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Title: Observer news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Publisher: M&M Printing Co., Inc ( Ruskin, FL )
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The Observer News office will be closed Monday and
, Tuesday, Dec. 24 and 25 in observance of Christmas
Deadlines will advance as follows:
Cl,::, led ads.............................................. 4 p.m ., Friday, Dec. 21
D,:I:.I.:,, ads ...................... ............ 11 a.m ., Friday, Dec. 21
Ne : Releases ................. ..................4 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 20


The Sun City Center Golf
Cart Parade had a record
number of entries this
year. See some of them
on page 1B


PRSTSTD
PAID
RUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570
PERMIT NO. 8


December 13, 2012
Volume 56
Number 47


THE OBSERVER NEWS


Santa Claus re- --
ceived a warm wel-
come at Wimauma '-.
Elementary School.
He arrived at the
school using
a Hillsborough
County fire truck ,..'
as a sleigh. Await- .
ing the children
in the auditorium
was a room full of
t smiles from dozens
.4 -.of volunteers and .-.
*. ` mounds of items,
from sweet treats
to necessities
including tooth-
brushes, mittens
and hats.


MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO f
MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTOS
Morgan Bernard, a 14-year-old musician, performing with her band
at the Orpheum in Ybor City on Friday night. The performance was
part of an event to celebrate the release of her new CD, "Give It
All". Santa, elves visit Wimauma Elementary


A girl, a guitar, a rising star


* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews. net
The first thing you notice
about Morgan Bernard is
not the studded boots, it's
not that she's an adorably cute
young woman, it's not
the driving rock 'n roll
rhythm laid down by
her band just before
she takes the stage, it's
not even her boundless
talent. What you'll first
notice about Bernard
happens before she even
straps on her electric
guitar and walks up
to her center stage
microphone. What
you'll notice, what everyone
immediately noticed during her
CD release party at the Orpheum
in Ybor City on Friday night,
was her presence. In the seconds
it took to walk across the stage,
grab her guitar and start singing,
she made her presence known.
Morgan Bernard has "It"; the
mysterious, inexplicable, yet
entirely recognizable feature of
someone who is going to go places
few people will reach. Bernard, a
girl from Gibsonton, is destined to
be a star.
Bernard and her band rocked the
Orpheum on Friday night as part
of a performance for the release of


her new CD entitled "Give It All."
By Sunday, she was rocking out in
a theater in Nashville, Tennessee.
Her presence, her talent, her music
are taking her places and that
is not mere happenstance. She


-- 1 I

decided at the age of 10 what she
wanted to do. Now, at only 14, it
is already coming to fruition. At
an age when many of her peers
still struggle to avoid putting their
clothes on inside out, Bernard
is fronting a rock band. Only 14
years old and she looks equally at
home with her guitar on stage as
she does running around laughing,
pre-show, with her friends and
Nathalie, her band's young
drummer doing all the things
teenage girls do. But when she gets
on stage, the teenage girl becomes
a serious musician. She literally
takes the stage and owns it.
> See RISING STAR, page 23


* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net
When Santa arrived at
Wimauma Elementary
school using a Hillsborough
County fire truck as a sleigh, some
of the younger children were so
excited, so much in disbelief at the
happy sight, they had to cover their
eyes. But as exciting as that was,
if there was a cause for disbelief,
it was awaiting the children in the
school's auditorium.
Inside that room was a scene that
would bring a tear of joy to the
eyes of the most jaded and cynical
among us. In the auditorium, an
organization of companies and
more than a dozen volunteers had
come together to make Christmas
special for hundreds of children,
some of whom are from families
barely able to afford the basic
necessities, let alone Christmas
presents. More than a dozen people
put aside their own obligations
and deadlines for a day to become
elves and to bring joy to children
in the magical way that only elves
can. It all happened on a December
morning.
The spirit of Christmas isn't
found in the gifts; it is found in the
love and generosity that inspire the
giving of gifts. On that, the more
than 600 children of Wimauma
Elementary were immersed in the
spirit, with love and generosity on
such a rare scale that it could not
be missed. On Dec. 4, members of


the Frozen and Refrigerated Foods
of Central Florida Association
were certainly inspired. After class
photos with Santa, the children

HCC earns

USDA


grant for

hydroponics

farm


walked around the room packed
full of everything from treats to
necessities, most piled high on
> See SANTA IN WIMAUMA, page 12


0 By PENNY FLETCHER P
penny@observernews.net
RUSKIN Karen
Lewandowski said going
to school saved her life.
PENNY FLETCHER PHOTO
Every day, while A grant will double the hydroponics
a Hospice patient growing area at Hillsborough Commu-
undergoing radiation and nity College campus in Ruskin and be-
using a walker or cane, come part of its earth science course.
friends drove her back and
forth to classes at Hillsborough Community College.
Most of the staff wasn't aware of her grave condition until she was
doing much, much better and decided to share her story.
But because going to school was what kept her going during her
hardest of times, she wanted to give something back.
When she did, it benefited many besides those at HCC.
"Thanks to the can-do attitude and pro-active work of Phi Theta
Kappa (PTK) honor society Vice President Karen Lewandowski and
Professor Karen Boosinger, HCC-SouthShore students will soon
0 See HYDROPONICS AT HCC, page 22


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2 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


ISS Order by DEC 20th

and we'll shin your gift before Christns.s!


1 ooley


NGroves
Country Farm Market in the Grove


Order by
Sunday,
Dec 16th
for Christmas
Delivery A


Citrus Bouquet
Gift# S701 only$38.99*


A Friendly Florida Voice will be happy to help you select that
PERFECT Holiday Gift! Call Anytime between 9am-5pm


www.doolevyroves.com
I M 813-645-32561 9
Fax 813-645-1827
1-tray Navels and Red Grapefru ir lirr (i, .
Gift # NR only $39.99*
Need MORE fruit? *
Add a tray of fruit to this gift
for only $10.00 more!
Order Gift # 2NR $49.99* 3 .


Sweet Surprise Basket
Gift #S200 only $51.99


A Gift Card Sunshine Tree-O
will be sent to those a Dooley Groves Exclusiv e! Cd CO
RtfiG initQ ****** ************


JILL lLI1ecJllenI
of late-Christmas
order
(ordered Dec 17th
thru Dec 20th)
to let them know that
the Holiday fruit gift
from you
will be arriving soon.
Please note that
packages ordered
after Dec 16 are
NOT guaranteed
to be delivered
by Dec 25th.
though almost all
arrive fresh and good
by Christmas day or
between Christmas
and
New Year's Day.


Packed with over 30 lbs. of
MIXED Navel Oranges,
Christmas Tangerines
and Red Grapefruit...
ripe and ready for
Christmas enjoyment!
HURRY...
TIME'S RUNNING OUT!
RDER TODAY!
y i4
-l l I f ^ ~ '"*


Plus shipping charge.
All Gift Packages are guaranteed and will arrive
fresh and good in time for Christmas enjoyment
when ordered by December 16th.


F,, ---


.50
1/2 ga
I Dooley G
freshly-squ

Oran

Juice
Limit 2
with coupon
I ooley
-- roves
Lk -


--M--- -j - [ 1 - -I -g- -U- - I
i f Packinghouse Special! I 10% OFF
O I SAVE $1.00 off tote bag I t
)ff Gift Shop Items
al I I
roves I I "
teezed I Citrus Fruit too small to pack and
send u North,
but GREA for juicing!
PICK 'n' PACK your own bag
from the packinghouse bin
SAVE $1.00 off 1/4 bu I
tote bag with coupon I Candy Marmalades
When they're gone, they're gone. Honey Cookies Gifts
U.S. # 1 grade & quality fruit Cannot be combined with other specials
ot be shipped shipping fruit, cheese and juice excluded
I9T 1Cannot be shipped |O
Dec 18, 2012 oves Dec 18, 2012 TO Ves
ON12181 ON12182 ON12183
--------------------------- -L


The Original Grove Store
1651 Stephens Road
Old Sun City, Florida
(some folks call it Ruskin)
Monday- Saturday 9am 5pm
Open Sundays through Christmas
10am- 5pm 813-645-3256
Directions From Sun City Center /
Riverview Area:
Travel WEST on S.R. 674 about 5 miles
(past 1-75) to U.S. 41.
Turn SOUTH (left) on U.S. 41.
Travel for about 3 miles to
Universal-Stephens Road.
(Riverside Club sign on the left corner)
Turn LEFT and drive about 1/4 mile to
Stephens Road. Turn RIGHT onto
Stephens Road. Travel 2 miles.
Dooley Groves is on the left.
www.dooleygroves.com/directions.htm
Little Squeeze Copyright 2012 FI Dept of Citrus


DECEMBER 13, 2012


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Reserve deputies offer their time to keep communities safe


0 By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews. net
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
- They give of their time without
pay but say they gain more than
they give.
Hillsborough County Sheriff's
Office Reserve Deputies
must pass the same physical,
psychological and mental tests as
full-time paid deputies. They have
the same duties; carry the same
weapons; and can arrest suspects
- under supervision of their
direct supervisor or of the Office
itself.
It's a tough job and qualifying
for it is tougher.
Still, there are those who say the
rewards are plenty, and they're
looking for more volunteers to
join their ranks.


"It's definitely not easy. The
badge is one of the hardest things
to earn and one of the easiest
things to lose," said Reserve
Cpl. Chris Lewis, a training and
recruiting coordinator who has
been a reserve deputy since June
2010.
At 50, Lewis, who moved to
this area in 1995, is the owner of
a local restaurant and a certified
high school coach. He can still
do all this while volunteering as a
deputy because the reserve deputy
position is not full time. Most do
work a lot more than the required
20 hours a month though, some as
many as 90 hours.
But why do they want to do the
job without pay?
All four reserve deputies
interviewed are in different


-~ Join us for atCelebration of our Savior
featuring worship music by
Dave Fitzgerald and Temple Veil
2 SERVICES: Sunday, Dec. 23
9:00 and 11:00 a.m.
Childcare available for infant-4 years old only
Also join us for a celebration of the family at our
/ lChristmas Eve Services
'a Monday, Dec. 24
at 3:00,4:30 and 6:00 p.m.


~Lj


stages of life. Although they all
had specific reasons (which will
be explained later in this story)
for volunteering, two common
threads were "giving back to
their communities" and "learning
how to take charge in emergency
situations when needed."
Their stories all differ as much
as the deputies differ themselves.
William Dauber retired from 26
years selling printing presses for a
company in Cincinnati, Ohio. He
had no law enforcement training
before applying to the sheriff's
office.
"I was inspired to do it after
9-11, when President Bush said
people should volunteer," he said.
He went through the training at
66, passing all the same physical
endurance tests as younger paid
deputies.
Now 67, Dauber said he plans
to do the job as long as he is
physically able. Because there's
a test each year, he won't have to
guess how long that will be.
At 58, Keven Yarbrough has
been at the job five years. A 15-
year Army veteran, he holds a
government position when not in
his sheriff's uniform.
Keven called his volunteer
position an opportunity to give
back to his community.
"I want to be an example to
inner city youth," he said. He
wants to show them deputies
aren't something to be feared, and
get them used to being around
him like in the old days where
residents were befriended by the
"cop on the beat."
Alexandra Argote (called Alex)
went through the Academy and
was sworn in with Lewis in 2010.
Both her parents were in law
enforcement and she said she
wanted to "test the waters" before


* m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m


- -U


PENNY FLETCHER PHOTO
Reserve Cpl. Chris Lewis, training and recruiting coordinator, and
deputies William Dauber, Alexandra Argote (called Alex), and Kev-
en Yarbrough, say their volunteer position with the Hillsborough
County Sheriff's Office gives them satisfaction no other volunteer
job could give. Because the requirements say they must only work
20 hours a month (although these deputies all work considerably
more) they are also able to work full time at other jobs.


jumping in herself.
"I went through the Academy at
19," she said. Not only was she
the youngest in her class, she was
also the only woman.
Argote is a student at St. Leo
University who wants to go into
law enforcement as a career. She
said she figured there was no
better way to gain experience than
volunteering her time.
'This way I know what it's
about," she said.
Recently a passenger in a car
that had an accident on Interstate
4, Argote said her training at the
Academy made all the difference
at the scene.
mmmmmmmmmmmmI


"We were on the way to the
airport for vacation and were
merging onto the Interstate. When
the others were getting frantic,
really upset, I was able to take
control of the situation and keep
them calm," she said.
Despite the fact she took the
course at the Academy, when it
comes time to become a full-time
paid deputy, she'll have to take it
over again.
'The training is tough," Lewis
said. Going over the steps,
which are also listed in detail at
www.hcso.tampa.fl.us/Careers/
SubPages/Career-Opportunities/
> See RESERVE DEPUTIES, page 10
Ummmmmmmmmmmm


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OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 3


DECEMBER 13, 2012


~"3


1 Z(D


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4







4 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER DECEMBER 13, 2012


Positive Talk: Why not train?


It is amazing to me the number of
people who will pass up a chance
to learn new skills and update their
knowledge. When I talk to training
directors representing both
industry and
government,
they often
confide that "
they are
having a very
difficult time
getting people By William Hodges
to attend
training
courses. At one U.S. Air Force
base, the no-show rate was so high
that the commander demanded
supervisors come to his office
and explain why an employee
was a no-show. The absentee rate
dropped substantially.
Obviously, the supervisor has a
lot to do with the attitude and the
availability of students for training.
But more important to the "train
or not train" question is how the
student feels about training. Here
are some of the reasons students in
my classes have given for avoiding
training in the past.
1. "I am happy where I am now.
Things are great and I don't really
want a promotion." If you will
think of life as a moving sidewalk
and you are going the wrong way,
you may have an accurate picture
of what will happen to you if you
stand still. The only way we can
stand still with respect to where
we are is to move forward at the
same rate as the walk. Simply
standing still will cause you to
move backward. Training keeps
you current and moving forward
on the sidewalk of life.
2. "I am already a professional
in my field; basic courses are
beneath me." Some of the hardest


member to support
local bIsiness shop local


people to reach are those who have
lots of letters behind their names.
A degree that is over seven years
old is probably very outdated. To
be a true professional in this ever-
changing world, we must take
every opportunity to enhance our
skills. I am very much encouraged
that many professional occupations
are requiring continuing education
credits. What have you done
recently to not only stay current
but move into the future? Training
is the pathway to the future if you
are a professional.
3."I just don't have time to go to
a training course."A course should
enhance your skills to the extent
that it is an investment of time and
one that will pay dividends. Keep
in mind the story of the man who
asked for a job as a lumber jack.
Though he had no experience, the
foreman gave him an ax and told
him to start work. The first day
he was the top wood cutter in the
forest with eight trees cut down.
The next day he cut down only
six trees and by the fifth day he
cut down only two. He went to the
foreman and said he was working
harder than everyone else and was
not even stopping for breaks like
the other men did. The foreman
replied that, yes, the other men did
take breaks, but while they were
on break, they sharpened their
axes. Training is the way for you
to sharpen your ax and get more
out of the time you are expending.
4. "The classes are boring." Yes,
some instructors may be better
suited to be accountants, mechanics
or doctors. But do not judge a class


720 4th Street SW *


until you have either participated
in it or talked to someone who has.
When I started a training course at
one company, the atmosphere was
very tense. The last two training
programs they had brought in for
their employees had bombed. To
make matters worse, they required
the employee to attend the
sessions on Saturday mornings.
Even though the employees were
being paid overtime, many of
them did not want to come. Those
were the conditions under which
I started the sessions. At the end
of the program, I received many
nice comments, but the best was
an evaluation that simply stated,
"I didn't want to come. They made
me. I am glad they did." Start every
training class with an optimistic
outlook. Give it a chance.
Well, that's how it is with
training. It will keep you current. It
will help you move into the future.
It will save you time and, best of
all, if you chose the right classes,
you will be glad you did.
Hodges is a nationally
7... : -..1 speaker, trainer
and syndicated columnist. He
also hosts an interview-format
television program, Spotlight on
Government, on the Tampa Bay
Community Network which airs
Monday at 8 p.m. (Bright House
channel 950, Verizon channel 30)
and Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. (BH
channel 949, Verizon channel 36).
The shows can also be viewed at
www.hodgesvideos.com. Phone
: 824-641-0816. Email: bill@
billhodges.com Website: www.
billhodges.com


Ruskin, FL 33570


813-645-3529
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Christmas tree
curiosity?
The Christmas tree combines
two medieval religious symbols:
the lighted candle representing
Christ, and the Paradise tree from
which Eve plucked the apple.
Princess Helen of Mecklenburg,
who married the Duke of Orleans,
introduced the Christmas tree to
France in 1837. Queen Victoria's
consort, the German Prince Albert,
ordered a tree for Windsor Castle
in 1841. The idea came to America
with the German immigrants, and
proper Bostonians looked at the
first outdoor lighted tree in 1912.

From Vogue's Book of Etiquette and Good
Manners, Simon and Schuster, 1969.


G CSFs3 G ,Ty .-...
jeaepy o ideeCays frem
jfe Observer News
( P omir
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Published Every Thursday
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EDITORIAL:
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brenda@observernews.net
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penny@observernews.net
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mj@observernews.net
All press releases, news articles and
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mailed to Observer News, 210 Woodland
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<__________


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KALUMINUMO
rA::INM


[^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^I'!! ^ 1!! p!


4 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


DECEMBER 13, 2012







DECEMBER 13, 2012 OBSERVER NEWS 5


Florida 'snow' brings
holiday smiles
Sixty-four children from RCMA (Redlands
Christian Migrant Association) enjoyed a
Winterfest celebration at Hillsborough Com-
munity College Dec. 6.
HCC staff arranged for the youth, which
were of first-, second- and third-grade age, to
make stuffed bears, have snacks and most of
all, enjoy snow courtesy of All Star Ice Com-
nany PENNv el ETuHm R nPHTOS


SouthShore Chamber seeks

sponsors for 2nd Annual

Membership Banquet
"Mardi Gras Style" is the theme for the SouthShore Chamber of Com-
merce's 2nd Annual Membership & Awards Banquet, scheduled for
Friday, Jan. 25, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Southshore Falls in Apollo
Beach.
Tickets will be $30 per person, or $235 for a table of eight.
The Chamber has several tiers of sponsorship available:

) $1,000 Grand Marshall Sponsor
1 reserved table, including 8 tickets to the event
8 beverage tickets to be redeemed at the Fat Tuesday Bar
6 complimentary luncheon passes for 2013
Featured as Business of the Week for one week in January
Company name listed as title sponsor on program, recognition
in all press releases and newspaper articles related to event
Company name listed on site banner/signage recognition

) $750 French Quarter Sponsor
1 reserved table, including 8 tickets to the event
8 beverage tickets to be redeemed at the Fat Tuesday Bar
3 complimentary luncheon passes for 2013
Company name listed as sponsor on program
Company name recognized on site

) $600 Fat Tuesday's Bar Sponsor
1 reserved table, including 8 tickets to the event
8 beverage tickets to be redeemed at the Fat Tuesday Bar
Company name listed as sponsor on program
Company name and logo predominantly displayed at the Bar
area
Promo material distributed here

> $500 Bourbon Street Sponsor
1 reserved table, including 8 tickets to the event
8 beverage tickets to be redeemed at the Fat Tuesday Bar
Company name displayed by the featured jazz band
Company name recognized on site

> $300 Cafe Du Monde Sponsor
1 reserved table, including 8 tickets to the event
Company name & info listed on site with signage recognition
For more information, contact the SouthShore Chamber at 813-645-
1366, or go to southshorechamberofcommerce.com.


Christmas dance

at Manatee RV
The Manatee RV Park will host a
Christmas dance on Saturday, Dec.
15, from 7 to 10 p.m. Music will be
provided by Musical Memories.
Ice will be provided, but BYOB.
The fee is $5 per person donation,
and all are invited.
The dance is at the park hall,
6302 US Hwy 41 South (seven
miles south of Ruskin).
For more information, call J. Sul-
livan at 813-649-9150 or E. Resch
at 813-649-1185.


