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Creation Date: November 25, 2010
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Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
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        Page 18
        Page 19
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        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
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Full Text



Pp .3 T ST,-
PAID
Pi 1,7 '1I FLOPI'" C ;; .
PEP[I T IO ,C


THE OBSERVER NEWS


Whatever


happened

about...
* By MELODY JAMESON
mj@observernews.net
...Senior Med Center
Planning is moving ahead and
specialists are joining in laying
ground work for a medical servic-
es center focused on the senior age
group, located adjacent to South
Hillsborough's first retirement
community.
Dr. Ken Barringer, retired psy-
chologist living in Sun City Center
and leader in the South County's
mental health coalition, as well as
Bill Kearns, Ph.D., a gerontologist
on the Department of Aging staff
in the University of South Flor-
ida's College of Medicine, have
become part of the local advisory
group formed about a year ago by
Dr. Pat Crow, a retired physician in
SCC, to spearhead establishment
of the medical facility.
It is envisioned that the multi-
aspect facility - providing medical
services tailored for the age group,
See WHATEVER HAPPENED, page 16


The entire Riverview High School band stands at attention for photographs after its performance, with
director, John Davis, in front at far left.

Riverview High hosts state band semi finals


* By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews.net
RIVERVIEW - All I could think
of when I entered the massive band
competition being held Nov. 20 at
the Riverview High School stadium
was the 1957 Broadway hit from
The Music Man, "76 Trombones."
The reason for that is easy to ex-
plain. The first thing I heard as I


walked through the gates was the
trombones and the first thing I saw
as I stepped onto the practice field
was a perfectly aligned row of tubas
lying on the ground. That's one in-
strument that's far too heavy to carry
around between performances.
Once I found my way to the check-


annual event, I was escorted cour-
tesy of the Riverview High School
Booster Club to an area where I
could see (and hear) everything I
needed despite the apparent chaos of
being in a group of more than 8,000
people, many holding (and playing)
instruments.


in table run by the Florida Marching Twenty three bands from all over
Band Coalition that sponsors the See RIVERVIEW BAND, page 12


Gibsonton

woman

thankful for

finding family
* By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews.net
GIBSONTON- People are giv-
ing thanks for many things today
but family and friends rank high
on most lists.
One woman from Gibsonton is
especially thankful for finding her
long-lost sister and learning she
has another sister as well.
"I always knew someone I loved
was missing in my life," said Su-
zanne Keller-Becker, who is now
23. "When I was younger I'd wake
up crying because she was gone,
but I was too young to understand
what had happened."
"I've always remembered being
with Jennifer. She was probably
about 13 and I was 3 or 4 and I
really looked up to her. Then one
day, she was just gone."
This happened due to her father's
See THANKFUL, page 15


Sailing in through the out door feature bserverew


* B, MAITCH TP-PH-,GEN


*
a


The quiicl ain IlK cjbin cclioes All of IlK icini\ i anid IlK C\CIlci-
Ilit oll pICp) ili, IlKc bhoIl '\ Iitl Mlmclcl IIcnoio' \\ iclt niin11-
oiicn I ci,11 sIllI fc l ihlic 1ii- il butI ll m i loiK In h IIIcin


The Cove Point Lighthouse near Solomons is the oldest working lighthouse in
Maryland. It is owned by the Calvert Marine Museum but is still operated by the
U.S. Coast Guard.


it will take Michelle to drive a thousand miles
back to Tampa Bay, I can, at best, make 100
miles under sail. This is not a journey for the
impatient. I am struggling to learn patience. But
first, I must overcome the quiet echoes in the
cabin.
Gale warnings for the Chesapeake Bay de-
layed my departure for the beginning of the
protected waters of the Intracoastal Waterway
in Norfolk, Virginia. The bay doesn't relinquish
her grip easily - especially for fools who tempt
her by leaving late in the season.
Since the day I bought this boat I have been
sailing in through the out door. In other words,
I have been moving in the opposite direction of
the normal cruising flow. Each year hundreds
of people sail their boats north for the summer
and south for the winter in a never-ending quest
for 75 degrees in temperature. When the days
grow short and cool in the north, the cruising
fleet, made up of everyone from retired cou-
ples on immaculate yachts to young drop-outs
on small boats experiencing adventure before
becoming tied to mortgages, point their bows
south for Florida, the Bahamas and the Carib-
bean. Months later when the summer heat and
the threat of hurricanes rise, they sail north. For
most of these cruisers, the ICW is the nautical
equivalent to Interstate 95.
When I launched the boat at Cape Cod and
See SAILING HOME, page 13


To protect or

not protect is

the question
Blue Crab Sanctuary meeting
* By MELODY JAMESON
mj@observernews.net
RUSKIN - Should a unique crustacean
that's an important link
in the ecological
chain, whose
numbers suf-
fer in drought
conditions
and which
is prized on the
plates of seafood
lovers everywhere get protections to
preserve it?
This is the question being posed by a
local fisherman who has been up close
and personal with this particular marine
life for decades.
In fact, Gus Muench feels so strongly
about preserving the little blue crab
which rambles up and down the Florida
west coast that he's scheduled a public
meeting to air the subject. He's also
drafted a signature petition to gauge
See BLUE CRAB FUTURE, page 16


PUT YOUR TIRED, PAINFUL LEGS INTO OUR

SKILLED HANDS.
See our full ad for more information
Mountcastle

vein centersNever stop liGi ig!
Sun City Center (next to South Bay Hospital) i
Call 813-634-1333 or 727-865-6941
www.mountcastleveincenters.com


i&-�


* 1 .,,


I


nl..,:h.-'.-.:.l:er erre , : rnel






2 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


Postcards
Brenda Sexton of Ruskin shot a great postcard last week of a mural at the The Dive
sports bar in Tarpon Springs (pictured below). The photo included an angry looking
shark swimming towards a diver. Just another day in Florida! Thank you, Brenda, for
sending it in. It seems you're not the only one to hang in Tarpon Springs -- Bill and
Margie Galbreath (thanks for the note and the kind words - it's great to hear from you!)
recognized it. This week we have a postcard from... St. Petersburg! No, just kidding!
This is in Tampa -- you know, the city just up the road no one has heard of. But now
that I gave that away, it's not enough to write and say, "I think that's in Tampa!" No,
we need details. Where in Tampa is this? Send your
best guess to where@observernews.net or mail to 210
Woodland Estates Ave., Ruskin, FL, 33570. This might
be a good excuse to take a road trip this weekend!


Holiday Teddy Bear Round Up
SUN CITY CENTER - The Sun City Center Curves is excited about
being one of the drop off sites for the Rough Rider's Teddy Bear Round
Up again this year. Every Christmas season the Rough Riders collect
teddy bears from the Bay area and deliver to patients in Bay Area hos-
pitals. Sun City Center Curves invites you to drop off NEW teddy bears
at their location at 761 Cortaro Drive, Ruskin (Marketplace Plaza). All
are invited to join in the round up. Drop
off deadline is December 18 at 6 p.m.
For those interested in joining Curves we
S . will offer 50% off the Service Fee if you
bring in a Teddy Bear.
Curves of Sun City Center recently re-
located to 761 Cortaro Drive, Ruskin
33573 (Marketplace Plaza). Curves
offers a 30 minute workout that
combines strength training and
sustained cardiovascular active
iity through safe and effective hy
f ^draulic resistance.

r CLII' ; S"','E ---------





TOWERS
A RETIREMENT & REHABILITATION COMMUNITY
I 101 Trinity Lakes Drive * Sun City Center, FL
I www.SunTowersRetirement.com
Upcoming December Events
Wed., Dec. 1 * 10-11 a.m. * Therapeutic Tai Chi open to the
public! Our therapists have advanced training in therapeutic Tai Chi
for Seniors and will provide guidance in this healthy exercise. This
class will be offered the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month. Number
of guests limited, so please RSVP as soon as possible!
Tues., Dec. 7 * 10-11 a.m. * The Sun Towers' Elder Care Forum.
A panel of experts consisting of: Amanda Wolf, Elder Law Attorney;
I Genevieve Faulk, Geriatric Care Manager and owner of Bayshore I
I Geriatrics; along with Dale Smrekar, ASEL, C.A.G.A., Professional
Estate Liquidator and Certified Personal Property Appraiser will be
answering your questions about legal issues, VA benefit programs,
senior care issues, the right time to move into a senior community,
downsizing and estate liquidations.
Thur., Dec. 9 * 10-11 a.m. * ResCare HomeCare's Barbara McClernan
(RN) and Amy Kubiak (Community Liaison) will be conducting
an Educational Seminar on Home Safety, Fall Prevention &
Medication Tips.
Thur., Dec. 9 * 2:30-4 p.m. * Edmond Dubreuil MSW, RCSWI
mental health professional facilitates this support group for
those suffering from depression, loss or grief or are the caregiver of
someone facing those issues. Supported by: South Shore Coalition on
Mental Health & Aging & The United Methodist Church of SCC.
Fri., Dec. 10 * 9:30 - 11 a.m. * Alzheimer's Symposium Kimn
Linder, Radio Talk Show Host heard every Monday on 1250 AM will be
here to moderate this informative symposium with the following panel
of experts: Amanda Wolf, Elder Law Attorney; Katie Colwell Williams,
I MA, CMC Geriatric Care Manager; Teresa W. Jackson, MAG, CMC, I
I Geriatric Care Manager; Scott Fox, Owner of Senior Helpers In Home
C'iro HHA Thic .*p.'n pnn. .-4f cxp-crt will he ..-n hand t.- _Innvr Ian-"
(ILl, I_ I- .I I_� ! I ,_ 1 1 I ! ,_ I...,_ -L__ I . i L . I . _., I_
A I h -, I I I _ ' - - 'I _ '-, .I _l -1
Mon., Dec. 13 * I-t,, u in * Join local Attorney Eniiua
Henineiis. Board Certified Expert in Elder La\i. addies%%ing
question.% like: \\hat legal document.1 do I need? Do I need
Florida document%? Do I hamve tihe type of tt=u=t that p=1teets
I my assets? Ho%% can I avoid probate? \ill iiny loved ones
I lhae to pay death taxes %lhen I die?
Wed., Dec. 15 * ,n-i,- I n *Wn .\ %e voice do you miss hearing?
If you are hard of hearing, the Floiida Telecomuntunications,
Relay is heie to help .at111 ia ge ,to you! Receive an
Simplified teleplhoine ls:ta lF . 4q gan hear your
Loved ones. Don 1It ili l efial . ni.tcl

RSVP_ _
2 a
to event to...
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Turn to the Experts.


NOVEMBER 25, 2010






NOVEMBER 25, 2010




By: Dana Dittmar, Executive Director
SCC Chamber News


Two weeks ago, I ran into Best
Buy to get a replacement car char-
ger for my GPS. That was my only
item and I knew right where to find
- it. I dashed
to the right
SN aisle, grabbed
the item, and
. dashedback to-
wards the front
of the store to
You, Me & an open ca-
Business shier. Before I
By DanaDittmar could take the
By Dna Dimr last two steps,
I was cut off by
another customer pushing a large,
overstuffed cart with 27 items (I
counted them!) Without so much
as a "pardon, me" he proceeded to
unload part of his cart. He paid for
those items, and then began to un-
load another section of his cart and
tally up again, paying with a dif-
ferent card. After 15 minutes and
yet a third transaction, he looked
back at me with my one little item,
shrugged his shoulders and left.
No "sorry 'bout that" or "I should
have let you go ahead."
I don't know about you, but my
Mamma raised me better than that.
Even if I'm rushing to get house-
hold supplies at Walmart on my
lunch hour, I will let someone else
go ahead of me if they only have


one or two items and I have a cart-
ful.
Where did common courtesy go?
These social gaffes don't just take
place in the checkout line. They
happen when you leave a message
for someone and it never gets ac-
knowledged, much less returned.
It happens when a customer ser-
vice representative gets snippy
because you don't have all your
account numbers handy, or when
someone neglects to hold the door
for the person walking in right be-
hind them.
In this economic climate when
it's a buyers market and custom-
ers can easily go to your com-
petitor, you can't afford to ignore
common courtesy. If you have a
customer who requires a little ex-
tra effort and time, make sure they
get it. Customers are the reason
for your day, not an interruption of
it! Now, in the case of Best Buy,
it was the customer, not the store
who was rude. So remember to be
an equally courteous customer and
see how much better your shop-
ping experience is!
Karma dictates what goes
around, comes around. Make sure
only good comes back around
your way. Besides, your Mamma
taught you better than that!


CWGA 18 Caloosa C.C. Women's 18


hole golf league
September 29, ABC-1 Best Ball
Net
Pearl Ashe 1st score 57
Sue Daveler
Nancy Cleary
Terry Cox 2nd 61
Lolita Johnson


Dessie Mahoney
Joan Guinta 2rd tie 61
Jean Atkins
(pio\N used)
Anita Ciota 2nd tie 61
Hazel Winklman
Jackie Wrigley


OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 3


Baked goodies
for sale
The Summerfield Ladies' Club
will be sponsoring a Holiday Bake
Sale in connection with the arrival
of Santa and the Gift and Craft
Show on Saturday, Dec. 4. This
bake sale will include cakes, pies,
cookies, pastries, fruit breads and
much more. All of these items will
be modestly priced and make won-
derful hostess and teacher gifts.
The proceeds of this bake sale
will be donated to the U.S. Marine
Corp. 'TOYS FOR TOTS' pro-
gram. Satisfy your sweet tooth and
support this wonderful program.


Holding some of the holiday cards are L to R: Back row: Pamala
Spry, Kathy McGartland, Faith Dube, Sherry Seals. Front row: Sonja
Ray, Katie Neaves, Dr. Michelle Halcomb.


Holiday mail for heroes a success
Thanks to their patients, and members of the Sun City Center commu-
' 15 unity, Drs. Zamikoff, Klement, Jungman, Varga and Halcomb achieved
' / their goal for "Holiday Mail for Heroes". Over 500
Si holiday cards were collected to send to service mem-
bers, their families and veterans all over the world.
The dental practice is grateful for the wonderful re-
sponse and plans to participate in the program again next year.

M&I Bank hosts Toys for Tots drive

The Apollo Beach Branch Office
of M&I Bank is proud to serve ,
as a collection point for the an-
nual U. S. Marine Corps Reserve
"Toys for Tots" Holiday gift drive.
Community members wishing to
donate can bring new, unwrapped
toys to the bank during normal
lobby hours, and place them in
the collection bin. The toys will
be distributed to needy children
within the community in time for
Christmas. The Bank is located at
5461 N. US Highway 41 in Apollo
Beach. For information on lobby
hours call 813-649-0400.

m m ~ A .nnie.Rodr.g.e..


M&I Bank employees, Yvonne Garcia, Joseph Orozco, Deb Adams,
and Annie Rodriguez.


KELLER WILLIAMS

35 Agents in Sun City Center to Serve You

1603 Sun City Center Plaza * 813-633-4200
(Just before the Nearly New Shop)


KIG PON UIIYCNE


I


Address


1801 Bedford Ter #J235..................22,000
1801 Bedford Ln #B27....................24,999
1802 Bedford Ln #H179.................27,000
1802 Bedford Ln #10......................27,800
1801 Bedford Ln #B45....................34,000
401 Dorchester PI #51 ....................35,000
2202 Clubhouse Dr #177 ................ 37,000
1902 Dandridge St #D14................39,000
402 S Dorchester PI #46..................39,900
1811 Bedford Ln #G165..................41,500
1906 Canterbury Ln #20.................44,000
312 Gloucester Blvd #9...................49,900
1802 Foxhunt Dr A #A....................49,900
124 Gloucester Blvd ....................... 50,000
2207 Greenhaven Dr......................62,000
2527 Lynx Rd.................................. 64,500
319 Kelsey Way.............................. 64,900
426 Gladstone PI ........................... 67,000
2104 Hailstone Rd.......................... 69,900
1255 Radison Ave........................... 77,900
2110 Harleston PI........................... 78,900
2514 Larkin Dr................................ 79,900
2151 Hailstone Cir.......................... 79,900


KELLER
WILLIAMS.


