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Title: Observer news
Publisher: M&M Printing Co., Inc ( Ruskin, FL )
Publication Date: 06-30-2011
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HAPPY BIRTHDAY AMERICA!!
Celebrate safely, have a Happy
4th of July holiday from
everyone at....


Solar energy is on the
minds of some local
summer camp students.
Read about their efforts to
promote 'clean green' on
page 24


PRST STD
PAID
RUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570
PERMIT NO. 8


JUNE 30, 2011
Volume 55
Number 23


HE OBSERVER NEWS


County Parks

Department

plan changes

for local


'Redneck

Riviera'

* By MELODY JAMESON 4
mj@observernews.net
RUSKIN - Concerned .ibuit
criminal activity at night aind
public protections during th da.%
Hillsborough County is plaliinii'
changes at one of this area's nii tI
historic - and still popular - ," mi-
ming holes.
Those changes, however Aluk "ill
effectively close a roadway andi di-
courage small boat launchmi., dl.at t
last such site in the area, o'.iniikd a
member of the area's mot liitoiiL
family.
But, a new boat launching I..il)�
has been provided close by, responds
county staff.
Yes, but access to it is limited to
five hours on three days of the week, is
comeback.
This is the conversation currently in ]
over proposed efforts at enhancing i
lic safety on the Little Manatee Rivei
Hillsborough's Parks, Recreation and C
servation Department.
The site in question, also known as "I
neck Riviera," is the sandy beach on
river's north shore, located at the souti
end of 24th Street S.E. The roadway
sects substantial preservation acreage
forms the western boundary of the Ca
Bayou Environmental Learning Cei
operated by volunteers under manager
by the Ruskin Community Developn
Foundation.
The parks department's current plan i
construct a seven to 10-space parking
on the west side of 24th street, a short
tance north of the Camp Bayou entrai
according to Forest Turbiville, a man;
in the ELAPP (Environmental Lands
quisition and Preservation Program)
tion of the department.
The lot, expected to encompass betw
a half to a full acre of vacant land, wil
enclosed with bollards and cable, surf
with shell, and include two gates, one 1I
ing to trails in the untouched ELAPP 1
to the west and another walk-through
leading south to the river. The paved rn
way will be closed to vehicle traffic im
diately south of the Camp Bayou entrai
Turbiville said.
See 'REDNECK RIVIERA', page


- -------


..... -,..


-T
[.


MELODY JAMESON PHOTOS
It may not be the beaches of Aruba or Miami or even Coquina Key, but "Redneck Rivi-
era" (above) on the north shore of the Little Manatee River has been a locally-favored
swimming hole on a hot summer afternoon for generations. Hillsborough's parks
department now is proposing a new parking area on 24th Street S.E. as it approaches
the river aimed at public safety and ending vehicles driven to the water's edge. It also
means that swimmers and boaters may have to hand carry their gear from the park-
ing lot about another 200 feet to the water. According to the plan, the "Canoe Launch"
directional sign at Camp Bayou (below) still will point the way, but the hike for canoe,
kayak or jon boat enthusiasts carrying their vessels through a gate and to the river
shore is likely to raise a sweat.


Children's


Board budget


called 'dire'

Many program cuts

recommII ended
* B, PENN' FLETCHEP
p:'err ' '., l:.:er erre - : rel
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b1\ I liaIInnI.' I' .'..'k , .\n1 ai \ W 'i. ili, [, l-
lm cd b y tpliblic Lo- n;ithnl.
i.' irn.' it.' s th t i l~ , 'lilde n' h lin d
hinI d indV nl, m.1ki 3 n1o1.,1 .un1g 1,m1a -
mentnging in detail as they were told that
across the board, recipients (which are ser-
vice providers) should take an eight percent
cut in funding (from the Children's Board)
opposed to last year's two percent cuts.
The Roundtable representatives also re-
ported that the group cited eight agencies
now providing help to area children and
families that should be cut from funding
all together by Sept. 30; with nine pages of
other agencies that it recommended be cut
within six months to a year.
Current recipients on the chopping block
for Sept. 30 include several that directly
affect South County. All but one of those
were recommended to be cut because
matching funds had dried up or for some
other financial reason. They include Reach
Up Inc., Closing the Gap in Infant Mortal-
ity; Voices for Children of Hillsborough
County's Guardian ad Litem education
director; and two subcontractors- Healthy
Start Coalition of Hillsborough County;
and the Tampa Metropolitan Area YMCA.
Catholic Charities Family Outreach,
counseling and support services, which
has three South County locations- Apollo
Beach, Ruskin and Wimauma - was cited
for cuts due to "failure to comply with ac-
counting performance issues."
A four-page letter was hand-delivered to
the Children's Board from Catholic Chari-
ties minutes before the meeting, the con-
tents of which was still not available as of
press time.
In a telephone interview Monday, June
27, Catholic Charities President Frank
See PROGRAM CUTS, page 6


SJOHNMOORE
.Clmp EMI


;- -






2 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


The theater of dreams


* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net
If I won the lottery, I would buy
the old Ruskin Theater build-
ing and work to restore it to
its former glory. Leading the list
of projects would be to rebuild
the box office along with a well-
lit marquee. The marquee would
be of the old style, jutting out
over the sidewalk with hundreds
of lights, a beacon for the renais-
sance of Ruskin. I would then ask
Ted and Karen Freiwald of the
Ruskin Drive-In to operate it, with
some additional cash that could be
applied towards the operation of
the drive-in. The Ruskin Drive-In
is, of course, a South Hillsborough
institution, and a gem that has
been in danger of disappearing for
years now. They currently survive
on money earned primarily from
the snack bar.
I have no doubt that my newly
refurbished Ruskin Theater of
Dreams would operate at a loss. In
a world of multiplexes, a single-
screen theater is quaint at best,
a business loser at worst. Not to
mention that it seems, more and
more, that people would rather
stay home to watch pay-per-view
movies on their high-definition
television sets.
But I believe that sometimes
people would want to take their
spouses or significant others out
for a night to dinner and a movie.
I believe that if the theater came
back to life right in the heart of
downtown Ruskin, it would spur
new nearby businesses to open. I
envision a coffee shop with free
Wi-Fi, a dozen flavors of coffee
and really tasty baked treats. I
envision chocolate, too. It prob-
ably can't happen on its own, but
if there was a theater nearby, that


might just be the tipping point for
a coffee shop. I envision an office
building across the street, a place
where entrepreneurs can find
reasonably priced space to build
on their dreams. That, of course,
would open the door for more new
businesses - an art gallery, per-
haps, or a place to buy household
goods or business casual cloth-
ing. The list is endless. I envision
the former Ruskin Firehouse be-
coming the new Ruskin Cultural
Center. With everything within
walking distance, Friday night in
downtown Ruskin could take on a
whole new feel. People could go
on dates without driving into the
madness that is Brandon. A tour
of an art gallery, followed by some
conversation in a coffee shop, fol-
lowed by a great movie sounds like
a great way to spend an evening. I
think there are others who would
enjoy it, too.
My dream isn't without prece-
dence. Wilmington, Ohio, has be-
come a media darling after being
dealt a particularly bad hand dur-
ing the Great Recession. The city
of 12,000 saw 10,000 jobs disap-
pear when the German shipping
company DHL, closed their U.S.
operations. Instead of drying up
and blowing away like so much
dust in the wind, Wilmington is
finding new life in places that had
been forgotten. The city's young
people, having fled for greener
pastures in big cities, are slowly
returning. They are putting their
social media know-how to work to
help older, less connected business
owners find footing in our new
technological world. Coffee shops
and other small businesses are
opening downtown. They have a
long way to go, but Wilmington's
renaissance has begun. And so it
could go here.


MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO
In my dreams, a box office would jut out into the sidewalk and a traditional, old-fashioned marquee
would light up the night sky announcing the latest movie or live performance.


When I first moved to Ruskin in
1994, remnants of the box office
remained outside the theater. That
is long gone now as the building
has since served a wide variety
of other purposes. But it could be
rebuilt. A marquee could be in-
stalled. The roof could be fixed,
comfortable theater chairs, a new
screen and the latest digital film
technology could be installed. Yes,
it could happen with enough mon-
ey and passion.
I would need to win the lottery
because the entire project would
likely cost more than I will ever
see in my lifetime and certainly
more than could ever be recouped.


But the investment would be so
very much worth it because I am
convinced that something like that
could dramatically turn the tide for
Ruskin and South Hillsborough.
The economy is bad right now, but
that doesn' t mean people are hid-
ing in their homes - they simply
don't have many nearby alterna-
tives. There is nothing affordable
about traveling to Tampa or even
Brandon to drop more than $100 on
dinner and a movie - it's easier to
stay home. But if it were right here
and if it were affordable, as are the
very excellent restaurants within
walking distance of the theater, I
think the people would come.


That is my dream. I want to take
my wife out for a date to a the-
ater right here in South County to
watch a great movie or even a lo-
cally produced live performance
after walking over from dinner at
the Ybor Grille or Popi's. I want
to stroll through a gallery of local
artists, either a private gallery or at
the future Ruskin Cultural Center,
marveling at the talent that resides
next door to all of us. I want to en-
joy my city in ways that have not
been possible for decades.
It can happen - all it takes is a
dreamer with a whole lot of cash
and a willingness to lose a little
money to gain a little soul. *


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OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 3


'Orphaned' road may have unenthusiastic 'relatives'


* By MELODY JAMESON
mj@observernews.net
SUN CITY CENTER - As it
turns out, an "orphaned" road here
may have "relatives" after all. But
the "family" remains reluctant to
claim it.
Leaning on extensive title
searches, a Hillsborough County
attorney has concluded that main-
tenance responsibility for the de-
teriorating roadway dubbed "Sun
City Center Plaza" can, in fact, be
identified.
Those entities, however, are not
rushing to take on the obligation,
currently estimated to require an
initial ante of about $40,000.
The aging pavement, of perhaps
a long city block, is the western
most entrance to the community's
oldest commercial district, on a
north-south alignment between
S.R. 674 and the plaza parking
area.
Immediately adjacent to it - and
accessible from it - are, among
others, the Sun City Center Cham-
ber of Commerce offices, leasing
occupants, including a bank, of a
two-story complex owned by lo-
cal developer Stan Whitcomb, the
regional U.S. Postal Service pro-
cessing hub for surrounding com-
munities as well as the retail post
office for the retirement commu-
nity, the Payant Financial Center,
also housing a bank, and a one-sto-
ry structure where the local offices
of Dr. Peter Jacobson are located.
These sites all are on the west side
of the road.
It is the owners of these abut-
ting parcels of land that have legal
responsibility for maintenance of
the roadway, according to Susan
Fernandez, an assistant county at-
torney who examined the issue at


the behest of county commission-
ers following formal inquiry from
SCC's Community Association.
Fernandez issued a six-page memo
last week detailing her assessment
of the situation and outlining vari-
ous approaches to an ultimate res-
olution.
That resolution involves repair
and ongoing maintenance of the
roadway now pock marked with
potholes that challenge the suspen-
sion systems, wheels and undercar-
riages of vehicles trying to negoti-
ate the road, including 18-wheel
trucks transporting freight for the
post office as well as plaza retail
outlets.
Focused concern about the de-
caying roadway surfaced months
ago, prompted by driver com-
plaints leading even to a protest
demonstration. Provable owner-
ship of or responsibility for the
roadway, generally assumed to
have become the abandoned prop-
erty of previous community devel-
opers, was not known at the time.
In an attempt to encourage cre-
ation of a repair procedure, Minto
Communities, the Canada-based
builder now completing housing
construction in SCC, assigned
engineers to assess the road con-
dition and produce, at no charge,
an initial estimate of repair costs
involved. That engineers' estimate
was $40,000, assuming no exten-
sive underground work would be
required to recover the road with a
reliable driving surface.
Tracking ownership of the road-
way and adjacent properties over
the years through various legal
documents, Fernandez pinpointed
easements granted by early devel-
opers as they sold parcels, con-
cluding that "'These supplemental
easements encumber the subject


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road..." She added that "...there
is common intention expressed
throughout these instruments that
responsibility for road mainte-
nance rests with the lot owners..."
Fernandez goes on to identify
five "lot owners" in consecutive
order along the west side of the
road: Payant Prestige properties,
LLC, the SCC Chamber, the Di-
ane Z. Jacobson Revocable Trust,
Center Plaza Bulding, Ltd., and
the U.S. Postal Service. In addi-
tion, the attorney noted that ease-
ments to owners of Lots 2 and 3
- the chamber and the Jacobson
properties - specify they "shall
repair, replace, maintain, and keep
any paving located within the ease-
ment in reasonably good condition
at the lot owner's expense."
The property owners themselves,
however, this week began to indi-
cate they are not yet convinced.
Dana Dittmar, chamber executive
director, told The Observer she
has scanned the county attorney's
memo and anticipates the matter
will be discussed when the cham-
ber leadership assembles for its
annual planning "retreat" on July
15.
Nancy Ross, USPS spokesman
in Tampa, acknowledged this
week that the existing postal ser-
vice building and land are owned
by the agency, but said the attor-
ney's memo had not been received,
much less reviewed. Given a brief
overview of its contents, she sug-
gested the matter may require
oversight by the agency's real es-
tate specialists.
More vocal on the subject, Stan
Whitcomb, whose company holds
tide to the office complex identi-
fied as the Center Plaza Building
in Fernandez' memo, said he had
not received nor reviewed the at-
torney's evaluation when reached
by telephone in North Carolina.
But, based on a very cursory con-
sideration of the memo's jist, Whit-
comb questioned use of the ease-
ments as an ultimate determining
document. He said he would pull
his own archived property files in
early July in order to compare the
components of his legal ownership
and responsibility.
No representatives of the other
two property owners - Payant and
Jacobson - could be reached by the
Observer.
Fernandez' detailed memo also


contains her recommendations.
She suggested commissioners in-
form the property owners of the
legally supported obligations, en-
couraging them to work together
cooperatively for resolution and
'"jointly share in the costs of the
repairs."
Barring the community approach
to the road repair remedy, the attor-
ney also listed other options. One
of them might be voluntary dona-
tion of the roadway by the prop-
erty owners to the county, meaning
nearly $7,000 in county tax dollars
would be required to pay off exist-
ing tax sales certificate holders and
the adjacent owners would have
to relinquish any rights under the
easements. Another option could
be use of the more expensive and
lengthy eminent domain procedure
whereby the county takes posses-

7 mm^ ~i~ _


sion through court action.
A third might be creation of a de-
pendent taxing district - generally
a two-year process - under which
members of the district are taxed
to support the district's objectives.
Yet another option, Fernandez out-
lined, is resumption of the code
enforcement procedure and poten-
tial designation of the private road
as a nuisance. However, the attor-
ney warned, the downside in this
instance could be opening the door
to a flood of disputes over private
driveways, for example.
Additionally, if certain circum-
stances were found to exist, the
county also could assume the re-
pair costs without taking owner-
ship of the "orphaned" roadway
providing, Fernandez concluded, a
true public purpose was served.
Copyright 2011 Melody Jameson


A po


AliI'~' .~a


-" '--**-. . -- .. . - .




--
* . '










MELODY JAMESON PHOTO
Taking a step toward ending the almost continual process of fill-
ing in water-logged potholes in the degrading pavement of Sun City
Center Plaza, a short road between S.R. 674 and the commercial
center (above), Hillsborough County attorneys have endeavored to
trace ownership of the roadway through various legal documents
executed over some 40 years. A newly released legal memorandum
places responsibility for repair and maintenance of the street on the
several property owners bordering it.

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4 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER

Our nation's power is its diversity-lending strength to
each other


Much has been written about the
factors that make America great.
Certainly our climate, fertile grass
lands, abundance of forests, and
fresh water allow for a diversity
of agricultural products
which gives us a fac-
tor of self-sufficiency.
When it comes to stra-


tegic metals, most of
the required ores can be
foundwithinourborders.
But I don't believe that's
what makes America
great. I don't believe
the diversity of natural


its citizens to participate regardless
of age, sex, race, color, national
origin or physical ability. The more
we can do to encourage access to
mainstream America for everyone,


Positive
Talk
By William Hodges


resources-farmlands,
mines, trees, and rivers-is the
deciding factor. I believe the
deciding factor that gives us our
greatness is the diversity of people
populating this unique land.
The pages of our history have
been written by the blood, sweat
and tears of the Chinese who built
the great railroad, the Africans who
picked the cotton, the Irish and
Scots who worked in the mines,
and the Scandinavians who planted
the wheat-just to name a few
diverse contributors. But diversity
goes beyond that; there are many
who have contributed much who
share a common bond. That bond
is a physical disability. It's almost
ironic that the man who gave us
the microphone, sound recording
and moving pictures was himself
hearing impaired. Thomas Alva
Edison suffered with a continual
degradation of hearing throughout
his life; at the end he was almost
completely deaf.
I believe our strength lies, not
only in our land, but in the fact that
America is making room for all of


the stronger our coun-
try will be. There is a
beauty in each human
being, and in the cul-
ture and abilities they
can share with us.
Much has been made
of the "melting pot"
idea. In fact, America
has been referred to
as the Great Melting
Pot. On the surface, the


idea appears good, but the more I
think about it, the more I reject the
idea that we should become lock-
stepping clones of each other. It is
important for the strength of our
country that we maintain vestiges
of our individuality. How then, do
we come together? The answer
came to me through one of my
students at an "Effective Briefing
Techniques" seminar. Connease
0. Warren, an employee at the
Defense Finance and Accounting
Center in Indianapolis, shared this
poem she had written which cel-
ebrates diversity better than any-
thing I have ever read. The poem
is entitled "The Cloth of Life."
Like one thread in a multitude of
fibers knitted in the cloth of life,
I exist.
How be it some think they have
control over this life and the shape
of destiny?
We must acknowledge the
Weaver, the pattern and the design
of the cloth.
The pattern is continuous, the
rhythm is steady, the design so


intricate.
The Master Weaver ingeniously
blends the short and long threads,
the nubby and the smooth.
Many multicolored textures lend
their beauty in unison or simply
keep step to the rhythm of the
Master's hand.
Some threads conspicuously
show their grain, others gently
blend in, remaining unnoticed.
Some threads are silver, some
are of gold, harmoniously woven
meticulously throughout the cloth.
Life unfolds.
What a lovely thought. America,
not some boiled down mash from a
melting pot, but rather a wondrous
cloth of many textures and colors.
All of us are a thread in the cloth,
each lending strength to the other.
That, I believe, is the true strength
of America.
Hodges is a nationally recog-
nized speaker, trainer and syndi-
cated columnist. He also hosts an
interview-format television pro-
gram, Spotlight on Government,
on the Tampa Bay Community
Network which airs Mondays at
8 p.m. and Wednesdays at 7:30
p.m. (Bright House channel 950,
Verizon channel 30). The shows
can also be viewed at www.hodg-
esvideos.com. Phone: 813-633-
1523. Email: bill(Kbillhodges.com
Website: www.billhodges.com"


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your appreciation to them for their
commitment. Assist this merito-
rious initiative by giving veter-
ans a better quality of life while
assisting them to the goal of self
sufficiency.
There will be food, entertain-
ment, dancing, singing, volleyball,
and horseshoes.
For more information, call (813)
352-7856 or (813) 900-9422.

