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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102144/00150
 Material Information
Title: Observer news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Publisher: M&M Printing Co., Inc ( Ruskin, FL )
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00102144:00156

Full Text



Little Manatee River State
Park was host to the 1 2th
annual Poker Hike Paddle
Ride event to raise funds
for park improvements.
See page 2


On Saturday, Tampa
Bay's biggest party PRSTSTD
begins with an invasion... PAID
that's right, it's Gasparilla RUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570
time. See page 5B PERMIT NO. 8


January 24, 2013
Volume 57
Number 1


THE OBSERVER NEWS


I www.Ob^^ serverews~netmrta


Addressing a mystery


* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net
RUSKIN On the third
floor of the Ruskin
Woman's Club stands a
mystery. The third floor reveals
the grand home's diverse past
with a classroom chalkboard on
the wall of one largely empty
room and, on the floor below, the
living quarters for the president
of Ruskin College and his family.
It is a compact yet heavy device,
with numbers and letters in a
wheel, a foot pedal and guides.
The mystery of what it is was
quickly solved. Robin Roberts of
the Woman's Club sent a photo
of the object to David Payne at
M&M Printing. He identified it
as an Elliot Addressing Machine.
The Office Museum website he
used as a reference had only a
drawing of it, but Payne, with
extensive experience in the
printing business, matched it up
to the photo Roberts had sent and
figured out how it would have
worked.
The machine was expensive in
its day. Back in 1906, it would
have cost $150, nearly $3,800
in today's dollars. That was a
considerable investment for
the fledgling colony of Ruskin


and for the college with grand
dreams.
Why it was there, however, was
more difficult to ascertain. There
is really no way to say who used
it and for what purpose. Seeing
the machine, now more than a
century old but still appearing as


though, with some clean up, it
could be ready for work, conjured
up even more questions. At some
point in time, someone last used
this machine, probably carefully
putting it away after a day of
work, never knowing that in
> See MYSTERY, page 24


Once a nurse


always a nur

* By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews.net
SUN CITY CENTER Those
who work with Doris Ragland
say she's a bundle of energy and
never runs out of ideas.
Ragland has worked with Sun
City Center Samaritan Services
since moving to Florida from
Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1973.
A psychiatric nurse both in the
Army and in civilian life, Ragland
has never lost her compassion for
helping others.
"She's constantly trying to
improve the lot of senior citizens
who have nowhere else to turn,"
said Sue Miller, office manager
for Samaritan Services, a 501(c)3
tax-exempt organization, for
12 years. "She remembers
everything the rest of us have
forgotten. She rolls off names and
dates from years ago like they
were yesterday."
Miller describes Ragland as
compassionate and caring, with
an unflappable exterior and a
soft heart hidden behind a no-
nonsense demeanor.
"Probably because of the
military career she shared with
her husband, she has the ability
to stand back and assess things
objectively before addressing


At 92, Doris Ragland
still cares for those
who can't help
themselves


Doris Ragland
them," Miller added.
Delores Berens agreed.
Berens, president of the
Alzheimer's Respite Group and
a board director of Samaritan
Services, has worked beside
Ragland for 15 years.
"It's time Doris was recognized
for the work she has done
from her heart. Everything she
does comes from her heart,"
Berens said. "She's a wonderful
humanitarian and she knows
her expertise, being a nurse and
being involved in assisted living
facilities for so many years."
Berens continued, saying that
> See ONCE A NURSE..., page 17


HCSO makes major bust near Gibsonton Elementary


Sheriff David Gee announced
on January 15, the conclusion of
"Operation Cease Fire" a six
month-long operation, ending in
a wave of arrests of convicted
felons who sold guns and drugs
across the street from Gibsonton
Elementary School.
In July 2012, a confidential
tip led investigators to a
consignment store located at
7724 Gibsonton Drive a
store that was once a flower
shop. In most cases, a tip
about drugs will lead HCSO
undercover detectives to illegal
guns and violent felons with
guns as well, and this case was
no exception. In this operation,
however, the undercover drug
and gun transactions took place


less than 175 feet away from
an elementary school. Most of
the transactions took place after
school hours.
During the course of the
investigation, undercover
detectives made drug and gun
transactions with the suspects
inside this consignment shop. Our
detectives put their lives on the
line, knowing they were dealing
with dangerous, armed felons.
In one instance, a detective
encountered unexpected gunfire
when a suspect spontaneously
fired his gun into the ground to
demonstrate the effectiveness of
a silencer.
"Operation Cease Fire" resulted
in the arrests of 10 people and the
> See GIBSONTON BUST, page 3


MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO


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It was a perfect day for poker at the Little Manatee River State Park


MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTOS
A rider checks out the trail map for the Friends of the Little Manatee
River State Park annual Poker Hike Paddle Ride.
It was a perfect day for an outdoor poker game on Saturday as dozens
of people took to the trail, the water and horseback for the Friends of
the Little Manatee River State Park 12th annual Poker Hike Paddle
Ride event. The annual fundraiser was sponsored by Ace Hardware of
Riverview and included participants paddling down the Little Manatee
River in canoes and kayaks, taking to the trails on foot and riding
horses along the park's equestrian trails in search of cards to build the
best poker hand. Winners were announced at 1:30 with an after party
held at the Canoe Outpost on U.S. 301. The event raises needed funds
for equipment and other park needs. For information on how you can
help to maintain one of the area's finest outdoor resources, visit www.
friendsofthelittlemanatee.com.


Cathy Moore, president of the Friends of the Little Manatee River
State Park with one of the event participants in front of the Ace
Hardware of Riverview tent.


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Kayakers take off towards the park from the Canoe Outpost on the beautiful Little Manatee River.




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2 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


JANUARY 24, 2013






JANUARY 24, 2013

Virtual job fair set for

healthcare professionals
On Tuesday and Wednesday, Jan. 29 30, there will be a
free two-day national online job fair for healthcare profes-
sionals. This event, sponsored by ADVANCE Magazine,
has been organized to connect job-seekers all over the
country with new job and education opportunities.
The healthcare sector was responsible for one out of ev-
ery six jobs created in 2012*, maintaining its status as one
of the fastest growing industries in the U.S. Hospitals and
health systems consistently add hundreds of thousands of
jobs each year, even when the economy is struggling.
The virtual career event shines the spotlight on oppor-
tunities in nursing, rehabilitation, respiratory care and
sleep medicine, imaging and radiation oncology, speech-
language pathology, medical laboratory and health in-
formation. Students and professionals in these fields can
chat with representatives from hiring facilities, instantly
upload their resumes in each exhibitor's booth, research
potential employers and more.
Attendees can enjoy two free educational sessions that
are eligible for CE credit, including Caring for the LGBT
Community (and Their Families) on Jan. 29, and Mi-
graines & Other Headaches on Jan. 30. Also up for grabs
is a $100 Visa gift card. Attendees can enter to win the
grand prize by 'attending' the event between noon and 4
p.m. ET on Jan. 29 or 3 to 7 p.m. on Jan. 30.
Professionals can learn more and register online here:
http: //j .mp/2dayjf
This online job fair will remain available to attendees
for 30 days after the event ends. This gives anyone who
wasn't able to attend the chance to still participate.
For more details, please call 800-546-4987, email AD-
VANCIl % .m.i"' id, ..ad "i n liii or visit www.advance-
web.comrn/events.
Florida fairs, livestock expos
Every year, millions of residents and visitors take
advantage of one of Florida's best entertainment values:
its county fairs and livestock exhibitions. Florida's fairs
and livestock exhibitions are more than just fun, they're
educational too. Florida's fair and livestock exposition
season runs from October through April.
Manatee County Fair.... Palmetto....................Jan. 17-27
DeSoto County Fair ..... Arcadia.....................Jan. 17-27
South Florida Fair ........ W. Palm Beach..... Jan. 18-Feb. 3
Polk County Youth Fair... Bartow ...............Jan. 26-Feb. 1
Charlotte County Fair..... Port Charlotte .......... Feb. 1-10
Florida State Fair.......... Tampa.................. ..... Feb. 7-18
Martin County Fair ...... Stuart........................ Feb. 8-16
Highlands County Fair.... Sebring ..................... Feb. 8-16


OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 3


Gibsonton


drug/gun bust
0 Continued from page 1
arrest warrants of three others. Deputies
are still on the hunt for those three at-
large suspects. Ten are convicted felons
who sold 34 firearms and 49 silencers to
undercover detectives. The guns removed
from the streets include an AR-15, AK-47
style rifle, 22 caliber rifle with silencer,
sawed-off shotguns, and sniper-type
rifles with night vision. Detectives also
purchased trafficking amounts of narcotic
prescription drugs, crack cocaine, and
methamphetamine. The fact that detectives
busted a criminal enterprise next to
an elementary school will translate to
enhanced charges for some of the suspects
involved.
The detectives who targeted these
suspects work in a specialized gun squad
out of HCSO's Special Investigations
Division. The group focuses solely on
crimes involving guns and felons in
possession of firearms. Last year alone,
these detectives bought 52 guns from
41 felons during undercover operations.
Specialized undercover operations are
just one part of the effort in getting guns
out of the wrong hands. Last year, HCSO
arrested 118 felons in possession of a
firearm, and 80 people for unlawfully
carrying concealed firearms. Deputies
impounded more than 1500 guns as
evidence in some type of crime in 2012.
The Sheriff's Office also plans to host a
gun buyback program in five locations
next month.
Arrested were Laavi Aguilar, 25,
William Kiser, 28, David Lundgren, 34,
Danny Ray York, 28, Robert Hammond,
43, Melissa Wright, 34, Gene Wayne
Johnston, 29, Sharrod Tolliver, 40, Delores
Bodden, 40, and Brian Du Bien, 46.
Arrest warrants have been issued for
Michael Allen Fox, 49, Edwina Hampton,
53, and Amberlie Jones, 22.


MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO
Ruskin Woman's Club to hold sale,
seeks donations
The Ruskin Woman's Club, one of the Tampa Bay area's longest
serving women clubs, will be holding their annual sale on Febru-
ary 1 and 2 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The non-profit club is a service
organization dedicated to helping residents and organizations in
the South Hillsborough area, with a mission of maximizing the po-
tential of the community by ensuring the continued development
of education, cultural, and social opportunities through the service
and resources of its members. According to the club's flyer, those
attending the sale can expect to find treasures, "junque", lunch and
more. The club is also seeking donations for the sale. If you can
help, call 813-482-0350. The Ruskin Woman's Club is located in one
of South Hillsborough's most beautiful historical landmarks at 503
U.S. Highway 41.


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4 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER JANUARY 24, 2013


'Blast from the Past' party to benefit

Hurricane Sandy relief
The Happy Travelers are hosting a dance paii --t
on Sunday, Jan. 27, from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. at th.e .
Kings Point Borini Theater. -
Tickets are $8, all are welcome, and proceeds .
will go to Hurricane Sandy relief funds.
Dance music will be provided by Del & Gary, .
playing a variety of music from the greats of
Doo Wop, '50s, '60s, '70s, old-time rock 'n .
roll, disco and country. _'d
Snack food and wine toast will be served. h- '6
BYOB and setups.
Call Sandi at 813-298-9632 for more information and to
purchase tickets.


American Farm Bureau President Bob Stallman, right, congratulates
Florida Farm Bureau President John Hoblick at the Pinnacle Award
presentation in Nashvill, RN on Jan. 13 during the American Farm
Bureau's 2013 Annual Meeting.
Florida Farm Bureau earns top
national award


The American Farm Bureau
Federation presented Florida Farm
Bureau with the national organiza-
tion's Pinnacle Award for 2012.
This honor recognizes Florida
Farm Bureau as the best state
Farm Bureau within its member-
ship group.
Announced at the American
Farm Bureau's Annual Meet-
ing in Nashville, RN on Jan. 13,
the award caps a stellar year for
the Voice of Florida Agriculture.
Florida Farm Bureau previously
received the AFBF's 2012 Awards
of Excellence for all major catego-
ries of operation evaluated. The
state Farm Bureau also garnered


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Free tax prep at
Hillsborough County
Extension Service
Hillsborough County Extension
Service is offering free tax prepa-
ration assistance for those who
earned $57,000 or less in 2012.
Tax filers will be able to access
a self-guided tax preparation pro-
gram and receive assistance, as
needed, from an IRS-trained and
-certified volunteer.
This free service will be avail-
able by appointment only on
Tuesday and Thursdays, noon
- 4 p.m. starting Tuesday, Feb. 5
through Tuesday, April 9.
This service is offered as part of
the United Way Suncoast Prosper-
ity Campaign. For a list of other
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For more information contact
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special accommodations should
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Jubilant Keller Williams Realty employees celebrate their record-
breaking year.

Local Realty firm sets 5 all-

time records
Gary Kaukonen, team leader of the Keller Williams Realty South Shore
office, has announced that 2012 was a record-setting year.
Kaukonen said, "Our Apollo Beach and Sun City Center offices had
1,117 written sales in 2012, which was a 16% increase over 2011. In
addition, we set records in written volume, closed units, closed volume,
and listing units."
Keller Williams first opened its Apollo Beach office in 2007 and fol-
lowed that with the opening of the sister office in Sun City Center in
2009.
For more information, visit Keller Williams Realty online at www.kw.com.


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4 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


JANUARY 24, 2013


n






JANUARY 24, 2013


Genealogy seminar announced
The South Bay Genealogical Society will conduct an all-day seminar
on Saturday, Feb. 19 in the Royal Palm Room of the Little Harbor Resort
in Ruskin. Titled "Genealogy by the Bay 2013," this event will feature
four lectures by noted genealogist Dr. John Philip Colletta, recognized as
one of America's most popular genealogical lecturers.
His talks will include
Breaking through Brick Walls: Use your HEAD!
The County Courthouse: "Your Trunk in the Attic"
Turning Biographical Facts into Real Life Events, How to Build His-
torical Context
Discovering the REAL Stories of your Immigrant Ancestors
Reservations close on Wednesday, Feb. 13, and may be made at the So-
ciety's website: www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~flsbgs or by calling Terri
Cardoza at 813-633-5172.
The cost is $40 per seat (SBGS members); $45 (non members), and in-
cludes a box lunch. The doors open at 8:30 a.m., and the seminar begins
at 9:30 a.m.
Dr. Colletta lectures nationally, and conducts programs for the Smith-
sonian Institution's Resident Associate Program. He has worked for both
the Library of Congress and National Archives, and is a noted author of
genealogy books and publications. Colletta is a faculty member of the
Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research at Samford University
(Birmingham, Ala.), the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy, and Boston
University's Certificate in Family History program.


Adult Computer Classes for the
Technologically Challenged
eBooks And eReaders: An Introduction *. Jan. 31 3 p.m.
Have a new eReader or interested in getting one? Learn which de-
vices can download the library's free eBooks and how to load eBooks
onto various types of eReaders. Discover the library's large selection of
eBooks in various formats! SpringTech!
iPad/iPhone: Demonstration and Open Lab Jan. 25 3 p.m.
Bring an iPad/iPhone and operation questions to the class. Will dem-
onstrate how to install the required software for eBooks, open an Apple
account, and how to download an eBook to the device. SpringTech!
Managing Media Jan. 29 3 p.m.
Learn about saving files using cloud storage and USB devices. Learn
how to transfer and download digital content..
PowerPoint: Introduction Jan. 30 3 p.m.
Learn the basics of slide design and layout to create a professional-
looking presentation. Basic mouse and keyboarding skills are recom-
mended. SummerTech!.
PowerPoint: Text Boxes, Clipart and Autoshapes. Jan. 30 3:45
p.m.
Adding text boxes, clipart and Autoshapes to your presentation. Previ-
ous experience with Microsoft PowerPoint is recommended.
PowerPoint: Effects and Transitions Jan. 30 4:30 p.m.
Learn different formats for expressing numbers in a spreadsheet. Excel
I is recommended.

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Students of the Month at Apollo Beach Elementary
Kylie Auciello, Morgan Ayan, Bailee Barnette, Vedhan Basnet, Lila Boyd, Micah Brandon, Holly Brophy,
Caroline Chase, Lacy Comer, Becky Council, Dillon Edgar, Tyler Fields, Lauren Gonzalez, Linda Grana-
dos, Max Granados, Caroline Halsema, Henry Hanlon, Adam Maysles, Myles McColl, Madilyn McMillan,
Ryan Mercer, Willow Morgan, Bailey Palmer, Julianna Perez, Halle Razick, Noah Rodrigues, Ethan Self,
Logan Simon, Amberleigh Smith, Cameron Smith, Morgan Steel, Sam Summerlin, Diego Vergara, Kath-
rn IA rran I tlairjn WIAiikrb nd i Di ,r-lI L- an Pt lrna


. __._

Cruiser of the month recalls 1950's
flair
An eye-catching 1959 Ford Fairlane 500 convertible owned and re-
stored by Don Wheeler of Myakka City is the January Cruiser of the
Month for the Roamin' Oldies Car Club.
The 4-1/2-year restoration process replaced or refurbished everything,
from suspension to interior trim. Don kept almost everything factory
original, but bumped up engine displacement to 390 cubic inches and
added power front disc brakes for confident driving in today's traffic.
The exterior is a brilliant Indian Turquoise, typical of the flashy 1950's
color schemes.
The monthly Roamin' Oldies cruise-in is held from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
on the first Thursday of every month in the Apollo Beach Winn-Dixie
Plaza on US41. The event is free to both entrants and spectators, and the
public is welcome.
About 100 of the area's finest antique and collectible cars and trucks
are typically on display, accompanied by classic 1950's music played
by DJ Joey Ferrante. The event is sponsored by Thompson's Auto Parts.
For information, call Chet at 813-842-1511.


Apollo Beach
Woman's Club
honors eight
members
At the January meeting of the
Apollo Beach Woman's Club eight
members were honored for their
longevity in the club. They were
each given yellow and red roses
signifying friendship and love.
Each honoree will be given a new
membership pin displaying the
year that they joined the ABWC.
Sharon Vasquez introduced the
honorees and told of the things
each has done within ABWC.
Emma Doyle and Diane Waronka
honored for 15 years. Phyllis Els-
berry, Sylvia Gordon, Betty Mi-
chelfelder, Marcia Morris, Mary
Jo Patterson and Betty Prager hon-
ored for 10 years.
In addition to its philanthropic
work, club members also enjoy en-
richment activities which include:
Book Club: The book group
meets monthly in members' homes
to discuss the latest novel mem-
bers have read. The February 28
meeting will feature the book The
Hunger Games, by Suzanne Col-
lins.
Bridge Club: Bridge players
meet the fourth Monday of each


South Shore Chamber
seeks support for 'Real
World Tour' program
The South Shore Chamber of
Commerce's Education Partner-
ship Committee has started the
'Real World Tour' program to
bring local middle-school students
to area businesses for a field trip.
The purpose is to expose middle-
school students to area businesses,
to help them learn the importance
of continuing their education, and
find out about the career opportu-
nities available.
The first field trip was a huge
success and the chamber are seek-
ing additional chamber members
to sponsor future Tours.
Sponsor responsibilities
00Sponsor half the cost of the
transportation and bagged lunch
for each student approximately
$265.
1WAllow 45 students to come to
your business for about a 45-min-
ute tour.
10Spend a few minutes of pre-
planning with the teacher to coor-
dinate dates, times, etc.
Any business interested in spon-
soring a field trip should email
Melanie@southshorechamber-
ofcommerce.org.


J M DOYLE PHOTO
From left: Sharon Vasquez, VP for Membership, Diane Waronka,
Mary Jo Patterson, Marcia Morris, Betty Michelfelder, Sylvia Gordon
and Phyllis Elsberry. Absent: Betty Prager and Emma Doyle


month at the Apollo Beach Golf
Club.
Culture Club: Activities are
organized monthly to introduce
members to the wide variety of
places of interest in the Tampa Bay
area. A tour of Mosaic Company,
the world's leading producer and
marketer of concentrated phos-
phate and potash crop nutrients, is
planned for Tuesday, Feb. 19.
Garden Club: Thursday, Jan. 31
will feature a master gardener from
USF who will do a hands-on dem-
onstration of bonsai gardening.


The next luncheon meeting will
be Wednesday Feb. 13 at Little
Harbor in Ruskin, FL. The meeting
will be presided over by Judy Peck,
President, beginning at 11:30 a.m.
with socializing followed by lunch
and the program by Kathleen M.
Rehl, Ph.D., CFP author of Mov-
ing Forward on Your Own.
Luncheon tickets are $16. Reser-
vations must be made and paid for
by Friday, Feb. 8, by contacting
Deanna Anest at 813-938-3641 or
e-mail hookr06@hotmail.com.


I


yr n arren, ey on j ra s.







