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Warren Resen is on the
road again. This time
he's reporting on the
500th anniversary of St.
Augustine, FL. Read the full
article on page 11


Shooting From Memories
is the topic of Mitch
Traphagen's feature story
this week. Read the full
article on page 2


PRST STD
PAID
RUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570
PERMIT NO. 8


November 14, 2013
Volume 57
Number 43


THE OBSERVER NEWS


Bill delaying

higher flood

insurance

rates could

become law

by year's end
* By KEVIN BRADY
kevin@observernews.net
Legislation that sent flood insurance
premiums skyrocketing for some
waterfront homes and is chilling part
of the local real estate market will be
reformed by the end of the year, an
author of the law said Nov. 9.
Homeowners and Realtors have been
calling for relief from the stiff rate
increases, organizing rallies across
the nation, including last month in
Tampa Bay, to protest rates that have
increased by 600 percent in some
cases.
The rate hikes went into effect Oct. 1
for anyone seeking a new policy.
Amy Soto, a Riverview Realtor who
has been buying and selling homes in
South County for 13 years, said the
rate hike is hurting the local real estate
market.
"Just the threat of flood insurance
rates going up will keep potential
buyers from buying. It's going to be a
much harder sell for some people and
it will limit the buyer pool."
In the wake of the uproar,
Congresswoman Maxine Waters, a
co-author of the law that led to the
rate hikes, now says the law will be
changed.
"Over the past several months, I have
felt the harm and heartache that many
Americans have already experienced
as a result of changes to the National
Hlood Insurance Program. From the
start, I have made clear that I would
lead the effort to fix the unintended
consequences of the Biggert-Waters
Hlood Insurance Reform Act," said
Waters in a statement released by her
office announcing the deal.
Local Congresswoman Kathy Castor
is co-sponsoring the bill.
"This bipartisan breakthrough will
benefit thousands of families and
businesses in Florida and other states,
and will responsibly analyze flood
I Continued on page 5


* South County remembers our veterans
: ____________ ,___ai~iiiiiiiiiii.


/


N


MICHELLE TRAPHAGEN PHOTO
The annual Ruskin VFW Veterans Day Parade was held Saturday on U.S. Highway 41. Boy and Girl Scouts, Cub Scouts, Brownies
and high school bands and JROTC units walked the route, many passing out beads and candy to the hundreds of people who
lined the parade route. This year's parade appeared bigger than ever, with businesses, organizations from around the region and
numerous Gasparilla Krewes taking part in the celebration of heroes. More photos on page 16.


First responder training gets a boost

from Sun City Center's Interfaith Council


* By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews.net
Paramedics, EMTs and EMS personnel
who train at Hillsborough Community
College's South County campus have a
new patient from Sun City Center.
Sometimes he has heart problems, other
days a fever and vomiting, and yet other
times it's trouble with his blood pressure
shooting too high or dropping too low.
He's a real mess likely to have any
number of accidents and illnesses in any
one day.
Some days, he may even technically die
on the table and be miraculously brought
back to life through extreme emergency
measures.
He's the latest high-fidelity medical
training mannequin in the lab, complete
with a variety of capabilities from speech
to displaying symptoms.
As of Nov. 12, he had not yet been
named.
Bought with a grant from the Interfaith


Council of Sun City Center, the new
"patient" helps future paramedics,
emergency medical technicians and
emergency medical service personnel
through simulations of actual events they
will encounter in the field.
"Equipment like this helps our students
continue to be the best trained when
they get out into our communities," said
Larry Linder, program coordinator for
all the HCC campuses. Linder explained
that while nationally, there is about a 50
percent pass rate on state exams after
schooling, HCC's last class had 100 pass
rate and usually has a state-wide rate of 98
percent.
"Some schools with just a couple of
graduates can say they have an 85 percent
pass rate, but if you only have two
students, that's a lot different than our
classes that put out about 110 paramedics
a year plus the EMT and EMS students,"
he explained.
I Continued on page 32


PENNY FLETCHER PHOTO
Dr. Allen Witt, president of the South
County campus of Hillsborough Com-
munity College, left, and Larry Linder,
program coordinator for paramedic,
EMT and EMS programs for all the HCC
campuses, check out the features of the
lifelike mannequin bought recently with
a grant from the Interfaith Council of
Sun City Center.


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2 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


Shooting from memories
An Observer New, feature tory


* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net
A almost everyone is a
photographer these
days, displaying their
photographs on Facebook and
Instagram, usually taken with cell
phones. Some of the results are
mediocre; some are incredible.
Cell phone cameras are so
ubiquitous now that even famed
photographer Annie Leibovitz has
been quoted as saying that she
recommends an iPhone to people
who ask her what kind of camera
to buy. After all, the best possible
camera is the one you have with
you and most people always have
their smartphones.
Over the past few years I've
published a few photos taken
with my iPhone but that pocket
device just doesn't measure
up for most of the work I do. I
couldn't possibly use an iPhone
to photograph a large event.
I wouldn't want to use it to
capture the photos of people for


my feature stories the least I
can do is make sure people look
good. And for that, I need good
equipment.
My first real 35mm camera,
purchased in my early teens on
the advice of Jim Brandenburg,
a family friend and photographer
who would later gain worldwide
fame, was entirely manual. I had
to actually focus the lens and
set the exposure by balancing a
little needle in the viewfinder. I
still have that camera and it still
works. At the time, my Dad told
me that I could pay him back with
my future photo royalties.
Fast-forward a few decades
and virtually everything about
photography has changed.
Recently, I upgraded one of my
professional Canon cameras
and, shortly after, photographed
an event in a darkened theater.
The camera was able to focus on
what I could barely see through
the viewfinder and the resulting
image was good enough to appear


~~--K 7A
%din.


in print. Technology is amazing.
That said, as camera technology
gets better and better, I'm feeling
my photography is getting worse
and worse. I'm less journalist or
an artist capturing a moment than
I am a mere cog in a recording
machine, machine-gunning
images captured by a high-tech
wonder of technology. It simply
became too much so I decided to
shoot from some memories.
Continued on page 21


MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTOS
A Leica M model rangerfinder camera is almost entirely manually
operated. There are no magic buttons, the results are entirely based
on the photographer's vision and skills. And, of course, some luck.


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Persistence the key to Sun City Center man's continued court success


* By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews.net
David Brown keeps pushing
ahead no matter what the opposing
lawyers throw at him.
Brown who is not an attor-
ney started fighting with the
Department of Environmental Pro-
tection in 2007 over the backflow
valves being forced on homeown-
ers who irrigate their lawns with
pond or lake water.
At first he filed on behalf of
other residents as well, but was not
permitted by law to continue as
a111lii in' but an individual.
So he filed the lawsuit again, this
time listing himself as the only
petitioner.
When he had trouble finding
an attorney who wanted to go up
against the DEP he went "pro se,"
(without a lawyer) which is every
citizen's right.
He says the backflow valves
installed to prevent irrigation
water from lakes and ponds getting
into the drinking water system is
unsafe, costly to homeowners, and
should not be the homeowner's
responsibility.
Where he lives in Sun City Cen-
ter alone, he says more than 1,000
people are affected. And the rules
he says are unfair are county-wide.
On Sept. 19, The Observer News
and The Current published a story
about how Brown had won the
Hillsborough County Commis-
sion's Moral Courage Award for
fighting bureaucracy.
The fight is still in progress and
has taken another turn.
At the time that story was writ-


ten Brown was awaiting a Nov. 13
court date to prove his case before
an administrative judge. He had
already overcome many court-
related hurdles and managed to
stay up with the team of lawyers
representing the DEP That story is
still online at www.observernews.
net for those who wish to read it.
Since that was written, however,
two things have happened.
First, Judge Bram E. Canter
overturned a DEP motion to dis-
miss, and then a new hearing date
was set for Jan. 27.
Canter is a judge with the Divi-
sion of Administrative Hearings in
Tallahassee.
"This was a big step," Brown
said, referring to the judge's
overturning the DEP's motion. He
is now preparing for the hearing
by lining up his 12 witnesses, and
writing his list of stipulations.
The stipulations are things that he
would like to ask the DEP to agree
upon beforehand. If they can agree
on some points early, the hearing
will be smoother and much shorter.
"It could mean I can call fewer
witnesses, which would really cut
down the time," Brown said.
Brown and many others who
were forced to install the backflow
valves on their property because
they watered their lawns from
lakes and ponds say the way the
valves are made and installed is
dangerous, not just expensive. And
they're on homeowner's property,
not county easement.
"It's a real threat because the
way they're made, somebody
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the water supply and poison
people," Brown said. "The valve
could work the other way not
just prevent the water from the
pond from coming in."
Bill Hodges agreed. Hodges, the
co-founder of South Shore Toast-
masters, and owner of Hodges
Seminars International Inc., has
a television show on Tampa Bay
Cable Network called Spotlight
on Government, on which he has
interviewed Brown.
"I've gone to several hearings of
the water board with David and I
feel he has a valid point. This is not
just dangerous, but terribly expen-
sive," Hodges said in a telephone
interview. "Just in Sun City Center,
there are about 80 ponds. If a lot of
people have to buy these, the costs
will be outrageous."
The cost of installing the valve
as designed now is about $670.
This price does not include any
weatherizing or covering for it,
or locks; after that it costs own-
ers about $114 a year to maintain.
Some homeowners have already
installed them, but not all.
Brown has continually objected
to the fact that the homeowner has


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PENNY FLETCHER PHOTO
This is the backflow valve that is causing citizens to rebel. David
Brown of Sun City Center has been fighting the county's practices
concerning backflow valves on private property since 2007.


to put the valve on his or her own
property, pay for it, and maintain it.
Worse yet, he claims it is very
unsafe.
Brown evidently made his case
to Judge Canter, because Canter
said, "Because the dangerous
condition is alleged to be real and
immediate and Petitioner's fear
is alleged to be real and immedi-
ate, it is determined that Petitioner
has alleged a sufficient injury for
standing to challenge the rule,"
when he overturned the DEP's


motion to dismiss.
Now Brown is working on two
things: a request for mediation and
his teleconference that will take
place in January if a judge does
not send the case to mediation
first.
Brown has demonstrated a valve
system he feels is safer and would
cost $19 instead of more than
$600.
"If the county, instead of the
homeowner, has to pay, I am
Continued on page 5


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OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 3


NOVEMBER 14,2013







4 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER NOVEMBER 14, 2013


Positive Talk: Morale the vital ingredient


Raising morale in an
organization from the bottom is
almost impossible. The amount
of pressure required is extreme.
The responsibility for creating a
climate for
good morale
within an
organization '
lies firmly and >9
clearly with
management.
Employees By William Hodges
will follow
their lead.


Here are some ideas that managers
and supervisors can use to create
an atmosphere of high morale.
1. Recognize even the smallest
achievement of your work
force. Recognition is one of the
greatest tools for building morale,
especially when it is timely.
2. Ensure that employees know
exactly what you want. If, in fact,
they are doing something that you
would rather they not do, spend little
time on what they did wrong. Opt
to spend the majority of your time
pointing out how you want it done.


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3. Keep your promises. Promise
only what you can produce and
then produce what you promised.
At Hodges Seminars International,
we have built customer satisfaction
by adhering to an even more
stringent standard. That standard
is under-promise and over-
produce. I believe this is a good
rule for supervisors and managers
to follow.
4. Practice consistency in your
dealings and be even-handed.
Employees can adjust to almost
an iuii.:, as long as they feel the
organization is consistent in the
way policies are administered.
Inconsistency causes employees to
feel unsure and uncomfortable.
5. If you are wrong, admit it.
Nothing is harder to defend than
an action you no longer believe
to be right. There is no shame in
admitting that you made a mistake.
A friend of mine used to say, "A
mistake is only proof that someone
tried to do something." When you
are wrong, face up to it. Thank the
person who helped you find the
error and get on with the job. This
will do two things. It will show
that you are a big enough person
to admit an error, and it will make
those around you unafraid to help
you find an error.
6. Keep your mind open to new
ideas. The song "Traditions" from


Award-Winning Newspapers
The Fiddler on the Roof makes a THE OBSERVER NEWS
simple point when it says, "All _______ _
of our traditions were new once." T B SCC OBSERVER &
This new, strange or different idea
which runs contrary to your current THE CU mN
traditions could be the start of an 210 Woodland Estates S.W.
even more profitable tradition. Ruskin, FL 33570
In any case, if people know you 813-645-3111
have an open mind, they will bring Fax: 813-645-4118
ideas to you. You will at least have www.ObserverNews.net
thle opportunity to decide whether byPublished Every Thursday
the opportunity to decide whether M&M Printing Co., Inc. 645-4048
they are good ideas or not.
7. Above all else, be honest with EDITORIAL:
your people. Participants in our Brenda Knowles............ Publisher/Editor
seminars consistently rank honesty brenda@observernews.net
as the number one attribute of a Mitch Traphagen................. Online Editor
good supervisor, mitch@observernews.net
In The Merchant of Venice, Penny Fletcher..........Contributing Writer
Shakespeare wrote, "iThe quality of penny@observernews.net
mercy is not strained, it droppeth Kevin Brady..............Contributing Writer
r ,kevin@observernews.net
as the gentle rain from heaven kevn@obseveews.net
upon the place beneath: it is twice Warren Resen.....................Travel Writer
w630@aol.com
blessed; it blesseth him that gives
and him that takes...." The same All press releases, news articles and
Ss a t m it photos may be emailed to news@
can be said about morale it observernews.net, faxed to 645-4118, or
blesses both the person who sets mailed to Observer News, 210 Woodland
up the conditions for high morale, Estates Ave. SW Ruskin, FL 33570
and those who are affected by SALES:
the enhanced working and living Vilma Stillwell... Display Advertising Rep.
environment. Whether you are the vilma@observernews.net
manager of a multi-million dollar
buinaes o yu have r onsbl Nan Kirk ........... Display Advertising Rep.
business or you have responsibility nan@observernews.net
for managing a home, creating
a high level of morale is your CLASSIFIED/CIRCULATION:
number one job. If you do that Beverly Kay......... Classified /Circulation
properly, your other jobs will be beverly@observernews.net
much easier.
PRODUCTION:
Hodges is a nationally recognized ChereSmmons ........... Create Director
speaker, trainer and syndicated
columnist. He also hosts an interview- Carol MacAlister... Graphic Arts / Layout
format television program, Spotlight carol@observernews.net
on Government, on the Tampa Bay Jason Martin.........Graphic Arts/Layout
Community Network which airs jason@observernews.net
Monday at 8 p.m. (Bright House The views expressed by our writers are
channel 950, Verizon channel 30) not necessarily shared by The Observer
and Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. (BH News, SCC Observer, The Current or
channel 949, Verizon channel 36). M&M Printing Co., Inc.
The shows can also be viewed at www. We Accept
hodgesvideos.com. Phone : 813-641- 00 1
0816. Email: ." i., l,. .,l^ ......
Website: ww- i-ih .,t> ... ,,


November is National Alzheimer's
Awareness Month
In honor of National Alzheimer's Awareness Month, Hillsborough
County's Aging Services division has scheduled a number of events.
On Tuesday, Nov. 19, they will host Annual National Memory Screening
Day, using materials sponsored by the Alzheimer's foundation of America.
Residents can call for an appointment between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. at the
following local sites:
Ruskin Senior Center: 813-672-1107
Oaks at Riverview Senior Center: 813-272-6829
Brandon Senior Center: 813-635-8066
In addition, at 11:30 a.m. on Thursday, Nov. 21 Aging Services will
host a presentation on "Alzheimer's and the Body-Mind Connection" at
the Wimauma Senior Center, 5714 North St. in Wimauma.

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A new program approved last week
by the Board of County Commission-
ers will put needed school supplies in
students' hands.
The commissioners approved a
$25,000 annual agreement with Hills-
borough Education Foundation for
their Teaching Tools for Hillsborough
Schools Program.
The Teaching Tools program col-
lects unused and reusable materials
from local businesses, including but
not limited to: obsolete office supplies,
castoffs, overruns and manufacturing
by-products generated in the commer-
cial sector. These items are then dis-
tributed free of charge to students in
Title 1 schools through the program's
teachers store at 2306 N. Howard Ave.
in Tampa.
The funding from the County assists
with the administrative expenses and
overhead costs associated with the
collection, storage and distribution
of materials. Hillsborough County
first became involved in the Teaching
Tools program in 2005 as a way to re-
duce the volume of commercial waste
and promote the positive reuse of busi-


nesses castoffs.
According the Hillsborough Educa-
tion Foundation:
56 percent of Hillsborough Coun-
ty Public Schools are classified as Title
1. This means that more than 75 per-
cent of the students at these schools
are considered economically disad-
vantaged, and may not be able to af-
ford the most basic school supplies.
Teaching Tools currently serves
120 Title 1 schools and educational
sites throughout the district, reaching
more than 2,300 teachers and 60,000
at-risk students every year.
Since 2002, Hillsborough Educa-
tion Foundation has distributed more
than $13 million in free school sup-
plies.
Businesses can learn more about
product and financial donations by
contacting Fred Weber at fweber@
educationfoundation.com or 813-574-
0280.
To learn more about the Teaching
Tools program at the Hillsborough
Education Foundation visit www.edu-
cationfoundation.com.


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4 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


NOVEMBER 14, 2013






OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 5


Higher flood insurance rates could be delayed


0 Continued from page 1

insurance reform in a measured,
reasonable way that focuses on
stability for homeowners," Cas-
tor said. "I am pressing to have
Congress act quickly to pass this
bipartisan legislation that provides
relief for my neighbors, some of
whom saw their rates skyrocket
overnight."
Waters' new plan delays poten-
tial rate increases up to four years.
The California Democrat, who
is leading a bipartisan group of 50
House members and 15 senators
who filed the Homeowner Flood
Insurance Affordability Act last
month, hopes the bill will become
law by the end of the year.
The Biggert-Waters Flood
Insurance Reform Act of 2012
was intended to dig the National


S iches- WO
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Palmetto, Florida 33421


941-729-46C

STOP ,
vO ,0 otIA I


Flood Insurance Program (NFIP)
out of a financial black hole. The
federal program that insures many
waterfront properties across the
U.S. is currently $24 billion in
the red, the result of claims made
after superstorms like Hurricane
Katrina.
The NFIP was created by
Congress in 1968 because flood
insurance was virtually unavail-
able from the private insurance
markets following frequent wide-
spread flooding along the Mis-
sissippi River in the early 1960s.
Private insurance companies are
still wary about writing policies
in flood-prone communities,
leaving the federal government as
the insurance of choice in many
waterfront communities.
Of the NIP's 5.6 million


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policyholders, 1.1 million are sub-
sidized, according to the Federal
Emergency Management Agency
(FEMA). Florida is the program's
largest customer with 2 million
policies.
The 2012 law called on FEMA
and other agencies to make a
number of changes to the way
NFIP is run, including raising
rates to reflect true flood risk. The
changes will mean premium rate
increases for most NFIP policy-
holders over time.
"Realtors understand the
need for solvency in the federal
flood program. However, the
law contains severe unintended
consequences that are harmful to
Floridians as well as other states,"
said Florida Realtors President
Dean Asher.
"We believe the reforms will
have a detrimental impact on the
entire economy of Florida, includ-
ing existing homeowners and
those who want to buy Florida
properties," said Asher after a
meeting with Gov. Rick Scott last
week on the issue.
Congress has apparently been
listening to Asher and others. Spe-
cifically, the legislation will:
Impose a delay likely to total
four years for the most vulnerable
properties, by delaying imple-
mentation of rate increases until
two years after FEMA completes
an affordability study, which
was mandated in Biggert-Waters
but not undertaken. FEMA has
estimated it will take two years to
complete the affordability study.
It would then take up to an ad-
ditional two years for FEMA to
submit an affordability framework
to Congress and for Congress
to review the framework. This
means rate increases would be


MITCH TRAPHAGEN FILE PHOTO
Congresswoman Kathy Castor
is co-sponsoring a bill to delay
huge rate hikes to flood insur-
ance.
delayed for four years in total.
Allow FEMA to utilize
National Flood Insurance Funds
to reimburse policyholders who
successfully appeal a map deter-
mination.
Eliminate the 50 percent cap
on state and local contributions to
levee construction and reconstruc-
tion.
Require FEMA to certify that
the agency has fully adopted a
modernized risk-based approach
to analyzing flood risk.
The bipartisan deal came after
several weeks of negotiations
with Democrats and Republicans
in the House and Senate.
Other state representatives back-
ing the bill are Connie Brown (D-
Jacksonville), Lois Frankel (D-
Boca Raton), Frederica Wikson
(D-Miami) and Patrick Murphy
(D-West Palm Beach). Senator
Bill Nelson has also backed the
new bill.


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Backflow

valves
0 Continued from page 3
sure it will favor this version,"
Brown stated in a telephone
interview Nov. 9.
Part of his request for me-
diation contains the statement:
"In other words, if RP's and
DCVA's (existing valves) pro-
vide vandals and terrorists with
direct access into the public
drinking water supply which
they certainly do it becomes
a 'dangerous condition' that
can cause injury to homeown-
ers. The judge has set the legal
framework for extraordinary
liability on the DEP and public
water systems for personal
injury, wrongful death, prop-
erty damage, and damages for
business interruption, when a
contamination event perpetrated
by vandals or terrorists may
occur. And remember that neg-
ligence does take precedent over
sovereign immunity."
In his prepared statements he
cites both U.S. Constitutional
law and Florida Constitutional
law as precedents.
"All federal law says about
needing the valves is that you
have to have some kind of a
cross-connection program.
It does not say what kind of
program that has to be," Brown
insists.
"I have been told that post-
poning the hearings is a tactic
agencies use to tire out the
petitioners," Brown said. "But
it is just giving me more time to
prepare.
Meanwhile he says he hopes
a judge will order the case into
mediation and save the time and
expense of the hearing, which is
expected to last two days.


I


NOVEMBER 14,2013


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_______jC.A.R.E. is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.
I'm A _For directions, visit www.CareShelter.org or call (813) 645-2273.


S ), lOPEN 8 am-5 pm Monday thru Friday __ _
0-YAIo 4 1-till* www.athomeauto.net '

rI rr BFGoodrich NUlINROY'i AaBelco l ...


Dory
Dory is a beautiful black and
white kitten. Her mother is Nellie
a gorgeous tabby cat. Dory loves
to play with the other kittens at the
shelter and really loves to chase
the cat toys for hours. She is cute
and adorable and would like to
come to live at a forever home of
her own. Go visit this sweet little
girl and give her that home. Dory
has been spayed and is current on
her shots. As part of her adoption
Dory will be microchipped.
DOB: April 25, 2013.


Russ
Russ is a Terrier mix with the
most heart-melting eyes. With an
invite, he will lie upside down in
your lap and take a nap. Russ en-
joys running in the play yard with
his furry friends, playing in the
doggy pool, and getting kisses.
Russ would do best in a dog-savvy
home with a patient and loving
owner. Russ is neutered, current
on his shots, and microchipped.
DOB: July 2, 2009.


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Attendance doubled at Caregiver
Symposium
On the last day of October, 255 caregivers received care themselves at the 2nd
Annual Caregiver Symposium held at Community Hall in Sun City Center.
Debbie Caneen, director of admissions at Sun Towers, which sponsors this
annual event, stated that attendance had doubled since last year. "It seems that
more people are realizing they are in fact caregivers of loved ones, or are just
interested in receiving information for their own aging process."
With seven different speakers who presented t. .i.NiIliiin from "Coping with
Caregiver Stress" to 'Technologies to Help Caregivers," everyone who partici-
pated gained additional knowledge to assist them in their journey as a caregiver.
More than 40 vendors were present to assist attendees with resources such as
the Samaritan's Alzheimer's Auxiliary, the Alzheimer's Association, and even
Dr. Vo, who is a mobile dentist willing to come to your home, to name just a few.
Senior Helpers provided free care for those loved ones with dementia who were
unable to be left at home so that their caregiver could attend the event.
Lara Cudvat, one of the attendees said, "Having all of this information under
one roof, along with the lovely lunch I enjoyed, has given me a break from my
caregiving duties. This event has provided me with resources to feel comfort-
able that I am doing the very best for my loved one. I am looking forward to
next year's event!"
If you were unable to attend the event and would like more information about
the speakers or vendors who might assist you in your caregiving journey, con-
tact Debbie Caneen at 813-892-2990.

Gamble Plantation offers an '"Old
South' Christmas open house
The United Daughters of the Confederacy, Florida Division, the Gainm-
ble Plantation Preservation Alliance and the Florida Park Service will
hold Plantation Christmas Open House Sunday, Dec. 8, from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. at Gamble Plantation Historic State Park in Ellenton.
Once again you can travel back to the Old South during the day through
the many lifestyle demonstrations of that time period. Gamble Mansion
and the Patten House will be lavishly decorated in the Christmas spirit,
allowing you a special look at a 19th century Christmas.
Members of the United Daughters of the Confederacy will be wearing
costumes reminiscent of the era of the 1840s through 1870s to add au-
thenticity to the day. The 4th Florida Volunteer Infantry will be dressed
in military uniforms re-enacting a Confederate encampment. There will
be music, crafts and fun for everyone. Admission is free.
Gamble Plantation Historic State Park is located on US 301 in Ellen-
ton, one mile west of 1-75 off exit 224. Florida State Parks are in vari-
ous stages of accessibility. Should you need assistance to enable your
full participation, contact Gamble Plantation.
For further information please call Gamble Plantation Historic State
Park at 941-723-4536 or Fax 941-723-4538.


6 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


NOVEMBER 14, 2013






NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Holiday cards come your way from SouthShore RegionaJlL$

Once again, the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library were spreading the joy in
area elementary and middle schools! The Friends organized an art contest in early fall,
and students at participating schools submitted their artwork.
The competition for this 5th Annual Holiday Art Contest was open to local students. Ten
students were selected as winners. Their designs were transformed into Holiday Greeting
Cards by Ruskin-based M&M Printing Company, Inc.
The cards are being sold now through December at the SouthShore Regional Library, I
15816 Beth Shields Way in Ruskin. -
A bundle of ten cards costs just $5. Proceeds from the sale will supplement free Library : .... :_. /1
programs offered to the public. _


Ii
II


(di~Y~i


-V-

Reddick Elementary School (from left): Belinda Solis, 3rd Grade; Alexander Moran
Chavez, 3rd Grade; Annahi Heredia, 2nd Grade; Lourdes Gonzalez, Kindergarten;
and Emily Cuevas, 5th Grade; with Assistant Principal Michelle Carrick and Art
Teacher Susan Turpyn. ,__


OBSERVER NEWS 7
I gh


Beth Shields Middle School (from left): Sean Davenport, 6th Grade; and JoAnna Gaff,
6th Grade; with Art Teacher Terrena Conson and Principal Tibor Kovacs.


M- M`4 I
Cypress Creek Elementary School (from left): Fatima Guia, 5th Grade; Vellenia Pena,
2nd Grade; and Kenneth Saldana, 5th Grade; with Principal Roy Moral and Art Teacher
Sandra Shelton.


LEGAL NOTICE
ACCEPTING BIDS FOR RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION TRADES
Florida Home Partnership, Inc. a not-for-profit homebuilder is currently accepting bids for all residential construction trades for its newest Community
BAYOU PASS VILLAGE PHASE IV
A 158 home single family community to be constructed utilizing the USDA Mutual Self Help Housing Program.
FHP currently has bid packets available at its corporate office located at 201 14th Avenue SE, Suite "H", Ruskin 33570. Bid packages may be picked up for a
$15.00 fee (checks or money orders only) from October 31,2013 through 1:30 PM on Friday November 15, 2013. A Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting will be held at
2:00 PM on Friday November 15 at the Dorothy Duke Community Center located at 2203 Dorothy Duke Lane, Ruskin 33570. Immediately following the pre-bid
meeting all bidders are welcome to tour homes currently under construction at Bayou Pass Village Phase III, adjacent to the pre-bid meeting.
All bidders will receive three separate floor plans to bid on along with general specifications. Bids are due to Florida Home Partnership's Ruskin office listed
above no later than 4:00 PM on Friday December 6, 2013. Successful bidders will be notified as soon as possible after December 20, 2013. Basis for award
will be lowest responsible negotiated bidder at FHP's sole discretion. It is anticipated these homes will be constructed over a 36-48 month period.
FHP is seeking proposals from the following construction trades:


* Surveyors
* Block and Concrete Masons
* Frame and Trim Carpentry Contractors
* Electricians
* Plumbers
* HVAC Contractors
* Drywall Contractors
* Window Suppliers and Installers
* Roofing Contractors
* Vinyl Siding Contractors
* Carpet and Vinyl Suppliers and Installers
* Ceramic Tile Suppliers and Installers
* Shelving and Mirror Suppliers and Installers
* Cabinet Makers and Installers
* Pest Control (termite) Contractors
* Stucco Contractors
* Excavation and Grading Contractors
* Waste Disposal Contractors
* Insulation Contractors
* Suppliers of Lumber, Concrete, Paint,Trusses,Appliances and
Masonry Products
* Supply & Install Sod,Trees and Landscaping


All Bidders must have appropriate state or county license for trade and
carry $1,000,000 in General Liability Insurance and $1,000,000 worker's
Compensation Insurance. Minority and small businesses are encouraged
to apply. All contractors and suppliers must furnish a minimum one year
warranty from date of occupancy.

For Further Information contact Kim Bishop at 813-672-7860 x 261 or
email kim@flhome.org
FHP is an equal opportunity employer www.flhome.org
Submitted by: Earl Pfeiffer Executive Director CRC 058278


A community of affordable homes

exclusively for first-time homebuyers!



EQUAL HOUSING FLORIDA HOME PARTNERIUIHIP
OPPORTUNITY
BUILDING A BETTER TOMORROW, TODAY!

(813) 672-7860 www.flhome.org







8 OBSERVER NEWS NOVEMBER 14, 2013


What Rhymes with...


I Niia G Thami (AO


There are lots of
games for kids from
board games to
video games. Fill in
the blanks to name
some popular kids'
games.


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;,Jokes S- Riddles


tfB^ ^I1^!-^ Q: Why couldn't people
play cards on the ark?
Soep eq uo buils eje@ / Aeql esneoeg V


List 10 words that rhyme with "game."


2.


10. _____
ewei 'eweqs 'ewes 'eweu 'ewel 'ewe 'ewej 'ewep 'eweo 'W!ie :SJeMSUe ewoS


Pass Along The Fun
It's nice to win, but not all games have a winner. Take the game of Telephone, for example. No one wins.
The fun comes in how a message is passed around.
To play Telephone, players must sit in a circle. The first player thinks of a good message and whispers it
in the next player's ear. Play continues in this way until everyone has had a turn. The last player to hear the
message repeats it out loud.
In most cases, the message given by the last player is not the message given by the first player. As the
message is passed around the circle, it often changes, sometimes in a big way. The message, "Mary has a black
and white dog named Misty" could very well end up, "Marty has a black and brown cat named Hissy." The
longer the message, the harder it is for players to remember and tell it to each other correctly.


Q: Why is it hard to play
cards in the jungle?
sqeEeeqO Auew oo1 eJe eJeJqi v


I Fact or Fiction?


Playground

Game

Challenge

When the bell rings and kids
head outside for recess, some
go directly to the jungle gym,
while others run around and
play games. Here are some
questions about some popular
playground games. How many
can you answer correctly?


1) In Red Rover, players make human chains. Fact or Fiction?
2) In Hide and Seek, players hide from each other.
Fact or Fiction?
3) In Simon Says, players follow instructions. Fact or Fiction?
4) In Hot Potato, players pass around a real hot potato.
Fact or Fiction?
5) In Duck Duck Goose, players chase each other.
Fact or Fiction?
6) In Shadow Tag, players chase each other at night.
Fact or Fiction?
7) In Freeze Tag, players freeze and unfreeze each other.
Fact or Fiction?
8) In Hop Scotch, players hop along a grid. Fact or Fiction?
9) In Four Square, players dodge balls. Fact or Fiction?
10) In Marco Polo, players try to tag each other in the mud.
Fact or Fiction?
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OGO FS_


8 OBSERVER NEWS


NOVEMBER 14, 2013







NOVEMBER 14, 2013inal ObSrVEryNW
Kid pogamevet i 0lih0
0N
151 ehShieds ay0Ru0i 83-73-65
Bak


5th Annual Kids'Wildlife Habitat Contest is on


On Earth Day in April 2014, the
Florida Wildlife Federation will
award a commemorative plaque
and an age-suitable gardening
book to the Florida kid or kids
12 years old or under who have
helped to establish and maintain a
habitat for wildlife at home or on
school property. The habitat will
also be featured on the FWF web-
site and in its newsletter. Entries
close March 31, 2014.
The Florida Wildlife Federation
is dedicated to encouraging young
Floridians to be good environ-
mentalists and to care for native
animals and plants. It believes that
time spent outdoors working on a
habitat project is of great value in
encouraging young people to learn
about nature. Experts say that lack
of active outdoor play and projects
contributes to many childhood
health problems.


It's easy to enter. Just tell FWF
how the habitat provides the fol-
lowing elements: food, water,
cover, and a place to raise young.
Send some photos of your habitat,
preferably with children working
there.
Teachers: note that it is not nec-
essary for schoolyard habitats to
be certified by National Wildlife
Federation or any other organi-
zation, just that they provide the
four necessary elements for a good
wildlife habitat. The group is es-
pecially interested in the science
that students learn in the habitat.

Explore your commul
news and
local business offerii
THE OBSERVER Ni
813-645-3111


A description and photos of the
habitat can be mailed to 2545
Blairstone Pines Dr., Tallahassee,
FL 32301, or emailed to patricia@
fwfonline.org.
Email patricia@fwfonline.org
or call the FWF office at 850-
656-7113 for more information, if
needed. Visit www.fwfonline.org
for photos and information about
previous winners.


LITTLE MANATEE SOUTH


CHARRETTE CLOSING PRESENTATION

What comes after planning? Doing. Together, as part of a process we're calling
LMS :NEXT, we've been building a code to reflect the future character and form
of the Little Manatee South Community Plan area. And we're wrapping up the
charrette process with a closing presentation on November 21, 2013.

Join us for this important event. Discover how your Community Plan can be
enabled by a customized form-based code. Hillsborough County staff and a team
of experienced consultants will discuss everyone's work to date and present the
latest recommended drafts.


WHEN:
Thursday, November 21, 2013, at 6:30 p.m.


WHERE:
SouthShore Community
Resource Center
201 14th Ave. S.E.
Ruskin, FL 33570


4.b LMSNEXT.ORG
JoeMoreda | 813-276-8379
Hillsborough moredaj@hillsboroughcounty.org
County

All meeting facilities are ADA compliant. For assistance, or for more information,
please call 813-272-5275 (TTY: 301-7173). Para informaci6n, llamar al 272-5275.

CO MNTSETN


Crafternoon Thursday, Nov. 14 at 4:30 p.m.
For children ages 5-10 Join the Children's Librarian and create col-
orful and fun Thanksgiving crafts to take home with you. Registration
is required. Register at the Reference Desk or by calling 813-273-3652.
Funded by the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library.

Bedtime Stories Thursday, Nov. 14 at 7 p.m.
For ages 2-5 with a caregiver ~ Stories, action rhymes, songs, inter-
active activities, and crafts make up this fun 30-minute program that
celebrates a love of reading. Children may wear pajamas and bring a
blanket and favorite cuddly toy.

HTML for Teens Thursday, Nov. 14 at 7 p.m.
For ages 13-18 ~ Learn how to program for the Web with HTMIL and
make your own dynamic websites. Registration is required. Ask at the
Information Desk or call 813-273-3652.

Pee Wee Artists: Let's Create! Monday, Nov. 18 at 10:30 a.m.
Pee Wee Artists(3-5 years, adult must be present) will join our art in-
structor and create an art project to take home. Limit 18. Registration
required at either the SouthShore Regional Library Information Desk or
by calling 813-273-3652.

Baby Time Monday, Nov. 18 at 1:35 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 11:35 a.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 20 at 10:05 am.
For children ages 0-20 months and their caregivers ~ Early literacy
begins at birth. Bond with your baby through stories, bouncy rhymes
and songs in this 20-minute lapsit program that introduces early literacy
skills and encourages language development.

Wacky Science Fun Monday, Nov. 18 at 3 p.m.
For ages 5-12. Join us as the goofy professor creates all kinds of fun
magic concoctions with common elements found in everyone's kitchen.
Things bubble, fizz up, and bounce out as kids are entertained while
being introduced to the fun of science. Funded by Friends of the South-
Shore Regional Library.

Toddler Time Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 10:05 a.m. & 10:35 a.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 20 at 10:35 a.m.
For children ages 20-36 months and their caregivers ~ Stories, finger-
plays, songs and interactive activities make up this fun 20-minute program
that highlights early literacy skills and encourages reading readiness.

Story Time Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 11 a.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 20 at 11 a.m.
For children ages 3-5 and their caregivers ~ Stories, action rhymes,
songs and interactive activities make up this engaging 30-minute pro-
gram that highlights early literacy skills, and encourages reading readi-
ness and social interaction.

Adult/Teen Photo Transfer on Clay Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 6:30 p.m.
Join art instructor Nicole Lamothe for this interesting ceramic class.
Students will transfer photos onto clay tiles. The clay will be fired in a
kiln and be ready for pick up Dec. 3 through 6 at the Circulation Desk.
Limit 20. Registration required at either the Southshore Regional Libray
Information Desk or by calling 813-273-3652. Funding by a grant from
the Community Foundation of Greater Sun City Center.

Teen Volunteer Orientation Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 7 p.m.
Prospective teen volunteers are invited to attend this informational
session. Topics will include the application process, filling out school
forms, shelving guidelines, and volunteer expectations.

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YOUR jAW

pRInTIsMM~t


& Printing Company, Inc.
Established in 1968 H E F H&W ;PINI NGS

813-645-4048
210 Woodland Estates Ave. SW Ruskin, FL 33570
www.mmprintinc.com


OBSERVER NEWS 9


NOVEMBER 14, 2013






10 OBSERVER NEWS NOVEMBER 14, 2013


Award-winners Danielle DeSilvestro, left, and Kyle Bowman pose with their FFA advisor Erin Elsberry.
Two Lennard High School students win

National FFA Awards


Two students at Ruskin's Len-
nard High School have won na-
tional awards from FFA at the
organization's 86th National Con-
vention, held in Louisville, Ky.
Danielle Rose DeSilvestro, 17,
was named national winner of the
Wildlife Production and Manage-
ment Entrepreneurship/Place-
ment Proficiency award program.
This award, sponsored by Purina
Animal Nutrition, recognizes FFA
members who excell as agricul-
tural entrepreneurs, employees or
volunteer while gaining hands-on


career experience.
Danielle has worked with the
Florida Wildlife Research In-
stitute; her work will reveal the
spawning and migration behavior
of fish native to the area. Her hope
is to become a marine biologist.
Kyle Lee Bowman, 18, was
named the national winner of the
Landscape Management Entre-
preneurship/PlacementProficiency
award program. This award, spon-
sored by John Deere and Tractor
Supply Company, recognizes FFA
members who excell as agricul-


Dance Saturday at Manatee RV Park
The Manatee RV Park will host a social dance from 7 to 10 p.m. on01
Saturday, Nov. 16 in the community's clubhouse.
Music will be provided by Thor. Bring your own refreshments; ice wil
be provided.
The cost is $5 per person and the public is invited.
Manatee RV Park is seven miles south of Ruskin; four miles north ot
1-275. For more information, contact J. Sullivan at 813-649-9150 or E
Resch at 813-649-1145.


tural entrepreneurs, employees or
volunteer while gaining hands-on
career experience.
The summer of his seventh-grade
year, Kyle began looking for a job
to pay for his kart-racing hobby.
He began working with his uncle
to maintain landscapes, golf cours-
es and athletic fields. He began
with such simple tasks as weeding
and cleaning sprinklers. But as he
earned his uncle's trust, he began
to operate large equipment install
landscapes, and install and repair
irrigation systems.


i f
1 '- ....
1 ^ ^; .:.'l

; IS^ y'


Southshore American Business
Woman's monthly dinner to focus on
human trafficking
On Monday, Nov. 18, the Southshore Charter Chapter of American
Business Women will hold its monthly dinner at Sandpiper Grille, 1702
S. Pebble Beach Blvd. in Sun City Center.
The speaker is June Wallace, a member of the SCC campaign against
human trafficking, which fosters community and faith-interactive action
against this scourge.
The dinner and program start at 6 p.m., with networking and sign-in
taking place from 5:30 p.m. on. There are six options to choose from for
dinner, all including entree, dessert and beverage. Wine, beer or cocktails
will be available for purchase separately.
The price for dinner is $16 per person, which is all-inclusive. Cash or
check only. If you are interested in going, RSVP as soon as possible to
diana@brandonfamilylaw.com or call 813-653-1744, so that the restau-
rant can prepare food accordingly.
Take along a friend, business associate and/or relative so they can hear
this very important presentation. All attendees will have a moment to
introduce themselves and their business.