Field of Honor
ceremony to
be held
The Veterans Council of
Hillsborough will be conduct-
ing a Field of Honor Ceremony
at 10 a.m. on Saturday, July 9
at the Veterans Memorial Park
& Admiral Leroy Collins Jr.
Museum, located just south of the
Florida State Fairgrounds at 3602
U.S. Highway 301 N., Tampa
This ceremony is open to the
public and it is normally conducted
every three months to honor those
who have given their lives in the
War on Terrorism. Because of
ongoing construction at the park
the ceremonies scheduled for
January and April were delayed.
The names of every Soldier,
Sailor, Airmen, Marine and Coast
Guardsman who died during the
last nine months will be read aloud
and a flag will be placed in the
field in their honor.
This ceremony will be jointly
hosted by American Legion Alafia
Post 148, American Legion Riders
from Post 148 and the Veterans of


JUNE 30, 2011

Award-Winning Newspapers
THE OBSERVER NEWS
The SCC Observer &
The Riverview Current
210 Woodland Estates S.W.
Ruskin, FL 33570
813-645-3111
Fax: 813-645-4118
www.ObserverNews.net
Published Every Thursday
by M&M Printing Co., Inc. 645-4048
EDITORIAL:
Brenda Knowles ............Publisher/Editor
brenda@observernews.net
Mitch Traphagen............... Online Editor
mitch@observernews.net
Penny Fletcher..........Contributing Writer
penny@observernews.net
Melody Jameson ......Contributing Writer
mj@observernews.net
All press releases, news articles and
photos may be emailed to news@
observernews.net, faxed to 645-4118, or
mailed to Observer News, 210 Woodland
Estates Ave. SW, Ruskin, FL 33570
SALES:
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vilma@observernews.net
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nan@observernews.net
For current rates and circulation
information visit our website at
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CLASSIFIED / CIRCULATION:
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beverly@observernews.net
PRODUCTION:
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chere@observemews.net
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sue@observernews.net
The views expressed by our writers are
not necesssanly shared by The Observer
News, SCC Observer, The Riverview
Current or M&M Pnnting Co., Inc.
We Accept


Audited by

VERIFICATION


Foreign Wars Post 8108. The presentation of colors, a rifle salute and the
playing of taps will be done by the Riverview Detachment of the Marine
Corps League. For more information, contact Walt Raysick at (813) 653-
4924 or email at wraysick@verizon.net.





Th bevrNw


Come out & enjoy the day
With friends & family!


JULY 4th


COMMUNITY


CELEBRATION
Monday, July 4 * 11-6 p.m.
LIVE MUSIC*CARNIVAL GAMES
FACE PAINTING.MAGIC SHOW


5120 U.S Hwy. 41 N. 0"
Ruskin HOT DOGS*HAMBURGERS*CHIPS*SODA
For more information: BALLOON ART from Creative Inflation

813-645-2935 www.Creativelnflation.blogspot.com


Sun City

Dental Center
Voted #1 in Best of South Shore for 2010
Thomas A. DeVol, D.D.S., PA
New Patients & Emergencies Welcome
New Patient FullMouth
Series of X-Rays (0210) and
Exam (0110o) for 95 and
receive a :Flll & Partiali
$100 CREDIT toward 1
your account for a Dentures
future treatment. Coupon Must Be Presented
Coupon Must Be Presented I At Time Of Estimate
At Time Of Estimate 5110,5120,5213,5214
fF;--------- L----------------
Offers expire 7/31/11. Coupons must be mentioned at time of
scheduling appointment. The fee advertised is the minimum fee
charged. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has
the right to refuse pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other
service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and
within 72 hrs. of responding to the advertisement for the fee service
examination or treatment. Senior citizen discount does not apply.
727 Cortaro Dr. (Behind Burger King)
Open Mon.-Thurs.* 8:30-5:00 813-633-2636 )






OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * 5


Kids' Program/Event Highlights
Week of July 3 to 9

Toddler Time
Tuesday, July 5 * 10:05 to 10:25 a.m. and 10:35 to 10:55 a.m.
Wednesday, July 6 * 10:35 to 10:55 a.m.
For ages 2-3 years with a caregiver. Stories, finger plays and
songs make up this fun 20-minute program.

Story Time
Tuesday, July 5 * 11 to 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday, July 6 * 11 to 11:30 a.m.
For ages 3-5 years. Stories, finger plays and songs
make up this fun 30-minute program.

A Many Festive World*
Tuesday, July 5 * 2 to 3 p.m.
Fun for the entire family. It's a celebration! It's a party around the
world! Grab your party gear and let's go! Singing, dancing, and
merriment will all be a part of the festivities. Groups must
register in advance, call 273-3652.

Baby Time
Wednesday, July 6 * 10:05 to 10:25 a.m.
For ages 0-24 months with a caregiver. Share books, rhymes, songs,
games and quality time together while instilling a love of reading
and regular library visits in this 20-minute program.

"Readying About Earthlings" by The Earthlings*
Wednesday, July 6 * 2 to 3 p.m. and 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
For grades K-5. This musical program is filled with stories
and Story-Songs from three continents: South Africa, Mexico,
and Australia, and includes demonstrations of nine very unusual
instruments from around the world. Groups must
registerin advance, call 273-3652.

'Expressive Artists' Let's Create!
Thursday, July 7 * 2:30 to 4 p.m.
'Expressive Artists,' 11 years and up, will have a creative afternoon
with artist Cory Wright. Limit 20. Registration required at
SouthShore Regional Library. Visit the Information Desk at
the Library or call 273-3652. Funding for this program provided
by a grant from the Greater Sun City Community Foundation.

Bedtime Stories
Thursday, July 7 * 7 to 7:30 p.m.
For ages 2-5 with a caregiver. Make reading a family affair.
Children may wear pajamas and bring a blanket and favorite cuddly
toy for stories, songs and activities during this 30-minute program.

Teen Night: Teen Advisory Board*
Thursday, July 7 * 7 to 8 p.m.
For middle and high school students. Have a voice in creating library
programs for teens and earn community service hours toward
graduation, scholarships and more! Refreshments provided
by Domino's Pizza and SweetBay Supermarkets.

Motion Commotion*
Friday, July 8 * 10:05 to 10:35 a.m. and 10:45 to 11:15 a.m.
For children ages 2-5 with their caregivers. Join others
for this fun and very interactive preschool music and
movement program as we shake some sillies out.

Stuffed Animal Summer Slumber Party! *
Saturday, July 9 * 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
For children ages 3-8. Friday, July 8 -- Bring your stuffed friend to the
Library by 5:30 p.m. and leave them overnight where they will enjoy
a slumber party with other stuffed friends. On Saturday, July 9, return
at 10:30 a.m. for stories, a picture review of all the activities your
stuffed friend did overnight, and a special craft project! Registration is
required. Ask at the Information Desk or call 273-3652. Parents --
make sure your little one can do without their stuffed friend overnight!


*Free event is provided by the
Friends of the . 'mil '1'.... Regional Library


Feline Folks will
conduct low-cost
spay/neuter clinic
Operation Feline Fix (OFF) for
free-roaming cats will be held on
Saturday, July 16 at C.A.R.E in
Ruskin.
Cats or kittens must weigh 4
pounds and be at least 4 months
old to qualify for the reduced $10
fee.
No soft-sided carriers allowed.
Only one cat per o
trap or hard-sid- ,
ed carrier.
Reservations
are required. Call .....
(813) 633-7302. """......
Drop-off time at C.A.R.E. is 7:30
a.m. Pickup time is 2:30 p.m.


Woman's Club to
host teen forum
The GFWC Brandon Junior
Woman's Club will again be host-
ing their annual TeenForm July 25-
29 at Nativity Catholic Church.
The one-week, half-day camp is
for girls beginning 6th, 7th or 8th
grades. Speakers will be provided
on topics ranging from self-esteem
to cooking classes as well as crafts,
team activities, snacks and prizes.
Reserve your spot now by going
to www.thebjwc.com and print-
ing the form and sending it and
a check for $70 to Brandon Ju-
nior Woman's Club, P.O. Box 66,
Brandon, FL 33509.
For more information, callDonna
Griffin at (813) 244-4758.


County extension
office to offer
Florida-friendly
landscape
workshops
Hillsborough County will offer
the following Florida-Friendly
Landscaping Workshops Friday,
July 22 at the extension office,
5339 County Road 579 in Seffner.
Compost Happens Workshop
Attend a Compost Happens
Workshop at 10 a.m. and learn to
turn trash to treasure. Each house-
hold will receive a free compost
bin and thermometer.
This workshop is sponsored by
the Master Composters of Hills-
borough County, Hillsborough
County Extension, Hillsborough
County Public Utilities Depart-
ment Solid Waste Management,
and the City of Tampa's Depart-


ment of Solid Wast
Water-Wise Work
The Water-Wise V
a.m. teaches how to
and attractive lawn
while conserving
installing and usin
tion also are present


This irrigation m
conserves water,
restricted by currei
tions as traditional
gation systems!
Hillsborough Co
attending this wo
first time will rec
micro-irrigation kit
Register at www.e
directory/Florida/S
For more informal
borough County
(813) 744-5519.


The
1212 E.S



Friday, July 1


te. Bay scallop season to open early and
shop close late this year
Workshop at 11
have a healthy The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC)
and landscape reminds people that the recreational harvest season for bay scallops in
water. Tips on Florida will begin June 25 and extend through Sept. 25. The FWC, in
g micro-irriga- support of Gov. Rick Scott and Cabinet, added three weeks to this year's
ated season to help relieve Florida fishing communities suffering from pos-
Open scalloping areas on Florida's Gulf coast extend from the west
bank of the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay County to the Pasco-Hernan-
do county line near Aripeka. It is illegal to possess bay scallops while
you're in or on state waters outside the open harvest areas, or to land bay
scallops outside the open areas.
There is a daily limit of 2 gallons of whole bay scallops in the shell or 1
pint of bay scallop meat per person. In addition, no more than 10 gallons
method not only of whole bay scallops in the shell or one-half gallon of bay scallop meat
but is not as may be possessed aboard any vessel at any time. You are allowed to
nt water restric- harvest bay scallops only by hand or with a landing or dip net. Bay
in-ground irri- scallops may not be harvested for commercial purposes.
Unless otherwise exempt, you will need a regular Florida saltwater
aunty residents fishing license when you use a boat to harvest scallops. If you wade from
rkshop for the shore, you will need a regular Florida saltwater fishing license or a free
ceive one free resident shore-based license.
t. Divers and snorkelers are required to display a 'divers-down' flag (red
eventbrite.com/ with a white diagonal stripe) while in the water. Boaters must stay at least
effner. 100 feet away from a divers-down flag in a river, inlet or channel. In open
ition, call Hills- waters, boaters must stay 300 feet away from a divers-down flag.
Extension at During the season, scallop harvesters can assist FWC's scallop
researchers by completing an online survey at http://svy.mk/bayscallops.
Harvesters can indicate where they
harvest scallops, how many they
collect and how long it takes to
harvest them. Participants can also
e-mail BayScallops@ MyFWC.
ww Mo osepLodages #-8com to ask questions or send more
information.
UPCOMING EVENTS IFor more information on bay
scallops, including management
rules, dive-flag regulations and
Ruskin Moose Lodge #813 is located at boating safety is available online
Shell Point Road, Ruskin * (813) 645-5919 at MyFWC.com/Fishing (click
www.lodge813.moosepages.org on 'Regulations' under 'Saltwater
Fishing'). Information about scal-
UPCOMING EVENTS lop research is available at MyF-
WC/Research/Saltwater under the
7-11 p.m. Calvin 0 'Mollusc' section.


Saturday, July 2 7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim

Friday, July 8 7-11 p.m. Top Shelf Band
Saturday, July 9 5-7 p.m. Pulled Pork Sandwic


Friday, July 15
Saturday, July 16


Friday, July 22
Saturday, July 23
Friday, July 29
Saturday, July 30


7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim
7-11 p.m. Fifi and Friends
5-7 p.m. Steak Dinner
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim
7-11 p.m. Charlie Burns
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim
7-11 p.m. Taylor 'n Taylor
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim

WEEKLY EVENTS


hes


No Spaghetti Dinners 'til Sept. 7


Every Thursday
Every Friday



Every Saturday


5-7 p.m.


Wings


5-7 p.m. Fish Fry (baked, beer batter
or fried)
7-11 p.m. Live Music

Horseshoes
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim


All events are open to qualified Moose members and guests.


Riverview Memorial
VFW Post #8108
7504 Riverview Dr.
(813) 671-9845

MEETINGS
Men's Auxiliary -- First Thursday
at 7 p.m.
Ladies'Auxiliary -- Second
Tuesday at 7 p.m.
Post -- Second Thursday at
7:30 p.m.
MEALS
Wednesday Spaghetti Dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m.
Friday Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.
Sunday Breakfast from 9 a.m.
to noon
CANTEEN HAPPENINGS
Bar Bingo Monday at 6:30 p.m.
Bar Poker with Lori on
Wednesday at 1 p.m.
Fire in the Hole on Saturdays
at 1 p.m.


Ruskin VFW Post #6287
Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120 U.S. 41 N. has listed the following
weekly activities. Meetings are: American Legion on 1st Wednesday
each month; VFW and LAVFW on the 2nd Wednesday each month;
and MAVFW on the 3rd Thursday
S' each month.
'* -' q Thursday, June 30 - Bar Bingo
Sat 6 p.m.
.1 Friday, tJuly 1 - Fish Fry from
,] B4:30 to 7 p.m. Musicby Chasenstarz
--- from 7 to 11 p.m.
Saturday, July 2 - Music by the
K.E.G.G. from 7 to 11 p.m.
Sunday, July 3 - Music by Bert
& Sassy from 5 to 9 p.m.
Monday, July 4 - Community Celebration from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Live Music by Nitelife, Carnival Games, Face Painting, Magic Show,
Free Hamburgers, Hot Dogs, Chips, and Sodas.
Tuesday, July 5- Games in Lounge from 1 to 5 p.m. Kitchen opens
at 4:30 p.m. Bingo at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, July 6 - American Legion Meeting at 7 p.m.