6 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER JANUARY 24, 2013


Positive Talk: The fear is false


It is ironic how many faces
fear can wear. Fear is all around
us and permeates our society. Yet
fear vanishes in most instances
when we shine the light of truth
on it. Someone said
that the word "fear" is
an acronym for "false
evidence appearing
real." I believe this
premise is right; most
of our fears are false.
An example of a By Willic
false fear came to
my attention long
ago while I was standing on a
corner waiting for a bus in a
large metropolitan city. It was
getting dark and as I waited with
several other people, I noticed a
very large young black man had
joined us. Almost immediately,
the others at the bus stop moved
away. I, on the other hand, tried
to engage him in conversation.
On my third attempt, he finally
started to talk to me. He told me
what it was like to see people
tremble at the sight of him,
and he said the fact I had not
shown fear actually caused him
to be fearful-strange, but true.
He turned out to be a very nice
young man who was working his
way through college. The people
who moved away from him will
never know this intelligent young
man because they let a false fear
control their actions.
Another false fear is fear of the
laughter of others. While living
in Ohio, I decided I wanted to
learn to cross country ski. So,
with my skis, I headed off to
Michigan and took to the trails.
Very slowly I moved along. My
progress was not what I had


im


envisioned and I asked a friend
for advice. The friend replied,
"Fall down." "Fall down?" I said.
"I am trying not to fall down; I
don't want everyone to laugh at
me." My friend said my
fear of looking foolish
was standing in my way
of learning to ski. I was
N., thinking so much about
'/ not falling that I could
not relax. For the next
Hodges hour, I spent more time
picking myself up than
I did going forward. My
friends did not laugh but rather
cheered me on. Remember that
the saddest reason for failure is
not to try for fear that someone
will laugh.
Probably the fear that is most
destructive is the fear we will
lose the love and affection of
family and friends. I listened
to a man talk with a radio
psychologist. He told her he was
in love with a woman who had
a child out of wedlock when she
was 15 and that child, now 11,
was also a delightful part of his
life. Having dated the woman for
about 10 months, he was now
thinking about marrying her.
He said she was everything he
wanted in a wife and more. So
what's the problem? His mother
and father did not want him to
marry what they considered a
"fallen" woman. He feared the
loss of their love if he married the
girl of his dreams. The talk show
host told him that if his folks
really loved him, they would
stand by his decision. She went
on to say that it was his choice
to make, and it should be made
on the basis of how he and the


love of his life felt rather than
some fear of rejection by other
parties. Those who love us will
stand by us even if we are wrong,
and maybe that is the true test of
love. Do not let the opinion of
others cause you fear that will
steal happiness from your life.
Think back over the past 12
months. How many things in
your life have caused you to
react with fear or have caused
you to have a sinking feeling in
your heart? How many of those
situations actually caused you
pain beyond the worry you felt
when you anticipated them?
In other words, how many of
those fearful situations really
materialized?
I can't stop you from worrying,
but I can suggest a few quick tests
to determine a real worry from
a false one. If you are basing
your worry on a stereotype as
the people at the bus stop did, or
on whether others will laugh at
you, or if family or friends are
emotionally blackmailing you,
you have real reason to believe
the fear is false.
Hodges is a nationally recognized
speaker, trainer and syndicated
columnist. He also hosts an
interview-format television program,
Spotlight on Government, on the
Tampa Bay Community Network
which airs Mondays at 8 p.m.
(Bright House channel 950, Verizon
channel 30) and Wednesdays at
7:30 p.m. (BH channel 949, Verizon
channel 36). The shows can also
be viewed at www.hodgesvideos.
com. Phone : 824-641-0816. Email:
i.;iil.'7 i.iii. ... .., Website: www.
i.;iih,. .. .. ,


Kindergarten
Round Up begins
Hillsborough County Public
Schools will hold a Kindergarten
Round Up period for the 2013-
2014 school year from Monday,
Jan. 28 to Friday, Feb. 8.
Families interested in enroll-
ing their child in their assigned,
attendance-area school should
attend the Kindergarten Round
Up scheduled for that school.
Kindergarten Round Up al-
lows parents to learn about the
school and become acquainted
with the campus, and offers the
student a first-hand look at kin-
dergarten life.
Parents who attend are encour-
aged to bring birth date, health
and home address documenta-
tion to register their child for
kindergarten. Parents unable to
attend the Round Up are encour-
aged to enroll their child by the
end of June, 2013.
Parents who would like to re-
search their kindergarten options
may visit various Round Ups
and apply for School Choice or
a magnet school.
The Hillsborough Choice ap-
plication period for elementary
schools closes Thursday, Feb.
14. Hillsborough Choice appli-
cations are available online for
download at http://choice.mys-
dhc.org.
For a detailed list of Kinder-
garten Round Ups and a list of
accepted documentation for en-
rollment, parents should visit the
district website at www.sdhc.
kl2.fl.us and see the "Kinder-
garten Round Up" section.


H Send your stories

and pictures to

News @ Observernews. net


COMMUNITY CHURCH COLLEGE PRING2013 SESSION
February 11 through March 21


*\ UNITED FREE CATALOG
~ COMMUNITY CHURCH with full details for the courses available at college
GREAT HALL office in the church, SCC Library, and around town.
For information, call
1501 La Jolla Avenue, SCC (813) 634-8607 or email Tri-C@verizon.net.
(813) 634-8607 Website: www.4lifelearning.org
Adult Education Classes. These are non-credit courses with no previous education needed.
Classes are open to everyone in the entire community & surrounding areas.
MONDAYS WEDNESDAYS
10:30- Noon Flower iAnigig 8:30- 10:00 Know Your World
10:30 Noon Beginning Sign Language 8:30 10:00 Safety Seminars
10:30 Noon Alternative Medicine 8:30 10:00 Economic Issues
10:30- 12:30 Bridge Basics 1: Bxginning 10:30- Noon Tampa General Hospital's
10:30 Noon Words We Use Health Series
1:00 2:30 Karate 10:30 Noon Introduction to Spanish
1:00 2:30 Sign Language Continuing 10:30 Noon News and Views
1:00 2:30 Antiques and Collectibles* 10:30 Noon Gc Il__'.
1:00 2:30 Investments Understanding 1:00 2:30 Personality Disorders
1:00 2:30 Memoirs or Creative Wriling
1:30 2:15 Basic Dog Tiuning THURSDAYS
3:00 4:30 Opening the Door to Spiritual Growth 8:30 10:00 Hypnosis*


TUESDAYS
8:30 10:00
8:30 10:00
8:30 10:00
8:30 10:00


U.S. History
Computer Applications*
Interior Design
Mathematics For Those Who Never
Quite Understood It
Estate & Tax Planning
Healthy Life Choices
Terrorism: Justifiable?
Sexuality
Computer Course Organize Your P.C.
Museum Primer
Travel Insights


0:30 Noon If You Like Book Talks*
0:30 12:30 Bridge Basics II; Competitive
Bidding
0:30 Noon Enjoy Plentiful Retirement
Money
1:00 2:30 Tools for Successful Living:
Reason and Emotion
1:00 2:30 The Point & Shoot Camera
2:30 4:00 Judaism
3:00 4:30 Buddhism/ Meditation*


OPEN REGISTRATION
Wednesday, January 23 in the Great Hall of
United Community Church. Use the West
Portico Entrance.
Hours are 9:00 Noon and 1:00 3:00
We are closed noon to 1:00 p.m.


I11i e pring Ness1on consists ol six VU-minute classes:
The cost is $25 for a six week session.
Walk-ins welcome in unlimited classes for $5 per class.
All seminars are $5 per class, no registration
EARLY REGISTRATION
(for unlimited classes ONLY)
You may register on the website: www.41ifelearning.org
using paypal and your credit card or print out a registration
form, mail it in with your check or drop it off at the college
Monday-Thursday mornings 8:30 to Noon.
LATE REGISTRATION
Will continue in the College office 8:30 a.m. to noon Monday
through Thursday only until start of classes. Closed Fridays.
TRIPS AND TOURS
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10 12:45 p.m.-5 p.m.
"You Can't Take it With You" Cost: $67
Asolo Theater, Sarasota
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Designer Show Houses "Jewels on the Bay" Lido Key & St.
Armand's Circle. Enjoy an afternoon of shopping Cost: $36
Lunch will be on your own.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 9 a.m. 2:30 p.m.
Keel & Curley Winerywine tasting and tour in Plant City
Cost: $36 Lunch will be on your own.
FRIDAY, MARCH 8 9:15 a.m. 2:30 p.m.
Raymond James Art Gallery in St. Pete Walking Tour
Cost: $38 Catered lunch provided.
FRIDAY, MARCH 15 8:30 a.m. 3:00 p.m.
Myakka Safari's Tour Cost: $44
Ride on one of world's largest airboats. Lunch on your own.
FRIDAY, MARCH 22 10:30 a.m. 3:00 p.m.
StarLite Sapphire Dining Yacht, St. Petersburg, Florida
Cost: $50 Maximum 45 people
Included is a sit-down lunch which includes salad, bread, choice
of six entrees, dessert, coffee and tea. Waitress tip included.


Award-Winning Newspapers

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THE CURRENT
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Fax: 813-645-4118
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EDITORIAL:
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brenda@observernews.net
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All press releases, news articles and
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mailed to ObserverNews, 210 Woodland
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=ME


10:30 -
10:30 -
10:30 -
10:30 -
1:00
1:00
3:00


Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
- 2:30
- 2:30
- 4:30


*Limited enrollment.
You must wait and i'. up on Jan. 23 or later.


6 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


JANUARY 24, 2013


1(
1(


1(







JANUARY 24, 2013 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 7


THE SAVVY SENIOR

Getting Social Security Help May Boost Your Benefits


Microloans up to $35k

open to small farmers, vets


Dear Savvy Senior,
Are there any services that you can
recommend that help pre-retirees
decide when to start drawing their
Social Security benefits? My wife
and I are still a few years away
from retiring
but want to
carefully weigh
all our options
I to make sure
we get the
most from our
benefits.
By Jim Miller Approaching
Retirement

Dear Approaching,
Deciding when to begin collecting
your Social Security benefits could
be one of the most important
retirement-income decisions you'll
make. The difference between a
good decision and a poor one could
cost you tens of thousands of dollars
over your retirement, so doing your
homework and weighing your
options now is a very smart move.
What to Consider
As you may already know, you
can claim Social Security any time
from age 62 to 70, but the longer
you wait, the larger your monthly
check. However, there are many
other factors you need to take into
account to help you make a good
decision, like your current financial
needs, your health and family lon-
gevity, whether you plan to work in
retirement, whether you have other
retirement income sources, and if
you're married, your spouse's situ-
ation.
You also need to understand the
dizzying array of rules that can af-
fect your Social Security benefits,
and factor in the various strategies


that can increase your benefits if
you're married, divorced or wid-
owed.
To help you compare all your op-
tions, there are a number of online
tools and services that have sprung
up in recent years that can help you
make an informed decision.
Online Tools
To get started, your first step is to
go to the Social Security Statement
web page (socialsecurity.gov/mys-
tatement) and get your personalized
statement that estimates what your
retirement benefits will be at age 62,
full retirement age (currently 66) or
when you turn 70. These estimates
are based on your yearly earnings
that are also listed on your report.
Once you get your estimates for
both you and your wife, there are
several online tools you can turn
to that can crunch hundreds of cal-
culations to compare your benefits
under various scenarios and differ-
ent ages to help you figure out your
optimum claiming strategy.
Two free sites are Analyze Now
(analyzenow.com) which offers a
robust decision-making tool called
the "Strategic Social Security Plan-
ner," but requires Microsoft Excel
to use it. And AARP's Social Secu-
rity Benefits Calculator (aarp.org/
socialsecuritybenefits), which is a
less sophisticated tool but very easy
to use.
Or, if you don't mind spending
a little money, there are higher-
level services like Social Security
Choices (socialsecuritychoices.
com) which provides a comprehen-
sive customized report for only $30
to help single, married or widowed
pre-retirees identify their best
claiming strategy. Or Maximize My
Social Security (maximizemyso-


cialsecurity.com), which charges
$40 for their report, and takes into
account the thousands of different
factors and combinations to help
you maximize your benefits.
Personalized Advice
If, however, you want or need
more help, there are specialized
firms and financial advisors that can
advise you for a fee.
One of the best is Social Security
Solutions (socialsecuritysolutions.
com, 866-762-7526), which offers
several levels of service including
their "Premier Plus" plan that runs
multiple calculations and compari-
sons, recommends a best course of
action in a detailed report, and gives
you a one-on-one session with a
Social Security specialist over the
phone to discuss the report and ask
questions. The fee for this service is
$125.
Premier Social Security Consult-
ing (premiersocialsecurityconsult-
ing.com, 800-518-0761) is another
option that offers several consult-
ing packages, ranging from $75 to
$295.
Or, you can get help through a fee-
only financial adviser who special-
izes in Social Security analysis and
charges on an hourly basis. To find
someone use the Garrett Planning
Network (garrettplanningnetwork.
com, 866-260-8400), which offers
the services of 300 independent
advisers nationwide. The cost for
a Garrett advisor ranges between
$150 and $300 per hour.

Send your senior questions to:
Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Nor-
man, OK 73070, or visit SavvySe-
nior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor
to the NBC Today show and author
of The Savvy Senior book


A new microloan program from
the U.S. Department of Agriculture
(USDA) is designed to help small
and family operations, beginning
and socially disadvantaged farm-
ers secure loans under $35,000.
The new microloan program is
aimed at bolstering the progress
of producers through their start-
up years by providing needed re-
sources and helping to increase
equity so that farmers may eventu-
ally graduate to commercial credit
and expand their operations. The
microloan program will also pro-
vide a less burdensome, more sim-
plified application process in com-
parison to traditional farm loans.
The interest rate for USDA's
new microloan product changes
monthly and is currently 1.25 per-
cent.
Administered through USDA's
Farm Service Agency (FSA) Op-
erating Loan Program, the new mi-
croloan program offers credit op-
tions and solutions to a variety of
producers. FSA has a long history
of providing agricultural credit to
the nation's farmers and ranchers
through its Operating Loan Pro-
gram.
In assessing its programs, FSA
evaluated the needs of smaller
farm operations and any unin-
tended barriers to obtaining fi-
nancing. For beginning farmers
and ranchers, for instance, the new
microloan program offers a sim-
plified loan application process.
In addition, for those who want to
grow niche crops to sell directly to
ethnic markets and farmers mar-
kets, the microloan program offers
a path to obtain financing. For past
FSA Rural Youth Loan recipients,
the microloan program provides a


bridge to successfully transition to
larger-scale operations.
Since 2009, USDA has made
a record amount of farm loans
through FSA-more than 128,000
loans totaling nearly $18 billion.
USDA has increased the number
of loans to beginning farmers and
ranchers from 11,000 loans in 2008
to 15,000 loans in 2011. More than
40 percent of USDA's farm loans
now go to beginning farmers. In
addition, USDA has increased its
lending to socially-disadvantaged
producers by nearly 50 percent
since 2008.
Producers can apply for a maxi-
mum of $35,000 to pay for initial
start-up expenses such as hoop
houses to extend the growing sea-
son, essential tools, irrigation, de-
livery vehicles, and annual expens-
es such as seed, fertilizer, utilities,
land rents, marketing, and distribu-
tion expenses. As their financing
needs increase, applicants can ap-
ply for an operating loan up to the
maximum amount of $300,000 or
obtain financing from a commer-
cial lender under FSA's Guaranteed
Loan Program.
USDA farm loans can be used
to purchase land, livestock, equip-
ment, feed, seed, and supplies,
or to construct buildings or make
farm improvements. Small farm-
ers often rely on credit cards or
personal loans, which carry high
interest rates and have less flex-
ible payment schedules, to finance
their operations. Expanding access
to credit, USDA's microloan will
provide a simple and flexible loan
process for small operations.
Producers interested in applying
for a microloan may contact their
local Farm Service Agency office.


Golf Club at Cypress Creek
1011 Cypress Village Blvd.'* Ruskin
Please call for reservation

813-440-4576 Ext. 2
S\


INCLUDES:


Two for 2 Soups or Salads


$39.99
J,


2 Entrees
Balsamic Salmon
Roasted Lamb Shank
6 oz. Petite Filet Steak
Chicken Marsala


Wednesday

PRIME RIB DINNER
12oz. Cut

$15.95
T.x .,nd gratuity not included


2 Desserts

1 Complimentary
Bottle of wine ,
Available for dinner Wednesday .
through Saturday.
Tax and gratuity not included




Thursday

ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
Build Your Own Pasta Night
$11.95
* Your choice of Angel Hair, Penne or Fettuccini
* Your choice of Alfredo, Marinara or Pink
Vodka Sauce
* Your Choice of Veggies
* Your choice of Chicken or Shrimp
Includes salad
Tax and gratuity not included


. A X


OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 7


JANUARY 24, 2013






8 OBSERVER NEWS






Baby Time Monday, Jan. 28 at 1:35 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 29 at 11:35 a.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 30 at 10:05 a.m.
For children ages 0-20 months and their caregivers ~ Early literacy
begins at birth. Bond with your baby through stories, bouncy rhymes
and songs in this 20-minute lapsit program that introduces early literacy
skills and encourages language development.

Super Science Monday Monday, Jan. 28 at 3 p.m.
For children ages 6-10 ~ Join us for an interactive, hands-on afternoon
and experiment as we turn the library into a science lab! Register at the
Reference Desk or by calling 813-273-3652. This is a school early-re-
lease Monday.

"Pee Wee Artists": Let's Create! Monday, Jan. 28 at 3:30 a.m.
""Pee Wee Artists", 3-6 years, will join our art instructor for a fun
afternoon creating an art project to take home. Limit 15. Adult must be
present. Registration required at either the Information Desk or by call-
ing 813-273-3652.

Toddler Time Tuesday, Jan. 29 at 10:05 a.m. & 10:55 a.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 30 at 10:35 a.m.
For children ages 20-36 months and their caregivers ~ Stories, finger-
plays, songs and interactive activities make up this fun 20-minute pro-
gram that highlights early literacy skills and encourages reading readi-
ness.

Story Time Tuesday, Jan. 29 at 11 a.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 30 at 11 a.m.
For children ages 3-5 and their caregivers ~ Stories, action rhymes,
songs and interactive activities make up this engaging 30-minute pro-
gram that highlights early literacy skills, and encourages reading readi-
ness and social interaction.

Family Story Time Thursday, Jan. 31 at 7 p.m.
For ages 2-5 with a caregiver ~ Make reading time family time. Sto-
ries, action rhymes, songs, interactive activities, and crafts make up this
fun 30-minute program that celebrates a love of reading. Children may
wear pajamas and bring a blanket and favorite cuddly toy.

Wacky Kitchen Wizardry Saturday, Feb. 2 at 10:30 a.m.
For ages 5-12 ~ Join us as the goofy professor creates all kinds of fun
magic concoctions with common elements found in everyone's kitchen.
Things bubble, fizz up, and bounce out as kids are entertained while
being introduced to the fun of science. Funded by the Friends of the
SouthShore Regional Library.
Membership with the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library
helps provide the funding for free programs offered at the Library. If you
would be interested in becoming a Member of the Friends of the Library,
call Jim Duffy at 813.634.1396 www.southshorefriends.com.


Champion Storage helps collect items
for African medical centers, schools


Champion Storage in Ruskin
will serve as a drop-off point from
Saturday, Feb. 9 through Friday,
Feb. 15, for much-needed supplies
for more than 2,000 HIV-positive
orphans in Tanzania.
The infirmaries, medical centers,
hospitals and schools in Moshi,
Tanzania are run by the Sisters of
our Lady of Kilimanjaro.
Needed supplies include: clothes,
shoes, sweaters, linens, towels,


walkers, crutches, canes, wheel-
chairs, bandages, wraps, gauze,
soap and shampoo, hand-sanitizer,
diapers, pencils, crayons, markers,
computers, sewing machines and
fabrics. Cash donations are also
welcome.
Champion Storage is located at
2809 College Ave. E in Ruskin.
All donated items will be sent to
the Sisters by ocean container in
March, 2013.


College & AP Night at local schools is
Feb. 6
The AVID programs at East Bay High School and Eisenhower Middle
School are organizing an undergraduate college and university informa-
tional event.
The event is designed to provide students with information on colleges
and universities, as well as Advanced Placement classes, to better equip
them for the future.
The evening will also serve as a good venue for participating institu-
tions to recruit from a diverse pool of admission candidates.
The event is scheduled to start at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 6 at East
Bay High School, 7710 Old Big Bend Rd. in Gibsonton.
For more information, contact Arnitra Gollett at 954-560-1125.