List Price


2018 Nantucket Dr......................... 85,000
1105 Harefield Circle...................... 89,500
1534 Ingram Dr.............................. 93,000
1533 Ingram Dr.............................. 94,000
1324 Idlewood Dr........................... 95,000
755 Mcdaniel St ............................. 98,000
739 Tremont Greens Ln...................99,500
808 Manchester Woods Dr..............99,900
1153 Jameson Greens Dr...............106,900
1142 Mcdaniel St ......................... 115,900
2038 Inverness Greens Dr................ 110,000
2345 Nantucket Dr.......................125,000
1101 Jameson Greens Dr..............125,000
1257 Lyndhurst Greens Dr............... 129,900
1012 Bristol Greens Ct..................138,000
527 Princeton Greens Ct ..............139,000
1257 Corinth Greens Dr................149,900
2258 Brookfield Greens Cir.............. 158,900
1209 Lyndhurst Greens Dr............... 169,900
2279 Sifield Greens Way...............189,650
2463 Kensington Greens Dr............. 195,000
2479 Kensington Greens Dr............. 249,900


Address


1305 Burbank Ct .......................49,000
218 S Pebble Beach Blvd..............62,000
722 Tam 0 Shanter Ave.................62,500
1714Atrium Dr ......................... 69,900
209 Genet Ct ............................. 74,500
702 Brockton Place West #2 .........75,000
211 Rickenbacker Dr..................78,000
720 Tam 0 Shanter Ave.................79,900
1812 Breth Ct............................ 84,900
666 Allegheny Dr ........................ 84,900
717 Thunderbird Ave....................85,000
1211 Simmons Way #02............... 86,400
1104 Beach Blvd .......................89,000
1212 Simmons Way...................89,900
1803 Allegheny Dr ....................99,000
811 Oakmont Ave ...................99,500
1933 Grand Cypress Ln ..............99,500
714 Sahara Dr............................ 99,900
1606 Dower Way .......................99,900
702 Ward Cir............................ 104,000
1226 Valley Forge Blvd ...............104,900
1814 Columbine PI ..................114,900
2455 Del Webb E Blvd .............115,000
381 Club Manor Dr #38b............119,000
1025 Bluewater Dr....................119,900
1112 El Rancho Dr ...................124,000
375 Club Manor Dr .................. 124,900
316 Fairside Ct......................... 124,900
303 Sedgewick Ct.................... 125,000


605 La Jolla Ave....................... 125,000
104 Cactusflower Ln................129,900
1820 Del Webb E Blvd .............139,900
218 Stoneham Dr....................149,900
1816 Bunker Hill Dr .................154,900
322 Caloosa Palms Ct..............159,900
2309 Del WebbW Blvd ...............160,000
2131 Del WebbW Blvd...............160,000
1618Woodmar Dr...................164,900
2002 Chickory Ln.....................168,500
704 Camellia Green Dr................169,000
1113 Villeroy Dr....................... 169,000
2006 E View Dr ........................ 169,900
2030 Berry Roberts Dr................174,900
1939 Sterling Glen Ct..............175,000
2012 Prestancia Ln..................181,900
307 S Pebble Beach Blvd ............195,000
1121 Jasmine Creek Ct ...............199,900
2112 WView Dr.......................209,900
1943 Sterling Glen Ct..............215,000
1040 Emerald Dunes Dr..............230,000
1016 Regal Manor Way..............239,000
2103 Platinum Dr....................249,000
1058 Emerald Dunes Dr..............249,900
1347 Emerald Dunes Dr #2.........260,000
1129 Emerald Dunes Dr..............262,000
1007 Emerald Dunes Dr..............264,900
1328 Emerald Dunes Dr #N/a.....280,800
2018 New Bedford Dr..............284,900


List Price


803 Regal Manor Way................294,900
2118 New Bedford Dr..............294,900
2206 New Bedford Dr..............297,500
2210 Platinum Dr.................... 299,500
2135 Platinum Dr #258 ..............312,000
302 Noble Faire Dr #267.............354,900
2133 Platinum Dr.................... 435,000

RESIDENTIAL
APOLLO BEACH
161 St. Thomas Circle ..................... 66,000
BRANDON
1112 Southside Drive...................... 70,000
RUSKIN
517 Frances Circle..... ...... ............ 65,000
2303 8th SW Street..........524,900
410 15th NE Street.......................... 65,700
RIVERVIEW
13312 C.R. 672................................ 99,900
9620 Raiden Lane ......................... 625,000
10212 Caraway Spice Avenue........... 289,000
WIMAUMA
5575 State Road 674..................... 124,900
302 West Lake Drive...................... 199,900
VALRICO
506 Crowned Eagle Court..............289,000
LAND AND MIXED USE
8243 Summer Orange Ave., Wimauma
-5+ acres..................................... 170,000
Oak St Ruskin, .21 acres.................. 29,900
Summer Tree, Wimauma, 5+ acres. 130,000
Boyette Rd, Riverview, 1/2 acre........ 149,000
Birdie Way, Apollo Beach, lot............ 134,000
W. College & 4th St., Ruskin, Acreage....200,000


I


List Price Address


List Price Address


List Price Address


THIS AD COMPLIMENTS OF Gail Green, Sharon Van Loan, Sam Provan, Linda McCown, Al Martinsky, Nora Nelson, Nicki Kaukonen, JR Del Castillo, LaVerne Calhoun, Marianne
Crowe, Judie McFarland, Tom McFarland, Neal Schaefer, Debi Tourangeau, Judi Brogden, Jerry Clifton, Kathy McGartland, Carole Wettach, Lexie Hagman, Mardell Williamson, Bob
Totero, Angie Cole, Susie Collins, Charley Collins, Larry Bruni, Karen Sellers, Pam Reno, Colleen Schmeiser,Travis Bunn






4 . OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER
Take stock now, the year's almost over


The middle of November is the
time of year to take stock of what
we have accomplished for the year.
It is also leaves us several weeks to
wind up the projects we have started
P and commit
ted to finish
ing in 2010.
If you are one
of the orga
nized people,
you probably
Positive started the
Talk year with a
By William Hodges list of goals
and checked
them off one at a time. This is great
because it creates a constant inven-
tory of accomplishment and tends to
keep you on target. Most of us don't
do that; when the year is over, we
have only vague memories of what
we have done. The problem with
this is we tend to undervalue what
we have accomplished because we
can't remember it. This can lead to
lowered self-worth because if we
can't remember what we did, we
can't give it value.
On a smaller scale than an entire
year, here is an example of what I
mean. A young mother of two small
children complained that her hus-
band would come home every night
talking about how hard he worked
at the office and telling her how
easy she had it at home. When she
responded that she worked hard as
well, he would ask her what she had
done that day. Her response was,
"Housework and watching the chil-
dren." He would always laugh and
offer to trade. Over a period of time,
she began to buy into the fact that
his job was much more taxing and
hers had little value, even though it
was not true. I asked her to define
what she meant by housework and
taking care of the kids. She said,
"You know," to which I responded,
"No, I don't know and I bet your
husband has no real grasp of how
much you do either. I suggest you
keep a log of what you do for the
next week and then show him what
you do. Even you may be surprised
at how much you are contributing
to the family." She took my advice
and was amazed at the sense of ac-
complishment she had when she
looked at the list. She showed her
husband the log and he never of


fered to trade jobs again.
If you take the time to review what
you have been able to get done so
far this year, your sense of accom-
plishment will soar and you will be
better positioned to finish the things
that still need to be done.
For myself, this is the first year
I have attempted to keep a log of
the things I am working on and my
progress toward their completion. I
have to admit I am surprised at the
variety of projects in which I have
been involved. As I review them, I
get a better sense of how I spent my
time.
There are only a few weeks until
the end of the year-a few weeks to
take stock of where you have been
and ascertain where you are. Most
importantly, when you know what
you've completed and what you
still need to do, you can use these
remaining weeks to direct your ef-
forts accordingly. If you do, you
can wrap up your future with a big
blue bow.
"Hodges is a nationally recog-
nized speaker, trainer and syndi-
cated columnist. He also hosts an
interview-format television pro-
gram, Spotlight on Government,
on the Tampa Bay Community
Network which airs Mondays at
8 p.m. and Wednesdays at 7:30
p.m. (Bright House channel 950,
Verizon channel 30). The shows
can also be viewed at www.hodges-
videos.com. Phone: 813-633-1523.
Email: bill@billhodges.com Web-
site: www.billhodges.com"


Are you concerned about the state of



Social Securit

* When will the Social Security Trust Fund be exhausted?
* How can I maximize the benefit I receive?
* Is it possible to increase my benefit if I am already getting
Social Security?
* If I die, what will my spouse receive?

M t miss this seminar!

Thurs., Dec. 2 at 10:00 a.m.
The Golf Club at Cypress Creek
1011 Cypress Village Blvd., Ruskin, FL 33573
Sponsored PROVIDENT
by PROVIDENT


Come have your questions answered by
Iris Santiago, Public Affairs Specialist for ...'. /
the Social Security Administration.
Light refreshments will be served.
Limited seating. Call or email to reserve your seat.
RSVP to Jason Heinzelmann or Jarrod Rutledge at
(813) 240-6655 or (813) 283-8413 or email
info@providentwmg.com by Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2010.
Securities offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment Advice offered
through IFP a Registered Investment Advisor and separate entity from LPL Financial.


Magnus Bingham is a 3rd grader from Cypress Creek Elementary
School and is shown with Judy Jordan.
Look no further for holiday greeting cards
The 2nd Annual Student Holiday Greeting Card Art Contest was held
this year during the months September and
October. The winners have been picked and if
the cards are ready for sale! --
The Friends of the SouthShore Regional --
Library are selling holiday greeting cards" --
created by local elementary school students. -_
The participating schools were Cypress
Creek, Reddick, Ruskin and Wimauma Elementary Schools. The win-
ning artists' holiday renderings were beautifully transformed into cards
by Ruskin printer, M&M Printing Company, Inc.
The Holiday Greeting Cards are now available to the public and can
be purchased at the SouthShore Regional Library front desk at a cost
of only $5 for all 10 cards! Proceeds from the sale of the cards will
supplement the cost of various programs offered to the public for free at
the Library. The SouthShore Regional Library is located at 15816 Beth
Shields Way (off 19th Avenue) in Ruskin. For more information, please
call 813.273.3652


NOVEMBER 25, 2010

THE OBSERVER NEWS
The SCC Observer &
The Riverview Current
210 Woodland Estates S.W.
Ruskin, FL 33570
813-645-3111
Fax: 813-645-4118
www.ObserverNews.net
Published Every Thursday
by M&M Printing Co., Inc. 645-4048
EDITORIAL:
Brenda Knowles ............Publisher/Editor
brenda@observernews.net
Mitch Traphagen............... Online Editor
mitch@observernews.net
Penny Fletcher..........Contributing Writer
penny@observernews.net
Melody Jameson......Contributing Writer
mj@observernews.net
Julie Ball.............. Press Releases/W riter
news@observernews.net
All press releases, news articles and
photos may be emailed to news@
observernews.net, faxed to 645-4118, or
mailed to Observer News, 210 Woodland
Estates Ave. SW Ruskin, FL 33570
SALES:
Vilma Stillwell... Display Advertising Rep.
vilma@observernews.net
Nan Kirk........... Display Advertising Rep.
nan@observernews.net
For current rates and circulation
information visit our website at
www.ObserverNews.net
CLASSIFIED / CIRCULATION:
Beverly Kay......... Classified / Circulation
beverly@observernews.net
PRODUCTION:
ChereSimmons....Graphic Arts/ Layout
chere@observemews.net
Sue Sloan .............Composition / Layout
sue@observernews.net
The views expressed by our writers are
not necesssanly shared by The Observer
News, SCC Observer, The Riverview
Current or M&M Pnnting Co., Inc.


A OA M


Family Owned & Operated
Nationwide Warranty Available Through American Car Care & NAPA

We are a AAA Approved

Auto Repair Center


WELCOME ABOARD Ryan Esto,
formerly of Pioneer Tire in Riverview,
and Carolyn Hogue.
Stop by and say hello!


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makes and models
including:
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902 N. Tamiami Trail, Ruskin, FL 33570
(Across from Sweetbay Supermarket)
NEW PATIENTS WELCOME
(813) 645-6491
Members American Dental Associaton, Florida State Dental Associaton, Florida West Coast Dental
Association, Manatee County Dental Association and Hillsborough County Dental Association


I






OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * 5


NOVEMBER 25, 2010

IN UNIFORM


Riverview hosts open novice Judo
tournament
T N-T Academy of Judo will be hosting The Kibo Cup, an Open Novice
Judo Tournament from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 27 at the Sum-
merfield Community Center, 13011 Summerfield Blvd., Riverview.
The competition entry fees are $40 per person. Walk-up registrations
are accepted, cash only. The event is free to the public.
There will be divisions available for everyone from pre-school to Mas-
ters, male and female. This is a novice-only tournament and a first of
its kind in Judo. The tournament is for Judoka (Judo students) who are
beginners holding a white, yellow or orange belt ranking only.
"The bravery required to stand across the mat from an opponent and
to engage in the hand-to-hand fighting could be made easier by intro-
ducing Judoka to the experience in this type of event rather than a huge
event with much higher ranked Judoka possibly being the opponent,"
said Coach Scott Ferry.
Offering a unique, fun and exciting event for the enjoyment of new
people to the sport promises to be a good time for all. Judo is an Olym-
pic sport that combines takedowns and throwing techniques with ground
control and submissions, including arm locks, chokes and pins. The
American College of Sports Medicine calls Judo 'the safest contact sport
for children under the age of 13.'


TechPlayZone sponsor
TechPlayzone, a science and
technology center, is coordinating
a First Lego League (FLL) Robot-
ics Tournament from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. on Saturday, December llth
at HCC-Brandon Campus.
The tournament kicks off the
season of First Lego League (FLL)
Robotics for Hillsborough County.
The Suncoast FLL Tournament
will host 22 teams and is open to
the public.
Dr. Carlos Soto, President of
HCC-Brandon Campus, is pleased
that HCC-Brandon is the host for
a competition that encourages
young people to engage in sci-
ence, technology, and research.
This tournament builds on the
Robotics Summer Camp hosted
by FL-ATE on HCC's campus for
middle schoolers.
Twenty-two teams from the
Tampa Bay Area, including sever-
al magnet schools, will participate
in the robotics tournament.
FIRST Lego League (FLL) tour-
naments are open for the public
with free admission. FIRST is an
international organization that
promotes interest and excitement
in science and technology. FIRST
Lego League teams consist of
young people from 9- to 14 year-
old who are interested in science,
technology and engineering.
Through the 2010 Body For-
wardTM Challenge, 9- to 14-year
olds will explore the cutting-edge
world of Biomedical Engineer-


TYREE J. ALLEN
Coast Guard Seaman Tyree J.
Allen, a 2007 graduate of River-
view Senior High School, recently
graduated from the U.S. Coast
Guard Recruit Training Center in
Cape May, N J.
During the eight-week training
program, Allen completed a vigor-
ous training curriculum consisting
of academics and practical instruc-
tion on water safety and survival,
military customs and courtesies,
seamanship skills, physical fitness,
health and wellness, first aid, fire
fighting and marksmanship. Men
and women train together from the
first day in the Coast Guard just
as they will work together aboard
ships and shore units throughout
the world. To reinforce the team
concept, all recruits are trained
in preventing sexual harassment,
drug and alcohol awareness, civil
rights training, and the basics of
the work-life balance.
Allen and other recruits also
received instruction on the Coast
Guard's Core Values - Honor,
Respect and Devotion to Duty
- and how to apply them in their
military performance and per-
sonal conduct. Allen will join
36,000 other men and women
who comprise the Coast Guard's
workforce.


Robotics Tournament in December


Left to right, back row: Robert Chrostkowski, 9th Grade; Ryan Keh-
rmeyer, 6th Grade; Mathias Madray, 6th Grade; Daniel Brown, 7th
Grade; Graham Peterson, 6th Grade; Darien Santmyer, 8th Grade;
Darrian Bagley, 7th Grade; Daryl Bagley, 9th Grade; Dean Lontoc,
8th Grade. Front row: Michael Schutte, 7th Grade; Devin Bagley, 4th
Grade; and Ben Harris, 8th Grade (not pictured).


ing to discover innovative ways
to repair injuries, overcome ge-
netic predispositions, and maxi-
mize the body's potential, with
the intended purpose of leading
happier and healthier lives. Each
team is responsible for identifying
a medical problem and providing
an innovative solution to the prob-
lem based on team research. In
addition to doing research, teams
must build a robot that can com-
plete as many missions as possible
in a head-to-head round lasting 21/2
minutes. Teams also compete for
teamwork awards, technical design
awards and presentation awards.
TechPlayzone CEO, Desh
Bagley, is the tournament director.
Students and parents from Tech-


Playzone are volunteering to help
make the event a success. In ad-
dition to TechPlayzone and HCC-
Brandon, other tournament spon-
sors include Florida's Advanced
Technological Education Center
(FL-ATE), Publix, The Brandon
Reading Clinic, Circa You, LLC,
Willie's Seafood Restaurant and
Jet's Pizza.
For more information about FIRST
Lego League and the Suncoast FLL
Tournament at HCC-Brandon, visit
www.suncoastfll.org. For more in-
formation about TechPlayzone's
robotics program for young people,
call (813) 684-7329 or visit www.
techplayzone.com/techplay. To
learn more about FL-ATE at HCC,
visit www.fl-ate.org.


Riverview Memorial
VFW Post #8108
7504 Riverview Dr.
(813) 671-9845

MEALS
Wednesday Spaghetti Dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m.
Friday Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.
Sunday Breakfast from 9 a.m.
to noon
ENTERTAINMENT
Friday, Nov. 26 - Jeff Olsen
Friday, Dec. 3 - Jeff Olsen
Saturday, Dec. 4 - Calvin 0
Friday, Dec. 10 -Jeff Olsen
CANTEEN HAPPENINGS
Bar Bingo on Monday at 6:30 p.m.
Bar Poker with Lori on
Wednesday at 1 p.m.
Fire in the Hole on Saturdays
at 1 p.m.


Skateboard park
projects to be
discussed
Hillsborough County will hold
two different public meetings
to discuss concept plans, future
design/planning workshops, and
construction schedules for the
Providence East and Apollo Beach
County skateboard parks.
Though they are two different
projects, both include the con-
struction of a 10,000-square-foot
outdoor concrete skateboard park.
The estimated design and con-
struction cost for each project
is $500,000, paid through Parks
Impact Fees.
Each meeting will discuss the
skateboard park of its own area.
Public comment is welcome.
Providence East Skateboard Park
meeting will be held at 6:30 p.m.
on Tuesday, Dec. 14 at Providence
West Recreation Center, 5417
Providence Road in Riverview.
Apollo Beach Skateboard Park
meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. on
Thursday Dec. 16 at Apollo Beach
Recreation Center, 664 Golf & Sea
Blvd. in Apollo Beach.


The United Daughters of the
Confederacy, Florida Division,
the Gamble Plantation Preserva-
tion Alliance and the Florida Park
Service proudly announce that the
Plantation Christmas Open House
will be held this year from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 12 at
Gamble Plantation Historic State
Park in Ellenton.
Once again you can travel back
to the Old South during the day
through the many lifestyle dem-
onstrations of that time period.
Gamble Mansion and the Patten
House will be lavishly decorated
in the Christmas spirit, allowing
a special look at a 19th century
Christmas.
The Ladies of the United Daugh-
ters of the Confederacy will wear
costumes reminiscent of the era


of the 1840s through 1870s to add
that special touch of authenticity
to the day. The 4th Florida Vol-
unteer Infantry will be dressed in
military uniforms re-enacting a
Confederate encampment. There
will be music, crafts and fun for
everyone.
They extend a most cordial
invitation for everyone to join
them for the Christmas Open
House. Gamble Plantation Histor-
ic State Park is located on U.S. 301
in Ellenton, one mile west of I -75
off exit #224. Florida State Parks
are in various stages of accessibil-
ity. They are working to improve
access to services and facilities.
Should you need assistance to
enable your full participation, con-
tact Gamble Plantation Historic
State Park at (941) 723-4536.


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OH SOSOSD!!


ESPINOZA CHAVES
Marine Corps Pfc. Elizabeth
Espinoza Chaves, a 2009 graduate
of Riverview High School, River-
view, recently graduated from the
Basic Water Support Technician
Course while assigned as a student
at Marine Corps Engineer School,
Camp Lejeune, NC.
Espinoza Chaves and fellow
students received instruction in
subjects such as maintenance man-
agement, plumbing, military water
supply and field sanitation. Upon
completion of the course, gradu-
ates are qualified to perform tasks
expected of a basic water support
technician.
Espinoza Chaves joined the
Marine Corps in March 2010.