JUNE 30, 2011






6 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


Program cuts


* Continued from page 1
Murphy said he could not com-
ment as no response to the letter
had yet been received from any
member of the Children's Board.
However, Murphy told The Ob-
server News, "We know from
serving five counties that the ser-
vices we provide are important to
families and we look forward to
continuing to serve those in South
County and others."
Bobbi Davis, a member of the
Roundtable and presenter of sug-
gested changes at many meetings
over the past year all around the
county, explained in an interview
after the meeting that the Round-
table was formed to study very
broad county-wide issues because
of budget constraints and had no
power to decide what should or
should not be cut.
"The Roundtable is made up of
heads of about 12 to 14 organiza-
tions, including the school district,
parks and recreation, the Chil-
dren's Board and others that serve
children and families," Davis said.
I w'i�liung we recommend will


eventually be voted upon. This is a
purely preliminary report."
Still, voices of concern rose
from both the crowd and from
some Children's Board members
as well.
Many who spoke in opposition
to where the cuts were suggested
to be made said they would be
especially hard on South County
where transportation and other is-
sues make access to alternatives
impossible.
At the meeting, Davis said the
suggested cuts will be neces-
sary because of "the (Children's)
Board's dire budget situation."
But she also said that a pool of
$150,000 had been reserved for
three specific purposes, each con-
taining $50,000 but that the money
was set up so it could be moved
between these three issues: Home-
less children; children living with
'kin' or they would otherwise be
homeless; and for children with
"challenging behaviors."
"We have these three buckets re-
served and can move these funds
between them if necessary," Davis


said.
Board members Mike Carroll,
Valerie Hubbard-Goddard and
Robert "Pete" Edwards all cited
concerns for the people who would
be affected most by the suggested
cuts.
One thing that was paramount
in discussion was that if the rec-
ommendations of the report are
followed, many children in after-
school programs may not have a
place to go.
Shifting of children from some
programs they are currently in,
including parks and recreation, to
the school district's OST (Out of
School Time) program was also a
part of the report.
"This makes sense because OST
is matched by State funds," Davis
said.
But qualifications for financial
aid under OST are different from
what is now implemented, and it
was pointed out that many fami-
lies now receiving help in the form
of "rate breaks" on sliding scales
(such as what families pay to parks
and recreation programs) would


not qualify under the guidelines
provided by the State.
Hubbard-Goddard said that to
qualify for early learning vouchers
for childcare (under OST) parents


had to be work-
ing, and many
who used these
programs now are
unemployed and
seeking work.
Josie Gracia, a
director at South
County's RCMA
(Redlands Chris-
tian Migrant Asso-
ciation), spoke to
this issue directly
as well.
RCMA workers


County, and to be sure that fami-
lies can access the ELC offices to
request the services.
"We (RCMA) offer free space in
the Ruskin/Wimauma area (in their


One thing that
was paramount in
discussion was that if
the recommendations of
the report are followed,
many children in after-
school programs may
not have a place to go.


are worried about losing the coun-
seling and other services offered
at Catholic Charities in Ruskin,
Wimauma and Apollo Beach and
help with child care.
"Our families (migrants) don't
even arrive in time to apply (under
the new suggested guidelines for
financial help to attend the child-
care and other programs)," Gracia
said noting that migrant workers
arrive later in the fall than the ap-
plication deadline.
The emphasis of partnering with
the state for 'early learning dol-
lars' makes sense financially, but
the way it is now, providers (like
parks and recreation and RCMA
and others) can give parents breaks
according to their income, or lack
of it. If the new procedures go into
effect many who qualify now will
not qualify and they could be the
ones who need help most, Gracia
said.
"We at RCMA want to make sure
that the many children we have
been serving in South County,
thanks to the support of the Chil-
dren's Board, do not lose their ac-
cess to the quality services they
need to continue succeeding in
school," Gracia continued.
She and other speakers asked the
Children's Board to be sure and
target a fair share of Early Learn-
ing funds to the children of South


facilities) for eligi-
bility intake to be
utilized," Gracia
said.
That means
RCMA will pro-
vide desk space
locally for families
to apply if the plan
goes into effect.
Another impas-
sioned plea was
given by Suzanne
Parker, a program
director of the


Guardian ad Litem Program that
looks after the interests of abused
and neglected children who pass
through dependency court.
"We are a government entity so
we can't hold fundraisers or solicit
donations," Parker said. \ illi'otii
a director to train our volunteers,
children in the court system will
suffer."
Others who made public com-
ments against the recommended
cuts were Tim McHale, who spoke
up for Palm River Point, a neighbor-
hood center; Marcia Lewis-Brown,
from the Northside Mental Health
Center; and Michael Randolph who
represented several neighborhood
associations and groups in West
Tampa.
Davis pointed out that there is
still plenty of time for public com-
ment and input as these are only
preliminary recommendations.
Workshops will continue around
the county during the summer.
Meanwhile, a preliminary budget
must go from the Children's Board
to County Commissioners by
July 1. Then there will be county
budget workshops in August and
more chances for public comment.
Sometime in September, County
Commissioners will take action.
Until then, Roundtable presenters
pointed out that nothing is set in
stone. *


Adult Program/Event Highlights

Week of July 3 to 9

All HCPLC Libraries Closed for Independence Day on July 4

SouthShore Needle People*
Wednesday, July 6 * 6:30 p.m.
Join other needle people to share techniques, tips and
experiences about knitting and other fiber and fabric crafts.
Beginners are welcome! Bring a project and ask questions!

Introduction to Genealogy*
Thursday, July 7 * 3 p.m.
An introduction to the print and online resources available at
the Library plus strategies to overcome research problems.

Opening Photography Reception*
Thursday, July 7 * 6 to 7:30 p.m.
Join the Crawford Gallery and welcome photographers Shayna Coonin
and Marsha Nelson. A cultural evening free to the public. Light
refreshments and music provided by the SouthShore Arts Council.

*Free event is provided by the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library

SThe Observer News office will be closed Mon., July 4


MOFFETT ORAL SURGERY

& DENTAL IMPLANT CENTER


Jeffrey V. Moffett, D.M.D., P.A.


Big Bend Professional Park
13136 Vail Ridge Drive - Riverview, FL 33579

813-677-3331

www.MoffettOralSurgery.com

Hours: Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.* Most Insurance Accepted
Nitou*Oxdeand V SeatonAvaiabl


Deadlines will advance as follows:
Classified ads.......................... 4p.m., Fri., July 1
Display ads........................... 11 a.m., Fri., July 1
News Releases................. 4 p.m., Thurs., June 30
Questions? Call: 813-645-3111
www.ObserverNews.net
h


goo


JUNE 30, 2011






OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 7


The right place


"You sure travel a lot." I hear
those words at least a few times
a week. The truth is that I used to
travel a lot, but now I just end up in
a lot of places. Right or wrong, there
are places I feel I need to be.
When my wife and I first returned
to Florida in early 2010, I remained
on the staff of the U.S. Congress-
man I worked for in Iowa for the
rest of the year. As a result, every
so often I would return to Iowa.
That didn't feel much like travel, it
felt like work. Now I'm returning
to nearby Minnesota for my mom.
That doesn't feel like travel, either,
I simply feel the need and desire to
be there.
My mom is in one of life's tran-
sitional stages. She was recently di-
agnosed with Lewy Body Disease.
There is no need to detail the symp-
toms and causality; it is something
that will progressively affect both
her body and mind. The road ahead
is uncertain - how and when things
will affect her is unknown. There are
good days, and there are bad days.
Last week, there were a whole
string of bad days and, as a result,
my wife and I rushed up to my little
hometown on the prairie to be there,
despite the fact that I knew there re-
ally wasn't ji.) hinii we could do.
As much as I wish for one, I have
no magic wand in my pocket.
My brother, who lives in my
hometown, has become her primary
caretaker. He is a busy man - he
has successfully raised three sons
who are now going on to live their
own lives, and he still works as hard
as he ever has as a teacher and activ-
ities director for the town's middle
school. It is a rare evening that he
can actually go home after work.
Yet he manages to find time to visit
Mom every day.
This weekend was the first time
in years that my brother, sisters, and
I would be in the same place. My


brother pushed hard to drive home
from a church service event in Ida-
ho. My sister missed an important
event, choosing Mom
over her own needs since
she was the closest to her
at the time. My older sis-
ter rearranged her sched-
ule and waited patiently '
as my wife and I all-too-
slowly covered the miles Obser
from Florida to pick her By Mitch
up. The string of bad days
ended shortly after we ar- mitch@obs
rived and by the time the
entire family was together, the bad
days had been forgotten.
"Would you like to go to church
with me?" That was a question that
required a quick moment of very
deep thought. I've probably never


va
Tra
eve


been asked a more significant ques-
tion in my life. People say that when
you die, your entire life is seen in
review, much like a
high definition movie.
I felt certain that how
I answered that ques-
tion would have serious
impact on how I would
eventually see my life's
nations review. When my ag-
aphagen ing mother living in an
assisted living facility
emews.net asked that simple ques-
tion, I have no doubt that
God's video editor, the guy who
puts everyone's life review together,
paused and waited for my answer.
How I answered would influence
how my life review would turn out
- answering one way could have


made his job a lot easier.
I didn't grow up in a church-going
family. My parents were religious
but we didn't often go to church.
My dad, certainly the smartest man
I've ever known, had a very certain
belief in God. I know that because
when I was young, he would talk
to me about God. When our church
needed help, he would volunteer.
But Sunday mornings were some of
the few hours that he could actually
catch his breath. As a child, I was
good with that. For some reason, I
always felt a certain coldness and
detachment in our church. Inside
it was big and echo-y and I felt
that some people were there sim-
ply because that's what you were
supposed to do in a small town on
Sunday morning. I didn't mind not


going to church. I didn't feel com-
fortable there, yet I grew up feeling
comfortable about my belief in God
and Clii-i. 1in..
After driving non-stop to Minne-
sota from Florida, I had no real de-
sire to go to church on that Sunday
morning. I didn't pack clothes with
the thought of going, I certainly
didn't miss the church that always
felt oddly cold to me. But I knew
with certainty that the question my
mom just asked held a significance
beyond .iN .)in ; in my life.
"Would you like to go to church
with me?" she asked. Had I told my
aging mother that, no, I didn't want
to go to church with her, I could
have spent the rest of my life doing
all sorts of horrible things from rob-
bing old people to murdering kittens
but the ONLY thing I would have
seen on my after-death life review
would have been that scene of me
declining to simply go to church
with her. Nothing else would have
compared. It would have been un-
necessary to show ,ii\ inii else.
"Yes, I'd love to go to church with
you," I said. And the next morning
we were sitting on a pew in what I
felt to be an oddly cold church with
echoes so extreme that, due to my
hearing impairment, m ,i i-i. spo-
ken was entirely unintelligible - so
much so that I could not have testi-
fied under oath that anyone was even
speaking English. Afterwards, my
wife said the minister gave a great
sermon and was very warm and per-
sonable. It seems I was wrong about
that church. Now I think that per-
haps I've been wrong all along.
Right or wrong, there are a lot of
places I feel I need to be. Certainly,
sitting on that pew on Sunday morn-
ing next to my mom was the right
place. Being in Minnesota with my
family was the right place. A little
more traveling isn't a big deal. *


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1802 BEDFORD LN................... S. I

301 ANDOVER S PL #187 ........ $24,500

2243 GRENADIER DR............... $31,400

1902 DANDRIDGE ST #D-3 ..... $32,900

1902 DANDRIDGE ST #D-6 ..... $34,900

401 DE GRASSE PL #9............ S41,500

2230 GREENWICH DR............. .S42.000

301 ANDOVER S PL #185 ........ S43." "

2201 CANTERBURY LN ........... S4 ',900

204 GLENELLEN PL................ S53.,

1809 FOXHUNT DR #A............ .5s.900

1812 FOXHUNT DR ................ S.5 ',900

2305 GAINSBOROUGH LP...... St,7,900

2515 LAMBDIN DR ................ St.7,900


2106 HOLYHEAD WAY...........$68,900

2501 LARKIN DR....................$69,900

317 KNOTTWOOD DR.............$69,900

761 TREMONT GRNS ........$...$75,000

2008 NANTUCKET DR...........$79,500

601 MANCHESTER WDS DR....$82,900

2414 NANTUCKET FIELD. S,3. ""'

2223 IVAN CT........................$84,500

1412 INGRAM .......................$...$86,000

2324 OLIVE BRANCH............$89,900

2408 OLD NATUCKET CT.......$94,000

1810 NANTUCKET DR...........$109,900

2022 INVERNESS GRNS.........$113,900

2024 INVERNESS GRNS.........$118,000

2066 INVERNESS GRNS.........$138,500


2423 SIFIELD GRNS WAY......$145,000

2122 WORTHINGTON ...........$164,000

2016 GRANTHAM GRN..........$199,900

2289 SIFIELD GRNS WAY......$239,500





1712 ATRIUM DR................. $70,000

1741 ATRIUM DR................. $79,900

316 FAIRSIDE CT.................... $98,500

1908 N. PEBBLE BEACH ...... $112,900

605 LA JOLLA AVE ............... $125,000

1802 ADREAN PL............... $209,000

1053 EMERALD DUNES........ $210,000

2025 S. PEBBLE BEACH....... $249,000

332 SIENA VISTA PL............. $310,000


3201 CAROUSEL LANE .......... $109,900
3302 RIVER ESTATES..............$135,900
16050 GOLDEN LAKES............$269,900
908 ACADEMY DR.
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3724 GAVIOTA DR...................$398,000



406 INDIAN MEADOW,
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GREAT,,,,.TlU


6'1IAHOEFNNC RU""FOIAI IL ETLMN,,FOIAIHOME & GENERAL *LINESINSUANC
-a0ffla0 **LSFAG HM ORGGE12
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MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO
My family is gathered in the living room of my Mom's apartment while some of her life's souve-
nirs, a collection of Shirley Temple dolls, silently listen in to the conversation and laughter.


I: "x 4F


JUNE 30, 2011





8 - OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT JUNE 30, 2011

I'm making my famous Fourth of July... ... firecracker cake with berry sauce!


Nde s r
www.readingclubfun.comN Annimills LLC g2011 V8-N26


Fourth of July!

J The Fourth of July is our day to celebrate our
country's independence and all of the freedoms we
enjoy. It's a day for picnics, parades, swimming
and fireworks. Have a ton of fun, everyone!


Do you know about the events that led up to the American colonies
making a declaration to break away from British rule to be independent? It was a time
of unrest and war, then peace and freedom. Fill in this puzzle about key events:
1. Before the American Revolution the colonies in America were under British rule.
2. King George the III was only years old when he claimed his throne.
3. King George wanted to raise some __
4. He placed too many on the colonies, which had no vote in Parliament.
5. One day, angry colonists threw rocks and other items at British soldiers. 5
The soldiers shot into the crowd, killing some people and wounding 1
others. This event is called "The Massacre." (1770)
6. Next, the King insisted that people pay their taxes on tea. Angry colonists
dressed up like Native Americans boarded the British ships. They threw the
tea into the harbor. This event is called the Boston Party. (1773)
7. In 1775, the people of Lexington and Concord, Mass., gathered with guns to face
arriving British soldiers. These clashes were the first of the Revolution.
8. George __ became the leader of the American armed forces.
9. The colonies of America declared themselves free from British rule on July 4, 1776,
when the Second Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of
10. The colonies became the United of America.
11. The surrendered to George Washington in October 1781, at Yorktown, VA. V
12. A treaty between America and Britain was finally signed in September 1787!


Washington
Independence
twenty-one
American


Tea
money
peace
taxes


Boston
British
thirteen
States


Find and circle these favorite
Fourth of July foods:


red flame grapes


fried chicken
barb
hamburgers


iced tea


Enter the
Reading Clun Book Giveawa
This summer we will give away dozens of books and lots of Readng
stickers to encourage kids to read. Just send in this signed/- Club Fun
form to be entered in the giveaway. No purchase needed- Readin
One entry per person per week. (Void where prohibited by law.) Club
Visit ReadingClubFun.com for more details. * you may
Cut out & Reading Club Fun send up to 3
mail this P.O. Box 646 entries for 3 children in
. -.... ,.,Box 6. one envelope!


form to:


Name
Age
Street/Apt.
City/Town


clam bakes
watermelon
ice cream
hot dogs
lemonade
cherry pie
potato chips


Canton, CT 06019


Grade


Boy - Girl [-


ly


State __ Zip


Which newspaper is this?
Grownup's Last Name First
Grownup's signature (over 18)


Email address:


iF l Gi ill b Th d S 1


e sae
p
ct nr eary na ,


What do you see when
you go to the fireworks show?


What do you hear ?


What do you smell?


5FR __D D __H


lP r int r! ,irlvl !f






OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 9


Backyard Wildlife H
Every morning I spend a good
deal of time looking out the win-
dow and gazing into my backyard.
The reason for this daydreaming is
because we have created an oasis
for wildlife, and believe
it or not, the wildlife is

There are several bird
species that fly in and
out of our yard depend-
ing on the time of year
and what species are Sature
migrating. These days, Point
I am amazed to see the
vast array of butterflies By Karey
that flutter around the
flowers-from little guys to huge
swallow tail species, they are
beautiful to watch.
Not only do we provide food
sources for different types of ani-
mals-ranging from seed for birds
and squirrels to flowers for hum-
mingbirds and butterflies. There
is a great deal of cover which
provides safety for animals hid-
ing from predators. In an effort to
attract hummingbird species, we
have tied red ribbon from several
tree branches and even have a few

Free depression
screening
The Mental Health and Aging
Coalition has arranged a screening
for depression from 9 a.m. to noon
on Tuesday, July 5; and from 1 to
4 p.m. on Friday, July 22 in the
privacy of your home.


To take advantage of this free
service, call Lucy Irizarry at (813)
232-3200 ext. 237 to make your
appointment. You can leave a mes-
sage 24 hours a day. All screenings
are confidential.


habitat -.
mirror balls nestled in the bushes;
both have been proven to attract , '-
hummingbirds.
According to National Wildlife * '
Federation, to certify your back- . -
yard as a wildlife hab- " -
itat one would need to
provide the wildlife
with certain things.
The three main items
_ . are food, water and
cover. Also included
nation in the "how-to" list
is to create an envi-
ronment where the
K Burek wildlife can raise and
protect their young, as
well as creating a naturally "green"
garden/wildlife area. Reducing . 1 .
chemical use is great for humans
and animals alike and will provide
a safe haven for animals that visit
the backyard habitat.
To certify your backyard, visit
www.nwf.org and follow the easy
registration process and get your
backyard wildlife certified. You
can even have habitat tips emailed
to you once a month and you can
read articles about creating wild-
life habitats.