JANUARY 24, 2013


Cypress Creek Elementary Terrific Kids
Sponsored by the Sun City Center Kiwanis, Cypress Creek's Terrific Kids for January are: Selena Perez-
Chavez, Jariah Porter, Tiffany Garcia, Azael Reducindo-Cervant, Mauriana Williams, Sophia Bocane-
gra, Nevaeh Butler, Daniel Vazquez, Jayden Hernandez, Payton Muirhead, James Navarrete-Nava, Maria
Navarro-Artiaga, Jose Pinto, Alex Mendieta-Rodriguez, Laylah Lee, Juan Carlos Perez-Perez, Liliana
Esquivel-Zuniga, Ardens Homidas, Nyla Janae McNair, Shooter Sweat, Valeria De La Cruz, Madison
Peluso, Jahel "JJ" Guzman, Madison Mathis, Lily Barrett, Allison Troyer, David McNabb, Alyssa Perez,
Hunter Lopez, Gracie Monroe, Daniel Godinez-Bermudez, Rylie Vasquez, Nya Rivera, Eva Gellert, Josh-
ua Dias, Jeanette Hilerio, Kayliana Martinez, Jennifer Espinoza, Jasmin Dimas, Rosaura Diaz-Hower,
Rosa Arteaga, Jose Ibarra-Cano, Aileen Vasquez, Jessica Rodriguez, Aracellie Rodriguez, Ariel Barrett,
Victoria Fox, Deana Perez-Perez, Zaniya Graham, William Leroy, Fatima Guia, Iris De La Fuente, Stephen
Heslin, Ximena Alvarez, Yaneli Escalante-Rosales, Erik Fernandez, Melanye Magana, Dakota Sperber,
Daniel Galicia, Maribel Martinez, Cielo Leon, Nariah Garcia, and Rubidia "Ruby" Coz.


'Iq

_, I

'Pups on the Patio'
is next Tuesday
Take your furry friends to "Pups
on the Patio" at 5 p.m. on Tues-
day, Jan. 29, hosted by Tavern on
the Boulevard, 250 Apollo Beach
Blvd. in Apollo Beach.
This event will benefit C.A.R.E.,
the no-kill animal rescue in
Ruskin. The $5 entry fee includes
six raffle tickets and a chance at a
50/50 drawing.

Creating 2013 and
beyond...
The Metaphysical Society meet-
ing on Wednesday, Jan. 30 will
feature Carl and Orturn Franklin
speaking on "Creating 2013 and
Beyond."
The Franklins are Coptic Minis-
ters, lecturers, seminar/workshop
leaders, metaphysical researchers
and authors.
The meeting starts at 10 a.m. in
the Atrium's Heritage Room in
Sun City Center. It is open to the
public, and admission is free.
For more information contact
Chris Waugh at cmwaugh22C@ya-
hoo.com or 513-305-9369.


Outdoor Adventure Film
Series starts Saturday
The 30th Annual Outdoor Ad-
venture Film Series, presented
by the Eagle Audubon Society of
Kings Point, kicks off withAmer-
ica Amazing Places. The film,
narrated by producer Bob DeLoss,
features America's little-known
travel destinations.
The general public is welcome to
this showing, at 7:30 p.m. on Sat-
urday, Jan. 26 in the Borini The-
ater.
Tickets are $7.50 and are avail-
able at the Kings Point Box Office
Monday through Friday, or just be-
fore the showing.


Ellen Klienschmidt Ann Marie LeBlanc Sandra Freedm

AAUW honors Women of Distinction


The Sun City Center/South-
shore Branch of the American
Association of University Women
will host a Champagne Brunch on
Tuesday, Feb. 19 at Community
Hall.
It will begin at 10:30 a.m. and
tickets are $20 per person. Tick-
ets are available in the Atrium
Feb. 4 -8 and Feb. 11-13, from
9 a.m. noon, or by calling Rox-
anne at 813-746-1350. All pro-
ceeds benefit Mature Women's
Scholarship.
AAUW will be honoring this
year's Women of Distinction:
OOEllen Klienschmidt, Teacher
of the year in 2006 and president
of SCC Performing Arts Club.
She received her BFA from the
University of Wisconsin. Ellen
continues to teach elementary
music and spends time devoted to


professional singing, acting, and
her playwriting career.
00Ann Marie LaBlanc, chair
of the SCC 50th Anniversary
Events, and past member of the
SCC Community Association
Board. She has worked with
the Performing Arts Club, Fun-
Fest, Holiday Walk and Pancake
Breakfast. She has had a special
interest in all of these activities
and more.
1Sandra W. Freedman, the
first female mayor of Tampa
(1986 1995). She is a graduate
of the University of Miami, with
a B.A. in Government. She was a
speaker at the 1992 Democratic
National Convention. Her inter-
ests are family, politics, travel,
and exercise.
For more information call Bun-
ny at 813-634-6387.


This pajama game is serious
Youngsters in the gifted program at Doby Elementary are spearhead-
ing The Pajama Program, which provides warm pajamas and books to
needy children, many waiting and hoping to be adopted. To find out
more, visit www.pajamaprogram.org
Their goal is to donate 100 pairs of pajamas in honor of the 100th
day of school.
The community can help by donating new, unused, pajamas and
books for all ages (infants to age 17). Pajamas need to be a complete
set or a nightgown.
Donations may be dropped off at the South Shore Chamber of Com-
merce locations in Ruskin and Apollo Beach. The chamber delivers all
items to the school on Friday, Jan. 25.


Ruskin Eagles Aerie 4351

12051st St. S.W.

Upcoming Events
Monday Night............... 6 p.m. Bingo. Free hot dogs.
Tuesday Night................6 p.m. Bar Games. $1 draft beer all day
Friday Night.................. 6 p.m. Feather Your Nest. Food available.
Saturday, Jan. 26............. 1 p.m. Meat Raffle
........................................... 5 p.m Lasagna dinner
........................................... 6:30 p.m M usic by Lani C & Company
Sunday............................6 p.m. Feather Your Nest. Free
hot dogs during games.

For more information, call (813) 645-2922.






OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 9


Observations: Strippers! Need I say more?


There's nothing like driving
from one of the northern-most
states to the southern-most state
to get a good idea of just how
large and diverse this nation really
is. That diversity, of course, is
reflected in the political rancor
of our time and it is also why a
two or three percent difference
in voting is now considered a
mandate.
But there is one thing we all
seem to have in common as
Americans: strippers. Yes, that's
right, strippers. From the Rust
Belt to the Bible Belt, if you drive


on any major freeway, you'll a short jaunt over to the edge
never be very far from a place of Tampa to find several places
with strippers. In the heart of the advertising them. Some people
Bible Belt on 1-75 in claim that the Tampa
Georgia, they don't Bay Area has more
even mince words in strippers per capital than
advertising. Multiple any other city. That's
billboards scream not true, of course.
out in giant letters, We'd have to work
STRIPPERS! And then, diligently to attract
in smaller text is says, Observations enough strippers to
"Need we say more? By Mitch Traphagen topple places like Las
Exit now." Vegas, let alone a few
While there are no mitch_ bseeews.ne third-world countries
strip joints in Sun City that would seem to
Center (that I know of), it's just be promising locales for finding
those willing to shed their clothes


in exchange for compensation.
And speaking of strippers, the
conversation brings to mind the
age-old profession of prostitution.
I've never hired a prostitute so I
don't know what is involved or
where to look, but it probably
wouldn't be hard to narrow things
down to a few promising parts of
town.
When Michelle and I visited
Havana in the late 90s with a few
dozen other American sailboats,
the marina we stayed at was
awash in prostitutes. As a result,
we sought them out. Our church
had given us a bunch of little New
Testament Bibles to hand out.
And in those days I was a serious
frequent-flyer with an impressive
collection of hotel soap bars we
also brought along to hand out.


STRIPPERS
L "..


Strip joints don't mince words c
1-75 in Georgia.

Back then and, possibly today,
soap, aspirin and the like were in
extremely short supply in Cuba.
So, we'd seek out someone who
appeared to be a prostitute and
give her a bag containing a Bible,
soaps, aspirin and a five-dollar
bill. Yep, five bucks was enough
for a whole menu of services
from a Cuban prostitute, but
there were no strings attached.
Besides, Michelle probably would
have frowned upon that. Also,
we weren't Bible-banging them
over the head, it was just a gift,
something we had to give.
Why would we seek out
prostitutes? Because most were
young women who would


ism -Sf


MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO
in their roadside advertising along


probably rather be anything else
or be anywhere else, but they
needed money to survive. Five
bucks went a long ways in Cuba
back then. It probably still does.
The little Bibles were hugely
popular. We were told that
anything written in English was
popular so people there could
better learn the language. As such,
you can blame us and others like
us if the trade embargo disappears
and large sections of the
population appear to be speaking
to you using the words "thy,"
"thee" and "smite." In fact, they
were so popular, that we ended
up running out and donating our
> See OBSERVATIONS, page 22


Photography Class
Photo: Intro to Experimental Processes
FOR TEENS & ADULTS at the FIREHOUSE
Sponsored by the Tampa Museum of Art

















Instructor, Photographer James Reiman
Work with lights, cameras and experimental processes.
Monday, January 28 March 4 (6 classes) 3:00 5:45 p.m.
Fee: $45 Member $55 Non-Member (includes materials)
Call today to register (813) 645-7651
or online at www.firehouseculturalcenter.org


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JANUARY 24, 2013







10 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER JANUARY 24, 2013


Dove Interiors Carpet One Floor &
Home introduces free iPad magazine


Dove Interiors Carpet One Floor
& Home is offering a new digital
magazine to its customers. The
magazine, Beautiful Design. Made
Simple., features inspiration, tips
and advice to make creating a
beautiful home just a little bit eas-
ier. The magazine is free and can
be downloaded from the Apple
App Store.
Each quarter Beautiful Design.
Made Simple. will feature new
ideas and inspiration. Dove Inte-
riors Carpet One Floor & Home's
goal is to provide its customers
with design tips and trends before,
during, and after they purchase
flooring.
The premier issue of Beautiful
Design. Made Simple. features
information and ways to incor-


r4 41-7506313


Thomas A. DeVol.
I .. ". I. \


DENTURE
CONSULTATION
OR 2nd OPINION


porate Benjamin Moore's 2013
color trends; simple tips on updat-
ing a room; inspiration and design
advice from professionals Tracy
Bross and Glen Peloso; carpet care
tips; flooring trends; and a plethora
of inspiring images for the entire
home.
To download this free magazine
visit http: //www.beautifuldesign-
madesimple.com or search for
Beautiful Design. Made Simple. in
your App Store.
Dove Interiors Carpet One Floor
& Home is a locally owned floor-
ing retailer serving the Ruskin
area. They are part of North Amer-
ica's leading floor covering co-op.
The showroom is located at 2305
College Ave. in Ruskin. For more
information, call 813-645-8660.


Train to volunteer
as a Master
Money Mentor
Hillsborough County Extension
Service, in partnership with Unit-
ed Way of Suncoast is offering
the Florida Master Money Mentor
Volunteer Certification program.
This volunteer program is for
people who want to devote time
mentoring individuals about the
basics of personal financial man-
agement. No previous financial ed-
ucation or background in financial
services is required. Prospective
mentors will receive approximate-
ly 20 hours of intensive training in
basic financial management and
mentoring techniques. In return,
they must commit to volunteering
at least two hours per week and
following protocols in regards to
reporting, client confidentiality,
and providing researched based,
unbiased information.
The next training in Hillsbor-
ough County will take place from
9 a.m. noon on Tuesdays, Feb.
12 March 12, at the Hillsborough
County Extension Service Office
at 5339 County Rd. 579 in Seffner.
Volunteers should plan to attend
all training sessions. An interview,
application, and background check
is required before being accepted
into the training.
The University of Florida Exten-
sion serves to provide the infra-
structure for this program through-
out the state of Florida, thanks to a
gift from Bank of America.
For more information, con-
tact Lisa Leslie at 813-744-5519
x54143 or lesliel@hillsborough-
county.org.


No money down
Cash Discounts
CALL FOM F-RE ESTIMAKT
649-1599
-visit our website-
www.BRATESALUMI NUM.com
la aour atea 26 qeats


Chuck Fredericks,
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* .I... IRI . .. d1.1... i'.
S1 ...i i.... ..I ..... .. .1 i L


\ew, Patients and
Emergencies .re
.AlwaYs I'elcome


FULL MOUTH
SERIES OF
X-RAYS & EXAM
. s. ir95. i,,
.for 5 .


I / I /'


C.A.R.E. is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.
For directions, visit www.CareShelter.org or call (813) 645-2273.


Hercules
Hercules is an appropriately
named little boy kitten who was
found as a stray. He is one strong
orange tabby when it comes to lift-
ing, batting, and carrying all those
cat toys. Please take this little guy
to his forever home and make him
a part of your family. As part of his
adoption Hercules will be brought
up to date on his shots, neutered
and micro chipped.
DOB: Nov. 15, 2012.


PHOTOS MARLENE GREENBERG
Angel
Angel is a delightful Terrier mix
who came to C.A.R.E. as a stray.
She is just as easygoing as she is
cute. Angel is fun when it is time
to play, and cuddles when you feel
like just being quiet. Angel likes
other dogs, big and small. She is
an all-around wonderful dog! She
would make a great companion for
just about any home. As part of her
adoption, Angel will be spayed.
She is micro chipped and current
on her vaccinations.
DOB: Dec. 2, 2010


Indulge in the Riches of Gold and Silver at [o We Pay'
Top $$
5916 FORTUNE PLACE -APOLLO BEACH, FL 33572 -

WE BUY GOLD0 CIN
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SILVER & COINS JEWELRY
813-938-1104 727-543-9247
Mon -Fnri 10am -5pm Sat 11 am -2pm &byappt
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Door and Drawer ....
Replacement ,
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FRESH VEGETABLES
Open Monl -Sat 9-00 a in -6 1) in


-6!124 L(31/3mieseat :fl30)[BIll F r
18313-790-


Sun City Dental Center

Thomas A. DeVol, D.D.S., P.A.

(813) 633-2636

727 Cortaro Drive
I.. .. 1... 1, 2 .. ....
II .. . .. l\.. ,. i. ,


-


I


I I I I I 1 1 . 1


10 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


JANUARY 24, 2013




JANUARY 24, 2013 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 11


WANTED: 50 PEOPLE
to try new DIGITAL Technology Hearing Aids.
Are you or someone you know, struggling with hearing loss? We need
50 people with difficulty hearing on the phone and in noisy situations
to evaluate the latest in digital technology. We will perform a thorough
hearing screening FREE of charge to ALL callers. We will then choose 50
qualified candidates for this program*. *Security deposit maybe required.
Introducing the NEW Proper Hearing Instruments
With PropelTM Wireless Hearing Instruments, You Can:
Listen to your TV, Radio or Cell Phone through your
hearing instruments
Adjust the volume without touching the aid wn onnt to
Have improved speech understanding, especially the sunifink Mobile streams steeo o
Sound from sound directly to
women's and children'svoiceS. your Cell Phone... I your hearing aids
Hear better in noisy places like a restaurant, or groups prepe
of people.
Please call immediately to schedule your FREE Screening and
FREE Demonstration of the new Wireless Hearing Instruments!
You will receive tremendous savings due to your participation if you are
selected. If your evaluation shows hearing improvement with the new
instruments, you may choose to be fitted with them and receive a 50%
Discount Off MSRP. You will also receive FREE In-Office Maintenance
for the life of the hearing aids. Appointment times are limited. CALL TODAY to
schedule your evaluation to determine if you're a candidate for this program!
6 Days Only! Call Now! January 24th-31st!
,I T ~ SAVE UP TO ~' ,'( AARP Members Receive (1
:I 50^O/ O F an additional
SU /o OFF MSRP $500 OFF MSRP
I toward the purchase of a pair of any Propel Hearing Aids. $I500 O F MSRP
| Can't be combined with other offers. Limit one coupon per customer. toward the purchase of a pair of any Propel Hearing Aids.
Offer expires: 1-31-2013 Limit one coupon per customer. Offer expires: 1-31-2013
4% - - -- - - %-----------------------------
Hearing Centers of Southwest Florida
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SWalk-ins Welcome! FREE Second Opinions! Proud to be American-Owned & Opei'at
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12 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


8 GREAT REASONS


GET


/C)


UrP


HEARING TESTED


~1~~~~


Your spouse


will thank you.


You're tired of saying


"Pardon me?"


" You want your answers to match the


questions.


2 You and your cell phone don't have a working


SYou've read studies that show hearing
health problems, like Alzheimer's.


relationship.


loss can contribute to serious


You're not alone after a certain age, just about all of us have hearing loss.

You're ready to hear at the restaurant, the play, the game.


V


Your hearing is as important


Get smart about your hearing
health with a FREE hearing
exam at Beltone.

Mention reservation code 120123
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Schedule an appointment for a
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Eu
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o it call today
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(800) 27-I
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uwinm~~3
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(00O


ZU10


"Aal





OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 13


Great service and convenience for Canadians at over 1,300
TD Bank locations in the U.S.

With TD Cross-Border Banking you can enjoy the convenience of over 1,300 TD Bank, America's Most
Convenient Bank locations in the U.S., from Maine to Florida. Open a U.S. TD Bank account today and
you can enjoy the benefits of easily transferring money between your Canadian based TD Canada Trust
account and your TD Bank account in the U.S. You can also apply to TD Bank for a U.S. mortgage' and
credit card2 based on your Canadian and U.S. assets, income and credit history. All while being able to
view both your TD Canada Trust and TD Bank accounts online on the same web page. Get the convenience
you've come to expect in Canada while in the U.S.

Visit a TD Bank for all your cross-border banking needs.
Visit tdbank.com/locator to find the location nearest you.
Call' for more information.3




ED Bank


America's Most Convenient Bank


TD Bank is TD Bank, N.A., a wholly-owned U.S. subsidiary of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. Member FDIC. Accounts issued by TD Bank, N.A. are not insured by Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation. 1. Subject to credit approval and other conditions. Mortgages limited to
property located in U.S. state where TD Bank, N.A. has locations. Equal Housing Lendere. 2. Subject to credit approval and other conditions. Applicants must be a resident of Canada or a U.S. state where TD Bank, N.A. has locations. 3. TD Bank, N.A. is located in the United
States and its support line and stores are serviced in English. /The TD logo and other trade-marks are the property of The Toronto-Dominion Bank or a wholly-owned subsidiary, in Canada and/or other countries.


JANUARY 24, 2013




14 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


JANUARY 24, 2013


I -ja


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JANUARY 24, 2013 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 15


Hearing loss prevention drugs closer


to reality thanks to new testing


method from the University of Florida


GAINESVILLE, Ha. A new
way to test anti-hearing-loss drugs
in people could help land those
medicines on pharmacy shelves
sooner. University of Florida re-
searchers have figured out the
longstanding problem of how to
safely create temporary, reversible
hearing loss in order to see how
well the drugs work. The findings
are described in the November/De-
cember 2012 issue of the journal
Ear & Hearing.
"There's a real need for drug
solutions to hearing loss," said
lead investigator Colleen Le Prell,
Ph.D., an associate professor in
the department of speech, lan-
guage, and hearing sciences at the
UF College of Public Health and
Health Professions. "Right now the
only options for protecting against
noise-induced hearing loss are to
turn down what you're listening
to, walk away from it or wear ear
plugs, and those options may not
be practical for everyone, particu-
larly for those in the military who
need to be able to hear threats."
About 26 millionAmerican adults
have noise-induced hearing loss,
according to the National Institute
on Deafness and Other Communi-
cation Disorders. Prevention is key
because damage to hearing-related
hair cells in the inner ear by loud
noise is irreversible. Though hear-
ing aids can help amplify sound
and implanted devices can restore
some sensation of sound for those
with more profound hearing loss,
they do not restore normal hearing.
Thus, researchers are trying to find
drugs that prevent hearing damage
in the first place.
Although prototype drugs have
prevented noise-induced hearing
loss in laboratory animals, it has
been hard to know whether the
same protection is possible in hu-
mans, largely because researchers
lacked an effective method for the
needed tests. Those tests are now
achievable because of the UF ef-
forts. The work brings scientists
closer to the development of drugs
that could help protect people at
risk of hearing damage from
rock concert goers to factory work-
ers and military personnel who are
routinely exposed to noise as they
work.
Le Prell's model is the first to use
controlled music levels to reliably
cause low-level, temporary hearing
loss in human participants. Other
studies have used beeps or tones,
user-selected music levels, or mu-
sic exposures that don't result in
temporary hearing loss. Three
monitoring boards ensured that
studies of the UF model met na-
tional safety standards for research
in humans. Co-investigator Patrick
Antonelli, M.D., the George T.
Singleton Professor and chair of
the UF department of otolaryngol-
ogy, provided onsite supervision


of study participant safety, and
collaborators at the University of
Michigan and Southern Illinois
University were involved in study
design and safety discussions.
"Dr. Le Prell started with a
unique idea to create a reversible
noise-induced hearing loss and has
established solid groundwork for
this new model in the use of clini-
cal drug testing," said hearing ex-
pert Jianxin Bao, Ph.D., an associ-
ate professor of otolaryngology and
biology and biomedical sciences at
Washington University School of
Medicine in St. Louis, who was
not involved in the UF study. "As
for every new model, several un-
known factors exist for this elegant
experiment model, which requires
further detailed studies."
To induce temporary hearing
loss, study participants listened
to rock or pop music on a digital
music player via headphones for
four hours at sound levels ranging
from 93 decibels the noise level
of a power lawn mower to 102
decibels, the noise of a jackham-
mer. Each participant got a hear-
ing test four times, 15 minutes to
three-and-a-quarter hours after his
or her listening session, as well as
follow-up tests one day and one
week later. Fifteen minutes after
the music stopped, those who lis-
tened to the highest music levels
had lost just a small amount of
hearing six decibels, on aver-
age. Hearing returned to normal
within three hours.
Le Prell's group will use this
testing model in two first-of-a-
kind clinical trials of therapeutics
designed to determine if noise-
induced hearing loss can be pre-
vented in humans. The first study
uses a dietary supplement called
Soundbites, manufactured by
Hearing Health Science, a Uni-
versity of Michigan bioscience
spinoff company. Soundbites con-
tains the vitamin A precursor beta
carotene, vitamins C and E and the
mineral magnesium. This antioxi-
dant formula, the patent for which
Le Prell shares, has prevented tem-
porary and permanent hearing loss
in laboratory animals.
In the other ongoing study, partic-
ipants take a drug called SPI-1005
produced by Sound Pharmaceuti-
cals Inc. The test capsule contains
a new molecule called ebselen that
mimics a protective inner ear pro-
tein.
The Food and Drug Administra-
tion will monitor the studies to en-
sure openness, analytical rigor and
participant safety as the research-
ers try to get badly needed drugs
onto the market.
"We really want to find out
what's going to work and we want
to make it possible for strategies
that do work to get in the hands
of the people who need them," Le
Prell said