I r S 1 - -
Marine of the year
The Riverview Detachment of the Marine Corps League selected Walt
Raysick as their 2010 Marine of the Year. Walt was selected as a result
of his many contributions to the detachment during this past year. In
addition to being the Color Guard Captain, he is active in the Toys for
Tots program, participates in the detachment's car washes, was the chair
person for the detachment's birthday celebration, represents the detach-
ment at Boy Scout Courts of Honor, is the president elect of the Hills-
borough Veterans Council and a member of the VFW, American Legion
and the Military Order of the Devil Dogs. He was presented with a medal
and certificate at the detachment's Marine Corps birthday celebration on
Nov. 13.

Visit a "Plantation Christmas'






6 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER















Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


-.


NOVEMBER 25, 2010


Keller Williams ribbon cutting is a success
The grand opening of the Keller Williams South Shore Business Cen-
ter in Sun City Center took place on Oct. 23. This fabulous event was
supported by the Sun City Center Chamber of Commerce and a long list
of businesses, organizations, and individual sponsors.
The Sun City Center Business Center has been growing rapidly since
it was established early in 2009 at a previous location. By year's end, it
was obvious that the original space was too small and the present loca-
tion was secured several months later. Painted, furnished, and filled with
smiling REALTORS�, the office was ready for its grand opening by
Oct. 23.
A successful real estate experience requires a buyer, seller, REALTOR�
and a host of service providers. All of these components came together
for the Sun City Business Center grand opening. Vendors and informa-
tion booths provided guests with a variety of useful knowledge ranging
from mortgages and titles to Shiners tickets for a Pancake Brunch. Fun
was had by all and nearly a thousand hot dogs were served!
Keller Williams Realty is now the 3rd largest franchise operation in
the United States with 695 offices and over 80,000 sales associates in
the United States and Canada. Of the four major real estate franchises,
Keller Williams Realty was the only one to show an increase in sales
associates in 2009 over 2008 and has major plans for growth in 2010
through mergers, acquisitions, and the addition of many more top pro-
ducing sales professionals. To learn more about Keller Williams Realty,
call Gary Kaukonen at 813-641-8300.

Freedom Fairways Mens Golf League
Modified Scramble, Sept. 28


1st - 52 -Warren Watson
Milt Ericson
Padge Padgham
Kurt Gadd


2nd - 59 - Julian Graham
Al Chesnes
Ken Whitfield
Ed Landry


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The sprouts from the wheat are full of
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Drs. Ott, Slaughter & Waldy
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The patent and any other patent responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay., cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination
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TIME TESTED TRUST
Providing Medicaid/VA Planning
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KNOWLEDGE IS POWER
Together We Can Discover Your Options
Tatanisha Bennett
Benefits Coordinator

Phone: (813) 244-3233 ~ Web: www.medicaidforseniors.com






OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 7


Shuttered SCC business landmark going, going...


* By MELODY JAMESON
mj@observernews.net
SUN CITY CENTER - Change
is in the wind for one of this com-
munity's oldest commercial land-
marks.
Attempted sale by auction last
week of the closed automotive ser-
vice station in the northwest corner
of Pebble Beach Boulevard and S.R.
674 has not yet produced a signed
deal, but the willing seller is en-
tertaining all offers over $500,000
from able buyers. And that enter-
taining outlook soon could become
hard negotiation.
The site at 702 North Pebble
Beach consists of an 1,800- square-
foot concrete block structure with
two bays and paved tarmac with
pumping islands over underground
tanks on six tenths of an acre, ac-
cording to Earl Williams, an auc-
tion manger with Higginbotham
Auctioneers in Lakeland. The
"well attended" auction with lively
bidding was conducted on Wednes-
day, November 17, by Marty Hig-
ginbotham, company founder, Wil-
liams added.
For many Sun City Center area
residents, though, the old filling
station is something more than real
estate flyer stats. For 45 years - be-
fore it was shuttered in 2008 - the
facility was both a standard land-
mark and a prized convenience in
a growing community.
Among the very first business
sites and ideally located at the com-
munity's Pebble Beach Boulevard
gateway, the service station was
built in 1963. The new retirement
center - then a cutting edge concept
being implemented by developer
Del Webb fresh from success in
Arizona - was beginning to spring
from the former sprawling cattle
range abutting the north side of a
two-lane roadway. On the south
side of what would become Sun
City Center Boulevard was nothing
but the cleared grassy strip which
served as landing site for the Webb


corporation plane.
S.R. 674, in front of the new ser-
vice station and barely more than
a paved track, still was considered
by longtime locals as the connec-
tor linking Wimauma and phos-
phate mines to the east with quiet,
village-like Ruskin and Tampa Bay
fishing to the west. Interstate 75
was not yet a gleam in the eyes of
state transportation engineers. U.S.
Highways 301 and 41 were more
than adequate north-south routes.
For several years, the little auto-
motive service center would share
the two opposing gateway corners
with the imposing Kings Inn, a lo-
cally popular restaurant designed
with a striking Tudor exterior ap-
propriately matched by an interior
of dark woods and soft leather. It
would see replacement of the burned
Kings Inn with another restaurant
and motel on the opposite corner,
this one dubbed the SCC Inn and
given a light tropical flavor with
muted pastels. It even would see a
Walgreen's pharmacy rise where
once the dining rooms stood.
As the community grew, com-
mercial activity followed with ex-
pansion of the aging strip plaza,
development on the southwest and
southeast corners of the Pebble
Beach-S.R. 674 intersection, arrival
of a medical facility first a satellite
of Bradenton's Blake Memorial
Hospital, along with a mushroom-
ing medical services complex in-
cluding numerous assisted living
facilities.
All the while, the service station
met the gas, oil, and repair needs
of residents, visitors and drivers-
by. A place where attendants once
checked customers' oil levels and
wiped windshields free of charge
without being asked, the station
underwent several brand changes
over the years. Marilyn Balkany,
who settled in SCC during the mid
1980s, recalls it as a Texaco station
where she could gas up quickly
and easily. It also bore the Amoco


signature and carried the BP brand
when it was closed.
Currently held by a corporation
named in county records as GC
Partners LLC, the structural com-
ponents and the site are valued for
taxing purposes at $405,000. The
property last changed hands in a
sales transaction during 2005 - a
period of rapidly inflating values
- when it apparently was sold for
$950,000, according to Tim Wil-
math in the Hillsborough County
Property Appraiser's office. Prior to
that transaction, the property sold in
1995 - 10 years earlier - for a re-
ported $375,000, Wilmath added.
Williams declined to pinpoint
the highest bid received at the auc-
tion, stating only that the seller
would not accept any of the bids
made. However, he added it is not
unusual for offers to be made fol-
lowing an auction, that "feelers are
out" and that with increasing credit
opportunities a deal for the service
station site could be reached in
the foreseeable future. The auc-
tion manager also would not name
a bottom line figure acceptable to
the seller but indicated that a solid
offer in the $500,000 neighborhood
could bring all interested parties to
the table.
Copyright 2010 Melody Jameson


MELODY JAMESON PHOTO
Once a busy place as Sun City Center residents arranged vehicle
repairs or gassed up golf carts and as area drivers pulled in for
oil or additives, this automotive service station at Pebble Beach
Boulevard and S.R. 674 that was a center of community activity for
nearly a half century went on the auction block last week. Built in
1963, the facility was among the earliest commercial developments
in the retirement community, preceding widening of the state road
in front of it, before construction of 1-75, leading the way to business
creation all around it. Over the last 47 years, the site changed only
in colors as different oil companies posted their branding. When it
was closed in 2008, it was displaying BP logos. The concrete block
building and its slightly more than a half acre of land is appraised at
$405,000 for taxing purposes.


Shutter & Blind Manufacturing Company
SHUTTERS - VERTICALS - FAUX WOOD & WOOD HORIZONTAL BLINDS - CELLULAR SHADES - SUNSCREEN SHADES


I PAINTED WOOD - BLINDS

S95 installed with a
CROWN MOLDING





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* Palmetto

Christmas in

the Park
Start your holiday festivities
with an old-fashioned Christmas
at Palmetto Historical Park and
Manatee County Agricultural Mu-
seum December 3rd and 4th from
5 to 9 p.m. This free event offers
something for everyone. Enjoy
beautifully decorated buildings,
kids' crafts, entertainment and of
course, Santa. Featured activities
include letters to Santa, contests
for prizes, letters to soldiers, plant-
ing and petting animals with FFA,
recipes to collect in each of the
park buildings, and a "Memory
Tree" in the Military Museum.
In addition to free craft projects,
there will be a Children's Holiday
Craft Corner where crafts can be
made for $1 or $2. Bring your own
camera for a photo with Santa.
Food vendors will be on the
premises. In the spirit of Christ-
mas, help needy families by bring-
ing canned goods for First United
Methodist Church of Palmetto's
food pantry and drop them off at
park entrances. The park is located
at 515-10th Ave. West, Palmetto.
For more information, call 941-
721-2034.


NOVEMBER 25, 2010







8. OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT NOVEMBER 25, 2010


The Ruskin Moose Lodge #813 is located at
1212 E. Shell Point Road, Ruskin * (813) 645-5919


Friday, Nov. 26 7-11 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 27 12 noon
5-7 p.m.
7-11 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 3 7-11 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 4 7-11 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 10 7-11 p.m.


Gypsy Highway
Ohio State/Michigan Tailgate Party
Cancer Benefit Dinner
Karaoke with Kim Mullins
Shine On
Karaoke with Charlie Bums
Caribbean Cowboys


Saturday, Dec. 11 5-7 p.m. WOTM Annual Christmas Party
with Ham Dinner
7-11 p.m. Party with Kim Mullins


Friday, Dec. 17 7-11 p.m.


Saturday, Dec. 18


Charlie Bums


4-7 p.m. Moose Legion Dinner
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins


Friday, Dec. 24 7-11 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 31


Candlelight Vigil
New Year's Eve Party with
Taylor and Taylor


Enjoy the AB
Christmas Lighted
Boat Parade
The Apollo Beach Christmas
Lighted Boat Parade will be held
on Saturday, Dec. 18. The parade
will begin at the South Channel at
approximately 6 p.m. and proceed
through some of the major deep
canals in Apollo Beach.
Posters will be display within
Apollo Beach at many business-
es and at the Chamber showing
the route.The Parade is a yearly
tradition sponsored, hosted and
organized by the Tampa Sailing
Squadron and the Apollo Beach
Chamber of Commerce.
Should you wish to be a par-
ticipant in the parade, all boaters
must attend 'The Captains Meet-
ing' to get their assigned number
and directions at 9 a.m. at the
Tampa Sailing Squadron on the
morning of the Dec. 18.
Awards will be given out at
the Squadron after the end of
the parade. There will be a chili
contest and the squadron will be
selling chowder. Participants and
members of the Club are invited
to attend this after event.


Lennard leads Ag-Ventures
Members of the Lennard FFA chapter served and led various schools
at Ag-Ventures on Oct. 26. Ag-Ventures is an event that teaches third
graders where their food and fibers come from and about local agricul-
ture. Ag-Ventures took place at the Florida State Fairgrounds in Tampa.
The five stations had something to do with plants, another with animals
and one with local agriculture. At every station there were hands on
activities for the students. Lennard had twenty members attend: Chris
Aronson, Kyle Bowman, Madison Brown, Elizabeth Burch, Adriana
Carranza, Gabby Carswell, Tiffany Conard, Danielle Desilvestro, Casey
Fitz, Kayla Gaines, Josh Grizzle, Rebecca Knowles, Tyler Leonard, Rey
Penaloza, Michelle Rathbum, Othiniel Romero, Courtney Spann, Josh
Stanaland, Taylor Vigoa, and Shelia Weimer.


Every Wednesday
Every Thursday
Every Friday


5-7 p.m. Spaghetti Dinner -- new and delicious
5-7 p.m. Wings (except Thanksgiving)
5-7 p.m. Fish Fry (except Christimas)
Live music


Every Saturday 7-11 p.m.


All events are open to qualified
Moose members and guests.


Rose Boutique
has special
holiday hours
The Rose Boutique will be open
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday,
Nov. 26 and from 9 a.m. to noon
on Saturday, Nov. 27. Start your
Christmas shopping with them.
Shop locally -- bring your out-of-
town guests and enjoy a relaxed
shopping experience and great
selection.
The Rose Boutique sells new
and name brand women's clothing
and accessories. The Thrift Store
at The Mary & Martha House and
the administrative office will be
closed on Nov. 25, 26 and 27 for
the Thanksgiving holidays.
All proceeds from their re-
tail outlets support The Mary &
Martha House, a shelter for women
and children in crisis. The agency
supports two emergency shelters
as well as transitional housing in
South Hillsborough County. For
more information to make a dona-
tion, call (813) 645-7874.


Karaoke by Kim


party
Ruskin Aglow Christmas Party
will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
on Saturday, Dec. 4 at the home of
Denise Jurdensen, 10423 Ashley
Oak Dr., Riverview.
Kristen Taylor will minister and
Paula Dufford will play on the
flute.
Bring covered dish; meat and
beverage will be provided. RSVP
Denise at (813) 677-9595 or Gloria
at (813) 633-9613.


WAVES celebrate Christmas season
Attention: all Women of the Military Sea Service. Tampa Bay WAVES
Unit #55 will meet on Saturday, Dec. 4, at Ben's Family Restaurant, 704
Brandon Blvd East, in Brandon, for their annual Christmas luncheon
beginning at 11 a.m.
Starting in January, the Unit's meeting date will change from the first
Saturday to the second Saturday of each month; the place and time remain
the same, St. Matthew's Anglican
Church, 10701 BloomingdaleAve.,
Riverview, at 11 a.m. Speakers
are scheduled periodically. At last
month's meeting, Brian MacNeel
of Crime Prevention Consultants
discussed personal and in-home se-
curity, security while traveling, and
identity theft as well as items that
can be purchased to deter intrud-
ers, such as pepper spray, window
shields, paper shredder, wireless
alarms, etc. He presented a wealth
of information that was of great
Brian MacNeel of Crime Pre- interest to the women attending
vention Consultants addresses Membership in the Unit and in
members at a recent meeting of the parent organization, WAVES
Tampa Bay WAVES Unit #55. National, is open to all women
who served honorably (including those currently serving) in the U.S.
Navy, Navy Nurse Corps, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, or Maritime Ser-
vice, or related reserve components.For more information, call Jeannette
Green at (813) 657-9164.


South Shore 3rd Annual Thanksgiving Big Give is today


Hundreds of people who might
otherwise go hungry will get tur-
key and all the trimmings this
Thanksgiving, thanks to the 3rd
Annual South Shore Big Give.
Realizing the need to serve the
greater area of South Shore resi-
dents who may be able to travel
to Ruskin, Beanie's partnered with
several local community churches
to provide them with meals to
serve on site of their locations.
The following locations will
be serving Thanksgiving dinner
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thurs-
day, Nov. 25. It is recommended
that you contact your location to
confirm availability.


Sponsors include Beanies Family
and Sports Grill, South Bay Hos-
pital, South Shore Angler Fishing
Club, Ruskin V.F.W. Post 6287,
Ruskin South Shore Chamber of
Commerce and other local busi-
nesses and residents of the South
Shore area.
For more information, contact
Beanie's Bar & Sports Grill at
(813) 649-1700.



L~~


The Apollo Beach Woman's
Club will hold its Christmas lun-
cheon/meeting on Wednesday,
Dec. 8. The program will feature
the East Bay High School Choral,
'The Sounds of Time,' performing
a medley of holiday music. ABWC
meetings are held at 11:30 a.m. the
second Wednesday of each month
September through May at the
Summerfield Crossing Golf Club
in Riverview.
In addition to its philanthropic
work, members of the club also
enjoy enrichment activities which
include:
Book Club: The book group
meets monthly in members' homes
to discuss the latest novel mem-
bers have read. The Dec. 30 meet-
ing will feature the book Shanghai
Girls by Lisa See.
Bridge Club: Bridge players
meet at 9:30 a.m. on the fourth
Monday of each month at the Apol-
lo Beach Golf Clubhouse on Golf
and Sea Blvd. Players contribute
$3, with 2/3 of the proceeds con-
tributed to the scholarship fund.
Culture Club: Activities are
organized monthly to introduce


members to the wide variety of
places of interest in the Tampa Bay
area. On Thursday, Dec. 16, the
group will enjoy a jazzy Christmas
by the ambassadors of jazz Peter
White, Rick Braun and Mindy
Abair at Ruth Eckert Hall.
Garden Club: The group meets
the third Wednesday of each month
for various activities that include
talks by horticulturists or visits
to nearby garden or horticultural
spots. In December, members will
enjoy a Christmas luncheon and a
plant exchange.
The cost of the luncheon is $16
and all are welcome. All reserva-
tions must be made by the Friday
before the luncheon. To make a
reservation, contact Regina Lesnau
at (813) 642-3305 orby e-mail rle-
NlnkIi ( Io\\ IucoIlii' c coin
Dues are $20 annually and canbe
sent to Judy Peck, vice-president/
membership at 6639 Cambridge
Park Dr., Apollo Beach, FL 33572.
For membership information or
for contact information regarding
any of the club's activities, contact
Peck at (813) 746-1072 or by e-
mail: judypeck @tampabay.rr.com.


Ruskin Aglow Apollo Beach Woman's Club offers
plans Christmas enrichment activities


Northside Baptist Church
(813) 645-1121

Southside Baptist Church
(813) 645-4085

United Methodist Church
(813) 645-1241

South Shore
United Methodist Church
(813) 677-9482

Day Star Faith Center
Gibsonton * (813) 672-6061


Ruskin VFW Post #6287

Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120 U.S. 41 N. has listed the following
weekly activities. Meetings are: American Legion on 1st Wednesday
each month; VFW and LAVFW on the 2nd Wednesday each month;
and MAVFW on the 3rd Thursday
each month.
Thursday November 25- Thanks-
giving Dinner at Post from noon to (
2 p.m. Members are free; everyone
else, donation please.
Friday, November 26- Flea Mar-
ket by American Legion from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Music by Corey Clark from
7 to 11 p.m.
Saturday, November27 Turkey /
Shoot at 1 p.m. Steak Dinner from
4:30 to 7 p.m. Music by Gene Cannon from 7 to 11 p.m.
Sunday, November 28- Music by Bert & Sassy from 3 to 7 p.m.
Irish Nachos from 4 to 6 p.m.
Monday, November 29- Taco Night from 5 to 7 p.m. Crew Night
at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, November 30- Games in Lounge from 1 to 5 p.m. Kitchen
opens at 4:30 p.m. Bingo at 6 p.m. Kaye Stroud Birthday.
Wednesday, December 1 - American Legion Meeting at 7 p.m.