Korean War Remembrance Day
The Korean War Remembrance Day with the theme, 'A Day to
Remember' was observed on June 25 at Hillsborough County Veterans
Memorial Park in Tampa.
More than 1.5 million American men and women served during the
Korean War, where more than 54,000 Americans were killed, 103,000
wounded, and 8,000 missing are still considered missing.
The Korean War is referred to as the Forgotten War, sandwiched
between the national unity of World War II and the national discord of
the Vietnam War. As Florida is home to more than 180,000 Korean War
Veterans, it is fitting to pay tribute to their service and sacrifice, without
which we wouldn't enjoy our freedoms today.
On this 61st anniversary of the Korean War, it is important to pro-
mote recognition of the lessons, history and legacy of the War and its
veterans. Join Hillsborough County Department of Parks, Recreation
and Conservation, the Veterans Council of Hillsborough County and the
Museum Committee in honoring Korean Veterans.
The Veterans Memorial Park and Museum is 40-acres set aside to pay
tribute to armed forces members, past and present. The Park and Museum
highlight the role of Florida and its residents in military campaigns
throughout history.
For more information, call the Hillsborough County Parks, Recreation
and Conservation Department at (813) 744-5502.


New times for
weekly boat
inspections
Free Boat Safety Inspections are
held every Saturday according to
the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
regulations, provided by Flotilla
75 in Ruskin. These safety inspec-
tions take about 15 minutes and
are available from 10 a.m. until
noon at Simmons Park in Ruskin
on the first and third Saturday
of the month and Williams Park
in Gibsonton on the second and
fourth Saturday, also from 10 a.m.
to noon.
For more information, call (813)
645-698


-


AARP Safe Driver
program to be
offered
AARP Safe Driver program will
be offered in the South County
area this summer at several loca-
tions. They are:
July 25-26, for Brandon and
Riverview, from 12:30-3:30 p.m.
at 11210 Bloomingdale Blvd.,
Riverview. To register, contact
629-3365.
July 1, in Kings Point at Sun City
Center in the Kings Point Social
Room from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. To
register, contact Lou or Mary Jane
Tovey at 634-7399.
July 19 for Sun City Center resi-
dents in the Caper Room at the
SCC Atrium Complex from 9 a.m.
to 3:30 p.m.
To register, call Lou or Mary
Jane Tovey at 634-7399.
The Toveys are also in charge of
the Ruskin/Apollo Beach areas but
no new classes are scheduled there
at this time.



SothH0 0oru



ElsLdgk27


Every Wednesday: Best Spaghetti
in Town -- $7, All You Can Eat, for
all Elks and their guests. Music by
Bryan from 5 to 8 p.m.
Every Friday: Seafood and Sand-
wiches for all Elks and their guests
from 5 to 7 p.m. Karaoke by Bryan
from 5 to 8 p.m.
Sunday, July 3: Pig Roast -- $8,
2 to 6 p.m. Menu: Pork, Baked
Beans, Potato Salad, Coleslaw,
and Roll.
Friday, July 8: State President
Visit. Will arrive in Sun City Center
at 4 p.m. Dinner at the Bradenton
Elks Lodge at 6:30 p.m.
Saturday, July 9: Golf Outing
and Lunch, Tee Off Time is 7
a.m., $60 including Cart. Dinner
at the South Hillsborough Lodge
at 6 p.m. Menu: Bourbon Chicken
Kebobs, Coleslaw, Baked Beans,
Potato Salad, Rolls & Butter, and
Dessert, $15.
Saturday, July 30: Cyndi Burger
- One Girl Band, from 7 to 10 p.m.
$6 with light snacks.
Every Sunday and Thursday in
June that the Rays play the Lodge
will be open for all Elks and their
guests. Hot dogs will be served.
The South Hillsborough Elk's
Lodge is located at 1630 U.S.
Hwy. 41 S., Ruskin, FL 33570. It
is a smoke-free environment.
For more information, call (813)
645-2089.

Riverview Marine
Corp. League
to meet
The next meeting of the River-
view Detachment of the Marine
Corps League will be held at
7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 5 at
American Legion Post #148, 7240
U.S. Hwy. 301 S. Riverview.
The Detachment would like to
invite all area Marines and FMF
Corpsmen to attend this meeting
and learn what they are all about.
For more information, call
Dennis Antle at (813) 835-0551 or
visit the website at www.mclriver-
view.org.


I 4H URTO


to ourstff I


H:1 :i -
BEAT THE


en ----- ,

(Fr t,


2212 E. Cllg Ae
---------------------------in


JUNE 30, 2011






10 - OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT* SCC OBSERVER
How to find affordable dental care


Dear Savvy Senior,
Where can seniors turn to find
affordable dental care? I had
dental insurance ;ih, 'i,gi my work
for many years, but lost it when I
retired. What can you tell me?
Fi. ."i;g Frank

Dear Frank, 7
Very few U.S. retirees
have dental insurance ...
today. Without cover-
age from traditional
Medicare, and with
private dental insur- The S
ance typically costing en
too much to be feasible, Seni
most seniors are stuck By Jim A
paying full out-of-
pocket prices every time they visit
a dentist. While there's no one sim-
ple solution to affordable dental
care there are a variety of options
that can help cut your costs. Here's
what you should know.
Dental Discounts
One way you may be able to trim
your dental care cost is by simply
asking your dentist for a senior
discount, especially if you're pay-
ing up front. Out-of-pocket payers
save the dentist office the cost and
hassle of filing an insurance claim,
so asking for a small 10 percent
discount is not unreasonable.
Another cost-effective way to
reduce your dental expenses is to
join a dental discount network.
How this works is you pay an
annual membership fee -- roughly


a
)r
Mh


$80 to $200 a year -- in exchange
for 15 to 50 percent discounts on
service and treatments from partic-
ipating dentists. To find a network,
go to dentalplans.com (or call 888-
632-5353) where you can search
for plans and participating dentists
by zip code, as well as
get a breakdown of the
discounts offered.
rr Brighter (brighter.
com, 866-893-1694),
which launched in
May in all states except
ivy Florida, Montana and
, Vermont, is anotherdis-
counted dental service
iler to check out. It gives
subscribers access to a
network of 25,000 dentists offer-
ing 20 to 60 percent discounts on
cleaning, crowns, implants, root
canals and other procedures. You
can sign up for a free one-month
plan or opt for the premium plan,
which costs $79 per year for indi-
viduals and families.
Low-Cost Care
Another way to get dental care at
a lower price is at a dental school
clinic. Almost every dental school
in the U.S. offers affordable care
provided by dental students who
are overseen by experienced,
qualified teachers. You can expect
to pay as little as a third of what
a traditional dentist would charge
and still receive excellent, well-
supervised care.
And for low-cost teeth cleaning,


check with local colleges that offer
dental hygiene programs. For train-
ing purposes, many programs pro-
vide teeth cleaning by their stu-
dents for a fraction of what you'd
pay at a dentists office. To locate
dental schools or dental hygiene
programs in your area visit www.
ada.org/267.aspx.
Low Income Care
If you're strapped for cash there
are other resources that provide
dental care to seniors at a reduced
rate or for free. Here's where to
look:
* Health centers: Federally-
funded by the Health Resources
and Services Administration
(HRSA), there are thousands of
health centers around the U.S.,
many of which provide discounted
or free dental care to people based
on financial need. To find a center
near you visit findahealthcenter.
hrsa.gov or call 877-464-4772.
* Local services: There are a
few states, as well as some local
programs or clinics that offer
discounted dental care to those
with limited means. To find out
what may be available in your
area, check with your state dental
director (see astdd.org for contact
information), or your state or local
dental society (see ada.org/state-
localorg.aspx).
* Dental Life Network: Offers
several programs that provide free
dental care for elderly and disabled
people who can't afford to pay. To


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learn more or to apply for care in
your state, visit nfdh.org or call
888-471-6334.
Savvy Tip: The best way to keep
your dental costs down is through
prevention and good oral hygiene.
So remember to brush your teeth
at least twice a day using fluoride
toothpaste, floss daily and get


routine checkups every six months
or at least once a year.
Send your senior questions to:
Savvy Senior, PRO. Box 5443,
Norman, OK 73070, or visit
SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is
a contributor to the NBC Today
show and author of "The Savvy
Senior" book.


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OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 11


'Redneck Riviera'


* Continued from page 1
Part of the purpose is to eliminate
as much as possible illegal activity
on and near the river shoreline at
night, he added. "It's sex, drugs
and rock 'n' roll down there" at
times. Turbiville noted.


Another objective is creating an
orderly parking area for the fami-
lies who regularly enjoy swim-
ming, tubing and rafting in the
river and hikers using the trails
during the day, he added. Orderly
nnarkino of vehicles as onnosed


AERIAL PHOTO COURTESY OF HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
This planned parking area, outlined in yellow on an aerial photo of
24th Street S.E. as it approaches the north shore of the Little Manatee
River, is expected to produce seven to 10 vehicle parking spaces in
an orderly fashion for swimmers and boaters using the popular swim-
ming hole known locally as "Redneck Riviera." The county parks and
recreation department project is located within the county-owned
preservation acreage surrounding 24th Street and is to provide gated
access to hiking trails to the west and to the river to the south. The
green vertical bar marks entrance to Camp Bayou. The green hori-
zontal bar at the top of the aerial photo marks an existing gate to the
preservation acreage.


to leaving vehicles in a haphaz-
ard manner along the roadsides,
should improve public safety, Tur-
biville suggested.
And, yes, he acknowledged, the
plan will require that swimmers
parking in the new lot walk per-
haps 200 feet further to reach the
river shore, carrying whatever wa-
ter accessories they favor, includ-
ing a canoe, kayak or jon boat.
However, if this is a hardship,
the ELAPP manager pointed out,
a new boat launching ramp has
been installed on the river "ox
bow" a short distance up river
from the swimming hole and eas-
ily accessed by driving into Camp
Bayou. In addition to adequate ve-
hicle parking in the vacant scrub,
two regulation handicapped park-
ing pads also have been built near
the new launch facility.
Perhaps a good plan in theory,
but not very practical given the
current conditions, said Dr. Arthur
"Mac" Miller, retired university
professor, Ruskin native and di-
rect descendant of the pioneering
Miller family which founded the
community. Miller, father of a pre-
teen and a Camp Bayou board di-
rector, said he frequently takes his
family for a summer-day swim in
the river just as generations of his
family did before him, adding that
the north shore swimming hole
has been a community fixture for
decades.
Blocking vehicle access to the
southern tip of 24th Street not only
will increase the walking - and
carrying - distance for swimmers,
picnickers, and river watchers, but
also will inhibit use of the site for
boat launching. 'And it's the last
accessible launching site for small
boats in the area," Miller asserted.
Most of the public launch places


/017�A


:ULL SLAB of tciu


on Tampa Bay's south eastern
shore have been closed as have
the facilities in Manatee Heritage
Park, he added, and smaller places
such as the one-slip Domino Park
or a similar site up river simply are
too inadequate for an afternoon
crowd of boaters.
As for the new $16,000 floating
dock with its double boat launch
feature within Camp Bayou, Miller
agreed it would be an asset if only
it were available to boaters for
more than a few hours on Thurs-
days, Fridays and Saturdays.
In response, Turbiville said
the department would like to see
Camp Bayou open more hours on
more days, but that present budget
constraints do not allow for em-
ployment of a ranger or additional
help.
As it is, he added, the $5,000 to
$10,000 parking lot project prob-


ably will not begin until October
or November, after the next fis-
cal year's budget monies become
available.
Miller, on the other hand, indi-
cated he favors depending more
heavily on careful control of the
existing gate across 24th Street
several hundred feet north of the
new parking lot site and the Camp
Bayou entrance. This barrier, pro-
viding access to all of the ELAPP
property surrounding the south-
ern end of 24th Street, should be
opened every morning and closed
each night routinely, he said,
thereby preventing access to the
river after dark and protecting the
"hefty public asset" that is Camp
Bayou while giving citizens ac-
cess to the river during the day and
to the new boat launch in a more
frequently opened learning center.
Copyright 2011 Melody Jameson


IVIELUUOY JAMVESOUN PHUOU
As part of planned improvements to the recreational acreage at the
foot of 24th Street S.E., a new floating dock with easy launch fea-
tures for small boats such as canoes and kayaks has been installed
on the river and is reached by entering the Camp Bayou Environ-
mental Learning Center. Complete with regulation handicapped
parking pads, the new launch facility is one of several installed by
the county's parks department at waterfront recreational sites in the
South County. This one inside Camp Bayou may be more problem-
atic than most because it can be accessed only for a few hours three
days a week.


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JUNE 30, 2011


0!






12 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER



Security Patrol is important to

residents
I am replying to the article in The SCC Observer on June 23 regarding
the SCC Security Patrol. I am a member of the Security Patrol. I dispatch
every other week and, along with my husband, have driven for one of
the teams at night. During my eight years, I have seen how helpful the
Security Patrol is to the residents. My husband and I were able to help a
woman living alone who was frightened by a strange noise in her house
at night. We traced the noise to a faulty timer on her oven, and she was
able to rest easy. We helped a man whose telephone was not working. He
was in the middle of the street, not understanding what to do. One night
my parents who are in their 90s did not have any electricity. They could
not reach me, and called Security Patrol. A member came over immedi-
ately and found their breaker had been tripped off due to a storm. These
are just a few of the many instances I could cite of how the Security
Patrol is important. Watching out for criminal mischief is only one of the
ways in which the Patrol helps.
I am not in a position of leadership myself, but I observe the chief and
captains going about their duties in a professional and dedicated manner.
I hope that the article that was published will not in any way discourage
someone from calling the Security Patrol for help at any time. Also, I
encourage everyone to support the Patrol by signing up to be a driver or
dispatcher. If that is not possible, then hopefully they will offer financial
support. It is a great organization.
Lynn Knapp * Sun City Center

Boating safety courses offered
Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Education Courses will be held at Century
21 Beggins Enterprises, 6542 N. U.S. Hwy. 41, Apollo Beach.
1) Boating Safely: This 8-hour beginner boating class will give the stu-
dent the knowledge needed to obtain a boat license or safety certification
in many states. $40 per student. July 16, or Aug. 20, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
2) The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary's Weekend Navigator Course is a
comprehensive course designed for both experienced and novice power-
boat and sailboat operators. Divided into two major parts to educate in the
skills required for a safe voyage on a variety of waters and boating condi-
tions. Classes are consecutive Saturdays. Pre-register with Guy Mandigo,
641-2488 or mandigo@earthlink.net. $70 per student. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
August 6 and 13.


JUNE 30, 2011


Multi-Chamber event a success


PHOTOS BY
MITCH TRAPHAGEN


The Sun City Center Chamber
of Commerce and The Club
Renaissance in Sun City Center
hosted business leaders from
around South Hillsborough
at The Club Renaissance on
June 21. The Multi-chamber
Business After Hours event
also included the Ruskin
SouthShore, Apollo Beach and
Greater Riverview chambers
of commerce. Attendees were
treated to a wide and delicious
variety of food and beverages,
door prizes, and an unparalleled
opportunity for business social-
izing and networking. For more
information, visit the chambers
online at www.sccchamber.
com, www.ruskinchamber.org,
www.apollobeachchamber.com,
www.riverviewchamber.com.
Continued on page 13.


I ON 'di .HO a


SUNSET GRILL
AT LITTLE HARBOR


Try our new

Expanded Sunday Brunch 15.95
8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
We have expanded to include:
* Entree & Carved Items * Omelette Station * Dessert Buffet
* Champagne * and More
611 Destiny Drive * Ruskin, FL 33570 * 813-645-7739
www. staylittleharb or. com
_ , . Il ' " l .


i~?~J ~


A






OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 13


Multi-


Chamber


event
U Continued from page 12
PHOTOS BY
MITCH TRAPHAGEN


p--------- CLIP & SAVE ---------q



TOWERS
A RETIREMENT & REHABILITATION COMMUNITY
101 Trinity Lakes Dr. * Sun City Center, FL * SunTowersRetirement.com1
DON'T FORGET....MARK YOUR CALENDAR for Thurs., , ,-
July 21 11 a.m.-3p.m. * Sun Towers' HEALTH FAIR! While.
you visit the variety of booths, your golf cart can be detailed! Test-
ing will be available for balance, : .'.. hii\.: heart failure and '
I blood work. Educational seminars by local physician- . S ,, I
will be offered and vendors from major health care r
companies will be joining together to provide you
with the resources to ensure good health. Please
RSVP for this event to 813-634-3347.

UPCOMING JULY EVENTS
Tues., July 5 * 2:30-4 p.m. * Congestive Heart Failure Support
Group Facilitator Shayne Kull, MSR, from Hometown Homecare introduces a
cutting edge resource group exclusively for those living with heart failure, their
families and caregivers.
Thurs., July 7 * 10-11 a.m. *Are you at risk offalling? Falls Safety
Education, developed by Yale University, shows falls can be reduced 30% by
intervening on multiple risk factors. There are 6 risk factors to be considered.
Attend this informative session to find out what they are. Sponsored by the Men's
Club and Philips Lifeline.
Tues., July 1 2 * 10-11 a.m. * Telemonitor Program Heather Bertram,
LPN and Joymarie Delgado, RN, BSN from Ace Homecare will present this in-
novative service. This program is a standard of care for CHF & COPD Medicare
patients for no charge. Discover how you or your loved one may receive this
advanced service in the comfort of your home.
Tues., July 1 2 * 2:30-4 p.m. * COPD Support Group facilitated by
nurse practitioner Joy Barlaan, ARNP and Jan Whitaker, LPN from Ace Home-
care. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with COPD, then this support
group is for you. These facilitators have over 50 combined years of experience
and resources are endless!
Thurs., July 14 * 2:30-4 p.m. * Edmond Dubreuil MSW, RCSWI mental
health professional facilitates this support group for those suffering from de-
pression, loss or grief or are the caregiver of someone facing those issues.
Supported by: South Shore Coalition on Mental Health & Aging and The United
Methodist Church of Sun City Center.