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OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 15


JANUARY 24, 2013







EarthTalkE- The Environmental Magazine:


Dear EarthTalk:
What are some tips for keeping
my dogs and cats healthy?
-- Kim via e-mail
Believe it or not, our pets may be
exposed to more harsh chemicals
through the course of their day than
we are. Researchers at the nonprofit
Environmental Working Group
(EWG) found that pet dogs and cats
were contaminated with 48 of 70 in-
dustrial chemicals tested, including
43 chemicals at levels higher than
those typically found in people.
"Just as children ingest pollutants
in tap water, play on lawns with
pesticide residues or breathe in an
array of indoor air contaminants, so
do their pets," reports EWG. Since
they develop and age seven or more
times faster than children, pets also
develop health problems from ex-
posures much faster, EWG adds.
"Average levels of many chemi-
cals were substantially higher in
pets than is typical for people, with
2.4 times higher levels of stain- and
grease-proof coatings (perfluoro-
chemicals) in dogs, 23 times more
fire retardants (PBDEs) in cats, and
more than five times the amounts
of mercury, compared to average
levels in people," reports the group.
Their 2008 study looked at plas-
tics and food packaging chemicals,
heavy metals, fire retardants and
stain-proofing chemicals in pooled
samples of blood and urine from 20
dogs and 37 cats tested at a Virginia
veterinary clinic.
"For dogs, blood and urine
samples were contaminated with
35 chemicals altogether, includ-
ing 11 carcinogens, 31 chemicals
toxic to the reproductive system,
and 24 neurotoxins," adds EWG.
This is particularly alarming given


Keeping pets healthy











that man's best friend is known to
have much higher cancer rates than
humans. A 2008 Texas A&M Vet-
erinary Medical Center study found
that dogs have 35 times more skin
cancer, four times more breast tu-
mors, eight times more bone cancer,
and two times more leukemia per
capital as humans. And according to
researchers from Purdue University,
cancer is the second leading cause
of death for dogs, with about one in
four canines succumbing to some
form of the disease. Meanwhile, hy-
perthyroidism a condition which
many think is on the rise in felines
due to chemical exposures is al-
ready a leading cause of illness for
older cats.
In its Pets for the Environment
website, EWG lists dozens of ways
for pet owners to ensure that dogs
and cats are as safe as possible in
this dangerous world we inhabit.
Among other tips, EWG recom-
mends choosing pet food without
chemical preservatives such as
BHA, BHT or ethoxyquin, and
looking for organic or free-range
ingredients rather than by-products.
As for drinking water, EWG sug-
gests running tap water through
a reverse osmosis filter either


faucet-mounted or pitcher-based
- before it goes into a pet's bowl
to remove common contaminants.
Also, replacing old bedding or fur-
niture, especially if it has exposed
foam, can prevent pets from ingest-
ing fire retardants. From avoiding
non-stick pans and garden pesti-
cides to choosing greener kitty litter
and decking material, the list of tips
goes on.
Taking steps to ensure a safer
environment for pets some 63
percent of U.S. homes have at least
one will mean a safer world for
humans, too. EWG concludes that
our pets "well may be serving as
sentinels for our own health, as
they breathe in, ingest or absorb the
same chemicals that are in our envi-
ronments."
For more information, www.ewg.
org/PetsfortheEnvironment
EarthTalk is written and edited
by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss
and is a registered trademark of
E The Environmental Magazine
(www.emagazine.com). Send ques-
tions to: earthtalk@emagazine.
com. Subscribe: www.emagazine.
corn/subscribe. Free Trial Issue:
www.emagazine.com/trial.


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Learn to preserve vegetables,
meats and seafood safely at home
Whether you raise or catch your own food or buy from someone
else, you can preserve vegetables, meats and seafood at their peak
of freshness to enjoy later.
Hillsborough County Extension Service will teach:
How to can vegetables
How to can meats & seafood
What equipment is needed
Types, pros & cons of canners
0 How to use a pressure canner
What can and cannot be altered safely in a recipe
Plus, what's important for safety
Participants will get directions, recipes and resources to take
home. The class will demonstrate equipment and procedures. The
new USDA Canning Guide will be for sale at discount price.
Classes will be at the Hillsborough County Extension Service of-
fice, located at 5339 CR 579 in Seffner.
Registration is $10 per household up to 4 people. Registration
opens six weeks prior to each class. Interested people can register
online as follows:
1Saturday, Feb. 9 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
http://canveggies020913.eventbrite.com
10Friday, Feb. 22 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
http://cancarrots022213.eventbrite.com
l0Friday, March 22 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.
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http://canveggies04l313.eventbrite.com
10Friday, May 3 noon to 3 p.m.
http://canveggies050313.eventbrite
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16 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


JANUARY 24, 2013






JANUARY 24, 2013


FWC catches Once a nurse, always a nurse
Continued from page 1


missing bear
Last Friday, Jan. 18,
staff with the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) caught the
missing grizzly bear cub that
had escaped in Collier County.
"We're very happy that
we located the bear and will
be able to return it safely to
its home," said Capt. Mitts
Mravic, area supervisor for the
FWC.
The bear escaped early
Tuesday afternoon from A
Grizzly Experience, a licensed
facility in Golden Gate Estates.
"Neighbors reported a
sighting Thursday night. We
focused our efforts in that same
area Friday and were able to
locate it," Mravic said.
A team of FWC staff,
including officers and
biologists, located the bear and
tranquilized it so that it could
be safely returned to its facility.
The FWC is still investigating
the cause of the escape to
determine what actions will
be taken to ensure this does
not happen again as well as
any costs associated with the
response. FWC investigators
will work with the local
prosecutor to see if charges
apply.
Report violations:
If you suspect a wildlife or
boating law violation, report
it to the FWC's Wildlife Alert
Reward Program: 888-404-
FWCC (3922).
Cell phone users can reach
them at *FWC or #FWC,
depending on your service
provider.


whenever someone needs help or
wants someone to talk something
out with, or if local clubs and
organizations need someone to
talk to them about Samaritan
Services, Ragland makes herself
available.
"She is a loyal friend and a
wonderful organizer. Without her
a lot of things would go by the
wayside and many people would
not get help. She makes it easy
for us- the volunteers- to do our
jobs," Berens continued.
Ragland's path to the Tampa
Bay area took many turns.
She grew up the baby of three
children in the small rural "one-
, p-liglu'" town of Strausburg,
Ohio, and after getting her nursing
degree at Youngstown Nursing
School, she became a psychiatric
nurse in the Army in 1942, during
World War II.
There she married Maurice
Healey, a dental surgeon in the
Army Air Force, which later split
from "Army" Air Force and was
renamed.
The couple was not permitted
to be married and both in service
at that time, so Ragland quit
the service and became a Civil
servant.
She still laughs at how much
more this cost the government.
"If I'd been allowed to stay in
the military, I'd have received a
much smaller check than through
Civil Service, but those were
the rules then," she said in an
interview Jan. 17.
The couple lived in Weisbaden,
Germany and in London.
Together, they lived the military/
Civil Service lifestyle for 30 years
and had two children.
Their daughter is now


administrator of a preschool in
Kentucky and their son a dentist
in Bradenton.
But their working lives didn't
stop after the service. Once retired
from active duty, the couple
moved to Indianapolis where
Ragland was director of nursing
for a 250-bed nursing home and
her husband taught in a dental
school.
'This is what we did until we
moved to Sun City Center -
supposedly to retire- in 1973," she
said.
But shortly after they moved,
the town's only doctor at that
time, J. Earl Wentzell, heard there
was a nurse who had credentials
in Ohio, Indiana, and Florida
living nearby. He had just lost
his nurse who'd had gall bladder
surgery.
"He called me out of the blue,"
she said. "And I went back to
work."
She began to see the problems
other seniors had. Alzheimer's
disease disturbed her so she
joined forces with Samaritan
Services of Sun City Center
Inc., and formed an Alzheimer's
Support Group in 1975.
Woman of the Year for both
the Sun City Center Chamber of
Commerce and the local chapter
of the American Association of
University Women in the mid-
1990s, Ragland worked tirelessly
to add programs and services to
Samaritan Services.
What started with one donated
car is now a fleet of eight: six
cars that take residents who need
medical transportation to Tampa,
Bradenton and Brandon and
two that drive residents who no
longer drive around town from
U.S. 301 to Sun Point in Ruskin


for any reason what-so-ever,
including shopping and beauty
appointments.
'We've come a long way,"
Ragland said.
While volunteering at Samaritan
Services, she continued to work
for Dr. Wentzell.
"I could see so many unmet
needs working there. People who
did not know what to do, where
to turn."
So Ragland was in on the
expansion of Samaritan Services.
When Sam Cook Painting
became a larger business and
moved to Ruskin, she helped
clean up the paint store and make
it an office.
"I was told at the time we only
had enough money to rent it for
six months. They said what are
we going to do? And I said, keep
working our butts off and pray,"
she said.
Somehow, they did it, and
in 2012 celebrated their 28th
anniversary.
Ragland was working 7-to-7
between Dr. Wentzell's and
Samaritan Services and driving a
Security Patrol car from midnight
to 3 a.m. in the late '70s and early
'80s.
"In the mid 1980s Dr. Wentzell
retired and I started coming in to
Samaritan full time," she said.
That job, of course, is volunteer.
By then, Maurice had died, and
for awhile, she was single.
Doris Healey married Mack
Ragland, who also volunteered
at Samaritan Services and other
places, in 1996.
He died in 2002 and she
continued to work, always
looking for unmet needs and
trying to fill them.
Eight years ago South Bay


OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 17


Hospital had to stop doing the
Meals on Wheels program by
itself and Samaritan Services and
the Sun City Center Woman's
Club jumped in to fill the gap.
'Now it is a three-pronged
effort," Ragland explained. The
hospital supplies the food with
a volunteer from Samaritan
Services watching, sorting and
routing, and woman's club
volunteers handling the food.
She also works a lot with
SHINE, which is a program
that helps senior citizens who
have problems with Medicare or
Medicaid.
"We are a catch-all here (at
Samaritan). People who have
nowhere to turn come to us."
Many times, it is a family
member, perhaps in another state,
that asks for help for a relative-
usually a parent who has become
frail or disabled- in Sun City
Center.
Ragland just had her 92nd
birthday.
It hasn't slowed her down.
When asked her future plans,
retirement was not among them.
"When I was eight or nine years
old and was confirmed, the priest
asked me what I wanted to do
in life," she said. "I told him I
wanted to bug people. That was
the only way I knew at that age to
explain I wanted to help people.
Be around people. Do things for
people. You know how kids are."
Samaritan Services is located at
916 N. Pebble Beach Blvd., which
is at the extreme east end of the
strip center at the back of the Sun
City Center Plaza, just north of
the travel agency on the comer
of the building. The telephone
number is (813) 634-9283.


* 0 S


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1212 Apollo Beach Blvd
Apollo Beach, Fl 33572
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1212 Apollo Beach Blvd
Apollo Beach, Fl 33572
WED., FEB. 6 @ 12 Noon


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wit ay the ofes. j BU RI L S 0 C ET







18 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


James H. Hause
James H. Hause, 81, of Sun City
Center, Florida, and formerly of Nineveh,
Indiana, passed away Sunday, January
13, 2013. He was born June 30,1931 in
Mulberry, Indiana to William Raymond
and Esther Ruthell (Vore) Hause.
He married Betty E. (Brock) Hause
on September 20, 1952 in Antioch,
Indiana; she preceded him in death
on November 8, 2007. He was a 1949
graduate of Jackson Township High
School in Clinton County, Indiana.
He retired after 20 years of service
for the Ford Motor Company in
Indianapolis, Indiana, retiring as a
maintenance engineer. He was a
veteran of the U.S. Navy and served in
the Korean War.
Survivors include two daughters,
Catherine Gordon (Jeff) of Easton,
Connecticut and Cassandra Summerlot
(Marlin) of Avon, Indiana; a son,
Howard Hause (Debbie) of Negley,
Ohio; ten grandchildren, Christopher
M. Summerlot, Kevin D. Summerlot,
Kaitlin E. Hause, Brittany R. Hause,
Taylor E. Hause, Jennifer Hacker,
James Hacker, Jacob Gordon, Stephen
Gordon, and Rita Gordon; three great-
grandchildren, Chase Summerlot,
Matthew Summerlot, and Jameson
Hacker; two sisters, Helen J. Hollis of
Sun City Center, Florida and Marjorie
Davison (John) of St. Cloud, Florida;
and a cousin, Marsha Cooper of
Ruskin, Florida.
The Reverend Harlan Kincade
conducted a service Saturday, January
19,2013at Whitestone Christian Church
in Coatesville, Indiana. Burial was in
Mt. Pleasant Cemetery in Greenwood,
Indiana with full military honors. Swartz
Family Community Mortuary and
Memorial Center in Franklin, Indiana is
handling the arrangements.
Memorial Contributions may be made
to Hause Scholarship Fund, in care of
Ozark Christian College, 1111 N. Main
Street, Joplin, Missouri 64801. Online
condolences may be sent to the family
at: www.swartzmortuary.com.


Jack E. Kenefick
Jack E. Kenefick, 84, passed on
January 17, 2013 at South Bay Hospital
in Sun City Center, FL while comforted
by family members. He was born in
Redlands, CA on December 3, 1928 to
John and Estella Kenefick and grew up


Area Obituaries

in the Los Angeles area attending Mt.
Carmel High School.
Jack was a U.S. Military Veteran
serving 20 years in the U.S. Navy
until retirement in 1968. On February
25, 1963, Jack married Arlys Royce.
They would have celebrated their 50th
wedding anniversary next month. Jack
was the proud father of daughter Estella
Kenefick, who preceded him in death.
After retirement from the Navy, Jack
and his family lived in Long Beach, CA
until 1982 when they moved to El Paso,
TX, where Jack started a new career as
truck driver.
Due to the onset of serious illness,
Jack and Arlys moved to Apollo Beach
in 2009 to live with daughter Terry
Fitzgerald and her husband. Jack is
survived by wife Arlys Kenefick; step-
daughter Terry Fitzgerald; stepson
Larry Wells; sisters Mary Fromwiller
and Betty Fox; brothers Jerry and Pat
Kenefick; granddaughters Johnna
Smith and Debbie Martinez; and
numerous nephews and nieces.
Interment will be in Bay Pines
National Cemetery, St. Petersburg, FL.
Our deepest gratitude goes out to the
staff at South Bay Hospital for giving
Jack sympathetic and compassionate
care. Thank you and God bless you all.
In lieu of flowers make donations to the
American Lung Association.


Thomas LeBerth Jr.
Thomas R. LeBerth Jr., 58, of Apollo
Beach, Florida passed away January
12, 2013. He served in the U.S. Army
during the Viet Nam Conflict.
Survivors include his wife of 38 years,
Donna; daughters Chantel Brown
and Laurie (Rick) Barnes; father and
stepmother, Thomas and Sally LeBerth,
Sr.; stepfather Peter LeBerth; brothers,
John (Gina) LeBerth, Steven LeBerth,
and Patrick (Holly) LeBerth; sisters
Elizabeth Coakley and Peggy (Harold
Brown) LeBerth; seven grandchildren;
and numerous nieces and nephews.
Memorial service with Military Honors
was held 1 p.m. Saturday, January
19, 2013 at Sun City Center Funeral
Home. Interment will be in Bay Pines
National Cemetery, Bay Pines, Fla.
Arrangements by Sun City Center
Funeral Home.

Grace L. Malley
Grace L. Malley, 91, of Sun City
Center, FL passed away on January
18, 2013. She was born in Brooklyn,
NY, and lived in Albertson, Long Island,
NY for 35 years before moving to West
Palm Beach, FL.
In 2005 she moved to Sun City
Center, FL. She was pre-deceased
by her husband of 57 years, John F.
Malley. She is survived by son Kenneth
J. (Darlene) Malley of Pleasant Valley,
NY; daughter Gloria A. (Roy) Musgnug
of Sun City Center, FL; granddaughters
Colleen Egger and Jessica Malley; and
two great-grandchildren.
Funeral services and entombment will
be held in Lake Worth, FL on Thursday,
January 24, 2013.
A local Memorial Service will be held
at 10:00 a.m. at Redeemer Lutheran
Church, 701 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun
City Center, FL on Friday, January 25,
2013. In lieu of flowers, donations to
either Redeemer Lutheran Church 701
Valley Forge Blvd, Sun City Center, FL
33573 or H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center
Foundation, P.O. Box 23827, Tampa,
FL 33623 would be appreciated.


Elwell Davison
Sanborn
Elwell Davison Sanborn of Sun City
Center died December 27, 2012 after
a long illness. He was born on January
12, 1925 in Plymouth, New Hampshire.
On September 22, 1945 Sanborn and
Carmen Poulin married at the naval
base in Norfolk, Virginia.
Elwell joined the United States Army
in 1943 at the age of seventeen. He
participated in the Normandy landing
(Omaha Beach), the liberation of
northern France, and the battles of the
Rhine, the Ardennes and the Bulge.
Staff Sergeant in Company "C" of the
134th Infantry (35th Infantry Division),
Mr. Sanborn was wounded in Holland
(for which he received the Purple Heart).
For his efforts in France, Mr. Sanborn
was honored by being named a "Knight
in the National Order of the Legion of
Honor," the highest French award given
to military or civilian recipients.
After the war, Mr. Sanborn worked at
Scott & Williams in Laconia, NH until he
retired. The Sanborns built the Flamingo
Motel in Weirs Beach, NH, and ran it
for many years until their retirement to
Florida. They were married for 67 years
and have two children: Sandra Strait
(William) and Brenda Hair (Lynn). They
are the grandparents of three: (Lauren
Osner, Karen Kelly, and Christopher
Hair, and great-grandparents of (Ryan
Osner, Miranda Osner, and Allison
Hair).
Services will be held at the Sarasota
National Cemetery on January 25,
2013 at 11:30 a.m. In lieu of flowers,
donations can be made to LifePath
Hospice, Sun City Center, Florida.

Geraldine (Jean) Vislay
Geraldine (Jean) Vislay, age 84,
died January 10, 2013. She is survived
by her five children: Diane (Frank)
Blackburn, Darlene (John) Rich,
Sandra (Ray) Ilse, Charles Nash Jr.,
and Michael (Ann) Nash. She is also
survived by eight grandchildren and
eight great-grandchildren. She was
preceded in death by husband Louis
(Lou) Vislay. She is also survived by
her step-daughters Patricia Vislay and
Joan Vislay.
Jean was a resident of Ruskin, FL for
33 years and loved cooking and taking
care of her yard. She and her husband
were avid bowlers and both worked at
Thunderbird Lanes.
A memorial service will take place in
Perrysburg, Ohio at St. Rose Catholic
Church, where she will be laid to rest
next to her husband.


Guest pastor is
from Zimbabwe
All are invited to hear Rev. Ed-
ward Matuvhunye speak on Sun-
day, Jan. 27 at the 10 a.m. worship
service with Rev. Dr. Jean Simp-
son at United Community Church,
1501 La Jolla Ave., Sun City Cen-
ter.
Rev. Mayuvhunye was the Unit-
ed Church of Christ president for
the country of Zimbabwe for the
past eight years. He was Pastor
Simpson's host while she was in
his country and introduced her to
many churches, hospitals, orphan-
ages, clinics and schools which the
United Church of Christ started
and supports.
There are 100 UCC churches in
Zimbabwe, which is 98% Chris-
tian. Rev. Matuvhunye will join
Pastor Simpson in a dialogue ser-
mon on Sunday, Jan. 27, on the
subject "That They All May Be
One," with Scripture: John 17.