Starting in December, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., the ladies of VFW
Post 6287 are going to have a budget dinner the last Wednesday of
the month. Each month will have a different menu. Only $6.
Call 645-2935 to see what will be served. Everyone is welcome.


8 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT


NOVEMBER 25, 2010






NOVEMBER 25, 2010
Sand Sculpture Phenomenon


I feel lucky to live in a place
where the sand filled beaches are
only a short drive away. This
time of year
makes me
thankful
-- "for the mild
weather and
sunny skies
because
Saturation there are still
Point so many ad-
By Karey Burek ventures to
be had out
doors-without getting frostbite.
This past weekend, our adven-
ture took us to the Treasure Island
area in search of fantastic sand
castles. What we saw were not
just mere bucket shaped displays,
but literally gorgeous and intricate
works of art. I could not believe
how transformative sand can be.
I wanted to learn how these art-
ists actually made the sand stay
put and look nothing like the soft
stuff I was walking on. I did some
research and found answers on
sandcastlecentral.com. To begin
with, water and your hands seem
to be the most important tools.
The advice is to make a mound
of sand roughly in the shape you
think your sculpture is going to
take, then moisten and pack it so
it stays in place. Once you have
your mound, then it gets interest-
ing. All kinds of tools can be used


OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT* SCC OBSERVER * 9





C.A.R.E. is open from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.
For directions, visit www.CareShel-
ter.org or call (813) 645 2273.

N . .1


"1" I - .'l, '' " . " " " - - ' ,= '" - . j -
...... - . .. . ..
.- . .* ,. . .... �

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to bring out the beautiful details
of the sand creation. However, a
shovel is key to helping build the
mound and packing it tight. From
that point on, artists have been
known to use everyday kitchen


tools and food prep utensils to
carve and create patterns on the
sand.
It seems like a lot of work, but
creating some animal art out of
sand sounds like a fun day at the


Kiwi is a feisty female Chihua-
hua mix. She was in bad shape
when she arrived at C.A.R.E., but
with TLC has made a wonderful
turnaround. Kiwi has a huge per-
sonality in a very small package.
She makes her caregivers laugh
every day as she dances around the
shelter grounds. Kiwi is spayed,
up-to-date on shots, and potty/pa-
per-trained. Kiwi is truly one of a
kind! She was born Feb. of 2004.


beach. Not to mention, making
a sand snowman for the holidays
would probably be considered ap-
propriate because of our lack of
snow!


Send your organization's news to
news@observernews.net by 4pm on
Thursday


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Victoria is a young black female
cat who claims Kettle as her mom.
Her sister is Remy who also is stay-
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10 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


Liberty gets a pat-down


In 1975, Dad took me on a trip
from our small, rural home-
town to the big city of Min-
neapolis. We went to a
Twins baseball game (out-
doors where it is meant
to be played) and then to <
the international airport .
to watch the Northwest
Orient 747 airplanes take
off. The flying behemoths Obse
were still new then and a By Mitc
remarkable sight to see. mitch@o\
In those days, the screws
were not yet tightened to
the breaking point and not every
inch of space needed to produce
a profit. The airport had an obser-
vation deck for visitors to watch
the planes come and go. To get
there, you needed to go through
security. The threat of hijacking in
1975 consisted of radicals hoping
to force an airliner to take them to
Cuba; or in one spectacular case, a
thief parachuting into infamy with
a few hundred thousand in cash.
Security at the airport consisted
of just walking through a metal
detector. Since Dad and I weren't
flying, we didn't have bags; so
there was nothing to x-ray. There
were no lines of anxious travel-
ers at the security checkpoint,
there was no presumption that my
40-year-old dad and 12-year-old
me were terrorists planning to rain
death and destruction across the
Midwest in the blasphemous use
of God's name. Certainly, no one
tried to grope either of us to check
for weapons or bombs sewn into
our underwear. If they had, I have
a feeling my dad might have had a
few words to say about it.
In 1975, the metal detectors and
x -ray machines were new. Only a
few years before, people simply
bought a ticket and boarded their
flights with no real security in be-
tween.
My, how things have changed
in 35 years. The observation deck
at the Minneapolis airport is long
gone. Airport security is an or-
deal that seems to become more
dehumanizing and embarrassing
each day. Today websites such as
WeWontFly.com and OptOutDay.
com are springing up in protest of
what is seen as an unnecessary in-
vasion of privacy and in the new
security procedures that require ei-
ther indiscreet scanning or a very
personal pat down by a complete
stranger.
One morning in Cambridge,
Maryland, I awoke to the sound
of air raid sirens. By that point, I
had spent enough time in town to
know that we weren't really under
attack, it just sounded like it. De-
spite being a fairly large town, the
fire department in Cambridge was
all volunteer. Earsplitting sirens
alerted the volunteers that it was
time to go to work; that someone
somewhere was in distress and
needed their help. The daily ruck-
us (or, in my case, the unscheduled
wake-up call) was oddly comfort-
ing; with the knowledge that there
were people standing by to help
their community. The work of fire-
fighters and first responders isn't
concealed by electronic communi-
cation, the entire town knows they
are being called to serve. There
is something highly appropriate
about that in my mind.
The problem with the ever in-
creasing, ever- more-intrusive se-
curity measures at airports today
is that government is seen as the
enemy - primarily because they
are viewing us as the enemy. Yet
for all of its faults, our government
works well. With a few notable
and newsworthy exceptions from


rv
f-



h
)bse


the Tampa Bay area, attempting
to bribe a government official in
America usually results only in a
w court date and the pos-
sibility of jail time. In
comparison to some
S countries I've visited,
. p our government is es-
sentially honest; and
it is for that reason we
rations are the envy of much
Traphagen of the world. If you
rvernews.net need help and you see
a person in uniform,
whether they are a law
enforcement officer, a fire fighter
or an emergency medical techni-
cian; it is a safe bet and a valid as-
sumption that they not only want
to help you but are truly motivated
deep down in their hearts to help
you. Virtually ten times out of ten,
you can count on that in this coun-
try.
Perhaps that is what is most dis-
turbing about the ramp-up in the
airline security procedures. The
public has accepted dramatically
tightened procedures since Sep-
tember 11,2001; but now a tipping
point is being reached. People are
beginning to view the latest pro-
cedures as an affront to personal
liberty. The public doesn't seem
to believe that the grainy, full-
body-scan images will necessarily
disappear into the ether after they
leave the machine, and regardless,


many people aren't happy with a
stranger seeing body parts that
only spouses or significant others
are typically allowed to see. Par-
ents are rightly disturbed about the
thought of strangers groping their
children.
This is not the America I grew
up with. At the same time, no one
wants to see innocent passengers
murdered as airliners explode in
the sky. But the fact remains that
the public, by and large, is not the
enemy. The enemy consists of a
relatively small number of luna-
tics. So where do you draw the
line between safety and liberty?
If indeed the public is beginning
to see government officials as the
enemy, nothing good can come
from that. We need our govern-
ment and, more so, we need to be
able to have an underlying faith in
our government. A quote by Ben
Franklin is frequently bandied
about today in response to how the
nation has changed in the past nine
years:
They who give up essential lib-
erty to obtain a little temporary
safety, deserve neither liberty nor
safety.
Dr. Franklin had no concept of
jetliners being flown into build-
ings when he said that. And as
a nation, I believe the public can
agree that measures need to be tak-
en to ward off those who wish us


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harm and have no human reserva-
tions about acting on those wishes.
Perhaps more fitting words came
from Dr. Franklin during a speech
at the Constitutional Convention
on June 28, 1787:
In these sentiments, Sir, I agree
to this Constitution, with all its
faults, - if they are such; because
I think a general Government nec-
essary for us, and there is no form
of government but what may be
a blessing to the people, if well
administered; and I believe, far-
ther, that this is likely to be well
administered for a course of years,
and can only end in despotism, as
other forms have done before it,
when the people shall become so
corrupted as to need despotic gov-
ernment, being incapable of any
other.
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12 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER

Riverview High School band


NOVEMBER 25, 2010


* Continued from page 1
both South Florida coasts participat-
ed in the competition which is the
marching band coalition's way of
promoting arts and music in Florida
schools.
The coalition, which is based in
Apopka, began holding state-wide
competitions in 2000 to help keep
interest in music alive as budget cuts
were eliminating arts and music pro-
grams in many schools.
According to the organization's
Web site, music - especially bands-
is hit especially hard in budget cuts
because music gets swallowed up by
remedial and supplemental academ-
ic course budgets.
This is not the case however, at
Riverview, where band is a major
force.
Unlike many schools, Riverview
does not have to pay a choreographer
or musician to write its competition
routine, because its band director,
John Davis can do it all.
"We are really fortunate to have
him," said Principal Bob Heilman.
Davis composed the entire routine,


called Interstellar Suite; including
both writing the music and putting
together the drills.
Davis, who came to Florida from
Pennsylvania, taught music, chorus
and band at several Florida schools
before landing the job four years ago
after returning to James Madison
University in Harrisonburg, Va. In
2005 to earn his Master's Degree.
"I wanted this job at Riverview
because here I get to just do band.
I can concentrate on it, without hav-
ing to teach other classes along with
it," Davis said.
In his spare time Davis plays
trombone and piano and sings with
the 'I!"" -i ,,,, . I) Richard Zielinski
Choir.
Davis says he is proud of his
band.
Now that he's been at Riverview
four years, it is the first time there
are players who have been with
him all through their time in high
school.
"I have 21 seniors," he said. "And
we have done really well. We won
every special award at the Chamber


lain semi-finals. Music, Marching,
Color Guard and General Effects."
This is the first time Riverview
High School has been host to the re-
gional semi-finals.
"I was worried at where we were
going to put all the buses," said
Heliman. But the day of the com-
petition, which began shortly after
7 a.m. and ended after 3 p.m., the
many buses were directed to the east
parking lot, and U-hauls, trucks and
covered trailers carrying instruments
and props were sent to the southwest
parking area and everything ap-
peared to go off without a hitch.
One band after another performed
and Davis said Riverview gave its
best performance of the year.
It did not, however, place in the
top five that performed that night at
Tropicana Field in the next step of


competition.
"We finished 13th, which is an
improvement over last year's 16th
place and we got our highest score
of the season today," said Riverview
High School's Band Booster Presi-
dent, Tammy Adams after the judg-
ing. "We're just so grateful for all
the individuals and businesses that
helped us financially and with their
time to allow us to compete."
Adams got involved because of
her son, Jason, a senior, who has
played trumpet all four years at Riv-
erview.
"We (the Booster Club) have had
car washes and sold coupon books,
lots of activities to go toward costs.
Each student has band fees and
uniforms and transportation costs
and we try and make that easier on
them," she added.


One car wash held at the Riverview
Burger King on U.S. 301 in October
brought in more than $1,000 which
was the highest amount raised by
any one event.
Many weeks were spent prepar-
ing to host the competition too, with
Event Coordinator Debbie Johns
and her committees making signs,
gathering water coolers and cups
to keep everyone participating hy-
drated, and readying the field and
stadium.
"We all worked hard and we're
having a great time," Johns said
when she paused for a photograph
at the event.
Davis said he plans to continue at
Riverview and enter the competi-
tion again next year.
Heilman said they might even try
to host a regional event again.


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OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 13


Reedville, Virginia,
Chesapeake Bay.
*. ^*s


MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTOS
is a quiet community on a creek just off the


Sailing home


* Continued from page 1
sailed south, the cruising fleet
was sailing north. While under-
way, I would often pass a dozen or
more northbound sailboats while
I continued in the opposite direc-
tion. Now at the Cambridge Yacht
Maintenance boatyard, I spent a
week busily preparing my boat
for extended cruising by adding
equipment and giving the bottom
a fresh coat of paint. All the while,
the workers in the yard were bus-
ily hauling out one boat after an-
other to store for the winter on
land. I have been moving in the
opposite direction of most boaters
since last year, but upon arrival to
Norfolk that will change. Though I
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of the southbound fleet, I will, for
the first time, be moving in the
customary direction.
My wife Michelle flew in to pick
up my car and we decided to let a
perfect weather window slip away
in favor of spending an extra day
together. The manager at Cam-
bridge Yacht Maintenance boat-
yard did not express impatience
or concern about my extended
stay. Instead she told me that I had
made the right choice.
When the day of departure final-
ly arrived, my engine lost power
just a mile out of the marina. I
had witnessed the yard employ-
ees scramble to rescue boats with
engine troubles and I took com-
fort in the fact that help was just
a radio or cell phone call away. As
I limped back to the slip, I wasn't
asked to relinquish the valuable
dock space (for which they never
did charge me) but instead was put
in touch with a diesel mechanic
who arrived within an hour. When
the next day was spent replacing
parts, I was only asked how things
were going. I've learned that when
people ask such questions here,
it is because they really want to
know. They sincerely care.
For the people in this boatyard,
their jobs are a source of good and
honest labor. With their muscles
and their minds, they produce
something worthwhile and valu-
able for the boats in their care,
many of which are the fruits of
years of hard work. Some of the
owners are in the autumn of their
lives and their boats are almost as
important to them as the children
who have long-since moved away
to start families of their own. Each
boat, regardless of size or pedi-
gree, is treated with care and re-
spect. In the boatyard, jobs cannot
be outsourced to a foreign nation,
nor can they easily be turned over
to younger, less-expensive work-
ers. The employees here learned
through time and experience, as
will those who come after them.
For me, the false starts and wait-
ing for parts were learning experi-
ences on many levels, not the least
of which was learning patience.
With the unexpected free time, I
was able to watch the yard crew
winterize and shrink-wrap large
boats. It is an amazing process -
and one that requires a high level of
patience from the person doing the
shrink-wrapping. I saw the testing
of an experimental cargo unit that
may someday serve our military by
sending fuel and supplies in from
offshore ships to land-based troops
as autonomous, self powered car-
go vessels. The odd-looking, small
cargo vessels are unmanned, so no
lives are risked through exposure
to enemy fire while landing.
That afternoon, I saw loons
swimming and diving in the har-
bor. The Chesapeake is a familiar


After delays and false starts, I finally sail out of Cambridge, Mary-
land. The engine died not long after this photo was taken. Fortu-
nately, I managed to get it started again.


.. ........


NOVEMBER 25, 2010


home to these most ancient of birds
and fossils of loons dating back to
the Pleistocene Epoch have been
found in Maryland. The loon is
the state bird of my home state of
Minnesota and seeing them here
was like seeing old friends and a
reminder that the world is indeed a
small, interconnected place. I also
had the opportunity to meet Pe-
ter, a fellow singlehanded sailor,
who will be heading south from
the Chesapeake on his own for the
first time. Peter gave me a proper
cruising bucket to replace one that
I had accidentally destroyed dur-
ing the chaos of my false start a
few days prior.
Although the weather and water
were challenging at times, leaving
the Chesapeake behind will be a
bittersweet parting. It is a fabled
cruising ground of picturesque
beauty, brimming with history, and
a place of friendly and generous
people. More so than many places,
it seems that people here know that
a smile for a stranger costs noth-
ing, yet has immeasurable value.
One could call this place "home".
My extended stay gave me an
opportunity to examine the need to
feel as though every waking mo-
ment should be filled with some-
thing productive. Sometimes the
best use of time is to learn to be
still; to practice patience; to ap-
preciate the moment and the peo-
ple and things around you. My
newfound, infant-stage, Zen-and-
the-Art-of Sailboat-Maintenance
attitude also comes with a new ap-
preciation for what has made this
experience possible: my wife and
my job. As a result, my patience
comes with a side of pragmatism
telling me to get things in gear and
get home.
Apparently, God was less than
impressed with my rationaliza-
tions. It seemed all of the lessons
in waiting for weather and wait-
ing for boat parts weren't getting
through my thick skull. So God
sent Alicia, a two-and-a-half foot
tall pixie with a plastic lizard.
On my last full day in Cam-
bridge, I took a county bus to a
Walmart store to restock some
supplies before sailing. The bus
meandered through town, turning
the 10-minute trip into a 45-min-
ute odyssey. Being newly patient,
I was interested in the opportunity
to see new parts of this beautiful
and fascinating community. With
my shopping completed, I waited
outside the store for a return bus.
Two showed up at the same time.
One driver told me I had a 20-min-
ute wait, the other driver told me
she'll take me where I need to go,
so I told her my stop was near the
hospital and jumped into a seat on
the empty bus. Within minutes, we
were a few blocks from my stop.
But the driver kept going down
See SAILING HOME, page 19





14 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER
I


NOVEMBER 25, 2010


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NOVEMBER 25, 2010

Gibsonton woman is thankful


* Continued from page 1
divorce from his second wife about
20 years ago, Suzanne said. They
were half sisters but they do not
choose to use the word "half."
"I remember them coming to
live with us. I would follow her
around. You know how little girls
look up to their older sisters. And
I remember that one day she was
just suddenly gone and that hurt
me inside."
Suzanne lives with her husband
Austin, her brother DJ, her moth-
er Shari Keller, and her mother's
family, who have lived in South
County since Suzanne was about
three years old.
"Family is very important to me,"
she said, as we sat surrounded by
not only her immediate family, but
the family's many pets.


"Last fall, I decided that with all
the social networking now going
on, there had to be a way to locate
Jennifer again."
Coincidentally (or as Suzanne
says, it was just meant to be) right
about the time Suzanne started
looking for Jennifer on line, her
husband Austin found an old
brown leather-covered address
book in a shed on the family's ru-
ral Gibsonton property where they
operate a lawn service.
Suzanne recognized having
heard some of the names in the
long-distant past and began call-
ing the telephone numbers imme-
diately.
None of the numbers were still
in service, but two of the old ad-
dresses were still good.
"I know now that without that


P..X\I I/MI


book I could never have found her
any other way because her father
has been married five or six times
and didn't know her last name. Plus
the fact that by now I figured she
was probably married anyway."
But Suzanne started putting the
addresses from the newly-found
book into the online reverse direc-
tory and looking up the names (in
the book) on sites like Face Book
and My Space and going through
the "Friend's Lists" of any pos-
sible matches.
"It was amazing to me that I was
able to locate anyone that way but
that's how I found Stacey, another
half sister, who's now 30. I came
across a Terri Lingrich who was in
the brown book, and she knew Sta-
cey. Neither of us knew that Sta-
cey was my sister too at that time
but I knew there was some sort of
connection to Jennifer because of
the book."
So Suzanne took the next step
and got Stacey's telephone number
and called her on the phone.
"Do you have a mother named
Becky and a sister named Jen-
nifer?" she asked. When Stacey
said yes, Suzanne remembers that
she immediately started to cry. "I
was so happy. I knew I had found
another sister, and that she would
lead me to Jennifer too."
Suzanne and Stacey talked for
several minutes after realizing
they were sisters. Then Stacey
called Jennifer, who immediately
recognized Suzanne's name.