Apollo Beach
Elementary poster
This poster is prominently dis-
played around Apollo Beach El-
ementary School (ABES), as part
of the school's commitment to
character education.
It's encouraging to see educators
honing improvements in character,
notjust test scores.


Canadian Meds South expands its
office space in Apollo Beach

Canadian Meds South, a local-
ly owned business has expanded
its office space to better serve
its customers and to continue
saving customers up to 80% on
both name-brand and generic
prescription drugs through its t i
international pharmacies.
The firm has also added a U.S.
pharmacy in order to offer cus-
tomers low prices on U.S. ge-
neric drugs such as Lipitor and
Plavix.
Canadian Meds South is a
member of both the SouthShore
and Sun City Center Chambers
of Commerce, as well the South
Shore Business Association.
In 2011, it was awarded the
Best of South Shore in the field.
The firm's goal is to help seniors
avoid the donut hole and to help
those who have no prescription
coverage or high co-pays.
Canadian Meds South's new office is at 200 Frandorson Circle, Ste.
101 in Apollo Beach, at the corner of 41 and Apollo Beach Blvd. behind
the Radiant Gas Station.







Baby Time Monday, Dec. 17, 1:35 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 18, 11:35 am.
Wednesday, Dec. 19, 10:05 a.m.
For children ages 0-20 months and their caregivers. Early literacy be-
gins at birth. Bond with your baby through stories, bouncy rhymes and
songs in this 20-minute lap-sit program that introduces early literacy
skills and encourages language development.

Toddler Time Tuesday, Dec. 18, 10:05 a.m. & 10:35 a.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 19, 10:35 a.m.
For children ages 20-36 months and their caregivers. Stories, finger-
plays, songs and interactive activities make up this fun 20-minute pro-
gram that highlights early literacy skills and encourages reading readi-
ness.

Story Time Tuesday, Dec. 18, 11 am.
Wednesday, Dec. 19, 11 am.
For children ages 3-5 and their caregivers. Stories, action rhymes,
songs and interactive activities make up this engaging 30-minute pro-
gram that highlights early literacy skills, and encourages reading readi-
ness and social interaction.

Family Story Time Thursday, Dec. 20, 7 a.m.
For ages 2-5 with a caregiver. Make reading time family time. Stories,
action rhymes, songs, interactive activities, and crafts make up this fun
30-minute program that celebrates a love of reading. Children may wear
pajamas and bring a blanket and favorite cuddly toy.

Membership with the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library
helps provide the funding for free programs offered at the Library. If you
would be interested in becoming a Member of the Friends of the Library,
call Jim Duffy at 813-634-1396, www.southshorefriends.com.


AMERICAN LEGION
Alafia Post 148 7240 U.S. Hwy. 301
(813) 677-6529


MEETINGS
Legion Riders
Legion General
S.A.L. (Sons of)
Auxiliary


1st Monday
2nd Monday
2nd Thursday
3rd Thursday


MEALS (Public Welcome)


Breakfast
Fish Fry
EVENTS
Flea Market
MCL Car Wash
Bingo and Food
Entertainment
Steak Shoot
Legion Closes Early
New Year's Eve


Every Sunday
Every Friday


Sunday
Saturday, Dec. 29
Wednesday
Friday
Saturday


6:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.


9 to 11 a.m.
5 to 7 p.m.


7 a.m. to noon

6:30 p.m.
8 p.m. till ...
2 p.m.


Monday, Dec. 24 6 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 31
Patsy Cline Show, $5 per person.
Public is welcome


OBSERVER NEWS 5


DECEMBER 13, 2012







6 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER DECEMBER 13, 2012


You, me and business:

'Chamber of Commerce weather'
Much to Husband's dismay and white bean soup total yummi-
constant disgust, I often say out ness! And the smell of a pot roast
loud how much I love the cooler with onions, potatoes and carrots
weather. (I say this while ever-so- cooking in the crockpot make me
grateful it was in the 80s this past salivate all day! I go from the light-
weekend for the highly er chilled wines to the
successful annual holi- deeper, heartier reds.
day golf cart parade! I And I make a huge pot-
felt sorry for the poor ful of my award-win-
and exceptionally funny ning four-alarm chili to
Grinch from the Meth- go into the freezer for
odist Church who was later.
sweating, but...) By Dana Dittmar, Yes, the days are
Fall is my favorite executive Director shorter and I love that
season of the year for a SCC Chamber of as well! When it's dark
number of reasons, the Commerce at six o'clock, I feel
first of which is obvi- validated in niittino


ous. The humidity dies down and
we aren't dripping perspiration
all day. The air conditioner goes
off and the windows come open,
meaning TECO gets less of my
paycheck every month.
The second reason is also fairly
obvious and universal; the leaves
turn every color of red, yellow,
purple, orange and all hues in
between. OK, maybe not here so
much, but I can see them on TV
and download photos as a screen
saver for the computer. It gets me
in the mood.
The third reason is only shared
by my lady friends. Men are in to-
tal disagreement with me on this
one. We can break out our beau-
tiful sweaters and boots and wear
something other than t-shirts and
shorts. There is something about
the rich textures and colors of
winter clothes that soothe the fe-
male need for variety in dress.
Out come the longer skirts and
thicker, long-sleeve tops. We get
a little sparklier and glittery even
if the Holidays are a month away.
So don't laugh when you see me
in a wool sweater, tights and boots
when it's in the mid-70s. I just
can't help it. It's in the genes!
Much as I love light salads and
ahi tuna, I also look forward to the
winter vegetables and rich stews.
Pumpkin, spaghetti squash and


L,1n OffI c .t s of
Personal Injun:


the household chores and snug-
gling with Husband on the sofa
earlier in the evening. Somehow,
when it's daylight until eight, I feel
I need to make hay while the sun-
light shines; work in the garden,
do laundry.
Cooler weather signals the end
of the year coming, which means
new, clean calendars, balanced
checkbook registers stored away,
new budgets created and all sorts
of rituals: a new set of nails, cut
and color for the hair, a facial and
new makeup! (Again, not a guy
thing...)
I'm sure I'll grumble along with
the rest of you when it gets bitter
in January and February and I'm
actually cold instead of comfort-
able. But until then, I am going to
enjoy every second of this "Cham-
ber of Commerce Weather." (Nice
that we get credit for it too!)

Celebrating 38 Years in Business
CALL FOR FREE
INSPECTION
TERMITES?
ASK ABOUTTERMIDOR
BRANDON
PEST CONTROL
Phone: (813) 685-7711
Fax:(813)685-3607
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Im m igration: -UI,,.iii. il ,I' S1 ii.,
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Fam ily Law : E' ,.... ,..t, ,i/
Crim final Law : \lis/. ,t. i, F, F ,.I,, .
Free Consultation (813) 251-2831
S I 1 1 I I I !! I l. I i l. I.i I. i l. -I L "i '1 .1
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CALL 813-645-2935
LOCATED 5120 US HWY 41 NORTH RUSKIN VFW 6287
BI IA N EDOOD DON I O E "I


Purchasing a gift card? Read this first
Advice from the Better Business Bureau
Gift cards may take the guesswork out of gift giving, but you sure don't want to leave the recipient feeling
bamboozled.
"Gift cards make excellent presents, especially when you're unsure of what to buy for a family member or
friend," said Karen Nalven, President of BBB serving West Florida. "However, it's important to read the fine
print before buying to understand if there are any hidden fees or strings attached."
Both the U.S. and Canada have recently made changes in federal laws to improve consumers' chances of get-
ting full value out of the cards they buy and give. These rules generally apply to gift certificates, store gift cards
and general use prepaid cards, which are often branded by payment networks such as Visa or MasterCard.
Here are some helpful tips from BBB regarding gift card purchases:
) Buy from sources you know and trust. Avoid buying gift cards from online auction sites, because the cards
may be counterfeit or may have been obtained fraudulently.
Read the fine print before you buy. Is there a fee to buy the card? If you buy a card by phone or online, are
there shipping and handling fees? If you don't like the terms and conditions, buy elsewhere.
See whether any fees will be deducted from the card after you purchase it.
Inspect the card before you buy it. Verify that none of the protective stickers have been removed. Make
sure that the codes on the back of the card haven't been scratched off to reveal a PIN number. Report any dam-
aged cards to the store selling the cards.
Give the recipient your original receipt so they can verify the card's purchase in case it is lost or stolen.
) Consider the financial condition of the retailer or restaurant.
Despite ongoing issues with gift cards, sales of gift cards are still expected to increase this year. According to a
survey by Consumer Reports, 62 percent of consumers are planning to buy gift cards this holiday season.


Holiday Help


for Family Caregivers.


Do you need a break from caregiving
duties, to travel, work, or fulfill holiday
obligations? Our Respite Program can help!


Family caregivers can relax and enjoy time away,
while your loved one has fun and makes new
friends at Sun City Senior Living.



Respite Care
Seniors who need assistance can reside at with us while
a caregiver takes a vacation, attends to other matters, or enjoys a
respite from caregiving. Participants will enjoy chef-prepared
meals, social and recreational activities, assistance with personal
care, medication management, and much, much more!

Call 813-938-2259 today for all the details!


EQUALWOM
OPPORTUNITY


SUN CITY
PACIFICA SENIOR LIVING
Assisted Living & Memory Care


Assisted Living Fac. Lic. # 7290
3855 Upper Creek Dr.
Sun City Center, FL 33570

813-938-2259
www.PacificaSunCity. cor


A, 11111cep
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SUNDAY AFTERNOONS
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GAMES START 12:30 PM
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6 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


DECEMBER 13, 2012










How does Sun City Center fare for disabled Americans?


* By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
SUN CITY CENTER How
does this community of retirees
over the age of 50 years rate on
accessibility for the disabled?
The question was the crux
of discussions this week
when Hillsborough County's
ADA coordinator and a local
advocate for the disabled met
with Community Association
directors, looking at residential
and commercial sections from the
perspectives of the wheelchair
bound, the deaf, the sightless.
The answer that emerged
might be couched as not badly,
but certainly with room for
improvement.
Sandra Sroka, the county's go-to
person on compliance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA) and herself confined to a
mechanized chair, responded to
questions from a half-dozen CA
directors Monday morning as Bill
Schnell, a resident and advocate,
pointed to several locations where


accessibility for the disabled is
difficult or denied.
Sroka, Schnell and the
assembled directors agreed that
newer parts of the community
and recent construction projects
have built in accessibility for
the physically impaired with
automatically opening doors and
large rest rooms accommodating
wheel chairs and pool lifts and
especially marked parking spaces
adequate for entering or exiting
vehicles with mechanical or other
assistance.
On the other hand, Schnell
noted that older public sites
in the community and some
transportation facilities are
markedly inaccessible. The
Rollins Theater on the central
campus, for example, has no
arrangements that allow the
disabled to get on stage, he
said. And, while all public
transportation buses in the county
are equipped to accommodate
those with physical disabilities,
Schnell added that within


the community the vehicles
that transport residents on
entertainment trips or longer
travel are closed to the disabled
because they lack the necessary
equipment.
Perhaps the most glaring
example of non-accessibility is
the Sun City Center Post Office,
in part because its services and
functions are so important in the
lives of most residents, Schnell
said. This postal hub, through
which mail to and from several
surrounding communities passes
daily, does not have automatically
opening doors making access to
the lobby, postal lock boxes or
sales windows difficult for anyone
requiring walking
assistance.
And for the
wheelchair-bound,
gaining access
from parked
vehicles can
be threatening
because it can
require the
disabled in a chair
to navigate around
vehicles moving
in and out of
spaces in order to reach a single
ramp to the sidewalk, he added.
The same issues were raised by
Mrs. John Manning who cares
for her 73-year-old husband
diagnosed with muscular
dystrophy in childhood and
confined to a wheelchair most of
his life. John Manning is most
familiar with the drawbacks and
hazards confronting a disabled


person in Sun City Center, she
said.
The Mannings relocated to
the community in 1990 and he
learned how to get around SCC
in his mechanized chair; learned
what he could access and where
access would be impossible
unless someone else stepped up
to help, she indicated. The couple
would have liked to take day trips
or make longer journeys, either
as part of a SCC travel club or
with others on SCC Chamber of
Commerce trips, but was unable
to do so because the transportation
vehicles cannot accommodate
his wheelchair, Mrs. Manning
said. The situation is exacerbated
because she
cannot drive a
car, only a golf
cart, she added.
Despite his
disease, John
Manning
earned a
degree from
the University
of Tennessee
and both taught
in a school
system and
tutored students, his wife said.
Long interested in music, he
also has composed songs,
devised games and maintained
email correspondence with
the help of the computer, she
added. Yet, Mrs. Manning said,
despite her husband' s interest in
entertainment, he could not access
the Rollins Theater stage.
In December, 2011, John


frmTeOsre/esfml


Manning encountered what many
wheelchair-bound individuals
determined to have a measure
of independence dread most -
he was struck by a car on the
street near their SCC home. He
sustained broken bones in one
leg, one arm and head trauma,
his wife said, adding that in the
view of the MD, pneumonia was
a particular concern while he was
hospitalized.
Manning recovered to a level
that allowed him to return home,
but with another casualty of the
accident. His mechanized chair
for which he had designed a
desk-like attachment that held
his computer, was destroyed on
the street. He has a new chair
but it lacks the computer rest
arrangement and therefore he no
longer can use this tool that was
both his portal on the world and a
vehicle for his creativity, his wife
said.
Following the Monday meeting,
Ed Barnes, SCC Community
Association president, said he
would look into requirements
for ADA accommodations that
might make use of transportation
facilities in the community easier
for disabled persons. He also said
the CA would be maintaining
connections with Sroka's office
and would plan to participate in
periodic ADA seminars held in
the Tampa area.
The Observer contacted
the communications section
of the U.S. Postal Service in
Washington, D.C., with questions
related to making the SCC Post
Office more accommodating to
those in mechanized chairs or
otherwise needing help to use
postal services. No answers were
available before deadline.
Copyright 2012 Melody Jameson


Golf Club at Cypress Creek
1011 Cypress Village Blvd. Ruskin
Please call for reservation

813-440-4576 Ext.2


INCLUDES:


Two for 2 Soups or Salads


$39.99


2 Entrees
Balsamic Salmon
Roasted Lamb Shank
6 oz. Petite Filet Steak
Chicken Marsala


Prime Rib

Wednesday
8 oz................. $14.95
12 oz............... $16.95
14 oz.............. $18.95

Includes salad and sides
Tax and gratuity not included


2 Desserts

1 Complimentary
Bottle of wine ,
Available for dinner Wednesday i
through Saturday.
Tax and gratuity not included




Thursday

ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
Build Your Own Pasta Night
$11.95
* Your choice of Angel Hair, Penne or Fettuccini
* Your choice of Alfredo, Marinara or Pink
Vodka Sauce
* Your choice of Chicken, Shrimp or Bolognese

Includes salad
Tax and gratuity not included


1~


OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 7


DECEMBER 13, 2012


..






8 OBSERVER NEWS


Corr Elementary recognizes Terrific Kids f
These students have been honored by Corr Elementary School in G
attitude: PK Jayden Marino and Nathan Ayan. K Gianpiero Vite
jeed Gbadejesin, Jatia Markes, Izallana Mendiola, Fernando Perez-B
1st Adalia Knight, Zion Castro, Toriana Sewell, Lenier Rivera, Em
tin, Yadhira Lemus, and Alex Pedraja. 2nd Herman Vasquez, Qwayz
Makaila Bowie, Sochi Maduagwu, Jared Palumbo, Zuley Castro, Mo
3rd -Ashley VanMeter, Mia Laboy-Reyes, Maddox Miller, Mikhi Martin
Taylor Parkhurst, and Brianna Paz. 4th Grey Taylor, Christian Morale
Angeles, Hamza Eraq, Makayley Delarosa, and Johnny Fogarty. 5th -A
Laura Perez-Bustamante, Xochitl Santiago, Ayden Hlawati, and Edwar






Every Tuesday -Jam Session 3 p.m. 5ish, No Charge for all Elks
and their guests.
Every Wednesday Best Spaghetti in Town $7, All You Can Eat, for
all Elks and their guests. Music by Bryan from 5 to 8 p.m.
Every Friday Seafood, Sandwiches, and a Chef's Special for all Elks
and their guests from 5 to 7 p.m. Karaoke by Bryan from 5 to 8 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 15 Holiday Anniversary Dinner Dance for all Elks
and their guests, Appetizers 5-6 p.m., Dinner Menu: Roast Beef with all
the trimmings, 6 p.m., Dancing to the Buddy Young Orchestra, 7 p.m.,
only $15 per person, Attire Dressy Business.
Join S. Hillsborough Elks Lodge Eastern Caribbean Fund Raiser
Cruise Jan. 13 to 20, 2013, contact Howard Elkin at Discover Travel
for details and reservations.
The South Hillsborough Elk's Lodge is a clean, smoke-free environ-
ment located at 1630 US Hwy 41 S. in Ruskin, Telephone (813) 645-
2089.






C.A.R.E. is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.
For directions, visit www.CareShelter.org or call (813) 645-2273.

a *


Spooky
Spooky is a very cute little
black kitten with the happiest
face. He really would like to go
home with a loving new owner
to his forever home. Spooky
was found as a stray; won't you
stop in to give Spooky your care
and love. As part of his adoption
Spooky will be brought current
on his shots, micro chipped and
neutered.
Approximate DOB: September
12, 2012.


PHOTOS MARLENE GREENBERG

Buddy
Buddy is a cute Chihuahua who
was seen hanging out with his sis-
ter Trixie for several months on
their own. Buddy is a little timid
at first but that is to be expected
when you have no human con-
tact for such a long time. Once
Buddy decides you mean him no
harm, he will crawl up into your
lap for some cuddle time. If you
have a big heart, come and meet
Buddy today! Buddy is neutered
and current on his shots. He will
be treated for Heartworm as part
of his adoption.
DOB: TBD


Keller Williams
hosts wine-tasting
event
SKeller Williams Realty South
Shore will host a wine-tasting
event at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, Dec.
21.
This holiday-inspired event will
Suffer an assortment of wine paired
with a cheese sampling to create
an environment of networking and
Celebrate the holiday season. The
public is encouraged to attend.
Keller Williams Realty Apollo
Beach is located on Harbor Village
Lane in Apollo Beach.
RSVP to Ashley Sandel at 813-
641-8300.

Drive through a

'symphony' of lights
Symphony
Isles in Apollo
Beach will be
open for its An-
For November nual Christmas
Drive Thru from
3ibsonton for keeping a positive 6 to 8 p.m. on
Ili, Makenzie Manning, Abdulma- Friday. Dec. 14 -
ustamante, and Gabriel Duenas. The public
ily Pesina-Morales, Aaliyeh Aus- The public
zvaughn Williams, Ayahna Faulk, is invited to go and enjoy the
ises Ventura, and Jaylin Albury. lights and decorations. Bring the
lez, Jorge Porras, Natalie Kargel, kids to visit with Santa and Mrs.
as, Jasmine Rios, Ishtar Jimenez- Claus.
,drian Santiago, Maureau Hartley,
d Stefalgo.

RIJSKIN VFW POST #6287
Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120 U.S. 41 N. has listed
the following weekly activities. Meetings are: Ameri-
-o" can Legion on 1st Wednesday each month; VFW and
S. LAVFW on the 2nd Wednesday each month; and MA-
VFW on the 3rd Thursday each month.
Thursday, Dec. 13 Bar Bingo 6 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 14 Fish Fry 4:30 p.m. Treasure Hunt 7 p.m. Music by
Lani C & Co at 7 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 15 Turkey Shoot 1 p.m. Voice of Democracy & Pa-
triot's Pen Recognition Awards 3 p.m. Music by Holly Ray 8 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 16 Fire 'n Steak 1 p.m. Music by Bert & Sassy 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 18 Games in Lounge 1-5 p.m.. Kitchen opens at 4:30
p.m. Bingo at 6 p.m.