JANUARY 24, 2013





Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (behind Suntrust Bank)
ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: Nov. April.................. 8:30 a.m. Day Care Available
Mon.- Fri.
Rev. Richard Nussel and All Year ...............10:45 a.m. 6 a.m.- 6 p.m.
Phone:645-1241 Sunday School............ 9:30 a.m. call 645-6198


S rienship S ptist Chwrch Sunday WEEKLY SERVICES:
Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist) 9 a.m ...................... Bible Study
ii15 1 El l Rancho Dr. 11a.m .....................Bible Study
1511Su n City Center, FL 33573 10 a.m. & 6 p.m............Worship

l- Phone/Fax: Wednesday
I 813-633-5950 6 p.m. ...Prayer Meeting/Bible Study


REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd. Sun City Center, FL 33573-5354
Rev. Robert G. Wiley, Interim Pastor
Telephone: 813-634-1292* Website: sccredeemer.org
Worship Services on Sunday 10 a.m.
Holy Communion First & Third Sunday Bible Class Thursday 10 a.m.




Spirituality Rather Than "Religion"
Henry Gibson Social Hall, Beth Israel Synagogue Sunday Service 10:30 a.m.
1115 Del Webb E. Sun City Center, FL S8 ic 10-7745
www.unitycommunityofjoy.com 813-298-7745


9 First Baptist Church of Gibsonton
"We loviFbecause He first loved us." 1 John 4:19
Traditional Worship Service *Sunday School 9:30 A.M.
Old-Time Gospel Hymns *MorningWorship 10:30 A.M. l
Nursery Available Sunday Evening 6:00 P.M.
Interpreter for the Deaf Mid-Week (Wed.) 7:00 P.M.
9912 Indiana St. Hwy 41 & Estelle Aenue Malcolm S. Clemens,. Pastor
\Gibsonton, FL 33534 813-677-1301 J


Prince of Peace u Masses:
Sunday ..........8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., Noon

Catholic Church Saturday Vigil................ 4:00 & 6:00 p.m.
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573 s Daily............... ...... 8:00 a.m.
Phone: 634-2328 Fax: 633-6670 W Confessions:
www.popcc.org Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m. and Sat. 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.


NO R Sunday School (all ages)........ 9:30 a.m.
NO R I HSIDE Sunday Morning Worship .... 10:45 a.m.
BAPTISTCHURCH Sunday Evening Worship ....... 6:00 p.m. SBC
Loving God Loving Others, Wednesday (all ages) ............. 6:30 p.m.
Serving Beyond Borders" Dr Samuel (Sam) A. Roach, Pastor
1301 U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL 645-1121 www.nbcor.org


UNITED COMMUNITY CHURCH ~ United Church of Christ
1501 La Jolla AVE, Sun City Center, FL 33573-5329
A Caring Church United in God's Love Serving Others
Rev.Dr. Jean M. Simpson
Worship Services ~ 8:30 and 10 AM ,
s...- (813) 634-1304 -All Are Welcome! .

& A e. EVERETT TATE, MINISTER

South Hillsborough Church of Christ g
1611 First St. SW Ruskin, FL 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL-
SERVICES: Sunday........................9:30 & 10:30 a.m.; 6:00 p.m .
Wednesday................7:00 p.m. -

A, CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH
S Sunday Worship: Blended 8:00 a.m.
Nursery Provided Contemporary 9:40 a.m. BiBnd.
Pastor Jack R. Palzer
Assoc. Pastor Derek Hoven Traditional 1 1:15 a.m.
5309 U.S. Highway 41 North Apollo Beach IA
(across from MiraBay) www.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1305


The United Methodist Church of Sun City Center
1210 Del Webb Blvd West 634-2539
http://www.sccumc.com
Come Belong WORSHIP SERVICES:
Qrow t Serve SUNDAY
"hr nddlMedhodidihr. 8:15 a.m........................ Sanctuary (Communion Service)
Q-r 1c . ..rd tlfdI ss~r- mp'rar


Bookstore 633-8595
FREE
Nursery Provided


9: I5 a.m..................Creason Hall (Oasis Contemporary)
10:55 a.m.........Sanctuary (Traditional with Choir & Bells)
S11:00 a.m ...................................... Hispanic W orship
4:00 p.m ....................................... Hispanic W worship
Senior Pastor: Dr. Warren Langer
Assistant Pastor: Rev. Robert Chaple


Changing Services? Having a special event?
Advertise it in The Observer News, The SCC Observer and The Current.
Just call (813) 645-3111 and ask to speak to a sales representative.


Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC
Meets in the Henry Gibson Social Hall of the Beth Israel
Synagogue 1115. E. Del Webb Blvd.
Thursday, 7:00 PM Call 633-0396 www.uuofscc.org
Seek what is true not what is desirable.
-Albert Camus






JANUARY 24, 2013




Spiritual Leader P tefs o r
Rev. Sue Meixner Sunday Service 11:00 a.m.
Rev. Sue Meixner ,, Sun City Center
813-362-0806 Chamber of Commerce
sue@alterways.com "I 1651 Sun City Center Plaza
New Thought ChurchReligious Science/SOM



Iy FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO SERVICES AT OUR NEW LOCATION
1707 33rd Street SE, SCC/Ruskin 813-938-4955
10:30 a.m. SUNDAYS
NO CREED...BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE
Minister DR. DAVID CAMPBELL


820 College Ave. W. Ruskin. FL 33570
645-6439
www.fbcruskin.org A Resource for Families
Sunday School...............................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship............. 8:30 &8 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ............................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night Service .............. 7:00 p.m.
Aw ana .......................................... 7:00 p.m .


Dr. Barry Rumsey
CHRISTIAN SCHOOL
K-2 Through 12th
Grade


Southside Baptist Church
"A Warm, Loving & Friendly Church"
Come join us to learn about God's Word and salvation in Jesus Christ
Join us on Sunday to come home to the warmth of our church family
Located in South Hillsborough County, just south of Universal in old Sun City
4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 S Sun City, FL 33586 813-645-4085
Getting to KnowYou (Donuts/Coffee).....9:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Service................6:00 p.m.
Sunday School ................... 9:30 am. Wednesday Evening Service.........7:00 p.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ...........10:55 a.m. Thursday Morning Prayer........... 10:00 a.m.m



First Church of Christ, Scientist
204 2nd St. N.W. Ruskin, FL 33570 (813) 645-6102
Christian Science Heals
Sunday Service............................................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School ........... ................................ 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service...................................... 5:00 p.m.
Reading Room...................... Wednesday 4 to 4:45 p.m.

All Are Welcome

i__________.


W St. Andrew P
Sun

4 ITraditiona
Contemporai
A S Prayers with anoint
A Stephen during worship the s
Ministry
Church Pastor: Rev.
S AMeet friends in FellI
@ Refrt
1239 Del Webb Blvd. West
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Church is Handicap accessible


resbyterian Church
day Services
d Service 9:30 a.m.
ry Service 11:00 a.m.
ing for healing and wholeness
second Sunday of every month.
Dr. Mark E. Salmon
owship Hall after each Service.
eshments served.
Phone: 813-634-1252
For information visit:
www.standrewatscc.org


SouthShore: Apollo Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. GAibsontonA
SouthShore: Apollo Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton


. -,, .__-.i i. 1 -


Very Rev. John F. McEvoy, V.F.
( MASSES


U.S. Hwy. 41
106 11th Ave. NE
Ruskin
813-645-1714
SaintAnneRuskin.org


Vigil M ass.................................................................. Saturday 5:00 p.m .
Sunday Mass........8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. (Contemporary)
M onday thru Friday .................................................................8... :00 a.m .
Holy Days.....................................Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Espatol ....................................Domingo 12:30 p.m.; Jueves 7:00 p.m.
Confession...................... Thursday 6:15 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.

\-------------------------------


OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 19


Hot dog dinner supports
Dominican mission
St. John the Divine Episcopal
Church at 1015 Del Webb Blvd
in Sun City Center is having a
Gourmet Hot Dog Dinner from 5
to 6:30 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 25, to
support the 2013 Dominican Mis-
sion Project working group.
Tickets are $8 if purchased in ad-
vance and $10 at the door. Dessert
and beverage are included in the
ticket price.
For more information, contact
Roger Mills at 813-641-3798.

Fashion show and
high tea at St.
Anne's
The St. Anne's Council of Cath-
olic Women will hold their tea and
fashion show at 1 p.m. on Satur-
day, Feb. 2 in the St. Joachim hall,
adjacent to St. Anne's Church in
Ruskin.
Fashions will be provided by
Bon Worth and the Rose Boutique,
located at 100 East Shellpoint Rd.
in Ruskin. The Rose Boutique sup-
ports the Mary & Martha House,
which provides emergency and
transitional housing to women and
children in crisis.
The Women's Council will be
collecting paper products and
cleaning supplies for the Mary &
Martha House at the event.
Tickets are $15 and must be pur-
chased in advance; no tickets will
be sold at the door. Tickets are
available at the church office and
at the Rose Boutique.
For more information, call St.
Anne's church office at 813-645-
1714 or the Rose Boutique at 813-
645-7628.


'Thank God It's Variety' concert series
continues on two Fridays
The United Methodist Church of Sun City Center, 1210 Del Webb
Blvd. West, welcomes back two very popular local jazz ensembles to its
"Thank God It's Variety" concert series on Fridays, Jan. 25 and Feb. 1.
Both concerts begin at 6:30 p.m.
The Jan. 25 concert features Phil Provenzano & the Jazz Xperience,
a mainstream, straight-ahead jazz combo that was originally formed to
perpetuate the West Coast jazz sounds of musicians like Gerry Mulligan
and Chet Baker.
The Feb. 1 concert features the Mike Markaverich Trio from Saraso-
ta. A native of Nashua, NH, Mike Markaverich was a premature baby
whose experience in the incubator resulted in his blindness. He began
playing a toy piano at age three and took lessons at Perkins School for
the Blind, where he attended grammar school. After attaining a graduate
degree at the University of New Hampshire, Mike began his professional
career on Cape Cod, where he worked as a solo performer and in various
combo settings in major area nightspots for over ten years. In November,
1988 he and wife Debbie moved to Sarasota, where he has been a regular
member of the local jazz scene.
Concert-goers are encouraged to arrive early for a good seat. A do-
nation of just $5 is requested at the door for each of the concerts. For
additional information about this and other concerts and recitals at the
United Church of Sun City Center, contact Jeff Jordan, Director of Wor-
ship Arts, at 813-634-2539.


Beth Israel Sisterhood welcomes
Rabbi Torop
The guest speaker at the next monthly program of the SCC Beth
Israel Sisterhood will be Rabbi Betsy Torop, who will speak on "The
Changing Jewish Identity in the Younger Generation."
Currently rabbi at Congregation Beth Shalom in Brandon, Rabbi
Torop has been ordained for the past 23 years and has been a popular
guest of the sisterhood in the past.
The program is at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 5, at the synagogue lo-
cated at 1115 Del Webb Blvd. E in SCC.
Refreshments will follow the meeting.

PET TIP: A squirt bottle with water is a safe way to startle
m"' isbehaving cat before redirecting its behavior. Hopefully
I .. he cat will stop doing whatever naughty thing it's involved
"and you can get the animal focused on something more
.' appropriate .
Drs. Ott, Slaughter, Waldy & Heaton
S* early 100 years of experience Voted Best Vet & Best Pet Services
liest Pet Resort with Medical Care
Provider of Free 5-Acre, Beautiful Dog Park
-* under of C.A.R.E. Rescue Shelter
Ruskin Animal Hospital & Cat Clinic
715 U.S. Hwy. 41 S. Ruskin 813-645-6411
Mon./Wed./Thur/Fri. 7-5:30 (closed Thur. 12-2) Sat. 7:30-1 Tues. 7-7


r
I


Offering Laser, Botox, Restylane and
various cosmetic products & services


- Dr. Robert A. Norman Same Day Appointments
Dermatologist FREE Skin Screening
Dr. A. Theodosato Insurance accepted: Medicare,
Dr. A. Theodosatos Mediaid, CBS, Humana,
Carole Mazzone, ARNP Cigna, Aetna, Amerigroup,
P 813-880-7546 and many more
10422 South U.S. Hwy. 301 Riverview
8002 Gunn Hwy., Tampa


Prince of Peace
hosts Valentine's
Dinner Dance
The date is Friday, Feb. 8; the
theme is the '50s and '60s; the
place is Conessa Hall at Prince of
Peace Church in SCC; the time is
5 to 9 p.m.
The occasion? The St. Valen-
tine's Dinner Dance, with music
supplied by Michael and Roberts
Show Band.
It promises to be a fun evening,
with prizes including $75 for best-
dressed couple (reflecting the
dance's theme of '50s and '60s)
and $75 for the best jitterbuggers.
The price is $8 per person, which
includes dinner of hamburgers,
hot dogs, french fries and dessert.
BYOB. Tables of eight can be re-
served.
Hosts are the Knights of Colum-
bus and the Ladies Auxiliary.
Tickets will be sold from 9 to 11
a.m. at Conessa Hall on the fol-
lowing dates: Jan. 15, 17, 22, 24,
29, and 31; and Feb. 5 and 7.
For more information and tick-
ets, call Jack Hawkins at 813-786-
0632 or Val Korolevich at 813-
938-3205.

SHMA hosts 'Community
Sing' on Jan. 28
South Hillsborough Ministe-
rial Association (SHMA) will
facilitate the monthly 'Commu-
nity Sing' beginning at 7 p.m. on
Monday, Jan. 28 at the Maranatha
Church of God, located at 101 6th
Ave. in Ruskin.
Grace and Truth Fellowship In-
ternational will be the 'hosting'
church. The 'prelude' to the Sing
will begin at 6:30 p.m. Refresh-
ments will be served afterwards.
Call 813-633-5404 for further in-
formation.
SHMA is an organized, interac-
tive group of local church minis-
ters and congregations in South
Hillsborough County.


CHURCH
Come and experience the power of
Jesus to change your life.
Sunday @ 9 & 11 AM Servicio en Espafiol @ 6 PM

www.aplace4everyone.org

2322 11th Ave. SE Ruskin, FL 813.645.3337






20 OBSERVER NEWS






Life Story Writing Sunday, Jan. 27 at 2 p.m.)
This class is for beginners who want to turn their memories into family
heirlooms. Participants will write as they learn ways to record their sto-
ries for future generations. This class meets for eight consecutive weeks.
Participants are asked to attend all eight meetings. Seating limit: 12.
Register in advance at the Information Desk or call 813-273-3652.
Teen/Adult Drawing Monday, Jan. 28 at 6:30 p.m.
Teens and adults will join Art Instructor Michael Parker, and learn
some techniques of drawing. All abilities welcome. Limit 22. Registra-
tion required at either the Information Desk or by calling 813-273-3652.
Funding for this program provided by the Friends of SouthShore Re-
gional Library
Internet: Viruses, Spyware, Phishing Scams and More! Tuesday,
Jan. 29 at 12:15 p.m.
Learn how to surf the Internet while avoiding common scams and pit-
falls that can compromise your security. Learn about different types of
malicious software, how they get on the personal computer, how to re-
move them, and precautions to take when using the internet. Limit: 20.
Genealogy Orienteering Tuesday, Jan. 29 at 3:30 p.m.
This program helps researchers use maps to quickly and effectively
locate the right place to conduct research. This is a Web-based program
available at the SouthShore Regional Library or by login from any remote
location with Internet access. Register here with your library card for re-
mote access. Presented by George G. Morgan Funded by the Friends of
the Library of Tampa-Hillsborough County, Inc.
English Practice @ Conversation Corner Tuesday, Jan. 29 at 6 p.m.
Practice speaking English in the comfort of a small group, with an
English speaker to help you try new words. Meet for conversation with
other adult learners; no registration is required. Co-sponsored by the
Hillsborough Literacy Council and the Tampa-Hillsborough County
Public Library System. For details, contact the Hillsborough Literacy
Council at 813-273-3650.
eBooks for Kindle and Kindle Apps Wednesday, Jan. 30 at 10:15
a.m.
Learn how to check out and download free library eBooks to read on
the Kindle or any device using the free Kindle app and Overdrive! Also
discover how to use library eBooks with an Amazon.com account. Pre-
sented by the Tampa Bay Library Consortium Limit: 20
Mah Jongg Club Wednesday, Jan. 30 at 6:30 p.m.
Enjoy an evening of the popular table game, Mah Jongg. Participants
are asked to bring their own Mah Jongg set or card. Limited to 16 play-
ers. Register in advance at the Information Desk or call 813-273-3652.
SouthShore Needle People Wednesday, Jan. 30 at 6:30 p.m.
Join other needle people to share techniques, tips and experiences
about knitting and other fiber and fabric crafts. Beginners are welcome!
Bring a project and ask us questions!
Excel: Introduction and Formatting Thursday, Jan. 31 at 12:15 p.m.
Layout, entering data, inserting rows and columns, and other tech-
niques. Learn different formats for expressing numbers in a spreadsheet.
Registration in person required at the opening of the Library at 12 p.m.
No Fuss Foods Friday, Feb. 1 at 11 a.m.
Cooking creative, delicious and nutritious meals does not need to take a
lot of time or cost a lot of money. Join Rowena Sjovall of No Fuss Foods
(www.nofussfoods.com) as she demonstrates a budget-friendly recipe.
Free samples! Seating limit: 20. Register in advance at the Information
Desk or call 813-273-3652. Funded by the Friends of the SouthShore
Regional Library.

Membership with the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library helps
provide the funding for free programs offered at the Library. Anyone in-
terested in becoming a Member of the Friends of the Library, should call
Jim Duffy at 813-634-1396; www.southshorefriends.com.

Call for Art in the Library exhibitors -
through March 2013
In celebration of Viva Florida 500, Tampa-Hillsborough County Pub-
lic Libraries invites Florida artists to apply to have their artwork dis-
played in a library community room for ongoing exhibits. Works with
local flavor and those of general appeal are considered good candidates
for review.
To apply, artist should:
Include a cover letter including brief biographical information, a list
of recent exhibitions or shows, and other interesting information about
the artist or artwork.
Submit at least three, but not more than five, examples of the kind
and style of artwork they intend to exhibit.
Submit materials by mail with digital images on a CD to: John F.
Germany Public Library, Attn: Stacey Jurewicz, 900 N. Ashley Dr., Tam-
pa, FL, 33602 or via email to: programming@hcplc.org.
Note exact size of artwork in the submission.
Submit applications between January 15 March 31, 2013.
Contact Stacey Jurewicz, Library Services, 813-273-3652, with ques-
tions.
Exhibition Guidelines
The artwork will be displayed at specific branch libraries for a pe-
riod of two months with no fee to the artist.
The artist must bring artwork ready to hang on designated wall space
at a mutually agreed-upon date and time.
An art reception will be held during the exhibition, and the artist
may present a brief summary about their artwork.
Control over the exhibition, its publicity (including exhibit photos),
placement of artwork, and exhibition duration rests entirely with Tampa-
Hillsborough County Public Libraries.


Future recruits for the SCC Emergency Squad
The Sun City Center Emergency Squad recently hosted the Tiger
Cubs from the Ruskin den to an evening at the Emergency Squad.
The boys had a tour of the building as well as the ambulance and
learned exactly what the Squad does for the community. From left:
Robert Leonard, Scoutmaster as well as EMT on the Squad, Julian
and Christian Stibich, Bodi Kittel, William Crevello, Brayden Good-
loe, Xavier and Steven Jones, and Tom Canady, Emergency Medical
Responder on the SCC Emergency Squad.

Adopt a manatee for Valentine's Day


Valentine's Day is a spe-
cial time to show some heart.
Save the Manatee Club sug-
gests giving meaningful,
green, and compassionate
manatee gift adoptions to
loved ones this Feb. 14.
Rob Babich from Taylor,
Pennsylvania, adopted Lo-
relei from the Club's Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park, Florida, adop-
tion program for his wife
Liz last Valentine's Day.
They then adopted Marga-
rito from Blue Spring State
Park in Orange City, Flori-
da, for their grandchildren,
Aidan and Mackenzie, who also
live in Pennsylvania. "We love
manatees," said Rob. "When I
saw the Club's ad on Facebook, I
just had to adopt one for my wife.
And when my wife received her
manatee for Valentine's Day, we
decided we had to get one for the
grandkids."
Every manatee in the Club's five
adoption programs is a real mana-
tee and has a known history. Most
other wild animal adoption pro-
grams do not feature real animals,
only symbolic ones. Tax-deduct-
ible gift adoptions from Save the
Manatee Club cost $25 and include
a biography and adoption certifi-
cate featuring the manatee select-
ed. Also included is a membership
handbook filled with photos, facts
and information, subscriptions to
the Club's official quarterly news-
letter, The Manatee Zone, and the
bi-monthly e-newsletter, Paddle
Tales, and a year's membership
in Save the Manatee Club. A per-
sonalized Valentine's Day gift card
comes with each adoption, and
postage is free within the United
States. An 8-inch manatee plush
toy is included with every gift
adoption of $35 or more.
Margaret McLoud, a retired
nurse who resides in northern
Indiana, gave a Valentine's Day


manatee adoption to her cousin's
children. "I wanted to bring some
awareness of manatees and their
needs, as well as their incredible
charm, to my cousin's family, es-
pecially the children, who live in
Washington State," she explained.
Funds from the adoption pro-
gram help manatees survive. Each
year, many manatees are injured or
killed by human activities, includ-
ing boat strikes, entanglements,
and habitat loss. Save the Manatee
Club, a 501(c) 3 nonprofit conser-
vation and manatee welfare orga-
nization established in 1981 by
singer/songwriter Jimmy Buffett,
works to safeguard manatees by
assisting with rescue, rehabilita-
tion, and release efforts in Amer-
ica and abroad; helps to expand
and protect the manatee's winter
warm-water habitat; obtains im-
proved boat speed zones in areas
frequented by manatees; and raises
public awareness.
For more information on adopt-
ing a manatee for Valentine's Day,
visit Save the Manatee Club's web-
site at www.savethemanatee.org,
or call 1-800-432-JOIN (5646).
Or sign up for the Club's free E-
Newsletter, and watch manatees in
their natural habitat on the Club's
Blue Spring webcams at manatv.
org.