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OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 15


PENNY FLETCHER PHOTO
Suzanne Keller-
Becker shows the
old brown leather-
covered book her
husband Austin
recently found in a
shed on their rural
Gibsonton prop-
erty that led to her J
finding her long-
lost sister and a
whole new branch
of her family.


"Stacey said Jennifer said 'that's
my baby sister!' and she called me
right away."
The three women burned up the
telephone lines talking for the rest
of that day.
Then Suzanne decided to fly
north and meet them in person.
Stacey lives in Indianapolis,
Ind., and Jennifer in Decatur, also
in Ind. So the very next day Su-
zanne booked a flight and landed
in Indianapolis.
"I found her Sept. 29 and flew
there Sept. 30," she said, show-
ing me her reservations and ticket
stubs. The one thing she could not
show me though, were her photo-
graphs, which did not come out.
There is a photo of Suzanne and
Jennifer on Suzanne's Face Book
page, but is too small to resize and
use with this story.
"I stayed three weeks with Jen-
nifer, who is married now to Brian,


and has three kids."
So Suzanne found not only a
sister, but a brother-in-law and
a nephew, Marcos, 10; and two
nieces, Aiana, 6 and Eva, 3.
"We drove back down to India-
napolis to see Stacey after the first
week. She's 30 now."
"We found that we all love dogs,
have tattoos, like the same music
and television shows and eat the
same foods. It was just amazing."
Suzanne is particularly glad she
found Jennifer now.
"It is really like it was meant to
be."
Jennifer has breast cancer and
they went to lots of doctor's ap-
pointments together. "It's some-
thing called triple-negative cancer.
The doctor ordered 12 weeks of
chemo right after her surgery."
They also had 5-to-6 appoint-
ments a week with 3-year-old Eva
who has a neurological problem
with her speech.
"Now we can talk on the phone
and I can keep up with their health
issues," said Suzanne. "This whole
thing has changed the way I look
at my life. I'm not even supposed
to be here, and sometimes I won-
dered how I was even kept alive."
She had a lot of separate health
issues when she was young, includ-
ing almost dying from sleep apnea.
"I was also put on a heart monitor
for a year when I was very young,"
she said. "And at 14 I was hit by a
box truck and had internal bleed-
ing and I wasn't expected to live.
Just a few years ago a 70-pound
bar fell down from the top of a
steel swing and hit me in the head
and cracked my skull."
The sisters got to share all these
experiences together and now Su-
zanne feels her life is complete.
"I have a wonderful husband and
mother, and now I have two sisters
and a nephew and two nieces. But
most of all I know what made the
hole in my heart and gave me the
feeling that something I loved very
much had been taken away. So for
whatever time we have together,
we'll keep up our communication
and I'll get to love her forever."


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16 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


Future of blue crabs


* Continued from page 1
public sentiment.
Muench, a Florida native who
grew up in Tampa, learned to fish in
the northern reaches of Tampa Bay
with his dad and raised his family on
the south shore of the Little Manatee
River, has been crabbing with traps
along the river for 30 plus years.
He's studied the small, tasty crus-
taceans first hand and studied about
them. The result, he says firmly, is
the conviction they're being over-
harvested. And if the delicious blue
crab is to continue to grace restau-
rant menus in the future, it needs
protections today, he adds.
He's also willing to put his money
where his mouth is. Muench be-
lieves a sort of sanctuary for the blue
crab should be established east of
I -75, with all commercial trapping
eliminated in that area - including
his own. Such a move would benefit
not only the crab population but also
boaters on the river, he adds, because
removing all the traps in the narrow
ing river east of the roadway would
make boating in the area safer and
easier as well as enhance the natural
beauty of the waterway.
Blue crabs, like shrimp, are detri-
tus feeders, Muench explains. Dur-
ing years of substantial rains, suf
ficient supplies of matter wash into
the river to decay and provide food
for a healthy crab population. But, in
drought conditions the crabs retreat
upstream, looking for food sources
where small streams empty into the
river. And that should be their sanc-
tuary; a place to rest, feed and grow
undisturbed until they return down-
stream and to the waiting traps.
Muench admits he has no surveys
beyond his own observations over a
period of years to back his convic-
tions but is convinced such a pro-
tection would preserve the blue crab
population for the enjoyment of fu
ture generations. The crabber also
notes that while Florida has no such
blue crab protections in place at the
present time, other states have taken
such a step. Plus, he adds, Florida
does protect many other types of
marine life one way or another:
manatees with go slow zones and
power plant sanctuaries, numerous
varieties of fish with season-only
harvesting or lasting moratoriums
on catching, shrimp and crawfish
and oysters with closed seasons
and/or maximum take limits.
While he's not yet ready to take a
position on Muench's question, Dr.
Ryan Candy, a research scientist on
the Florida Wildlife Commission
staff in St. Petersburg, allows the
blue crab of the fisherman's har-
vesting area is both unique and eco-
logically valuable.
FWC has not conducted any
studies or surveys that would sub
stantiate Muench's contention the
blue crab population in the Little
Manatee River area has diminished
or radically fluctuated over time,
Candy notes. But, the agency has
been able to demonstrate the crabs
will migrate en masse hundreds of
miles along the Florida west coast.
This makes them unique, Candy
says, unlike other crab varieties and
differentiated from other blues.
Moreover, the blue crab is both
predator and prey, Candy adds,
feeding on other organisms and also
becoming dinner for larger marine
life. This fact makes the crab un-
arguably an important piece in the
ecological chain, the scientist says.
Muench , currently a member of
the FWC blue crab advisory com-
mittee, plans to open discussion of a
sanctuary for the crustacean before
the committee when it next meets in
February.
And in response, Candy says
"we're open to looking into it".


Whatever happened about...


Meanwhile, Muench wants to
know if there's public support for
protecting the little crab with the big
taste. It is such support, he suggests,
that would go a long way toward
bringing the FWC into the sanctu-


ary camp. The public meeting is set
for 6:30 PM, Wednesday, December
8, in the SouthShore Regional Li-
brary conference room, adjacent to
19th Avenue N.E.
Copyright 2010 Melody Jameson


CHERE SIMMONS PHOTO
Hannah practices her skills at cracking a blue crab with her great-
grandpa, Gerald Simmons. The crabs were taken from local waters
and have been enjoyed for generations. Some fear this delicacy is
being over-harvested and would like to establish a sanctuary to en-
sure it's future.


Whit and whimsey


Grace and Gobble
* By NANCY PORTER-THAL
Thanksgiving is always a mean-
ingful holiday when we gather
with friends and family to say
thanks for all we have and appreci-
ate in our lives. Even in the worst
of times there is always something
to be grateful for and to remind us
of our many blessings.
I'm most grateful however, when
the day is over and the holiday is
gasping for its last breath as the
guests take their leave at the door.
For me, the gobble and Grace
begins a month before when the
guest list is arranged. Of course
there's the family, the friends and
sometimes the families of friends.
Seating charts have to be made.
Who sits next to grumpy grandpa?
Cousin Millie and Aunt Margaret
aren't speaking. Brother Alfred
can't hear. Uncle Martin wants to
be near the bathroom. Sister Bar-
bara is the talker; Victor the com-
plainer, Sylvia the moaner, and
Uncle Ronald the jokester. Where
do the children sit?
Now to the linens, and the china,
and the crystal, and the turkey do
dads for the tables. I set the tables
(always borrow more from my
neighbors) a week before so any-
one eating meals after that has
to juggle plates on their laps. All
focus is now on the preparation
of the feast. The grocery list is so
extensive that at least three trips
are required to fill it. Then, the


baking and making in the kitchen
begins. Freezing, wrapping, mold-
ing, kneading, chopping, storing,
slicing, is a daily dedication to the
Gobble fest. Every corner and cup-
board is filled with something for
the Thanksgiving meal.
As the doorbell rings and the
guests arrive, I remember I forgot
the centerpiece or the gravy ladle
or some other thing that is sure to
ruin the festivities. The mingling
of folks begins. The chatter cen-
ters on the place cards and finding
seats. As people seat themselves,
there's a certain amount of grum-
bling from a few but it is soon re-
placed with appropriate Ahhs as
the food is served.
What amazes me is that saying
of the Grace sometimes takes lon-
ger than the eating of the meal.
Guests can scarf down their food
in 20 minutes. Desserts that took
days to make are polished off in
10. I think stuffing the bird took
longer than stuffing the tummies.
Of course, compliments abound
between mouthfuls and everyone
says the obligatory thank yous.
Then it's over; the house is quiet.
In reflection, I know Thanksgiv-
ing dinner is about the gathering of
friends and family; a time to give
thanks. Somehow, I forget that
every year as my obsessive food
focus distorts the meaning of what
makes a Happy Thanksgiving.


* Continued from page 1
training young physicians in senior
care and centralizing collection
of pertinent research
data - can be created
through a partner-
ship involving the
USF College of
Medicine and
South Bay Hos-
pital with the help
of and for the ben-
efit of South County
seniors. Hospital Corpo-
ration of America, parent com-
pany of South Bay Hospital, has
created a similarly focused center
in North Florida but a contractual
agreement between the university
and the hospital has not yet been
signed, said Bob Black, a member
of the local planning group.
HCA/South Bay is scheduled to
appear for an Administrative Law
Court hearing in Tallahassee re-
garding its long competition with
Tampa-based St. Joseph's Health-
care network for state approval to
build a new hospital on Big Bend
Road. What may be the final hear-
ing on the matter is set for mid-
December.
...BOCC chairmanship
County Commissioner Al Hig-
ginbotham, whose large district
includes parts of the South County
including Sun City Center, has
been named chairman of the newly
constituted board of county com-
missioners.
Higginbotham, who lives in
Plant City, was named the board's
chairman last week as the new


board was formally seated follow-
ing the November 2 general
electionn . A graduate of
the University of
Florida with a BS
degree in politi-
cal science, the

was elected a
county com-
missioner in
2006, according
to information re-
leased by his office.
...Ag Expo wins
Three graduate students aim-
ing for advanced degrees related
to aspects of agricultural research
shared $1,000 in prize money af
ter a panel of six judges reviewed
posters demonstrating their areas
of study and conclusions reached
at the fifth annual Florida Ag Expo
earlier this month. The Gulf Coast
Research and Education Center
at Balm, a part of the University
of Florida Extension Service net
work, hosts the day-long exposi-
tion each year.
Top prize of $500 went to Vivek
Kumar and a second award of
$300 was presented Garima Kak-
kar, both students working at the
university's Tropical Research
Center, Homestead. Third prize,
$200, went to Sarah Smith, a stu-
dent working at the Gulf Coast
center east of Balm.
The three winning posters were
chosen from among 14 entries.
Copyright 2010 Melody Jame-


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NOVEMBER 25, 2010







NOVEMBE 25, 200-OBSERER-NEWS--R-VER -EW -CURENT- 1


James Arthur 'Jim' Strickland named
2010 Outstanding Agriculturalist
At the annual Farm City Week Luncheon sponsored by the Kiwanis
Club of Bradenton on Nov. 16, Jim Strickland, a Manatee County cattle
and citrus producer was named the 2010 Agriculturalist of the year and
was inducted into the Manatee County Agricultural Hall of Fame.
Strickland has been involved in agriculture in Manatee County all of
his life. As a youngster, he was riding, roping, and generally helping his
dad Hiram Strickland former Manatee County Tax Assessor on the fam-
ily's ranch in eastern Manatee County.
In his youth he was a member of the Trail Dusters Saddle Club, riding
in horse shows and volunteering at agriculture events throughout the
county. At the young age of 17, due to the tragic death of his father, he
had to take over the operations of his family's cattle and citrus business.
Like many others in the agriculture family, Jim has served the industry
in numerous ways. In the early 1990s he assisted the SPCA in establish-
ing protocols for handling livestock and horses in the event of emer-
gency such as hurricanes. He has been active with the Manatee River
Fair Association, serving as a director for over 10 years, receiving the
appointment as Director Emeritus
in 2000.
Strickland currently serves on
the Board of Directors for the
Manatee County Farm Bureau and
has been an active leader with the
Florida Cattlemen's Association,
this year serving as state President.
He has been actively engaged in
the politics of agriculture all of
his adult life; works hard to sup-
port legislation that is favorable to
the agriculture industry and fights
hard to prevent legislation detri-
JIM STRICKLAND mental to its future; and has been
a strong supporter of The University
of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and currently
serves on the Senior Vice Presidents Advisory Council.
As a young adult he worked his own cattle and the ranches of others
as a professional cowboy. During those years through a series of night
classes he earned his property appraisers and real estate licenses. Then
soon began working part time in the Manatee County Property Apprais
ers Office as an agriculture assessor.
Because of his experience in cattle and citrus along with his familiar
ity with other types of agriculture production, his role as an ag assessor
benefited both the Property Appraisers office and those in the agriculture
business. He has been diligent in reminding producers to file for green
belt and educating them on opportunities they may be eligible for.
He is married to Renee Toussaint Strickland; in addition to their ranch-
ing operation they have recently established Strickland Ranch & Ex
ports, Inc., a livestock exporting business. He has one son, James Arthur
Strickland (JJ) currently serving in the United States Army, stationed at
Fort Bragg, North Carolina.
"Jim's whole life has been dedicated to agriculture in Manatee County,
The State of Florida, and now providing quality product abroad. His years
of service, commitment to the industry, and dedication to the people who
are agriculture has been evident in his professional life and volunteer
service" says Brenda Rogers, Community Services Department Direc
tor, Manatee County Government and former Manatee County Exten
sion Director, who presented the award.

Help Toys for Tots while Christmas
shopping
For residents wanting to knock special drawing. However, partici
out their Christmas list, they need pants are required to be present for
to look no further than the Sum the hourly drawings held by indi
merfield Community Center's vidual vendors.
Annual Holiday Market and Craft Homemade goodies will be
Show from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on hot from the oven courtesy of the
Saturday, Dec. 4. This free event Ladies Club, Doug Benroth will
will benefit the Marine Corps' provide musical entertainment and
Toys for Tots programs. Donna Berry will enchant the kids


The Summerfield Community
Center, located at 13011 Summer-
field Blvd. in Riverview, will house
more than 40 vendors and their
products. Items that are sure to be
on top of your Christmas list are
jewelry and beauty products, chil-
dren's gifts and books, handmade
items, kitchen gadgets, candles,
scrapbooking materials, handbags,
and seasonal centerpieces.
Those who attend the free event
are encouraged to bring a new, un-
wrapped toy for the Toys for Tots
and hand it to a Marine who will
be there to accept the toys. Those
who bring a new, unwrapped toy
will receive a special ticket for a
drawing to be held at the end of
the show. The two prizes, a $50
gifts basket and a 1/2 carat diamond
sterling silver bracelet valued at
$200 have been donated by two
Summerfield Crossing residents.
You need not be present to win the


with stories in Santa's workshop
from noon to 1 p.m. The highlight
of the Holiday Market and Craft
Show is the arrival of Santa Claus
at 1 p.m. Be sure to capture the mo-
ment by snapping photos of Santa
with your child. For more infor-
mation, call Diane at 671-2824 or
e-mail dfinch@tampabay.rr.com.


Rock the night
away
The public is invited to 'rock the
night away' from 6:30 to 10:30
p.m. on Friday, Dec. 10 at Apollo
Beach Elementary School PTA's
6th annual Silent Auction and Ca-
sino Night at the Riverside Golf &
Boating Resort Clubhouse, 2550
Pier Drive in Ruskin.
Tickets (on sale now at the
school) are $25 and include din-
ner, musical entertainment, and
the opportunity to bid on an ar-
ray of wonderful items. All pro-
ceeds from the event will go for
new technology equipment for the
students.


Holiday tips for single dads
While TV commercials and
retail ads proclaim the holidays as
a time for peace and joy (and lots
of gifts), many feel that it is the
season for family obligations and
unpleasant visits with contentious
relatives.
That feeling of discomfort is
compounded for single dads, who
many times face awkward gather-
ings with former in-laws or touchy
ex-wives who request or require
'family time' with their children.
But it doesn't have to be that
way, according to life coach and
motivational speaker Michael Tay- time with their
lor. He believes that the holidays extravagant g
don't have to be loaded with rough porary fix for
patches for single dads, and with a issue. It is
few key tips, they can show their shame of not
children a happy holiday season. because they
"It doesn't take much to carve the child. Be
a happier holiday out of all those go overboard
potential pitfalls for single dads," and your love
said Taylor, author of A New Con- mean the mos
versation With Men (www.coach- Make Peac
michaeltaylor.com). "We are crea- with a former
tures of habit - although during of your childr
the holidays, we tend to call them difficult situ.
'traditions.' As life changes, and as bring. So, doi
we evolve as individuals trying to ficult than it
learn from our mistakes, sometimes peace with y
it's good to change those habits and even if it's j
try to make them into something days. This is
that fits our new dynamic." forgiveness a
Taylor's tips include: the hurtful fe.
Don't Isolate Yourself - One and showing
classic reaction to awkward shared caring about
custody situations is to simply hide true marks of
from all the gatherings of family Be Good t
and friends. Don't do that. Men stop at being
generally will shut themselves off Treat yourself
from people during the holidays single dads ai
because of loneliness, without selves and a
realizing what they really need is pensate for fe
the support of friends. It will help by taking car
minimize the loneliness.
Don't Drink Too Much Holi Learn a
day toasts, office parties and other
celebrations tend to include oppor- Squadr
tunities to drink, and drink heavily. Plan a visit 1
There is no shame in having a sip of of club memb
wine for a holiday toast, and then ing the friend]
switching to soft drinks. It's easy for the sailing
to medicate sadness with drugs or who wants to
alcohol, but it never does anything your family. ]
more than increase those feelings. joyment of sa
Alcohol is a depressant, so it's best at 10 a.m. on
not to drink when you're already their general
susceptible to depression. of each mont]
Don't Overspend - Some men Beach Blvd.,
try to make up for their lack of sail-tss.org.