Hillsborough County Animal Services
celebrates "Phoebe Navidad" and
Animal Angel Giving Tree
The staff and volunteers at Hillsborough County Animal Services wish
you and yours Phoebe Navidad!
'Tis the season to drop off canned pet food, wash-
able bedding and more for n-cchd shelter pets. The an-
nual Animal Angel Giv- I[IZ I Tree has been erected
at the County shelter, and the wish list may be
found by visiting the inCounty's Animal Ser-
vices website, www. i lullsboroughcounty.
org/animalservice.
On Saturday, Dec. 15, the public is in-
vited to the 440 N. Falkenburg Road
facility in Tampa to meet some very spe-
cial guests: Santa "n Claus and Phoebe
the Miracle Dog. Kids of all ages
can tell Santa their holiday wish
when they drop off an item to fill
a needy pet's dish. Celebrity
pooch Phoebe will be avail-
able for wags,l kisses, and
keepsake photos with
Santa. Chil- dren are also
invited to craft orna-
ments featuring
Phoebe and other
shelter animals.
In October, an animal control officer rescued Phoebe, a young female
pit bull/hound mix found critically injured and buried. Phoebe survived
the brutal attack and still manifests joy for everyone she meets. While
her case remains an open investigation, Friends of Hillsborough County
Animal Services is building a reward for information leading to an ar-
rest. Tips may remain anonymous to Animal Services, and donations to
the Phoebe Fund may be made through the non-profit organization at
www.friendsofhcas.org.
Monetary donations to assist with animal medical needs (like Phoebe's) are
always needed, and Animal Angel Giving Tree donations may be dropped off
anytime. Hillsborough County Animal Services is now open daily from 10
a.m. 7 p.m. (excepting County holidays), and visitors can enjoy a variety of
pet adoption specials such as "Home For The Holidays," just $20 for any cat
or kitten. All pet adoptions at the County shelter include spay/neuter surgery,
vaccination, micro-chip, and pet registration tag.
For more information on pet adoption, the Animal Angel Giving Tree,
or the Santa Photos With Phoebe holiday event, call Hillsborough Coun-
ty Animal Services at 813-744-5660 or log on www.hillsboroughcounty.
org/animalservice.


DECEMBER 13, 2012
MOSI receives
$500K grant from
PNC for new
'Slippery Science'
exhibit
MOSI (Museum of Science
& Industry) has been awarded a
$500,000 grant by the PNC Foun-
dation to create its newest per-
manent exhibition, Slippery Sci-
ence, the first element of a new
preschool education program at
MOSI.
Slippery Science, which opened
Sunday, Dec. 2, is located inside
Kids In Charge!, MOSI's chil-
dren's science center, and will
contain multiple new exhibits that
incorporate elements of the Tam-
pa Bay Times Forum and Tampa
Bay Lightning hockey team as a
backdrop. Slippery Science will
include a series of interactive
exhibits that teach friction, phys-
ics, the science behind reaction
time and more. Inside the exhibit,
guests will be able to play games,
see what's inside the hockey pro-
tection of a player's uniform and
even ham it up on the Jumbo-
Tron.
The grant from the PNC Foun-
dation, which receives its princi-
pal funding from The PNC Finan-
cial Services Group, Inc. (NYSE:
PNC), also will result in MOSI's
new early childhood project
called PNC Passport to Science:
A Grow Up Great Initiative, in
collaboration with the Tampa Bay
Lightning. This program will ad-
dress the need to create interest in
science in young children through
facilitating children's ability to
explore, use science language,
ask questions and think using sci-
entific inquiry processes.
The Slippery Science exhibit
will also include accompanying
take-home activities and educa-
tor-led STEM investigations for
children, parents and teachers. An
interactive website, which offers
educational games, lesson plans
for teachers, MOSI-generated
preschool science explorations
for home and parent-generated
activities, will also be available.
The PNC Passport to Science
grant also will fund the recruit-
ment and training of volunteers,
including PNC employees, to
support Head Start events and
activities, along with supplying
tools for teachers and parents to
improve their science facilitation
skills.
This exhibit not only uses sci-
ence to engage young children in
active exploration, but it will also
be rich in strengthening the use
of science language for children,
teachers and parents. MOSI's ex-
pertise in educating and exciting
young children, their parents and
teachers about science provides a
solid foundation upon which to
build the PNC Passport to Sci-
ence program.
"Children are our natural scien-
tists," said Wit Ostrenko, MOSI
President. "They're engaged in
their environment and their imag-
inations run wild. Our work with
PNC Foundation allows MOSI
to continue connecting with their
curiosity."
In addition, PNC will donate
4,000 "Happy, Healthy, Ready
for School Math Is Everywhere"
activity kits to supplement math-
ematics learning for Head Start
children throughout Hillsborough
County. Created by Sesame Work-
shop as part of a continuing part-
nership with PNC, the bilingual,
multimedia kits include a guide
for parents and caregivers, a chil-
dren's book, along with an original
Sesame StreetTM DVD.






DECEMBER 13, 2012


OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 9

Observations:


Where the heroes are


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Last week, a New York Times
headline asked, "Where are the
heroes?" The question was posed
in response to the death of a man
at a Midtown Manhattan
subway station. He
was thrown onto the
tracks and killed by an
oncoming train.
Although people were '
on the platform, no one
helped as Ki-Suck Han, a By Mit
husband and father from mitch@
Queens, tried to climb
back on the platform
to escape the oncoming train. A
photographer from a New York
tabloid did manage, however,
to get some haunting, well-
composed photographs of the
last moments of his life, holding
9 the edge of the platform while a
train was bearing down on him.
The photographer later said he
Repeatedly fired his camera's
flash in an attempt to alert the
train driver. He later said that was
all he could do. I wasn't there,
I'll have to take him at his word.
But I do know the newspaper he
- works for had no concerns about
it they ran a front page photo
of the last seconds of his life,
with an inflammatory and (to
me) incredibly insensitive and
disrespectful headline. I'm sure
they made money off of it. I can't
imagine it was enough to pay off
the mortgage they also placed on
their souls.
There were no heroes that day
for Mr. Han. I would like to think
that he was the tragic exception
in not having a hero nearby
when needed. Please tell me that
is the case. Please tell me there
are indeed heroes among us. I
personally believe you might be
one of them.
A lot of people believe the word
"hero" is bandied about a good
bit too freely since 9/11. Today, it
is apparently applied to everyone
from someone recovering from a
S bad head cold to young children
S who manage to use the toilet
properly.
From my perspective, the
events of 9/11 simply brought
the definition of a hero into sharp
1444 focus. As thousands of people
ran out of the smoking, flaming,
crumbling nightmare that was
the World Trade Center in New
York, police officers, firefighters
and other first responders ran in.
They put the welfare of others
before themselves. To me, that is
the very definition of a hero and
I believe that could be amended


ch
ibse


to simply include people who
do good things that most people
wouldn't do. Such people are my
personal heroes.
I hope we all have
personal heroes,
some we know about,
others like unobtrusive
.- -t- companions, standing
by in the wings to
keep us from stepping
Traphagen out into traffic or
rvernews.net falling onto the tracks.
Clearly, on that day
last week, Mr. Han's
hero was nowhere to be found. I
would like to think I would have
tossed the camera gear and tried
to help. But no one really knows
what you'd do in a split-second
emergency like that. In many
more minor instances, I often
catch myself after the fact saying,
'I wish I had done something."
If there is a silver lining to Mr.
Han's death, it is that something
has been added to a mental
checklist of things for which to
be prepared. I'll toss the cameras
and run to help, praying I make it
in time a life is worth at least
trying.
My Mom is my personal hero.
The reasons why are far too
numerous to list in a newspaper
column, but suffice to say that she
raised four children to be happy
and productive adults and lived
her life to the best of her ability,
the last 35 years of which as a
single mother. Seriously, most
people could (should) consider
their mothers their heroes, right?
My wife Michelle is my
personal hero. She deserves that
title just for putting up with me,
but there is far more to it than
that. She puts herself out there
when she feels she is needed,
sometimes to unintended dramatic
effect (ask me about the time she
kidnapped a parakeet to save its
life), but always with the best of
intentions. Her heart is made of
gold.
My bosses at the newspaper
are personal heroes. When my
Mom's health took a turn for the
worst recently and I decided to
leave for Christmas more than
two weeks early, the response of
CEO Wes Mullins and Publisher
Brenda Knowles wasn't one of
worry about me doing my job
and earning my keep, it was of
concern for me and my Mom.
"Family comes first," Wes said.
That's not a quote you'd hear
from many CEOs today.
> See OBSERVATIONS, page 10


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Observations
0 Continued from page 9


September 11, 2001, did indeed
provide a sound definition of a
hero, but it seems the definition
has softened in the years since.
Today people are more likely to
criticize cops than to walk up to
give them a hug. From the hero
standpoint, they are no different
today than they were 11 years
ago. It doesn't matter who you
are, how much money you make,
where you live, or even if you've
told inane jokes about them in the
past, if you need them they will
come. They will put your welfare
before their own, and although
they repeatedly demonstrate
that, they rarely take the credit
for it. Firefighters and other
first responders are the same -
unsung heroes. They don't want
headlines, they want to keep you


safe.
I wish Mr. Han's hero,
his unknown, unobtrusive
companion, had been in that
subway station that day. Perhaps
in thinking about him, in
honoring him and the unsigned,
unspoken compact we have
as our brother's keepers, we
could all be someone's hero. It
doesn't take much hold open
a door, carry an elderly person's
groceries or carry out their
garbage, perhaps even just give
someone a smile it may change
their day. It's simply a matter of
doing something good that a lot
of people wouldn't otherwise
do. You never know you
could even end up saving a life.
Where are the heroes? They are
everywhere you are.


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If you are looking for Superman, he's on a pedestal in the small town
of Metropolis, Illinois. If you are looking for a hero, just look around
you. Or, perhaps, in a mirror.



Reserve deputies
0 Continued from page 3


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Reserve-Deputy.aspx, Lewis said
the first thing persons more than
19 years old who would like to
see about volunteering must do
is call 813-247-8000 and ask for
Recruiting.
Following that, the steps
are attending an orientation; a
physical abilities assessment test
consisting of 25 sit ups and 20
push-ups in one minute (each);
a one-and-a-half mile run in 16
minutes; a 14-inch vertical jump;
and a 300-yard run in 69 seconds.
If that can be accomplished,
other steps not always in this
exact order will be taken. An
initial interview will be done with
a recruiter; a detailed application
will be filled out; a detective will
do what they call "an integrity
interview," and a thorough
background check done. Then
two polygraphs, followed by two
written psychological exams,
will be administered before the
candidate is interviewed by a
psychiatrist who will be asking
questions based on the exam
answers.
"It's very difficult to get people
to meet the requirements," Lewis
said. 'Many never get past the
initial interview."
But the reserve program
currently saves the taxpayers more
than a million dollars a year in
manpower with its 97 reserves


and has been in existence for more
than 40 years. The department
wishes it had at least 100 more.
No prior law enforcement
training or experience is required
to apply.
But why would people want to
do the job without any financial
rewards?
Yarbrough said a person has to
be driven by the desire to serve
others. "It takes people who
are looking for a solution, not
someone to blame, for the things
that go on around them."
Dauber explained it is the same
type of first-responder mentality
that makes a firefighter, EMT,
nurse or doctor. 'When there's
gunfire, civilians run from it. We
run towards it,"he said.
"It's a brotherhood," said Lewis.
"You're part of something bigger
than yourself."
Argote said she enjoys the
camaraderie. That it's like having
brothers and sisters. "It's a real
family," she said. 'We're always
there for each other."
Reserve deputies train for
approximately six months in the
evening from 6-10 p.m. and all
day Saturday. That way they keep
their regular jobs and can still be
of service.
To find out more, call the
number given earlier in the story
or log onto the sheriff's website.


DECEMBER 13, 2012




OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 11


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12 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


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MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTOS

Santa visits Wimauma
) Continued from page 1
tables. Carrying shopping bags, the children were given school supplies and
toothbrushes, hats and lightweight wool mittens for cool weather and Ben
& Jerry's ice cream for the warm December day; there were candy bars and
healthy snacks galore, enough to fill a shopping bag or two, along with plenty
of good cheer as each volunteer added another gift to a bag carried by a smiling
child, with grins growing bigger upon hearing the words, "Merry Christmas."
"Of all our charitable events including Paint Your Heart Out Tampa,
Metropolitan Ministries, Make a Wish Golf Tournament, our Christmas Visit to
Wimauma Elementary is the most touching. Being involved at this level and
seeing each child's smile makes this a special day for all of us," said FRFCF
Association President Linda Lamberson.
The FRFCF Association has organized and hosted the annual Christmas event
for nearly two decades. Volunteers said that at Wimauma Elementary, they
could feel the love and gratitude, they knew their gifts had meaning, as did the
act of giving. Publix provided reusable bags for the children that were filled up
with gifts from brands such as Hershey, Dole, Sara Lee,
Sargento, Unilever, Wrigley's, Smithfield, Weymouth Farms, Hostess, JelSert,
Crunchmaster, Conagra and others.
Joining Santa and the volunteer elves in greeting the children were FRFCF
Association mascot Shivers the Penguin and Sargento Cheese's Mooreese the
Cow. The event also included plenty of Christmas music and the singing of
Christmas carols.
For more information about the FRFCF and their charitable events, visit
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over 30 years of experience in geriatrics. This informational
gathering is for anyone providing care for someone living with
Alzheimer's or another type of dementia. Complimentary Lunch
will be served. RSVP is required no later than 12/14/12.
Tues., Dec. 18 2:30-3:30 p.m. Alzheimer's Association Caregiver
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DECEMBER 13, 2012

County selects projects for Historic

Preservation Challenge Grant


Hillsborough County Commis-
sioners agreed on Dec. 5 to award
more than $1.2 million to sev-
eral local groups, companies and
venues to support historic pres-
ervation projects. The grants are
offered through the County's His-
toric Preservation Challenge Grant
Program.
The County adopted the Chal-
lenge Grant Program in December,
2011 to promote historic preserva-
tion and heritage tourism and cre-
ate new jobs. Under the plan, non-
profits can apply for grants up to
$250,000 with a minimum of one-
to-one match. The money must be
used to rehabilitate historic build-
ings, or to promote festivals, of-
fer tours, print brochures, or other
projects that would help build the
heritage tourism industry.
The following will receive the
grants for Round Two of the appli-
cation process:
Heritage Tourism Project
Allocations
MOSI $24,950 to restore
and expand the Richard T. Bowers
Historic Tree grove, which pro-
vides historical links to Florida's
history through trees.
Tampa Downtown Partner-
ship $13,650 to provide a mar-
keting campaign that introduces
'Touring Tampa," and promotes
the diverse tours offered to visitors
to our area.
Heritage Tourism Project
Building and Sites Allocations
All recipients below are listed on
the National Register of Historic
Places, Florida Historical Marker
Program, or designated as a Tampa
Local Landmark.
Broadway Development
-$250,000 to contribute to the
renovation of the Las Novedades


Building on 7th Avenue in Tampa.
The Chiselers $250,000
to restore 178 exterior windows
in the Tampa Bay Hotel, built by
Henry Plant in 1891, now part of
the University of Tampa.
Ybor City Museum Soci-
ety $250,000 to rehabilitate the
Al Lopez home and develop the
proposed Al Lopez Baseball Mu-
seum.
Italian Club Cemetery-
$150,000 to construct a new mau-
soleum in North 26th Street in
Tampa to generate income for the
long-term preservation of the his-
toric cemetery.
Cherokee and Associates -
$100,000 for exterior stabiliza-
tions to the Labor Temple, 2004
North 16th St. in Tampa, the meet-
ing place for Tampa's labor force
in the early 1900s.
St. James House of Prayer
Episcopal Church, 2708 N. Cen-
tral Ave. in Tampa $64,000 for
renovations to the exterior of the
historic structure built in 1922.
Tyler Temple Lofts, LLC -
$52,000 to restore stained glass
windows in the main sanctuary of
the Sanctuary Lofts, 502 E. Ross
Ave. in Tampa, which were built in
1910.
Michael Murphy $34,000 to
repair and restore the Ybor Casita
Art Gallery (Silver Meteor art gal-
lery) and performance venue, 2213
6th Ave. in Tampa.
The Hillsborough Education
Foundation $33,000 to rehabili-
tate exterior balconies of the El
Centro Espanol de West Tampa
on North Howard Avenue, which
were built in 1912 using member-
ship dues from cigar workers in
Ybor City and Tampa.
Temple Terrace Preservation


Society, 405 Riverhills Drive in
Temple Terrace $22,500 to con-
struct a replacement of the historic
bat tower in Riverhills Park locat-
ed in Temple Terrace.
Tampa Realistic Artists, Inc.
- $18,000 for restorations to the
Old Hyde Park Art Center, 705 W.
Swann Ave. in Tampa.
St. Peter Claver Catholic
School, 1401 Governor St. in Tam-
pa $16,250 for renovations to the
exterior of the historic building,
which was established in 1894.
For a list of grants awarded dur-
ing Round One, visit the County's
Historic Preservation website. An-
other funding round will begin in
2013.


OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 15


Tampa Bay approach meets

regulatory requirements for nutrients
The collaborative approach used to reduce nitrogen pollution in Tampa
Bay has been formally designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection
as meeting new federal standards for water quality.
This important milestone means that state and federal regulators agree
that Tampa Bay's nutrient management strategy is sufficient to achieve
the water quality targets they have established for the bay.
'This is a great example of how local, state and federal entities can
work together, with our public and private partners, to develop the
strong technical basis needed for effective policies for clean waters and
the aquatic resources that they support," said TBEP Executive Director
Holly Greening.
EPA released its Numeric Nutrient Criteria November 30, adopting
the standards developed by the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection to protect recreation and a healthy-well-balanced population
of fish and wildlife. DEP had previously determined that the nitrogen
management approach developed by TBEP and the Tampa Bay Nitrogen
Management Consortium would address state water quality targets.
Tampa Bay now has more seagrass than at any time since 1950
By implementing a variety of pollution-control projects, the Nitrogen
Management Consortium -- a partnership of local and state agencies and
key industries impacting the bay -- has reduced nitrogen loads to the


Santa arrived early for homeless vets
Santa arrived Sunday, Dec. 2, with gifts for needy children and
homeless veterans at Liberty Manor for Veterans, Inc. The event was
organized by Bill & Sheri Brown with Cookson Hills Toy Run, as well
as many other organizations that contributed to the event. Mem-
bers of Liberty Manor and Riverview Moose Riders distributed gifts
to veterans who otherwise might have been "forgotten." Liberty for
Veterans, Inc, is a non-profit organization committed to promoting
the developmental and social needs of veterans who have served
our country, fought for our country but fallen victim to homeless-
ness. Contact veteran Jeff Luddeke (813) 352-7856.


bay by more than 100 tons from
2007-2011, and more than 500
tons since 1996.
This cooperative approach has
resulted in overall water clarity
in Tampa Bay equal to that of the
1950s, as well as more seagrasses
than at any time since then.
In a letter to DEP Secretary
Herschel Vinyard announcing the
Numeric Nutrient Criteria deci-
sion, EPA Water Protection Divi-
sion head Jim Giattina noted the
"invaluable" contributions of the
three Gulf Coast NEPs (Tampa
Bay, Sarasota Bay and Charlotte
Harbor) to developing science-
based water quality targets.