Panther Trace holds Vendor Fair and
Blood Drive
On Saturday, Feb. 23, Panther Trace in Riverview will hold its annual
Vendor Fair and Blood Drive. Potential customers will be able to browse
the wares and services of local businesses and home sales representa-
tives.
The event, which runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., is open to all ages.
There will be a free inflatable for kids to play on, sponsored by TaMpA
BoUnCe. Among area food vendors will be Pampered Chef, Scentsy,
SaladMaster Cookware, Juice Plus+ and Organo Gold Coffee.
In addition, a Blood Mobile will be there from Florida Blood Services.
Everyone who donates blood through Sunday, March 31 will receive a
free movie voucher, courtesy of the organization. In addition, the Panther
Trace CDD will give ach donor a complimentary Panther Trace license
plate.
The fair is free, and attendees can register for free door prizes.
The Panther Trace Clubhouse is located at 12515 Bramfield Dr. in Riv-
erview.


JANUARY 24, 2013
Gospel Music
comes to Palmetto
in February
Bill Bailey's 2013 Winter Gos-
pel Music Convention will be held
Monday through Saturday, Feb.
4-9 at the Manatee Convention
Center in Palmetto.
Over 40 of southern gospel's top
artists will be appearing through-
out the week including award-
winning artists, the Booth Broth-
ers, Triumphant Quartet, and the
Collingsworth Family.
This event is recognized as the
largest southern gospel winter
concert event in the nation. This
year's event also marks Bill Bai-
ley's 27th anniversary promoting
southern gospel concerts through-
out the southeast. For a schedule
of performers, visit www.billbai-
leyconcerts.com.
General admission tickets are $17
per night or $90 for a six-night pass.
Children ages 3-11 are $5 per night
at the door only. VIP Reserved
tickets are $125 each (includes a
reserved seat for all evening and
matinee concerts). VIP Reserved
tickets are only available by phone
at 941-756-6942. General admis-
sion tickets are available at Family
Christian Store and the Happy Gos-
pel Church office Bradenton; and
Living Word Christian Store and
Yoder's Restaurant & Gift Shop -
Sarasota. Tickets are not required
for 1:30 p.m. matinee concerts; love
offerings received. Doors open
at 12:30 p.m. for matinees, and at
5:30 p.m. for evening concerts.
The Manatee Convention Center
is located at One Haben Blvd. in
Palmetto, just off US Hwy 301/41.
For more information, call 941-
756-6942.

Tips from

Outdoor

World
Being different
Don't be afraid to change baits
when fishing slows down. Giving
fish a new look is sometimes all it
takes to put several in your boat.
Say you fish an area that is hold-
ing good fish and you catch one or
two on a crankbait. Before mov-
ing on, work the area again with
a crankbait that has a different ac-
tion or maybe one that will run a
little deeper or shallower.
Also, don't be afraid to try lures
that aren't supposed to work under
certain conditions. That different
look can be enough to coax a few
more fish into striking.
Every time you present a lure
that looks different, you give your-
self a chance to catch fish that
wouldn't respond to other baits
you've fished. Sometimes, being
different is all it takes.
Gary Parsons is a member of the
Bass Pro N/i. Ty" Pro F, i ii. Team.
For more tips, log onto basspro.com
and click on News & Tips.

Moon and
weather
During late season it is important
to time moon phases. Deer become
more nocturnal during the winter
partly because of energy benefits
they receive by resting during the
day when it's warmer and moving to
feed at night when it's colder.
However, during the dark of the
moon or several nights with heavy
cloud cover, deer will be much
more active in the mornings.
Time your hunting with not only
the moon, but with cold weather
and cold fronts. Time your cold
weather with the moon, and your
chances of catching that big buck
moving around, especially during
the morning, double.






OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 21


I


BedroomiClearancel


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Dr. Susan Bailey Robinson, conductor and artistic director of the
South Shore Symphony Orchestra.
A Valentine from the South Shore
Symphony Orchestra
The South Shore Symphony Orchestra goes all romantic in two Valen-
tine performances Saturday, Feb. 9 in Sun City Center. The concert of
romantic classics by Bach, von Weber, Elgar, Dvorak and Mendelssohn,
will be presented at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. at St. John the Divine Episcopal
Church, 1015 Del Webb Blvd., E., in Sun City Center. Tickets at $12 are
available at the church office, at the Sun City Center and South Shore
Chambers of Commerce and online at www.thessso.org
In addition to the St. John The Divine church office, Monday through
Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., tickets are available at The Sun City Center
Chamber of Commerce, 1651 Sun City Plaza, Suite 117 and the two of-
fices of the South Shore Chamber of Commerce, 315 South US Hwy 41,
Ruskin, and 137 Harbor Village Lane, Apollo Beach.


The right-colored thread
Having two daughters in Girl Scouts,
I find myself sewing patches on fairly
often. Since each patch is usually a dif-
ferent color, I used to have to change
the color of my thread in my sewing
machine so my stitching wouldn't stand
out. And I'd have to hope I had a color
of thread that matched the patch!
This year, I realized that I could just
use white thread for all of the patches,
and then after sewing each on, I use a
Sharpie marker to color the top stitch-
es to match the patch. It works like a
charm! I already owned an assorted set
of Sharpie markers, and I discovered
that there is always one that matches
really well. Now my stitches disappear
without having to a buy colored spools
of thread. And I don't have to take
the time to change the thread for each
patch. Coloring the top thread (and
even the under-stitching) works really
well for any project that doesn't have to
be too perfect!
Charly


Eas3 organized clothing
When a new season arrives, I
hang all the items with the hangers
facing backwards. When I wear
and wash the item, I return it to the
closet facing the proper way. At the
end of the season, it's super easy
to tell which of the items I never
wore, and those are the ones I do-
nate for someone else to enjoy.
Suzie
Clothing swaps
If you're not in a clothing swap,
find one and join it! It's a great
way to clear your closet and pick
up some new-to-you clothes for
you and your family. Some groups
welcome other household "stuff'
like perfume, cosmetics, home de-
cor, plants, and small appliances.
If you volunteer to take the left-
overs to charity, you get the tax
deduction!
Sharon B.


Agriculture Department

awarded $150k for reforestation


Tallahassee, FL The Florida
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services' Florida For-
est Service was awarded $154,750
by the Arbor Day Foundation to
support reforestation activities on
Florida State Forests.
With this funding, one million
longleaf pine seedlings will be
planted on Blackwater River State
Forest, Four Creeks State Forest
and Goethe State Forest during the
2012-2013 planting season.
Since it established a partnership
with the Florida Forest Service in
2008, the Arbor Day Foundation
has provided more than one-half
million dollars in funding to sup-
port the Florida Forest Service's
state forest reforestation program.
"Florida is the first state to cel-
ebrate Arbor Day each year,"
said Jim Karels, director of the
Florida Forest Service. "Commu-
nities around the state work with
the Florida Forest Service to plant


trees, give away seeds and host
educational opportunities."
Arbor Day celebrations originat-
ed in the 1870s when J. Sterling
Morton, a journalist for the Wood-
ed Environs of Michigan, moved
to the treeless plains of Nebraska.
Morton immediately set about cor-
recting this situation by planting
trees on his own property and used
his newspaper to advocate that
other Nebraskans do the same. The
first Arbor Day celebration took
place 1872 and quickly became
a national movement. Arbor Day
is recognized on different days
throughout the country, depending
on the seasons.
For more information about the
Florida Department of Agricul-
ture and Consumer Services, visit
www.freshfromflorida.com.
For statewide forestry updates
and wildfire information, visit
www.floridaforestservice.com.


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Observation,
0 Continued from page 9
own personal Bibles one was a
small New Testament from when
I was a kid it had my name and
home address in it. Three months


after returning from our trip, my
Mom received a letter at that
address from a woman who very
politely wrote to thank us for the
money, soap and Bible. She was


a government employee with a
Department of Fisheries and was
curious as to what prompted us to
give that to her. Regardless, she
appreciated it. I remember giving
it to her; she didn't look like a


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prostitute but just seemed to be
a nice lady. She smiled when we
handed over the bag.
Before we set sail, we were
told by those who knew someone
who knew someone else who
had an uncle who had been there
that Cuba would not be all that
welcoming of the little Bibles.
Thus we spread them out around
the boat so it didn't look like we
had corruptive plans for banging
innocent Cubans over the head
with them. Our worries were
for naught, however, when the
customs official who boarded
our boat upon arrival was the
first person to take one. He asked
about it on our bookshelf and we
told him to have at it. The small
parade of people who boarded
to clear us in took that Bible, a
Corona beer (it was 5 a.m.) and a
can of Diet Coke (carefully placed
into his briefcase to enjoy later,
or, more likely, to present to his
kids as a surprise).
The Diet Coke we had was
almost as popular as the Bibles.
When the parade of officials
returned for clearing us out of the
country, the representatives of
various governmental departments
cleaned us out of it, as they tore
our boat apart looking for guns. We
didn't have one on board but they
told us they were concerned we
would get in trouble with the U.S.
if it turned out we did accidentally
have one. Whatever. We enjoyed
meeting the gun and drug sniffing
German Shepherd they brought


aboard and he enjoyed the dog
treats we had.
There is a good reason for the
popularity of
Diet Coke.
Cuban soda
is scary. -
Almost as
scary as
the orange
hamburger Observations
that Michelle By Mitch Traphagen
had from a
stree v en mitch@observernews.net
street vendor
in Havana.
Yes, orange, but that's another
story.
Entering Florida and leaving
the Georgia strippers behind,
the billboards only slightly
become more nuanced. "WE
BARE ALL!" they scream out as
families with little Johnny and
Susie pass by making their way
towards Disney World. At least
we seem to have that in common,
as we shout out, "SOCIALIST!"
"COMMUNIST!" and "NAZI!"
to our neighbors (usually
anonymously via the Web,
pronouncing that this person or
that will bring on the end of our
nation, passing harsh judgment
upon those we deem to be too
fortunate or, more frequently,
not fortunate enough to warrant
simple human compassion).
Meanwhile, back in Havana,
a young woman tucks another
five-dollar bill into a little Bible,
quietly saving for dreams of better
days. She can't imagine, let alone
wish for, problems like ours.


Florida Seafood Festivals
Florida is known for its commercial fishing heritage and quality seafood
products. Many communities throughout the state are home to annual
festivals that celebrate the positive impact of commercial fishing and
seafood. These family-oriented events have a local flair that is unique to
each community. Visit the department's website for updates on these and
other festivals at http://www.florida-agriculture.com
January
Port Salerno Seafood Festival ........Port Salerno ...................... Jan. 26
www.portsalernoseafoodfestival.org
February
Everglades City Seafood Festival ..Everglades City..............Feb. 8-10
www.evergladesseafoodfestival.com
Cortez Commercial Fishing Fest .... Cortez...........................Feb. 16-17
March
St. Augustine Seafood/Music.......... Saint Augustine...................Mar. 1-3
www.lionsfestival.com
Treasure Coast Seafood Festival ....Port St. Lucie......................Mar. 2
www.cityofpsl.com
Grant Seafood Festival ................. Grant..................................M ar. 2-3
www.grantseafoodfestival.com
Isle of Eight Hags Shrimp Fest ......Fernandina Beach............Mar. 3-5
www.shrimpfestival.com
Marathon Seafood Festival ..........Marathon........................Mar. 9-10
marathonseafoodfestival.com
Shrimpa-Palooza Festival ............Homosassa........................Mar. 23
www. shrimpapalooza.com
Taste of the Sea Seafood Fest ........Fort Pierce.........................Mar. 23
tasteofthesea.wix.com/seafood-festival
Marco Island Seafood Festival .......Marco Island................Mar. 23-24
www.marcoislandseafoodfestival.com
Deering Seafood Festival .............Miami ...............................Mar. 24
www.deeringestate.com
Blue Crab Festival ........................ Palatka ......................... M ar. 24-27


I


JANUARY 24, 2013









ou Jit t


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OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 23


JANUARY 24, 2013






24 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


Addressing a mystery


0 Continued from page 1


the next century, a time of laser
surgery and laser printers, people
would look at it with questions.
Someone, somewhere in the
passing of time, last used it. Then,
things changed.
But mysteries tend to exist only
until someone finds an answer.
Dr. Mac Miller, son and grandson
of one of Ruskin's founding
families, has an idea where it
came from.
"It produced addresses for
mailings of early newspapers and
promotional materials," Dr. Miller
said. "After the fire that took
the college, the Woman's Club
[then the president's home, which
had survived the fire] pretty
much became the repository for
valuable things and things that
had sentimental value."
Miller believes the machine was
used to print addresses for the
Ruskin Bugle, a newspaper and
land sales promotional circular for


the Ruskin Commongood Society.
He believes the machine started
out in Kansas, used by Julius
Wayland, editor of a newspaper
named, The Coming Nation. In
the late 1800s, Wayland moved
on to Ruskin, Tennessee, a
short-lived utopian society that
was a forerunner to the Ruskin
Commongood Society in Florida.
Wayland then came to Ruskin,
Florida, possibly bringing the
machine with him.
Miller has reason to believe this
- he remembers seeing a photo
of Wayland sitting at the machine.
"Kansas to Tennessee to
Florida, that was quite a trip in
those days," Miller said. "It's
very possible that this is the same
machine that addressed the papers
back in Kansas."
But Miller acknowledges
there is no real trail of evidence.
The machine was popularized
in the early 1900s, although


Sterling Elliot, who was himself
a publisher and created the
machine for his own use, built
an earlier model in 1897. When
others saw it, however, and
realized it was an ingenious
machine for making address
labels, Elliot saw an opportunity
and became a manufacturer. The
first commercial machines were
marketed in the early 1900s, just
about the time that the Ruskin
Commongood Society was
building a dream in the scrub and
wetlands of South Hillsborough.
As a group, they were forward
thinking and such a device,
despite being costly, could easily
have been justified. The colonists
had found a home in the wilds of


Florida and had every reason for
optimism.
"'The Ruskin College and the
Ruskin Commongood Society
had their own printing plant,"
Miller went on to say. \ ly father
worked there as a boy."
Not many years later, in 1918,
a fire devastated the college,
sparing few of the college
buildings. What is now the Ruskin
Woman's Club and was then the
home of the college president, Dr.
George McAnelly Miller, Mac
Miller's grandfather, survived
the fire. At some point, the Elliot
Addressing Machine, having itself
survived the fire, was likely taken
into the home and then lost only
to the passing of time.


On the third floor of one of
the grandest buildings in South
Hillsborough, the chalkboard in
what was once a classroom only
whispers its past. At one point,
lessons, perhaps homework
assignments were written on it but
were never completed. There is a
last time for a '.i hin'. after all.
In the storage room is the Elliot
Addressing Machine, a substantial
investment in hopes and dreams.
One evening long ago, someone
sighed after a long day of work,
most likely printing address
labels for the Ruskin Bugle, then
perhaps cleaned the machine with
care, pushed back the chair and
went home. And then, he or she
never returned.


In 1906, the machine sold for $150 which is nearly $3,800 today, a
sizeable investment for the fledgling Ruskin Colony and college.


A chalkboard remains in one of the rooms in the historic home, a whispering remnant of the building's
diverse past. MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTOS


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IN YOUR BACKYARD


1~
I ~ U


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a -.


TRIPS WORTH TAKING

CODY, WYOMING



Cowboy Town U.S.A.


January 24, 2013
THE OBSERVER NEWS
THE SCC OBSERVER
THE CURRENT


The Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyoming.


* By WARREN RESEN, North
American Travel Journalists Association
Photos by JEANNE O'CONNOR
Yeehaw!..This is the one word I
think that best describes the most
Cowboy of Cowboy Towns I've
so far visited in the American
West. Cowboy Culture thrives
here and the people really live it.
If you want better service in any
restaurant, bar or better seats at
the daily Rodeo the secret, we
discovered, was to wear your
Stetson 24/7 everywhere you go
in Cody.
Cody is the focal point for
eastern Yellowstone National
Park. Whether going to or coming
from the park, you must drive
through Cody. Colonel William
Cody, a/k/a "Buffalo Bill" saw to
this major marketing ploy. After
all, he was an entrepreneur and
the consummate showman.
Colonel Cody had traveled
through this region in the 1870s
and was so impressed by its
potential and the area's proximity
to Yellowstone, which had been
declared a National Park by
President Ulysses S. Grant in
1882, he returned in the mid-
1890s. The resulting town of
Cody was incorporated in 1901.
This is the town he built, as if
anyone can miss the connection.
His name is on almost anything
of importance even structures
completed long after his passing.
In 1902 he built the Irma Hotel,
named for his daughter, right in
what is today the city's center.
The 2-story Irma Hotel is the
focus for many of the happenings
in Cody. This is where tourists
congregate to hear the legends,
true or not, about The Great Man.
The Cody Gunfighters hold the
requisite afternoon shoot out
between the good and bad guys in
the street outside the hotel. Shoot
outs have become a tradition in
many small western towns. They
are generally free and fun to
watch. Cody's popular sightseeing
trolley begins its run from the
hotel.
This is a family town with no


high rises and friendly people
where the badge of one's
manhood seems to be the degree
of noise one's muffler can
emit while driving on Sheridan
Avenue, the
main road
through
town. But -
still, it's good f
clean fun
and nobody
seems to .
mind.
The famous
Irma Hotel
is a historic
landmark which in this instance
means a little dated. The hotel
with its bar (smoking is allowed)
and busy restaurant had a tad
too much activity for us so we
opted to stay at the charming and
definitely peaceful Chamberlin
Inn, a small 21 room hotel just 12
block north of Hotel Irma.
The Chamberlin Inn is
a different world with its
individually furnished rooms
and lovely private garden for
guests where we had time to rest
and recharge our batteries after
thousands of miles on the road.
We were in the heart of the city
yet totally removed from the
downtown.
Built in 1903 by Agnes
Chamberlin who worked
for Buffalo Bill at the Cody
Enterprise newspaper, the
Chamberlin Inn was expanded
over the years, had several
different owners and operated
under various names. The original
name was restored by Ev and
Susan Diehl in 2005 when they
purchased this historic gem.
We had the privilege of
staying in Suite #18, a/k/a "The
Hemingway Room." Ernest
Hemingway stayed there in 1932
when he was 33 years old and had
just completed the manuscript
for "Death in the Afternoon."
His greatest works were still
on the horizon and copies of all
of Hemingway's works are on
the writing desk next to the old
manual typewriter. Nice touch.


It is said that Hemingway fished
during the day and spent evenings
in the Hotel Irma's bar. Perhaps
he found time to also do some
writing during his sojourn at the
Chamberlin Inn.
.:. --- Tripadvisor has
.. .. page after page
of superlatives
W from guests
about the
Chamberlin Inn.
or 7 V. The list includes
S ., .refined boutique
'"' hotel, charming,
delightful, warm
and inviting,
excellent, quaint plus many, many
more. This might seem a tad too
elegant for a cowboy town, but
don't we all deserve a little bit of
pampering from time to time?
Guests can walk to almost
anything in the city from the
Chamberlin Inn. And while not a
B&B, just around the comer from
the Inn is Peter's Caf6 & Bakery
serving good food at inexpensive
prices with friendly service and
local color.
The Inn's accommodations vary
in size and rooms are individually
and tastefully furnished.
Bathrooms feature amenities
ranging from footed tubs to
glass block shower stalls. There
are several private sitting areas
inside the Inn and the previously
mentioned private tree shaded
garden is quite spacious. An
afternoon bar is available for the
Inn's guests. There are no lines
at the front desk during check-
in. The Inn's concierge provides
individual service.
While the Chamberlin Inn was a
wonderful and relaxing stopping
place on our cross country
journey, there is a lot to do in
Cody. A must visit is the world-
class Buffalo Bill Historical
Center.
The museum is a complex of 5
connected wings. Buffalo Bill's
Museum features his life and
exploits. Did you know Colonel
William Cody was presented
> See COWBOY TOWN, page 3B


Hotel Irma's aging sign welcomes visitors to the original Buffalo Bill
hotel. Below, a view of the front of the historic building.
-


The famous Chamberlin Inn.


t4


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2B OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER THE CURRENT


Wi-fi available at South County parks


* By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews.net
SOUTH COUNTY Thanks
to the installation of wireless
Internet at 12 of its recreation
centers, including three in the
Brandon and South County area,
parents can now work or socialize
on their laptops while their small
children play on swings and slides
and their older ones take part in
organized sports.
'There's a wide range so people
can sit inside or outside and pick
up the Wi-Fi signals," said Shorty
Robbins, recreation services
manager for the county's Parks,
Recreation and Conservation
Department.
Available at 12 major centers
around the county, locally it can
be picked up without charge at the
Brandon Community Center, 502
E. Sadie Street; the Gardenville
Community Center, 6219
Symmes Road in Gibsonton; and
the Ruskin Recreation Center, 901
Sixth Street S.E.
It is also available at some
other recreation and community
centers around Tampa, and in
Thonotosassa, and Odessa.
'We've been expanding our
services to include larger age
groups," Robbins said. "We've
added gyms at several rec centers
and are working on gardens so
people can enjoy sitting outdoors
with their laptops."
Gardenville plans to eventually
put benches and perhaps some
other outdoor furniture in its
garden area in front of the
building where people can use
their computers in a relaxing
setting said director Dave
Ramirez.