3/


ir children by buying
gifts. This is a tem-
r a deeper emotional
driven by guilt and
being a good father
may not reside with
thoughtful, but don't
. After all, your time
are the gifts that will
st in the long run.
:e - Spending time
r spouse for the sake
en is one of the most
nations the holidays
n't make it more dif
needs to be. Make
your former spouse,
ust for a couple of
an excellent time for
nd setting aside all
elings from the past,
your children that
others is one of the
being a man.
o Yourself Don't
nice to everyone else.
with kindness. Most
re too hard on them-
ttempt to overcom-
elings of inadequacy
e of others. The holi-


days are an excellent time to do
something nice for yourself to
lift your spirits and brighten your
day. Mail yourself a holiday card.
Take some time to listen to your
favorite music. Rent a movie that
you enjoy. Treat yourself to your
favorite meal. It's the holidays -
celebrate.
"Single dads can go through
some important transformations
during the holidays, if they can
take a moment to think before they
act, and work to break the habits
that have governed past seasons,"
Taylor added. "It's time to man up,
and do right by your kids and by
yourself."

About Coach Michael Taylor
A proud father of three grown
children, Coach Michael Taylor
is happily married and resides in
Houston, Texas. He is also a self
educated entrepreneur, author,
personal coach and radio show
host. Taylor has been facilitating
workshops and seminars for more
than 15 years and has reached
thousands through his books,
seminars and radio show.


bout the Tampa Sailing
on
to the Tampa Sailing Squadron and learn about the benefits
ership. If you like being on the water, you will enjoy meet-
ly folks at TSS. They offer an extensive variety of activities
g enthusiast. If you are an experienced sailor or someone
learn to sail, they have programs and activities for you and
[hey are a private club dedicated to the promotion and en-
iling. Join them for coffee and an introduction to their club
the second Saturday of each month. You can also attend
membership meetings at 7:30 p.m. on the third Monday
h. The Tampa Sailing Squadron is located at 1250 Apollo
Apollo Beach. For more information, e-mail membership@


Breakfast, shopping and big money
highlight SCC's Holiday Walk

Sun City Center's Central Campus at 1009 N. Pebble Beach
Blvd. will be the site of the 3rd Annual Holiday Walk on Saturday,
Dec. 4.
Early risers as well as the brunch crowd can order a fantastic
$5 breakfast from 7 a.m. to noon. Two eggs, two sausages, two
pancakes plain or blueberry, toast, tea and bottomless coffee will
combine to form a breakfast fit for a king or queen.
A leisurely stroll through the courtyard to work off those added
pounds will lead to holiday gifts from the craft stores that will
be open from 9 a.m. to noon. Enjoy the morning serenaded by
seasonal music, playing with the model railroads and shopping
for those special holiday gifts.
All proceeds from the Holiday Walk will benefit the Sun City
Center 50th Anniversary Fund. Don't forget to register for the
three Sun City Center 50th Anniversary drawings. Three lucky
winners will walk away with $1,250, $750 and $500.
Eat hearty, shop vigorously, enjoy the holiday festivities,
play like a kid and win big money. It promises to be a fantastic
Saturday!


N
















�A


OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * 17


NOVEMBER 25, 2010


lc�






18 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


Adhere to food
safety over the
Holidays
With the beginning of the wed-
ding season, Florida Agriculture
and Consumer Services Commis-
sioner Charles H. Bronson today
reminded state residents to follow
a few food safety tips to avoid a
holiday celebration resulting in
cases of food-borne illness.
"Everybody enjoys holiday
meals, and with a little care, noth-
ing will mar the pleasure of the
celebration," Bronson said. "But
food safety measures are particu-
larly important, especially with the
variety of foods being served, the
number of helpers in the kitchen
and the fact that food is often left
out for long periods of time after
being served."
An estimated 76 million people
contract food-borne illness in the
United States each year and about
5,000 such cases are fatal. Young
children, pregnant women, the el-
derly and those with compromised
immune systems are the most vul-
nerable for contracting such ill-
ness.
Bronson offered these food safe-
ty tips:
- Clean and sanitize cooking
equipment.
- Wash your hands thoroughly
with soap and warm water before
preparing food and after contact
with raw meat, poultry, seafood
and eggs.
- Keep raw foods away from
cooked foods to avoid cross-con-
tamination, and make sure that raw
meat juices never come in contact
with salads and vegetables.
- Defrost the turkey in the re-
frigerator, or if time is short, it can
be defrosted under cold running
water in a matter of hours. Never
defrost the bird at room tempera-
ture as bacteria can rapidly grow
on raw meat at room temperature.
- Keep cold foods cold and hot
foods hot, especially when serv-
ing buffet style. Buffet servings
should be kept small and replen-
ished often.
- State and federal food safety
officials stress that the turkey
should be cooked to an internal
temperature of at least 165 degrees
F, and a food thermometer should
be used to verify the temperature.
While many people cook stuffing
inside the bird, officials suggest
that it be cooked in a separate pan
because there is no guarantee that
the stuffing will reach 165 degrees
F at the same time as the turkey.
- Carefully store leftovers. They
should be refrigerated promptly
and should sit out no more than
two hours after coming out of the
oven. Slice the turkey before re
frigerating as whole turkeys do
not store safely in the refrigerator.
Leftovers should be put in shallow
containers to speed up the cool-
ing process and prevent bacterial
growth.
For more tips on safely handling
and preparing food during the hol-
idays, visit:
http://www.florida-agriculture.
com/consumers/foodsafety win-
ter.htm.

Kings Point Ladies
18 Hole League
Game: Points, September 27
A Flt.
1st (tie) Rosa Gerry, Linda Suh
Even
2nd MaryMcClafferty Minus 1
B Flt.
1st Gladys Lowrie Plus 1
C Flt.
1st (tie) Nancy Sanders, Marie
Schick Minus 1
2nd Marge Miller Minus 2


South Hillsborough Elks Lodge #2672's
Upcoming Activities
Every Tuesday - Jam Session from 3p.m. to 5 - No Charge for all
Elks and their guests.
Every Wednesday - Best Spaghetti in Town - $7, All You Can Eat,
for all Elks and their guests. Music by Bryan from 5
to 8 p.m.
Every Thursday - Fun Night, Bar Bingo, Wii games
available all evening till closing.
Every Friday - Seafood and Sandwiches for all Elks
and their guests from 5 -7 p.m. Karaoke by Bryan Usa
from 5 to 8 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 29, Poor Man's Dinner for all Elks
and their guests. 5p.m., $5 in advance, $6 at the door. Menu: Ameri-
can Goulash.
Saturday, Dec. 11, Holiday Anniversary Dinner Dance for all Elks
and their guests. 5- 10 p.m. Appetizers: 5-6 p.m., Dinner: 6 p.m.
and Dancing: 7 p.m. Music by Bryan. Menu: Surf & Turf $15 per
person.


Freese is SCC MOAA speaker
Capt. Don Freese, USNR/RET, president of the MOAA Florida Council
of Chapters, will be the featured speaker at the Sun City Center Chapter
of the Military Officers Association of America luncheon Dec. 1, at
the Florida Room in the Sun City Center North Side Atrium Building.
Reservations ($14.00) should be made by calling 1-877-2203 no later
than the Sunday prior to the Wednesday meeting.
Capt. Freese is the current president of the Florida Council of Chapters,
an affiliate of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA),
which is a dynamic organization of more than 10,000 active, retired and
former officers of the uniformed services. The Council was chartered
on November 18, 1970 with 20 Chapters and Clubs and now includes 44
organizations from the Florida Panhandle to the Florida Keys.
Capt. Freese will discuss the current status and activities of the na-
tional MOAA organization. In addition to his presentation, he will install
the newly elected MOAA officers for the coming year. Colonel James
Shumway will be the 2011 MOAA president, replacing this year's presi-
dent Major Kirk Faryniasz.


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Sessums Elementary Terrific Kids
Terrific Kids for November 2010 at Sessums Elementary that exhibited pa
tience included: Dakota Garcia, Jazzmyne Roberson, Riley Terrell, Kaden
Herbert, Nicole Then, Reese Riley, A.J. Pratt, Alyson Cantrell, Adriel Car-
mona, Vanessa Amaya, Camron Daley, Sebastian Medor, Jordyn Smith, Jaden
Fisher, Justin Eatman, Arianna Cognito, Saniyah Murray, Melissa Felix, Nico
Smith, Deonna Rogers, Erin Nuhfer, Celeste Armijo, Alyssa Snelling, Ce-
leste Armijo, Jaylyn Wheeler, Rishard Dukes, Mekhi Turner, Jacob Maag,
Kevin Kerr, Ashley Mohammed, DeShawn Dees, Riley Coussens, Gabriel
Schwarzlose, Cameron Vigh, Leonie Alderson, Magili Chadbourne, Alyssa
Stanley, Christian Maag, Sydney Christenson, Shania Boyer, Michael Skid-
more, Noah Balik, Bethany O'Donnell, Gabrielle Castro, Cristian Denny, Bri-
ana Puello, Riley Ji, Samantha Preston, Lindsey Kipp, Ashley Halley, Sami
Choukri, Glerisbeth Ruiz, Lashawntis Cambell, Mahima Patel, Hailey Rodri-
guez, Stashia Wilson, Jasmine Iraq, Andy Ho, Senuda Rajapakse, Delaney
Garcia, Lauren Boyd, Keven Amaya, Cameron Williams, Niem Le.

30th wedding anniversary
Jose and Mariam Diaz recently
celebrated their 30th wedding an-
niversary. They were married on
September 20, 1980 at Heidelberg L .
United Church of Christ in Phila-
delphia, PA. Family guests included
their daughters Lisa, a guidance
counselor at Gallaudet University in
Washington, DC and Leann a senior
at Southeastern University in Lake-
land, Florida.


Dr. Robert A. Norman Dr. A. Theodosatos
Board Certified Dermatologist Brandi Broughton, PA-C

Offering Botox, Restylane and various cosmetic
products and services
Same Day Appointments * FREE Skin Screening
6322 U.S. Highway 301 * Riverview
813-880-7546
Insurance accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, BCBS, Humana,
Cigna, Aetna, Amerigroup, and many more i
















Free Skin Cancer


Screening Clinic

If you are concerned about a skin
growth, we would be happy to evaluate

Howard A. Oriba, M.D. Michael G. Caruso, M.D.
Dermatologists

4002 Sun City Center Blvd. e Suite B , Sun City Center FL 33573
(Corner of Upper Creek and Sun City Center Blvd)(Pink building with green roof)







C* A A
*:i


NOVEMBER 25, 2010






OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 19


Sailing home Collector goes for the unusual


* Continued from page 13
the highway, across a bridge and
into the next county. I considered
asking her if she stole the bus and
was on the run; but decided to be
still and see how things played out.
Finally, after nearly 15 miles, she
stopped at a hospital in a different
town.
This is where Alicia comes in.
It was afternoon and the county
buses became school buses for the
children attending charter schools.
The only way I could get back was
to wait at an elementary school
with the kids and then ride their
route. I was stuffed into a seat with
my groceries as the kids boarded.
Before long, I felt a tug at my
sleeve.
"I'm Alicia, what's your name?"
The young girl asked.
Thus began a true odyssey in
which Alicia and a young man in a
six-inch necktie competed at who
could talk the most to the dishev-
eled stranger on their school bus
- Alicia with tugs on my sleeve
and the young man by repeat-
edly asking, "Guess what?". I sat
back and enjoyed the ride learning
about how Scoobie Doo spends his
summers in Florida, a new Battle-
ship game, and Alicia's plastic liz-
ard that sleeps on the bus but stays
awake inside her backpack (which
was roughly half her size) during
school.
Three hours after I left, I returned
to the boat feeling better about
pretty much everything in life. On
the other hand, I also realized that
an entire busload of two-foot tall
children managed to find the right
bus - something I failed to do.
And yeah, I'm going to sail a boat
from Maryland to Florida.
The next day I finally departed
Cambridge. Two miles from the
marina, the engine died. After a
few moments of panic, the engine
started and kept running (for the
most part) until it finally delivered
me to a small coastal community
in Virginia named Reedville. Dur-
ing the sail, three boats were head-
ed south along with me. Finally, I
am pointed in the right direction.
On the last day of my 47th year,
I enjoyed the hospitality and sea-
food at a restaurant in Reedville. It
seems the cabin is still too quiet.


It started
with a fan
from a pen
pal in Ja
pan when
she was 13.
Now, collec-
Over tions of rare
Coffee fans, hatpins,
By Penny Fletcher beaded purs
es, wooden
penny@observernews.net a p a n e s e
Kokeshi
dolls, perfume bottles and kaleido-
scopes are interspersed throughout
her home.
"My first collection was antique
fans," said Francine Webb, a Sun
City Center resident who says
she just collects what pleases her,
never buying anything for value,
investment or resale profit.
The Canadian citizen, raised in
Ontario, Canada, and her husband
David have been residents of Flor-
ida since 2004 having come from
Detroit where they met and mar-
ried 10 years ago.
"Windsor, Ontario where I grew
up is practically right across the
border from Detroit," Francine told
me. "That's where David lived and
where we met."
Together they have three chil-
dren and three grandchildren.
While David is busy with his
love of boating, volunteering as
treasurer for the Tampa Bay Sail-
ing Squadron in Apollo Beach
and sailing whenever he gets the
chance, Francine serves as a vol-
unteer on the State Board of Di-
rectors for The Questers, a large
national antique collector's club.
Although she's picked up a few
things here and there since pen-
paling with kids from foreign
countries while in her teens- first
Japan and then Korea and Spain-
she started collecting in earnest
around 2000, about four years be-
fore moving to Sun City Center.
Retired from careers in both
media and tourism, she said she
missed the skiing in "snow coun-
try" and was spending more time
now with her collections.
The tri-lingual resident has a col-
lection of antique beaded purses
hanging on a kitchen door and in
her bedroom, some going back to
stagecoach days.
The purses are made of varied


we have something

to smile about
The dental practice of zamikoff,
Klement, Jungman and Varga
welcomes Dr. Michelle Halcomb to
their staff. Dr. Halcomb comes to
Sun City Center with over 20 years
of dental practice experience.
She looks forward to developing
long lasting relationships with her
patients in order to give them the
best that dentistry has to offer.
NOW ACCEPTING
NEW PATIENTS Michelle Halcomb, D.D.S.


* Tooth Pain
* Crowns
* Dental Implants
* Sedation Dentistry
* Tooth Whitening


* Dentures
* Bridges
* Porcelain veneers
* Cosmetic Dentistry
* Partials


813-634-3396
www.suncitycenterdental.com
703 Del webb Blvd. W., Suite B
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Lic #6193 * Lic #9109 * Lic #11099 * Lic #15756 * Lic #D1713809


I


i A


materials from feathers to metal
beads, having been sewn by hand
by unnamed women who have
long-since passed away.
"In the 1800s this was a cottage
industry for women," she told me.
"They would sit in their rocking
chairs after they'd finished their
chores and design these intricate
patterns."
The purses and fans began to
take up too much room, so for
awhile, she concentrated on extra-
long hand-painted hatpins. In 1908
various states started making laws
to limit their length to 9-inches and
by 1910 some states had declared
them illegal altogether because
they could be used as weapons.
Francine also became intrigued
by Japanese Kokeshi dolls be-
cause she said that in Japan, little
girls aren't allowed to play with
most of their dolls because they're
very fancy and put on shelves to
look at. So the little wooden dolls
were devised for play, their trade-
mark being that they have no arms
or legs, just torsos and heads with
painted faces.
She has a few antique perfume
bottles too.
But the most unusual collection
is her small but interestingly var-
ied collection of kaleidoscopes.
One beautiful wood-and-metal
kaleidoscope is also a music box;
and another just looks like a plain
piece of round, shined wood until
you see what's inside.
She also has a small gold-col-
ored one that's been made into a
necklace.
Francine was so fascinated by
how the different patterns are made
she purchased a cheap one just to
take it apart and examine the way
the mirrors and colored materials
are placed inside.
"They're so relaxing you some-
times find them in medical of
fices," she told me. "I know some
children get to make them in
school, but I never did, yet I was
always fascinated by them."
Her kaleidoscope collection isn't
nearly as large as some of her oth-
er collections, but the pieces are all
made with different colored mate-
rials inside. Some are beads, oth-


Celebrating 36 Years in Business

< CALL FOR FREE ----
INSPECTION
TERMITES?
ASK ABOUT TERMIDOR s
,A, BRANDON
_W PEST CONTROL
Phone: (813) 685-7711
Fax: (813) 685-3607


ers pearls. One has patterns made
with feathers and another with oil-
filled glass.
Then there's one that's different
from all the rest in that instead of
bright geometric patterns, when
you turn it the designs form ever
so slowly in a lacey way, almost
like snow.
"It is said that early Egyptians
placed two or three slabs of pol-
ished stone at various angles
and watched as circular designs
formed. Centuries later, this opti-
cal marvel took shape in a small
tube called the kaleidoscope in-
vented by Sir David Brewster in
1816," the history brochure Fran-
cine gave me says.
"You really start studying these
things when you collect," Francine
explained.


She's looking forward to the
2012 Quester's national conven-
tion because it will be held in Bal-
timore which is in the same state
as Bethesda, Md., where author
Cozy Baker, who writes about ka-
leidoscopes, has turned her home
into a museum.
"I know I'll rent a car and drive
there just to see it," she said, show-
ing me a brightly illustrated book
written by Baker.
"A nostalgic need for calming
beauty has made kaleidoscopes
more popular again," Francine
said. "I love the feeling of sur-
prise, because you never know
what you'll see.
*Perhaps you have something
you'd like to share. Or maybe you'd
rather tell the community about
your favorite charity or cause: or
sound off about something you
think needs change. That's what
"Over Coffee" is about. It really
doesn't matter whether we actually
drink any coffee or not (although I
probably will). It's what you have
to say that's important. E-mail me
any time at penny@observernews.
net and suggest a meeting place.
No matter what's going on, I'm
usually available to share just one
more cup.


These long hatpins
were often used as
weapons and were
banned by law. This
is one of the stands
in Francine's hatpin
collection she really
likes because of the
tiny hand-painted
scenes on the tops.