I RSVP
2 days prior
to event to...
U---------


Shutter & Blind Manufacturing Company w
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CELLULAR SHADES ~ WOVEN WOODS ~ SUNSCREEN SHADES ~ PRIVACY SHADINGS ~ MORE

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36" W x 48" H....... 39 Installed
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HILLSBOROUGH
(813) 634-8310
MANATEE
(941) 524-2259


S Al * i11^f\Ijf~fTTJV


Celebrating 38 Years in Business
C CALL FOR FREE



BBRANDON
PEST CONTROL
Phone: (813) 685-7711
Fax: (813) 685-3607
i.,. * m:*'


JUNE 30, 2011


SUNSCREENS
A .






14 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


Ruskin Cemetery cleanup a great success


r . _ * PETTIP:D I'l. ii' 1f ,ii I Take special precautions to avoid excessive heat.
Also, hot pavement burns your dog's footpads. Clean up after the party and
don't allow your dogs or cats to eat the left overs. Finally, ensure your pets are
11,h-t l" h'l.hl 1, ,1 - ,i ,' . ii.. .. I'l n,, . . i ii. .i i Loud noises from fireworks and
thunderstorms may cause animals to "bolt" from their home, owners or yards.
Drs. Ott, Slaughter & Waldy
* Nearly 100 years of experience * Voted Best Vet & Best Pet Services
S* �Best Pet Resort with Medical Care
* Provider of Free 5-Acre, Beautiful Dog Park
I: t. * �Founder of C.A.R.E. Rescue Shelter
, Ruskin Iniinal Hospital & Cal Clinic
I) ;4 I I II i I > * llukin * SI.-(-61-611



DAMON C. GLISSON, ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Probate and Estate Planning Home Visits
*Wills * Medicaid Planning * Divorce
* PersonalInjury * Wrongful Death


5908 FORTUNE PLACE
APOLLO BEACH, FL 33572
www.Glissonl.com

(813) 645-6796


The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that
Should not be based solely on advertisement. Before you
decide, ask us to send you FREE written information
about our qualifications and experience.





FAMILY DENTISTRY


Kirk D. Parrott, D.D.S

Carl E. Friedman, D.D.S.

902 N. Tamiami Trail, Ruskin, FL 33570
(Across from Sweetbay Supermarket)
NEW PATIENTS WELCOME

(813) 645-6491
Members Amencan Dental Associaton, Flonda State Dental Associaton, Flonda West Coast Dental
Association, Manatee County Dental Association and Hillsborough County Dental Association






Riverside Gol

FOURSOME SPECIAL $5OExp. 9/111


$2 3 ................before noon

, 2 0 ................after noon

18 .................... after 2 pm

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Includes 18 holes and cart. Tax Included.
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on I LEAGUES WELCOME
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Kiuerside

Casual Waterfront Dining
Steaks, Seafood, Burgers
and Other Delicious Fare
FULL LIQUOR BAR
Live Music Every Thursday
and Saturday
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Tuesday-Saturday 11-8 pm
Sunday 11r-3pm
www. RiversideBarAndGrille, corn


, .i .. ," ,, I I I . - I


More than 150 local residents
showed up Saturday morning,
June 25 to beautify the 104-year-
old 10-acre Ruskin Memorial
Park located on the Little Manatee
River in Ruskin.
The organized clean-up and
beautification project was orga-
nized by the Ruskin Woman's
Club committee, chaired by Deb
Adams and Debbie Bonerake.
According to Wayne Harris,
president of the local cemetery as-
sociation, this was an outstanding
example of what a community can
do when everyone works together
to make a project a success.
The nonprofit cemetery is
owned by the Board of Trustees
and operated by a board of trust-
ees. Ten large trailer loads of tree
trimmings were removed from
the property along with the grass
being mowed and all the trim-
mings completed. Because of the
success of the day and the interest
by the people of our community,
Deb and Debbie announced that
another clean-up day will be
planned in the fall.
It is amazing what a large
number of interested people can
do in a short amount of time when
everyone works together for the
good of the community.


Scallop season is now open


The sturgeon is in the top news
this week. Not often do we see a
sturgeon in our bay waterways,
but they are in mass production in
the Swannee River, jumping into
boats and injuring many people. It
is from the sturgeon that caviar is
produced.
The average size is three feet,
and the largest on record is 1,500
pounds.
They are a saltwater fish found
from Canada to Florida, spending
most of their time in the salt
water, but come into fresh water to
spawn.
They are covered with bony
plates with mouth under snouts
equipped to gather food off the
bottom.
When the white man came to
America, the rivers were teeming
with sturgeon. They have been
fished out so much that today
sturgeon is a rarity.
Famous the world over is the
Swannee River song, but now the
peaceful beautiful Southern Swan-
nee is teeming with the powerful,
strong, jumping boney bodies, of
huge sturgeons.
Some anglers are building pro-
tective guards around their boats
to keep the sturgeon from attack-
ing them as they cruise the beauti-
ful Swannee River.
You first see the Swannee as you
cross the Georgia eastern border
into Florida.
Our bay waters have hit the 950
mark on many days of our sum-
mer weather. You should fish only
in early morning or late night to
protect yourself, and to catch fish.
They too, do not like the heat and


are searching for deep cool holes
or shades of mangrove roots.
Big news this week -- June 25
scallop season was opened. They,
like the oysters, are scarce in our
waterways, but if you
know where to go, you
can enjoy digging for
scallops.
The west side of the
Long Boat Key bridge is a
place where scallop snor-
keling takes place. Some Fish*
say they have a secret
scallop dig near Piney By Jon
Point.
One of the most popular
is Crystal River, where the charter
boats excel in the "know-how" to
get scallops.
They know where, what, and
when. The charters provide the
spot to snorkel, the bag to put them
in, and they have the license to get
them.
For $65 per person you can
snorkel for scallops with a Crystal
River captain. He will stay out an
average of five hours.
Tarpon are on the move. I have
had reports that they are moving
south. Those landing them in our
waterways say that they are using
light tackle. This seems odd to me,
one would think, heavy tackle for
those giants.
It was explained to me that their
pole is heavy, but they use light
rig so as not to spook him before
the catch. Their bait is threadfish,
pinfish or crabs.
Tarpon are still in our area, but
much less than I saw last month.
Tarpon is a trophy fish and not
edible. Most all I have seen are


T
ie
m


caught and released. Take a photo
without injury to fish and imme-
diately release.
School is out, so take your
children fresh water fishing. For
those who are first
time anglers it is easy
and fun to catch blue
gill, stumpknockers,
which are small pan
fish and easy for chil-
dren to reel into shore
'ales or boat.
ases , The fresh waters of
Maschek both the Alafia and
Little Manatee Riv-
ers are full of pan fish
this time of year. Of course, for the
adults, the largemouth bass and
freshwater catfish are also in our
lakes and fresh waters for you to
catch.
Sheepshead are great for pier
fishing and have a lean white meat
with excellent food value.
Founder are being caught at
high and low tide, as they surface
off the bottom and come up to eat.
Black drum are giving many
anglers a thrill as those being
caught are giants. Be careful as
you fillet these, they are often full
of worms.
Redfish are in schools, running
with the mullet. Silver trout are
waiting for your bait. A great food
value fish and we have even eaten
them for breakfast.
Watch the weather, it is hurricane
season, the sun is hot, wear your
sunscreen, drink plenty of water,
dress in light colors, and always
wear your life jackets.
Aleta Jonie Maschek is a mem-
ber of Florida Outdoor Press.


JUNE 30, 2011




























front doors. I have to admit it star-
tled me. It's happened before that
some early-rising resident ignored
the posted hours and wanted assis-
tance before we officially opened.
But not often. And as it turned out,
that wasn't the case here.
It was Eric, the project direc-
tor for Florida Southern Roofing,
setting up shop for our new roof!
Before we could enjoy our first
cup of joe, a monolith of a truck
pulled up to the building, a giant
expandable claw slowly uncurling
from behind the cab. Using remote
control, the driver began to direct
the claw to pick up materials and
deposit them gently on the rooftop.
It was an amazing sight to watch.
As the claw moved more and
more piles of heavy materials onto
the old roof, the staff and volun-
teers made a mental note of what
was below and agreed we'd all
stay out of the board room just in


"Our practice provides a
complete range of professional
services including Restorative
Dentistry, Cosmetic Dentistry,
Thorough Examinations,
Cleaning, Dental Makeovers
and Implant Restorations."




, r we salute all of our men,
women and Veterans of the
Armed Forces!


* Tooth Pain
* Dentures
* Dental Implants
* Sedation Dentistry
* Tooth Whitening


0
V iii.r
I1IhluiI


* Crowns
* Bridges
* Partials
* Porcelain veneers
* Cosmetic Dentistry


case things came crashing through.
You never know...
Soon we heard footsteps over-


head, which completely
confused Sonic the
Wonder Guard Dog. I
could almost hear him
think "that's one big
squirrel up there!" The
noise of the clawed
truck made answering
the phones somewhat
difficult and we lost
a few parking spaces


to the temporary dumpster, but
we were thrilled anyway! After
months of getting bids and wait-
ing for financing, we were finally
going to get a new roof.
And not a day too soon. Rainy
season is officially here and the
old roof would have had a tough
time making it through another
one. In fact, as the clouds rolled in
Monday afternoon, Eric came in to
tell me they were packing it up and
would start again early Tuesday.
So please pardon our dust and
excuse the fact you may have
to walk a little further to visit us
for a week or so. For a couple of
days we won't have air condition-
ing and the dumpster is a little
unsightly. We apologize for the
inconvenience. But we're awfully
glad Eric and his team are here and
we already feel a little safer know-
ing we'll be a little better protected
from above. No pun intended.


Sunny Windows
Too much sun cOIinnI' LhlouLhi \ our Indois jnd IKcILiih i up Loiln
houisi ' Bui I solji sAdkk TIKl '\oikjutlh likie I olk l siud biut kIccp
most of the sun/heat out in the summer and insulate the window in the
winter to keep the house heat in. We chose a white one because I like
the clean, bright look of it. There are other colors available, though.
I can see out through the shade, but no one can see inside. Debbie
Want to live better on the money you already make? Visit corn/index. cfm?TipsSyn> to find hundreds of articles to help you
stretch your day and your dollar! Copyright 2011 Dollar Stretcher, Inc.

Riverview Flea Market


Hours:
Wed.- Fri. 10 a.m.
Sat. & Sun. 9 a.m.


Michelle Halcomb,
D.D.S.


Our office is open:
Monday thru Thursday
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Friday
8:00 a.m. to noon


OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 15


JUNE 30, 2011




By: Dana Dittmar, Executive Director
SCC Chamber News


11


OF RUSKIN
Office Address: 720 4th St. S.W. Ruskin, FL 33570
XIVMPRCOVEVME Er *TS


"Our Customers Are Our Best Advertisement"


Check the... Concrete *Carports Lic.RX0057641
/ Quality Pool Enclosures * Screen Rooms , W ,
/ Difference * Garage Screens * Glass Rooms - B- B
SPric< * Vinyl Windows *Roof Overs
813-645-3529 FAx:813-645-7353 * KnoxAluminum.com


- Permanent Hair Removal
- FACIALS-
SELECTROLYSIS
Laurie Collier. RE. CCE
101 Flamingo Drive, Ste. B & E
C :,r lleF ,:f I I . 11 . Fl'.llll' l`Z ,:, Drive.
Apollo Beach, FL 33572
Call for appt. 813-244-0341


Dr. A. Theodosatos
Brandi Broughton, PA-C


Offering Botox, Restylane and various cosmetic
products and services
Same Day Appointments * FREE Skin Screening
6322 U.S. Highway 301 * Riverview
813-880-7546
Insurance accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, BCBS, Humana,
Cigna, Aetna, Amerigroup, and many more l


On Monday morning, I pulled
into the Chamber parking lot,
unlocked the front door and headed


to the kitchen to start the
coffee. It was 7:30 a.m.
and already humid and
muggy outside. The rain
from over the weekend
made it feel like I was try-
ing to breathe water.
Before I could turn on
the pot of decaf, I heard the
jingle bell that indicates
someone has entered the


Queso is a darling Chihuahua
that was brought to the shelter
as a stray. It appears that his life
wasn't the easiest. Don't worry
though, he is now getting the TLC
that he needs and deserves. He is
shy but easy going and loving as
well. Queso needs someone that
can help turn his life around. He
is the type of dog that will be loyal
to you as long as he lives. As part
of his adoption, Queso will be
neutered, microchipped, brought
current on his shots, and treated for
heartworm. DOB: June 12, 2009

Veterans Affairs
employee chosen
to act as guardian
on Honor Flight
The Veterans Council of
Hillsborough County has cho-
sen to sponsor Tracey Coley of
Hillsborough County Veterans
Affairs to represent them as a
guardian on the most recent Honor
Flight. During this trip, 71 WWII
Veterans visited their memorial
in Washington D.C. Ms. Colley
served as guardian to ensure these
heroes experience a safe, memo-
rable and rewarding experience.
Honor Flight of West Central
Florida serves the Tampa Bay area
and is made up of local volunteers.
They raise funds to pay for veter-
ans to visit Washington D.C. Each
trip costs approximately $60,000.
For more information on this
program, to nominate a WWII vet-
eran to participate in a future trip,
or to participate as a guardian, visit
www.honorflightwcf.org, or call
Norm Haddad at (727) 393-4940.


Free public awareness signs available
Save the Manatee Club offers a variety of free public awareness
materials to Floridians to help protect the state's official marine mammal
- the endangered manatee. With the busiest boating weekend of the year
coming up, the Club encourages the public to participate in manatee
safety this July 4 weekend and throughout the year.
Waterproof banners are free to Florida boaters, and these bright yellow
banners help boaters alert other boaters when manatees are present in the
area with the easy-to-see directive, "Please Slow, Manatees Below." Free
yellow dock signs for shoreline property owners in Florida, plus boat-
ing decals, are also available from the Club. Both provide the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) hotline number
(1-888-404-3922) for reporting manatees in distress.
Dr. Katie Tripp, Director of Science and Conservation for Save the
Manatee Club, says the public awareness signage combined with respon-
sible boating and better reporting of injured manatees can make a sig-
nificant difference in the lives of Florida's gentle giants. "Even though
Florida's manatee population suffers from frequent, possibly daily
watercraft strikes, there are only a handful of strikes that have been fully
reported and documented. It is crucial that boaters report known or pos-
sible manatee strikes to the FWC. This reporting is essential for scien-
tists to better understand the physics of manatee watercraft strikes, and
for managers to most effectively assign areas of needed protection on our
state's waterways."
Julie Doble posted the Club's manatee awareness sign on a canal
in Apollo Beach that leads to Tampa Bay. "We observed quite a few
dolphins in our canal in January and then came the manatees," said
Doble. "I grew tired of running out onto the dock to wave and shout
at boaters who were going too fast
*,, and didn't understand the meaning
SW of 'no wake' zone."
J , 7 Over in Hemando County,
Patricia Cosner also posted one of
the Club's dock signs on her prop-
erty. "Our canal dead ends so we
put it on an angle facing the oncom-
ing boats," Cosner explained. "My
neighbors and I find it a privilege
to be able to see the manatees in
their natural habitat and it is our responsibility to help keep the water-
ways as safe as possible. When a boat approaches and there are manatees
in the water, we point to our sign and then to the water and ask them to
cut their engine while passing."
Dr. Tripp also reminds those who will be boating and fishing over the
July 4 weekend to properly dispose of monofilament fishing line in recy-
cling bins located at most boat ramps and other select locations because
of the threat that discarded line poses to manatees and other marine life.
The free signs, banners and decals can be obtained by contacting Save
the Manatee Club via e-mail at education@ savethemanatee.org, by regu-
lar mail at 500 N. Maitland Ave., Maitland, FL 32751, or by calling toll
free at 1-800-432-JOIN (5646). "Manatee Protection Tips for Boaters"
can be found on the Club's website at http " " saivethemanatee.org/
boatertips.htm.
For more information on manatees, the Adopt-A-Manatee� program,
or to sign up for the Club's free e-newsletter, visit the Club's website at
www.savethemanatee.org.


Cloud is a gray-silver female
domestic short hair. She tends to
be on the shy side, but can be pried
out of her shell for a pleasurable
upfront petting experience. Cloud
was found as a stray, but is making
great strides to fit in and she just
wants to go to her forever home
soon. She has been spayed and
brought up-to-date on her shots,
and microchipped. Visit Cloud
and make her part of your family.
DOB: Approx. Jan. 2, 2010


C.A.R.E. is open from 10 a.m. to
3 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.
For directions, call 645-2273
or visit www.CareShelter.org.


You, Me &
Business
By Dana Dittmar
- I


34,000 sq. ft. BOOTH
Air Conditioned SPECIAL
Accepting New Vendors 1 fEE
Low Monthly & Daily Rates 1/2 UO

7415 Hwy. 301 S. First
Riverview, FL 33578 Month's
813-671-9315 Rent


We're Here For You!

we Welcome New Patients


Dr. Robert A. Norman
Board Certified Dermatologist


813-634-3396
www.suncitycenterdental.com
703 Del Webb Blvd. W., Suite B
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Lic #6193 * Lic #9109 * Lic #11099 * Lic #15756 * Lic #D1713809


t! t- _ ^
& , ,r *?