How to deal with depression in the
holiday season
For many people, the holiday season presents more challenges
than what to cook or what to buy for a loved one. Those susceptible
to anxiety and depression are likely to suffer more when everyone
around them is broadcasting happiness and joy.
From 2 to 4 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 21, a special seminar entitled
"Dealing with Anxiety and Depression During the Holiday Season"
will be offered at the Sun City Center Chamber of Commerce, lo-
cated at 1651 Sun City Plaza.
Sponsored by NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness), the
program will feature Kelly M. Akerley, who for 20 years has been a
strong advocate for those with mental illness. She earned her Mas-
ter's degree in Clinical Psychology from Edinboro University of
Pennsylvania, and is the vice-president of NAMI Hillsborough.
For more information about the workshop, call 813-634-6747.
Other programs from NAMI
NAMI holds a SCC advisory group meeting the third Wednesday
of the month in the Atrium's Sandpiper Room.
The group also offers a 12-session training for family members of
those with mental illness.
NAMI is looking to collaborate with other local organizations to
do a SCC/South Shore needs-assessment, based on the strengths of
the community.


Jfuan&biun9wu U9uffet


Aimemey 2iHt& Iiam-6p m


Bourbon &-" -Brown Sugar glazed Ham

Rosemary &-' Sage Roasted Uurkey


$19.99
Plus Jax 6 QCratuity


GOLF e





OOcLF CV *
J i )al


Sides

Home-style Mashed Rotatoe.

Cornbread Dressing

Candied Skeet Potatoes

green Bean Casserole

Honey glazed Carrots

Cranberry Sauce

Uurkey gravy

Dinner 5Rolls w/ Butter


LUNCH: Tues.- Sat. 11 a.m. to 4 p.n
DINNER: Wed. Sat. 4 to 8 p.m.
BRUNCH: Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.r


Salads

garden Salad with 7all the trimmings

Tropical Citrus Truit Salad


with Shaved Coconut

3 Bean Salad

Mandarin Cole SlaI'

Beet and Onion Salad



Reservations S:e

n. Cypress H
1011 Cypre,


Ivd.,


Please call for reservation


P -"uhanksgiving to go...
Let us do the cooking and you get the credit!
Delicious Thanksgiving feasts available
for pickup on November 27th
Starting at $16.95 a person
Call Casey for details
tu S A 813-305-7888 x6

Luskm 1


10 OBSERVER NEWS


NOVEMBER 14, 2013






NOVEMBER 14, 2013
-----------------. CLIP & SAVE .-----------------




TOWERs
A RETIREMENT & REHABILITATION COMMUNITY
Independent Living Assisted Living Skilled Nursing Memory Care
101 Trinity Lakes Dr. Sun City Center, FL SunTowersRetirement.com

MON., NOV. 18 1:30 3:30 p.m. Parkinson's Support Group of SCC. Spon-
sored by The Men's Club of SCC. Facilitated by the USF Parkinson's Disease and Move-
ment Disorders Center. Speaker will be Dr. Ricardo H. Gonzalez, neurologist. Gonza-
lez earned his medical degree from Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Colombia. He
completed an internship in internal medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin,
Milwaukee, and performed his residency in neurology and fellowship in movement
disorders at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. his areas of expertise include
Parkinson's disease, stroke, headache and multiple sclerosis. Gonzalez is certified by
the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. Free Valet Parking at entrance.
TUES., NOV. 19 1011 a.m. The Connection Between Hearing Loss and De-
mentia! Don't miss this presentation by Don Guiley, BCHIS from A+ Hearing Center,
Inc. If you or a loved one are missing the conversation, there may be memory loss in
your future! Learn how to prevent this form of isolation.
TUES., NOV. 19 2:303:30p.m. Alzheimer's Association Caregiver Sup-
port Group. Bring your loved one for a well deserved break. Facilitated by Aging
Care Advocates. Receive information while your loved one is cared for in our Secured
Memory Care. RSVP 3 days prior to 813-246-4120. alzheimer's % association
WED., NOV. 20 *1011 a.m. "Your Money Matters: Myths about Annuities,
What You Need to be Aware of!" presented by Chris Redhead, CFP,ChFC,CFS,
Executive Vice President of Sequoia Financial Group. During these turbulent times
many investors are plagued with challenging questions and difficult decisions that
may !ynio..,111: impact their family's financial future. Join us each month on the
third Wednesday as we share prudent strategies that have helped us guide our clients
to achieve successful results III. h uncertain markets.
WED., NOV. 20 1-30 2:30p.m. Low Vision Support Group. Facilitated byAna
Maria Oliva, M.D., Sponsored by the SCC Men's Club. Grace Terry, MSW, will offer "Ten
Simple Ways to Be Healthy and Happy." Grace has been a professional social worker
for over 30 years with impressive experience as a licensed mental health provider,
medical social worker, and geriatric services provider. She now specializes in Grief
Education and Grief Support, and hosts two once-a-month "Grief Cafes" in Sun City
Center as well as with numerous additional venues in Pasco, Pinellas, tii!1,1.il--I ,,
and Polk counties. As a speaker, she is described as enlightening, entertaining, and
dynamic.
RSVP 1 Assisted Living
2 days prior Facility License
'to event to...

See more stories from Warren Resen online at
www.ObserverNews.net under "Trips Worth Taking"


OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 11


SA brief tour of St. Augustine
500 years after Ponce de Leon

U By WARREN RESEN, North American Travel Writers Association
S March 1513 is the date recorded for Ponce de Leon's reported landing on the
coast of eastern Florida. A ship's log book records land being sighted at what he
probably thought wa4 an land at 30 degree 8 minutes North Latitude, which is
.[bkIII II in[ik iiIh lh 1 ilii. pic.t.inii d.\ ,Ni \I.'Lstine. This year marks the 500th year
i| il ii in Vt'i h 1,Vii .' .' Il II.ILnI It.V ii% iiit.' ill continue into early 2014.
S \\lII. l'tPi.i. iV. ic tI II c. iI 1.11 nii .ld "liai it pilobably thought was an island for
Np.iiin it. "a, itt.1.hi.ill\ .in nld iiiii n'_iii'ly, claiming all of North America,
inilthidinh.,' i '.n.dl.i .a nId \l.ili
lii liiidit.ii.nII Ni \ll.[ii.'iiic i llii Ipla.t.e in American history we have to
"l.II I '\ Ilh I llll~lh hln~h \
.tinti.ii'h [II \ \ 1%v. hI uindtd. I li Ii .Ilanidtned in 1610, and reestablished in
I' I'I Ilt I. I'llnIiii, l.iidtl l. 1 1ii ili.i l.inh ,'I % i,,t kin 1620.
Il 15 I5 i . ,,'' I,' \/.... 1 ,. / .... i's landing) St. Augustine was found-
L ..d 1\ 1'c.di \ lc..nIInI.div dI. \ ii.c, .an admiral in the Spanish Navy. This
42 \ t.ai~ I'..t. icili. Ini it J.anestown settlement and 55 years
hI'll. iilic. I'ikniini, dii,.niiaiked by stepping onto that rock.
I L ii 1ktik in I'ti pc pil. Inch is the oldest European city in the
ti.iiiiiiii.i I N \ .and ili, answer is usually Jamestown. Why?
Nt ti \Li.'Liiiic.a Npaniih and Jamestown was English, and,
a, \Liu t.in.TI kii~, tili. \i tors write the history books.
N i \tii.,'iiiic. ailI. capital of Spanish Florida for 200
^ \.\, .and iti ili. Ii o t. ntinuously occupied European settle-
n t iii.n .and p ii iit ili. I 'iiininental United States. It remained
tili. tap.. l al 1 iai 1 hiiiid.a when the territory changed hands
i ccI.I. I N it i andd I .iicai I'1ritain in 1763 and was capital of the
1 hiid.- I i.initii\ 1I I iiiunil it was moved to Tallahassee in 1824.
1 I li. tii.ca i 1I Ni \Lit.'ii iic is at King and St. George Streets.
I I\ \i iniii it.idiait. iii I Itin ilihere: sightseeing attractions, muse-
ums, restaurants and lodgings.
To get an overview of the city, its
history and places of interest, a
trip on one of the hop-on/hop-off
sightseeing lines is the best way to
get oriented.
One block east of St. George
Street is Aviles Street (Pedro
Menendez de Aviles), the oldest
street in St. Augustine. It's an easy
walk south from King Street to
the Gomez-Alvarez House, the
oldest house in St. Augustine. The
__ Continued on page 17


Pictured at left is Aviles
Street, the oldest street in St.
Augustine.


MAKOplasty with Robotic Arm technology

eliminates guesswork in hip and knee surgeries

Are you living with knee or hip pain? Lakewood Ranch Medical Center is the
ONLY hospital in Bradenton and Sarasota to offer MAKOplasty with Robotic
Arm technology for Partial Knee Resurfacing, an innovative new treatment
option for people with early to mid-stage osteoarthritis of the knee. And ...
For the many people who suffer from degenerative joint disease of the hip, we
also offer MAKOplasty with Robotic Arm technology for Total Hip Replacement.
Using a computer-assisted visualization guide, a robotic arm gently directs the
surgeon's hand, ensuring precision and quality results.
The Orthopaedic Spine and Joint Center at Lakewood Ranch is committed to
providing the latest advances in orthopaedic surgery and dedicated to
helping our patients return to daily activities with relief from pain.


By acquiring innovative technologies
such as MAKOplasty precision knee resurfacing
and hip replacement surgery, orthopaedic
surgeons at LWRMC can now offer more precise
techniques that can allow for more consistency
and ultimately a better result.


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Medical Director of the Orthopaedic Spine and Joint Center


f t

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Spine and
Joint Center at
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8330 Lakewood Ranch Blvd.
Bradenton, FL 34202
www.lakewoodranchmedicalcenter.com







12 OBSERVER NEWS NOVEMBER 14, 2013


Green sea turtles nest at unprecedented pace in Florida this year


WE REMEMBER
Project Corregidor Ride for the Fallen
On Saturday, Nov. 16, the second annual Ride for the Fallen will start off at
9:30 a.m. at Beef 0 'Brady's in Apollo Beach. All motorcycles and vehicles are
welcome to participate.
This event is a fundraiser for Project Corregidor Grief & Peer Mentoring
Program that My Warrior's Place conducts for veterans and military service
members who have returned from deployments where they have endured the
death of a comrade-in-arms. The ride will be in the memory of Kelly Kowall's
son, SPC. Corey J. Kowall and all fallen warriors.
This year's Ride will be led by Patriot Guard Rider Thomas "T-Man" Brown,
with the Patriot Guard Riders providing escort services to the Veterans Memo-
rial Park from the Opening Ceremony.
Schedule:
9 a.m. Noon: Opening Ceremony and Brunch at Beef 0' Brady's, 205
Apollo Beach Blvd. in Apollo Beach
Noon -1 p.m. Escorted Memorial Ride to Veterans Memorial Park, 3601 N.
US Hwy 301 in Tampa
11 a.m. -1 p.m. Check in at Veterans Park for Poker Run
1 p.m.- 1:30 p.m. GI Joe Parachute Drop at Veterans Memorial Park
1:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. Poker Run starts at Veterans Memorial Park with stops for
card draws at American Legion, VFW,AmVET Post, ending at the AmVE[ Post 44,
5521 Hwy 60 East in Plant City for winners announcements and entertainment.
The cost to participate in the event is a $20 donation per person.
Event ticket with Brunch at Opening Ceremony (limited to 200 people).
Includes T-shirt, 1 entry into GI Joe Drop, 1 entry into Poker Run and admit-
tance to Event Party Fun.
Event Ticket without Brunch (will receive a 2nd GI Joe Drop Ticket instead)
GI Joe Drop Tickets are $5 each (chance to win $25,000, winner guaran-
teed 2 round-trip airline tickets to anywhere Southwest flies)
Tickets can be purchased online at http://ride4fallen.org or in person at Re/
Max Bayside, 237 Apollo Beach Blvd. # 107, in Apollo Beach; 813 Customs,
8701 N. Nebraska Ave. in Tampa; Jen's MarketPlace at the Sunday Market-
Place on Nov. 10, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. at Cl Bank parking lot, 6542 N. US Hwy
41 in Apollo Beach; tickets purchased on the day of the event are guaranteed
only for the Memorial Ride, Poker Run and entry to Event Party. T-shirt/GI Joe
Drop purchases are subject to availability.
For more information, call Kelly Kowall at 813-321-0880 or by email at
kelly@mywarriorsplace.org.


The number of
green sea turtle
nests in Florida this
year was more than ..
double the count of .j
the previous highest
year. Biologists with ,-
the Florida Fish and "-1
Wildlife Conserva- f'
tion Commission " "
(FWC) have docu-
mented more than
25,000 green turtle
nests on 26 index
beaches in the state
in 2013.
"We are astound-
ed and pleased by
the high number of
green turtle nests
documented in
2013," said Dr. Blair
Witherington, FWC Green turtle
research scientist.
"It looks like the years of conser-
vation efforts for this endangered
species are paying off."
FWC-trained and authorized
surveyors across the state moni-
tor nests on a set of index beaches
that span nearly 250 miles and are
the focus of the Index Beach Nest-
ing Survey. These surveys began
in 1989. Index surveyors follow
firm counting guidelines, making
it possible for FWC researchers to
use the data from these beaches to
identify trends.
The trend for green turtles shows
an exponential increase in nesting
over the past 25 years. In 1989,
biologists documented only 464
green turtle nests on index beach-
es. In 2013, this index nest count
was 25,553. The index count rep-
resents about 70 percent of green
turtle nesting statewide.
Leatherback sea turtle nest counts
have also risen dramatically over


the past quarter century. However,
the 2013 count of 322 leatherback
nests on index beaches was 193
lower than last year.
Loggerhead sea turtles, the most
prevalent sea turtle species on
Florida's shores, accounted for
44,810 nests on index beaches
this year, down from 2012's near-
record count of 58,172 nests. Al-
though this federally threatened
species nests on the same beaches
as green turtles and leatherbacks,
loggerheads have not shown the
recovery in numbers seen in nest-
ing by the other two species. The
high level of loggerhead nesting
last year followed a pronounced
drop in the species' nest counts be-
tween 1998 and 2007.
Hundreds of surveyors from con-
servation organizations, universi-
ties and federal, state and local
governments along with other
volunteers make possible the ex-
tensive data collection on Florida's


nesting sea turtles. In conjunction
with the Index Nesting Beach Sur-
vey, the Statewide Nesting Beach
Survey documents sea turtle nest-
ing on nearly all sandy beaches in
Florida. Data from the statewide
surveys will be available in early
2014.
The FWC's role in coordinating
Florida's sea turtle nest counts,
training surveyors and compiling
data is funded by the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service and sales of
the state's sea turtle license plate.
Florida residents can purchase the
plate to support these efforts at
BuyaPlate.com.
For more information about
trends in sea turtle nest counts,
visit MyFWC.com/Research,
click on "Wildlife," then click on
"Nesting" under the "Sea Turtle"
heading. Report sick or injured
sea turtles to the FWC's Wildlife
Alert Hotline at 888-404-FWCC
(3922).


A doctors' office for the entire

family that's close to home.

Our family medicine physician is ready to meet the healthcare needs of your entire
family from babies to grandparents. Dr. Ramsahai provides a range of healthcare
services, from immunizations and treatment of childhood illnesses to management
of chronic health conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure.

* Same-day appointments available.
* Secure online access to portions of your medical record via MyChart.
FREE mobile app available.
* We participate in most major health plans. Visit www.tgmg.org
for a list of accepted insurance plans.


Prema L. Ramsahai, D.O.
Board certified Family Medicine

We're open Monday Friday

7:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m.

For appointments, call (813) 844-4600.


10647 Big Bend Road
Riverview, FL 33579


Tampa
General
Medical Group

FAMILY CARE CENTER


www.tgmg.org


12 OBSERVER NEWS


NOVEMBER 14, 2013






NOVEMBER 14, 2013



New Dentist joins SCC Practice

_Dr. Bryan Thatcher has joined the office of
.. ........ Dr. T. Gregory Jacobs, which was founded 50 years
ago by the late Dr. Gerald M. Isbell.
l ^Dr. Thatcher grew up in Tampa and now resides
in Apollo Beach. He graduatedfrom the University
:* of Florida College of Dentistry, and continued his
.education by attending a residency at the U ofF in
Seminole, Florida, where he was awarded a certificate
of Advanced Education in General Dentistry. He
S currently serves as a ClinicalAssistant Professorfor that
residency program. He looks forward to practicing all

1601 Rickenbacker phases ofgeneral dentistry.
1601 Rickenbacker , ,
Drie, S e1This office offers a number of aesthetic, restorative
Drive Suiterand rehabilitative dental services. With a board-
Sun City Center, L certified prosthodontist on site, all aspects of

813 restorative treatment are available, including crowns,
634-1932 bridges, complete and partial dentures, implant
restorations and sleep apnea.


All Floor Samples O R


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813-645-8660 I www.doveinteriorscarpetone.com
I l l l II, l I l i 1 l i i l 1 1 ',I l i ,li i i l I,, ,' I il II 1 l l ,i I, I-l lh l l
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Appointments made in
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Dr. Robert Norman, week waiting period ...) -W. 0
DO MPH, MBA maximum, and same day appointments are available.
Dr. William Eng
Holly Pohler, Diagnosis & treatment of skin cancer & diseases of the skin, hair & nails.
ARNP Wide excision, treatment for spider veins & rosacea, Electrodessication,
Kate SedlaczekN curettage, cryotherapy & debridement. Botox & Restylane.
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~Clarisonic, MD Solar Sciences, Image, Merderma, Retin-A, Sun Block,
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I813-80-7546


OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 13


Paddle under

the full moon

at Camp Bayou
The next program at Camp Bay-
ou is the Full Moon Paddle on Fri-
day, Nov. 15, starting at 6 p.m. Ex-
pect a 90-minute to 2-hour paddle
with Camp Bayou's experienced
guides. Canoe rental is $25 each.
If you wish to join the trip using
your own canoe or kayak, Camp
Bayou requests a donation of just
$5. Reservations required: contact
Dolly at campbayou@gmail.com
or call 813-641-8545.
Camp Bayou is neither a camp-
ground nor a summer camp. It
was an RV park before the County
ELAP program purchased the land
but it is now open for day use
only, open to the general public.
Through volunteers, donations,
membership and grants, the Cen-
ter offers pre-scheduled programs
to schools, youth groups, adult
groups and families, plus it is open
from Thursday through Saturday
from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. for passive rec-
reational pursuits such as wildlife
watching, nature photography and
trail walks.
The Camp Bayou Outdoor Learn-
ing Center is managed by the newly
created, nonprofit Bayou Outdoor
Learning & Discovery, Inc., in a
public-private partnership with the
nonprofit Ruskin Community De-
velopment Foundation, Inc. and
Hillsborough County Parks, Rec-
reation and Conservation.
Camp Bayou is located three
miles south of SR 674 at the end
of 24th St. SE in Ruskin. More in-
formation is on the web at www.
campbayou.org or call 813-641-
8545.

Academy

Award-winner

Marlee Matlin to

lecture at USF
The student-run University
Lecture Series at the University
of South Florida will welcome
Marlee Matlin, Academy Award-
winning actress and activist, on
Thursday, Nov. 14. The free,
open-to-the-public lecture begins
at 8 p.m. in the Marshall Student
Center Ballroom, 4202 E. Fowler
Ave. on the Tampa campus.
Addressing topics of inclusion,
diversity, and access, as well as
addiction and abuse, Matlin, who
is deaf, will share her life experi-
ences in front of the camera, off
the set, and as an activist for these
important issues. A book signing
for her
autobi-
ography,
I'll
Scream
Later, -
will fol i -
low the
lecture p- i i
at 9:45
p.m.
Matlin
received
world-
wide critical acclaim for her
motion picture debut in Children
of a Lesser God, earning her the
Academy Award for Best Ac-
tress. At age 21, she became the
youngest recipient of the Best
Actress Oscar, making her one of
only four actresses to receive that
honor for a film debut.
The lecture is free and open to
the public. For more informa-
tion and the audience policy, visit
http://uls.usf.edu/.


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14 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER NOVEMBER 14, 2013


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How Divorce Can Affect Your

Social Security


Dear Savvy Senior,
Am I entitled to my for
band's Social Security be
I was married for 12 unt
years and would like to
I may be eligible for.

Dear Ex-spouse,
You'll be happy to kno
the
Social
provi
vorce
bene
like
spou
By Jim Miller you
gove
requ
Here's how it works.
A divorced spouse ca
Social Security retirem
on the work record of th
band (or ex-wife) if they
age 62, were married foi
years, are unmarried no
not eligible for a higl
based on their own work
In order to collect, hov
former spouse must also
62 and eligible for Soci
benefits, and you must
divorced for at least 1
But, he doesn't have to
ing them in order for yoi
divorced spouse's benefit
Even if your ex is re
won't affect your right I
benefits, nor will it affec
retirement benefits or
spouse's benefits.
Benefit Amount
A divorced spouse can
to 50 percent of their ex's
Security benefit, or less i
benefits before their full
age which is 66 if yoi
between 1943 and 195
out your full-retirementa
how much your benefits
duced by taking them ea
gov/retire2/agereductiorn
Keep in mind though,
qualify for benefits basic
own work history, you
the larger of the two be
cannot receive benefits
your own record, and
work record, too.
To find out your retire
efits based on your ow
history, see your Socia
statement at ssa.gov/i
And to get an estimate
vorced spouse benefit,
Security at 800-772-12
need your ex's Socia
Number to get it.


Getting Remarried
,mer hus- Since three-quarters of U.S. di-
enefits? vorcees get married again, it's also
pleasant important to understand that remar-
know what trying makes you ineligible for di-
vorced spouse's benefits unless the
Ex-spouse later marriage ends. And, for those
who have been married and di-
ow that for vorced twice, with both marriages
most part, lasting more than 10 years, you can
al Security collect using the ex-spouse with the
ides di- larger Social Security benefit.
ed spouses Divorced Survivor
fits just You also need to know that if
they do your ex-spouse dies, and you were
ses, if married for 10 or more years, you
meet the become eligible for divorced "sur-
ernment's vivor benefits," which is worth up
irements. to 100 percent of what your ex-
Scollect a spouse was due.
n colec a Survivor's benefits are available
ent enefit to divorced spouses as early as age
are at least 60 (50 if you're disabled). But, if
are at least 10 you remarry before 60 you become
Sat least 10 ineligible unless the marriage ends.
*w, and are Remarrying after age 60 will not
her benefit
record. affect your eligibility.
ke yeourd Also note that if you are receiv-
vever, your ing divorced spouse benefits when
* be at least
S e your ex-spouse dies, you will auto-
al Security matically be switched over to the
have been higher paying survivor benefit.
two years.
be receiv- Switching Strategies
U to collect Being divorced also offers some
its. switching strategies that can help
married, it boost your benefits. For working
to divorcee divorced spouses, there's an op-
At your ex's tion that lets you file a "restricted"
hIis current application with Social Security
(at full retirement age) to collect
a divorced spousal benefit, which
is half of what your ex gets. Then,
s full Socialve once you reach 70, you stop re-
i ue Social ceiving the ex-spousal benefit and
if they take switch to your own benefit, which
-retirement will be 32 percent higher than it
Were born would have been at your full retire-
4. To find montage.
gle and see Divorced widows (and widow-
will be re- ers) have even more options. If, for
rly see ssa. example, you are currently collect-
Lhatm. ing Social Security retirement ben-
that i you refits on your own record, and your
e on your ex-spouse dies, you can switch to
11receive Y survivor's benefits if the payment
nefits. You is larger. Or, if you're collecting
s on both survivor's benefits, you can switch
your exs to your own retirement benefits -
between 62 and 70 if it offers a
men earnings larger payment.
7n earnings
al Security Send your senior questions to:
nyaccount. Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Nor-
of your di-man, OK 73070, or visit SavvySe-
call Social nior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor
13. You'll to the NBC Today Show and author
1 Security of The Savvy Senior book.


Holiday shopping extravaganza
comes to Ruskin
From 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 16, the Ruskin Woman's
Club will present "Trinkets, Baubles & Bling Holiday Shopping Ex-
travaganza" at the historic club building at 503 South Hwy 41, directly
across from Grannie's Restaurant.
This annual event will have numerous vendors on hand selling jew-
elry, cosmetics, scents, handbags, origami, fine artwork, craft items
and more.

SSun City Center Travelworld &

SHolland America Line
A Siqnature of Excellence
invite you to come learn about Holland America Cruises!
Tuesday, November 19 2:00 4:00 p.m.
&. M... . . .. .. . .


L FREE ADMISSION ]


14 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


NOVEMBER 14, 2013





NOVMBE 1, 213OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 15

It t>t>t) t) t


NOVEMBER 14, 2013

t)


Order NOW for Christmas!


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Navel Oranges
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Juicy Herb and Garlic Yogurt
Savings Tomato-Garlic Yogurt
All Fiesta Jack (HOT!)
SeasonI,1 Yellow Mild Cheddar
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I ooley
droves


Country Farm Market in the Grove
The Original Grove Store Location
1651 Stephens Road
Old Sun City, Florida
(some folks call it Ruskin)
000 0ID0 0 0


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Open Sundays through Christmas
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V Directions From Sun City Center / Riverview Area:
Travel WEST on S.R. 674 about 5 miles (past 1-75) to U.S. 41.
STurn SOUTH (left) on U.S. 41. Travel for about 3 miles to
Universal-Stephens Road. (Riverside Club sign on the left corner)
Turn LEFT and drive about 1/4 mile to Stephens Road. Turn RIGHT
onto Stephens Road. Travel 2 miles. Dooley Groves is on the left.
http://www .dooleygroves.com/about-florida-citrus-shipper-dooley-groves/country-farm-market-location/
400 00 00 0G40 000 00 0G40 0


)ttt>t






16 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER

South Hillsborough remembers our veterans


* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net
South Hillsborough, from
Riverview to Sun City Center
and Ruskin, stood up to honor
and respect our nation's veterans
over the weekend.
Veterans Day kicked off early
last week. On Saturday the annual
Ruskin VFW Veterans Day Pa-
rade was held down U.S. High-
way 41. Boy and Girl Scouts, Cub
Scouts, Brownies and high school
bands and JROTC units from the
South County Career Center to
Brandon High School walked the
route, many passing out beads and
candy to the hundreds of people
who lined the parade route. One
young scout from Troop 661,
Ruskin / Apollo Beach, was
on a mission and he worked to
complete it. Although often fall-
ing behind his troop during the
parade, he was intent on ensuring
that each child along the parade
route received a piece of candy.
His dedication spoke volumes,
particularly on a day devoted to
those who dedicated themselves.
This year's parade appeared
bigger than ever, with businesses,
organizations from around the
region and numerous Gasparilla
Krewes taking part in the celebra-
tion of heroes.
On Monday in Sun City Center,
the combined military veterans
organizations held their annual
Veterans Day Ceremony at the
Community Association Com-
munity Hall. Lt. Commander Paul
Wheat, US Army (Ret) provided
the welcome and introduction
and the East Bay High School
JROTC served as the color guard.
The guest speaker was newspaper


columnist Steve Otto.
On Monday morning at Seren-
ity Meadows on 6919 Providence
Road in Riverview, a ceremony
was held to show support and pay
tribute to the nation's veterans,
both past and active duty. The
event included music, a flag cer-
emony and guest speakers from
MacDill Air Force Base.
Last week, the Greater Riv-
erview Chamber of Commerce
sponsored their annual Veterans
Day Tribute at Vets Memorial
Park on U.S. Highway 301 in
Tampa. The Vice Commander of
the 6th Air Mobility Wing at Mac-
Dill Air Force Base, Col. Andre J.
Briere, was the keynote speaker
for the event, which also included
a JROTC color guard.
Veterans Day, November 11, is
the anniversary of the armistice
between the Allied Nations and
Germany, ending World War I in
1918. The name of the day was
changed to Veterans Day by an act
of Congress in 1954. That year,
President Dwight Eisenhower
called on all Americans to observe
the day by remembering all those
who fought for this nation. The
President referred to the name
Veterans Day to honor those who
have served in all of the nation's
wars.
For more photos, visit The Ob-
server News and The Current on
the web at www.observernews.net
or www.riverviewcurrent.com.
L bA a.. I I.


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NOVEMBER 14, 2013

A brief tour of St. Augustine
0 Continued from page 11


cobblestone streets and old homes
are a photographer's delight.
Ancient coquina walls still show
indentations from invader's can-
non balls.
Historic St. George Street north
of King Street is pedestrian-
friendly and lined with restaurants
and shops selling history, trinkets
and t-shirts. Some visitors have
been heard to comment negatively
on this use of such an historic area
without realizing that in the old
days it was taverns, buggy whips
and muskets. It's always been a
street of merchants.
Most prominent in this area of
the city is Flagler College, which
was originally the Ponce de Leon
Hotel. Flagler College is today
one of the top rated four-year lib-


eral arts colleges in the country.
Built by Henry Flagler and
opened in 1888, the hotel was
the height of luxury. It had every
known modem amenity for that
time, including electricity. The
system was designed by Flagler's
friend Thomas Edison.
Being able to turn lights on and
off with a button was a novelty. It
was so new that some guests were
afraid to touch the buttons, fear-
ing they would be electrocuted.
No problem. The staff was at their
disposal to do the deed.
The original museum-quality art
has been preserved throughout the
building. Dining room windows
and leaded glass decorations were
designed by Louis Comfort Tiffa-
ny. I believe the college has these


treasures insured for an amount in
excess of $30 million.
Today this magnificent build-
ing is home to students study-
ing, eating in the opulent dining
room, socializing, working their
electronic devices and possibly
no longer aware of their fabulous
surroundings after a couple of
weeks in residence.
A guided tour is the only way to
see and experience the building's
magnificent interior since security
measures were imposed. Do take
it. It's really worthwhile.
In 1917 a publication called
Gullible's Travels published a hu-
morous rendition of a (supposed)
visitor's reaction to visiting St.
Augustine and the Ponce de Leon
Hotel:


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'The hotel's named after the
fella that built it. He come from
Spain and they say he was huntin'
for some water that if he'd drunk
it he'd feel young. I don't see
myself how you could expect to
feel young on water. But, anyway,
he'd heard that this here kind
o' water could be found in St.
Augustine, and when he couldn't
find it .... he went into the hotel
business and got even with the
United States by charging' five dol-
lars a day and up for a room."
At the same time, Flagler also
built the Hotel Alcazar across the
street for the more athletically
inclined of his guests. It featured
a huge indoor swimming pool,
Turkish baths, steam room, and
massage room and was the center
for physically active guests of
both hotels.
The Hotel Alcazar was pur-
chased in 1946 by Ohio newspa-
per magnate Otto Lightner and
reopened as the Lightner Museum
housing, on three floors, an
eclectic collection of the treasures
of America's Gilded Age and
probably every family heirloom
their descendants ever sold or
discarded.
All of the athletic facilities
previously mentioned have been
retained as museum pieces except
for the swimming pool, which
today is home to the Alcazar Res-
taurant and various retail shops.
Florida and Henry Flagler are
synonymous, but no more so than
in St. Augustine, where Henry
Flagler and his family are buried
in the church he built.
A few blocks north of the Old
City's North Gate is the first
Ripley's "Believe It or Not Mu-
seum. "The building was previ-
ously a hotel owned and operated
by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings,
author of The Yearling, Cross
Creek and other books. There is
one item here not shared with any
of the other Ripley museums.
Surrounded by a tall ficus
hedge, planted so as not to of-
fend passersby by the unclothed
depiction of the male form, is
David, one of only two full-scale


JEANNE O'CONNOR PHOTOS
A statue of Ponce de Leon
stands at 30 degrees, 8 minutes
North Latitude.
reproductions of the original in
Florence, Italy. It was carved from
a block of marble quarried in the
same Italian quarry as the original
and was commissioned for the
1963 New York World's Fair.
The Castillo de San Marcos is
St. Augustine's signature attrac-
tion and the oldest masonry fort
(coquina stone) in the Continental
United States.
Construction of the fort began in
1672, 107 years after incorpora-
tion of St. Augustine. Its construc-
tion took 23 years. The Castillo de
San Marcos was attacked twice in
the 1700s but was never taken by
an invading force.
There are self-guided and
docent-led tours of the inside of
this historic fort. Visitors even
learn of the time when the United
States imprisoned leaders of the
Seminole Nation here.
The Fountain of Youth is one of
Florida's oldest tourist attractions
and had remained unchanged for
generations. If you visited it once,
there was no reason to return. But
now descendants of the original
owners have brought life back to
the old girl.
Archeologists have uncovered
foundations of early Native
American and Spanish villages.
0 Continued on page 22


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NOVEMBER 14,2013






OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 19


NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Observations: The last goodbye


I'm not sure why I am so
amazed that things change in the
passing of decades. After all, the
only constant in life is change. Yet
I spent the bulk of my growing-up
years in this small town and as I
looked around a restaurant I was
dining in, I was stunned to realize
that I didn't recognize a single
person. And no one knew me.
New families have moved into
the houses on my former street
and there, too, I knew no one. It's
an odd feeling to know a place
so intimately yet discover that I
don't really know it at all.
The town has changed so
much. Unlike many small, rural
towns it has managed to grow
and it appears more prosperous
than when I lived here. Many of
the homes have been rehabbed,
remodeled and rebuilt, reflecting
that prosperity, but also feeding
the displacement I felt in my
own hometown. It's not just the
people I don't recognize nearly
everything is different.
Except for one house.


S II I jE
: mmHlm MH -:
mmm^' mm -s
I LL lE,


This one house looks exactly
like it did when I was growing
up here 30 years ago. It is even
the same unearthly blue color.
In a town that has changed so
much, in a world that has changed
beyond description, there
is something comforting
about seeing the house, it .
being the same through 44
the passing of time. It '
stands there like a little
rock of stability in an
unstable world. Obser
So many times this past By Mitch TI
year I've struggled with mitchtc
saying what could be a
last goodbye. And now,
the time is rapidly approaching
to do that again. But it seems I'm
gaining the awareness that I've
said my goodbyes. More, I'm
realizing it is not the goodbyes
that are so important but rather the
hellos and the time spent between
the hello and goodbye. That time
is meaningful; it is invaluable.
I've lived in Florida since 1994
and have never seen a Christmas


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Eve there. In my entire life, I've
only missed one Christmas in my
small hometown on the northern
plains. That year, Michelle and
I were cruising through the
Bahamas on our sailboat. At the
S time, I found the
telephone (priced
iSRI at one dollar per
S minute) to be a poor
* 'tJ substitute for the
warmth of my family
gathered together
tions up north in a place
hagen so cold. But this
ervernews.net year, I think, will be
my first in Florida.
Like the growing
awareness about goodbyes,
Christmas is increasingly more
in the heart and mind than it is a
specific date on a calendar.
The wind blows hard and cold,
making a warm home feel so
welcoming. So much like home.
The wind and the cold, at least,
have not changed. Christmas
will be different, but except for
the wind, the cold and that blue
house, all things eventually
change.
Between visits at the nursing
home and with my brother and
sisters, I drive around the town
marveling at how small it is,
wondering how anyone could
grow and grow up in such a finite
space. But somehow we did and
somehow the town has produced

Visit
www.ObserverNews.net
for archives of Observations and
many other top news stories
published in The Observer News
and The S((CC Observer.


MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO
In life, trains are always leaving the station. Goodbyes are spoken,
tears are shed and then the heart is warmed with the memories of
what happened between the hello and that goodbye. In the end, the
goodbye really isn't all that important. Above, my hometown during
an early November snowfall.


artists, authors, photographers and
playwrights, apparently finding
something within them that far
supersedes the confines of the
town yet somehow they were
nurtured by it.
It is time to go for the last
goodbye, at least for this trip. And
perhaps forever. There is no way
to truly reconcile that. I have no
magic wand to transform myself
into the perfect person with the
perfect grace and words. But now,
at least, I am growing comfortable
with the knowledge that the
important words have already
been spoken. That was in the
hello; it was in the past; it was in
the time between then and now.
There are always goodbyes but
that isn't what is remembered.
That isn't what we take with us
when the train leaves the station.
In life, trains are always leaving
the station and tomorrow is
always another (but different)
day. We wave goodbye, perhaps
shed some tears and then smile
while remembering what was


good and important. And what
we remember is what warms
our hearts the stuff before the
goodbye.
I walk out the door into the
cold November air and drive the
streets of this town. It is early
morning and it is starting to snow,
with the wind driving it, stinging
my face. So much has changed; I
sometimes can barely recognize
this place that at one time was
my home. But then I come to the
blue house that looks exactly as
it did 30 or more years ago. It
looks like my childhood. Right
at this moment, just after the last
goodbye of the trip, this house
somehow stands for the time
between then and now. It reminds
me of what was, and perhaps what
will be tomorrow, and it warms
my heart.
Yes, there are tears. Once again,
I may have said the last goodbye.
But driving out of the town, my
heart is warmed despite the cold
wind, at the thoughts of what was
between then and now.


"There's nothing in the market

like Butterfly. I just wish

I had it sooner!"

Anita age 65


/


I, I


Introducing Butterfly.

A new kind of discreet protection for accidental boweL Leakage (ABL).

New Butterfly Body Liners fit comfortably and discreetly in the buttocks, providing secure
protection from accidental bowel leakage (ABL). Consumer studies show that women who
use Butterfly feel more confident and protected going about their day. That's because
with its absorbent core, odor shield and stay-fast wings, Butterfly adheres securely and
invisibly in the buttocks, giving you a new kind of protection you can count on.

Be confident. Be brave. Be Butterfly.


,nA


Butefl is ntytaa a naLstrs

Tofn u hr o a u5,tefytdy aL8042-94o ii utr~~o


2013 Butterfly Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Butterfly wouldn't be possible without the many women who inspired it.
Anita is an actual Butterfly user and has been compensated for her appearance here.