See the current issues of
The Observer News,
as well as past issues, classified
advertising, advertising information,
and much more!
www.ObserverNews.net


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> Soup of the Day or Garden Salad with your choice of dressing
CHOICE OF:
I Roast turkey with stuffing, mashed potatoes and gravy, vegetable of the
day and cranberry salad, or
S Carved steamship round roast beef topped with Marsala sauce and
served with mashed potatoes and vegetable of the day, or
> Tilapia Rockefeller, lightly fried tilapia topped with a creamy sauce, and
served with rice and vegetable of the day, or
SSliced honey baked ham with fruit salsa, served with rice and vegetable
of the day
Serving 11 a.m. o 8:30 p.m.
~> Any pie with or without ice cream Reservations accepted for
S1995 parties of 7 or more
1 per person
-At the Sandpiper Golf Course OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

-- 1702 S. Pebble Beach Bld. Sun City Center 813-634-7900 I

www.TheSandpiperGfille.com


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|I c Fish Tales: Boating, fishing


HUGE SAVINGS on New & Reconditioned Carts


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SCorner of SCC Blvd. & US 301
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becoming high-tech
It soon will be Christmas and to get their supplies, and always
the stores are full of all types of stayed the night outside along the
technology. Many of our boats are way and cooked over a fire with
so high-tech that it takes a degree to a black iron pot. They took dogs
run them. But then, I was along in the wagon
talking to this fisherman for protection. As they
who doesn't even have cooked the dogs would
a cell phone, but does howl. While making
have a canoe with two AB the batter for the fried
paddles. He doesn't bread, they would give
have an engine, doesn't bites to the dogs and
buy gas, has no gadgets yell "hushpuppies."
on his canoe to fix or to ByJonie Maschek You can buy them in
spend his fishing time the frozen food section
fixing. He said: "I just of the supermarket
spend my time fishing." I noticed these days.
that he had an ice chest full of a founder have been plentiful
variety of catches. He told me that again this week. Almost everyone
he didn't go out in the deep, but who brought ashore a redfish, had
probably caught more than those a flounder.
who were 40 miles out. His fishing The usual sheepshead catches
was in spots where a big boat prevailed in the land anglers'
can't go and he had spots to fish weekly catches.
that no one else had found. The Trout catches have been great.
water this week was as smooth as They have been caught from piers,
silk, sun was beautiful, fish were boats, and bridges. They look as if
everywhere, and no people were they have not traveled, just hung
around him, but he said he "saw out in our warm waters and grew
plenty of them sailing by going big and fat.
out to make a catch. Their fish cost Schools of thread herring bait
them three or four times as much have entered our bay waters. If
as mine cost me." You may give you can't locate bait, follow the
this some thought, sounds like a flock of birds, they are chasing
wise angler to me. schools of bait. Learn how to cast
This inexpensive way of fishing your bait net in a complete circle
also applies to those with kayaks. over the bait and you will fill up
Of course you can buy all prices of your bait well.
canoes and kayaks, it is up to you, Trash fish, so called, because
how much your ride will cost. they are not good to eat, make
Reports came in of monster good fish to cut or grind up for
redfish out in the deep waters. I chumming. Dogfish, needlefish,
did not see them, but was told that saltwater cats and so on. There
they were so big that they had to are plenty around, as they like our
have help pulling them in. This warm weather.
is not a "Fish Tale" but the truth. We not only offer the best salt
Nothing was said to me, about a water fishing in the world, but also
catch and release deal. I wonder.... have many freshwater lakes and
Mullet are playing hide and seek, streams and upper fresh water in
jumping to and fro in much of our the Little Manatee and the Alafia
waterways. They have come back Rivers.
in large schools. Many with cast Our winter visitors are now in
nets are enjoying them deep fried our area, the waterways are full
with hushpuppies. I have been told of boats of all types and sizes. Be
that "hushpuppies" originated in careful, be kind, be nice to them
the South with the early settlers. and if they are lost, help them find
They would travel a long distance their way.

Attention all Veterans
The Disabled American Veterans, SCC Chapter 110, who assist
Veterans and surviving spouses with VA claims, have relocated. They
now utilize the meeting room of the security office located at 1005 N.
Pebble Beach Blvd., Sun City Center. They provide support to Veterans
and surviving spouses in need of assistance with;
Applying for initial VA Benefits
Requesting reevaluations of current benefit status
Applying for surviving spousal benefits
Appointments will be available each Monday from 2 6 p.m. There
are no fees for service and all Veterans are welcome.
For more information or to schedule an appointment call Darrell
Katz at 813-260-3692.


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24" W x 36" H.......... 84 Installed
36" W x 50" H........s175 Installed
48" W x 48" H........$224 Installed
48" W x 60" H........s280 Installed
72" W x 62" H........$434 Installed


EXAMPLE OF OUR PRICES
36" W x 48" H....... $39 Installed
52" W x 62" H....... 68 Installed
60" W x 62" H....... $75 Installed
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36" W x 48" H....... $39 Installed
52" W x 48" H....... $49 Installed
60" W x 48" H.......$69 Installed
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16 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


DECEMBER 13, 2012







DECEMBER 13, 2012

Coast Guard Auxiliary rescue training pays off


Flotilla 75 (Ruskin) of the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary is always
training. Training missions in-
volve safe practices for towing an-
other boat in a variety of wind and
weather conditions; training for
search-and-rescue missions day or
night; training for man-overboard
scenarios and effective marine
radio communications with other
agencies.
Many recreational boaters in
Tampa Bay have seen Coast Guard
Auxiliary vessels slowly patrolling
our waters. Some local boaters
have benefitted from the presence
and training of Coast Guard Auxil-
iary units on the water.
Two days before Thanksgiving
two boaters especially benefitted
from the alert response of Coast
Guard Auxiliary vessels that were
in the process of training exercis-
es.
Alerted by Coast Guard watch-
standers at Station St. Petersburg
and relayed through the Coast
Guard Auxiliary radio station at
Simmons Park, a call went out to
find an overturned boat with two
people in the water somewhere be-
tween Pine Key (Beer Can Island)
and Big Bend Channel.
Coincidently, Auxiliary vessels,
Legal Limit, owned by Pat Costel-
lo, and Gulf Lady, owned by Walt
Wagner, were engaged in training
exercises near the large spoil is-
lands.
Both vessels were quick to re-
spond and headed for probable
search and rescue areas.


OBSERVER NEWS 17


Working with the Sheriff's Department, the Coast Guard Auxiliary
secured the overturned boat to prevent it from sinking.


Rescue helicopters hovered overhead as Coast Guard Auxiliary
vessel Legal Limit towed an overturned boat two days before
Thanksgiving.


Legal Limit was first on the
scene just off the shore at Apollo
Beach and quickly and efficiently
rescued the two men in the wa-
ter. Once aboard and donning life
jackets, the two men were secured
while Auxiliary crew members
Ted Cohen, Fred Kramer, Gary
Mull and Joe Lamb secured the
overturned boat to prevent it from
sinking.
Helicopters dispatched by Coast
Guard Station St. Petersburg and
the Sheriff's Dept. monitored the
situation from above while Coast
Guard boats, Air Force patrol
boats from MacDill and boats
from the Sheriff's Dept. and Fish
and Wildlife aided in the search
and stood by to render any addi-
tional assistance.


After interviewing the rescued
men, it appeared that winds and
tide accompanied by an unusually
large wave conspired to overturn
their boat. Without life jackets,
they were fortunate to find rescu-
ers close at hand. At night things
might have been different.
The Coast Guard and the Coast
Guard Auxiliary urges all recre-
ational boaters to wear their life
jackets, take a safe boating class
and have a vessel safety check.
Any one of these steps could have
prevented the need for extraordi-
nary responses. But when the need
arises, the Coast Guard Auxiliary
is trained to respond and help.
For information about boating
safety, call Ray Stewart at 813-
645-2130.


Bed alarms not proven to prevent patient falls


in hospitals, UF
GAINESVILLE, Fla. -Equipping
hospital beds with alarms does not
decrease patient falls and related
injuries, according to University of
Florida researchers and colleagues.
The findings, published last week
(Nov. 20) in the Annals of Internal
Medicine, cast doubt on the merits
of the widely touted alarms as a pa-
tient safety tool.
"The idea that hospitals can
magically eliminate the problem
of falls by investing a lot of money
and effort into bed alarms is not
well-founded," said lead research-
er Ron Shorr, M.D., a professor of
epidemiology in the UF College of
Public Health and Health Profes-
sions and College of Medicine and
director of the Geriatric Research,
Education and Clinical Center at
the Malcom Randall Veterans Af-
fairs Medical Center. "Does that
mean bed alarms should never be
used in hospitals? No I think
that alarms may have a use within
the context of a well-developed
fall prevention program."
Funded by the National Institute
of Health's National Institute on
Aging, the study adds to the sparse
data that exist on the effective-
ness of alarms in fall prevention
in hospitals, and could help inform
the design and application of fall-
reduction strategies.
About one-quarter of falls
among hospitalized patients result
in injury, according to an analysis
in the journal Clinics in Geriatric
Medicine. Older adults are particu-
larly at risk. Accidental falls lead
to complications in 2 percent of
hospital stays, according to vari-
ous studies, including from the
Agency for Healthcare Research
and Quality. And falls extend
hospital stays and raise treatment
costs by more than $4,000 per pa-
tient, on average, according to an
analysis in the American Journal
of Medicine. In 2008, the Centers
for Medicare and Medicaid Ser-


researchers say
vices stopped paying hospitals for
excess costs incurred for treating
injuries related to inpatient falls.
Bed alarms are thought to be use-
ful in heading off falls by alerting
staff when patients are attempting
to move about unaided. And re-
searchers acknowledge that some
nurses point to alarms as a valu-
able tool based on their particular
experiences.
Use of alarms also could poten-
tially reduce the use of physical
restraints, which have been shown
to increase medical complications
and, in some cases, actually raise the
risk of falls and related injury. But
despite widespread bed alarm use,
a 2010 Cochrane Database of Sys-
tematic Reviews analysis found little
evidence justifying the practice.
"The question is, if you're the
chief nurse in a hospital, are you
wasting your time buying these
alarms for your units?" said David
Oliver, M.D., M.Sc., an intera-
tionally noted geriatrics expert who
is the national clinical director for
Older People's Services in Eng-
land's Department of Health. Oli-
ver was not involved in the study.
To help answer that question,
UF's Shorr and colleagues at the
University of Tennessee and Van-
derbilt University conducted a
clinical study of almost 28,000
patients at Tennessee's Methodist
Healthcare University Hospital.
The 18-month study involved 349
patient beds in 16 general-medical,
surgical and specialty units.
Units were randomly assigned to
use commercial bed alarms or not.
The alarm, made of weight sen-
sors embedded into a flexible pad,
could be placed on a bed, chair
or toilet. When the patient's body
broke contact with the sensor, a
noise alerted the nurse. Patients
did not know in advance whether
they would be in units where alarm
use was promoted, and neither did
study personnel who assessed pa-


tient outcomes.
In one group, nurses were given
educational materials and trained to
use the bed alarms. Technical sup-
port providers also promoted use of
the alarms and helped with setup
and troubleshooting. In the second
group, bed alarms were made avail-
able, but their use was not formally
promoted or supported.
Among nursing units where bed
alarm use was encouraged, the
use of alarms was almost 36 times
higher than among other units. But
the increased usage did not translate
into a decrease in the overall rate or
number of falls, fall-related injuries
or physical restraints used.
"That says to me that if we are
relying on only one intervention to
prevent falls, it's very unlikely to
be successful," said co-author Lor-
raine Mion, Ph.D., R.N., the Inde-
pendence Foundation professor
of nursing at Vanderbilt Univer-
sity School of Nursing. "We're not
saying don't ever use bed alarms
- we're saying that if you think
this intervention in and of itself is
going to take care of the problem,
then you're sadly mistaken."
Not counting alarms, both sets
of hospital units in the study had
various fall-prevention techniques
in place. So because the study did
not strictly contrast alarm use with
the absence of any fall-prevention
strategy, the results must be inter-
preted cautiously, the researchers
said. Also, studies in which indi-
vidual patients rather than hospi-
tal units are randomly assigned to
alarm use might help clarify the
role of alarms.
"I don't think from the paper you
could say definitively that alarms
don't prevent falls," said Oliver,
also a visiting professor of medicine
for older people at City University,
London. "The question has not been
settled. There needs to be more re-
search. You can see the jury is very
much out on the use of alarms."


-'
A roguewave led to misfortune fortwo boaters -who had no life jackets.
Luckily, the Coast Guard Auxiliary was nearby and able to help.







Internet: Viruses, Spyware, Phishing Scams and More! Thursday,
Dec. 13, 12:15 p.m.
Learn how to surf the Internet while avoiding common scams and pit-
falls that can compromise your security. Learn about different types of
malicious software, how they get on the personal computer, how to re-
move them, and precautions to take when using the internet. Limit: 20

Florida Wildlife Series Friday, Dec. 14, 4:30 p.m.
Meet a Park Ranger from Lettuce Lake Park and learn more about
Florida's wildlife. This month's topic is Alligators and Other Florida
Reptiles.

Star Party Tuesday, Dec. 18, 6:30 p.m.
Enjoy an evening of astronomy and stargazing. Astronomy enthusi-
ast Craig MacDouga; will lead a brief discussion on stars, planets, and
moons. Immediately following will be an outside viewing of the night
sky through telescopes as we search for these celestial wonders.

Teen Volunteer Orientation Tuesday, Dec. 18, 7 p.m.
Prospective teen volunteers are invited to attend this informational
session. Topics will include the application process, filling out school
forms, shelving guidelines, and volunteer expectations.

eBooks for PC, MAC, Nook, Kobo, Sony and any other eReaders -
Wednesday, Dec. 19, 10:15 a.m.
Learn how to check out and download free library eBooks to read onto a
PC, Mac, Nook, Kobo, Sony and other eReaders. Explore Adobe Digital
Editions and learn how to check out a library eBook using OverDrive and
Freading. Presented by the Tampa Bay Library Consortium. Limit: 20

Elder Law Seminar Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2 p.m.
This program will provide information and education regarding legal
issues for seniors including planning for incapacities and long term care
with emphasis on public benefits. Medicaid, Medicare, and VA pro-
grams will be discussed

Mah Jongg Club Wednesday, De. 19,6:30 p.m.
Enjoy an evening of the popular table game, Mah Jongg, featuring
challenging play for experienced players and instruction for beginners.
The American Rules will be used. Spectators are welcome! Participants
are asked to bring their own Mah Jongg card. Limited to 16 players.
Register in advance at the Information Desk or call 273.3652.

SouthShore Needle People Wednesday, Dec. 19, 6:30 p.m.
Join other needle people to share techniques, tips and experiences
about knitting and other fiber and fabric crafts. Beginners are welcome!
Bring a project and ask us questions!

Internet Media: Videos, Music & more! Thursday, Dec. 20,12:15 p.m.
Explore Internet media including podcasts, Flickr, YouTube and Pan-
dora Limit: 20

Book Discussion: White Truffles in Winter by N.M. Kelly Thursday,
Dec. 20, 2 p.m.
French Chef, August Escoffier, changed the way we eat, but was a man
of contradictions. He was also torn between two women: the famous
and reckless actress Sarah Berhnardt, and his wife, the independent and
sublime poet Delphine Daffis, who refused to ever leave Monte Carlo. In
the last year of Escoffier's life, he has returned to Delphine, who requests
a dish in her name as he has honored Bernhardt, Queen Victoria, and oth-
ers. How does one define the complexity of love on a single plate?


. . ..... .......







18 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


Area Obituaries


Janet Belding
Janet Belding, 96, died on December
2, 2012. Janet was born in Philadelphia
and grew up in Brooklyn, NY. Her
maternal family was Pennsylvania
Dutch and paternal family was English
and Welsh. Janet attended Packer
Collegiate Institute and Columbia
Teachers College. She came of age in
the era when families thought it natural
to encourage males to attend university,
but Janet insisted and proudly received
a BS degree in Dietetics and Nutrition
Science.
She began her career as a dietician
at Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital
and worked at the Heinz Pavilion
at the 1939 World's Fair. Janet met
George Belding, "the wonder boy from
Pittsburgh," at the World's Fair, and
they married in 1941. After WWII, Janet
and George moved to Seattle, to be
near George's family; George used the
GI Bill to finish his education. Together
they shared tandem careers and taught
in Seattle, Brazil, the Virgin Islands,
California and Hawaii, and traveled
the world together. Janet retired from
Konawaena High School on the Kona
coast of the Big Island in 1981, and
continued to tutor homebound students
until she was 79. Janet is still fondly
remembered in Captain Cook as a
special education teacher. Janet was
active in the Outdoor Circle, the Board
of Directors, West Hawaii Humane
Society.
At the age of 80 Janet left her
beloved Hawaii and moved to Sun
City Center, FL where her sister Mary
lives. Janet lived independently until
this year; she remained strong and
feisty, corrected grammar when ever
possible, and always appreciated a
good joke. From her father, David
Mitchell, Janet inherited her love of
language and rhyme, the ability to
quote poetry, and fine penmanship. Her
mother, Florence Baum, came from a
line of schoolteachers and from her
Janet learned cooking and gardening
and some German. Janet spoke
French and German and instilled in her
children the utility of speaking other
languages. She was uniquely tolerant
of all diversity. The angst and sadness
during this year as her life deteriorated
to where she no longer had the ability
to do or be what she wanted most, was
most difficult. She took solace from St.
Andrew Presbyterian Church's visits.
Janet is survived by her son David,
of Santa Barbara, CA; her daughter
Barbara of Sante Fe, NM; her sister
Mary Hubbard, of Sun City Center, FL;
her niece Susan Corbett of Bradenton,
FL; and her granddaughter Thea
Khama, son-in-law Tshekedi Khama
and grandchildren Tahlia and Kaedi
Khama of Botswana.
In lieu of flowers, please make
memorial contributions to the National
Humane Society, 4039 Gunn Hwy,
Tampa, FL 33618. Jane and George's
ashes will be scattered on Kealakekua
Bay, HI at a later date.


Mildred V. Fo
Mildred V. Fountain we
our Lord on November 3
was born December 11,1
County, Alabama, and mo
in 1942.
Survived by her
Fountain; sister Elizabet
Dathan, Alabama; four grz
two great-grandchildren;
nieces and nephews.
She was a charter mem
Church of Christ for 47 ye
the owner of Fountain Sl
until her retirement.
We love you, Aunt Mim.


Robert S. Hamilton

Grace H. Hamilton
Robert passed away on Oct. 30,
2012 at LifePath Hospice at the age of
86. Grace passed away at the age of
85 at Cypress Creek.
They had three sons: Bob, Jon and
Bill; and two grandchildren, Cory and
Laura.
They had a wonderful marriage for 64
years. Both were born in Des Moines,
Iowa; they lived in Florida for 39 year,
most of that time in Longwood, FL.
A short memorial service was held on
Wednesday, Dec. 12 at the Redeemer
Lutheran Church in Sun City Center.


Dorothy M. Lee
Dorothy M. Lee, born May 30, 1921
in Baltimore, Maryland, passed away at
Hospice House in Sun City Center on
November 28, 2012. She was formerly
from Romeo, Michigan.
Survived by daughter Barbara
(Don) Ream of Lapeer, Michigan; five
grandchildren; five great-grandchildren;
brother Andrew and sister Kate, of
Michigan; and Margaret Lindley of Sun
City Center.
She was preceded in death by
her husband Bill, son Buzz, brothers
Jack and Walt, and sister Mary Jane
Clutterbuck of Sun City Center.
She was a member of the United
Community Church in Sun City Center.
Burial will be at a future date at
White Chapel Cemetery in Michigan.
Memorials can be made to Sun City
Hospice House, 3723 Upper Creek Dr.,
Ruskin, FL 33573.