Joe Soletti, who has been rec
center director in Ruskin only
since Thanksgiving, said the
ESOL (English as a Second
Language) program is the first to
use its facility wi-fi as a group.
'They meet on Monday mornings
at 9 a.m. and bring laptops,"
Soletto said.
Robbins says she is hoping this
community service will be helpful
to many.
Instead of having to sit in a
wireless caf6 where you feel
obligated to order food and
drinks whether you want them
or not because you're blocking a
table, or having to "be quiet" in a
library, having wireless internet
indoors and outdoors at the
recreation and community centers
operated by the county's parks
department will allow people
much more freedom, she said.
They can just stop by and use
the easy-access codes posted on
the bulletin board, said Soletti,
pointing to the flyer posted at the
Ruskin center.
According to county
spokeswoman Kemly Green, Wi-
Fi is being phased in at most all
county buildings, as costs allow. It
has been added to County Center
on Kennedy Boulevard, and many
other county-owned buildings,
with the objective of adding it
eventually at all of them.
'The RNC (Republican
National Convention recently
held in Tampa) pushed it to the
forefront," said Robbins. "We had
to have it for that."
The service went live at the
parks in October but most people
are still not aware of it, she said.


'This will make it easy for parents
to work or socialize on line while
their kids play, or take part is
sports activities. They won't have
to leave them at the park and go
elsewhere to use their laptops."
This especially helps the ESOL
group (for Spanish-speaking
people who learn English) that
meets Monday mornings at the
Ruskin Recreation Center because
the timing coincides with the
center's Tiny Tots program which
means child care is provided.
In an interview Jan. 7, Janie
Schrock, who teaches the program
based at Lennard High School
through the Hillsborough County
School District, said she is hoping
that the same program may soon
be initiated in Wimauma where it
is also badly needed.
'This is wonderful for us,
because we take the GED class
at Lennard as well," said Natalia
Garcia.
Another student, Manuel
Garzon, is an accomplished
graphic designer. He says he
knows his computer technology
but is glad to be perfecting his
understanding and speaking of
English.
The wireless Internet service at
each of the recreation centers is
available from 7 a.m. to midnight
seven days a week and once
you have gone inside to get the
access code and entered it into
your laptop, you will be able to
pick up the signal outside and use
your laptop for the Internet and
to check your email during those
hours even when the center is
closed.


PENNY FLETCHER PHOTO
Janie Schrock helps Natalia Garcia and Manuel Garzon learn fluent
speaking and written English as part of the ESOL program now giv-
en at the Ruskin Recreation Center Monday mornings at 9 a.m. The
program has been relocated there since the rec center became one
of three in the area to receive wi-fi Internet service. Jan. 7 the three
were working on an I-pad. Usually they use laptops, Schrock said.

S .- ............
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JANUARY 24, 2013





JANUARY 24, 2013


The famous Silver Saddle Saloon and restaurant located inside Hotel Irma, Cody, WY.


AP


The registration desk at the Chamberlin Inn.


OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER THE CURRENT 3B
TRIPS WORTH TAKING

CODY, WYOMING


Cowboy Town U.S.A.
10 Continued from page 1B .


with the Congressional Medal of
Honor? It's displayed in his wing.
Other wings include The Plains
Indian Museum, the Gallery
of Western Art Museum and a
Museum of Natural History. The
largest display space is given over
to the Cody Firearms Museum.
This firearms collection is
purported to be the largest and
most comprehensive assemblage
of American Firearms in the world
displaying both long and hand
guns. Virtually every significant
gun manufacturer in the world
is represented here. I found the
sheer size of the gun collection
overwhelming. Be prepared to
spend time in all of the museums
to properly appreciate the scope of
the Buffalo Bill Historical Center.
Cody, WY is known as the
"Rodeo Capital of the World."
The 6,000 seat Stampede Park sits
above the Shoshone River just
west of town. The Rodeo goes on
seven nights a week from June
1st through August 31st. July 1-4
is when the world famous Cody
Stampede takes place featuring
some of the nation's greatest
cowboys but if you can't make
it for this event, any night is a
fun night and attending a regular
nightly event was one of the
highlights of our stay. Local talent
of all ages is showcased. It is
family oriented. It is local. It is fun
and it is real.
We would look forward to a
return visit to Cody, Wyoming and
would not even consider staying
anywhere but at the Chamberlin
Inn.


1872 Congressional Medal of Honor, inscribed
"The Congress to William F. Cody, Guide, For
Gallantry at Platte River, Nebraska, April 26,
1872. Cody received this for his bravery after
Sioux Indians ambushed the Third Cavalry
he was guiding.
This medal is on display in the museum in
Cody, Wyoming, along with many other arti-
facts from this era of the wild west.


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4B OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER THE CURRENT


Fish Tales: Free boat launches are hard to find


Why not spend a day
watching the boats go
by, sailing out into the
blue? You can tell who' s
just cruising and who's
going fishing!
Interesting to know,
that 95% of recreational By Jonie
boats are trailable.
I see more than a
couple hundred trailers parked at
Williams Park on North Hwy. 41
each weekend. It is best to launch
there, free of charge, your trailer
is safe, and close to the water. If
you launch on Cockroach Bay
Road, your trailer may not be
there when you return. I have
heard lots of reports of vandalism
there.
I agree that there are not many
free places to launch your boat
anymore. You could launch
any place before parks started
charging a fee, big corporations
built private homes on our
waterways, yacht clubs became
members only, and fences were
built. All and all we are still the
nation's best place to fish, so find
a place to launch free of charge.
The weather has been great,
with a slight change for some
sections but where else in the
world, can you see 80 degrees in
January?
We have so many fish out there
waiting for your bait, just drop a
line and you will get some type of
fish. It is said that one needs fish
in each and every diet. Want to
save money? Fish for your supper,
have fun and come home with a
free meal.
Trout are playing hide and seek,
in the grassy areas, just pole in,
turn your engine off and have fun.
Redfish are waiting for you. It


is legal, one per person
per day but you can
catch and release.
Founder are playing
around at high and low
tide, you can hook one
easily, so don't wait
until they retire to the
sandy bottom of the
waterways.


Sheepshead are swimming all
around bridges, piers and pilings.
Get a bucket of live shrimp and
feed them. If you feel a nudge,
count three and set your hook.
You will come home with fish and
not an empty bucket of bait.
Don't just go fishing go
catching!


USF named national leader

for online learning


The University of South Florida
stands as a national leader in on-
line education, according to newly
released rankings by the Guide to
Online Schools and U.S. News &
World Report.
Based on data compiled by the
National Center for Education Sta-
tistics (NCES), the primary federal
entity for collecting and analyzing
data related to education, the Guide
to Online Schools ranks USF 25th
on its 2013 "best overall" list of
the Top 30 nonprofit and for-profit
schools offering high-quality, af-
fordable online programs. It is
USF's first appearance on the an-
nual index, now in its fourth year,
and USF is the only Florida public
university named among the na-
tion's best
U.S. News, meanwhile, ranks
USF's online graduate programs in
engineering and education among
the best in the country for the sec-
ond year in a row, rating the uni-
versity's graduate engineering
programs 22nd nationally, the best
showing of any eligible institution
in the state, and its graduate educa-


tion offerings 47th.
USF currently offers 22 fully on-
line programs at the undergraduate
and graduate levels, in disciplines
ranging from Applied Sciences,
Global Sustainability, and Instruc-
tional Technology to Music Educa-
tion, Public Health, and Reading
K-12.
Overall, roughly 58 percent of all
USF students take at least one on-
line course (defined as 80 percent
or more of content delivered online)
each year, according to the Florida
Board of Governors.
The annual Sloan Consortium
Survey of Online Learning reports
the national average of college
students taking at least one online
course each year is 32 percent.
According to the Sloan Survey, the
number of students nationwide tak-
ing at least one online course now
surpasses 6.7 million, an increase
of more than 570,000 students since
2010. At the same time, more than
two-thirds (69.1 percent) of chief
academic leaders now say that
online learning is critical to their
long-term strategy a new high.


Updates in Glaucoma & Cataracts
With Dr. Robert Edelman
Join us for our next educational seminarJ
on Friday, January 25th at 12:00-1:00 p.m.

Register online at YourEyeDoctors.com
or call 941-782-5832 to reserve your seat
and learn how you can enjoy clearer vision.


^ MANATEE
EYE CLINIC
SFI- T i l 1 Light lunch will be served.


Robert Edelman, M.D.
Board-Certified
Ophthalmologist
Fellowship-Trained Glaucoma
Specialist & Cataract Surgeon


JANUARY 24, 2013

Gamble Plantation hosts 13th Annual
Plantation Festival
The Florida Department of Environmental Protection's Gamble
Plantation Historic State Park in Ellenton, in conjunction with The
Gamble Plantation Preservation Alliance, will host the 13th Annual
Plantation Festival at Gamble Plantation from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on
Friday and Saturday, Feb. 2 and 3.
Visitors will enjoy an arts and crafts show, a school art competition,
free tours of the Gamble Mansion and the Patten House, food and
beverage vendors and more.
Admission and parking for the event is free. Donations will be ac-
cepted to benefit the Gamble Plantation Preservation Alliance, a non-
profit Citizens Support Organization dedicated to supporting the Gam-
ble Plantation Historic State Park.
Gamble Plantation is located on US 301 in Ellenton, approximately
one mile west of 1-75 (exit 224).
For more information, contact the park at (941) 723-4536 or visit
www.floridastateparks.org/gambleplantation/.


Tampa Bay Symphony announces
winter concerts
Under the baton of the new permanent Music Director Mark Sforzini,
the Tampa Bay Symphony will give three February concerts in Clear-
water, Tampa and St. Petersburg.
The Tampa Bay Symphony has more than 80 classically trained
volunteer players, many of them music teachers and others who have
played professionally.
Concerts will be on Sunday, Feb.
24, at 4 p.m. in the Arts Audito-
rium on the St. Petersburg College
Clearwater campus at 2465 Drew
St.; on Monday, Feb. 25 at 8 p.m. in
Louise Lykes Ferguson Hall, Straz
Center for the Performing Arts, in
Tampa; and on Tuesday, Feb. 26,
at 8 p.m. at the Palladium Theater,
253 Fifth Ave. N in St. Petersburg.
Tickets at the door are $20 for
adults. Free tickets are available
in advance for students, and also
at the door in Clearwater and St.
Petersburg. Students 18 and over
must show student ID. Mark Sforzini
For additional information, visit
the website: www.TampaBaySymphony.org.



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On Saturday,

Tampa Bay's

biggest party begins

with an invasion

Tampa Bay's biggest
event, the 2013 Gasparilla
Pirate Fest will take place
in downtown Tampa on
Saturday. The event begins
with the Gasparilla Invasion,
with the ship Jose Gaspar
leading an armada towards
the Tampa Convention
Center between 11:30 a.m.
and 1 p.m. The day continues
with a parade beginning at
2 p.m. at the intersection of
Bay to Bay and Bayshore
boulevards and running
through downtown. The
crowd for the parade has
estimates running to 300,000
people but despite that,
with at least two South
Hillsborough krewes in the
parade, along with a large
number of sheriff's deputies
from the Ruskin District IV
office, familiar faces are
likely to be seen. During both
the invasion and the parade,
from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., the
Gasparilla Pirate Fest Street
Festival will take place along
Florida Avenue from Kennedy
Blvd. to Channelside Drive.
Put on your best pirate suit
and dive into the crowd. Oh,
and don't forget the many
security cameras set up
for the Republican National
Convention last August
will still be keeping an eye
on things, the jump from
politicians to pirates being
fairly short in some people's
minds and all.


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6B OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER THE CURRENT


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THL-^~ SHOPPER-~~ II100 Announcements
200 Farmer's Mkt

To place an ad call 400 Marine
813.645.3111 ext. 201 CLASSIFIED ADVf RTISING 450 Transportation
Fax: 813.645.1792 CLAISE ADVE TII I 500 Real Estate
$17.00 M & M Printing Co., Inc weekly publisher of the 550 Manuf. Housing
up to 20 words 600 Rentals
300 addl. word The Observer News. The SCC Observer and Current 650 Prof. Services
Deadline is Monday 210 Woodland Estates Ave., SW 700 Services
at 4pm Ruskin. Florida 33570 800 Employment


105 PERSONALS


IT o UdE
NO 100 EN


Thank you St. Jude & St Anthony
for prayers answered. AK






260 FRUITS & VEGETABLES


Under New
Management!
Starting 1/22
Tues. Fri. 8:30 am 5 pm
Saturday 8:30 am 3 pm
Prices good thru 2/9
Bananas.........................350 / lb.
Vine-ripe tomatoes......... 890 / lb.
Full flat of strawberries....$12


5% DISCOUNT
for Seniors thru
February!
Hwy. 674
3/4 mile east of Wal-Mart
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(SCC Residents)

(813) 380-5214


280 PETS





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310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Almost New Thrift Store. 10008
Indiana St., Gibsonton (1 block off
US 41, 1 block north Gibsonton
Dr.,) Wednesday through Saturday,
9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture, lots
misc. Ministry First Baptist Gibson-
ton. 813-671-0036 to donate

Moving sale. Many fishing poles,
reels, lures for salt/ fresh water.
Down rigger. New & used golf
clubs, lots of golf balls. Army work
uniforms, shoes boots, jackets.
Antiques, furniture, family clothes.
Tools electric & hand, curio cabi-
nets. Deep Design I sewing ma-
chine, craft supplies & much more.
Must sell, low prices. Jan. 25 &
26, 8am-2pm. 650 Allegheny Dr.,
SCC

LHS Community Yard Sale
LHS drama club is sponsoring
a yard sale. Saturday, Feb 2,
8am-3pm. to support LHS musical
theater. 2342 E. Shell Point Dr.,
Ruskin. Donated items for sale
accepted 1/30 & 2/1, 3-5pm. at
auditorium.

Multi family sale. Jan 25 & 26,
8am-2pm. 701 Bel Air Ave., SCC.
Longaberger, collectibles, tools,
household, clothing & much more.

2347 East Del Webb, SCC. Kitchen
items, cookbooks, china set, crafts,
beautiful framed art & misc. Friday
& Saturday, 8am-noon

Mechanic tools. 50's T-bird, Chevy
Vet, Mustang, GTO, parts & manu-
als. 3pcs entertainment center,
(2) swivel rockers & misc. 1/25 &
1/26, 8am-2pm. 1809 El Rancho
Dr., SCC.


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310 GARAGE/YARD SALE




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Yard sale. Friday, Jan. 25, 9am-
noon. No early birds. 1916 East
View Dr., SCC. Leather loveseat,
household appliances, TV, ladies
clothes, etc.

Garage sale. Lots of misc. house-
hold. Great assortment of toys,
infant seat, baby walkers & more.
Decorative items, clothes, glider.
Friday 1/25, 8am-2pm. 2354 Em-
erald Lake Dr., SCC

Leukemia benefit sale. 202 Fla-
mingo Dr., Apollo Beach. Satur-
day, Jan. 26, 8am-noon. Multiple
families. Antiques, tools, fishing,
household items.

Huge yard sale. Saturday, 1/26,
8am-2pm. 3711 Nazimova Ave.,
Ruskin. US 41 to Universal follow
signs. See Craigslist for pictures &
directions.

Lots of Christmas items, dishes,
clothes & lots of misc. 410 Smith-
field Lane, St. Andrews Estates
SCC. 8am-1 pm. Thursday & Friday,
1/24 & 1/25

Lawn mower, books & lots of misc.
2004 Ford F-150. Saturday, Jan
26, 9am-1pm. 2314 Lyndhurst Dr.,
SCC.

2014 El Rancho Dr., SCC. Jan 25
& 26, 8am-1 pm. Wingback chairs,
end tables, art work, collectibles,
books, clothes, lamps & misc. Good
prices


A Cavary's

Thrift Store
Wed., Fri. & Saturday
9 a.m. Noon
Jan. 23, 25 & 26
Bed and Bath Sale
50% off all bedding, linens
and towels
Plus the Secret Sale
1424 E. College Ave. Ruskin
813-641-7790
Ministr7~ ofCalvar Lutheran Church


312 ESTATE SALES

Wanda's Estate Sale.
Don't Miss This One!
Club Car golf cart, tools, furniture,
artwork, office supplies, por-
table AC, 7pc patio set, kitchen
cabinets, beddings & kitchenware.
Clothing, shoes & purses, lots of
costume jewelry. 713 Riviera Dr.,
SCC. Off Rickenbacker & Augus-
ta. Friday & Saturday, 8am-1 pm.
Don't forget to visit (Above The
Rest)

Estate sale. Friday & Saturday,
1/25 & 1/26, 8am-2pm. All must
go. 2119 7th St. SW, Ruskin. 813-
645-2892


AAA Furniture
New & Gently Used Furniture

BUY & SELL
Daily Trips to SCC


6819 U.S. 301 S., Riverview
(813) 677-8180



'"NETTIE'i

ESTfITE

SaLES


ll:1
382-7536
Personalized
Service


Let us get done in one day
what it takes the other
guys a week to do.
We will pack-up and
pick-up one room or the
entire house for a QUICK,
PROFITABLE, TROUBLE-
FREE EXPERIENCE.
CALL
BUTTERFIELD'S
AUCTIONS


, g


www.ButterfieldsAuctions.com
Butterfield Auctions AB2706/AU3549


312 ESTATE SALES











2000 FORD WINDSTAR
MINI VAN (Low Miles), 2003
E-Z-GO Golf Cart, Antiques
& Collectibles from all over,
Bamboo/Rattan Sofa & Coffee
Table, Bamboo Rockers, Drop
Leaf Dining Room Table w/
Chairs, Side Board, Buffet,
Grandfather Clock, Antique
Game Table, Organ, Kitchen
Table, Windsor Rocking Chair,
Antique Quilts, Antique Singer
Sewing Machine, Queen Bed,
Twin Beds (one is a Tempur-
Pedic), Secretary, Cedar Chest,
Patio Furniture, TOOLS, Art,
Household & Garage Items, Full
House!
Please park on side of sale due to
emergency vehicles.
See You There!






Your home will be staged for
best results. Working in
Sun City Center for 26 years.
Please feel free to call about the
sale or its contents.
Bonded Licensed
Cell: 508-0307
or Eve: 633-1173








iRighti
Se Habla Espahol License
www.denneysestatesales.com
J.P. Auctions & Consignment Shop
93 7th Ave. N.E. Ruskin, FL 33570
813-625-4240
& 813-732-5000


330 FURNITURE


Computer desk, oak, 3 tier, 28x45
$60. Black high back cloth executive
chair $30. All excellent condition.
813-671-3302


Your neighborhood
printer.

i 1i Printing Company, Inc.
Established in 1968 I

210 Woodland Estate Ave.,
Ruskin, Fl
813-645-4048 I
------ .1J


Mon.-Sat.
9 a.m.-5 p.m.


mI


JANUARY 24, 2013


THE SHOPPER 7B


S.
[Rer es
v t
Best Kept
Secret-ept' Wsvl']


0 ; *,


1






8B THE SHOPPER
360 GOLF CARTS

Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade.
Chargers, parts all related. Ronny's
Carts & Parts. 813-484-9855 or
813-645-4515

390 MISC. FOR SALE

Eddy Bauer screened dining room
tent, zipped carrying case. 14x12,
used twice. SCC. 813-642-0248

Skyway Memorial Gardens, Pal-
metto. Two adjacent plots in Good
Samaritan section. Valued at $3,790
asking $3,000. 813-634-4247








2 Locations
Lone Pine RV Park
201 11th Ave. NW* Ruskin
Carol Motel
1308 Hwy. 41 N.* Ruskin
(813) 645-1325


395 WANTED TO BUY

Wanted
Oriental jade, coral & Ivory, fine
old paintings, coins, currency,
silver flatware, etc. 813-610-5824

Furniture wanted. I buy small
chests, cabinets, tables, chairs,
mirrors, cupboards, desk, lamps,
stands. 1960s & older. Call Jeff
813-645-4337

Wanted
Gold, silver, sterling flatware. Gold
& silver coins, silver certificates.
Call Conco 863-899-8048, by ap-
pointment. Payment in cash.


