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www.ObserverNews.netMarch 1, 2012 Volume 56 Number 6THE OBSERVER NEWS PRST STDPAIDRUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570 PERMIT NO. 8 Some fear proposed U.S. 41 Overlay will discourage industry Community planners in Balm mean to keep this once-isolated pocket of Hillsborough agriculture on the country side. See page 8Mitch Traphagen ponders the identity of Ruskin which is often viewed by outsiders as the odd man out. See page 11Nations only showmens museum opening in Gibsonton By MELODY JAMESON%  GIBSONTON Millions of dollars and many years in the making, a museum unlike any other is preparing to open here. Its exhibits range from human figures no larger than a fingertip to machinery towering more than 30 feet. Its colorful wall hangings constitute a walk through the history of a livelihood that also is a lifestyle. Its three-dimensional displays can tickle the funny bone and tease mature memories back to the days of carefree youth. Unique though it is, this museum does, however, share certain commonalities with other such facilities; it is an invaluable record, a prized celebration, an honorable tribute to the world of the carnival and to its people, the independent showmen, the carnies who bring amusements to the country every summer. Carnivals in America, those cotton candy, sugared pastry, game barker, blinking lights, thrill ride extravaganzas that can make kids out of sixty somethings, date back to the 19th century. The 1893 Chicago Worlds Fair is credited with spawning the traveling carnival when it assembled a section of rides, games, burlesque and side show curiosities the first midway and, incidentally, presented the first Ferris wheel built by George Washington Gale Ferris. Before the Chicago Exposition, circuses and vaudeville shows toured Americas cities and rural areas, offering sought-after entertainments in an era when homemade music and visitors conversations were the primary recreation. After that worlds fair, operators of its midway features took a tip and took to the road. And America embraced the newcomers. By 1902, there reportedly were 17 traveling carnivals and by 1905 the number more than doubled to 46 such outfits. In 1937 at the height of the Great Depression some 300 carnivals complete with animal acts, multiple games, flavorful foods, side shows and rides to amuse all ages were crisscrossing the country. From there, the world of the creative traveling amusement purveyors grew into an industry, making millionaires of enterprising equipment manufacturers, Planes, Trains and CraigslistBy %  MItchTCH TraRAPhaHAGenEN mitch@observernews.netThe last place I expected to be was on the Auto Train just outside of Washington, D.C. Sitting on the train, the thought occurred to me that there might be something wrong with me. Over the past decade, Ive bought three different old cars and a sailboat over the Internet; all sight unseen and all with nothing more than the blind faith that those cars and that boat would get me home. And now Ive just added to the list. Porsche made all three cars. They were all at least 25-years-old and were all relatively inexpensive (certainly no more expensive than any other cheap used car). My wife and I still have one, but two have since been sold during fits of utilitarianism, practicality and economy. After driving a pickup truck with more than 200,000 miles on the odometer, I decided I needed a little more pep (and a backup vehicle) in my life. As my wife drove off each morning in our 1986 Porsche 944, I fired up Craigslist on my web browser in search of one that I, too, could drive off in. After a month of searching, I found a lot ofjunk. A Porsche PENNNY FLETCHER PHOTOThe area just south of Big Bend Road and U.S. 41 intersection is zoned heavy industrial but some think the proposed U.S. 41 Overlay plan will discourage industry because of its specific fencing and landscaping requirements. By PPENNY FLETCHER penny@pennyetcher.com%  RUSKIN Owners of large stretches of industrial-zoned property fronting U.S. 41 in Ruskin and Apollo Beach say the new rules proposed by the county in conjunction with the U.S. 41 Zoning Overlay Working Committee are fine for residences and retail stores but will keep industry out of South County. The Overlay will put an extra layer of zoning regulations on all property fronting U.S. 41 between Big Bend Road and the Little Manatee River Bridge and is part of the on-going effort to implement the Ruskin and Apollo Beach Community Plans. Meetings have been held every month for nine months and working committees for both communities have been involved, voting on standards they think would be beneficial to their communities. In the beginning of the meetings nine months ago, county staff, led by planners Jose Fernandez and John Healey, two working groups were formed, one for Ruskin and the other for Apollo Beach, because the two communities were so different. The maps now show three distinct groups, based on the usage of U.S. 41. Area 1 is between Big Bend Road and 19th Avenue in Ruskin. Area 2 is between 19th Avenue and College Avenue Area 3 is between College Avenue and the Little Manatee River Bridge. But the county recognizes there is already a group working on Ruskins downtown (from 19th Avenue to College) so it is not working on that area in this Overlay. We recognize that there is already a plan for Ruskins downtown in the making, Fernandez said. We dont want to duplicate efforts. And we also recognize that U.S. 41 is similar in the Apollo Beach area and the area south of Ruskins downtown. That is because those two areas are used as a traffic corridor while Part One of an Observer News Feature StorySteerage class (Amtrak calls it coach class) on the Auto Train would be remarkably comfortable if it had wings and flew. Initially, it felt less so for a 17-hour overnight trip down the Eastern Seaboard.MitchITCH TraphaRAPHAGenEN PhotoHOTO944 is a remarkably reliable and economical car if it is taken care of properly. The car my wife drives had 140,000 miles on it when I bought it in 2005 for $3,500 from a guy in New Hampshire. Today it has nearly 250,000 miles on it and it has required only minimal maintenance. But that maintenance cant be put off and it has required that I not be afraid to get my hands greasy now and again. In comparison, in 2003, See SHOWMENS MUSEUM, page 9 See PLANES, TRAINS, page 14 See U.S. 41 OVERLAY, page 31 Winners have been announced in the February competition for the Sun City Center PPhoto Club. See some of their photos and more info on page 31

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MARCH 1, 2012 3 2 for $19.96 All for $ 19.96 www.TotalAutomotiveServices.com We provide shuttle service and towing available upon request OIL CHANGE$1999TIRE BALANCE AND ROTATION$3999ALIGNMENT$6999 MXV4$14999TRANSMISSION SERVICE$9999BRAKE SERVICE$9999 INTEGRITY$6999REG. SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE $9999FREE CHECK ENGINE LIGHT FREE GAS Get a $50 Gas Card Shell Point Rd. SR 674To Sun City Center N Now Open To The PublicEvery SaturdayTours at 11 a.m., 12:30 & 2 p.m.13910 Seminole Trail WimaumaAdults: $15and under: $7.50 Seniors (65+): $10 (3 and under FREE)Under 18 must be accompanied by an adult Members enter free with newsletter voucherElmirasWildlife.org (941) 776-8975info@elmiraswildlife.org $2 OffAdult tour with this ad BookwormUsed Paperbacks, Hardbacks Childrens & Specialty Books!7414 Commerce St. Riverview, FL 33578Bookworms4U@gmail.com(1 Block west of Hwy. 301, off Riverview Dr.)(813) 443-0968Used Books 902 N. Tamiami Trail, Ruskin, FL 33570(Across from Sweetbay Supermarket)NEW PATIENTS WELCOMEKirk D. Parrott, D.D.S Carl E. Friedman, D.D.S.Members: American Dental Association, Florida State Dental Association, Florida West Coast Dental Association, Manatee County Dental Association and Hillsborough County Dental Association. (813) 645-6491 Faulkner, cultural center open to a sellout audience%  RUSKIN When the lights were dimmed and the curtain rose, performance artist Leland Faulkner emerged to a sellout nights performance with the assistance of the Florida Home Partnership, Inc., Paintmore Corp., Sherwin Williams of Ruskin, Keith Arsenault of the International Arts & Entertainment Group, A&R Stucco of Ruskin, the StageWorks Theatre in Tampa, and numerous volunteers. Faulkners Artist-in-Residency was made possible through the sponsorship of the SouthShore Arts Council, Target Stores, Walmart, the Community Foundation of Greater Sun City Center, and the hospitality of the Mary & Martha House. Additional donations came from Home Depot, Traditional & Digital Arts, PRP Wines International, SouthShore Signs in Ruskin, and the Destiny Church, along with support from the Arts Council of Hillsborough County. After conducting a week of workshops, Faulkner will conclude his residency with a final performance at 7 p.m. on Friday, March 2. The performance will include participants from the workshops, a talkback session and a post-residency celebration. For more information, visit www. firehouseculturalcenter.org.With the help and wonder of a young woman from the audience, Faulkner made paper fly. Upon taking the stage as the first-ever artistin-residence, Leland Faulkner modestly attempts to quiet the audience with one hand, while encouraging more cheers with the other.MITCH T TRAPHAGEN P PHOTOSA finale to Faulkners hour-long performance included magic confetti and paper streamers. The audience provided a standing ovation. audience for the debut event of the Firehouse Cultural Centers first-ever Artist-in-Residence program. Faulkners hour-long performance was a brilliant combination of fables, magic and illusion, going far to prove the heart and mind of a talented artist trumps artificial special effects. The artist had the audience laughing throughout the show and received a standing ovation at the conclusion of the performance. The theater is what were once large bays for fire trucks, transformed into the BlackBox Theater only days before Saturday Shadow art by Faulkner.

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4 MARCH 1, 2012 Sun Hill Optical Sun Hill Optical Sun Hill Optical McDonalds Hess Station Hess Station Publix Post Office Dollar General SavALot HWY. 60 Boyette Rd. S.R. 674Valrico Rd.VALRICO (813) 653-2244 RIVERVIEW (813) 672-8100 SUN CITY CENTER (813) 634-6344 Sun Hill Optical 2 Complete Pairs of EyeglassesSome restrictions apply. Most prescriptions. Not valid with any other offer. Exp. 3/8/12 CR39 Not valid with any other offer exp. 3/8/12 CR39 Not valid with any other offer. Clear. exp. 3/8/12 CR39CONTACTS Progressive No-Line Bifocalsmonth supply starter kit with exam7$99$149The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee, examination or treatmentINSURANCES ACCEPTED: United Healthcare, EyeMed, VBA, Spectra, Humana, Freedom, VCP, Advantica, Optimum, Davis Vision and many moreVision insurance for employees of Hillsborough County, Media General, Publix, Citigroup, Verizon, FedEX, Ford, and many more. THE 2010 McMullen Rd. SCC PlazaPLAZASome restrictions apply. Some restrictions apply. 7 $ 99 $ 149 Expires 3/8/12$99 $ 99with rebate 210 Woodland Estates S.W. Ruskin, FL 33570813-645-3111Fax: 813-645-4118www.ObserverNews.netPublished Every Thursday by M&M Printing Co., Inc. 645-4048EDITORIAL:Brenda Knowles. ............Publisher/Editor brenda@observernews.net Mitch Traphagen. .................Online Editor mitch@observernews.net Melody Jameson. ......Contributing WriterAll press releases, news articles and photos may be emailed to news@ observernews.net, faxed to 645-4118, or mailed to Observer News, 210 Woodland Estates Ave. SW, Ruskin, FL 33570SALES:Vilma Stillwell. ...Display Advertising Rep. vilma@observernews.net Nan Kirk. ...........Display Advertising Rep. nan@observernews.netFor current rates and circulation information visit our website at www.ObserverNews.netCLASSIFIED / CIRCULATION:Beverly Kay.........Classied / Circulation beverly@observernews.netPRODUCTION:Jason Martin. .........Graphic Arts / Layout jason@observernews.net Chere Simmons. ....Graphic Arts / Layout chere@observernews.net Sue Sloan. .............Composition / Layout sue@observernews.net The views expressed by our writers are not necesssarily shared by The Observer News, SCC Observer, The Riverview Current or M&M Printing Co., Inc.We Accept: Audited by: Award-Winning Newspapers By William Hodges I have a friend who is one of the best informed people I know; she always seems to be up on everything. There is little happening in our circle of friends she does not know. If we go to a conference, she comes back with more knowledge of the other people attending than any of the rest of us. On the other hand, she does not seem to be a gossip or a person who overtly pries into the lives of other people. I wondered how she could be so informed so decided to ask her. She replied, I take the time to listen. Well, I thought I listened too, but I didnt seem to come away with nearly as much information. So I asked if she had any tricks she used to enhance her listening skills. Here are the ideas she shared with me. ing said, not how it is being said. Some people speak with an accent, lisp or stutter, or they have other delivery problems that can be distracting. Make a conscious effort not to be turned off by these problems. common interest. Its easier to remember what they say if you can tie their statements to something in which you are interested. tions, such as fans, the voices of other people, music or other extraneous noises. tionally charged words to shut down your mental process. The words the other person is using may not have been meant to ofthe words to the intent of the speaker. phrase and repeat back to the other person the information you heard. This will validate your understanding. completed a thought before you reply. This prevents you from jumping to conclusions and unnecessary misunderstandings. Sharpen your listening skills as Why do you feel that way? that? or use any one of Kiplings honest serving menWho? What? When? Where? Why? and How? the conversation. You have to sift a lot of dirt before you find a nugget of gold. The same is true of conversations. If you are patient and listen intently, the nugget will appear. remember specific information from a conversation, write it down as soon as possible after the conthat the faintest pencil is better ideas to paper reinforces them in your mind and allows reference at a later date. My friends ideas all make sense to me. In fact, she told me noththese principles, I was not applying them. Knowledge without application is only potential power. My challenge, and that which I give to you, is to begin applying these principles. If we do, we can all become better listeners and we wont miss anything. Hodges is a nationally recognized speaker, trainer and syndicated columnist. He also hosts an interview-format television program, Spotlight on Government, on the Tampa Bay Community Network which airs Mondays at 8 p.m. and Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. (Bright House channel 950, Verizon channel 30). The shows can also be viewed at www.hodgesvideos.com. Phone: 813-6410816. Email: bill@billhodges.com Website: www.billhodges.comMOWW National Commander addresses local chapter Capt Vowinkel, left, presenting Lt Col Paul Nixon, USAF (Ret) with Perpetual Membership certificate.PHOTO BY FRANK KKEpPLEY The Military Order of the World Wars (MOWW) featured the monthly luncheon which was held on Feb.17. was commissioned as an Ensign in the US Navy in 1962 after Florida. He served on active duty from 1962-1967 and served in Operations as a Naval Flight Officer during a portion of this time. He completed 24 years in which time he successfully served three command tours. In July his current position as MOWW the presentation of awards and provided information pertaining to the state of affairs of MOWW from a national perspective

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X 8 5 MARCH 1, 2012 5 RUSKIN Moose Lodge #813 UPCOMING EVENTS Enjoy MOSIs March Special Events and ProgramsThe Museum of Science and Industry is a not-for-profit, communitybased institution and educational resource dedicated to advancing public interest, knowledge and understanding of science, industry and technology. Located at 4801 East Fowler Ave. in Tampa, MOSI features educational and entertaining exhibits, activities and special events, and is home to Floridas only IMAX Dome Theatre and the new Sky Trail Ropes Course. For more information about MOSI and upcoming activities, visit www.mosi.org or call (813) 987-6000. MOSI Shows Off Mars in March Cost: $20 per person; $15 per MOSI member Mars is in opposition so not only is it at its closest to Earth, but the sun will fully illuminate the red planets surface. Join MOSI to observe the most studied planet in our solar system. Spend time with a NASA scientist to learn how NASA plans to send people to Mars, and build habitable colonies on this distant world. Visit MOSIs planetarium for an interactive show about the night sky and end the evening with a view of Mars through telescopes on top of the IMAX Dome Theatre. Spring Break Camps are available at MOSI for kids in grades 3-5 and grades 4-8 from March 12-16. Campers should bring two snacks and wear clothing that can get messy, and bring a lunch or buy one from the MOSI Caf. Extended hours are available from 7 to 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. for an additional $10 per week. Program fee: $223 per person; $168 per MOSI member Tap into the power of play through odd inventions and exciting brain games. Solve challenges with flying ping-pong balls and rolling marbles. Design racing tracks on the computer, teach robots to follow mazes and make a toy in Idea Zone! to take home. Let the imagination run loose for a week of creative fun. Program fee: $223 per person; $168 per MOSI member Combine a love of movies and video games by making movies inspired by video games. Learn to use 3D animation and other computerized movie making skills to direct Diner Dash: The Movie, Halo: The Untold Story; or whatever movie idea comes to mind. Participants can put themselves into the movie with green screening, or work with friends or on a solo project. Ages 21 and up. Tickets: $60 for MOSI Members (in advance); $70 for Non-Members (in advance); $80 if purchased the week of the event; $125 for VIP Tickets For more information on any of these events, visit www.mosi.org or call (813) 987-6000. Tickets are now on sale for the Apollo Beach Womans Club Annual Fashion Show Passport to Fashion to be held at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 31 at the Bradenton Yacht Club, 4307 Snead Island Rd., Palmetto. Coldwater Creek will feature unique casual and cruise wear in striking easycare fabrics. ABWC members will be the models and Carol Torres, South Shore Day Spa in Apollo Beach will be the hairstylist. Tickets are $30 for the event that supports the ABWCs scholarship fund for college-bound Apollo Beach high school graduates. Doors to the event will open at 10:30 a.m. Tickets are selling out quickly for the three course luncheon and must be purchased in advance by calling Pam Kerstetter at (813) 645-2425 or (813) 6792424. If transportation is needed it can be arranged with Kerstetter. Ellen Kleinschmidt, singer, actor and writer for the theater, television and movies and her new musical play Aged to Perfection will be the emcee for the show. When not performing, Ellen is teaching for Hillsborough County where she Apollo Beach Womans Club announces annual fashion show The Ruskin Moose Lodge #813 is located at www.lodge813.moosepages.org WEEKLY EVENTS Every Wednesday 5-7 p.m. Best Spaghetti in Ruskin Every Thursday 5-7 p.m. Wings Every Friday 5-7 p.m. Fish Fry (baked, beer batter or fried) 7-11 p.m. Live Music Every Saturday 2 p.m. Horseshoes UPCOMING EVENTS Friday, March 2 7-11 p.m. Southern Tide Saturday, March 3 7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins Friday, March 9 7-11 p.m. Calvin O Saturday, March 10 5-7 p.m. Steak Dinner 7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins Friday, March 16 7-11 p.m. Live Band Saturday, March 17 4-7 p.m. St. Patricks Day Corned Beef Dinner 7-11 p.m. St. Patricks Day Party with Kim Mullins Friday, March 23 7-11 p.m. Del and Gary Saturday, March 24 7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins Friday, March 30 7-11 p.m. Shine On Saturday, March 31 7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins All events are open to qualified Moose members and guests RUSKIN Moose Lodge #813 UPCOMING EVENTS Brandon Jr. Womans Club seeks membersYou are invited to join the Brandon Jr. Womans Club for their 2012 Annual Membership Recruitment Spring Fling Event from 7 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, March 29 at their Clubhouse located at 129 N. Moon Avenue in Brandon. Learn what the GFWC Brandon Jr. Womans Club is all about and how they support the community through projects such as their Childrens Holiday Party for the less fortunate, Scholarships for High School Female Seniors, Road Cleanups, Troop Support, International Projects, Health Awareness issues and more. It will be a fun evening with refreshments, activities, speakers and more. For more information, contact Kim at kholt28@gmail.com.A little goes a long wayThe Tiger Cub Den of Cub Scout Pack #607, Riverview, while small in physical size and numbers, performed a big civic service in February. Their efforts stretched over four days of commitment to the Scouting for Food Program. Their work included collecting donated food from the congregation of South Shore United Methodist Church (their charter organization) and from the generous shoppers at the Publix, Big Bend Road and U.S. Hwy. 301. On Feb. 18, they took all the donated food to the Emergency Care Health Organization (ECHO) in Brandon where it weighed in at over one thousand pounds. Ruskin VFW Post #6287Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120 U.S. 41 N. has listed the following weekly activities. Meetings are: American Legion on 1st Wednesday each month; VFW and LAVFW on the 2nd Wednesday each month; and MAVFW on the 3rd Thursday each month. Thursday, March 1 VA Hospital at 5:30 p.m. Bar Bingo at 6 p.m. Friday, March 2 Fish Fry from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Music by Blinky & Fritz from 7 to 11 p.m. Saturday, March 3 Turkey Shoot at 1 p.m. Music by Rick Bourbon from 7 to 11 p.m. Sunday, March 4 Fire in the Hole from 1 to 4 p.m. Music by Bert & Sassy from 5:30 to 10 p.m. Monday, March 5 Fire in the Hole from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, March 6 Games in Lounge from 1 to 4 p.m. Kitchen open from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Bingo at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 7 American Legion Meeting at 7 p.m. was Teacher of the Year in 2006. Brian Kleinschmidt, actor, singer, and survivor of televisions The Amazing Race is Ellens son and a third generation performer. He will entertain the attendees of the fashion show with song and charm. Those in attendance also will have the opportunity to bid on silent auction items that include a wonderful display of food and special-item baskets and gift certificates from local stores and restaurants. ABWC members raise money throughout the year for numerous community service projects including scholarships and helping needy families and children in the area. The fashion show is the clubs biggest fundraiser. Last years event funded 11 scholarships totaling $11,000 awarded to Apollo Beach college-bound students for the current academic year. ABWC is open to all women in the greater Apollo Beach area. Membership information is available by calling Sharon Vasquez, membership vice president, at (813) 641-7856.New members sought for young professionalsSouth Shore Young Professional Association was launched in May, 2011 to serve young professionals living and working in the South Shore area. The Association meets twice monthly and offers professional development talks by community business owners and leaders. SSYPA meets at local venues and supports various non-profit organizations throughout the year. Currently the club is working hard to build its Relay for Life team to support the American Cancer Society. SSYPAs leadership chair position is now held by Lisa Kennedy, the current Honorary Mayor of Riverview. The Association is affiliated with the Greater Riverview Chamber of Commerce. The group will meet from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 6 at S&S Tacos/Pizzas & Stuff, 10664 U.S. Highway 301 S., Riverview. To learn more about SSYPA, visit www.ssypa.com or call (813) 234-5944. Riverview Memorial VFW Post #81087504 Riverview Dr. (813) 671-9845 Mens Auxiliary -First Thursday at 7 p.m. Ladies Auxiliary -Second Tuesday at 7 p.m. Post -Second Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday Spaghetti Dinner from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday Breakfast from 9 a.m. to noon Bar Bingo Monday at 6:30 p.m. Bar Poker with Lori on Wednesdays at 1 p.m. Fire in the Hole on Saturdays at 1 p.m.

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6 MARCH 1, 2012 If you have one piece of chocolate or one potato chip or one peanut, you will want another one. Same thing with beer. You can work hard to get through the pile of work on your desk, but when you come in the next morning, there will be a new stack. I think its elves. No one can do a presentation with electronics without something breaking. No one. I have found the perfect pair of shoes in the store, but invariably they did not have them in my size. If you are not the lead dog on a dog sled team, the view is all the same. Nothing tastes as good as thin feels. Wine is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy. He has also given us Godiva chocolate. Want to be extra happy? Get a bottle of that new chocolate wine! Once you find a product that is the perfect size, the perfect price and does exactly what you want it to do, they will stop making it. Now, none of these stream of consciousness thoughts will change the world or even change one life. I doubt Oprah will let me ghostwrite her column any time soon. But if even one of these made you smile today, then it was worth taking the time to write them down. And if you have a One Sure Truth youd like to share, send it to me I can always use a smile myself! TECH TALKBy: Dana Dittmar, Executive DirectorSCC Chamber News YOU, ME, AND BUSINESSPeriodically, when Im in the lobby of a doctors office or waiting for the oil to be changed in my car, I pick up whatever magazine is nearby to pass the time. The other week, it was O magazine. Its hard to tell which issue it was because Oprah always puts herself on every cover, but she has a column in the very back entitled Things I Know to be True. She usually writes of sentimental and fundamental things. Things designed to be life changing or at least life affirming. Most of them I agree with. And as I was reading this column, I got to wondering about the things I know to be true. I started writing them down whenever I thought of one, and came up with my own list. Here are a few of my rambling thoughts (in no particular order). Mom was right. Life is like a roll of toilet paper -it goes faster the closer you get to the end. (Wasnt it just the holidays and now its March?) As soon as you finally get around to entering someones email address into your contacts list, they will send you an email telling you they changed their address. If you wash your car, it will rain. If you mow the grass it will rain. If you plan a day at the beach, it will rain. When you take your vehicle to the mechanic because its making a funny noise, it wont make the funny noise in front of the mechanic.You, Me & BusinessBy Dana Dittmar Dove Interiors Carpet One is proud to present Sally Morse, world renowned designer, speaker and author. Sally MorseTen steps to a perfect roomBUSINESS NEWSTen steps to a perfect room is one of Sallys most popular seminars. It answers some of the most asked questions. Whether youre building a new home, moving into an older home, remodeling or just wanting to improve what you have, this is the seminar for you. Sally leads you through the steps of where to start your plan, then adding furniture, lighting, windows, walls, floors and accessories. The rule of thumb demystifies the process of decorating and makes anyone feel like a pro. Sally has appeared in Better Homes & Gardens, Windows and Walls, Real Simple and other interiors design publications. She has evolved from owning her own retail decorating business, to consulting with the largest manufacturers on interior design products in the world. This event will be held from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 8 in support of the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation. A $10 contribution will be collected from each person attending. All monies collected will go directly to the Foundation. There will be a grand prize drawing, food and fun. Register at Dove Interiors, 2305 College Avenue, Ruskin, or phone 645-8660. A vision recognizedThe Sun City Center Area Chamber of Commerce held a monthly coffee and ribbon cutting at OT Rehab Solutions in Sun City Center. They specialize in products and therapies for those with low vision. Keeping up to dateDon and Chris Guiley from A + Hearing Center, in Sun City Center, Fl. attended the 13th Annual Florida Continuing Education Workshop in Orlando, Jan 20 & 21, 2012. This years workshop wanted to focus on ways to build your business as these challenging economic times continue. The program consisted of the Florida Laws on Hearing Aid Dispensing, Infection Control for Hearing Healthcare Providers, How Loop Systems help us all, Advertising Mistakes and How to Avoid Them. This workshop is necessary to get the Continuing Education Hours needed for the Florida State License and International Institute Don and Chris Guiley from A + Hearing Center, in Sun City Center, Fl.for Hearing Instrument Studies, American Academy Audiology and American Speech-Language Hearing Association. For more information call 813-642-8200.

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MARCH 1, 2012 7 813-633-7333Fax 813-633-6420Tax PreparationCall today for your appointment and receive your FREE Tax OrganizerTax PreparationCall today for your appointment and receive your FREE Tax Organizer Tax Services, Inc. Filing No Charge (39 yrs exp.)Located in the Payant Financial Plaza1653 Sun City Center Plaza, SCC, FL 33573 Gibsonton Elementarys Terrific Kids Sun City Center Silent and Live Auction Set for March 26Hard to believeMarch is here! That means it is only a few weeks until the Sun City Center 50th Anniversary Auction on March 26 (5:30 p.m.) at the Renaissance Club. Tickets are $25 each will be sold March 1, 2, 5, 6 and 7 from 9 a.m. till noon in the Atrium on the SCC Central Campus, N. Pebble Beach Blvd. This event is open to the public. Is a hot air balloon ride on your bucket list? Or are you more interested in a weeks stay at a beach resort, or does a two-night, three-day stay at Little Harbor sound more appealing? Will you be the highest bidder for a baseball signed by pitcher Jeremy Hellickson of the Rays Baseball Team? Maybe a more practical item gets your attentionlike an area rug ($500 value) or that beautiful stone-paver entry for your home ($500 value). Perhaps you need new golf cart batteries or a new microwave. These are just some of the items that will be available to the highest bidders. It will be exciting to peruse the auction catalog for the wonderful items, then hearing the gavel sounding and the auctioneer announcing, Sold, to the lady in the purple dress! Cam McGary and Merlene Smithyman, co-chairs for the event, say they are excited about the word on the street about the high level of interest and expect all 200 tickets will be sold quickly. ClubLink, sponsor for the auction, is preparing the Renaissance clubhouse for arrival of the auction items. Ticket holders will enjoy complimentary beverages and hors doeuvres as they study their catalogs and view the items to be auctioned. This is one of the last major 50th Anniversary Celebration events, so buy your tickets early to reserve your spot. For further information, call 642-9800 (McGary) or 634-8387 (Smithyman).The following students were outstanding examples of what it means to be Inclusive: Ethan Hayes, Hailey Merrell, Aiyana Nowland, Harmonie Churh, Jazmin Sneed, Jannette Ortiz, Laylah Posey Davison, Wyatt Burger, Johnny Parker, Shawn Terry, Olivia Kimborough, Crystal Espinoza, Carlos Gutierrez, Courtney Sumner, Steven Marinez-Mata, Emily Sneed, Jessica Benitez, Samantha Martinez, Nyah Hickory, Amie Woodham, Eric Mayberry, Kaitlyn Pruitt, Austin Osteen, Diana Espinoza, Shane Canfield, Eduardo Reyes, Mark Nguyen, Darius Taylor, and Christian Ritter. Auction co-chairs Merlene Smithyman (L) and Cam McGary expect ticket sales to be brisk when they go on sale March 1.BY CARL McCGARY:Community Hall of SCC to host public concertsSwinging Into Spring The 18-piece Sarasota Jazz Project will come back to Sun City Center Community Hall, 1910 S. Pebble Beach Blvd., Sunday, March 4, 2-4 p.m. Open to public. Reserved seats. Tickets are $12. Sarasota Concert Band Three concerts will be performed by this 40-piece band at the Sun City Center Community Hall, 1910 S. Pebble Beach Blvd. from 2-4 p.m. on Sunday: April 22-Russian Romance, May 27-Latin Rhythms and July 1-Victory Celebrations. Open to public. Reserved seats. Tickets are $18 each or buy all three as a mini-series for $45 person. Both event tickets are on sale at the Community Association Office Mon-Fri, 9 a.m.-noon. For more information call 813-642-2001.Hillsborough County Parks, Recreation and Conservation is holding conferences designed to raise the level of awareness about positive life styles, and health and welfare of young Hillsborough County adults. The Girls Only Conference and the Men of Tomorrow Conference for Boys are each limited to the first 100 participants. Cost is $10 per person, or $5 for Rec2Six program participants. Registration deadline for the conferences held in March is Thursday, March 8. Men of Tomorrow Conference for Boys When: Tuesday, March 13, from 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Where: All Peoples Life Center, 6105 E. Sligh Ave. in Tampa Who: Young men, ages 10 to 16 Cost: $10 per person, $5 for Rec2Six program participants Registration Deadline: March 8, open to the first 100 participants Workshop topics include Dress for Success, Fitness and Nutrition, Disabilities Awareness, and Fishing. A free lunch will be provided by Brocatos Sandwich Shop. Keynote speaker Jason Romano is a former professional Major League baseball player, and currently works as an agent for Excel Sports Management, a full-service sports management and marketing agency that represents some of the top athletes in professional sports today. For more information call David Andrews, Parks, Recreation and Conservation at (813) 376-5755. Girls Only Conference When: Wednesday, March 14, from 9 a.m. 4 p.m. Where: Apollo Beach Recreation Center, 664 Golf and Sea Blvd. in Apollo BeachYoung Adults Conference scheduled for MarchWho: Young women, ages 10 to 15 years old Cost: $10 per person, $5 for Rec2Six program participants Registration Deadline: March 8, open to the first 100 participants Workshop topics include College and Careers, Dress for Success, Flourishing Faces and Nails, Zumba, and a presentation by the Hillsborough County Sheriffs Office. A free lunch will be provided by Brocatos Sandwich Shop. Transportation from some of Hillsborough Countys recreation centers might be available. A special presentation will be given on past participants and where they are now. For more information, contact the Ruskin Recreation Center at (813) 672-7881, or the Gardenville Recreation Center at (813) 672-1120. Business slow? Need to advertise? 813-645-3111 or visit www.observernews.net

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8 MARCH 1, 2012 813-633-3065 1515 Sun City Center Plaza Missing?We offer technologically advanced lens implants for cataract surgery patients, including Crystalens, ReSTOR and Toric which can improve vision near, far and in between!Call 813-633-3065 for a consultation with Dr. Jeffrey Davis to nd out which lens implant is right for YOU!Ask us how Lifestyle Lens Implants are helping many people enjoy clearer vision.Dont let cataracts hinder your lifestyle.Jeffrey Davis, M.D. Fellowship-trained Cornea Specialist, Lasik and Cataract SurgeonYourEyeDoctors.com What are youMissing? Dr. Robert A. NormanDermatologistDr. A. 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Must present coupon for special price. Must present coupon for special price. Citizen planners outline a future rooted in rural activity By MELODY JAMESON%  BALM Community planners here mean to keep this onceisolated pocket of Hillsborough agriculture on the country side. Six of the 10 goals identified in their draft Balm Community Plan focus on maintaining agrarian activity, conserving open land, encouraging recreation of a rural style and eventually establishing a hamlet or village core as alterations wrought by development transpire. Few trappings of urban or suburban lifestyles are coveted here. Citizen planners composed of both small homestead owners and large acreage holders have been at work on their guideline for a year, fashioning a mutually agreed-to vision of the little community which can trace its beginnings back a solid century. And, while their outlooks now committed to paper could undergo changes as they are discussed and reviewed during forthcoming months, the final concepts may be ready for open house exhibit in May, Principal Planner Lisa Silva said this week. If a May date cannot be scheduled, an early autumn timeframe is likely, the professional planner added. Silva, a member of The Planning Commission staff, has been assisting the citizen planners. Balm, established around turn of the 20th century by hardy rural families who earned livings in lumbering, crop farming, livestock ranching and phosphate mining, was generally unknown outside the South County region until late in the century. Balms settlers, proud of their selfsufficiency and able to meet their material, spiritual as well as educational needs locally, liked it that way. And many of their descendants still do. The first goal outlined in their plan draft calls for continued strong support of agricultural endeavors as the communitys economic base, whether from crop production or ornamental horticulture, tropical fish farming or livestock ranching. The plans third goal recognizes the potential need to diversify that base with alternative but related undertakings such as a comprehensive farmers market and community garden along with agricultural and ecological tourism, plus retail activity such as feed stores and machinery dealers. Cognizant of the Balm Scrub, the extensive, natural state acreage bordering the community to the north and acquired through the countys environmental lands purchase program, planners in their fifth goal call for creation of wildlife corridor connections to protect the areas mammal, reptile and avian inhabitants, for parking facilities plus rest rooms and tables to accommodate those using the scrub lands for passive recreation, as well as for minimizing light pollution and pervasive artificial light through nighttime lighting standards. Still focused on conserving the natural environment, the planners would have a multi-use pathway network through the community for biking, jogging, sightseeing, plus equestrian trails for riders and their mounts, as well as greenways connecting clustered housing and the village center when development comes. They made it all the crux of their ninth goal. Pointing out that the community has been burdened with such liabilities as a large assortment of borrow pits and an immense landfill, the citizen planners call also for a Hillsborough County Sheriffs substation to enhance community safety and a satellite office of the countys extension service to serve resident needs for help with composting, rain barrel water conservation and the like. In addition, they emphasize the importance of maintaining their historic post office recently threatened with closure in a U.S. Postal Service cost savings effort plus restoration to full use of their county park with its civic center building and recreational ball fields which has been impacted by county cutbacks. They also assert the value of expanding the community partnership with the University of Floridas ag research and experiment center on its east side. And, while other South Hillsborough community plans were hammered out only after intense debate over the number of housing units to be permitted per acre in a given area, Balms planners at this point have made it simple. They want the current rural housing density maintained: one unit per five acres or less, discouraging suburban scale density and conventional subdivision development. Yet, they realize, in time development will come to their settlement tucked away east of U.S. 301, still outside existing urban service areas, largely beyond public potable water lines and sewage disposal systems. When it does, they would have clustered housing with the village center situated near their longstanding post office and around the Andrews and Balm Roads intersection. Here they envision the commercial neighborhood of shops and eateries, perhaps a bed and breakfast inn, all of it connected via pedestrian linkages to the communitys churches, library, school, parks, etc. As Balms plan is being polished, Silva said contacts are being made with the various governmental agencies involved because of specific items included in the guideline. For example, she added, it is necessary to determine what if any changes on the county level must be made to facilitate creation of a community garden MELODY JAMESON PHOTOBalm residents may recognize their community no longer is an isolated pocket of South Hillsborough County, but they still want to preserve every aspect possible of their rural agricultural lifestyle. In their current community planning documents, they are maintaining open space for multiple reasons, including to allow for various continued farming and ranching endeavors such as the placid pastoral scene above.and to pin down rural design standards for community signage. The next community meeting on the plan is set for 6 PM, Tuesday, March 20, in Balms civic center building, Silva said. At that time, a Mosaic representative is expected to give the planning group an overview of the phosphate mining companys outlook for its not-yet-mined tracts in the Balm area. Copyright 2012 Melody Jameson NEVER PAINT, SPRAY-CRETE OR STUCCO YOUR HOUSE AGAIN OUR 7-STEP PROCESS #1 SINCE 1960CLIMATE PROOF COATINGSMWhole House Flex-CoatedSAVE YOUR ROOF w/PROTECTIVE COATINGCoupon worth $1,000Special Roof Coating Discounts SPRAY-COAT EXTERIORS, INC.Applied over Spray Crete, Stucco, Wood, Block or MetalLifetime Warranty Lifetime WeatherProong $1895Up to 1500 sq. ft. 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MARCH 1, 2012 9 Is Sedation Dentistry for you?Learn how Sedation Dentistry is helping patients with the following: Dont Miss Our FREE Seminar on Mini Implants, Sedation and Cosmetic Dentistry(Mini Implant seminar) (Cosmetic Dentistry and Sedation Seminar) Do you fear the dentist, but need dental work?Look more youthful... Feel more condent...You Deserve It!Your smile CAN reect the brighter, more youthful YOU!Dont miss this free, informative seminar!Cosmetic Dentistry Seating is Limited. Please Call For Reservations Zamikoff, Klement, Jungman & Varga Visit our website:www.suncitycenterdental.comfor more information LOOSE DENTURES?Learn about the amazing new MINI DENTAL IMPLANT SYSTEMThis is a one-step dental procedure that involves minimally invasive surgery, no sutures, nor the typical months of healing. The curtain falls on an era at the Ruskin Drive-InThis week marks the end of the 35mm film era at the Ruskin Drive-In. Beginning Monday, March 5, the iconic South Hillsborough theater will begin the conversion to digital movies through new equipment purchased to replace the aging but still functional 35mm film projector. Over the past year, the theater held several events to raise funds for the new equipment. But while the drive-in will soon be digital, most things wont change, including the family-friendly atmosphere, the availability of first-run movies and the need for customers to continue to support the theater by purchasing the reasonably-priced food and beverages from the theater snack bar. The first digital movie at the Ruskin Drive-In will be shown on Monday, March 9. Above, theater owner Ted Freiwald stands next to large platters of 35mm film for the old projector.MITCH T TRAPHAGEN PPHOTO making good livings for show owners and their families, making succeeding generations of showmen as sons followed fathers on the circuit of county fairs and church bazaars, civic celebrations and volunteer fire department fund raisers. They began finding their way to Gibsonton in the 1920s, eventually making it the preferred winter home for showmen where family ties and friendships could be renewed, animals rested, equipment repaired, and life slowed to a normal pace in reliably comfortable weather. At this point, five generations of carny showmen in the same family have made Gibtown their headquarters, says Lee Stevens, as he shows a visitor around the new International Independent Showmens Museum on the Gibsonton end of Riverview Drive. Stevens, a New York native who notes he left home to join the circus in his teens, is a past president of the 4700-member Showmens Association headquartered in an expansive complex on the south side of Riverview Drive, opposite the museum. As a member of the association board which oversees its several components among them a showmens retirement village, multiple charities, a scholarship program as well as the museum Stevens estimates the local showmens colony numbers at least 15,000. As a lifelong carnival feature operator and now a food concessionaire who soon will hit the road with his wife and the youngest of their four children to work venues in and around Chicago for the summer, he knows his industry from the inside out. It has great appeal, he points out, for the independent business individual. It may have a poor image with some on the outside the old grifter reputation he acknowledges, but it is a family whose members attach a high value to the camaraderie. There may be competition for bookings, but if youre broken down on the road, therell also be help. And their museum, he indicates, stands as testimony. The 40,000 square foot structure started about 14 years ago and finished with a $1.15 million donation from Jim Frederiksen, a manufacturer of carnival machinery, houses on two floors a wide assortment of antique equipment, historic printed materials and detailed exhibits that tell the carnival story most of it donated by practicing carnies. Theres the bright red 1918 Packard delivery truck that once rolled along small town streets, loaded with tents and gear headed Showmens museum first in nation%  See SHOWMENS MUSEUM, page 17 mMELODY JAmMESON PHOTOAs attention-getting as it would be on a carnival midway, this lighted sign inside the new showmens museum leaves no doubt as to its location. The museum, one of a kind initiated 14 years ago and completed recently with a $1.15 million donation, is housed in a 40,000 s.f. building that showcases the showmens art and artistry.

