
Ship Brook from London...nails, hoes, hinges,
axes, adzes, etc...



January 8, 1737
Very good mill-stones for grinding
Indian corn, just imported in the Sloop
Batchelor from North Carolina and to be
sold on board the said sloop lying at Elliot's
Bridge by John Ross.

January 15, 1737
Just Imported in the William, Capt.
Baker from London and to be sold very
reasonable by Peter Horry & Comp viz...
all sorts of nails...Hanly's plains, kitchen
jacks, large scale beams & weights...

February 19, 1737
Just Imported in the Baltick Merchant
from Bristol and to be sold by John McKenzie
...4, 6, 8, 10, 20, & 24d nails, several sorts
of iron ware...

March 5, 1737
Exported from this place since November
1, 1736...pitch 6,143; tar 1,649; turpentine
1,201...
Prices 6f the following goods...
pitch per barrel 35s
tar per barrel 30s
turpentine 8s 9d

April 9, 1737
Peter Horry being just removed to Capt.
Croft's new house on the Bay, has lately im-
ported...short & long pipes, nails, locks,







sides, HL. T, and hooks & hinges...


April 16, 1737
Two very good coopers to be lett (sic)
out for a year, any person that may be
inclinable to hire both or either of them
may apply to John Guerard.

May 7, 1737
Lately imported & to be sold by Wastone
& McKenzie...hand saws files, locks, hinges,
nails, spades, kitchen doggs, broad & narrow
hoes...

Just Imported from London, and to be sold
reasonably for ready money by Peter Dallis in
Church Street...hand & cross cut saws, iron
riddles, nails, hoes, glew (sic), and all sorts
of iron ware, by wholesale or retail.

June 4, 1737
Imported in several of the last vessels
and to be sold very reasonably by Cattell &
Austin...iron ware and nails, pewter, sadlery,
window glass...

June 18, 1737
To Be Sold by Hutchinson & Grimke at
their store...
Two good Negro carpenters & a very good
cooper, to be hired by the day, week, or
month by the said Hutchinson.

John Vaughan, bricklayer, forwarns here-
by all persons of entertaining or crediting
William Archer, who is his indebted servant...

July 7, 1737
Exported from this place since November
1, 1736...pitch 10,149; tar 6,800; turpentine
3,609...
Prices on the following goods...
pitch per bar 40s
tar per bar 35s
turpentine 10s

July 16, 1737
Gentlemen may be supplied with landscapes
(sic) for chimney places of all sizes. Like-
wise draughts of their houses in colours or
Indian ink by B. Roberts.

July 23, 1737
A Negro bricklayer & playsteter (sic) to
be lett (sic) by the month, quarter, or more







or less time. Whoever in town or country
hath occasion, may agree with John Simmons
living on the Bay at Capt. Scott's.

July 30, 1737
Just Imported in the ship Princess
Carolina, John Coe, from London and to be
sold by Yeomans & Escott...4, 6, 8, 10, &
20d nails, Indian hatchets, narrow hoes, scale
beams, broad axes, black-smith's anvil...

August 13, 1737
Lately Imported from London, and to be
sold reasonably for ready money, by Peter
Dallas in Church Street...carpenter, joyner
(sic), and coopers tools, nails of all sorts,
iron riddles, glew (sic), all sorts of brass,
locks, hinges, bolts, iron screws, brass
knobs for windows, etc...

October 29, 1737
Exported from this place since November
1, 1736...pitch 11,987; tarr (sic) 8,581;
turpentine 4,411...

November 24, 1737
An infalliable receipt how to keep
iron from rust. Communicated to the public
(sic) by the society for improving in the
knowledge of agriculture, etc. at Edenburgh.
Take 8 pounds of hog's grease, throw
the skinny part away, cut it small and with a
little water melt it well over a gentle fire,
in a new greased pot, then strain the liquor
thro' (sic) a cloth, set it again over a gentle
fire, putting into it four ounces of
cmphire in powder, let it boyl (sic) gently,
till the camphire is well dissolved, take it
off the fire, and while it is hot put into it
as much of the powder of plumbbarge, of which
leaden pencils are made, as will give it a
leaden colour, then put it hot on your irons,
and let it stay on them two days, then wipe
it clean off.

December 22, 1737
To Be Sold by Peter Dallis very cheap...
fine brass locks, sash pulies, brass & iron
hinges for doors and shutters, broad hoes,
axes, and hatchets; saws sorted, carpenters'
tools, etc...







March 2, 1738
Exported from this place since November
1, 1737...pitch 5,070; tarr (sic) 2,986;
turpentine 589...
Prices of the following goods...
pitch 45s per barrel
tar 32s 6d per barrel
turpentine 7s 6d


DROUGHT AND SMALL POX HIT CHARLESTOWNI



July 6, 1738
Exported from this place since November
1, 1737...pitch 136,355; tarr (sic) 5,322;
turpentine 781...