16 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


Dessert card party
The Council of Catholic Wom-
en of Prince of Peace Catholic
Church invites anyone who likes
to play cards or board games to
make up a table in advance and
join the church for its monthly
Dessert Card Party July 13 from
noon until 3:30 p.m. in the Conesa
Center.
Cards, pencils and tallies are fur-
nished along with an assortment of
desserts, table and door prizes.
For more info call 633-2460.

Beth Shalom needs
religion teachers
Congregation Beth Shalom of
Brandon is seeking Religious
School Teachers for the upcoming
2011-2012 school year.
The sessions run from Septem-
ber to May and follow the Hills-
borough County School District
calendar. They meet on Sundays
from 9:15 a.m. to noon and some
classes meet again on Wednesday
evenings from 6 p.m. to 7:45 p.m.
For more information call Amy
Weinstein at 813-685-7064.


Honoring Father's Day


PHOTO BY HAZEL MARTIN


Father's Day was celebrated at the United Community Church, 1501
La Jolla Ave., Sun City Center, by honoring the men with music,
scripture, and in spirit.

South Shore Christian Women


South Shore Christian Women's
Connection presents Kay T. Dan-
iels. Kay will share her love of


Mary Hupp, (seated) First row, Alice Knight, Dee Hottinger, Barbara
Schuler. Second row, Grace Eickelman, Betty Parsons, Rose Timm,
Helen Hodenpyl, Shirley Barber and Carol Michael.

United Community Church

honors dedicated volunteer


Sun City Center is losing a dedi-
cated 25-year volunteer of the com-
munity, Mary Hupp. It is a famil-
iar story: "I am going to move to
be near my daughter Sandy while
I am still in good health." Sandy
is a recently retired college profes-
sor from Illinois State University
in Bloomington, Illinois. Mary
will be able to see her daughter's
Bloomington house from the win-
dow of her new retirement home,
The Presbyterian retirement com-
munity Westminister Residence.
June 16 the ladies of Mary's
church circle friends from the
United Community Church hon-
ored her with a going away lun-
cheon at the home of Betty Lu
Heimbold.
In 2004 Mary was honored as the
"Volunteer of the Year" at South
Bay Hospital. Since 1996 she has
made 100 tray favors every week
for those in the hospital. A recent
favor had the look of a chocolate
Sunday. It took communion cups,
cotton balls, dark felt for the choc-
olate syrup look and a dot of red
felt for a cherry on top.
For Tampa's Children's Hospital
she has made little books for the
children to be placed in the wait-
ing rooms.
Mary has sent cards and letters
to many servicemen and women.
She has sent as many as two thou-
sand Christmas cards in one year.
Also, she writes letters to those
in the service; one year she wrote
over one hundred and seventy let-
ters.
She has boxed up unused cards
to send to those in the service so
they could send cards to their fam-


ily members; has served as a chair
of a circle of the Women's Fellow-
ship for fourteen years; and was
chosen as the United Community
Church's "Woman of the Year" in
2006. She also served as its First
Vice President of the Fellowship.
She knows her way around in the
church kitchen, often doing the
behind the scenes preparations for
social events.


Quilting, and will also share how
God has impacted her life. The
presentation and luncheon will be
held at Club Renaissance, 2121
South Pebble Beach Blvd. Thurs-
day, July 14 2011. Doors open at
11 a.m. Luncheon and program
11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
Reservations or cancellations be-
fore noon Monday, July 11. Cost
is $17 inclusive.
All ladies are welcome. No
membership is required. Spon-
sored by South Shore Christian
Women's Connection, affiliated
with Stonecroft Ministries.
For more information call 813-
938-4320 or 813-383-7540 or
email aunt.butler@gmail.com


Cancer Concerns

Group will meet
All are welcome to join in on an
afternoon to become aware of the
resources available to all in our
community. Bring your family,
friends, and neighbors. There is no
cost and no reservations are nec-
essary. There will be information
that is valuable to you as a survi-
vor and caregiver.
The time is Friday, July 8, at 1
p.m. and the place is The United
Community Church, 1501 La Jolla
Ave. Sun City Center.
For further information, contact
facilitator, Hazel Martin at 813-
642-9020.


DIRECT CREMATION $875



1520 33rd Street SE * Ruskin, FL 33570

813-645-6130
, www.zipperersfuneralhome.com
% Only onsite Crematory in South Hillsborough County
Family owned and operated since 1979


Special gift package for new year
Beth Israel Sisterhood of The Jewish Congregation of Sun City, is
offering a special gift package to celebrate the September 28 holiday
of Rosh Hashanah. The package consists of a gift boxed eight ounce
jar of honey, gift card and postage included. It is a wonderful way
of celebrating the Jewish New Year for family and friends. Even
though it seems early, orders must be in by August 10 so that you
can receive your gift package in time. The price is $10 per box. You
may call Carol Sisskin at 642-9266 to place your orders, or mail your
check made out to Beth Israel Sisterhood, to Carol Sisskin, 1609
Laughton Place, Sun City Center, FL 33573.







e A" EVERETT TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ f
1611 First St. SW * Ruskin, FL * 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL-
SERVICES: Sunday ........................9:30 & 10:30 a.m .; 6:00 p.m .
Wednesday ................ 7:00 p.m. � -'.0 .--

REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH-ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center, FL 33573-5354
Rev. Dr. Peter Stiller, Pastor * 634-1292
Saturday Worship: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion....First & Third Sunday * Bible Class...Thursday 10 am, Guests Welcome


Sriencdship Baptist Chwrch Sunday WEEKLY SERVICES
Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist) 9 a.m ......................Bible Study
S1511 E R n Dr 11a.m. ...................Bible Study
1511 El Rancho Dr. 10 a.m. & 6 p.m............Worship
Sun City Center, FL 33573 10 &
- - Phone/Fax: Wednesday
I 813-633-5950 6 p.m.... Prayer Meeting/Bible Study


Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (behind Suntrust Bank)
ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: Nov. - April.................. 8:30 a.m. Day Care Available
Rev. Dr. Hank Galloway and All Year ...............10:45 a.m. 6 a.m.- 6 p.m.
Phone: 645-1241 Sunday School............ 9:30 a.m. call 645-6198

St. John the Divine Episcopal Church
Growing by Faith from Generation to Generation
Rev. Tracy H. Wilder * Church Office: 813-645-1521
\Sunday Services: 9:oo a.m. - Contemporary Service and Sunday School
at West Campus (S.R. 674 and 9th Street SE, Ruskin)
8:00 a.m. - Traditional Service and 11:oo a.m. Holy Communion with Choir at
East Campus (1015 Del Webb Blvd., Sun City Center)
ALL WORSHIP SERVICES WITH HOLY COMMUNION AND HEALING HOLY OIL


1 1 )


CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH
Sunday Worship: Blended 8:00 am


Contemporary 9:40 a.m. "''
Pastor Jack R. Palzer Traditional 11:15 a.m.
5309 U.S. Highway 41 North * Apollo Beach
(across fromMiraBay)www.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1305

"A Warm, Loving & Friendly Church"
Looking for a church home?
Need the comfort of a warm and loving family?
Join us on Sunday to come home to the warmth of our church family.
Located in South Hillsborough County, just south of Stephens Road in old Sun City.
4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 S * Sun City, FL 33586 * 813-645-4085


"Getting to KnowYou" (Donuts & Coffee)....................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................................................................. 9:30 am .
Sunday Morning Worship .........................................10:55 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service...............................................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service ....................................... 7:00 p.m.
Thursday Morning Prayer.........................................10:00 a.m.


Dan Collis, Pastor
Come join us to
learn about God's
Word and salvation
in Jesus Christ


The United Methodist Church of Sun City Center
1210 Del Webb Blvd West * 634-2539
http://www.sccumc.com
Come Belong Worship Services
Qrow 1 Serve Saturday
.. ..n i ,, 4:00 PM Creason Hall (Casual Service)
Sunday
8:15 AM Sanctuary (Communion Service)
9:15 AM Creason Hall (Oasis Contemporary)
10:55 AM Saniduary (Tradilional with Choir & Bells)
O ,[ PASTOR: DR WARREN LANCER
Bookstore 633-8595 PASTOR: DR. DANIEL WHITE

F 'RST BAPTIST CHURCH ,

820 COLLEGE AVE. W.
jRUSKIN, FL 33570
645-6439 A
V www.fbcruskin.org
A Resource for Families
Sunday School............................9:45 a.m . r B
Morning Worship............8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Dr. Barry Rumsey
Evening Service...........................6:00 p.m. CHRISTANSCHOOL
Wednesday Night Service..............7:00 p.m. THROUGH 12TH
Awana...................... .................. 7:00 p.m . GRADE


JUNE 30, 2011






JUNE 30, 2011





Prince of Peace Masses:
Sunday..........8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., Noon
Catholic Church ... Saturday Vigil ..................... 4:00 p.m.
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573 Daily..........................................8:00 a.m.
Phone: 634-2328 * Fax: 633-6670 W Confessions:
www.popcc.org Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m. and Sat. 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.

Sunday School (all ages)........ 9:30 a.m.
NOR 4 SIDE Sunday Morning Worship .... 10:45 a.m.
BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday Evening Worship ....... 6:00 p.m. SBC
"Loving God Loving Others Wednesday (all ages) ............. 6:30 p.m.
Serving Beyond Borders" Rev. Samuel Roach, Pastor
1301 U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL * 645-1121 * www.nbcor.org


First Baptist Church of Gibsonton t
"We love because He first loved us." 1 John 4:19
Traditional Worship Service *Sunday School 9:30 A.M. =
Old-Time Gospel Hymns *Morning Worship 10:30A.M. 9
Nursery Available Sunday Evening 6:00 P.M.
* Interpreter for the Deaf Mid-Week (Wed.) 7:00 P.M.
9912 Indiana St. 5 Hwy 41 & EsIellelle A enue Malcolm S. Clemenit, Paslor
Gibsonton, FL 33534 813-677-1301

UNITED COMMUNITY CHURCH - United Church of Christ
1501 La jollAVE Sun City Center, FL 33573-5329
i rin \ A Caring Church United in God's Love Serving Our Community .,
All Are Welcome!
Rev. Dr. Michael F. Evans - Worship Service - to AM 1
(8, l 634-1304 - www.uccinscc.org ..*




U i Spirituality Rather Than "Religion"
Henry Gibson Social Hall, Beth Israel Synagogue Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
1115 Del Webb E. * Sun City Center, FL 771
www.unitycommunityofjoy.com 813-298-7745


, THE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO THE SERVICES NOW WORSHIPPING IN THE "CHAPEL"
AT SUN CITY CENTER FUNERAL HOME 10:30 AM ON SUNDAYS
NO CREED... BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE
1851 RICKENBACKER DRIVE * 813-938-4955
Minister - DR. DAVID CAMPBELL


First Church of Christ, Scientist
204 2nd St. N.W. * Ruskin, FL 33570
Christian Science Heals
Sunday Service............................................... 10:00 a.m .
Sunday School ......................... ........... 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service........................................ 5:00 p.m.
Reading Room..............Wed. 4-4:45 p.m. * Sat. 1-4 p.m.

All Are Welcome



0.iL St. Andrew Presbyterian Church
Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.
Casual Service 11:00 a.m.
t Prayers with anointing for healing and wholeness
during worship the second Sunday of every month.
A Stephen
Ministry Pastor: Dr. Gerald Iwerks
Church Meet friends in Fellowship Hall after the Service.
Refreshments served.


1239 Del Webb Blvd. West
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Church is Handicap accessible


Phone: 813-634-1252
For Information visit:
www.standrewatscc.org


OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 17


/In Memoriam
Edward L. Hoskins, Jr.
July 3,1980-April 22, 2010
In loving memory of our son
and grandson, Edward L.
Hoskins, Jr. We think ofyou
constantly when we look at
your two sons and we miss
you so very, very much.
Love,
Mom, Grandma and Grandpa



Area

Obituaries

Maurice N. Haines
1922 - 2011
Maurice (Mike) N. Haines, 88, of
Sun City Center, FL and Cherry Hill
and Camden, N.J., passed away June
11. Maurice was born on a farm in
Primghar, Iowa on September 13,1922.
He grew up in Camden, NJ, married
and raised his family in Cherry Hill,
NJ, solely owned the Lakes Home &
Auto Parts store in Medford Lakes, NJ,
and retired to Florida in 1986. Maurice
was preceded in death by his wife
Betty Jane (Wildwood, NJ) just short
of their 50th anniversary in 2004. He is
survived by his two daughters, Melissa
Haines, and Amy and husband Michael
Loomer, and two granddaughters Kari
and Krista Loomer.
"Moose" Haines proudly served in
the US Army Air Corps Pilot Class of
1944 as a Fighter Pilot (Mustang P51)
in WWII, was a POW in Germany, and
retired from the USAF Reserves as a
Lt. Colonel in 1982. He continued his
passion for flying throughout his life.
Mr. Haines was a 32nd Degree Mason
and a member of the Medford, NJ
Lodge. He was an avid Baseball and
Ice Hockey Fan.
Relatives and friends are invited to
attend the Military Funeral Service on
Friday, July 1, at 11 am at Brigadier
General William C. Doyle Veterans
Memorial Cemetery, 350 Provinceline
Road, Wrightstown, NJ. In lieu of
flowers, the family requests that
donations be made to the American
Red Cross. Our Dad climbed into the
cockpit of his plane one last time and
flew off into the great blue. He is at
peace and will be missed.


William Rutherford
William Rutherford passed away
June 13. He was born Sept. 23,
1936. He is survived by his best
friend and caregiver Ben Zingale;
two children, Linda MacDougall and
David Rutherford of Michigan; two
sisters, six grandchildren; three great-
grandchildren; and seven of man's best
friends which were a big part of his life.
A memorial service was held at
the Riverview Moose Lodge, 900
Honeywell Road, Gibsonton, Florida,
on Sunday, June 26.
Arrangements by Zipperer's Funeral
Home, Ruskin.

The Lord is not slow in keeping his
promise, as some understand slowness.
Instead he is patient with you, not
wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to
come to repentance.
-2 Peter 3:9-


a


9 ,


Joyous Pentecost Sunday PHOTO BY HAZEL MARTIN
It was a joyous service at the United Community Church, 501 La
Jolla Ave. Sun City Center, when they celebrated Pentecost Sun-
day. The sanctuary and Great Hall were decorated with red balloons
and flowers. Pentecost is the great festival marking the birth of the
Christian Church. It is celebrated fifty days after Easter. The liturgi-
cal color for the occasion is red and everyone was encouraged to
wear something red for the day to honor the church's birthday.


Singers, poets,

and storytellers needed


For their community presentation
on the 10th Anniversary of 9-11-
01 entitled 'A Service of Remem-
brance, Reflection and Recovery,'
the United Methodist Church of
Sun City Center is seeking sing-
ers for a community choir as well
as poets and storytellers who were
present or personally impacted by
the tragic events of that day.
Jeff Jordan, Minister of Worship
Arts at the church, has put together
a program of music, poetry, video,
scripture, imagery, dance and
storytelling to commemorate this
important occasion.
The community chorus will
be performing excerpts from the
Requiems of Brahms, Faur6, and


SEEDS
FROM
nTHE
SOWER
P.. , , :t , ' I

Three-year-old Carla was
helping her mother deliver
newspapers.
"Let me do one," she
begged.
So the mother drove her
pickup to a box on Carla's
side, and Carla leaned out of
the window. But she leaned
too far, and fell to the ground.
Terrified, the mother jumped
out of the cab and picked her
up. And she cried, "Mom, you
didn't get close enough!"
You and I live in two worlds.
We get so busy making a liv-
ing that we don't make any
overtures to the Lord. And we
fall. Why?
Like the girl said, "You
didn't get close enough."
The Bible says, "Let us draw
near to God with a sincere
heart."
Visit us at: www.TheSower.


Mozart as well as music appropri-
ate to the occasion by Joseph Mar-
tin. Rehearsals will be on Thurs-
days Aug. 25 and Sept. 1, and on
Saturday morning, Sept. 10.
Music will be provided and there
are no auditions. Interested singers
should call (813) 634-2539, ext.
207 or visit the church office at
1210 Del Webb Blvd. West in Sun
City Center.
Part of the program will also be
dedicated to personal testimony
and poetry. If you or someone you
know was personally impacted by
the events of 9-11 or you have writ-
ten or would like to write a poem
for the occasion, submit these texts
via email to jeff@sccumc.com.
The program will be presented
to the public at 2 p.m. on Sept. 11
in the church sanctuary. A worship
service with choir and orchestra
using many of the elements of the
afternoon presentation will also
happen at 10:55 a.m. in the church
sanctuary.
Earlier that morning, there will
be a service of remembrance out-
lining the chronological events of
that day. This service, to be held in
Creason Hall, will run from 8:46
a.m. (the time of the first plane
crash) to approximately 10:03 a.m.
(the crash of Flight 93).
For more information about this
and other events and activities at
the United Church of Sun City
Center, call Jeff Jordan, Direc-
tor of Music and the Arts at (813)
634-2539.
To learn more about the United
Methodist Church of Sun City
center, visit the website at www.
sccumc.com.