KNOX


ALUMINUM
720 4th Street SW Ruskin, FL 33570

S813-645-3529


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MANATEE
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I Shutter & Blind Manufacturing Company r
SHUTTERS VERTICALS FAUX WOOD & WOOD HORIZONTAL BLINDS I
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South 0 I 0 <^l ^*O0E Lodge
# 2 6 72 0U p 0o ming A ct i -tI


Every Sunday Football, 1 p.m.. 5 high-definition TVs.
Every Tuesday -Jam Session 3 p.m. 5ish. No charge for all Elks
and their guests.
Every Wednesday Best Spaghetti in Town $7, All You Can Eat,
for all Elks and their guests from 5 to 7 p.m. Music by Bryan from 5 to
8p.m.
Every Friday Seafood, Sandwiches, and a Chef's Special for all Elks
and their guests from 5 to 7 p.m. Music by Bryan from 5 to 8 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 25 Blue Plate Special for all Elks and their guests,
5 p.m., $7 per person. Menu: Beef Stew on Biscuit including dessert.
Only 50 tickets available.
The South Hillsborough Elks Lodge is a clean, smoke-free environ-
ment that accepts all major credit and debit cards and is located at 1630
US Hwy 41 S. in Ruskin. Telephone 813-645-2089.

Moonglow hosts the Mellotones
Moonglow Ballroom Dance Club will feature the live music of the
Mellotones at its monthly dance on Thursday, Nov. 21 from 7:30-9:30
p.m. at Community Hall, 1910 S. Pebble Beach Blvd., Sun City Center.
The attire at Moonglow Dances is dressy casual. Members are free;
visitors/guests pay $5 per person at the door. Singles tables are always
available. BYOB and snacks, and the club will provide ice, water, cups,
and napkins
Information about the club's Annual Dinner Dance will be available at
the November dance.
For more information call 813-633-1297 or 813-642-8845, or if
you would like to receive Moonglow information by email, contact
gai13357@ gmail.com.


Adult Computer Classes for the
Technologically Challenged
eBooks & eReaders: An Introduction Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 3 p.m.
Have a new eReader or interested in getting one? Learn which de-
vices can download the library's free eBooks and how to load eBooks
onto various types of eReaders. Discover the library's large selection of
eBooks in various formats!.


Computer Tutor Wednesday, Nov. 20 at 5:30 p.m.
Tutoring in Microsoft software, email, and the Internet.


Fish Tales:


The recent cold front, choppy from the sandy bottoms and eating
waters and wind changed some on high and low tides. This flat fish
anglers' fishing habits this past is one of the most popular catches in
week. It made fish- --- our waters. Legal is 12 inches
ing more interesting and 10 per person, per day.
and challenging as For years snook was the
it drove the fish into most popular catch in our bay,
the roots of the man- but after the freeze of 2010
groves, in potholes, no one could legally catch a
on the bottom, or in snook. There are many an-
the safe warm waters ByJonie Maschek glers who are still catching
of TECO's outpour ember: Florida Outdoor and releasing snook even
Writers Association
from its plant. though the Fish and Wildlife
Many fish look for Commission has authorized
a warmer spot if the water tempera- a one per day catch. These are an-
ture is 60 degrees or below, glers who think that another year
Those fishing this week tell me is needed to bring back the snook
they have done a lot of chumming to population. The redfish is an active,
locate fish. Some boats have hand- jumping game fish that seems to be
operated food choppers aboard and a favorite for those former snook
grind up their trash fish for chum- anglers. At one time it was restrict-
ming. If you know a spot where you ed and is now one per person, per
might make a catch, throw your bag day not less than 18 inches or more
of chum overboard or, as you troll than 27 inches.
along, drag your chum. Our weather is a main driver of
This is the last month to catch gag the numerous bass tournaments
and red grouper. Some have migrat- bringing anglers from all corners of
ed into bay waters, the world. Many of the fishing tele-
I found some anglers using dead vision shows are shot in Florida.
shrimp for their catches this week, Fishing is a great source of revenue
and say they did very well because for our state. You are in one of the
the fish were hungry and would greatest fishing spots in the world,
strike at anything, so take advantage of the waterways
Flounder have been surfacing and go fishing.


*May not be combined with other
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EXAMPLE OF OUR PRICES
24"W x 36" H.......... 84 Installed
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48"W x 60" H........$280 Installed
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NOVEMBER 14, 2013


Shooting from memories
kb tnfn r iF-m -


r oniiiinueu 1rom1 puye L
I've always admired Leica,
a German company known for
making some of the best lenses
and cameras in the world. Un-
like the big camera companies,
Leica doesn't chum out tens of
thousands of bodies and lenses,
thus they need to charge more to
survive. They also have a long and
hard-earned reputation to protect
and, except for their compact cam-
eras built to their specifications
by Panasonic in Japan, all of their
cameras are hand-built by crafts-
men in Germany. Even the boxes
that enclose them are hand made.
The company also has a commit-
ment to and a passion for photog-
raphy. In 2012, they sponsored
a group of photographers from
the elite photo agency Magnum
as they chronicled the election
in Florida. Most grippingly they
provided dignity and humanity to
the homeless and disadvantaged,
whom both political parties tended


to ignore in the run up to Elec-
tion Day. Leica is also a strong
supporter of young photographers
struggling to make it in a world
increasingly difficult for artists.
Photography from Leica cameras
has had a dramatic impact on hu-
manity. So many of the most com-
pelling photos in history have been
made using their cameras. Some
of the photos have changed the
world, such as the Pulitzer Prize-
winning photo by AP photographer
Nick Ut of Phan Thi Kim, a young
girl running naked and in terror
down a road after a napalm attack
in Viet Nam. That photo was taken
with a Leica camera and is widely
credited with helping to bring an
end to the war.
A Leica was also used to capture
the sheer joy at the end of an ear-
lier war, recording for posterity the
famous kiss in Times Square on
V-E Day. Henri Cartier-Bresson,
one of the world's most famous
photographers, was rarely seen


OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 21


JYAlNT FINALL"' i


Joe Lang, CFP Glenn Krcmaric, OSJ Robyn Payant, President Tom Payant, C.E.O.,
Lillian Brassil, Office Manager Heidi Oelgart, Marketing Assistant Peter Farina, CFA

WHO IS THE TEAM BUILDING .-"
YOUR RETIREMENT STRATEGY? -


Let our team help you!
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without his Leica. He chose the
camera for many of the same
reasons I've always admired it. It
is unobtrusive, it requires thought
and the work put in, when done
correctly, is rewarded with stun-
ning imagery.
At the Leica Store in Miami,
they let me walk out the door
with their latest model camera,
the Leica M, just to try it out. The
camera and the lens were valued at
$15,000. It dramatically changed
my outlook on my lifelong pas-
sion, carrying me back to where I
began: shooting from the heart.
Leica is flying high these days.
They announced the new M model
last year and the waiting list to get
the camera still stretches out into
weeks and months and this is
a camera that costs nearly $7,000
for the body alone. Although old
lenses will work just fine, new
lenses could add many thousands
more to the price (these days,
even high-end Canon and Nikon


cameras and lenses can easily cost
much the same).
Perhaps what is most amazing
is that the Leica is almost totally
manually operated. While it will
set the shutter speed, if desired, the
aperture and focus must be per-
formed manually. Unlike the older
M cameras, this model also shoots
video but that is just a side to what
many photographers have long




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Licensed
psychologist now
accepting Medicare
and health insurance
Licensed psychologist, Dr. Ste-
ven Walker is accepting new cli-
ents at his
Sun City
Center of- .
fice located "
at 1210 Del
Webb Bou-
levard. He
also has an
office in
downtown
Tampa at Dr. Steven Walker
400 North Ashley Drive, Suite
2600.
Dr. Walker holds a doctoral de-
gree in clinical psychology and a
master's degree in counseling psy-
chology He has more than 15 years
of experience helping clients of all
ages develop more self-awareness
and achieve their potential.
Dr. Walker has experience work-
ing with depression, anxiety,
PTSD, ADHD, substance abuse
and all manners of addictions,
existential and meaning of life
questions, anger management, ex-
ecutive coaching, and end of life
transitions. He works with adults,
children, couples, families, and he
can even schedule a house call if
you can't come to one of his offic-
es. "Please don't suffer in silence,
reach out, there is hope available
for people at any age."
For more information or to ar-
range an appointment with Dr.
Walker, call him directly at: Of-
fice, 813-938-3926 or visit his
website at www.LicensedPsy-
chology.com for more informa-
tion and to read his client reviews.
Email: LicensedPsychology
gm ail.com.
Dr. Walker also accepts all ma-
jor credit cards, checks and cash.
PAID ADVERTISEMENT


recognized is a beautifully made
photographic instrument, ideal for
producing iconic still images.
Leica is leading the pack in what
appears to be a retro renaissance.
Recently Nikon announced a new
digital camera built to look and
be used like one of their most
famous cameras from the film era.
Like the Leica M, it is a digital
camera that uses the strengths of
their film cameras, adding in the
high technology required for pho-
tography today.
After using the Leica in Mi-
ami, I knew that it was right for
me, although it was well beyond
my budget. I found a relatively
inexpensive six-year-old Leica
M8 digital rangefinder, now two
generations old, at a used camera
shop. Before long, I had a small
collection of four Leica lenses,
most of which dated back to the
1960s and 70s, with the oldest
being from 1958 (and is identical
to one Cartier-Bresson had used).
With Leica, almost all of their
lenses going back to the 1950s still
work on their cameras.
A few months later I found
another M8 in the New York Leica
Store. It was a back-closet beauty
of which I became the first owner
for a fraction of the price of a new
camera. Now with two M8s, I
feel more like a journalist and an
artist than a machine operator. My
Canon will always be with me;
it is an excellent camera that is
capable of so much but it is getting
less use these days. An added bo-
nus is that the relatively small size
of the Leica cameras and lenses
means my camera bag is now
much lighter.
The Leica rangefinder is a beau-
tiful pairing of technology and art-
istry. It doesn't rapid-fire frames,
it doesn't shoot in pitch darkness,
but it is a magical piece of equip-
ment, a work of art in itself. My
older Leicas may not have the
latest technology but the sensors
produce film-like images that most
new cameras can't match. And,
to get the most out of it, I have to
think about what I'm doing. My
photos are completely dependent
upon my own vision and skills.
There are no magic buttons; I have
to do the work to capture the mo-
ment that my eye sees. And once
that happens, the results make my
heart and soul sing. It's a song I've
missed since that first camera that
my Dad gave me it is wonder-
ful to hear it again.
Leica and the Leica stores,
including the Miami location, are
active on Facebook. Many people
ask me for advice on buying
cameras and while I'm no expert
on compact cameras I'm always
happy to talk photography; please
feel free to send me an email.
While it requires a little patience
and practice, many cameras can
be manually set to capture the
images you see in your mind's eye,
despite all of the amazing technol-
ogy that sometimes gets in the way.


MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO
A camera such as a Leica is ideal for street photography. You never
know when you may round a corner and see something beautiful.
Small and unimposing, the camera helps to capture life's magic.






22 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER

A brief tour of St. Augustine


0 Continued from page 17
Restorations are underway to rec-
reate prior habitations and special
events are featured throughout the
year.
The new St. Augustine Pirate &
Treasure Museum was in Key West
for five years until its owner Pat
Croce, former owner of the Phila-
delphia 76ers, realized Key West
was a party town.
He moved his treasures lock,
stock, and musket to St. Augustine
where it opened in late 2010. The
only remaining pirate's treasure
chest in the world, purchased by
Mr. Croce for $1 million, is dis-
played inside.
The museum is a touchy, feely
place. Almost t. %. i N ihiiii here is to
be handled, including two authen-
tic old cannons that can be fired,
my favorite thing to do, electroni-
cally.
The museum, located directly
across from the Castillo de San
Marcos, became an instant success
when opened to the public and
continues to draw people of all
ages.
Backing up to pirate's museum,
where the Spanish Quarter once
stood on King St., is the brand-new
Colonial Quarter (also a Pat Croce
project) featuring three centuries
of Spanish and English occupation.
Costumed tour guides walk visitors
through the centuries while village


The famed Fountain of Youth.


"residents" busily work at their
trades.
At the downtown Municipal
Marina, visitors can take guided
eco-tours, a two-hour bay tour on
the tall ship Freedom under full
sail or be entertained by a trip on
the Black Raven, a painstakingly
detailed reproduction of a pirate
ship.
As a frequent visitor to St.
Augustine, I'm often asked where
to stay. That is a subjective call.
There are many fine inns and
hotels.
One of my favorites is the St.
Francis Inn. It is the oldest continu-
ously operating inn in the oldest
continuously occupied European
city in the Continental U.S. and is
run by Joseph Finnegan, who bills
himself as the oldest innkeeper of
the oldest inn in the oldest city.
The original structure, a one-sto-
ry building, was built in 1791 with
the first travelers being hosted in
1845. The Inn was expanded over
the years and now has three stories
plus some adjoining residences.
It is not a cookie-cutter motel. An
added benefit for guests is their
St. Augustine beach-front building
available to guests for daytime use.
The question of dining avail-
abilities always comes up. Walking
to restaurants in the Old City is
normally a pleasant stroll but a list-
ing of places to eat, even briefly,
where Spanish, Minorcan, French,
Greek, Italian, American and other
cultures are represented would
take more room than I am allowed
here. Even this article is but a brief
capsule of things to do and see in
St. Augustine.
Many towns and cities along the
coast, from Jupiter north, claim to
have been the place where Ponce
de Leon actually landed. No mat-
ter, St. Augustine has a lock on the


NOVEMBER 14, 2013
worth NEVER PAINT, SPRAYCRETE 0'
ilAOoj STUCCO YOUR HOUSE AGAIN! J


claim and has
made the most
of it over the years, es-
pecially during this, the 500th an-
niversary year of Ponce de Leon's
purported landing.
The next big celebration will be
in 2065 for the 500th anniversary
of the founding of the city. This
will be something for our children
and grandchildren to celebrate.
Thankfully, St. Augustine's his-
tory will be preserved and not torn
down to put up high-rise condos or
gated communities.



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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 23


You, me and business:

The business relationship difference


Do you ever stop and think why
you choose to do business with one
company and not another? Are you
shopping in a specific store out of
habit? Or maybe it's the
convenient location?
How about because of
the relationships you K
have built there?
Business relationships
are different from inter-
personal relationships. B Dana
Unless you are under Executive
contract, there isn't the SCC Chao
same strong moral or Commerce
cultural obligation to re-
main loyal that exists in a romantic
relationship, or even in a friend-
ship. And no awkwardness...
That's why, even though building
a strong relationship is essential to
keeping your customers, it's often
not enough. Your customer might
love you, love your business, love
every employee you have and ev-
ery product you make; but your
customer will still love you and
leave you for a better deal, a more
attractive offer, something new,
shiny, and discounted.
So how do you build that strong
relationship that keeps your cus-
tomers loyal? One way is to re-
ward the behavior that you want
your customers to repeat. In this
case, the key is to reward loyal be-
havior. I'm not talking about print-
ing up another batch of customer
loyalty punch cards. I'm talking
the kind of rewards or incentives
that have actual, significant value.
(Think gas cards!)
Your job is to think of rewards
that your customers will actually
value, and then offer them at the
right time in order to reward loyal-
ty. No matter what business you're
in, good incentive rewards include


three common features: immedi-
ate gratification, convenience,
and monetary worth. Immediacy
is nice, convenience is even nicer,


Dittmar,
Director
mber of
e


Calling all writers and poets
The widespread use of electronic media has changed the rules of the copyright picture. The
Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library are privileged to present Anne Dalton, Esq. who will
try to make sense of the current and ever-changing landscape of "Copyrights and Fair Use: Traps
and Pitfalls for Writers."
Her talk, with plenty of time for questions, will be held in the Crawford Art Studio of the Library,
15816 Beth Shields Way in Ruskin. The event is free and no registration is required. For more in-
formation call 813-273-3652.


and actual money, or
perceived monetary
value? That's the best.
A basic reward will
include at least one of
these features. A better
reward should involve
two or provide a greater
advantage (i.e., imme-
diate gratification plus
convenience is great,
immediate gratification


plus more convenience is better).
The greatest reward will meet all
three requirements and thus will
be most highly valued.
A reward that gives immedi-
ate gratification is something like
a tangible trinket; you hand it to
the customer right away. It could
be cheap, but useful, or funny, or
interesting in a small way. (Key
chain with a bottle opener, travel
mug...) Your customer buys, or
signs up for the mailing list, or
brings a friend, or refers someone,
orjoins a customer club, and walks
away with an immediate reward.
A reward that offers convenience
might be pick up or delivery ser-
vice, free gift wrapping, a personal
shopper, exclusive late-night or
weekend shopping hours. Rewards
of convenience make life easier
and simpler for the customer. Con-
venience rewards usually make it
easier and simpler for the custom-
er to buy.
A reward that gives monetary
worth could be something as sim-
ple as, well, money. Try returning
a $5 or $10 bill from a customer's
most recent purchase and see what
happens.


Advertise in The Observer
= Vo We cover south Hillsborough County with a circulation
CallAa S!'I.. of 48,000 papers every week! .,,., ,,, options in
i ,... y price range...from classified ads to full pages. Call 813-
(%- 4-.It 11 and ask to speak to an advertising representative today
ri ,iii, information visit us on the web atwww.ObserverNews.net




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15 I ., IA i o R.iskin 813-0i5-01ll
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OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 23


NOVEMBER 14, 2013


I --------------------- I


I






24 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER

Area Obituary


Carl E. Kopischkie, Jr.
Carl E. Kopischkie, Jr., 71 of Sun City
Center, Fla. passed away Nov. 7, 2013
following a tragic accident. He retired
as a high school teacher and golf coach
after 25 years of service for Wauwatosa
(Wisc.) Public School System. He was
a member of the Lions Club in Sussex,
Wisc., an avid golfer and volunteer
for the Good Samaritans. He was a
member and served on the Board of
Deacons of the United Community
Church.
He was preceded in death by parents
Carl E. and Bernice Kopischkie, Sr.;
brother-in-law Richard Margolis; and
sister-in-law Judy Vandenberg.
Survivors include his wife of 46 years,
Jan; sons Michael (Paula) Kopischkie
and Patrick (Carrie) Kopischkie; sister
Joan Margolis; grandchildren Melina,
Carter and Aidan Kopischkie; niece
Joan Endres; nephews Jon Lourigan,
Sam Morrison, and Eric and Ryan
Henderson; sister-in-law Bev (Tom)
Henderson; brothers-in-law Ron
Nehring and Dan (Zinnia) Vandenberg;
aunt Eleanor Weber; and many
cousins.
A memorial service was held
Tuesday, November 12, 2013 at the
United Community Church in Sun City
Center, Fla. Arrangements by Sun City
Center Funeral Home.

Prince of Peace
holds Ministry Fair
Prince of Peace Catholic Church
in Sun City Center will be hosting
its annual Ministry Fair on Sun-
day, Nov. 17 from 8:30 a.m. until
2p.m.
All are invited to come to the
parish hall and learn more about
the various ministries and vol-
unteer opportunities available at
Prince of Peace.
Food and beverages will be
available for purchase. For more
information, visit www.popcc.org
or call the parish office at 813-
634-2328. Prince of Peace is lo-
cated at 702 Valley Forge Blvd. in
Sun City Center.


,'. ^y 1^.^ l
y '^E^E '








Redeemer Lutheran Women of ELCA
At a recent planning meeting, Redeemer Lutheran Women of the
ELCA Board are, seated from left: Miriam Sorby and Dorothy Peter-
son. Standing: Irene Brenner, Lois Hobratsch, Sigi Espino, Sheila
Smith, Jane Trefren, Vivan Kann and Miriam Zane. The next meet-
ing of the organization is Wednesday, Nov. 20 at 9:30 a.m., with a
breakfast provided by board members. For information, call 813-
634-1292.

'Sermon in Songs' at Unity Community
of Joy
Sue K. Riley will perform the
entire Sunday service as a "sermon
in songs" at Unity Community of
Joy on Sunday, Dec. 1.
This talented spiritual musician/
songwriter describes herself as
"A Life built around Music." She
believes in the power of music to
touch hearts and heal lives. She
loves to share her passion for mu- i
sic by creating songs that remind
people of their connection with :7
the Divine and their true nature as


spiritual beings.
Sue has been the Music Director
of Unity Church of Clearwater for
the past 10 years, and also serves
as chairperson of the Unity World-
wide Ministries Music Team that
offers support across the entire
Unity movement through original
music and educational conferenc-
es. Sue has created seven CDs of
original, uplifting music. She re-
cently received a Gold Medal for
her song "Grandpa's Hands" and
a Silver Medal for "Teach Me to


Pray" from the Songwriters Asso-
ciation of Washington, DC.
She regularly tours Unity spiri-
tual centers across the country per-
forming her songs of peace, love,
and joyous living.
Unity Community of Joy invites
you to celebrate Spirit with Sue K.
Riley on Sunday, Dec. 1 at 10:30
a.m. in the Henry G. Gibson Social
Hall of the Beth Israel Temple at
1115 Del Webb Blvd. East.


St. Matthew welcomes new pastor


There is an atmosphere of excited
anticipation at St. Matthew's Angli-
can Church in Riverview these days
as the congregation prepares to wel-
come a new pastor. The Reverend
Kenneth R. Bailey, Jr. was recently
selected from a group of candidates
to lead the 100+ member traditional
Anglican Catholic parish, which
moved from Tampa to its present
location on Bloomingdale Avenue
15 years ago.
The parish grew to its present
size under the shepherding of Fa-
ther William H. Perkins, Jr., who


recently answered the call of his
bishop to assume the rectorship of
a church in Delray Beach, Fla.
St. Matthew's has been without a
permanent rector since Aug. 1 and
has been served by Anglican Dea-
con David Keller in the interim.
Father Bailey is scheduled to ar-
rive Dec. 1 and will function as
priest-in-charge until such time as
he is formally installed as rector
by the Right Reverend Walter H.
Grundorf, Bishop of the Diocese
of the Eastern United States in the
Anglican Province of America. He


had been serving a small Anglican
Parish in Burnt Hills, N.Y for the
past two years, and prior to that
assignment, he was the rector of
St. Joseph of Arimathea Anglican
Church in Montgomery, Alabama.
Fr. Bailey and his wife Nancy
have six children ranging in age
from 15 down to 3. Nancy Bailey
homeschools the children and is
involved with many interests, in-
cluding blogging, home decorating
and photography. The Baileys will
live in Riverview. For information
call the church at 813-633-0334.


NCWS tops $100,000 in local donations
Upon reaching this noteworthy nations include, but are not limited NCWS currently conducts 10
goal, Jim Butner, Worship Leader to, the 5th grade students at Red- weekly worship services, along with
for NCWS (Nondenominational dick Elementary School (above), sponsoring two Adopt-A-Highway
Christian Worship Services), com- These students are involved in our Programs, one Adopt-A-Family
mented: "We give our thanks and Role Model Program. Our minis- Program and provides visitations to
blessings to all our attendees in try is composed of more than 50 patients at South Bay Hospital on
Sun City Center who have support- volunteers. We donate all our love Thursday afternoons in the form of
ed our ministry down through the offerings to eight local nonprofit pastoral visits. For more informa-
years. The beneficiaries of our do- organizations." tion, call 813-634-3114.


NOVEMBER 14, 2013


Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (behind Suntrust Bank)
.- ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: Nov. -April .................. 8:30a.m. Day Care Available
Mon.- Fri.
Rev. Richard Nussel and All Year............... 10:45 a.m. 6 a.m. 6p.m.
Phone:645-1241 Sunday School............ 9:30 a.m. call 645-6198

f rienlship Baptist Church Sunday WEEKLY SERVICES
I Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist) 9 a.m ....................... Bible Study
i 1511 El Ranci o Dr. 11a.m .................... Bible Study
15I El Rancho Dr. L 10a.m. & 6 p.m ............Worship
Sun City Center, FL 33573
l-- Phone/Fax: Wednesday
813-633-5950 6 p.m. ...Prayer Meeting/Bible Study

REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd. Sun City Center, FL 33573-5354
,o Reverend David Allman, Pastor
STelephone: 813-634-1292 Website: sccredeemer.org
'011 Worship Services on Sunday 10 a.m.
Holy Communion First & Third Sunday Bible Class Thursday 10 a.m.



Spirituality Rather Than "Religion"
Henry Gibson Social Hall, Beth Israel Synagogue Sunday Service 10:30 a.m.
1115 Del Webb E. Sun City Center, FL
www. u n ityco m m u n ityofjoy.com 813-481-9060

SFirst Baptist Church of Gibsonton
"We love because He first loved us." 1 John 4:19
Traditional Worship Service *Sunday School 9:30 AM.
Old-Time Gospel Hymns *Morning Worship 10:30 AMM.
Nursery Available Sunday Evening 6:00 P.M. l
Interpreter for the Deaf Mid-Week (Wed.) 7:00 P.M. 7
9912 Indiana St. Hwy 41 & Estelle A. enue Malcolm S. Clements, Paslor
Gibsonton, FL 33534 813-677-1301

Prince of Peace Masses:
of Pe c Sunday.8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., Noon
Catholic Church Saturday Vigil.................... 4:00 p.m.
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573 = a h Daily ................................ 8:00 a.m .
Phone: 634 2328 Fax: 633 6670 Confessions:
www.popcc.org Mon. Fri. 7:30 a.m. and Sat. 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.


N Sunday School (all ages)........ 9:30 am. %
NOR I SI Sunday Morning Worship .... 10:45 a.m.
BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday Evening Worship ....... 6:00 p.m. SBC
"Loving God, Lovin g Ot hers, Wednesday (all ages)............. 6:30 p.m.
Serving Beyond Borders" Dr Samuel (Sam) A. Roach, Pastor
1301 U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL 645-1121 www.nbcor.org

UNITED COMMUNITY CHURCH United Church of Christ
1501 La Jolla AVE, Sun City Center, FL 33573-5329
A Caring Church United in God's Love Serving Others
Rev. Dr. Jean M. Simpson
Worship Services ~ 8:30 and 10 AM i
(813) 634-1304 ~ www.uccsuncity.org

& d/ wte EVERETT TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ .
1611 First St. SW Ruskin, FL 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL-
SERVICES: Sunday ........................ 9:30 & 10:30 a.m.: 6:00 p.m. A
Wednesday ................7:00 p.m. -

4% *-Wimauma Church of God
^ Sunday School ................................ 10:00 a.m.
SSunday Morning Worship................ 10:45 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship.................. 6:00 p.m.
,l l } Wednesday Youth Worship............... 6:00 p.m.
g in Wednesday Evening Service............. 7:00 p.m.
Pastor Tom Durrance 5504 S.R. 674, Wimauma, FL 33598 o 813-634-4776

(Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC
Meets in the Henry Gibson Social Hall of the Beth Israel
Synagogue 1115. E. Del Webb Blvd.
Thursday, 7:00 PM Call 633-0396 www.sccuu.org
Love is not real until forgiveness is real.
John F. Hayward


Christ Centered Holy Spirit Led Sunday 10:00 a.m.

HUNGRY FOR REVIVAL? www.theanointingchurch.com
PRAYER PRAISE WORSHIP
Sun City Center Inn, S.R. 674 & Pebble Beach Dr., Meeting Room

The United Methodist Church of Sun City Center
1210 Del Webb Blvd West 634-2539


Come Bela
Qrow Serve
TIhN nned M odh hsl C-r1h


Bookstore 633-8595
FREE
Nursery Provided


http://www.sccumc.com
ing WORSHIP SERVICES:
e SUNDAY


8:30 a.m..................................Contemporary Service
9:30 a.m.......................................... Traditional Service
10:00 a.m................................Contemporary Service
11:00 a.m........................................ Traditional Service
4:00 p.m ........................................Hispanic Worship
Senior Pastor: Dr. Warren Langer
Assistant Pastor: Rev. Samuel Rorer


v






NOVEMBER 14, 2013





4 Southside Baptist Churc
719 "A Warm, Loving & Friendly Church"
4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 S Sun City, FL 33586 813-645
"Getting to Know You" (Donuts & Coffee).... 9:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Service........
Sunday School ........................................... 9:30 am. Wednesday Evening Service..
Sunday Morning Worship............................ 10:55 a.m. Thursday Morning Prayer......

cGwstian cb, Worship Service @10:30 ah
i%. Adult Sunday School @ 9:.30
170733rd Street Southeast
Rus kin, Florida 33570
www.firstchristiansuncitycenter.cc
SFCC SCC Phone: 813-419-4930
Y Ce nte \ Minister Mike Grant







820 College Ave. W. Ruskin, FL 33570
645-6439
www.fbcruskin.org A Resourcefor Families
Sunday School .................................9:45 a.m .
Morning Worship............... 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. D
Evening Service .............................. 6:00 p.m. Dr Barr R
Wednesday Night Service ................ 7:00 p.m. KC2 ThroS I
Aw ana ............................................ 7:00 p.m Grad


ST. JOHN THE DIVINE EPSCOPALCHLH l


SUNDAY SERVICES
RUSKIN
705 9th St. S.E /0655-5970
9:00 AM-Contemporarnj
Sunclai School-Youth Bible Stud,,
&- ... _-k.- .. k _i.L ..-- --


Fr. Lee Miller
Priest


.e..wship..uralt.r the t.. vic. SUN CITY CENTER
S Pae 1015 Del Webb Blvd E/633
10 AMornin Peverij Hedn Srvc. d 8:00 AM-Rite I -- 11:00 AM-Rit
10 AM every Wecdnesdatj
Sun Citi] Center &
fCellowship hour alterboth serve
A CARING CHRISTIAN FAMILY-WIGGLY CHILDREN WELC(



First Church of Christ, Scier,
204 2nd St. N.W. Ruskin, FL 3352
(813) 645-6102
Sunday Service........................................................ 10:
Sunday School......................................................... 10:
W wednesday Service...................................................5:
Reading Room...............................Wednesday 4 to 4:
AllAre Welcome


W St. Andrew Presbyterian Church
Sunday Services
Traditional Service 9:00 a.m.
Contemporary Service 11:00 a.m.
S Prayers with anointing for healing and wholeness
A Stephen during worship the second Sunday of every month.
Mlmustry
Church Pastor: Rev. Dr. Mark E. Salmon
J Meet friends in Fellowship Hall after each Service.
@ Refreshments served.


1239 Del Webb Blvd. West
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Church is Handicap accessible


Phone: 813-634-1252
For information visit:
www.standrewatscc.org


Saint -Anne Cathohc Church
SouthShore: Apollo Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton


jr

~

-.


U.S. Hwy. 41
106 11th Ave. NE
Ruskin
813-645-1714
SaintAnneRuskin.org


c< MASSES GQ
Vigil M ass..................................................................... Saturday 4:30 p.m.
Sunday Mass..................................... 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
M onday thru Friday .....................................................................8:00 a.m.
Holy Days....................................... Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Espahol.........Sabado 6:00 p.m.; Domingo 12:30 p.m.; Jueves 7:00 p.m.
Confession.................Thursday 6:15 p.m.; Saturday 3:15 p.m.

'IN__________640,________


OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 25


'What's in Your


9 Genes?' is topic
Congregation Beth Shalom in
-- Brandon will host Dr. Parul Jaya-
1h kar from The Victor Center at Mi-
ami Children's Hospital, who will
5-4085 discuss "What We Need to Know
... 6:00 p.m. about Jewish Genetic Diseases."
...7:00 p.m. There are a number of serious
.... 10:00 a.m.J genetic diseases for which persons
of Jewish heritage are more like-
ly to be carriers than the general
m population. Dr. Jayakar will dis-
I am cuss these diseases and the risks to
people of Jewish descent.
"The great advances in technol-
ogy allow us a unique opportunity
0m to learn about our genetic makeup
and the particular issues faced by
Jews," said Rabbi Betsy Torop,
"This information is valuable and
potentially life-saving; we wel-
come the opportunity to educate
Sthe community about this critical
health issue."
The event will be held at Congre-
^ gation Beth Shalom of Brandon at
706 Bryan Rd. on Thursday, Nov.
21 at 7:30 p.m.
This is the first in a series of
health presentations organized by
the synagogue's Adult Education
s Committee. The health events are
umsey
SCHOOL free and open to the public no
ih 12th RSVPs are necessary.
e The Victor Center offers accessi-
ble genetic counseling and screen-
ings. On a national level, they
work in partnership with health-
Scare professionals, clergy and the
Community to create awareness
.*- _, and organize screenings for the 19
,^K preventable genetic diseases for
which 1 in 4 Ashkenazi Jews is a
carrier. The national Victor Center
5-3970 is located in Philadelphia.
teII
iChoir Fateful Choices
As we progress through life,
fateful choices affect our personal
outcomes. Some choices are made
consciously, some are foisted upon
S i us, and some things "just happen."
til ~This gamut is the topic of Bill
70 Danek's presentation at the Unitar-
ianUniversalist Fellowship of SCC
on Thursday, Nov. 14. The service
:00 a.m. begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Henry
Gibson social hall of the Beth Isra-
:00 a.m. el Synagogue on Del Webb Blvd.,
00 p.m. East. All are welcome.


Healthy eating is
topic at sisterhood
meeting
At 1 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 7,
2014, the Beth Israel Sisterhood
will welcome Jeanne Shanin as the
guest speaker. Her topic will be
health improvement, with a focus
on healthy eating.
Shanin will share some ideas for
delicious recipes and show how to
substitute healthier ingredients in
cooking.
The meeting will take place in
the Henry Gibson Social Hall at
the Synagogue on East Del Webb
Blvd.




Come and experie
Jesus to chain
Sunday @ 9 & 11 AM Ser

www.aplace4c

2322 11th Ave. SE Rus


SCC Chamber Players present first
concert on Nov. 22
The Sun City Chamber Players present their first concert of the 2013-
2014 season, "Suites for Strings," on Friday, Nov. 22 at 7 p.m. at the
United Methodist Church of Sun City Center.
This concert will feature the members of the ensemble performing
Holst's St. Paul's Suite, Grieg's Holberg Suite, Kalliwoda's Duet for
Violin and Viola, and a special performance of Vivaldi's Concerto for
Violin in G minor with soloist Karen Tuttle.
Tickets are $10 at the door. For more information, visit www.suncity-
chamberplayers.com or call Shawn Snider at 941-323-9434.


The cast of Murder on the High C's shares a laugh.
A murder comes to UCC
Go to the United Community Church of Sun City Center at 6 p.m. on
Friday or Saturday, Nov. 22 or 23, and you will witness a murder during
the performance of Murder on the High C's, a dinner theater production
written and directed by Peggy Burgess.
Laura Schlar of Sun Coast Catering will prepare the meal of chicken
Marsala, garlic mashed potatoes, mixed vegetables and banana pudding
for dessert.
Tickets are $20 per person and may be purchased Sunday morning after
worship, or on Tuesday or Thursday in the church narthex from 10 a.m. to
noon. Call Paula at 813-633-6739 for tickets and more information.


-~2- I


Start the holidays with Stacey Knights
Musical artist Stacey Knights and her band Forecast will welcome in
the holiday season with a concert at Sun City Center United Methodist
Church on Friday, Nov. 29 at 7 p.m.
There will be 2 1/2 hours of Christmas music, carol sing-alongs, won-
derful humor provided by the comedy team Rev'd Up, door prizes and
surprises, plus a very special rendition of "Silent Night" to close the
evening's program.
Tickets are $10 in advance; $15 the night of the concert. Tickets can
be purchased at UMC, 1210 West Del Webb Blvd. and at the Sun City
Center Chamber, 1651 Sun City Center Plaza.
For more information contact the Church at 813-634-2539.
Braun & Wolf

Ln l_| concert postponed
CHURCH ) The duo recital of Mati Braun
'nce the power of on violin and Gary Wolf on piano,
le scheduled for Friday night, Nov.
nge your life. 15 at the United Methodist Church
of Sun City Center, has been post-
vicio en Espafiol @ 6 PM poned due to grave illness in one
ave ry n e .0 gof the performer's families.
everyone.org The new date for the concert is 7
;kin,*F 8 .453 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 6. Call 813-
kin, FL 813.645.3337 634-2539 for more information.






26 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


PUBLIC NOTICE

FREE HEARING TEST SET FOR SENIORS
PINELLAS, PASCO, HERNANDO AND HILLSBOROUGH COUNTIES Electronic hearing tests will be given
during the hours of 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday thru Friday.
There will be a hearing specialist at each of the locations below. Everyone should have a hearing test at least once a year if there is any trou-
ble at all hearing clearly. Even people now wearing a hearing aid or those who have been told nothing could be done for them should have a
hearing test and find out whether modern methods of hearing correction can help them hear better. Do not miss this valuable opportunity to
learn more about your hearing and the causes of hearing loss. To avoid waiting, please call ahead for an appointment.

In es tan -hurYouCa Fnd utHo0Muh f ou

Hern Is Los AnmhtYu a*oT GtI ak


* The Outer Ear
When sound waves reach the ear, they are gathered by the funnel-shaped outer ear and channeled into the
middle ear. Sometimes hearing loss can be easily and quickly corrected by clearing '1d. I that can occur
from wax build up.
Years of using q-tips to clean your ears can embed layers of wax so tightly that it affects your ability to hear
clearly. That's why the first part of your ear exam will be with an otoscope to determine if there is any 'I. I :,-
that can open up your ear canal and allow you to enjoy the beauty of unmuted sound again.
* The Middle Ear
At the entrance to the middle ear, sound waves hit the eardrum. A damaged eardrum can not only be
painful, but it can muffle natural sounds and make it extremely difficult to hear clearly. If you' i, i,, i,,
hearing loss, it's important to find out if it is a correctable condition involving the middle ear.
* The Inner Ear
Sound vibrations travel through the middle ear and into the fluid filled inner ear where they are converted
into signals that are sent to your brain. Damage to the inner ear can lead to deafness, so it's vital to make sure
your inner ear is functioning properly. Problems with the inner ear often require surgery or medication. If the
damage is irreparable, you'll want to ask about the new cochlea implants that can help restore your ability
to hear again. There is also new scientific and medical research with stem cell transplants that can regrow
damaged inner ear hair follicles (known as cilia) that send I- h, ,i i j:,il:. to your brain allowing you to
translate sounds into language. Researchers at Stanford University say that they are 5-10 years away from a
breakthrough that could possibly correct human deafness.
How Hearing Is Tested
To evaluate your hearing a specialist will perform a series of hearing tests. These tests are often performed
by using a combination of electronic equipment and headphones.


Knowledge About How Your Ears Work Helps With The Healing Process!
It's important that you have a basic understanding of how your ears work. The
S healing starts when you first acknowledge that you have a hearing problem.
S The next step is to get your ears examined so you will know the cause and the
:. degree (mild to profound) of your condition.


Ear Canal


Inner Ear
. Cochlea


Outer Ear
Outer Ear


Eustachian
Tube
What Hearing Tests Show
Hearing tests can determine whether a hearing impairment exists and what the cause may be. Your hearing
examination will also let you know the degree of hearing loss you are experiencing, from mild to profound, and
what technologies are available to help correct your hearing loss. The results of your hearing exam will provide
you with the road map to what you should do next to regain and restore your ability to hear clearly again.


mWhy DoPeople elay ] UP1 Addres[ s ~*1ing1 Hear*ing Loss? ~~In


In America, the average person with hearing loss delays dealing with it for 5 to
7 years. The big question is, "Why do people waitso long before confronting
the obvious problems that come with an inability to hear clearly?"
Accepting & Correcting Your Hearing Loss
Researchers estimate that over 30 million people in the United States suffer
from hearing loss, but almost 75% avoid scheduling a hearing test to determine
the cause and how to remedy this condition. As the baby boomer generation
ages, more people are going to experience hearing loss.
Many people with hearing loss do not take the steps needed to correct the
problem. The first step starts with getting a hearing exam when you first notice
you are experiencing symptoms. A hearing test can determine the cause of
your hearing loss, and which state-of-the-art hearing devices can improve
your quality of life. There is often a period of denial or hesitation that must be
overcome before the appointment for the hearing test is made.
At first it may seem like you only have very mild hearing loss, if any,
because you can hear someone talking to you, or you can hear the TV, radio,
or a movie, you just can't catch every word. Or you may have trouble following
conversations, but you always come up with a reason why it's too noisy, people
are speaking too fast, or there are too many people talking at once.
The truth is that when you have early, mild hearing loss, you will start to
have trouble hearing certain higher frequency sounds. Consonant sounds are
in the higher range and are the first to go. While you may hear voices, you
may find yourself mistaking similar-sounding words, like "rent" and "sent" or
"time" and "lime".
If you believe you have mild hearing loss, begin by getting a hearing exam.
You can use the results of the hearing test to rule out or fix any correctable
conditions, and then you can assess if any of the new and advanced hearing
technologies can help you hear more clearly.
After your hearing test you will be able to make a more educated decision
about what your options are to prevent further hearing loss and hear more
clearly immediately, improving your overall quality of life.