425 SLIPS OR STORAGE

Little Manatee Outdoor Storage.
RVs, boats, trailers. All sizes. 2903
39th Ave., SE. Ruskin. 813-361-
3725.

Special! First 90 days $25 monthly
includes tax. Outdoor storage. Boat
trailer, RV, cars, trucks. $30 month-
ly. Fenced yard. Woodland Estates
Ave., Ruskin. 813-641-3281, David
813-310-5027

South Bay RV & Boat Storage.
Specializing in outside storage for
RVs, boats &trailers. 813-677-2000
www.SouthBayStorage.com







511 HOUSES FOR SALE

Must see. Beautiful 2br/2ba/2cg,
Twin Tree, 1,600sf Many extras.
$140,000. Nice area, SCC 55+
813-633-2106

For sale. 2 for price of 1. Resi-
dential or commercial, Ruskin.
3br/2ba home or commercial space
+ monthly income from separate
commercial rental. Great location
& condition. Seller to pay $2,500
in closing cost for buyer & may
consider financing. Both buildings
for $167,900. Call owner 813-601-
7339

Turn your unwanted items
into cash. Call the classified
department to place your ad
813-645-3111


CA IAC



DICKMAN (813) 645-3211
I C INC. Serving South Hillsborough

REALTY County since 1924
Celebrating 89 Years www.dickmanrealty.com
1924 2013 dickman@tampabay.rr.com
Looking for experienced realtors to join our well established team.
Call 813-468-0288 for confidential meeting.
NEW LISTING: GREAT FAMILY HOUSE 4BR/2BA, split plan, beautiful MBA with dual sinks
and huge shower, large kitchen opening to great room, inside utility with W & D, 2-car-garage,
fenced backyard for your children and pets! Tile floors in kitchen & BA, solar water heater
(energy saver). $155,900. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
PERFECTLY MAINTAINED AND FURNISHED DOUBLEWIDE HOME: 2BR/2BA, large MBR
& MBA, enclosed lanai, double attached carport with large utility/storage room, cement drive-
way. Roof is new, CHA is 1 year old, carpet is 3 years old, kitchen is well equipped. Move-in-
condition! $54,900. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
ACREAGE FOR SALE, MOTIVATED OWNERS! 6.7 acres, cleared, great for horses, farming
or for your dream home. Country setting, secluded. $53,500. More acreage for sale in area.
CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
COMMERCIAL LISTING APOLLO BEACH: Great retail location on Apollo Beach Blvd. Spe-
cial features include : 1890 sq.ft. built in 2006, track lighting, small utility kitchen, handicap
bath, alarm system with digital cameras, free-standing custom-built showcases with glass tops,
shelving, mahogany wood trim, loads of storage. $224,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 OR
ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
COMMERCIAL ACREAGE IN RUSKIN! 3.7 acres (MOL) with CG Zoning. The initial work
has been done for office buildings. This property has a great location, on corner of 10th St SW
and Woodland Estates. $324,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK
748-2201
SHORT SALE! 3BR/1.5 BA 2 Car Carport in good condition, close to schools and shopping.
Call KAY PYE 361-3672 OR ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 Just $69,900
PRICE REDUCED!! COMMERCIAL SITE located close to Hwy 41 in Ruskin with over 200
feet of road frontage. Zoned General Commercial with county water & sewer. Mobile home
on property brings rental income. $139,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 OR ROXANNE
WESTBROOK 748-2201
YOU'RE GONNA LIKE THIS, OH YEAH!! Newly listed by original owner, the popularity of this
model is well deserved. 2BR 2BA plus den, Sanibel II in prime location has lots of natural light
to add to cheerfulness of spacious well laid out plan. Huge master bedroom and closet, garden
tub, vaulted ceilings, inside utility, 2 car garage with extra storage. Follow your passion for
learning and/or having fun or just relaxing. $169,900 JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
ALWAYS WANTED TO FARM OR HAVE ANIMALS? Do we have the perfect property for you!
Outstanding 3BR 2BA Jacobson doublewide has nice addition and carport/driveway for stor-
ing big toys. 2nd dwelling is 3BR 1.5 BA next door that would make great house for partner,
worker, or renter. 18 acres with huge steel building and carport, greenhouse, 5 wells. Come
explore. $359,000 JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
BE PART OF THE EXCITEMENT BUT ENJOY SERENE SURROUNDINGS if you want to
retreat to your lovely bayside condo. Beautifully updated Bahia Beach condo features 2BR
2BA you must check out. If you view at sunset you won't want to leave. $209,000 CALL
JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
Call US FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS...645-3211


511 HOUSES FOR SALE

Open House, Sunday 1-4pm
902 Birdie Way, Apollo Beach.
$215,000. 2289sf. Large home
with very open floor plan. 2 large
sliders open onto golf course.
Split bedroom with huge closet
on master side. Fenced back
yard with screened lanai. Home
features bamboo flooring & new
porcelain tile. Owner transferred,
this is not a short sale. S.L. Real
Estate Service, LLC Mandra Stew-
art, broker 813-741-3678


RUSKIN HOME AND WORK PLACE!
Great family house on 1 acre, zoned
residential/commercial, close to shopping
and main Hwy. House can be 5BR/2.5BA, or
2BR/2BA, with 3 offices, 1/2BA and separate
entrance. Wood floors, fireplace, inside
utility, screened porch, and detached garage
and carport. Beautiful large oaks, circular
driveway. $165,000.
RUSKIN WATERFRONT POOL-HOUSE:
With 100 ft on canal and quick access to
Tampa Bay, this home is a fisherman's dream.
2BR/2BA, tile floors, newer CHA, enclosed
patio, dock, davits, boat ramp, huge attached
carport for boat or RV, attic storage space
and more! Tropical landscaping, extensive
view of water. $209,500.

CLAIRE TORT ID N
Cell: (813) 363-7250










community, many upgrades!
$139,000
* WATERFRONT!! 3/2/2 on a wide
canal with direct access to Tampa
Bay only minutes away $283,000
* SNOWBIRD SPECIAL!!! Tip Top
Condition. 3/2 manufactured home.
$56,900
* KINGS POINT 2/2 expanded Stuart
model with indoor utility & golf cart
parking. $49,000


2BR/2BA in Kings Point, enclosed lanai,
w asher/dryer ..........................................$29,900

SEASONAL RENTALS

1BR/1.5BA in Kings Point,
FURNISHED........................ $1,000 month

2BR/2BA in KP & Golf Course view,
FURNISHED.....................$1,500 month









Occupy Immediately!

Financing Available
Credit check a 'must'
for owner financing
Includes:
stove, refrigerator,
washer/dryer
3 BR/2 BA
EXTRA LARGE rooms & lot
double car garage,
huge built-in barbecue grill
w/ counter & sink,
screened-in lanai





For a good buy shop in the
classified


560 M. H. ON LOTS






A gated, resident-owned, waterfront,
55+ mibihh' home *, .i/I
www caribbeanisles net* cislesl@verizon net
John Lewis* office 813-641-7067* cell 814-937-9978
NEW LISTING WATERFRONT: Dbl wide
with 3BR/2BA handicapped accessible -1272
Sq. Ft. Appliances are included with a Washer
& Dryer in the entry room from the carport. View
the water from your large screen room or from
under your own grapefruit and navel orange trees.
$65,000.
FULLY FURNISHED: 3BR/2BA single wide
in g .1 ..1ii . .. 11 ... com er lot. All
appliances are incl., even the washer & dryer. The
home has a Florida Room with vinyl windows and
a shed. MUCH MORE ONLY $34,500.


565 M.H. IN PARKS


4 sale $4,500 or rent. $600 monthly.
2br/1ba with 2 enclosed rooms,
laundry room/third bedroom. Shed,
appliances included. 55+ 813-447-
6123

One bedroom mobile home in wa-
terfront park with dock. Corner lot
with view of river. No pets $5,000.
Call for info. 813-645-2446







610 WATERFRONT RENTALS

Apollo Beach 2br/2ba, comfy,
furnished condo. A/C, pool, tennis
courts, dock. Quiet community. Sea-
sonal? Long term? Rent negotiable.
TECO welcome. 440-666-1330

612 APTS FOR RENT

Large
One Bedroom Apt.
Ideal for single person or couple.
Totally remodeled. Utilities includ-
ed. Ruskin area. $775 monthly
plus deposit. No pets, no smoking
813-634-2329

613 CONDOS FOR RENT

Beautifully furnished. Gated
lbr/1.5ba 55+ Sun City Center.
Fully furnished, free cable, club-
house, transportation, much more.
$700 monthly. 813-633-8083

614 DUPLEX FOR RENT

Riverview apt, 2br/lba, CHA,
water, maintenance included. Tile
floors. $600 monthly $600 security.
Ask for Vicky 813-458-8178 or 813-
641-8400

Place a Garage/Yard Sale Ad
$17.00 for 20 Words
Call Beverly
813-645-3111 ext.201


s.
w 4
1
Ist St.W.


TORFT_
STORE


JANUARY 24, 2013
630 M.H. RENTALS

For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With
A/C. 813-677-1086

One bedroom furnished, water &
electric included. $165 weekly, plus
security deposit. R & M Mobile
Home Park Gibsonton. 813-236-
9207

One bedroom RV on private prop-
erty. References. $125 weekly
plus deposit. includes utilities. 813-
363-6001

For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home
near shopping center in Gibsonton.
813-677-8789, 813-601-1542 or
813-516-0896

646 WAREHOUSE SPACE

Garage & mini storage, RV lots
& mobile home lots for rent. Call
Pirates Treasure Cove, Gibsonton.
813-677-1137

649 WANTED TO RENT

Room to rent? Divorced WW II
veteran. Need mailing address &
internet access. Have references.
Interested? Rob 813-297-6036






651 BOOKKEEPING

QuickBooks
Certified Pro-Advisor. Can do atti-
tude: 1099's, W2's, forms, cleanup
& review financial, full bookkeep-
ing services, tutoring, software &
issues. Hourly rates. Your local
office or mine. Thea's Quick Book-
keeping Inc Ruskin 813-641-1089
email: theahp@verizon.net www.
theasquickbookkeeping.com

680 ADULT & CHILD CARE


Light Housekeeping Grocery
Shopping Running Errands
Companionship Sitters In-Home
or Care Facility Flexible Schedules
License #232465
137 S. Pebble Beach Blvd., Ste. 104
Sun City Center 33573
(813) 293-5369 or (813) 419-4967
www.AngelsofLifeServices.com



Your neighborhood
printer.

r I Printing Company, Inc.
E.ab.hedi.nlM 1...968.I

210 Woodland Estate Ave.,
I Ruskin, Fl
813-645-4048 I
L. ---- .


S THRIFT STORE
OPEN: Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 8 a.m. 3 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. 12 p.m.
1009 1st. Street 5.W.
Nu Ruskin
67 W Hv


674 E We Have
Furniture, Too!
DONATION DROP OFFS
TUES. THRU FRL ONLY PLEASE,
ALL DONATIONS MUST BE IN CLEAN
USEABLE CONDITION.


U U


i-


I 5.R.







JANUARY 24, 2013





705 CLEANING

Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integ-
rity. Call for free estimate. 7days a
week. Move-in, move-out, rentals.
Insured, bonded, licensed. Ruskin,
Apollo Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean





iLRED It
The only Cleaning Professional service
to satisfy every discerning taste
Licensed, Bonded and Insured
at Affordable Prices
Call Now & Get 15% Off!
(813) 645-0264
Red 1 is owned and managed by service-related
disabled veterans


708 MOVERS

Affordable Moving & Hauling. Local
or long distance. Full service mov-
ing to/from anywhere in US. Load &
unload storage units, truck & more.
Licensed & insured. Free estimate.
Call Dave 813-447-6123

Tony Hill Moving & Storage.
In business 40yrs. Move 1 piece
to whole household plus haul
away anything in your way. (Fully
Insured). Best rates. Call 813-629-
0108 U.S. DOT #434469

710 LAWN CARE

Bill's Lawn Service
Licensed & insured. No contract.
Yearly, monthly or per cut. As low
as $25 per cut. 813-293-6840






Free Estimates!
Landscape & Irrigation Services
& Lawn Maintenance

Turf Keepers, Inc.
(813) 633-2092
(813) 295-3462


THE SHOPPER 9B


710 LAWN SERVICE

Shaw's Lawn Service
Complete outdoor property main-
tenance. Landscaping, trimming,
pressure washing, sprinkle repair.
Licensed & insured. 813-298-
3376

714 TREE REMOVAL

Stump Grinding
Ruskin, Apollo Beach, Riverview,
Gibsonton, SCC area. Reason-
able Call Tony Horman. 603-662-
6079

715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service.
Culvert sets, driveways, shell,
crushed asphalt, concrete, fill dirt,
excavating, mowing etc. Tony
(813) 363-7963 Free estimates.

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill
dirt, topsoil, sand, crushed rock &
asphalt, driveway culverts. Load-
er, backhoe, grading, bushhog,
discing. Install Septic System &
drain fills. CFC#1427021. 813-
645-1883

718 REMODELING


















720 HOME MAINTENANCE

Handyman
Phil Oley 25+ yrs experience. In-
sured. Apollo Beach, Ruskin, Sun
City Center & Kings Point.
Call 813-649-1418

Jerry Myers Handyman
Minor repairs. Housecleaning with
pride. Free estimate. Licensed &
insured. I 813-741-1912 H
813-849-8390 cell


Join our Advertising Sales Team
The Current has 2 sales positions available
in the Riverview / South Brandon area.
Benefits package includes medical insurance,
paid holidays and vacation, plus a gas allowance.
Sales experience a plus and a working knowledge of the
area is desired. If you want to join a dynamic team, work for
a stable company approaching its 55th year in
South Hillsborough County, email your resume to
Brenda@observernews.net or call 813-645-3111 x 210.








A community of affordable homes Phase III Now Available!
exclusively for first-time homebuyers! 2 Swimming Pools and a Clubhouse
o M *3,4 and 5 Bedrooms, 1 and 2 Garages
noma .OHoi.n n=mwo Popular Ruskin Location
............... w. flh... .*. o USDA Self-Help Housing program --help
(813)672 7889 www.flhome.org build your home in exchange for a down
S- payment
No money down, easy to qualify
Non-profit agency works for you
Hablamos Espafiol -



SBAYOUPASS
e1M., ,r,:.-r,,N r,~TIne m b runderr80 ~oof laiaiornme.Callfordesak


740 MISC. SERVICES

Window Washing
single story homes & business.
Free estimates. Call Rick 812-
896-5359

Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks,
boat lifts & seawalls. Free inspec-
tion. Hecker Construction Co. 813-
236-9306

Hate that Wallpaper?
I can remove it. Want something
textured & painted. Big or small, I
can do it. Debby. 813-434-6499







810 MEDICAL

Sun City Center busy Internal
Medical Office is looking for a
certified medical assistant or LPN.
Full-time, Monday thru Friday.
Must be flexible, customer service
oriented, team player. Please fax
resume & salary requirements to:
813-634-4595

Visiting Angels is searching for qual-
ified CNAs/HHAs to provide home
care services throughout Eastern
Hillsborough, Manatee & Polk
counties. Candidates must have
valid CPR card, HIV/AIDS CEUs,
valid Florida drivers licenses, Physi-
cal & level 2 AHCA background
screening to be considered. Call
813-752-0009 or email vangels@
verizon.net

870 GENERAL

Full time maintenance worker. Riv-
erview Mobile Home Park. English
speaking, clean background a must.
813-677-4778 Monday thru Friday
8am.-5pm

Now hiring nail tech/ full specialist/
hair stylist. Contact Annette at 813-
634-5422

Drive/ Rep needed. Out of state
travel. Retirees welcome Apply at
2209 South Dock Dr., Palmetto.
Monday thru Friday, 8am-11am.




Come Join our
Friendly Staff
and positive work environment!
Job duties are: answering multi-lines,
scheduling appointments,
checking in clients,
checking out clients, and
working one-on-one with clients





COMMUNITY
PAPERS
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(CPF STATEWIDE)

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Broccoli with Fusill and Red Pepper


FamilyFavorites
FAMILY FEATURES

f you're looking for delicious ways to bring more nutrition to the family table, it's hard to beat broccoli. Broccoli
is on most top 10 lists of superfoods, and packs a lot of nutrients in each bite.
"Easily incorporated into a variety of dishes, broccoli offers a great way for busy families to eat healthy on a
daily basis," said Rachel Brandeis, registered dietitian.
For an extra nutrient boost, try these recipes made with Eat Smart Benefort6 broccoli. Brandeis said,
"Benefort6 broccoli provides more phytonutrient glucoraphanin, which naturally strengthens your antioxidant
enzyme levels to help maintain the antioxidant activity of vitamins A, C and E in your body. These vitamins
protect your body from potentially damaging free radicals and environmental stresses."
Benefort6 broccoli is available in the packaged produce section of grocery stores. Find out more at www.
EatSmartBeneforte.com.


r


Serves: 4
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
2 shallots, peeled and thinly sliced
4 garlic cloves, peeled and thinly
sliced
1 cup assorted Asian mushrooms
(maitake, white buna-shimeji,
enoki, yellow foot, shiitake)
1/2 head Napa cabbage, shredded
1 1/2 cups of Eat Smart Benefort6
broccoli florets
1 1/2 cups snow peas
1 red bell pepper, chopped
Sea salt and fresh ground pepper
to taste
Sprouts for garnish
Heat large saut6 pan with oil over
medium high heat.
Cook shallots until translucent,
about 2 minutes, add garlic. Cook for
1 minute.
Add mushrooms and cook until
liquid dissolves, about 5 minutes.
Add cabbage, broccoli, snow peas
and bell pepper; cook for 3 minutes.
Top with sprouts. Serve immediately.




Serves: 6 to 8
1 1/2 cups of Eat Smart Beneforte
broccoli florets
3 teaspoons salt, divided
1/2 pound fusilli pasta
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 red bell pepper, seeded and sliced
into long thin strips
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1 lemon zest
1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black
pepper
2 1/2 tablespoons freshly squeezed
lemon juice
Freshly grated Parmesan
(optional)
Cook broccoli for 3 minutes in
a large pot of boiling water with 1
teaspoon salt. Remove from water
with slotted spoon. Place in large
bowl and set aside.
In same water, cook pasta
according to package directions,
about 10 minutes. Drain well and add
to broccoli.


While pasta is cooking, in small
saut6 pan, heat oil and cook sliced red
pepper, garlic and lemon zest over
medium-low heat for 3 minutes.
Off heat, add 2 teaspoons salt, red
pepper flakes, pepper and lemon
juice. Mix and pour this over broccoli
and pasta. Toss well.
Season to taste, sprinkle with
cheese (if using), and serve.
For added protein, shred 1/2 of a
cooked store-bought roasted chicken,
then toss with pasta and serve.



Serves: 4
1 1/2 cups of Eat Smart Beneforte
broccoli florets
3 garlic cloves, peeled and thinly
sliced
2 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon lemon zest
3 tablespoons grated Parmesan
3 tablespoons toasted pine nuts
1 teaspoon chopped basil (optional)
Preheat oven to 425E
In large bowl, toss broccoli with
garlic, olive oil, salt and pepper.
Place broccoli in a single layer
on baking sheet. Roast for 15 to 20
minutes, turning once during cooking,
until crisp-tender.
Remove broccoli immediately to
serving bowl and toss with lemon
juice and zest, Parmesan, pine nuts
and basil. Adjust seasoning to taste
and serve hot.




Yield: 1 pizza (serves 6 to 8)
1 whole wheat 12-inch ready-to-
bake pizza crust
4 tablespoons olive oil
4 cloves garlic, minced
2/3 cup shredded mozzarella-
provolone cheese blend, or 1/3
cup shredded mozzarella and 1/3
cup shredded provolone
1/4 cup shredded sharp cheddar
cheese
1 cup of Eat Smart Benefort6
broccoli florets (raw and


quartered)
2 Roma tomatoes, chopped coarse
Preheat oven to 450E. Place pizza
crust on cookie sheet.
Pour olive oil into small pan; heat
and add garlic. Stir for 3 minutes.
Remove from heat and transfer to
small cup to cool. Pour garlic olive
oil mixture over crust, distributing
evenly.
Sprinkle mozzarella-provolone
blend evenly over crust. Sprinkle
cheddar cheese evenly over top of
mozzarella-provolone blend.
Place broccoli on top of cheese;
distribute evenly. Place tomatoes on
top of pizza; distribute evenly.
Bake for 10 minutes. Remove from
oven; let sit for 2 minutes before
slicing and serving.




Note: Cooking decreases
the glucoraphanin content
of Benefort6 broccoli as it
does for all broccoli. The
best way to get the health
benefits from any broccoli
is to eat it raw or lightly
steamed.


Roasted Broccoli Broccoli and Fresh Tomato Pizza


,: "2 f" ":
.I -n
-' Pr
t"


' Journal of the Science of Food andAgriculture 85:681 (2005) relationship of the climate and genotype to seasonal variation in
the glucosinolate-myrosinasa system.
2 Average glucoraphanin content in Benefortd broccoli relative to market standard broccoli varieties assessed over 3 years in 23
locations.


JANUARY 24, 2013


17