NOVEMBER 25, 2010


PENNY FLETCHER PHOTOS
Francine Webb holds a tiny kaleidoscope necklace next to a few
of the kaleidoscopes she has collected since 2000. She says they
don't look like much on the outside, but inside they're made of dif-
ferent substances, including oils, sand, beads and feathers. "I don't
buy anything for value or investment," Francine said. "I just collect
what makes me happy."






20 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


Phyllis Butner, left, 1 of 7 pianists for Nondenominational Christian
Worship Services, is shown presenting a check for $1471 to Dolores
Berens, president of Samaritan Alzheimer's Auxiliary.
Alzheimer's Auxiliary gains financial assistance
Nondenominational Christian Worship Services is currently providing
10 weekly worship services in the Sun City Center Community along
with sponsoring a role model program at Reddick Elementary School
and sponsoring an Adopt-A-Highway program. From their October love
offering they donated $1421 to the Samaritan Alzheimer's Auxiliary.
Phyllis Butner said, "We are thankful & grateful for the financial sup
port from our attendees to help fund such a worthwhile organization as
Samaritan Alzheimer's' Auxiliary." Those interested in volunteering or
having a worship service in your area call Jim at 634-3114.


Lady of Song
concert scheduled
Enjoy a wonderful night of music
with the Legendary Lady of Song.
This is a limited one night engage-
ment at Apollo Beach Community
Church, 6414 Gulf & Sea Blvd, Nui
Apollo Beach, Dec. 4, at 6:30pm. Pa
Cost of a ticket is $12.50. Tick- 53
ets can be purchased by calling
the Church at 641-2222 between [
9-12, Monday thru Friday or call
645-8202 and leave your name,
telephone number and number of
tickets you would like.

Join MOPS
If you are a mom who is preg-
nant or has a child newborn thru
kindergarten, desires to make new
friends, wants to share the chal-
lenges and joys of motherhood,
is looking for opportunities for
personal growth through trusted
resources, enjoys giving back to
the community then YES! MOPS
is for you.
Group Meetings are the 1st and
3rd Wednesdays of every month
until May 18, 2011, from 9:30 H(
am- 11:30am. Cost is $5 per meet-
ing for refreshments and crafts (as
needed) To register for the waiting
list, e-mail mops@southbay.cc. or
call 813-677-0721.


Trinity Baptist
Singles go to Mt.
Dora
The Trinity Baptist Church
Singles group gets ready for a
day trip to beautiful Mt. Dora.
The group is lead by Rose Co-
lucci, shown front left. For infor-
mation on the group or church,
call 634-4228.


Latkes and
dreidles, oh my!
Join the Brandon Chai group
of Hadassah for their annual fun-
packed Channukah party on Sun-
day, Dec. 5, at 1p.m. The party
will include a pot-luck luncheon
and will be held at the home of
Janice Perelman in Brandon.
Members, husbands and guests
are invited, but reservations are a
must. Call Janice at (813) 571-
2029 to RSVP.


Community sings
South Hillsborough Ministerial
Association (SHMA), an organ-
ized, interactive group of local
church ministers and congregations
committed to the work of the Lord
Jesus Christ in South Hillsborough
County, will conduct its monthly
'Community Sing' at 7 p.m. on
Monday, Nov. 29 at the Ruskin
United Methodist Church, located
at 105 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin.
The 'prelude' to the sing begins
at 6:30 p.m. For more information,
call (813) 645-1241 or visit www.
shmasouthshores.org.


I V endr. "paceren alAvilab


CHURCH
Come and experience the power of
Jesus to change your life.
Sunday @ 9 & 11 AM * Servicio en Espariol @ 6 PM

www.aplace4everyone.org

2322 11th Ave. SE * Ruskin, FL * 813.645.3337







Ziyyerer's Tunera( C-Tome

Only Onsite Crematory in S. Hillsborough County
Family owned and operated since 1979


813-645-6130

' 7 1520 33rd St. S.E, Ruskin, FL 33570
www.zipperersfuneralhome.com
Exp. 12/31/10


/f Sunday Worship: Blended 8:00 a.m.
er Provided Contemporary 9:40 a.m. _ gBend. R.
rsery Provided |
stor Jack R. Palzer Traditional 11:15 a.m.
09 U.S. Highway 41 North * Apollo Beach
ossroom MiraBay)www.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1305 v N

St. John the Divine Episcopal Church
Growing by Faith from Generation to Generation
Rev. Tracy H. Wider - Church Office 813-645-1521
UNDAY SERVICES: 9 am - Contemporary Service and Sunday School
at West Campus, S.R. 674 and 9th Street SE, Ruskin
8 am - Traditional Service and 11 am Holy Communion with Choir at East Campus
at 1015 Del Webb Blvd., SCC
All Worship Services with Holy Communion and Healing Holy Oil

Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (Behind Suntrust Bank)
ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: (Nov.-April ............................. 8:30 a.m. Day Care Available
Mon.- Fri.
Rev. John M. Bartha and all year)...................... 10:45 a.m. 6 am -6p.m.
Phone: 645-1241 Sunday School.......................9:30 a.m. call 645-6198

REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH-ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center, FL 33573-5354
Rev. Dr. Peter Stiller, Pastor * 634-1292
Saturday Worship: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
oly Communion....First & Third Sunday * Bible Class...Thursday 10 am, Guests Welcome

First Church of Christ, Scientist
Ruskin - Sun City Center (813) 645-6102
204 Second St. N.W, Ruskin, Florida 33570
Sunday Service * Sunday School ............................................. 10AM
Wednesday Testimony Meeting............................................ 5PM
Reading Room * Tuesday & Thursday.......................................1- 4 PM
ALL ARE WELCOME www.spirituality.com


FriendIship Beiptist Church
Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist)
- 1511 El Rancho Dr.
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Phone/Fax:


WEEKLY SERVICES:


.Bible Study
.Bible Study
.....Worship


Sunday
9 a .m . ...............
1 1 a .m ..............
10 a.m. & 6 p.m.


Wednesday
6 p.m.... Prayer Meeting/Bible Study


Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC
Meets in the Social Hall of the Beth Israel Synagogue
1115 E. Del Webb Blvd.
Thursday, 7:00 PM - Call 633-0396
We are constantly invited to be what we are.
HENRY DAVID THOREAU

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where God's Love is Shared"
U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL * 645.1121 * www.nbcor.org
Sunday School for all ages 9:30 AM SBC
Morning Worship 10:45 AM Wanted: People Who Want to Grow
Evening Worship 6:00 PM and Live for Jesus!
Full Wednesday Schedule for all ages

North River Church of Christ i
- Non-Instrumental -
13885 U.S. Hwy 301 South
(Just South of the Manatee County Line)
Minister: Howard Johnson Office 941-776-1134
Services: Sunday 10:00am, 11:00am & 6:00pm
Wednesday7:00pm Home 813-754-1776

First Baptist Church of Gibsonton
"We love because He fir!t loved us." 1 John 4:19
ITraditional Worship Service *Sunday School 9:30 A.M. l
Old-Time Gospel Hymns *1Morning Worship 10:30 A.M. l
Nursery Available I Sunday Evening 6:00 P.M. l
* Interpreter for the Deaf d-Week (Wed.) 7:00 P.M.
9912 Indiana St. * Hwy 41 & Estelle A4 r 'Malcolm S. Clements, Pastor
\Gibsonton, FL 33534 - . 813-677-1301 J

Welc~ Ate EVERETT TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ
1611 First St. SW * Ruskin, FL * 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL-
SERVICES: Sunday........................9:30 & 10:30 am.; 6:00 p.m .
Wednesday................7:00 p.m.

Prince of Peace - Masses:
Sunday.......... 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., Noon
Catholic Church Saturday Vigil ...............4:00 and 6:00 p.m.
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573 Daily .... . ... 8:00 a.m.
Phone: 634-2328 * Fax: 633-6670 W Confessions:
www.popcc.org Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m. and Sat. 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.


FfRST BAPTISTo CH-IURCH

LTIT\ 820 COLLEGE AVE. W.
RUSKIN, FL 33570
645-6439
- . . ' www.fbcruskin.org
A Resource for Families
Sunday School............................9:45 a.m .
Morning Worship ...........8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Dr. Barry Rumsey
Evening Service..............................6:00 p.m. KCHRIST 2 SCHOOL
Wednesday Night Service..............7:00 p.m. THROUGH 12TH
Awana...................... .................. 7:00 p.m . GRADE


CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH


NOVEMBER 25, 2010

Area lace of W rshi







NOVEMBER 25, 2010








IU it *Spirituality Rather Than "Religion"


Beth Israel's Social Hall
1115 Del Webb E. * Sun City Center, FL
www.unitycommunityofjoy.com


Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
Tel. 813-298-7745


EMPOWERMENT CHRISTIAN CENTER
at SouthShore, Inc.
Worship SU1D.IY NOV14 * 9:00A.M.
Service Schedule: Sundays........9 a.m. Thursdays........7:30 p.m.
6140 N. U.S. Hwy. 41 * Apollo Beach, FL 33572
(In the plaza with Blockbuster Video)
Pastor Deondrick Douglas * (813) 938-5815


4V THE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO THE SERVICES NOW WORSHIPPING IN THE "CHAPEL"
AT SUN CITY CENTER FUNERAL HOME 10:30 AM ON SUNDAYS
NO CREED...BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE
1851 RICKENBACKER DRIVE * 813-938-4955
Minister - DR. DAVID CAMPBELL


Southside Baptist Church
"A Warm, Loving & Friendly Church"
Looking for a church home?
Need the comfort of a warm and loving family?
Join us on Sunday to come home to the warmth of our church family.
Located in South Hillsborough County, just south of Stephens Road in old Sun City.
4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 S * Sun City, FL 33586 * 813-645-4085


"Getting to KnowYou" (Donuts & Coffee)................. 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................................................. ..... .. 9:30 am .
Sunday Morning Worship............................................ 10:55 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service...............................................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service ....................................... 7:00 p.m.
Thursday Morning Prayer.........................................10:00 a.m.


Dan Collis, Pastor
Come join us to
learn about God's
Word and salvation
in Jesus Christ


qnijed'Re/Sodi CGrc�ofcunQ C6i Genler
The Church of Open Hearts... Open Minds... Open Doors
1210 W. Del Webb Blvd. * 634-2539
".� ' Worship Services:
'. \1 Saturday................. 4:00 p.m. - Creason Hall (Traditional Service)
Sunday................. 8:15 a.m. in Sanctuary (Traditional Service)
" - 9:30 a.m.- Creason Hall (The Oasis)
10:55 a.m. - Sanctuary (Traditional with Chancel Choir)
W. w Fellowship timid .... T?, ,,. i, ' ..iii,. I.. r .. 10:15a.m. and 11a.m. in Creason Hall
9*od'tsLove "".SCCUNIC.com
PASTORS: DR. WARREN LANGER, REV GARYBULLOCK
Communion First Sunday of Each Month



21. St. Andrew Presbyterian Church

Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.
4 S 6 Prayers with anointing for healing and
& wholeness during worship the second Sunday
of every month.
A Stephen Pastor: Dr. Gerald Iwerks
Ministry
Church Meet friends in Fellowship Hall after the Service
Refreshments served


1239 Del Webb Blvd. West
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Church is Handicap accessible


Phone: 813-634-1252
For Information visit:
www.standrewatscc.org


Saint Anne Catholic Chutch

Fr. John McEvoy
Pastor
813-645-1714
SaintAnneRuskin.org

U.S. Hwy. 41 * 106 11th Ave. NE * Ruskin
SouthShore: r- :. .11., Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton
C MASSES
Saturday Vigil M ass....................................... ............. ..... 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass..............................8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Holy Days................................... Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Daily ...................................................... M onday thru Friday 8:00 a.m.
Espahiol .............................Domingo - 12:30 p.m.; Miercoles 7:30 p.m.
Confession..........................Wednesday 6:45 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.
Nursery Available for 10:00 a.m. Mass




evrtig in te na e ofour ord esu


OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 21


Obituaries

Patricia McKinney
Patricia McKinney passed away
November 17, 2010, with her family in
Kalamazoo. She was born September
24,1926, in Pellston, MI to the late John
and Beatrice (Riegel) Gehman. Patricia
was married on October 6, 1952, to
Robert McKinney, who preceded her in
death on March 15, 2003. She was a
very social person, loved to travel and
was always said to be "on the go". She
didn't cook very often but made great
reservations. Surviving Patricia are her
children, Debra McKinney of Bogota,
Colombia, Elaine (Greg) Mannes of
Kalamazoo, Janis McKinney of Grand
Rapids, Bob (Michelle) McKinney
of Coppell, TX and Greg (Tammy)
McKinney of Tarpon Springs, FL; four
grandchildren, Courtney Mannes,
Kevin, Alex and Andrea McKinney;
sisters, Rosina North and B. Anne
Gehman. Also preceding Patricia in
death were sisters Mary Horton and
Aloise Kaprowski and brothers John
and Bob Gehman. No visitation is
scheduled. A private family memorial
gathering will take place at a later date.
Interment will take place at Bay Pines
Cemetery in Tampa, FL. Arrangements
are by the Langeland Family Funeral
Homes, Westside Chapel, 3926 S. 9th
St. Memorials in Patricia's name may
be directed to Hospice of Southwest
Michigan or to a charity of your choice.
"We will miss our beautiful mom and
grandma and her fun, adventurous
spirit." Please see www.langelands.
com for online obituary, register book
and condolences.

Jane Snyders Meek
Jane Snyders Meek, a long-time
resident of Sun City Center, FL.
and Jackson, MI., died Saturday,
November 13, 2010 from congestive


heart failure and lung cancer. Jane
was 92. A loving mother of Lt. Col.
James Snyders PhD (wife Marylea)
of Brandon FL, and Robert Snyders
(wife Alice) of Hudsonville MI. A loving
grandma of Colin Snyders and great
granddaughter Ella Snyders of Falls
Church VA.
Jane, a kindergarten teacher, retired
from the Van Dyke Public Schools in
Warren Michigan. Her biggest joy came
from being with family and friends. She
loved to travel which included most all
of the 50 states, Europe and Asia.
In lieu of flowers donations may
be made to either Life Path Hospice,
Development Dept., 12973 N. Telecom
Pkwy, Ste. 100, Temple Terrace,
FL 33637, or Faith Hospice, 2100
Raybrook St, Ste. 300, Grand Rapids,
MI 49546


Eva L. O'Boyle
Eva L. O'Boyle, 89, of Valrico passed
away November 19, 2010. She is
survived by her children, Paul, Mary Lee
and Jr., Pat and John, Kathy, Robert,
Leona and Steve, Ken and Lydia.
Love you Forever.


Christian Science Church to hold
Thanksgiving service
First Church of Christ, Scientist, Ruskin-Sun City Center welcomes
all to a Thanksgiving Day service at 10 a.m. on Thursday, Nov. 25. The
Bible text is : "Offer unto God Thanksgiving and pay thy vows unto
the most High," Psalms 50:14.
Readings of thanksgiving and
gratitude will be from The Bible
and from Science and Health
with Key to the Scriptures by
Mary Baker Eddy.
Readers are Lynn Knapp and
Mary Anderson , Sun City Cen
tter. The soloist is Betty Bishop,
also of Sun City Center. The
service will provide time for
expressions of gratitude by indi
viduals in the congregation. No
collection will be taken.
First Church of Christ, Scien
tist is located at 204 Second Street NW in Ruskin. For further informa
tion, call 633 6459.






LADIES OF SON G













APOLLO BEACH
COMMUNITY CHURCH 641-2222
6414 Golf & Sea Blvd.
Apll Beach,.L - � 1


pA ollo Beach, FL 33572


4 aftf 6o601Sto k ak ff waaf a felaf

December 4th * 6:30 p.m.
Tickets $ 12.50 in Church office Mon.-Fri. 9 to Noon
| Cash or Checks please * Doors open at 6:00 p.m.
SPECTACULAR PERFORMANCE s DON'T MISS IT!!


Eleanor J. Sherwood
Ellie Sherwood, 79, passed away
after a brief illness in Tampa, Florida
on August 30, 2010. She was born on
Christmas Day in 1930 in Rochester,
New York to Cecil and Maria (Genova)
Kellar.
Ellie is survived by three grown
children, sons Paul Werner and Daniel
Werner, and daughter, Lori (Phil) Sabon;
three grandchildren, Steven Werner,
Ryan and McKenna Sabon; sister
Beatrice Petterson, brothers Richard
(Alice) Kellar and Willard Kellar.
After high school, Ellie became a
flight attendant for Capital Airlines
and Eastern Airlines for almost 9
years, then got married and retired
from the airlines to raise her children
in Michigan. She earned a bachelor's
degree and then a master's of social
work (MSW) and worked for the State
of Michigan as a Disability Examiner
for many years. After retiring, she
moved to Vermont, then Winter Haven
and Sun City Center, Florida. Ellie
was a member of the Tampa Sailing
Squadron, loved attending air shows,
genealogy, traveling, and entertaining
family and friends. Ellie was a volunteer
for Tampa's Guardian ad Litem, which
is a program to help abused, neglected
and abandoned children. She was also
a member of St. Anne Catholic Church
in Ruskin, Florida.
Funeral services were held on Sept
15, 2010 at St. James Catholic Church
in Mason, Michigan. A get together will
be held near Sun City Center, Florida to
celebrate Ellie's life during the week of
Thanksgiving. Please leave a message
at 810-522-7570 for information.
Memorial contributions may be made
in Ellie's name to "Voices For Children,"
which is part of the Guardian ad Litem
program: http://www.vfcgal.org, or to
the Youth Sailing Program at Tampa
Sailing Squadron: tssyouthsailing@
yahoo.com


New Thought
Church shares music
of the season
The music of the season is an
essential element of the holidays.
Music shares the joy of the birth
of Jesus, celebrates rich traditions
from around the world, and pro-
motes peace on earth!
On Saturday, Dec.11, Unity in
Brandon will host "An Acoustic
Christmas" - a holiday concert that
will share some unique music of
the winter. The program will begin
at 7:00 pm in the intimate setting of
the Brandon Junior Woman's Cen-
ter, located at 129 N. Moon Ave.,
Brandon. Since the building is
designated as
a historic site,
the concert
.eC' . will be strictly
- acoustic, with
no electronic
. equipment!
; The evening
.- will feature a
performance


by Marion Gwizdala, a local en-
tertainer and recording artist. Ad-
mission is on a love offering basis
and no one will be turned away!
Light refreshments will be avail-
able at the concert and there will
be a Holiday Bake/Craft Sale.
For more information about Uni-
ty in Brandon, visit their web site
at unityinbrandon.org .or call 813-
263-6155.