I-


Thomas Edison Suffered From Hearing Loss!
One of the most famous people with hearing loss in history is the inventor Thom-
as Edison (1847-1931), who is credited with inventing the phonograph, light bulb,
and movie camera. What many people are not aware of is that Edison became
technically deaf in his early teens. It could have been from a childhood illness or
the result of a "boxing"of his ears by a train conductor.

Purchasing a hearing aid is not a decision made lightly. It's important that
the person you are working with listens to you and works together with you to
address your specific hearing needs. You need to be able to trust their guidance
in choosing a solution to match your lifestyle.
Advances In Hearing Care!
A hearing specialist with Audibel Hearing Centers will be available to answer
all your questions and discuss the latest advances in hearing care. Even with
the new technology, your brain still needs time to readjust to hearing sounds it
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In addition, technology is constantly changing. A hearing test can now
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Most hearing losses don't require expensive hearing aids to help you with


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It is true that hearing aids of past years did have a stigma attached to them.
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loss. With advanced digital technology and miniaturization, nobody else has to
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In addition, hearing aids technology has an exciting future. Even now you
can have your hearing aid connected to different external devices, such as an
MP3 player, a cell phone, radio, or your TV. As microchips continue to get small-
er, the amount of data processing power continues to increase at astronomical
rates, allowing for hearing aids to be made smaller while continuing to improve
sound quality. If you checked out hearing aids five years ago, you should take a
look at the new models- you might be surprised at how far things have come
and how easily hearing loss may be corrected.
Hearing loss can affect people of all ages. If you were in the military, law
enforcement, or simply exposed to the loud noises of machinery in a factory,
you could have developed hearing loss at an early age. Don't be embarrassed
by your inability to hear clearly- take action now and get a hearing test to
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continued deterioration.
Start by having a hearing test and then take steps to decide if you feel
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energy are you spending apologizing because you misheard something, or
asking someone to speak louder or to repeat themselves? Having a hearing test
and wearing a hearing device can alleviate many problems caused by hearing
loss and that is priceless!
- www.floridahearing.com


BRANDON
813-681-4046


TAMPA
813-831-9442


SUN CITY CENTER
4850 Sun City Center Blvd.


ELLENTON


BRADENTON


941-722-7200 941-747-6966


813-634-8451
This advertisement funded by the MANUFACTURER, Minneapolis, MN


NOVEMBER 14,2013








NheOVEbserve 14,w2013 TOBERVERNEWSerSCCrOBSERERCuTHEn2









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100......Announcements
200......Farmers' Market
300......Merchandise
400......Marine
500......Real Estate
550 ......Manufac. Housing
600......Rentals
650 ......Professional Services
700......Services
800......Employment


PHONE:
813-645-3111
FAX:
813-645-1792
EMAIL:
beverly@
observernews.net
BOLD LINE:
Addl. $3


Published by M&M Printing Co.
210 Woodland Estates Ave. SW -S
Ruskin, FL 33570


105 PERSONAL



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ext. 201


L -30


310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana
St., Gibsonton (1 block off US 41, 1
block north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday
through Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing,
furniture, lots misc. Ministry First Baptist
Gibsonton. 813-671-0036 to donate

SCC 634 La Jolla. Friday 11/15 & Sat-
urday 11/16, 9am-? Ironing table, tile
steamer, knickknacks & more.

Moving sale. Thursday through Satur-
day, Nov. 14-16. 205 Islip Way, South
Pebble Beach to New Bedford. Jewelry,
tools, indoor/ outdoor furniture, clothes
& much more.

Large garage sale. Saturday, Nov. 16,
8am-? Christmas decoration, paintings,
lawn furniture & lots more. 911 Sun Key
Ct., SCC.

Huge multi family sale. Something for
everyone. Friday & Saturday, 9am-?
1609 N. Pebble Beach Blvd., SCC.
Tools, housewares, more

Yard sale, 5527 Hillsborough St.,
Wimauma. Nov 15 & Nov 16, Many
items. 3 families. All must go cheap.
8:30am-?

Antiques, collectibles, household. Thurs-
day, Friday, Saturday, 8am-? 1416
Seton Hall. (1 mile from SR 674 off Del
WebbW.) SCC.

Friday only 11/15, 8am-1 pm. 1612 Vin-
cennes, SCC. 4 family sale. Furniture,
tools, mirrors, high quality household
misc.

Garage sale. Nov. 15 & 16, 8am-2pm.
2008 Meadowlark SCC. Kitchen, cloth-
ing, Christmas, household, small appli-
ances, furniture & more.

Moving sale. 11/14& 11/15, 8am-1 pm.
1007 Athens Way, SCC. Furniture,
household items. S. Pebble Beach to
end of road on Weatherford

Street sale. Thursday, Friday & Satur-
day. Furniture, tools, jewelry, lots more.
Follow signs. Linger Lane, off W. Del
Webb. SCC.


U.S. Paper Money WANTED (Small orLarge)
Foreign Currency WANTED
ALWAYS BUYING SILVER COINS,
INGOTS, Misc. & Other Mint Bars
You tried the Chamber & Ruskin.
Why not try us for better prices?




Watch Out for Counterfeit Coins

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(813) 503-4189


SQuality Wicker 6 Rattan Furniture
:2711 N. Macdill Ave.. Tampa, FL 33607 813-876-1566
Siul.llS: Mon.-Fri.10-6 " T I -"I I I
* Closed Weekends LWe-coveror -aknecuion
^ -: Quality Furniture at Affordable Prices
Dining Seatming Bedroom Patio Much More
'1 f i c.=www.QualltyWickerandRattan.com
DELIVERY AVAILABLE
<6t SOMETHING FOR
T EVERY ROOM INSIDE |
-b__ AND ALL AREAS OUTSIDE [


310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Garage sale. Friday 11/15, 8am-2pm.
off West Del Web 1909 Sterling Glen
Ct, (end of culdesac) SCC. Lamps,
desk, Electrolux vacuum, clothes. Good
prices.

Moving sale. Saturday 11/16, 7am-4pm.
2011 Park Village Dr., Ruskin. (off 21st
Ave., SE)

Apollo Beach Caribbean Isles carport
sale. Saturday, Nov. 16, 8am-1lpm,.
From Big Bend Rd south on Hwy 41,
take 1 st right Elsberry follow signs. From
Ruskin pass Apollo Beach Blvd.. to next
left Elsberry Rd. Follow signs.

Neighborhood yard sale. 1403 -1430
Bluewater Dr., SCC. (off Del Webb
east). Friday Nov. 15 & Saturday Nov.
16, 8am-? Bikes, square dance clothes,
Christmas items & tree, pet items, Lazy
boy recliner & lots more

The Lawn Bowling Club of Sun City Cen-
ter will be holding Grand Garage Sale.
on Friday, Nov. 15 & Saturday Nov. 16,
8am-noon. at the Lawn Bowling facility
on North Pebble Beach Blvd., located
behind the lawn bowling greens.

Sale. 108 Cactus Flower Lane, SCC.
11/15 & 11/16, 8am-2pm. Baretta 391
Eurika trap 1/2 garuge. Remington 1/2
gauge STS shot gun shells. Household,
lines, mens XL shirts, women, file cabi-
net, Christmas, lots more.

Giant Yard Sale
Everything you can imagine. Please
come & support our troop. Scout
Troop 601. Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints. Nov. 16, 7am-1 pm.
5208 12th St., NE Apollo Beach.

Garage sale. Friday 11/15, 8am-2pm.
off West Del Web 1909 Sterling Glen
Ct, (end of culdesac) SCC. Lamps,
desk, Electrolux vacuum, clothes. Good
prices.

Collectibles, Christmas, vintage hats,
jewelry, designer clothes, books, house-
hold items, etc. 8am-noon Friday & Sat-
urday, 1238W. Del Webb, SCC.

Hide-a-way RV Resort, 2206 Chaney
Dr. Ruskin. annual parkwide yard sale.
Saturday, Nov 16, 8am-1 pm.

Big Yearly Fall Sale
In Sundance
All name brand clothes, kids, wom-
ens, men's all sizes, Levi, Hollister,
Aeropostale, Guy Harvey, Dickies,
Nike, Michael Kors & Kenneth Cole,
girls & pre-teen Justice & many
more brands. Great kids & ladies $
1 tables & men's $2 table. 50 cent
baby clothes table. New CDs, DVDs
$3 each. Linens, kitchenware, books,
lots of misc. decor. Lots of furniture
& lots of Vera Bradley, horse supplies
& horse decor. Lots of guys stuff, (2)
26" bikes, Something for everyone,
don't miss this one. Friday, Saturday
& Sunday 8am-5pm. 1106 Oxbow Rd
(4.5 miles south of SR 674 on US 301
to Lightfoot Rd). Follow signs & bal-
loons. See you there.




Carport & Craft Show

Saturday, Nov. 16th
8 am to 1 pm

Craft show in clubhouse!
FOOD AVAILABLE

Chula Vista Landing
1702 Gulf City Rd. Ruskin


310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Antiques & collectibles sale. Saturday,
Nov. 16, 7am-noon. Cash only. 2pc
oak desk secretary. Signed black artist
prints, oriental silks, samplers, Barbie's,
Patsy doll, Stieff silver plated flatware,
butter churns, pottery, Beleek, Limoge,
Roseville, Spode, Weller, jewelry. To
much to list. 1627 Costa St., SCC.

Vintage furniture, lamps, decorat-
ing & household items. & Christmas
items. Nov. 16 & 17. Saturday & Sun-
day, 8:30am-1pm. 1002 Ventana Dr.,
Ruskin.

Tools & household items for sale.
Drywall, painting & tons of tools. Nov..
15 & 16. 8am-3pm. 1624 2nd St., NE,
Ruskin.

SCC. Street garage sale. Fox Hills &
Sahara. Thursday, Friday & Saturday.
Nov. 14,15 & 16. 8am-noon.


A~ Cafvary's
yy ^n(Aettic
( I 3 Thrift Store

Wed., Fri.& Saturday
9 a.m.- Noon
Nov. 13,15 & 16

BuY 1, GET 1 FREE
all books and movies
Plus the Secret Sale

1480 E. College Ave. Ruskin

813-641-7790
zini/r ofCkalvarz Lutheran Church


310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Nov.. 15 & 16. Cherry Hills Dr. & Au-
gusta Dr., SCC. A variety of things for
house, clothes. 98 Lincoln Continental.
8am-1 pm

2026 E. Del Webb Blvd., SCC. Nov. 15 &
16, 7am-1 pm. Lots of Christmas decor,
household items, tools. Something for
everyone.

312 ESTATE SALES

The Perfect Piece
Quality used furniture. 2406 College
Ave., Ruskin. Stop in you will be
pleasantly surprised. We buy & sell.
813-645-1800

Extra Large Estate Sale
SCC. Thursday, Friday & Saturday,
Furniture, humongous Christmas
items, antiques, toolmakers tools,
dishes. 704 Indian Wells.





Your home will be staged for
best results. Working in
Sun City Center for 26 years.
Please feel free to call about the
sale or its contents.
Bonded Licensed
Cell: 508-0307 (
or Eve: 633-1173


Call

DICKMAN (813)645-3211
DI KMAN_ ( Serving South Hillsborough
R EA LTYINC. County since 1924
R E A L T Y www.dickmanrealty.com
Celebrating 89 Years .dickman@tampabay.rr.com
1924 -2013 dickman@tampabay.rr.com

RUSKIN JUST LISTED! Nice family house on large fenced lot: 3BR/2BA +
large inside utility room with closet (4th BR?), split plan, eat-in-space in kitchen,
tile floors throughout, CHA, 4-year's-new roof, covered porch and 10' X 10'
shed in backyard. $75,000 CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
APOLLO BEACH LARGE COMMERCIAL BUILDING: With CG zoning, a nice
lot with ample parking, and fenced area in back, this property, a block from US
Hwy 41, could accommodate a large business or be divided for 3 different busi-
nesses. Newer CHA and roof, new drywall, freshly painted. $299,000 CALL
CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
GREAT ACREAGE FOR YOUR DREAM HOME/MOBILE-HOME: With all new
utilities, this 1.92 acres cleared lot is in a peaceful area, across the street from
Little Manatee River, only minutes from town. Boat ramp and park at end of
street. $84,500 CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
RENT NEVER COMES BACK CHECK THIS ONE OUT! 3BR/2BA with an
attached 2-car garage and built in 2010. This home is located in a non-deed
restricted neighborhood with no HOA or CDD fees. Special features include:
ceramic tile throughout, granite countertops, coffered ceilings in master bed-
room with walk-in closet, nice open floor plan and more! There are four homes
available! $119,900 CALL ROXANNE WESTBROOK 813-748-2201
NEW LISTING! 2BR/1 BA mobile home on a huge fenced lot (almost 34 acre)!
No HOAor CDD fees! Great location! Within minutes to US Hwy 41 or 1-75. Mo-
bile home is in need of some repairs. $35,000 CALL KAY PYE 813-361-3672
OR ROXANNE WESTBROOK 813-748-2201
FISH TO YOUR HEART'S CONTENT on this 1.6 acre corner lot on Blue Heron
Lake. Subdivision has 4 lakes of 123 acres each & each has its own boat ramp
& gazebo furnished with picnic tables & grills. No time frame to build & choose
your own builder. Canoe, hike or just sit & watch birds & wildlife play in every
direction. 274 ft. frontage. Live the good life for just $76,300 CALL KAY PYE
361-3672 OR ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
REDUCED PRICE ON COMMERCIAL ACREAGE IN RUSKIN! 3.7 acres
(MOL) with CG zoning. The initial work has been done for office buildings. This
property has a great location, on corner of 10th St SW and Woodland Estates.
$299,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
This 2BR/1BA in an age-restricted and gated community with low HOA
fees, screened porch, carport and storage is just what the Doctor ordered. No
stress, no worries. Enjoy the clubhouse, pool, shuffleboard or do nothing at all.
JUST $39,000 CALL LINDA BADGEROW 695-5515
REDUCED PRICE on already low priced lot near 1-75, park, shopping, medical
and office buildings, university. Once had mobile home, and still has electric
service, well, septic, outbuilding. All it is missing is you and your new dwelling.
Just $25,000 JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
DOLLHOUSE AWAITS YOUR LOVING TOUCHES! 2BR/1 BA, eat-in kitchen is
open to living room. Attached utility room and storage sheds in nice-sized back
yard. Steps to the river, quiet neighborhood. $59,750 CALL MARGOT WARD
813-486-9480
PRICE REDUCTION!! Prized zoning "M" 5021 Sq. Ft. office and storage in
place. Easy access to major highways and port. Completely fenced, .81 acre on
dead-end street. Cell phone tower brings income. Please call for tour. This one
won't last long. $374,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672


OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER THE CURRENT 9 27


NOVEMBER 14, 2013






28 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER THE CURRENT


312 ESTATE SALE


Contents Include: Dining
Room Table w/Chairs, Bassett
Buffet, Sofas, Loveseat, Lamp
Tables, Side Chairs, Home
Decor, Oil Paintings & Prints,
Silk Trees & Plants, Men's &
Women's Clothing, Glassware,
Kitchenware, PFAFF Hobby
Sewing Machine, Patio Setw/
Umbrella, Ducane Gas Grill,
Power Pro Generator, Power
Tools, Christmas Decor,
Household & Misc. Items.
Please park on side of sale due to
emergency vehicles.
Please don't miss our other
sale this Friday/Saturday at
1026 Regal Manor Way
See You There!

AAA Furniture
New & Gently Used Furniture
BUlY & SELL
Daily Trips to SCC


312 ESTATE SALE






NETIE -E STAE SALES



Contents Include: Beautiful
Broyhill Two-Toned White
Washed Dining Room Table w/
Chairs, and Matching Broyhill
China Cabinet, Two- Toned White
Washed Hutch, Broyhill Server,
Nice Curio Cabinet, Wrought
Iron Baker's Rack, TV Armoire,
Beautiful Cherry Office/Computer
Desk, Sony Home Theatre
System, Home Decor, Glassware,
Kitchenware, Household &
Garage Items.
Please park on side of sale due to
emergency vehicles.
Please don't miss our other
sale this Friday/Saturday at
2013 East Del Webb Blvd.
See You There!


RZ- "qs~
-NETTIE'

EsTf1TE
]EST TE
$ LE$


382-7536
Personalized
Service


312 ESTATE SALE


Anne's Estate Sales -_'






Furniture: Grandfather clock,
sofa sleeper w/matching loveseat
& chair, china hutch, Queen
bedroom suite, patio set w/
lounger, dinette table w/chairs,
4-poster bed, Queen size, swivel
rocker, microwave w/cart, end
& coffee tables, wicker chairs.
Collectables: Longaberger baskets,
artwork, jewelry, dolls. Misc.:
Artificial trees, file cabinets,
stepladder, household & kitchen.
www.AnnesEstateSales.blogspot.com


335 MUSIC


Technic's organ SX-EA-5. All books,
bench, amplifier, ear phones. Good
condition. Asking $500 or obo. 813-
642-8383

360 GOLF CARTS
Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade. Char-
gers, parts all related. Ronny's Carts &
Parts. 813-484-9855 or 813-645-4515

390 MISC. FOR SALE
(2) Ceiling fans. 52" Brass & white with
crystals $90. 52" brass & white $65. Like
new. 813-633-4506, SCC

Classifieds Work


ppA -



425 SLIPS OR STORAGE
South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special-
izing in outside storage for RVs, boats &
trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay-
Storage.com





455 AUTOMOBILES
2008 Smart car 20,000+ miles, loaded.
Truly like new. 48mpg, sunroof. $21,000
new asking $10,000. 813-634-4782

456 TRUCKS AND VANS
For sale. 1993 Isuzo truck, 12' box with
lift gate. 137,709 miles. $2500. 813-
633-3757





511 HOUSES FOR SALE



Hampton (2B3R/2B3A) with up-leveled
lanai, CARPORT IN KINGS POINT
....................................................... $6 5,50 0
RENTAL IN KINGS POINT
Call me to advertise your RENTAL!
2BR/2BA -1700 sq. ft. double car garage
on Golf Course. Unfurnished
................................................. $ 1 2 0 0 /m o n th


NOVEMBER 14, 2013
511 HOUSES FOR SALE

PRICE REDUCTION ON THESE 2 RUSKIN
LOTS, AND OWNER'S FINANCING:
I 1/3 Acre cleared corner lot with
huge oaks, zoned for home or duplex.
Electric and water on site. Convenient
location close to schools and major
roads. $18,000
* Great residential lot, College
Ave West, cleared, with nice shed in
back. Quick access to shopping and
major hwys. Water, sewer and electric
available. $19,500
Thinking of selling or buying?
Please give me a call,
I can help!
nB CLAIRE TORT DICK N
SCell: (813) 363-7250








* BEAUTIFUL HOME IN CYPRESS
CREEK VILLAGE 3/2/2/, no ODD, low HOA
$176,200
* WATERFRONT! Built in 2007, 3/2/3+,
dock, LOW insurances plus 1 Year HOME
WARRANTY! $234,000
* AWESOME LA PALOMA GOLF COURSE
HOME, 4/3/3, pool, low HOA and no CDD!
$343,000
* GREAT WATERFRONT LOCATION,
STUNNING HOME INCLUDED!! 3/2/2
$283,000
* COTTAGE BY THE BAY 3/2/1 great
location with in-law suite! $169,900


ENT., INC.
Lic. #CMC056816
AIR-CONDITIONING,
HEATING & REFRIGERATION
Complete Sales, Service,
Installation & Repair
Amana and Senior
Trane Dealer Discount
John R. Bowman, Jr., Owner
(813) 633-2703



GRIFFITH
AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING SERVICE INC.
It'i'r 30 ) r> I t'lE iri'iit(
Rt iltiinrll A& ( 'iiwnilifril
*SALES INSTALLATION SERVICE
on all Makes and Models
NO OVERTIME RATES


* llitntd *BordeI
k h.ouiit
00(A 23l48 1
*^, 5 (SO023


MELVIN'S AX I HEAm,
SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS
* Residential and Light Commercial
* Family Owned and Operated
* NO REVOLVING TECHNICIANS
* Quality Service. Sales. Installation.
* Most replacement parts on hand
(813) 263-6503 rv
RUSKIN CAC 1814336 2Ye


H HOFFMAN
E ELECTRICAL
www.HoffmanElectrical.com
Lic. #ECI3004496


FREE 15%
Service OFF
COFF:
wCall any service
with any repair, or repair.
WE MATCH ANY COMPETITOR'S COUPONS
813-298-FAST
(3278)






BONDED ALL TYPES



INSURED OF WIRING
Over 50 Years Experience


COMMER CIAL 26636 / RESIDENOVATIONSAL
IElectric Co. Z
"~\of Ruiskin/ .SERVICE
LICENSED W. \"%/UPGRADES
BONDED VJ / ALL TYPES
INSURED W OF WIRING
ER001266361 T ^ RENOVATIONS
SECURITY LIGHTS CEILING FANS
SSWITCHES & OUTLETS SPAS & DOCKS




145 21st ST. N.W. RUSKIN


Need help with your
computer, or setting up




MAC & PC
Friendly, Professional, Microsoft Certified, A+
$35 per hr.
Setting up, Upgrades, Virus Removal, Spyware,
Pop-Ups, Security, Email & Printer Problems
Call Ryan 813-262-2559


".,I,1,





1130 11, LE






*11 FREE
The Floor Source Estimates!
Specializing in Hardwood,
Laminate & Vinyl Flooring
We bring the Showroom to you!
SMALL BUSINESS,
SMALL PRICES
(813) 495-7027
davidmoorellc@yahoo.com
www.TheFloorSource.biz
David Moore, Owner-Operator
Chamber Members Licensed and Insured


*No project over $1000. No
electrical, gas, or plumbing,
and nothing structural.

Bob's Mobile Fix-It Center
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured
We Fix It All!
Customer Satisfaction Guaranteed!
Attic Stairs Ceiling Fans
SCabinets Flooring Interior
Painting Home Improvement
Call for FREE Estimate
(813) 671-7870
Robert Gerstenschlager


Mon.-Sat.
9 a.m.-5 p.m.


6819 U.S. 301 5., Rivervlew
(813)677-8180


ALL AMERICAN
APPLIANCE &
AC REPAIR-=-

We Repair ALL
Makes & Models
* No Service Charge
if repair is made
(813)294-8444


SELF ARREST BONDS
COURT DATES 664-0056
WARRANT CHECKS
BIG JOHN'S
BAIL BONDS
641-8400
FAMILY BONDSMAN
STATE FEDERAL
24 HOUR SERVICE
JOHN L. VATH
2100 Orient Road Tampa, FL. 33619
Fax: (813) 628-8739


4
D. KAY CARR, P.A.
Attorney at Law
Family Criminal Probate
Wills and Estate Planning
Civil Litigation Real Estate
214 Apollo Beach Boulevard
Apollo Beach, FL 33572
(813) 645-7557


The Perfect Klean
Residential / Commercial
Cleaning Service

$50 OFF
Your First Cleaning!
Licensed, Bonded and Insured

(813)625-2944


Mobile Auto Repair
'WQ we -e Y VMa
FREE Scan with repair
10% Off any repair
for military personnel and their dependents
Call, text or email Joe Brys
813.833.8973 joehd2007@yahoo.com


Business & tfTrdDirectory


I







NOVEMBER 14, 2013

,Bsns &~~~g li Trade D ir ctorye)


4 .


*No project over $1000. No
electrical, gas, or plumbing,
and nothing structural.



HANDY MEN
Your Hepin'g' anwds
; C
Home Improvements, Remodels
& Repairs Carpentry. Dry Wall
General Home Maintenance Painting
Power Washing. Screen Repair
Ask about our other Services
FREE ESTIMATES- INSURED .
813-642-6182 BEST

........ .. ,l "........ : .. ..'...........
4:

,. SOUTH SHORE
'- 'CONSTRUCTION LLC
'v Over 25 years of experience
CG01517322 (813) 333-1222
Kitchen & Bath Remodeling
ADA Conversions
Design Build & Additions
FREE ESTIMATES
For ALL Your Home Improvement Needs
Dial "doitright from your mobile phone
We do it right the first time!
Residential & Commerical Construction
exceptionalconstruction.com






DESIRE'S RANCH
Ruskin
Specialized Canine Boarding
Air-Conditioned Kennels
Canine Obedience
Problem Solving

(813) 645-3545


KENNY'S
OUTSIDE MAINTENANCE
Commercial or Residential
Popcorn Curbing Landscaping
SIrrigation Pressure Washing
Seal Driveways
Licensed Insured



1(813) 850-8490





Y SERVICES CORP.
?. LOCKSMITH
-- ^ Owner: Johnny Cook/Stan-Tech

Medeco Home
Commercial Auto
Locked out of your car or home?
We'll promptly get you in!
Licensed & Bonded Member of SCC Chamber
813633-5100
918 N. Pebble Beach Blvd., SCC, FL 33573


For information on
advertising in the Business
& Trade Directory, call
813-645-3111


I

SouthShore Painting
'- Painting
S(Interior/Exterior)
I': *Power Washing
.^. Drywall Repairs
T.'71 Preparing Homes For Sale
f.- 5 .- Improving Curb Appeal
S : Replacing Old Fixtures
'' 4-- and Lock Sets
License #PA2878
David Squire Bonded Insured
(813) 787-5235


q


9: f A&J
:,- Hares
35 Ys Plumbing
F.perience
Service & Repairs
Repipes Water Heaters
New Construction
Remodels & Additions


BB FREE Estimates
Lic. #CFC057969
A+Rating Bonded Insured


U'


4l3ob BiI na'
9P numbing
The Name You Know. The Service You Trust.
P.O Box 5082 Sun City Center, FL 33571
CFC#01 9149 CFC#1428556
(813)641-9174
www.shjplumbing.com
Residential
Commercial
Backflow Certifications

PAUL WOOD PLUMBING, INC.
State Certified Plumbing Contractor
#CFC1427697
0 e Residential
e Commercial
SCertified Backflows
SStoppages
SService and Repairs
* FREE Estimates 24-Hour Service
Licensed Bonded Insured
(813) 641-1387
'Al :'S = M


'",e'-ie 0 ?6A -,'I"


Residential Commercial
New Roofs Re-Roofs Tile
lile Repairs Hot Tar/Flat Decks
Ventilation Leaks Repaired
FREE Estimates Financing Available
24 Hr. Emergency Service
Senior Citizen Discount
We Carry Workers' Comp
For Your Protection
Lic #CC1325993- Bonded Insured




G. HORN ROOFING LLC OF APOLLO BEACH
FLORIDA REGISTERED ROOFING CONTRACTOR
Gill Horn, Owner
vLic #RC29027076
40 Years Experience


BUl.lrWL


* Roof Repairs Roof Replacements
Shingle -Tile Metal
"Superb Quality Guaranteed"


a1


-1


I gs67horn@gmail.com


OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER THE CURRENT 29


612 APTS FOR RENT


560 M. H. ON LOTS


CUSTOM ROOFIN


All Types of Roofing
New Roofs & Repairs
Shingle Tile Metal Hot Tar
No job too big or too small!


SERVING SINCE 1973
Ruskin Sun City Center Kings
Point Apollo Beach Riverview
"ALL MY CUSTOMERS ARE DRY
FRIENDS WHEN QUALITY COUNTS"


Ruskin &
Sun City Center
Chamber Member
P.O. Box 551 Ruskin, FL 33570
www.customroofing.us
Bonded & Insured Lic. #CCC1326907


Johnny Sewel


NOW OPEN
A LOOKING
FOR EXTRA
STORAGE
< il)b SPACE
i FOR YOUR...
& sR.V.
4L STOp BOAT
645-5222 CAMPER
cell: 240-2049 ETC.
1501 33rd St. SE ANY SIZE
Ruskin, FL 33570

FOR**RV, aETC.

ii;,iiii i i[' -........."""""""""""iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii.


ABC Tree Service
Tree Trimming
Limb Removal Clean Up
L24-Hour Emergency Service
Free Estimates
813-453-5104


... :.. .. .......... .. EEL ... .....:....= ..:..:....:....... .


SUN VIEW
WINDOW CLEANING, INC.
Exceptional
Service
Registered at Kings Point
Licensed Insured
SBonded A
Call now to bookyour appointment
813-944-8478
Here to ServeYour Community
Year Round





HOME & AUTO
TINTING


Solar Designs

0 D @o wm


565 M.H. IN PARKS


One bedroom mobile home in waterfront
park with dock. Corner lot with view
of river. No pets $6,000. Call for info.
813-645-2446






611 HOUSES FOR RENT
SCC. 2br/2ba, 55+ community, clean,
close to shopping. Super quiet & safe
neighborhood $795 monthly. 813-
363-1941
Ruskin, 3br/2ba home with covered
porch on large lot. Well suited for 1-3
people. Monthly rent $925 with signed
lease. No smoking. No pets. Security
deposit & references required. 813-
649-1599
Apollo Beach. 3br/1.5ba/lcg, Large liv-
ing & kitchen area. Newly remodeled,
screened porch, fenced yard. $1,050
monthly. Call 813-220-1232
Thinking of renting your home! Let
us help. S L Real Estate Service LLC
813-741-3678

612 APTS FOR RENT
Ruskin, 3br/lba, CHA, utility shed,
washer/ dryer hookup. Very clean.
813- 645-1447



APARTMENT

FOR RENT
Management for
Newmauma Homes
Phase I, II and III now
accepting applications for
apartments at 5701 Bassa
Street, Wimauma, Florida.
These apartments are one,
two and three bedrooms.
Rental rates are
subsidized by USDA RA
Program and HUD
Section 8 program. Rates
are based on gross income
and number of
dependents.

Please apply in person at
Rental Office
5701 Bassa St.
Wimauma, Florida


OPPORTUNITY


A gated, resident-owned, waterfront,
55+ mobile home community.
www.caribbeanisles.net cislesl@verizon.net
John Lewis office 813-641-7067 cell 814-937-9978
SNOWBIRDS Furnished 2 BR/2BA, 720 Sq. Ft.
Sgl. Wide with appliances incl. washer, dryer, and
central AC. Also incl. a 10 x 8 screen room, 7 x
10 shed, and a 10 x 27 carport with cement drive.
Only $25,000 incl. the share.
WATERFRONT w/FLOATING, HANDICAPPED
ACCESSIBLE DOCK 3 BR/2BA Dbl. Wide Home
with over 1300 Sq. Ft. Includes appliances, central
AC, 2 sheds, carport, cement drive, and a gorgeous
.. f ,, .. .. f...... ii .. .............. ..;i ,,,i ,,
the water. Move-in Ready $109,900.
PRICE JUST SLASHED TO
$95,900 incl. the share!


('I .'-J


U


Light Housekeeping Grocery
Shopping Running Errands
Companionship Sitters In-Home
or Care Facility Flexible Schedules
license #232465
137 S. Pebble Beach Blvd., Ste. 104
Sun City Center 33573
(813) 293-5369 or (813) 419-4967
Swww.AngelsofLifeServices.com






704 JUNK REMOVAL
Hauling/ moving. Anything you don't
need, unwanted items or move to your
new home. Appliances, furniture, trash
yard debris, construction junk. No job
too small. Licensed/Insured. Free es-
timate. Dave 813-447-6123

705 CLEANING

Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integrity.
Call for free estimate. 7days a week.
Move-in, move-out, rentals. Insured,
bonded, licensed. Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean

708 MOVERS
Affordable Moving & Hauling. Local or
long distance. Full service moving to/
from anywhere in US. Load & unload
storage units, truck & more. Licensed &
insured. Free estimate. Call Dave 813-
447-6123. Ask about free boxes


Classifieds Works


M..HOSN


For rent: Efficiency apartments. Weekly
rates, utilities furnished 813-601-1542
or 813-850-7886

614 DUPLEX FOR RENT
Riverview apt, 2br/1lba, CHA, water,
maintenance included. Tile floors. $600
monthly $600 security. Ask for Vicky
813-458-8178 or 813-641-8400

630 M.H. RENTALS
For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home near
shopping center in Gibsonton. 813-601-
1542 or 813- 850-7886
Country 3br/2ba, DWMH near Bob
Evans & 1-75. Metal roof, AC, new
laminate & carpet. Huge porch, acre lot.
813-645-4708
Trailer for rent, 1 bedroom. Riverview
area. Access to fishing $175 weekly $75
deposit. Call Nancy 813- 677-0141

For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With
A/C. 813-677-1086
Private one acre, mobile homes, Ruskin.
2br/2ba, with front & back porch. First,
last & deposit. 813-404-6804

646 WAREHOUSE SPACE
Garage & mini storage, RV lots & mobile
home lots for rent. Call Pirates Treasure
Cove, Gibsonton. 813-677-1137


P_- _--1q^



680 ADULT & CHILD CARE
Caregiver with transportation. Will take
you where you need to go. Shopping, Dr.
appointments, movies, restaurants, etc.
Also light housekeeping & light cooking.
Local references available. 20yrs exp,
Call Connie at 813-649-0860


; I






30 0 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER THE CURRENT


708 MOVERS


Tony Hill Moving & Storage
In business 40yrs. Move 1
piece to whole household plus
haul away anything in your way.
Packing services available. (Fully
Insured). Best rates. Call 813-629-
0108, 813-260-9840 US. DOT
#434469

Harrison's Moving Service.
No job too big or small. Clean, honest
& dependable. Licensed & insured.
Call 813-633-5544. IM1340

710 LAWN CARE

Bill's Lawn Service
Licensed & insured. No contract.
Yearly, monthly or per cut. As low as
$25 per cut. 813-293-6840

Shaw's Lawn Service
Complete outdoor property main-
tenance. Landscaping, trimming,
pressure washing, sprinkler repair.
Licensed & insured. 813-298-3376

714 TREE REMOVAL

Stump Grinding/
Light Tree Trimming
Shrubs trimmed & removed Ruskin,
Apollo Beach, Riverview, Gibsonton,
SCC area. Free estimate & fully
Insured. Call Tony Horman. 603-
662-6079

715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service. Cul-
vert sets, driveways, shell, crushed
asphalt, concrete, fill dirt, excavating,
mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963
Free estimates.

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill dirt,
topsoil, sand, crushed rock & asphalt,
driveway culverts. Loader, backhoe,
grading, bushhog, discing. Install Sep-
tic System & drain fills. CFC#1427021.
813-645-1883

To Place a classified
ad Call Beverly
813.645.3111.
ext. 201


720 HOME MAINTENANCE

Handyman
Phil Oley 25+ yrs experience. Insured.
Apollo Beach, Ruskin, Sun City Center
& Kings Point.
Call 813-649-1418

740 MISC. SERVICES

Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks, boat
lifts & seawalls. Free inspection. Heck-
er Construction Co. 813-236-9306

Hate that Wallpaper?
I can remove it. Want something tex-
tured & painted. Big or small, I can do
it. Debby. 813-434-6499

Ultimate Tile & Grout
cleaning. Residential & commercial.
Licensed & insured. Call Chris for free
quote 928-458-9896






870 GENERAL
Maintenance & warehouse help. Must
be able to fix trucks. Must pass drug test
& background check. Call 813-944-2918
or apply at CNN Enterprise, 2209 S.
Dock St., Palmernto

Truck driver. Must be able to pass DOT
physical. To set up & deliver. Out of
state travel, Background & drug test.
Call 813-944-2918 or apply at CNN
Enterprise, 2209 S. Dock St., Palmetto.
8am-3pm.

Drivers $5,000 sign on bonus! Great
pay. Consistent freight. Great miles on
this regional account. Werner Enter-
prises: 1-855-517-2507



TOMATOES

of RU5KIN

Now Taking Applications

for Packing House

Apply within.
Behind 5th 3rd Bank
5G5-B531


870 GENERAL


Must have experience in service,
re-piping and/or construction.
Need to have valid driver's license.
Must be willing
to work flexible hours.
Only serious, hard-working
applicants need apply.
Fax resume to 813-633-8930 or
call to make appointment:
813-633-8923
Email:
SunCityCenterPlumbing@ verizon.net


TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD

,, Call
Beverly
at
"645-3111
ext. 201

or email: Beverly@observernews.net

Up to 20 words: $ 17
Additional words: 30' each

Bold lines: $3 each
Classifieds must be paid in advance
DEADLINE: Monday 4 p.m.
for Thursday paper

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For complete details, call Beverly at
813.645.3111 ext. 201


A community of affordable homes
exclusively for first-time homebuyers!

FLORIDA H7OME PARTNERfHIP
(813)672-7889 www.flhome.org


* Phase III Now Available!
* 2 Swimming Pools and a Clubhouse
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BAYOU PASS
ai I' m ?" ,', ,. Tr.-r,, r,,7e e under80% ofrmedanirnome. Callfrdetls.