Rejoice always, pray continually,
give thanks in all circumstances;
for this is God's uwillfor you in
ChristJesus.
1 Thessalonians5:16-18l


S. Fr John McEvoy
. - - _ . Pastor
Sr 813-645-1714
As SaintAnneRuskin.org

U.S. Hwy. 41 * 106 11th Ave. NE * Ruskin
SouthShore: - j. .11. Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton
CP MASSES
Vigil M ass.................................................................. Saturday 5:00 p.m .
Sunday Mass........8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. (Contemporary)
Daily ...................................................... M onday thru Friday 8:00 a.m.
Holy Days................................... Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Espatol.............................Domingo - 12:30 p.m.; Miercoles 7:30 p.m.
SConfession.................. Wednesday 6:45 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.


cIje2Linj
CHURCH
Come and experience the power of
Jesus to change your life.
Sunday @ 9 & 11 AM * Servicio en Espafiol @ 6 PM

www.aplace4everyone.org

2322 11th Ave. SE - Ruskin, FL * 813.645.3337





18 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER

The Observer News
CARRIER OF THE WEEK


' - f


JUNE 30, 2011


$36,500 AWARDED TO
LOCAL FOOD PANTRIES

CONNECTING DONORS WHO CARE
WITH CAUSES THAT MATTER
For good. For ever.R


Janie McRoberts is a real hustler! She delivers the walking routes
in Sun City Center and Wimauma. Janie hand-delivers bundles to
more than 90 customers each week. She has been with The Ob-
server News for more than 11 years. She's a very friendly person
with a friendly smile. When she takes her well-deserved vacation
her daughter and granddaughter assume her duties on the route.
Thanks, Janie, for an incredible job.


Governing board appoints interim
executive director, recruits new
The Southwest Florida Water Management District's Governing
Board accepted the resignation of Executive Director David L. Moore
today and appointed the District's General Counsel William S. Bilenky
to serve as interim executive director.
Moore, who was appointed executive director in March 2003, resigned
on May 26, but had offered to continue temporarily in the role to help
facilitate the successful transition of the next executive director. The
Board accepted Moore's resignation today during a special workshop
and praised him for his service to the District. Moore will continue to
serve in an advisory capacity until July 15.
The Board also authorized District Human Resources staff to begin the
recruitment process for a new executive director immediately.
Bilenky has been with the District since September 1999 and has
served as its general counsel since March 2000. As the District's gen-
eral counsel, Bilenky provides legal advice and support to the Governing
Board and the District, appearing on their behalf before the Department
of Administrative Hearings, the Legislature, the state trial and appellate
courts, and federal agencies and courts.
Before joining the District, Bilenky was in private practice and has
also been the general counsel to the Florida Public Service Commis-
sion.
Bilenky holds a bachelor's degree in industrial engineering from Cor-
nell University, a master's degree in business administration from Flori-
da State University and a juris doctorate from the University of Florida.
He has been admitted to the Virginia State Bar, the Florida Bar, the Bars
of the United States Supreme Court; the United States Courts of Appeal
for the 4th, 5th, 11th and D.C. Circuit; the Federal District Court for the
Eastern and Western Districts of Virginia; and the Bankruptcy Court Bar
for the Eastern District of Virginia. Bilenky is also a Florida Supreme
Court-Certified Circuit Court Mediator.
Moore was appointed executive director in March 2003. He began
his career at the District in 1984 as a hydrologist, working his way up
through the leadership ranks as a project manager, manager, director and
deputy executive director.


Horseback rides offered
Napier's Log Cabin Horse & Animal Sanctuary, Inc. offers horseback
rides - no prior riding experience necessary or age limits for $25 per
person per hour, benefiting all the animals at the Sanctuary.
Riding takes place at Napier's 'Wingate Wilderness,' 4957 Wingate
Rd., in Myakka City. Fun and educational for all ages. All rides are by
appointment. Call (941) 750-8185 to set up a day and time or visit.
Napier's Log Cabin Horse & Animal Sanctuary, Inc. is a not-for-profit
501(c)(3) no-kill Florida corporation that provides loving adoptive
homes or permanent homes to needy animals. For more information, call
(941) 750-8185.


DON'T FORGET.... The Observer News office will be closed Monday, July 4,
to celebrate INDEPENDENCE DAY with our families.
Submit your ads and/or news today! 813-645-3111 * www.ObserverNews.net


9!


Does your loved one require more
dementia care than you can provide at home?


Are you doing the right things?
As it progresses, are you concerned for their safety?
Are they stimulated and engaged at home?


Sun City Senior Living offers your loved one a secure
environment, with specially-trained caregivers, innovative
activities and compassionate services.
* Assistance with activities of daily living
* Medication management
* Secured safe environment
* Housekeeping and laundry services
* Activity program specific to dementia care
* Meals, snacks and special diets * Much, much more!


You're invited to call or visit our community
today to see all we have to offer!


SUN CITY
PACIFICA SENIOR LIVING
Assisted Living & Memory Care


Assisted Living Fac. Lic. # 7290
3855 Upper Creek Dr.
Sun City Center, FL 33570

813-938-2259
www. Pacific caSunCity. corn







June 30, 2011 THESHOPPER 19


To place an ad call THE SHOPPER
813.645.3111 ext. 201 CLA AVETII
Fax: 813.645.1792
$17.00 M & M Printing Co., Inc


up to 20 words
300 addl. word
Deadline is Monday
at 4pm


weekly publisher of the
The Observer News, The SCC Observer and The Riverview Current
210 Woodland Estates Ave., SW
Ruskin, Florida 33570


The Observer News/
M & M Printing
will be closed
Monday, July 4
in observance of
Independence Day. Dead-
line for
classified line ads
will move to Friday,
July 1 at 4pm.
for the July 7 edition


105 PERSONAL


Prayer to St. Jude. May the Sacred
Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified,
loved & preserved throughout the world,
now & forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus
pray for us. St. Jude worker of miracles
pray for us. St Jude helper of the hope-
less, pray for us. Say this prayer 9
times a day by the 8th day your prayer
will be answered. It has never known to
fail. Publication must be promised. My
prayers have been answered. VS





261 FARM EQUIPMENT
Read the entire newspaper online
including the classified by going to
Observernews.net. Community news &
advertising 24/7 is only 1 click away.




310 GARAGE/YARD SALE

B>Ca(vary's

i Thrift Store
Wednesday, Friday
& Saturday
9 a.m. - Noon
4th of July Sale!
Buy any Red, White or
Blue Clothing Item -- Get
Same Type Item FREE
Also 'Secret Sale'
1424 E. College Ave. * Ruskin
813-641-7790
Ministr of Calvarl Lutheran Church

Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana
St., Gibsonton (1 block off US 41,1 block
north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday thru
Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture,
lots misc. Ministry First Baptist Gibson-
ton. 813-671-0036 to donate
Huge yard sale /flea market. Various
equipment: marine, horse/ farm, many
tools, small appliances, electronics,
many brand new items. 1620 US 41
south in front of motorcycle shop,
Ruskin. Credit cards accepted. July 2
& 3, 8am-2pm
Furniture, clothes, lots of misc., Weber
grill, golf cart. 1510 Heron Drive., SCC.
July 1 & 2, 8am-1 pm.


NNUCEE
100 1jH


312 ESTATE SALES




Your home will be staged for
best results. Working in
Sun City Center for 23 years.
Please feel free to call about
the sale or its contents.
Bonded * Licensed
Cell: 508-0307
or Eve: 633-1173



NETTIE'S
ESTATE
SfALES


310 GARAGE/YARD SALE





SENIOR MONDAYS
Many popular items
discounted 50%, in addition to
weekly specials. Always low,
reasonable prices.
r - - - - - - - - - ---
'BRING THIS AD

SSave*


|1 OOFF
1 with purchase of $50
(before tax)
Expires 7/13/11





312 ESTATE SALE
















Loveseat & Chairs, Ebony Coffee Table
& End Table, Bassett Bedroom Suite,
- Kitchen Table w14
97rji Chairs, Golden Bisque
,ll Bedroom Suite,
Lamps, End Tables,
^jlij j PatioChairs, Royal
Worcester China,
..,keSt . Faberware Stoneware,
Hull, Capodimote,
Artwork, Treadmill, Stair Stepper,
Weights, Welding Tools, Small Yard
Utility Trailer, Schwinn Bicycle,
Fridge, Scooter Lift, Rods & Reels,
Household & Garage Items, Tools.


6819 U.S. 301 S., Riverview
(813) 677-8180













Contents Include: Antiques &
Collectibles, Wing Back Chairs,
Antique Parlor Chair w/Ottoman,
Antique Vanity Antique Needle-


ville Dining Room Table w/Chairs,
Beautiful Wrought Iron Floral
Design Kitchen Table w/Chairs,
Provincial Style Full Bedroom Set,
Broyhill Desk & Chest of Drawers,
Coffee Table & End Tables, Curio
Cabinet, Telescope, Sleeper Sofa,
Rocking Chairs, Singer Sewing
Machine & Cute Sewing Chest,
Patio Set, John Deere Mower,
Pressure Washer, Workbench &
Grinder, Tools, Paddle Boat,
Household & Garage Items,
Worth The Drive!
PLEASE PARK ON SIDE OF SALE
DUE TO EMERGENCY VEHICLES.
See You There!

Your best Advertising Buy!
The Observer News


312 ESTATE SALES


Let us get done in one day
what it takes the other
guys a week to do.
We will pack-up and
pick-up one room or the
entire house for a QUICK,
PROFITABLE, TROUBLE-
FREE EXPERIENCE.
CALL
BUTTERFIELD'S
AUCTIONS


U83


www.ButterfleldsAuctions.com
Butterfield Auctions AB2706/AU3549

314 ANTIQUES/COLLECTIBLE
Genuine Meissen china. White /blue
onion motive, trade mark: Meissen in
oval with star underneath. 6 dinner /6
soup & 6 desert plates. 11.5" Soup
tureen with lid; 16" oval serving platter,
11" round serving dish. Also; vintage
embroider linen /lace tablecloths w /
napkins, individual lace doilies. Call
8139381786

330 FURNITURE
Electronic lift chair, like new $250.
Trundle bed + 2 mattress, like new
$250. Bedding package $50. Sterling
bath lift, still in box. $300. Husquvarna
embroidery machine (one+) with many
accessories $400. Sewing machine
cabinet $100. 813-645-2095
335 MUSIC
Upright piano w/ bench, rescued from
the Sun City Center Inn before being
torn down. Call 813-672-1071
350 COMPUTERS
HP computer w/ HP 1350 printer, all
in one, desk, chair & shredder. $275.
813-634-1162
360 GOLF CARTS
Golf cartswanted. Buy sell, trade. Char-
gers, parts all related. Ronny's Carts &
Parts. 813-645-4515 or 813-484-9855


Classified Works


425 SLIPS OR STORAGE
South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special-
izing in outside storage for RVs, boats &
trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay-
Storage.com





458 PARTS & SERVICE

*WANTED*P
DEAD OR ALIVE

Cars, Tracks, Vans, SUVs,
ann Trucks & Equipment
fWE PAY CASH
7 Days a Week
'o Green Auto Recycling'
(813) 247-5865

461 TRAVEL TRAILERS


465 RV LOT RENTAL
RV lot for rent in Ruskin. $275 monthly
includes water & sewer plus deposit.
941-737-1944 or 813-345-6860

The Observer News will
be closed
Monday, July 4
in observance of
Independence Day.
Deadline for
classified line ads
will move to Friday,
July 1 at 4pm.
for the July 7 edition


" THiRIFT STORE "
OPEN: Wed., Thurs. & Fri, 8 aom. - 3 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. - 12 p.m.


N
5.R.
w 4
IstSt SW.

THRIFT S
STORE


1009 Ist_


R


Street S.W.
Zuskin


674 E We Have
Furniture, Too!
DONATION DROP OFFS
TUES. TfHRU FRL ONLY PLEASE,
ALL DONATIONS MUST BE IN CLEAN
USEABLE CONDITION.


U U


AAA Furniture
New & Gently Used Furniture

BUY & SELL
Daily Trips to SCC


Mon.-Sat.
9 a.m.-5 p.m.


m c& A to W Ar |

2711 N. MacDill Ave. * Tampa, FL 33607
813-876-1566 Call for directions
Quality Furniture at Affordable Prices
* Dining * Seating * Bedroom * Patio * Much More
WE HAVE SOMETHING FOR EVERY ROOM
INSIDE AND ALL AREAS OUTSIDE
We are worth Delivery Available We re-cover or
the drive from HOURS: make new
anywhere! Mon.-Fri.10-6 cushions
Closed on Weekends


741-0225
Cell: 382-7536
Personalized
Service


THE SHOPPER 19


June 30, 2011


stst
BeveinneWsw'st
-ept
Secretive 1]






20 THE SHOPPER





511 HOUSES FOR SALE


2BR/2BAWindsor walk in tub,
open kitchen ..................................................$6 8 ,000
SCC 3BR (split) SPA and therapy pool... $199,000
KINGS POINT RENTALS
2BR/2BA,fum, .II ..... .
garage ... ........................................ $850/m onth
SCC Furnished or unfurnished,
3BR ........................... ........... $1200/m onth
GREENBRIAR 2BR/2BA, furnished,
... ..11 ... " .950/month


Newly tiled,,3BR/2BA
home with large fenced
yard. Monthly rent $1050
with signed lease. Security
deposit and references
required. Available now.
Please call
(813) 671-4965

SRUSKIN BEAUTIFUL POOL HOUSE:
2BR + Den/ 2.5BA/Garage (den could be
a 3rd BR), extensively remodeled: new
kitchen, new hardwood floors, new central air
& heat, 3-year-new caged pool, windows
& roof,and a very nice lot with a 10 ft.
easement from backyard to canal.
$175,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
SUN CITY CENTER LAKEFRONT HOME
with fabulous view of water from most
every room, this 2BR/2BA fumished house offers
a large enclosed Florida-Room overlooking
lake, nice outside patio, inside utility-mi, and
a large pie-shaped lot on a cul-de-sac.
$150,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
2 ADJACENT ACRE LOTS for home/mobile
home of your dreams! Each lot is $44,900 with
owner financing. Mostly cleared, secluded, facing
nature preserve, they are minutes from town &
shopping. No association fees, not in flood zone.
CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
Claire
SDICKMAN
Tort REALTY
OFFICE:
. (813) 363-7250


565 M. H. IN PARKS

565 M. H. IN PARKS


610 WATERFRONT RENTALS
The Dolphin House, 768 Gran Kay-
men Way, Apollo Beach, efficiency
apartments on water. Boat docking /
fishing. Pool, laundry. $185 weekly,
plus deposit. No pets. 813-850-5217,
813-863-6123

SCC 2br/2ba Spacious Twin Tree model
w/ water view. 1756 sf, tile throughout.
Water/ lawn/ CA memberships included.
Furnishings available. $985 monthly,
Short or long term. 813-368-3711

611 HOUSES FOR RENT
Ruskin, quaint 3br/2ba home with front
covered porch. Well suited for 1-3
people. Monthly rent $925 with signed
lease. No smoking. No pets. Security de-
posit & references required. Availability
by July 1st. Please call 813-649-1599

55+ Community
Spacious 1 br/1 ba unfurnished, en-
closed patio, w/ carport. Includes yard
care, water, sewer, trash collection,
recreation card. 813-634-9695

Your best Advertising Buy!
The Observer News


TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD

Beverly
at
1645-3111
ext. 201

or e-mail: Beverly@observernews.net
up to 20 words $ 17* 30' each additional word.
Bold line S3. Classified ads must be paid in advance.
Deadline: Monday 4 p.m. for Thursday paper


Classified is the Buyers
Marketplace


611 HOUSES FOR RENT

S & R Properties
3, 2 & 1 bedrooms. No pets. Ruskin,
Gibsonton area. RV lots available 813-
310-1888 or 813-849-1469

House for rent. Ruskin 2br/1 ba fenced
yard. $700 monthly. Close to Manatee
River & boat ramp. Available Aug. 1st.
813-610-3485 or 813-641-7791

612 APTS. FOR RENT
1br/1ba, unfurnished, non smoker, no
pets. 1013 Neptune Dr, Ruskin. Water,
sewer included. $395 monthly, $385
deposit. Info. 813-633-0069

Riverview apt, 2br/2ba, CHA, water,
maintenance included. Tile floors. $600
monthly $600 security. 813-239-4292 or
813-403-3119

One bedroom, one bath, central heat
& air. Ruskin. Clean. $135 weekly,
$265 deposit. Close to stores. 813-
966-4050





AVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE
OCCUPANCY
RIVERWOOD APARTMENTS

1 Bedroom Apartments

Rental Rates Beginning
at $520 + Utilities

For Rental Information
call: (8131) 645-7320
(TDD 800-955-8771)

709 Oceanside Circle
& Ruskin G1

Mon-Fri 9:00 AM- 5:00 PM
Equal Opportunity Provider & Employer


613 CONDOS FOR RENT
Kings Point 1 br/1.5ba. furnished nicely,
covered parking, all amenities $700
monthly or for sale. $25,000, owner
financing. 813-634-1162

Summerfield area, 2br/2.5ba condo. Un-
furnished, freshly painted, new flooring.
Includes cable, water. Close to school.
Available Aug. 1. 813-789-4129

620 ROOMS FOR RENT
Furnished 1br/lba, in nice neighbor-
hood. Includes water, cable electric
& pool. $700 monthly, $350 deposit.
Sundance. 813-967-3619

Wimauma. Furnished bedroom. Country
setting. Share 2 bathrooms /kitchen.
Includes utilities& cable. Near bus route.
Maid clean baths, kitchen, hallways
weekly. No alcohol /drugs. $500 month-
ly. Only one, call today 813-503-4592

630 M.H. RENTALS

For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With
A/C. 813-677-1086

1 bedroom mobile home in quiet mobile
home park, 21st St. NW, Ruskin. Fish-
ing dock, laundry. $595 monthly, plus
security, all utilities. No pets. 813-645-
8985 or 813-610-7515

Movie in special (2 week free). Newly
renovated MHP. Several homes ready.
$155 weekly. L&N MHP, Gibsonton.
813-684-9708 or 813-245-7425

Mobile homes & RV lots for rent. Mobile
homes for sale. E-Z terms. Eastwood
Estates Mobile Home Park, Gibsonton.
Call Heather 813-677-5726

2br/2ba mobile homes on private prop-
erty on beautiful Bullfrog Creek. 813-
239-4353. or 813-967-5501


646 WAREHOUSE SPACE
Garage & mini storage rooms for rent.
Pirates Treasure Cove, Gibsonton.
813-677-1137






680 ADULT CARE
Caregiver /licensed CNA. Private duty
in your home or a facility. $12hr. 20+
yrs experience. References available.
813-641-0673 or 813-675-7275

Caregiver/Com panion
Quality care for your loved one.
References upon request. Please call
813-641-9012

Reliable caregiver. I am willing to help
you with all your everyday needs, in-
cludes: cooking, cleaning, shopping &
transportation. Call Viki 513-505-9369

Elderly caregiver or housekeeper, excel-
lent driving record. Any hour, Monday
thru Friday. Years of experience w/
references. 813-645-2456








* Affordable, in-home non-medical care
* Hourly, overnight or 24 hour service, _ _
* Meal planning and preparation 2
* Transportation/Errands
* Light housekeeping, laundry
* Respite care
Our goal is to help seniors continue to live
independently and comfortably by supporting
you with active senior caregivers who are
understanding and trustworthy.