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10 MARCH 1, 2012 to get two months worth of medicine for the price of one. Shop around: Drug prices can vary from drugstore to drugstore, so its definitely worth your time to compare prices at the different pharmacies in your area. Using U.S.-based online pharmacies are another way to save 25 percent or more. Drugstore.com and familymeds.com are two good sites that provide solid savings, but there are dozens to choose from. If you opt for an online pharmacy, be sure you purchase from ones that have the VIPPS seal of approval (see vipps.info) from the National Association of Board of Pharmacy. Seniors enrolled in a Medicare prescription drug plan also need to make sure the online pharmacy theyre buying from is included in their network. Otherwise, the purchase may not count toward their deductible. Get a discount card: Many pharmacies have free or low-cost discount card programs that will let you buy generics for $4 or qualify for steeper discounts on other drugs. Other drug card programs worth a look include togetherrxaccess.com, rxsavingsplus.com, yourrxcard.com, rxfreecard.com, pscard.com and familywize.com. Search for drug assistance programs: If your income is limited, you can probably get help through drug assistance programs offered through pharmaceutical companies, government agencies and charitable organizations. To find these types of programs use benefitscheckup.org, a comprehensive website that lets you easily locate the programs youre eligible for, and will show you how to apply. Buy from Canada: This option offers savings between 50 and 80 percent on brand-name drugs, but its important to understand that its illegal to import drugs from Canada. The FDA, however, does not prosecute anyone who imports prescription drugs for personal use. If youre interested in this option, see pharmacychecker.com, an independent resource that finds the lowest prices from licensed and reputable Canadian pharmacies. (Note: This is not a good option for Medicare Part D beneficiaries because it will not count toward their deductible.) Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of The Savvy Senior book. Dear Savvy Senior What tips can you recommend to help me save on my drug costs? Im 62 years old, and currently take six different prescription medications that I can barely afford. Poorly Insured Dear Poorly, There are actually a variety of ways you can reduce your medication costs without cutting quality, but youll need to take a proactive approach. The following tips can also help seniors with a Medicare prescription drug plan avoid the donut hole coverage gap, or reduce their costs once they reach it. Here are some cost-cutting strategies to try. Check your insurance: If you have drug coverage, your first step is to find out what your plan does and doesnt cover. You can do this by visiting the insurers website or by calling their 800 number on the back of your insurance card. Once you have this information, share it with your doctor so (if possible) he or she can prescribe medications that are best covered by your plan. You also need to find out if your insurer has a mail-order service. This would help you to purchase your medications for 20 to 40 percent less. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist: Find out if the medications youre taking are available in a generic form or a less expensive brand-name drug (you can also look this up online at sites like destinationrx.com). About 75 percent of all premiums drugs on the market today have a lower-cost alternative. Switching could save you between 20 and 90 percent. Many chains like Wal-Mart, Target, Costco, Kmart, CVS, Walgreens and Kroger sell hundreds of generics for as little as $4 for a 30-day supply and $10 for a 90day supply. Another cost cutter is to buy your medications in bulk. Many pharmacies give discounts if you buy a three-month supply of drugs versus a 30-day supply. Also, find out if the pills youre taking can be cut in half. Pill splitting allows you By Jim Miller How to Save Money on Your Prescription Drug Costs THE SAVVY SENIORSouth Shore Regional Library to host juried Art ShowJoin the artists at the South Shore Regional Library, 15816 Beth Shields Way, Ruskin on Thursday, March 1 from 6 p.m.-7:30 p.m. The first juried Fiber Arts group show in the Crawford Gallery will have an opening reception to meet the artists. Barbara Agemi, Ruth Mahoney, Mary McLaughlin, Elizabeth Murrary, Joan Mynahan, Charlene Roberts, Diana Speedy, Barbara Siros, Nina Tatlock and Sandra Yavocik will be showing their work. Free to the public. Light refreshments and music will be provided. For more information, call Laurie Burhop at 273-3652. The Sanctuary has teamed up with Purinas Pets for Seniors to help adoptable pets at the Sanctuary find new homes and to help seniors find a new companion. Select dogs and all cats will be offered free to seniors (age 60+) thanks to Purina. All cats will be spayed/neutered, have shots, de-wormed, FIV/Leuk. test and microchipped for ID. Dogs will be spayed/neutered, have shots, de-wormed, a heartworm test and microchipped for ID. All dogs and cats also have 30days of FREE pet insurance. An adoption certificate along with a coupon for a free bag of Purina pet food is provided by Purina. Call 941-750-8185 for more information. Funds for this program are limited and available on a first come basis. Want to help keep the program going? Donate! Please mail donations to 20010 East SR 64, Bradenton, FL 34212 or anonymous cash donations can be dropped off at any Bank of America (Horse & Animal Sanctuary fundraising account). Veterinarian Expense Donations can be paid to Animal Medical Center of Bradenton, 3102 Cortez Road, Bradenton, FL 34207 or by calling in a credit card donation to (941) 753-6709.Pets to Seniors for freeCAPT Donald W. Aiken, Jr., USN (Ret.), Executive officer for the Aircraft Operations Center of NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) hurricane hunter will speak at the Silver Osprey Squadron luncheon on Friday, March 2. The meeting will be held at The Plaza Club, Freedom Plaza, 3932 Upper Creek Drive, Sun City Center. Meet and Greet is at 11:30, lunch at noon. CAPT Aiken directs the operation of the Lockheed WP-3 Orion and Gulfstream IV hurricane hunter aircraft based at Tampa, Fl. He will explain what its like to fly these aircraft in a hurricane and how these flights have helped predict the size and courses of some of the major Florida hurricanes.Silver Osprey Squadron hosts hurricane hunterCAPT Aiken graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1978, and became a Naval Aviator in 1980. He served on numerous carriers including the USS John F. Kennedy in 1990 during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm and the USS Kitty Hawk in 2000 He has over 4,300 flight hours and 700 arrested landings. Before assuming his current position, he retired from the Navy in 2005. This meeting is open to members and non-members. For reservations, contact Bill Shanks at 813-634-3194 or send an email to wshanks@tampabay.rr.com. To receive information about the Silver Osprey Squadron send an email to silverosprey@yahoo.com.

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Ruskin somehow manages to be the odd man out in things. Sun City Center has an identity, and the people who live there work hard to maintain it. Apollo Beach has an identity of sorts, mostly as a bedroom community, but there is also an inclusiveness found in the community. Gibsonton has an identity and, until recently, it had a certain exclusiveness among the many performers who called it home. Riverview, well Riverview is a big ol place filled with homes and people, and is right next to all of the big city amenities. But what is Ruskin? It always seems to be the odd man out. When I moved to Ruskin nearly 17 years ago, it had two tack stores and at least three grocery stores. I, of course, heard about the history of the place steeped in hard work, education and the arts, but saw little of the remnants in todays life. When the Coffee Cup disappeared and there were no more for $2 breakfasts at the Ruskin Cafe, it seemed the last threads to what Ruskin was and wanted to be were fraying away. When I was looking into opening a marine store back in 2000, I was told that people from Apollo Beach would not go to Ruskin. I was told that people from Sun City Center wouldnt go to Ruskin. Why not? OK, yes, Ruskin is a little eclectic. While Apollo Beach and Sun City Center have nicely planned streets and avenues, Ruskin is a good bit more ad hoc. There are houses in this community that have no real right-of-way access to a street. Over the years, stuff just MARCH 1, 2012 11 HILLSBOROUGH(813) 634-8310MANATEE(941) 524-2259 For a FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATE, call us TODAY!Shutter & Blind Manufacturing CompanySHUTTERS ~ VERTICALS ~ FAUX WOOD & WOOD HORIZONTAL BLINDS CELLULAR SHADES ~ WOVEN WOODS ~ SUNSCREEN SHADES ~ PRIVACY SHADINGS ~ MORE INSTALLED FREE! INSTALLED FREE! VERTICALS PLANTATION SHUTTERS$1395Sq. Ft. 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Guaranteed lowest price on all Stressless CONTEMPORARYTRADITIONAL Since 1986 HOME THEATER100s OF COLORS & STYLES TO CHOOSE FROMHURRY IN FOR THE BEST SELECTIONNOW THROUGH MONDAYIn Business YEARS! ELLENTON 2015 60th Ave. EI-75 Exit #224941-723-6100At the doorsteps of Prime Outlets SARASOTA 7261 S. Tamiami Tr. 941-926-3500 * By Mitch Traphagenmitch@observernews.net Everything changed in an instantIt was almost surreal being able to attend a live performance in Ruskin on Saturday night and it was certainly enjoyable. Above, performance artist Leland Faulkner display one of his thousand faces.MITCH T TRAPHAGEN PPHOTO happened, and things seemed to be randomly put together. One day, a silver travel trailer is new and shiny on an empty lot, the next day someone nails a bunch of plywood to it and that trailer becomes the living room of an inexpensive, oddlooking house. And yes, the randomness and ad hoc nature of things has made for a somewhat dangerous neighborhood or two. Shopping in town isnt quite what youd find in Apollo Beach, but eclectic isnt a bad thing and a little diversity adds some spice to life, as long as that doesnt include getting shot or continually having your yard ornaments stolen. In 17 years here, Ive never been the victim of a crime in Ruskin, unless I count the missing bicycle that I accidentally left unlocked at a marina bike rack for a year or so. Of course, there have been many crimes over the years, so maybe Im just lucky. There have been some horrific crimes in Apollo Beach and Sun City Center, too, but those are seen with surprise. Ruskin, again, is the odd-man out because people always seem to expect it here. The reality is that Ruskin isnt dangerous, and crime is actually lower here than in many parts of the Tampa Bay area. Yes, this place runs the gamut from outlandish to run-down and, lets face it, the main shopping center isnt exactly Fifth Avenue style. But somewhere in this community I can still hear a heart that has been beating for more than 100 years. The past few months have exemplified that with numerous gatherings to help people in need. There have been so many events lately that Im at a loss for new headlines because there are only so many ways to say Community steps up for. In my opinion, thats a good problem for a community to have. It shows that there is most certainly a heart in Ruskin. Even with my already fond feelings towards the community, everything I knew about Ruskin changed last Saturday night. I now know something of the Ruskin that the community has always wanted it to be a long spoken of, yet oft-forgotten vision for Ruskin has been transformed into reality. On Saturday night, Ruskin became a regional center for the arts. A group of people, with help from local, regional, and national businesses and organizations, worked their tails off to transform a decades-old, somewhat unattractive building that had been built to house fire trucks and firefighters into a regional cultural center. They did that work based entirely on faith: faith that people in Ruskin would see the potential in it and thus support it and faith that people in Sun City Center, Apollo Beach, Gibsonton and Riverview would make the trip to Ruskin to do the same. To me, it was the fulfillment of Ruskins destiny, all built on hard work, dreams and a shoestring. The large bays that once housed fire engines have been painted black, a stage with long curtains is in place in the largest bay at the far end, and there is seating for at least 100 people inside. On Saturday night, when performance artist Leland Faulkner took that stage, each and every seat was full. The show was a sellout. For the first time in my 17 years in Ruskin, my wife and I enjoyed live theater in a place dedicated to live theater and other performances. It felt good to see so many turn out, it felt great to hear their laughter and applause as Faulkner dazzled the audience with his worldly talent. It felt great to know that people my neighbors in this community cared so much to work so hard to make it happen. I can only imagine how they felt seeing all of their hard work come to fruition. For years, Ive heard that Ruskin was founded on the arts. On Saturday night, Ruskin returned to its roots. When the curtain went up and the applause began at the Firehouse Cultural Center, everything that anyone alive today has thought about Ruskin changed. This is going to leave a mark a good one, my wife Michelle said as we left the theater after Faulkners performance. Twenty years from now, people will remember this is when it all began. This community just emerged from being the odd man out to being what it was always meant to be a regional center for the arts and a resource for all of South Hillsborough. Saturday night in Ruskin you can catch a live show and, perhaps, enjoy dinner or cocktails afterwards. How cool is that? Find out more at www. firehouseculturalcenter.org. Encore of carnival glass presentationThe Palmetto Historical Park and Manatee Agricultural Museum are sponsoring two free presentations: Carnival Glass Beginnings to 2012 at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Saturday, March 3, in the Carnegie Library, 515 10th Ave. West, Palmetto. Presenters Carl Chapman and J.R. Leach, officers of the Tampa Bay Carnival Glass Club, will speak about the history of Carnival Glass, aspects of collecting the glass, and will have lots of time for questions and answers. Examples of the glass will be available for viewing and attendees are encouraged to bring glass to the presentation for identification and valuation. Two pieces per family. Reservations are needed, 941-721-2034. In addition, an exhibit of Carnival Glass is on display in the Carnegie Library and Agricultural Museum until March 15.

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SOUTHSHORE RREGIONAL LLIBRARY Kids Program/Event Highlights March 1-7 X 12 MARCH 1, 2012Family Story Time For ages 2-5 with a caregiver. Make reading time family time. Stories, action rhymes, songs, interactive activities, and crafts make up this fun 30-minute program that celebrates a love of reading. Children may wear pajamas and bring a blanket and favorite cuddly toy. Teen Advisory Board Meeting For teens in grades 6-12. Join the Teen Advisory Board to get involved with the Librarys teen programs or earn community service hours for graduation, scholarships and more. Event is funded by the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library. For children in grades K-5 with stories and cake on a plate. A craft you can make, so mark the date. Lots of fun to partake, so dont be late. It will be great, cant hardly wait! Refreshments will be provided. Event is funded by the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library. Baby Time For children ages 0-20 months and their caregivers. Early literacy begins at birth. Bond with your baby through stories, bouncy rhymes and songs in this 20-minute lapsit program that introduces early literacy skills and encourages language development. Join them for this special play based on the classic fairy tale. Featured in the play are Snow White, The Queen and her Mirror; however, instead of the Seven Dwarfs, meet Doc Dwarf and his rock band in the woods. Presented by the Twig Theater South and The Pelican Players. This is a school early release Monday. Teen/Adult Printing Without a Press Join Art Instructor Tim Gibbons and create and explore the many possibilities of printing. You will go home with some completed printing projects. Limit 20. Registration required at either the Information Desk or by calling 273.3652. Funding for this program provided by the Friends of SouthShore Regional Library. Toddler Time For children ages 20-36 months and their caregivers. Stories, fingerplays, songs and interactive activities make up this fun 20-minute program that highlights early literacy skills and encourages reading readiness. Story Time For children ages 3-5 and their caregivers. Stories, action rhymes, songs and interactive activities make up this engaging 30-minute program that highlights early literacy skills, and encourages reading readiness and social interaction. Eagles Set Their Weekly ActivitiesThe Ruskin Eagles, FOE, located at 1205 1st St. S.W. has scheduled the following weekly activities. All events and activities of the Eagles Club are supported by the members and members guests. The FOE Aerie meet at 7 p.m. the 1st and 3rd Thursday of the month. The Ladies Auxiliary meets at 7 p.m. on the 2nd and 4th Thursday. Eagle Riders meet the 2nd Sunday of the month at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, March 1 -Bar Games at 1 p.m. Friday, March 2 Feather Your Nest Game at 6 p.m. Saturday, March 3 Chicken and Rice Dinner by Thea at 5 p.m. Music by The sister Act from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. Sunday, March 4 Feather Your Nest Game at 6 p.m. Monday, March 5 Bingo at 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 6 Come on down and socialize. Wednesday, March 7 Wings and Things at 5 p.m. OH SO GOOD! Bar Games at 6 p.m. For more information, call the club at 645-2922. James C. Smith of Rochester, NY shot a hole-in-one on Feb. 20, 2012 on the 4th hole at the Apollo Beach Golf Club of Apollo Beach, FL. He used a 6 Iron and drove the ball 150 yards. This feat was witnessed by Ken MillsHOLE-IN-ONE High schoolers invited to experience university life Only 45 percent of American students who enroll in college will ultimately earn a bachelors degree. Pre-College programs introduce high school students to the university experience. USF Pre-College 2012 provides high schoolers opportunities to explore university-level academics in an intensive, exciting, and enjoyable on-campus environment. Programs offer high school students the opportunity to pursue academic interests, discover career opportunities, earn college credit, and explore the experience of university life. We believe that the more familiar you are with university life, the better prepared you will be when you enter college in the near future, affirms Stuart Silverman, dean of the University of South Floridas Honors College. This summers line-up offers a diverse group of learning experiences to high school students. Programs are enriched with field trips that take Pre-College students from theory to practice. Students may enroll in one or more of the twelve programs, selecting from a broad range of academic disciplines. University faculty provide innovative instruction in a handson learning environment that encourages creative problem solving. Programs range from one day to three weeks and offer residential, commuter or online access. Program registration, full schedules, and detailed descriptions are available on the web: http://usf.edu/precollege. Application deadline is June 1, 2012. This years offerings include the following programs: 1. Architecture USF School of Architecture 2. Global Sustainability USF School of Global Sustainability 3. Mechanical Engineering USF College of Engineering 4. Computer Science USF College of Engineering 5. Biomedical Engineering USF College of Engineering 6. American Sign Language USF College of Behavioral & Community Sciences 7. Art and Design USF School of Art & Art History 8. Music USF School of Music 9. Online Music USF School of Music 10. Marine Science USF College of Marine Science 11. Film Studies USF College of Arts and Sciences 12. S.T.E.M. (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) USF College of Arts and SciencesLennard FFA Chapter takes first placeFFA members from all across Hillsborough County gathered to compete in the county level Nursery Landscape and Floriculture Career Development Event, held Jan. 26 at the County Extension office. Among these competitors were several members representing the Lennard FFA Chapter; Joy Bordner, Kyle Bowman, Randall Casey, Natalie Hausler, Rebecca Knowles, Tyler Leonard, Rey Penaloza, Roger Smith, and Lucas Worley. These students were required to demonstrate their knowledge of the horticulture and floriculture industry through a series of identification practicums and a general knowledge assessment. In the individual placings Kyle and Rey tied for fourth high individual, Randall earned second high individual, and Lucas earned high individual, and first in all of the contest categories. The Lennard FFA Chapter team placed first overall in the competition. From left to right: Kyle Bowman, Joy Bordner, Madi Brown, Lucas Worley, Erin Elsberry, Rebecca Knowles, Natalie Hausler, Randall New Eagle ScoutDistrict Vice Chairman Michael van Hoek presents the Eagle Certificate to new Eagle Scout David Timothy Watts, of Riverview, at a National Court of Honor convened on Feb. 11 at the 1st United Methodist Church of Brandon. For his Eagle Scout Service Project, David led a team of fellow Scouts in making needed repairs to the exterior and grounds of the Brandon Outreach Clinic. David is a member of Boy Scout Troop 610, chartered by St. Stephens Catholic Church, and is the son of Timothy and Suzy Watts. Troop 610 is led by Scoutmaster Stu Gray and former Scoutmaster Mike Mann. WAVES Unit #55 to meetAttention, all Women of the Military Sea Service. Tampa Bay WAVES Unit #55 will meet at 11 a.m. on Saturday, March 10, at St. Matthews Anglican Church, 10701 Bloomingdale Ave., River view in St. Annes Hall, located at the rear of the church building. Member ship in the Unit and in the parent organization, WAVES National, is open to all women who served honorably (including those currently serving) in the U.S. Navy, Navy Nurse Corps, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, or Maritime Service, or related reserve components. For more information, call Jeannette Green at (813) 657-9164.Comfort dinner plannedThe American Legion Auxiliary, Alafia Unit 148 will hold a comfort dinner from 5 to 7 p.m. on Saturday, March 10 at 7240 U.S. Hwy. 301 in Riverview. The dinner will consist of Southern smoked chicken, roasted red potatoes, green beans, salad and dessert. Cost is $7 per plate. Rick and Ed will provide entertainment from 7 to 11 p.m. The public is cordially invited. Proceeds will go to various Auxiliary projects. For more information, call Kay Gialenios at (704) 996-5285.

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MARCH 1, 2012 13 We are a AAA Approved Auto Repair CenterAt Home Auto Care, Inc.(813) 645-0339 Riverside Golf813.645.2000 $38................before noon$30...................after noon$20...................after 3 pm $500 OFF Any RoundGolf Lessons $20Includes 18 holes and cart. Tax Included.Valid only with this coupon. Exp. 3/31/12Visit our New, Improved PRO SHOP1 Pier Drive, RuskinLEAGUES WELCOMEReserve your tee time today CASUAL WATERFRONT DININGSteaks, Seafood, Burgers & Other Delicious FareFULL LIQUOR BARLive Music Every Wednesday and SaturdayOPEN TO TH E PUBLICTuesday-Saturday 11-8 pm NOW OPEN Sunday 11-6 pm for Lunch and NFL Direct TV Sunday Ticketwww.RiversideBarAndGrille.com FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC. FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.Registered Investment Advisor Robyn PayantPresidentTom PayantChairman & CEOWe offer retirement planning and services tailored to your individual needs since 1979 Visit our website at www.PayantFinancial.com Thomas A. Payant oers securities and insurance products through SagePoint Financial, Inc. and its aliates, member FINRA/SIPC. Thomas A. Payant oers investment advisory services through Payant Financial Services, Inc., a registered investment advisor not aliated with SagePoint Financial, Inc. BRANDON PEST CONTROLPhone: (813) 685-7711Fax: (813) 685-360710 Locations in Florida, Georgia & Tennessee CALL FOR FREE INSPECTIONASK ABOUT TERMIDORCelebrating 38 Years in Business TERMITES? 2011 Allstate Insurance Company The population of our area has tripled this time of year. We have a bay full of boats; many of them being out of state. This is the peak of our tourist season. So many questions come my way about fishing. It might be fun and interesting to you as I reminisce back in time of the so-called good ol days on our waterways. It was 1821 that Florida became a state. Before railroads and automobiles, the only transportation, except for oxen and horses, was boats. The Indians had boats made from trees, and canoes made from animal skins. Fishing was the only means of survival. Florida was full of palm fronds, underbrush, snakes, and mosquitoes. It was hot and no one thought Florida was a paradise, as we do today. Many prisoners from northern states sent to Florida as a punishment died in the heat and infested areas. People looking for adventure were migrating to Florida to start a new life. It was around the 1900s that marine engines were available. Still most all boats were operated by rowing or pushed with a pole. Those who could not afford an engine, rigged up sailboats and sailed with the wind. Tom Saffold, a pioneer of this area, had a twomasted schooner with no engine which he used on high tide. Globe engines were installed in many boats after money started to flow in the area. One of the stories Waterways are full of fishtold about the pioneer fishermen was that of Nebraska Buzbee, who would fish all day for a living, but would always take part of his catch and feed the whole neighborhood. They would be at shore when his boat arrived. A famous boat in the area is the Kilkare, owned by the Dickmans. This boat has been replaced many times, but still bears the name. Pioneer river boaters were: Charlie Jahns, Tom and Andrew Anderson, Lewis Smith, Dan Graves, Selner boys, Malachi Denson, Norton Williams, Tom Saffold, Paul Dickman, and Capt. Thomas. The area waters were teeming with fish in those days. Some say that you didnt need a fishing pole, they just jumped into your boat as you glided by. In this century of the electronic gadget, fishing is more or less the same, but perhaps more complicated. There are many who still fish with a rod and pole, and some still row their own boats. Our waterways are full of fish, so, go fishing. I saw many fat seatrout, sheepshead, a red or two, flounder, amberjack, permit, and a cobia at the docks in the baitwells of anglers. Fish for fun; watch out for the Florida sun. Aleta Jonie Maschek is a member of Florida Outdoor Press.By Jonie Maschek FISH TALESBoating Safety Classes offered The About Boating Safety course satisfies the education requirements that anyone in Florida who was born after January 1, 1988, must take a boating safety course in order to operate a boat of 10 hp or more. Other states require boaters to have boating safety education if they were born after a certain date, meaning boaters of all ages will eventually be required to have taken a course. The About Boating Safety course offered by the Coast Guard Auxiliary satisfies the education requirement in Florida and most Southern states. This course gives boaters of all ages a solid background in boating safety and covers subjects including boat handling, weather, navigation rules, trailering, federal regulations and more. Many insurance companies also give discounts for having taken the boating safety education course. The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 75 will present a 9 hour beginner class that will give the student the knowledge to earn a boating license from the State of Florida. Classes will be held on Thursday nights, March 8, 15, and 22 from 7 10 p.m. at the Tampa Sailing Squadron, 1250 Apollo Beach Blvd., Apollo Beach. For more information, call Guy Mandigo at (813) 641-2488.Safe boating students work out a navigation problem at Tampa Sailing Squadron. S.T.A.R.T. to meetScience & Technology Active Round Table (S.T.A.R.T.) will meet from 7:30 9 p.m. on Monday, March 12, Caper Room, Atrium Building, N. Pebble Beach Blvd., SCC At this meeting Walt Prouty will discuss, The Making of a Pharmaceutical Drug. No cost; all who are interested in science and technology subjects are invited.Hillsborough County Commissioner Al Higginbotham, District 4, and the Board of County Commissioners welcomed Florida Strawberry Festival representatives to the County Center for the sixth consecutive year to proclaim March 1 through 11, as Florida Strawberry Festival Days. This years presentation had a unique twist, as royalty history was made in the selection of the 2012 Strawberry Queen. Chelsea Bowden, current Strawberry Queen, is the granddaughter of two former Strawberry Queens, Barbara Alley Bowden and Ruby Jean Barker Redman. Commissioner Higginbotham asked grandmothers Bowden and Redman to attend the presentation. It is a great day when I get to welcome a bit of my hometown into downtown Tampa. The Strawberry Festival and the agriculture industry have consistently had a positive impact on the economy of Hillsborough County. Im proud of Plant City and the international fame of the Florida Strawberry Festival, said Commissioner Al Higginbotham. He encouraged all residents to visit the Festival, preserve its rich heritage, and celebrate the strawberry harvest. The Florida Strawberry Festival has been an ongoing tradition since 1930. Today, the Festival continues to draw major recording artists and a paid attendance of more than 500,000 people. For the third consecutive year, the annual event has been named a Blue Ribbon Fair by the Florida Federation of Fairs and recognized by the Southeast Tourism Society as a Top 20 event in the Southeast. Hillsborough Countys Agriculture Industry Development Program estimates the strawberry acreage is the highest sales crop at $366,046,522, representing 44.9 percent of the Countys total agricultural sales. Hillsborough County produces 90 percent of the strawberries grown in Florida, and nearly 11 percent of the strawberries grown in the nation. For information on the Florida Strawberry Festival, visit www.flstrawberryfestival.com.Its Strawberry Festival time

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14 MARCH 1, 2012 BIG or SMALL... we do em allDirect Farm PricesSpecializing in Re-Sodding Beautiful, Drought-Tolerant Lawns 813-645-6911 before afterJohn V Dunne, MD, FACS In Office Procedure 813.634.9260Insurance Accepted SUN CITY CENTER Sunhill Medical Arts Bldg. Why Go Anywhere Else?Let a Board Certified Vascular Surgeon & Vein SpecialistEliminate Your Ugly Veins! Americas Carwash NOW OPEN SUNDAYS 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.RAIN CHECK: Bring in your receipt for any full service wash within 48 hours and receive an Express Wash for $1.00 (on same vehicle) ANY FULL SERVICE WASH ONLYWith this coupon only. Not valid with other specials or discounts. $1.50 extra for vans and SUVs. 3/31/12EXPRESS HAND WAXMost vehicles. With this coupon only. Not valid with other specials or discounts. Additional charge for oversize vehicles. 3/31/12 $2 OFF$3995GET YOURMONTHLY CAR WASH PASSPay once a month and come as often as you like! CARDS 728 Cypress Village Blvd.Sun City Center, FL813-634-9409 Next to Sonnys I purchased a brand new Saturn Vue for nearly $20,000. It barely made it over the 100,000-mile mark before the repairs it needed exceeded its remaining value. From a dollar standpoint, the Saturn was far more extravagant than the Porsche. Thats some twisted irony in my opinion. Heck, the Porsche even got better gas mileage. But as the years have passed, the alone, and there was the little matter of an approaching snowstorm. Michelle offered well-meaning but impractical suggestions (How about I meet you in South Carolina and you just drive really, really close behind me?) and I began to feel as though fate had finally caught up with me. I began to feel as though I would be stuck in that motel near an auto parts store in Virginia for the rest of my life with just one change of underwear and a car that had no headlights. Then, with a spark of optimism, I remembered the Auto Train. Last year, Michelle and I took our first trip on the Auto Train and it was a wonderful experience. Departing just south of Washington and running non-stop to Sanford, Florida, it was an adventure unto itself. And now, it had the potential to get me home before the weekend ran out. A quick, late night call to Amtrak secured a ticket in coach class and a place for my car it was the last remaining seat on the train. Last year, Michelle and I had our own miniature room (known as a roomette) on the train; this time I would be in a coach seat for the 17hour trip. I asked the representative about having a window or aisle seat and was told the porter would help with that. I decided it didnt matter I had a way to get home. But it turns out it does matter. It matters a lot. As a solo traveler, being assigned to the wrong side of the window or aisle seat debate on the Auto Train is the difference between the God-given freedom we have come to expect in this country and a miserable steerage-class, prison-like misery from which there is, seemingly, no escape while your seat-mate rests her feet on the provided footrest and keeps her yogurt containers on her fold-down tray. Oh yes, it does matter. Suddenly, the thought of spending the rest of my life in a motel near an auto parts store in Virginia looked pretty darn good. Before the train even started moving, I could feel my mind slipping away into madness. Within the first minute of arriving at my seat, I had to disturb my seatmate twice and she did make it known it was a disturbance. The first disturbance was simply to get into my seat. The second was to put my backpack away in an overhead shelf when it immediately became obvious I didnt have room for it by my seat. As she reassembled her tray table and footrest, it was clear that there would be no more excursions for me. And then, just before insanity completely engulfed me, a miracle happened: my seatmate got up to throw away one of her containers of yogurt. It was then I made my escape with thoughts of fleeing the train. As I ran and ducked past my seatmate in the aisle, the train lurched forward. We were underway. I was a long 17 hours from Florida and effectively homeless on the Auto Train. But...I was free. All aboard! In next weeks Observer News, come along for the ride as we make the trip home to Florida. As things somehow tend to do, it all turned out OK.Planes, Trains and Craigslist%  model of car I wanted has become harder to find. People who did not consider the little things the cars need, like a new timing belt every 30,000 miles, bought them on the cheap and paid a price for the neglect. Where five years ago I would see 50 of them for sale on eBay, today there are routinely fewer than 20 and many of those are offered at premium prices or are project cars in various states of disassembly. And then, almost magically, the exact car I was looking for appeared in an ad near Washington, D.C. My wife fired off an email to the seller expressing our interest. The emails turned into telephone calls and by 11 p.m. on a recent Thursday night, a deal was struck. By 11:15 p.m., I had a one-way ticket to Washington that was scheduled to depart just seven hours later. For those few hours, I slept fitfully wondering what airport security could have in store for a guy who purchased a last minute, one-way ticket to Washington, D.C. and had no luggage. The next morning (entirely unmolested by airport security) I arrived to a brisk, cold wind blowing through the nations capitol. Shivering, I watched as a white Porsche slipped through the traffic outside Washington-Dulles International Airport. The seller greeted me with a smile and a handshake and held open the drivers door. My test drive would be from the airport to the bank near his home in Arlington. The car was everything I had hoped for, but the abrupt shift from Ruskin to Washington and the associated lack of sleep left me in no position to assess the situation adequately. The seller, a 30-year employee at the Pentagon, thought I was crazy. I decided to forego the madness on Interstate 95 and started making my way home via I-81, through the Appalachian Mountains. It was a beautiful day for driving, but the cold wind from the morning was foretelling an approaching snowstorm. I needed to get out of the north as quickly as possible. Like a fool overflowing with the optimism only a fool can have, I had only packed for a single overnight. Indeed, 200 miles into the trip home, a single overnight seemed possible. But then, a little voice inside my head started nagging at me. I had checked the engine oil, but had failed to check other small, but important, details. It almost came as no surprise that the headlights didnt work. I pulled into an auto parts store, spent a small fortune on tools, an electrical meter and wire, and spent the next few hours under the car in the parking lot diagnosing the problem only to conclude: the headlights did not work. I was nearly 900 miles from home on an unplanned, unscheduled trip, a snowstorm was approaching and the headlights on the car did not work. That was a problem, but what really bothered me was that I had done this three times before and never with any of those cars did I NOT have to crawl underneath each of them for something during the maiden trip home. One that I purchased in Boston left a trail of broken alternator belts until I finally managed to correct the problem a thousand miles down the road. Another, picked up in Virginia, had the heat stuck on an unattractive feature for a car purchased in late July. A sailboat purchased on Cape Cod had enough stuff go wrong for eleven parts of a newspaper series. For reasons that remain unclear, I didnt prepare for anything in buying this car. I had packed only a nice jacket and a decent change of clothes and soon the realization sunk in that I was not only crazy but also, quite possibly, a moron. With hours of good driving remaining, the sunset ended any further progress I would make that day. I quickly calculated that the weekend simply wasnt long enough to get home during daylight hours A sign at the motel near the auto parts store in Virginia appropriately summed up my adventure with yet another sports car purchased sight-unseen from a guy on the Internet.MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO

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16 MARCH 1, 2012 www.mosaicfla.com As we mine the phosphate needed to help grow the worlds food, its no coincidence that we preserve the water quality of nearby creeks and rivers. As an environmental specialist, Im part of a team that monitors these bodies of water to ensure that the water quality is sustained or even enhanced. Mosaic takes great care to meet Floridas clean water standards. Because stewardship is an integral part of what we do. And I see to it that the job is done right. The Importance of Colorectal Cancer ScreeningsPresented by Dr. Ashok Dhaduvai, Gastroenterologist at South Bay HospitalMarch is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Celebrate by learning about the importance prevention and early detection.March 29th, 12:00 1:00 p.m. South Bay Hospital Medical Auditorium 1901 Haverford Plaza, Suite 106, Sun City Center. (Behind South Bay Hospital) Fr ee lun c h and gi veaway s p rov ide d t o all att endee s. T o r egis t er f or t he semi n ar s, c all 18 88-685-1595 Di ne w ith the Doctor CLIP & SAVERSVP2 days prior to event to...Assisted Living Facility License #4991813-634-3347 813-634-3347 MARCH EVENTS Thur., March 1 C.O.A.P. (Children of Aging Parents) an Tues., March 6 Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) Support Group. Wed., March 7 Therapeutic Tai Chi Grief, Loss or Depression Support Group UV Radiation and Your Skin. COPD Support Group St. Patricks Day Celebration! Low Vision Support Group SCC Security Patrol members cruise to raise fundsTwenty eight Sun City Center Security Patrol members recently completed a five day fund raising cruise from the Port of Tampa to the West Caribbean. Twenty two cruise participants were from the Simmons Lake area of Sun City Center. The cruise traveled to Cozumel and Costa Maya, Mexico. All enjoyed fine weather, great food and a super time. Patrol Chief Mike Albanese wants to thank all those who took this cruise that benefited the Patrol.PHOTO COURTESY OF MIKE ALBaANESE, CCHIEF OF Pa A TROL Deadline ReminderNews Releases. ................. . ....................... . ...................... Questions? Call: 813-645-3111

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MARCH 1, 2012 17 SAVE UP TO 40%$39 INSTALLATIONon Karastan carpet, Americas Finest Carpet plus FREE Karastep carpet pad ($7/yd. value)ANY SIZE HOUSE, ANY SIZE ROOM, ANY CARPET. SOUTH TAMPA 1510 SOUTH MACDILL AVE. 254-4066 CARROLLWOOD 14306 N. DALE MABRY HWY. 961-1362 BRANDON 1920 W. BRANDON BLVD. 413-8313 18 MONTHS NO INTEREST Showmens museum to set-up, and the 1929 Ford pick-up once loaded with pretty carnival women calling attention to the coming event and a horseless carriage like the one Buffalo Bill used to promote his shows. Theres wall after wall of show banners which, like labeled cigar boxes and fruit crates, demonstrates the large number and colorful naming creativity of amusement operators. There are ride cars that go back many decades and a delightful hard-carved goat which once graced a merry-go-round and the fun house mirror that warped the image of everyone who stepped in front of it. Theres the fullyassembled Ferris wheel resting on the ground floor but reaching toward the peaked ceiling above the second. Theres the 60foot-long midway in miniature, displaying in minute carved detail every conceivable ride and food station and side show, lovingly hand made during off seasons by a Michigan carnival operator. Unlike the conventional circus, Stevens emphasizes, the carnival offers interactive entertainment. Tucked away on the second floor, reached either by a grand staircase or a new elevator, is a library inviting attention to dozens of books related to the industry and outside are several of the large carnival trailers which, with their brightly lettered signage, could excite an entire community when they arrived, forecasting the wonders of the carnival soon to welcome one and all. As many features as the museum has, though, its not finished yet. Stevens foresees a repair workshop on the second floor as well as more displays. But whats needed most at the moment is a curator, he adds. Someone who can become familiar with the industry and the pieces on display; someone able to maintain regular museum open hours, to relate to the public, give tours, provide a comprehensive understanding of the industry for both school youngsters and seniors, he notes. And if they have grant writing experience, it would be good. Stevens can be reached through the association office 813-6773590. Meanwhile, hes anticipating some help from the University of South Florida in cataloguing a collection of written materials, some of it detailing first hand showmen experiences, and looking ahead to future exhibits. The industry is changing rapidly, he says, incorporating new technology such as LED lights and computerized equipment. Someday, that, too, will be part of the carnival industry history, another display for the countrys only showmens museum.Copyright 2012 Melody Jameson If only this 1929 Ford pick-up could talk, the tales it might spin could entertain visitors for hours. Veteran showmen say that even in the depths of the Great Depression, Americans would scrape together enough coins to escape for a few hours on the visiting shows midway.MELODY JAMESON PHOTOSNearly a century of showmens history is being displayed in this soon-to-open International Independent Showmens Museum (above) at the Gibsonton end of Riverview Drive, opposite the Showmens Association complex. Several large trailers which formerly hauled carnival equipment around the country for the bigger show producers are located on the grounds while inside antique vehicles, rides and banners trace the evolution of the industry which began with the Worlds Fair in 1893.At left, an old midway ride car, originally part of a carnival ride that operated on tracks. The wooden car would have seated four to six comfortably and probably was not subject to the safety restrictions that carnival operators now enforce. It is no doubt older than Lee Stevens (seated in it), a Showmens Association past president and lifelong amusement show operator whose career began when he left home as a teenager to join a circus. Tucked away in the museum is a quiet nook well suited to a growing industry library decorated, of course, with colorful carnival posters. Handwritten notes by carnival people recalling their experiences and numerous photographs await library literate personnel from the University of Florida who, the showmen hope, will properly catalog the collections.