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NOVEMBER 14, 2013

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OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 31


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extra and not included in discount. 0tO% is $16.67 per month per $1000 borrowed with $0 down and approved credit on select models. All offers exclude tax, tag, title, registration and excludes dealer fee. All factory rebates
and incentives to dealer, excludes College Grad and Military rebates. Prior sales excluded. In-stock units only. Offers cannot be combined. See dealer for complete details. Offers expire end of day 11/17/13.
KEATOYOTA 5959 E SR64 Bradenton "^
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32 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


First responder training gets a boost from Interfaith Council


0 Continued from page 1
Students come to this pro-
gramin from all over, including
Pasco and Hernando counties, and
some even from out of state, he
added. The cost is about $4,500 to
$5,000 for paramedic training and
from $1,500 to $1,600 for EMT
students.
"This means many students can
go through, paying as they go,
instead of racking up a $20,000
debt," said college President Allen
Witt. "Between Pell Grants and
jobs, it's possible to go through
our program and be out on the
street making a starting figure
around $30,000 and some later
go up to six figures, with no stu-
dent debt behind them."
August graduates Judy Myette
and Robert Leonard said they
couldn't be happier with the
careers they have chosen.
Leonard was just hired as a
paramedic in the emergency room
at South Bay Hospital and is also
continuing his training to get an
EMS degree. He then plans to go
on to become a registered nurse.
Leonard and Myette say they
were "buddies" during their
training together, and remain so
now. But their lives "pre HCC"
couldn't have been more different.
While Leonard is just starting
out, Myette, now 65, decided
upon her new career at the age of
64.
"I owned my own dry clean-
ing business in Massachusetts,"
Myette said. "When I moved to
Sun City Center, I joined the (Sun
City Center) Emergency Squad as
a volunteer. But then I realized I
wanted to be a paramedic."
Myette, who was class speaker
at graduation, loves her new pos-
sibilities, and has just accepted
ajob at South Bay Hospital. She
says she will continue as a vol-
unteer with the Squad, too, if she


PENNY FLETCHER PHOTOS
The HCC lab trains future paramedics, EMTs and EMS responders in
a simulated ambulance right in the classroom.


finds she is able to do both.
"We have students 18 and 74,"
said Linder, who is in his 40th
year in emergency services.
"Things have really changed,"
he said, showing slides of what he
referred to as "training in the old
days," and books from "then and
now." The differences could be
easily spotted.
Linder and Lab Coordinator
Ron Dorsey took turns demon-
strating the different mannequins'
capabilities: two infants, a woman
mannequin capable of delivery
of a mannequin infant, and many
mannequins in various stages of
burns, lacerations, and internal
distress.
"We have a whole variety of
props in the back rooms," Linder
said. "Ladders they can fall from,
plastic guns and knives, chain
saws, tools."
One of the mannequins was
a roofer with a nail stuck in his
mouth. Others had various de-
grees of burns and lacerations.
"We want to make sure our


students don't get any surprises
when they face the real thing,"
Linder said.
That's why the high-tech man-
nequins are such an important part
of the training.
Obviously Cruthis thought
so, because she the chair of
Interfaith's Grants Committee -
suggested that HCC apply for the
grant.
"It isn't often someone comes to
us and says why don' t you come
to us for money," Witt said.
But community medical needs
are changing faster than anyone
can keep up with, they explained.
It hasn't been long since the
combination Fire-Rescue teams
started. Now every fire truck has
to have an emergency medical
personnel person on board.
I igluy percent of the calls the
fire trucks go on are medically-re-
lated," he said. "That means only
20 percent are for fires."
Newer home-building materi-
als and safety regulations have


resulted in fewer fires, but an ag-
ing population is raising the need
for medical response teams with
greater knowledge.
\ ly1 age group is going to live
to be 130," Witt joked. "So the
medical personnel need to be
ready for a lot of new things."
And many new things are in the
works.
Linder explained that EMS and
EMT personnel now do many
jobs only doctors used to do.
And more and more "Commu-
nity Paramedics" are beginning to
be used.
This is a new position where
paramedics check on homebound
patients and on those released
from hospitals.
"They're doing things they
never thought they would be do-
ing," Linder said.
Sonograms in ambulances are
coming soon, and many other new
jobs as well.
"Soon there will be mini labs
right in the ambulance," he added.
Witt plans a mock mass tragedy
simulation in January where this
class will do their first response


duties and then transport "pa-
tients" by ambulance across the
campus to the nurses' training
labs where they will all work
together as an ER team.
"We have so many plans. We
are going to keep up with the
changing laws and times."
By laws, Witt referred to the
fact that hospitals are penalized
if emergency patients return too
often or too soon, and Community
Paramedics can help eliminate the
need for those returns. "Things
are changing as people in the
medical fields are cross-trained,"
he said.
"I have learned that no matter
what our job tide, fire-rescue,
EMT, paramedic whatever, we
are the first-responders and it is
our job to keep people alive until
they reach the doctor or hospital.
We had to do 50 intubations be-
fore we were allowed to graduate.
We were highly trained here. I am
very happy with my training, and
will be thrilled to begin my new
job," Myette said.
To find out about the program,
visit http://www.hccfl.edu.


Ron Dorsey, lab coordinator at HCC for 12 years, demonstrates all
the capabilities of the newly purchased mannequin.


TAMPA BAY





PHYSICIANS


1 /- r ',' "" "
T i / 's,


ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS!

SAME DAY APPOINTMENTS

Adult Primary Care
(Men's & Women's Health)
El personal habla espahol


CALL TODAY! 813-D33-2000
4874 Sun City Center Boulevard
Sun City Center, Florida 33573
www.tampabayfamilyphysicians.com


MED ICAEAD OTINSRNE CETEICUI

Aena- me, BueCrss -le-Siel, Fredm0 eath -. Ntwrk
Optmu Halt -ae-PH S Ntor, Sim lyHalhcr,*riae UiedHelhcr


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NOVEMBER 14,2013




Full Text

PAGE 1

www.ObserverNews.netNovember 14, 2013 Volume 57 Number 43THE OBSERVER NEWS Warren Resen is on the road again. This time hes reporting on the 500th anniversary of St. Augustine, FL. Read the full article on page 11Shooting From Memories is the topic of Mitch Traphagens feature story this week. Read the full article on page 2 PRST STDPAIDRUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570 PERMIT NO. 8 INSIDE: Bill delaying higher flood insurance rates could become law by years end By %  KEVIN BRADY kevin@observernews.netLegislation that sent flood insurance premiums skyrocketing for some waterfront homes and is chilling part of the local real estate market will be reformed by the end of the year, an author of the law said Nov. 9. Homeowners and Realtors have been calling for relief from the stiff rate increases, organizing rallies across the nation, including last month in Tampa Bay, to protest rates that have increased by 600 percent in some cases. The rate hikes went into effect Oct. 1 for anyone seeking a new policy. Amy Soto, a Riverview Realtor who has been buying and selling homes in South County for 13 years, said the rate hike is hurting the local real estate market. Just the threat of flood insurance rates going up will keep potential buyers from buying. Its going to be a much harder sell for some people and it will limit the buyer pool. In the wake of the uproar, Congresswoman Maxine Waters, a co-author of the law that led to the rate hikes, now says the law will be changed. Over the past several months, I have felt the harm and heartache that many Americans have already experienced as a result of changes to the National Flood Insurance Program. From the start, I have made clear that I would lead the effort to fix the unintended consequences of the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act, said Waters in a statement released by her office announcing the deal. Local Congresswoman Kathy Castor is co-sponsoring the bill. This bipartisan breakthrough will benefit thousands of families and businesses in Florida and other states, and will responsibly analyze flood Continued on page 5X South County remembers our veterans MICHELLE TRAPHAGEN PHOTOThe annual Ruskin VFW Veterans Day Parade was held Saturday on U.S. Highway 41. Boy and Girl Scouts, Cub Scouts, Brownies and high school bands and JROTC units walked the route, many passing out beads and candy to the hundreds of people who lined the parade route. This years parade appeared bigger than ever, with businesses, organizations from around the region and numerous Gasparilla Krewes taking part in the celebration of heroes. More photos on page 16. First responder training gets a boost from Sun City Centers Interfaith Council PENNPENNY FLETCHERLETCHER PHOTOPHOTODr. Allen Witt, president of the South County campus of Hillsborough Community College, left, and Larry Linder, program coordinator for paramedic, EMT and EMS programs for all the HCC campuses, check out the features of the lifelike mannequin bought recently with a grant from the Interfaith Council of Sun City Center. By %  PENNYENNY FLEETCHERER penny@observernews.netParamedics, EMTs and EMS personnel who train at Hillsborough Community Colleges South County campus have a new patient from Sun City Center. Sometimes he has heart problems, other days a fever and vomiting, and yet other times its trouble with his blood pressure shooting too high or dropping too low. Hes a real mess likely to have any number of accidents and illnesses in any one day. Some days, he may even technically die on the table and be miraculously brought back to life through extreme emergency measures. Hes the latest high-fidelity medical training mannequin in the lab, complete with a variety of capabilities from speech to displaying symptoms. As of Nov. 12, he had not yet been named. Bought with a grant from the Interfaith Council of Sun City Center, the new patient helps future paramedics, emergency medical technicians and emergency medical service personnel through simulations of actual events they will encounter in the field. Equipment like this helps our students continue to be the best trained when they get out into our communities, said Larry Linder, program coordinator for all the HCC campuses. Linder explained that while nationally, there is about a 50 percent pass rate on state exams after schooling, HCCs last class had 100 pass rate and usually has a state-wide rate of 98 percent. Some schools with just a couple of graduates can say they have an 85 percent pass rate, but if you only have two students, thats a lot different than our classes that put out about 110 paramedics a year plus the EMT and EMS students, he explained.Continued on page 32X

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2 NOVEMBER 14, 2013 Dr. TRAN Dr. KORAHJSA Medical Group Sun City Center Activity CenterEVENTS CALENDARJSA MEDIC A L GROUP SUN C ITY C ENTER787 Cortaro Dr., Sun City Center, FL 33573 Adult Primary CareIn a State-of-the-Art New Facility!physiciansJSA Medical Group in Sun City Center is a comprehensive primary care clinic with many services offered in-house including radiology and labs! There is no better time to become a member of JSA!Call Today! (813) 634-2500ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTSIncluding Humana and CarePlus Medicare Advantage Plan MembersJSA Medical Group Sun City Center Activity Center is open to the community & offers a variety of FREE community & patient events including Yoga, Tai Chi, health lectures, parties, line dancing & more! (*Classes are subject to change) Visit us online for the monthly schedule: www.JSAMedicalGroup.com/events, click button for Calendar Thu 14: SilverSneakers (MSROM)* 9:30 to 10:30 am Fri 15: SALSA DANCING SLOW FLOW Y OGA GENTLE CHAIR YOGA 10 to 11 am 1 to 2 pm 2:15 to 3:30 pm Mon 18: BALLROOM DANCE TANGO (COUPLES ONLY)SLOW FLOW Y OGA GENTLE CHAIR YOGA 11 am to Noon 1 to 2 pm 2:15 to 3:30 pm Tue 19: SilverSneakers (MSROM)* HEALING WITH ESSENTIAL OILS 11 am to Noon 2 to 3 pm Wed 20: LINE DANCING*: Beginners Class Advanced Class 11 am to Noon 12:15 to 1:15 pm Thu 21: SilverSneakers (MSROM)* 9:30 to 10:30 am Fri 22: SALSA DANCING SLOW FLOW Y OGA GENTLE CHAIR YOGA 10 to 11 am 1 to 2 pm 2:15 to 3:30 pm Mon 25: BALLROOM DANCE TANGO (COUPLES ONLY)SLOW FLOW Y OGA GENTLE CHAIR YOGA 11 am to Noon 1 to 2 pm 2:15 to 3:30 pm Tue 26: SilverSneakers (MSROM)* DEALING WITH HOLIDAY STRESS (PART 2) 11 am to Noon 1 to 2 pm Wed 27: LINE DANCING*: Beginners Class Advanced Class 11 am to Noon 12:15 to 1:15 pm Thu 28: HAPPY THANKSGIVING! JSA CLOSED FOR HOLIDAY No Classes Today Fri 28: JSA CLOSED FOR THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY No Classes TodayNOVEMBER EVENTS *R EGISTER NOW (813) 419-5020 LIN E D ANCIN G PARTICIPANTS: Close-toe shoes with non-stick bottoms only permitted. No scented perfumes & lotions to class. NEXT Kidney SmartSM CLASS IS: NOV EMBER 26Offered through DaVita Dialysis on Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) the program is free and open to the community. www.davita.com, click on Kidney Smart tab. Please check your insurance coverage for SILV ERSNEAKERS class participation eligibility. *MSROM: Muscular Strength & Range of Movement Classes All events schedule: JSAMedicalGroup.com click Events Shooting from memoriesAn Observer News feature storyMITCH T TRAPHAGEN PPHOTOSA Leica M model rangerfinder camera is almost entirely manually operated. There are no magic buttons, the results are entirely based on the photographers vision and skills. And, of course, some luck. By %  MITCH TTRAPHAGEN mitch@observernews.netAlmost everyone is a photographer these days, displaying their photographs on Facebook and Instagram, usually taken with cell phones. Some of the results are mediocre; some are incredible. Cell phone cameras are so ubiquitous now that even famed photographer Annie Leibovitz has been quoted as saying that she recommends an iPhone to people who ask her what kind of camera to buy. After all, the best possible camera is the one you have with you and most people always have their smartphones. Over the past few years Ive published a few photos taken with my iPhone but that pocket device just doesnt measure up for most of the work I do. I couldnt possibly use an iPhone to photograph a large event. I wouldnt want to use it to capture the photos of people for Taken with the Leica manual camera.my feature stories the least I can do is make sure people look good. And for that, I need good equipment. My first real 35mm camera, purchased in my early teens on the advice of Jim Brandenburg, a family friend and photographer who would later gain worldwide fame, was entirely manual. I had to actually focus the lens and set the exposure by balancing a little needle in the viewfinder. I still have that camera and it still works. At the time, my Dad told me that I could pay him back with my future photo royalties. Fast-forward a few decades and virtually everything about photography has changed. Recently, I upgraded one of my professional Canon cameras and, shortly after, photographed an event in a darkened theater. The camera was able to focus on what I could barely see through the viewfinder and the resulting image was good enough to appear in print. Technology is amazing. That said, as camera technology gets better and better, Im feeling my photography is getting worse and worse. Im less a journalist or an artist capturing a moment than I am a mere cog in a recording machine, machine-gunning images captured by a high-tech wonder of technology. It simply became too much so I decided to shoot from some memories.X

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 3 Were Here For You! We Welcome New PatientsOur practice provides a complete range of professional services including Restorative Dentistry, Cosmetic Dentistry, Thorough Examinations, Cleanings, Dental Makeovers and Implant Restorations. Michelle Halcomb, D.D.S.813-634-3396703 Del Webb Blvd. W., Suite B Sun City Center, FL 33573 DONATE!CARS, TRUCKS, BOATS, RVs Please Help FightFULLY TAX DEDUCTIBLE RECEIVE BLUE BOOK V ALUE800-714-3575 American Childrens SocietyFlorida Reg. #CH11978 An IRS Recognized Non-Pro t 501(c)3 OrganizationMaking a difference for a child!We also accept collectibles, appliances, furniture, etc.R ecei pts on the sp ot and IRS forms sent directly to you!F AST & FREE PICK UPVehicles Running or Not NO RestrictionsFREE $200 Gas CardWITH YOUR DONATION!! has been located at 1601 Rickenbacker Dr., Ste #5 in Sun City Center for 14+ years and is only a phone call away Call 634-6617We accept most long-term care insurance policies.WithHanson Services...Its like having a personal staff.Personalized services for your individual needs.Some of our many services include, but not limited to: All caregivers are background screened.You DO have choices. FREE in-home and private consultation to see how we can help you with your needs to be comfortable in your home.References upon request Check Out Our NewRATES New Clients Only Persistence the key to Sun City Center mans continued court success By %  PENNY FLETCHER penny@observernews.netDavid Brown keeps pushing ahead no matter what the opposing lawyers throw at him. Brown who is not an attorney started fighting with the Department of Environmental Protection in 2007 over the backflow valves being forced on homeowners who irrigate their lawns with pond or lake water. At first he filed on behalf of other residents as well, but was not permitted by law to continue as anything but an individual. So he filed the lawsuit again, this time listing himself as the only petitioner. When he had trouble finding an attorney who wanted to go up against the DEP he went pro se, (without a lawyer) which is every citizens right. He says the backflow valves installed to prevent irrigation water from lakes and ponds getting into the drinking water system is unsafe, costly to homeowners, and should not be the homeowners responsibility. Where he lives in Sun City Center alone, he says more than 1,000 people are affected. And the rules he says are unfair are county-wide. On Sept. 19, The Observer News and The Current published a story about how Brown had won the Hillsborough County Commissions Moral Courage Award for fighting bureaucracy. The fight is still in progress and has taken another turn. At the time that story was written Brown was awaiting a Nov. 13 court date to prove his case before an administrative judge. He had already overcome many courtrelated hurdles and managed to stay up with the team of lawyers representing the DEP. That story is still online at www.observernews. net for those who wish to read it. Since that was written, however, two things have happened. First, Judge Bram E. Canter overturned a DEP motion to dismiss, and then a new hearing date was set for Jan. 27. Canter is a judge with the Division of Administrative Hearings in Tallahassee. This was a big step, Brown said, referring to the judges overturning the DEPs motion. He is now preparing for the hearing by lining up his 12 witnesses, and writing his list of stipulations. The stipulations are things that he would like to ask the DEP to agree upon beforehand. If they can agree on some points early, the hearing will be smoother and much shorter. It could mean I can call fewer witnesses, which would really cut down the time, Brown said. Brown and many others who were forced to install the backflow valves on their property because they watered their lawns from lakes and ponds say the way the valves are made and installed is dangerous, not just expensive. And theyre on homeowners property, not county easement. Its a real threat because the way theyre made, somebody could dump chemicals right into the water supply and poison people, Brown said. The valve could work the other way not just prevent the water from the pond from coming in. Bill Hodges agreed. Hodges, the co-founder of South Shore Toastmasters, and owner of Hodges Seminars International Inc., has a television show on Tampa Bay Cable Network called Spotlight on Government, on which he has interviewed Brown.Ive gone to several hearings of the water board with David and I feel he has a valid point. This is not just dangerous, but terribly expensive, Hodges said in a telephone interview. Just in Sun City Center, there are about 80 ponds. If a lot of people have to buy these, the costs will be outrageous.The cost of installing the valve as designed now is about $670. This price does not include any weatherizing or covering for it, or locks; after that it costs owners about $114 a year to maintain. Some homeowners have already installed them, but not all.Brown has continually objected to the fact that the homeowner has PENNY FLETCHER PHOTo OThis is the backflow valve that is causing citizens to rebel. David Brown of Sun City Center has been fighting the countys practices concerning backflow valves on private property since 2007. to put the valve on his or her own property, pay for it, and maintain it.Worse yet, he claims it is very unsafe. Brown evidently made his case to Judge Canter, because Canter said, Because the dangerous condition is alleged to be real and immediate and Petitioners fear is alleged to be real and immediate, it is determined that Petitioner has alleged a sufficient injury for standing to challenge the rule, when he overturned the DEPs motion to dismiss. Now Brown is working on two things: a request for mediation and his teleconference that will take place in January if a judge does not send the case to mediation first. Brown has demonstrated a valve system he feels is safer and would cost $19 instead of more than $600.If the county, instead of the homeowner, has to pay, I am X

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4 NOVEMBER 14, 2013 Call, text or email Joe Brys 813-833-8973joehd2007@yahoo.comJoe Brysformerly of Teds Auto Center now known asMOBILE AUTO REPAIRwelcomes back our northern visitors.10% OFFany repair for Veterans and Military Personnel and their dependents.LIC. # MV87956 Robert Edelman, M.D. ~ Eric Berman, M.D. Anita Shane, M.D. ~ Jeffrey Davis, M.D. 813-633-3065 1515 Sun City Center Plaza YourEyeDoctors.com Compr ehensive Ophthalmology Cataract Sur gery Glaucoma Management Laser Sur gery Macular Degeneration Cor nea Diabetic Eye Car e Neur o-Ophthalmology Trustedby & Patients Alike. PhysiciansOur ophthalmologists are board-certied and fellowship-trained to provide specialized care for your eyes. Medicar e & most insurance accepted. When surveyed, 97.5% of patients stated they would recommend us to a friend! 210 Woodland Estates S.W. Ruskin, FL 33570813-645-3111Fax: 813-645-4118www.ObserverNews.netPublished Every Thursday by M&M Printing Co., Inc. 645-4048EDITORIAL:Brenda Knowles ............ Publisher/Editor brenda@observernews.net Mitch Traphagen ................. Online Editor mitch@observernews.net Penny Fletcher .......... Contributing Writer penny@observernews.net Kevin Brady .............. Contributing Writer kevin@observernews.net Warren Resen ..................... Travel Writer w630@aol.comAll press releases, news articles and photos may be emailed to news@ observernews.net, faxed to 645-4118, or mailed to Observer News, 210 Woodland Estates Ave. SW, Ruskin, FL 33570SALES:Vilma Stillwell ... Display Advertising Rep. vilma@observernews.net Nan Kirk ........... Display Advertising Rep. nan@observernews.netCLASSIFIED / CIRCULATION:Beverly Kay ......... Classied / Circulation beverly@observernews.netPRODUCTION:Chere Simmons ........... Creative Director chere@observernews.net Carol MacAlister ... Graphic Arts / Layout carol@observernews.net Jason Martin ......... Graphic Arts / Layout jason@observernews.net The views expressed by our writers are not necessarily shared by The Observer News, SCC Observer, The Current or M&M Printing Co., Inc.We Accept:Award-Winning Newspapers Raising morale in an organization from the bottom is almost impossible. The amount of pressure required is extreme. The responsibility for creating a climate for good morale within an organization lies firmly and clearly with management. Employees will follow their lead. By William Hodges Here are some ideas that managers and supervisors can use to create an atmosphere of high morale. 1. Recognize even the smallest achievement of your work force. Recognition is one of the greatest tools for building morale, especially when it is timely. 2. Ensure that employees know exactly what you want. If, in fact, they are doing something that you would rather they not do, spend little time on what they did wrong. Opt to spend the majority of your time pointing out how you want it done. 3. Keep your promises. Promise only what you can produce and then produce what you promised. At Hodges Seminars International, we have built customer satisfaction by adhering to an even more stringent standard. That standard is under-promise and overproduce. I believe this is a good rule for supervisors and managers to follow. 4. Practice consistency in your dealings and be even-handed. Employees can adjust to almost anything, as long as they feel the organization is consistent in the way policies are administered. Inconsistency causes employees to feel unsure and uncomfortable. 5. If you are wrong, admit it. Nothing is harder to defend than an action you no longer believe to be right. There is no shame in admitting that you made a mistake. A friend of mine used to say, A mistake is only proof that someone tried to do something. When you are wrong, face up to it. Thank the person who helped you find the error and get on with the job. This will do two things. It will show that you are a big enough person to admit an error, and it will make those around you unafraid to help you find an error. 6. Keep your mind open to new ideas. The song Traditions from Positive Talk: Morale the vital ingredient The Fiddler on the Roof makes a simple point when it says, All of our traditions were new once. This new, strange or different idea which runs contrary to your current traditions could be the start of an even more profitable tradition. In any case, if people know you have an open mind, they will bring ideas to you. You will at least have the opportunity to decide whether they are good ideas or not. 7. Above all else, be honest with your people. Participants in our seminars consistently rank honesty as the number one attribute of a good supervisor. In The Merchant of Venice Shakespeare wrote, The quality of mercy is not strained, it droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven upon the place beneath: it is twice blessed; it blesseth him that gives and him that takes.... The same can be said about morale it blesses both the person who sets up the conditions for high morale, and those who are affected by the enhanced working and living environment. Whether you are the manager of a multi-million dollar business or you have responsibility for managing a home, creating a high level of morale is your number one job. If you do that properly, your other jobs will be much easier.Hodges is a nationally recognized speaker, trainer and syndicated columnist. He also hosts an interviewformat television program, Spotlight on Government, on the Tampa Bay Community Network which airs Mondays at 8 p.m. (Bright House channel 950, Verizon channel 30) and Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. (BH channel 949, Verizon channel 36). The shows can also be viewed at www. hodgesvideos.com. Phone : 813-6410816. Email: bill@billhodges.com Website: www.billhodges.com November is National Alzheimers Awareness MonthIn honor of National Alzheimers Awareness Month, Hillsborough Countys Aging Services division has scheduled a number of events. On Tuesday, Nov. 19, they will host Annual National Memory Screening Day, using materials sponsored by the Alzheimers foundation of America. Residents can call for an appointment between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. at the following local sites: the Wimauma Senior Center, 5714 North St. in Wimauma.A new program approved last week ers will put needed school supplies in students hands. The commissioners approved a borough Education Foundation for their Teaching Tools for Hillsborough Schools Program. The Teaching Tools program collects unused and reusable materials from local businesses, including but not limited to: obsolete office supplies, castoffs, overruns and manufacturing by-products generated in the commer cial sector. These items are then distributed free of charge to students in Title 1 schools through the programs in Tampa. The funding from the County assists with the administrative expenses and overhead costs associated with the collection, storage and distribution of materials. Hillsborough County first became involved in the Teaching duce the volume of commercial waste and promote the positive reuse of busi-Unused business supplies destined for Hillsborough County studentsnesses castoffs. According the Hillsborough Education Foundation: 56 percent of Hillsborough County Public Schools are classified as Title 1. This means that more than 75 per cent of the students at these schools are considered economically disadvantaged, and may not be able to afford the most basic school supplies. Teaching Tools currently serves sites throughout the district, reaching at-risk students every year. tion Foundation has distributed more than $13 million in free school supplies. product and financial donations by contacting Fred Weber at fweber@ educationfoundation.com or 813-574To learn more about the Teaching Tools program at the Hillsborough Education Foundation visit www.educationfoundation.com.

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 5 eall the way to the on all four sides EVENT 3rd Annual HOLIDAYPIE TASTINGNovember 16 & 17th 12 noon 5 pmFREEPRE-ORDER HOLIDAY PIES TODAY!LOCAL PRODUCE AMISH JAMS & JELLIES FRESH FRUIT CITRUS COUNTRY STORE & MUCH MUCH MORE!The Garden of Palmetto7301 Highway 41 North Palmetto, Florida 33421Like Us On Facebookwww.facebook.com /thegardenofpalmettoOver 40 Dierent PiesMade Everyday 941-729-4606BEST CUBAN SANDWICHES IN THE AREASTOP IN FOR LUNCH!DEVIL CRABS STUFFED POTATOESTRY OUR FAMOUS ... STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE & MILKSHAKES insurance reform in a measured, reasonable way that focuses on stability for homeowners, Castor said. I am pressing to have Congress act quickly to pass this bipartisan legislation that provides relief for my neighbors, some of whom saw their rates skyrocket overnight. Waters new plan delays potential rate increases up to four years. The California Democrat, who is leading a bipartisan group of 50 House members and 15 senators who filed the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act last month, hopes the bill will become law by the end of the year. The Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012 was intended to dig the National policyholders, 1.1 million are subsidized, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Florida is the programs largest customer with 2 million policies. The 2012 law called on FEMA and other agencies to make a number of changes to the way NFIP is run, including raising rates to reflect true flood risk. The changes will mean premium rate increases for most NFIP policyholders over time. Realtors understand the need for solvency in the federal flood program. However, the law contains severe unintended consequences that are harmful to Floridians as well as other states, said Florida Realtors President Dean Asher. We believe the reforms will have a detrimental impact on the entire economy of Florida, including existing homeowners and those who want to buy Florida properties, said Asher after a meeting with Gov. Rick Scott last week on the issue. Congress has apparently been listening to Asher and others. Specifically, the legislation will: four years for the most vulnerable properties, by delaying implementation of rate increases until two years after FEMA completes an affordability study, which was mandated in Biggert-Waters but not undertaken. FEMA has estimated it will take two years to complete the affordability study. It would then take up to an additional two years for FEMA to submit an affordability framework to Congress and for Congress to review the framework. This means rate increases would be delayed for four years in total. National Flood Insurance Funds to reimburse policyholders who successfully appeal a map determination. on state and local contributions to levee construction and reconstruction. the agency has fully adopted a modernized risk-based approach to analyzing flood risk. The bipartisan deal came after several weeks of negotiations with Democrats and Republicans in the House and Senate. Other state representatives backing the bill are Connie Brown (DJacksonville), Lois Frankel (DBoca Raton), Frederica Wikson (D-Miami) and Patrick Murphy (D-West Palm Beach). Senator Bill Nelson has also backed the new bill.Higher flood insurance rates could be delayedX MITCH TRAPHAGEN FILE PHOTOCongresswoman Kathy Castor is co-sponsoring a bill to delay huge rate hikes to flood insurance.Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) out of a financial black hole. The federal program that insures many waterfront properties across the U.S. is currently $24 billion in the red, the result of claims made after superstorms like Hurricane Katrina. The NFIP was created by Congress in 1968 because flood insurance was virtually unavailable from the private insurance markets following frequent widespread flooding along the Mississippi River in the early 1960s. Private insurance companies are still wary about writing policies in flood-prone communities, leaving the federal government as the insurance of choice in many waterfront communities. Of the NFIPs 5.6 million sure it will favor this version, Brown stated in a telephone interview Nov. 9.Part of his request for mediation contains the statement: In other words, if RPs and DCVAs (existing valves) provide vandals and terrorists with direct access into the public drinking water supply which they certainly do it becomes a dangerous condition that can cause injury to homeowners. The judge has set the legal framework for extraordinary liability on the DEP and public water systems for personal injury, wrongful death, property damage, and damages for business interruption, when a contamination event perpetrated by vandals or terrorists may occur. And remember that negligence does take precedent over sovereign immunity.In his prepared statements he cites both U.S. Constitutional law and Florida Constitutional law as precedents. All federal law says about needing the valves is that you have to have some kind of a cross-connection program. It does not say what kind of program that has to be, Brown insists. I have been told that postponing the hearings is a tactic agencies use to tire out the petitioners, Brown said. But it is just giving me more time to prepare. Meanwhile he says he hopes a judge will order the case into mediation and save the time and expense of the hearing, which is expected to last two days.X Backflow valves

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6 NOVEMBER 14, 2013 Master Certified Technicians AT HOME AUTO CARE Family Owned & OperatedApproved Auto Repair CenterOPEN 8 am-5 pm Monday thru Friday www.athomeauto.net (813) 645-0339 (1 mile south of SR 674/College Ave.)GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE Stop b y for MICHELINtires and get$70We participate in AAA Dollars Program Buy any set of 4 new MICHELIN brand passenger or light truck tires, and get a $70 MasterCard Reward Card after submission.* OFFER VALID NOV. 1 DEC. 2, 2013via MasterCard Reward Card after submission.*rd Card eligibility is limited to tire rchases from dealers y. See r form for offer details. Offer 12/02/2013. Void he Re ard Card be reloaded s, it be used at A Re ard Card 6 after e. For terms, fees, see the Cardholder your card e. Re ard Cards are issued by .S. to a is a registered of 2013 North America, All rights reserved. he is a registered by North America, Lic# MVS51635 Instructors lead students on pathways to success.After only a few years in the U.S., Sandra Garcia enrolled in remedial reading and writing courses at Hillsborough Community College as she worked to gain uency in English. Undeterred by the mountain of classes between her and graduation, Sandra sought free tutoring help in the Academic Success Center. Instructors like David Worley gave her the encouragement and support to keep pushing forward. Sandra will graduate next semester and apply for HCCs nursing programfollowing her dream of helping others. With small class sizes, affordable tuition and guaranteed transferability to state universities, its easy to see why more than 46,000 students each year choose HCC.hcc.edu/registernowHCC is an equal access/equal opportunity educational institution. HCC11_ObserverNews_6x5_11.14.13_Garcia.indd 1 11/8/2013 8:04:31 AM CALL TODAY for your FREE Skin Cancer Screening Call 813-634-1455 to reserve your spotThe Skin Cancer Centers / Dermatology AssociatesHoward A. Oriba, M.D. | Michael G. Caruso, M.D. | Leslee Baute, P.A.C.WWW.THESKINCANCERCENTERS.COMSOUTH HILLSBOROUGH COUNTYS ONLY FELLOWSHIP TRAINED MOHS SURGEON Are you over 65? Did you know people over 65 have a 50% higher likelihood of developing Skin Cancer? NOW ACCEPTING TRICARE PRIME C.A.R.E. is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. For directions, visit www.CareShelter.org or call (813) 645-2273.PHOTOS MARLENE GREENBERgG DoryDory is a beautiful black and white kitten. Her mother is Nellie a gorgeous tabby cat. Dory loves to play with the other kittens at the shelter and really loves to chase the cat toys for hours. She is cute and adorable and would like to come to live at a forever home of her own. Go visit this sweet little girl and give her that home. Dory has been spayed and is current on her shots. As part of her adoption Dory will be microchipped. DOB: April 25, 2013. RussRuss is a Terrier mix with the most heart-melting eyes. With an invite, he will lie upside down in your lap and take a nap. Russ enjoys running in the play yard with his furry friends, playing in the doggy pool, and getting kisses. Russ would do best in a dog-savvy home with a patient and loving owner. Russ is neutered, current on his shots, and microchipped. DOB: July 2, 2009. Attendance doubled at Caregiver SymposiumOn the last day of October, 255 caregivers received care themselves at the 2nd Annual Caregiver Symposium held at Community Hall in Sun City Center. Debbie Caneen, director of admissions at Sun Towers, which sponsors this annual event, stated that attendance had doubled since last year. It seems that more people are realizing they are in fact caregivers of loved ones, or are just interested in receiving information for their own aging process. With seven different speakers who presented everything from Coping with Caregiver Stress to Technologies to Help Caregivers, everyone who participated gained additional knowledge to assist them in their journey as a caregiver. More than 40 vendors were present to assist attendees with resources such as the Samaritans Alzheimers Auxiliary, the Alzheimers Association, and even Dr. Vo, who is a mobile dentist willing to come to your home, to name just a few. Senior Helpers provided free care for those loved ones with dementia who were unable to be left at home so that their caregiver could attend the event. Lara Cudvat, one of the attendees said, Having all of this information under one roof, along with the lovely lunch I enjoyed, has given me a break from my caregiving duties. This event has provided me with resources to feel comfortable that I am doing the very best for my loved one. I am looking forward to next years event! If you were unable to attend the event and would like more information about the speakers or vendors who might assist you in your caregiving journey, contact Debbie Caneen at 813-892-2990.Gamble Plantation offers an Old South Christmas open houseThe United Daughters of the Confederacy, Florida Division, the Gamble Plantation Preservation Alliance and the Florida Park Service will hold Plantation Christmas Open House Sunday, Dec. 8, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Gamble Plantation Historic State Park in Ellenton. Once again you can travel back to the Old South during the day through the many lifestyle demonstrations of that time period. Gamble Mansion and the Patten House will be lavishly decorated in the Christmas spirit, allowing you a special look at a 19th century Christmas. Members of the United Daughters of the Confederacy will be wearing costumes reminiscent of the era of the 1840s through 1870s to add authenticity to the day. The 4th Florida Volunteer Infantry will be dressed in military uniforms re-enacting a Confederate encampment. There will be music, crafts and fun for everyone. Admission is free. Gamble Plantation Historic State Park is located on US 301 in Ellenton, one mile west of I-75 off exit #224. Florida State Parks are in various stages of accessibility. Should you need assistance to enable your full participation, contact Gamble Plantation. For further information please call Gamble Plantation Historic State Park at 941-723-4536 or Fax 941-723-4538.

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Beth Shields Middle School (from left): Sean Davenport, 6th Grade; and JoAnna Gaff, 6th Grade; with Art Teacher Terrena Conson and Principal Tibor Kovacs. Reddick Elementary School (from left): Belinda Solis, 3rd Grade; Alexander Moran Chavez, 3rd Grade; Annahi Heredia, 2nd Grade; Lourdes Gonzalez, Kindergarten; and Emily Cuevas, 5th Grade; with Assistant Principal Michelle Carrick and Art Teacher Susan Turpyn. NOVEMBER 14, 2013 7 LEGAL NOTICE ACCEPTING BIDS FOR RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION TRADES Florida Home Partnership, Inc. a not-for-prot homebuilder is currently accepting bids for all residential construction trades for its newest Community BAYOU PASS VILLAGE PHASE IV A 158 home single family community to be constructed utilizing the USDA Mutual Self Help Housing Program. FHP currently has bid packets available at its corporate ofce located at 201 14th Avenue SE, Suite H, Ruskin 33570. Bid packages may be picked up for a $15.00 fee (checks or money orders only) from October 31, 2013 through 1:30 PM on Friday November 15, 2013. A Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting will be held at 2:00 PM on Friday November 15 at the Dorothy Duke Community Center located at 2203 Dorothy Duke Lane, Ruskin 33570. Immediately following the pre-bid meeting all bidders are welcome to tour homes currently under construction at Bayou Pass Village Phase III, adjacent to the pre-bid meeting. All bidders will receive three separate oor plans to bid on along with general specications. Bids are due to Florida Home Partnerships Ruskin ofce listed above no later than 4:00 PM on Friday December 6, 2013. Successful bidders will be notied as soon as possible after December 20, 2013. Basis for award will be lowest responsible negotiated bidder at FHPs sole discretion. It is anticipated these homes will be constructed over a 36-48 month period. FHP is seeking proposals from the following construction trades: All Bidders must have appropriate state or county license for trade and carry $1,000,000 in General Liability Insurance and $1,000,000 workers Compensation Insurance. Minority and small businesses are encouraged to apply. All contractors and suppliers must furnish a minimum one year warranty from date of occupancy. For Further Information contact Kim Bishop at 813-672-7860 x 261 or email kim@home.org FHP is an equal opportunity employer www.home.org Submitted by: Earl Pfeiffer Executive Director CRC 058278 EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY Cypress Creek Elementary School (from left): Fatima Guia, 5th Grade; Vellenia Pena, 2nd Grade; and Kenneth Saldana, 5th Grade; with Principal Roy Moral and Art Teacher Sandra Shelton. Holiday cards come your way from SouthShore Regional LibraryOnce again, the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library were spreading the joy in area elementary and middle schools! The Friends organized an art contest in early fall, and students at participating schools submitted their artwork. The competition for this 5th Annual Holiday Art Contest was open to local students. Ten students were selected as winners. Their designs were transformed into Holiday Greeting Cards by Ruskin-based M&M Printing Company, Inc. The cards are being sold now through December at the SouthShore Regional Library, 15816 Beth Shields Way in Ruskin. A bundle of ten cards costs just $5. Proceeds from the sale will supplement free Library programs offered to the public.