Joshua Steven
Lewandowski


Joshua Steven Lewandowski, 23, of
Ruskin passed away November 30,
2012 in Tampa, Florida. Joshua worked
at Beef O'Brady's in Sun City Center.
He is survived by his mother Cindy
Lewandowski Carlson and his step-
dad Jimmy Carlson; daughter Kassadi
Grevers and her mother Brandi
McDonald; sons Jayden Lewandowski
and T.J. Mantia, daughter Amy Mantia,
and their mother Debby Smith; brothers
J.J. Carlson, Jamie Carlson, Joey
Carlson and Johnathon Carlson; aunt
and uncles Denise and Keith Axtel,
and David Steffes. He is predeceased
S by his grandparents Sandy Casey and
Henry Lewandowski; great-grandparent
untain Dorothy Blake.
ant to be with He is also survived by his dad Jeffrey
0, 2012. She Zinzer and his wife Jande Zinzer;
932 in Huston siblings Steven Miller, Brittani (Zinzer)
ved to Florida Hall (Josh Hall), Brooklyn Tutor, Bethani
Zinzer, Mavryck Zinzer, Hawkyns
son Stanley Zinzer, and JayniBell Zinzer; aunts
h Cannon of Sharon Daulberg, Cathie Gregory,
and-chrildren; Yvonne Brozenec, Ruby Grommes;
and several uncle John Zinzer. Survived by all his
Juggalo Friends. He is preceded in
ber of Ruskin death by his paternal grandparents
aars. She was John and Mary Jane Zinzer.


hoes & Boots


Funeral services were held on
Tuesday, December 4, at Zipperer's
Funeral Home.


Richard V. Wills
Richard V. Wills, 94 of Sun City
Center, FL passed away November
25, 2012. He was preceded in death by
wife Margaret (Peg) M. Wills, brother
Robert L. Wills, and sister Marion Wills
Burnham. He is survived by wife Irene
Wills.
Dick was born August 1, 1918 in
Waverly, Ohio to the late Leonidas E.
Wills and Georgia Wills. He graduated
in 1943 from Ohio State University
College of Dentistry.
He is survived by sons Richard
J. Wills (Cheryl), Georgetown, TX
and Robert E. Wills, Ruskin, FL;
stepchildren Gail Burkart, Columbus,
OH; Gwyn and Craig Dorris, Orlando,
FL; Lucinda and Wallace Sagendorph,
Atlanta, GA; grandson Christopher; five
step-grandchildren; and seven step-
great-grandchildren.
Dick served in the U.S. Navy Dental
Corps during WWII and Korea, then
went into private practice in Columbus,
OH.
Dick was a dentist for 39 years who
enjoyed sharing his professional and
practical knowledge of dentistry with
others. Prior to the requirement for
mandatory continuing dental education,
Dick and four other dentists, Dr. Walter
"Pappy" Wright, Donald Merker,
Don "Chenny" Chenowith, and Bob
Hinkle, formed a lecture group calling
themselves the Perennial Sophomores.
They gave lectures throughout the state
to other practicing dentists.
He was a member of the American
Dental Association, the Ohio Dental
Association, the Columbus Dental
Society, the Fellowhip International
College of Dentistry, the LD. Pankey
Institute and the Quiet Birdmen. He
retired from private practice in 1982.
He was an avid golfer and pilot, and a
great father to his two sons
The memorial service was private. In
lieu of flowers donations can be sent to
LifePath Hospice, 3723 Upper Creek
Drive, Ruskin, FL 33573.




FROM
THE
SOWER

r . .-- ,1.. c. c.-



"Mommy," asked a small child,
Ilho\ long did Baby Jesus stay in
the manger?"
Puzzled, the mother answered.
"Not too long, I would imagine."
Unfortunately, there are far too
many individuals who leave Je-
sus in the stable, seeing His birth
as an end, not the beginning.
Not everyone realizes that this
day is the day that the journey to
the cross actually began on earth.
This One who was born on this
day of days is often left wrapped
in swaddling clothes, lying in a
manger. It seems that many have
no understanding of the spiritual
significance or importance of
Christmas.
But for those of us who accept
and acknowledge Christ as our
Savior, we rejoice and say with
the Apostle Paul, "Thank God for
His Son a gift too wonderful to
describe!"
His Gift is the gift of God Him-
self: His only begotten Son. It is
the source of His grace, the ex-
pression of His mercy, the revela-
tion of His plan, the meaning of
His purpose, the passion of His
love, the assurance of His pres-
ence and the provision for our
salvation.
He knew what we needed then
and what we need now. In Him
we have faith to fight our fears
and hope for a life in His pres-
ence. "Too wonderful" indeed.
Visit us at: www.SowerMinis-
tries.org


DECEMBER 13, 2012





Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (behind Suntrust Bank)
ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: Nov. April.................. 8:30 a.m. Day Care Available
Mon. Fri.
Rev. Richard Nussel and All Year............... 10:45 a.m. 6 a.m.-6 p.m.
Phone: 645-1241 Sunday School............ 9:30 a.m. call 645-6198


F riendship Baptist Chwrch Sunday WEEKLYSERVICES
&A: Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist) 9 am ...................... Bible Study
i.1511 El Ranchi Dr. 11 .m .................... Bible Study
1 1 Enly ncer, 10 o.m. & 6 p.m............Worship
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Phone/Fax: Wednesday
-4 813-633-5950 6 p.m. ...Prayer Meeting/Bible Study


REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd. Sun City Center, FL 33573-5354
Rev. Robert G. Wiley, Interim Pastor
Telephone: 813-634-1292* Website: sccredeemer.org
Worship Services on Sunday 10 a.m.
Holy Communion First & Third Sunday Bible Class Thursday 10 a.m.



Unity
Spirituality Rather Than "Religion"
Henry Gibson Social Hall, Beth Israel Synagogue Sunday Service 10:30 a.m.
1115 Del Webb E. Sun City Center, FL
www.un itycom mun ityofjoy.com 813-298-7745


First Baptist Church of Gibsonton
"We lovtbecause He first loved us." 1 John 4:19
Traditional Worship Service *Sunday School 9:30 A.M.
Old-Time Gospel Hymns *MorningWorship 10:30 A.M.
Nursery Available Sunday Evening 6:00 PM.
Interpreter for the Deaf Mid-Week (Wed.) 7:00 P.M.
9912 Indiana St. Hwy 41 & Estelle t enue Malcolm S. Clemens,. Pastor
Gibsonton, FL 33534 813-677-1301


Prince of Peace Masses:
S1 C Of C C Sunday ..........8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., Noon

Catholic Church Saturday Vigil.................4:00 & 6:00 p.m.
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573 Daily.......................................... 8:00 a.m.
Phone: 634-2328 Fax: 633-6670 W Confessions:
www.popcc.org Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m. and Sat. 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.


S SSunday School (all ages)........ 9:30 a.m.
NOR I HSIDE Sunday Morning Worship .... 10:45 a.m.
TIST CHURCH Sunday Evening Worship....... 6:00 p.m. SBC
oving d L g Wednesday (all ages) ............. 6:30 p.m.
Loving God, Loving Others,
Serving Beyond Borders" Dr Samuel (Sam) A. Roach, Pastor
1301 U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL 645-1121 www.nbcor.org


UNITED COMMUNITY CHURCH United Church of Christ
1501 La Jolla Ave., Sun City Center, FL 33573-5329
A Caring Church United in God's Love Serving Our Community
All Are Welcome!
Rev. Dr. Jean M. Simpson Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
(813) 634-1304 www.uccinscc.org

*WJec e A EVERETT TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ
1611 First St. SW Ruskin, FL 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL-
SERVICES: Sunday ........................9:30 & 10:30 a.m .; 6:00 p.m .
Wednesday................7:00 p.m.

A CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH
S Sunday Worship: Blended 8:00 a.m.
a Nursery Provided Contemporary 9:40 a.m. BipB.
Pastor Jack R. Palzer
Assoc. Pastor Derek Hoven Traditional 1 1:15 a.m.
5309 U.S. Highway 41 North Apollo Beach A
(across from MiraBay) wvww.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1305


The United Methodist Church of Sun City Center
1210 Del Webb Blvd West 634-2539
http://www.sccumc.com
Come Belong WORSHIP SERVICES:
Grow 1 Serve SUNDAY
Ther nld Mdhodid l O r. 8:15 a.m....................... Sanctuary (Communion Service)
.' flII ais r m


Bookstore 633-8595
FREE
Nursery Provided


9: I5 a.m................... reason Hall (Oasis contemporary)
10:55 a.m.........Sanctuary (Traditional with Choir & Bells)
11:00 a.m ........................................ Hispanic W orship
4:00 p.m ......................................... Hispanic W orship
Senior Pastor: Dr. Warren Langer
Assistant Pastor: Rev. Robert Chaple


S A Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC
Meets in the Henry Gibson Social Hall of the Beth Israel
A Synagogue 1115. E. Del Webb Blvd.
Thursday, 7:00 PM Call 633-0396 www.uuofscc.org
It is in our lives, and not from our words, that our religion
4 must be read. Thomas Jefferson


Changing Services? Having a special event?
Advertise it in The Observer News, The SCC Observer and The Current.
Just call (813) 645-3111 and ask to speak to a sales representative.






DECEMBER 13, 2012




Spiritual leader latfs tor
Rev. Sue Meiner Sunday Service 11:00 a.m.
Rev. Sue Meixner sun City Center
S .,,. Sun City Center
813-362-0806 Chamber of Commerce
sue@alterways.com "I 1651 Sun City Center Plaza
NewThought ChurchReligious Science/SOM



I FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO SERVICES AT OUR NEW LOCATION
1707 33rd Street SE, SCC/Ruskin 813-938-4955
10:30 a.m. SUNDAYS
NO CREED...BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE
Minister DR. DAVID CAMPBELL


820 College Ave. W. Ruskin. FL 33570
645-6439
www.fbcruskin.org A Resource for Families
Sunday School..........................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............ 8:30 & 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service .............................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night Service ............... 7:00 p.m.
Aw ana ........................................... 7:00 p.m .


Dr. Barry Rumsey
CHRISTIAN SCHOOL
K-2 Through 12th
Grade


Southside Baptist Church
"A Warm, Loving & Friendly Church"
Come join us to learn about God's Word and salvation in Jesus Christ
Join us on Sunday to come home to the warmth of our church family
Located in South Hillsborough County, just south of Universal in old Sun City
4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 S Sun City, FL 33586 813-645-4085
Getting to KnowYou (Donuts/Coffee).....9:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Service ................6:00 p.m.
Sunday School ................................ 9:30 am. Wednesday Evening Service.........7:00 p.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ........... 10:55 a.m. Thursday Morning Prayer........... 10:00 a.m.



First Church of Christ, Scientist
204 2nd St. N.W. Ruskin, FL 33570 (813) 645-6102
Christian Science Heals
Sunday Service.................................................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School ................................................ 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service...........................................5:00 p.m.
Reading Room....................... wednesday 4 to 4:45 p.m.

All Are Welcome




AL St. Andrew Presbyterian Church

Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.
V V Contemporary Service 11:00 a.m.
Prayers with anointing for healing and wholeness
during worship the second Sunday of every month.
A Stephen
inisty Pastor: Rev. Dr. Mark E. Salmon
Chrh IMeet friends in Fellowship Hall between Services.
Refreshments served.

1239 Del Webb Blvd. West Phone: 813-634-1252
Sun City Center, FL 33573 For information visit:
Church is Handicap accessible www.standrewatscc.org



e&uWi c lue CalAdi CAua A
SouthShore: Apollo Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton
U.S. Hwy. 41

-~ ito' A II 813-645-1714
9 m -. SaintAnneRuskin.org
Very Rev. John F. McEvoy, VF.
(0 MASSES
Vigil M ass.....................................................................Saturday 5:00 p.m .
Sunday Mass........8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. (Contemporary)
M onday thru Friday .................................................................... 8:00 a.m.
Holy Days ..... .................................... Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Espatol .................Domingo 12:30 p.m.; Jueves 7:00 p.m.
Confession......................... Thursday 6:15 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.
>________e


United Methodist Church hosts
Christmas with the Celts, featuring
Marcille Wallis
As part of its popular Thank GodIt 's Variety concert series, the Unit
Methodist Church of Sun City Center, 1210 Del Webb Blvd. West, w
host Christmas with the Celts: traditional Celtic Christmas music an
dance, on Friday, Dec. 14 at 6:30 p.m. in the church sanctuary.
This year's Christmas tour features Marcille Wallis hammer dulcim
Don Pigeon -vocals/flute/whistle/mandolin/banjo, Matt Miller fidd
Ann & Cal Lloyd Irish and Scottish dance, Robin Hendrickson ba
pipes, and Michael DeLalla guitar.
Native Floridian Marcille Wallis is a classically trained pianist wl
began her musical studies at age six. As a full- time professional har
mer dulcimer player, Marcille now tours the country entertaining at fail
festivals, churches, concerts, pubs, bookstores, workshops and priva
functions. Drawing on her 23 years in the classroom as a mathemati
teacher, Marcille's shows are both entertaining as well as educational
she takes audiences on a "tour" of the Celtic lands and their history.
A suggested donation of $5 is requested at the door on the evening
the concert. For additional information about this and other concerts an
recitals at the United Methodist Church of Sun City Center, contact Je
Jordan, Minister of Worship Arts, at 813-634-2539.


Annual Foster Angel Tree awaits at United Community Church
The SCC United Community Church has decorated its annual Fost
Angel Tree with paper angels that provide suggestions to select
gift for children from babies to teenagers. A gift or two may be pu
chased and returned to the church by Wednesday, Dec. 19. Those
who wish may also make a monetary donation, check payable
United Community Church and designated "Foster Angel." For fu
their information, contact Jane Ruth at (813) 938-3895.


des CHURCH
Come and experience the power of
Jesus to change your life.
Sunday @ 9 & 11 AM Servicio en Espafiol @ 6 PM

www.aplace4everyone.org

2322 11th Ave. SE Ruskin, FL 813.645.3337


OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 19
Redeemer
Lutheran presents
Christmas cantata
The Redeemer Lutheran Church
of Sun City Center will present a
Christmas Cantata entitled "And
Glory Shone Around" at 10 a.m.
on Sunday, Dec. 16.
The church welcomes all to come
hear a blending of new melodies
and familiar Christmas carols.
The Redeemer Lutheran Church
is located on the corer of Route
674 and Valley Forge. Church Ser-
vices are Saturday at 4 p.m. and
Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Holy Com-
munion is held on the first and
third weekends. Bible Study is at
10 a.m. All are welcome.

First Baptist stages lavish
Christmas show
Nearly a quarter-century of
Christmas productions have been
performed by the First Baptish
ed Church of Ruskin, and none of
ill them were exactly the same.
nd The one common thread: they all
celebrated the birth of Jesus over
er, 2,000 years ago.
le Some of the productions were set
g- during Biblical times, some had a
more modern setting, and one was
ho even a Broadway musical that took
m- place in 1904.
rs, Some were funny, some dramatic,
Lte and some combined comedy with
cs drama to keep things interesting.
as This year's Christmas produc-
tion is A Respectable Birth, a
of brand-new humorous show by
nd Kevin Stone that will be staged
ff this weekend.
Performances will be at 3 and 7
p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 15; and at
6 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 16. Doors
will open an hour prior to each
performance.
Child care for infants through
toddlers will be available for the
7 p.m. performance on Saturday,
and for the 6 p.m. performance on
Sunday.
There is no charge to attend the
performances.
First Baptist Church of Ruskin
is located at 820 College Ave. W
in Ruskin, approximately 1/2 mile
west of Hwy 41.
S For additional information, call
813-645-6439 or go to www.fb-
er cruskin.org.
a
r- Free Christmas
se
to party & program
Ir-
Disciples of Christ Chris-
tian Fellowship is having a free
Christmas party and program at 6
p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 15. The
location is 7732 Gibsonton Drive
in Gibsonton.
All are welcome to enjoy free
food, entertainment, and fellow-
ship.

Join the 'Celebration of
Birth 2012' Dec. 21
The Unity Community of Joy is
sponsoring "Celebration of Birth
2012" from 12:30 to 2 p.m. on Fri-
day, Dec. 21 at Camp Bayou, locat-
ed at 4202 24th St. SE in Ruskin.
Participants are encouraged to
bring their drums and rattles.
Attendees will spend time to-
gether in song and prayers; they
will also conduct a sacred 'despa-
cho ceremony,' used by shamans
in Peru, a ceremonial offering to
Mother Earth.
The group will assemble a col-
lage of whatever participants bring
(a feather, rock, picture, small
memento, etc.) and 'infuse it with
collective prayers and intentions
for the birth of the new era.'
Refreshments will be served, and
all are welcome. Call Dr. Betty at
813-298-7745 for more information







20 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER DECEMBER 13, 2012


Real vs. fake? It's okay to cut down a
real tree
By Tom McCann, The Nature Conservancy


Looking to 'green'
some holiday traditions
this year? Consider be-
ginning with the center-
piece of holiday giving:
the Christmas tree. Then
go and cut one down.
That's right. You don't
need to feel bad about
choosing a real tree over
a fake one.
Christmas trees prove
to be a very renewable
resource, with more than .
400 million growing on i
tree farms across the
nation more than the ,
entire U.S. population.
Each year tree farmers
cut down approximately
10 percent of these trees
to sell during the holi-
day season. For every
Christmas tree that is cut
down, tree farmers plant between
one and three seedlings.
While they grow (usually about
one foot per year), the Christmas
trees collectively clean the air and
water, provide habitat for animals,
buffer the landscape from extreme
weather and absorb carbon from
the atmosphere.
Twenty Christmas tree farms are
listed on the Florida Christmas
Tree Association website, which
means the business of growing
Christmas trees actually benefits
Florida lands and waters, as well
as local growers and economies.
Shipping fake trees from over-
seas where 85 percent of them are
manufactured leaves an enormous
carbon footprint on the planet. So
do their ingredients, mainly poly-
vinyl chloride a type of plastic
that is difficult to return to nature.
After they are unpacked from the
basement or attic for an average of
five or six years, most fake Christ-
mas trees up in a landfill. That's
not the case with fresh-cut trees,
which can be immediately re-
turned to nature after the holidays
are over. Follow your usual waste
pick up schedules and place trees
and wreaths next to your trash and
recycling containers. Be sure to re-


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move all ornaments and do not put
the trees in plastic or cloth bags. If
they are taller than six feet, cut the
tree in half.
And don't stop there. From
the tree down to the gifts, make
choices that are good for nature
and friends and family. Consider
hanging locally made and bought
ornaments. Create homemade
cards. And give the gift of an ex-
perience in nature or a day out at
one of The Nature Conservancy's
preserves. The recipient will
thank you, and the planet surely
will.


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Safety tips for decorating
during the holidays
As Floridians begin to decorate
their homes and businesses for the
holidays, the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services'
Florida Forest Service released a list
of five tips today to help Floridians
prevent fire hazards.
According to the National Christ-
mas Tree Association, Americans
will purchase nearly 35 million natu-
ral Christmas trees this season. Natu-
ral trees and greenery are renewable
resources and when consumers pur-
chase Florida-grown trees, they're
supporting the local economy.
However, with dry conditions
around the state, there is the poten-
tial for fires and Floridians should
use caution when decorating trees or
hanging lights.
1. Keep natural and artificial
Christmas trees away from fireplac-
es, portable heaters and other heat
sources.
2. Use only non-combustible or
flame-resistant decorations on a
tree.
3. Check the labels on lights to
make sure they were tested at a fa-
cility, such as ULor ETL, and follow
manufacturer's instructions for use.
4. Discard any lights with cracked
sockets, frayed or bare wires, or
loose connections.
5. Always turn off holiday lights
and blow out candles when going to
bed or leaving the house.
For more information about the
Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services, visit www.
FreshFromFlorida.com.


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Rowdies visit All Children's Hospital
Tampa Bay Rowdies midfielder Keith Savage and forward Mike Am-
bersley visited the All Children's Hospital in St. Petersburg recently to
meet with the kids at the hospital.
All Children's Hospital is the only specialty licensed children's hospi-
tal on Florida's west coast. Founded in 1926, All Children's has grown
into a leading pediatric referral center that is dedicated to advancing
treatment, education, research and advocacy in child health.
Rowdies forward Matt Clare, defender Daniel Scott, midfielder Dan
O'Brien, and goalkeeper Andrew Fontein visited the hospital prior to
the second leg of the NASL Soccer Bowl. While visiting, they spent
time with the children talking about sports, soccer and the Rowdies 2012
season. To represent all the children from All Children's Hospital who
could not be in attendance for the second leg of the NASL Soccer Bowl
finals, the Rowdies players asked each of the children they met with to
sign jerseys and balls which would be placed on the bench supporting
their hometown Rowdies. With the support of the kids at the All Chil-
dren's Hospital, the Rowdies overcame a 2-0 deficit in the first leg, and
defeated Minnesota in the second leg, being crowned the 2012 NASL
Soccer Bowl Champions.
"It means so much to us that we are able to make the kids smile and
laugh," said Ambersley. "These kids are such an inspiration and it is a
blessing that I get the opportunity to spend time with them."
On Tuesday, the children received the balls and thejerseys that they had
signed, but they now included the signatures of the 2012 NASL Cham-
pion Rowdies. The kids also had the opportunity to see the NASL Soccer
Bowl Trophy, as well as to talk to the players on their experience on the
field and how it felt to bring the NASL Soccer Bowl back to Tampa.

PET TIP: Cats tend to be attracted to tinsel or string.
S\\ hiin swallowed, the long strands can get caught up in the
ii i ,-lines causing a blockage or even rupture. Watch for
S- lu- 11 of food, vomiting, and fever, and seek emergency
S i- Illnent immediately.
SD. .. Ott, Slaughter, Waldy & Heaton
1 .. i 100 years of experience Voted Best Vet & Best Pet Services
f bn i le,. ret ResortwithMedicalCare
I* I i. ler of Free 5-Acre, Beautiful Dog Park
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715 U.S. Hwy. 41 S. Ruskin 813-645-6411
Mon./Wed./Thur/Fri. 7-5:30 (closed Thur. 12-2) Sat. 7:30-1 Tues. 7-7




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20 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


DECEMBER 13, 2012


ImprvedPRO.," 81 .4. 2 0 1, II e v,-


q






OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 21


ensure that it remains a secret until YOU'RE ready.


.5


Simmom Loop


r-ih
wOl


***NEW LOCATION***
Sun City 813-634-2850
3846 Sun City Center Blvd (next to Bealls in
Home Depot Center) M-F 8-8 Sat 9-6 Sun 10-4
Brandon Regency 813-681-7267
2480 W. Brandon Blvd. (next to TJ Maxx & Movie
Theater) M-F 9-9 Sat 9-6 Sun 12-5
Brandon Causeway- 813-651-4640
11235 Causeway Blvd. (next to Publix across from
Wal Mart) M-F 9-9 Sat 9-6 Sun 11-5


B1G BEND
sTORAos
* Non-Climate/Climate-Control Units
" Fenced and Lighted
" Tractor Trailer/Moving Truck Accessibility
* Electronic Controlled Access
* 24-Hour Video Surveillance
* Moving Supplies .


Kids Cuta l & undei Adult Cut

F. 1. 1, 1
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5-7 Foil Highlights Highlights/Lowlights
Free Shampoo & Lite Dy Free Shampoo & Style
Price will vary Price will vary
with length or with length or
condon of hair condition of
Haircut extra $ Uhair Haircut
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Price wil ary The gold standard
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2604CollegeAe .*s *..41gm"i'to.


Community Association


members favor continuity


in their election


* By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
SUN CITY CENTER -
Indicating satisfaction with their
leadership, about 17 percent of the
community association members
here have returned two familiar
faces to the board of directors and
approved a dues increase in 2013.
Following the annual balloting
last week, Chuck Collett, Mike
Killian and Neil Rothfeld were
elected to three-year terms as
directors of the SCC Community
Association, according to David
Floyd, CA board secretary who
certified the election results.
Collett will be serving his
second and last term under
provisions of the organization's
by-laws. Rothfeld, the board's
treasurer for a number of years
although not an elected director,
returns to the board in 2013 as
a first-term director. Killian, a
newcomer to CA leadership,
also commences his first term in
January.
Election choices are based on
simple majorities of the votes
cast by CA members. Rothfeld,
whose career was in corporate
accountancy, garnered 1,404 nods
of approval, racking up the largest
number by a single candidate.
Collett, a former Maryland
attorney in private practice and
business executive, received
1,192 votes, the second highest
number. Killian, an automotive
industry engineer, was accorded
1,132 votes and outdistanced
another potential newcomer to the
board, Gerald Collings, by just
53 ballots, according to the final
tally.
Barring extraordinary
circumstances, the customary
staggered board composition
process each year produces three
open seats out of the nine places
around the directors' table. This
year a combination of situations
affected the openings. One open
seat was due to expiration of
Collett's first term, another by the
departure of Ann Marie Leblanc
who had completed two terms
and a third by Martin Hurwitz,
who chose not to seek a second
term. Come January, Rothfeld
and Killian officially will take
the seats vacated by Leblanc and
Hurwitz. The board will have its
full complement of nine directors.
Following certification of
the election results, board
members re-organized to create
their leadership team for the
forthcoming year. Ed Barnes, who
will be serving the last year of his
second term in 2013, again was


tapped to be board president. Jane
Keegan, still in her first term as
a director but with several years
of experience with the board, was
named vice president. Directors
Floyd and Rothfeld were
designated corporate secretary
and treasurer respectively, taking
on for the coming year the same
responsibilities they discharged
in 2012.
Voting CA members also
approved by a substantial majority
a six dollar increase in the
organization's annual dues, Floyd
noted. Beginning in January, CA
membership dues will be $269,
up from $263 in 2012. A total of
1,765 votes were cast on the dues
question, Floyd added, with 1,274
approving the proposed increase
and 491 opposing it.
Board directors have pointed
out previously that even with
the increase, the dues amount
remains considerably less than
that assessed residents in some
similar communities where the
monthly fee can top Sun City
Center's annual rate and yet fewer
amenities exist.
Barnes, looking ahead to the
CA menu in 2013, emphasized
directors will have three primary
objectives on their plates. The
board president said he expects
within a matter of days a final
report from the task force formed
in October to pin down means
of accomplishing specific items
identified by the community at
large in a comprehensive survey
last summer. Laying groundwork
for implementing those objectives
as part of long-range community
planning tops the list of 2013
goals, he said.
The board in 2013 also will
be working out details related to
integrating residents of Freedom
Plaza and Sun Towers as members
of the CA, Barnes added. And,
as importantly, the board must
finalize a long-term plan to
support maintenance of the
planted north and south Pebble
Beach medians when the current
support by the community's last
developer, Minto Communities, is
withdrawn as its building program
ends.
The board president also said
he anticipates the contingent of
directors now at the board table
will be up to the tasks at hand. "I
see this board as action-oriented,"
Barnes said, "well equipped to
meet the challenges, to handle the
necessary accomplishments, and
able to work well together."
Copyright 2012 Melody Jameson


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22 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


PENNY FLETCHER PHOTOS
Dr. Allen Witt, HCC SouthShore president, and Shannon Galey, vice
president of membership for the school's Beta Sigma Alpha chap-
ter of Phi Theta Kappa which has taken the hydroponics garden as
a community and school project; and Nicole Lynch-Schuyler and
Karen Lewandowski who teamed up with chapter advisor Karen
Boosinger to write a grant, have received money from the U.S. De-
partment of Agriculture to expand the project.


Rainwater is collected in a large retention area built around the school instead of a traditional reten-
tion pond which drips (and occasionally flows) down a small rock waterfall into a nearby koi pond. In
keeping with many green projects used at the campus, rainwater will be used to hydrate the expanded
hydroponics garden.


HCC earns grant for hydroponics farm


0 Continued from page I
begin growing hydroponic crops
intended for sharing with the local
migrant farm worker families,"
said HCC's spokeswoman
Kimberly French.
Lewandowski and Boosinger
worked closely with faculty
advisor Diego Grilli; PTK Honor
Society president Nicole Lynch-
Schuyler and Shannon Galey, vice
president of PTK membership, to
come up with an award-winning
project that also earned the school
a grant.
After getting the project up and
running, the founding group plans
to turn it over to students to run it.
'"The project was based on
migrant farm worker families.
What they grow and what they
can use in their meals," said
Lewandowski. "We visited
several local organizations and
toured their facilities and decided
to work with the Good Samaritan
Mission in Wimauma."
The project will take into
consideration many elements
of green technology, including
using rainwater to irrigate and the
natural growing seasons of local
crops.
"Students will learn about
growing and the community will
eventually get to share in the
bounty," said Dr. Witt.
The U.S. Department of
Agriculture awarded the project a
Community School-Garden Grant
for $3,450 that will be used to
expand the existing hydroponics
garden located on the southwest
side of the campus.
Owners of Hydro Harvest
Farms, 1101 Shell Point Road E.
in Ruskin, had notified the school
of the possibilities for obtaining
the grant and assisted them in
learning about hydroponics
farming which is a method of
growing plants and vegetables
using nutrient solutions in water,
without soil. Plant roots grow
in the mineral nutrient solution
in gravel, clay, husks or other
material but not in dirt.
"We had less than 60 days to
write the grant and submit it in
time," said Lewandowski, to
whom the others gave credit for
"taking the bull by the horns and
getting the project done."
"We wrote it in August and
submitted it by deadline on Sept.


17 and got the results in late
November," Lynch-Schuyler said.
The (original) hydroponic
garden was started at HCC as a
joint class project in English and
Science (before the grant was
applied for). Science students
were doing the hands-on work
and the English students were
writing poetry about it, said
Campus President, Dr. Allen Witt.
Now with the grant, it will more
than double in size.
The school has submitted the
project to the PTK International
Awards Committee and that's
earned the campus Society a
5-Star rating. "We went from


being a One-Star club at the
beginning of the semester and
reached 5-Star, the highest level,"
said Shannon Galey.
Four students will be flown
to San Jose, California for the
International Honor Society
Awards ceremony April 4-6 but
the four students haven't been
named yet.
An essay written by the group
will also be judged during the
event as part of the "Honors in
Action" project.
Another honors student,
Christine Putt, has taken on
the job of gathering, reporting
and submitting data based on


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questions she will submit to
officials at Good Samaritan
Mission. These have not been
written yet but the goal of the
questionnaire is two-fold. First it
will gather information that will
help the recipients who use the
mission's services and second, it


will be used for reporting the uses
of grant money to the USDA.
Professor James MacNeil
will eventually incorporate the
hydroponics garden into his earth
sciences classes, said Dr. Witt.
'This is a win-win situation for
everybody," Dr. Witt said.


The Observer News office will be closed Monday and
Tuesday, Dec. 24 and 25 in observance of Christmas

Deadlines will advance as follows:
Classified ads....................... .... ................ 4 p.m., Friday, Dec. 21
Display ads................ ............... .... 11 a.m., Friday, Dec. 21
News Releases .......................................4 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 20


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DECEMBER 13, 2012






OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER 23


from ihe creators of ls year's musical hi, 'Aged to Perfection"
The Performing Ars Company of un City Center presents at


Rising star
) Continued from page 1

Bernard is no Mouseketeer. She
is a rock 'n roller through and
through. But unlike the tragic
handful of notable young people
who went from wearing mouse
ears to stardom to rehab, Morgan
Bernard is a straight A high school
student who appears to have
avoided self-absorption and values
her friends and family as much or
more as she values her growing
stardom. She occasionally misses
school for shows or interviews, but
she is smart and is motivated to
succeed in everything she does.
"My motto for anyone trying to
get to a goal, whether it is a young
person trying to be a musician or
anything else, just give it all and
never give up," Bernard said.
That motto became the title of
her first album.
Bernard is also giving it all for
a good cause. She has joined an
anti-bullying effort and one song,
entitled "Shame," on her new
CD, along with a music video,
is dedicated to that cause. It's no


small effort. Increasingly, bullying
is reaching tragic new lows for
victimized young people. It is even
claiming lives.
"The song started out as just one
person getting bullied and finding
her confidence to stand up for
herself," Bernard said. "But the
song gained more meaning when
my actual friends told me their
own stories about bullying and I
realized it was a bigger problem
than I thought. Now I'm trying to
work to get to the solution to this
problem."
Her talents range across multiple
instruments, with her voice and
guitar-playing headlining her act.
Her musical inspirations range
from AC/DC to Lady Gaga and
Elvis, a wide range of musical
styles that are reflected in her
wide-ranging abilities. She also
acts and has appeared as an extra
on the locally produced, award-
winning family television series,
Dry Creek.
Her Facebook page lists her


as a self-employed entertainer.
Her musician page, already with
thousands of fans, is rapidly
growing. Brimming with talent and
possessing the presence of a star,
there is little doubt Bernard will
go around and to the very top of
the world. But there is also little
doubt that this young girl from
Gibsonton will never forget where
her home is. In a mere 14 years of
life, Morgan Bernard has not only
figured out what she wanted to do,
she is already making it happen -
by giving it her all.
For more information, visit
her website at www.morgan-
bernard.com or her Facebook
page at www.facebook.com/
MorganBernard.Singer She
is also on the musician s
website, ReverbNation at www.
reverbnation. com/morganbernard
and on YouTube at www.youtube.
com/user/morgannmegan.
To find out more or to contribute
to her anti-bullying effort, visit
www. bullyingisugly.com.


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24 OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER


DECEMBER 13, 2012








Classified Ads
and the BTD begin on A V A D
page 3B of this section IN Y OUR BvjIKY Rm


DECEMBER 13, 2012
THE OBSERVER NEWS
THE SCC OBSERVER
THE CURRENT


SCC Holiday Golf Cart Parade more than tripled its participants this year


* By CAROL MacALISTER
carol@observernews.net
Dave Birkett, organizer of the Sun City Center Holiday Golf Cart
parade, was all smiles, asking the crowd gathered for award ceremonies,
"Was that a parade or was that a parade?!"
One-hundred-sixty golf carts participated in this year's colorful proces-
sion on Dec. 8, dwarfing last year's 42. The skies were lowering as golf
carts arrived to get organized, but the overcast helped keep the heat from
becoming overpowering as multiple Santas donned their beards, the
several mermaids slipped into their tails, Rudolph's nose was securely
fastened, and both the blow-up and moving dolphins took their places.
The theme was 'Tis the Sea-Sun, and there was no shortage of smil-
ing suns, sunglasses, swim tubes and even a few sand castles. Capturing
the Best of Show Award were Ron and Linda Ringenback, with a cast
of characters wearing 'bikini' t-shirts, flippers, flapping beards and a
goggle-eyed scarecrow (dummy? stuffed shirt? it was hard to tell) in the
rear-facing seat.
Second place in the individual category went to Audrey and Mark
Vietzke, whose cart was brimming with grand- and great-grandchildren.
Third place went to Sherry Walker; 4th to Charles and Mary Flaugh.
A major crowd-pleaser was the cart from the United Methodist
Church, with Santa's Reindeer leading a cart piled with gifts (and a
Grinch); it took 1st place for Service Organizations. Second-place was
snagged by the dolphin-led SCC Chamber of Commerce cart, driven by
Dana Dittmar; 3rd place went to Good Samaritan's Ball; 4th place to
the Shrine Club.
The Irish Connection was awarded 1st place in the clubs category, with
a cart disguised as a tinker's wagon, driven by Irishman Paddy Cooney
(carrying his Guinness and his hurling stick), accompanied by Elizabeth
Gilmer cradling a 'baby.' Second place in clubs went to the Swim Danc-
ers; 3rd to the Time Steppers; and 4th to the Woodcarvers, with a Pinoc-
chio strapped into the navigator's seat.
The Best Business Entry went to Freedom Plaza.
The rash of prizes totaled a generous $5,000, donated by Minto Com-
munities. Judges were Jo Boggs and Gail Link-Ogle of Boggs Jewelers;
Jeremy Estill of Winn Dixie; John Moore of John Moore Flooring; Dr.
Doug Reitz, husband of SCC Community Manager; and Clara Urbino of
Wal-Mart.
It was a crowded field of competitors, and a number of spectators had
personal favorites they felt were overlooked. But it was a festive, joyous
morning ... and there's always next year.


of I
r0.


Best of Show Award went to Ron and Linda Ringenback
for their 'bikini'-shirted crew and captain.

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2B OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER THE CURRENT


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TO place an ad call
11" e 2101THE SHOPPER The Observer News
813.645.3111 ext. 201 The Observer News
Fax: 813.645.1792 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING will be closed Tuesday,
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING December 25th in
$17.00 M & M Printing Co., Inc observance of Christmas.
up to 20 words weekly publisher of the Deadline for classified line
300 addl. word The Observer News. The SCC Observer and Current ads will move to Friday,


Deadline is Monday
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310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Multi family yard sale. Car seat, Jump-
eroo, walker, double stroller, name
brand small women clothes, men's
clothes, some 3T boy's clothes, some
infant girl's clothes, golf clubs, bike,
armoire, modern cribs, house decor,
jewelry, Mary Kay, movies, CDs, Christ-
mas decorations & lots of misc. Friday
5pm-? possibly Saturday. 1634 Bonita
Bluff Court, Ruskin.

Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana
St., Gibsonton (1 block off US 41, 1
block north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday
through Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing,
furniture, lots misc. Ministry First Baptist
Gibsonton. 813-671-0036 to donate

Garage sale. Ruskin. Paradise MHP,
lot 100. Indoors. 8:30am-5pm. Friday,
Saturday & Sunday. Lots of good stuff.
813-489-3936


210 Woodland Estates Ave., SW
Ruskin. Florida 33570


310 GARAGE/YARD SALE


r IW 990



hank aaro 'fl




Call Ed for best prices.
(813) 361-2493

Garage sale. 12/14, Friday. 1727 South
Pebble Beach, SCC. Nice furniture,
clothes, toys, books, lamps, garage
items, misc. No early birds.

Estate sale. Dec. 15, 9am-1pm. 6521
Solitaire Palm Way, Apollo Beach. Ma-
jority of items from antique shop. Phase
2 of previous sale. Cash only.

Garage sale. Stereo, china cabinet, RCA
TV, stainglass lamps, handmade king
quilt sets. Saturday, 12/15, 8am-? 2907
Jasmine Run Lane, Ruskin.

Who wants quality, variety & value?
Kitchen, furniture, Civil war items, golf
balls (25% below Dicks), flat screens,
adult collapsible tykes, framed wall art
& other unique items, some boring stuff
too. Thursday & Friday, 8am-1pm. 207
Cactusflower Lane, SCC.

Great sale at 1501 Bel Glade, SCC.
Friday & Saturday, 12/14 & 12/15,
8am-2pm. Crafts, gifts, housewares,
computer cables. Items to numerous
too mention.

Sun City Center Sale
Womens clothes, misc. furniture,
lamps,. bedspread, patio blocks
(12x12), Dresses, recliner, etc. 8am-
1pm. Friday 12/14 & Saturday 12/15,
1515 Allegheny Dr.,


f C Calvary's

S Thrift Store
Wed., Fri. & Saturday
9 a.m. Noon
Dec. 12, 14 & 15
The Big BOGO Book
and Movie Sale
Buy 1, get 1 free
Plus the Secret Sale
1424 E. College Ave.- Ruskin
813-641-7790
Ministry ofrCavarq Lutheran church


310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Multi family garage sale. Clothes, small
to large, some new. Christmas items,
appliances, construction material. Friday
10am-6pm, Saturday 8am-3pm 303 4th
St SE, Ruskin

Multi family yard sale. Friday & Satur-
day, 8am-3pm. 6033 Golf & Sea Blvd.,
Apollo Beach.

Yard sale. Furniture, washer & dryers,
clothes, tools & more. 7am-3pm. Sat-
urday only. 12/15. 2207 Pleasant View





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Barbara Weis, Producer
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Backyard sale. Friday & Saturday, 12/14
& 12/15. 603 6th Ave. SW, Ruskin.
Something for everyone.

Dec. 14& 15, 8am-? 1814 Ft. Duquesna,
SCC. Tools, woodworking books, house-
hold goods, holiday decorations.

Moving: American Girl clothing & acces-
sories, household items & lots of stuff.
Thursday & Friday, Dec. 13 & 14, 9am-
noon. 1106 Desert Hills Dr., SCC.

Sidewalk sale. 87 7th Ave. NE, Ruskin.
Southshore Bait & Tackle. Dec. 21 & 22,
8am-4pm. Santa Clause will be here on
Dec. 22. 11am-3pm.

Lots of Christmas items, dishes, clothes,
misc. Few furniture pieces. 410 Smith-
field Lane (St. Andrews Estates) 8am-
1pm. Friday & Saturday

Drexel chest & mirror, grandfathers
clock, rug, comforter, marble fireplace,
kitchen chairs, 1635 Costa St., SCC.
Friday & Saturday, 9am-noon


GARAGE

SALE


Sat. & Sun. Dec. 15 & 16
8 a.m. 2 p.m.
Little Manatee Isles
2821 Gulf City Rd. Ruskin
Crafts & Supplies
Jewelry & lots more!


312 ESTATE SALES


AAA Furniture
New & Gently Used Furniture

BUY & SELL
Daily Trips to SCC


Mon.-Sat.
9 a.m.-5 p.m.


6819 U.S. 301 S., Riverview
(813) 677-8180


310 GARAGE/YARD SALE











Come Join Nettie's Side-By-Side Sale
at 1306 & 1304 Lenox Greens Dr.
Contents Include: Swivel Rocker,
Dining Room Table w/Chairs, Buffet,
Art Deco Vanity, Beautiful Select
Comfort Queen Bed Set, Samsung HD
Flat TV, La-z-Boy Recliner, Dresser
w/Mirror and Night Stand, Glass &
Brass Coffee Table, Murphy Bed,
Office & Computer Desks, Bookcases,
Patio Set, Char-Broil Patio Caddie,
Christmas Decor, Glassware and
Collectibles, Garage Items and More!
Please park on side of sale due to
emergency vehicles.
Please don't miss our other sale
next door at
at1304130 Lenox Greens Dr.
Fri. & Sat. Dec. 14-15.
See You There!













Contents Include: Like-New
Furniture, Gorgeous 5pc Queen
Tempur-pedic Adjustable Massage
Bed Set, Beautiful Dining Room
Table W/Chairs, Buffet, Swivel
Rocker Recliner, Pineapple Print
Side Chair, Beautiful Glass-Top
Marble & Wrought-Iron Coffee &
Lamp Tables, Round Glass-Top
Kitchen Table w/Chairs, Wood-
Framed Sofa & Loveseat, Leather
Top Coffee & End Tables, 3pc Queen
Bed Set, Pretty Twin Beds, Cuckoo
Clock, Rainbow Vac, Patio Sets,
BBQ Grill & More!
Please park on side of sale due to
emergency vehicles.
Please don't miss our other
sale next door at
1306 Lenox Greens Dr.
Fri. & Sat. Dec. 14-15.
See You There!

Let someone else do that
HEAVY work
Look in the
Business & TradeDirectory


December 21st at 4pm for
the December 26th edition


312 ESTATE SALES


Anne's Estate Sales







Furniture: Queen Air Bed,
Lowry Royale electric organ,
trundle bed, dining rm table
w/chairs, china cabinet, inlay
entry table, desk w/chair,
loveseat, dinette table w/chairs,
tea cart, King Air Bed, dresser
w/mirror, bookcases, coffee
& end tables, rocking chair,
hall tree, garden bench, file
cabinet; appliances: chest-
type freezer, microwave, Oreck
vac; collectables: Hummels,
Knowles plates, artwork,
oriental art, Lladro, Lenox;
household: kitchen & misc.
www.AnnesEstateSales.blogspot.com







Dec. 14& 15
7:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
610 Allegheny Drive
ElRancho or Pebble Beach N toAllegheny
2006 Yamaha, new batteries, golf
cart, loaded. Golf clubs, lawn mower,
edger, weed whacker, garden tools,
shop vacs, 2 bicycles, pool table
(Playmaster), ping pong table & dart
board. 4-piece leather recliner sofa,
3-piece expandable entertainment
center, 2001, 60" Sony TV. Broyhill
couch & loveseat, Alan White couch
& loveseat, dining table, 6 chairs
& china cabinet, Baldwin piano,
trundle bed (white iron), desk, king
mattress & headboard, 4 counter-size
barstools, bookcases (low white,
high brown), cedar chest, quilt rack,
coffee & end tables, rugs, CDs, lamps,
pictures and frames, material, ladies
& men's clothing (M & L), silk trees,
Boyde bears, fenton glass, luggage,
rubber shelves, Christmas, linens &
kitchen. Outdoor table, 4 chairs, 2
reclining chairs w/ottomans, Schwinn
exercise bike. 42" Samsung flat-
screen TV.
508-0307 or 633-1173

Need a car/truck
Checkout 455


THRIFT STORE
OPEN: Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 8 aom. 3 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. 12 p.m.
1009 1st. Street S.W.
u. Ruskin
S.R 674 E We Have
W 4 E
I, Furniture, Too!
DONATION DROP OFFS
[ |TUES. THRU FRL ONLY PLEASE,
T tRFT ALL DONATIONS MUST BE IN CLEAN
STORE USEABLE CONDITION.


Quality Wicker & Rattan Furniture
2711 N. Macdill Ave. -Tampa, FL 33607 813-876-1566
HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 10-6
Closed Weekends We-coe- rm ' n w s- i
S- Quality Furniture at Affordable Prices
S Dining Seating Bedroom Patio Much More
._c lwww.QualityWicker.com
.lJ DELIVERY AVAILABLE
SOMETHING FOR
E VERY ROOM INSIDE
.-._ AND ALL AREAS OUTSIDE


THE SHOPPER 3B


DECEMBER 13,, 2012


ORiimeTim







4B THE SHOPPER
312 ESTATE SALES


Classified Works


Let us get done in one day
what it takes the other
guys a week to do.
We will pack-up and
pick-up one room or the
entire house for a QUICK,
PROFITABLE, TROUBLE-
FREE EXPERIENCE.
CALL
BUTTERFIELD'S
AUCTIONS


&


www.ButterfieldsAuctions.com
Butterfield Auctions AB2706/AU3549


312 ESTATE SALES



XNETTIE'

ESTflTE




S382-7536
Personalized
Service


360 GOLF CARTS
Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade. Char-
gers, parts all related. Ronny's Carts &
Parts. 813-484-9855 or 813-645-4515

390 MISC. FOR SALE
For sale. Beautiful full length mink coat,
size 8-10, glamorous has Vegas style,
original cost $18,000 now $3,000. Cock-
tail ranch mink jacket, dark brown, must
see. $800. Large chandelier, cast iron,
white coral original price $8,000 now
$3,000. For more information call Irene
813-633-1535

Brothers Quattro 6000-D $4,500. Broth-
ers 1250-D, $1,499. Low stitch count, all
bells & whistles. Call 813-334-8952


SCall

DICKMAN (813) 645-3211
INC. Serving South Hillsborough
R E A L T Y County since 1924
Celebrating 88 Years www.dickmanrealty.com
1924- 2012 dickman@tampabay.rr.com
Looking for experienced realtors to join our well established team.
Call 813-468-0288 for confidential meeting.
PERFECT WINTER/RETIREMENT CONDO, KINGS POINT: Lovely 1BR/1.5BA, elegantly
furnished, with tile floors, new stove & refrigerator, new large shower in BA, extended lanai,
washer/ dryer, detached carport. Close to Club House, exceptionally clean, ready to move in!
$24,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7280
AFFORDABLE HOUSE IN RUSKIN: 2BR/1BA well maintained, with central heat and air,
attached utility-room, tin roof, and shed in backyard. Peaceful area close to river. $59,900.
CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7280
ACREAGE FOR SALE: 6.7 Acres, cleared, great for horses, farming or your dream
home Country setting, secluded. Other parcels available for sale in area. $53,500. CALL
CLAIRE TORT 363-7280
BEAUTIFUL WATERFRONT POOL HOUSE FOR RENT! 3,500 sq ft, unfurnished
3BR/3BA, just repainted and remodeled, large kitchen & Breakfast nook, formal din-
ing-rm, fireplace in Family-rm, large den, inside utility, Florida-rm and more! Detached
2-car-carport and storage, and 3/ acre lot on water with boat dock. Tropical and se-
cluded! $2,250/month CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7280
OH, GIVE ME LAND, LOTS OF LAND. This property is currently zoned for 15 single homes,
water and sewer are available. There is a well and 3 septic tanks on the property. 4.7 acres and
a small pond. It can be yours for $124,900. Check it out and then call Kay Pye 361-3672 or
Roxanne Westbrook 748-2201.
WATERFRONT TOWNHOME!! NEED SPACE FOR YOUR 65' BOAT? This townhouse
at Bahia Beach offers just that as well as beautiful sunrises and the fun of watching the
manatees and birds play. 2BR/2BA completely re-done including painting and new carpet.
Only 9 units in this cozy community and only townhomes with private docks. Balcony and
sundeck. Corner unit on a cul-de-sac. $204,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 OR ROX-
ANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
AWESOME COMMERCIAL LOCATION ON BUSY HIGHWAY 41 IN RUSKIN! .84 ACRE
with 150 feet on Highway 41. Easy access to 1-75. Property is zoned CG/General. $164,900
CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 OR ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
COMMERCIAL LISTING APOLLO BEACH: Great retail location on Apollo Beach Blvd.
Special features include : 1890 sq.ft. built in 2006, track lighting, small utility kitchen, hand-
icap bath, alarm system with digital cameras, free standing custom-built showcases with
glass tops, shelving, mahogany wood trim, loads of storage. $224,900 CALL KAY PYE
361-3672 OR ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
DROP DEAD GORGEOUS bayfront 2BR/2BA condo in the delightful community of Little
Harbour. Beautiful views of Tampa Bay, near the community pool, restaurant, tennis courts,
marina, and within minutes of Tampa and Sarasota. Well-maintained complex with minimal
association fees and no CDD fees. Totally updated with wood cabinets and granite coun-
tertops. Must see to appreciate! Asking $209,000. JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
2 homes on 1.39 acres on THE LITTLE MANATEE RIVER and a freshwater pond. 4BR/3BA
home (2380 sq.ft.) and a 1 BR/1.5BA with 1731 sq.ft. and a boathouse. $289,900. CALL ROX-
ANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 OR KAY PYE 361-3672
YOU CAN'T BE SERIOUS! Reduced to what??? You heard right: this outstanding 3BR
2BA house with 25X30 metal building on a slab could never be replaced for asking price of
$125,000. Great for extended family and for people who like to collect or have large toys.
Must see to appreciate. Call for details and viewing. JUDY ERICKSON 468 -0288-3672
OR ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
Call US FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS...645-3211


"Your local dealer for over 23 years"
U.S. Paper Money WANTED (SmallorLarge)
Foreign Currency WANTED
ALWAYS BUYING SILVER COINS,
INGOTS, misc. & other Mint Bars
Paying depending on the market
at time of purchase
APPRAISALS GIVEN
Watch out for Counterfeit Coins
Call for private consultation or appointment.
All transactions are strictly confidential.
(813) 634-3816
cell (813) 503-4189


ri ri SEASO\ ,,, E,,,. ',, ., i N S I I II I W/D .......NTA..S
.............................................. I ... . $ 2 9 ,9 0 0

SEASONAL RENTALS


1BR/1BA in SCC, FURNISHED..


$900 month


1BR/1.5BA in KP FURNISHED ............$1000 month
2BR/2BAinKP ... I, ,,,Ill I iii 1 1111)
................. ................................... $ 1 5 0 0 m month


* 1.92 ACRES CLEARED LOT ACROSS
FROM RIVER, RUSKIN: With well,
septic and electric, property is ready for
your dream home! Consisting of 5 lots,
secluded, peaceful, with a few shady
trees, great views of nature and birds, lot
is down the road from Park and boat ramp.
Survey available. $84,500.

* RUSKIN OFFICES & WAREHOUSES
FOR RENT: 5 acres zoned 'agricultural,'
cleared & fenced property with 6-office
building, work shop, chemical shed,
warehouse and fuel storage: $3,000/mo.
Adjacent 5 acres with 3 large greenhouses,
propane heaters, irrigation, and 2,500 sq.ft.
seed house: $2,000/mo. Call for details.

CLAIRE TORT DCKMAN
Cell: (813) 363-7250


390 MISC. FOR SALE
4x8 pool table, 2 pickup trucks, table w/ 4
chairs, Honda motorfor mixer, boat. Call
for information. 812-691-4845

395 WANTED TO BUY
I buy pre-1965 kitchenware, fishing gear,
pocketknives, tools, toys, books, cans,
tins, Singer sewing machines & more.
Jeff. 813-645-4337

Wanted
Oriental jade, coral & Ivory, fine old
paintings, coins, currency, silver etc.
813-610-5824






425 SLIPS OR STORAGE
South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special-
izing in outside storage for RVs, boats &
trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay-
Storage.com

Little Manatee Outdoor Storage. RVs,
boats, trailers. All sizes. 2903 39th Ave.,
SE. Ruskin. 813-361-3725.






455 AUTOMOBILES
Mercury Marquis LS, 2,000, 72,000
miles, excellent condition, white, dark
blue top. $6,000 make offer 813-642-
9535

Mercedes Benz C-240, silver, 2004,
74,500 miles, V-6, one owner, garaged,
all service records, accident free,
excellent condition! $11,5000. 813-
641-6777






511 HOUSES FOR SALE
902 Birdie Way, Apollo Beach. $215,000.
2289sf. Large home with very open floor
plan. 2 large sliders open onto golf
course. Split bedroom with huge closet
on master side. Fenced back yard with
screened lanai. Home features bamboo
flooring & new porcelain tile. Owner
transferred, this is not a short sale.
S.L. Real Estate Service, LLC Mandra
Stewart, broker 813-741-3678

SCC over 55 community. Completely
remodeled, 2br/2ba carport. Available
Jan. 1st. Call Lisa for showing. 941-
380-8100


565 M.H. IN PARKS


Ruskin 55+ park. Reduced. $8,000.
2br/1ba, pet friendly. Roof over, long
carport, CHA, (2) Florida rooms. Newer
appliances. Furnished. 813-463-6589

MH 55+ park. Ruskin. Buy on contract
with low down & monthly payments.
1br/1ba. Call 317-645-3851







611 HOUSES FOR RENT
4br/2ba Apollo Beach home, large pri-
vacy fence. $1,150 monthly. First, last &
$500 deposit. 727-391-1121

3br/2ba/2cg. appliances, new cabinets.
Quiet, desirable area. Ruskin. 813-645-
4145 or 813-642-0681

Sun City 55+
2br/2ba/ 1br/1ba. Includes: yard
care, water, sewer, trash collection,
recreation card. No smoking no pets
813-634-9695

612 APTS FOR RENT
For rent: Efficiency apartments. Weekly
rates, utilities furnished 813-677-8789,
813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896






RIVERWOOD
APARTMENTS
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments

Rental rates beginning
at $ 540 + Utilities

For rental information,
call (813) 645-7320
(TDD 800-955-8771)

709 Oceanside Circle, Ruskin
Mon-Fri 8 a.m. 4 p.m.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
S Provider &
0-M. Employer


511 HOUSES FOR SALE

For Sale By Owner
Owner financing available.
2br/2ba/2cg, great neighborhood in
SCC, 55+ community. For infor. call
813-938-9935

549 PROPERTY TO BUY
Wanted: 1-10 acres, reasonably priced
within 15 miles of Apollo Beach. 813-
645-2041




^B550


651 BOOKKEEPING


QuickBooks
Certified Pro-Advisor. Can do attitude:
1099's, W2's, forms, cleanup & review
financial, full bookkeeping services,
tutoring, software & issues. Hourly
rates. Your local office or mine. Thea's
Quick Bookkeeping Inc Ruskin 813-
641-1089 email: theahp@verizon.net
www.theasquickbookkeeping.com

680 ADULT/CHILD CARE
Ruskin United Methodist preschool,
approved VPK provider is now accept-
ing applications for January 2013. Call
813-645-6198, CHC-110087

Experienced caregiver/ CNA/ House-
keeper. Dependable, excellent driving
record. References, 16yrs experience.
Available Monday thu Saturday. Call
813-716-7842




Did you know?
You can have all your
business and personal
printing done locally?
Brochures, posters, books,
newsletters, business cards,
invitations, and much,
much more!

r T I Printing Company, Inc.
Established in 1968 BIr:Irlli llll'lrJ lr
210 Woodland Estates Ave. SW
Ruskin, FL 33570
813-645-4048
www.mmprintinc.com


A community of affordable homes Phase III Now Available!
exclusively for first-time homebuyers! 2 Swimming Pools and a Clubhouse
.V *e 3,4 and 5 Bedrooms, 1 and 2 Garages
0om OME2 X7 zR SP Popular Ruskin Location
(8 ... 7 ...... . USDA Self-Help Housing program -- help
(813)672 7889 www.flhome.org build your home in exchange for a down
payment
No money down, easy to qualify
Non-profit agency works for you
-Hablamos Espafol -




A BAYOU PASS
. I rn ari i~. e homebuyersunder80%olmedianinconme Callfordetals


DECEMBER 13, 2012
613 CONDOS FOR RENT
Apollo Beach condo, one floor. One
bedroom, one bath. Refrigerator, range.
dishwasher. Quiet. 813-642-0681 or
813-645-4145

Snow birds. January, February & March.
Apollo Beach. Totally furnished, 2br/1 ba.
813-645-4145 or 813-642-0681

614 DUPLEX FOR RENT
Riverview apt, 2br/lba, CHA, water,
maintenance included. Tile floors. $600
monthly $600 security. Ask for Vicky
813-458-8178 or 813-641-8400

630 M.H. RENTALS
For lease. 1 br/1 br mobile home in quiet
parkon river. No pets, $500 monthly plus
deposit. 813-645-2446

For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With
A/C. 813-677-1086

For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home near
shopping center in Gibsonton. 813-677-
8789, 813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

646 WAREHOUSE SPACE
Garage & mini storage, RV lots & mobile
home lots for rent. Call Pirates Treasure
Cove, Gibsonton. 813-677-1137

F--S
uRO.wSRVC
L 650 -J,


L







DECEMBER 13, 2012

680 ADULT/ CHILD CARE


690 DRY CLEANING


$2.99 Dry Cleaning Special
Dresses, suits, pants, jeans, skirt,
blouse. Located 13 7th Ave., NE,
Ruskin. For info. call 813-649-1600







705 CLEANING





L ,RED It
The only Cleaning Professional service
to satisfy every discerning taste
Licensed, Bonded and Insured
at Affordable Prices
Call Now & Get 15% Off!
(813) 645-0264
Red 1 is owned and managed by service-related
disabled veterans


----_


U


THE SHOPPER


A IF I E 11 "


THE OBSERVER NEWS THE SCC OBSERVER THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT


To place a classified ad
call 813-645-3111 Ext. 201;
fill out the form below and fax to
813-645-1792; or mail this form to
The Shopper
210 Woodland Estates Ave. SW Ruskin, FL 33570


DEADLINE:
Ad and payment must
be received by 4:00 p.m.
Monday for publication in
that week's edition.