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18 MARCH 1, 2012 www.staylittleharbor.com Try our new$8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.We have expanded to include: p.p. GOT SCREENED?IF YOU ARE CONCERNED ABOUT A SKIN GROWTH, WE WOULD BE HAPPY TO EVALUATE IT FOR YOU. CALL TODAY FOR A FREE SKIN CANCER SCREENING!NOW ACCEPTING AV-MED INSURANCE Howard A. Oriba, M.D. | Michael G. Caruso, M.D. | Leslee Baute, P.A.The Skin Cancer Centers / Dermatology Associates4002 Sun City Center Blvd. Unit 102 Sun City Center, FL 33573(One Block West of the Hospital)813-634-1455 SIGN UP FOR A FREE SKIN CANCER SCREENINGBRING THIS COUPON IN TO RECEIVE A FREE GIFT! Select Duette Architella Honeycomb Shades can reduce energy loss by up to 40%.Save on stylish window fashions that help insulate your home, now through March 31. Duette Architella Honeycomb ShadesEnergy SaleinSave SAVE* Vignette Tiered Architella Shades$50per unitVignette Modern Roman Shades$40per unitBUY 2 OR MORE OF ANY COMBINATION OFSAVE* Duette ArchitellaHoneycomb Shades$25per unitDuette Honeycomb Shades$20per unitBUY 4 OR MORE OF ANY COMBINATION OF DOVE INTERIORS CARPET ONEFLOOR & HOME 2305 College Ave. E Ruskin, FL(1 mile west of I-75 Exit 240-B) www.doveinteriorscarpetone.com813-645-8660CARPET | HARDWOOD | VINYL | TILE | LAMINATE | BLINDS | SHUTTERS | WE REPAIR BLINDS Call Kim for details* Manufacturers rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made between 1/16/2012-3/31/2012. A qualifying purchase of any of the product models set forth above in the quantities set forth above. If you purchase less than the specified quantity, you will not be entitled to a rebate. Rebate offers may not be combined. All rebates will be issued in U.S. dollars, in the form of an American Express Prepaid Reward Card. Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas, Inc. BYOD (Bring Your Own Dog) to CARE happy hour at IncognitosCARE, the no-kill Critter Adoption and Rescue Effort, will hold a fundraising happy hour event at Incognitos at the Mira Bay Sweetbay Plaza in Apollo Beach on Wednesday, March 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. The event is designated as B.Y.O.D. Bring Your Own Dog (must be dog-friendly, well-behaved, leashed, spayed or neutered and current on shots the dogs, not humans, of course). The $5 entry fee to the CARE fundraising event includes six raffle tickets for possible prizes. Food and beverages from Incognitos will also be available for purchase. Above, a dog from CARE helps to distribute information about the event (and raise a little cash) during the Southshore Sunday Market in Ruskin.MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO League of Women Voters meeting set Members of the League of Women Voters, South County unit, will meet at 2 p.m., Saturday, (March 3) in the computer room of the SouthShore Regional Library. The non-partisan, not-for-profit League is dedicated to public education on issues impacting citizens and stands for responsible, responsive, accountable government. Unit President Melody Jameson is available to present programs about the League, its history, its mission and its current positions for organizations in South Hillsborough County. She can be reached via email at mchinnae@aol.com. League membership is open to both women and men. All visitors are welcome.An angel gets her wings at the Southshore MarketCrowds turned out to check out local vendors offering wares at the monthly Sunday Southshore Market at the corner of U.S. 41 and Shell Point Road in Ruskin. Along with seafood, farm fresh vegetables, pastries and bread were vendors offering everything from photography and jewelry to gossamer wings. Above, a young woman checks out a pair of those wings from the Bel Amour booth. Right, a sample is cut from a angelic-looking rum cake at the Bear Cakes booth. The market is held the last Sunday of each month.MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTOS

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MARCH 1, 2012 19 A+ Hearing CenterMonday through Friday 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.Premium Digital ProcessorNew 100% Custom Digital 3-Dimensional Hearing Aid$899 Compare elsewhere for $1,800Any Hearing Loss, Any Size Aid just $899FITS ANY HEARING LOSS!! Multi-Channel 100% Computer Programmable Get What You See Advertised! $799SPARO 2 OTEPremium Digital Processor Fits Any Loss HEARING LOSS? Hearing Aids Available for any Budget SALEPOLICYOur assortment includes discont inuedmodels,fl oor samples,spe cial purch ases and one-of-a-kind merch andise. Quantitiesare limited. All merch andiseis sold as-is and all salesare final.Noexcha nges.Noref unds.NoC.O.D. purch ases.No holds.No phoneor mailor ders. Delivery fees apply. All majorcr edit cards accepted. Sorry weare una bletoa cceptMacysCre dit Cards.*HighlandParkFurnitureisanauthorizedLicenseeofMacys.NotallmerchandiseofferedforsaleisprovidedbyMacys. StockAvailabilityonFirstComeFirstServed. HurryforBestSelection STOREHOURS:Mon-Fri.10-7pm;Sat.10-6pm;Sun12-5Furniture&MattressClearanceCenter Visit ourwe bsite:Ta mpaFur niture.com Local Stores withInternetSavings Includes Dresser, Mirror, Queen Headboard, Footboard and Rails. Matching Chest and Night Stand also available.BrandonStoreSR-60,1/4mileWestofI-75 atFalkenburg byHomeDepot813-626-2297Bradenton StoreI-75 and S.R. 70 next to Lowes941-739-6400by Highland Park Furniture LIMITED QUANTITIES IN FACTORY PACKAGING Motorized LIFT Reclinersstarting at South Hillsborough Elks Lodge #2672 Upcoming ActivitiesEvery Tuesday Jam Session 3 to 5 p.m. No charge for all Elks and their guests. Every Wednesday Best Spaghetti in Town $7, All You Can Eat, for all Elks and their guests. Music by Bryan from 5 to 8 p.m. Every Friday Seafood and Sandwiches for all Elks and their guests from 5 to 7 p.m. Karaoke by Bryan from 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday, March 3Cyndi, A One Girl Band, 6-9 p.m., $8 including Snacks. Monday, March 5 and March 19 Blue Plate Special, $7 with all the trimmings, 5 p.m. Saturday, March 17 St Patricks Day Celebration, Music by Bryan Ashley, Menu: Corn Beef and Cabbage with all the trimmings, Cocktails 5p.m., Dinner, 6p.m., all for only $12 per person. March 31 Installation of new officers and appreciation & awards for all the volunteers who worked so hard all year. The South Hillsborough Elks Lodge is located at 1630 US Hwy 41 S., Ruskin, FL 33570, Telephone 813-645-2089 and has a clean, smoke free environment. SOUTHSHORE RREGIONAL LLIBRARYeBooks and eReaders Thursday, March 1 12:15 to 1:15 p.m. Wednesday, March 7 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. Learn how to check out & download eBooks to your PC, tablet, or eReader. Limit: 20. Presenter: Tampa Bay Library Consortium Fiber Art Exhibit Opening Reception Thursday, March 1 6 to 7 p.m. The first juried Fiber Arts group show in the Crawford Gallery at SouthShore Regional Library. Barbara Agemi, Ruth Mahoney, Mary McLaughlin, Elizabeth Murray, Joan Mynahan, Charlene Roberts, Diana Speedy, Barbara Sirois, Nina Tatlock and Sandra Yavocik will be showing their work. Public invited for an interesting evening with light refreshments and music. Questions? Contact Laurie Burhop at 273-3652. Event is funded by the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library Mouse and Keyboard Tuesday, March 6 12:15 to 2:30 p.m. In part one, learn how to grip, move and click the buttons on the mouse. In part two, you will learn the keys on the computer keyboard. This is a beginner level class. Registration in person required no earlier than one hour prior to the start of the program. Stargazing Party Tuesday, March 6 6 to 8:30 p.m. Join others for a stellar stargazing party! Astronomy enthusiast, Craig MacDougal, will lead a brief discussion on stars, planets and moons. Immediately following on the Harkins Plaza, will be a viewing of the night sky through telescopes as we search for these celestial wonders. Funding for this program is provided by the SouthShore Friends of the Library English Conversation Class Wednesday, March 7 1 to 2 p.m. Adults (18 years or older) are invited to practice their English conversational skills with English speakers. No registration is required to participate. Cosponsored by the Hillsborough Literacy Council and the Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library System. For more information, contact the Hillsborough Literacy Council at 273-3650. Mah Jongg Club Wednesday, March 7 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Enjoy an evening of the popular table game, Mah Jongg, featuring challenging play for experienced players and instruction for beginners. They will be using the American Rules. Spectators are welcome! Participants are asked to bring their own Mah Jongg set or card. Limited to 16 players. Register in advance at the Information Desk or call 273-3652. SouthShore Needle People Wednesday, March 7 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Join other needle people to share techniques, tips and experiences about knitting and other fiber and fabric crafts. Beginners are welcome! Bring a project and ask us questions! Teen/Adult Mix Media Wednesday, March 7 6:30 to 8 p.m. Join Art Instructor, Anne Walker, for this two-part class. During the first class on March 7, students will create a painting. The second class on March 14, students will use various materials to embellish their paintings. Limit 20. Registration required at the Information Desk or by calling 273-3652. Funding for this program provided by the Friends of SouthShore Regional LibraryAttention all VeteransSun City Center Chapter #110 of the Disabled American Veterans (DAV) has opened an outreach center in Conessa Hall at the Prince of Peace Church located at 702 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center. Bob Gerdes and Darrell Katz are DAV certified service officers who will discuss benefits and assist with claims for all veterans in South Hillsborough County. Male and female Vets are welcome to participate in this non-denominational, and free service. Appointments are available for Tuesday mornings from 9 a.m.noon. Drivers also areneeded to assist Veterans with transportation to James A. Haley Veterans Hospital in Tampa. For more information call Bob at 813-634-1761 or Darrell at 813260-3692. On Feb. 17, at the Sun City Center Plaza Club the Military Order of the World Wars (MOWW) presented Thomas Diggs with the French Legion of Honor Medal he recently received from the Consult General De France A Miami. The notification stated that COL Diggs was given the award for demonstrating courage and selflessness during World War II, and that The solidarity you lent our country and people as a Colonel in the 75th military airlift Squadron participating in the Battles such as Normandy will never be forgotten and be assured that we are eternally French Legion of Honor Medal awardedgrateful. I would like to extend, on behalf our government and people, a heartfelt congratulations for your induction into the French Legion of Honor. Without your bravery, and that of those who fought alongside with you, France and Europe might have never been liberated from the barbarity of Nazi occupation. Your efforts are both admirable and an example to follow and it is our pleasure to award you Frances highest military distinction. Colonel Diggs was shot down behind enemy lines in France shortly after D-Day and was rescued by the French underground.Lt Col Frank Zahrobsky, Commander SCC MOWW; Col. Diggs; Lt Col Gordon Bassett, Region VI Commander; and CAPT Russel Vowinkel MOWW National Commander Photo by Frank Kepley PHOTO BY FRANK KKEpPLEYPlanning to travel outside the United States? First, plan to get your passport. Will your next vacation of business trip take you outside of the United States? No matter where you go, a U.S. passport will get you back home. To learn more about travel requirements for U.S. citizens or to apply for your U.S. passport, stop by for Passport Day in the USA from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 10 at Wimauma Post Office, 5608 S.R. 674, Wimauma.Passport Day on March 10

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Friday, March 2 The Final Moose Idol Competitions Well Done to all who have participated this year! Come enjoy a Steak / Fish Dinner and cheer on the finalist. Saturday, March 3 Spaghetti Dinner / Fundraiser for Asha Taylor She has a great opportunity to go to Alaska. Asha, a wonderful singer is reaching her goal to become a sound tech in the music industry. To further boost your enjoyment Riverview Moose Family Center will be hosting a Del & Gary Show. Enjoy a fabulous dinner and an outstanding show. Saturday, March 10 The Moose Charity Dinner Pork Loin, Yum Yum Potatoes followed by Games, Many Door Prizes and a Jewelry Raffle. Every Sunday is Sport Sunday Beer Specials Wings 6 for $3 Free Pool Bar Games All the fun begins at 3 pm Riverview Moose Family Center is the Happening Place Kitchn a Cookin Wednesday thru Sunday Great Food, Great Companionship and a Fabulous Time for All Ages 20 MARCH 1, 2012 NEW SHOWROOMCome see our... NEW ADDRESS 720 4th St. SW Ruskin, FL 33570 813-645-3529www.KnoxAluminum.com Stop in for a FREE cup of coee and cookies! Were Here For You! We Welcome New PatientsOur practice provides a complete range of professional services including Restorative Dentistry, Cosmetic Dentistry, Thorough Examinations, Cleanings, Dental Makeovers and Implant Restorations. Michelle Halcomb, D.D.S.813-634-3396703 Del Webb Blvd. W., Suite B Sun City Center, FL 33573 We salute all of our men, women and Veterans of the Armed Forces! C.A.R.E. is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. For directions, visit www.CareShelter.org or call (813) 645-2273.TippieTippie has started her stay at the shelter by spending a lot of time in the cat condo. But then relaxing kind of comes naturally to this young girl now that she is safe and sound. She was found as a stray near C.A.R.E. but is once more looking for a home full of tender loving care. Please come and adopt Tippie, the cat with 4 white feet. Tippie will be spayed and brought up to date on her shots as well as microchipped as part of her adoption. DOB: February 2, 2010. ZoeyZoey is a very pretty Lab with an awesome personality. She loves people! If you walk past her kennel without paying attention to her, she will call out to you. She is quite the talker. It is super cute! Zoey loves to go for walks and to have her ears scratched. She would make a great companion. She is an all-around wonderful pup. Zoey is spayed, microchipped, and current on her shots. DOB: February 2, 2011 The Hillsborough County Commission on the Status of Women (COSW) is pleased to announce the selection of three distinguished women, Phyllis Busansky, Gwendolyn Miller, and Jan Platt, for induction into the 2012 class of the Hillsborough County Womens Hall of Fame. These designees will be introduced at a Hillsborough County Commission meeting in March, followed by a formal induction ceremony in May. Phyllis Busansky Phyllis Busansky has served as Hillsborough Countys Director of Aging Services and Director of Human Resources, as Executive Director of Floridas WelfareTo-Work agency. Ms. Busansky served on the Hillsborough Board of County Commissioners, and as the Hillsborough County Supervisor of Elections before her death in June, 2009. Ms. Busansky was instrumental in ensuring improvement in the quality of life of Hillsborough County Residents. Gwendolyn Miller Gwendolyn Miller committed thirty five years to educating community children in Hillsborough County schools. Ms. Miller was elected to the Tampa City Council, and served as its Chairman, dedicated to improving the quality of life in several neighborhoods. Jan Platt Jan Platt served on Tampa City Council as well as the Hillsborough Board of County Commissioners, where she helped write the current Hillsborough County Charter. Ms. Platt has actively served on many community boards, including the Friends of the Library of Tampa-Hillsborough County and the Hillsborough Head Start Community Foundation. The Hillsborough County Womens Hall of Fame was created by the COSW to recognize women who have made significant contributions to the betterment of life for residents of Hillsborough County. The charter class of ten accomplished women was inducted into the Womens Hall of Fame on May 26, 2011, in a memorable ceremony featuring a whos who of political and community leaders. The COSW is comprised of 13 members and was created by the Hillsborough Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) on April 16, 2003, to advise the BOCC, the county administration, the community, and all agencies and persons in Hillsborough County with respect to matters pertaining to the status of women. For more information, call Brandon Wagner at 813-276-2640.Hillsborough County Womens Hall of Fame inductees announced Riverview Moose Family Center 2158/Chapter 1031 Upcoming EventsAll events are open to qualified Moose Members and guests. Engagement announcedMaster Sergeant Steven D. Gunter and Holly Gunter, currently stationed at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Kristin Heathre Kay Gunter to Adam Patrick Vencill, son of Chuck Vencill and Jan Vencill of Madison, Alabama (formerly of Grant, Alabama). Heathre is a senior at Faulkner University and is employed as a lab technician with Lens Crafters in Montgomery, Alabama. Adam is a graduate of Faulkner University and is employed with NetCents at Gunter Air Force Base, Alabama. Heathre is the granddaughter of Jerry and Kay Crumpler of Kenly, North Carolina, Johnny and Rose Gunter of Sun City Center, Florida and Ben and Cheryl Mozingo of Waynesboro, Mississippi. Adam is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Teddy Vencill, Jr. of Sugar Grove, Virginia and Mr. and Mrs. Billy Bearden of Grant, Alabama. Heathre and Adam will marry May 12, 2012 in Montgomery, Alabama. Post-Polio Support Group to meetPost-Polio Support Group will meet for lunch at noon on Thursday, March 15 at Dennys on S.R. 674 in Sun City Center. This group meets the third Thursday of every month from September thru May and everyone is welcome to attend. For more information call: Pam Vogelsang at 642-8707. The group also meets the first Friday of every month, year long, for breakfast, at 10 a.m. at the Sun City Cafe, just off S.R. 674 in the Sun City Plaza. For more information call 642-024.Fundraiser organizedA fundraiser is scheduled for Lila Ruiz, a local three-year-old suffering from Megacystis-Micorcolon-IntetinalHypoperistalsis syndrome from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, April 28 at Winthrop Barn, 11349 Bloomingdale Ave., Riverview. This life threatening genetic disorder is very rare. It is estimated that only 15 to 25 people in the US are currently living with this disease. During her short life Lila has endured 29 surgeries, monthly hospital stays and visits to specialists in four states. This event will feature music, monster trucks, car shows, bounce houses, baloons, face painting, giveaways, a silent auction, food and fun. To find out more about the fundraiser, go to www.staystronglila.com or call Sandy Martinez at 813-309-2395.

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16 MARCH 1, 2012 21 he recipes below feature Irish dairy products because dairying has been a part of Ireland for centuries, long before potatoes. In Ireland we can grow grass like nowhere else in the world, said Allen with pride. So we have fantastic butter, lovely cream and, of course, cheese. Butter is the fat of the land. Our animals are grass is what we are. Dairy products come from this beautiful, lush green grass. available at supermarkets and specialty stores throughout the country. And be sure to do as the Irish do: no celebration is complete without below features Kerrygold Aged Cheddar, Cashel Blue farmhouse cheese, Dubliner and Blarney Castle Irish cheese. These recipes are adapted from Forgotten Skills of Cooking. Recipe introductions are from Darina Allen. Serves 6 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 garlic cloves, mashed 1 small onion, chopped 1 pound beef, freshly ground 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves 1/2 cup dry white or red wine 1 cup beef stock 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1 tablespoon tomato paste Roux (recipe follows) Salt and freshly ground pepper For the Topping 3 pounds baking potatoes, unpeeled 1 cup whole milk, boiling Salt and freshly ground pepper 2 tablespoons Kerrygold Irish butter 1 tablespoon chopped chives (optional) 1/4 cup grated Dubliner cheese 1/4 cup grated Kerrygold Aged Cheddar To Serve Garlic Butter (recipe follows) Green salad Heat the oil in a saucepan. Add garlic and onion and fry until soft and slightly brown. Increase heat, add ground beef and thyme and fry until beef changes color. Add wine, half the stock, Worcestershire sauce, and tomato paste. Simmer for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, boil the unpeeled potatoes, then peel them. Add boiling milk and mash potatoes while they are still hot. Season with salt and freshly ground pepper, and add butter and chives, if using. Bring the rest of the stock to a boil and thicken slightly crispy. Serve with garlic butter and a green salad. Roux as required, or it can be made up on the spot if preferred to thicken up a sauce. 8 tablespoons Kerrygold Irish butter on low heat, stirring occasionally. It will keep for two weeks in the refrigerator.Garlic ButterSlather over bruschetta or toast. Also great with 8 tablespoons Kerrygold Irish butter 3 to 5 cloves crushed garlic A few drops of freshly squeezed lemon juice Whip butter, then add in parsley, garlic and a few drops of lemon juice at a time. Roll into butter pats or form into a roll and wrap in parchment paper or foil, twisting each end. Refrigerate to harden. Kerrygold Aged Cheddar, Cashel Blue farmhouse cheese, Dubliner and Blarney Castle Irish cheese served with chutneys and brown bread.Irish Apple Cake varies from house to house, and the technique has been passed from mother to daughter in farmhouses all over the country for generations. Serves about 6 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 8 tablespoons Kerrygold Irish butter 1 egg About 1/4 to 1/2 cup whole milk 1 to 2 cooking apples 2 to 3 cloves, optional Egg wash 10-inch ovenproof plate into bowl. Rub in butter with Make a well in the center and egg and enough milk to form a an oven proof plate and press it the base. tuck in cloves, if using. Sprinkle over some or all remaining sugar, depending on the sweetness of the apples. Roll out the second this pastry is more like scone dough and as a result is very a slit through the lid, egg wash, and bake for about 40 minutes or until cooked through and nicely browned on top. Dredge warm with raw sugar and softly whipped cream.e in this crust and the lump of garlic butter that melts into the center make this into something very special.

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X 22 Courage celebrated at Ruskin ElementaryTerrific Kids were recognized for the character trait, Courage. Kiwanis members from Sun City Center came to present the awards. The following students were present to receive their awards: Kevin MonterrosasCoeto, Maria Rios, Justin Archer, Ruben Santidor, Kayla Quick-Wells, Andrea Rodriguez, Aden Lopez, Natalie Dominguez, Nicholas Scott, Destiny Padron, Daynara Lopez-Lopez, Laurence Pratt, Lillie Tran, Sheili Martinez, Blerona Mahmuti, Cailyn Wilson, Wilson Tiburcio, Jr., Sebastian Giles, Karla Torres-Figueroa, Jasmine Guerrero, Sophia Gonzalez, Jesse Villanueva, Daniel Hernandez, Selena Fernandez, Margarita Pantoja, Giovanni Leon, Tiffany Ruiz, Brahe Greene, Lex Vega, Sara Abukhdeir, Delani Kilburn, Alejandro Urraya, Arysa Terry, Nicholas Williams, Carlos Aldape, Justin Nieves, Matthew Eunice, Jorge Rendon, Desiree Varela, Bakir Abukedheir, Citlaly Ramos Rodriguez, Kevin Suarez, Noel Perez, Nikolai Rauda, Norma Hernandez, Anthony Hahn, Norma Valdez, Oscar Nagera, Marissa Maurice, Kylee Mucher, Haven Crisp, Alexis Carswell, Guadalup Cesario, Tamia Draper, and Alexis Arzola. Also pictured are our Kiwanis members from Sun City CenterJoe Nargawala and Dee Wilcox, Principal of Ruskin Elementary Lisa Amos, Rebecca Salgado is the Assistant Principal. Those that recieved the award but were not present for the photo are: Gavin Singh,Adrianna Ibarra, Lanette Mercado, Edith Ferral, Adelmar Abonce, and Ashley Aguirre. A special SCC group presented a donation to the James A. Haley Veterans Hospitals Wounded Warrior Fund on Feb. 16. The check, for $2,090, is the proceeds from the Sun City Center Community Associations Military Ball held in November. Jan and Gordon Bassett, as the Ball Planning Committee co-chairs, presented the check on behalf of the SCC CA and the Ball Planning Committee. They also represented the Military Order of the World Wars (MOWW) SCC Chapter. Gordon is also the MOWW Region VI Commander. Also from the Committee and representing the American Legion and the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) is Paul Wheat. Paul is the President of the MOAA SCC Chapter. Tom and Mary Culliton, from the Committee, represented the SCC Leathernecks. Cathy Williams is the Chief Recreation Therapist at the VA. Military Ball proceeds donated to Wounded Warrior Fund LHS Student Government to host charity basketball gameLennard High School Student Government is hosting a faculty versus student basketball game at 6 p.m. on Thursday, March 8. Prior to the game there will be student-run carnival for families and students to enjoy from 3 to 6 p.m. This is a non-profit event in which all proceeds will be donated to the Make-A-Wish Foundation. USF awarded $1.57-million for research on traumatic brain injuryThe University of South Florida has received a $1.57 million U.S. Department of Defense grant to conduct translational research on traumatic brain injury and other battlefield related injuries and diseases. The studies, many in collaboration with James A. Haley Veterans Hospital, are intended to improve the quality of life for military personnel returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Traumatic brain injury, or TBI, is known as the signature injury of soldiers returning home from Afghanistan and Iraq. Blast forces sustained in combat often cause damage to parts of the brain critical to high-level functions influencing memory, attention, decisionmaking and motor skills. Many veterans developing symptoms after TBI also suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Working with the VA, the Department of Defense and private research entities, we will develop novel studies everything from drug discovery and preclinical work to clinical, social and behavioral trials, said principal investigator Dr. Paul R. Sanberg, USF senior associate vice president for research and innovation and director of the USF Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair. Our multidisciplinary work will provide critical knowledge about TBI and its complications that could lead to more effective diagnosis and treatments for soldiers and veterans, as well as skills to improve their physical and psychological adjustment into civilian life. The grant involves four major projects: Researchers will assess in animal models how granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF), a growth factor that mobilizes the bodys own stem cells, may help treat traumatic brain injury. A clinical trial will test whether GCSF reduces neurological damage and improves recovery of memory, decision-making and other cognitive functions in soldiers and veterans with TBI, even when administered a month or two after the initial injury. Patients will be recruited from the polytrauma rehabilitation and blast injury programs at James A. Haley Veterans Hospital. In an attempt to identify better diagnostic measures for mild TBI, a frequently underdiagnosed condition, a study will compare the balance, gait, hearing and vestibular functions of otherwise healthy USF student veterans with and without self-reported TBI to those of non-veteran students. Using advanced technology researchers will monitor changes in patterns of everyday movement and the cognitive function of TBI patients undergoing smart house-based rehabilitation at the Tampa VA hospitals Polytrauma Transitional Rehabilitation Program. The study will evaluate whether scientific analysis of movements, tracked by devices like radiofrequency identification and global positioning systems, can help assess therapeutic improvement. A second arm of the study will investigate whether variability in walking patterns is greater for USF student veterans reporting mild TBI than for those without this diagnosis. Start the new year knowing your credit is in good standing and your credit report is accurate. Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, consumers can receive a free copy of their credit report from each of the three nationwide reporting agencies Experian, Equifax and TransUnion every 12 months. Reviewing your credit report annually is a smart way for consumers to understand their financial health, as well as avoid identity fraud, said Karen Nalven, President of BBB serving West Florida. Many television advertisements and websites claim to offer free credit reports, free credit scores or free credit monitoring. However, BBB reminds consumers that AnnualCreditReport. com is the only authorized source for free annual credit reports under federal law. Additionally, BBB reminds consumers that a credit report is different than a credit score. A credit report is a snapshot of your credit use history which gives a lender a view of whether you pay your debts back or not. Your credit score is a number which shows lenders how much of a risk you are in paying back a debt. BBB offers these tips for pulling your annual credit report: Credit Report Request Service through links from unfamiliar websites. If you get an e-mail or see a pop-up ad claiming its from AnnualCreditReport.com or any of the three nationwide consumer reporting companies, do not reply or click on any link in the message. To help ensure the privacy and protection of your personal information, go to AnnualCreditReport. com directly to request your free annual credit report either by secure website, phone or email. AnnualCreditReport.com will not approach consumers via email, telemarketing or direct mail solicitations. quarterly. While you can pull all three credit reports at once, you can also consider pulling your credit reports quarterly. Pulling your reports separately allows you to better monitor your reports and keep track of any changes or new information that may appear on your credit report. If you pull all your reports at once, you wont be eligible to pull your report for another year. As child identity theft remains a national problem, it can be just as imperative to pull your childs report as it is to pull your own. While the credit reporting agencies do not knowingly maintain credit files on minor children, you can contact the credit reporting agencies directly and they can run the report. can improve your credit for free. The Federal Trade Commission cautions consumers to be wary of companies that make claims regarding credit repair. These companies, commonly called credit clinics, dont do anything for consumers that consumers cannot do for themselves at little or no cost. Beware of any organization that offers to create a new identity and credit file for you. For more information on credit clinics and a list of warning signs visit www.ftc.gov. credit report. Inaccurate, derogatory information can lower your credit score and may indicate possible fraudulent activity. If you find information that you believe is inaccurate, you have the right to dispute it free of charge. Go directly through the reporting agency you pulled your report from to file your dispute. To check the reliability of a company and find trustworthy businesses, visit bbb.org. To contact BBB serving West Florida about this release, please call (727) 535-5609 ext. 3317 or jzajac@bbbwestflorida.org.Check your credit for free Annual Lawn Bowling match heldThe Annual Challenge Match between the lady members of the Suncoasters and the men members of the Pebble Beach clubs was played on Feb. 16. At stake was the honor of winning the coveted Challenge Trophy. This was the 5th year that this event has taken place, and so far the score is 4-0 in favor of the men. The competitive interest from both clubs was terrific, and 16 teams comprising 48 players took part. The result was a disappointment for the ladies, who were more than a match for the men. They won by 4 games to 3 with one game drawn, but lost on the total amount or shots scored, by only 5 shots. Afterwards a vote was taken on the method of scoring for next year, and it was agreed to take the number of wins rather than the shots scored -a very predictable decision, lets hope it doesnt backfire!

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MARCH 1, 2012 23 Goodson Strawberry Market CLARKE AUTOMOTIVE CLARKE AUTOMOTIVEOPEN ALL DAY SATURDAY Everything we do keeps your car in warranty Includes: Visual Inspection of tires, belts & hoses, horn/lights, brakes, shocks/struts, exhaust, wipers, suspension, air and breather filter. Most cars/light trucks. Disassembly to perfect inspection may result in additional charges. Present coupon to receive savings. No other discounts apply. Additional charges for shop supplies may be added. See store for details. Exp. 4/5/12MAINTENANCE INSPECTIONFREEValue$3995 AAA DiscountOBNCALL FOR LOWEST PRICES ON TIRES131 Central Ave., Brandon813.685.2939 FREE Shuttle to FishHawk & Sun City Center TIRES DEALER ALTERNATIVEAAA Autorized Service Center OIL CHANGE & LUBRICATION$1095OBN motor oil. Purolator oil filter. Most cars and light trucks. Please call for appointment. Valid only with coupon. Not valid with any other 10% DISCOUNT on service or repair.EXCLUDES TIRES & SALES SPECIALS Honor All Competitors Coupons Welcome to...Sun City Dental CenterThomas A. DeVol, D.D.S., P.A.633-2636General and Cosmetic DentistryOur Own In-House Denture LabOur Lab Tech Has 38+ Years Experience Thomas A. DeVol, D.D.S., P.A., Practicing Dentistry for 23 YearsChuck Fredericks, Lab Technician, 38+ Years Experience727 Cortaro Drive (Burger King Plaza) Open: Monday Thursday 8:30 5:00 New Patients & Emergencies Are Always WELCOME PATIENT REWARDSRefer 2 new patients and receive a $25 credit toward your next visit. Be sure to have your friend or family member mention your name to receive the credit at time of scheduling.Coupon must be mentioned at time of scheduling appointment. The fee advertised is the minimum fee charged. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the fee service examination or treatment. Senior citizen discount does not apply. Mystery Theatre plannedBeth Israel Sisterhood in Sun City Center will meet at noon on Tuesday, March 6 at the Kings Point Banquet Room. You are invited to participate in solving a mystery called The Murder at Watersdown Mansion, performed by the Pelican Players. Enjoy a high tea luncheon in your best finery, and if you have a favorite teacup and saucer, bring it along. Tickets are $15 each, bring your friends and have a delightful afternoon. Robin Kitzmuller will accept reservations, her address is 1211 Wild Feather Lane, Sun City Center, 33573 or call (813) 645-9154.Christian Womens Connection to meetChristian Womens Connection luncheon and program will begin at 11 a.m. on Thursday, March 8 at Club Renaissance, 2121 So. Pebble Beach Blvd. Sun City Center, with guest speaker Marcia Trego. Marcia will discuss stress relief and the Superwoman Syndrome. Dr. Patrick, a local dermatologist, will talk about skin care and cancer prevention from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The menu is chef salad or alternate meal of tossed salad with grilled chicken. If you desire this option, be sure to order it when you make your reservation. Cost is $17 inclusive. Reservations are required. Call Pat Butler 938-4320 or Tara Flood 383-7540 or e-mail aunt.butler@gmail.com. Make reservations or cancellations before noon Monday, March 5.Armand and Angelina return to Sun City CenterSunday March 4, Armand and Angelina will once again perform in Sun City Center for Unity Community of Joy in the Henry G. Gibson Hall of the Beth Israel Temple, 1115 Del Webb Blvd E. At 10:30 they will conduct the regular Sunday service. A suggested love offering for the native flute workshop at 1:30 p.m. is $20. Flutes will be provided and can be purchased. Gifted with one of the most angelic and heart-opening voices Angelina is often compared to Sarah Brightman. Armands brilliant compositions, powerful vocals and engaging presence inspires us to love life passionately. Hear them sing their version of Ave Maria, theme from Romeo and Juliet, songs from Phantom of the Opera plus many of their original love songs. Visit them on them online at www.armandandangelina.com. Caregiver stress addressedThe Samaritan Services Alzheimers monthly meeting will be held at 2 p.m. on March 7 at the Redeemer Lutheran Church. The speaker will be Amy Richardson, speaking on how to help with caregiver stress in difficult situations. For more information call Doris at 634-3489 or the office at 634-9283.Unitarian Universalists announce March scheduleMarch 1 Unitarian Universalists in the Social Hall at 1115 Del Webb Blvd. East, Sun City Center host Dr. Rev. Robert P. Tucker No Greater Love. Since March 11 marks the 46th anniversary of the martyrdom of Unitarian minister James Reeb, a Civil Rights activist, Dr. Tucker will review the life and times of this magnificent man who was willing to put himself in harms way so that others might enjoy all of our precious American freedoms. This is the week to bring food for the Beth-El Migrant Worker food bank. March 8 The Rev. Roger Fritts The Kingdom of God Is Within You. A warm welcome awaits you and will tempt your interest. Coffee and conversation at 7 p.m., followed by program at 7:30 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For information call 813-633-2349Southside Baptist to host Alan HarrisSouthside Baptist Church 4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 S, Sun City will be hosting award winning vocalist Alan Harris at 6 p.m. on Sunday, March 4. Alan has a blended worship style that appeals to young and old alike. He has toured with many of the Gaither Homecoming Friends and was recently honored with a Diamond Award nomination for Male Vocalist of the Year. His preaching style touches the heart. He will be accompanied by his wife, Angie and his son, Andrew.The inaugural Saint Anne Spring Fling Community Fair will take place in Ruskin from Thursday, March 8 to Sunday March 11, 2012. This years event promises to be one of the best fairs ever held on the church grounds. Carnival offerings have been expanded with additional large rides and games. Arts and crafts vendors will offer jewelry, ceramics, leather goods, T-shirts, woodworking, stained glass, art-work, caricatures, face-painting and more! Food vendors will provide choices guaranteed to appeal to a variety of ethnic preferences and tastes. Want traditional American fare? Hot dogs, hamburgers, fries and ice cream should do the trick! A dining tent will be set up to allow patrons to relax while enjoying their meal. Entertainment under the tent will include magic performers, dancers, bands, and St. Anne Catholic Church hosts Spring Fling Community Fairchoirs, to name a few. If your timing is right, you may even catch Elvis or Blue Eyes. The fair will also feature a tribute to veterans in honor of the many local men and women serving our country in the armed services. The popular semi-annual You Choose the Prize cash drawing will be held on Sunday afternoon. Tickets for the drawing will be available all weekend. This event will be held on the Saint Anne Catholic Church grounds located at 106 11th Ave NE at the intersection of 11th Ave and US 41 in Ruskin. Hours are Thursday, March 8 from 4-10 p.m. (reduced-rate armbands will be available at the gate on Thursday only for $15); Friday, March 9 from 4 10 p.m.; Saturday, March 10 from Noon to Midnight; and Sunday, March 11 from 2 10 p.m. Call the parish office 645-1714 for more information. .Listen to the Sounds of JoyAt 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, March 4 the New Beginnings Fellowship will be blessed to have a wonderful singing group ministering from Ocala, FL. The Sounds of Joy has been singing and traveling the country for 23 years. While everyone enjoys doing Gods work, the main purpose of the group is to see one more soul come to know Jesus as their personal Savior. The church is located at 1120 27th St. SE Ruskin. For more information call Rev. Lewis Brady at 654-1018.Prince of Peace to host author Thomas SmithPrince of Peace Catholic Church invites the public to hear author and retreat director Thomas Smith, the former director of the Denver Catholic Biblical School and Catechetical School. The Lenten Mission schedule is Monday, March 5 through Wednesday, March 7, in Conesa Center, immediately following the 8 a.m. Mass. The morning presentation will be repeated at 7 p.m. that same evening at 702 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center. For more information, call 6342328.

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24 MARCH 1, 2012 South Hillsborough Church of Christ Welcome to the:SERVICES:Sunday........................9:30 & 10:30 a.m.; 6:00 p.m. Wednesday................7:00 p.m.EVERETT TATE, MINISTER NON-INSTRUMENTAL CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCHSunday Worship: Blended 8:00 a.m. Contemporary 9:40 a.m. Traditional 11:15 a.m.Nursery Provided Pastor Jack R. Palzer www.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1305 Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist)1511 El Rancho Dr. Sun City Center, FL 33573Phone/Fax:813-633-5950 WEEKLY SERVICES: Sunday9 a.m.......................Bible Study 11 a.m.....................Bible Study 10 a.m. & 6 p.m............WorshipWednesday6 p.m....Prayer Meeting/Bible Study Ruskin United Methodist Church First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (behind Suntrust Bank)ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:SUNDAY MORNINGS:Rev. Richard NusselPhone: 645-1241Nov. April..................8:30 a.m. and All Year...............10:45 a.m. Sunday School............9:30 a.m.Day Care Available Mon. Fri. 6 a.m. 6 p.m. call 645-6198 REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA Rev. Dr. Peter Stiller, PastorTelephone: Website: sccredeemer.org Worship Services on Sunday 9:30 & 11:15 a.m. Area Places of Worship Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCCMeets in the Henry Gibson Social Hall of the Beth Israel To be human is not a fact, but a task. Frederick H. Heinmann Ruskin Foursquare ChurchBuilding Community Thru Gods Love 106 7th Ave. N.W. Ruskin, FL 33570 N. Blanton (813) 309-3558Pastor Norman & Sherril Blanton 10 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service 7 p.m. Wed. Bible Study 702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573 www.popcc.orgMasses:Sunday..........8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., Noon Saturday Vigil.................4:00 & 6:00 p.m. Daily..........................................8:00 a.m.Confessions: Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m. and Sat. 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCHMinister DR. DAVID CAMPBELL INVITES YOU TO SERVICES AT OUR NEW LOCATION10:30 a.m. SUNDAYSNO CREED...BUT CHRIST NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE Sunday Service 10:30 a.m.www.unitycommunityofjoy.com 813-298-7745 Spirituality Rather Than ReligionUnityHenry Gibson Social Hall, Beth Israel Synagogue www.nbcor.orgLoving God, Loving Others, Serving Beyond Borders Sunday School (all ages)........9:30 a.m. Dr. Samuel (Sam) A. Roach, Pastor Area Obituaries h h Direct Cremation $925Zipperers Funeral Home813-645-6130 EXP. 3/31/12 Gilbert Gil Charles FosterGilbert (Gil) Charles Foster, 89, passed away peacefully Feb. 21, 2012 in Sun City Center, Florida. Born Jan. 19, 1923 in Hamilton, Ontario Canada to Charles Edward Foster and Norah Redden, both deceased; and sister Ruby May Taylor (deceased). Surviving is his beloved wife of 67 years, Helen C. Foster; two sons, Murray and Ian Foster (Sally), and two daughters, S. Leigh Diakopoulos (Anestis) and Deirdre Totten; one nephew, Glenn Taylor (Betty) of Stoney Creek, Ontario, Canada; and four grandsons, Chris, Nick, and Dimi Diakopoulos, and Kevin Foster. A Memorial Service celebrating Gils life was held Monday, Feb. 27, 2012, at Freedom Plaza, Auditorium, 1010 American Eagle Drive, Sun City Center, FL. 33573. A reception followed. In Gils honor, in lieu of flowers or memorial gifts, a donation may be made to the Eagle Audubon Society, c/o Nancy Terry 2444 Kensington Green Drive, Sun City Center, FL. 33573. Services under the direction of Brewer and Sons Funeral Home, Tampa. Lillian Margaret Castillo-McMullinLillian Grannie Margaret CastilloMcMullin, 88, of Ruskin, FL passed away on February 16, 2012. She was born December 6, 1923 in Dowling Park, FL to Joseph and Cora Clark. Lillian set roots in the Tampa Bay area in the 1940s. She opened Castillos Little Barn general store in Ruskin in 1951. She made numerous friends in her 35 years of business there. She enjoyed dancing and fishing, she spent many days on the bay, in the inlets of Ruskin and on Lake Kissimmee. She was a member for most of her life at First Baptist Church of Ruskin. Grannie is survived by two daughters: Bonnie Leasure (Ben) of Brooksville and Donna Castillo-Budd of Ruskin; four grandchildren: Terri Torres (Juan) of Brooksville, Todd Bryan (Margie) of Alabama, Jamey Baker (Gina) of Ruskin, and Tracy Baker-Howard (Bobby) of Balm; and twelve great-grandchildren: Casey, Cody, Brenden, Katy, Alex, Marty, Cinnamon, Mason, Nick, Ryan, Bo and Cassi; one brother: Mitchell Clark; one sister: Edna Mae Bush; a step-daughter: Betty Jo Castillo; and numerous nephews, nieces, cousins and in-laws. She was preceded in death by her father and mother Joseph and Cora Clark; her grandson: Joseph Bryan; her granddaughter: Lori BakerDixon; and her two brothers: Milton Clark and Clyde Chick Clark. Services were held on Tuesday, February 21, 2012 at First Baptist Church of Ruskin with Dr. Barry Rumsey and Rev. Jim Farr officiating. Pallbearers: Casey Sullivan, Cody Sullivan, Brenden Torres, Bo Howard, Ryan Dixon and Carl Ware. Honorary Pallbearers: Nicholas Hunter and Mason Baker. She was laid to rest at Clearwater Municipal Cemetery.continued at top of page Lillian Margaret CastilloMcMullin obituary continuedLavernia Patricia Bick MeyerLavernia Patricia Bick Meyer, 83, of Wheeling died on Saturday, February 25, 2012 at home. She was born November 29, 1928 in Wheeling the daughter of the late David and Mary Hummel Bick and was a Baptist by faith. Lavernia was a high school graduate of the former Wheeling High School in Wheeling and from Bowling Green University. She was a retired Teacher for Ohio County Board of Education and was a volunteer for the South Bay Hospital in Sun City Center, Florida. She also enjoyed playing cards. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Gerald Louis Meyer who passed away in 2005 and a sister, Nancy Agar. Surviving are two sons, David P. Meyer of Wheeling and Daniel L. Meyer and his wife, Jadi of Kingwood, TX; a daughter, Diana L. Wilds and her husband, Norm of Wheeling; six grandchildren, David Meyer and his wife, Lori, Amie DeMasi and her husband, Bill, Danielle and Zachary Meyer and Elizabeth Knollinger and her husband, Josh; six great grandchildren, Katie Meyer, Allison Meyer, Taylor Knollinger, Trenton Knollinger, Haydon Meyer and Dalton Meyer; a brother in law, Mike Agar and his wife, Myrna of Wheeling and a nephew, Chris Agar of Memphis, TN. Services were held with the Reverend Dr. William G. McCoy officiating. Interment in Halcyon Hills Memorial Gardens, Sherrard, WV. Memorial contributions may be made to Valley Hospice,10686 State Route 150, Rayland, OH 43943. Personal condolences may be offered to the family at www.kepnerfuneral. com. Jacqueline Laney MollmanJacqueline Laney Mollman, 83, formerly of Sun City Center, Florida, passed away peacefully on Sunday, February 12, 2012 at The Episcopal Church Home in Louisville,KY. She was born on December 18, 1928 to Ross and Wilma Laney in Pittsburg, Kansas, and graduated from Canton High School, Canton, Illinois. She met her husband of 62 years, Edward Mollman, at the University of Illinois, and together they raised five daughters. Over the years, the family lived in Wood River, Illinois; Orono, Maine; Boston, Massachusetts; Chicago, Illinois; Bethesda, Maryland and Sun City Center, Florida. Jackie made lifelong friends each place she lived. The couple moved to Louisville in 2009 to be closer to family. Jackie was known for her creativity, sense of humor and a love of reading, all of which she passed to her daughters and grandchildren. She was seldom without a book. While living in Washington, Jackie also volunteered at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Library and the Bethesda Public Library. Jackie, Ed and their children shared a keen enjoyment of travel. Their adventures included numerous independent trips to the UK, Europe and Canada as well as travel through most of the United States. Jackie was preceded in death by her parents, Ross and Wilma Laney and her brother, Norman Laney. She is survived by her husband of 62 years, Edward Mollman, daughters Meredith Parente, Carol Mollman, Jennifer Mollman, Katherine Waters, Elizabeth Behringer (Mark), and grandchildren Jeffrey Waters, Alexandra Waters, and Claire Behringer. The family wishes to thank everyone at Sunrise Senior Living, and most recently, Jefferson Manor and The Episcopal Church Home for their wonderful care. The visitation and memorial service is now planned for Saturday, March 10, 2012 beginning at 10 am at Pearsons Funeral Home, Louisville, with private burial to follow at Cave Hill Cemetery.Sumiko Miko TempleSumiko Miko Temple, 73, of Sun City Center, FL died February 18, 2012. Miko was born April 30, 1938 in Japan. Survivors include her two children: Cissy Betz of North Venice, FL and Clifford G. and his wife, Jeanne L. Temple of Elgin, OK; two grandchildren: Clifford and Vicky and great grandson, Zander. She is also survived by one brother and three sisters. A Celebration of Life Service was held at 1 PM, Friday, February 24 at Farley Funeral Home, Venice Chapel. Memorial donations may be made to Make-A-Wish Foundation, 3635 Bonita Beach Road #4, Bonita Springs, FL 34134. To share a memory visit www.farleyfuneralhome. com.Memorial Service plannedA memorial service for Louis H. Benner, a twenty-year resident of Sun City Center, will be held at noon on Thursday, March 8. at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church 1239 Del Webb Boulevard, SCC.Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light for my path. Psalm 119:105