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8 U OBSERVER NEWS NOVEMBER 14, 2013 COLORING PICTURE A: There are too many cheetahs! Q: Why is it hard to play cards in the jungle? Q: Why couldn’t people play cards on the ark? A: Because they were sitting on the deck. Some answers: aim, came, dame, fame, flame, lame, name, same, shame, tame Answers: 1) Go Fish, 2) Checkers, 3) Pick-Up Sticks, 4) Tic-Tac-Toe, 5) Old Maid, 6) Chess, 7) Chinese Checkers There are lots of games for kids from board games to video games. Fill in the blanks to name some popular kids’ games. Pass Along The Fun It’s nice to win, but not all games have a winner. Take the game of Telephone, for example. No one wins. The fun comes in how a message is passed around. To play Telephone, players must sit in a circle. The first player thinks of a good message and whispers it in the next player’s ear. Play continues in this way until everyone has had a turn. The last player to hear the message repeats it out loud. In most cases, the message given by the last player is not the message given by the first player. As the message is passed around the circle, it often changes, sometimes in a big way. The message, “Mary has a black and white dog named Misty” could very well end up, “Marty has a black and brown cat named Hissy.” The longer the message, the harder it is for players to remember and tell it to each other correctly. Playground Game Challenge 1) In Red Rover, players make human chains. Fact or Fiction? 2) In Hide and Seek, players hide from each other. Fact or Fiction? 3) In Simon Says, players follow instructions. Fact or Fiction? 4) In Hot Potato, players pass around a real hot potato. Fact or Fiction? 5) In Duck Duck Goose, players chase each other. Fact or Fiction? 6) In Shadow Tag, players chase each other at night. Fact or Fiction? 7) In Freeze Tag, players freeze and unfreeze each other. Fact or Fiction? 8) In Hop Scotch, players hop along a grid. Fact or Fiction? 9) In Four Square, players dodge balls. Fact or Fiction? 10) In Marco Polo, players try to tag each other in the mud. Fact or Fiction? When the bell rings and kids head outside for recess, some go directly to the jungle gym, while others run around and play games. Here are some questions about some popular playground games. How many can you answer correctly? Answers: 1) Fact, 2) Fact, 3) Fact, 4) Fiction, players pass around a small bean bag or some other item that is not hot, 5) Fact, 6) Fiction, Shadow Tag is played during the day when shadows can be found, 7) Fact, 8) Fact, 9) Fiction, players hit balls to each other, 10) Fiction, Marco Polo is played in the water Fact or Fiction? What Rhymes with… List 10 words that rhyme with “game.” 1. ___________ 2. _____________ 3. ____________ 4. ___________ 5. ____________ 6. ____________ 7. __________ 8. ____________ 9. ___________ 10. ___________ 1 G O F __ S __ 2 C H E __ __ E R S 3 P I __ __ U P S T I __ __ S 4 T I __ T A __ T O __ 5 O L __ __ A I D 6 C __ E __ S 7 C __ I N E __ E C H E C __ E __ S Jokes & Riddles Name That Game Name That Game Name That Game

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 9 LITTLE MANATEE SOUTHCHARRETTE CLOSING PRESENTATIONWhat comes aer planning? Doing. Together, as part of a process were calling LMS:NEXT weve been building a code to reect the future character and form of the Little Manatee South Community Plan area. And were wrapping up the charrette process with a closing presentation on November 21, 2013. Join us for this important event. Discover how your Community Plan can be enabled by a customized form-based code. Hillsborough County sta and a team of experienced consultants will discuss everyones work to date and present the latest recommended dras.WHEN:ursday, November 21, 2013, at 6:30 p.m.WHERE:SouthShore Community Resource Center 201 14th Ave. S.E. Ruskin, FL 33570 COMMUNITY MEETINGAll meeting facilities are ADA compliant. For assistance, or for more information, please call 813-272-5275 (TTY: 301-7173). Para informacin, llamar al 272-5275.LMSNEXT. ORG Joe Moreda | 813-276-8379 moredaj@hillsboroughcounty.org On Earth Day in April 2014, the Florida Wildlife Federation will award a commemorative plaque and an age-suitable gardening book to the Florida kid or kids 12 years old or under who have helped to establish and maintain a habitat for wildlife at home or on school property. The habitat will also be featured on the FWF website and in its newsletter. Entries close March 31, 2014. The Florida Wildlife Federation is dedicated to encouraging young Floridians to be good environmentalists and to care for native animals and plants. It believes that time spent outdoors working on a habitat project is of great value in encouraging young people to learn about nature. Experts say that lack of active outdoor play and projects contributes to many childhood health problems.5th Annual Kids Wildlife Habitat Contest is onIts easy to enter. Just tell FWF how the habitat provides the following elements: food, water, cover, and a place to raise young. Send some photos of your habitat, preferably with children working there. Teachers: note that it is not necessary for schoolyard habitats to be certified by National Wildlife Federation or any other organization, just that they provide the four necessary elements for a good wildlife habitat. The group is especially interested in the science that students learn in the habitat. A description and photos of the habitat can be mailed to 2545 Blairstone Pines Dr., Tallahassee, FL 32301, or emailed to patricia@ fwfonline.org. Email patricia@fwfonline.org or call the FWF office at 850656-7113 for more information, if needed. Visit www.fwfonline.org for photos and information about previous winners. SouthShore Regional LibraryKids program/event highlights Crafternoon Thursday, Nov. 14 at 4:30 p.m. For children ages 5-10 ~ Join the Childrens Librarian and create colorful and fun Thanksgiving crafts to take home with you. Registration is required. Register at the Reference Desk or by calling 813-273-3652. Funded by the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library. Bedtime Stories Thursday, Nov. 14 at 7 p.m. For ages 2-5 with a caregiver ~ Stories, action rhymes, songs, interactive activities, and crafts make up this fun 30-minute program that celebrates a love of reading. Children may wear pajamas and bring a blanket and favorite cuddly toy. HTML for Teens Thursday, Nov. 14 at 7 p.m. For ages 13-18 ~ Learn how to program for the Web with HTML and make your own dynamic websites. Registration is required. Ask at the Information Desk or call 813-273-3652. Pee Wee Artists: Lets Create! Monday, Nov. 18 at 10:30 a.m. Pee Wee Artists(3-5 years, adult must be present) will join our art instructor and create an art project to take home. Limit 18. Registration required at either the SouthShore Regional Library Information Desk or by calling 813-273-3652. Baby Time Monday, Nov. 18 at 1:35 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 11:35 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 20 at 10:05 a.m. For children ages 0-20 months and their caregivers ~ Early literacy begins at birth. Bond with your baby through stories, bouncy rhymes and songs in this 20-minute lapsit program that introduces early literacy skills and encourages language development. Wacky Science Fun Monday, Nov. 18 at 3 p.m. For ages 5-12. Join us as the goofy professor creates all kinds of fun magic concoctions with common elements found in everyones kitchen. Things bubble, fizz up, and bounce out as kids are entertained while being introduced to the fun of science. Funded by Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library. Toddler Time Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 10:05 a.m. & 10:35 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 20 at 10:35 a.m. For children ages 20-36 months and their caregivers ~ Stories, finger plays, songs and interactive activities make up this fun 20-minute program that highlights early literacy skills and encourages reading readiness. Story Time Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 20 at 11 a.m. For children ages 3-5 and their caregivers ~ Stories, action rhymes, songs and interactive activities make up this engaging 30-minute program that highlights early literacy skills, and encourages reading readiness and social interaction. Adult/Teen Photo Transfer on Clay Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 6:30 p.m. Join art instructor Nicole Lamothe for this interesting ceramic class. Students will transfer photos onto clay tiles. The clay will be fired in a kiln and be ready for pick up Dec. 3 through 6 at the Circulation Desk. Limit 20. Registration required at either the Southshore Regional Libray Information Desk or by calling 813-273-3652. Funding by a grant from the Community Foundation of Greater Sun City Center. Teen Volunteer Orientation Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 7 p.m. Prospective teen volunteers are invited to attend this informational session. Topics will include the application process, filling out school forms, shelving guidelines, and volunteer expectations. No Safari Needed. Just visit your neighborhood printer. For All Your Printing Needs. &Established in 1968 Printing Company, Inc.SHEETFED & WEB PRINTING 813-645-4048

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10 OBSERVER NEWS NOVEMBER 14, 2013 Cypress Creek Golf Club 1011 Cypress Village Blvd., RuskinPlease call for reservation 813-440-4576 Ext. 2LUNCH: Tues.Sat. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. DINNER: Wed. Sat. 4 to 8 p.m. BRUNCH: Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.Cypress Creek Golf Club 1011 Cypress Village Blvd., RuskinPlease call for reservation 813-440-4576 Ext. 2LUNCH: Tues.Sat. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. DINNER: Wed. Sat. 4 to 8 p.m. BRUNCH: Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Let us do the cooking and you get the credit! Delicious Thanksgiving feasts available for pickup on November 27th Starting at $16.95 a person Call Casey for details813-305-7888 x6 8 8 Award-winners Danielle DeSilvestro, left, and Kyle Bowman pose with their FFA advisor Erin Elsberry.Two Lennard High School students win National FFA AwardsTwo students at Ruskins Lennard High School have won national awards from FFA at the organizations 86th National Convention, held in Louisville, Ky. Danielle Rose DeSilvestro, 17, was named national winner of the Wildlife Production and Management Entrepreneurship/Placement Proficiency award program. This award, sponsored by Purina Animal Nutrition, recognizes FFA members who excell as agricultural entrepreneurs, employees or volunteer while gaining hands-on career experience. Danielle has worked with the Florida Wildlife Research Institute; her work will reveal the spawning and migration behavior of fish native to the area. Her hope is to become a marine biologist. Kyle Lee Bowman, 18, was named the national winner of the Landscape Management Entrepreneurship/Placement Proficiency award program. This award, sponsored by John Deere and Tractor Supply Company, recognizes FFA members who excell as agricultural entrepreneurs, employees or volunteer while gaining hands-on career experience. The summer of his seventh-grade year, Kyle began looking for a job to pay for his kart-racing hobby. He began working with his uncle to maintain landscapes, golf courses and athletic fields. He began with such simple tasks as weeding and cleaning sprinklers. But as he earned his uncles trust, he began to operate large equipment install landscapes, and install and repair irrigation systems.Dance Saturday at Manatee RV ParkThe Manatee RV Park will host a social dance from 7 to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 16 in the communitys clubhouse. Music will be provided by Thor. Bring your own refreshments; ice will be provided. The cost is $5 per person and the public is invited. Manatee RV Park is seven miles south of Ruskin; four miles north of I-275. For more information, contact J. Sullivan at 813-649-9150 or E. Resch at 813-649-1145.Southshore American Business Womans monthly dinner to focus on human traffickingOn Monday, Nov. 18, the Southshore Charter Chapter of American Business Women will hold its monthly dinner at Sandpiper Grille, 1702 S. Pebble Beach Blvd. in Sun City Center. The speaker is June Wallace, a member of the SCC campaign against human trafficking, which fosters community and faith-interactive action against this scourge. The dinner and program start at 6 p.m., with networking and sign-in taking place from 5:30 p.m. on. There are six options to choose from for dinner, all including entree, dessert and beverage. Wine, beer or cocktails will be available for purchase separately. The price for dinner is $16 per person, which is all-inclusive. Cash or check only. If you are interested in going, RSVP as soon as possible to diana@brandonfamilylaw.com or call 813-653-1744, so that the restaurant can prepare food accordingly. Take along a friend, business associate and/or relative so they can hear this very important presentation. All attendees will have a moment to introduce themselves and their business.How to deal with depression in the holiday seasonFor many people, the holiday season presents more challenges than what to cook or what to buy for a loved one. Those susceptible to anxiety and depression are likely to suffer more when everyone around them is broadcasting happiness and joy. From 2 to 4 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 21, a special seminar entitled Dealing with Anxiety and Depression During the Holiday Season will be offered at the Sun City Center Chamber of Commerce, located at 1651 Sun City Plaza. Sponsored by NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness), the program will feature Kelly M. Akerley, who for 20 years has been a strong advocate for those with mental illness. She earned her Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, and is the vice-president of NAMI Hillsborough. For more information about the workshop, call 813-634-6747. Other programs from NAMI NAMI holds a SCC advisory group meeting the third Wednesday of the month in the Atriums Sandpiper Room. The group also offers a 12-session training for family members of those with mental illness. NAMI is looking to collaborate with other local organizations to do a SCC/South Shore needs-assessment, based on the strengths of the community.

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 11 *Individual results may vary. There are risks associated with any knee or hip surgical procedure, including MAKOplasty. Talk with your doctor about these risks to nd out if MAKOplasty is right for you. Physicians are on the medical staff of Lakewood Ranch Medical Center, but, with limited exceptions, are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Lakewood Ranch Medical Center. The hospital shall not be liable for actions or treatments provided by physicians. ROBOTIC SUR GERY NOW AT THE RANCH MAKOplasty with Robotic Arm technology eliminates guesswork in hip and knee surgeries8330 Lakewood Ranch Blvd. Bradenton, FL 34202 www.lakewoodranchmedicalcenter.com The Orthopaedic Spine and Joint Center at Lakewood Ranch Are you living with knee or hip pain? Lakewood Ranch Medical Center is the ONLY hospital in Bradenton and Sarasota to offer MAKOplasty with Robotic Arm technology for Partial Knee Resurfacing, an innovative new treatment option for people with early to mid-stage osteoarthritis of the knee. And For the many people who suffer from degenerative joint disease of the hip, we also offer MAKOplasty with Robotic Arm technology for Total Hip Replacement. Using a computer-assisted visualization guide, a robotic arm gently directs the surgeons hand, ensuring precision and quality results. The Orthopaedic Spine and Joint Center at Lakewood Ranch is committed to providing the latest advances in orthopaedic surgery and dedicated to helping our patients return to daily activities with relief from pain. Help reduce your pain and restore your lifestyle with MAKOplasty. For more information please call 941.782.BONE (2663). Medical Director of the Orthopaedic Spine and Joint Center NOVEMBER EVENTSA RETIREMENT & REHABILITATION COMMUNITY Parkinsons Support Group of SCC. Sponsored by The Mens Club of SCC. Facilitated by the USF Parkinsons Disease and Movement Disorders Center. Speaker will be Dr. Ricardo H. Gonzalez, neurologist. Gonzalez earned his medical degree from Ponticia Universidad Javeriana, Colombia. He completed an internship in internal medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, and performed his residency in neurology and fellowship in movement disorders at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. his areas of expertise include Parkinsons disease, stroke, headache and multiple sclerosis. Gonzalez is certied by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. Free Valet Parking at entrance. The Connection Between Hearing Loss and Dementia! Dont miss this presentation by Don Guiley, BCHIS from A+ Hearing Center, Inc. If you or a loved one are missing the conversation, there may be memory loss in your future! Learn how to prevent this form of isolation. Alzheimers Association Caregiver Support Group. Bring your loved one for a well deserved break. Facilitated by Aging Care Advocates. Receive information while your loved one is cared for in our Secured Memory Care. RSVP 3 days prior to 813-246-4120. Your Money Matters: Myths about Annuities, What You Need to be Aware of! presented by Chris Redhead, CFP,ChFC,CFS, Executive Vice President of Sequoia Financial Group. During these turbulent times many investors are plagued with challenging questions and difcult decisions that may signicantly impact their familys nancial future. Join us each month on the third Wednesday as we share prudent strategies that have helped us guide our clients to achieve successful results through uncertain markets. Low Vision Support Group. Facilitated by Ana Maria Oliva, M.D., Sponsored by the SCC Mens Club. Grace Terry, MSW, will offer Ten Simple Ways to Be Healthy and Happy. Grace has been a professional social worker for over 30 years with impressive experience as a licensed mental health provider, medical social worker, and geriatric services provider. She now specializes in Grief Education and Grief Support, and hosts two once-a-month Grief Cafes in Sun City Center as well as with numerous additional venues in Pasco, Pinellas, Hillsborough, and Polk counties. As a speaker, she is described as enlightening, entertaining, and dynamic. A brief tour of St. Augustine500 years after Ponce de LeonBy %  WARREN RESEN, North American Travel Writers AssociationMarch 1513 is the date recorded for Ponce de Leons reported landing on the coast of eastern Florida. A ships log book records land being sighted at what he probably thought was an island at 30 degrees 8 minutes North Latitude, which is about 10 miles north of the present day St. Augustine. This year marks the 500th year of this momentous event and festivities will continue into early 2014. When Ponce de Leon claimed what he probably thought was an island for Spain, he was technically, and unknowingly, claiming all of North America, including Canada and Alaska. To understand St. Augustines rightful place in American history we have to start with British history. Jamestown, VA, was founded in 1607, abandoned in 1610, and reestablished in 1616. The Pilgrims landed on that famous rock in 1620. In 1565 (52 years after Ponce de Leons landing) St. Augustine was founded by Pedro Menendez de Aviles, an admiral in the Spanish Navy. This was 42 years before the first Jamestown settlement and 55 years before the Pilgrims disembarked by stepping onto that rock. But ask most people which is the oldest European city in the continental USA and the answer is usually Jamestown. Why? St. Augustine was Spanish and Jamestown was English, and, as you well know, the victors write the history books. St. Augustine was the capital of Spanish Florida for 200 years and is the oldest continuously occupied European settlement and port in the Continental United States. It remained the capital of East Florida when the territory changed hands between Spain and Great Britain in 1763 and was capital of the Florida Territory (US) until it was moved to Tallahassee in 1824. The heart of St. Augustine is at King and St. George Streets. Everything radiates out from there: sightseeing attractions, museums, restaurants and lodgings. To get an overview of the city, its history and places of interest, a trip on one of the hop-on/hop-off sightseeing lines is the best way to get oriented. One block east of St. George Street is Aviles Street (Pedro Menendez de Aviles), the oldest street in St. Augustine. Its an easy walk south from King Street to the Gomez-Alvarez House, the oldest house in St. Augustine. The Pictured at left is Aviles Street, the oldest street in St. Augustine.X See more stories from Warren Resen online at

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12 OBSERVER NEWS NOVEMBER 14, 2013 Were open Monday Friday 7:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m.A doctors ofce for the entire family thats close to home. For appointments, call (813) 844-4600.10647 Big Bend Road Riverview, FL 33579 www.tgmg.org Same-day appointments available. Secure online access to portions of your medical record via MyChart. FREE mobile app available. We participate in most major health plans. Visit www.tgmg.org for a list of accepted insurance plans.Prema L. Ramsahai, D.O. Our family medicine physician is ready to meet the healthcare needs of your entire family from babies to grandparents. Dr. Ramsahai provides a range of healthcare services, from immunizations and treatment of childhood illnesses to management of chronic health conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure. 301 75Big Bend Rd. Big Bend Rd. tgh_27844_01_TGMG_Rview_10x7.5_ON&C_M.indd 1 10/4/13 10:22 AM Project Corregidor Ride for the FallenOn Saturday, Nov. 16, the second annual Ride for the Fallen will start off at 9:30 a.m. at Beef OBradys in Apollo Beach. All motorcycles and vehicles are welcome to participate. This event is a fundraiser for Project Corregidor Grief & Peer Mentoring Program that My Warriors Place conducts for veterans and military service members who have returned from deployments where they have endured the death of a comrade-in-arms. The ride will be in the memory of Kelly Kowalls son, SPC. Corey J. Kowall and all fallen warriors. This years Ride will be led by Patriot Guard Rider Thomas T-Man Brown, with the Patriot Guard Riders providing escort services to the Veterans Memorial Park from the Opening Ceremony. Schedule: 9 a.m. Noon: Opening Ceremony and Brunch at Beef O Bradys, 205 Apollo Beach Blvd. in Apollo Beach Noon 1 p.m. Escorted Memorial Ride to Veterans Memorial Park, 3601 N. US Hwy 301 in Tampa 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Check in at Veterans Park for Poker Run 1 p.m.1:30 p.m. GI Joe Parachute Drop at Veterans Memorial Park 1:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. Poker Run starts at Veterans Memorial Park with stops for card draws at American Legion, VFW, AmVET Post, ending at the AmVET Post 44, 5521 Hwy 60 East in Plant City for winners announcements and entertainment. The cost to participate in the event is a $20 donation per person. Event ticket with Brunch at Opening Ceremony (limited to 200 people). Includes T-shirt, 1 entry into GI Joe Drop, 1 entry into Poker Run and admittance to Event Party Fun. Event Ticket without Brunch (will receive a 2nd GI Joe Drop Ticket instead) GI Joe Drop Tickets are $5 each (chance to win $25,000, winner guaranteed 2 round-trip airline tickets to anywhere Southwest flies) Tickets can be purchased online at http://ride4fallen.org or in person at Re/ Max Bayside, 237 Apollo Beach Blvd. # 107, in Apollo Beach; 813 Customs, 8701 N. Nebraska Ave. in Tampa; Jens MarketPlace at the Sunday MarketPlace on Nov. 10, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. at C1 Bank parking lot, 6542 N. US Hwy 41 in Apollo Beach; tickets purchased on the day of the event are guaranteed only for the Memorial Ride, Poker Run and entry to Event Party. T-shirt/GI Joe Drop purchases are subject to availability. For more information, call Kelly Kowall at 813-321-0880 or by email at kelly@mywarriorsplace.org.The number of green sea turtle nests in Florida this year was more than double the count of the previous highest year. Biologists with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) have documented more than 25,000 green turtle nests on 26 index beaches in the state in 2013. We are astounded and pleased by the high number of green turtle nests documented in 2013, said Dr. Blair Witherington, FWC research scientist. It looks like the years of conservation efforts for this endangered species are paying off. FWC-trained and authorized surveyors across the state monitor nests on a set of index beaches that span nearly 250 miles and are the focus of the Index Beach Nesting Survey. These surveys began in 1989. Index surveyors follow firm counting guidelines, making it possible for FWC researchers to use the data from these beaches to identify trends. The trend for green turtles shows an exponential increase in nesting over the past 25 years. In 1989, biologists documented only 464 green turtle nests on index beaches. In 2013, this index nest count was 25,553. The index count represents about 70 percent of green turtle nesting statewide. Leatherback sea turtle nest counts have also risen dramatically over Green turtle nesting.FWC PHOTOGreen sea turtles nest at unprecedented pace in Florida this yearthe past quarter century. However, the 2013 count of 322 leatherback nests on index beaches was 193 lower than last year. Loggerhead sea turtles, the most prevalent sea turtle species on Floridas shores, accounted for 44,810 nests on index beaches this year, down from 2012s nearrecord count of 58,172 nests. Although this federally threatened species nests on the same beaches as green turtles and leatherbacks, loggerheads have not shown the recovery in numbers seen in nesting by the other two species. The high level of loggerhead nesting last year followed a pronounced drop in the species nest counts between 1998 and 2007. Hundreds of surveyors from conservation organizations, universities and federal, state and local governments along with other volunteers make possible the extensive data collection on Floridas nesting sea turtles. In conjunction with the Index Nesting Beach Survey, the Statewide Nesting Beach Survey documents sea turtle nesting on nearly all sandy beaches in Florida. Data from the statewide surveys will be available in early 2014. The FWCs role in coordinating Floridas sea turtle nest counts, training surveyors and compiling data is funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and sales of the states sea turtle license plate. Florida residents can purchase the plate to support these efforts at BuyaPlate.com. For more information about trends in sea turtle nest counts, visit MyFWC.com/Research, click on Wildlife, then click on Nesting under the Sea Turtle heading. Report sick or injured sea turtles to the FWCs Wildlife Alert Hotline at 888-404-FWCC (3922).

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 13 DOVE INTERIORS FLOORING & WINDOW TREATMENTS1 mile west of I-75, Exit 240-B813-645-8660 | 22 years strong! AREA RUG SALE!ALL SALES FINAL! L O W DRAPERY | VALANCES | BEDDING | UPHOLSTERY | BACKSPLASHES | AREA RUGSCARPET | HARDWOOD | VINYL | TILE | LAMINATE | BLINDS | SHUTTERS | WE REPAIR BLINDS Bryan R. Thatcher, DMDNew Dentist joins SCC PracticeDr. Bryan atcher has joined the oce of Dr. T. Gregory Jacobs, which was founded 50 years ago by the late Dr. Gerald M. Isbell.Dr. atcher grew up in Tampa and now resides in Apollo Beach. He graduated from the University of Florida College of Dentistry, and continued his education by attending a residency at the U of F in Seminole, Florida, where he was awarded a certicate of Advanced Education in General Dentistry. He currently serves as a Clinical Assistant Professor for that residency program. He looks forward to practicing all phases of general dentistry.is oce oers a number of aesthetic, restorative and rehabilitative dental services. With a boardcertied prosthodontist on site, all aspects of restorative treatment are available, including crowns, bridges, complete and partial dentures, implant restorations and sleep apnea.1601 Rickenbacker Drive, Suite 7 Sun City Center, FL813634-1932 Dr. Robert Norman & Associates Dermatology Dr. Robert Norman, DO MPH, MBA Dr. William Eng Holly Pohler, ARNP Kate Sedlaczek, ARNPWE OFFER THE FOLLOWING:Appointments made in a timely manner with never more than a 2 week waiting period maximum, and same day appointments are available. Diagnosis & treatment of skin cancer & diseases of the skin, hair & nails. Wide excision, treatment for spider veins & rosacea, Electrodessication, curettage, cryotherapy & debridement. Botox & Restylane. Dermatological products available in the ofce. Clarisonic, MD Solar Sciences, Image, Merderma, Retin-A, Sun Block, moisturizer and more.Radiation & laser treatment for skin conditions.Call to schedule your appointment today!813-880-7546 10422 U.S. H WY 301 Riverview MOST INSURANCE ACCEPTED CABINETSCOASTAL WOOD DESIGN, INC.Tear out the old... install new, We do it all!We Will Beat Any Written Estimate with this couponCALLJOYCE SUTHARD OR RICHARD TALLY(813) 422-3454Sun City Center References Available 24-HOUR TOWINGFree Diagnostics Free Towing to shop if we do repairs SUN POINT AUTOMOTIVEA/C CHECK$1995+ FreonFREE Mount & Balancewith purchase of 4 tiresBRAKE BUNDLE$150Per Axle + TaxOIL CHANGE$199510 EMERGENCY SERVICES Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m.813-645-7653 (At the corner of U.S. 41 and S.R. 674) For your convenience were now open longer hours! www.TotalAutomotiveServices.com Servicing Sun City Center, Ruskin & Apollo BeachGet YourFREE2014CALENDAR BRAKE SERVICE$9999PER AXLE. Includes replacing pads, shoes and turning rotors. 813-645-4632We offer a Same Dealer Services... Lower Prices/ Better Care Call CATHY 813-938-5801 for an appointment 137 S. Pebble Beach Blvd. Sun City Center MATRIX COLOR$35HAIR CUT$15 The student-run University Lecture Series at the University of South Florida will welcome Marlee Matlin, Academy Awardwinning actress and activist, on Thursday, Nov. 14. The free, open-to-the-public lecture begins at 8 p.m. in the Marshall Student Center Ballroom, 4202 E. Fowler Ave. on the Tampa campus. Addressing topics of inclusion, diversity, and access, as well as addiction and abuse, Matlin, who is deaf, will share her life experiences in front of the camera, off the set, and as an activist for these important issues. A book signing for her autobiography, Ill Scream Later, will follow the lecture at 9:45 p.m. Matlin received worldwide critical acclaim for her motion picture debut in Children of a Lesser God, earning her the Academy Award for Best Actress. At age 21, she became the youngest recipient of the Best Actress Oscar, making her one of only four actresses to receive that honor for a film debut. The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information and the audience policy, visit http://uls.usf.edu/. Academy Award-winner Marlee Matlin to lecture at USFPaddle under the full moon at Camp BayouThe next program at Camp Bayou is the Full Moon Paddle on Friday, Nov. 15, starting at 6 p.m. Expect a 90-minute to 2-hour paddle with Camp Bayous experienced guides. Canoe rental is $25 each. If you wish to join the trip using your own canoe or kayak, Camp Bayou requests a donation of just $5. Reservations required: contact Dolly at campbayou@gmail.com or call 813-641-8545. Camp Bayou is neither a campground nor a summer camp. It was an RV park before the County ELAP program purchased the land but it is now open for day use only, open to the general public. Through volunteers, donations, membership and grants, the Center offers pre-scheduled programs to schools, youth groups, adult groups and families, plus it is open from Thursday through Saturday from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. for passive recreational pursuits such as wildlife watching, nature photography and trail walks. The Camp Bayou Outdoor Learning Center is managed by the newly created, nonprofit Bayou Outdoor Learning & Discovery, Inc., in a public-private partnership with the nonprofit Ruskin Community Development Foundation, Inc. and Hillsborough County Parks, Recreation and Conservation. Camp Bayou is located three miles south of SR 674 at the end of 24th St. SE in Ruskin. More information is on the web at www. campbayou.org or call 813-6418545.

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14 NOVEMBER 14, 2013 FREE ADMISSION Show Times Fri., Nov. 15 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Sun City Center Inn 809 N. Pebble Beach Blvd. Sun City Center, FL 33573 FREE ADMISSION Stone Beads Findings Crystal Chains Jewelry Pearls Cabs Points We will be closed Thanksgiving Day so our employees can spend the day witht their families.PARRISH8348 U.S. 301 N.Corner of US 301 and Old Tampa/Erie Road, just past CVS941-723-1111VOTED BEST!www.FerrarosRestaurantGroup.comHOURS: Monday-Thursday 11 a.m.-9 p.m. $5 Offany purchase of $25 or more$2 Offany lunchFerraros Italian Grille With this coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. 1 coupon per visit. Expires 11/21/13 Ferraros Italian Grille With this coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. 1 coupon per visit. Expires 11/21/13 CARDS 2 $22 Wednesday onlyChoose from: Baked Ziti, Pasta & Meatballs, Manicotti, Cheese Ravioli, Stuffed Shells, or Lasagna, with: 2 House Salads, 2 Soft Drinks, Garlic Bread, 2 Small Cannoli2 $22 Wednesdays & ThursdaysChoose from: Baked Ziti, Pasta & Meatballs, Manicotti, Cheese Ravioli, Stuffed Shells, or Lasagna, with: 2 House Salads, 2 Soft Drinks, Garlic Bread, 2 Small Cannolifor forFerraros Italian Grille With this coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. 1 coupon per visit. Expires 11/21/13 Ferraros Italian Grille With this coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. 1 coupon per visit. Expires 11/14/13 Approx. 19 minutes south of Sun City Center 2s are WILD on 2s are WILD on CHOOSE Y OUR WEDNESD AYWe welcome all our Friends from the SCC areaBring your family and friends.They will Thank You! Happy Thanksgiving *Interest rates as of 10/24/2013, subject to change. FG Guarantee-Platinum annuity is a single premium xed deferred annuity issued by Fidelity & Guaranty Life Insurance Company, Baltimore, MD. Form Numbers: FGL SPDA-MY-F (7-04); et al. Subject to state availability. Certain restrictions may apply. When your guarantee period expires, Fidelity & Guaranty Life will automatically renew your annuity for the same period at the then-current interest rate. The renewal interest rate will never be less than the minimum guaranteed interest rate, which will be established between 1 percent and 3 percent. Surrender charges may apply to withdrawals. Withdrawals may be taxable and subject to penalties prior to age 59-1/2. Withdrawals will reduce available death benet. A market value adjustment may apply to withdrawals and may increase or decrease the surrender value. FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY3.5% Interest5-Year Guarantee PeriodContact us today to learn more about the FG Guarantee-Platinum Annuity a Great Savings OptionDONT DELAY.This offer is good until Dec. 13, 2013* 948-B Cypress Village Blvd. Sun City Center, FL 33573 (813) 633-7377Ronald H. Ward has been helping clients build, manage and protect their wealth for over 40 years. Dear Savvy Senior, Am I entitled to my former husbands Social Security benefits? I was married for 12 unpleasant years and would like to know what I may be eligible for. Ex-spouse Dear Ex-spouse, Youll be happy to know that for the most part, Social Security provides divorced spouses benefits just like they do spouses, if you meet the governments requirements. Heres how it works. A divorced spouse can collect a Social Security retirement benefit on the work record of their ex-husband (or ex-wife) if they are at least age 62, were married for at least 10 years, are unmarried now, and are not eligible for a higher benefit based on their own work record. In order to collect, however, your former spouse must also be at least 62 and eligible for Social Security benefits, and you must have been divorced for at least two years. But, he doesnt have to be receiving them in order for you to collect divorced spouses benefits. Even if your ex is remarried, it wont affect your right to divorcee benefits, nor will it affect your exs retirement benefits or his current spouses benefits. Benefit Amount A divorced spouse can receive up to 50 percent of their exs full Social Security benefit, or less if they take benefits before their full-retirement age which is 66 if you were born between 1943 and 1954. To find out your full-retirement age and see how much your benefits will be reduced by taking them early see ssa. gov/retire2/agereduction.htm. Keep in mind though, that if you qualify for benefits based on your own work history, youll receive the larger of the two benefits. You cannot receive benefits on both your own record, and your exs work record, too. To find out your retirement benefits based on your own earnings history, see your Social Security statement at ssa.gov/myaccount. And to get an estimate of your divorced spouse benefit, call Social Security at 800-772-1213. Youll need your exs Social Security Number to get it. Getting Remarried Since three-quarters of U.S. divorcees get married again, its also important to understand that remar rying makes you ineligible for divorced spouses benefits unless the later marriage ends. And, for those who have been married and divorced twice, with both marriages lasting more than 10 years, you can collect using the ex-spouse with the larger Social Security benefit. Divorced Survivor You also need to know that if your ex-spouse dies, and you were married for 10 or more years, you become eligible for divorced sur vivor benefits, which is worth up to 100 percent of what your exspouse was due. Survivors benefits are available to divorced spouses as early as age 60 (50 if youre disabled). But, if you remarry before 60 you become ineligible unless the marriage ends. Remarrying after age 60 will not affect your eligibility. Also note that if you are receiving divorced spouse benefits when your ex-spouse dies, you will automatically be switched over to the higher paying survivor benefit. Switching Strategies Being divorced also offers some switching strategies that can help boost your benefits. For working divorced spouses, theres an option that lets you file a restricted application with Social Security (at full retirement age) to collect a divorced spousal benefit, which is half of what your ex gets. Then, once you reach 70, you stop receiving the ex-spousal benefit and switch to your own benefit, which will be 32 percent higher than it would have been at your full retirement age. Divorced widows (and widowers) have even more options. If, for example, you are currently collecting Social Security retirement benefits on your own record, and your ex-spouse dies, you can switch to survivors benefits if the payment is larger. Or, if youre collecting survivors benefits, you can switch to your own retirement benefits between 62 and 70 if it offers a larger payment. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Nor man, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of The Savvy Senior book. How Divorce Can Affect Your Social Security THE SAVVY SENIORBy Jim Miller Sun City Center Travelworld &invite you to come learn about Holland America Cruises!at our Sun City Center Travelworld ofce906 N. Pebble Beach Blvd.RSVP requested (813) 634-3318 Holiday shopping extravaganza comes to RuskinFrom 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 16, the Ruskin Womans Club will present Trinkets, Baubles & Bling Holiday Shopping Extravaganza at the historic club building at 503 South Hwy 41, directly across from Grannies Restaurant. This annual event will have numerous vendors on hand selling jewelry, cosmetics, scents, handbags, origami, fine artwork, craft items and more.

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 15

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16 NOVEMBER 14, 2013 Experience the all new Alta. 4-Day Digital Technology EventNovember 19th-22nd The hearing device customized exclusively for you. Your life. Your world.Your day takes you from one difficult hearing situation to another. Alta is customized to give you optimal performance. Its sound-processing architecture is our most advanced ever. Think of it as a micro-brain that works in harmony with your brain. Your personal hearing preferences are used by the Alta chip so you can differentiate sounds and hear with more clarity. Yet for all its sophistication, each Alta hearing solution begins with talking, and listening. Consult with us today, and hear the difference a truly personalized hearing solution can make for you. Hear more. Anywhere. Anytime. illsborough earing Aid Center Better Hearing...Better Life! H New Location, Same Great Service1509A Sun City Center Plaza Sun City Center, FL 33753 CALL TODAY!813-642-7580 Your visit will includeComplimentary Consultation and Demonstration of Latest Digital TechnologyBring your spouse, family member or a friend with you for the Familiar Voice part of the evaluation.Located in the same shopping center as the Post Oce, next to Bella Cucina Italian Restaurant FREEBATTERIES FOR 3 YEARSwith purchase of Alta ProsSAVE UP TO $1000on new hearing devices*Select models only, restrictions applyCoupons only valid on event dates. No cash value and not applicable to previous purchases. Dr. Ken Curtis, Au.D. Oticons expert trained in this Advanced Digital Technology, will be in our oce to discuss these solutions with you. Dr. Kamal Elliot, Au.D.Doctor of Audiology/OwnerBen Ericsson, HAS, BC-HISBoard Certied Hearing Instrument SpecialistSpecial GuestDr. Ken Curtis, Au.D.Doctor of Audiology By %  MITCH TTRAPHAGEN mitch@observernews.netSouth Hillsborough, from Riverview to Sun City Center and Ruskin, stood up to honor and respect our nations veterans over the weekend. Veterans Day kicked off early last week. On Saturday the annual Ruskin VFW Veterans Day Parade was held down U.S. Highway 41. Boy and Girl Scouts, Cub Scouts, Brownies and high school bands and JROTC units from the South County Career Center to Brandon High School walked the route, many passing out beads and candy to the hundreds of people who lined the parade route. One young scout from Troop 661, Ruskin / Apollo Beach, was on a mission and he worked to complete it. Although often falling behind his troop during the parade, he was intent on ensuring that each child along the parade route received a piece of candy. His dedication spoke volumes, particularly on a day devoted to those who dedicated themselves. This years parade appeared bigger than ever, with businesses, organizations from around the region and numerous Gasparilla Krewes taking part in the celebration of heroes. On Monday in Sun City Center, the combined military veterans organizations held their annual Veterans Day Ceremony at the Community Association Community Hall. Lt. Commander Paul Wheat, US Army (Ret) provided the welcome and introduction and the East Bay High School JROTC served as the color guard. The guest speaker was newspaper columnist Steve Otto. On Monday morning at Serenity Meadows on 6919 Providence Road in Riverview, a ceremony was held to show support and pay tribute to the nations veterans, both past and active duty. The event included music, a flag ceremony and guest speakers from MacDill Air Force Base. Last week, the Greater Riverview Chamber of Commerce sponsored their annual Veterans Day Tribute at Vets Memorial Park on U.S. Highway 301 in Tampa. The Vice Commander of the 6th Air Mobility Wing at MacDill Air Force Base, Col. Andre J. Briere, was the keynote speaker for the event, which also included a JROTC color guard. Veterans Day, November 11, is the anniversary of the armistice between the Allied Nations and Germany, ending World War I in 1918. The name of the day was changed to Veterans Day by an act of Congress in 1954. That year, President Dwight Eisenhower called on all Americans to observe the day by remembering all those who fought for this nation. The President referred to the name Veterans Day to honor those who have served in all of the nations wars. For more photos, visit The Observer News and The Current on the web at www.observernews.net or www.riverviewcurrent.com.South Hillsborough remembers our veterans SUN CITY CENTER VETERANS DAY PARADE VETERANS DAY PARADE RUSKIN SUN CITY CENTER MICHELLE TRAPHAGEN PHOTOS

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 "\011-\015,\015, \015-U-\012\012"\011-\015,\015, 17 Take Charge of Your Health. Aetna BeHealthy America Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida CarePlus Health Plans Coventry Healthcare Florida Healthcare Plus Freedom Health Humana Molina Healthcare Optimum Health Care Physicians United Plan Preferred Care Partners Simply Healthcare Plans Sunshine State Health Plan Ultimate Health Plan United Healthcare WellCare Health Plans \027 \027 \027 \027 \027 \027 \027 \027 \027 \027 \027 \027 \027 \027 \027 \027 \027 Please visit www.Medicare.gov/find-a-plan to confirm plan options in your zip code. Blake Medical Center I Brandon Regional Hospital I Doctors Hospital of Sarasota I Edward White Hospital Englewood Community Hospital I Fawcett Memorial Hospital I Largo Medical Center I Medical Center of Trinity Memorial Hospital of Tampa I Northside Hospital I Oak Hill Hospital I Palms of Pasadena Hospital Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point I South Bay Hospital I St. Petersburg General Hospital I Town & Country Hospital That is why HCA West Florida affiliated hospitals are in-network with 17 Medicare Advantage plans including: Know Your Choices 1-877-4-HCA-DOCS I HCA West Florida.com America’ s Carwash HOURS OF OPER AT \014\017\016\007\001\006\002\005\007\004\003\001\015\017\016\002\012\021\014\001\025\001\006\002\005\001\022\010 T NOW OPEN SUNDAYS 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. A A ANY FULL SERVICE W ASH ONL Y With this coupon only Not valid with other specials or discounts. $1.50 extra for vans and SUVs. Exp.12/15/13 $ 2 OFF GET YOUR MONTHL Y CAR W ASH P ASS Pay once a month and come as often as you like! a a CARDS 728 Cypress Village Blvd Sun City Center, FL 813-634-9409 Next to Sonny’ s cobblestone streets and old homes are a photographer’s delight. Ancient coquina walls still show indentations from invader’s cannon balls. Historic St. George Street north of King Street is pedestrianfriendly and lined with restaurants and shops selling history, trinkets and t-shirts. Some visitors have been heard to comment negatively on this use of such an historic area without realizing that in the old days it was taverns, buggy whips and muskets. It’s always been a street of merchants. Most prominent in this area of the city is Flagler College, which was originally the Ponce de Leon Hotel. Flagler College is today one of the top rated four-year lib A brief tour of St. Augustine \012œˆ'i`vœ“>}i££ X eral arts colleges in the country. Built by Henry Flagler and opened in 1888, the hotel was the height of luxury. It had every known modern amenity for that time, including electricity. The system was designed by Flagler’s friend Thomas Edison. Being able to turn lights on and off with a button was a novelty. It was so new that some guests were afraid to touch the buttons, fear ing they would be electrocuted. No problem. The staff was at their disposal to do the deed. The original museum-quality art has been preserved throughout the building. Dining room windows and leaded glass decorations were designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany. I believe the college has these treasures insured for an amount in excess of $30 million. Today this magnificent build ing is home to students study ing, eating in the opulent dining room, socializing, working their electronic devices and possibly no longer aware of their fabulous surroundings after a couple of weeks in residence. A guided tour is the only way to see and experience the building’s magnificent interior since security measures were imposed. Do take it. It’s really worthwhile. In 1917 a publication called Gullible’s Travels published a hu morous rendition of a (supposed) visitor’s reaction to visiting St. Augustine and the Ponce de Leon Hotel: “The hotel’s named after the fella that built it. He come from Spain and they say he was huntin’ for some water that if he’d drunk it he’d feel young. I don’t see myself how you could expect to feel young on water. But, anyway, he’d heard that this here kind o’ water could be found in St. Augustine, and when he couldn’t find it ….he went into the hotel business and got even with the United States by chargin’ five dol lars a day and up for a room.” At the same time, Flagler also built the Hotel Alcazar across the street for the more athletically inclined of his guests. It featured a huge indoor swimming pool, Turkish baths, steam room, and massage room and was the center for physically active guests of both hotels. The Hotel Alcazar was pur chased in 1946 by Ohio newspaper magnate Otto Lightner and reopened as the Lightner Museum housing, on three floors, an eclectic collection of the treasures of America’s Gilded Age and probably every family heirloom their descendants ever sold or discarded. All of the athletic facilities previously mentioned have been retained as museum pieces except for the swimming pool, which today is home to the Alcazar Res taurant and various retail shops. Florida and Henry Flagler are synonymous, but no more so than in St. Augustine, where Henry Flagler and his family are buried in the church he built. A few blocks north of the Old City’s North Gate is the first Ripley’s “Believe It or Not Mu seum.” The building was previ ously a hotel owned and operated by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, author of The Yearling Cross Creek and other books. There is one item here not shared with any of the other Ripley museums. Surrounded by a tall ficus hedge, planted so as not to of fend passersby by the unclothed depiction of the male form, is David one of only two full-scale reproductions of the original in Florence, Italy. It was carved from a block of marble quarried in the same Italian quarry as the original and was commissioned for the 1963 New York World’s Fair. The Castillo de San Marcos is St. Augustine’s signature attrac tion and the oldest masonry fort (coquina stone) in the Continental United States. Construction of the fort began in 1672, 107 years after incorpora tion of St. Augustine. Its construc tion took 23 years. The Castillo de San Marcos was attacked twice in the 1700s but was never taken by an invading force. There are self-guided and docent-led tours of the inside of this historic fort. Visitors even learn of the time when the United States imprisoned leaders of the Seminole Nation here. The Fountain of Youth is one of Florida’s oldest tourist attractions and had remained unchanged for generations. If you visited it once, there was no reason to return. But now descendants of the original owners have brought life back to the old girl. Archeologists have uncovered foundations of early Native American and Spanish villages. JEANNE O’CONNOR PH O T O S A statue of Ponce de Leon stands at 30 degrees, 8 minutes North Latitude. The St. Francis Inn is the oldest inn in the oldest city. Dating from 1791, it embodies the rich history and culture of the nation’s oldest city. \012œˆ'i`œ>}i"" X