THE SHOPPER


THE OBSERVER NEWS * THE SCC OBSERVER * THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT

To place a classified ad
call 813-645-3111 Ext. 201;
fill out the form below and fax to
813-645-1792; or mail this form to
The Shopper
210 Woodland Estates Ave. SW * Ruskin, FL 33570


DEADLINE:
Ad and payment must
be received by 4:00 p.m.
Monday for publication in
that week's edition.


Up to 20 words

$17.00
300 for each
additional word


Name:

Address:

City: State: __ Zip:

Daytime Phone: _


Classification: _


Ad copy as you wish it to appear:


.- - - - - -- - - - - - - --_ --------------.


JUNE 30, 2011
680 ADULT CARE



7 nge& of ifope

Quaf Home HeafL Care

Over 20 years experience
caring for your loved ones
in health care facilities
and private homes.
* References upon request *

Hope Romero

(813) 468-3983

HopeRomero65@gmail.com







705 CLEANING
A-Plus Quality Cleaning, Inc. Quality
services at affordable prices. Licensed
& insured. Residential, commercial &
move-outs. Call for free quote. 813-
217-1822

Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integrity.
Call for free estimate. 7days a week.
Move-in, move-out, rentals. Insured,
bonded, licensed. Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean

Let someone else do
that HEAVY work
Look in the
Business & Trade
Directory


CALL
PaulB. (813)645-3211

DICKMAN Serving South Hillsborough
INC. County since 1924.
REALTY
Celebrating 87 Years www.dickmanrealty.com
1924 - 2011 dickman@tampabay.rr.com
REDUCED PRICE!! 5 acres with 10 greenhouses! 3BR/2BAMH built in 2001. Special
features include: 20x30 workshop, 2 free standing double carports, 190 foot well,
electric gate and much more. Zoning is AR. $134,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or
ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
COMMERCIAL LISTING! Great commercial property with 158 ft of frontage on
Highway 41 (1.04 acres MOL). Property is zoned Cl (commercial intensive) and is
currently rented to an auto/service/repair garage. Special features include: huge
building (3,192 sq.ft.) with new roof, three bays, two offices, and lots of room for
storage. Adjacent property with 128 feet (MOL) of waterfront is also for sale. $279,000
CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-220
PRICE REDUCTION !! GREAT LOCATION on 4.7 Acre Parcel(MOL) in a very
convenient location, minutes from Hwy 674 and 1-75. Great area for a small develop-
ment or your own private estate. $129,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE
WESTBROOK 748-2201
PRIME LOCATION close to Hwy 41 w/easy access to 1-75, pole barn w/bath & small
living quarters. Property formerly a nursery Now has cows grazing. Approx. 45 usable
acres. Phase one environmental survey & traffic study completed. Reduced to
$1,680,000 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
RUSKIN BEAUTIFUL POOL HOUSE: 2BR + Den/2.5BA/Garage, (den could be a 3rd
BR) extensively remodeled: new kitchen, new hardwood floors, new central air & heat,
3-year-new caged pool, windows & roof, and a very nice lot with a 10 ft. easement from
backyard to canal. $175,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
RUSKIN 2BR/1BA HOUSE A BLOCK FROM RIVER: Great starter/retirement or
rental property, this home has newer metal roof, carport, utility-rm, and deep lot with
shed. Peaceful area, adjacent lot for sale separately $64,900. CALL CLAIRE TORT
363-7250
VERY NICE 2BR/2BA MOBILE HOME on .41 acre lot: Furnished, great condition, split
BR plan, huge enclosed addition, inside utility, 2-car attached carport, and large
shed/workshop. Cleared lot with fruit trees. $46,900 CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
TWOFER the price of one!!! Newly listed PAIR of CB duplexes priced below county
appraisal and at fraction of 2005 sales price. Great investment: Four 2BR/1 BA units all
currently occupied, convenient location. Short sale. $79,900 JUDY ERICKSON
468-0288
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY - GREAT LOCATION ON HIGHWAY 41!! This property
has 200 ft. on U.S. Hwy 41 and is set up for both office and warehouse space. The
property is completely fenced in with parking for over 30 vehicles. This is a great
location for a business that needs easy highway access and flexible space. Owner will
also consider a lease or lease purchase. $499,000. CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
MUST SELL to settle estate! Almost 34 acre corner lot in quiet area. Close but not too
close to town, partially cleared, zoned for residential single family home. Asking
$30,000 but make us an offer! Motivated Seller! CALL JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540
CALL US FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS........645-3211
Donate your old functioning cell phones and drop off at our
office for use by the "Victims Assistance Program."
(Evening phone numbers)
Judy Erickson ..................... 468-0288 Christine Nethers .................. 260-6335
Claire Tort ........................... 363-7250 Roxanne W estbrook ............... 748-2201
Kay Pye .. ....................361-3672 Jo Ellen Mobley ..................... 645-1540
Cathy Griggs .......... ...... 391-8653 LaRae Regis........................ 633-8318






June 30, 2011


705 CLEANING


710 LAWN CARE


M & C Mower Repair
Parts & service. Authorized warranty
center. Commercial & residential.
725 14th St., Wimauma. 813-938-
3226. Pickup & delivery

Bill's Lawn Service
Licensed & insured. No contract.
Yearly, monthly or per cut. As low as
$25 per cut. 813-293-6840

Henry's Lawn Maintenance.
Landscaping needs. Rock, mulch,
tree service. Pressure wash-
ing. Monthly lawn maintenance.
Licensed & insured. Free estimates.
813-477-3054 www..henryslawn-
maintenance.com

714 TREE REMOVAL

Professional Tree &
Landscaping. Sales: trimming,
removals, popcorn curbing, stump
grinding, clearing, hauling. Fill dirt/
top soil/ rock/ mulch. We barter for
items of value. Free estimate. Call
Paul 813-634-6041 or 813-751-9691

715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service. Culvert
sets, driveways, shell, crushed as-
phalt, concrete, fill dirt, excavating,
mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963
Free estimates.

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill
dirt, topsoil, sand, crushed rock &
asphalt, driveway culverts. Loader,
backhoe, grading, bushhog, discing.
Install Septic System & drain fills.
CFC#1427021. 813-645-1883

716 CONCRETE

Concrete Finishing
Patios' driveways' sidewalks'.
Licensed & insured. Call Steve Sim-
mons 813-503-8764. Lic#201587

720 HOME MAINT.

Custom Carpentry
Doors. Doors installed, decks, rails,
stairs, screens enclosures. Home
repairs, remodeling, framing. Senior
discount. Free estimates. C-117507
www.myic.com/customcarpentry
813-645-1778.

Advertise in the newspaper
that your community is
reading.


720 HOME MAINT.


I live in SCC & can fix leaky toilets,
faucets, AC filters, screen repair, minor
electric & inside painting. The best part,
you set the price & no service charge.
Call Artie 813-300-9699


729 STORM SHIEDS


J &F CLEANING\
Husband & Wife Team
Honest and Reliable ._.
RESIDENTIAL
* SunCityCenter )
* Apollo Beach
* Ruskin ^"

FREE Estimates
Move-Ins * Move-Outs
(813) 419-4233


A community of affordable homes * Phase III Now Available!
exclusively for first-time homebuyers! * 2 Swimming Pools and a Clubhouse
* 3,4 and 5 Bedrooms, 1 and 2 Garages
pHOME PrT s=..HIP * Popular Ruskin Location
.......o....... *USDA Self-Help Housing program-- help
(813) 672 - 7889 www.flhome.org build your home in exchange for a down
Payment
* No money down, easy to qualify
* Non-profit agency works for you
~Hablamos Espafol -




n - -,BAYOUPASS
1:~,rna g,, r.r,, r,r~e homehlerstrider 80% ofmedhinriume. Cillfor devis.


Affordable Storm Shields
Aluminium panels, clean clear
panels, Hurricane fabric, accordion
style panels & more. Free estimate.
wwww.affordablestormshields.com.
813-446-7172

735 TRANSPORTATION

At Your Service Transportation to
Tampa airport /charters /cruise ship.
Excellent prices. Call Express Trans-
portation 813-731-9283 for rates

740 MISC. SERVICES

In Your Home Pet Care
813-767-7225. Affordable, licensed,
bonded, insured. References avail-
able. email: olivertort@aol.com
Oliver & Company

Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks,
boat lifts & seawalls. Free inspec-
tion. Hecker Construction Co. 813-
236-9306







870 GENERAL

Handyman/ maintenance manager
needed, please apply in person to
Sundance Growers, Inc. 4910 US
Highway 41 South, Sun City. Salary
negotiable with experience. Must have
experience /knowledge with electrical,
mechanical, plumbing, and carpentry
work.


[ ] National Cremation
& BL R I A L SOCIETY
National Cremation &
Burial Society, Ruskin is
accepting applications for
a part-time FUNERAL
ATTENDANT and
GENERAL DUTY position
(involves some lifting)
Please stop at
308 E. College Ave.
Ruskin, FL 33570



The Observer News
will be closed
Monday, July 4
in observance of
Independence Day.
Deadline for
classified line ads
will move to Friday,
July 1 at 4pm.
for the June 7 edition


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Classified is the Buyers

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AUT REAIR


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SELF ARREST BONDS
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& #CAC 1814397
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Wilhelm "S"oic
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641-1811

DEALER 802 4th St.S.W.
'a (Off College Ave. West
Ruskin, Florida
Turn to the Experti
www.wilhelmac.com


Over 30 Years Experience
COMMERCIAL S , t Ba / * RESIDENTIAL
T (South Bay\ -
Electric Co. -
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LICENSED \ W / UPGRADES
BONDED \JL. ALL TYPES
INSURED OF WIRING
ER00126636 RENOVATIONS
* SECURITY LIGHTS * CEILING FANS
. SWITCHES & OUTLETS * SPAS & DOCKS
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145 21st ST. N.W. * RUSKIN


813-642-6182


PHIL OLEY
25+ Years Experience


m Insured m


SERVING
* APOLLO BEACH
* RUSKIN * SCC
* KINGS POINT


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* Lawn Service
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(813) 928-5500
FREE Estimates Provided
(will beat any written estimate)


Timothy Sutton, ��C
INTERIOR EXTERIOR
PAINTING
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PRESSURE WASHING
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NOW SERVING FLORIDA
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and Lock Sets


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35 ft Plumbing
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* Repipes *Water Heaters
* New Construction
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FREE Estimates
BUD
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No job too big or too small
SERVING SINCE 1973
* Ruskin * Sun City Center * Kings
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P.O. Box 551 * Ruskin, FL 3357C
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22 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


JUNE 30, 2011





OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 23


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24 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


Teaching kids about clean green


* By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews.net
RUSKIN - Some of the smart-
est students in South County are in
summer school this year.
In fact, they're there by choice.
June 20-23 they attended the En-
ergy Camp held at Hillsborough
Community College SouthShore
campus.
Run by the Florida Advanced
Technological Education (FLATE)
group that gives special summer
camp programs for advanced sci-
ence and math, the focus of last
week's program was to show 25
students from Beth Shields Middle
School in Ruskin about solar en-
ergy.
From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. for three
days students learned about the im-
pact of using fossil fuels and the
science of generating solar electric-
ity through various fun activities.
While at the camp, I watched
students perform two of those ac-
tivities: compare the activation and
strength of solar cells under differ-
ent amounts of sunlight and colors
and make "cookers" that would
cook food using sunlight.
"Look, there is a difference," said
Daniel Cervantes as lead camp in-
structor from FLATE, Jorge Mon-
real, changed the '"filter" between
the sun and the cells from blue to
red. Using simple plastic dividers
from three-ring notebooks, Mon-
real was able to demonstrate how
color affects the power of solar en-
ergy and heat.
Brian Sanchez agreed. Others
lying on the ground watching and
connecting cells were Cristofer
Garcia, Hailey Clavel, and Emely
Reyes-Reynoso.
At the same time, other students
were making cookers using alumi-
num foil.


Luis Porras, Juan Juarez-Hernan-
dez and Daniela Reyes-Villalon
stretched the foil and cut it to size
and then put the food pots in place
to be cooked in the sun.
During the three-day period other
experiments were also done using
wind energy and time was spent
learning about ocean energy and
home efficiency as well.
Dr. Allen A. Witt, SouthShore
campus president, said he is proud
to be able to offer his campus for
many summer activities.
In July, there will be a repeat of
the Robotics Camp featured last
year in The Observer News.
"This is the first year we have of-
fered the Energy Camp," Witt said.
'The more opportunities students
have to learn, the more inclined
they are to stay in school and fur-
ther their higher education."
The new campus of HCC South-
Shore has gained many new stu-
dents and programs since opening
in the fall of 2008, many of which
would have normally chosen a uni-
versity. The poor economy has been
good for HCC because student's
scholarship funds go farther there
and for that reason many choose to
attend community college for two
years and then transfer to a univer-
sity.
The Energy Camp is a natural for
HCC because the HCC campus is
being built according to new green
energy specifications, Witt said.
Although only the first buildings
are up, the campus is eventually
slated to house six energy-efficient
buildings on its 60-acre site at 551
24th St. N.E. in Ruskin.
Working hard to set up the sum-
mer camps were Carlos Ortiz, who
teaches at the college and will also
be taking charge of the Robotics
Camp and David Gula, outreach

t'i2


manager at FLATE and coordinator
of the summer camps. Gula is based
at the Brandon HCC campus.
'This is very exciting because
it is the first ever summer Energy
Camp," said Monreal, who led
most of the activities with the help
of USF professor Denis Karaiskaj;
Andrea Hemphill, middle school
science teacher; and Dawn Simon
AVID program teacher.
The 25 students from AVID (Ad-
vancement Via Individual Deter-
mination) learned about the many
aspects of renewable energy tech-
nologies guided by FLATE, which
is an arm of the National Science
Foundation funded by the Florida
Energy Systems Consortium of
Florida universities established by
the Florida Legislature.
Not bothered by all those fancy
names and details, students heard
about the importance of a college
education; why clean energy is
important to society; and how we
have used energy in the past.
Students lay on the ground in
sweltering heat connecting and re-
connecting energy cells and mea-
suring how much sunlight affected
their temperatures. They simulated
greenhouse gas and did experi-
ments with electromagnetism.
The first day, they got to construct
a simple motor using only magnets,
a battery and a conducting wire.
At lunch time they ate sun-baked
cookies, after which they watched a
solar technology demonstration.
The main thrust, however, was
group workshop projects where
students worked together to do
tests and measures.
The second and third days they
learned about wind technologies
and fuel cells and watched renew-
able energy fuel videos.
It was amazing watching the


students unroll aluminum foil
knowing they were constructing a
"stove" that would cook meals us-
ing the energy from the sun. Two
cook pots were set on the foil, and
their heat measured regularly.
For those whose curiosity is now
up, portions of what the students


learned are available on the Web.
One activity they did: "How light
affects molecules in the atmo-
sphere," may be viewed at http://
phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/
molecules-and-light, and another
is a NOVA video available for
view at http://video.pbs.org/vid-
eo/1873639434. *


PENNY FLETCHER PHOTOS
Jorge Monreal, project manager for FLATE, shows middle school
students how to measure solar cell devices at Hillsborough Com-
munity College's recent Solar Energy Camp. FLATE is the Florida
Advanced Technological Education Center's Energy Systems Con-
sortium that gives special summer camp programs for advanced
science and math students.


W'. 4"r








'SUNSETG RILL 611 Destiny Drive * Ruskin, FL 33570 * 813-645-8119,
AI f H'AT LITTLE HARBORJ www.StayLittleHarbor.com


JUNE 30, 2011




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