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MARCH 1, 2012 25 Southside Baptist ChurchA Warm, Loving & Friendly ChurchLooking for a church home? Need the comfort of a warm and loving family? Join us on Sunday to come home to the warmth of our church family.Located in South Hillsborough County, just south of Stephens Road in old Sun City.Getting to Know You (Donuts & Coffee) ....................9:00 a.m. Sunday School .................................................................9:30 am. Sunday Morning Worship ............................................10:55 a.m. Sunday Evening Service..................................................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ..........................................7:00 p.m. Thursday Morning Prayer ............................................10:00 a.m.Come join us to learn about Gods Word and salvation in Jesus Christ Area Places of Worship 1239 Del Webb Blvd. West Sun City Center, FL 33573 Church is Handicap accessible Phone: 813-634-1252 For information visit: www.standrewatscc.org St. Andrew Presbyterian ChurchSunday Services 9:30 a.m. Casual Service 11:00 a.m.Prayers with anointing for healing and wholeness during worship the second Sunday of every month.Pastor: Rev. Dr. Mark E. SalmonMeet friends in Fellowship Hall after the Service. Refreshments served.A Stephen Ministry Church First Church of Christ, ScientistChristian Science HealsSunday Service ..................................................10:00 a.m. Sunday School ..................................................10:00 a.m. Wednesday Service .............................................5:00 p.m. Reading Room .........................Wednesday 4 to 4:45 p.m. All Are Welcome WORSHIP SERVICES: SATURDAY 4:00 p.m. .............................Sanctuary (Casual Service)5:00 p.m. ................Creason Hall (Oasis Contemporary)SUNDAY 8:15 a.m. ......................Sanctuary (Communion Service)9:15 a.m. .................Creason Hall (Oasis Contemporary)10:55 a.m. ........Sanctuary (Traditional with Choir & Bells) Bookstore 633-8595Pastor: Dr. Warren Langer Pastor: Dr. Daniel White Spiritual LeaderRev. Sue Meixner813-362-0806sue@alterways.comSunday Service 11:00 a.m. Sun City Center Chamber of Commerce 1651 Sun City Center PlazaTurning problems into lessons, lessons into wisdom and wisdom into freedom. U.S. Hwy. 41 106 11th Ave. NE Ruskin 813-645-1714SaintAnneRuskin.orgMASSES Vigil Mass.....................................................................Saturday 5:00 p.m. Sunday Mass ........8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. (Contemporary) Monday thru Friday ....................................................................8:00 a.m. Wednesday and Friday ..................................................................12 noon Holy Days ....................................... Espaol ......................................Domingo 12:30 p.m.; Jueves 7:00 p.m. Confession .........................Thursday 6:15 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m. Saint Anne Catholic ChurchSouthShore: Apollo Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton Very Rev. John F. McEvoy, V.F. McDonald Family sings for the LordAt 2 p.m. on Sunday March 4, at the United Community Church, 1501 La Jolla Ave., Sun City Center the Fun Brigade has invited the McDonald Family Singers to perform in the churchs sanctuary. The McDonald Family will be presenting a free concert with various styles of music by Victor and Laurie and their 7 homeschooled children ages 11-26 from Orange, Massachusetts. Working together in family harmony their musical presentation includes bluegrass gospel, acapella, brass, instrumentals, sacred classical and more! Everyone is encouraged to attend this free event. Members of the Fun Brigade will be collecting a free will offering for the family. Church doors open 1 hour prior to the concert.Discover timely treasuresThe United Methodist Church of Sun City Center, 1210 Del Webb Blvd. West, presents its annual Timely Treasures Sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday, March 2 and from 8 a.m. to noon on Saturday, March 3. Whatever youre looking for can be found at this humongous sale of slightly used goods including kitchen items, electronics, furniture, collectibles, jewelry, sports equipment, luggage, antiques, clothing and so much more! A great and inexpensive lunch will also be available for purchase both days. Drop by and find that treasure youve been looking for! For more information, call the church office between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information call 813-634-2539. Sixteen congregations combine for concertSt. Andrew Presbyterian Church, 1239 Del Webb W., Sun City Center is pleased to sponsor and host the fourteenth annual St. Andrew & Friends Sacred Music Concert at 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 11. Once again the sanctuary is resounding with the voices of more than 80 singers, representing sixteen congregations from Sun City Center, Apollo Beach, Brandon, Parrish and Ruskin as they gather for nine weeks of rehearsals. The chorus is directed by Rita M. Hughes, and accompanied by the husband and wife team of pianist Robert Winslow, and organist Dr. JoAnne Winslow. Join them for what promises to be an exciting and uplifting afternoon. Through song your spirit will be reminded of Gods constant presence. You will also be invited to add your voice to those of the chorus in singing beloved hymns of faith. St. Andrew & Friends presents this concert as a free gift and no tickets are necessary. Arrive early to allow yourself sufficient time to park, find the seat of your choice and visit with other concert goers.Paying close attention to the direction of Rita Hughes, members of the St. Andrew and Friends Community Chorus are preparing for their Fourteenth Annual Sacred Music Concert. Northside Baptist hosts movie nightA free showing of the movie Courageous will be held at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 3, at Northside Baptist Church located at 1301 N. U.S. Hwy. 41 in Ruskin. Childcare through age 12 is provided free of charge. Jerry Goff & Lil Jan Buckner will be ministering at First Baptist Church of Gibsonton, 9912 Indiana St. at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, March 4 with an exciting Christian music performance playing and singing their national hits. Search the Book Again, Walk Around Me Jesus, I Firmly Promise You, The Tree God Grew, I Am Blessed, Tell It Again, plus many, many more. These two are top award winners; members of the Gospel Music Hall of Fame; Dove Award winners; Peoples Choice Award winners; Gold Record winners; Grammy nominees; voted Favorite Male & Female Vocalist; Mr. Gospel Trumpet; Speakers, Authors and Composers Extraordinaire who have been in gospel music over 50 years. Dont miss this refreshing and uplifting service. For more information, call (813) 677-1301.Attend a Christian music performance The sixth concert in the Fine Arts Series at St. Andrew Presbyterian Church, 1239 Del Webb Blvd. West, Sun City Center, will be at 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 4. The concert will feature a return performance by pianist Dr. Naomi Niskala, Assistant Professor of Music at Susquehanna University in Pennsylvania. Dr. Niskala has appeared as a soloist and chamber musician in the United States, Europe, Canada, Israel, and Japan. She holds degrees from Yale, Stony Brook, and Tufts. Recently, Dr. Niskala has performed in Russia and Berlin, Germany. Tickets at the door are $9. Season tickets for the 2012-13 music series wil be available at the concert. Season tickets are $40 for 7 concerts ($5.71 per concert). For more information, call the church office at (813) 634-1252 or Judy Voorhees at (813) 642-8125.Classical pianist in concert DR. NAOMI NIISKAALAA Men and Womens Bible StudiesVisit www.SouthBay.cc to register online and for more details. Childcare is available by reservation, call 677-0721.SOUTH BAY CHURCH MEN: Every Tuesday 7:00 p.m. Beginning March 13Every Mans BattleWOMEN: Tuesdays 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. Beginning March 27 (6 week study)The Virtuous Woman: Shattering the Superwoman Myth by Vicki Courtney. Workbook $10. Tuesdays 7 p.m. Beginning March 27 Experiencing GodVisit SouthBay.cc for details on Celebrate Recovery Training; Youth/Kids Summer Camp; much more Dear friends, since God so loved us, we also ought to love one another. 1 John 4:11

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FARMERS MKT200 MERCHANDISE300MarchARCH 1, 2012 THE SHOPPER To place an ad call 813.645.3111 ext. 201 Fax: 813.645.1792 $17.00 up to 20 words 30 addl. word Deadline is Monday at 4pm100 Announcements 200 Farmers Mkt 300 Merchandise 400 Marine 450 Transportation 500 Real Estate 550 Manuf. Housing 600 Rentals 650 Prof. Services 700 Services 800 EmploymentTHE SHOPPER CLASSIFIED ADVERTISINGThe Observer News, The SCC Observer and The Riverview Current CARDS M & M Printing Co., Inc weekly publisher of the 210 Woodland Estates Ave., SW Ruskin, Florida 33570 310 GaraARAGeE/ Yard ARD saSALeE 312 estateESTATE saSALesES 312 estateESTATE saSALesES 280 PetsETS(3) ten week old kitten. D DOB 12/25/11. Mother is Himalayan Persian S S eal Point. D D addy is S S eal Point S S iamese. $150 each. 813-641-8021 Call for DirectionsDelivery AvailableQuality Furniture at Aordable Prices Quality Wicker & Rattan Furniture HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 10-6 Closed WeekendsWE HAVE SOMETHING FOR EVERY ROOM INSIDE AND ALL AREAS OUTSIDE We are worth the drive from anywhere! 310 GaraGARAGeE/YardYARD SaALeE annual yard sale. S S aturday, March 3, 8am-1pm. Please park on street. 813690-8071Timely Treasure Sale FFriday 8am-2pm. SSaturday, 8am-noon. United Methodist Church, 1210 W. D Del Webb. Jewelry, art & antiques, luggage, sport equipment furniture, linens & much misc.. LLunch available. DeJa Vu special treasure youve been looking for.A Almost N New T Thrift S Store. 10008 I Indiana S S t., G G ibsonton (1 block off US S 41, 1 block north G Gibsonton D Dr.,) Wednesday through S Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture, lots misc. Ministry F F irst Baptist G Gibsonton. 813-671-0036 to donateYYost Park YYard Sale R Radial saw, small refrigerator, small furniture, books, kitchenware & much more. 1112 SShell Point RRd., W. SSaturday, 3/3, 8am-2pm. RRain date 3/10 Moving/ E E states sale. F F urniture, TV TV s, & misc. 11am-2pm daily, 8am-4pm. weekends. (2 consecutive weeks) 3319 16th A A ve., SE SE R R uskin. 1st S S t. past Zipper Mortuary off 33rd S St, SE SE. 813504-8650 920 E Eagle L Lane, A Apollo Beach. F Fireplace, computer, household items, clothes. March 2 & 3, 8am-? E Everything must go.T Thursday, F Friday & S Saturday. Multi family yard sales, 642 F Ft.. D Duquesna S SCC. Clothes, antiques, toys, keyboard, rugs. S Something for everyone.R Reading place, S Sun City Centers (off of R Rickenbacker) One day sale. S Saturday, March 3, 8am-1pm. N N o early birds please.S S ale. R R easonable prices. A A ntiques, collectibles, Coca Cola cooler, slot machine, computer, tools, many misc. March 2 & 3, 8am-3pm. Yard sale. S S aturday, March 3, F F urniture, clothes, knickknacks & more. 1405 6th S St., SESE, RRuskin. S S CC Berry R R oberts area yard sale. March 2 & 3, 8am-1pm. Clothes, bikes, sewing supplies, ladies golf clubs, bedding, antiques, Harley helmet & items, computer, printers, & much misc.S SCC 1513 N New Bedford, 7;30am-5pm. T Thursday, F Friday & S Saturday, March 1, 2, 3. F Fishing, lamps, exerciser, crafts, fabric, valences, vases, potato pockets, misc.. 2 family yard sale. 208 7th A A ve. N N W, R R uskin. F Friday & S S aturday, 8am-2pm. G Generator & lots of misc. items. Yard sale. 2617 G Gulf City R Rd., R Ruskin. S S aturday, 8am-2pm, S S unday 8am-noon. Household items, fishing, hunting, clothes, etc. TToo much to mention Yard sale. S S aturday, 8am-1pm. 1419 Murillo L Loop, R Ruskin. F Furniture, housewares, linens, clothing, tools, big TV TV casino machine, gas grill, toys & lots of misc. Big yard sale. S S aturday, March 3, 8am-noon R R iverstone Church, 12011 E E ast Bay R R d., G G ibsonton. D D onations accepted. 813-677-0125 Big garage sale. F F riday & S S aturday, March 2 & 3, 8am-1pm. 414 S Stoneham D Dr., S St A Andrews. Washer, dryer, furniture, household items, clothes. A A little of everything for all. 310 GaraARAGeE/ Yard ARD saSALeE SSaturday March 3rd, 8am-2pm. One Day Only Multi family sale. Bluewater & Wintersong, SSCC. Breadmaker, espresso, juicer & soda machines, baby items, clothes size 6-10, Betty Boop items, L Lowry organ. GGoodies for all. Bahia L L akes community yard sale. off 11th A A ve., N N W, R R uskin. S S aturday, March 3, 8am-1pm. R Rain date March 4. S Something for everyone.G G arage sale. 1541 Chevy Chase D D r., S S CC. F F riday only. 7am-2pm. S S mall tools, golf cart items & household goodsG G arage/ moving sale. F F urniture, TV TV power tools, clothes, misc. 12804 E E arly R R un L L ane (S S outh Point) R R iverview. S S aturday & S S unday, March 3 & 4, 8am-2pm.311 AUctionsCTIONSTT ailgate auctions, 10816 US S 41 N N Palmetto, F Fl. (Midway F Flea Mkt) L Load your trunk & trucks. Come sell. S Saturday, March 3, 10am. 813-403-0069. A AB2109AAU3055A A uction. E E lks L L odge, 1630 Hwy 41 S S R R uskin. T T hursday, March 1. Old coins & collectibles. Preview at 6pm. A Auction starts 6:30pm. 813-403-0069 A AB1230AAU3055312 estateESTATE saSALesES Fri. & Sat. (7-1) 1209 Bluewater Dr., SCCBamboo Soe w/Chairs, Love Seat, Queen & Twin Bedroom Suites, Dining Room Suite w/6 Chairs, Rocking Chairs, Recliners, Noritake China, Patio Furniture, Desk w/Chair, TVs, Entertainment Center, Swivel Rockers, Bookcases, Bar Stools, File Cabinet, Card Table w/Chairs, Jewelry, Household, Kitchen and Misc. Items.www.AnnesEstateSales.blogspot.comAnne's Estate Sales Furniture: Heywood-Wakefield Dining Room Suite, Sofa w/Matching Loveseat, Entertainment Center, Rocking Chair, Recliner, Trundle Bed, California Twin Beds, Bakers Rack, Twin Bedroom Suite, Dinette Table w/Chairs, Portable AC, Polaris Telescope, Card Table w/Chairs, Privacy Screen, Gas Grill, Garage Shelving, TVs, Microwave, Collectables, Jewelry, Tools, Kitchen & Misc. Items.www.AnnesEstateSales.blogspot.comAnne's Estate Sales BEVERLY's ESTATE SALESSUN CITY CENTERHenry Link Wicker, Loveseat, 2 Chairs, Ottoman, Coffee, End Table, Kitchen Table w/4 Caster Chairs, Trundle Bed, La-Z-Boy Rattan Recliner, Lowry Organ, Leather Recliner, 2 La-Z-Boy Recliners, Sleep Sofa, Leather Sofa w/Dual Recliner Ends & 2 Ottomans, Twin Bed, Chest, Night Stand, 2 Twin Select Sleep Comfort Beds, Dresser, Mirror, Chest (one short, dark), 2 Accessory Chairs w/Arms, Tapestry Covered, 2 Tall Oriental Curios, Teak Dining Table w/6 Chairs, Expandable Entertainment Center, Grandmother Clock, Bose Stereo Speakers, Mirrors, Linens, Small Appliances, Pictures, Rugs, Men and Womens Clothing, Misc. Kitchen, Electric Tools, Craftsman Standing Tool Chest, Bench Grinder, Extension Ladder, Oreck XL2 Vacuum, Hummels, Gobel, Lenox.633-1173 or 508-0307322 Caloosa Woods Dr.(Enter Caloosa Palms off Del Webb E.; you will be on right side)PARK ON SIDE OF SALE, NARROW STREETMarch 2 & 3 7:30am-1pm Thrift Store813-641-7790Ministry of Calvary Lutheran Church 9 a.m. Noon MENS SHIRT Sale2 for 1 on allmens shirtsPlus, the secret sale Broyhill Sofa Bed & Loveseat; Raan: La-Z-Boy Recliner, Magazine Rack, Bench & End Table; Whitewash: End & Coee Tables, Entertainment Center, Sofa w/Wood Trim, Glass Top Coee Table, Beautiful Lamps, Dinee Set w/4 Chairs, Broyhill Chests of Drawers, Double Bed, Twin Beds, TVs, Electronic Equipment, Optimus Speakers, Singer Sewing Machine, Patio & Lawn Furniture, Exercise Bike, Mens Clothing, Kitchenware, Garage Items and Tools. CONSIDER PARKING ON COCO PALM CIRC LE, LEAVING ROOM FOR EMERGENCY VEHI C LESwww.denneysestatesales.com DENNEYS ESTATE SALES1807 Orchid Ct., SCC(S. Pebble Beach to New Bedford Dr., left on Flamingo Lane, right on Coco Palm Circle, right on Orchid Ct.) Fri. & Sat., March 2 & 37 a.m to 1 p.m. (813) 477-1793 The Price is Right! NETTIES ESTATE SALES1128 Villeroy Dr. Sun City CenterFri. & Sat., March 2-37 a.m. to NoonPLEASE NOTE DATE & TIMES. Contents Include: Large 50" Panasonic Flat Screen TV, adorable Ocean/Beach Print Rattan Sofa & Matching Loveseat, La-Z-Boy Recliners, Vintage Coffee & End Tables, Teak Dining Room Table w/Chairs, Art 50s Bedroom Furniture, Vintage Kitchen Table w/Chairs, Desk, Queen Bed, Antique Secretary, Full Size Bed, Wash Stand, Coleman Air Mattress, Deep Chest Freezer, Kitchenware, Household, Garage Items, & Tools. (PLEASE DON'T MISS OUR OTHER SALE ON 1254 Del Webb Blvd. W. THIS FRIDAY-SATURDAY MARCH 2-3rd 7AM-NOON) See You There!PLEASE PARK ON SIDE OF SALE DUE TO EMERGENCY VEHICLES. FFind what you need in Craft & Quilt ShowMonday, March 5 9 a.m. to noon Hawaiian Isles R.V. Park Refreshments and Lunch available. All are welcome. Manatee RV Parkwill be holding their Craft BazaarMarch 3 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Coffee and doughnuts and Sloppy Joe lunch available. Prizes throughout the Bazaar! Park is located at6302 U.S. 41 S. (between Ruskin and Palmetto) Park-WideYARD SALETampa South RV Resort 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. IInformative

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THE SHOPPER RENTALS TRANSPORTATION REAL ESTATE M.H. HOUSING MARINE 741-0225Cell: 382-7536 354 MeEDiICalALAutomatic scooter lift, attaches to vehicle, good working condition. $400 obo. 813-645-5563 CGolf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade. Chargers, parts all related. Ronnys Carts & Parts. 813-484-9855 or 813-645-4515Bogey Bills Golf CCars Cruise Car, Loadmaster trailer, Club Car, E-Z Go. New, custom, restoration, rebuilds, rentals, solar, LSV upgrades, SVC, seasonal storage, parts, charger repair & Trojan batteries. 2202 US 41 S. Ruskin. 813-649-8099 MFSGrizzly woodworking tools. 10 contractor saw, 15 plainer, 14 band saw, wood shaper, 6 & 9 belt disk sander. 813-645-5626 Bicycle 26, 7 speed, aluminum frame & RV ladder mount bike carrier. $80 for both 618-444-4998. Tampa South Resort. For sale. Round 41 pedestal table w/18 leaf, 2 chairs & 2 arm chairs, 4yrs old $400. 2008 Club Car, gas, fully solid enclosure. Excellent condition. $3,000. 813-634-7031 1991 19 V hull Sunbird, sport boat, V-6 I/O Cobra, low hrs. Cuddie cabin w/ head, AM/FM radio, Bimini top, 2 props on trailer w/ surge brakes Skis & books included $3,000. 765-894-0167 SSgSouth Bay RV & Boat Storage. Specializing in outside storage for RVs, boats & trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBayStorage.comStorage Rameys Business Park Dollar a day. RV & boat storage & heavy equipment. Water & electric hookup, 1/4 mile from Williams Park boat ramp. Also RV lots available. 813-310-1888, 813-690-1836, 813849-1469, 455 AutomobilesUTOMOBILESWill buy your used automobile for cash. 2005 or older, less that 60,000 miles. For more info. call Doug 813944-8478 458 partsPARTS & serSER ViICeE 461 TraRA VelEL TrailersRAILERS2002 Coachman Catalina Lite, GSX 35 towable $6,500 Call 813-645-1605 or 813-416-3703 2.5 Acres with fish ponds (not in operation) in secluded area of Ruskin. $29,000. These 2 cleared lots with few trees in Ruskin, zoned for house or mobile home, offer privacy and elbow room. Adjacent to brand new house. 4.66 Acres, close to main highway and new subdivisions, this property will make a great little farm, a perfect spot for your dream home, and a nice investment for future development. $125,000. CALLClaire TortCELL:(813) 363-7250 YORK in Highgate (1BR/1.5BA), 1000 sq. ft. under A/C, skylights, covered parking at front door, enclosed lanai, large utility room.................................. $31,500 2BR/2BA in KNOLLS (private heated POOL), furnished......................... $63,500 RENTAL 2BR/2BA in Bedford, FURNISHED............ ..................................... $675 per month CFSCFSR 2br/2ba/1cg (loft & den) Cathedral ceilings, screened lanai. Near club house, pool & golf course. Call 813-938-4216 for information. 565 M.H. inIN Par ARKsSWaterfront, beautiful 900 sf on Little Manatee River, tons of updates. Breath taking view, low lot rent. Park approval required. $27,000 obo. Commission paid to buyers agent. Visit www.sharpsales. com ad:128525 Call 813-260-2181 3br/2ba, 24x40 modular in 55+ park w/ river view & access. Totally furnished central air, new carpet, washer, TV, even boat, trailer, motor & 2 bicycles. Buy groceries, turn the key youre home. $19,990 or best offer. Will be sold by March 31. 213-938-1405 Cozy 2br/1ba, furnished, CHA, carport, patio, added work room, new aluminum roof. Remodeled. 55+ $200 lot rent. Ruskin. $7,000. 813-645-5430 55+ park 2br/1.5ba, carport, sun room. Club house, pool, activities. Partly furnished, all appliances, shed w/ W/D. $9,000. 813-741-2940 House for sale. Hacienda Heights, Riverview. 5 room, 2 baths, screened room, on water. $25,000 negotiable. Call 813-671-2541 55+ park 2br/1ba, large Florida room, work shop inside a workshop, 2 car carport, minor inside repair needed, but not necessary. Boat dock available. 813-641-3203, $4,600. Holiday Palms RV Park. 55+ park Trailer with glass enclosed Florida room, lot 11. $5,000 obo. includes everything. 989-255-6244 RThe Dolphin House, 768 Gran Kaymen Pool, laundry. $185 weekly, plus $300 deposit, utilities included. No pets. 813850-5217, 813-863-6123Have a nice day Have a nice day NETTIES ESTATE SALES1254 Del Webb Blvd. W. Sun City CenterFri. & Sat., March 2-37 a.m. to NoonPLEASE NOTE DATE & TIMES. Contents Include: Paragon Touch & Fire Kiln, White-Unpainted Porcelain, China Paint, Arts & Crafts, Painted China, WURLITZER Piano, Sofa, Barrel Chairs, Coffee & End Tables, Beautiful 3-pc. Rattan Wall Unit, Rattan Sofa, Side Chair & Recliner, Entertainment Center, Day Bed, White/Cream Bedroom Furniture, Wicker Loveseat & Furniture Pieces, Rattan Glass Top Table w/Chairs, White Wall Unit, 7-pc. King Bedroom Set, Wrought Iron Dining Room Table w/Chairs, China Cabinet, Desk, Silk Plants, Clothing, Household TONS OF COSTUME JEWELRY & Garage Items. Too Much To List! (PLEASE DON'T MISS OUR OTHER SALE ON 1128 Villeroy Dr. THIS FRIDAY-SATURDAY, MARCH See You There!PLEASE PARK ON SIDE OF SALE DUE TO EMERGENCY VEHICLES. Advertise in the newspaper that your community is reading. NO WAITING ON BANK APPROVAL!! Very well maintained 4BR/3BA, 3-car garage POOL home in Clubhouse Estates in Summerfield Crossings. Special features include: fresh paint inside and out, recently replaced A/C, new carpet in bedrooms, wood burning fire-place, new refrigerator & dishwasher and much more! $199,000 CALL ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 GREAT COMMERCIAL LOCATION! 2052 sq.ft. building with a great location on busy Shell Point Road in Ruskin. Nice size lot (72x170) with a circular driveway and parking for 6-12 vehicles. Large reception area, 6 private offices, kitchen area, 1 full bath and 1 half bath. $150,000 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 UNLIMITED POTENTIAL!! Great commercial acreage located near Highway 41 in Ruskin and close to planned shopping center. 3BR/1BA house with detached garage on 1.4 acres (mol) $299,000 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 COMMERCIAL LISTING! Great commercial property with 158 ft of frontage on Highway 41 (1.04 acres MOL). Property is zoned CI (commercial intensive) and is currently rented to an auto/service/repair garage. Special features include: huge building (3,192 sq.ft.) with new roof, three bays, two offices, and lots of room for storage. $279,000 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 PRICE REDUCED!!! GORGEOUS RIVERFRONT LOCATION!! Quaint and cozy 1BR/1BA with a dock and two storage sheds. Large lot with towering oak trees and completely fenced with 121 feet on the river. Just $111,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 NICE PRICE REDUCTION FOR COUNTRY CHARM KEY WEST FLAVOR. 3BR/2.5BA, Mexican tile throughout, wet bar with icemaker & sink, glass doors on kitchen cabinets, French doors to patio. Plantation shutters in front bedroom, vaulted ceilings. Koi pond with waterfall, wrap-around porch & private screened cat porch. Loads of storage & closet space. 1.59 acres with fruit trees & oak trees & lots of parking space, garage with workshop. Truly one of a kind. Priced at $349,900. CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 NEW COMMERCIAL LISTING APOLLO BEACH: Great retail location on Apollo Beach Blvd. Special features include: 1890 sq.ft. built in 2006, tract lighting, small utility kitchen, handicap bath, alarm system with digital cameras, free standing custom built showcases with glass tops, shelving, mahogany wood trim, loads of storage. $234,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 PRICE REDUCTION ON LISTING IN SUN CITY CENTER! Very nice 2BR/1BA single family home with a 1-car garage Located on a nice corner lot. Special features include a new roof and air conditioner. $58,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 COMMERCIAL ACREAGE IN RUSKIN! 3.7 acres (MOL) with CG Zoning. The initial work has been done for office buildings. This property has a great location, on corner of 10th St. SW and Woodland Estates. $374,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 SUN CITY CENTER Nicely maintained popular 2BR/2BA T2 floor plan located close to shopping, hospital, and Sun City Center clubhouse with lots of activities available. Come on and enjoy the carefree living that this golf cart community has to offer. $74,500 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653 CAREFREE LIVING IN SUN CITY CENTER! This beautiful, spotless, move-in ready 2BR/2BA 2-car garage Nassau model has been well taken care of and meticulously maintained with a newer roof and state of the art HVAC system. Call today for a showing and make this home your own! DONT LET THIS ONE GET AWAY $135,000 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653 WATERFRONT LOT Beautiful building lot ready for the home of your dreams located on a wide canal with no bridges to the bay. Lot size is 75x140 mol with county water and sewer available & no HOA. $90,000 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY PRIME LOCATION ON HIGHWAY 41!! Owner will consider both purchase and lease option offers with flexible terms. This property has 200 ft on U.S. Hwy. 41 and is set up for both office and warehouse space. The property is completely fenced in with parking for over 30 vehicles. This is a great location for a business that needs easy highway access and flexible space. Dont miss this opportunity! PRICE REDUCED TO $474,500!! CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653 Donate your old functioning cell phones and drop off at our office for use by the "Victims Assistance Program." CALL (813) 645-3211Serving South Hillsborough County since 1924www.dickmanrealty.com dickman@tampabay.rr.comCALL US FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS.........645-3211Celebrating 88 Years 1924 2012GREAT PROPERTY FOR CHURCH, BUSINESS AND/OR HOME: 2,600 sq.ft. home & office space + garage and carports, on 1 beautiful acre with large oaks, circular driveway, lots of road frontage, right in Ruskin, close to main Hwy! CG zoning. Now $239,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 SUN CITY CENTER RENTAL: Very nicely repainted & remodeled 2BR/2BA furnished condo, enclosed lanai overlooking nature preserve, utility-rm, attached carport. Available after March 31, for long term: $800/mo., or short term please call for quote. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 FABULOUS RIVERFRONT IN RUSKIN: Ready for your dream house/manufactured home, this lot, with PD-MU zoning, has all utilities on site including sewer, and is fenced and gated. Great fishing, deep water, large newer dock and what a view of water & nature! $199,900. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 APOLLO BEACH NEW LISTING! Beautiful newer 3BR/2BA house, split BR plan, spacious open living area, large kitchen with breakfast counter and lots of cabinets, inside utility + washer/dryer, lovely enclosed Florida room overlooking backyard, 2-car garage. Tile floors in living area and wood in BR. $120,000 CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 RUSKIN NEW LISTING! Pool house on 1/3 acre lot, in very nice secluded neighborhood, high and dry, close to river and boat ramp. 2BR/2BA, garage, and large fenced backyard with screened-in-pool. $125,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 DARLING HOME with 2BR/1BA in retirement community on quiet cul-de-sac with large backyard for extra breathing room. Freshly painted, updated kitchen and baths, inside utility room, in super condition. Priced to please at $69,900. CALL JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540 1.4 ACRES with county water and sewer available. Ideal for your estate home or build up to 4 homes on this property. Mostly cleared corner lot within minutes to Schools, churches, restaurants and recreation. Asking $60,000. CALL JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540. THIS MIGHT BE THE YEAR FOR DEVELOPMENT TO RECOVER. Get a head start by investing in this acreage where previous owner reportedly did some preliminary study for subdivision. Just over 14 acres near I-75 now owned by bank and priced at appraised value but below assessed value. $155,000 CALL JUDY ERICKSON 462-0288 WHAT A VIEW. And just waiting for clever buyer with floor plan that takes advantage of opportunity. Oversized lot on Ruskin Inlet with short boat trip to bay and river. Near end of cul de sac. Come check it out at asking price of $95,000 CALL JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288 START A WISH LIST. Of all the activities of which you want to take advantage in Sun City Center because original owner has maintained home in excellent condition leaving lots of leisure time for you. Outstanding 2BR/2BA plus den, large kitchen, breakfastroom, living/dining combo, master bedroom with sitting area and 2 walk-in closets. Must see at $199,900. CALL JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288 NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY!!

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MARCH 1, 2012 THHE SHHOPPERR 680 ADULt T & CHILD CAReE EMPLLOYMENT800Name: -_ ____________________________________________________ Address: _ ___________________________________________________ City: _ ____________________________State: _ ______ Zip:_ __________ Daytime Phone: _ _____________________________________________SRnt THE SHOPPER CLASSIFIED ADVERTISINGcall 813-645-3111 Ext. 201; 813-645-1792 The Shopper $17.0030 DDEADLIADLINE: : _ ___________________ _____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ _ ____________ CARDS SERR VICICES700 610 WAte TERFRontONT RentENT ALsS 611 HoHOUsesSES FoOR RentENT 612 Apts APTS. FoOR RentRENTNOW RENTINGAVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCYRIVERWOOD APARTMENTS1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments Rental Rates Beginning at $520 + Utilities For Rental Information call: (813) 645-7320 (TDD 800-955-8771) 709 Oceanside Circle Ruskin Mon-Fri 8:00 AM 4:00 PMEqual Housing Opportunity 612 Apts APTS. FoOR RentRENT 613 ConCONDosOS FoOR RentRENT 615 To OWnNHomesOMES FoOR RentENT 620 PLACesES toTO SHAReE 621 RoomsROOMS FoOR RentRENT 630 M.HH. RentRENT ALsS Mobile HHomes WWith A A/CC. 813-677-1086 631 M.HH. LotLOT RentRENT ALsS 644 CommeCOMMERCIAL 646 WW AReEHoOUseSE SpP ACeE 649 WW AnteNTED toTO RentRENT PRROFF SERR VICICES650 651 BooOOKKeepEEPInNG PIANO TUNING & REPAIR 813-645-4112 685 mMUsSICAL RepEP AIR Senior Home Companions, Inc.For Seniors by Active Seniors Call for FREE In-Home Consultation813-980-3408www.SeniorHomeCompanions.comLic. #232146 Our goal is to help seniors continue to live independently and comfortably by supporting you with active senior caregivers who are understanding and trustworthy. 20 YEARS of SERVICE 705 CCLeEAnNInNG 813-846-7629 710 LLAWnN CCAReE 715 FFILL DDIRtT/HHAULInNG Free estimates. 720 HomeHOME MAIntNT CCall 813-649-1418 735 TRAnspoNSPORtT At TIonON 740 MIsSC. SeERv VICesES 870 GeneGENERAL880 PARtT -TImeME TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED CallBeverlyat 645-3111 ext. 201 or email: Beverly@observernews.n etUp to 20 words: $17 Additional words: 30 eachBold lines: $3 eachClassieds must be paid in advance &Established in 1968 Printing Company, Inc.SHEETFED & WEB PRINTING 210 Woodland Estate Ave., Ruskin, Fl 813-645-4048 ext. 201. $18 for 6 mo CommCOMMUnNItyTY PApePERsS o OF FFLoORIDA (CCPFF stST Ate TEWIDesES)

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MARCH 1, 2012 31 U.S. 41 in Ruskin is a Main Street. Encouraging slowing down and stopping to shop in downtown Ruskin is one of the goals of the plan while maintaining a good traffic flow is a high priority in the other two areas of the Overlay. During the nine months of meetings, sizes and types of signs; parking lot design; (new and expanded); building design; landscaping and fencing have been examined, voted upon and are now being put into language that will define the plan. Only certain types of signs and fencing will be permitted, and the rules say property owners must plant a shade tree every thirty feet along the highway. Now that the series of meetings are over, county staff must take residents wishes and develop the language of the Overlay which will be presented at an Open House for more input and then taken to County Commissioners for a vote. Hearing no exception for industrial zoning, and being told they would address that later, worries owners of industrial sites that exist in the Overlay area.. If were held to the same standards, it will definitely cost hundreds of jobs, said Noel Andress, owner of Sunmark Realty based in Pineland. He owns 6,000 square feet in the area of the overlay; 3,000 on U.S. 41 and 3,000 on Big Bend Road. The way it is being proposed, if you have land attached to the frontage along U.S. 41, that land must also be brought up to the standards of the Overlay. What Im saying is that that will cost too much and make bringing in new industry to that area impossible. Its already an industrial siteI mean, just look at the smokestacks, that wont ever be anything but industrial. There wont be hotels or tourist attractions there. Andress made that statement at the final of nine working committee meetings Feb 21 at the South Shore Regional Library. If rules of the overlay are adopted for industry as well as residences and retail, he says it will cost too much for anyone to develop industrial property and even if they do, plant security would be compromised by the overlay standards concerning fencing. Andress expounded his answers in an interview following the meeting to say the beautification required would not only be of no value to industries that might want to locate there, but would also cost close to a million extra dollars on just one parcel that he himself owns. In an interview the next day David McDaniel of Titan Properties based in Winter Park who represents Pacific Tomato Growers on U.S. 41 in Apollo Beach, McDaniel fully explained the points he had made during the meeting. Factories and manufacturing companies have to have secure fences some even with barbed wire on topbecause they need them. Theft and safety are compromised in an industrial area when the only reason a fence is put up is for aesthetic value. And to have a regulation that says you have to have a shade treelike an oakevery 30 feet is fine for a homeowner or small business owner but adds thousands of dollars in original costs and then theres the added maintenance industrial plants dont need. They need to be spending their money creating the things their factories were built to manufacture. It comes down to jobsjobsjobs, he said. At the meeting, Michael Peterson, who has been part of South Countys community planning for about 20 years, suggested incentives be given to industrial companies to take part in the plan. Maybe exempt them from some taxes for three years following their compliance. Or some other kind of break so we can maintain the standards but still encourage industry and development, Peterson said. The language of the plan will be unveiled at an Open House which will be held at the South Shore Library March 27 at 6 p.m. Fernandez and Healey said they will once again notify the more than 400 land owners whose properties front U.S. 41 in the overlay area. So far, only about 50 people have attended the meetings and working groups despite notification. To find out more about the plan or read about any of the meetings already held, visit http://www. hillsboroughcounty.org/pgm/ zoning/cpoiongoing/US41.cfm or look at previous coverage in the archives at www.observernews. net.Some fear proposed plan will discourage industry, costing jobs%  Winners have been announced in the February competition for the Sun City Center Photo Club. In the Color Print category, at the Advanced level, Stan Lipski received a silver award for Vineyard Overlooking Lake Geneva and Glenn Laucks received a silver for End of the Line. At the Intermediate level, Rose Stack received a gold for Spring Bouquet Allen Maser received a bronze for Pottin Around and Marianne Strehar received a bronze for Snow on the Rockies. At the Beginner level, Sue McBride received a gold for Hello, Dali. In the Monochrome Print category, Rose Stack, intermediate level, won a bronze for Stairway to Heaven In the Color Digital category, at the Advanced level, Gayle Fischer won a silver award for Swallowtail At the Intermediate level, Pat Jones won a silver award for Harley Rider. Fred Durr won a bronze award for The World IS Flat! Marion Kundiger won a bronze award for I Love My Little Sister. Bob Trivus won bronze awards for The Tango and Jellyfish and Kathy Vitale won bronze awards for Again I Lost My Mom and But Mom At the Beginner level, Jerri Garretson won a gold for You May Kiss the Bride. Roger Kele won a bronze award for Banana Spider. Robert Price won a gold award for Chinas Venice and a silver award for Bottoms Up and Andre Ledoux won a silver award for Trail Rose and a bronze for Got Ya! In the Monochrome Digital category, at the Intermediate level, Kathy Vitale won gold awards for Penguin by Home and Penguin Pair. At the Beginner level, Jerri Garretson won a bronze for Will You Be My Valentine? and Roger Kele won a silver for Sleepy Seal and a bronze for Japanese Maple. In the new Creative category which is judged at the Advanced level, Rolf Sulzberger received a gold for Comedic Eye. Matt Batt received bronze awards for Building Dies, Art Survives and Sunrise at Horse Farm and Rose Stack received a silver award for Im Watching You. For more information visit www.photoclubscc.com or the learning lab at 960D Cherry Hills Drive, SCC.SCC Photo Club announces winnersComedic Eye by Rolf Sulzberger Hello, Dali by Sue McBride Spring bouquet by Rose Stack

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www.ObserverNews.netMarch 1, 2012 Volume 56 Number 6THE OBSERVER NEWS PRST STDPAIDRUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570 PERMIT NO. 8 Some fear proposed U.S. 41 Overlay will discourage industry Community planners in Balm mean to keep this once-isolated pocket of Hillsborough agriculture on the country side. See page 8Mitch Traphagen ponders the identity of Ruskin which is often viewed by outsiders as the odd man out. See page 11Nations only showmens museum opening in Gibsonton By MELODY JAMESON GIBSONTON Millions of dollars and many years in the making, a museum unlike any other is preparing to open here. Its exhibits range from human figures no larger than a fingertip to machinery towering more than 30 feet. Its colorful wall hangings constitute a walk through the his tory of a livelihood that also is a lifestyle. Its three-dimensional displays can tickle the funny bone and tease mature memories back to the days of carefree youth. Unique though it is, this museum does, however, share certain commonalities with other such facilities; it is an invaluable record, a prized celebration, an honorable tribute to the world of the carnival and to its people, the independent showmen, the carnies who bring amusements to the country every summer. Carnivals in America, those cot ton candy, sugared pastry, game barker, blinking lights, thrill ride extravaganzas that can make kids out of sixty somethings, date back to the 19th century. The 1893 Chicago Worlds Fair is credited with spawning the travel ing carnival when it assembled a section of rides, games, burlesque and side show curiosities the first midway and, incidentally, presented the first Ferris wheel built by George Washington Gale Ferris. Before the Chicago Exposition, circuses and vaudeville shows toured Americas cities and rural areas, offering sought-after entertainments in an era when homemade music and visitors conversations were the primary recreation. After that worlds fair, operators of its midway features took a tip and took to the road. And America embraced the new comers. By 1902, there reportedly were 17 traveling carnivals and by 1905 the number more than doubled to 46 such outfits. In 1937 at the height of the Great Depression some 300 carnivals complete with animal acts, mul tiple games, flavorful foods, side shows and rides to amuse all ages were crisscrossing the country. From there, the world of the creative traveling amusement purveyors grew into an industry, making millionaires of enterpris ing equipment manufacturers, Planes, Trains and CraigslistBy MITCH TRAPHAGEN mitch@observernews.netThe last place I expected to be was on the Auto Train just outside of Washington, D.C. Sitting on the train, the thought occurred to me that there might be something wrong with me. Over the past decade, Ive bought three different old cars and a sailboat over the Internet; all sight unseen and all with nothing more than the blind faith that those cars and that boat would get me home. And now Ive just added to the list. Porsche made all three cars. They were all at least 25-years-old and were all relatively inexpensive (certainly no more expensive than any other cheap used car). My wife and I still have one, but two have since been sold during fits of utilitarianism, practicality and economy. After driving a pickup truck with more than 200,000 miles on the odometer, I decided I needed a little more pep (and a backup vehicle) in my life. As my wife drove off each morning in our 1986 Porsche 944, I fired up Craigslist on my web browser in search of one that I, too, could drive off in. After a month of searching, I found a lot ofjunk. A Porsche PENNNY FLETCHER PHOTOThe area just south of Big Bend Road and U.S. 41 intersection is zoned heavy industrial but some think the proposed U.S. 41 Overlay plan will discourage industry because of its specific fencing and landscaping requirements. By PENNY FLETCHER penny@pennyetcher.com RUSKIN Owners of large stretches of industrial-zoned property fronting U.S. 41 in Ruskin and Apollo Beach say the new rules proposed by the county in conjunction with the U.S. 41 Zoning Overlay Working Committee are fine for residences and retail stores but will keep industry out of South County. The Overlay will put an extra layer of zoning regulations on all property fronting U.S. 41 between Big Bend Road and the Little Manatee River Bridge and is part of the on-going effort to implement the Ruskin and Apollo Beach Community Plans. Meetings have been held every month for nine months and working committees for both communities have been involved, voting on standards they think would be beneficial to their communities. In the beginning of the meetings nine months ago, county staff, led by planners Jose Fernandez and John Healey, two working groups were formed, one for Ruskin and the other for Apollo Beach, because the two communities were so different. The maps now show three distinct groups, based on the usage of U.S. 41. Area 1 is between Big Bend Road and 19th Avenue in Ruskin. Area 2 is between 19th Avenue and College Avenue Area 3 is between College Avenue and the Little Manatee River Bridge. But the county recognizes there is already a group working on Ruskins downtown (from 19th Avenue to College) so it is not working on that area in this Overlay. We recognize that there is already a plan for Ruskins downtown in the making, Fernandez said. We dont want to duplicate efforts. And we also recognize that U.S. 41 is similar in the Apollo Beach area and the area south of Ruskins downtown. That is because those two areas are used as a traffic corridor while Part One of an Observer News Feature StorySteerage class (Amtrak calls it coach class) on the Auto Train would be remarkably comfortable if it had wings and flew. Initially, it felt less so for a 17-hour overnight trip down the Eastern Seaboard.MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO944 is a remarkably reliable and economical car if it is taken care of properly. The car my wife drives had 140,000 miles on it when I bought it in 2005 for $3,500 from a guy in New Hampshire. Today it has nearly 250,000 miles on it and it has required only minimal maintenance. But that maintenance cant be put off and it has required that I not be afraid to get my hands greasy now and again. In comparison, in 2003, See SHOWMENS MUSEUM, page 9 See PLANES, TRAINS, page 14 See U.S. 41 OVERLAY, page 31 Winners have been announced in the February competition for the Sun City Center Photo Club. See some of their photos and more info on page 31

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Ruskin, FL 33570813-645-3111Fax: 813-645-4118www.ObserverNews.netPublished Every Thursday by M&M Printing Co., Inc. 645-4048EDITORIAL:Brenda Knowles ............ Publisher/Editor brenda@observernews.net Mitch Traphagen ................. Online Editor mitch@observernews.net Melody Jameson ...... Contributing WriterAll press releases, news articles and photos may be emailed to news@ observernews.net, faxed to 645-4118, or mailed to Observer News, 210 Woodland Estates Ave. SW, Ruskin, FL 33570SALES:Vilma Stillwell ... Display Advertising Rep. vilma@observernews.net Nan Kirk ........... Display Advertising Rep. nan@observernews.netFor current rates and circulation information visit our website at www.ObserverNews.netCLASSIFIED / CIRCULATION:Beverly Kay ......... Classied / Circulation beverly@observernews.netPRODUCTION:Jason Martin ......... Graphic Arts / Layout jason@observernews.net Chere Simmons .... Graphic Arts / Layout chere@observernews.net Sue Sloan ............. Composition / Layout sue@observernews.net The views expressed by our writers are not necesssarily shared by The Observer News, SCC Observer, The Riverview Current or M&M Printing Co., Inc.We Accept: Audited by: Award-Winning Newspapers By William Hodges I have a friend who is one of the best informed people I know; she always seems to be up on everything. There is little happening in our circle of friends she does not know. If we go to a confer ence, she comes back with more knowledge of the other people attending than any of the rest of us. On the other hand, she does not seem to be a gossip or a person who overtly pries into the lives of other people. I wondered how she could be so informed so decided to ask her. She replied, I take the time to listen. Well, I thought I listened too, but I didnt seem to come away with nearly as much information. So I asked if she had any tricks she used to enhance her listening skills. Here are the ideas she shared with me. ing said, not how it is being said. Some people speak with an accent, lisp or stutter, or they have other delivery problems that can be distracting. Make a conscious effort not to be turned off by these problems. common interest. Its easier to remember what they say if you can tie their statements to something in which you are interested. tions, such as fans, the voices of other people, music or other extra neous noises. tionally charged words to shut down your mental process. The words the other person is using may not have been meant to ofthe words to the intent of the speaker. phrase and repeat back to the other person the information you heard. This will validate your understanding. completed a thought before you reply. This prevents you from jumping to conclusions and unnecessary misunderstandings. Sharpen your listening skills as Why do you feel that way? that? or use any one of Kiplings honest serving menWho? What? When? Where? Why? and How? the conversation. You have to sift a lot of dirt before you find a nugget of gold. The same is true of conversations. If you are patient and listen intently, the nugget will appear. remember specific information from a conversation, write it down as soon as possible after the conthat the faintest pencil is better ideas to paper reinforces them in your mind and allows reference at a later date. My friends ideas all make sense to me. In fact, she told me noththese principles, I was not applying them. Knowledge without application is only potential power. My challenge, and that which I give to you, is to begin applying these principles. If we do, we can all become better listeners and we wont miss anything. Hodges is a nationally recognized speaker, trainer and syndicated columnist. He also hosts an interview-format television program, Spotlight on Government, on the Tampa Bay Community Network which airs Mondays at 8 p.m. and Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. (Bright House channel 950, Verizon channel 30). The shows can also be viewed at www.hodgesvideos.com. Phone: 813-6410816. Email: bill@billhodges.com Website: www.billhodges.comMOWW National Commander addresses local chapter Capt Vowinkel, left, presenting Lt Col Paul Nixon, USAF (Ret) with Perpetual Membership certificate.PHOTO BY FRANK KEPLEY The Military Order of the World Wars (MOWW) featured the monthly luncheon which was held on Feb.17. was commissioned as an Ensign in the US Navy in 1962 after Florida. He served on active duty from 1962-1967 and served in Operations as a Naval Flight Officer during a portion of this time. He completed 24 years in which time he successfully served three command tours. In July his current position as MOWW the presentation of awards and provided information pertaining to the state of affairs of MOWW from a national perspective

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X 8 5 MARCH 1, 2012 5 RUSKIN Moose Lodge #813 UPCOMING EVENTS Enjoy MOSIs March Special Events and ProgramsThe Museum of Science and Industry is a not-for-profit, communitybased institution and educational resource dedicated to advancing public interest, knowledge and understanding of science, industry and technol ogy. Located at 4801 East Fowler Ave. in Tampa, MOSI features educational and entertaining exhibits, activities and special events, and is home to Floridas only IMAX Dome Theatre and the new Sky Trail Ropes Course. For more information about MOSI and upcoming activi ties, visit www.mosi.org or call (813) 987-6000. MOSI Shows Off Mars in March Cost: $20 per person; $15 per MOSI member Mars is in opposition so not only is it at its closest to Earth, but the sun will fully illuminate the red planets surface. Join MOSI to observe the most studied planet in our solar system. Spend time with a NASA scientist to learn how NASA plans to send people to Mars, and build habitable colonies on this distant world. Visit MOSIs planetarium for an interactive show about the night sky and end the evening with a view of Mars through telescopes on top of the IMAX Dome Theatre. Spring Break Camps are available at MOSI for kids in grades 3-5 and grades 4-8 from March 12-16. Campers should bring two snacks and wear clothing that can get messy, and bring a lunch or buy one from the MOSI Caf. Extended hours are available from 7 to 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. for an additional $10 per week. Program fee: $223 per person; $168 per MOSI member Tap into the power of play through odd inventions and exciting brain games. Solve challenges with flying ping-pong balls and rolling marbles. Design racing tracks on the computer, teach robots to follow mazes and make a toy in Idea Zone! to take home. Let the imagination run loose for a week of creative fun. Program fee: $223 per person; $168 per MOSI member Combine a love of movies and video games by making movies inspired by video games. Learn to use 3D animation and other computer ized movie making skills to direct Diner Dash: The Movie, Halo: The Untold Story; or whatever movie idea comes to mind. Participants can put themselves into the movie with green screening, or work with friends or on a solo project. Ages 21 and up. Tickets: $60 for MOSI Members (in advance); $70 for Non-Members (in advance); $80 if purchased the week of the event; $125 for VIP Tickets For more information on any of these events, visit www.mosi.org or call (813) 987-6000. Tickets are now on sale for the Apollo Beach Womans Club Annual Fashion Show Passport to Fashion to be held at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 31 at the Bradenton Yacht Club, 4307 Snead Island Rd., Palmetto. Coldwater Creek will feature unique casual and cruise wear in striking easycare fabrics. ABWC members will be the models and Carol Torres, South Shore Day Spa in Apollo Beach will be the hairstylist. Tickets are $30 for the event that supports the ABWCs scholarship fund for college-bound Apollo Beach high school graduates. Doors to the event will open at 10:30 a.m. Tickets are selling out quickly for the three course luncheon and must be purchased in advance by calling Pam Kerstetter at (813) 645-2425 or (813) 6792424. If transportation is needed it can be arranged with Kerstetter. Ellen Kleinschmidt, singer, actor and writer for the theater, television and movies and her new musical play Aged to Perfection will be the emcee for the show. When not performing, Ellen is teaching for Hillsborough County where she Apollo Beach Womans Club announces annual fashion show The Ruskin Moose Lodge # 813 is located at www.lodge813.moosepages.org WEEKLY EVENTS Every Wednesday 5-7 p.m. Best Spaghetti in Ruskin Every Thursday 5-7 p.m. Wings Every Friday 5-7 p.m. Fish Fry (baked, beer batter or fried) 7-11 p.m. Live Music Every Saturday 2 p.m. Horseshoes UPCOMING EVENTS Friday, March 2 7-11 p.m. Southern Tide Saturday, March 3 7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins Friday, March 9 7-11 p.m. Calvin O Saturday, March 10 5-7 p.m. Steak Dinner 7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins Friday, March 16 7-11 p.m. Live Band Saturday, March 17 4-7 p.m. St. Patricks Day Corned Beef Dinner 7-11 p.m. St. Patricks Day Party with Kim Mullins Friday, March 23 7-11 p.m. Del and Gary Saturday, March 24 7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins Friday, March 30 7-11 p.m. Shine On Saturday, March 31 7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins All events are open to qualifie d Moose members and guests RUSKIN Moose Lodge #813 UPCOMING EVENTS Brandon Jr. Womans Club seeks membersYou are invited to join the Brandon Jr. Womans Club for their 2012 Annual Membership Recruitment Spring Fling Event from 7 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, March 29 at their Clubhouse located at 129 N. Moon Avenue in Brandon. Learn what the GFWC Brandon Jr. Womans Club is all about and how they support the community through projects such as their Childrens Holiday Party for the less fortunate, Scholarships for High School Female Seniors, Road Cleanups, Troop Support, Interna tional Projects, Health Awareness issues and more. It will be a fun evening with refreshments, activities, speakers and more. For more information, contact Kim at kholt28@gmail.com.A little goes a long wayThe Tiger Cub Den of Cub Scout Pack #607, Riverview, while small in physical size and numbers, performed a big civic service in February. Their efforts stretched over four days of commitment to the Scouting for Food Program. Their work included collecting donated food from the congregation of South Shore United Methodist Church (their charter organization) and from the generous shoppers at the Publix, Big Bend Road and U.S. Hwy. 301. On Feb. 18, they took all the donated food to the Emergency Care Health Organization (ECHO) in Brandon where it weighed in at over one thousand pounds. Ruskin VFW Post #6287Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120 U.S. 41 N. has listed the following weekly activities. Meetings are: American Legion on 1st Wednesday each month; VFW and LAVFW on the 2nd Wednesday each month; and MAVFW on the 3rd Thursday each month. Thursday, March 1 VA Hospital at 5:30 p.m. Bar Bingo at 6 p.m. Friday, March 2 Fish Fry from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Music by Blinky & Fritz from 7 to 11 p.m. Saturday, March 3 Turkey Shoot at 1 p.m. Music by Rick Bourbon from 7 to 11 p.m. Sunday, March 4 Fire in the Hole from 1 to 4 p.m. Music by Bert & Sassy from 5:30 to 10 p.m. Monday, March 5 Fire in the Hole from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, March 6 Games in Lounge from 1 to 4 p.m. Kitchen open from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Bingo at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 7 American Legion Meeting at 7 p.m. was Teacher of the Year in 2006. Brian Kleinschmidt, actor, singer, and survivor of televisions The Amazing Race is Ellens son and a third generation performer. He will entertain the attendees of the fashion show with song and charm. Those in attendance also will have the opportunity to bid on silent auction items that include a wonderful display of food and special-item baskets and gift certificates from local stores and restaurants. ABWC members raise money throughout the year for numer ous community service projects including scholarships and helping needy families and children in the area. The fashion show is the clubs biggest fundraiser. Last years event funded 11 scholar ships totaling $11,000 awarded to Apollo Beach college-bound students for the current academic year. ABWC is open to all women in the greater Apollo Beach area. Membership information is avail able by calling Sharon Vasquez, membership vice president, at (813) 641-7856.New members sought for young professionalsSouth Shore Young Professional Association was launched in May, 2011 to serve young professionals living and working in the South Shore area. The Association meets twice monthly and offers professional development talks by community business owners and leaders. SSYPA meets at local venues and supports various non-profit organizations throughout the year. Currently the club is working hard to build its Relay for Life team to support the American Cancer Society. SSYPAs leadership chair position is now held by Lisa Kennedy, the current Honorary Mayor of Riverview. The Association is affiliated with the Greater Riverview Chamber of Commerce. The group will meet from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 6 at S&S Tacos/Pizzas & Stuff, 10664 U.S. Highway 301 S., Riverview. To learn more about SSYPA, visit www.ssypa.com or call (813) 234-5944. Riverview Memorial VFW Post #81087504 Riverview Dr. (813) 671-9845 Mens Auxiliary -First Thursday at 7 p.m. Ladies Auxiliary -Second Tuesday at 7 p.m. Post -Second Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday Spaghetti Dinner from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday Breakfast from 9 a.m. to noon Bar Bingo Monday at 6:30 p.m. Bar Poker with Lori on Wednesdays at 1 p.m. Fire in the Hole on Saturdays at 1 p.m.

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6 MARCH 1, 2012 If you have one piece of chocolate or one potato chip or one peanut, you will want another one. Same thing with beer. You can work hard to get through the pile of work on your desk, but when you come in the next morning, there will be a new stack. I think its elves. No one can do a presentation with electronics without something breaking. No one. I have found the perfect pair of shoes in the store, but invariably they did not have them in my size. If you are not the lead dog on a dog sled team, the view is all the same. Nothing tastes as good as thin feels. Wine is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy. He has also given us Godiva chocolate. Want to be extra happy? Get a bottle of that new chocolate wine! Once you find a product that is the perfect size, the perfect price and does exactly what you want it to do, they will stop making it. Now, none of these stream of consciousness thoughts will change the world or even change one life. I doubt Oprah will let me ghostwrite her column any time soon. But if even one of these made you smile today, then it was worth taking the time to write them down. And if you have a One Sure Truth youd like to share, send it to me I can always use a smile myself! TECH TALKBy: Dana Dittmar, Executive DirectorSCC Chamber News YOU, ME, AND BUSINESSPeriodically, when Im in the lobby of a doctors office or waiting for the oil to be changed in my car, I pick up whatever magazine is nearby to pass the time. The other week, it was O magazine. Its hard to tell which issue it was because Oprah always puts herself on every cover, but she has a column in the very back entitled Things I Know to be True. She usually writes of sentimental and fundamental things. Things designed to be life changing or at least life affirming. Most of them I agree with. And as I was reading this column, I got to wondering about the things I know to be true. I started writing them down whenever I thought of one, and came up with my own list. Here are a few of my rambling thoughts (in no particular order). Mom was right. Life is like a roll of toilet paper -it goes faster the closer you get to the end. (Wasnt it just the holidays and now its March?) As soon as you finally get around to entering someones email address into your contacts list, they will send you an email telling you they changed their address. If you wash your car, it will rain. If you mow the grass it will rain. If you plan a day at the beach, it will rain. When you take your vehicle to the mechanic because its making a funny noise, it wont make the funny noise in front of the mechanic.You, Me & BusinessBy Dana Dittmar Dove Interiors Carpet One is proud to present Sally Morse, world renowned designer, speaker and author. Sally MorseTen steps to a perfect roomBUSINESS NEWSTen steps to a perfect room is one of Sallys most popular seminars. It answers some of the most asked questions. Whether youre building a new home, moving into an older home, remodeling or just wanting to improve what you have, this is the seminar for you. Sally leads you through the steps of where to start your plan, then adding furniture, lighting, windows, walls, floors and accessories. The rule of thumb demystifies the process of decorating and makes anyone feel like a pro. Sally has appeared in Better Homes & Gardens, Windows and Walls, Real Simple and other interiors design publications. She has evolved from owning her own retail decorating business, to consulting with the largest manufacturers on interior design products in the world. This event will be held from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 8 in support of the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation. A $10 contribution will be collected from each person attending. All monies collected will go directly to the Foundation. There will be a grand prize drawing, food and fun. Register at Dove Interiors, 2305 College Avenue, Ruskin, or phone 645-8660. A vision recognizedThe Sun City Center Area Chamber of Commerce held a monthly coffee and ribbon cutting at OT Rehab Solutions in Sun City Center. They specialize in products and therapies for those with low vision. Keeping up to dateDon and Chris Guiley from A + Hearing Center, in Sun City Center, Fl. attended the 13th Annual Florida Continuing Education Workshop in Orlando, Jan 20 & 21, 2012. This years workshop wanted to focus on ways to build your business as these challenging economic times continue. The program consisted of the Florida Laws on Hearing Aid Dispensing, Infection Control for Hearing Healthcare Providers, How Loop Systems help us all, Advertising Mistakes and How to Avoid Them. This workshop is necessary to get the Continuing Education Hours needed for the Florida State License and International Institute Don and Chris Guiley from A + Hearing Center, in Sun City Center, Fl.for Hearing Instrument Studies, American Academy Audiology and American Speech-Language Hearing Association. For more information call 813-642-8200.

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MARCH 1, 2012 7 813-633-7333Fax 813-633-6420Tax PreparationCall today for your appointment and receive your FREE Tax OrganizerTax PreparationCall today for your appointment and receive your FREE Tax Organizer Tax Services, Inc. Filing No Charge (39 yrs exp.)Located in the Payant Financial Plaza1653 Sun City Center Plaza, SCC, FL 33573 Gibsonton Elementarys Terrific Kids Sun City Center Silent and Live Auction Set for March 26Hard to believeMarch is here! That means it is only a few weeks until the Sun City Center 50th Anniversary Auction on March 26 (5:30 p.m.) at the Renaissance Club. Tickets are $25 each will be sold March 1, 2, 5, 6 and 7 from 9 a.m. till noon in the Atrium on the SCC Central Campus, N. Pebble Beach Blvd. This event is open to the public. Is a hot air balloon ride on your bucket list? Or are you more interested in a weeks stay at a beach resort, or does a two-night, three-day stay at Little Harbor sound more appealing? Will you be the highest bidder for a baseball signed by pitcher Jeremy Hellickson of the Rays Baseball Team? Maybe a more practical item gets your attentionlike an area rug ($500 value) or that beautiful stone-paver entry for your home ($500 value). Perhaps you need new golf cart batteries or a new microwave. These are just some of the items that will be available to the highest bidders. It will be exciting to peruse the auction catalog for the wonderful items, then hearing the gavel sounding and the auctioneer announcing, Sold, to the lady in the purple dress! Cam McGary and Merlene Smithyman, co-chairs for the event, say they are excited about the word on the street about the high level of interest and expect all 200 tickets will be sold quickly. ClubLink, sponsor for the auction, is preparing the Renaissance clubhouse for arrival of the auction items. Ticket holders will enjoy complimentary beverages and hors doeuvres as they study their catalogs and view the items to be auctioned. This is one of the last major 50th Anniversary Celebration events, so buy your tickets early to reserve your spot. For further information, call 642-9800 (McGary) or 634-8387 (Smithyman).The following students were outstanding examples of what it means to be Inclusive: Ethan Hayes, Hailey Merrell, Aiyana Nowland, Harmonie Churh, Jazmin Sneed, Jannette Ortiz, Laylah Posey Davison, Wyatt Burger, Johnny Parker, Shawn Terry, Olivia Kimborough, Crystal Espinoza, Carlos Gutierrez, Courtney Sumner, Steven Marinez-Mata, Emily Sneed, Jessica Benitez, Samantha Martinez, Nyah Hickory, Amie Woodham, Eric Mayberry, Kaitlyn Pruitt, Austin Osteen, Diana Espinoza, Shane Canfield, Eduardo Reyes, Mark Nguyen, Darius Taylor, and Christian Ritter. Auction co-chairs Merlene Smithyman (L) and Cam McGary expect ticket sales to be brisk when they go on sale March 1.BY CARL McCGARY:Community Hall of SCC to host public concertsSwinging Into Spring The 18-piece Sarasota Jazz Project will come back to Sun City Center Community Hall, 1910 S. Pebble Beach Blvd., Sunday, March 4, 2-4 p.m. Open to public. Reserved seats. Tickets are $12. Sarasota Concert Band Three concerts will be performed by this 40-piece band at the Sun City Center Community Hall, 1910 S. Pebble Beach Blvd. from 2-4 p.m. on Sunday: April 22-Russian Romance, May 27-Latin Rhythms and July 1-Victory Celebrations. Open to public. Reserved seats. Tickets are $18 each or buy all three as a mini-series for $45 person. Both event tickets are on sale at the Community Association Office Mon-Fri, 9 a.m.-noon. For more information call 813-642-2001.Hillsborough County Parks, Recreation and Conservation is holding conferences designed to raise the level of awareness about positive life styles, and health and welfare of young Hillsborough County adults. The Girls Only Conference and the Men of Tomorrow Conference for Boys are each limited to the first 100 participants. Cost is $10 per person, or $5 for Rec2Six program participants. Registration deadline for the conferences held in March is Thursday, March 8. Men of Tomorrow Conference for Boys When: Tuesday, March 13, from 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Where: All Peoples Life Center, 6105 E. Sligh Ave. in Tampa Who: Young men, ages 10 to 16 Cost: $10 per person, $5 for Rec2Six program participants Registration Deadline: March 8, open to the first 100 participants Workshop topics include Dress for Success, Fitness and Nutrition, Disabilities Awareness, and Fishing. A free lunch will be provided by Brocatos Sandwich Shop. Keynote speaker Jason Romano is a former professional Major League baseball player, and currently works as an agent for Excel Sports Management, a full-service sports management and marketing agency that represents some of the top athletes in professional sports today. For more information call David Andrews, Parks, Recreation and Conservation at (813) 376-5755. Girls Only Conference When: Wednesday, March 14, from 9 a.m. 4 p.m. Where: Apollo Beach Recreation Center, 664 Golf and Sea Blvd. in Apollo BeachYoung Adults Conference scheduled for MarchWho: Young women, ages 10 to 15 years old Cost: $10 per person, $5 for Rec2Six program participants Registration Deadline: March 8, open to the first 100 participants Workshop topics include College and Careers, Dress for Success, Flourishing Faces and Nails, Zumba, and a presentation by the Hillsborough County Sheriffs Office. A free lunch will be provided by Brocatos Sandwich Shop. Transportation from some of Hillsborough Countys recreation centers might be available. A special presentation will be given on past participants and where they are now. For more information, contact the Ruskin Recreation Center at (813) 672-7881, or the Gardenville Recreation Center at (813) 672-1120. Business slow? Need to advertise? 813-645-3111 or visit www.observernews.net

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8 MARCH 1, 2012 813-633-3065 1515 Sun City Center Plaza Missing?We offer technologically advanced lens implants for cataract surgery patients, including Crystalens, ReSTOR and Toric which can improve vision near, far and in between!Call 813-633-3065 for a consultation with Dr. Jeffrey Davis to nd out which lens implant is right for YOU!Ask us how Lifestyle Lens Implants are helping many people enjoy clearer vision.Dont let cataracts hinder your lifestyle.Jeffrey Davis, M.D. Fellowship-trained Cornea Specialist, Lasik and Cataract SurgeonYourEyeDoctors.com What are youMissing? Dr. Robert A. NormanDermatologistDr. A. TheodosatosCarole Mazzone, ARNPOffering Laser, Botox, Restylane and various cosmetic products & services 813-880-7546MOBILE RADIATIONSame Day Appointments FREE Skin ScreeningInsurance accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, BCBS, Humana, Cigna, Aetna, Amerigroup, and many more Call for a FREE ESTIMATE649-1599www.BratesAluminum.com Annettes Beauty SalonCorner Hwy In the Village Plaza (next to Copper Penny) Golf Cart Accessible 634-5422FULL SERVICE SALON for Men and Women Welcome Miriam to our staff Tuesday Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. SUN POINT AUTOMOTIVE SUN POINT AUTOMOTIVE 24-HOUR TOWING Se Habla Espaol Apollo Beach, Ruskin, Sun City CenterFULLY INSURED & BONDED FREE DIAGNOSTICSBRAKE SPECIALOIL CHANGE Emergency Services645-7653 Monday Friday 8 a.m. 5:30 p.m. FREE TOWING to shop if we do repairs$99$2495Includes Labor, Turn Rotors. Most Cars & Light Trucks. Per Axle + Pads Most cars & light trucksAC Check$2995+ FreonMost cars and light trucks. Must present coupon for special price. Must present coupon for special price. Must present coupon for special price. Citizen planners outline a future rooted in rural activity By MELODY JAMESON%  BALM Community planners here mean to keep this onceisolated pocket of Hillsborough agriculture on the country side. Six of the 10 goals identified in their draft Balm Community Plan focus on maintaining agrarian activity, conserving open land, encouraging recreation of a rural style and eventually establishing a hamlet or village core as alterations wrought by development transpire. Few trappings of urban or suburban lifestyles are coveted here. Citizen planners composed of both small homestead owners and large acreage holders have been at work on their guideline for a year, fashioning a mutually agreed-to vision of the little community which can trace its beginnings back a solid century. And, while their outlooks now committed to paper could undergo changes as they are discussed and reviewed during forthcoming months, the final concepts may be ready for open house exhibit in May, Principal Planner Lisa Silva said this week. If a May date cannot be scheduled, an early autumn timeframe is likely, the professional planner added. Silva, a member of The Planning Commission staff, has been assisting the citizen planners. Balm, established around turn of the 20th century by hardy rural families who earned livings in lumbering, crop farming, livestock ranching and phosphate mining, was generally unknown outside the South County region until late in the century. Balms settlers, proud of their selfsufficiency and able to meet their material, spiritual as well as educational needs locally, liked it that way. And many of their descendants still do. The first goal outlined in their plan draft calls for continued strong support of agricultural endeavors as the communitys economic base, whether from crop production or ornamental horticulture, tropical fish farming or livestock ranching. The plans third goal recognizes the potential need to diversify that base with alternative but related undertakings such as a comprehensive farmers market and community garden along with agricultural and ecological tourism, plus retail activity such as feed stores and machinery dealers. Cognizant of the Balm Scrub, the extensive, natural state acreage bordering the community to the north and acquired through the countys environmental lands purchase program, planners in their fifth goal call for creation of wildlife corridor connections to protect the areas mammal, reptile and avian inhabitants, for parking facilities plus rest rooms and tables to accommodate those using the scrub lands for passive recreation, as well as for minimizing light pollution and pervasive artificial light through nighttime lighting standards. Still focused on conserving the natural environment, the planners would have a multi-use pathway network through the community for biking, jogging, sightseeing, plus equestrian trails for riders and their mounts, as well as greenways connecting clustered housing and the village center when development comes. They made it all the crux of their ninth goal. Pointing out that the community has been burdened with such liabilities as a large assortment of borrow pits and an immense landfill, the citizen planners call also for a Hillsborough County Sheriffs substation to enhance community safety and a satellite office of the countys extension service to serve resident needs for help with composting, rain barrel water conservation and the like. In addition, they emphasize the importance of maintaining their historic post office recently threatened with closure in a U.S. Postal Service cost savings effort plus restoration to full use of their county park with its civic center building and recreational ball fields which has been impacted by county cutbacks. They also assert the value of expanding the community partnership with the University of Floridas ag research and experiment center on its east side. And, while other South Hillsborough community plans were hammered out only after intense debate over the number of housing units to be permitted per acre in a given area, Balms planners at this point have made it simple. They want the current rural housing density maintained: one unit per five acres or less, discouraging suburban scale density and conventional subdivision development. Yet, they realize, in time development will come to their settlement tucked away east of U.S. 301, still outside existing urban service areas, largely beyond public potable water lines and sewage disposal systems. When it does, they would have clustered housing with the village center situated near their longstanding post office and around the Andrews and Balm Roads intersection. Here they envision the commercial neighborhood of shops and eateries, perhaps a bed and breakfast inn, all of it connected via pedestrian linkages to the communitys churches, library, school, parks, etc. As Balms plan is being polished, Silva said contacts are being made with the various governmental agencies involved because of specific items included in the guideline. For example, she added, it is necessary to determine what if any changes on the county level must be made to facilitate creation of a community garden MELODY JAMESON PHOTOBalm residents may recognize their community no longer is an isolated pocket of South Hillsborough County, but they still want to preserve every aspect possible of their rural agricultural lifestyle. In their current community planning documents, they are maintaining open space for multiple reasons, including to allow for various continued farming and ranching endeavors such as the placid pastoral scene above.and to pin down rural design standards for community signage. The next community meeting on the plan is set for 6 PM, Tuesday, March 20, in Balms civic center building, Silva said. At that time, a Mosaic representative is expected to give the planning group an overview of the phosphate mining companys outlook for its not-yet-mined tracts in the Balm area. Copyright 2012 Melody Jameson NEVER PAINT, SPRAY-CRETE OR STUCCO YOUR HOUSE AGAIN OUR 7-STEP PROCESS #1 SINCE 1960CLIMATE PROOF COATINGSMWhole House Flex-CoatedSAVE YOUR ROOF w/PROTECTIVE COATINGCoupon worth $1,000Special Roof Coating Discounts SPRAY-COAT EXTERIORS, INC.Applied over Spray Crete, Stucco, Wood, Block or MetalLifetime Warranty Lifetime WeatherProong $1895Up to 1500 sq. ft. 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MARCH 1, 2012 9 Is Sedation Dentistry for you?Learn how Sedation Dentistry is helping patients with the following: Dont Miss Our FREE Seminar on Mini Implants, Sedation and Cosmetic Dentistry(Mini Implant seminar) (Cosmetic Dentistry and Sedation Seminar) Do you fear the dentist, but need dental work?Look more youthful... Feel more condent...You Deserve It!Your smile CAN reect the brighter, more youthful YOU!Dont miss this free, informative seminar!Cosmetic Dentistry Seating is Limited. Please Call For Reservations Zamikoff, Klement, Jungman & Varga Visit our website:www.suncitycenterdental.comfor more information LOOSE DENTURES?Learn about the amazing new MINI DENTAL IMPLANT SYSTEMThis is a one-step dental procedure that involves minimally invasive surgery, no sutures, nor the typical months of healing. The curtain falls on an era at the Ruskin Drive-InThis week marks the end of the 35mm film era at the Ruskin Drive-In. Beginning Monday, March 5, the iconic South Hillsborough theater will begin the conversion to digital movies through new equipment purchased to replace the aging but still functional 35mm film projector. Over the past year, the theater held several events to raise funds for the new equipment. But while the drive-in will soon be digital, most things wont change, including the family-friendly atmosphere, the availability of first-run movies and the need for customers to continue to support the theater by purchasing the reasonably-priced food and beverages from the theater snack bar. The first digital movie at the Ruskin Drive-In will be shown on Monday, March 9. Above, theater owner Ted Freiwald stands next to large platters of 35mm film for the old projector.MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO making good livings for show owners and their families, mak ing succeeding generations of showmen as sons followed fathers on the circuit of county fairs and church bazaars, civic celebrations and volunteer fire department fund raisers. They began finding their way to Gibsonton in the 1920s, eventu ally making it the preferred winter home for showmen where family ties and friendships could be renewed, animals rested, equip ment repaired, and life slowed to a normal pace in reliably comfort able weather. At this point, five generations of carny showmen in the same family have made Gibtown their headquarters, says Lee Stevens, as he shows a visitor around the new International Independent Show mens Museum on the Gibsonton end of Riverview Drive. Stevens, a New York native who notes he left home to join the circus in his teens, is a past president of the 4700-member Showmens Association headquartered in an expansive complex on the south side of Riverview Drive, opposite the museum. As a member of the association board which oversees its several components among them a showmens retirement village, multiple charities, a scholarship program as well as the museum Stevens estimates the local show mens colony numbers at least 15,000. As a lifelong carnival feature operator and now a food concessionaire who soon will hit the road with his wife and the youngest of their four children to work venues in and around Chica go for the summer, he knows his industry from the inside out. It has great appeal, he points out, for the independent business individual. It may have a poor image with some on the outside the old grifter reputation he ac knowledges, but it is a family whose members attach a high value to the camaraderie. There may be competition for bookings, but if youre broken down on the road, therell also be help. And their museum, he indicates, stands as testimony. The 40,000 square foot struc ture started about 14 years ago and finished with a $1.15 million donation from Jim Frederiksen, a manufacturer of carnival machin ery, houses on two floors a wide assortment of antique equip ment, historic printed materials and detailed exhibits that tell the carnival story most of it donated by practicing carnies. Theres the bright red 1918 Packard delivery truck that once rolled along small town streets, loaded with tents and gear headed Showmens museum first in nation See SHOWMENS MUSEUM, page 17 MELODY JAMESON PHOTOAs attention-getting as it would be on a carnival midway, this lighted sign inside the new showmens museum leaves no doubt as to its location. The museum, one of a kind initiated 14 years ago and completed recently with a $1.15 million donation, is housed in a 40,000 s.f. building that showcases the showmens art and artistry.

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10 MARCH 1, 2012 to get two months worth of medi cine for the price of one. Shop around: Drug prices can vary from drugstore to drugstore, so its definitely worth your time to compare prices at the different pharmacies in your area. Using U.S.-based online pharmacies are another way to save 25 percent or more. Drugstore.com and family meds.com are two good sites that provide solid savings, but there are dozens to choose from. If you opt for an online pharmacy, be sure you purchase from ones that have the VIPPS seal of approval (see vipps.info) from the National Association of Board of Pharmacy. Seniors enrolled in a Medicare prescription drug plan also need to make sure the online pharmacy theyre buying from is included in their network. Otherwise, the pur chase may not count toward their deductible. Get a discount card: Many phar macies have free or low-cost discount card programs that will let you buy generics for $4 or qualify for steeper discounts on other drugs. Other drug card programs worth a look include togetherrx access.com, rxsavingsplus.com, yourrxcard.com, rxfreecard.com, pscard.com and familywize.com. Search for drug assistance programs: If your income is limited, you can probably get help through drug assistance programs offered through pharmaceutical compa nies, government agencies and charitable organizations. To find these types of programs use benefitscheckup.org, a comprehensive website that lets you easily locate the programs youre eligible for, and will show you how to apply. Buy from Canada: This option offers savings between 50 and 80 percent on brand-name drugs, but its important to understand that its illegal to import drugs from Canada. The FDA, however, does not prosecute anyone who imports prescription drugs for personal use. If youre interested in this option, see pharmacychecker.com, an independent resource that finds the lowest prices from licensed and reputable Canadian pharmacies. (Note: This is not a good option for Medicare Part D beneficiaries because it will not count toward their deductible.) Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of The Savvy Senior book. Dear Savvy Senior What tips can you recommend to help me save on my drug costs? Im 62 years old, and currently take six different prescription medications that I can barely afford. Poorly Insured Dear Poorly, There are actually a variety of ways you can reduce your medica tion costs without cutting quality, but youll need to take a proactive approach. The following tips can also help seniors with a Medicare prescription drug plan avoid the donut hole coverage gap, or reduce their costs once they reach it. Here are some cost-cutting strate gies to try. Check your insurance: If you have drug coverage, your first step is to find out what your plan does and doesnt cover. You can do this by visiting the insurers website or by calling their 800 number on the back of your insurance card. Once you have this information, share it with your doctor so (if possible) he or she can prescribe medications that are best covered by your plan. You also need to find out if your insurer has a mail-order service. This would help you to purchase your medications for 20 to 40 per cent less. Talk to your doctor or pharma cist: Find out if the medications youre taking are available in a generic form or a less expensive brand-name drug (you can also look this up online at sites like destinationrx.com). About 75 per cent of all premiums drugs on the market today have a lower-cost alternative. Switching could save you between 20 and 90 percent. Many chains like Wal-Mart, Tar get, Costco, Kmart, CVS, Walgreens and Kroger sell hundreds of generics for as little as $4 for a 30-day supply and $10 for a 90day supply. Another cost cutter is to buy your medications in bulk. Many pharmacies give discounts if you buy a three-month supply of drugs versus a 30-day supply. Also, find out if the pills youre taking can be cut in half. Pill splitting allows you By Jim Miller How to Save Money on Your Prescription Drug Costs THE SAVVY SENIORSouth Shore Regional Library to host juried Art ShowJoin the artists at the South Shore Regional Library, 15816 Beth Shields Way, Ruskin on Thursday, March 1 from 6 p.m.-7:30 p.m. The first juried Fiber Arts group show in the Crawford Gallery will have an opening reception to meet the artists. Barbara Agemi, Ruth Mahoney, Mary McLaughlin, Elizabeth Murrary, Joan Mynahan, Charlene Roberts, Diana Speedy, Barbara Siros, Nina Tatlock and Sandra Yavocik will be showing their work. Free to the public. Light refreshments and music will be provided. For more information, call Laurie Burhop at 273-3652. The Sanctuary has teamed up with Purinas Pets for Seniors to help adoptable pets at the Sanctuary find new homes and to help seniors find a new companion. Select dogs and all cats will be offered free to seniors (age 60+) thanks to Purina. All cats will be spayed/neutered, have shots, de-wormed, FIV/Leuk. test and microchipped for ID. Dogs will be spayed/neutered, have shots, de-wormed, a heartworm test and microchipped for ID. All dogs and cats also have 30days of FREE pet insurance. An adoption certificate along with a coupon for a free bag of Purina pet food is provided by Purina. Call 941-750-8185 for more information. Funds for this program are limit ed and available on a first come basis. Want to help keep the program going? Donate! Please mail donations to 20010 East SR 64, Bradenton, FL 34212 or anonymous cash donations can be dropped off at any Bank of America (Horse & Animal Sanctuary fundraising account). Veterinarian Expense Donations can be paid to Animal Medical Center of Bradenton, 3102 Cortez Road, Bradenton, FL 34207 or by calling in a credit card donation to (941) 753-6709.Pets to Seniors for freeCAPT Donald W. Aiken, Jr., USN (Ret.), Executive officer for the Aircraft Operations Center of NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) hur ricane hunter will speak at the Silver Osprey Squadron luncheon on Friday, March 2. The meeting will be held at The Plaza Club, Freedom Plaza, 3932 Upper Creek Drive, Sun City Center. Meet and Greet is at 11:30, lunch at noon. CAPT Aiken directs the operation of the Lockheed WP-3 Orion and Gulfstream IV hurricane hunter aircraft based at Tampa, Fl. He will explain what its like to fly these aircraft in a hurricane and how these flights have helped predict the size and courses of some of the major Florida hurricanes.Silver Osprey Squadron hosts hurricane hunterCAPT Aiken graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1978, and became a Naval Aviator in 1980. He served on numerous carriers including the USS John F. Kennedy in 1990 during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm and the USS Kitty Hawk in 2000 He has over 4,300 flight hours and 700 arrested landings. Before assuming his current position, he retired from the Navy in 2005. This meeting is open to mem bers and non-members. For reservations, contact Bill Shanks at 813-634-3194 or send an email to wshanks@tampabay.rr.com. To receive information about the Silver Osprey Squadron send an email to silverosprey@yahoo.com.

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Ruskin somehow manages to be the odd man out in things. Sun City Center has an identity, and the people who live there work hard to maintain it. Apollo Beach has an identity of sorts, mostly as a bedroom community, but there is also an inclusiveness found in the community. Gibsonton has an identity and, until recently, it had a certain exclusiveness among the many performers who called it home. Riverview, well Riverview is a big ol place filled with homes and people, and is right next to all of the big city amenities. But what is Ruskin? It always seems to be the odd man out. When I moved to Ruskin nearly 17 years ago, it had two tack stores and at least three grocery stores. I, of course, heard about the history of the place steeped in hard work, education and the arts, but saw little of the remnants in todays life. When the Coffee Cup disappeared and there were no more for $2 breakfasts at the Ruskin Cafe, it seemed the last threads to what Ruskin was and wanted to be were fraying away. When I was looking into opening a marine store back in 2000, I was told that people from Apollo Beach would not go to Ruskin. I was told that people from Sun City Center wouldnt go to Ruskin. Why not? OK, yes, Ruskin is a little eclectic. While Apollo Beach and Sun City Center have nicely planned streets and avenues, Ruskin is a good bit more ad hoc. There are houses in this community that have no real right-of-way access to a street. Over the years, stuff just MARCH 1, 2012 11 HILLSBOROUGH(813) 634-8310MANATEE(941) 524-2259 For a FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATE, call us TODA Y!Shutter & Blind Manufacturing CompanySHUTTERS ~ VERTICALS ~ FAUX WOOD & WOOD HORIZONTAL BLINDS CELLULAR SHADES ~ WOVEN WOODS ~ SUNSCREEN SHADES ~ PRIVACY SHADINGS ~ MORE INSTALLED FREE! INSTALLED FREE! VERTICALS PLANTATION SHUTTERS$1395Sq. Ft. 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Guaranteed lowest price on all Stressless CONTEMPORARY TRADITIONAL Since 1986 HOME THEATER100s OF COLORS & STYLES TO CHOOSE FROMHURRY IN FOR THE BEST SELECTIONNOW THROUGH MONDAYIn Business YEARS! ELLENTON 2015 60th Ave. EI-75 Exit #224941-723-6100At the doorsteps of Prime Outlets SARASOTA 7261 S. Tamiami Tr. 941-926-3500 * By Mitch Traphagenmitch@observernews.net Everything changed in an instantIt was almost surreal being able to attend a live performance in Ruskin on Saturday night and it was certainly enjoyable. Above, performance artist Leland Faulkner display one of his thousand faces.MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO happened, and things seemed to be randomly put together. One day, a silver travel trailer is new and shiny on an empty lot, the next day someone nails a bunch of plywood to it and that trailer becomes the living room of an inexpensive, oddlooking house. And yes, the randomness and ad hoc nature of things has made for a somewhat dangerous neighborhood or two. Shopping in town isnt quite what youd find in Apollo Beach, but eclectic isnt a bad thing and a little diversity adds some spice to life, as long as that doesnt include getting shot or continually having your yard ornaments stolen. In 17 years here, Ive never been the victim of a crime in Ruskin, unless I count the missing bicycle that I accidentally left unlocked at a marina bike rack for a year or so. Of course, there have been many crimes over the years, so maybe Im just lucky. There have been some horrific crimes in Apollo Beach and Sun City Center, too, but those are seen with surprise. Ruskin, again, is the odd-man out because people always seem to expect it here. The reality is that Ruskin isnt dangerous, and crime is actually lower here than in many parts of the Tampa Bay area. Yes, this place runs the gamut from outlandish to run-down and, lets face it, the main shopping center isnt exactly Fifth Avenue style. But somewhere in this community I can still hear a heart that has been beating for more than 100 years. The past few months have exemplified that with numerous gatherings to help people in need. There have been so many events lately that Im at a loss for new headlines because there are only so many ways to say Community steps up for. In my opinion, thats a good problem for a community to have. It shows that there is most certainly a heart in Ruskin. Even with my already fond feelings towards the community, everything I knew about Ruskin changed last Saturday night. I now know something of the Ruskin that the community has always wanted it to be a long spoken of, yet oft-forgotten vision for Ruskin has been transformed into reality. On Saturday night, Ruskin became a regional center for the arts. A group of people, with help from local, regional, and national businesses and organizations, worked their tails off to transform a decades-old, somewhat unattractive building that had been built to house fire trucks and firefighters into a regional cultural center. They did that work based entirely on faith: faith that people in Ruskin would see the potential in it and thus support it and faith that people in Sun City Center, Apollo Beach, Gibsonton and Riverview would make the trip to Ruskin to do the same. To me, it was the fulfillment of Ruskins destiny, all built on hard work, dreams and a shoestring. The large bays that once housed fire engines have been painted black, a stage with long curtains is in place in the largest bay at the far end, and there is seating for at least 100 people inside. On Saturday night, when performance artist Leland Faulkner took that stage, each and every seat was full. The show was a sellout. For the first time in my 17 years in Ruskin, my wife and I enjoyed live theater in a place dedicated to live theater and other performances. It felt good to see so many turn out, it felt great to hear their laughter and applause as Faulkner dazzled the audience with his worldly talent. It felt great to know that people my neighbors in this community cared so much to work so hard to make it happen. I can only imagine how they felt seeing all of their hard work come to fruition. For years, Ive heard that Ruskin was founded on the arts. On Saturday night, Ruskin returned to its roots. When the curtain went up and the applause began at the Firehouse Cultural Center, everything that anyone alive today has thought about Ruskin changed. This is going to leave a mark a good one, my wife Michelle said as we left the theater after Faulkners performance. Twenty years from now, people will remember this is when it all began. This community just emerged from being the odd man out to being what it was always meant to be a regional center for the arts and a resource for all of South Hillsborough. Saturday night in Ruskin you can catch a live show and, perhaps, enjoy dinner or cocktails afterwards. How cool is that? Find out more at www. firehouseculturalcenter.org. Encore of carnival glass presentationThe Palmetto Historical Park and Manatee Agricultural Museum are sponsoring two free presentations: Carnival Glass Beginnings to 2012 at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Saturday, March 3, in the Carnegie Library, 515 10th Ave. West, Palmetto. Presenters Carl Chapman and J.R. Leach, officers of the Tampa Bay Carnival Glass Club, will speak about the history of Carnival Glass, aspects of collecting the glass, and will have lots of time for questions and answers. Examples of the glass will be available for viewing and attendees are encouraged to bring glass to the presentation for identification and valuation. Two pieces per family. Reservations are needed, 941-721-2034. In addition, an exhibit of Carnival Glass is on display in the Carnegie Library and Agricultural Museum until March 15.

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SOUTHSHORE REGIONAL LIBRARY Kids Program/Event Highlights March 1-7 X 12 MARCH 1, 2012Family Story Time For ages 2-5 with a caregiver. Make reading time family time. Stories, action rhymes, songs, interactive activities, and crafts make up this fun 30-minute program that celebrates a love of reading. Children may wear pajamas and bring a blanket and favorite cuddly toy. Teen Advisory Board Meeting For teens in grades 6-12. Join the Teen Advisory Board to get involved with the Librarys teen programs or earn community service hours for graduation, scholarships and more. Event is funded by the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library. For children in grades K-5 with stories and cake on a plate. A craft you can make, so mark the date. Lots of fun to partake, so dont be late. It will be great, cant hardly wait! Refreshments will be provided. Event is funded by the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library. Baby Time For children ages 0-20 months and their caregivers. Early literacy begins at birth. Bond with your baby through stories, bouncy rhymes and songs in this 20-minute lapsit program that introduces early literacy skills and encourages language development. Join them for this special play based on the classic fairy tale. Featured in the play are Snow White, The Queen and her Mirror; however, instead of the Seven Dwarfs, meet Doc Dwarf and his rock band in the woods. Presented by the Twig Theater South and The Pelican Players. This is a school early release Monday. Teen/Adult Printing Without a Press Join Art Instructor Tim Gibbons and create and explore the many possibilities of printing. You will go home with some completed printing projects. Limit 20. Registration required at either the Information Desk or by calling 273.3652. Funding for this program provided by the Friends of SouthShore Regional Library. Toddler Time For children ages 20-36 months and their caregivers. Stories, fingerplays, songs and interactive activities make up this fun 20-minute program that highlights early literacy skills and encourages reading readiness. Story Time For children ages 3-5 and their caregivers. Stories, action rhymes, songs and interactive activities make up this engaging 30-minute program that highlights early literacy skills, and encourages reading readiness and social interaction. Eagles Set Their Weekly ActivitiesThe Ruskin Eagles, FOE, located at 1205 1st St. S.W. has scheduled the following weekly activities. All events and activities of the Eagles Club are supported by the members and members guests. The FOE Aerie meet at 7 p.m. the 1st and 3rd Thursday of the month. The Ladies Auxiliary meets at 7 p.m. on the 2nd and 4th Thursday. Eagle Riders meet the 2nd Sunday of the month at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, March 1 -Bar Games at 1 p.m. Friday, March 2 Feather Your Nest Game at 6 p.m. Saturday, March 3 Chicken and Rice Dinner by Thea at 5 p.m. Music by The sister Act from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. Sunday, March 4 Feather Your Nest Game at 6 p.m. Monday, March 5 Bingo at 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 6 Come on down and socialize. Wednesday, March 7 Wings and Things at 5 p.m. OH SO GOOD! Bar Games at 6 p.m. For more information, call the club at 645-2922. James C. Smith of Rochester, NY shot a hole-in-one on Feb. 20, 2012 on the 4th hole at the Apollo Beach Golf Club of Apollo Beach, FL. He used a 6 Iron and drove the ball 150 yards. This feat was witnessed by Ken MillsHOLE-IN-ONE High schoolers invited to experience university life Only 45 percent of American students who enroll in college will ultimately earn a bachelors degree. Pre-College programs introduce high school students to the university experience. USF Pre-College 2012 provides high schoolers opportunities to explore university-level academ ics in an intensive, exciting, and enjoyable on-campus environment. Programs offer high school students the opportunity to pursue academic interests, discover career opportunities, earn college credit, and explore the experience of university life. We believe that the more famil iar you are with university life, the better prepared you will be when you enter college in the near future, affirms Stuart Silverman, dean of the University of South Floridas Honors College. This summers line-up offers a diverse group of learning experi ences to high school students. Programs are enriched with field trips that take Pre-College students from theory to practice. Students may enroll in one or more of the twelve programs, selecting from a broad range of academic disciplines. University faculty provide innovative instruction in a handson learning environment that encourages creative problem solving. Programs range from one day to three weeks and offer residential, commuter or online access. Program registration, full schedules, and detailed descriptions are available on the web: http://usf.edu/precollege. Application deadline is June 1, 2012. This years offerings include the following programs: 1. Architecture USF School of Architecture 2. Global Sustainability USF School of Global Sustainability 3. Mechanical Engineering USF College of Engineering 4. Computer Science USF College of Engineering 5. Biomedical Engineering USF College of Engineering 6. American Sign Language USF College of Behavioral & Community Sciences 7. Art and Design USF School of Art & Art History 8. Music USF School of Music 9. Online Music USF School of Music 10. Marine Science USF College of Marine Science 11. Film Studies USF College of Arts and Sciences 12. S.T.E.M. (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) USF College of Arts and SciencesLennard FFA Chapter takes first placeFFA members from all across Hillsborough County gathered to compete in the county level Nursery Landscape and Floriculture Career Development Event, held Jan. 26 at the County Extension office. Among these competitors were several members representing the Lennard FFA Chapter; Joy Bordner, Kyle Bowman, Randall Casey, Natalie Hausler, Rebecca Knowles, Tyler Leonard, Rey Penaloza, Roger Smith, and Lucas Worley. These students were required to demonstrate their knowledge of the horticulture and floriculture industry through a series of identification practicums and a general knowledge assessment. In the individual plac ings Kyle and Rey tied for fourth high individual, Randall earned second high individual, and Lucas earned high individual, and first in all of the contest categories. The Lennard FFA Chapter team placed first overall in the competition. From left to right: Kyle Bowman, Joy Bordner, Madi Brown, Lucas Worley, Erin Elsberry, Rebecca Knowles, Natalie Hausler, Randall New Eagle ScoutDistrict Vice Chairman Michael van Hoek presents the Eagle Certificate to new Eagle Scout David Timothy Watts, of Riverview, at a National Court of Honor convened on Feb. 11 at the 1st United Methodist Church of Brandon. For his Eagle Scout Service Project, David led a team of fellow Scouts in making needed repairs to the exterior and grounds of the Brandon Outreach Clinic. David is a member of Boy Scout Troop 610, chartered by St. Stephens Catholic Church, and is the son of Timothy and Suzy Watts. Troop 610 is led by Scoutmaster Stu Gray and former Scoutmaster Mike Mann. WAVES Unit #55 to meetAttention, all Women of the Military Sea Service. Tampa Bay WAVES Unit #55 will meet at 11 a.m. on Saturday, March 10, at St. Matthews Anglican Church, 10701 Bloomingdale Ave., River view in St. Annes Hall, located at the rear of the church building. Member ship in the Unit and in the par ent organization, WAVES National, is open to all women who served honorably (including those cur rently serving) in the U.S. Navy, Navy Nurse Corps, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, or Maritime Ser vice, or related reserve components. For more information, call Jeannette Green at (813) 657-9164.Comfort dinner plannedThe American Legion Auxiliary, Alafia Unit 148 will hold a comfort dinner from 5 to 7 p.m. on Saturday, March 10 at 7240 U.S. Hwy. 301 in Riverview. The dinner will consist of Southern smoked chicken, roasted red potatoes, green beans, salad and dessert. Cost is $7 per plate. Rick and Ed will provide enter tainment from 7 to 11 p.m. The public is cordially invited. Proceeds will go to various Auxiliary projects. For more information, call Kay Gialenios at (704) 996-5285.

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MARCH 1, 2012 13 We are a AAA Approved Auto Repair CenterAt Home Auto Care, Inc.(813) 645-0339 Riverside Golf813.645.2000 $38................before noon$30...................after noon$20...................after 3 pm $500 OFF Any RoundGolf Lessons $20Includes 18 holes and cart. Tax Included.Valid only with this coupon. Exp. 3/31/12Visit our New, Improved PRO SHOP1 Pier Drive, RuskinLEAGUES WELCOMEReserve your tee time today CASUAL WATERFRONT DININGSteaks, Seafood, Burgers & Other Delicious FareFULL LIQUOR BARLive Music Every Wednesday and SaturdayOPEN TO TH E PUBLICTuesday-Saturday 11-8 pm NOW OPEN Sunday 11-6 pm for Lunch and NFL Direct TV Sunday Ticketwww.RiversideBarAndGrille.com FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC. FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.Registered Investment Advisor Robyn PayantPresidentTom PayantChairman & CEOWe offer retirement planning and services tailored to your individual needs since 1979 Visit our website at www.PayantFinancial.com Thomas A. Payant oers securities and insurance products through SagePoint Financial, Inc. and its aliates, member FINRA/SIPC. Thomas A. Payant oers investment advisory services through Payant Financial Services, Inc., a registered investment advisor not aliated with SagePoint Financial, Inc. BRANDON PEST CONTROLPhone: (813) 685-7711Fax: (813) 685-360710 Locations in Florida, Georgia & Tennessee CALL FOR FREE INSPECTIONASK ABOUT TERMIDORCelebrating 38 Years in Business TERMITES? 2011 Allstate Insurance Company The population of our area has tripled this time of year. We have a bay full of boats; many of them being out of state. This is the peak of our tourist season. So many questions come my way about fishing. It might be fun and interesting to you as I reminisce back in time of the so-called good ol days on our waterways. It was 1821 that Florida became a state. Before railroads and automobiles, the only transportation, except for oxen and horses, was boats. The Indians had boats made from trees, and canoes made from animal skins. Fishing was the only means of survival. Florida was full of palm fronds, underbrush, snakes, and mosquitoes. It was hot and no one thought Florida was a paradise, as we do today. Many prisoners from northern states sent to Florida as a punishment died in the heat and infested areas. People looking for adventure were migrating to Florida to start a new life. It was around the 1900s that marine engines were available. Still most all boats were operated by rowing or pushed with a pole. Those who could not afford an engine, rigged up sailboats and sailed with the wind. Tom Saffold, a pioneer of this area, had a twomasted schooner with no engine which he used on high tide. Globe engines were installed in many boats after money started to flow in the area. One of the stories Waterways are full of fishtold about the pioneer fishermen was that of Nebraska Buzbee, who would fish all day for a living, but would always take part of his catch and feed the whole neighborhood. They would be at shore when his boat arrived. A famous boat in the area is the Kilkare, owned by the Dickmans. This boat has been replaced many times, but still bears the name. Pioneer river boaters were: Charlie Jahns, Tom and Andrew Anderson, Lewis Smith, Dan Graves, Selner boys, Malachi Denson, Norton Williams, Tom Saffold, Paul Dickman, and Capt. Thomas. The area waters were teeming with fish in those days. Some say that you didnt need a fishing pole, they just jumped into your boat as you glided by. In this century of the electronic gadget, fishing is more or less the same, but perhaps more complicated. There are many who still fish with a rod and pole, and some still row their own boats. Our waterways are full of fish, so, go fishing. I saw many fat seatrout, sheepshead, a red or two, flounder, amberjack, permit, and a cobia at the docks in the baitwells of anglers. Fish for fun; watch out for the Florida sun. Aleta Jonie Maschek is a member of Florida Outdoor Press.By Jonie Maschek FISH TALESBoating Safety Classes offered The About Boating Safety course satisfies the education requirements that anyone in Florida who was born after January 1, 1988, must take a boating safety course in order to operate a boat of 10 hp or more. Other states require boaters to have boating safety education if they were born after a certain date, meaning boaters of all ages will eventually be required to have taken a course. The About Boating Safety course offered by the Coast Guard Auxiliary satisfies the education requirement in Florida and most Southern states. This course gives boaters of all ages a solid background in boating safety and covers subjects including boat handling, weather, navigation rules, trailering, federal regulations and more. Many insurance companies also give discounts for having taken the boating safety education course. The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 75 will present a 9 hour beginner class that will give the student the knowledge to earn a boating license from the State of Florida. Classes will be held on Thursday nights, March 8, 15, and 22 from 7 10 p.m. at the Tampa Sailing Squadron, 1250 Apollo Beach Blvd., Apollo Beach. For more information, call Guy Mandigo at (813) 641-2488.Safe boating students work out a navigation problem at Tampa Sailing Squadron. S.T.A.R.T. to meetScience & Technology Active Round Table (S.T.A.R.T.) will meet from 7:30 9 p.m. on Monday, March 12, Caper Room, Atrium Building, N. Pebble Beach Blvd., SCC At this meeting Walt Prouty will discuss, The Making of a Pharmaceutical Drug. No cost; all who are interested in science and technology subjects are invited.Hillsborough County Commissioner Al Higginbotham, District 4, and the Board of County Commissioners welcomed Florida Strawberry Festival representatives to the County Center for the sixth consecutive year to proclaim March 1 through 11, as Florida Strawberry Festival Days. This years presentation had a unique twist, as royalty history was made in the selection of the 2012 Strawberry Queen. Chelsea Bowden, current Strawberry Queen, is the granddaughter of two former Strawberry Queens, Barbara Alley Bowden and Ruby Jean Barker Redman. Commissioner Higginbotham asked grandmothers Bowden and Redman to attend the presentation. It is a great day when I get to welcome a bit of my hometown into downtown Tampa. The Strawberry Festival and the agriculture industry have consistently had a positive impact on the economy of Hillsbor ough County. Im proud of Plant City and the international fame of the Florida Strawberry Festival, said Commissioner Al Higginbotham. He encouraged all residents to visit the Festival, preserve its rich heritage, and celebrate the strawberry harvest. The Florida Strawberry Festival has been an ongoing tradition since 1930. Today, the Festival continues to draw major recording artists and a paid attendance of more than 500,000 people. For the third consecutive year, the annual event has been named a Blue Ribbon Fair by the Florida Federation of Fairs and recognized by the Southeast Tour ism Society as a Top 20 event in the Southeast. Hillsborough Countys Agriculture Industry Development Program estimates the strawberry acreage is the highest sales crop at $366,046,522, representing 44.9 percent of the Countys total agricultural sales. Hillsborough County produces 90 percent of the strawberries grown in Florida, and nearly 11 percent of the strawberries grown in the nation. For information on the Florida Strawberry Festival, visit www.flstrawberryfestival.com.Its Strawberry Festival time

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14 MARCH 1, 2012 BIG or SMALL... we do em allDirect Farm PricesSpecializing in Re-Sodding Beautiful, Drought-Tolerant Lawns 813-645-6911 before af terJohn V Dunne, MD, F A C S In Office Procedure 813.634.9260Insurance Accepted SUN CITY CENTER Sunhill Medical Arts Bldg. Why Go Anywhere Else?Let a Board Certified Vascular Surgeon & Vein SpecialistEliminate Your Ugly Veins! Americas Carwash NOW OPEN SUNDAYS 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.RAIN CHECK: Bring in your receipt for any full service wash within 48 hours and receive an Express Wash for $1.00 (on same vehicle) ANY FULL SERVICE WASH ONLYWith this coupon only. Not valid with other specials or discounts. $1.50 extra for vans and SUVs. 3/31/12EXPRESS HAND WAXMost vehicles. With this coupon only. Not valid with other specials or discounts. Additional charge for oversize vehicles. 3/31/12 $2 OFF$3995GET YOURMONTHLY CAR WASH PASSPay once a month and come as often as you like! CARDS 728 Cypress Village Blvd.Sun City Center, FL813-634-9409 Next to Sonnys I purchased a brand new Saturn Vue for nearly $20,000. It barely made it over the 100,000-mile mark before the repairs it needed exceeded its remaining value. From a dollar standpoint, the Saturn was far more extravagant than the Porsche. Thats some twisted irony in my opinion. Heck, the Porsche even got better gas mileage. But as the years have passed, the alone, and there was the little matter of an approaching snowstorm. Michelle offered well-meaning but impractical suggestions (How about I meet you in South Carolina and you just drive really, really close behind me?) and I began to feel as though fate had finally caught up with me. I began to feel as though I would be stuck in that motel near an auto parts store in Virginia for the rest of my life with just one change of underwear and a car that had no headlights. Then, with a spark of optimism, I remembered the Auto Train. Last year, Michelle and I took our first trip on the Auto Train and it was a wonderful experience. Departing just south of Washington and running non-stop to Sanford, Florida, it was an adventure unto itself. And now, it had the potential to get me home before the weekend ran out. A quick, late night call to Amtrak secured a ticket in coach class and a place for my car it was the last remaining seat on the train. Last year, Michelle and I had our own miniature room (known as a roomette) on the train; this time I would be in a coach seat for the 17hour trip. I asked the representative about having a window or aisle seat and was told the porter would help with that. I decided it didnt matter I had a way to get home. But it turns out it does matter. It matters a lot. As a solo traveler, being assigned to the wrong side of the window or aisle seat debate on the Auto Train is the difference between the God-given freedom we have come to expect in this country and a miserable steerage-class, prison-like misery from which there is, seemingly, no escape while your seat-mate rests her feet on the provided footrest and keeps her yogurt containers on her fold-down tray. Oh yes, it does matter. Suddenly, the thought of spending the rest of my life in a motel near an auto parts store in Virginia looked pretty darn good. Before the train even started moving, I could feel my mind slipping away into madness. Within the first minute of arriving at my seat, I had to disturb my seatmate twice and she did make it known it was a disturbance. The first disturbance was simply to get into my seat. The second was to put my backpack away in an overhead shelf when it immediately became obvious I didnt have room for it by my seat. As she reassembled her tray table and footrest, it was clear that there would be no more excur sions for me. And then, just before insanity completely engulfed me, a miracle happened: my seatmate got up to throw away one of her containers of yogurt. It was then I made my escape with thoughts of fleeing the train. As I ran and ducked past my seatmate in the aisle, the train lurched forward. We were under way. I was a long 17 hours from Florida and effectively homeless on the Auto Train. But...I was free. All aboard! In next weeks Observer News, come along for the ride as we make the trip home to Florida. As things somehow tend to do, it all turned out OK.Planes, Trains and Craigslist model of car I wanted has become harder to find. People who did not consider the little things the cars need, like a new timing belt every 30,000 miles, bought them on the cheap and paid a price for the neglect. Where five years ago I would see 50 of them for sale on eBay, today there are routinely fewer than 20 and many of those are offered at premium prices or are project cars in various states of disassembly. And then, almost magically, the exact car I was looking for appeared in an ad near Washington, D.C. My wife fired off an email to the seller expressing our interest. The emails turned into telephone calls and by 11 p.m. on a recent Thursday night, a deal was struck. By 11:15 p.m., I had a one-way ticket to Washington that was scheduled to depart just seven hours later. For those few hours, I slept fitfully wondering what airport security could have in store for a guy who purchased a last minute, one-way ticket to Washington, D.C. and had no luggage. The next morning (entirely unmolested by airport security) I ar rived to a brisk, cold wind blowing through the nations capitol. Shivering, I watched as a white Porsche slipped through the traffic outside Washington-Dulles International Airport. The seller greeted me with a smile and a handshake and held open the drivers door. My test drive would be from the airport to the bank near his home in Arlington. The car was everything I had hoped for, but the abrupt shift from Ruskin to Washington and the associated lack of sleep left me in no position to assess the situation adequately. The seller, a 30-year employee at the Pentagon, thought I was crazy. I decided to forego the madness on Interstate 95 and started making my way home via I-81, through the Appalachian Mountains. It was a beautiful day for driving, but the cold wind from the morning was foretelling an approaching snowstorm. I needed to get out of the north as quickly as possible. Like a fool overflowing with the optimism only a fool can have, I had only packed for a single overnight. Indeed, 200 miles into the trip home, a single overnight seemed possible. But then, a little voice inside my head started nagging at me. I had checked the engine oil, but had failed to check other small, but important, details. It almost came as no surprise that the headlights didnt work. I pulled into an auto parts store, spent a small fortune on tools, an electrical meter and wire, and spent the next few hours under the car in the parking lot diagnosing the problem only to conclude: the headlights did not work. I was nearly 900 miles from home on an unplanned, unscheduled trip, a snowstorm was approaching and the headlights on the car did not work. That was a problem, but what really bothered me was that I had done this three times before and never with any of those cars did I NOT have to crawl underneath each of them for something during the maiden trip home. One that I purchased in Boston left a trail of broken alternator belts until I finally managed to correct the problem a thousand miles down the road. Another, picked up in Virginia, had the heat stuck on an unattractive feature for a car purchased in late July. A sailboat purchased on Cape Cod had enough stuff go wrong for eleven parts of a newspaper series. For reasons that remain unclear, I didnt prepare for anything in buying this car. I had packed only a nice jacket and a decent change of clothes and soon the realization sunk in that I was not only crazy but also, quite possibly, a moron. With hours of good driving remaining, the sunset ended any fur ther progress I would make that day. I quickly calculated that the weekend simply wasnt long enough to get home during daylight hours A sign at the motel near the auto parts store in Virginia appropriately summed up my adventure with yet another sports car purchased sight-unseen from a guy on the Internet.MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO

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16 MARCH 1, 2012 www.mosaicfla.com As we mine the phosphate needed to help grow the worlds food, its no coincidence that we preserve the water quality of nearby creeks and rivers. As an environmental specialist, Im part of a team that monitors these bodies of water to ensure that the water quality is sustained or even enhanced. Mosaic takes great care to meet Floridas clean water standards. Because stewardship is an integral part of what we do. And I see to it that the job is done right. The Importance of Colorectal Cancer ScreeningsPresented by Dr. Ashok Dhaduvai, Gastroenterologist at South Bay HospitalMarch is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Celebrate by learning about the importance prevention and early detection.March 29th, 12:00 1:00 p.m. South Bay Hospital Medical Auditorium 1901 Haverford Plaza, Suite 106, Sun City Center. (Behind South Bay Hospital) F r ee lun c h and gi v e a w a y s p r o v ide d t o all a t t endee s T o r egis t er f or t h e semi n ar s c all 18 88-685-1595 D i ne w i t h the Doctor CLIP & SA VERSVP2 days prior to event to...Assisted Living Facility License #4991813-634-3347 813-634-3347 MARCH EVENTS Thur., March 1 C.O.A.P. (Children of Aging Parents) an Tues., March 6 Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) Support Group. Wed., March 7 Therapeutic Tai Chi Grief, Loss or Depression Support Group UV Radiation and Your Skin. COPD Support Group St. Patricks Day Celebration! Low Vision Support Group SCC Security Patrol members cruise to raise fundsTwenty eight Sun City Center Security Patrol members recently completed a five day fund raising cruise from the Port of Tampa to the West Caribbean. Twenty two cruise participants were from the Simmons Lake area of Sun City Center. The cruise traveled to Cozumel and Costa Maya, Mexico. All enjoyed fine weather, great food and a super time. Patrol Chief Mike Albanese wants to thank all those who took this cruise that benefited the Patrol.PHOTO COURTESY OF MIKE ALBANESE, CHIEF OF P A TROL Deadline ReminderNews Releases ................. ....................... ...................... Questions? Call: 813-645-3111

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MARCH 1, 2012 17 SAVE UP TO 40%$39 INSTALLATIONon Karastan carpet, Americas Finest Carpet plus FREE Karastep carpet pad ($7/yd. value)ANY SIZE HOUSE, ANY SIZE ROOM, ANY CARPET. SOUTH TAMPA 1510 SOUTH MACDILL AVE. 254-4066 CARROLLWOOD 14306 N. DALE MABRY HWY. 961-1362 BRANDON 1920 W. BRANDON BLVD. 413-8313 18 MONTHS NO INTEREST Showmens museum to set-up, and the 1929 Ford pick-up once loaded with pretty carnival women calling attention to the coming event and a horseless carriage like the one Buffalo Bill used to promote his shows. Theres wall after wall of show banners which, like labeled cigar boxes and fruit crates, demonstrates the large number and colorful naming creativity of amusement operators. There are ride cars that go back many decades and a delightful hard-carved goat which once graced a merry-go-round and the fun house mirror that warped the image of everyone who stepped in front of it. Theres the fullyassembled Ferris wheel resting on the ground floor but reaching toward the peaked ceiling above the second. Theres the 60foot-long midway in miniature, displaying in minute carved detail every conceivable ride and food station and side show, lovingly hand made during off seasons by a Michigan carnival operator. Unlike the conventional circus, Stevens emphasizes, the carnival offers interactive entertainment. Tucked away on the second floor, reached either by a grand staircase or a new elevator, is a library inviting attention to dozens of books related to the industry and outside are several of the large carnival trailers which, with their brightly lettered signage, could excite an entire community when they arrived, forecasting the wonders of the carnival soon to welcome one and all. As many features as the museum has, though, its not finished yet. Stevens foresees a repair workshop on the second floor as well as more displays. But whats needed most at the moment is a curator, he adds. Someone who can become familiar with the industry and the pieces on display; someone able to maintain regular museum open hours, to relate to the public, give tours, provide a comprehensive understanding of the industry for both school youngsters and seniors, he notes. And if they have grant writing experience, it would be good.Ž Stevens can be reached through the association office 813-6773590. Meanwhile, hes anticipating some help from the University of South Florida in cataloguing a collection of written materials, some of it detailing first hand showmen experiences, and looking ahead to future exhibits. The industry is changing rapidly, he says, incorporating new technology such as LED lights and computerized equipment. Someday, that, too, will be part of the carnival industry history, another display for the countrys only showmens museum.Copyright 2012 Melody Jameson If only this 1929 Ford pick-up could talk, the tales it might spin could entertain visitors for hours. Veteran showmen say that even in the depths of the Great Depression, Americans would scrape together enough coins to escape for a few hours on the visiting shows midway.MELODY JAMESON PHOTOSNearly a century of showmens history is being displayed in this soon-to-open International Independent Showmens Museum (above) at the Gibsonton end of Riverview Drive, opposite the Showmens Association complex. Several large trailers which formerly hauled carnival equipment around the country for the bigger show producers are located on the grounds while inside antique vehicles, rides and banners trace the evolution of the industry which began with the Worlds Fair in 1893.At left, an old midway ride car, originally part of a carnival ride that operated on tracks. The wooden car would have seated four to six comfortably and probably was not subject to the safety restrictions that carnival operators now enforce. It is no doubt older than Lee Stevens (seated in it), a Showmens Association past president and lifelong amusement show operator whose career began when he left home as a teenager to join a circus. Tucked away in the museum is a quiet nook well suited to a growing industry library decorated, of course, with colorful carnival posters. Handwritten notes by carnival people recalling their experiences and numerous photographs await library literate personnel from the University of Florida who, the showmen hope, will properly catalog the collections.

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18 MARCH 1, 2012 www.staylittleharbor.com Try our new$8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.We have expanded to include: p.p. GOT SCREENED? IF YOU ARE CONCERNED ABOUT A SKIN GROWTH, WE WOULD BE HAPPY TO EVALUATE IT FOR YOU. CALL TODAY FOR A FREE SKIN CANCER SCREENING!NOW ACCEPTING AV-MED INSURANCE Howard A. Oriba, M.D. | Michael G. Caruso, M.D. | Leslee Baute, P.A.The Skin Cancer Centers / Dermatology Associates4002 Sun City Center Blvd. Unit 102 Sun City Center, FL 33573(One Block West of the Hospital)813-634-1455 SIGN UP FOR A FREE SKIN CANCER SCREENING BRING THIS COUPON IN TO RECEIVE A FREE GIFT! Select Duette Architella Honeycomb Shades can reduce energy loss by up to 40%.Save on stylish window fashions that help insulate your home, now through March 31. Duette Architella Honeycomb ShadesEnergy SaleinSave SAVE* Vignette Tiered’ Architella Shades$50per unitVignette Modern Roman Shades$40per unitBUY 2 OR MORE OF ANY COMBINATION OFSAVE* Duette ArchitellaHoneycomb Shades$25per unitDuette Honeycomb Shades$20per unitBUY 4 OR MORE OF ANY COMBINATION OF DOVE INTERIORS CARPET ONEFLOOR & HOME 2305 College Ave. E € Ruskin, FL(1 mile west of I-75 Exit 240-B) www.doveinteriorscarpetone.com813-645-8660CARPET | HARDWOOD | VINYL | TILE | LAMINATE | BLINDS | SHUTTERS | WE REPAIR BLINDS Call Kim for details* Manufacturers rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made between 1/16/2012-3/31/2012. A qualifying purchase of any of the product models set forth above in the quantities set forth above. If you purchase less than the specified quantity, you will not be entitled to a rebate. Rebate offers may not be combined. All rebates will be issued in U.S. dollars, in the form of an American Express Prepaid Reward Card. 2011 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas, Inc. BYOD (Bring Your Own Dog) to CARE happy hour at IncognitosCARE, the no-kill Critter Adoption and Rescue Effort, will hold a fundraising happy hour event at Incognitos at the Mira Bay Sweetbay Plaza in Apollo Beach on Wednesday, March 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. The event is designated as B.Y.O.D. „ Bring Your Own Dog (must be dog-friendly, well-behaved, leashed, spayed or neutered and current on shots „ the dogs, not humans, of course). The $5 entry fee to the CARE fundraising event includes six raffle tickets for possible prizes. Food and beverages from Incognitos will also be available for purchase. Above, a dog from CARE helps to distribute information about the event (and raise a little cash) during the Southshore Sunday Market in Ruskin.MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO League of Women Voters meeting set Members of the League of Women Voters, South County unit, will meet at 2 p.m., Saturday, (March 3) in the computer room of the SouthShore Regional Library. The non-partisan, not-for-profit League is dedicated to public education on issues impacting citizens and stands for responsible, responsive, accountable government. Unit President Melody Jameson is available to present programs about the League, its history, its mission and its current positions for organizations in South Hillsborough County. She can be reached via email at mchinnae@aol.com. League membership is open to both women and men. All visitors are welcome.An angel gets her wings at the Southshore MarketCrowds turned out to check out local vendors offering wares at the monthly Sunday Southshore Market at the corner of U.S. 41 and Shell Point Road in Ruskin. Along with seafood, farm fresh vegetables, pastries and bread were vendors offering everything from photography and jewelry to gossamer wings. Above, a young woman checks out a pair of those wings from the Bel Amour booth. Right, a sample is cut from a angelic-looking rum cake at the Bear Cakes booth. The market is held the last Sunday of each month.MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTOS

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MARCH 1, 2012 "\011-\015,\015, \015-U,\026\015,\026\015\012,,\015 /U-\012\012"\011-\015,\015, U 19 A+ Hearing Center £{-'\012ˆ*>>U-'ˆi"\001 n£‡{"‡n" Monday through Friday 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Premium Digital Processor New 100% Custom Digital 3-Dimensional Hearing Aid $ 899 UVœ`ˆˆœ> \015iVœˆV>> U\035œE\014>“>}i >> L@=\003:=KL\003HJA;=\003QGM\010DD\003=N=J\003>AF<\031\031\003 Compare elsewhere for $ 1,800 œ\025ˆ``i\023iiU œ\024ˆ““ˆVŽ Any Hearing Loss, Any Size Aid just $ 899 FITS ANY HEARING LOSS!! Multi-Channel 100% Computer Programmable /\000&&\001r\001/\000\(*..*$, Get What You See Advertised! $ 799 SPARO 2 OTE Premium Digital Processor Fits Any Loss HEARING LOSS? Hearing Aids Available for any Budget SALE POLICY O u r asso r t m e n t includ e s di s c o n t inu e d m o d e l s f l oo r sa mpl es s p e ci a l pu r c h ase s an d one-of-a-kin d me r c h andis e Quantitie s a r e limited Al l me r c h andis e i s sol d as-i s an d al l sale s a r e final N o e x c h a ng es N o r e f und s N o C O D pu r c h ases N o holds N o phon e o r mai l o r ders Delive r y fee s appl y Al l majo r c r edi t ca r d s accepted Sor r y w e a r e un a bl e t o a cc e p t M a c y ’ s C r e di t Ca r d s *Highland Park Fur nitur e is an authorized Licensee of Mac y’ s. Not all mer c h andise offer ed for sale is pro vided b y Mac y’ s. s Stoc k A v ailability on First Come First Ser ved. s Hurr y for Best Selection s STORE HOURS: Mon-Fri. 10-7pm; Sat. 10-6pm; Sun 12-5 Furniture & Mattress Clearance Center \\000LLU\003\ Visi t ou r w e bsi t e : T a mpa F u r nitu r e co m s L o c a l St o r e s wit h I n t e r n e t S a v i n g s Includes Dresser, Mirror, Queen Headboard, Footboard and Rails. Matching Chest and Night Stand also available. Brandon Store SR-60, 1/4 mile W e st of I-75 at F a lkenburg by Home Depot 813-626-2297 Bradenton Store I-75 and S.R. 70 next to Lowe’s 941-739-6400 by Highland Park Furniture LIMITED QUANTITIES IN FACTORY PACKAGING Motorized LIFT Recliners starting at \013 \034\033 \034 \\000LLU\003\ \013 \034 \034 \013 \034 \034 South Hillsborough Elks Lodge #2672 Upcoming Activities Every Tuesday Jam Session – 3 to 5 p.m. – No charge for all Elks and their guests. Every Wednesday – Best Spaghetti in Town $7, All You Can Eat, for all Elks and their guests. Music by Bryan from 5 to 8 p.m. Every Friday Seafood and Sandwiches for all Elks and their guests from 5 to 7 p.m. Karaoke by Bryan from 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday, March 3Cyndi, A One Girl Band, 6-9 p.m., $8 including Snacks. Monday, March 5 and March 19 Blue Plate Special, $7 with all the trimmings, 5 p.m. Saturday, March 17 St Patrick’s Day Celebration, Music by Bryan Ashley, Menu: Corn Beef and Cabbage with all the trimmings, Cocktails 5p.m., Dinner, 6p.m., all for only $12 per person. March 31 Installation of new officers and appreciation & awards for all the volunteers who worked so hard all year. The South Hillsborough Elk’s Lodge is located at 1630 US Hwy 41 S., Ruskin, FL 33570, Telephone 813-645-2089 and has a clean, smoke free environment. S OUTH S HORE R EGIONAL L IBRARY \024\030\033\024\031\003%HWK\003KLHOGV\003:D\\000‡\003XVNLQ\003\026\026\030\032\026 eBooks and eReaders Thursday, March 1 12:15 to 1:15 p.m. Wednesday, March 7 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. Learn how to check out & download eBooks to your PC, tablet, or eReader. Limit: 20. Presenter: Tampa Bay Library Consortium Fiber Art Exhibit Opening Reception Thursday, March 1 6 to 7 p.m. The first juried Fiber Arts group show in the Crawford Gallery at SouthShore Regional Library. Barbara Agemi, Ruth Mahoney, Mary McLaughlin, Elizabeth Murray, Joan Mynahan, Charlene Roberts, Diana Speedy, Barbara Sirois, Nina Tatlock and Sandra Yavocik will be showing their work. Public invited for an interesting evening with light refreshments and music. Questions? Contact Laurie Burhop at 273-3652. Event is funded by the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library Mouse and Keyboard Tuesday, March 6 12:15 to 2:30 p.m. In part one, learn how to grip, move and click the buttons on the mouse. In part two, you will learn the keys on the computer keyboard. This is a beginner level class. Registration in person required no earlier than one hour prior to the start of the program. Stargazing Party Tuesday, March 6 6 to 8:30 p.m. Join others for a stellar stargazing party! Astronomy enthusiast, Craig MacDougal, will lead a brief discussion on stars, planets and moons. Immediately following on the Harkins Plaza, will be a viewing of the night sky through telescopes as we search for these celestial wonders. Funding for this program is provided by the SouthShore Friends of the Library English Conversation Class Wednesday, March 7 1 to 2 p.m. Adults (18 years or older) are invited to practice their English conversational skills with English speakers. No registration is required to participate. Cosponsored by the Hillsborough Literacy Council and the Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library System. For more informa tion, contact the Hillsborough Literacy Council at 273-3650. Mah Jongg Club Wednesday, March 7 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Enjoy an evening of the popular table game, Mah Jongg, featuring challenging play for experienced players and instruction for beginners. They will be using the American Rules. Spectators are welcome! Partici pants are asked to bring their own Mah Jongg set or card. Limited to 16 players. Register in advance at the Information Desk or call 273-3652. SouthShore Needle People Wednesday, March 7 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Join other needle people to share techniques, tips and experiences about knitting and other fiber and fabric crafts. Beginners are welcome! Bring a project and ask us questions! Teen/Adult Mix Media Wednesday, March 7 6:30 to 8 p.m. Join Art Instructor, Anne Walker, for this two-part class. During the first class on March 7, students will create a painting. The second class on March 14, students will use various materials to embellish their paintings. Limit 20. Registration required at the Information Desk or by calling 273-3652. Funding for this program provided by the Friends of SouthShore Regional Library Attention all Veterans Sun City Center Chapter #110 of the Disabled American Veterans (DAV) has opened an outreach center in Conessa Hall at the Prince of Peace Church located at 702 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center. Bob Gerdes and Darrell Katz are DAV certified service officers who will discuss benefits and assist with claims for all veterans in South Hillsborough County. Male and female Vets are welcome to participate in this non-denomina tional, and free service. Appointments are available for Tuesday mornings from 9 a.m.noon. Drivers also areneeded to assist Veterans with transportation to James A. Haley Veterans’ Hospital in Tampa. For more information call Bob at 813-634-1761 or Darrell at 813260-3692. On Feb. 17, at the Sun City Center Plaza Club the Military Or der of the World Wars (MOWW) presented Thomas Diggs with the French Legion of Honor Medal he recently received from the Consult General De France A Miami. The notification stated that COL Diggs was given the award for demonstrating courage and selflessness during World War II, and that “The solidarity you lent our country and people as a Colonel in the 75th military airlift Squadron participating in the Battles such as Normandy will never be forgotten and be assured that we are eternally French Legion of Honor Medal awarded grateful. I would like to extend, on behalf our government and people, a heartfelt congratulations for your induction into the French Legion of Honor. Without your bravery, and that of those who fought alongside with you, France and Europe might have never been liberated from the barbarity of Nazi occupation. Your efforts are both admirable and an example to follow and it is our pleasure to award you France’s highest military distinction. Colonel Diggs was shot down behind enemy lines in France shortly after D-Day and was rescued by the French underground. Lt Col Frank Zahrobsky, Commander SCC MOWW; Col. Diggs; Lt Col Gordon Bassett, Region VI Commander; and CAPT Russel Vowinkel MOWW National Commander Photo by Frank Kepley PHOTO BY FRANK K E P LEY Planning to travel outside the United States? First, plan to get your passport. Will your next vacation of business trip take you outside of the United States? No matter where you go, a U.S. passport will get you back home. To learn more about travel requirements for U.S. citizens or to apply for your U.S. passport, stop by for Passport Day in the USA from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 10 at Wimauma Post Office, 5608 S.R. 674, Wimauma. Passport Day on March 10

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Friday, March 2 The Final Moose Idol Competitions Well Done to all who have participated this year! Come enjoy a Steak / Fish Dinner and cheer on the finalist. Saturday, March 3 Spaghetti Dinner / Fundraiser for Asha Taylor She has a great opportunity to go to Alaska. Asha, a wonderful singer is reaching her goal to become a sound tech in the music industry. To further boost your enjoyment Riverview Moose Family Center will be hosting a Del & Gary Show. Enjoy a fabulous dinner and an outstanding show. Saturday, March 10 The Moose Charity Dinner Pork Loin, Yum Yum Potatoes followed by Games, Many Door Prizes and a Jewelry Raffle. Every Sunday is Sport Sunday Beer Specials Wings 6 for $3 Free Pool Bar Games All the fun begins at 3 pm Riverview Moose Family Center is the Happening Place Kitchn a Cookin Wednesday thru Sunday Great Food, Great Companionship and a Fabulous Time for All Ages 20 MARCH 1, 2012 NEW SHOWROOMCome see our... NEW ADDRESS 720 4th St. SW Ruskin, FL 33570 813-645-3529www.KnoxAluminum.com Stop in for a FREE cup of coee and cookies! Were Here For You! We Welcome New PatientsOur practice provides a complete range of professional services including Restorative Dentistry, Cosmetic Dentistry, Thorough Examinations, Cleanings, Dental Makeovers and Implant Restorations. Michelle Halcomb, D.D.S.813-634-3396703 Del Webb Blvd. W., Suite B Sun City Center, FL 33573 We salute all of our men, women and Veterans of the Armed Forces! C.A.R.E. is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. For directions, visit www.CareShelter.org or call (813) 645-2273.TippieTippie has started her stay at the shelter by spending a lot of time in the cat condo. But then relax ing kind of comes naturally to this young girl now that she is safe and sound. She was found as a stray near C.A.R.E. but is once more looking for a home full of tender loving care. Please come and adopt Tippie, the cat with 4 white feet. Tippie will be spayed and brought up to date on her shots as well as microchipped as part of her adoption. DOB: February 2, 2010. ZoeyZoey is a very pretty Lab with an awesome personality. She loves people! If you walk past her kennel without paying attention to her, she will call out to you. She is quite the talker. It is super cute! Zoey loves to go for walks and to have her ears scratched. She would make a great companion. She is an all-around wonderful pup. Zoey is spayed, microchipped, and current on her shots. DOB: February 2, 2011 The Hillsborough County Commission on the Status of Women (COSW) is pleased to announce the selection of three distinguished women, Phyllis Busansky, Gwendolyn Miller, and Jan Platt, for induction into the 2012 class of the Hillsborough County Womens Hall of Fame. These designees will be introduced at a Hillsbor ough County Commission meet ing in March, followed by a formal induction ceremony in May. Phyllis Busansky Phyllis Busansky has served as Hillsborough Countys Director of Aging Services and Director of Human Resources, as Execu tive Director of Floridas WelfareTo-Work agency. Ms. Busansky served on the Hillsborough Board of County Commissioners, and as the Hillsborough County Supervisor of Elections before her death in June, 2009. Ms. Busansky was instrumental in ensuring improve ment in the quality of life of Hillsborough County Residents. Gwendolyn Miller Gwendolyn Miller committed thirty five years to educating community children in Hillsborough County schools. Ms. Miller was elected to the Tampa City Council, and served as its Chairman, dedicated to improving the quality of life in several neighborhoods. Jan Platt Jan Platt served on Tampa City Council as well as the Hillsborough Board of County Commissioners, where she helped write the cur rent Hillsborough County Charter. Ms. Platt has actively served on many community boards, includ ing the Friends of the Library of Tampa-Hillsborough County and the Hillsborough Head Start Community Foundation. The Hillsborough County Womens Hall of Fame was created by the COSW to recognize women who have made significant contri butions to the betterment of life for residents of Hillsborough County. The charter class of ten accom plished women was inducted into the Womens Hall of Fame on May 26, 2011, in a memorable ceremo ny featuring a whos who of politi cal and community leaders. The COSW is comprised of 13 members and was created by the Hillsborough Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) on April 16, 2003, to advise the BOCC, the county administration, the community, and all agencies and per sons in Hillsborough County with respect to matters pertaining to the status of women. For more information, call Brandon Wagner at 813-276-2640.Hillsborough County Womens Hall of Fame inductees announced Riverview Moose Family Center 2158/Chapter 1031 Upcoming EventsAll events are open to qualified Moose Members and guests. Engagement announcedMaster Sergeant Steven D. Gunter and Holly Gunter, currently stationed at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Kristin Heathre Kay Gunter to Adam Patrick Vencill, son of Chuck Vencill and Jan Vencill of Madison, Alabama (formerly of Grant, Alabama). Heathre is a senior at Faulkner University and is employed as a lab technician with Lens Crafters in Montgomery, Alabama. Adam is a graduate of Faulkner University and is employed with NetCents at Gunter Air Force Base, Alabama. Heathre is the granddaughter of Jerry and Kay Crumpler of Kenly, North Carolina, Johnny and Rose Gunter of Sun City Center, Florida and Ben and Cheryl Mozingo of Waynesboro, Mississippi. Adam is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Teddy Vencill, Jr. of Sugar Grove, Virginia and Mr. and Mrs. Billy Bearden of Grant, Alabama. Heathre and Adam will marry May 12, 2012 in Montgomery, Alabama. Post-Polio Support Group to meetPost-Polio Support Group will meet for lunch at noon on Thursday, March 15 at Dennys on S.R. 674 in Sun City Center. This group meets the third Thursday of every month from September thru May and everyone is welcome to attend. For more information call: Pam Vogelsang at 642-8707. The group also meets the first Friday of every month, year long, for breakfast, at 10 a.m. at the Sun City Cafe, just off S.R. 674 in the Sun City Plaza. For more informa tion call 642-024.Fundraiser organizedA fundraiser is scheduled for Lila Ruiz, a local three-year-old suffering from Megacystis-Micorcolon-IntetinalHypoperistalsis syndrome from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, April 28 at Winthrop Barn, 11349 Bloomingdale Ave., Riverview. This life threatening genetic disorder is very rare. It is estimated that only 15 to 25 people in the US are currently living with this disease. During her short life Lila has endured 29 surgeries, monthly hospital stays and visits to specialists in four states. This event will feature music, monster trucks, car shows, bounce houses, baloons, face painting, giveaways, a silent auction, food and fun. To find out more about the fundraiser, go to www.staystronglila.com or call Sandy Martinez at 813-309-2395.

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16 MARCH 1, 2012 21 he recipes below feature Irish dairy products because dairying has been a part of Ireland for centuries, long before potatoes. In Ireland we can grow grass like nowhere else in the world, said Allen with pride. So we have fantastic butter, lovely cream and, of course, cheese. Butter is the fat of the land. Our animals are grassis what we are. Dairy products come from this beautiful, lush green grass. available at supermarkets and specialty stores throughout the country. And be sure to do as the Irish do: no celebration is complete without below features Kerrygold Aged Cheddar, Cashel Blue farmhouse cheese, Dubliner and Blarney Castle Irish cheese. These recipes are adapted from Forgotten Skills of Cooking. Recipe introductions are from Darina Allen. Serves 6 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 garlic cloves, mashed 1 small onion, chopped 1 pound beef, freshly ground 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves 1/2 cup dry white or red wine 1 cup beef stock 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1 tablespoon tomato paste Roux (recipe follows) Salt and freshly ground pepper For the Topping 3 pounds baking potatoes, unpeeled 1 cup whole milk, boiling Salt and freshly ground pepper 2 tablespoons Kerrygold Irish butter 1 tablespoon chopped chives (optional) 1/4 cup grated Dubliner cheese 1/4 cup grated Kerrygold Aged Cheddar To Serve Garlic Butter (recipe follows) Green salad Heat the oil in a saucepan. Add garlic and onion and fry until soft and slightly brown. Increase heat, add ground beef and thyme and fry until beef changes color. Add wine, half the stock, Worcestershire sauce, and tomato paste. Simmer for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, boil the unpeeled potatoes, then peel them. Add boiling milk and mash potatoes while they are still hot. Season with salt and freshly ground pepper, and add butter and chives, if using. Bring the rest of the stock to a boil and thicken slightly crispy. Serve with garlic butter and a green salad. Roux as required, or it can be made up on the spot if preferred to thicken up a sauce. 8 tablespoons Kerrygold Irish butter on low heat, stirring occasionally. It will keep for two weeks in the refrigerator.Garlic ButterSlather over bruschetta or toast. Also great with 8 tablespoons Kerrygold Irish butter 3 to 5 cloves crushed garlic A few drops of freshly squeezed lemon juice Whip butter, then add in parsley, garlic and a few drops of lemon juice at a time. Roll into butter pats or form into a roll and wrap in parchment paper or foil, twisting each end. Refrigerate to harden. Kerrygold Aged Cheddar, Cashel Blue farmhouse cheese, Dubliner and Blarney Castle Irish cheese served with chutneys and brown bread.Irish Apple Cake varies from house to house, and the technique has been passed from mother to daughter in farmhouses all over the country for generations. Serves about 6 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 8 tablespoons Kerrygold Irish butter 1 egg About 1/4 to 1/2 cup whole milk 1 to 2 cooking apples 2 to 3 cloves, optional Egg wash 10-inch ovenproof plate into bowl. Rub in butter with Make a well in the center and egg and enough milk to form a an oven proof plate and press it the base. tuck in cloves, if using. Sprinkle over some or all remaining sugar, depending on the sweetness of the apples. Roll out the second this pastry is more like scone dough and as a result is very a slit through the lid, egg wash, and bake for about 40 minutes or until cooked through and nicely browned on top. Dredge warm with raw sugar and softly whipped cream.e in this crust and the lump of garlic butter that melts into the center make this into something very special.

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X 22 Courage celebrated at Ruskin ElementaryTerrific Kids were recognized for the character trait, Courage. Kiwanis members from Sun City Center came to present the awards. The following students were present to receive their awards: Kevin MonterrosasCoeto, Maria Rios, Justin Archer, Ruben Santidor, Kayla Quick-Wells, Andrea Rodriguez, Aden Lopez, Natalie Dominguez, Nicholas Scott, Destiny Padron, Daynara Lopez-Lopez, Laurence Pratt, Lillie Tran, Sheili Martinez, Blerona Mahmuti, Cailyn Wilson, Wilson Tiburcio, Jr., Sebastian Giles, Karla Torres-Figueroa, Jasmine Guerrero, Sophia Gonzalez, Jesse Villanueva, Daniel Hernandez, Selena Fernandez, Margarita Pantoja, Giovanni Leon, Tiffany Ruiz, Brahe Greene, Lex Vega, Sara Abukhdeir, Delani Kilburn, Alejandro Urraya, Arysa Terry, Nicholas Williams, Carlos Aldape, Justin Nieves, Matthew Eunice, Jorge Rendon, Desiree Varela, Bakir Abukedheir, Citlaly Ramos Rodriguez, Kevin Suarez, Noel Perez, Nikolai Rauda, Norma Hernandez, Anthony Hahn, Norma Valdez, Oscar Nagera, Marissa Maurice, Kylee Mucher, Haven Crisp, Alexis Carswell, Guadalup Cesario, Tamia Draper, and Alexis Arzola. Also pictured are our Kiwanis members from Sun City CenterJoe Nargawala and Dee Wilcox, Principal of Ruskin Elementary Lisa Amos, Rebecca Salgado is the Assistant Principal. Those that recieved the award but were not present for the photo are: Gavin Singh,Adrianna Ibarra, Lanette Mercado, Edith Ferral, Adelmar Abonce, and Ashley Aguirre. A special SCC group presented a donation to the James A. Haley Veterans Hospitals Wounded Warrior Fund on Feb. 16. The check, for $2,090, is the proceeds from the Sun City Center Community Associations Military Ball held in November. Jan and Gordon Bassett, as the Ball Planning Committee co-chairs, presented the check on behalf of the SCC CA and the Ball Planning Committee. They also represented the Military Order of the World Wars (MOWW) SCC Chapter. Gordon is also the MOWW Region VI Commander. Also from the Committee and representing the American Legion and the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) is Paul Wheat. Paul is the President of the MOAA SCC Chapter. Tom and Mary Culliton, from the Committee, represented the SCC Leathernecks. Cathy Williams is the Chief Recreation Therapist at the VA. Military Ball proceeds donated to Wounded Warrior Fund LHS Student Government to host charity basketball gameLennard High School Student Government is hosting a faculty versus student basketball game at 6 p.m. on Thursday, March 8. Prior to the game there will be student-run carnival for families and students to enjoy from 3 to 6 p.m. This is a non-profit event in which all proceeds will be donated to the Make-A-Wish Foundation. USF awarded $1.57-million for research on traumatic brain injuryThe University of South Florida has received a $1.57 million U.S. Department of Defense grant to conduct translational research on traumatic brain injury and other battlefield related injuries and diseases. The studies, many in collaboration with James A. Haley Veterans Hospital, are intended to improve the quality of life for military personnel returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Traumatic brain injury, or TBI, is known as the signature injury of soldiers returning home from Afghanistan and Iraq. Blast forces sustained in combat often cause damage to parts of the brain critical to high-level functions influencing memory, attention, decisionmaking and motor skills. Many veterans developing symptoms after TBI also suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Working with the VA, the Department of Defense and private research entities, we will develop novel studies everything from drug discovery and preclinical work to clinical, social and behavioral trials, said principal investigator Dr. Paul R. Sanberg, USF senior associate vice president for research and innovation and director of the USF Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair. Our multidisciplinary work will provide critical knowledge about TBI and its complications that could lead to more effective diagnosis and treatments for soldiers and veterans, as well as skills to improve their physical and psychological adjustment into civilian life. The grant involves four major projects: Researchers will assess in animal models how granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF), a growth factor that mobilizes the bodys own stem cells, may help treat traumatic brain injury. A clinical trial will test whether GCSF reduces neurological damage and improves recovery of memory, decision-making and other cognitive functions in soldiers and veterans with TBI, even when administered a month or two after the initial injury. Patients will be recruited from the polytrauma rehabilitation and blast injury programs at James A. Haley Veterans Hospital. In an attempt to identify better diagnostic measures for mild TBI, a frequently underdiagnosed condition, a study will compare the balance, gait, hearing and vestibular functions of otherwise healthy USF student veterans with and without self-reported TBI to those of non-veteran students. Using advanced technology researchers will monitor changes in patterns of everyday movement and the cognitive function of TBI patients undergoing smart house-based rehabilitation at the Tampa VA hospitals Polytrauma Transitional Rehabilitation Program. The study will evaluate whether scientific analysis of movements, tracked by devices like radiofrequency identification and global positioning systems, can help assess therapeutic improvement. A second arm of the study will investigate whether variability in walking patterns is greater for USF student veterans reporting mild TBI than for those without this diagnosis. Start the new year knowing your credit is in good standing and your credit report is accurate. Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, consumers can receive a free copy of their credit report from each of the three nationwide reporting agencies Experian, Equifax and TransUnion every 12 months. Reviewing your credit report annually is a smart way for consumers to understand their financial health, as well as avoid identity fraud, said Karen Nalven, President of BBB serving West Florida. Many television advertisements and websites claim to offer free credit reports, free credit scores or free credit monitoring. However, BBB reminds consumers that AnnualCreditReport. com is the only authorized source for free annual credit reports under federal law. Additionally, BBB reminds consumers that a credit report is different than a credit score. A credit report is a snapshot of your credit use history which gives a lender a view of whether you pay your debts back or not. Your credit score is a number which shows lenders how much of a risk you are in paying back a debt. BBB offers these tips for pulling your annual credit report: Credit Report Request Service through links from unfamiliar websites. If you get an e-mail or see a pop-up ad claiming its from AnnualCreditReport.com or any of the three nationwide consumer reporting companies, do not reply or click on any link in the message. To help ensure the privacy and protection of your personal information, go to AnnualCreditReport. com directly to request your free annual credit report either by secure website, phone or email. AnnualCreditReport.com will not approach consumers via email, telemarketing or direct mail solicitations. quarterly. While you can pull all three credit reports at once, you can also consider pulling your credit reports quarterly. Pulling your reports separately allows you to better monitor your reports and keep track of any changes or new information that may appear on your credit report. If you pull all your reports at once, you wont be eligible to pull your report for another year. As child identity theft remains a national problem, it can be just as imperative to pull your childs report as it is to pull your own. While the credit reporting agencies do not knowingly maintain credit files on minor children, you can contact the credit reporting agencies directly and they can run the report. can improve your credit for free. The Federal Trade Commission cautions consumers to be wary of companies that make claims regarding credit repair. These companies, commonly called credit clinics, dont do anything for consumers that consumers cannot do for themselves at little or no cost. Beware of any organization that offers to create a new identity and credit file for you. For more information on credit clinics and a list of warning signs visit www.ftc.gov. credit report. Inaccurate, derogatory information can lower your credit score and may indicate possible fraudulent activity. If you find information that you believe is inaccurate, you have the right to dispute it free of charge. Go directly through the reporting agency you pulled your report from to file your dispute. To check the reliability of a company and find trustworthy businesses, visit bbb.org. To contact BBB serving West Florida about this release, please call (727) 535-5609 ext. 3317 or jzajac@bbbwestflorida.org.Check your credit for free Annual Lawn Bowling match heldThe Annual Challenge Match between the lady members of the Suncoasters and the men members of the Pebble Beach clubs was played on Feb. 16. At stake was the honor of winning the coveted Challenge Trophy. This was the 5th year that this event has taken place, and so far the score is 4-0 in favor of the men. The competitive interest from both clubs was terrific, and 16 teams comprising 48 players took part. The result was a disappointment for the ladies, who were more than a match for the men. They won by 4 games to 3 with one game drawn, but lost on the total amount or shots scored, by only 5 shots. Afterwards a vote was taken on the method of scoring for next year, and it was agreed to take the number of wins rather than the shots scored -a very predictable decision, lets hope it doesnt backfire!

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MARCH 1, 2012 23 Goodson Strawberry Market CLARKE AUTOMOTIVE CLARKE AUTOMOTIVEOPEN ALL DAY SATURDAY Everything we do keeps your car in warranty Includes: Visual Inspection of tires, belts & hoses, horn/lights, brakes, shocks/struts, exhaust, wipers, suspension, air and breather filter. Most cars/light trucks. Disassembly to perfect inspection may result in additional charges. Present coupon to receive savings. No other discounts apply. Additional charges for shop supplies may be added. See store for details. Exp. 4/5/12MAINTENANCE INSPECTIONFREEValue$3995 AAA DiscountOBNCALL FOR LOWEST PRICES ON TIRES131 Central Ave., Brandon813.685.2939 FREE Shuttle to FishHawk & Sun City Center TIRES DEALER ALTERNATIVEAAA Autorized Service Center OIL CHANGE & LUBRICATION$1095OBN motor oil. Purolator oil filter. Most cars and light trucks. Please call for appointment. Valid only with coupon. Not valid with any other 10% DISCOUNT on service or repair.EXCLUDES TIRES & SALES SPECIALS Honor All Competitors Coupons Welcome to...Sun City Dental CenterThomas A. DeVol, D.D.S., P.A.633-2636General and Cosmetic DentistryOur Own In-House Denture LabOur Lab Tech Has 38+ Years Experience Thomas A. DeVol, D.D.S., P.A., Practicing Dentistry for 23 YearsChuck Fredericks, Lab Technician, 38+ Years Experience727 Cortaro Drive (Burger King Plaza) Open: Monday Thursday 8:30 5:00 New Patients & Emergencies Are Always WELCOME PATIENT REWARDSRefer 2 new patients and receive a $25 credit toward your next visit. Be sure to have your friend or family member mention your name to receive the credit at time of scheduling.Coupon must be mentioned at time of scheduling appointment. The fee advertised is the minimum fee charged. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the fee service examination or treatment. Senior citizen discount does not apply. Mystery Theatre plannedBeth Israel Sisterhood in Sun City Center will meet at noon on Tuesday, March 6 at the Kings Point Banquet Room. You are invited to participate in solving a mystery called The Murder at Watersdown Mansion, performed by the Pelican Players. Enjoy a high tea luncheon in your best finery, and if you have a favorite teacup and saucer, bring it along. Tickets are $15 each, bring your friends and have a delightful afternoon. Robin Kitzmuller will accept reservations, her address is 1211 Wild Feather Lane, Sun City Center, 33573 or call (813) 645-9154.Christian Womens Connection to meetChristian Womens Connection luncheon and program will begin at 11 a.m. on Thursday, March 8 at Club Renaissance, 2121 So. Pebble Beach Blvd. Sun City Center, with guest speaker Marcia Trego. Mar cia will discuss stress relief and the Superwoman Syndrome. Dr. Patrick, a local dermatologist, will talk about skin care and cancer prevention from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The menu is chef salad or alternate meal of tossed salad with grilled chicken. If you desire this option, be sure to order it when you make your reservation. Cost is $17 inclusive. Reservations are required. Call Pat Butler 938-4320 or Tara Flood 383-7540 or e-mail aunt.butler@gmail.com. Make reservations or cancellations before noon Monday, March 5.Armand and Angelina return to Sun City CenterSunday March 4, Armand and Angelina will once again perform in Sun City Center for Unity Community of Joy in the Henry G. Gibson Hall of the Beth Israel Temple, 1115 Del Webb Blvd E. At 10:30 they will conduct the regular Sunday service. A suggested love offering for the native flute workshop at 1:30 p.m. is $20. Flutes will be provided and can be purchased. Gifted with one of the most angelic and heart-opening voices Angelina is often compared to Sar ah Brightman. Armands brilliant compositions, powerful vocals and engaging presence inspires us to love life passionately. Hear them sing their version of Ave Maria, theme from Romeo and Juliet, songs from Phantom of the Opera plus many of their original love songs. Visit them on them online at www.armandandange lina.com. Caregiver stress addressedThe Samaritan Services Alzheimers monthly meeting will be held at 2 p.m. on March 7 at the Redeemer Lutheran Church. The speaker will be Amy Richard son, speaking on how to help with caregiver stress in difficult situations. For more information call Doris at 634-3489 or the office at 634-9283.Unitarian Universalists announce March scheduleMarch 1 Unitarian Universalists in the Social Hall at 1115 Del Webb Blvd. East, Sun City Center host Dr. Rev. Robert P. Tucker No Greater Love. Since March 11 marks the 46th anniversary of the martyrdom of Unitarian minister James Reeb, a Civil Rights activ ist, Dr. Tucker will review the life and times of this magnificent man who was willing to put himself in harms way so that others might enjoy all of our precious American freedoms. This is the week to bring food for the Beth-El Migrant Worker food bank. March 8 The Rev. Roger Fritts The Kingdom of God Is Within You. A warm welcome awaits you and will tempt your interest. Coffee and conversation at 7 p.m., followed by program at 7:30 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For infor mation call 813-633-2349Southside Baptist to host Alan HarrisSouthside Baptist Church 4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 S, Sun City will be hosting award winning vocalist Alan Harris at 6 p.m. on Sunday, March 4. Alan has a blended wor ship style that appeals to young and old alike. He has toured with many of the Gaither Homecoming Friends and was recently honored with a Diamond Award nomination for Male Vocalist of the Year. His preaching style touches the heart. He will be accompanied by his wife, Angie and his son, Andrew.The inaugural Saint Anne Spring Fling Community Fair will take place in Ruskin from Thursday, March 8 to Sunday March 11, 2012. This years event promises to be one of the best fairs ever held on the church grounds. Carnival offerings have been expanded with additional large rides and games. Arts and crafts vendors will offer jewelry, ceramics, leather goods, T-shirts, woodworking, stained glass, art-work, caricatures, face-painting and more! Food vendors will provide choices guaranteed to appeal to a variety of ethnic preferences and tastes. Want traditional American fare? Hot dogs, hamburgers, fries and ice cream should do the trick! A dining tent will be set up to allow patrons to relax while enjoying their meal. Entertainment under the tent will include magic performers, dancers, bands, and St. Anne Catholic Church hosts Spring Fling Community Fairchoirs, to name a few. If your timing is right, you may even catch Elvis or Blue Eyes. The fair will also feature a tribute to veterans in honor of the many local men and women serving our country in the armed services. The popular semi-annual You Choose the Prize cash drawing will be held on Sunday afternoon. Tickets for the drawing will be available all weekend. This event will be held on the Saint Anne Catholic Church grounds located at 106 11th Ave NE at the intersection of 11th Ave and US 41 in Ruskin. Hours are Thursday, March 8 from 4-10 p.m. (reduced-rate armbands will be available at the gate on Thursday only for $15); Friday, March 9 from 4 10 p.m.; Saturday, March 10 from Noon to Midnight; and Sunday, March 11 from 2 10 p.m. Call the parish office 645-1714 for more information. .Listen to the Sounds of JoyAt 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, March 4 the New Beginnings Fellowship will be blessed to have a wonder ful singing group ministering from Ocala, FL. The Sounds of Joy has been singing and traveling the country for 23 years. While everyone enjoys doing Gods work, the main purpose of the group is to see one more soul come to know Jesus as their personal Savior. The church is located at 1120 27th St. SE Ruskin. For more information call Rev. Lewis Brady at 654-1018.Prince of Peace to host author Thomas SmithPrince of Peace Catholic Church invites the public to hear author and retreat director Thomas Smith, the former director of the Denver Catholic Biblical School and Catechetical School. The Lenten Mission schedule is Monday, March 5 through Wednesday, March 7, in Conesa Center, immediately following the 8 a.m. Mass. The morning presentation will be repeated at 7 p.m. that same evening at 702 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center. For more information, call 6342328.

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24 MARCH 1, 2012 South Hillsborough Church of Christ Welcome to the:SERVICES:Sunday........................9:30 & 10:30 a.m.; 6:00 p.m. Wednesday................7:00 p.m.EVERETT TATE, MINISTER NON-INSTRUMENTAL CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCHSunday Worship: Blended 8:00 a.m. Contemporary 9:40 a.m. Traditional 11:15 a.m.Nursery Provided Pastor Jack R. Palzer www.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1305 Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist)1511 El Rancho Dr. Sun City Center, FL 33573Phone/Fax:813-633-5950 WEEKLY SERVICES: Sunday9 a.m.......................Bible Study 11 a.m.....................Bible Study 10 a.m. & 6 p.m............WorshipWednesday6 p.m....Prayer Meeting/Bible Study Ruskin United Methodist Church First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (behind Suntrust Bank)ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:SUNDAY MORNINGS:Rev. Richard NusselPhone: 645-1241Nov. April..................8:30 a.m. and All Year...............10:45 a.m. Sunday School............9:30 a.m.Day Care Available Mon. Fri. 6 a.m. 6 p.m. call 645-6198 REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA Rev. Dr. Peter Stiller, PastorTelephone: Website: sccredeemer.org Worship Services on Sunday 9:30 & 11:15 a.m. Area Places of Worship Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCCMeets in the Henry Gibson Social Hall of the Beth Israel To be human is not a fact, but a task. Frederick H. Heinmann Ruskin Foursquare ChurchBuilding Community Thru Gods Love 106 7th Ave. N.W. Ruskin, FL 33570 N. Blanton (813) 309-3558Pastor Norman & Sherril Blanton 10 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service 7 p.m. Wed. Bible Study 702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573 www.popcc.orgMasses:Sunday..........8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., Noon Saturday Vigil.................4:00 & 6:00 p.m. Daily..........................................8:00 a.m.Confessions: Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m. and Sat. 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCHMinister DR. DAVID CAMPBELL INVITES YOU TO SERVICES AT OUR NEW LOCATION10:30 a.m. SUNDAYSNO CREED...BUT CHRIST NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE Sunday Service 10:30 a.m.www.unitycommunityofjoy.com 813-298-7745 Spirituality Rather Than ReligionUnityHenry Gibson Social Hall, Beth Israel Synagogue www.nbcor.orgLoving God, Loving Others, Serving Beyond Borders Sunday School (all ages)........9:30 a.m. Dr. Samuel (Sam) A. Roach, Pastor Area Obituaries h h Direct Cremation $925Zipperers Funeral Home813-645-6130 EXP. 3/31/12 Gilbert Gil Charles FosterGilbert (Gil) Charles Foster, 89, passed away peacefully Feb. 21, 2012 in Sun City Center, Florida. Born Jan. 19, 1923 in Hamilton, Ontario Canada to Charles Edward Foster and Norah Redden, both deceased; and sister Ruby May Taylor (deceased). Surviving is his beloved wife of 67 years, Helen C. Foster; two sons, Murray and Ian Foster (Sally), and two daughters, S. Leigh Diakopoulos (Anestis) and Deirdre Totten; one nephew, Glenn Taylor (Betty) of Stoney Creek, Ontario, Canada; and four grandsons, Chris, Nick, and Dimi Diakopoulos, and Kevin Foster. A Memorial Service celebrating Gils life was held Monday, Feb. 27, 2012, at Freedom Plaza, Auditorium, 1010 American Eagle Drive, Sun City Center, FL. 33573. A reception followed. In Gils honor, in lieu of flowers or memorial gifts, a donation may be made to the Eagle Audubon Society, c/o Nancy Terry 2444 Kensington Green Drive, Sun City Center, FL. 33573. Services under the direction of Brewer and Sons Funeral Home, Tampa. Lillian Margaret Castillo-McMullinLillian Grannie Margaret CastilloMcMullin, 88, of Ruskin, FL passed away on February 16, 2012. She was born December 6, 1923 in Dowling Park, FL to Joseph and Cora Clark. Lillian set roots in the Tampa Bay area in the 1940s. She opened Castillos Little Barn general store in Ruskin in 1951. She made numerous friends in her 35 years of business there. She enjoyed dancing and fishing, she spent many days on the bay, in the inlets of Ruskin and on Lake Kissimmee. She was a member for most of her life at First Baptist Church of Ruskin. Grannie is survived by two daughters: Bonnie Leasure (Ben) of Brooksville and Donna Castillo-Budd of Ruskin; four grandchildren: Terri Torres (Juan) of Brooksville, Todd Bryan (Margie) of Alabama, Jamey Baker (Gina) of Ruskin, and Tracy Baker-Howard (Bobby) of Balm; and twelve great-grandchildren: Casey, Cody, Brenden, Katy, Alex, Marty, Cinnamon, Mason, Nick, Ryan, Bo and Cassi; one brother: Mitchell Clark; one sister: Edna Mae Bush; a step-daughter: Betty Jo Castillo; and numerous nephews, nieces, cousins and in-laws. She was preceded in death by her father and mother Joseph and Cora Clark; her grandson: Joseph Bryan; her granddaughter: Lori BakerDixon; and her two brothers: Milton Clark and Clyde Chick Clark. Services were held on Tuesday, February 21, 2012 at First Baptist Church of Ruskin with Dr. Barry Rumsey and Rev. Jim Farr officiating. Pallbearers: Casey Sullivan, Cody Sullivan, Brenden Torres, Bo Howard, Ryan Dixon and Carl Ware. Honorary Pallbearers: Nicholas Hunter and Mason Baker. She was laid to rest at Clearwater Municipal Cemetery.continued at top of page Lillian Margaret CastilloMcMullin obituary continuedLavernia Patricia Bick MeyerLavernia Patricia Bick Meyer, 83, of Wheeling died on Saturday, February 25, 2012 at home. She was born November 29, 1928 in Wheeling the daughter of the late David and Mary Hummel Bick and was a Baptist by faith. Lavernia was a high school graduate of the former Wheeling High School in Wheeling and from Bowling Green University. She was a retired Teacher for Ohio County Board of Education and was a volunteer for the South Bay Hospital in Sun City Center, Florida. She also enjoyed playing cards. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Gerald Louis Meyer who passed away in 2005 and a sister, Nancy Agar. Surviving are two sons, David P. Meyer of Wheeling and Daniel L. Meyer and his wife, Jadi of Kingwood, TX; a daughter, Diana L. Wilds and her husband, Norm of Wheeling; six grandchildren, David Meyer and his wife, Lori, Amie DeMasi and her husband, Bill, Danielle and Zachary Meyer and Elizabeth Knollinger and her husband, Josh; six great grandchildren, Katie Meyer, Allison Meyer, Taylor Knollinger, Trenton Knollinger, Haydon Meyer and Dalton Meyer; a brother in law, Mike Agar and his wife, Myrna of Wheeling and a nephew, Chris Agar of Memphis, TN. Services were held with the Reverend Dr. William G. McCoy officiating. Interment in Halcyon Hills Memorial Gardens, Sherrard, WV. Memorial contributions may be made to Valley Hospice,10686 State Route 150, Rayland, OH 43943. Personal condolences may be offered to the family at www.kepnerfuneral. com. Jacqueline Laney MollmanJacqueline Laney Mollman, 83, formerly of Sun City Center, Florida, passed away peacefully on Sunday, February 12, 2012 at The Episcopal Church Home in Louisville,KY. She was born on December 18, 1928 to Ross and Wilma Laney in Pittsburg, Kansas, and graduated from Canton High School, Canton, Illinois. She met her husband of 62 years, Edward Mollman, at the University of Illinois, and together they raised five daughters. Over the years, the family lived in Wood River, Illinois; Orono, Maine; Boston, Massachusetts; Chicago, Illinois; Bethesda, Maryland and Sun City Center, Florida. Jackie made lifelong friends each place she lived. The couple moved to Louisville in 2009 to be closer to family. Jackie was known for her creativity, sense of humor and a love of reading, all of which she passed to her daughters and grandchildren. She was seldom without a book. While living in Washington, Jackie also volunteered at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Library and the Bethesda Public Library. Jackie, Ed and their children shared a keen enjoyment of travel. Their adventures included numerous independent trips to the UK, Europe and Canada as well as travel through most of the United States. Jackie was preceded in death by her parents, Ross and Wilma Laney and her brother, Norman Laney. She is survived by her husband of 62 years, Edward Mollman, daughters Meredith Parente, Carol Mollman, Jennifer Mollman, Katherine Waters, Elizabeth Behringer (Mark), and grandchildren Jeffrey Waters, Alexandra Waters, and Claire Behringer. The family wishes to thank everyone at Sunrise Senior Living, and most recently, Jefferson Manor and The Episcopal Church Home for their wonderful care. The visitation and memorial service is now planned for Saturday, March 10, 2012 beginning at 10 am at Pearsons Funeral Home, Louisville, with private burial to follow at Cave Hill Cemetery.Sumiko Miko TempleSumiko Miko Temple, 73, of Sun City Center, FL died February 18, 2012. Miko was born April 30, 1938 in Japan. Survivors include her two children: Cissy Betz of North Venice, FL and Clifford G. and his wife, Jeanne L. Temple of Elgin, OK; two grandchildren: Clifford and Vicky and great grandson, Zander. She is also survived by one brother and three sisters. A Celebration of Life Service was held at 1 PM, Friday, February 24 at Farley Funeral Home, Venice Chapel. Memorial donations may be made to Make-A-Wish Foundation, 3635 Bonita Beach Road #4, Bonita Springs, FL 34134. To share a memory visit www.farleyfuneralhome. com.Memorial Service plannedA memorial service for Louis H. Benner, a twenty-year resident of Sun City Center, will be held at noon on Thursday, March 8. at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church 1239 Del Webb Boulevard, SCC.Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light for my path. Psalm 119:105

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MARCH 1, 2012 25 Southside Baptist ChurchA Warm, Loving & Friendly ChurchLooking for a church home? Need the comfort of a warm and loving family? Join us on Sunday to come home to the warmth of our church family.Located in South Hillsborough County, just south of Stephens Road in old Sun City.Getting to Know You (Donuts & Coffee) .................... 9:00 a.m. Sunday School ................................................................. 9:30 am. Sunday Morning Worship ............................................ 10:55 a.m. Sunday Evening Service..................................................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service .......................................... 7:00 p.m. Thursday Morning Prayer ............................................ 10:00 a.m.Come join us to learn about Gods Word and salvation in Jesus Christ Area Places of Worship 1239 Del Webb Blvd. West Sun City Center, FL 33573 Church is Handicap accessible Phone: 813-634-1252 For information visit: www.standrewatscc.org St. Andrew Presbyterian ChurchSunday Services 9:30 a.m. Casual Service 11:00 a.m.Prayers with anointing for healing and wholeness during worship the second Sunday of every month.Pastor: Rev. Dr. Mark E. SalmonMeet friends in Fellowship Hall after the Service. Refreshments served.A Stephen Ministry Church First Church of Christ, ScientistChristian Science HealsSunday Service .................................................. 10:00 a.m. Sunday School .................................................. 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Service ............................................. 5:00 p.m. Reading Room ......................... Wednesday 4 to 4:45 p.m. All Are Welcome WORSHIP SERVICES: SATURDAY 4:00 p.m. ............................. Sanctuary (Casual Service)5:00 p.m. ................ Creason Hall (Oasis Contemporary)SUNDAY 8:15 a.m. ...................... Sanctuary (Communion Service)9:15 a.m. ................. Creason Hall (Oasis Contemporary)10:55 a.m. ........ Sanctuary (Traditional with Choir & Bells) Bookstore 633-8595Pastor: Dr. Warren Langer Pastor: Dr. Daniel White Spiritual LeaderRev. Sue Meixner813-362-0806sue@alterways.comSunday Service 11:00 a.m. Sun City Center Chamber of Commerce 1651 Sun City Center PlazaTurning problems into lessons, lessons into wisdom and wisdom into freedom. U.S. Hwy. 41 106 11th Ave. NE Ruskin 813-645-1714SaintAnneRuskin.orgMASSES Vigil Mass ..................................................................... Saturday 5:00 p.m. Sunday Mass ........ 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. (Contemporary) Monday thru Friday .................................................................... 8:00 a.m. Wednesday and Friday .................................................................. 12 noon Holy Days ....................................... Espaol ...................................... Domingo 12:30 p.m.; Jueves 7:00 p.m. Confession ......................... Thursday 6:15 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m. Saint Anne Catholic ChurchSouthShore: Apollo Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton Very Rev. John F. McEvoy, V.F. McDonald Family sings for the LordAt 2 p.m. on Sunday March 4, at the United Community Church, 1501 La Jolla Ave., Sun City Center the Fun Brigade has invited the McDonald Family Singers to per form in the churchs sanctuary. The McDonald Family will be presenting a free concert with various styles of music by Victor and Laurie and their 7 homeschooled children ages 11-26 from Orange, Massachusetts. Working together in family harmony their musical presentation includes bluegrass gospel, acapella, brass, instrumen tals, sacred classical and more! Everyone is encouraged to attend this free event. Members of the Fun Brigade will be collecting a free will offering for the family. Church doors open 1 hour prior to the concert.Discover timely treasuresThe United Methodist Church of Sun City Center, 1210 Del Webb Blvd. West, presents its annual Timely Treasures Sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday, March 2 and from 8 a.m. to noon on Saturday, March 3. Whatever youre looking for can be found at this humongous sale of slightly used goods includ ing kitchen items, electronics, fur niture, collectibles, jewelry, sports equipment, luggage, antiques, clothing and so much more! A great and inexpensive lunch will also be available for purchase both days. Drop by and find that trea sure youve been looking for! For more information, call the church office between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information call 813-634-2539. Sixteen congregations combine for concertSt. Andrew Presbyterian Church, 1239 Del Webb W., Sun City Center is pleased to sponsor and host the fourteenth annual St. Andrew & Friends Sacred Music Concert at 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 11. Once again the sanctuary is resounding with the voices of more than 80 singers, representing sixteen congregations from Sun City Center, Apollo Beach, Brandon, Parrish and Ruskin as they gather for nine weeks of rehearsals. The chorus is directed by Rita M. Hughes, and accompanied by the husband and wife team of pianist Robert Winslow, and organist Dr. JoAnne Winslow. Join them for what promises to be an exciting and uplifting afternoon. Through song your spirit will be reminded of Gods constant presence. You will also be invited to add your voice to those of the chorus in singing beloved hymns of faith. St. Andrew & Friends presents this concert as a free gift and no tickets are necessary. Arrive early to allow yourself sufficient time to park, find the seat of your choice and visit with other concert goers.Paying close attention to the direction of Rita Hughes, members of the St. Andrew and Friends Community Chorus are preparing for their Fourteenth Annual Sacred Music Concert. Northside Baptist hosts movie nightA free showing of the movie Courageous will be held at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 3, at Northside Baptist Church located at 1301 N. U.S. Hwy. 41 in Ruskin. Childcare through age 12 is provided free of charge. Jerry Goff & Lil Jan Buckner will be ministering at First Baptist Church of Gibsonton, 9912 Indiana St. at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, March 4 with an exciting Christian music performance playing and singing their national hits. Search the Book Again, Walk Around Me Jesus, I Firmly Promise You, The Tree God Grew, I Am Blessed, Tell It Again, plus many, many more. These two are top award winners; members of the Gospel Music Hall of Fame; Dove Award winners; Peoples Choice Award winners; Gold Record winners; Grammy nominees; voted Favorite Male & Female Vocalist; Mr. Gospel Trumpet; Speakers, Authors and Composers Extraordinaire who have been in gospel music over 50 years. Dont miss this refreshing and uplifting service. For more information, call (813) 677-1301.Attend a Christian music performance The sixth concert in the Fine Arts Series at St. Andrew Presbyterian Church, 1239 Del Webb Blvd. West, Sun City Center, will be at 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 4. The concert will feature a return performance by pianist Dr. Naomi Niskala, Assistant Professor of Music at Susquehanna University in Pennsylvania. Dr. Niskala has appeared as a soloist and chamber musician in the United States, Europe, Canada, Israel, and Japan. She holds degrees from Yale, Stony Brook, and Tufts. Recently, Dr. Niskala has performed in Russia and Berlin, Germany. Tickets at the door are $9. Season tickets for the 2012-13 music series wil be available at the concert. Season tickets are $40 for 7 concerts ($5.71 per concert). For more information, call the church office at (813) 634-1252 or Judy Voorhees at (813) 642-8125.Classical pianist in concert DR. NAOMI NISKALA Men and Womens Bible StudiesVisit www.SouthBay.cc to register online and for more details. Childcare is available by reservation, call 677-0721.SOUTH BAY CHURCH MEN: Every Tuesday 7:00 p.m. Beginning March 13Every Mans BattleWOMEN: Tuesdays 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. Beginning March 27 (6 week study)The Virtuous Woman: Shattering the Superwoman Myth by Vicki Courtney. Workbook $10. Tuesdays 7 p.m. Beginning March 27 Experiencing GodVisit SouthBay.cc for details on Celebrate Recovery Training; Youth/Kids Summer Camp; much more Dear friends, since God so loved us, we also ought to love one another. 1 John 4:11

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FARMERS MKT200 MERCHANDISE300MARCH 1, 2012 THE SHOPPER To place an ad call 813.645.3111 ext. 201 Fax: 813.645.1792 $17.00 up to 20 words 30 addl. word Deadline is Monday at 4pm100 Announcements 200 Farmers Mkt 300 Merchandise 400 Marine 450 Transportation 500 Real Estate 550 Manuf. Housing 600 Rentals 650 Prof. Services 700 Services 800 EmploymentTHE SHOPPER CLASSIFIED ADVERTISINGThe Observer News, The SCC Observer and The Riverview Current CARDS M & M Printing Co., Inc weekly publisher of the 210 Woodland Estates Ave., SW Ruskin, Florida 33570 310 GARAGE/ Y ARD SALE 312 ESTATE SALES 312 ESTATE SALES 280 PETS(3) ten week old kitten. DOB 12/25/11. Mother is Himalayan Persian S eal Point. D addy is S eal Point S iamese. $150 each. 813-641-8021 Call for DirectionsDelivery AvailableQuality Furniture at Aordable Prices Quality Wicker & Rattan Furniture HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 10-6 Closed WeekendsWE HAVE SOMETHING FOR EVERY ROOM INSIDE AND ALL AREAS OUTSIDE We are worth the drive from anywhere! 310 GARAGE/YARD SALE annual yard sale. S aturday, March 3, 8am-1pm. Please park on street. 813690-8071Timely Treasure Sale Friday 8am-2pm. Saturday, 8am-noon. United Methodist Church, 1210 W. Del Webb. Jewelry, art & antiques, luggage, sport equipment furniture, linens & much misc.. Lunch available. DeJa Vu special treasure youve been looking for. Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana S t., G ibsonton (1 block off U S 41, 1 block north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday through Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture, lots misc. Ministry F irst Baptist Gibsonton. 813-671-0036 to donateYost Park Yard Sale Radial saw, small refrigerator, small furniture, books, kitchenware & much more. 1112 Shell Point Rd., W. Saturday, 3/3, 8am-2pm. Rain date 3/10 Moving/ E states sale. F urniture, TV s, & misc. 11am-2pm daily, 8am-4pm. weekends. (2 consecutive weeks) 3319 16th A ve., SE R uskin. 1st S t. past Zipper Mortuary off 33rd St, SE. 813504-8650 920 Eagle Lane, Apollo Beach. Fireplace, computer, household items, clothes. March 2 & 3, 8am-? Everything must go. Thursday, Friday & Saturday. Multi family yard sales, 642 Ft.. Duquesna SCC. Clothes, antiques, toys, keyboard, rugs. Something for everyone. Reading place, Sun City Centers (off of Rickenbacker) One day sale. Saturday, March 3, 8am-1pm. N o early birds please. S ale. R easonable prices. A ntiques, collectibles, Coca Cola cooler, slot machine, computer, tools, many misc. March 2 & 3, 8am-3pm. Yard sale. S aturday, March 3, F urniture, clothes, knickknacks & more. 1405 6th St., SE, Ruskin. S CC Berry R oberts area yard sale. March 2 & 3, 8am-1pm. Clothes, bikes, sewing supplies, ladies golf clubs, bedding, antiques, Harley helmet & items, computer, printers, & much misc. SCC 1513 New Bedford, 7;30am-5pm. Thursday, Friday & Saturday, March 1, 2, 3. Fishing, lamps, exerciser, crafts, fabric, valences, vases, potato pockets, misc.. 2 family yard sale. 208 7th A ve. N W, R uskin. Friday & S aturday, 8am-2pm. Generator & lots of misc. items. Yard sale. 2617 Gulf City Rd., Ruskin. S aturday, 8am-2pm, S unday 8am-noon. Household items, fishing, hunting, clothes, etc. Too much to mention Yard sale. S aturday, 8am-1pm. 1419 Murillo Loop, Ruskin. Furniture, house wares, linens, clothing, tools, big TV casino machine, gas grill, toys & lots of misc. Big yard sale. S aturday, March 3, 8am-noon R iverstone Church, 12011 E ast Bay R d., G ibsonton. D onations accepted. 813-677-0125 Big garage sale. F riday & S aturday, March 2 & 3, 8am-1pm. 414 Stoneham Dr., St Andrews. Washer, dryer, furniture, household items, clothes. A little of everything for all. 310 GARAGE/ Y ARD SALE Saturday March 3rd, 8am-2pm. One Day Only Multi family sale. Bluewater & Win tersong, SCC. Breadmaker, espresso, juicer & soda machines, baby items, clothes size 6-10, Betty Boop items, Lowry organ. Goodies for all. Bahia L akes community yard sale. off 11th A ve., N W, R uskin. S aturday, March 3, 8am-1pm. Rain date March 4. Something for everyone. G arage sale. 1541 Chevy Chase D r., S CC. F riday only. 7am-2pm. S mall tools, golf cart items & household goods G arage/ moving sale. F urniture, TV power tools, clothes, misc. 12804 E arly R un L ane ( S outh Point) R iverview. S aturday & S unday, March 3 & 4, 8am-2pm.311 AUCTIONST ailgate auctions, 10816 U S 41 N Palmetto, Fl. (Midway Flea Mkt) Load your trunk & trucks. Come sell. Saturday, March 3, 10am. 813-403-0069. AB2109AU3055 A uction. E lks L odge, 1630 Hwy 41 S R uskin. T hursday, March 1. Old coins & collectibles. Preview at 6pm. Auction starts 6:30pm. 813-403-0069 AB1230AU3055312 ESTATE SALES Fri. & Sat. (7-1) 1209 Bluewater Dr., SCCBamboo Soe w/Chairs, Love Seat, Queen & Twin Bedroom Suites, Dining Room Suite w/6 Chairs, Rocking Chairs, Recliners, Noritake China, Patio Furniture, Desk w/Chair, TVs, Entertainment Center, Swivel Rockers, Bookcases, Bar Stools, File Cabinet, Card Table w/Chairs, Jewelry, Household, Kitchen and Misc. Items.www.AnnesEstateSales.blogspot.comAnne's Estate Sales Furniture: Heywood-Wakefield Dining Room Suite, Sofa w/Matching Loveseat, Entertainment Center, Rocking Chair, Recliner, Trundle Bed, California Twin Beds, Bakers Rack, Twin Bedroom Suite, Dinette Table w/Chairs, Portable AC, Polaris Telescope, Card Table w/Chairs, Privacy Screen, Gas Grill, Garage Shelving, TVs, Microwave, Collectables, Jewelry, Tools, Kitchen & Misc. Items.www.AnnesEstateSales.blogspot.comAnne's Estate Sales BEVERLY' s ESTATE SALESSUN CITY CENTERHenry Link Wicker, Loveseat, 2 Chairs, Ottoman, Coffee, End Table, Kitchen Table w/4 Caster Chairs, Trundle Bed, La-Z-Boy Rattan Recliner, Lowry Organ, Leather Recliner, 2 La-Z-Boy Recliners, Sleep Sofa, Leather Sofa w/Dual Recliner Ends & 2 Ottomans, Twin Bed, Chest, Night Stand, 2 Twin Select Sleep Comfort Beds, Dresser, Mirror, Chest (one short, dark), 2 Accessory Chairs w/Arms, Tapestry Covered, 2 Tall Oriental Curios, Teak Dining Table w/6 Chairs, Expandable Entertainment Center, Grandmother Clock, Bose Stereo Speakers, Mirrors, Linens, Small Appliances, Pictures, Rugs, Men and Womens Clothing, Misc. Kitchen, Electric Tools, Craftsman Standing Tool Chest, Bench Grinder, Extension Ladder, Oreck XL2 Vacuum, Hummels, Gobel, Lenox.633-1173 or 508-0307322 Caloosa Woods Dr.(Enter Caloosa P alms off Del Webb E.; you will be on right side)PARK ON SIDE OF SALE, NARROW STREETMarch 2 & 3 7:30am-1pm Thrift Store813-641-7790Ministry of Calvary Lutheran Church 9 a.m. Noon MENS SHIRT Sale2 for 1 on allmens shirtsPlus, the secret sale Broyhill Sofa Bed & Loveseat; Raan: La-Z-Boy Recliner, Magazine Rack, Bench & End Table; Whitewash: End & Coee Tables, Entertainment Center, Sofa w/Wood Trim, Glass Top Coee Table, Beautiful Lamps, Dinee Set w/4 Chairs, Broyhill Chests of Drawers, Double Bed, Twin Beds, TVs, Electronic Equipment, Optimus Speakers, Singer Sewing Machine, Patio & Lawn Furniture, Exercise Bike, Mens Clothing, Kitchenware, Garage Items and Tools. CONSIDER PARKING ON CO C O PALM CIRC LE, LEAVING ROOM FOR EMERGENC Y VEHI C LESwww.denneysestatesales.com DENNEYS ESTATE SALES1807 Orchid Ct., SCC(S. Pebble Beach to New Bedford Dr., left on Flamingo Lane, right on Coco Palm Circle, right on Orchid Ct.) Fri. & Sat., March 2 & 37 a.m to 1 p.m. (813) 477-1793 The Price is Right! NETTIES ESTATE SALES1128 Villeroy Dr. Sun City CenterFri. & Sat., March 2-37 a.m. to NoonPLEASE NOTE DATE & TIMES. Contents Include: Large 50" Panasonic Flat Screen TV, adorable Ocean/Beach Print Rattan Sofa & Matching Loveseat, La-Z-Boy Recliners, Vintage Coffee & End Tables, Teak Dining Room Table w/Chairs, Art 50s Bedroom Furniture, Vintage Kitchen Table w/Chairs, Desk, Queen Bed, Antique Secretary, Full Size Bed, Wash Stand, Coleman Air Mattress, Deep Chest Freezer, Kitchenware, Household, Garage Items, & Tools. (PLEASE DON'T MISS OUR OTHER SALE ON 1254 Del Webb Blvd. W. THIS FRIDAY-SATURDAY MARCH 2-3rd 7AM-NOON) See You There!PLEASE PARK ON SIDE OF SALE DUE TO EMERGENCY VEHICLES. Find what you need in Craft & Quilt ShowMonday, March 5 9 a.m. to noon Hawaiian Isles R.V. Park Refreshments and Lunch available. All are welcome. Manatee RV Parkwill be holding their Craft BazaarMarch 3 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Coffee and doughnuts and Sloppy Joe lunch available. Prizes throughout the Bazaar! Park is located at6302 U.S. 41 S. (between Ruskin and Palmetto) Park-WideYARD SALETampa South RV Resort 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Informative

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THE SHOPPER RENTALS TRANSPORTATION REAL ESTATE M.H. HOUSING MARINE 741-0225Cell: 382-7536 354 MEDICALAutomatic scooter lift, attaches to vehicle, good working condition. $400 obo. 813-645-5563 Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade. Chargers, parts all related. Ronnys Carts & Parts. 813-484-9855 or 813-645-4515Bogey Bills Golf Cars Cruise Car, Loadmaster trailer, Club Car, E-Z Go. New, custom, restoration, rebuilds, rentals, solar, LSV upgrades, SVC, seasonal storage, parts, charger repair & Trojan batteries. 2202 US 41 S. Ruskin. 813-649-8099 Grizzly woodworking tools. 10 contractor saw, 15 plainer, 14 band saw, wood shaper, 6 & 9 belt disk sander. 813-645-5626 Bicycle 26, 7 speed, aluminum frame & RV ladder mount bike carrier. $80 for both 618-444-4998. Tampa South Resort. For sale. Round 41 pedestal table w/18 leaf, 2 chairs & 2 arm chairs, 4yrs old $400. 2008 Club Car, gas, fully solid enclosure. Excellent condition. $3,000. 813-634-7031 1991 19 V hull Sunbird, sport boat, V-6 I/O Cobra, low hrs. Cuddie cabin w/ head, AM/FM radio, Bimini top, 2 props on trailer w/ surge brakes Skis & books included $3,000. 765-894-0167 South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special izing in outside storage for RVs, boats & trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay Storage.comStorage Rameys Business Park Dollar a day. RV & boat storage & heavy equipment. Water & electric hookup, 1/4 mile from Williams Park boat ramp. Also RV lots available. 813-310-1888, 813-690-1836, 813849-1469, 455 AUTOMOBILESWill buy your used automobile for cash. 2005 or older, less that 60,000 miles. For more info. call Doug 813944-8478 458 PARTS & SER VICE 461 TRA VEL TRAILERS2002 Coachman Catalina Lite, GSX 35 towable $6,500 Call 813-645-1605 or 813-416-3703 2.5 Acres with fish ponds (not in operation) in secluded area of Ruskin. $29,000. These 2 cleared lots with few trees in Ruskin, zoned for house or mobile home, offer privacy and elbow room. Adjacent to brand new house. 4.66 Acres, close to main highway and new subdivisions, this property will make a great little farm, a perfect spot for your dream home, and a nice investment for future development. $125,000. CALLClaire TortCELL:(813) 363-7250 YORK in Highgate (1BR/1.5BA), 1000 sq. ft. under A/C, skylights, covered parking at front door, enclosed lanai, large utility room.................................. $31,500 2BR/2BA in KNOLLS (private heated POOL), furnished......................... $63,500 RENTAL 2BR/2BA in Bedford, FURNISHED............ ..................................... $675 per month 2br/2ba/1cg (loft & den) Cathedral ceil ings, screened lanai. Near club house, pool & golf course. Call 813-938-4216 for information. 565 M.H. IN P ARKSWaterfront, beautiful 900 sf on Little Manatee River, tons of updates. Breath taking view, low lot rent. Park approval required. $27,000 obo. Commission paid to buyers agent. Visit www.sharpsales. com ad:128525 Call 813-260-2181 3br/2ba, 24x40 modular in 55+ park w/ river view & access. Totally furnished central air, new carpet, washer, TV, even boat, trailer, motor & 2 bicycles. Buy groceries, turn the key youre home. $19,990 or best offer. Will be sold by March 31. 213-938-1405 Cozy 2br/1ba, furnished, CHA, carport, patio, added work room, new aluminum roof. Remodeled. 55+ $200 lot rent. Ruskin. $7,000. 813-645-5430 55+ park 2br/1.5ba, carport, sun room. Club house, pool, activities. Partly furnished, all appliances, shed w/ W/D. $9,000. 813-741-2940 House for sale. Hacienda Heights, Riverview. 5 room, 2 baths, screened room, on water. $25,000 negotiable. Call 813-671-2541 55+ park 2br/1ba, large Florida room, work shop inside a workshop, 2 car carport, minor inside repair needed, but not necessary. Boat dock available. 813-641-3203, $4,600. Holiday Palms RV Park. 55+ park Trailer with glass enclosed Florida room, lot 11. $5,000 obo. includes everything. 989-255-6244 The Dolphin House, 768 Gran Kaymen Pool, laundry. $185 weekly, plus $300 deposit, utilities included. No pets. 813850-5217, 813-863-6123Have a nice day Have a nice day NETTIES ESTATE SALES1254 Del Webb Blvd. W. Sun City CenterFri. & Sat., March 2-37 a.m. to NoonPLEASE NOTE DATE & TIMES. Contents Include: Paragon Touch & Fire Kiln, White-Unpainted Porcelain, China Paint, Arts & Crafts, Painted China, WURLITZER Piano, Sofa, Barrel Chairs, Coffee & End Tables, Beautiful 3-pc. Rattan Wall Unit, Rattan Sofa, Side Chair & Recliner, Entertainment Center, Day Bed, White/Cream Bedroom Furniture, Wicker Loveseat & Furniture Pieces, Rattan Glass Top Table w/Chairs, White Wall Unit, 7-pc. King Bedroom Set, Wrought Iron Dining Room Table w/Chairs, China Cabinet, Desk, Silk Plants, Clothing, Household TONS OF COSTUME JEWELRY & Garage Items. Too Much To List! (PLEASE DON'T MISS OUR OTHER SALE ON 1128 Villeroy Dr. THIS FRIDAY-SATURDAY, MARCH See You There!PLEASE PARK ON SIDE OF SALE DUE TO EMERGENCY VEHICLES. Advertise in the newspaper that your community is reading. NO WAITING ON BANK APPROVAL!! Very well maintained 4BR/3BA, 3-car garage POOL home in Clubhouse Estates in Summerfield Crossings. Special features include: fresh paint inside and out, recently replaced A/C, new carpet in bedrooms, wood burning fire-place, new refrigerator & dishwasher and much more! $199,000 CALL ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 GREAT COMMERCIAL LOCATION! 2052 sq.ft. building with a great location on busy Shell Point Road in Ruskin. Nice size lot (72x170) with a circular driveway and parking for 6-12 vehicles. Large reception area, 6 private offices, kitchen area, 1 full bath and 1 half bath. $150,000 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 UNLIMITED POTENTIAL!! Great commercial acreage located near Highway 41 in Ruskin and close to planned shopping center. 3BR/1BA house with detached garage on 1.4 acres (mol) $299,000 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 COMMERCIAL LISTING! Great commercial property with 158 ft of frontage on Highway 41 (1.04 acres MOL). Property is zoned CI (commercial intensive) and is currently rented to an auto/service/repair garage. Special features include: huge building (3,192 sq.ft.) with new roof, three bays, two offices, and lots of room for storage. $279,000 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 PRICE REDUCED!!! GORGEOUS RIVERFRONT LOCATION!! Quaint and cozy 1BR/1BA with a dock and two storage sheds. Large lot with towering oak trees and completely fenced with 121 feet on the river. Just $111,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 NICE PRICE REDUCTION FOR COUNTRY CHARM KEY WEST FLAVOR. 3BR/2.5BA, Mexican tile throughout, wet bar with icemaker & sink, glass doors on kitchen cabinets, French doors to patio. Plantation shutters in front bedroom, vaulted ceilings. Koi pond with waterfall, wrap-around porch & private screened cat porch. Loads of storage & closet space. 1.59 acres with fruit trees & oak trees & lots of parking space, garage with workshop. Truly one of a kind. Priced at $349,900. CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 NEW COMMERCIAL LISTING APOLLO BEACH: Great retail location on Apollo Beach Blvd. Special features include: 1890 sq.ft. built in 2006, tract lighting, small utility kitchen, handicap bath, alarm system with digital cameras, free standing custom built showcases with glass tops, shelving, mahogany wood trim, loads of storage. $234,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 PRICE REDUCTION ON LISTING IN SUN CITY CENTER! Very nice 2BR/1BA single family home with a 1-car garage Located on a nice corner lot. Special features include a new roof and air conditioner. $58,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 COMMERCIAL ACREAGE IN RUSKIN! 3.7 acres (MOL) with CG Zoning. The initial work has been done for office buildings. This property has a great location, on corner of 10th St. SW and Woodland Estates. $374,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 SUN CITY CENTER Nicely maintained popular 2BR/2BA T2 floor plan located close to shopping, hospital, and Sun City Center clubhouse with lots of activities available. Come on and enjoy the carefree living that this golf cart community has to offer. $74,500 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653 CAREFREE LIVING IN SUN CITY CENTER! This beautiful, spotless, move-in ready 2BR/2BA 2-car garage Nassau model has been well taken care of and meticulously maintained with a newer roof and state of the art HVAC system. Call today for a showing and make this home your own! DONT LET THIS ONE GET AWAY $135,000 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653 WATERFRONT LOT Beautiful building lot ready for the home of your dreams located on a wide canal with no bridges to the bay. Lot size is 75x140 mol with county water and sewer available & no HOA. $90,000 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY PRIME LOCATION ON HIGHWAY 41!! Owner will consider both purchase and lease option offers with flexible terms. This property has 200 ft on U.S. Hwy. 41 and is set up for both office and warehouse space. The property is completely fenced in with parking for over 30 vehicles. This is a great location for a business that needs easy highway access and flexible space. Dont miss this opportunity! PRICE REDUCED TO $474,500!! CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653 Donate your old functioning cell phones and drop off at our office for use by the "Victims Assistance Program." CALL (813) 645-3211Serving South Hillsborough County since 1924www.dickmanrealty.com dickman@tampabay.rr.comCALL US FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS.........645-3211Celebrating 88 Years 1924 2012GREAT PROPERTY FOR CHURCH, BUSINESS AND/OR HOME: 2,600 sq.ft. home & office space + garage and carports, on 1 beautiful acre with large oaks, circular driveway, lots of road frontage, right in Ruskin, close to main Hwy! CG zoning. Now $239,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 SUN CITY CENTER RENTAL: Very nicely repainted & remodeled 2BR/2BA furnished condo, enclosed lanai overlooking nature preserve, utility-rm, attached carport. Available after March 31, for long term: $800/mo., or short term please call for quote. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 FABULOUS RIVERFRONT IN RUSKIN: Ready for your dream house/manufactured home, this lot, with PD-MU zoning, has all utilities on site including sewer, and is fenced and gated. Great fishing, deep water, large newer dock and what a view of water & nature! $199,900. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 APOLLO BEACH NEW LISTING! Beautiful newer 3BR/2BA house, split BR plan, spacious open living area, large kitchen with breakfast counter and lots of cabinets, inside utility + washer/dryer, lovely enclosed Florida room overlooking backyard, 2-car garage. Tile floors in living area and wood in BR. $120,000 CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 RUSKIN NEW LISTING! Pool house on 1/3 acre lot, in very nice secluded neighborhood, high and dry, close to river and boat ramp. 2BR/2BA, garage, and large fenced backyard with screened-in-pool. $125,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 DARLING HOME with 2BR/1BA in retirement community on quiet cul-de-sac with large backyard for extra breathing room. Freshly painted, updated kitchen and baths, inside utility room, in super condition. Priced to please at $69,900. CALL JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540 1.4 ACRES with county water and sewer available. Ideal for your estate home or build up to 4 homes on this property. Mostly cleared corner lot within minutes to Schools, churches, restaurants and recreation. Asking $60,000. CALL JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540. THIS MIGHT BE THE YEAR FOR DEVELOPMENT TO RECOVER. Get a head start by investing in this acreage where previous owner reportedly did some preliminary study for subdivision. Just over 14 acres near I-75 now owned by bank and priced at appraised value but below assessed value. $155,000 CALL JUDY ERICKSON 462-0288 WHAT A VIEW. And just waiting for clever buyer with floor plan that takes advantage of opportunity. Oversized lot on Ruskin Inlet with short boat trip to bay and river. Near end of cul de sac. Come check it out at asking price of $95,000 CALL JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288 START A WISH LIST. Of all the activities of which you want to take advantage in Sun City Center because original owner has maintained home in excellent condition leaving lots of leisure time for you. Outstanding 2BR/2BA plus den, large kitchen, breakfastroom, living/dining combo, master bedroom with sitting area and 2 walk-in closets. Must see at $199,900. CALL JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288 NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY!!

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MARCH 1, 2012 THE SHOPPER 680 ADUL T & CHILD CARE EMPLOYMENT800Name: ____________________________________________________ Address: ___________________________________________________ City: ____________________________ State: ______ Zip: __________ Daytime Phone: _____________________________________________ THE SHOPPER CLASSIFIED ADVERTISINGcall 813-645-3111 Ext. 201; 813-645-1792 The Shopper $17.0030 DEADLINE: : ___________________ _____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ CARDS SER VICES700 610 WA TERFRONT RENT ALS 611 HOUSES FOR RENT 612 APTS. FOR RENT NOW RENTINGAVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCYRIVERWOOD APARTMENTS1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments Rental Rates Beginning at $520 + Utilities For Rental Information call: (813) 645-7320 (TDD 800-955-8771) 709 Oceanside Circle Ruskin Mon-Fri 8:00 AM 4:00 PMEqual Housing Opportunity 612 APTS. FOR RENT 613 CONDOS FOR RENT 615 T OWNHOMES FOR RENT 620 PLACES TO SHARE 621 ROOMS FOR RENT 630 M.H. RENT ALS Mobile Homes With A/C. 813-677-1086 631 M.H. LOT RENT ALS 644 COMMERCIAL 646 W AREHOUSE SP ACE 649 W ANTED TO RENT PROF SER VICES650 651 BOOKKEEPING PIANO TUNING & REPAIR 813-645-4112 685 MUSICAL REP AIR Senior Home Companions, Inc.For Seniors by Active Seniors Call for FREE In-Home Consultation813-980-3408www.SeniorHomeCompanions.comLic. #232146 Our goal is to help seniors continue to live independently and comfortably by supporting you with active senior caregivers who are understanding and trustworthy. 20 YEARS of SERVICE 705 CLEANING 813-846-7629 710 LAWN CARE 715 FILL DIRT/HAULING Free estimates. 720 HOME MAINT Call 813-649-1418 735 TRANSPORT A TION 740 MISC. SER VICES 870 GENERAL880 PART -TIME TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED CallBeverlyat 645-3111 ext. 201 or email: Beverly@observernews.n etUp to 20 words: $17 Additional words: 30 eachBold lines: $3 eachClassieds must be paid in advance &Established in 1968 Printing Company, Inc.SHEETFED & WEB PRINTING 210 Woodland Estate Ave., Ruskin, Fl 813-645-4048 ext. 201. $18 for 6 mo COMMUNITY PAPERS OF FLORIDA (CPF ST A TEWIDES)

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MARCH 1, 2012 THE SHOPPER CPF ST A TEWIDES A CHILDLESS, SUCCESSFUL, COUPLE SEEKS TO ADOPT. Large extended family. Financial security. Expenses paid. Call Lori & Kathy. 1-888-929-4299. (FL Bar#0150789) Abortion Not an Option? Consider Adoption. Its a Wonderful Choice for an Unplanned Pregnancy. Living/Medi cal Expenses Paid. Loving, Financially Secure Families Await. 1-877-341-1309 Atty Ellen Kaplan (#0875228) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline. com ADOPT College Sweethearts, Creative Professionals yearn for 1st miracle baby to Love, cherish & devote our lives. George & Lisa FLBar42311 1-800552-0045. Expenses Paid ADOPTION Give your baby a loving, ARE YOU PREGNANT? A Childless Married Couple Seeks to Adopt! Large Extended Family. Financial Security. Expenses Paid. Theresa and Steve 1-877-801-7256 (FL Bar # 0150789) at $65 *1 Signature Divorce *Missing Spouse Divorce We Come to you! 1-888-705-7221 Since1992 PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring adoption expert. You choose from families nationwide. Abbys One True Gift Adoptions. 866413-6298. License #100013125 SWIM SPA LOADED! Brand New with Warranty, 3 Pumps, LED lighting, Ozone Deluxe Cover, maintenance free $8995. Can deliver. 727-851-3217 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. You WIN or Pay Us Nothing. Contact Disability Group, Inc. Today! BBB Accredited. Call For Your FREE Book & Consultation. 888-903-1353 GOT LOTS OF DEBT OR CREDITORS No Amount Too Small or Too Large National Consumer Program Free Federal Debt Hot Line (855) 840-6020 Hablamos Espanol AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866314-6283 ASSEMBLE JEWELRY & MAGNETS from Home! Year-Round Work! Excellent Pay! No Experience! Top US Company! Glue Gun, Painting, Jewelry, More! Call 1-860-482-3955 Running or Not. Get a FREE Top Dollar INSTANT Offer NOW! 1-800558-1097 Were Local! Paul and Anne-Louise, a British couple, are hoping to adopt. They assistance. Call Jessica, Heart of Adoptions, Tampa, FL, 1-800-5901108 or email jessica@heartofadop tions.com (Lic#100019753) 100MG and CIALIS 20mg! 40 Pills+ 4/FREE for only $99. #1 Male Enhancement, discreet Shipping. Only $2.25/pill. The Blue Pill Now! 1-888 800-1280 DISH Network. Starting at $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels SAME DAY Installation! CALL 888418-9787 Every baby deserves a healthy start. Join more than a million people walking and raising money to support the March of Dimes. The walk starts at marchforbabies.org. MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW! FastStart engine. Ships FREE. One-Year MoneyBack Guarantee when you buy DIRECT. book! 866-674-4644 REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for Free and programming upgrade for new callers, Call Now. 1-800-795-7279 Phone. Packages start at $89.99/mo (for 12 months.) Options from ALL major service providers. Call Acceller today to learn more! CALL 1-888-903-2647 A CHILDLESS, SUCCESSFUL, WOMAN SEEKS TO ADOPT. Loving/stable home. Will be hands-on w/flexible schedule. Large family w/adopted relatives. Financial security. Expenses paid. Emily or Adam 1-800-790-5260. (FL Bar#0150789) 2-minute phone calls with no selling or Msg. 641-715-3900 Ext 689808# WANTED YOUR DIABETES TEST STRIPS. Unexpired. Any Kind/Brand. Up to $24.00 per box. Shipping Paid. Hablamos Espanol. Call 1-800-2679895 / www.SellDiabeticstrips.com ; $88/Hour Work. No Scam. Flexible Hours. Start Today: www.SusansBlog9.com CPF ST A TEWIDES CPF ST A TEWIDES CPF ST A TEWIDES Graduate in 14 Months. FAA Approved; assistance. 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30 MARCH 1, 2012 AC REPAIR/SALES BUSINESS & TRADE DIRECTORY PAINTING BAIL BONDS ELECTRICIAN 813-645-7000Lic. #EC13002936 Approved by Kings Point Management NEED A GOODELECTRICIAN?Call Don or John!LICENSED BONDED INSURED ER00126636SERVICE UPGRADES ALL TYPES OF WIRING RENO VA TIONS SECURITY LIGHTS CEILING F ANS SWITCHES & OUTLETS SP AS & DOCKSDon 645-8985145 21st ST N.W R USKIN RESIDENTIALSouth BayElectric Co. of Ruskin C OMMERCIAL DON645-8985 JOHN493-2861Over 50 Y ears Experience TREE TRIMMING Tuffstuff Trees813-446-8651 Licensed & Insured WINDOW FILM FLOORING (813) 495-7027davidmoorellc@yahoo.com www.TheFloorSource.bizWe bring the Showroom to you!David Moore, Owner-OperatorFREE Estimates! The Floor Source CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE Frank Shaft FL Certified Roofing ContractorCCC# 1327713 Palm Tree Roofing Florida Certified Roofing Contractor PalmTreeRoofing@gmail.com Proudly Serving: Member SCC Chamber of CommerceOFFICE CELL We will match any Competitors Discount and Prices within this area.813-741-9220www.bigbendstorage.com STORAGE HANDYMAN* Bo b s Mobile Fi xIt Ce nterResidential & C ommercialLicensed & Insured C ustomer Satisfac tion Guaranteed! eiling F ans Fl P t Call for FREE Estimat e(813) 671-7870Rober t GerstenschlagerWe F ix It All! *No project over $1000. No electrical, gas, or plumbing, and nothing structural. PLUMBING www.ObserverNews.net ROOFING CARPET & TILE WINDOW CLEANING Call now to book your appointment Now scheduling appointments for HOME WATCH SERVICESUN VIEWWINDOW CLEANING, INC.813-944-8478 FREE ESTIMATES FREE ESTIMATES Registered at Kings Point F R E E E S T I M A T E S F R E E E S T I M A T E S LANDSCAPING SouthShore Painting(813) 787-5235 David SquireLicense #PA2878 (813) 471-1054 826 W. Shell Point Rd., RuskinFully Insured & Bonded FREE ESTIMATESALL TRADES OF CONS TRU CTION & ROOFINGwww.homeandroof.com ALL TRADES of CONSTRUCTION & ROOFING No Job Too Small!CGC 059604 CCC 1327410 HANDYMAN* 813-642-6182 www.ObserverNews.net www.ObserverNews.net www.ObserverNews.net www.ObserverNews.net www.ObserverNews.net www.ObserverNews.net CONCRETE COATINGS 1 www.ObserverNews.net www.ObserverNews.net CARPET & TILECLEANERS813-304-5850 No Hidden Cost or Gimmicks!$1995 $2495Per carpet area Truck mount cleaning system Per room for tile and grout up to 120 sq. ft. All cleaning includes deodorizer www.ObserverNews.net www.ObserverNews.net www.ObserverNews.net

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MARCH 1, 2012 31 U.S. 41 in Ruskin is a Main Street. Encouraging slowing down and stopping to shop in downtown Ruskin is one of the goals of the plan while maintaining a good traffic flow is a high priority in the other two areas of the Overlay. During the nine months of meetings, sizes and types of signs; parking lot design; (new and expanded); building design; landscaping and fencing have been examined, voted upon and are now being put into language that will define the plan. Only certain types of signs and fencing will be permitted, and the rules say property owners must plant a shade tree every thirty feet along the highway. Now that the series of meetings are over, county staff must take residents wishes and develop the language of the Overlay which will be presented at an Open House for more input and then taken to County Commissioners for a vote. Hearing no exception for industrial zoning, and being told they would address that later, worries owners of industrial sites that exist in the Overlay area.. If were held to the same standards, it will definitely cost hundreds of jobs, said Noel Andress, owner of Sunmark Realty based in Pineland. He owns 6,000 square feet in the area of the overlay; 3,000 on U.S. 41 and 3,000 on Big Bend Road. The way it is being proposed, if you have land attached to the frontage along U.S. 41, that land must also be brought up to the standards of the Overlay. What Im saying is that that will cost too much and make bringing in new industry to that area impossible. Its already an industrial siteI mean, just look at the smokestacks, that wont ever be anything but industrial. There wont be hotels or tourist attractions there. Andress made that statement at the final of nine working committee meetings Feb 21 at the South Shore Regional Library. If rules of the overlay are adopted for industry as well as residences and retail, he says it will cost too much for anyone to develop industrial property and even if they do, plant security would be compromised by the overlay standards concerning fencing. Andress expounded his answers in an interview following the meeting to say the beautification required would not only be of no value to industries that might want to locate there, but would also cost close to a million extra dollars on just one parcel that he himself owns. In an interview the next day David McDaniel of Titan Properties based in Winter Park who represents Pacific Tomato Growers on U.S. 41 in Apollo Beach, McDaniel fully explained the points he had made during the meeting. Factories and manufacturing companies have to have secure fences some even with barbed wire on topbecause they need them. Theft and safety are compromised in an industrial area when the only reason a fence is put up is for aesthetic value. And to have a regulation that says you have to have a shade treelike an oakevery 30 feet is fine for a homeowner or small business owner but adds thousands of dollars in original costs and then theres the added maintenance industrial plants dont need. They need to be spending their money creating the things their factories were built to manufacture. It comes down to jobsjobsjobs, he said. At the meeting, Michael Peterson, who has been part of South Countys community planning for about 20 years, suggested incentives be given to industrial companies to take part in the plan. Maybe exempt them from some taxes for three years following their compliance. Or some other kind of break so we can maintain the standards but still encourage industry and development, Peterson said. The language of the plan will be unveiled at an Open House which will be held at the South Shore Library March 27 at 6 p.m. Fernandez and Healey said they will once again notify the more than 400 land owners whose properties front U.S. 41 in the overlay area. So far, only about 50 people have attended the meetings and working groups despite notification. To find out more about the plan or read about any of the meetings already held, visit http://www. hillsboroughcounty.org/pgm/ zoning/cpoiongoing/US41.cfm or look at previous coverage in the archives at www.observernews. net.Some fear proposed plan will discourage industry, costing jobs Winners have been announced in the February competition for the Sun City Center Photo Club. In the Color Print category, at the Advanced level, Stan Lipski received a silver award for Vineyard Overlooking Lake Geneva and Glenn Laucks received a silver for End of the Line. At the Intermediate level, Rose Stack received a gold for Spring Bouquet Allen Maser received a bronze for Pottin Around and Marianne Strehar received a bronze for Snow on the Rockies At the Beginner level, Sue McBride received a gold for Hello, Dali. In the Monochrome Print category, Rose Stack, intermediate level, won a bronze for Stairway to Heaven In the Color Digital category, at the Advanced level, Gayle Fischer won a silver award for Swallowtail At the Intermediate level, Pat Jones won a silver award for Harley Rider. Fred Durr won a bronze award for The World IS Flat! Marion Kundiger won a bronze award for I Love My Little Sister. Bob Trivus won bronze awards for The Tango and Jellyfish and Kathy Vitale won bronze awards for Again I Lost My Mom and But Mom At the Beginner level, Jerri Garretson won a gold for You May Kiss the Bride. Roger Kele won a bronze award for Banana Spider. Robert Price won a gold award for Chinas Venice and a silver award for Bottoms Up and Andre Ledoux won a silver award for Trail Rose and a bronze for Got Ya! In the Monochrome Digital category, at the Intermediate level, Kathy Vitale won gold awards for Penguin by Home and Penguin Pair. At the Beginner level, Jerri Garretson won a bronze for Will You Be My Valentine? and Roger Kele won a silver for Sleepy Seal and a bronze for Japanese Maple. In the new Creative category which is judged at the Advanced level, Rolf Sulzberger received a gold for Comedic Eye. Matt Batt received bronze awards for Building Dies, Art Survives and Sunrise at Horse Farm and Rose Stack received a silver award for Im Watching You. For more information visit www.photoclubscc.com or the learning lab at 960D Cherry Hills Drive, SCC.SCC Photo Club announces winnersComedic Eye by Rolf Sulzberger Hello, Dali by Sue McBride Spring bouquet by Rose Stack

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32 MARCH 1, 2012 T he C ent e r f or J o int an d Spine C a r e at S outh Ba y Hospita l h a s r e c e i v ed the J o i nt C ommi ssio n G old S e a l of Appr o v al f o r T o tal H ip a nd T otal K n ee R eplacement. T o learn mo r e ple ase c all 1-888-685-1565 www S o uthBa y H o spital c o mNa tionally R ec og niz ed f orO r t hopedi c C a r eE x c ellenc e in