Up to 20

$17,
30 for
additional


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words

.00
reach
al word
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Name: -

Address:

City: State: Zip:

Daytime Phone:


Classification:


Ad copy as you wish it to appear:


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________________ ________________I


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Light Housekeeping Grocery
Shopping Running Errands
Companionship Sitters In-Home
or Care Facility Flexible Schedules
License #232465
137 S. Pebble Beach Blvd., Ste. 104
Sun City Center 33573
(813) 293-5369 or (813) 419-4967
Swww.AngelsofLifeServices.com


zcZ~-
~nor.~ a~lfLif


705 CLEANING

Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integrity.
Call for free estimate. 7days a week.
Move-in, move-out, rentals. Insured,
bonded, licensed. Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean


Jan's Housekeeping
Including personal touch with high
moral standards. Self efficient & moti-
vated. $12.50hr. Holiday rates. Merry
Christmas. Call 813-304-3006

710 LAWN CARE

Bill's Lawn Service
Licensed & insured. No contract.
Yearly, monthly or per cut. As low as
$25 per cut. 813-293-6840


Shaw's Lawn Service
Complete outdoor property main-
tenance. Landscaping, trimming,
pressure washing, sprinkle repair.
Licensed & insured. 813-298-3376

715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill dirt,
topsoil, sand, crushed rock & asphalt,
driveway culverts. Loader, backhoe,
grading, bushhog, discing. Install Sep-
tic System & drain fills. CFC#1427021.
813-645-1883


Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service. Cul-
vert sets, driveways, shell, crushed
asphalt, concrete, fill dirt, excavating,
mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963
Free estimates.


WATERFRONT ESTATE SALE -
S20Acres w/dockable frontage on St.
I Lucie Canal $189,500. Paved road. Near
I Lake Okeechobee. 24miles to Stuart.
1-hour to ocean. 1-888-721-0515


AT&T U-Verse for just $29/mo! BUNDLE
& SAVE with AT&T Internet+Phone+TV
and get a FREE pre-paid Visa Card!
(Select plans). HURRY, CALL NOW!
800-327-5381

ADOPTION
Give your baby a loving, financially
secure family. Living expenses
paid. Call Attorney Charlotte Danciu
28 years experience. 1-800-395-
5449 www.adoption-surrogacy.com
; FL Bar # 307084


740 MISC. SERVICES

Hate that Wallpaper?
I can remove it. Want something tex-
tured & painted. Big or small, I can do
it. Debby. 813-434-6499


Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks, boat
lifts & seawalls. Free inspection. Heck-
er Construction Co. 813-236-9306


EMPLOYMENT

800S^9


870 GENERAL


Sunroom & screen room

Installers Needed
for full time employment with Ruskin
based business. Experience is a must!
Also need some tools & a Florida driv-
ers license. Dependability & good work
ethic are a must. Good communica-
tions skills a plus. Call 813-649-1599
to apply

880 PART-TIME

Kitchen help with experience needed.
Rachels Country Kitchen, 5128 SR 674,
Wimauma or call 813-633-3023



Village
Inn.


Now Hiring
Cooks...$8 to $12 hr.
(short order cooking exp. preferred)
Servers...earn up to $15 hr. (incl tips)
Host/Cashier
1 Full/Part-time 1 Paid vacation
1 AM & PM 1 Flexible schedules
l Meal/whole pie l A fun place to work
discounts
1 Health benefits available
Apply 'in person'
10293 Big Bend Rd.
Riverview EOE



TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD

Call
Beverly
at
645-3111
ext. 201

or email: Beverly@observernews.net
up to 20 words$ 1 7 30' each additional word.
Bold line $3 Classified ads must be paid in advance.
Deadline: Monday 4 p.m. for Thursday paper


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ADOPTION
GIVE YOUR BABY THE BEST IN
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DIABETIC TEST STRIPS WANTED!!!
Get the Most Cash, up to $27 per
box! Shipping Paid! Must be Sealed
& Unexpired. Call Tony 813-528-1480
tonyteststrips@hotmail.com

DIRECTV for $29.99/mo for 24 months.
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DONATE A CAR Humane Society of
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Call Before Tax Year Ends 1-800-349-
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Every baby deserves a healthy start.
Join more than a million people walk-
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SWIM SPA LOADED! Brand New with
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ADOPTION 866-633-0397 Unplanned
Pregnancy? Provide your baby with
a loving, financially secure family.
Living/Medical/Counseling expenses
paid. Social worker on staff. Call
compassionate attorney Lauren Fein-
gold (FL Bar#0958107) 24/7

DIVORCE $50 $240* Covers Child
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LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7
Abby's One True Gift Adoptions. 866-
413-6298. FL License #100013125

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for
hands on Aviation Maintenance Career.
FAA approved program. Financial aid
if qualified Housing available. CALL
Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-
314-6283

CASH FOR CARS
All Cars/Trucks Wanted. Running
or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come
To You! Any Make/Model. Call For
Instant Offer: 1-800-871-9638


THE SHOPPER 5B

CPF STATEWIDE

SURROGATE
MOTHER NEEDED Please help us
have our baby! Generous Compen-
sation Paid. Call Attorney Charlotte
Danciu 1-800-395-5449 FL Bar #
307084


AVIATION MAINTENANCE/AVIONICS
NOWTRAINING PILOTS! Financial aid
if qualified. Job placement assistance.
Call National Aviation Academy! FAA
Approved. Classes Starting Soon!
1-800-659-2080 NAA.edu

MEDICAL CAREERS begin here. Train
ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical
Management. Job placement assis-
tance. Computer available. Financial Aid
if qualified. SCHEVauthorized. Call 888-
203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com ;

NEED YOUR High School Diploma?
Finish from home fast for $399! Nation-
ally Accredited. EZ Pay.Free Brochure.
www.diplomaathome.com ; Call 1-877-
661-0678

NURSING CAREERS begin here -Train
in months, not years. Financial aid if
qualified. Housing available. Job Place-
ment assistance. Call Centura Institute
Orlando (888)220-3178

$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT Cash Now!!
Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-
$500,000++ within 48/hours? Low rates
Apply Now By Phone! 1-800-568-8321.
www.lawcapital.com ;

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income!
Assembling CD cases from home! No
Experience Necessary! Call Our Live
Operators Now! 1-800-267-3944 Ext
602 www.easywork-greatpay.com ;

Top of the line RV park lot for rent,
monthly or seasonal. Across from beach
on Hwy A1A between Vero Beach and
Fort Pierce. Boat docks, tennis and
heated pool overlooking the ocean.
Call 352-347-4470 or Email: Iwhy2@
aol.com.

WESTERN CAROLINA REAL ESTATE
Offering unbelievable deals on homes
and land in the beautiful NC mountains.
Call for free brochures, foreclosures, and
area information. 800-924-2635

ATTENTION DIABETICS with Medicare.
Get a Free Talking Meter and diabetic
testing supplies at No Cost, plus Free
home delivery! Best of all, this meter
eliminates painful finger pricking! Call
888-377-3536

Canada Drug Center is your choice for
safe and affordable medications. Our
licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy
will provide you with savings of up to 90
percent on all your medication needs.
Call Today 888-372-6740 for $10.00 off
your first prescription and free shipping.
Prescriptions Dispensed from Canada
are Dispensed by: Health One Phar-
macy. License Number: 21791

GEORGIA INVESTMENT PROPER-
TIES Single family rehabbed homes.
Macon near 1-75! Leased & cash-
flowing w/manager available. Starting
@ $16,000. Buy & create future wealth!
ONLY 60 remaining! Owner: 404-550-
6900


CASH FOR CARS!
We Buy ANY Car, Truck or Van!
Running or Not. Get a FREE Top
Dollar INSTANT Offer NOW! 1-800-
558-1097 We're Local!

VIAGRA/ CIALIS!
Save $500.00! Get 40 100mg/20mg
Pills, for only-$99! +4-Bonus Pills
FREE! #1 Male Enhancement.
Discreet Shipping. Buy The Blue Pill
Now 1- 888-800-1280

Advertise your product of
service in over 125 free
community publications
throughout the State of
Florida
Fast, easy, very affordable.
For complete details,
call Beverly at
813.645.3111 ext. 201


II,


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6B OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER THE CURRENT


CAC1816456

A-PLUS
Air Conditioning & Heating
634-8679
Sales Service Installations
SERVICING ALL MAJOR BRANDS
Preventive Maintenance
LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED
10% Off All
Service & Repair
With this advertisement



ENT., INC.
Lic. #CMC056816
AIR-CONDITIONING,
HEATING & REFRIGERATION
Complete Sales, Service,
Installation & Repair
Amana and Senior
Trane Dealer Discount
John R. Bowman, Jr., Owner
(813) 633-2703



ARGOTT AIR INC.
CAC1817004
813-759-3488
THE AIR CONDITIONIST
No Overtime Charges
Service Installs Sales
Honest Work & 2nd Opinions
10% OFF All Services with this ad
LICENSED BONDED INSURED






Complete Sales Service
Repair Installation
SERVICING ALL MAKES AND MODELS
24 Hour Service Financing Available
Lic. #CAC18159280


Senior&Military
Discounts


GRIFFITH
AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING SERVICE INC(
Over 30 ears E rperiene'
Rtetlrdenttl & (',imerciul
*SALES *INSTALLATION *SERVICE
on all Makes and Models
NO OVERTIME RATES


SELF ARREST BONDS
COURT DATES 664-0056
WARRANT CHECKS
BIG JOHN'S
BAIL BONDS
641-8400
FAMILY BONDSMAN
STATE FEDERAL
24 HOUR SERVICE
JOHN L. VATH
2100 Orient Road Tampa, FL. 33619
Fax: (813) 628-8739




The Perfect Klean
Residential I Commercial
Cleaning Service






(813) 625-2944



I 'illIS1I III ;!














a-





$H HOFFMAN
E ELECTRICAL
www.HoffmanEletrical.com
Li. #ECI3004496


FREER 15%:
Service OFF
Call
wih a any service
with any repair or repair.
WE MATCH ANY COMPETITOR'S COUPONS
813-298-FAST
(3278)




Ceiling Fans
Outlets r' I
Lighting
Panel Upgrades t
FREE Estimates

813-645-7000
Lic. #EC13002936


Approved by Kings Point Management


DECEMBER 13, 2012



Trade Directory


Over 50 Years Experience
COMMERCIAL B RESIDENTIAL
SSouth Ba
Electric Co.
of Ruskin SERVICE
LICENSED *%UPGRADES
BONDED ALL TYPES
INSURED OF WIRING
ER00126636 RENOVATIONS
SECURITY LIGHTS CEILING FANS
SWITCHES & OUTLETS SPAS & DOCKS
1153 ^


V~1~T~Y1~


145 21st ST. N.W. RUSKIN



I FREE
I The Floor Source Estimates!
Specializing in Hardwood,
Laminate & Vinyl Flooring
We bring the Showroom to you!
SMALL BUSINESS,
SMALL PRICES
(813) 495-7027
davidmoorellc@yahoo.com
www.TheFloorSource.biz
David Moore, Owner-Operator
Chamber Members Licensed and Insured

(
*No project over $1000. No
electrical, gas, or plumbing, and
nothing structural.
Bob's Mobile Fix-It Center
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured
We Fix It All!
Customer Satisfaction Guaranteed!
Attic Stairs Ceiling Fans *
SCabinets Flooring Interior
Painting Home Improvement
Call for FREE Estimate
(813) 671-7870
Robert Gerstenschlager


HANDY MEN


Home Improvements, Remodels
& Repairs Carpentry Dry Wall
General Home Maintenance* Painting
Power Washing Screen Repair
Ask about our other Services *
FREE ESTIMATES* INSURED 1'"
813-642-6182 4BEST



SOUTH SHORE
mj? CONSTRUCTION LLc
v Over 25 years of experience
CG1517322 (813) 333-1222
Kitchen & Bath Remodeling
Replacement Windows
Design Build & Additions
FREE ESTIMATES
For ALL Your Home Improvement Needs
We do it right the first time!
Residential & Commerical Construction
Dial *doitright from your cell
exceptionalconstruction.com


Timothy Sutton, LLC
INTERIOR EXTERIOR
PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
PRESSURE WASHING
29 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN OHIO
NOW SERVING FLORIDA
LICENSED BONDED INSURED
813-727-1013
LIC. #PA2809

SouthShore Painting
SPainting
(InteriorlExterior)
SPower Washing
Drywall Repairs
Preparing Homes For Sale
Improving Curb Appeal
Replacing Old Fixtures
and Lock Sets
License #PA2878
David Squire Bonded Insured
(813) 787-5235




A A&J
SHares
5 YYn-. Plumbing
Experience P
Service & Repairs
Repipes Water Heaters
New Construction
Remodels & Additions


PAUL WOOD PLUMBING, INc.
State Certified Plumbing Contractor
#CFC1427697
a Residential
Commercial
A { k : 3 Certified Backflows
Stoppages
e Service and Repairs
FREE Estimates 24-Hour Service
Licensed Bonded Insured
(813) 641-1387



-


_
m
Printing Company. Inc.
.--,,"--- *m .u* ric

Glossy, Full Color Brochures,
Flyers, Posters and More!
210 Woodland Estates Ave. SW Ruskin, FL 33570
813-645-4048
www.mmprintinc.com






"W e .'e 64 ? A


Residential Commercial
New Roofs Re-Roofs Tile
Tile Repairs Hot Tar/Flat Decks
Ventilation Leaks Repaired
FREE Estimates Financing Available
24 Hr. Emergency Service
Senior Citizen Discount
We Carry Workers'Comp
For Your Protection
SLic #CCC1325993 Bonded- Insured


All Types of Roofing
New Roofs & Repairs
SShingle Tile Metal Hot Tar
No job too big or too small!
SERVING SINCE 1973
Ruskin Sun City Center Kings
Point Apollo Beach Riverview
"ALL MY CUSTOMERS ARE DRY
FRIENDS WHEN QUALITY COUNTS"
BBB

Sun City Center
Chamber Member
P.O. Box 551 Ruskin, FL 33570
www.customroofing.us
Bonded & Insured Lic. #CCC1326907


J h ny S *well






NOW OPEN
.-L LOOKING
FOR EXTRA
STORAGE
SSPACE
FOR YOUR...
>sO R.V.
STo BOAT
645-5222 CAMPER
cell: 240-2049 ETC.
1501 33rd St. SE ANY SIZE
Ruskin, FL 33570
Covered storage






SUN VIEW
WINDOW CLEANING, INC.
Exceptional
Service *
Registered at Kings Point
Licensed Insured
SBonded
Callnow to book your appointment
813-944-8478
Here to ServeYour Community
Year Round



if'TWINDO FIN
H--A

HOME & AUTO
TINTING


solar designs


B FREE Estimates
BBB
S Lic. #CFC057969
A+Rating Bonded Insured


D. KAY CARR, P.A.
Attorney at Law
Family Criminal Probate
Wills and Estate Planning
Civil Litigation Real Estate
214 Apollo Beach Boulevard
Apollo Beach, FL 33572
(813) 645-7557


DESIRE'S RANCH
Ruskin
Specialized Canine Boarding
Air-Conditioned Kennels
Canine Obedience
Problem Solving

(813) 645-3545


1


mI


I r KENNELS





OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER THE CURRENT 7B


Hyundai of

Bradenton


S A L E S


E V E N T


L I I I


SALES


List Price $19,768
- $3773 Savings
$3000 Cash
or Trade* =


Receive A Holiday Wreath
With Purchase!** Proceeds
will benefit The Payton
Wright Foundation & The
Taylor Emmons Fund.


EVENT


NEWil -13


ft.<
DW1lh
(,r4v/lrc r jf


* STK#H354280
* MDL#16402F4.5


Sae $2,995
Price 121995


IE9V ^ WXWi WTH


List Price $20,933
- $3938 Savings
- $3000 Cash or
Trade* =


* STK#H685299
* MDL#46423F45


Sale $
Price I


* STK#H63425S
* MDL#27412F45


List Price $26,053
- $5948 Savings
- $3110 Cash or
Trade* =


Price 16,995


ymNEW ^ ^ L 20 3 -


List Price $28,623
- $4328 Savings
- $3000 Cash or
Trade* =


* STK#H036746
* MDL#63402F45


Sale $9 ,295
Price 212 ,95


*'H..Ju y vri ,rr ,,,,,z 'ld t, y Hyuyu..ii :. Brd ile,- '.i-, Wifili ,:ipi up ri. la I Mull I, IrI ,(e Thr'rri,'iugJr HMF L APR ppi'grim wi.in In [ppr,1 i eTil dih hr ',Iull i "u.i ,il', i i-, umpi-, Ilpr L I p.i y 'rTn i ItI ij 1 I.) '40 i3y. ElIjilI, l-riTi up I. U.0 mriho rii ,, .vin I[hI I 1r m riIT, ly payTI r i r1lu n' .ilyI li'Um i4fl .i' 1 I
date, subsequent payments will be made on the 1:1 iT r.Ily lufili if ,u, 1 :Ii ,rii u'lle.:.Tir I ,ji .r, I Df iprmrrri l mT e..iui'. : [ I. vi i eilie rre ii 1,, r-. J.ij ire r. d ealer for complete program details.*$3000 or $3110 (Sonata) estimated trade-in value or cash down payment. All
new and used vehicle pricing excludes tax, tag, tla, r g,:oi .r.i r,,v1. \ ol I u Ir .r 1-j m i rir..i[A ,us)a):, :,,1 T r,,, 1. All v~r..' :uJti I h. pr, nr r sales excluded. Offers cannot be combined. See dealer for complete details. Offers expire end of day 12/16/12.



AINTENAS_ r .. COMPLIMENTARYs
EXPRESSAN NTAM W CiMSmS
MA!NT11ENANCE l -C-AR Wri RAWiS faS.1S11


HYUNDAI
of Bradenton
a - * *. sss n as^


2503 1"t Street Bradenton
On 1st Street, 2 Blocks South of Where 301 Meets US41
1 -941-747-9262
Monday Saturday 9am-8pm Sunday Noon-5pm
HyudaU =Badeton co


Assurance
America's Best Warranty'
10-YearlOO, OOO-Mile
Powertrain Limed Warranty


HYUnDRI


DECEMBER 13, 2012


NEW 2013 O




8B OBSERVER NEWS SCC OBSERVER THE CURRENT


TIT


I MI YIM


NO PAYMENTS
FOR 6 MONTHS



STK#1380 m- 8


TOWN&

LEASE FROM IRSA VE UP TO
27 PER 5000
12 9MO* OFF MSRP+


J': I. P


ii


72
MONTHS!


lipmi tRI R.


SAVE 80 O
UPTO8000MSRP


2M o 21,990 NW
88299 S.18998


W. M


35'61 2 ,8808
NZOW


ALL PRE-OWNED
VEHICLES ARE
ON SALE!


1999 HONDA ACCORD I 2006 CHEVROLET MALIBU I


2006 CHEVY IMPALA 1 2002 CHEVY SILVERADO REGENCY I


08 KIA SORENTO


1 07 DODGE CARAVAN SXT


5995* 8495* 8995** 8995 S $10,45** 10, 95**


2007 DODGE CHARGER T


S19 Q **


Iu nIrI .JUUL


2000 FORD F250


s13,995**
1 2010 HONDA CIVIC


T 09 CHRYSLER SEBRING T


S 2005 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE

lA R-q.**
I SMQI


2009 FORD ESCAPE


I SIAi Oq**


2008 NISSAN ROGUE
iim %'%


I $1579"**


S2006 CHRYSLER 300C


I sla5nR n*


I LUI I UUUtL U..LIULII I1MIN1 IIIL.I UI UIIIVnI.Ll IUIll HIIvU UUI lN U IM I. lJtlTl .1I.11 I H1


115.995* I


i**9 171 8169* 16.995"
'** lt6995"* s16,995"*


SHOP OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY AT WWW.FIRKINSCJ.COM


LEASE
FROM


DECEMBER 13, 2012


.1 l


NNRNE


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