September 7, 1738
Just Imported by Capt. Piercy from London,
and to be sold by James Crokatt, Negro cloqth-
ing (sic)...gloves, shoes, white lead in oyl
(sic), linseed oyl (sic), and most other goods
that have been scarce this summer.
N.B. In order to prevent any danger of
infection by the woolings being in town, I
keep them in a store on Mr. William Elliots'
Bridge, where attendance will be given.

November 9, 1738
Just Imported in the Heylyn, Alexander
Dick, Master, from Bristol, and to be sold by
Benjamin Savage & Co...window glass, short
pipes, 4d, 10d, 20d, nails...

December 7, 1738
Notice is hereby given to all the
inhabitants of Charlestown, that the fire
masters intend within a few days to make a
thorough search for buckets and ladders and that
they will admit of no excuse for want of either
having already in their former searches
admonished every defaulter to be provided as
the law tdrects buckets may be had of John
Laurens sadler, at 30s each.

December 21, 1738
Just Imported...by Peter Horry
N.B. He has also good New England rum,
axes, cow bells, onions, and bricks.







January 25, 1739
This is to give notice, that George Bridge
living in Tradd Street, turner of brass, iron,
or ivory, makes and sells screws of all sizes,
presses of any sorts tea biards (sic) of all
sizes, pestills (sic) and mortars, billiard
balls, nine pins and bowls, banisters after the
best manner, he likewise mends prospective glasses,
coffee mills, and fits up canes, sells cut
tobacco by the hundred weight or any smaller
quantity, and hand engines for extinguishing
fire in chimneys.

February 8, 1739
To be sold at public vendue on Tuesday the
13th instant, a quantity of logwood lately
imported in the Ship Dorset, of London...
That the Wood (sic) will be sold per ton,
all usual customs on logwood in this place
allow'd...

February 22, 1739
Just Imported in the Nightingale, Tho:
Barnes, Master, from New York, and to be sold by
John Dart:
melassas rum iron pots and
sugar tobacco chest drawers good
bread bricks cart wheels Madeira
butter scrutoir (sic) lanterns wine
pease tables wooden ware

March 8, 1739
Exported from this place since November 1,
1738...pitch 1,740; tarr (sic) 315; turpentine
12.
Prices of the following goods...
pitch 40s
tar 30s
turpentine none

March 29, 1739
To be lett (sic) by the weaver carpenter, a
very good two story house very cheap, three booms
on a floor with kitchen, wash house and garden, etc.
over against Mr. Grame's garden in Alien's Street

May 12, 1739
Stone and wood carving and carpenters and
joyners (sic) work, done by Richard Baylis, from
London who has two very good tabacco engines to
dispose of...

All persons indebted to the estate of Tho:
Blundell, carpenter, deseased...







June 2, 1739
All manner of bricklayers and plasterers
work performed with all convenient speed, and at
reasonable rates by Samual Holmes.

June 16, 1739
Any person that understands the management
of a saw mill, may apply to Gabriel Manigault.

June 30, 1739
Exported from this place since November 1,
1738...pitch 3,026; tarr (sic) 731; turpentine
14...
Prices of the following goods...
pitch 30s-35s
tar 25s
turpentine none

July 7, 1739
Whereas the Commissioners of Fortifications
(having received his Honour the Lieutenant
Governor's Directions) are about to erect a
building of about 82 feet long, 19 feet wide,
10 the first and 8 and-a-half the second story
on the South side of the old church yard in
Charlestown...
Therefore the Commissioners do hereby
desire that any person or persons who are
inclined to furnish, brick, lime, timber, plank
(for the lower floors) boards, shingles or other
materials, which may be wanted, or who will
undertake the bricklayer or carpenter work...
Phillip Prioleon, sec.

September 15, 1739
All persons indebted to the estate of
David McClellan late of Charlestown, carpenter,
deceased...

October 27, 1739
Post Script: All sorts of house, joiner's,
and carpenter's work, finished and completed
(sic) by Thomas Legare...

November 4, 1739
Exported from this place since November 1,
1738...pitch 7,890; tarr (sic) 2,722; turpentine
33
Prices of the following goods...
pitch 40s-45s
tar 35s-40s
turpentine 15s-20s

December 1, 1739
To be hired by the day by Sarah Blakewey,
a pair of very good sawyers, and a pacing horse.




49


December 22, 1739
All sorts of bricklayer's and stone work
done by Isaac Younge, enquire (sic) at the sign
of the King's Arms, at North end of the bay.




BIBLIOGRAPHY




Dodsley, R. & J. A Description of South Carolina.
London: 1761.

Forrison, H. Early American Architecture. New York:
Oxford University Press, 1952.

Ravenel, B.S.J. Architects of Charleston. Charlestown:
Carolina Art Association, ---

Stoney, S.G. Plantations of the Carolina Low Country.
Charleston: Carolina Art Association, 1955.

--South Carolina Gazette. Lewis Timoth, printer, 1732-1782.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs