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Publisher: M&M Printing Co., Inc ( Ruskin, FL )
Publication Date: 07-12-2012
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SECTION B:
The trip out west continues with part 2 of
"See The U.S.A. in your Chevrolet" by
i Warren Resen. Read his messages from
the road as he chronicles his journey.
See page 1B


America's symbol of
freedom is thriving
in Florida. Read the
Full story with
pictures on
page 38


Also is SECTION B you'll
find classified advertising, the
Business and Trade Directory,
church news, automotive
dealer ads, and additional
news and advertising.


PRSTSTD
PAID
RUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570
PERMIT NO. 8


July 12, 2012
Volume 56
Number 25
2 Sections


OBSERVER


EWS


I www.OSBtserver~es~net


The point of embarkation


* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net
TAMPA A man preached
the word of God, along with
some fire and brimstone, as
more than two thousand people
streamed off an enormous ship
that dominated the skyline
at Channelside in Tampa.
The human traffic of mostly
sunburned tourists was almost
exclusively outbound. Laden
with luggage and souvenirs, they
made their way alongside the
shopping area at Channelside,
but only a rare few ventured half
a block down the street into the
inconspicuous entrance to the
shopping courtyard.
Most of the people were
probably sad their vacations
are over, but were then eager to
get home. The only noticeable
economic impact from the horde
of tourists disembarking from
the Carnival Legend cruise ship
was on the taxi drivers, shuttle
buses and the municipal parking
lot across the street. Early on a
Sunday morning, the Channelside
District is packed with people but
few of them are where they need
to be for the business owners
inside the shopping courtyard just
a short distance away.
At 10 a.m. on a Sunday
morning, the chocolate shop
was open, but not many others
- even with thousands of
people coming off a large cruise
ship. Unquestionably, a sizable
population (no pun intended)
no doubt believes it is never
too early for chocolate, but
for the rest of us, the shop had
breakfast sandwiches and coffee
to supplement the display cases
of incredible chocolate treats.
Most of their customers appeared
to be the ship's crewmembers,
many of whom were focused
on their laptop computers and
smartphones, catching up on
email with family and friends.
While people still poured off
the ship, early arrivals for the
next cruise, which was to depart
in just six hours, trickled into
the courtyard toting luggage
and herding children. Before
long, the ice cream shop opened
along with a sandwich shop.
But with visions of near infinite
buffets of food and the beaches
See EMBARKATION, page 12


MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTOS
Above, the Carnival Legend cruise ship dwarfs the Channelside
shopping center while in port on Sunday. The ship makes seven-
day cruises to the Western Caribbean, arriving and departing from
Channelside every week. At right, some children have success get-
ting tourists to check out their wares on Channelside Drive.


Deputies face multiple demands while serving, protecting


* By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
As a hot and humid darkness
descended, the bloody wound


still could be seen clearly. The
young man prone on the grass had
sustained the result of a sharp,
slashing, well wielded knife. He


was, nonetheless, very much alive,
probably very much in pain, likely
very much intoxicated.
Evidence of the fight also lay


MELODY JAMESON PHOTO
What, precisely, transpired, Sgt. Daniel Alarcon (left) asks Deputy Chris McMurtry (center) after Deputy
Amy Morton (right) subdued an individual threatening him with her taser during a South County do-
mestic dispute investigation. In keeping with department policy, the two deputies provided full oral
and written reports immediately following the use of force to ensure an accurate record. The reports
procedure, however, also kept them out of their patrol zone for another 90 minutes.


scattered and visible: a nearly
empty fifth of booze, patches
of dark hair not attached to any
head, overturned yard furniture,
torn clothing, blood, liberally
flowing blood. And the several
witnesses standing around a
cleared area hundreds of yards
from the nearest paved road had
things to say.
It was the beginning of a sum-
mer weekend in South Hillsbor-
ough and the two deputies arriv-
ing in separate cruisers already
had responded to another domes-
tic dispute since their shift began
a couple of hours earlier. Some
30 percent of their calls are in
this category. This one would
make it a long shift indeed.
The two uniformed patrol
deputies, working out of the
Hillsborough Sheriff's District 4
Office, moved in with quick ef-
ficiency. Assessing the situation,
without conversation between
them, they ensured that emer-
gency medical attention was
enroute, spoke quietly to the in-
jured man, asked initial pertinent
See DEMANDS ON HCSO, page 14


rv-

~14


Uiac




2 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 3


Beating the heat rec center style


* By PENNY FETCHER
penny@observernews. net
RUSKIN South County is
fortunate to have two recreation
centers with summer programs for
youth ages 5 to 15 and both are
filled to the brim.
One is the Ruskin Recreation
Center, 901 Sixth St. S.E., Ruskin,
and the other is Gardenville
Recreation Center, 6215 Symmes
Road, Gibsonton.
My schedule only allowed time
to visit one center so by the time
I got to the Ruskin Recreation
Center, July 6, it was nearly 3
p.m. and it was really, really hot.
But inside, the kids taking part
in their Friday party didn't seem
to mind. The a/c was on high and
they were preparing to do Hula
Hoop and Jump Rope contests.
It was part of the indoor activity
schedule the kids use when it's
just too dar hot to play outside.
Arts ands crafts are also big
around the rec center and head-
party-planner-and "keeper-of
the jumpin' joint" Joy Robinson
showed me the things they'd done
since the program began June 18.
Between then and its end, Aug.
10, shortly before school starts
back, every week has had (and
will continue to have) a theme
around which almost all activities
are planned.
Besides normal recreation-
games, exercise and play- these
themes are educational as well as
fun.
The theme last week was
American Pride because of the
July Fourth holiday and included
stories (connected with the
library's Literacy Program) about
famous Americans including
President Barack Obama.
The 138 children registered


in Ruskin's summer activity
program are kept busy from 7:30
a.m. to 6 p.m. although they do
not have to attend those hours -
all depending upon the parents
work schedule and preference.
At a sliding scale cost of between
$40 and $76 for two five-day
weeks, it's been called the best
deal in town.
Most of the kids come from
Apollo Beach and Ruskin,
Robinson said, but some come
from Wimauma.
Those living in Gibsonton and
Riverview attend the Gardenville
Recreation Center that has also
been busy with its programs.
"Right now, the kids are reading
from the Horse Tales books,"
Robinson told me. "We read an
hour a day. They're reading things
like The Black Stallion. We're
going to the Florida Fairgrounds
and watching Arabian Nights July
25 when they'll get to see real
horses in action."
This week the kid's theme is
Wild Adventures, and the kids
will be given learning information
that will tie in to some of the trips
to the Florida Aquarium, Wet &
Wild and Busch Gardens they've
taken or plan to take this
summer with the group.
The last week of camp, the
theme will be Countries of
the World, featuring cultures,
holidays and stories and of
course, related activities of many
kinds.
This week "American Pride"
took a jump back in time as
lessons ending in contests -
featured 1950s and '60s-style play
like hula hooping and jump rope
which the kids said they found
quite different from the computer
games they play now. (Except


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when they're at the rec center and
get to play organized sports like
softball and kickball!)
Ernest Howell (a.k.a. "Coach
Ricky") demonstrated the hula


hoop in great style and kept the
kids clapping as he swayed back
and forth keeping the hoops going
to the beat of the rock music
coming over the PA system.


But when all was said and done,
it was 8-year-old Maelis Jaimes
who won the contest, juggling
four hoops at once without ever
missing a beat.


Coach Ricky (a.k.a. Ernest Howell) shows how it's done! PENNY FLETCHER PHOTOS

RUSKIN GIBSONTON
Ruskin Recreation Center Gardenville Recreation Center
901 Sixth St. S.E. 6215 Symmes Road
(813) 672-7881 (813) 672-1117


Eight-year-old Maelis Jaimes
beat out all the other kids in the
Hula Hoop Contest at the Ruskin .., .
Recreation Center July 6 as she
continued to juggle four hoops
well past the needed length During the hot part of the day, the Ruskin Recreation Center pro-
of time and was finally told to vides various arts and crafts on a themed basis with a different
stop. theme each week.






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JULY 12, 2012


i
-;.-







4 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


There's more to communicating than words


Did you know that any time
you are in the presence of another
human being, you are communi-
cating whether you speak or not?
In fact, your actions and the way
you look may speak much more
eloquently about who you are
and how you feel than any
words you may utter. The
truth is you cannot "not"
communicate. Your non-


verbal signals such as
facial expressions, body
posture, gestures and the
type and/or color of the
clothes you wear will
speak volumes to those
around you.
Take facial gestures


10 minutes a day standing straight,
with your shoulders back in a con-
fident and erect posture. Once you
have mastered the 10 minutes,
move it to 11 or 12 minutes. You
may even wish to do it several
times a day. It will take some time


Positive
Talk
By William Hodges


for instance. There are more than
80 muscles in the face that, when
used in various combinations, can
express several thousand emo-
tions. Trained actors, by the way
they contort their face, can present
an entirely different personality.
Therefore, we must be very
careful of the expressions we put
on our face-especially if we do
not want to be read like a book by
those around us. Actors are not the
only people who practice facial
expressions. I have friends in sales
and other customer-related occu-
pations who find that being able to
assume a particular look is a very
valuable skill. But how does one
do that? You may laugh at this,
but an actor friend of mine tells
me any time he passes a mirror, he
practices a certain look-a smile, a
grimace or even a blank stare.
The posture we present to others
is another area in which we can
speak volumes to those around us.
Most of us have come to associate
standing straight as a sign of self-
confidence. Therefore, if we hope
to be thought of as self-confident,
we must stand straight. Play a
game with yourself. Try to spend


to stand straight if
your natural tendency
is to sag and droop,
but in addition to the
benefits you achieve
by presenting a posi-
tive air, you will also
find you breathe and
feel better.
Gestures are also
important as a form of
nonverbal communi-


cation. We must be careful about
the message our gestures send. We
are in a global market, but gestures
do not have the same meaning all
over the world.
What may be a safe gesture in
one country may be an insult in
another. Be sure your gestures
are appropriate to where you are.
Even the amount of gestures used
can vary from culture to culture. In
the Nordic cultures, few gestures
are used. However, in the Mediter-
ranean areas, constant gesturing is
appropriate. Know where you are,
and what the custom is.
Clothing is also a nonverbal
communication. How you dress
will define, in the eyes of many
people, who you are. In most so-
cieties, the more formal you dress,
the more likely you are to be ac-
cepted as someone from the upper
class-assuming, of course, that
the attire is appropriate to the oc-
casion. In addition to the clothes
you wear, the colors you choose
will also communicate a great deal
about you.
Again, what certain colors signal
are a matter of culture. For exam-
ple, in our society, a woman may


wear a red "power suit." However,
a man would simply look silly
wearing a red suit, unless he is
Santa Claus.
Nonverbal communications are
a powerful tool if we learn to use
them well. For the next week, lis-
ten to what people are "doing."
You will be amazed at what you
will find out.
Hodges is a nationally recog-
nized speaker, trainer and syndi-
cated columnist. He also hosts an
interview-format television pro-
gram, Spotlight on Government,
on the Tampa Bay Community
Network which airs Mondays at


8 p.m. and Wednesdays at 7:30
p.m. (Bright House channel 950,
Verizon channel 30). The shows
can also be viewed at www.hodg-
esvideos.com. Phone: 813-641-
0816. Email: bill@billhodges.com
Website: www.billhodges.com"


Uta Kuhn, center, President of the Patriots Club of SCC, is shown
receiving checks totaling $1434 from (L) Mackenzie Steele and (R)
Taylor Randall, youth volunteers at Homewood Residence in SCC.

Homewood/NCWS youth volunteers
present check
The love offering came from donations for June. Jim Butner, Worship
Leader for NCWS said, "Mackenzie and Taylor have been a tremendous
help to us when we do our worship service on Wednesdays at Homewood.
The girls just decided to do this volunteering gig on their own. What a
blessing!" Uta Kuhn said, "The donation will help replace faded/tattered
flags, expand our club projects to promote patriotism in our community
and financially help support the Wounded Warriors Program.


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Award-Winning Newspapers



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210 Woodland Estates S.W.
Ruskin, FL 33570
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Fax: 813-645-4118
www.ObserverNews.net
Published Every Thursday
by M&M Printing Co., Inc. 645-4048
EDITORIAL:
Brenda Knowles............ Publisher/Editor
brenda@observernews.net
Mitch Traphagen.................Online Editor
mitch@observernews.net
Penny Fletcher......... Contributing Writer
penny@observernews.net
Melody Jameson...... Contributing Writer
mj@observernews.net
All press releases, news articles and
photos maybe emailed to
news@observetrnewsnet
faxed to 645-4118, or mailed to Observer
News, 210 Woodland Estates Ave. SW
Ruskin, FL 33570
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For current rates and circulation
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CLASSIFIED I CIRCULATION:
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r










Local civic group beckons


* By MELODY JAMESON
mj@observernews.net
RUSKIN A prominent
civic organization here with an
illustrious history of benefitting
the South County is looking for "a
few good men and women."
The Ruskin Community
Development Foundation (RCDF)
currently is recruiting individuals
interested in leadership or
membership as the organization
strides toward the 20th
anniversary of its founding.
No dues are required, meetings
are held on a quarterly basis
unless and until projects
underway demand closer
coordination, and residency in
Ruskin is not necessary, according
to Sandy Council, current
president.
However, two criteria for
membership are imposed, she
added an affection for and
dedication to the community plus
a keen interest in its potential
future prospects.
Perhaps the South County
citizens most likely to meet that
standard are business operators in
the area who recognize that civic
development in a community is
good for commerce and retirees
with active professional or
business careers behind them
yet equipped with a wealth of
experience they want to share,
suggested Arthur 'Mac" Miller, a
long-time RCDF board member.
RCDF was founded in 1994 and
established as a 501(c)3, giving
it tax exempt status under the
U.S. Internal Revenue Service


code and recognizing it as a
non-profit organization engaged
in community service, noted
Miller, a member of a pioneer
Ruskin family. Under its by-laws,
the organization and its various
community projects are overseen
by a nine-member board, he
added, and three board slots are
expected to be open.
The civic group's interests
and undertakings have been
varied and numerous throughout
its history. RCDF suggested
and supported formation of
the SouthShore Roundtable
(SSRT) on which a number of
community leaders have served
over the years, acting as conduit
between the unincorporated
South County and the county
administration seated in Tampa.
SSRT thrives today, functioning
in the same capacity, regularly
bringing together representatives
of the various communities and
developments from across the
region with their elected officials
as well as with other individuals
recommending South County
projects or proposals.
RCDF members took an active
role in hammering out the Ruskin
Community Plan, which outlines
the community's vision of its
future and sets forth guidelines
for its development as builders
eye the area with its expanses of
open acreage coming available
as agriculture recedes. Approved
by county and state agencies, the
Ruskin Community Plan now
is nearing the 10-year mark and
soon could come up for review.


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It was RCDF which also
secured funds for restoration
of Marsh Creek, considered an
ecologically significant waterway
flowing through and under the
downtown district to become
the Ruskin Inlet. It was along
the shores of the creek that the
communal settlement of Ruskin
and its Commongood Society put
down roots more than a century
ago, constructing the first Ruskin
College in the forested area on its
banks.
Two more environmentally-
related projects highlight RCDF
history, Miller pointed out.
The organization built a scenic
boardwalk and fishing pier in
Commongood Park on the Ruskin
Inlet and developed a plan for
landscaping the medians in U.S.
41 as it bisects Ruskin. The
latter project has not yet reached
fruition, Miller added.
One other undertaking in which
RCDF played a role did not
become reality: incorporation of
Ruskin as Hillsborough's fourth
municipality, giving its residents
more local control of such factors
as planning and zoning, drafting
of ordinances, marketing itself as
an eco-tourism destination. The
civic group established an entity
that investigated the incorporation
issues, underwrote two feasibility
studies to determine if a City
of Ruskin could be financially
self-supporting and conducted
a community survey to solicit
outlooks on a local referendum.
County officials just as vigorously
opposed the concept and,
ultimately, so did many Ruskin
residents.
Most of RCDF's projects,
however, have blossomed.
One is the Camp Bayou
Outdoor Learning Center, an
environmental, history and
paleontology education facility


on the north shore of the Little
Manatee River, operated on a part
time basis in partnership with
Hillsborough County. A more
recent endeavor is the Firehouse
Cultural Center being developed
in the former county fire station,
in downtown Ruskin. The RCDF
board currently is awaiting a
draft of the proposed agreement
covering lease of the fire station
site to RCDF, Miller said.
It is the complexity of such
projects that makes addition of
newcomers to the RCDF group
and to its board increasingly
important at this time, Miller
indicated. Miller, a retired college
professor, asserted "I'd like to
see a knowledgeable attorney,
for example, join the group and
consider board service. We need
that kind of expertise now, as well
as others with focused experience
in specific aspects of business
like accounting/budgeting and
strategic planning."


An orientation session to
welcome prospective RCDF
members and discuss with them
how their areas of knowledge
could be applied to current and
future projects was scheduled for
Saturday morning in the firehouse
now under renovation, Council
said. However, because it is the
traditional vacation season before
schools open next month, the
meeting has been postponed until
later in the summer, she added.
Meanwhile, Miller said
anyone from anywhere in the
area interested in learning more
about RCDF and with an eye on
possible involvement as the civic
organization looks toward its
third decade can contact him via
email at macmiller@ncf.edu. "All
it takes is a few good men and
women," he said, "to help RCDF
build on the planks in place and
work toward a better Ruskin."

Copyright 2012 Melody Jameson


15816 Beth Shields Way Ruskin 33573
Adult Program/Event Highlights July 12-18
eBooks for Kindle and Kindle Apps
Wednesday, July 18 10:15 to 11:15 a.m.
Learn how to check out and download free library eBooks to read on
the Kindle or any device using the free Kindle app and Overdrive!
Also discover how to use library eBooks with an Amazon.com ac-
count. Limit: 20 Presented by the Tampa Bay Library Consortium.
Elder Law Seminar
Wednesday, July 18 2 to 4 p.m.
This program will provide information and education regarding legal
issues for seniors including planning for incapacities and long-term
care with emphasis on public benefits. Medicaid, Medicare, and
VA programs will be discussed.
SouthShore Needle People
Wednesday, July 18 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Join other needle people to share techniques, tips and experiences
about knitting and other fiber and fabric crafts. Beginners are wel-
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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 5


JULY 12, 2012






6 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT


Kids' Program/Event Highlights

July 12-18
Baby Time
Monday, July 16 1:35 to 1:55 p.m.
Tuesday, July 17 11:35 to 11:55 a.m.
Wednesday, July 18 10:05 to 10:25 a.m.
For children ages 0-20 months and their caregivers. Early literacy be-
gins at birth. Bond with your baby through stories, bouncy rhymes and
songs in this 20-minute lapsit program that introduces early
literacy skills and encourages language development.
Toddler Time
Tuesday, July 17 10:05 to 10:25 a.m. and 10:35 to 10:55 am.
Wednesday, July 18 10:35 to 10:55 a.m.
For children ages 20-36 months and their caregivers. Stories,
fingerplays, songs and interactive activities make up this fun
20-minute program that highlights early literacy skills
and encourages reading readiness.
Story Time
Tuesday, July 17 11 to 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday, July 18 11 to 11:30 a.m.
For children ages 3-5 and their caregivers. Stories, action rhymes,
songs and interactive activities make up this engaging 30-minute
program that highlights early literacy skills, and encourages reading
readiness and social interaction.
Mouse and Keyboard
Tuesday, July 17 12:15 to 2:30 p.m.
In part one, learn how to grip, move and click the buttons on
the mouse. In part two, you will learn the keys on the computer
keyboard. This is a beginner level class. Limit: 20.
Night Capers
Tuesday, July 17 2 to 2:45 p.m.
For ages 5-12. Superheroes, unite! Grab a cape and mask to save the
day as a heroic crime fighter through stories, activities and games.
Groups must register in advance, call 273-3652.
Cartooning Pizza Party
Tuesday, July 17 6 to 7:30 p.m.
Join us for our bookmark reception and awards ceremony.
Enjoy pizza while creating cartoon drawings with step-by-step
instruction from Leah Lopez. All ages are welcome. Registration
required. Call 273-3652 or ask at the Information Desk. Funding
provided by the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library.
Drum Magic
Wednesday, July 18 2 to 2:45 p.m. and 3:15 to 4 p.m.
For ages 5-12. Join us for this loud, feet-tapping program features
drummer Jana Broder who brings drums for everyone and play in a
drum circle. Registration is required to attend. Register at the
Reference Desk or by calling 273.3652. Funded by the
Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library.


Don't get steered into paying extra for


a rental car
Gasoline prices have dropped
for the 10th week in a row and
are closing in on $3.50 a gallon,
according to AAA. This just may
be the perfect time for a road trip!
Better Business Bureau recom-
mends tips for renting a car with-
out breaking the bank.
In 2011, BBB received 3,773
complaints nationally against the
auto renting and leasing industry.
Many of the complaints were a
result of billing and contracting
issues. When it comes to navigat-
ing the rental car process, there are
many little details that often times
leave consumers confused as they
eagerly wait to get on the road.
"Although you may be excited
to hit the road, take the time to in-
spect the car and ask questions,"
notes Karen Nalven, President of
BBB serving West Florida. "Make
sure you know and understand
your options, such as additional
add-ons, before signing on the
dotted line."
BBB recommends the following
tips to avoid overspending when
looking to rent a car:
Shop around and lookout for
hidden charges. There are several
different budget travel websites
that can give a good scope of
what's out there pricewise. Make
sure to follow-up with the rental
car websites' directly to see if you
can snag an even cheaper rate.
Always remember, though, if the
deal sounds too good to be true, it
probably is. Don't fall for the low-
ball offer and make sure to always


clarify which taxes, surcharges
and other fees you'll be expected
to pay. Many states have addition-
al fees for drivers under age 25 or
for multiple drivers.
Opt for a smaller car. If you're
traveling solo, or don't need a lot
of leg room or trunk space, go for
the smaller car. Oftentimes, the
salesperson will steer you in the
direction of an upgrade for "only
a few extra dollars" because the
smaller economy cars are in high
demand -just say no, and stick to
the smaller car (or smile politely
and ask for a free upgrade).
Ask lots of questions. Make sure
that you understand where the "un-
limited mileage" rates apply. Some
rental car companies have restric-
tions and only apply the mileage to
certain states.
Gas up and be on time. Many
times, car rental companies will
ask if you want to prepay for gas
- it's not always necessary and it's
rarely the best deal. Don't forget
to refill the tank before returning
the car, and make sure to return on
time. Some rental car companies
will charge an extra day for being
late make sure to know their pol-
icy for early and late returns, and
call if you get stuck in traffic.
If you're going to be traveling
with children or fear that you'll get
lost, make sure to bring your own
car seat and GPS. No need to pay
for the daily fee for these items if
you have them at home.
For more consumer tips you can
trust, visit www.bbb.org.


JULY 12, 2012

More Hillsborough County students taking Advance
Placement courses
A record number of Hillsbor- aggressively increasing access lauded the district for achieving
ough County Public Schools stu- to the rigorous AP courses, the the largest increase in the num-
dents participated in Advanced number of Hillsborough County ber of students earning AP exam
Placement courses in 2012 and a students taking AP tests has more scores of 3 or higher of any district
record number earned a score of 3 than doubled from 15,069 in 2007 in the nation from 2008-2010.
or above, to 32,796 in 2012. A significant In addition to encouraging more
The percentage of students earn- increase in participation typically students to take AP courses, the
ing a 3 or above also increased results in a decrease in the per- district has implemented the AVID
from 38 percent to 42 percent a centage of students earning a 3 or program (Advancement Via Indi-
significant increase, especially above, especially since AP tests vidual Determination) at the mid-
given the increase in the number are no longer only for the academ- dle school level to help prepare
of students taking the AP exams. ic elite. Now that percentage has students for the high-level course-
Both the number and percentage steadily increased and exceeds the work.
of students earning a 3 or above on rate at the time the district began The Florida Department of Edu-
AP exams increased by more than emphasizing AP exams. In 2007, cation and the State Board of Edu-
10 percent. the percentage of test-takers earn- cation have recognized the value
"This is more evidence that our ing a 3 or above was 39 percent. of AP classes by including partici-
students and our teachers are AP exams are scored on a scale pation and passing rates as a factor
up to the task," said Hillsborough of 1 to 5, with 3 or above consid- in school grades at the high school
County Public Schools Superin- ered eligible for college credit, level. Also, students who earn a
tendent MaryEllen Elia. "These Hillsborough County has been score of 3, 4, or 5 on the AP exam
are the toughest, most rigorous lauded for dramatically increas- are considered eligible to received
courses available. These external ing access to AP classes. In 2011 college credit in that course, which
exams are proof that with the right the College Board awarded the can significantly reduce college
preparation and with excellent in- school district the District of the tuition costs for families, often by
struction our students are doing Year Beacon Award for creating as much as $17,000 when students
college-level work." a culture based on college and ca- earn enough credits to cover their
Since the school district began reer readiness. The College Board first year of college.


35,000






30,0000

15.0M

10.,00

5,000

0


Total Number of AP Exams Taken


S32.050 32,796
29,637
25,728

20.214
-

14561 15069








2005-06 2006-07 2007-038 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12


Tiffany Haynes
graduates
Tiffany Haynes of Riverview,
received a Bachelor of Arts from
Emory College of Emory Universi-
ty in Atlanta, GA, at its 167th com-
mencement ceremony on May 14.
Emory University is knownforits
demanding academics, outstanding
undergraduate experience, highly
ranked professional schools and
state-of-the-art research facilities.
Emory encompasses nine academ-
ic divisions as well as the Michael
C. Carlos Museum, The Carter
Center, the Yerkes National Pri-
mate Research Center and Emory
Healthcare, Georgia's largest and
most comprehensive health care
system.


Democratic Club to meet
The East Hillsborough County Democratic Club will hold its meeting
at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 14, at Barnacles Restaurant, 926 Provi-
dence Rd., Brandon.
Club members Elizabeth Belcher (candidate for State Senate District
24), Bruce Barnett (candidate for State House of Representatives District
57), Gail Gottlieb (candidate for State House of Representatives District
59), and Mark Nash (candidate for District 4 Hillsborough County Com-
mission) will discuss their campaigns and answer questions.
For more information, visit www.easthillsboroughdems.org or club
president Mike Angel at demsinbrandon@aol.com.


CONNOR S. KENNEY
Air Force Airman Connor S.
Kenney graduated from basic mili-
tary training at Lackland Air Force
Base, San Antonio, TX.
The airman completed an in-
tensive, eight-week program that
included training in military dis-
cipline and studies, Air Force core
values, physical fitness, and basic
warfare principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits toward
an associate in applied science
degree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
Kenney is the son of Lisa and
Sean Kenney of St. Filagree Drive,
Riverview.
He is a 2010 graduate of East
Bay High School, Gibsonton.


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Voluntourism: A growing alternative travel option among retirees


Dear Savvy Senior
Can you write a column on vol-
unteer vacations? My husband and
I are both in our 60s and are inter-
ested in taking a service-oriented
"altruistic" vacation this summer
but could use some help.
Retired Travelers


Senior
By Jim Miller


Dear Retired,
If you're looking to do more on
your vacation than relax in the
sun or go sightseeing, volunteer
service vacations also known as
voluntourism are a great altera-
tive and a growing trend among
retirees. Here's what you should
know.
Voluntourism
Nowadays, you don't need to
join the Peace Corps to travel to
exotic destinations and serve oth-
ers. Many organizations today of-
fer short-term volunteer projects
overseas and in the U.S., lasting
anywhere from a few days to a few
months.
Common program themes include
teaching English, working with
children and teens, building and


repairing homes and schools, and
assisting with community or envi-
ronmental projects.
In addition, volunteer vacations
also give travelers the opportunity
to experience the culture more fully
and connect with the local people
- much different than your run-of-
the-mill sightseeing vacation.
Most volunteer vacation groups
accept singles, couples and fami-
lies and you don't need to speak a
foreign language. Costs typically
range from around $700 to $1,500
a week, not including transpor-
tation to the country your site is
in. Fees typically cover pre-trip
orientation information, room and
board, on-site training, ground
transportation once you get there,
the services of a project leader, and


a contribution to the local commu-
nity that covers material and ser-
vices related to the project. And, if
the organization running your trip
is a nonprofit, the cost of your trip,
including airfare, is probably tax
deductible.
Where to Look
While there are dozens of orga-
nizations that offer volunteer vaca-
tions, here are some good ones that
attract a lot of retirees.
Earthwatch Institute (earth-
watch.org, 800-776-0188): A
global nonprofit that offers one
and two-week expeditions that
focus on environmental conserva-
tion and field research projects all
over the world.
Globe Aware (globeaware.org,
877-588-4562): Offers one-week
volunteer vacations in 15 different
countries.
Global Volunteers (global-
volunteers.org, 800-487-1074):
Offers a wide variety of two and
three-week service programs in 18
countries, including the U.S.
Road Scholar (roadscholar.org,
800-454-5768): Formally known
as Elderhostel, they offer a wide
variety of volunteer service pro-
grams both in the U.S. and abroad
usually to the 50-plus traveler.
Habitat for Humanity (habitat.
org, 800-422-4828): Offers a vari-
ety of house-building trips through
its Global Village Program and RV
Care-A-Vanners program.
How to Choose
With so many different volun-
teer vacations to choose from,
selecting one can be difficult. To
help you decide, you need to think
specifically about what you want.
Ask yourself: Where you want to
go and for how long? What types
of work are you interested in do-
ing? What kind of living situation
and accommodations do you want?
Do you want to volunteer alone or


with a group? Do you want a rural
or urban placement? Also consider
your age and health. Are you up to
the task, or do you have any special
needs that will need to be met?
Once you figure out what you
want and spot a few volunteer va-
cations that interest you, ask the
organization to send you infor-
mation that describes the accom-
modations, the fees and what they
cover including their refund poli-
cy, the work schedule and work
details, and anything else you have
questions about. Also, get a list of
previous volunteers and call them.
Don't sign up with a group that
won't supply you with this infor-
mation.
Other Tips
If you're volunteering outside
the U.S. find out if any vaccina-
tions and/or preventative medica-
tions are recommended or required
at cdc.gov/travel. Also, check to
see if your health insurer pro-
vides coverage outside the U.S.
Many health policies (including
Medicare) don't pay for medi-
cal expenses outside the border.
If you're not covered, you should
consider purchasing a policy (see
quotewright.com or insuremytrip.
com) that includes emergency
evacuation coverage.
Send your senior questions to:
Savvy Senior PRO. Box 5443,
Norman, OK 73070, or visit Sav-
vySeniororg. Jim Miller is a con-
tributor to the NBC Today show
and author of "The Savvy Senior"
book.


Got something going on?
Let us know!!
Send your press releases to
www. news@observernews. net


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 9


JULY 12, 2012


iT~rl I r~T~~TIV






JULY 12, 2012


10 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


At least 111 has three number ones


Forbes Magazine recently rated
Tampa as the lllth best place
for business. It's kind of hard to
cheer, "Yay! We're lllth!" but at
least this area did better than most
other Florida cities. Ft. Lauderdale


came in near dead last at 182.
Provo, Utah came out at the top of
the list of best places for business
and careers, while Modesto,
California came in last at number
200. No Florida cities were in the


top 100.
The top five cities were Provo,
Raleigh, Fort Collins, Des Moines,
and Denver. Ironically, I've lived
in three of those top five cities
and have traveled to all of them.


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72"Wx 60" H.................131 Installed


36" W x 48" H.......$39 Installed
52" W x 48" H....... $49 Installed
60" W x 48" H.......$69 Installed
72" Wx 72" H....... 86 Installed


HILLSBOROUGH

(813) 634-8310
MANATEE
(941) 524-2259


I A ; I I I H I [ ^ Ii i^


You might be asking yourself...
Des Moines? Yes, it is a very
prosperous, well-educated and
progressive little city, but it
has only a handful of the cool
amenities of Minneapolis or
Chicago while sharing the same
occasionally difficult climate.
And when the next blizzard hits
(and there will be a next one), half
the city will be on the
web looking for flights
to Florida or Arizona.
It is, however, a great
place to get a good job
and has some really '
excellent roads with even
better roads on the way. ObSE
Oh yeah, like the other By Mit
cities in the top five, Des
mitch@c
Moines has great public
parks and nature trails.


F That infrastructure, along
with excellent education and
employment opportunities, are
among the things that Forbes
looked at in creating their list.
Tampa, and the state of Florida in
general, stumbled on those counts.
The truth is that to big companies,
taxes aren't \ i llini\ All five
of those cities have much higher
tax rates than does Florida, and
in none of those places is it easier
to start a business. Taxes pay for
education, highways, light rail,
and parks none of which are
lately renowned in Florida. The
bottom line is that if a state won't
S invest in itself through education
and infrastructure, then it certainly
creates the appearance that it
doesn't believe in itself or in the
future. Big companies want to
be where there are well-educated
people who are happy with
their homes and neighborhoods.
Moreover, having big companies
around makes it easier for small
companies, including the Mom-
and-Pop businesses, because big
companies employ more people
who make more money and thus
have more to spend at the small,
local businesses.
It's not a vicious circle, it's
the only circle. And yes, it does
involve a roll of the dice when it
comes to taxpayer dollars.
No one likes to pay taxes and
part of the allure of Florida is the
absence of a state income tax. I'm
not advocating for more taxes, I'm
just wondering where the heck
all of the money goes. Florida
really has no excuse for being
in a recession. We have tens of
millions of tourists coming here
year around, paying taxes through
the nose for virtually t 'i \ iunii
you can imagine. Somehow,
someway, I firmly believe that as
a state, we can do better with what
we have.
Hillsborough County
Commissioner Mark Sharpe seems
to agree. In response to the Forbes
list, the commissioner took to


er
ch /
ibse


his Twitter account stating there
should be no excuses, that Tampa
needs to be in the top ten on that
list. He goes on to point out that
the University of South Florida,
the University of Tampa and
Hillsborough Community College
are keys to improving the city
and the economy. He also stated
a circle of his own with a tweet
saying, 'The more
companies that locate
here, the more talent
' wants to be here,
which improves the
attractiveness to more
companies. Cluster
nations 101"
Traphagen I greatly admire
Commissioner Sharpe.
Irvernews.net
While I don't agree
with Li. i liiifg he
says, I am convinced he is an
honest man who speaks from
the heart and that his heart is set
firmly in the Tampa Bay area. He
wants what is best for this area
and the people living here. And
not just today with quick fixes
for appearance's sake, but in the
future as well.
All that said, I don't take the
Forbes list as the gospel. Yes,
things could be better here but
there is an awful lot of good stuff
already in place. No mainland
state can match the natural beauty
in Florida. Apparently Forbes
didn't get down to South County
where we have Simmons Park, a
beautiful waterfront respite that
is indicative of a commitment to
preserving some of the best Florida
has to offer, the Apollo Beach
Nature Park, the still new and
growing Hillsborough Community
College campus in Ruskin and
literally scores of residents ranging
from philanthropists to artists to
entrepreneurs. They apparently
didn't meet the dedicated and
caring teachers in our area schools.
They didn't meet the incredibly
dedicated officers of the District
IV Hillsborough County Sheriff's
Office who have not only kept a
lid on crime better than anywhere
else in the county, but also work
hard to make this a better place
to live. Of course, there is always
room for improvement and that
goes without saying in a large state
like Florida, but 111 out of 200
metropolitan areas? I'm going
to focus on the number ones. We
have a lot of them.
I've met some of the best and
most caring people in my life
here. Like few other places,
Florida in general, and Tampa
Bay specifically, opens the door
to literally anyone, offering some
of the best ways possible to enjoy
life. I've lived in three of the
Forbes top five cities, and yet I
chose Tampa Bay. With a definite
potential for improvement, to me
it's number one.


MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO
Forbes Magazine recently ranked Tampa Bay as the 111th best place
to do business in the United States. At least that number includes
three number ones.




OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 11


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12 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


MITCH
TRAPHAGEN
PHOTOS


Embarkation


* Continued from page 1
of Mexico, Belize and Roatin
dancing in their heads, most
simply sauntered off to wait for
the boarding line to open.
A lone musician began setting
up his equipment in the courtyard,
next to a bar serving boat drinks
to a few people who had just
walked in. If the crowd remained
small in the courtyard, at least
the boarding passengers on the
starboard side of the ship tied
to the pier at Channelside could
enjoy his talents.
Before long, even the small
trickle of incoming passengers
slowed to a stop when the gates
opened to board the ship. The
shopping courtyard was empty
save for some tourists buzzing
about on rented Seqways and the
occasional family walking up to
gawk at the 973-foot long cruise
ship that towered over the open
waterfront end of the shopping
area.
Within a matter of hours on a
Sunday morning, more than 4,000
people crowded into Channelside,
yet few of them discovered the
courtyard of bars and restaurants
just a short distance away.
Instead, the line of people waiting
to board, baking in the July sun,
stretched out along the street.
There, a group of young children
with entrepreneurial streaks
displayed necklaces and bracelets
outside of a shop. While their
business could not have been
described as brisk, they did have
customers opening their wallets.
Unlike the restaurants inside the
courtyard, the children and their
wares were visible to the cruise
ship passengers, as were other
shops facing Channelside Drive.
At Channelside, the point of


embarkation makes all of the
difference. Businesses have long
come and gone in the shopping
area and much has been made
of the failures. But with only
seemingly minor changes,
perhaps those thousands of
passengers could be routed
through the courtyard rather
than around it. As it stands
today, the arriving and departing
cruise ship passengers may not
be a boon to the shops inside
Channelside, but the courtyard
is certainly good advertising for
the cruise ships. By noon, the
restaurants started opening and
just-arrived passengers could be
seen excitedly checking out their
balconies and the upper decks
of the ship. A few more visitors
sauntered in and my wife and
I walked into the quiet and air
conditioned comfort of the highly
regarded Stumps BBQ Supper
Club and were immediately
given a table. Over lunch, we
decided that an escape from life
for a week sounded pretty dam
good and the means for doing
so was just 20 yards away on the
Carnival Legend tied up outside
of the restaurant.
When I was young and foolish
I would laugh at the thought
of being on a cruise ship with
thousands of other tourists.
I wanted to conquer the seas
from the deck of my own boat.
My attitude changed, however,
one dark and gusty night on
the Atlantic Ocean far from
land. Sixty or so miles from
Mayaguana, the furthest of the
Bahamian out islands, Michelle
and I were rocking and rolling in
deep water waves in our 32-foot
sailboat when we saw the brightly


lit cruise ship just after it appeared
as a large blip on our radar screen.
The ocean can be a lonely
place at night so, on a lark, we
called out on our VHF radio to
see if we could raise the ship. A
pleasant sounding voice with a
British accent responded to our
call and we had a nice chat for a
few minutes. As we watched the
ship steam over the dark horizon,
we considered just how much
fun those passengers must have
been having with no worries
about navigation, having too
much sail up, or bumping into
something in the night. And the
food! The Oreo cookies we had
stocked up on before leaving
the Bahamas suddenly seemed
paltry in comparison to what our
imaginations could envision was
provided on that ship.
After now having been on two
cruises, I am aware that there
is no better way to escape the
world and forget about life for a
while than on a cruise ship. Once
you are aboard, there is nothing
further to do, nothing further to
worry about. If you left bills on
your desk, there they will remain
until you return. The same goes
for deadlines. While wifi and
cell phone reception is available
on most cruise ships today, I
have found it best to consider
the invisible tether (or, perhaps,
the chain) that binds you to the
real world as severed when the
ship leaves the dock. Unlike
almost any other vacation, your
every need is catered to and your
concerns are left in the ship's
wake on a cruise. As Michelle and
I enjoyed our lunch, we concluded
that we could really use a week
like that.


Below,
people line
up to board
their cruise
ship while
inside the
Channelside
courtyard,
there was
no waiting
for a table at
lunch.


Continued on next page


JULY 12, 2012






JULY 12, 2012


Embarkation
* Continued from page 12


After cutting through the line
of people waiting to board, the
travel agent at the cruise ship port
didn't laugh when Michelle asked
if there were any balcony cabins
available on the ship. Yes, the one
leaving in three hours. The ship,
however, was
booked and that The travel ag
was probably ship port did
a good thing Michelle ask
because had
there been a any balcony ca
cabin, we would the ship. Yes, t,
have scurried three
back to our car
talking in rapid,
marginally coherent sentences
about just how we would get back
home to pack, make arrangements
with a dog sitter and get back to
Tampa before the ship left. And,
of course, there was the small
matter of our jobs and the fact that
we had not taken leave.
But still, it would have been
fun a lot of fun. Perhaps we'll
try again next week when the
Carnival Legend returns and the


sn
n'
ed
bi
he
ho


new passengers we saw board the
ship become the old, with a fresh
crowd waiting. If so, I'll stop by
the chocolate shop for a breakfast
sandwich on our way to the ship.
Channelside is a Bay Area gem,
and I'm happy to support it. Even
_if you can't
t at the cruise board a ship, it's
t laugh when a great place to
There were pick up on some
if there were dreams over
dreams over
ns available on lunch or a boat
Sone leaving in drink.
ours...
For more
information,
visit Channelside on the web at
www.channelsidebayplaza.com.
If you can't escape the world
aboard a cruise ship, the
Channelside Cinemas offers a
great way to escape for at least a
few hours. For more information,
visit www.channelsidecinemasl O.
com
Information about Carnival
Cruise Lines is available at www.
carnival.com.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 13
.. ............


row -4.
MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTOS
The cruise ship dominates the open waterfront end of the Channelside courtyard. Due to security, it is
not possible to walk directly up to the ship, but visitors to Channelside can get close enough to gawk.


Over lunch, Michelle and I concluded, that we would see if we could
sail away on that ship. Maybe we'll try again next week.
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Dementia through Diet! Melody Harber, RN, with
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of Dementia.


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Tues.,July 17*2:30-3:30p.m. Bring your loved one for well deserved I
break and attend our Alzheimer's Association Caregiver Support I
I Group. Join Katie Colwell Williams, MA, CMC, from Aging Care Advocates
I for information while your loved one is cared for in our Secured Memory
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Thurs., July 19 *2:30-3:30p. m. Low Vision Support Group:Jennifer
Petit from Hometown Homecare will facilitate this group. If you are facing I
the challenges of low vision or caring for a loved one facing this issue, I
this support group is a must! A FREE quick vision health questionnaire
Assessment will be provided.
Tues., July 24 2:30-4 p.m. Amputee Support Group: Facilitated
by Ty Wilson, Patient Care Advocate with Orthotic & Prosthetic Centers.
The group is open to amputees, their family member, friends and involved I
medical personnel. It is our goal to enrich the lives of amputees and I
help them reach their full potential. The tools we use are peer support,
education and activism.
Wed., July 25 2:30-4p.m. Diabetes Support Group. Please join
Rachelle Hatcher, LPN from Comprehensive Home Health Care as she
facilitates our support group "Everyday Basics of Diabetic Care".
I Thurs., July 26 *2:30-4p.m. Grief, Loss or Depression Support
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14 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Demands on HCSO


* Continued from page 1
questions of the witnesses, one of
them never taking eyes off the in-
jured individual. Operating as if
a single unit, the pair of officers
made it clear they had the situation
safely under control.
Good news and bad news
That's the good news. Hillsbor-
ough County law officers are ex-
tremely well trained, strive con-
sistently to meet high professional
standards, fully understand theirs
is a service demanding sensitivity
and are dedicated to all of it.
The bad news is their ranks are
stressed. It seems to be a thin green
and white line. And the situation
begs the question: why? Why can
two hours elapse between report of
a house burglary and a deputy's ar-
rival? Why can calls for assistance
stack up on a deputy's car comput-
er? Why can a half day or night
- shift entail a mere two responses
to calls for help.
The answers are multiple and
complicated. But they can be
boiled down to a society's expand-
ing and sometimes unreasonable
expectations, a legal system's
heavy reliance on paper work, the
ever present threats of violence in
a gun-toting population, a volume
of calls demanding prioritizing,
even an inclination among officers
to specialize rather than remain the
law enforcement version of general
practitioners. To this can be added,
career changes due to salaries con-
sidered not commensurate with
the daily risks and shaved pension
benefit plans as governments try to
staunch the flow of red ink.
To pin some of them down, this
reporter spent two shifts night
and day- with separate deputies,
accompanying them as they rolled
on the calls that demanded their
attention next, observing the pro-
cesses they follow, listening close-
ly as they did what they are sworn
to do: uphold and enforce laws as
written by elected officials, and
asking the "why" questions.
It's a deep, steep org chart
Patrol deputies are the front line
in a metropolitan agency such as
Hillsborough's SO; the uniformed


force, the public face that citizens
encounter most often. Beyond
them, less visible, are various units
trained for specialized duty nar-
cotics, gang suppression, street
crimes, traffic accident investiga-
tion, etc. and etc. Deeper into the
org chart are the detectives, often
not uniformed, focused on solving
homicide, robbery, rape and as-
sault cases. Add to this the correc-
tions personnel, both uniformed
and management, who handle the
jails.
There are the layers of admin-
istration; ranking officers charged
with supervisory responsibilities
and sometimes going on the street
to do double duty; sergeants, lieu-
tenants, captains, majors and on
up the line to the elected sheriff
himself, all sworn law enforce-
ment officers (LEOs) with arrest
authority, frequently holding col-
lege degrees, all formally trained,
all with skills honed by years of
experience on the street, many ris-
ing over years through the local
ranks. This SO, like most profes-
sional law enforcement agencies,
is organized on the military model
and the profession frequently at-
tracts former military personnel.
The SO roster, of course, fur-
ther is filled out with non-sworn
personnel; staff performing public
information duties and providing
clerical support and doing a mul-
titude of other jobs that keep the
complex system up and operating.
Making a patrol deputy
Most of the arrest action, though,
begins with deputies on patrol,
in uniform, in marked cruisers
equipped with technology that
speeds exchange of information.
A new deputy today signs on for
an annual salary of $38,000 to
$41,000, notes Major Ron Hartley,
a 38-year veteran now command-
ing District 4. He, or she, will have
been in the system for nearly two
years before taking to the street
alone. The freshly minted deputy
will have been put through an early
application process, a painstaking
background check, rigorous physi-
cal testing and training, weaponry
evaluation, the law enforcement


JULY 12, 2012


MELODY JAMESON PHOTO
After calming two young women whose relationship had disinte-
grated into a physical dispute, Deputy Nicki Smith wanted to ensure
their disagreements would not escalate as soon as her cruiser was
out of sight. Here she carefully examines the recesses of a back-
pack one was carrying. Finding nothing of concern, she was able
to return it to its owner. Smith, currently a field training officer, says
she would relish becoming the first female officer assigned to the
Intelligence-led Policing Unit.


academy and, ultimately, lengthy
field training beside a street-wise
officer.
Before it's over, he or she will
have developed the innate senses
for reading people, their body lan-
guage and between the lines of
their statements. He or she may
be expected to defuse many vola-
tile situations, take in details with
a glance, outrun a lot of suspects,
take down an average human be-
ing without firepower, unholster,
aim and fire a sidearm in smooth
rapid motion, activate a tazer with
a flick of the finger, lock handcuffs
in place while intoning arrested's
rights and wade into the most gross
or pitiful scenes without exhibiting


physical or emotional reaction on
the spot.
After this investment of time,
energy, gut-level determination,
the new LEO will work a 12-hour
shift, days or nights, weekends,
holidays or whenever needed and
that's the routine duty. He or she
will get no more than a 45-minute
meal break. No matter the weath-
er, he or she probably will wear
the hot but protective Kevlar vest
that may save life in the event of
gunshot to the chest or trunk of the
body.
He or she also will perfect the
art of multi-tasking, particularly in
the vehicle, watching the all-infor-


1ll.ll\ i1 il-bk1-I d I.HL IIlli tl Ii ~r. I
aiId .11 i1 Illt kI.Illl_ 1 iti iti. ll po
..l.k llllu _- I.ldll ..d i Illr. : .r.'i. n Il1'11
.lttlll. dIl l tk th .nid I l il it lln
w fokin_11 p bII phonit .ll % litul b-
'ing hair lout of hid tllae "itd all-
atter of beinglllllll \ signal." She
lils as oltell ll no id U olldl theil-








Isupportive loyalty, should she
On the ob
1 'put\. Nilkil nuth l Ilk, 111
'.1e spent a Friday t it NIl shit td-
ge .ler, li.1wing er lne in a cen'.
Soinkd I.Id.Iwhat ha...d o be done, i.soll
f llt proactive lawI \ -dll \ l.en cement,
1,so d ciedly lessp sio.l In tlk
ibill t .lll' .1 I. ll.lt d .iplllt 111 .1
plh 6 ,,h' h l I t 1 1% ill' .'.'I d, illlll.l% kd. I
b\ m% n \. h, lilt __1,.[I% [ a .
itK I ll: iild .l in .l.d k Ilp-
ing hair out of her face, "it's all a
matter of being professional." She
has absolutely no doubt of their
supportive loyalty, should she
need them, she adds.
We spent a Friday day shift to-
geter, working her zone in a icen-
tral section of the South County,
doing what had to be done, some
of it proactive law enforcement,
some decidedly less so. In the
course of the shift, we would try
twice to serve an ex part order on
a defendant unwilling to be found,
would use lights and siren to stop
two speeders, would investigate a
"suspicious person" concerncom-
ing from parents in a subdivision,
would respond to a frantic "chok-
ing baby" call for help, would
check out a residential alarm,
would mediate a dispute between
two young women after a witness
reported their physical confronta-
tion on a public sidewalk, would
consult with a woman concerned
about her hospitalized son's re-
portedly stolen truck and twice
checked on a hundred or more cars
queued up for bargain gas at a ser-
vice station.
The two speeding stops could
be said to possibly have prevented
a vehicle injury or death. But the
other calls? Not so much. Emer-
gency medical personnel had the
See DEMANDS ON HCSO, page 20


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JULY 12, 2012

Free cancer
screenings
South Bay Hospital will be host-
ing an open house from 10 a.m. to
noon on Thursday, July 19 to cele-
brate the grand opening of the new
American Cancer Society Resource
Center, located inside of the hospi-
tal. Free skin cancer screenings,
refreshments, and giveaways will
be provided at the event.
The American Cancer Society
Resource Center is a free service
to the community that gives free
wigs, bras, prosthetics and re-
sources to those with cancer. The
resource center is staffed by com-
passionate volunteers trained to
support those dealing with cancer.
For more information about this
event or the American Cancer
Society Resource Center at South
Bay Hospital, call (813) 634-0496.


Fundraiser to benefit the VFW
Hangovers Boutique, LLC, 1311 Apollo Beach Blvd., Apollo Beach,
will be holding a Christmas in July fundraiser July 17-21 to benefit the
VFW Post 6287 in Ruskin. The sale will include everything in the store
at great discounts with a portion of the proceeds to benefit the VFW.
Hangovers Boutique is celebrating their 3rd Anniversary with additional
fundraising sales events. Sharil Nenarella and Grace Whitmyer would
like to thank the community for their continued success and support.
Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, and from 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. on Saturday. For more information, call (813) 645-5777.

Block Party is planned
The Center for Restoration is throwing a Block Party from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. on July 28 at 310 1st St. NE in Ruskin. There will be food, drinks,
games, inflatables, live entertainments, face painting, local vendors and
a yard sale. Stop by, meet your neighbors, and have some old fashion
friendly, family fun. Reconnect with old friends and meet new ones the
following day at 11 a.m. Sunday, July 29 at the same location for the
Center for Restoration's Family and Friends Day.
The Pastors Freddie Roberts Sr. and Teresa Roberts will be there to
greet and welcome you and your family. They preach "the family that
prays together stays together."
For more information, call (813) 645-7779.


If you worry about a parent taking medications, or eating
properly, maybe it's time to consider a Sun City lifestyle.
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one monthly rate:


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3855 Upper Creek Dr.
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813-938-2259
www.PacificaSunCity. com


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 15




Waterways are teeming with boats


Our waterways are teeming with
boats of many shapes and sizes.
It isn't tourist, but new residents
who have moved to our area. As
I gaze upon the bay full of boats,
I can't help but go back
in time .
To all of you who
have just arrived in
our paradise, I can tell
you that Florida did not
become a state until
1821. Fish T
Many people in By Jonie
the 1800s braved the
journey to Florida, the land of
snakes, alligators, mosquitoes,
palm fronds, and underbrush.
Oxen and horses were the only
means of transportation until
they learned to make boats from
hollowed tree trunks, and canoes
from animal hides. They were
taught by the Indians, who already
had taken residence in this area.
Some Indian tribes were friendly
to settlers who arrived and other
tribes were not.
At one time, our town of Ruskin
was known as Siberia. It was a
place where convicts from the
North were sent to die.
Waterways here were full of fish.
It wasn't until the 1900s that the
Marine engine was available, but
not many boaters could afford one.
The majority of boats were still
operated by hand or sails.
Tom Saffold had a great boat
called "Isadore." It was a two-
masted schooner with no engine.
It would only run up river on high
tide. It wasn't too many years later
in the mid 1900s that anglers were
adding engines to their boats. O.J.
Williams added a Frisbie engine
and probably had the largest boat.
The Selner brothers Rob and
Henry added a 16-hp Globe engine


to a 30-foot boat which they used
to take hogs and farm items to
market in Tampa. If you operated a
boat in those days, you were called
Captain.


ales
Maschek


In those days all
types of shellfish
were plentiful in this
area. One story is the
Indians were eating
so many oysters that
the discarded shells
reached so high they
would use the top of the
mound as a lookout for


Jose Gaspar. Supposedly, this tale
took place at Shell Point.
It was first called Bellamy Road,
but obtained its name Shell Point,
when the County hauled the huge
mound of shells away to pave
roads. So many shells fell off the
trucks that Bellamy Road became
Shell Point. Some of the best
fishing is in the Little Manatee
River, at Shell Point.
If you could make a collage of
memories, the first one would be
when you caught your first fish.
Since the tropical storm has
moved out of our waterways,
fishing has been great.
I saw hundreds of trailers this
weekend at Williams Park on Hwy.
41 North.
Tarpon have stayed in our waters
and are still jumping around.
Redfish are roaming. Sheepshead
are around the docks.
Freshwater pan fish and catfish
are roaming with the largemouth
bass in the upper waters of the
rivers.
Enjoy our great outdoors, be
safe, be kind, help our strangers
in our waterways, it is now their
paradise, not just yours and mine.
AletaJonieMaschekis a member
ofFlorida Outdoor Press.


Blithe Spirit at the Borini promises
laughter, surprises
The play Noel Coward created during England's battle-scarred year of
1941 is Blithe Spirit, a delightfully satirical and spicy comedy about
ghosts. The upcoming production by the Pelican Players, July 20 and 21 at
the Borini Theatre, captures Coward's inimitable wit and repartee, and un-
derscores the play's superatu-
ral themes with extraordinary
special effects.
Charles Condomine (Erik
Hann) is a successful novelist.
Ruth (Linda Halperin) is his
charming, strong-willed wife.
Their wedded bliss is threat-
ened by the seductive ghost of
his first wife Elvira (Carol Ma-
cAlister), who appears at a seance presided over by eccentric medium
Madame Arcati (Jene Evans). What follows is a darkly funny competition
between two women, one dead, one living, as they battle for the posses-
sion of their husband.


SUN POINT
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Free Towing to shop
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i'J'a -" Tune Ups
Oil Changes A/CWork
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Doctor Bradman (Dan Tackitt) is
the local physician trying to heal
supernatural injuries with bandages
and splints, while his wife Violet
(Diane Turcotte) tipples in bemuse-
ment at the supernatural goings-on.
Edith (Wendy Smith), the Condom-
ine's maid, plays a surprisingly piv-
otal role in resolving the warfare
between the wives.
Clint Shepherd, in his directo-
rial debut with the Pelican Players,
enhances Coward's timeless play
with masterful humorous touches.
Judy Michael is Assistant Direc-
tor, and Bill Turcotte is the show's
Producer.
The upcoming show will be at
7 pm on Friday, July 20, and Sat-
urday, July 21, with a matinee on
Saturday at 1:30 pm. Tickets are
$12 at the Kings Point Box Office,
or may be purchased at the door 30
minutes before the curtain goes up.
Seating is cabaret-style, and
theater-goers are welcome to bring
their beverages of choice and
snacks.






16 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
July events scheduled for South Shore
Senior Singles
The South Shore Senior Singles, a ministry of the Sun City Center
United Methodist Church, has announced their July events. Mark your
calendars and call Patti at (813) 634-7171 or Mary Jo at (813) 383-7535
a week before each event. Reservations and cancellations are required
for all events.
On the third Saturday of each month, July 21, they will be going to the
Alpha Pizza House in Apollo Beach to dine and dance from 5 to 8 p.m.
Call Mary Jo or Patti with your reservation, or for more information.
On the second Saturday of the month, July 14, from 7 to 9 p.m., is
Game Night. A member of the group has volunteered to have this at
his home in Sun City Center. As there is limited seating, call as soon as
possible to be sure your place has been reserved. This is a great time to
get to know others in a casual setting.
On the fourth Sunday of the month, July 22, they are going to The
Alley inRiverview for bowling, from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. For reservations,
call Bernadette at (813) 677-2061.
The fourth Saturday of the month, July 28, a trip to the South Florida
Museum at 201 10th St. West, Bradenton, is planned. There are three
different adult Planetarium shows that are offered: 'The Ultimate
Universe' focuses on everything in the universe from its origins with
the Big Bang through more detailed information about our solar system.
'Two Small Pieces of Glass' is a history of star gazing and astronomy
using the various innovations in the 400-year history of the telescope as
a narrative guide. A 'Live Star Talk' is a look at our night sky with one
of the Planetarium staff. Cost is $7.50 per senior for a self-guided tour,
and starts at 10 a.m. They will carpool, and all money must be paid in
advance. For more information and to turn in your reservation, and how
to pay in advance, call Patti or Mary Jo.
The second Friday of the month (July 13), is Movie night at the United
Methodist Church of Sun City Center at 6 p.m. Call Patti if you want to
attend.
All events require registration and cancellations.
The South Shore Senior Singles group was organized for those age
50+, for all the South Shore area, to provide a non-threatening atmo-
sphere for singles to meet and have fun.


Read


online, including
classified at
observernews.net.
Community news and
advertising 24/7 is
only 1 click away.


JULY 12, 2012


ABWA to meet
The Southshore Charter Chapter
American Business Woman's As-
sociation monthly dinner meeting
will be at 5:30 p.m. on Monday,
July 16 at the Sandpiper Grille,
1702 Pebble Beach Blvd. South,
Sun City Center.
The speaker this month will be
Sandra Murman, Hillsborough
County Commissioner. The topic
will be "The future of Southshore
and issues relating to businesses
in Southshore." Sandra has been
a prominent local political figure
for many years. She has served
on numerous Boards and has been
directly involved in more than
20 organizations that support the
community and enhance the lives
of children and families.
They will have a set menu with
3 entree choices, beverages and
dessert. The cost for dinner will
be $16 per person and wine, beer
and cocktails will be available for
purchase.
RSVP as soon as possible so
the restaurant can prepare accord-
ingly. Cash or credit cards only
accepted.
Bring a friend, spouse or busi-
ness associate and business cards
for networking. All attendees will
have a moment to introduce them-
selves and their business.
For more information call (813)
649-0400.


Every Wednesday Best Spaghetti in Town -- 1
$7, All You Can Eat, for all Elks and their guests.
Music by Bryan from 5 to 8 p.m.
Every Friday -- Seafood and Sandwiches for
all Elks and their guests from 5 to 7 p.m. Karaoke by Bryan from 5 to 8
p.m.
Sunday, July 15 -- Ice Cream Social. Make your own sundaes from 4
to 5 p.m. Only $5 per person.
Monday, July 23 -- Blue Plate Special at 5 p.m. Menu: Baked Ham
with all the trimmings. Only 50 tickets will be sold, $7 per person.


C.A.R.E. is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.
For directions, visit www.CareShelter.org or call (813) 645-2273.


CRICKET
Cricket is a real charmer and
never stops playing except to greet
any volunteer who picks him up.
He also does not stop bouncing
with kitten energy and is a ball
of fun, always chasing the balls
around the kitten room. Cricket
will be brought up to date on his
shots, neutered, and microchipped
as part of his adoption.
DOB: March 22, 2012.


REX
Rex is a handsome American Bulldog mix
who was abandoned by his owner. He came
/ to C.A.R.E. very skinny and suffering from
heartworms. The shelter has worked on get-
ting his health back in order and Rex is now
working the crowds in hopes that some won-
Sderful person will offer him a forever home.
Rex has an awesome personality and a great
smile. He showers every person he meets
with love. He also seems to like other dogs,
/ especially puppies. Do you have a place in
your heart for this goofy guy? If so, stop by
and meet him. As part of Rex's adoption, he
has been neutered, microchipped, brought
current on his shots, and put through heartworm treatment. He will need
a calm, quiet home while going through treatment. DOB: Dec. 2, 2009.



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JULY 12, 2012

BBB provides advice for hiring a roofing contractor


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 19


Natural disasters like tornados,
hurricanes and earthquakes can
bring out the best in people, as
strangers reach out to help oth-
ers in need. Unfortunately, crises
also bring out persons who choose
to take advantage of the victims.
Some of the most common "after-
disaster" scams involve damage
done to roofs.
Whether your roof got hit hard
by a natural disaster or just needs
to be replaced due to time, you
need to take certain precautions
when it comes to hiring a roofing
contractor. In 2011, BBB (nation-
ally)received more than 3.3 mil-
lion inquiries from consumers
looking to find a roofer they could
trust making it the top inquired
industry in the BBB system.
BBB offers the following tips
to homeowners who suffer roof
damage in the wake of a natural
disaster:
Do your research. Check with
your insurance company about
policy coverage and specific filing
requirements. Save all receipts
if temporary roofing repairs are
necessary.
Stay calm. Although you may be
anxious to get things back to nor-
mal, avoid letting your emotions
get the better of you. Don't be
pressured into making an immedi-
ate decision with a long-term im-
pact. Be pro-active in selecting a
company and not re-active to sales
solicitations.
Shop around. For major re-
pairs, take time to shop around
and get 3-4 estimates based on the
same specifications and materi-
als. Check out references that are
at least one year-old, and verify
that the contractor is required to


be licensed and/or registered to
do work in your area. Also, check
with your local building inspec-
tor to see if a building permit is
required.
Avoid high-pressure sales tactics.
Be wary of door-to-door workers
who claim to have left-over mate-
rials from a job "down the street"


-~I
B^BB
REDTEDj~uj
FACC 2 1^3
BUSINESS^^^


or who do not have a permanent
place of business. If sales people
go door-to-door, check to see if
your community requires them to
have solicitation permits.
Trust your gut. Be leery if a
worker shows up on your doorstep
to announce that your home is un-
safe. If you are concerned about
possible structural damage in your
home, have an engineer, archi-
tect or building official inspect it.
While most roofing contractors
abide by the law, be careful al-
lowing someone you do not know
to inspect your roof. An unethi-
cal contractor may actually create
damage to get work.
Get everything in writing.
Require a written contract agree-


ment with anyone you hire. Be
sure their name, address, license
number and phone number are in-
cluded in the contract. Read and
understand the contract in its en-
tirety, don't sign a blank contract,
and make sure you get a copy of
the signed contract at the time of
signature.
Clearly written proposals that
are detailed and broken down into
separate line items are a good sign
that the contractor is being thor-
ough and has prepared an accurate
estimate. The following is a partial
list of items your estimate or pro-
posal should include:
The type of roof covering,
manufacturer and color
Materials to be included in the
work, e.g., underlayment, ice dam
protection membrane
Scope of work to be done
Removal or replacement of
existing roof
Flashing work, e.g., existing
flashings to be replaced or re-
used, adding new flashing, flash-
ing metal type
Ventilation work, e.g., adding
new vents
Who is responsible for repair-
ing/replacing exterior landscape or
interior finishes that are damaged
during the course of the work?
Make sure that it contains language
addressing who is responsible for
any damage that occurs as a result
of the work. All items of concern
and work to be done should be
included in the contract.
Installation method
Approximate starting and com-
pletion dates
Payment procedures
Length of warranty and what is
covered, e.g., workmanship, water
leakage
Who will haul away the old
roofing materials and/or project
waste (e.g. extra materials, pack-
aging, etc.)? Is there extra charge
for this service?
If one estimate seems much
lower than the others and it sounds
too good to be true, it probably
is. Many fly-by-night contractors'
below-cost bids seem attractive,
but these contractors often are un-
insured and perform substandard
work or use substandard materials.


'-ILI
Martin Lagunas Sr. and son Martin "El Gallito Azteca" Lagunas Jr.,
the recent 2012 International Title winner.

Local boxer earns international
recognition
Martin "El Gallito Azteca"
Lagunas Jr., the 2009 National
Boxing Champion just captured
an International Title in Caguas,
Puerto Rico in June 2012.
He trains out of St. Pete Boxing
Gym, taking another step toward
his dream of becoming the Cham-
pion of the World.
Martin would like to thank his
sponsors: A+M Furniture, Apollo
Meats, Rent King, Select Therapy
and La Teresita Cuban Restau-
rant, and extend a special thanks
to his father for his support and "El Gallito Azteca" displaying
dedication. his multiple title belts.


Make sure to read the fine print.
Some contracts use a clause where
substantial cancellation fees or
liquidation damages are required
if the homeowner decides not to
use the contractor after insurance
approval of the claim. In some
instances you may be required
to pay the full agreed price if the
homeowner cancels after the 3-day
cancellation period. If an estimate
or contract is confusing, ask the
contractor to break it down into
items/terms you can understand.
Disaster victims should never
feel forced to make a hasty deci-
sion or to choose an unknown
contractor. BBB has BBB Busi-
ness Reviews on more than 67,000
roofing contractors, and they are
available for free at www.bbb.org.


Kids build a giant puppet


The Firehouse Cultural Center in
Ruskin kicks off its second Artist-
in-Residence program on July 16.
The artist is Sara Peattie, a well
known puppet builder and puppe-
teer. The unique program encour-
ages family and team participation
in studio workshops.
Response from the community
has been very positive. Dolores
Coe, Program Chair for the Fire-
house, reports, "Our giant puppet
workshops are almost full." While
the workshops on building the gi-
ants are filling up, Coe says a few
openings for participants remain
available.
Thanks to the SouthShore Cham-
ber of Commerce and other area
businesses, the children's classes
are now free. The Chamber has
organized sponsorship for these
classes, once priced at $15 per
child. The Cultural Center offers a
choice of two sections: Section 1


-- Tuesday, July 17, 1:30 to 3:30
p.m.; and Section 2 -- Wednesday,
July 18, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Coe
says, "The classes on small and
shadow puppets are great summer-
time activities for youngsters ages
8-11 years."
Sara Peattie culminates her resi-
dency with two events. The first is
a "Grand Finale Surprise" at 7:30
p.m. on Saturday, July 21. The Fi-
nale features all participants and
their creations. Then, the morning
of Monday, July 23, Peattie will
lead an "All Things Puppets Shop
Talk." Coe says, "We invite art-
ists, teachers, program directors,
and anyone interested for coffee
and conversation from 10 to 11:30
a.m." The cost? "Very reasonable
at $5!"
Register online at http://www.
firehouseculturalcenter.org/home/
peattie. For more information, call
(813) 645-7651.


MOSI's Sky Trail Ropes Course is celebrating the addition of
ziplines.

Take fun to new heights!
MOSI is taking fun to new heights with its 7th birthday celebration for
Kids in Charge! and Sky Trail Zip Line Launch Party from 11:30 a.m.
to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, July 14 at their 4801 East Fowler Ave., Tampa
location. With mummy-themed activities, games and birthday cake,
along with the opportunity to defy gravity and soar more than 700 feet
on the new Zip Line, the celebration is guaranteed to have something for
everyone.
Additionally, Blue Bell Ice Cream will be at MOSI from noon to 2 p.m.
on Sunday, July 15 to continue the celebration and to honor National
Ice Cream Day. The newest Blue Bell flavor, Summer Strawberry Pie
Ice Cream, is a luscious strawberry ice cream combined with sweetened
strawberries, flaky piecrust pieces and a whipped topping swirl and will
be the featured flavor at MOSI on National Ice Cream Day. For those
who prefer something more traditional, Blue Bell's most popular ice
cream, Homemade Vanilla, will also be served.
Birthday party, cake and Blue Bell Ice Cream are included with MOSI
admission (while supplies last). Additional fees apply for Zip Line
rides.


Riverview Memorial
VFW Post #8108
7504 Riverview Dr.
(813) 671-9845


MEETINGS

Men's Auxiliary -- First Thursday
at 7 p.m.

Ladies' Auxiliary -- Second
Tuesday at 7 p.m.
Post -- Second Thursday at
7:30 p.m.

MEALS

Wednesday Spaghetti Dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m.

Friday Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.

Sunday Breakfast from 9 a.m.
to noon

CANTEEN HAPPENINGS

Bar Bingo Monday at 6:30 p.m.

Bar Poker with Lori on
Wednesday at 1 p.m.

Fire in the Hole on Saturdays
at 1 p.m.

RVHS band to
hold fundraiser
Riverview High School Shark
Attack band comprised of
approximately ninety members is
holding car washes this summer to
raise $22,000 to participate in U.S.
Bands National Marching Band
Championships at the U.S. Naval
Academy in Annapolis, MD the
weekend of Nov .9-12.
The car washes will be held from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, July
14 and Saturday, Aug. 11 at the
Burger King 9660 U.S. 301 S., in
Riverview.
Donations are appreciated.


Ruskin VFW Post #6287
Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120 U.S. 41 N. has listed the following
weekly activities. Meetings are: American Legion on 1 st Wednesday
each month; VFW and LAVFW on the 2nd Wednesday each month;
and MAVFW on the 3rd Thursday each month.
S Thursday, July 12 Bar Bingo
... at 6 p.m.
Friday, July 13 Fish Fry from
^ 4:30 to 7 p.m. Music by Soul-R-
Coaster from 7 to 11 p.m.
Saturday, July 14 Music by
Soul-R-Coaster from 7 to 11 p.m.
S Sunday, July 15 Fire in the
Hole from 1 to 4 p.m. Horse Races
VA Hospital at 2 p.m. Music by Bert
& Sassy from 5:30 to 7 p.m.
Monday, July 16 American Legion Riders Meeting at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, July 17 Games in Lounge from 1 to 5 p.m. Kitchen
open from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Bingo at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, July 18 American Legion Auxiliary Meeting at 7
p.m. SAL's Meeting at 7 p.m.






20 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Demands on HCSO
U Continued from page 14


baby incident well in hand, the
suspicious person was a visiting
Asian without a command of Eng-
lish, the two women worked out
their differences, the concerned
mother was counseled to obtain
the legal authority to act in her
son's place, the home alarm was
false accidentally set off by the
resident, the mob of gas bargain-
ers was orderly, and the ex parte
simply could not be served.
Yet, there were South County
citizens worried enough to call for
the help and support of a deputy
sheriff and the agency whose mot-
to is serve and protect responded,
trying to do so. Strictly law en-
forcement? No, not strictly, Hart-
ley acknowledges, but perhaps
indicative of a growing attitude of
the society in general; an increas-
ing dependency on government.
Call a cop to be a cop
Whatever the motivations, citi-
zen expectations of deputies some-
times stretches credulity, Hartley
adds. "I have had people call want-
ing a deputy to check on their wa-
ter lines," he asserts, "and I have
told them I don't have any plumb-
ers in uniform or on staff." There
have been complaints about pot-
holes opening up after a rain and
calls for a deputy to help with an
unmoving railroad cross arm, nei-
ther of which are chapters covered
at the police academy. Then, there
was the recent case of a teen-ager
reportedly abducted through her
bedroom window and assaulted.
Some 17 hours later, Hartley re-
lates, it was shown no abduction
and no assault had occurred. But
two deputies and two detectives
devoted an entire day to the in-
vestigation before the truth was
exposed.
Each fraudulent or non- law
enforcement request that ties up a
deputy takes that officer in whose
training thousands of tax dollars
have been invested from the tasks
he, his agency and the general pub-
lic have a right to expect of him.
It's a career, too
Another factor affecting patrol
deputy ranks has to do with their
individual ambitions and the ar-
ray of talents they bring to the
job. Almost all new officers with
the department get their first years
of experience in the patrol troops,
Hartley says. In this capacity, they
deal with the constantly changing
human condition, polish their peo-
ple skills, gain confidence, perfect
with practice all they must know
and perform. Plus, they are able to
exhibit what they do best and spot
where in the large, multi-faceted
agency they most would prefer to
be, if patrol is not the first choice.
Retirements, relocations and pro-
motions occur constantly, open-
ing up new opportunities, clearing
paths to ultimate goals, be they in
a specialized unit or a particular
division or in management.
Smith, now an FTO (field train-
ing officer) with five years under
her belt, sees herself eventually as
a detective, preferably dedicated
by the department to its intelli-
gence-led policing (ILP) section.
ILP holds that 60 percent of the
crime is committed by only six
percent of the population, indi-
cating that focus on that criminal
element is the single most success-
ful means to catching "bad guys,"
closing cases and protecting the
law-abiding public. Smith sup-
ports the premise and points out
there is not yet a woman assigned
to that area. It only stands to rea-
son, she argues, that the intuitive


skills which come naturally to
women would be useful there.
Of course, without a replace-
ment settled in, her departure, like
any patrol deputy's re-assignment,
would take one more car from the
squad, eliminate one more officer
on the beat.
The burden of paper
Another issue impacting patrol
deputies is the extensive paperwork
required of them and the reporting
necessary in connection with their
actions. It was demonstrated the
night of the domestic dispute in-
volving the knife wound.
As with all domestic disturbance
cases which inherently pose threats
of physical danger to both citizens
involved and responding person-
nel, two deputies and two cars
advanced on the scene. Officers
Amy Morton and Chris McMurtry
might have wrapped up the situa-
tion at the location with departure
of the injured individual in an am-
bulance, had the young man, spew-
ing profanities and spraying blood
droplets, not chosen to lunge at
one of them. Morton fingered her
taser. And the young man again
was subdued.
But, under department policy,
the show of force mandated full
review of the entire scenario. Back
in the district offices, detail by
detail was verbally recounted by
the two deputies, examined and
recorded by their sergeant, com-
mitted to report form substantiat-
ing each move made. Should any
legal ramifications arise later, the
precise report, made immediately
before a detail could be lost, ac-
counts fully for their actions.
The exceedingly careful han-
dling, however, also consumed
another 90 minutes of the depu-
ties' shifts, keeping both of them
off the road and unable to respond
to other calls. In all, Morton and
I were able to get to just two do-
mestic violence situations and of-
fer help to one stranded motorist
during an entire 12-hour shift. The
remainder of the work night was
spent compiling reports.
Yet in a society which increas-
ingly embraces litigation, accurate
reports are necessary. With no way
to predict timing or which situa-
tions may result in legal actions,
the precautions taken by the de-
partment and vitally important to
the state's attorney cannot be ig-
nored or reduced.
Priortizing on night shift
Morton, who says she originally
thought she would go into legal
practice, also is a FTO and a five-
year veteran. She, however, does
not plan to leave the patrol ranks,
she asserts, but aspires to add a ca-
nine partner to her cruiser, work-
ing in tandem with a trained police
dog to do the ever-changing job. "I
love patrol work," she notes, "and
I love the constant variety; no two
shifts are the same."
In that case, Morton will contin-
ue to prioritize the constant stream
of calls on her cruiser's computer
screen, responding to the most ur-
gent first, leaving the less urgent
for a later hour or another deputy.
It is by such prioritization that they
all work their way through each
shift, striving first to protect lives
in imminent danger.
On the other hand, every call is
answered in one way or another,
says Hartley. "No call is ignored."
The priority approach will con-
tinue to prevail, he indicates, with
crimes-in-progress topping the re-
sponse list and 911 pleas for help a
close second.


Asked about boosting his patrol
staffing level to answer more calls,
the district commander allows that
seven rookies are due into District
4 shortly. But they won't be ready
for street work alone for a while,
so the district will get along as it
has been. "I'd rather work short
than work with problems," Hartley
notes, because personnel turned
loose before they're ready bring
on problems that soak up time and
manpower to correct.
And the numbers bear him out.
The FBI's recent Uniform Crime
Report put the crimes per 1,000
population in the district the
largest in the county both geo-
graphically and in population at


611 Destiny Drive

Ruskin, FL 33570

813-645-7739


18.2 on a annualized basis, Hart-
ley says. The next best record was
made in Hillsborough's District 3
where the per 1,000 crime rate was
pegged at 22.4.
So, his 194 officers the major-
ity of them patrol deputies and su-
pervisors are performing at high
levels, despite all the handicaps
and hurdles, he suggests. "When
things go bad, it's my fault," he
states firmly, "when things go
well, it's because of them."
Although all of his troops may
not be as sanguine as he is about
their thin green and white line,
their major says philosophically
"we were short when I came here
and we will be short when I leave."


They will, though, do their jobs,
each shift, and to the very best of
their abilities.
Copyright 2012 Melody Jameson













buge.


SUNSET GRILL
AT LITTLE HARBOR


www.staylittleharbor.com


-.. -----










vtocidK F"rida
tC A


Come and enjoy a great meal


on the beach


JULY 12, 2012






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 21


You, Me, and Business

By: Dana Dittmar, Executive Director
SCC Chamber News


There are two types of attitudes
about change: you either thrive
on it, or you hate it. Some
people love the freshness
of something different and
embrace new experiences
like an old friend. They are
the ones who initiate new
programs, redecorate, take
exotic vacations and don't yr1


I
k


interru
crease







Me &


think twice about picking BU "'ness
up and moving on.
Those who resist change By Dana Dittmar
cling to stability, stick a
toe in the water and seek a com- a mind
fort in what is consistent and con- change
tinual. They are the ones who still technol
have un-smart phones and a VCR events
for recording their favorite TV impact
shows. They vacation at the same And
place every year and usually do it of the
the same week of the same month, that ou
And somewhere in between are our pr
those who believe in their minds we're
they want to grow and change, but know.
haven't the intestinal fortitude to happen
actually do it. They read up on new short c
technology but never use it. They like ou
collect exotic recipes, but never the deb
cook them up. They procrastinate Agaii
for so long, they actually sabotage side el
their chance at real growth. pare fo
There are business owners who and id
do not pursue a new type of clien- involve
tele. They stick with old-fashioned ment 1
cash registers instead of comput- with th
erized sales systems. They don't Chant
do any research or development that igi
of new product lines or improved die the
services. Why? change
Often, we are convinced change or scar
will affect our productivity and are key
increase our stress. Once we have the san
what we consider an efficient rou- But resc
tine, we're afraid to interrupt it. reveal f
Making changes takes re-training worthy
time, which can be stressful. But
being stagnate isn't the answer. *
Instead, we need to plan for the ..

School supplies needed!


option and the potential de-
in productivity and factor
those costs into the
overall change.
Sometimes, mak-
ing changes makes us
feel as if the way we
were doing things be-
fore was a mistake. If
we improve a product,
maybe the product we
sold before just wasn't
doing the job. Instead,
we need to develop
Iset that reminds us these
s are the result of new
logy, new research or other
that have had a definite
on the market.
finally, we succumb to fear
unknown. We may know
r services are outdated and
ducts could improve, but
comfortable with what we
We have no idea what will
Sif that new technology
ircuits or people just don't
ir new service. Remember
acle that was New Coke?
n, we need to face potential
Tfects of change and pre-
or them. If we investigate
entify potential problems
ed in change, we can imple-
best practices for dealing
em.
ge is healthy and businesses
nore the market trends will
way of the pay phone. But
doesn't have to be painful
y. Preparation and research
y. The vacation can still be
ne week of the same month.
search into a new location can
un activities and experiences
of taking a different route.

f- ei k.


The South Shore Chamber is in need of teaching supplies for the
upcoming "Welcome to SouthShore, New Teacher Breakfast." This
event will be held at 7:30 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 17.
On average, a teacher spends nearly one thousand dollars of their own
money during the course of the year just on teaching supplies!
The SouthShore Chamber of Commerce hosts a Welcome to South-
Shore New Teacher Breakfast annually which supports 11 area schools.
Any supplies are accepted, however they have put together a 'wish list'
of items from teachers:
Pens, pencils, pencil sharpeners, dry erase markers, board erasers,
notebook & construction paper, glue, crayons, markers, pencil boxes,
notebooks, post-it notes, tissues, hand sanitizer, and baby wipes.
If you are able to donate any of these supplies for this event they have
established some drop-off locations and will be collecting items from
July 17 through Aug. 10.
If you need to arrange to have them picked up from you, just let them
know! They will handle the rest!
Drop-off Locations


A Spicy Supernatural Comedy by Noel Coward


At the Sandpiper Golf
OPEN TO THE PUBL
Open Daily 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.


* Lunch & Dinner Specials

SFull Bar* Catering

* Banquet Facilities


Directed
by Clint Shepherd











Tickets: $12
at KP box office












Course
.IC




lc^^


FRIDAY
Fish Fry Special ......................... $9.95

SATURDAY
Prime Rib (all day) .................. 14.95


1702 S. Pebble Beach Blvd.

S Sun City Center 813-634-7900
www.TheSandpiperGrille.com


I


I


I


SouthShore Chamber of Commerce
Ruskin office: 315 S Tamiami
Trail, Ruskin (813) 645-3808
Apollo Beach office: 137 Harbor
Village Lane, Apollo Beach
(813) 645-1366

Kids R Kids SouthShore
13151 Kings Lake Drive
Gibsonton (813) 672-0400
Hours: 6 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday

American Momentum Bank
5998 U.S. Hwy. 41 N.
Apollo Beach (813) 649-9400
Hours: 9 a.m.to 4 p.m.
Monday through Friday

Nicole M. Cameron PA
449 Apollo Beach Blvd.
Apollo Beach (813) 645-8787
Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday


Victory Martial Arts
205 Apollo Beach Blvd. #115
Apollo Beach (813) 938-5802
Hours: 5 to 7 p.m. Friday,
9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Saturday,
10 a.m. to noon
Monday through Friday

Hillsborough Community College
-- SouthShore campus
551 24th Street NE, Ruskin
Student Services, Room 135
Hours: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Monday and Tuesday,
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Thursday,
8 to noon Friday


FREE
* DENTURE
CONSULTATION
SOR 2nd OPINION
with patient bringing current x-ray.
S 0140. Limit one per patient.
Exp. 7/31/12

S NEW PATIENTS
FULL MOUTH
SERIES OF
SX-RAYS & EXAM
0210 0110
for 95
and receive a $100 credit toward
S your account for future treatment.
Exp. 7/31/12
I Imm mm m m mm m m


New Patients and Emergencies Are Always Welcome

Sun City Dental Center

Thomas A. DeVol, D.D.S., P.A.
General Dentist

633-2636 727 Cortaro Drive
(Two doors down from AAA)
Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Closed for Lunch 1-2 p.m.
*Have your Upper and Lower Full Dentures made in just one week in
our own In-House Denture lab
*Time to process denture cases may change due to complexity/type of case.
The fee advertised is the minimum fee charged. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the
right to refuse to pay cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment
which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free service, examina-
tion or treatment. Senior Citizen discount does not apply
*Actual Fee May Vary Depending Upon Degree of Complexity in a Given Case


-"r"~"l~~


JULY 12, 2012


pr' m'ilt


I .







22 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER JULY 12, 2012


Veterans: apply for
waiver
The Department of Business and
Professional Regulation (DBPR)
today encouraged military veter-
ans who have been honorably dis-
charged within the past 24 months to
apply for a new licensure fee waiver
available through the Department.
As of July 1, the Department will
have the ability to waive initial li-
censure fees for military veterans
under a new law that passed during
the 2012 Legislative Session. The
waivers could save veterans any-
where from a few hundred dollars
to more than a thousand dollars, de-
pending on the license type.
"We want to encourage veterans
who may be thinking about start-
ing a business or getting a profes-
sional license in Florida to apply
for this waiver," said Secretary Ken
Lawson. "This is our way of say-
ing 'thank you' to the veterans who
have already sacrificed so much to
protect and defend our nation."
Through HB 517, the initial li-
cense fee, initial application fee and
initial unlicensed activity fee will be
waived for veterans returning from
service, provided the veteran ap-
plies for licensure within 24 months
of being honorably discharged.


I


Low interest loans available for storm damage


Hillsborough County small busi-
nesses, including small agricultural
cooperatives and small aquaculture
businesses, as well as most private
non-profit organizations of all siz-
es, may apply for the U.S. Small
Business Administration's (SBA)
Economic Injury Disaster Loans
to recover from financial, working
capital losses caused by Tropical
Storm Debby.
Landlords who have lost revenue
from their rental properties are also
eligible. This Economic Injury Di-
saster Loan assistance is available
regardless of whether the business
suffered any physical property


damage. At this time, Hillsborough
County businesses and non-profits
are not eligible for cost recovery for
any physical storm damage.
Interest rates are as low as 3 per-
cent for non-profit organizations
and 4 percent for businesses with
terms up to 30 years. Loan amounts
and terms are set by the SBA and
are based on each applicant's finan-
cial condition. The deadline to re-
turn economic injury applications is
April 3, 2013.
For more information call 800-
659-2955, 800-877-8339 for the
deaf and hard-of-hearing, or by
sending an e-mail to disastercus-


Robert Edelman, M.D.


Jeffrey Davis, M.D.


tomerservice sba.gov. Impacted
businesses may apply online using
Electronic Loan Application on the
SBA's secure website at https://di-
sasterloan.sba.gov/ela/.
Individual homeowners suffering
home damages can seek assistance
from Hillsborough County's Hom-
eowner Rehabilitation Program by
calling (813) 612-5397.
To be considered for other di-
saster assistance, call the Federal
Emergency Management Agency
(FEMA) at 800-621-FEMA (3362),
(TTY) 800-462-7585 for the deaf
and hard-of-hearing.


Eric Berman, M.D.


Anita Shane, M.D. I


licensure fee

The law will apply to new licenses
granted after July 1 for more than
20 professions under DBPR's juris-
diction, including construction, real
estate, certified public accountants
and cosmetologists. The waiver can
be downloaded from the Depart-
ment's military services webpage at
http://www. myfloridalicense .com/
dbpr/dbprmilitary.html and should
be included in applications for pro-
fessional licensure.
The new law becomes one of
Florida's military-friendly licensure
laws that serve as a model for other
states. This year, Florida was ac-
knowledged as one of only a hand-
ful of states that have a state license
program specifically for spouses of
military veterans.
The Department of Business and
Professional Regulation's mission
is to license efficiently and regu-
late fairly. The Department licenses
and regulates more than one million
businesses and professionals rang-
ing from hotels and restaurants, real
estate agents and certified public
accountants to veterinarians, con-
tractors and cosmetologists.
For more information, visit www.
MyFloridaLicense.com.


Brandon Orthopedic Associates is one of the
most respected and professional orthopedic
and sports medicine practices and
Hillsborough County. Our state-of-the-art
facilities allow us to specialize in sports
medicine, arthroscopic surgery, partial and
total joint replacements of hip, knee and
shoulder, hand surgery including endoscopic
carpal tunnel release, finger joint replacement,
complex surgery of the elbow, and ankle and
foot injuries. Our compassionate and caring
atmosphere is in two convenient locations near
local hospitals and outpatient surgery facilities
in Brandon and Sun City Center. We work
relentlessly to provide the best care possible
for every patient's unique orthopedic need.


Robert J. Maddalon, MD
John D. Okun, MD
Peter V. Lopez, MD
Steven M. Page, MD
Board-Certified Orthopedic Surgeons





2 P
M.^i rB


Brandon Orthopedic Associates 1910 Haverford Avenue Suite 107
721 West Robertson St., Ste. 102 Sun City Center, FL 33573
Brandon, FL 33511 (813) 633-0286
Phone: 813-684-3707 www.brandonorthopedics.com


* Comprehensive Macular
Ophthalmology Degeneration
* Cataract Surgery Cornea
* Glaucoma Diabetic Eye Care
Management Neuro-Ophthalmology
* Laser Surgery
Our ophthalmologists are fellowship-trained
to provide specialized care for your eyes.
Medicare & most insurance accepted.

9 MANATEE
SEYE CLINIC
ri SsaaE


10 -nCP -I.


Dramatic readings
showcased talent
Area poet, John Foster, was
among twelve writers selected to
read from their work at the Spo-
ken Word Event on Sunday, June
24. The Tampa Writers Alliance,
host of the event, presented se-
lections of prose and poetry from
4 6 p.m. at O'Brien's Irish Pub
and Grill in Tampa. The program,
which attracted members of the
press as well as many from the
literary community, featured on-
stage dramatic readings The pre-
senters, all members of the TWA,
had rehearsed their presentations
together prior to the event. Music
was provided as background by
Steve Vaclavik on guitar. After the
program the audience had an op-
portunity to meet the presenters
and to browse through their pub-
lications on display. John Foster
resides in Sun City Center and is
known for his instructive and en-
tertaining readings.


Riverview Moose Family Center 2158/Chapter 1031
Loyal Order of Moose 9000 Honeywell Rd. Gibsonton
RIVERVIEWMOOSELODGE2158.ORG (813) 677-7921
All events are open to qualified Moose Members and guests.
UPCOMING EVENTS
Dinners Available
Tuesday Hot Dogs with fixin' 5 to 7 p.m.
Chili, Cheese, Onions, Relish, etc.
Wednesday Chef's Choice 5 to 7 p.m.
4th Wednesday of the month Linda's Famous Liver 'n Onions
Bar Games begin at 7 p.m.
Thursday Tacos/Burgers Night 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Blind Draw Darts at 7:30 p.m.
Friday Fabulous Fish/Steak/Shrimp Dinner 5 to 7:30 p.m. In-
cludes burgers and sides
Karaoke Kat kicks off at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, July 21 Hawaiian Pig Roast 5 p.m.
Also Grilled Huli Huli Chicken, Hawaiian Cole Slaw and more sides
$6 for Adults and $3 for Children. Live Band following dinner.
Hoola Hoop Contest and Best Dress Contest
Sunday Sport Sunday
Bar Games begin at 3 p.m.
Wings from 3 to 6 p.m. 6 for $3 BBQ, Hot or Mild
And there is always Naked Wings!
We are the friendliest lodge! Enjoy some good family fun with us!

Thankful for special gift
On July 4 while most of us were will be used to maintain and
celebrating our independence, A improve the grounds.
Dr. Ott was giving thanks for The SouthShore com-
a very generous donation he j, inmunity is fortunate to have
received on this special day. ,-.- .,- one of the nicest dog
An individual who wishes parks anywhere. The
to remain anonymous gave park opened in Novem-
a $5,000 unrestricted gift ber of 2004 at 3rd Ave. SE
to the park. And perhaps and 21st St. SE and was
what makes the donation the first of its kind in the
even more special is that the area. It remains free to
individual who frequents the the public and receives
park on occasion and enjoys no government aid and
observing the happy playful dogs is supported solely through dona-
and their owners does not live in tions. Hours are from 7 a.m. until
the immediate area and does not sunset Thursday, Friday, Saturday
currently own a dog! The money and Sunday.



Southeast Windows & Glass, Inc.








..D -'Iii I





603 Hwy. 41 S Ruskin, FL
(Your local company for 30 years) Fax: 645-6964

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Thru August 31, 2012


BRANDON ORTHOPEDIC ASSOCIATES
EAST BAY SPORTS MEDICINE & ORTHOPEDICS
Board Certified Orthopedic Surgery
Sports Medicine Onsite Open MRI


22 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


JULY 12, 2012





OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 23


MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTOS
Beach erosion not just on the Gulf
While the Gulf beaches in Pinellas and Manatee counties made the
news for beach erosion in the wake of Tropical Storm Debby, Hills-
borough County beaches have suffered as well, although to a lessor
degree. At Simmons Park in Ruskin, significant beach erosion is
plainly visible through the roots of palm trees and numerous small
tree stumps. The area for sunbathers, however, remains largely un-
scathed and still an idyllic and quiet place to catch some rays on a
summer day. And, as a benefit, shelling on the South County coast
has been reported as excellent.


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Op&n rj{O&AG&

SThursday, July 19th
: 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
South Bay Hospital Main Lobby


Free skin cancer screening
S'ening,


refreshments, information and 9ea


Join us to celebrate the grand opening of the new
American Cancer Society Resource Center, located
inside of South Bay Hospital. The Resource Center
provides free wigs, prosthetics and resources for
those with cancer. For more information on this
event or to learn more about the Resource Center,
call 813-634-0396.


South Bay Hospital
Caring for You


Umria


JULY 12, 2012




24 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


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mT JULY 12, 2012



u N 0UR BACKYARD THE OBSERVER NEWS THE SCC OBSERVER THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT






"See the USA in your Chevrolet..."


Enitor'snmor"o' thot'he as" 't "r ...ha : t e:









oI VVAPPEN PEN cer ler N- f : r
-I : CA -oI "' "o '






S ee lansae changes fro green to

\Vee inAlmTUEDAY 220ime biown. Roads run arrow straight and you can see
' A/C it i 30ydo, NM it'9 O. ESDAY MA:Y, 2 20 tomorrow's weather coming over a table-top flat
/ n dswith landscape and mile after mile of highways are
Devoid of any other traffic. For this article, I'd like
(e e e- to offer a few hints on survival in these foreign
.- - -- ------ -- climes.


Out west, in those states with the square borders wheic
humidity levels generally run under 5%, be sure to
bring a supply of lip balm. Severely chapped lips can
very painful, especially when smiling. I say this from
nal experience. Also bring body lotion, eye drops,
screen and carry plenty of water. If traveling the higher
udes remember to bring a heavier jacket or sweater,
i in the height of summer. It can snow in Yellowstone
month of the year.
When starting out each day be sure to have a full tank of
&. You might find yourself on a road going through federal
ids, Native American reservations, pasture lands and
mountain passes where you can drive hour after hour without
passing a gas station or convenience store and at times, not
ven another car. It's not someplace you want to run out of
;as. And of course make sure your car is in top condition.
Leaving Carlsbad Caverns, with its awesome caves, we
headed west to White Sands and then into the New Mexico
desert. The only thing I didn't check out was my car's a/c. As
far as I knew a car's a/c either worked or it didn't. In the high
desert of New Mexico, with the outside temperature at 98
degrees and the wind blowing at 40-50 mph, my a/c died.
We had to resort to the old 470 AC/c; driving with 4
windows open at 70 mph. Of course conversation was
impossible and with a minor sand storm blowing outside, the
interior of the car started silting up. Oh well, that's one of
the "joys" of travel. But then the humidity was only 4%. You
really gain new respect for the pioneers who crossed this
land in their covered wagons.
If you are like so many people today who won't leave
home without your GPS be warned, they are not infallible.
When leaving the Interstate to take a more scenic route,
should your GPS direct you to leave a paved road and turn on
road, ignore it and use your better judgment or refer to a map.
In today's society, movies and television have been blamed
homogenizing our culture. Regional differences have suppose
been eliminated by the media. That's not entirely true. Along i
route of travel, the different cultures we encountered were am
In New Orleans, LA it was French architecture and cuisine an
American Blues. Santa Fe, NM is all about their Spanish and
Native American heritage. Jackson Hole, WY has some weste
and Native American thematic materials but it is mostly aboul
nature and the great outdoors. Regional foods, prepared locally
are always a treat.
The cities mentioned above will be covered more thoroughly
in future articles. In Cody, WY we intended to only spend on(
night and stayed for three. In the old days, Cody boasted 13
saloons and no houses of worship.
There is a great deal more to do and see there then we had
imagined. This is literally COWBOY TOWN USA. The
people live the cowboy culture. Local hero William Cody,
a/k/a Buffalo Bill, accomplished amazing things here,
especially public works. Did you know he was awarded
the Congressional Medal of Honor?
The Buffalo Bill Historical Museum is a must see
stop. There are four different wings representing the


A25, 2012 wd re
FRKY, k near A\amogor4do urine woreo
Wexw mio C, I/REN RESEN pHoTO


FRIDAY MAY 25, 2012
You Might have hoard of
New Mexico. Here i~ of the wildfire
south of Ala is a Photo of the s ky tb raging i2
wday before aorordo from the high w ken 2 days a
windoWs oten have been driving t*h Our A/C died the
The outside t"p os in the O,- j ,eoh the deset ith
4 -5 it' Pearab inthe high As /bC u ,t /ncar.
it b2oarabic e is( 2) C 3 but w a itiha of5of
Course with the windi n'ise tion i mini tis of
no" ng at speeds of 35 -50 ph. n this a ve
pe 5 e mph. ustshave


* ".4
,a r4


SUNDAY, MAY 27, 2012
Memorial weekend: view from our window at La Quinta in
Provo, UT.
4AlZe.-


WEl
It's
drink,
Hole
havi,
next
where
check
next


DNE5DAY, MAY 30, 2012
been quite a trip with still another moti to go.
k t night at the fiamou Cowrboy r ii Jtck o.
vvyomirn. is famous for, amonw oyir tiicsn
4 real saddles for basto' _0 other things,
to us who tod urbr too. Talking to the couple
o uy might r they were from Tampa. They asked
e They miht red emy articles ad I told them to
* out The Observer News. We'll be touring Yellowstone
two days then it' on to Cody, WY
&-


THURSDAY MAY 31, 2012
The A/C will probably stay broken until we get h e then
I will trade car in, after repairs. Car his really t hken I
beating. We've learned to a just to life without n a/ bt
then temps here are 30s to 60. We' ee how we can
hdle it getting back into the hot nd s hmid world.
sent from my iPhone


et .
y/.eare Te ee e. -i 't
Si o uch rentrips unlt
T '~~ t, ~ -if Uqh the/F


See SEE THE U.S.A., page 2B


7~1~ ;~J






2B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


See the USA


* Continued from page 1 B
area's past. The Cody Firearm
wing houses the most
comprehensive
assemblage of
American firearms
in the world.
The Winchester
Collection, the heart
of this museum,
was transported
from New Haven,
Connecticut, to Cody,
Wyoming, in 1975.
We drove for several
days through the high
deserts of New Mexico
and Utah. The terrain is
desolate until just south
of Arches National
Park. The Interstate
would have been a better
choice. The scenery
reminded me of driving
through the deserts of
the Middle East, except with 1
sand.
In the Middle East, small
isolated Bedouin camps pop
up in the most remote desolate
locations. So too do Native
American clusters of housing
campers. It was only when we
further into Utah and of course
Wyoming that the scenery tool
the grandeur for which this pa
the country is famous. And wl
magnificent scenery it is.
A requisite photo stop is the
Four Corners marker at the
confluence of Utah, New Mex
Arizona and Colorado. It's on
Navajo land. The marker is
surrounded by stalls in which
Navajos sell trinkets to tourist
Entry fee currently is $3pp.
Stop, take your photos, use the
restrooms and get on your wa'
In Yellowstone, we were tall
to a couple from England while


O\d EXitPh~>', YeiwAtn fl-


waiting for Old Faithful's
performance. They were raving
about the beauty of this country.
Having spent years on foreign
travel, we had to agree with these
Brits.
A trip to Yellowstone for most
people is all about seeing its star
performer. Old Faithful erupts on
the average of every 90 minutes
with a plume that reaches a height
of 145 feet for perhaps a couple of
minutes. I have to tell you though
that it is just a kid brother to its
less famous neighbor.
Just beyond Old Faithful in
the same viewing area is its
big brother Beehive. When this
geyser erupts, it goes off about
twice a day, it sends a column of
steam and water up 200 feet into
the air with an eruption lasting up
to five minutes and a roar that can
be heard a quarter mile away. The
major difference though is Old
Faithful's dependability. The Old


Faithful Inn is definitely worth
a visit and prices for lunches in
the main dining area are very
reasonable.
Almost every major National
Park has a visitor center offering
a wealth of information about
that facility. Don't just stop
in to buy a trinket and use the
restroom. Take advantage of
the exhibits and movies, if one
is offered. It will enrich your
visit.
Yellowstone National Park
is breathtaking. There is no
other way to describe it. The
scenery and terrain changes
every few miles. At almost
3.5 million acres (63 miles
north to south and 54 miles
east to west) the park is
larger than Rhode Island
and Delaware combined. Driving
through Yellowstone is not
something that can be hurried.
Maximum speed is 45 mph
with many areas being posted
at 35 mph or less. Visitors slow
down considerably or stop when
wildlife is visible or when herds
of bison amble slowly down the
middle of the road and pass just
feet from your car giving you
scant notice as you busily snap
away with your camera. When a
grizzly sighting is confirmed, just
park and forget about any forward
motion. Cars are abandoned as
motorists jockey for position with
cameras and binoculars.
Leaving the Yellowstone area
and returning to the low country,
where you are still more than a
mile above sea level, the scenery
changes completely. There are
still mountains to climb, but not
as high, and the terrain starts
changing to prairie and grass
lands. After traveling through


JULY 12, 2012


13 states, to this
point, I woke up
one morning and -
said to my wife, -
"What state are
we in?" It did
happen.
Ahead of us was
The Badlands,
Mt. Rushmore, '
Crazy Horse and
The Black Hills.
Then it would be
on to Denver to Morning pedestrians, Yellowstone.
get my a/c fixed
before driving
to Asheville,
NC and on to
the humidity of
Florida.
There will
be one more
installment of
this odyssey
before writing
individually
about the
major cities ..
in which we
stopped and
our stays at
5-star hotels
that are
members h.
of Historic c) dot
Hotels of
America.
I will not discuss the
look-alike, unremarkable chains
or the flea bags. Yes, we
experienced it all including THR A JUNE
sleeping in a tent and a 0URsDAY JUNE 5, 2012
sleeping in a tent and a Visited South Dakota adands today and
cabin with no running tomorrow we are off to Mt. Ruhmore &
water. /Crazy Horse before heading to Denver nd
hopeftly getting a/c fixed.

Watch for the next n y ettinnIxe,
installment in this series. ent


Patient Trust Comes First.


Fine surgeons. Skilled nurses. Conscientious support staff. This goes without
saying for Manatee Healthcare System. But what you find, at both Manatee
Memorial Hospital and Lakewood Ranch Medical Center, is a different approach
to surgery. The difference is called "patient confidence."

The caring, compassionate staff focuses on reducing patient anxiety. The surgery
staff explains processes and procedures and works to ensure patients are
comfortable and at ease.

Manatee Healthcare System understands how well patient confidence contributes
to successful outcomes.


For more information, please call 941.745.7545.


Manatee

Memorial Hospital
206 Second Street East
Bradenton, FL 34208
941.746.5111
www.manateememorial.com


Lakewood Ranch

Medical Center

8330 Lakewood Ranch Blvd.
Bradenton, FL 34202
941.782.2100
www.lakewoodranchmedicalcenter.com


Physicians are on the medical staff of Manatee Healthcare System, but, with limited exceptions, are independent practitioners who are not employees
or agents of Manatee Healthcare System. The hospitals shall not be liable for actions or treatments provided by physicians.


S .'', -- .-".
b'-


,-
....s~






JULY 12, 2012


Our nation's symbol soars in Florida


t W


^


ne bald eagle population is
increasing in Florida, which
continues to be one of the top
spots in the lower 48 states for
bald eagles to nest and raise their
young.
Based on its 2011 aerial survey,
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
estimates there are 1,457 active
bald eagle nests in Florida, nearly
a 9-percent increase since 2008,
when the state implemented a
bald eagle management plan.
Long-term success with bald
eagles in Florida is reflected in
the species' recovery from just 88
active nests in 1973.
Today at the Audubon Center
for Birds of Prey in Maitland,
leaders from the FWC and
Audubon Florida highlighted
the bald eagle's recovery and the
ongoing challenge of conserving
these large raptors. They said
celebrating the bald eagle's
resurgence in Florida was a
great way to kick off the nation's
236th anniversary of declaring
independence.
"Bald eagles have made a
remarkable recovery in Florida.
The FWC and Audubon are
working together to protect
bald eagles in Florida, so these
majestic raptors will continue to
soar as a symbol of national pride
and conservation success," said
FWC Chairman Kenneth Wright.
For 20 years, Audubon Florida
has recruited citizen-scientists
to monitor eagles and their nests
through its EagleWatch program,
active in more than 40 counties.


By monitoring
more than 20
percent of the state's
nesting pairs, these
volunteers make a
significant difference
in conserving the
species.
"Audubon is proud
to have played a role
in the bald eagle's
amazing success
story in Florida,"
said Eric Draper,
executive director
for Audubon Florida.
"Our dedicated staff
and EagleWatch
volunteers, along
with our state agency


partners, have helped
to identify potential
threats to these magnificent
birds and their nest sites, but our
work is far from done. Together,
we are leading the nation in the
protection of this important and
iconic species."
Working with ranchers and
other landowners to protect bald
eagle habitat is another priority
for Audubon, with its involvement
going back 50 years to the start of
the Cooperative Kissimmee Eagle
Sanctuary Program.
Florida's greatest concentrations
of bald eagle nesting territories
are clustered around coastal
and freshwater areas such as
the Kissimmee Chain of Lakes.
In 2011, Osceola and Polk
counties ranked first and second,
respectively, for highest number
of documented bald eagle nests.
Floridians and visitors are
encouraged to get outdoors on
patriotic holidays and throughout
the year to enjoy the state's many
parks and public lands and watch
bald eagles soar. You can find
a Bald Eagle Nest Locator at
MyFWC.com/Eagle.
Bald eagles almost disappeared
from the lower 48 states by
the mid-20th century, with an
estimated 417 pairs in the United
States in 1963. The use of the
now-banned pesticide DDT was
causing eggshells to weaken and
break under the weight of adults
incubating eggs.
Today, a healthy and stable
eagle population in Florida will
depend on continued availability
of appropriate nesting and


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 3B


At 10:30 a.m. on Saturday,
July 14, at John F Germany Li-
brary, 900 N. Ashley Drive in
Tampa,Congressman Sam Gibbons
and Judge John F Germany will
give a very special presentation
celebrating and sharing the history
of Tampa during their years of pub-
lic service. The longtime friends
will share how they met, and will
focus on events from the 1950s
and 1960s that changed Tampa.
Topics will include developments
in local education with the creation
of the University of South Florida
and the Headstart program, and de-
velopments in downtown Tampa,
such as the riverfront urban renew-
al project and the movement for
a new main library. Hillsborough
Television will record this histori-
cal event for the library's digital
history archive project, and it will
air this month on Bright House
channel 622, Verizon channel 22,
and on www.youtube.com/hills-
boroughcounty. Light refreshments


will be provided by the Friends of
the John F Germany Library.
Sam Gibbons was born in Tampa
in 1920, attended Henry B. Plant
High School, and graduated from
the University of Florida School of
Law to join four generations of his
family to practice law in Tampa.
He served in the Florida House
of Representatives from 1953 to
1958, and then in the Florida Sen-
ate from 1959 to 1962. Gibbons
was elected to the United States
House of Representatives in 1962
where he served until 1996. The
US Middle District Courthouse in
Tampa is named in his honor.
John F Germany was born in
1923, graduated from the Univer-
sity of Florida in 1944, and from
Harvard Law School in 1950. He
practiced law in Tampa for nine
years, and then served as a judge
for the Thirteenth Judicial Circuit
until 1966, when he became a part-
ner in Knight, Jones, Whitaker and
Germany (which later merged with


another firm to become Holland &
Knight). Germany has been a long-
time supporter of the Tampa-Hills-
borough County Public Library
System, and in 1999, Hillsborough
County named its main library at
900 N. Ashley Drive in Tampa in
his honor.
Tampa-Hillsborough County
Public Libraries will celebrate
their 100th Anniversary in 2014.
To prepare, the libraries have part-
nered with the Tampa Bay History
Center to present the Library His-
tory Roadshow. The Library His-
tory Roadshow will make stops
at library branches throughout
Hillsborough County over the next
several years gathering and docu-
menting the communities' library
memories, photographs and mem-
orabilia. For more information
about the Library History Road-
show, and to see photos and videos
of library memories and treasures,
visit http://thplhistoryroadshow.
blogspot.com or call 273-3652.


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foraging habitats, as well as
protection from disturbance
during the nesting season.
While the bald eagle is no
longer listed as an endangered or
threatened species, it is federally
protected under the Bald and
Golden Eagle Protection Act and
Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and by
state rule (F.A.C. 68A-16.002).
It is illegal to feed, disturb,
take or possess a bald eagle, its
feathers, nest or eggs.
The public can help conserve
bald eagles in Florida by
following state guidelines for
activities near eagle nests, and by
reporting new eagle nest locations
to BaldEagle@MyFWC.com.
The goal of the FWC bald eagle
management plan, developed
with public input, is to maintain
a stable or increasing bald eagle
population throughout Florida.
The FWC provides guidelines
for avoiding disturbance to PHOTOS COURTESY FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION (FWC)
nesting eagles, and a permitting EagleWatch program. The Center EagleWatch and Center for Birds
framework for activities that recently celebrated the 450th of Prey, visit http://fl.audubon.
cannot adhere to the guidelines. rehabilitated bald eagle released org/audubon-center-birds-prey.
Audubon's Center for Birds back into the wild since 1979. For information on volunteering
of Prey contributes to eagle For more on bald eagles, go to monitor eagles through
conservation through its to MyFWC.com/Eagle. For EagleWatch contact eaglewatch@
specialized clinical care and information on Audubon's audubon.org.



Notables share historical memories







4B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW

xArea Obituaries


Anne Maracissa
Cooley
Anne Maracissa Cooley, 83, of Bass
Ridge Dr, Blairsville, Georgia passed
away Friday, July 6, 2012 at Union
General Hospital following an extended
illness. She was born Feb. 28, 1929
in Floral City, FL to the late Basil
and Bessie Sweatt. Anne moved to
Blairsville 20 years ago from Ruskin, FL
and Augusta, GA. She was a member
of the Order of Eastern Star and the Girl
Scouts. Anne was preceded in death by
her husband, Glenn M. Cooley in 1989.
She was a member of the First United
Methodist Church of Union County.
Survivors include daughter, Glenda
C. Taylor and her husband, Bob
Taylor; son, Gene Cooley and friend
Nichole Attaway; brother, Dr. Basil
Owen Sweatt SR of Hammond, LA;
grandchildren, Ashley Taylor and friend
Brandon Collins, Colton Cooley and
Troy Cooley; special nieces, Carolyn
Henderson, Roynelle Simmonds,
Judy Pruvis, Arnelle Adcock, Carol
Monnier and Katheryn Sweatt, special
nephews, Dr. B. Owen Sweatt JR, and
Van Sweatt.
Funeral services were held Sunday,
July 8, 2012 at 3 p.m. at the First
United Methodist of Union County
with Rev. Bob Biberstine officiating.
Music was by Jeff Bauman and Keith
Defoor. Pallbearers were Ed Combs,
Bud Davis, Billy Eckstein SR, Charlie
Gluodenis, Carl Neuhaus and Paul
Pierson. Interment and graveside
services will be held on Thursday, July
12, 2012 at 11 am from the Ruskin
Cemetery in Ruskin, FL. The family will
receive friends at the church Sunday
from 2 until 3 p.m.
Mountain View Funeral Home
of Blairsville is in charge of the
arrangements. You may sign the family
guest book and send condolences
to the family on line at www.
mountainviewfuneralhome.com
Joan M.Weiss
Joan M.Weiss, 79, of Sun City Center,
passed away suddenly on Monday, July
2, 2012. Joan was preceded in death
by her husband, Raymond as well as
her parents, Joseph F. and Rozanna
Liska. She is survived by her brother,
Joseph J. Liska of Pittsburgh, PA; also
a nephew, Joseph M. Liska of Hawaii;
two nieces, Susan Coleman and Janice
Walker of Pittsburgh; great-nephews;
a great-niece; and many loving family
members and friends. Joan was born in
Pittsburgh, PA and moved to Sun City
Center 21 years ago. She was active
in Eastern Star, Shriners, Caloosa
Country Club, The "Purple Butterflies"
Red Hats and an avid card and bridge
player. A memorial service was held
on July 10 at 11 a.m. at the United
Methodist Church of SCC. A reception
at Creason Hall, on the church grounds,
followed the services. In lieu of flowers,
donations can be made to a Shriners
Children's Hospital or contributions
in Joan's memory to a charity of your
choice.


Visit us on
the Web





www.ObserverNews.net


'ER JULY 12, 2012





Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (behind Suntrust Bank)
.. ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: Nov. April .................. 8:30 a.m. Day Care Available
Mon. Fri.
Rev. Richard Nussel and All Year...............10:45 a.m. 6am -6p.m.
SPhone: 645-1241 Sunday School............ 9:30 a.m. call 645-6198


ci




Rev. Dr. Louis D. Leone
Rev. Dr. Louis D. Leone returns
The United Community Church, 1501 La Jolla Avenue, warmly wel-
comes the return of Reverend Dr. Louis D. Leone as Interim Senior Min-
ister. Dr. Leone served the church from 1997 as Associate Pastor and
Pastoral Counselor until his retirement in 2009.
Lou and his wife Barbara reside in Sun City Center. Their son, Peter,
is in the military and has served four tours in Afghanistan. Peter and
his wife Dawn live in Fayetteville, N.C. with their two sons who are
the pride and joy of the family. Lenoir, N.C. is home to daughter, Jen-
nifer who is employed as a Medical Staff Analyst at Taldwell Memorial
Hospital.
United Community Church is a caring church, united in God's love
serving others. This thought is very special to Dr. Leone. His sermons
reflect a genuine love of community and the church family.
Wherever you are on life's journey of your faith, you are invited and
will be welcomed at 10 a.m. on Sunday morning where fellowship, shar-
ing and Christian love is central.


From left to right: Clare Fenney, Bill Barker and Harry Friedenreich
Father's Day celebrated
Father's Day is always a special event at the United Community
Church, 1501 La Jolla Avenue. The morning message, music, decora-
tions, and joy were reflected on this wonderful day.


Members and guests of The Women's Chorus took advantage of a
summer rehearsal and got a tremendous "jump-start" on music for
their Christmas Concert.

There's still time
OK, so you missed the first of three Women's Chorus summer rehears-
als. Good news! There's still time to join the chorus for the second and
third summer rehearsal on July 12 and August 16.
Attend for one or both at St. Andrew Presbyterian Church, 1239 Del
Webb Blvd. W., Sun City Center from 9 11:00 a.m. You do not have to
reside in Sun City Center or Kings Point to attend. All are welcome.
For more information, call Chris at 813-634-4341.

Sound The Shofar to meet
Sound The Shofar will meet at 2 p.m. on Sunday, July 15 in the South
Shore Library. The Library is located at 15816 Beth Shields Way in
Ruskin. Pastor David Jones, of Ruach Ministries in Brandon, will con-
tinue presenting "Hebraic Roots of the Christian Faith." There will be a
time of worship in song and dance. Everyone is welcome to attend.
For more information, call Pastor David at 813-477-1517.


S riencship SB ptist Church Sunday WEEKLY SERVICES:
Ai4 Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist) 9 a.m ................. Bible Study
.1511 El Rancho Dr. 11a.m .................... Bible Study
Sun Ciy Cener, FL 33573 10 a.m. & 6 p.m............Worship
Sun City Center, FL 33573
I Phone/Fax: Wednesday
813-633-5950 6 p.m. ...Prayer Meeting/Bible Study


,!Ruskin oursquare le& c/h
Building Community Thru God's Love
106 7th Ave. N.W. 10 a.m. Sunday School
Ruskin, FL 33570 11 a.m. Worship Service s
N. Blanton (813) 309-3558 7 p.m. Wed. Bible Study ss,,s \,


REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd. Sun City Center, FL 33573-5354
SRev. Dr. Peter Stiller, Pastor
Iz Telephone:813-634-1292 Website:sccredeemer.org
Worship Services on Sunday 9:30 & 11:15 am.
Holy Communion First & Third Sunday Bible Class Thursday 10 a.m., Guests Welcome



Unity"""""""
Spirituality Rather Than "Religion"
Henry Gibson Social Hall, Beth Israel Synagogue Sunday Service 10:30 a.m.
1115 Del Webb E. Sun City Center, FL
www.unitycommun ityofjoy.com 813-298-7745

First Baptist Church of Gibsonton
"We love because He first loed us." 1 John 4:19
Traditional Worship Service *Sunda) School 9:30 A.M.
Old-Time Gospel Hymns "Morning %onrhip 10:30A.M. 1
Nursery Available Sunday Evening 6:00 P.M. l
*Interpreter for the Deaf Mid-Week (Wed.) 7:00 P.M.
9912 Indiana St. Hwy 41 & Estelle Aenue Malcolm S. Clementls Paslor
Gibsonton, FL 33534 813-677-1301

Prince of Peace Masses:
C Sunday ..........8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., Noon
Catholic Church Saturday Vigil.............................4:00 p.m.
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573 Daily..........................................8:00 a.m.
Phone: 634-2328 Fax: 633-6670 Confessions:
www.popcc.org Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m. and Sat. 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.

N Sunday School (all ages)........ 9:30 a.m.
NO R HSIDE Sunday Morning Worship.... 10:45 a.m.
SBAPTIST C HCH Sunday Evening Worship....... 6:00 p.m. SBC
"Loving God Loving Others Wednesday (all ages) ............. 6:30 p.m.
Loving God, Loving Others,
Serving Beyond Borders" Dr Samuel (Sam) A. Roach, Pastor
1301 U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL 645-1121 www.nbcor.org

UNITED COMMUNITY CHURCH United Church of Christ
1501 La Jolla Ave., Sun City Center, FL 33573-5329
SA Caring Church United in God's Love Serving Our Community
ALL ARE WELCOME!
Rev. Dr. Louis D. Leone Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
(813) 634-1304 www.uccinscc.org

&WaCom EVERETT TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ
1611 First St. SW Ruskin, FL 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL--
SERVICES: Sunday........................9:30 & 10:30 a.m.; 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday................7:00 p.m. -..

CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH
S Sunday Worship: Blended 8:00 a.m.
yPr d Contemporary 9:40 a.m. .i--flaA
Nursery Provided |1
Pastor Jack R. Palzer Traditional 11:15 a.m.
5309 U.S. Highway 41 North Apollo Beach
(acrossromMiraBay) www.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1305


The United Methodist Church of Sun City Center
1210 Del Webb Blvd West 634-2539
http//www.sccumc.com
Come 4 Belong WORSHIP SERVICES:
Grow I Serve SUNDAY
Ihr Ie rdMedhoedL 0(.11.h 8:15 a.m ....................... Sanctuary (Communion Service)
Q-11 .. rr 14esiul ..fld)


Advertise in the Observer News, a trusted publication for
over 60 years.
813-645-3111


: Ib a.m .................. .reason Hall (Oasis contemporary)
10:55 a.m.........Sanctuary (Traditional with Choir & Bells)
11:00 a.m............................... ... Bilingual
4:00 p.m ..................................... ........... Casual
Pastor: Dr. Warren Langer
Pastor: Dr. Daniel White


Bookstore 633-8595






JULY 12, 2012




Spiritual Leader l o fhs t
Rev. Sue Meixner o Sunday Service 11:00 a.m.
Rev. Sue Mexner Sun City Center
813-362-0806 C : Chamber of Commerce
sue@alterways.com .*4 1651 Sun City Center Plaza
New Thought ChurchReligious Science/SOM


FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO SERVICES AT OUR NEW LOCATION
1707 33rd Street SE, SCC/Ruskin 813-938-4955
10:30 a.m. SUNDAYS
NO CREED...BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE
Minister DR. DAVID CAMPBELL


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 5B


Pictured (left to right) are Mikayla Wiles, Stella Hering, instructor
Thessa Sollenberger, Alyvia Wiles, Taylor Curtis, and Rebecca Cer-
rato.

New Youth Group Established
Four junior high and high school girls met recently at St. Andrew Pres-
byterian Church in Sun City Center, to attend the first meeting of the
church's new Youth Group. The leaders had been planning to hold meet-
ings once a month, but the group, which is for boys as well as girls, had
such a fun time that they voted to meet weekly.
Thessa Sollenberger showed the girls how to make "flip-flop" (shoe)
greeting cards. The girls decorated and embellished the cards. In addi-
tion to crafting, the girls discussed the influence of television on Chris-
tian teenagers. This discussion was led by Bobbi Curtis, the adult leader
of the group.
Other area youth are encouraged to join the group, which meets week-
ly. Membership in church is not required. At the next meeting the group
will make their lunch PIZZA! St. Andrew is located at 1239 Del Webb
Boulevard West. For more information, call Bobbi Curtis at 813-633-
8582.


Southside Baptist Church
"A Warm, Loving & Friendly Church"
Looking for a church home?
Need the comfort of a warm and loving family?
Join us on Sunday to come home to the warmth of our church family.
Located in South Hillsborough County, just south of Stephens Road in old Sun City.
4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 S Sun City, FL 33586 813-645-4085


"Getting to KnowYou" (Donuts & Coffee) ....................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ..................... ....................... 9:30 am.
Sunday Morning Worship ............................................ 10:55 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service..............................................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service ..........................................7:00 p.m.
Thursday Morning Prayer............................................ 10:00 a.m.


Dan Collis, Pastor
Come join us to
learn about God's
Word and salvation
in Jesus Christ


First Church of Christ, Scientist
204 2nd St. N.W. Ruskin, FL 33570 (813) 645-6102
Christian Science Heals
Sunday Service.......................... ... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................................................. 10:00 a.m .
Wednesday Service............................................. 5:00 p.m.
Reading Room......................... Wednesday 4 to 4:45 p.m.
All Are Welcome



SSt. Andrew Presbyterian Church
Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.
Contemporary Service 11:00 a.m.
Prayers with anointing for healing and wholeness
during worship the second Sunday of every month.
ministry Pastor: Rev. Dr. Mark E. Salmon
Church Meet friends in Fellowship Hall between Services.

a Refreshments served.


1239 Del Webb Blvd. West
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Church is Handicap accessible


Phone: 813-634-1252
For information visit:
www.standrewatscc.org


Proud to be Americans
J.A.M. (Jesus and Me) Children's Show Choir opened the annual
"Faith and Freedom Cantata" at the United Methodist Church of Sun
City Center with a stirring rendition of "You're a Grand Old Flag." The
Cantata featured the church's fine Chancel Choir as well as their Bellis-
sima handbell ensemble, organ and brass ensemble. Narrators for the
service were Julian and Linda Graham and soloists included Amanda
Jordan and JoAnne Podgurski.
The United Methodist Church is in the midst of construction of a new
ministry building, the Life Enrichment Center, that should be completed
by the end of the year. For information about this and other events and
activities at the United Methodist Church of Sun City Center, contact
Jeff Jordan, Minister of Worship Arts, at 813-634-2539. To learn more
about the United Methodist Church of Sun City center, visit their website
at www.sccumc.com.

Time to be amazed
Vaughn Street Bible Church will be featuring the Amazing Wonders
Aviation theme for their Vacation Bible School which will be held night-
ly from 6:30 p.m. 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, July 23 July 27.
Kids of all ages are welcome to attend. This event is free and will include
Bible lessons, snacks, crafts, games and more.
For more information call (813) 677 1189 or email, pastorrobertda-
vis@yahoo.com or go to their web site at www.vaughnstreetbiblechurch.
com


Tw Saturday Night Service
WE NOW OFFER 3 SERVICES:
Saturday Night Service: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Services: 9:00 & 11:00 a.m.

SOUTH BAY CHURCH
13498 US 301 S. Riverview, FL 33578 677-0721
www.southbay.cc Pastor: David Speicher U1
Visit SouthBay.cc for details on Celebrate Recovery Training; Youth/Kids Summer Camp; much more




CHURCH
Come and experience the power of
Jesus to change your life.
Sunday @ 9 & 11 AM Servicio en Espafiol @ 6 PM

www.aplace4everyone.org

2322 11th Ave. SE Ruskin, FL 813.645.3337


Kids from
Northside Baptist
Church enjoy


camp
During the week of June 25,
Northside Baptist Church ofRuskin
sent eight 3rd through 6th graders
to CentriKid Camp at Eckerd Col-
lege in St. Pete. This camp was
staffed by college and seminary
students who were anxious to hang
out with the kids and share Christ
through every aspect of camp. The
children were taught about mis-
sionaries and serving God as well
as "foot praise," (dance?) drama
and music. Outside activities in-
cluded baseball, archery and some-
thing called OMC or "organized
mass chaos!" There was time for
learning and fun along with some
time for bonding between students
and group leaders. Prayer time
helped the children focus on others
and their needs. Among the things
they said they were grateful for
were: learning about missionaries,
quality time with their leaders and
fun with friends.


&id (:t/ze/ GCa[61k0hi CAu fA
SouthShore: Apollo Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton
U.S. Hwy. 41
106 11th Ave. NE
-A," .- --" -.- "Ruskin
S9 813-645-1714
..-:I SaintAnneRuskin.org
Very Rev. John F. McEvoy, VF.
( MASSES
Vigil M ass .................................................................Saturday 5:00 p.m .
Sunday Mass........8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. (Contemporary)
M onday thru Friday .................................................................... 8:00 a.m .
Holy Days ....................................... Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Espatiol .....................................Domingo 12:30 p.m.; Jueves 7:00 p.m.
Confession......................... Thursday 6:15 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.