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18 NOVEMBER 14, 2013 www .beltone.com HEALTH ALERT!Dont Wait Until Its Too LateScientific studies have proven that if hearing loss goes untreated, a condition called auditory deprivation occurs. Hearing loss starves the auditory centers of your brain of acoustic information, affecting your ability to understand speech. Use it or lose it! The longer your hearing loss goes untreated, the more likely it is your brain will actually forget how to hear. But theres good news! High-quality hearing instruments like the Beltone Promise can ensure the auditory centers of your brain stay busy, minimizing the effects of auditory deprivation. Auditory Nerve Eardrum WARNINGDONT IGNORE THE WARNING SIGNS1. Difficulty hearing in noisy situations, like restaurants 2. Hearing but not understanding all the words in a conversation 3. A need to ask people to repeat themselves If youve experienced any of the above, get your hearing tested immediately.FREE HEARING TEST AND LIVE DEMONSTRATION Call today for this FREE In-Office Trial OfferBeltone Promise 17 or 9A breakthrough for demanding listening situations. Years of research have produced Beltone Promise 17 or 9, the hearing instrument that offers unprecedented features for hearing in the most difficult listening situations. Typical problems such as feedback, hearing in noise and TV and phone use are now addressed, using sophisticated solutions and the fastest integrated circuit on the market. *Discount off MSRP and applies to Promise 17 and 9. Cannot be combined with other offers or coupons. Previous purchases excluded. Participation may vary. See store for details. Benefits of hearing aids vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper fit. Beltone Hearing Care Centers are independently owned and operated. 2012 Beltone.We are providers for BC/BS Insurance*on our BELTONE Promise 17 and Promise 9 Untreated hearing loss causes your ears auditory nerve to deteriorate. Ronald HapanowiczCoupon good November 14-20, 2013

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 19 813-645-3529 Ken Knox, Contractor Lic: #RX0057641 Free Low-E upgrade on Simonton House Windows. Energy Star Rated for a TECO Rebate! Call the Ofce for Details! Offer Valid: November 1st December 31st FREE 32834_Butterfly_Anita_NewBar_ObserverNews_BW_1025x75.indd 1 11/7/13 3:08 PM Im not sure why I am so amazed that things change in the passing of decades. After all, the only constant in life is change. Yet I spent the bulk of my growing-up years in this small town and as I looked around a restaurant I was dining in, I was stunned to realize that I didnt recognize a single person. And no one knew me. New families have moved into the houses on my former street and there, too, I knew no one. Its an odd feeling to know a place so intimately yet discover that I dont really know it at all. The town has changed so much. Unlike many small, rural towns it has managed to grow and it appears more prosperous than when I lived here. Many of the homes have been rehabbed, remodeled and rebuilt, reflecting that prosperity, but also feeding the displacement I felt in my own hometown. Its not just the people I dont recognize nearly everything is different. Except for one house.Observations: The last goodbyeMITCH T TRAPHAGEN PPHOTOIn life, trains are always leaving the station. Goodbyes are spoken, tears are shed and then the heart is warmed with the memories of what happened between the hello and that goodbye. In the end, the goodbye really isnt all that important. Above, my hometown during an early November snowfall.Eve there. In my entire life, Ive only missed one Christmas in my small hometown on the northern plains. That year, Michelle and I were cruising through the Bahamas on our sailboat. At the time, I found the telephone (priced at one dollar per minute) to be a poor substitute for the warmth of my family gathered together up north in a place so cold. But this year, I think, will be my first in Florida. Like the growing awareness about goodbyes, Christmas is increasingly more in the heart and mind than it is a specific date on a calendar. The wind blows hard and cold, making a warm home feel so welcoming. So much like home. The wind and the cold, at least, have not changed. Christmas will be different, but except for the wind, the cold and that blue house, all things eventually change. Between visits at the nursing home and with my brother and sisters, I drive around the town marveling at how small it is, wondering how anyone could grow and grow up in such a finite space. But somehow we did and somehow the town has produced This one house looks exactly like it did when I was growing up here 30 years ago. It is even the same unearthly blue color. In a town that has changed so much, in a world that has changed beyond description, there is something comforting about seeing the house, it being the same through the passing of time. It stands there like a little rock of stability in an unstable world. So many times this past year Ive struggled with saying what could be a last goodbye. And now, the time is rapidly approaching to do that again. But it seems Im gaining the awareness that Ive said my goodbyes. More, Im realizing it is not the goodbyes that are so important but rather the hellos and the time spent between the hello and goodbye. That time is meaningful; it is invaluable. Ive lived in Florida since 1994 and have never seen a Christmas artists, authors, photographers and playwrights, apparently finding something within them that far supersedes the confines of the town yet somehow they were nurtured by it. It is time to go for the last goodbye, at least for this trip. And perhaps forever. There is no way to truly reconcile that. I have no magic wand to transform myself into the perfect person with the perfect grace and words. But now, at least, I am growing comfortable with the knowledge that the important words have already been spoken. That was in the hello; it was in the past; it was in the time between then and now. There are always goodbyes but that isnt what is remembered. That isnt what we take with us when the train leaves the station. In life, trains are always leaving the station and tomorrow is always another (but different) day. We wave goodbye, perhaps shed some tears and then smile while remembering what was good and important. And what we remember is what warms our hearts the stuff before the goodbye. I walk out the door into the cold November air and drive the streets of this town. It is early morning and it is starting to snow, with the wind driving it, stinging my face. So much has changed; I sometimes can barely recognize this place that at one time was my home. But then I come to the blue house that looks exactly as it did 30 or more years ago. It looks like my childhood. Right at this moment, just after the last goodbye of the trip, this house somehow stands for the time between then and now. It reminds me of what was, and perhaps what will be tomorrow, and it warms my heart. Yes, there are tears. Once again, I may have said the last goodbye. But driving out of the town, my heart is warmed despite the cold wind, at the thoughts of what was between then and now. ObservationsBy Mitch Traphagenmitch@observernews.net Visit www.ObserverNews.net for archives of Observations and many other top news stories published in The Observer News and The SCC Observer.

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20 NOVEMBER 14, 2013 Sun City Dental CenterThe fee advertised is the minimum fee charged. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free service, examination or treatment. Senior Citizen discount does not apply.*Actual Fee May Vary Depending Upon Degree of Complexity in a Given Case** Time to process denture cases may change due to complexity/ type of case Thomas A. DeVol, D.D.S., P.A.(813) 633-2636General Dentist727 Cortaro Drive(Two doors down from AAA) Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Closed for Lunch 1-2 p.m. Thomas A. DeVol, D.D.S., P.A. Practicing Dentistry for 26 years Chuck Fredericks, Lab Technician, 41 years experienceIn-House Denture Lab Choices Made in Just One Week**New Patients and Emergencies Are Always WelcomeMost Major Insurance Plans AcceptedFREEDENTURE CONSULTATION OR 2nd OPINIONwith patient bringing current x-ray. Limit one per patient. FULL MOUTH SERIES OFX-RAYS & EXAMfor $95and receive a $100 credit toward your acount for future treatment. 0210 0150 HILLSBOROUGH(813) 634-8310MANATEE(941) 524-2259 For a FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATE, call us TODAY!Shutter & Blind Manufacturing CompanySHUTTERS ~ VERTICALS ~ FAUX WOOD & WOOD HORIZONTAL BLINDS CELLULAR SHADES ~ WOVEN WOODS ~ SUNSCREEN SHADES ~ PRIVACY SHADINGS ~ MORE INSTALLED FREE! INSTALLED FREE! VERTICALS PLANTATION SHUTTERS$1395Sq. Ft. Measured & Installed LIFETIME WARRANTY 2 FAUX BLINDS Our blinds are built with a STEEL HEADRAIL. Unlike the Flimsy Plastic Headrail from the Home CentersMADE IN AMERICA EXAMPLE OF OUR PRICES24 W x 36 H ..........$84 Installed 36 W x 50 H ........$175 Installed 48 W x 48 H ........$224 Installed 48 W x 60 H ........$280 Installed 72 W x 62 H ........$434 InstalledEXAMPLE OF OUR PRICES36 W x 48 H .......$39 Installed 52 W x 62 H .......$68 Installed 60 W x 62 H .......$75 Installed 72 W x 72 H .......$93 InstalledEXAMPLE OF OUR PRICES36 W x 48 H .......$39 Installed 52 W x 48 H .......$49 Installed 60 W x 48 H .......$69 Installed 72 W x 72 H .......$86 Installed SAVE ENERGY EXAMPLE OF OUR PRICES FOR SUN SCREENS24 W x 36 H ....................$49 Installed 36 W x 48 H ....................$62 Installed 52 W x 48 H ....................$93 Installed 72 W x 60 H .................$131 Installed SUN SCREENS The recent cold front, choppy waters and wind changed some anglers fishing habits this past week. It made fishing more interesting and challenging as it drove the fish into the roots of the mangroves, in potholes, on the bottom, or in the safe warm waters of TECOs outpour from its plant. Many fish look for a warmer spot if the water temperature is 60 degrees or below. Those fishing this week tell me they have done a lot of chumming to locate fish. Some boats have handoperated food choppers aboard and grind up their trash fish for chumming. If you know a spot where you might make a catch, throw your bag of chum overboard or, as you troll along, drag your chum. This is the last month to catch gag and red grouper. Some have migrated into bay waters. I found some anglers using dead shrimp for their catches this week, and say they did very well because the fish were hungry and would strike at anything. Flounder have been surfacing from the sandy bottoms and eating on high and low tides. This flat fish is one of the most popular catches in our waters. Legal is l2 inches and 10 per person, per day. For years snook was the most popular catch in our bay, but after the freeze of 2010 no one could legally catch a snook. There are many anglers who are still catching and releasing snook even though the Fish and Wildlife Commission has authorized a one per day catch. These are anglers who think that another year is needed to bring back the snook population. The redfish is an active, jumping game fish that seems to be a favorite for those former snook anglers. At one time it was restricted and is now one per person, per day not less than 18 inches or more than 27 inches. Our weather is a main driver of the numerous bass tournaments bringing anglers from all corners of the world. Many of the fishing television shows are shot in Florida. Fishing is a great source of revenue for our state. You are in one of the greatest fishing spots in the world, so take advantage of the waterways and go fishing.By Jonie MaschekMember: Florida Outdoor Writers Association Fish Tales: Cool front changes strategies South Hillsborough Elks Lodge #2672 Upcoming Activities Every Sunday Football, 1 p.m.. 5 high-definition TVs. Every Tuesday Jam Session 3 p.m. 5ish. No charge for all Elks and their guests. Every Wednesday Best Spaghetti in Town $7, All You Can Eat, for all Elks and their guests from 5 to 7 p.m. Music by Bryan from 5 to 8 p.m. Every Friday Seafood, Sandwiches, and a Chefs Special for all Elks and their guests from 5 to 7 p.m. Music by Bryan from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 25 Blue Plate Special for all Elks and their guests, 5 p.m., $7 per person. Menu: Beef Stew on Biscuit including dessert. Only 50 tickets available. The South Hillsborough Elks Lodge is a clean, smoke-free environment that accepts all major credit and debit cards and is located at 1630 US Hwy 41 S. in Ruskin. Telephone 813-645-2089. RUSKIN BrR ANCH LIbr BR Ar R Y Adult Computer Classes for the Technologically Challenged Have a new eReader or interested in getting one? Learn which devices can download the librarys free eBooks and how to load eBooks onto various types of eReaders. Discover the librarys large selection of eBooks in various formats!. Tutoring in Microsoft software, email, and the Internet.Moonglow hosts the MellotonesMoonglow Ballroom Dance Club will feature the live music of the Mellotones at its monthly dance on Thursday, Nov. 21 from 7:30-9:30 p.m. at Community Hall, 1910 S. Pebble Beach Blvd., Sun City Center. The attire at Moonglow Dances is dressy casual. Members are free; visitors/guests pay $5 per person at the door. Singles tables are always available. BYOB and snacks, and the club will provide ice, water, cups, and napkins Information about the clubs Annual Dinner Dance will be available at the November dance. For more information call 813-633-1297 or 813-642-8845, or if you would like to receive Moonglow information by email, contact gail3357@gmail.com.

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 21 Americas Finest Cabinets SOUTH TAMPA CARROLLWOOD BRANDON 254-4066 961-1362 413-8313 1510 South MacDill Ave. 14306 N. Dale Mabry Hwy. 1920 W. Brandon Blvd. Across from Chilis Countertop Surfaces available with a FREE Standard Edge and FREE Stainless Steel Sink 18 Months no interest!We Beat All Superstores on Price and Service Delivery available in under 3 weeks Joe Lang, CFP Glenn Krcmaric, OSJ Robyn Payant, President Tom Payant, C.E.O., Lillian Brassil, Office Manager Heidi Oelgart, Marketing Assistant Peter Farina, CFA Regi stered Investment AdvisorThomas A. Payant, Glenn Krcmaric, Joseph Lang, and Peter Farina offer securities through SagePoint Financial, Inc., member FINRA/SIPC. Thomas A. Payant, Glenn Krcmaric, and Joseph Lang offer investment advisory services through Payant Financial Services, Inc., a registered investment advisor not affiliated with SagePoint Financial, Inc.WHO IS THE TEAM BUILDING YOUR RETIREMENT STRATEGY? Let our team help you!Call us! 813-633-73331653 Sun City Center Plaza Sun City Center, FL 33573 www.payantfinancial.com Serving South Shore for 30 years Licensed psychologist, Dr. Steven Walker is accepting new clients at his Sun City Center office located at 1210 Del Webb Boulevard. He also has an office in downtown Tampa at 400 North Ashley Drive, Suite 2600. Dr. Walker holds a doctoral degree in clinical psychology and a masters degree in counseling psychology. He has more than 15 years of experience helping clients of all ages develop more self-awareness and achieve their potential. Dr. Walker has experience working with depression, anxiety, PTSD, ADHD, substance abuse and all manners of addictions, existential and meaning of life questions, anger management, executive coaching, and end of life transitions. He works with adults, children, couples, families, and he can even schedule a house call if you cant come to one of his offices. Please dont suffer in silence, reach out, there is hope available for people at any age. For more information or to ar range an appointment with Dr. Walker, call him directly at: Office, 813-938-3926 or visit his website at www.LicensedPsychology.com for more information and to read his client reviews. Email: LicensedPsychology@ gmail.com. Dr. Walker also accepts all major credit cards, checks and cash.Dr. Steven Walker Licensed psychologist now accepting Medicare and health insurancePAID ADVERTISEMENT Kathleens CleanHouse and Condo Cleaning Move-ins and Move-outs Spring Cleaning$5.00 off rst cleaningLet us make your life easierCall for a FREE Quote813-260-3375 Ive always admired Leica, a German company known for making some of the best lenses and cameras in the world. Unlike the big camera companies, Leica doesnt churn out tens of thousands of bodies and lenses, thus they need to charge more to survive. They also have a long and hard-earned reputation to protect and, except for their compact cameras built to their specifications by Panasonic in Japan, all of their cameras are hand-built by craftsmen in Germany. Even the boxes that enclose them are hand made. The company also has a commitment to and a passion for photography. In 2012, they sponsored a group of photographers from the elite photo agency Magnum as they chronicled the election in Florida. Most grippingly they provided dignity and humanity to the homeless and disadvantaged, whom both political parties tended to ignore in the run up to Election Day. Leica is also a strong supporter of young photographers struggling to make it in a world increasingly difficult for artists. Photography from Leica cameras has had a dramatic impact on humanity. So many of the most compelling photos in history have been made using their cameras. Some of the photos have changed the world, such as the Pulitzer Prizewinning photo by AP photographer Nick Ut of Phan Thi Kim, a young girl running naked and in terror down a road after a napalm attack in Viet Nam. That photo was taken with a Leica camera and is widely credited with helping to bring an end to the war. A Leica was also used to capture the sheer joy at the end of an earlier war, recording for posterity the famous kiss in Times Square on V-E Day. Henri Cartier-Bresson, one of the worlds most famous photographers, was rarely seen Shooting from memoriesX MITCH T TRAPHAGEN PPHOTOA camera such as a Leica is ideal for street photography. You never know when you may round a corner and see something beautiful. Small and unimposing, the camera helps to capture lifes magic. without his Leica. He chose the camera for many of the same reasons Ive always admired it. It is unobtrusive, it requires thought and the work put in, when done correctly, is rewarded with stunning imagery. At the Leica Store in Miami, they let me walk out the door with their latest model camera, the Leica M, just to try it out. The camera and the lens were valued at $15,000. It dramatically changed my outlook on my lifelong passion, carrying me back to where I began: shooting from the heart. Leica is flying high these days. They announced the new M model last year and the waiting list to get the camera still stretches out into weeks and months and this is a camera that costs nearly $7,000 for the body alone. Although old lenses will work just fine, new lenses could add many thousands more to the price (these days, even high-end Canon and Nikon cameras and lenses can easily cost much the same). Perhaps what is most amazing is that the Leica is almost totally manually operated. While it will set the shutter speed, if desired, the aperture and focus must be performed manually. Unlike the older M cameras, this model also shoots video but that is just a side to what many photographers have long recognized is a beautifully made photographic instrument, ideal for producing iconic still images. Leica is leading the pack in what appears to be a retro renaissance. Recently Nikon announced a new digital camera built to look and be used like one of their most famous cameras from the film era. Like the Leica M, it is a digital camera that uses the strengths of their film cameras, adding in the high technology required for photography today. After using the Leica in Miami, I knew that it was right for me, although it was well beyond my budget. I found a relatively inexpensive six-year-old Leica M8 digital rangefinder, now two generations old, at a used camera shop. Before long, I had a small collection of four Leica lenses, most of which dated back to the 1960s and 70s, with the oldest being from 1958 (and is identical to one Cartier-Bresson had used). With Leica, almost all of their lenses going back to the 1950s still work on their cameras. A few months later I found another M8 in the New York Leica Store. It was a back-closet beauty of which I became the first owner for a fraction of the price of a new camera. Now with two M8s, I feel more like a journalist and an artist than a machine operator. My Canon will always be with me; it is an excellent camera that is capable of so much but it is getting less use these days. An added bonus is that the relatively small size of the Leica cameras and lenses means my camera bag is now much lighter. The Leica rangefinder is a beautiful pairing of technology and artistry. It doesnt rapid-fire frames, it doesnt shoot in pitch darkness, but it is a magical piece of equipment, a work of art in itself. My older Leicas may not have the latest technology but the sensors produce film-like images that most new cameras cant match. And, to get the most out of it, I have to think about what Im doing. My photos are completely dependent upon my own vision and skills. There are no magic buttons; I have to do the work to capture the moment that my eye sees. And once that happens, the results make my heart and soul sing. Its a song Ive missed since that first camera that my Dad gave me it is wonderful to hear it again. Leica and the Leica stores, including the Miami location, are active on Facebook. Many people ask me for advice on buying cameras and while Im no expert on compact cameras Im always happy to talk photography; please feel free to send me an email. While it requires a little patience and practice, many cameras can be manually set to capture the images you see in your minds eye, despite all of the amazing technology that sometimes gets in the way.

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22 NOVEMBER 14, 2013 GOT MOLD?Call the Experts GOT MOLD? Call the ExpertsADVANCED RESTORATION SERVICES 813-225-1441 WE ALSO OFFER FREE Mold Inspection$99 Value10 point inspection10% Senior Discount On Any ServiceNo minimumLic# MRSR1933 MRSA1774 | DRAPERY | VALANCES | BEDDING | UPHOLSTERY | BACKSPLASHES | AREA RUGS | | CARPET | HARDWOOD | VINYL | TILE | LAMINATE | BLINDS | SHUTTERS | WE REPAIR BLINDS | 2011 & 2012BEST OF SOUTH SHORE Save $100* or more with rebates on qualifying purchases of Hunter Douglas window fashions. S EPTEMBER 14 D ECEM BER 17 2013 joy. W onderfu l w indow fash ions now at a sa vings.Pl us, a federal tax cre dit oppo rtuni ty on D uette Ar chi tella Honeycomb Shades through De cember 31, 2013.** Duette Architella Honeycomb Shades *See store for details Your Flooring & Window Treatment Experts....22 Years Strong!Dove Interiors Carpet One supports MADE IN AMERICA! Applied over Spray Crete, Stucco, Wood, Block or Metal Lifetime Warranty Lifetime WeatherProong Coupon worth$1,000 NEVER PAINT, SPRAY-CRETE or STUCCO YOUR HOUSE AGAIN!SAVE 50%CLIMATE PROOF COATINGWHOLE HOUSE FLEX-COATED OUR 7-STEP PROCESS #1 SINCE 1960 $1495Priced with coupon discount Up to 1500 sq. ft. Expires 12/31/13 A brief tour of St. AugustineX Restorations are underway to recreate prior habitations and special events are featured throughout the year. The new St. Augustine Pirate & Treasure Museum was in Key West for five years until its owner Pat Croce, former owner of the Philadelphia 76ers, realized Key West was a party town. He moved his treasures lock, stock, and musket to St. Augustine where it opened in late 2010. The only remaining pirates treasure chest in the world, purchased by Mr. Croce for $1 million, is displayed inside. The museum is a touchy, feely place. Almost everything here is to be handled, including two authentic old cannons that can be fired, my favorite thing to do, electronically. The museum, located directly across from the Castillo de San Marcos, became an instant success when opened to the public and continues to draw people of all ages. Backing up to pirates museum, where the Spanish Quarter once stood on King St., is the brand-new Colonial Quarter (also a Pat Croce project) featuring three centuries of Spanish and English occupation. Costumed tour guides walk visitors through the centuries while village residents busily work at their trades. At the downtown Municipal Marina, visitors can take guided eco-tours, a two-hour bay tour on the tall ship Freedom under full sail or be entertained by a trip on the Black Raven, a painstakingly detailed reproduction of a pirate ship. As a frequent visitor to St. Augustine, Im often asked where to stay. That is a subjective call. There are many fine inns and hotels. One of my favorites is the St. Francis Inn. It is the oldest continuously operating inn in the oldest continuously occupied European city in the Continental U.S. and is run by Joseph Finnegan, who bills himself as the oldest innkeeper of the oldest inn in the oldest city. The original structure, a one-story building, was built in 1791 with the first travelers being hosted in 1845. The Inn was expanded over the years and now has three stories plus some adjoining residences. It is not a cookie-cutter motel. An added benefit for guests is their St. Augustine beach-front building available to guests for daytime use. The question of dining availabilities always comes up. Walking to restaurants in the Old City is normally a pleasant stroll but a listing of places to eat, even briefly, where Spanish, Minorcan, French, Greek, Italian, American and other cultures are represented would take more room than I am allowed here. Even this article is but a brief capsule of things to do and see in St. Augustine. Many towns and cities along the coast, from Jupiter north, claim to have been the place where Ponce de Leon actually landed. No matter, St. Augustine has a lock on the claim and has made the most of it over the years, especially during this, the 500th anniversary year of Ponce de Leons purported landing. The next big celebration will be in 2065 for the 500th anniversary of the founding of the city. This will be something for our children and grandchildren to celebrate. Thankfully, St. Augustines history will be preserved and not torn down to put up high-rise condos or gated communities. The famed Fountain of Youth.

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 "\011-\015,\015, \015-U-\012\012"\011-\015,\015, U 23 CLARKE AUTOMOTIVE CLARKE AUTOMOTIVE OPEN ALL DAY SATURDAY Everything we do keeps your car in warranty Includes: Visual Inspection of tires, belts & hoses, horn/lights, brakes, shocks/struts, exhaust, wipers, suspension, air and breather filter. Most cars/light trucks. Disassembly to perfect inspection may result in additional charges. Present coupon to receive savings. No other discounts apply. Additional charges for shop supplies may be added. See store for details. Exp. 12/19/13 MAINTENANCE INSPECTION FREE Value $ 39 95 AAA Discount OBN *\(\003-\003>,:; \000*,:\003\003;\0009,: 131 Central Ave., Brandon -ON\016\015\000&RI\016\000\027\032\021\025\000AM\015\026\000PM\000s\000AT\016\000\027\032\021\025\000AM\015\025\000PM 813.685.2939 -$\021\022\026\026\000s\000!\000FEE\000WILL\000BE\000ADDED\032\000\024\005\000\010\004\022\016\025\020\000MIN\016\011\000NOT\000TO\000EXCEED\000\004\022\020\011\000TO\000COVER\000THE\000DISPOSAL\000OF\000HAZARDOUS\000WASTE\000MATERIALS\000\006\000SUPPLIES FREE Shuttle to FishHawk & Sun City Center TIRES DEALER ALTERNATIVE AAA Authorized Service Center OIL CHANGE & LUBRICATION $ 10 95 OBN \LUDES\000UP\000TO\000\025\000QTS\000\025\022\020\014\000\021\020\023\020\014\000OR\000\021\020\024\020 motor oil. Purolator oil filter. Most cars and light trucks. Please call for appointment. Valid only with coupon. Not valid with any other coupons or specials. Coupon expires 11/28/13 10 % DISCOUNT on service or repair. EXCLUDES TIRES & SALES SPECIALS Honor All Competitor’s Coupons $ 33 ................before noon $ 28 ...................after noon $ 20 ..............after 2:00 pm $ 5 00 OFF Any Round IMPROVED COURSE CONDITIONS Includes 18 holes and cart. Tax Included. Valid only with this coupon. Exp. 12/1/13 =PZP[\003V\\000Y\003L^\023\003 \000TWYV]LK\003\003:/ 1 Pier Drive, Ruskin LEAGUES WELCOME Reserve your tee time today 813.645.2000 CASUAL WATERFRONT DINING Steaks, Seafood, Burgers & Other Delicious Fare FULL LIQUOR BAR Live Music every Fri. & Sat. 6-10 p.m. Karaoke every Wed. 5-9 p.m. OPEN TO THE PUBLIC OPEN Mon.Sun. 7 a.m.10 p.m. Food Served 7 a.m.8 p.m. Bright House NFL TV Sunday Ticket 2034 Pier Drive Ruskin, FL 33570 813-638-1005 Ruskin Animal Hospital & Cat Clinic \027\021\025\000\016\016\000\(WY\016\000\024\021\000\016\000s\000USKIN\000s\000\030\021\023\015\026\024\025\015\026\024\021\021 -ON\016\017ED\016\017HUR\016\017&RI\016\000\027\015\025\032\023\020\000\010CLOSED\000HUR\016\000\021\022\015\022\011\000s\000AT\016\000\027\032\023\020\015\021\000s\000UES\016\000\027\015\027 Drs. Ott, Slaughter, Waldy & Heaton s\000.EARLY\000\021\020\020\000YEARS\000OF\000EXPERIENCE\000s\000OTED\000"EST\000ET\000\006\000"EST\000\000ET\000ERVICES\000 s\000"EST\000\000ET\000ESORT\000WITH\000-EDICAL\000#ARE\000s\000&OUNDER\000OF\000#\016!\016\016%\016\000ESCUE\000HELTER s\000\000ROVIDER\000OF\000&REE\000\025\015!CRE\014\000"EAUTIFUL\000$OG\000\000ARK\000 PET TIP: When your dog is barking and you yell to stop him, you could actually be encouraging him to bark more. He might think you are joining in. A more effective way to stop barking is to distract him with something else to do. Try giving commands that he knows well. Calling all writers and poets The widespread use of electronic media has changed the rules of the copyright picture. The Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library are privileged to present Anne Dalton, Esq. who will try to make sense of the current and ever-changing landscape of “Copyrights and Fair Use: Traps and Pitfalls for Writers.” Her talk, with plenty of time for questions, will be held in the Crawford Art Studio of the Library, 15816 Beth Shields Way in Ruskin. The event is free and no registration is required. For more in formation call 813-273-3652. Do you ever stop and think why you choose to do business with one company and not another? Are you shopping in a specific store out of habit? Or maybe it’s the convenient location? How about because of the relationships you have built there? Business relationships are different from inter personal relationships. Unless you are under contract, there isn’t the same strong moral or cultural obligation to remain loyal that exists in a romantic relationship, or even in a friendship. And no awkwardness… That’s why, even though building a strong relationship is essential to keeping your customers, it’s often not enough. Your customer might love you, love your business, love every employee you have and every product you make; but your customer will still love you and leave you for a better deal, a more attractive offer, something new, shiny, and discounted. So how do you build that strong relationship that keeps your customers loyal? One way is to reward the behavior that you want your customers to repeat. In this case, the key is to reward loyal behavior. I’m not talking about printing up another batch of customer loyalty punch cards. I’m talking the kind of rewards or incentives that have actual, significant value. (Think gas cards!) Your job is to think of rewards that your customers will actually value, and then offer them at the right time in order to reward loyal ty. No matter what business you’re in, good incentive rewards include three common features: immedi ate gratification, convenience, and monetary worth. Immediacy is nice, convenience is even nicer, and actual money, or perceived monetary value? That’s the best. A basic reward will include at least one of these features. A better reward should involve two or provide a greater advantage (i.e., imme diate gratification plus convenience is great, immediate gratification plus more convenience is better). The greatest reward will meet all three requirements and thus will be most highly valued. A reward that gives immedi ate gratification is something like a tangible trinket; you hand it to the customer right away. It could be cheap, but useful, or funny, or interesting in a small way. (Key chain with a bottle opener, travel mug…) Your customer buys, or signs up for the mailing list, or brings a friend, or refers someone, or joins a customer club, and walks away with an immediate reward. A reward that offers convenience might be pick up or delivery ser vice, free gift wrapping, a personal shopper, exclusive late-night or weekend shopping hours. Rewards of convenience make life easier and simpler for the customer. Convenience rewards usually make it easier and simpler for the customer to buy. A reward that gives monetary worth could be something as simple as, well, money. Try returning a $5 or $10 bill from a customer’s most recent purchase and see what happens. By Dana Dittmar, Executive Director SCC Chamber of Commerce You, me and business: The business relationship difference Advertise in The Observer We cove r south Hillsborough County with a circulation of 48,000 papers every week! We offer many options in every price range...from classified ads to full pages. Call 813645-3111 and ask to speak to an advertising representative today. For more information visit us on the web at www.ObserverNews.net

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24 \000s eXi[hl[h\000d[mi\000\000\000iYY\000eXi[hl[h NOVEMBER 14, 2013 South Hillsborough Church of Christ Welcome to the: SERVICES: Sunday........................9:30 & 10:30 a.m.; 6:00 p.m. Wednesday................7:00 p.m. EVERETT TATE, MINISTER —NON-INSTRUMENTAL— \006\011\006\006\001\017\031\034\035\036\001\025\036\004\001\025\030\001 \001\024\037\035\032\031\033\002\001\017\021\001 \001\011\007\010\003\012\011\005\012 Ruskin United Methodist Church First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (behind Suntrust Bank) ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US: SUNDAY MORNINGS: Rev. Richard Nussel Phone: 645-1241 Nov. April..................8:30 a.m. and All Year...............10:45 a.m. Sunday School............9:30 a.m. Day Care Available Mon. Fri. 6 a.m. 6 p.m. call 645-6198 702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573 \000HONE\032\000\026\023\024\015\022\023\022\030\000s\000&AX\032\000\026\023\023\015\026\026\027\020 www.popcc.org Masses: Sunday.8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., Noon Saturday Vigil....................4:00 p.m. Daily................................8:00 a.m. Confessions: Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m. and Sat. 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. Sunday Service 10:30 a.m. www.unitycommunityofjoy.com 813-481-9060 Spirituality Rather Than “Religion” Unity Henry Gibson Social Hall, Beth Israel Synagogue \021\021\021\025\000$EL\000EBB\000%\016\000s\000UN\000#ITY\000#ENTER\014\000&, \021\023\020\021\000\016\016\000\(WY\016\000\024\021\000.\016\014\000USKIN\014\000&,\000s\000\026\024\025\015\021\021\022\021\000s\000 www.nbcor.org “Loving God, Loving Others, Serving Beyond Borders” Sunday School (all ages)........9:30 a.m. UNDAY\000-ORNING\000ORSHIP\016\016\016\016\021\020\032\024\025\000A\016M\016 UNDAY\000%VENING\000ORSHIP\016\016\016\016\016\016\016\026\032\020\020\000P\016M\016 EDNESDAY\000\010ALL\000AGES\011\016\016\016\016\016\016\016\016\016\016\016\016\016\026\032\023\020\000P\016M\016\000 Dr. Samuel (Sam) A. Roach, Pastor WORSHIP SERVICES: SUNDAY 8:30 a.m. .................................Contemporary Service 9:30 a.m. ......................................... Traditional Service 10:00 a.m. ...............................Contemporary Service 11:00 a.m. ....................................... Traditional Service 4:00 p.m. ........................................Hispanic Worship Senior Pastor: Dr. Warren Langer Assistant Pastor: Rev. Samuel Rorer Bookstore 633-8595 FREE Nursery Provided Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist) 1511 El Rancho Dr. Sun City Center, FL 33573 Phone/Fax: 813-633-5950 WEEKLY SERVICES: Sunday 9 a.m.......................Bible Study 11 a.m.....................Bible Study 10 a.m. & 6 p.m............Worship Wednesday 6 p.m....Prayer Meeting/Bible Study (813) 634-1304 ~ www.uccsuncity.org UNITED COMMUNITY CHURCH ~ United Church of Christ 1501 La Jolla AVE, Sun City Center, FL 33573-5329 A Caring Church United in God's Love Serving Others Rev. Dr. Jean M. Simpson Worship Services ~ 8:30 and 10 AM Wimauma Church of God Sunday School ................................10:00 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...............10:45 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Youth Worship ...............6:00 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service .............7:00 p.m. \030\030\023\027\003\021\021\003\031\032\027\017\003:LPDXPD\017\003\\003\026\026\030\034\033\003‡\003\033\024\026\020\031\026\027\020\027\032\032\031 Pastor Tom Durrance REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA \030\021\022\001BMMFZ\001'PSHF\001#MWE\017\001t\001VO\001$JUZ\001$FOUFS\015\001'-\001\024\024\026\030\024\016\026\024\026\025 FWFSFOE\001%BWJE\001"MMNBO\015\001BTUPS FMFQIPOF\033\001\031\022\024\016\027\024\025\016\022\023\032\023\001t\001FCTJUF\033\001TDDSFEFFNFS\017PSH Worship Services on Sunday 10 a.m. \JSTU\001\007\001IJSE\001VOEBZ\001t\001#JCMF\001$MBTT\001IVSTEBZ\001\022\021\001B\017N\017 Area Places of Worship Christ Centered — Holy Spirit Led — Sunday 10:00 a.m. HUNGRY FOR REVIVAL? www.theanointingchurch.com PRAYER PRAISE WORSHIP Sun City Center Inn, S.R. 674 & Pebble Beach Dr., Meeting Room Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC Meets in the Henry Gibson Social Hall of the Beth Israel ->}œ}'iU£££x\015\014iiLL\011` /…'`>]\\000*\037U\012>‡™UVV''œ} Love is not real until forgiveness is real. — John F. Hayward Area Obituary Carl E. Kopischkie, Jr. Carl E. Kopischkie, Jr., 71 of Sun City Center, Fla. passed away Nov. 7, 2013 following a tragic accident. He retired as a high school teacher and golf coach after 25 years of service for Wauwatosa (Wisc.) Public School System. He was a member of the Lions Club in Sussex, Wisc., an avid golfer and volunteer for the Good Samaritans. He was a member and served on the Board of Deacons of the United Community Church. He was preceded in death by parents Carl E. and Bernice Kopischkie, Sr.; brother-in-law Richard Margolis; and sister-in-law Judy Vandenberg. Survivors include his wife of 46 years, Jan; sons Michael (Paula) Kopischkie and Patrick (Carrie) Kopischkie; sister Joan Margolis; grandchildren Melina, Carter and Aidan Kopischkie; niece Joan Endres; nephews Jon Lourigan, Sam Morrison, and Eric and Ryan Henderson; sister-in-law Bev (Tom) Henderson; brothers-in-law Ron Nehring and Dan (Zinnia) Vandenberg; aunt Eleanor Weber; and many cousins. A memorial service was held Tuesday, November 12, 2013 at the United Community Church in Sun City Center, Fla. Arrangements by Sun City Center Funeral Home. Redeemer Lutheran Women of ELCA At a recent planning meeting, Redeemer Lutheran Women of the ELCA Board are, seated from left: Miriam Sorby and Dorothy Peterson. Standing: Irene Brenner, Lois Hobratsch, Sigi Espino, Sheila Smith, Jane Trefren, Vivan Kann and Miriam Zane. The next meeting of the organization is Wednesday, Nov. 20 at 9:30 a.m., with a breakfast provided by board members. For information, call 813634-1292. Prince of Peace holds Ministry Fair Prince of Peace Catholic Church in Sun City Center will be hosting its annual Ministry Fair on Sunday, Nov. 17 from 8:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. All are invited to come to the parish hall and learn more about the various ministries and volunteer opportunities available at Prince of Peace. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. For more information, visit www.popcc.org or call the parish office at 813634-2328. Prince of Peace is located at 702 Valley Forge Blvd. in Sun City Center. Sue K. Riley will perform the entire Sunday service as a “sermon in songs” at Unity Community of Joy on Sunday, Dec. 1. This talented spiritual musician/ songwriter describes herself as “A Life built around Music.” She believes in the power of music to touch hearts and heal lives. She loves to share her passion for music by creating songs that remind people of their connection with the Divine and their true nature as spiritual beings. Sue has been the Music Director of Unity Church of Clearwater for the past 10 years, and also serves as chairperson of the Unity Worldwide Ministries Music Team that offers support across the entire Unity movement through original music and educational conferences. Sue has created seven CDs of original, uplifting music. She recently received a Gold Medal for her song “Grandpa’s Hands” and a Silver Medal for “Teach Me to Pray” from the Songwriters Association of Washington, DC. She regularly tours Unity spiritual centers across the country performing her songs of peace, love, and joyous living. Unity Community of Joy invites you to celebrate Spirit with Sue K. Riley on Sunday, Dec. 1 at 10:30 a.m. in the Henry G. Gibson Social Hall of the Beth Israel Temple at 1115 Del Webb Blvd. East. ‘Sermon in Songs’ at Unity Community of Joy NCWS tops $100,000 in local donations Upon reaching this noteworthy goal, Jim Butner, Worship Leader for NCWS (Nondenominational Christian Worship Services), commented: “We give our thanks and blessings to all our attendees in Sun City Center who have supported our ministry down through the years. The beneficiaries of our donations include, but are not limited to, the 5th grade students at Reddick Elementary School (above). These students are involved in our Role Model Program. Our ministry is composed of more than 50 volunteers. We donate all our love offerings to eight local nonprofit organizations.” NCWS currently conducts 10 weekly worship services, along with sponsoring two Adopt-A-Highway Programs, one Adopt-A-Family Program and provides visitations to patients at South Bay Hospital on Thursday afternoons in the form of pastoral visits. For more informa tion, call 813-634-3114. St. Matthew welcomes new pastor There is an atmosphere of excited anticipation at St. Matthew’s Angli can Church in Riverview these days as the congregation prepares to wel come a new pastor. The Reverend Kenneth R. Bailey, Jr. was recently selected from a group of candidates to lead the 100+ member traditional Anglican Catholic parish, which moved from Tampa to its present location on Bloomingdale Avenue 15 years ago. The parish grew to its present size under the shepherding of Father William H. Perkins, Jr., who recently answered the call of his bishop to assume the rectorship of a church in Delray Beach, Fla. St. Matthew’s has been without a permanent rector since Aug. 1 and has been served by Anglican Deacon David Keller in the interim. Father Bailey is scheduled to ar rive Dec. 1 and will function as priest-in-charge until such time as he is formally installed as rector by the Right Reverend Walter H. Grundorf, Bishop of the Diocese of the Eastern United States in the Anglican Province of America. He had been serving a small Anglican Parish in Burnt Hills, N.Y. for the past two years, and prior to that assignment, he was the rector of St. Joseph of Arimathea Anglican Church in Montgomery, Alabama. Fr. Bailey and his wife Nancy have six children ranging in age from 15 down to 3. Nancy Bailey homeschools the children and is involved with many interests, including blogging, home decorating and photography. The Baileys will live in Riverview. For information call the church at 813-633-0334.

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 25 CHRISTIAN SCHOOL K-2 Through 12th GradeSunday School.................................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship...............8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Evening Service..............................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Night Service................7:00 p.m. Awana............................................7:00 p.m.Dr. Barry RumseyA Resource for Families 1239 Del Webb Blvd. West Sun City Center, FL 33573 Church is Handicap accessible Phone: 813-634-1252 For information visit: www.standrewatscc.org St. Andrew Presbyterian ChurchSunday Services Traditional Service 9:00 a.m. Contemporary Service 11:00 a.m.Prayers with anointing for healing and wholeness during worship the second Sunday of every month.Pastor: Rev. Dr. Mark E. SalmonMeet friends in Fellowship Hall after each Service. Refreshments served.A Stephen Ministry Church First Church of Christ, Scientist Sunday Service ........................................................10:00 a.m. Sunday School .........................................................10:00 a.m. Wednesday Service ...................................................5:00 p.m. Reading Room ...............................Wednesday 4 to 4:45 p.m. All Are Welcome U.S. Hwy. 41 106 11th Ave. NE Ruskin 813-645-1714SaintAnneRuskin.org MASSESVigil Mass.....................................................................Saturday 4:30 p.m. Sunday Mass .....................................8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday ....................................................................8:00 a.m. Holy Days ....................................... Espaol ......... .................Thursday 6:15 p.m.; Saturday 3:15 p.m.Saint Anne Catholic ChurchSouthShore: Apollo Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. GibsontonSS Area Places of Worship Getting to Know You (Donuts & Coffee) ....9:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Service ............6:00 p.m. Sunday School ...........................................9:30 am. Wednesday Evening Service ......7:00 p.m. Sunday Morning Worship............................10:55 a.m. Thursday Morning Prayer ..........10:00 a.m. Southside Baptist ChurchA Warm, Loving & Friendly Church Worship Service @10:30 am Adult Sunday School @ 9:30 am 1707 33rd Street Southeast Ruskin, Florida 33570 Minister Mike Grant First Christian ChurchSun City Center FloridaFCCSCC SCC Chamber Players present first concert on Nov. 22The Sun City Chamber Players present their first concert of the 20132014 season, Suites for Strings, on Friday, Nov. 22 at 7 p.m. at the United Methodist Church of Sun City Center. This concert will feature the members of the ensemble performing Holsts St. Pauls Suite, Griegs Holberg Suite, Kalliwodas Duet for Violin and Viola, and a special performance of Vivaldis Concerto for Violin in G minor with soloist Karen Tuttle. Tickets are $10 at the door. For more information, visit www.suncitychamberplayers.com or call Shawn Snider at 941-323-9434.Whats in Your Genes? is topicCongregation Beth Shalom in Brandon will host Dr. Parul Jayakar from The Victor Center at Miami Childrens Hospital, who will discuss What We Need to Know about Jewish Genetic Diseases. There are a number of serious genetic diseases for which persons of Jewish heritage are more likely to be carriers than the general population. Dr. Jayakar will discuss these diseases and the risks to people of Jewish descent. The great advances in technology allow us a unique opportunity to learn about our genetic makeup and the particular issues faced by Jews, said Rabbi Betsy Torop, This information is valuable and potentially life-saving; we welcome the opportunity to educate the community about this critical health issue. The event will be held at Congregation Beth Shalom of Brandon at 706 Bryan Rd. on Thursday, Nov. 21 at 7:30 p.m. This is the first in a series of health presentations organized by the synagogues Adult Education Committee. The health events are free and open to the public no RSVPs are necessary. The Victor Center offers accessible genetic counseling and screenings. On a national level, they work in partnership with healthcare professionals, clergy and the community to create awareness and organize screenings for the 19 preventable genetic diseases for which 1 in 4 Ashkenazi Jews is a carrier. The national Victor Center is located in Philadelphia. The cast of Murder on the High Cs shares a laugh.A murder comes to UCCGo to the United Community Church of Sun City Center at 6 p.m. on Friday or Saturday, Nov. 22 or 23, and you will witness a murder during the performance of Murder on the High Cs, a dinner theater production written and directed by Peggy Burgess. Laura Schlar of Sun Coast Catering will prepare the meal of chicken Marsala, garlic mashed potatoes, mixed vegetables and banana pudding for dessert. Tickets are $20 per person and may be purchased Sunday morning after worship, or on Tuesday or Thursday in the church narthex from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Paula at 813-633-6739 for tickets and more information.Braun & Wolf concert postponedThe duo recital of Mati Braun on violin and Gary Wolf on piano, scheduled for Friday night, Nov. 15 at the United Methodist Church of Sun City Center, has been postponed due to grave illness in one of the performers families. The new date for the concert is 7 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 6. Call 813634-2539 for more information. Start the holidays with Stacey Knights Musical artist Stacey Knights and her band Forecast will welcome in the holiday season with a concert at Sun City Center United Methodist Church on Friday, Nov. 29 at 7 p.m. There will be 2 hours of Christmas music, carol sing-alongs, wonderful humor provided by the comedy team Revd Up, door prizes and surprises, plus a very special rendition of Silent Night to close the evenings program. Tickets are $10 in advance; $15 the night of the concert. Tickets can be purchased at UMC, 1210 West Del Webb Blvd. and at the Sun City Center Chamber, 1651 Sun City Center Plaza. For more information contact the Church at 813-634-2539.Fateful ChoicesAs we progress through life, fateful choices affect our personal outcomes. Some choices are made consciously, some are foisted upon us, and some things just happen. This gamut is the topic of Bill Daneks presentation at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC on Thursday, Nov. 14. The service begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Henry Gibson social hall of the Beth Israel Synagogue on Del Webb Blvd., East. All are welcome.Healthy eating is topic at sisterhood meetingAt 1 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014, the Beth Israel Sisterhood will welcome Jeanne Shanin as the guest speaker. Her topic will be health improvement, with a focus on healthy eating. Shanin will share some ideas for delicious recipes and show how to substitute healthier ingredients in cooking. The meeting will take place in the Henry Gibson Social Hall at the Synagogue on East Del Webb Blvd.

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26 NOVEMBER 14, 2013 PUBLIC NOTICEFREE HEARING TEST SET FOR SENIORSPINELLAS, PASCO, HERNANDO AND HILLSBOROUGH COUNTIES Electronic hearing tests will be given during the hours of 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday thru Friday.There will be a hearing specialist at each of the locations below. Everyone should have a hearing test at least once a year if there is any trouble at all hearing clearly. Even people now wearing a hearing aid or those who have been told nothing could be done for them should have a hearing test and nd out whether modern methods of hearing correction can help them hear better. Do not miss this valuable opportunity to learn more about your hearing and the causes of hearing loss. To avoid waiting, please call ahead for an appointment. In less than 1-hour You Can Find Out How Much Of Your Hearing Is Lost And What You Can Do To Get It Back!Why Do People Delay Addressing Hearing Loss? When sound waves reach the ear, they are gathered by the funnel-shaped outer ear and channeled into the middle ear. Sometimes hearing loss can be easily and quickly corrected by clearing blockage that can occur from wax build up. Years of using q-tips to clean your ears can embed layers of wax so tightly that it affects your ability to hear clearly. Thats why the rst part of your ear exam will be with an otoscope to determine if there is any blockage that can open up your ear canal and allow you to enjoy the beauty of unmuted sound again. At the entrance to the middle ear, sound waves hit the eardrum. A damaged eardrum can not only be painful, but it can mufe natural sounds and make it extremely difcult to hear clearly. If youre experiencing hearing loss, its important to nd out if it is a correctable condition involving the middle ear. Sound vibrations travel through the middle ear and into the uid lled inner ear where they are converted into signals that are sent to your brain. Damage to the inner ear can lead to deafness, so its vital to make sure your inner ear is functioning properly. Problems with the inner ear often require surgery or medication. If the damage is irreparable, youll want to ask about the new cochlea implants that can help restore your ability to hear again. There is also new scientic and medical research with stem cell transplants that can regrow damaged inner ear hair follicles (known as cilia) that send electronic signals to your brain allowing you to translate sounds into language. Researchers at Stanford University say that they are 5-10 years away from a breakthrough that could possibly correct human deafness. How Hearing Is Tested To evaluate your hearing a specialist will perform a series of hearing tests. These tests are often performed by using a combination of electronic equipment and headphones. Knowledge About How Your Ears Work Helps With The Healing Process! Its important that you have a basic understanding of how your ears work. The healing starts when you rst acknowledge that you have a hearing problem. The next step is to get your ears examined so you will know the cause and the degree (mild to profound) of your condition. In America, the average person with hearing loss delays dealing with it for 5 to 7 years. The big question is, Why do people wait so long before confronting the obvious problems that come with an inability to hear clearly? Accepting & Correcting Your Hearing Loss Researchers estimate that over 30 million people in the United States suffer from hearing loss, but almost 75% avoid scheduling a hearing test to determine the cause and how to remedy this condition. As the baby boomer generation ages, more people are going to experience hearing loss. Many people with hearing loss do not take the steps needed to correct the problem. The rst step starts with getting a hearing exam when you rst notice you are experiencing symptoms. A hearing test can determine the cause of your hearing loss, and which state-of-the-art hearing devices can improve your quality of life. There is often a period of denial or hesitation that must be overcome before the appointment for the hearing test is made. At rst it may seem like you only have very mild hearing loss, if any, because you can hear someone talking to you, or you can hear the TV, radio, or a movie, you just cant catch every word. Or you may have trouble following conversations, but you always come up with a reason why its too noisy, people are speaking too fast, or there are too many people talking at once. The truth is that when you have early, mild hearing loss, you will start to have trouble hearing certain higher frequency sounds. Consonant sounds are in the higher range and are the rst to go. While you may hear voices, you may nd yourself mistaking similar-sounding words, like rent and sent or time and lime. If you believe you have mild hearing loss, begin by getting a hearing exam. You can use the results of the hearing test to rule out or x any correctable conditions, and then you can assess if any of the new and advanced hearing technologies can help you hear more clearly. After your hearing test you will be able to make a more educated decision about what your options are to prevent further hearing loss and hear more clearly immediately, improving your overall quality of life. Purchasing a hearing aid is not a decision made lightly. Its important that the person you are working with listens to you and works together with you to address your specic hearing needs. You need to be able to trust their guidance in choosing a solution to match your lifestyle. Advances In Hearing Care! A hearing specialist with Audibel Hearing Centers will be available to answer all your questions and discuss the latest advances in hearing care. Even with the new technology, your brain still needs time to readjust to hearing sounds it may not have been hearing for years. You will be amazed at your own ability to reconnect with your life with the help of this advanced technology. In addition, technology is constantly changing. A hearing test can now determine if you have even very mild hearing loss, and the new generation of digital hearing aids has nearly eliminated the problems of feedback, and extraneous noise that was bothersome with earlier models. Most hearing losses dont require expensive hearing aids to help you with Thomas Edison Suffered From Hearing Loss! One of the most famous people with hearing loss in history is the inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931), who is credited with inventing the phonograph, light bulb, and movie camera. What many people are not aware of is that Edison became technically deaf in his early teens. It could have been from a childhood illness or the result of a boxingof his ears by a train conductor. sounds you were missing, including those lost consonants, without introducing additional, distracting noises. Personalized programming adjustments ensure your hearing aid is set to your specic loss and unique needs. No One Will Know It is true that hearing aids of past years did have a stigma attached to them. They were large and bulky, and usually they were visible to anyone who walked by. But just as the internal technology has changed, so have the external characteristics of digital hearing aids. New models are virtually invisible when worn making your Audibel hearing aid far less noticeable than your hearing loss. With advanced digital technology and miniaturization, nobody else has to know that youre wearing a hearing device. In addition, hearing aids technology has an exciting future. Even now you can have your hearing aid connected to different external devices, such as an MP3 player, a cell phone, radio, or your TV. As microchips continue to get smaller, the amount of data processing power continues to increase at astronomical rates, allowing for hearing aids to be made smaller while continuing to improve sound quality. If you checked out hearing aids ve years ago, you should take a look at the new models you might be surprised at how far things have come and how easily hearing loss may be corrected. Hearing loss can affect people of all ages. If you were in the military, law enforcement, or simply exposed to the loud noises of machinery in a factory, you could have developed hearing loss at an early age. Dont be embarrassed by your inability to hear clearly take action now and get a hearing test to nd out what you can do to enhance your ability to hear clearly and prevent continued deterioration. Start by having a hearing test and then take steps to decide if you feel comfortable with the new technologies. Think about it how much time and energy are you spending apologizing because you misheard something, or asking someone to speak louder or to repeat themselves? Having a hearing test and wearing a hearing device can alleviate many problems caused by hearing loss and that is priceless!What Hearing Tests Show Hearing tests can determine whether a hearing impairment exists and what the cause may be. Your hearing examination will also let you know the degree of hearing loss you are experiencing, from mild to profound, and what technologies are available to help correct your hearing loss. The results of your hearing exam will provide you with the road map to what you should do next to regain and restore your ability to hear clearly again. Ear Canal Outer Ear Eardrum Middle Ear Inner EarCochleaEustachian Tube 20 Locations in the Tampa/St. Pete Area, one just minutes from you www.oridahearing.com BRANDON TAMPA SUN CITY CENTER ELLENTON BRADENTON 813-681-4046 813-831-9442 4850 Sun City Center Blvd. 941-722-7200 941-747-6966 813-634-8451This advertisement funded by the MANUFACTURER, Minneapolis, MN

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oveber ANNOUNCEMENTS100 FARMERS MKT200 rerse Place your ad by calling:(813) 645-3111 x201Up to 20 words:$17Deadline:Monday at 4 p.m. 30 each addl. word100 ......Announcements 200 ......Farmers Market 300 ......Merchandise 400 ......Marine 500 ......Real Estate 550 ......Manufac. Housing 600 ......Rentals 650 ......Professional Services 700 ......Services 800 ......Employment PHONE: 813-645-3111 FAX: 813-645-1792 EMAIL: beverly@ observernews.net BOLD LINE: Addl. $3 Published by M&M Printing Co. 210 Woodland Estates Ave. SW Ruskin, FL 33570 rerse rerse Quality Furniture at Aordable Prices HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 10-6 Closed Weekends SOMETHING FOR EVERY ROOM INSIDE AND ALL AREAS OUTSIDE We are worth the drive from anywhere! Call for Directions erson Total Therapy We offer groups and Mommy and Me Classes663-9828 Established in 2002 Now accepting newKITTY CLIENTSProfessional Pet Sitting Service 813-634-8894 Oliver & Company, LLCFull Service Pet Sitting (813) 767-7225 pets GreY re Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana St., Gibsonton (1 block off US 41, 1 block north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday through Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture, lots misc. Ministry First Baptist Gibsonton. 813-671-0036 to donate SCC 634 La Jolla. Friday 11/15 & Saturday 11/16, 9am-? Ironing table, tile steamer, knickknacks & more. Moving sale. Thursday through Saturday, Nov. 14-16. 205 Islip Way, South Pebble Beach to New Bedford. Jewelry, tools, indoor/ outdoor furniture, clothes & much more. Large garage sale. Saturday, Nov. 16, 8am-? Christmas decoration, paintings, lawn furniture & lots more. 911 Sun Key Ct., SCC. Huge multi family sale. Something for everyone. Friday & Saturday, 9am-? 1609 N. Pebble Beach Blvd., SCC. Tools, housewares, more Yard sale, 5527 Hillsborough St., Wimauma. Nov 15 & Nov 16, Many items. 3 families. All must go cheap. 8:30am-? Antiques, collectibles, household. Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 8am-? 1416 Seton Hall. (1 mile from SR 674 off Del Webb W.) SCC. Friday only 11/15, 8am-1pm. 1612 Vincennes, SCC. 4 family sale. Furniture, tools, mirrors, high quality household misc. Garage sale. Nov. 15 & 16, 8am-2pm. 2008 Meadowlark SCC. Kitchen, clothing, Christmas, household, small appliances, furniture & more. Moving sale. 11/14 & 11/15, 8am-1pm. 1007 Athens Way, SCC. Furniture, household items. S. Pebble Beach to end of road on Weatherford Street sale. Thursday, Friday & Saturday. Furniture, tools, jewelry, lots more. Follow signs. Linger Lane, off W. Del Webb. SCC. MERCHANDISE300 U.S. Paper Money WANTED (Small or Large)Foreign Currency WANTED Will be buying coins Wednesday, Thursday & Friday 10 a.m. 3 p.m. 918 North Pebble Beach Blvd. (813) 634-3816 (813) 503-4189ALWAYS BUYING SILVER COINS, INGOTS, Misc. & Other Mint BarsYou tried the Chamber & Ruskin. Why not try us for better prices?Watch Out for Counterfeit Coins Your local dealer for over 24 years Sun Ci ty Center COINS C ollectables Garage sale. Friday 11/15, 8am-2pm. off West Del Web 1909 Sterling Glen Ct, (end of culdesac) SCC. Lamps, desk, Electrolux vacuum, clothes. Good prices. Moving sale. Saturday 11/16, 7am-4pm. 2011 Park Village Dr., Ruskin. (off 21st Ave., SE) Apollo Beach Caribbean Isles carport sale. Saturday, Nov. 16, 8am-1pm,. From Big Bend Rd south on Hwy 41, take 1st right Elsberry follow signs. From Ruskin pass Apollo Beach Blvd.. to next left Elsberry Rd. Follow signs. Neighborhood yard sale. 1403 -1430 Bluewater Dr., SCC. (off Del Webb east). Friday Nov. 15 & Saturday Nov. 16, 8am-? Bikes, square dance clothes, Christmas items & tree, pet items, Lazy boy recliner & lots more The Lawn Bowling Club of Sun City Center will be holding Grand Garage Sale. on Friday, Nov. 15 & Saturday Nov. 16, 8am-noon. at the Lawn Bowling facility on North Pebble Beach Blvd., located behind the lawn bowlings greens. Sale. 108 Cactus Flower Lane, SCC. 11/15 & 11/16, 8am-2pm. Baretta 391 Eurika trap 1/2 garuge. Remington 1/2 gauge STS shot gun shells. Household, net, Christmas, lots more.GY Everything you can imagine. Please come & support our troop. Scout Troop 601. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Nov. 16, 7am-1pm. 5208 12th St., NE Apollo Beach. Garage sale. Friday 11/15, 8am-2pm. off West Del Web 1909 Sterling Glen Ct, (end of culdesac) SCC. Lamps, desk, Electrolux vacuum, clothes. Good prices. Collectibles, Christmas, vintage hats, jewelry, designer clothes, books, household items, etc. 8am-noon Friday & Saturday, 1238 W. Del Webb, SCC. Hide-a-way RV Resort, 2206 Chaney Dr. Ruskin. annual parkwide yard sale. Saturday, Nov 16, 8am-1pm. Y All name brand clothes, kids, womens, mens all sizes, Levi, Hollister, Aeropostale, Guy Harvey, Dickies, Nike, Michael Kors & Kenneth Cole, girls & pre-teen Justice & many more brands. Great kids & ladies $ 1 tables & mens $2 table. 50 cent baby clothes table. New CDs, DVDs $3 each. Linens, kitchenware, books, lots of misc. decor. Lots of furniture & lots of Vera Bradley, horse supplies & horse decor. Lots of guys stuff, (2) 26 bikes, Something for everyone, dont miss this one. Friday, Saturday & Sunday 8am-5pm. 1106 Oxbow Rd (4.5 miles south of SR 674 on US 301 to Lightfoot Rd). Follow signs & balloons. See you there. PARK WIDE Carport & Craft ShowChula Vista LandingSaturday, Nov. 16th8 am to 1 pm Craft show in clubhouse!FOOD AVA IL A BLE Antiques & collectibles sale. Saturday, Nov. 16, 7am-noon. Cash only. 2pc oak desk secretary. Signed black artist prints, oriental silks, samplers, Barbies, butter churns, pottery, Beleek, Limoge, Roseville, Spode, Weller, jewelry. To much to list. 1627 Costa St., SCC. Vintage furniture, lamps, decorating & household items. & Christmas items. Nov. 16 & 17. Saturday & Sunday, 8:30am-1pm. 1002 Ventana Dr., Ruskin. Tools & household items for sale. Drywall, painting & tons of tools. Nov.. 15 & 16. 8am-3pm. 1624 2nd St., NE, Ruskin. SCC. Street garage sale. Fox Hills & Sahara. Thursday, Friday & Saturday. Nov. 14,15 & 16. 8am-noon. Nov.. 15 & 16. Cherry Hills Dr. & Augusta Dr., SCC. A variety of things for house, clothes. 98 Lincoln Continental. 8am-1pm 2026 E. Del Webb Blvd., SCC. Nov. 15 & 16, 7am-1pm. Lots of Christmas decor, household items, tools. Something for everyone.st te esQuality used furniture. 2406 College Ave., Ruskin. Stop in you will be pleasantly surprised. We buy & sell. 813-645-1800L SCC. Thursday, Friday & Saturday, Furniture, humongous Christmas items, antiques, toolmakers tools, dishes. 704 Indian Wells. Your home will be staged for best results. Working in Sun City Center for 26 years.Please feel free to call about the sale or its contents. d Cell: 508-0307 or Eve: 633-1173 Ministry of Calvary Lutheran Church T hrift Store Nov. 13, 15 & 16 BUY 1, GET 1 FREE all books and movies Wed., Fri. & Saturday 9 a.m. Noon 813-641-7790Plus the Secret Sale ad Call Beverly 813.645.3111. ext. 201 Call (813) 645-3211Serving South Hillsborough County since 1924www.dickmanrealty.comdickman@tampabay.rr.comCelebrating 89 Years 1924 2013 RUSKIN JUST LISTED! Nice family house on large fenced lot: 3BR/2BA + large inside utility room with closet (4th BR?), split plan, eat-in-space in kitchen, shed in backyard. $75,000 CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 APOLLO BEACH LARGE COMMERCIAL BUILDING: lot with ample parking, and fenced area in back, this property, a block from US $299,000 CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 GREAT ACREAGE FOR YOUR DREAM HOME/MOBILE-HOME: With all new street. $84,500 CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 RENT NEVER COMES BACK CHECK THIS ONE OUT! 3BR/2BA with an ceramic tile throughout, granite countertops, coffered ceilings in master bed$119,900 CALL ROXANNE WESTBROOK 813-748-2201 NEW LISTING! bile home is in need of some repairs. $35,000 CALL KAY PYE 813-361-3672 OR ROXANNE WESTBROOK 813-748-2201 FISH TO YOUR HEARTS CONTENT $76,300 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 OR ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 REDUCED PRICE $299,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 This 2BR/1BA in an age-restricted and gated community with low HOA fees, JUST $39,000 CALL LINDA BADGEROW 695-5515 REDUCED PRICE Just $25,000 JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288 DOLLHOUSE AWAITS YOUR LOVING TOUCHES! $59,750 CALL MARGOT WARD 813-486-9480 PRICE REDUCTION!! Prized zoning M 5021 Sq. Ft. $374,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 REAL ESTATE500 MARINE400 TRANSPORTATION450 Business & Trade Directory AC REPAIR/SALES Family Owned and Operated 263-6503 D. KAY CARR, P.A.Attorney at Law e 214 Apollo Beach Boulevar d Apollo Beach, FL 33572(813) 645-7557 ATTORNEYA AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRA Mobile Auto Repair FREE Scan with repair10% Off any repairfor military personnel and their dependentsCall, text or email Joe Brys813.833.8973 joehd2007@yahoo.com Lic. # MV87956 APPLIANCE REPAIRA CLEANINGC COMPUTER REPAIRC ELECTRICIANE BAIL BONDSB NEED A GOODELECTRICIAN?Call Don or John!LICENSED BONDED INSURED ER00126636SERVICE UPGRADES ALL TYPES OF WIRING RENOVATIONS Don 645-8985 South BayElectric Co. of Ruskin Call Don or John Need a Licensed Electrician?www.HoffmanElectrical.comLic. #ECI3004496 CARDS 813-298-FAST(3278) FREEService Callwith any repair.15% OFFany service or repair. Need help with your computer, or setting up your electronics?MAC & PCFriendly, Professional, Microsoft Certified, A+$35 per hr.Setting up, Upgrades, Virus Removal, Spyware, Pop-Ups, Security, Email & Printer ProblemsCall Ryan 813-262-2559 (813) 495-7027davidmoorellc@yahoo.com www.TheFloorSource.bizWe bring the Showroom to you!David Moore, Owner-OperatorFREE Estimates! The Floor Source FLOORINGF BO SIDDLEWOOD FLOORING Sanding & Renishing Sales Installing Laminate, Vinyl & HardwoodFREE ESTIMATESbosiddle1@gmail.com941-592-0802LLC *No project over $1000. No electrical, gas, or plumbing, and nothing structural. HANDYMAN*H Bobs Mobile Fix-It CenterResidential & CommercialLicensed & Insured Customer Satisfaction Guaranteed! Call for FREE Estimate(813) 671-7870Robert GerstenschlagerWe Fix It All! For information on advertising in the Business & Trade Directory, call 813-645-3111 Cell: 382-7536 Technics organ SX-EA-5. All books, bench, amplifier, ear phones. Good condition. Asking $500 or obo. 813642-8383 Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade. Chargers, parts all related. Ronnys Carts & Parts. 813-484-9855 or 813-645-4515(2) Ceiling fans. 52 Brass & white with crystals $90. 52 brass & white $65. Like new. 813-633-4506, SCC South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Specializing in outside storage for RVs, boats & trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBayStorage.com 2008 Smart car 20,000+ miles, loaded. Truly like new. 48mpg, sunroof. $21,000 new asking $10,000. 813-634-4782 For sale. 1993 Isuzo truck, 12 box with lift gate. 137,709 miles. $2500. 813633-3757 RE/MAX South Shore RealtyRoberta Rowe, Realtor Cell: 813-215-7127Hampton (2BR/2BA) with up-leveled lanai, CARPORT IN KINGS POINT ....................................................... $65,500RENTAL IN KINGS POINTCall me to advertise your RENTAL! 2BR/2BA 1700 sq. ft. double-car garage on Golf Course. Unfurnished ................................................. $1200 /month Annes Estate Sales 1928 Grand Cypress Ln. 7 am noon PARK ON SIDE OF SALE ONLYFurniture: Grandfather clock, sofa sleeper w/ matching loveseat & chair, china hutch, Queen bedroom suite, patio set w/ lounger, dinette table w/chairs, 4-poster bed, Queen size, swivel rocker, microwave w/cart, end & coffee tables, wicker chairs. Collectables: Longaberger baskets, artwork, jewelry, dolls. Misc.: Artificial trees, file cabinets, stepladder, household & kitchen.www.AnnesEstateSales.blogspot.com PRICE REDUCTION ON THESE 2 RUSKIN LOTS, AND OWNER'S FINANCING: 1/3 Acre cleared corner lot with huge oaks, zoned for home or duplex. Electric and water on site. Convenient location close to schools and major roads $18,000 Great residential lot, College Ave West, cleared, with nice shed in back. Quick access to shopping and major hwys. Water, sewer and electric available. $19,500 Thinking of selling or buying? Please give me a call, I can help! CLAIRE TORT Cell: (813) 363-7250 Cathy Griggs 813-391-8653 cathygriggs@msn.com 3/2/2/, no CDD, low HOA $176,200 Built in 2007, 3/2/3+, dock, LOW insurances plus 1 Year HOME WARRANTY! $234,000 4/3/3, pool, low HOA and no CDD! $343,000 3/2/2 $283,000 3/2/1 great location with in-law suite! $169,900 NETTIES ESTATE SALESCell: (813) 382-7536Contents Include: Dining Room Table w/Chairs, Bassett Buffet, Sofas, Loveseat, Lamp Tables, Side Chairs, Home Dcor, Oil Paintings & Prints, Silk Trees & Plants, Mens & Womens Clothing, Glassware, Kitchenware, PFAFF Hobby Sewing Machine, Patio Set w/ Umbrella, Ducane Gas Grill, Power Pro Generator, Power Tools, Christmas Dcor, Household & Misc. Items.Please park on side of sale due to emergency vehicles.Please dont miss our other sale this Friday/Saturday at 1026 Regal Manor Way See You There!2013 East Del Webb Sun City CenterFRIDAY & SATURDAY Nov. 15th & 16th7 a.m. NOON NETTIES ESTATE SALESCell: (813) 382-7536Contents Include: Beautiful Broyhill Two-Toned White Washed Dining Room Table w/ Chairs, and Matching Broyhill China Cabinet, TwoToned White Washed Hutch, Broyhill Server, Nice Curio Cabinet, Wrought Iron Bakers Rack, TV Armoire, Desk, Sony Home Theatre System, Home Dcor, Glassware, Kitchenware, Household & Garage Items.Please park on side of sale due to emergency vehicles.Please dont miss our other sale this Friday/Saturday at 2013 East Del Webb Blvd. See You There!1026 Regal Manor Way (Renaissance area) Sun City CenterFRIDAY & SATURDAY Nov. 15th & 16th7 a.m. NOON

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Get a FREE Top Dollar INSTANT Offer NOW! 1-800-558-1097 Were Local! ADOPTION GIVE YOUR BABY THE BEST IN LIFE! Many Kind, Loving, Educated & Financially Se cure Couples Waiting. Living & Medical Expenses Paid. Counseling & Transportation Provided. Former Birth Moms on Staff! FLORIDA ADOPTION LAW GROUP, P.A. Jodi Sue Rutstein, M.S.W., J.D. Mary Ann Scherer, R.N., J.D. 1-800(#133050&249025) Diabetic Test Strips WANTED!!! TOP PRICES PAID! Faster-$-$-$-Cash For Local Pickup Call 813-528-1480 For Free Shipping Call Toll-Free 1-888-656-0725 tonyteststrips. com 708 MOVERS. In business 40yrs. Move 1 piece to whole household plus haul away anything in your way. Packing services available. (Fully Insured). Best rates. Call 813-6290108, 813-260-9840 US. DOT #434469. No job too big or small. Clean, honest & dependable. Licensed & insured. Call 813-633-5544. IM1340710 LAWN CARELicensed & insured. No contract. Yearly, monthly or per cut. As low as $25 per cut. 813-293-6840 Complete outdoor property main tenance. Landscaping, trimming, pressure washing, sprinkler repair. Licensed & insured. 813-298-3376 714 TREE REMOVAL Shrubs trimmed & removed Ruskin, Apollo Beach, Riverview, Gibsonton, SCC area. Free estimate & fully Insured. Call Tony Horman. 603662-6079 Backhoe & Tractor Service. Cul vert sets, driveways, shell, crushed mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963 Free estimates. topsoil, sand, crushed rock & asphalt, driveway culverts. Loader, backhoe, grading, bushhog, discing. Install Sep 813-645-1883 Phil Oley 25+ yrs experience. Insured. Apollo Beach, Ruskin, Sun City Center & Kings Point. Call 813-649-1418 740 MISC. SERVICES also new construction of docks, boat lifts & seawalls. Free inspection. Heck er Construction Co. 813-236-9306 I can remove it. Want something textured & painted. Big or small, I can do it. Debby. 813-434-6499 cleaning. Residential & commercial. Licensed & insured. 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32 "\011-\015,\015, \015-U-\012\012"\011-\015,\015, NOVEMBER 14, 2013 OPEN HOUSE November 18-22 9:00am 12:00pm TAMPA BAY famil PHYSICIANS \002\002\002\003\004\005\006\007\005\010\005\011\012\005\006\013\014\011\007\015\011\016\013\017\013\005\020\016\003\017\021\006\001 Khushi Dhaliwal, MD Board Certified Family Medicine ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS! CALL TODAY! 813-633-2000 Adult Primary Care (Men’s & Women’s Health) El personal habla espaol 4874 Sun City Center Boulevard Sun City Center, Florida 33573 www.tampabayfamilyphysicians.com SAME DAY APPOINTMENTS MEDICARE AND MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED, INCLUDING: Aetna, Avmed, Blue Cross Blue Shield MultiPlan Network, Optimum HealthCare, PHCS Network, Simply Healthcare, Tricare & United Healthcare Freedom Health, Students come to this program from all over, including Pasco and Hernando counties, and some even from out of state, he added. The cost is about $4,500 to $5,000 for paramedic training and from $1,500 to $1,600 for EMT students. “This means many students can go through, paying as they go, instead of racking up a $20,000 debt,” said college President Allen Witt. “Between Pell Grants and jobs, it’s possible to go through our program and be out on the street making a starting figure around $30,000 – and some later go up to six figures, with no student debt behind them.” August graduates Judy Myette and Robert Leonard said they couldn’t be happier with the careers they have chosen. Leonard was just hired as a paramedic in the emergency room at South Bay Hospital and is also continuing his training to get an EMS degree. He then plans to go on to become a registered nurse. Leonard and Myette say they were “buddies” during their training together, and remain so now. But their lives “pre HCC” couldn’t have been more different. While Leonard is just starting out, Myette, now 65, decided upon her new career at the age of 64. “I owned my own dry cleaning business in Massachusetts,” Myette said. “When I moved to Sun City Center, I joined the (Sun City Center) Emergency Squad as a volunteer. But then I realized I wanted to be a paramedic.” Myette, who was class speaker at graduation, loves her new possibilities, and has just accepted a job at South Bay Hospital. She says she will continue as a volunteer with the Squad, too, if she finds she is able to do both. “We have students 18 and 74,” said Linder, who is in his 40th year in emergency services. “Things have really changed,” he said, showing slides of what he referred to as “training in the old days,” and books from “then and now.” The differences could be easily spotted. Linder and Lab Coordinator Ron Dorsey took turns demonstrating the different mannequins’ capabilities: two infants, a woman mannequin capable of delivery of a mannequin infant, and many mannequins in various stages of burns, lacerations, and internal distress. “We have a whole variety of props in the back rooms,” Linder said. “Ladders they can fall from, plastic guns and knives, chain saws, tools.” One of the mannequins was a roofer with a nail stuck in his mouth. Others had various degrees of burns and lacerations. “We want to make sure our students don’t get any surprises when they face the real thing,” Linder said. That’s why the high-tech mannequins are such an important part of the training. Obviously Cruthis thought so, because she – the chair of Interfaith’s Grants Committee — suggested that HCC apply for the grant. “It isn’t often someone comes to us and says why don’t you come to us for money,” Witt said. But community medical needs are changing faster than anyone can keep up with, they explained. It hasn’t been long since the combination Fire-Rescue teams started. Now every fire truck has to have an emergency medical personnel person on board. “Eighty percent of the calls the fire trucks go on are medically-related,” he said. “That means only 20 percent are for fires.” Newer home-building materials and safety regulations have resulted in fewer fires, but an aging population is raising the need for medical response teams with greater knowledge. “My age group is going to live to be 130,” Witt joked. “So the medical personnel need to be ready for a lot of new things.” And many new things are in the works. Linder explained that EMS and EMT personnel now do many jobs only doctors used to do. And more and more “Community Paramedics” are beginning to be used. This is a new position where paramedics check on homebound patients and on those released from hospitals. “They’re doing things they never thought they would be doing,” Linder said. Sonograms in ambulances are coming soon, and many other new jobs as well. “Soon there will be mini labs right in the ambulance,” he added. Witt plans a mock mass tragedy simulation in January where this class will do their first response First responder training gets a boost from Interfaith Council \012œˆ'i`vœ“>}i£ X PENNY FLETCHER PHOTOS The HCC lab trains future paramedics, EMTs and EMS responders in a simulated ambulance right in the classroom. duties and then transport “patients” by ambulance across the campus to the nurses’ training labs where they will all work together as an ER team. “We have so many plans. We are going to keep up with the changing laws and times.” By laws, Witt referred to the fact that hospitals are penalized if emergency patients return too often or too soon, and Community Paramedics can help eliminate the need for those returns. “Things are changing as people in the medical fields are cross-trained,” he said. “I have learned that no matter what our job title, fire-rescue, EMT, paramedic — whatever, we are the first-responders and it is our job to keep people alive until they reach the doctor or hospital. We had to do 50 intubations before we were allowed to graduate. We were highly trained here. I am very happy with my training, and will be thrilled to begin my new job,” Myette said. To find out about the program, visit http://www.hccfl.edu. Ron Dorsey, lab coordinator at HCC for 12 years, demonstrates all the capabilities of the newly purchased mannequin.