6B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Financing
Financing** +


TOYOTA
ofLakewood


DOWN +


TOYOTA
THE 3


ONE
SALES EVENT
Payments
For i
90 Daystt ...E


*12 Month /12,000 Mile Comprehensive Warranty from Date of Purchase.
* 7 Year /100,000 Mile Limited Power Train Warranty
* Rental Car Allowance


* 1 Year Unlimited Roadside Assistance from Date of PurchaseN
* 160 Point Quality Assurance Inspection (174 Point for Hybrids)
* CARFAX Vehicle History Report.
- 0w II


ed 'L 69)M '98 44 .1I9,9.94_1 y1,3d
S5-SpeeLow l-wn Miles! 10wner! Comfortable& Roomy! Sunmoo! Clean Car Auto, PowerSeat, Only 117K! Lealer,Sunroof,P/Seat! 3 ,AutoA/C23 wMiles 27L,A sP/ P/L 4-Cyl 3n Row Seating, P/Seat
*All Leases are for 36 months with $999 due at signing and SO security deposit. 12,000 miles per year, 18i per mile thereafter. With approved credit. "With approved credit for a limited term. iWith approved credit for well-qualified buyers. ttWith approved credit for well-qualified buyers. Interest
accrues from date of purchase. See dealer for complete details. tMust qualify for Dealer Conquest Cash program and trade-in a non-Toyota/Scion towards the purchase of a new 2012 Toyota Camry (gas only) or 2012 Toyota Prius (excludes V & C). All offers exclude tax, tag, title, registration and
include dealer fees. All prices on in stock units only, all vehicles are subject to prior sale. Offers cannot be combined. Photos are for illustration purposes only. See dealer for details. Gettel Certified Plus vehicles are 2003 or newer with 90k miles or less. Offers expire end of day 7/15/12.


5959 E SR64 Bradenton
(TOYO TOn SR64 Just Seconds West of 1-75, Exit 220
1 -877-248-3893
of La kewood Monday Friday 8:30am-Bpm Saturday 8:30am-7pm Sunday Noon-5pm


A GettlAutomotve Deaershi


I I I I Ti.I r I .I..c


When you purchase or lease a new Toyota, get


Includes Oil Changes & Major Services
Covers normal factory scheduled service for 2 years or 25K miles, whichever comes first. The new vehicle cannot be part of a
rental or commercial fleet. See participating dealer for complete plan details. Valid only in the continental United States and Alaska.


WMAI VA-=VlRI-JF.'IL li I I ; I I I q w i 0
I R A I A M.- R A 11- ^4 1w, a


I A M KA 1 -


RAND NEW L RIB r
012 TOYOTA


(-eT^^^^^^Y ^^^
CERTIFIED^


oil


JULY 12, 2012







JUY12202TESOPR*B


aTHE SHOPPER
TO place an ad callTHE SHO
813.645.3111 ext. 201


Fax: 813.645.1792
$17.00
up to 20 words
300 addl. word
Deadline is Monday
at 4pm


-A LA, 11S-SI II1_1 M17)- I lMI.IAIES1*I

M & M Printing Co., Inc
weekly publisher of the
The Observer News, The SCC Observer and The Riverview Current
210 Woodland Estates Ave., SW
Ruskin, Florida 33570


100 Announcements
200 Farmer's Mkt
300 Merchandise
400 Marine
450 Transportation
500 Real Estate
550 Manuf. Housing
600 Rentals
650 Prof. Services
700 Services
800 Employment


105 PERSONAL



Problems? NeedAdvice?
Areyou worried or troubled?
ConfusedLost? &7 '.
One visit will change yourlife. \
Palm Readings & '^-


Tarot Card Readings
(813) 300-3325
Ruskin


115 LOST & FOUND
Gray and white male cat lost in Re-
naissance area. Reward. Call 813-
938-5965 or 1-443-618-4431.

Lost car key that was in container
in vicinity of East Shell Point Rd. &
1st St NE. or anywhere Reward
813-541-2507





280 PETS

Vicky's Pet Boutique
All Breed Dog Grooming

STuesday-Saturday
8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Closed Monday

38 years experience

(813) 641-9155
209 2nd St. N.W., Ruskin






310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Almost New Thrift Store. 10008
Indiana St., Gibsonton (1 block off
US 41, 1 block north Gibsonton
Dr.,) Wednesday through Saturday,
9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture, lots
misc. Ministry First Baptist Gibson-
ton. 813-671-0036 to donate


W 4
1
Ist St S.W.

THRIFT
STORE


310 GARAGE/YARD SALES

j Cafvary's
y naen ttic
u Thrift Store
Wednesday, Friday
& Saturday
9 a.m. Noon
Coupon Sale
Bring in coupon for 25% off
entire purchase.
Excludes furniture and appliances.
Plus, the secret sale
1424 E. College Ave. Ruskin
813-641-7790
z/n1sr9 c alvarzr Lutheran Church


Moving sale. 8am-3pm. Friday, July
13 & 8am-4pm. Saturday July 14.
7310 Guilford Pine Way, Covington
Park, Apollo Beach. Formal dining
room set, all pictures, accessories &
china. 55" Mitsubishi HD TV, 1080P.
included Yamaha tuner, DVD play-
er, surround sound speakers.
Queen size bedroom ensemble w/
pastel shells, pictures, bench, etc.
10ft silk palm tree, beautiful pottery,
vases, Fat Chef pieces, (2) curio
cabinets & collectibles. 7ft preflight
Christmas tree & other decorations.
Garage cabinets, patio furniture,
large upright Frigidaire commercial
freezer, Amana refrigerator/ bottom
freezer. Don't miss this sale.

Large multi family garage sale. Sat-
urday, July 14, 8am-noon. Summer-
field Crossing Club House Estates,
11720 Stonewood Gate Dr.

Garage sale. July 13,14, 8am-4pm.
Electronics, stereo equipment,
scooter, clothes, boat & misc. 811
Greenview Dr., Golf & Sea Village,
Apollo Beach.

Moving sale. Friday, July 13, 8am-?
710 Fox Hills Dr., SCC. Lift chair,
scooter, transfer chairs, furniture &
misc. items.

Garage sale. SCC. 810 El Rancho
Dr. Nice women clothes small to
medium. Household items, misc.
7/12, 13, 14. 8am-?

2 family sale. 7/13 & 7/14, 8am-?
Electronics, video games, misc.
household items, Carousel horse.
6324 Florida Circle West, Apollo
Beach.

Please Recycle This Paper


310 GARAGE/YARD SALES
Garage sale. 1007 El Rancho Dr.,
SCC. July 14, 8am-lpm. Kitchen
items, books, furniture, tools, patio
set & more.

208 7th Ave., NW, Ruskin. Friday,
Saturday 8am-? Tools, clothes,
household items & much more. All
priced to sell.

312 ESTATE SALES


I a


1945 East View Dr.
(Caloosa Country Club
Pebble Beach N. to Caloosa)
SPARK ON SIDE OF SALE ONLY *
July 13 & 14
7:30am-1 pm
Sleep Sofa, Coffee, 2 End Tables,
2 Fabric Swivel Rockers, Leather
Chair & Ottoman (Recliner), JUKE
BOX, PINBALL MACHINE &
SLOT MACHINE, 6'x7'
Free-Standing Bar (Dark Wood),
Bar Stools, Hitchcock Chair,
2 Oriental Arm & Side Chairs, 2
Oriental End Tables, Dolphin Glass
Top Table, Kitchen Table, 6 Chairs,
2 Double Bookcases, 5-Piece Black
Entertainment & Curio Center,
Couch & Loveseat, Large Fire King
& Rooster Collection, Lane Queen
Suite (Bamboo, Light), Office
Chair, Large Cuckoo Clock, Brown
Wicker Chest, Stack Tables, Porch
(Wicker) Furniture, TV Tables,
Long Bench, Signed Animal Prints
(Large), Lamps, Dishes, Small
Appliances, Books, Linens, Green
Glass Dish Collection.
508-0307 or 633-1173











Attention TOOL Lovers!!
This is the Sale for You!
Contents include: GRIZZLY Sawdust
Collecting System, Band Saw, Drill
Press, Combo Sander w/Stand, Bench
Combo Sander, Table Saw w/Rolling
Stand, Delta Bench Band Saw, Rigid
Spindle Sander, Craftsman 30-Gallon
Air Compressor, Chop Saws
(Wood/Metal), tons more Hand &
Power Tools, Archery & Hunting Gear,
Jon Boat, Frigidaire Chest Freezer,
Sectional Sofa, Entrance Table,
Bamboo/Rattan Recliners, Beautiful
5-pc. Cherry Entertainment Center,
Dale TIFFANY Floor & Table Lamps,
Pink La-Z-Boy Recliners, Catnapper
Recliner, Nice Green/Aqua Sleeper
Sofa, Wicker Table w/Chairs, Cream
Buffet, White Kitchen Set, Bedroom
Furniture, TVs, Office Desk
w/Bookcases, Oriental Cabinet
w/Mother of Pearl Inlay, Thomas Cairn
Gnomes, Kitchenware, Home Decor,
Big Beautiful House FULL Of
Treasures, Something for Everyone!
Too Much to List
PLEASE PARK ON SIDE OF SALE
DUE To EMERGENCY VEHICLES.
See You There!
Check out our web site
observernews.net


312 ESTATE SALES


Anne's Estate Sales :'





Furniture: Kenmore Refrigerator,
like new, Queen Bedroom Suites,
Leather Sofa w/Incliners & Sleeper,
Buffet w/Mirror, Dining Room
Table w/Chairs & Matching China
Cabinet, Sofa, White Wicker Patio
Set, Recliners, Entertainment Center,
Dinette Table w/Chairs, Bar Stools,
Swivel Rockers, Bedroom Chest,
Server, Sofa Sleeper, Stacked Tables;
Collectibles: Orientals, Cameras,
Jewelry Vintage & Costume,
Artwork; Misc.: Gas Grill, Laptop
Computers, Tools, Ladders, Lots of
Household, Kitchen & Misc. Items.
www.AnnesEstateSales.blogspot.com


AAA Furniture
New & Gently Used Furniture

BUY & SELL
Daily Trips to SCC


Mon.-Sat.
9 a.m.-5 p.m.


S


6819 U.S. 301 5., Riverview
(813)677-8180








Let us get done in one day
what it takes the other
guys a week to do.
We will pack-up and
pick-up one room or the
entire house for a QUICK,
PROFITABLE, TROUBLE-
FREE EXPERIENCE.
CALL
BUTTERFIELD 'S
AUCTIONS


&


www.ButterfieldsAuctions.com
Butterfield Auctions AB2706/AU3549




NETTIE'

ESTATE


S741-0225

Personalized
1 Service


312 ESTATE SALES





Dealei in Gold & Silrei Coins
Domestic & Foreign
U.S. Paper Money WANTED (SmallorLarge)
Foreign Currency WANTED
BUYING SILVER COINS
Paying depending on the
market at time of purchase
APPRAISALS GIVEN
Watch out for Counterfeit Coins
now being sold & circulated in this area
Call for private consultation or appointment.
All transactions are strictly confidential.
(813) 634-3816
cell (813) 503-4189
"Yourlocaldealerforover 20years"


314 ANTIQUES/COLLECTIBLE
For sale. 25 Hummel plates with
original boxes. Complete set $2,750.
Call 813-642-8740

330 FURNITURE
Furniture: Solid oak roll top desk
& chair, like new. $200. 813-419-
4391, SCC

336 TV, STEREO, RADIO
For sale. 65" Toshiba TV. $300
813-545-3696 Serious inquiries
only.

360 GOLF CARTS
Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade.
Chargers, parts all related. Ronny's
Carts & Parts. 813-484-9855 or
813-645-4515

2002 Easy Go, rain curtain pack-
age. Brand new batteries & tires.
Built-in cooler. Like new condition,
very low hours. $2,300. 813-419-
4027 or 860-637-6348

390 MISC. FOR SALE
Printers for sale: HP Photosmart
color ink jet, $40 Cannon Pixma
color ink jet, $35. Call 813-634-
6665

Hunting for
a place to live?
Check out the
600 RENTAL Section





425 SLIPS OR STORAGE
South Bay RV & Boat Storage.
Specializing in outside storage for
RVs, boats & trailers. 813-677-2000
www.SouthBayStorage.com

Storage
Ramey's Business Park
Dollar a day. RV & boat storage &
heavy equipment. Water & electric
hookup, 1/4 mile from Williams
Park boat ramp. Also RV lots
available. 813-310-1888, 813-690-
1836, 813-849-1469,


"' THRIFT STORE
OPEN: Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 8 a.m. 3 p.m.
Saturdoq 8 a.m. 12 p.m.
1009 1st. Street S.W.


s.R.674 E We Have
Furniture, Too!
DONATION DROP OFFS
TUES. THRU FRI. ONLY PLEASE,
ALL DONATIONS MUST BE IN CLEAN
5 USEABLE CONDITION.


U U


THE SHOPPER 7B


JULY 12. 2012


L (813
878'-27001


[
$10
SPECIAL







8B THE SHOPPER
435 PARTS/SERVICE

Summer Special
10% off all parts & service now
through Aug 31. Alafia Marine,
6128 Lewis Ave., Gibsonton. 813-
671-BOAT (2628)


-71


458 PARTS & SERVICE
m! alnplnm i*B umunlulmlinulmlW^ ipumall? wmuimma
*WANTED*
DEAD OR ALIVE

Cars, Trucks, Vans, SUVs, i
Farm Trucks & Equipment

WE PAY CASH
7 DAYS A WEEK '
, Go Green Auto Recycling '
(813) 247-5865
5120 36th Avenue S.
Tampa, FL 33619
ill i







t I\hy drive 20 miles for !
your printing?
We are the local
source for
S business cards, I
I letterhead, invoices, post-
I ers, tickets, etc..... Your I
I neighborhood printer. I

I'I IPrinting Company, Inc.
IEstfob hedln. 198 .. ... I
S210 IWdila/d Estate Ave., I
I Ruskin, FI I


813-645-4048
- - - -


I
-J


511 HOUSES FOR SALE

PERFECTLY MAINTAINED 2BR/2BA
MANUFACTURED HOME ON ITS OWN LOT:
Large open living area, bright kitchen, inside
utility, walk-in closets in both BRs, enclosed lanai,
and a fabulous 12x24 attached workshop/shed
OFF CARPORT Close to golf course,
no HOAfees $59,900.
MODERN SPACIOUS 3BR/2BA
MANUFACTURED HOME on half acre
corner lot Split BR plan, huge MBR & MBA,
walk-in closet, fabulous huge kitchen with island,
pantry and lots of cabinets, fireplace in living-rm,
large inside utility 2-car carport, shed and
detached boat/RV port No HOA, no flood
insurance needed $86,900.
MOST AFFORDABLE MOBILE-HOME!
2BR/1 5BA singlewide, split plan, large screened
porch, double roof, utility shed, carport, 4 years
new CHA Nice own lot, no HOA $31,900.

Claire DICKMAN
Tort REALTYo
CELL:
(813) 363-7250


SIERRA (1550 sq, ft.) 2BR/2BA, GARAGE, oak
floors, in Greenbriar .................. ..... $129,000
2BR/2BA with enclosed lanai, close to Clubhouse,
2 to choose from.. from $17,500 to $20,000
2BR/2BA in KNOLLS 1I. i h. .. ,ii....1
FURNISHED, updated............................ $57,900
RENTALS
2BR/2BA furnished,
enclosed lanai........................ $700 per month
2BR/2BA, double garage
HOME in SCC......................... $975 per month




m^ESW

554 PARK MODELS

1988 Part model in Hidden River
Resort, Riverview. Very good condi-
tion, new kitchen, roof, heat pump,
windows. Nice lot. 813-374-5469


CALL
PauIAB. (813) 645-3211
DICKMAN
.M AINC Serving South Hillsborough
R E A LTY County since 1924
Celebrating 88 Years www.dickmanrealty.com
1924 2012 dickman@tampabay.rr.com
WATERFRONT TOWNHOME!! NEED SPACE FOR YOUR 65' BOAT? This townhouse at Bahia
Beach offers just that as well as beautiful sunrises and the fun of watching the manatees and
birds play. 2BR/2BA completely re-done including painting and new carpet. Only 9 units in this
cozy community and only townhomes with private docks. Balcony and sundeck. Corner unit on
a cul-de-sac. $204.900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
NEW COMMERCIAL LISTING APOLLO BEACH: Great retail location on Apollo Beach
Blvd. Special features include: 1890 sq. ft., built in 2006, track lighting, small utility kitchen,
handicap bath, alarm system with digital cameras, free standing custom built showcases with
glass tops, shelving, mahogany wood trim, loads of storage. $224,900 CALL KAY PYE
361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
OVER 6 ACRES of beautiful secluded, wooded acreage, one-of-a-kind waterfront view.
Property has M/M, well & septic. Two folio numbers. 165 FT. RIVER FRONT. $249,900 CALL
KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
NEW LISTING IN CARIBBEAN ISLES IN APOLLO BEACH! Very well maintained 3BR/2BA
MH in gated waterfront community. Special features include: nice open floor plan with split
bedrooms, extra large kitchen with tons of cabinets, wet bar, new insulated windows, new
flooring & carpet, remodeled bathrooms, workshop, fruit trees and much more! $82,000
CALL ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
A HOUSE AND A WORKING PLACE IN RUSKIN: zoned CG, property offers 1 acre lot in
residential area, close to major Hwy, 2BR+Den (3rd BR), 2.5BA and 4 large attached offices,
2,600 sq. ft. total. Inside utility rm, screened porch, remodeled kitchen, beautiful wood floors,
fireplace, and detached 2-car garage and carport are other great features of property.
$219,000 CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
RUSKIN ACREAGE AND 2 MOBILE-HOMES: 2.30 acre lot, representing 2 parcels and 2
folio numbers, cleared with few shady trees and a very nice pond full of fish. First M/Home is
2BR/2BA, second M/H is 2BR/1BA, both in good condition, with large screened porch,
peaceful secluded area, not in flood zone, no HOA. $89,900 CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
NICE 2BR/2BA DOUBLEWIDE ON OWN LOT: Large MBR & MBA, "L" shaped living/dining
room with built-in china cabinet, glass enclosed addition, carport, utility shed. No HOA, not in
flood zone. $49,900 CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
IDEAL SITUATION. Waterfront acreage now owned by motivated mortgage holder not
interested in being land owner. Beautiful tropical setting on Little Manatee that would be
perfect new home setting or opportunity for development. $234,900. Also foreclosed 14+
acres near 1-75 priced below appraised value and at a fraction of previous sales price. Now
only $144,500 and seeking offer. CALL JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
PRICE REDUCED NEARLY 23% AND yearning for bargain hunter to see potential. 3BR/2BA
on over a third acre in convenient Ruskin location. Are you up for a creative challenge?? Now
only $50,000 CALL JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
PRICED TO PLEASE! Tastefully decorated 3BR/2BA/2CG pool home in desirable commu-
nity with deed restrictions to protect property values, but no CDD fees! Needs a little TLC but
mostly cosmetic. Just under 2000 sq. ft. of living area but feels larger. Take advantage of this
great buy! Only $159,000 CALL JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540.
NEW ON THE MARKET -- WATERFRONT LOT -- BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME!! Beautiful
building lot ready for the home of your dreams located on a wide canal with no bridges to the
bay, sailboat water. Lot size is 80x131 mol with county water and sewer available. Seawall in
place & no homeowner association, so no extra fees. Best price for great waterfront in the
area! $88,000 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
CALL US FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS .......645-3211
Donate your old functioning cell phones and drop off at our
office for use by the "Victims Assistance Program."


(Evening phone numbers)
Judy Erickson ..................... 468-0288
Claire Tort ......................... 363-7250
Kay Pye .............................. 361-3672
Cathy Griggs ..................... 391-8653


Christine Nethers ............... 260-6335
Roxanne Westbrook............... 748-2201
Jo Ellen Mobley................ ... 645-1540
LaRae Regis..................... .... 633-8318
Joanie Cooper........................ 480-2428


554 PARK MODELS

Park model 35'x12' with 28'x10 en-
closed room. 1 bedroom,. 1 bath.
stove, refrigerator, washer, dryer,
furniture, storage shed, landscaped,
beside pond. 55+ park along the
Manatee river. Move-in ready. 573-
421-6860


565 M.H. IN PARKS


One bedroom mobile home in wa-
terfront park with dock. Corner lot
with view of river. No pets $5,000.
Call for info. 813-645-2446

Beautiful 12x65 singlewide
$12,500 cash, slightly negotiable.
2br/2ba, laundry & computer
rooms. Carport, painted screened
porch & back patio. 10x6 shed.
New paint inside, new 3/4"
Plyboard, floors & floor covering
throughout. Partly furnished. Pet
friendly. On Little Manatee river,
with private boat ramp, dock.
Senior 55+ Villa Maria, lot 103,
Ruskin. Call to see.
813-419-4066






610 WATERFRONT RENTALS

The Dolphin House, 768 Gran Kay-
men Way, Apollo Beach, efficiency
apartments on water. Boat docking/
fishing, laundry. $185 weekly, plus
$300 deposit, utilities included. No
pets. 813-863-6123

611 HOUSES FOR RENT

3br/2ba house. Apollo Beach, com-
pletely remodeled, fenced yard, no
pets. $1,200 monthly plus deposit.
813-849-1469

Clean one bedroom mobile home
in country near SCC. $140 weekly
plus deposit. Electric, water, gar-
bage included, A/C extra 813-
335-2877

Ruskin, 3br/2ba home with cov-
ered porch on large lot. Well suited
for 1-3 people. Monthly rent $925
with signed lease. No smoking. No
pets. Security deposit & references
required. 813-649-1599

3br/2ba Apollo Beach home, large
privacy fence. $1,150 monthly plus
deposit. 813-482-6374

SCC house for rent. 55+ 2br/1.5ba,
Monthly rent $850 plus security de-
posit with yearly lease. Association
fees & lawn maintenance extra. No
pets, no smoking. Call 813-649-
1599 for details

Clean updated cottage, 2br, tiled
bath, AC on 1/2 acres. Close to
schools & shopping, near SCC.
$950 monthly with 2yr lease. 813-
418-7620

Apollo Beach. 3br/2ba/2cg. fresh
paint, CHA, screened lanai, W/D
hookup, garbage included. No pets.
First, last & deposit. $995 monthly.
813-731-0348, 813-416-7590,
please leave message.

612 APARTMENTS FOR RENT

Large
One Bedroom Apt.
Ideal for single person or couple.
Totally remodeled. Utilities includ-
ed. Ruskin area. $775 monthly
plus deposit. No pets, no smoking
813-634-2329

Very clean 2br/lba apt. with wash-
er/ dryer hookup. Includes water &
mowing. $625 monthly plus deposit.
No pets. 813-645-1801

Thanks for reading
the Observer News


612 APARTMENTS FOR RENT

For rent: Efficiency apartments.
Weekly rates, utilities furnished
813-677-8789, 813-601-1542 or
813-516-0896

Apollo Beach large one bedroom.
Refrigerator, range, carport, yard,
washer/ dryer hookup. 813-645-
4145 or 813-642-0681

Ruskin area. 2br/lba, very clean,
washer/dryer hookup. $675 monthly
plus deposit, lawn service included.
813-244-1676

For rent. Efficiency apt. in Ruskin.
$445 monthly. Suitable for one
person. 813-833-3257

613 CONDOS FOR RENT

55+ 2br/2ba/1.5cg. Enjoy the ame-
nities of Kings Point. Completely
furnished. lyr lease. $850 monthly
plus electric. Free yard mainte-
nance, cable, water. Call Vickie
813-633-3328, 941-932-6027

621 PLACES TO SHARE

Trailer to Share
2br/lba, furnished, fenced yard,
ADT alarm, $250 monthly + secu-
rity & 1/2 utilities. 813-310-5027

630 M.H. RENTALS

Move in special (1 week free).
Newly renovated MHP. $600 moves
you in. $165 weekly. L&N MHP,
Gibsonton. 813-684-9708 or 813-
245-7425

One bedroom RV on private prop-
erty. References. $150 weekly
plus deposit. includes utilities. 813-
363-6001

One bedroom mobile home on riv-
erfront. Lease for $550 monthly in-
cludes water & electric up to $75. No
pets. Call for info. 813-645-2446

Ruskin, Mobile home, 2br/2ba
on one acre. $675 monthly plus
deposit. 813-641-7791 or 813-
610-3485

For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With
A/C. 813-677-1086

For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home
near shopping center in Gibsonton.
813-677-8789, 813-601-1542 or
813-516-0896

1 bedroom, 1 bath mobile home.
$550 monthly plus $350 deposit.
Close to boat ramp. Call 813-645-
8885, Ruskin

645 OFFICE SPACE

Available office & storage, etc. On
private property for lease. Wimau-
ma. Call 813-633-1222


Find what your looking
for in the Classifieds


JULY 12, 2012

645 OFFICE SPACE


APOLLO BEACH
3000 sq. ft. with 2 offices (1 large
and 1 small), full kitchen, hallway,
restroom. Next to Post Office.
$2,500 per month.
Also available either the small or
large office with shared kitchen &
restroom. Realtor owned.


(813)
Realtv....y 641.3339








We will not be underprced!

Prices starting at
$250 per month





646 WAREHOUSE SPACE

Garage & mini storage, RV lots
& mobile home lots for rent. Call
Pirates Treasure Cove, Gibsonton.
813-677-1137

Let someone else do that
HEAVY work
Look in the
Business & Trade
Directory







651 BOOKKEEPING

QuickBooks
Certified Pro-Advisor. Can do atti-
tude: 1099's, W2's, forms, cleanup
& review financial, full bookkeep-
ing services, tutoring, software &
issues, classes. Hourly rates. Your
local office or mine. Thea's Quick
Bookkeeping Inc Ruskin 813-641-
1089 email: theahp@verizon.net
www.theasquickbookkeeping.com

680 ADULT/CHILD CARE

Good hearted women seeking
private duty with excellent skills.
In home health aide/ caregiving/
housekeeping/ companionship.
Please call Jan 813-304-3006

Daily living assistants 24/7. Hourly
rates. Everything & anything non
medical. Call for info. 941-592-4249
Ruskin/ Apollo Beach/ SCC area

Experienced caregiver/ house-
keeper. Dependable. Excellent
driving records. References. Also
house cleaning. Call Donna 813-
645-2456


OWN ~~A NWHM

WnUNO ONY DW0


A community of affordable homes
exclusively for first-time homebuyers!

FLORIDA HOME PARTNERSHIP
(813) 672- 7889 www.flhome.org


Phase III Now Available!
2 Swimming Pools and a Clubhouse
3,4 and 5 Bedrooms, 1 and 2 Garages
Popular Ruskin Location
USDA Self-Help Housing program -- help
build your home in exchange for a down
payment
I No money down, easy to qualify
Non-profit agency works for you
-Hablamos Espaiol




SBAYOU ASS
, i' i,, rr,.in ri e hamebumersunder80% lmedlan Income. Call lrdealls.







JULY 12, 2012

680 ADULTS/ CHILD CARE


Light Housekeeping Grocery
Shopping Running Errands
Companionship Sitters In-Home
or Care Facility Flexible Schedules
License #232465
137 S. Pebble Beach Blvd., Ste. 104
Sun City Center 33573
(813) 293-5369 or (813) 419-4967
www.AngelsofLifeServices.com







704 JUNK REMOVAL

Hauling unwanted items. Demoli-
tion, boats, cars, appliances, trash,
yard debris, junk. Anything you don't
need. Free estimate Call Dave 813-
447-6123

705 CLEANING

Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integ-
rity. Call for free estimate. 7days a
week. Move-in, move-out, rentals.
Insured, bonded, licensed. Ruskin,
Apollo Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean

708 MOVERS

Affordable Moving. One piece or
whole house. Also specializing in
estate sale delivery. Loading &
unloading storage units/ trucks &
more Free estimate. Dave 813-
447-6123

710 LAWN CARE

M & C Mower Repair
Parts & service. Authorized Briggs
& Statton dealer. Commercial &
residential. Open 7days, 8:30am-
6pm. 725 14th St., Wimauma.
813-938-3226, 813-690-4375.
Pickup & delivery


Bill's Lawn Service
Licensed & insured. No contract.
Yearly, monthly or per cut. As low
as $25 per cut. 813-293-6840


B&S Lawn Care, Inc
Professional lawn care provid-
ing all of your turf, landscaping &
irrigation needs. Residential/ com-
mercial. www.bandslawncare.com
813-645-7266


Henry's Lawn Maintenance
Landscaping needs. Rock, mulch,
tree service. Pressure washing.
Monthly lawn maintenance. Li-
censed & insured. Free estimates.
813-477-3054 www.henryslawn-
maintenance.com


Terry's Lawn Service
Free estimates. Mowing, trimming,
edging. Home 813-634-2856, cell
813-317-7679

S & L Lawn Mower Repair
1105 15th St SE. Ruskin. Tune-
up special. $39 push mower $59
riding mowers. Free pickup &
delivery. Same day service. 813-
305-6666

Mike' mowing. Mow, trim, edge.
Free estimates. Call 813-677-7955
or 813-394-9167

To Place A Classified line Ad
Call Beverly 813-645-3111
20 words for $17.00 and 300 for
each additional word. Bold line $3.
All Classified ads are prepaid. We
take Visa, MasterCard or Discover


THE SHOPPER 9B


W4


870 GENERAL


Tropical Fish Farm seeks help for
outside field work. Individual must
be willing to workweekends, speak
English, lift 40 pounds & have a
valid Florida driver's license. Ap-
ply at 2700 36th Ave., SE, Ruskin.
Monday Wednesday 8:30am-
noon.

Tired of having no purpose in life?
Board out of your gourd? Want
to make a lot of money and help
people? 813-391-0236


( ,, ~~Ec


715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill
dirt, topsoil, sand, crushed rock &
asphalt, driveway culverts. Load-
er, backhoe, grading, bushhog,
discing. Install Septic System &
drain fills. CFC#1427021. 813-
645-1883


Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service.
Culvert sets, driveways, shell,
crushed asphalt, concrete, fill dirt,
excavating, mowing etc. Tony
(813) 363-7963 Free estimates.

720 HOME MAINTENANCE

Handyman
Phil Oley 25+ yrs experience. In-
sured. Apollo Beach, Ruskin, Sun
City Center & Kings Point.
Call 813-649-1418

740 MISC. SERVICES

Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks,
boat lifts & seawalls. Free inspec-
tion. Hecker Construction Co. 813-
236-9306

In Your Home Pet Care
813-767-7225. Affordable, li-
censed, bonded, insured. Refer-
ences available, e-mail: olivertort@
aol.com Oliver & Company

Hate that Wallpaper?
I can remove it. Want something
painted. Big or small, I can do it.
I'll even clean windows. Debby.
813-434-6499





860 SALES


Newspaper Positions
Available
Local publication's expansion
requires 2 sales reps and an
editor. Hillsborough County
resident preferred, but exten-
sive knowledge of the area can
be substituted for residency.
Positions require experience in
either sales or journalism. Must
have reliable transportation, be
self-motivated, computer savvy
and a team player. Benefits
include medical insurance,
paid vacation and holidays.
E-mail resume to Brenda@
observernews.net or fax to 813-
645-4118 or call 813-645-3111
x210.


830 RESTAURANT


PART TIME

Servers &

Bartenders

Cypress Creek
Golf Club

(813) 634-8888

ext. 3


870 GENERAL




Administrative position available
for an appraisal office in home
office in Valencia Lakes. Open
immediately. Strong computer
skills and communication
skills a definite requirement.
Bookkeeping is also a part of
the job, but only minimum skills
required. E-mail resumes to
mike@mikeseward.com.


COMMUNITY PAPERS
OF FLORIDA
(CPF STATEWIDE)

Abortion Alternative/
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5449 www.adoption-surrogacy.com
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CPF STATEWIDE

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SUMMER LAKE SALE 7 ACRES w/
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$39,900 NEVER BEFORE OFFERED!
Comps selling for $100K & up! Beauti-
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roads, power & phone. Perfect for
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Must see. Excellent financing. Call now
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WESTERN CAROLINA REAL ESTATE
Offering unbelievable deals on homes
and land in the beautiful NC mountains.
Call for free brochures, foreclosures,
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20 ACRES IN WEST TEXAS $0 Down,
$99/mo. $14,900 Beautiful Mountain
Views, Money Back Guarantee Free
map/pictures 1-800-343-9444 (Place
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ATTENTION DIABETICS with Medi-
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CASH FOR CARS: All Cars/Trucks
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SAVE on Cable TV-Internet-Digital
Phone. Packages start at $89.99/mo
(for 12 months.) Options from ALL major
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learn more! CALL 1-888-903-2647

RS PUBLIC AUCTION -Commercial
Equipment Sale Woodworking equip-
ment, spray booth, dust collectors, drum
sanders, saws &more. Complete listing
online. Sale 7/19/12 11:00am. 7601
NW 37th Ave. Miami, 33147. Sharon
Sullivan 954-740-2421 www.irsauc-
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ICOMIENZA TU PROPIO NEGO-
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Para El Hogar. Llama Sin Costo
1.877.426.2627. CATALOGO GRATIS.
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BUSINESS & TRADE DIRECTORY
THE OBSERVER NEWS THE SCC OBSERVER THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT


-I VENT., INC.
Lic. #CMC056816
AIR-CONDITIONING,
HEATING & REFRIGERATION
Complete Sales, Service,
Installation & Repair
Am aaand Senior
Trane Dealer Discount
John R. Bowman, Jr., Owner
(813) 633-2703

CAC1816456

A-PLUS
Air Conditioning & Heating

634-8679
Sales Service Installations
SERVICING ALL MAJOR BRANDS
Preventive Maintenance
LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED
10% Off All
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With this advertisement





Complete Sales Service
Repair Installation
SERVICING Au. MAKES AND MODELS
24 Hour Service Financing Available
Lic. #CAC1815928


SBB Senaior&aEtary
-- Discounts


GRIFFITH
AIR CONDITIONINGG & HEATING SERVICE INC.
OIvr 30 )c>irs Experun iiect
Reriidicinril AC iionier iiir l
SALES INSTALLATION SERVICE
on all Makes and Models
NO OVERTIME RATES


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D. KAY CARR, P.A.
Attorney at Law
Family Criminal Probate
Wills and Estate Planning
Civil Litigation Real Estate
214 Apollo Beach Boulevard
Apollo Beach, FL 33572
(813) 645-7557
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SELF ARREST BONDS
COURT DATES 664-0056
WARRANT CHECKS
BIG JOHN'S
BAIL BONDS
641-8400
FAMILY BONDSMAN
STATE FEDERAL
24 HOUR SERVICE
JOHN L. VATH
2100 Orient Road Tampa, FL. 33619
Fax: (813) 628-8739


1&i Printing Co.
COMMERCIAL SHEETFED AND WEB PRINTERS

PRINTING
From Design to Finish


*BUSINESS CARDS
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MARKETING
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FINANCIAL & LEGAL
PRINTING
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& PUBLISHING


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-I
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Additions Gaag

Over 35 years experience
in Hillsborough County
Class "A" General Contractor
On-Staff Interior Designer
CORNERSTONE HOMES
& DESIGN, INC.
cell (813) 263-6096
License #CGC1511749 Insured

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Over 50 Years Experience
* COMMERCIAL / RESIDENTIAL
SSouth Bay "*
Electric Co.
of Ruskin SERVICE
LICENSED \UPGRADES
BONDED L ALL TYPES
INSURED OF WIRING
ER00126636 B RENOVATIONS
SECURITY LIGHTS CEILING FANS
SWITCHES & OUTLETS SPAS & DOCKS
-wz1


145 21st ST. N.W. RUSKIN

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eAWWE Tog$
tRAN IEA?




t' HOBSkVER NEWS

BUSINESS
TRADE
DIRECrORY YOU'RE ON...

Call Us 645-3111
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FREEE
The Floor Source Estimates!
Specializing in Hardwood,
Laminate & Vinyl Flooring
We bring the Showroom to you!
SMALL BUSINESS,
SMALL PRICES
(813) 495-7027
davidmoorellc@yahoo.com
www.TheFloorSource.biz
David Moore, Owner-Operator
Chamber Members Licensed and Insured


*No project over $1000.
No electrical, gas, or
plumbing, and nothing
structural.

Bob's Mobile Fix-It Center
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured
We Fix It All!
Customer Satisfaction Guaranteed!
Attic Stairs Ceiling Fans
*Cabinets Flooring *Interior
Painting Home Improvement
Call for FREE Estimate
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Robert Gerstenschlager



jHANDY MEN
urI e C a T

Home Improvements, Remodels
& Repairs Carpentry Dry Wall
* General Home Maintenance Painting
Power Washing Screen Repair
*Ask about our other Services*
FREE ESTIMATES INSURED '.
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S" Unstuff those

,A *Nj somebody's
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S Sell your
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items in the
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THE OBSERVER NEWS
813-645-3111 ext. 201
Fax 813-645-1792

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Timothy Sutton, LC
INTERIOR EXTERIOR
PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
PRESSURE WASHING
29 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN OHIO
NOW SERVING FLORIDA
LICENSED BONDED INSURED
813-727-1013
LIC. #PA2809

SouthShore Painting
Painting
(InteriorlExterior)
Power Washing
Drywall Repairs
Preparing Homes For Sale
Improving Curb Appeal
Replacing Old Fixtures
and Lock Sets
License #PA2878
David Squire Bonded Insured
(813) 787-5235

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4' f A&J
Hares
S Yee Plumbing
Service & Repairs
*Repipes Water Heaters
New Construction
Remodels & Additions


FREE Estimates
-I-
Lic. #CFC057969
A+ Rating Bonded* Insured


AN

$10 6 $10
OFF- OFF
* Located in the heart ofSCC *
FREE Estimates 24/7 Service
License #CFC1425759 Bonded Insured
(813) 633-8923

PAUL WOOD PLUMBING, INc.
State Certified Plumbing Contractor
#CFC1427697
S Residential
Commercial
'.' t Certified Backflows
Stoppages
* Q Service and Repairs
* FREE Estimates 24-Hour Service
Licensed Bonded Insured
(813) 641-1387

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AI y'es ofI Ro fn


Residential Commercial
New Roofs e Re-Roofs Tile
Tile Repairs Hot Tar/Fiat Decks
Ventilation a Leaks Repaired
FREE Estimates Financing Available
24 Hr. Emergency Service

We Carry Workers'Comp I
For Your Protection BM
1 Lic #CCC1325993* Bonded@Insured .






All Types of Roofing
New Roofs & Repairs
Shingle Tile Metal HotTar
No job too big or too small!
SERVING SINCE 1973
Ruskin Sun City Center Kings
Point Apollo Beach Riverview
"ALL MY CUSTOMERS ARE DRY
FRIENDS WHEN QUALITY COUNTS"

7-

Sun City Center
Chamber Member
P.O. Box 551 Ruskin, FL 33570
www.customroofing.us
Bonded & Insured Lic #CCC1326907

Moi e( 3 404-202
ifcWWW .^


G.HORN ROOFING LLC
b C ~FLORIDA REGISTERED
ROOFING CONTRACTOR
'ZJ Gill Horn,Owner
Lic. #RC29027076
40 Years Experience
*Roof Repairs
SRoof Replacements
Shingle. Tile. Metal
"Superb Quality Guaranteed"


I gs67horn@gmail.com
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net


L PUMBNG


645-5222
cell: 240-2049
1501 33rd St. SE
Ruskin, FL 33570


LOOKING
FOR EXTRA
STORAGE
SPACE
FOR YOUR...
R.V.
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CAMPER
ETC.
ANY SIZE


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Let someone
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Look in the
Business & Trade
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SUN VIEW
WINDOW CLEANING, INC.
Exceptional
Service .
Registered at Kings Point
Licensed* Insured
SBonded
Call now to bookyourappointment
813-944-8478
Hereto ServeYour Community
Year Round

www.ObserverNews.net



HOME & AUTO
TINTING


Solar Designs


1ae Aon


_ I L __-_-_--------______.I- I -


IG6 BEND
TORAGOE
We willmacII any









NOW OPEN


10B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


JULY 12, 2012


I


( 8 3 ) 1





OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 11B


DEALERl!!l


I.


All offers valid on in stock units only and are in lieu of any other offers. All offers with approved credit. tBased on 2012 EPA highway estimates. "#1 Volume Hyundai Dealer In Manatee County. *All leases are based on 36 months/12,000
miles per year, with 20o per mile thereafter with approved credit and $2995 down (Sonata $3495, Santa Fe $2999, Veloster $2699) dealer fee, and dealer & factory installed options plus tax, tag, title and destination. Must qualify for Hyundai
Loyalty to qualify for pricing. All images may not depict actual model. ttFor a limited term on select models with approved credit. *With approved credit. Interest accrues from date of purchase. Offers expire end of day 7/15/12.



MA R sS COMPLIMENTARY
MAIN NANNCN ~ ER CARS
^_______________________"_________* )," -___________________________________________________________________^__________


HYUNDAI
OF BRADENTON
A -te AutmtieDelrsi


< HYunoRI
Assurance


America's Best Warranty'
10-Year/100,000-Mile
Powertrain Limited Warranty


2503 1st Street Bradenton
On 1st Street, 2 Blocks South of Where 301 Meets US41
1 -941 -747-9262
Monday Saturday 9am-8pm Sunday Noon-5pm
Hyund Ul = -ade- U Uo


HYunDRI


LIE ; n,
F wq' ll"


EL
Brand New
2012 HyundaiVELOSTERS




$159
PER MONTHH! *


^Brand New3

2012 yundiSANA FE


JULY 12, 2012





12B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


00



... . ....





.......*S.S.
.5. ... ... a.....
.. .. .....




a a b agd a

*s*oam*eD*va *n*s
... .... ..e


S$50.00 off
I I
Your next repair
-_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ d


$19.95 18-point
I I

check-up
I I


Lennox knows you don't compromise and neither do we. That's why we dedicate
ourselves to product innovation and customer service. So go ahead, get comfortable.


t.


LENNIpXl
HOME COMFORT SYSTEMS
Innovation never felt so good."


'A


CAC1813763
"We don't charge to show up!"

(813) 645-0381
www.ApolloBeachAir.com


CAC1813763
Offers expire 8/24/2012. *Rebate offer is valid only with the purchase of qualifying Lennoxe products. 2012 Lennox Industries Inc. See your participating Lennox dealer for details. Lennox dealers include
independently owned and operated businesses.


JULY 12, 2012


?t