Dessert and card
party planned
The Prince of Peace Council of
Catholic Women invites anyone
who likes to play cards or any
board game to make up a table in
advance and come to the dessert
card party on Wednesday, Dec. 8,
noon to 3:30 pm. They furnish
cards, pencils and tallies. They
have an assortment of desserts and
have table and door prizes. For
more information, call 633-2460.


I






22 . OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER
Join the festivities at SCC Methodist


NOVEMBER 25, 2010


The United Methodist Church of
Sun City Center, 1210 Del Webb
Blvd. West, will present A Christmas
Madrigal Dinner III on Thursday,
Friday, and Saturday, Dec. 2, 3 and
4 at 6pm in Creason Hall. This tra-
ditional Elizabethan madrigal din-
ner is an evening of dinner theatre
in which diners join a 16th century
English court in its celebration of
Christmas dinner, typically a four-
course meal that is eaten along with
a royal family and their immediate
friends. The emphasis is on silli-
ness, slapstick comedy, good music
and period food. Besides toasting
and eating, diners are also encour-
aged to participate in the festivities
by singing and dancing. The main
plot of this third installment of the
show revolves about Prince Clau-
dius and Princess Christina who are
about to have a baby. The evening
of comedy ends with dessert and a
short concert of Christmas madri-
gals, 16th century a cappella choral


pieces. The experience of a mad-
rigal dinner is unlike that of any
other dinner theatre. "So the story
unfolds before ye this night; watch
and enjoy as it all comes to light!"
The players in this year's Mad-
rigal include Bill Turcotte, Jene
Evans, David and Katy Style, Al
Moorman, Pat Johnson, Scott LaR-
ue, Rod Peterson, Dianne Turcotte,
Shane Canfield, Mike Sekol, Kathy
Straub, Isabelle Jordan, Tom & Sue
Montgomery, Julia Jordan, Linda
Whitt, Donna Van Dreser, Dennis
& Sydney LaRue, Linda Sanford,
Shirley Bengston, Shirley Walker,
Barbara Kanoza and Mary Bush-
ong. Costumes are by Carol Stew-
art, dinner by Amanda Jordan and
the play is written and directed by
Jeff Jordan.
There are still several tickets
available for these special perfor-
mances. Tickets are $15 each in-
clude a home-cooked four-course
meal and may be purchased in the


St. Andrew group travels
The Traveling Group at St. Andrew Presbyterian Church is planning a trip
to Orlando to see "The Singing Christmas Trees" on Friday, Dec. 3. The
"Trees" have become one of Central Florida's most loved and spectacular
traditions. The show features a huge choir, full orchestra, worshipful dance,
powerful drama, 250,000 lights and two 40-foot-tall Christmas trees. The
cost of the trip is $68 per person and includes bus, buffet, the pageant and
all gratuities. The public is invited to participate and for more information
call Susan at 634-1141.


church office during business hours.
For more information about this and
other concerts and special events
at the United Methodist Church of
Sun City Center, please contact Jeff
Jordan, Minister of Worship Arts at
813-634-2539.

SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWER


Every time he went for a sail in his
yacht, Joseph Dollar threw a bottle
containing his business card and a
fifty-dollar bill into the sea.
He kept this up for many years, but
he never received any thanks for his
gifts.
All along your journey on the sea
of life, the Lord has been dropping
tokens of His goodness and grace.
Some ignore them. Others accept
them. But few thank Him.
Ingratitude - it's one of the worst
sins we can commit.
No wonder the Psalmist said, "Say
'Thank You' to the Lord. Every
morning tell Him, 'Thank You for
Your kindness,' and every evening
rejoice in His faithfulness."
Visit us at: www.TheSower.com


Unity announces upcoming services
Unity in Brandon invites all to worship services at 10:30 am at 129
N. Moon Ave., Brandon, FL at the Brandon Woman's Club. Rev. Aaron
Moore and Rev. Mary Moore are the spiritual leaders. Topics for the
upcoming weeks are as follows:
November 28 - In The Beginning by Rev. Mary Moore
December 5 - Every Day Is a Miracle
December 11 - Marion Gwizdala Concert at 7:00pm.
A special invitation is sent to all Daily Word readers.


MANATEE MEMORIALOFSFERST -HELATEST

PROCEDURE FOR HEARTRHYT HMllDISODR


Precision. Faster recovery.

And you don't miss a bpat (anymore)!

If you have a heart rhythm disorder, there. responsible for the electrical disturbance
a good chance it's caLued ,:: , g9litc: ii nid-:C le- e , horin l Ihe:rt niu.:Cle i.- t,:t
your heart's electrical pF:I thl ',, C r:Jd : , ?l:It:i i,'-i t o iie e-:itng -- ',
Surgeons at Manatee i.len-i:,,ril l , .i :?.: : l ,: , . I
ablation to target the hiert i- .




Could you have a
heart rhythm disorder?
Heart rhythm problems *:.an ,.:.:ur . "
at any age. Certain disor.:l-er- ..re o -
more prevalent for patient-s . ith
these risk factors: ' .
* Older age '
* High blood pressure
* History of heart diseas-e .
* Obesity ":- ..
* Gland abnormalities,
such as hyperthyroidism



To find an electrophysiologist, please call Direct Doctors:,, Plus
at 1-800-816-4145. Or, visit www.manateememorial.com
and click Find a Doctor in the left menu.


Become a fan Facebook


The electrophysiologists (cardiologists who specialize in the heart's
electrical system) on the medical staff at Manatee Memorial include:
Jagan Akella, MD, Joseph Pace, MD, Jeffrey Rothfeld, MD and
Kenneth Zide, MD.


Manatee

Memorial Hospital


~t~he free mobile app at
http://gettag.mobi


206 Second Street East
Bradenton, FL 34208
www.manateememorial.com


Happy thanksgiving
from the staff of
The Observer Jlews
and )W ' Printing!


I






OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 23


Get GREAT SERVICE


and support YOUR COMMUNITY!

VISIT THESE LOCAL BUSINESSES FOR YOUR NEEDS


HEADACHES!!!
If your head is talking to you, then you should be talking to us.

I l| ' . ' I ,

Stephen Murray
Atlas Orthogonal Chiropractor
(813) 641-3333




Hanson Services, Inc.
In-Home Assisted Living Providers


GEORGANA COLLINS, LP.N.
Administrator

Tel: 813-634-6617 1601 Rickenbacker Drive #5
Toll Free: 877-634-6617 Sun City Center. FL 33573
Fax: 813-634-7259 hsinc5@msn.com



COMASSION ) aOUR ArTURE HKAL PAT L. Rph
C.URING IS OUR BUSINESS Pharma Manager

_Z^isUNRISE
PHARMACY
FRAFIHOM.DE1jVRRY.PURSONALI.ERICE
,FrrORDABLE PRICEi * QUALITY CARE
139 S. Ptbbl Beach Bd. Suite 103
Sun City Ccntr, Florida 33573
Ph.: 813-633-8 222 Fax 8131-63-8227
sunrxpharmacy@yahoo.com







W 4,Pjf .j ne..

*Service24/7 10% -U COW-
* Specializing in Re-Piping (BImildba g
* Drain Cleaning I Sewer Line Replacement cFc1unr






The Little Uniti M
That Could...
big cooling or heating that ru
on the power of a light bulb L
* BONUS ROOMS, ADDITIONS, BEDROOMS
Qualifies for energy rebate * Hurricane packages * Financing available


To have your business featured here,
call 1-888-697-9562 (toll-free)


LOCAL MORTGAGE COMPANY
OFFERS FAST, CONVENIENT SERVICE

A hometown presence and reputation for personal service are
keys to the success of Partners Funding, Eric Heckman's 16
year-old mortgage lending firm.
"We treat everyone like family, with honesty and integrity," said
Heckman, who attended Sun City Center's official Grand Opening
ceremony while on a family trip and moved to the area in 1981. He
has headed the firm since founding it in 1994.
"We're still around because we do things right," he said, adding
that about 60 percent of his business is from referrals and previous
customers.
In addition to conventional funding, the firm offers FHA and VA
loans, and is the largest mortgage originator in Sun City Center.
"We treat all loans equally. All of our loans are processed locally,"
Heckman explained.
"That means fast, personal service. Clients can meet personally
with their loan officer at times and places they find convenient."
A graduate of the University of Louisville, he is a Kentucky
Colonel.
For trouble free, convenient mortgage financing, contact Eric Heckman at
Partners Funding, 813-634 3235 or ericpfsc@tampabay.rrcom



HEADACHE RELIEF WITHOUT DRUGS
FROM 'THE GUY WHO WON'T JERK
YOU AROUND'

M M ost headaches start in the neck. A lot of people don't
realize that," said Dr. Stephen Murray, D.C., of Apollo
Beach Chiropractic Center, P.A., as he explained how
he helps patients who have headache pain.
"All of the body's nerves pass through the Atlas, the vertebra that
sits atop the spinal column. When it's misaligned, headaches-and
other pain throughout the body-are frequently the result."
Dr. Murray specializes in the Atlas orthogonal technique, which
requires additional training and involves making precisely calibrated
adjustments to the Atlas. "I like to be known as 'The Guy Who
Won't Jerk You Around,"' he said.
He starts by having each patient x-rayed to determine the exact
extent of corrections needed.
Relief can come almost immediately, but treatment typically takes
6-12 visits over 3-6 weeks, according to Dr. Murray.
He told of a patient who was already scheduled for surgery due
to severe pain caused by a bad disc in his neck. "He said he didn't
expect me to help him and only came to humor his girlfriend. After
just a week, he had such relief that he cancelled the surgery. I have
since treated or referred several members of his family."
A Plant City native, Murray first worked as a strawberry farmer.
Wanting a more forward-looking occupation, he considered
becoming an M.D. But, after working in a hospital and seeing
overworked doctors whose patients were getting sicker, he rejected
that choice. On the advice of friends and relatives, he investigated
chiropractic and found his niche. Following training at Life
University in Atlanta, GA, he opened his Apollo Beach practice in
2003.
For treatment of headache or other chronic pain, schedule a consultation with Dr
Stephen Murray, D.C., at Apollo Beach Chiropractic Center, 813-641 3333.



HEALTH INSURANCE THAT MEETS
YOUR NEEDS

1 work to do what's right for the client 100% of the time,"
- explained independent health insurance broker Adam
1 Struckhoff as he described his approach to business.
Struckhoff handles major medical and Medicare supplement
insurance policies for individuals and groups throughout the Tampa
Bay region, focusing on South Shore.
Because his firm, Accurate Health & Financial Services, is
independent, Struckhoff can locate and recommend the right policy
for a client, regardless of which company offers it.
"Many agents, who represent specific insurers, are forced to sell
what they have, rather than the policy that best fits the customer,"
Struckhoff observed.
"We can often find insurance for people who thought they were
uninsurable or didn't realize they could get better coverage," he
added, citing the case of a Ruskin woman.
"Because of pre-existing conditions, she was on the Cover Florida
Plan, which she didn't realize didn't offer major medical. We were
able to qualify her for a major medical plan and on the basis of that,
ultimately get her an even better policy."
A native of the St. Louis MO area, Struckhoff was an executive
with The Boys and Girls Clubs of America for 15 years before
starting his insurance business in 2006. He has resided in the Tampa
Bay area for 10 years.
For a health insurance solution that fitsyour needs, not the broker's, contact Adam
'... at 727-455-2725.


Partners Funding
CORRESPONDENT MORTGAGE LENDER
Eric D. Heckman
815 Cypress Mllage Blvd. * Suite A
Sun City Center, FL33573
(o) 813-634-3235 * (f) 813-634-2648
813-601-3235 (evenings)
EricPFSC'Iaampabay.rrcomrn
www.partners-funding.com





Go with Flo
I Help People and Pets
find Happy Homes!
Direct 813-500-0529 * Fax: 813-633-0706
Flo@FloVochon.com - www.FloVochon.com
I dI PoFi**MU *fearl s* h o �AA if..nd Pmr
3896 Sun C;ty Cearer B.vd. Flo Vachon
R6K SuniC,ly Cer.le. Fi 33573 ip c: CRm Pm
f - *-- 813-633-3311 ext I o :eI .. , , C_ r




SOUTH BAY TITLE INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.

MICHAEL ANTHONY
President
936 Cypress Village Blvd. Ste A (813) 633-3330
Ruskin, FL 33573 Fax (813) 633-1789
Email: mall@southbaytitleinc.com












813-633-800I
L -V--- - - - s-- travel -- --


Phil Wootton
Roofer/Handyman
Iwootton@tampabay.rr.com


813-478-2403


\ ---


#CCC1327371






MO AL AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES
SAME DE SERVES I LOWERUPS I BRI /I CARE
� " " ----- -----N

OPEN:aam-51m(M-Fi) dSSS
Sam-2pm (Sa) . n 1
Closed Sunday


Main: (813) 645-4632
Fax: (813) 641-2541


616 US Highway 41 S.
Ruskin, FL 33570
wW.TotalAuto aoliVeSermcas.com


Fast-Lube Center & Tires, Brakes. Alignmnt. A/C and Batteries
We Service and Maintain Cars and Trcmds all Makes and Models.




OAccura teH cal ft

dua Fames * el Employed
* Major Medical PPOs * Diabetic Insurance
*IRA Planning Disability Income
* Medicare Plans * Ufe and Annuities
Adam Struckhoff
(866) 241-8078 (727) 455-2725


INJURED?
CAR ACCIDElNT - WRO(NGFULI DEATH


NOVEMBER 25, 2010





24 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


PUT YOUR TIRED,


PAINFUL LEG


SKILLED


S


NTO OUR


HANDS,


Our free consultation
will be your first step
to pain-free legs.
The signs of varicose veins aren't
always obvious. Even if you don't
see veins on the surface of your
legs, there's a good chance your
discomfort is a symptom of vein
disease. Half of all men and
women over 50 are affected by
a vein problem. And without
intervention, the problem will
only get worse. Fortunately, the
solution is a simple one.

Here's all that's
standing between
you and healthier,
younger looking legs:
All veins have valves. Healthy
valves keep blood flowing only
upward and support the weight
of the column of blood. When
Normal One-Way Varicose
Vein Valves Vein Valves





Healthy valve prevents Reverse blood flow
reverse blood flow due to damaged valve

these valves are broken, blood
pools below. This congestion
and increased pressure result in
discomfort and cause fluid to
build up and leak from the deeper
capillaries. The result - gradual
and continuous deterioration of
your legs over the years. Both
visible and hidden varicose veins
are dangerous - they increase
your risk of blood clots. Most
varicose veins are hidden. Tired,
painful legs are a symptom that
something is wrong.

Don't take your
ultra-sound while
lying down.
We test your vein valves while
you are standing. If you have ever
had an ultrasound of vein valves
performed while you were lying


Any of these symptoms can
signal dangerous, hidden
varicose veins. Schedule
a FREE consultation
to see if our painless
procedures can help.


Before and after photos show dramatic
results from advanced vein procedures.
down, you have had inadequate
testing. This is a gravity issue,
after all! Our more advanced


I


Daniel J. Mountcastle, MD
(Ohio State University)


E Painful, aching legs
D Tired legs
E Leg cramps
S D Swollen ankles
E Skin discoloration
E Restless legs
SD Itching, burning skin


methods detect valve problems
frequently missed by less well-
equipped clinics.
Vein testing is easy and painless
and takes place right in our office.
At your exam appointment, our
doctor will explain the ultrasound
results and discuss treatment
options with you. At Mountcastle
Vein Centers, we offer four simple,
advanced 20-minute procedures
performed in our private, small
clinic atmosphere. All four are













1





V


Naushin Jobe, MD Jack Lipps, MD
(Chicago Medical School) (University of Louisville)


painless, effective, minimally
invasive and non-surgical. You
can expect to return to normal
activity the same day.
The sooner you
call, the sooner
you'll find relief.
Don't let leg discomfort keep you
from enjoying life. In most cases,
our procedures are considered
medically necessary and are
covered by health insurance and
Medicare. This is a progressive
disease. So call today for
your free consultation. Learn
how to stop and reverse the
deterioration of your legs.

Sun City Center
4040 Upper Creek Dr., Ste. 105, FL
33573 (next to South Bay Hospital)
St. Petersburg (at Isla del Sol)
Largo (next to Largo Medical Center)
Palm Harbor
(at The Fountains, Alderman & US19)
Mountcastle
vein centers
Never stop living!"'
Call 813-634-1333
www.mountcastleveincenters.com


'N


*1


Kim Truett, BS, Vascular Technology
(Oregon Institute of Technology)


02010 Mountcastle Vein Centers


A simple procedure will change your life.
There are many different treatments for vein disease,
but not all are equal. Some are obsolete, painful and
dangerous. Ours are modern, painless and safe.


NOVEMBER 25, 2010






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2B * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER

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NOVEMBER 25, 2010

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NOVEMBER 25, 2010 THE SHOPPER 3B


TO place an ad call THE SHOPPER
813.645.3111 ext. 201


Fax: 813.645.1792
$15.50
up to 20 words
300 addl. word
Deadline is Monday
at 4pm


100 Announcements
200 Farmer's Mkt
300 Merchandise
400 Marine
450 Transportation
500 Real Estate
550 Manuf. Housing
600 Rentals
650 Prof. Services
700 Services
800 Employment


We are worth Delivery Available
the drive from HOURS:


anywhere!


Mon.-Fri. 10-6
Closed on Weekends


310 GARAGE /YARD SALE


261 FARM EQUIPMENT
Trudy's
Fresh Blue Crabs
for sale. By the dozen or bushel. Call
today 813-641-15722 or 813-541-
3670 leave message.






310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana
St., Gibsonton (1 block off US 41,1 block
north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday thru
Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture,
lots misc. Ministry First Baptist Gibson-
ton. 813-671-0036 to donate
United Methodist Drive-in thrift shop.
Opened Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
& Saturday, 9am-3pm. 5601 16th Ave.,
East (Canal Rd) Palmetto. 941-722-
3456
Don't miss this one. Laureate Zeta Pi
yard sale. Saturday, 12/4, 8am-2pm.
223W. College Ave., Ruskin. Household
items, clothes, odds & ends.
Garage sale. Moving. Everything must
go. Furniture, small appliances & much
more. 1550 Council Dr., SCC. Saturday,
11/27, 8am-1 pm.
Friday & Saturday, 11/26 & 11/27.
Ruskin. US41 south 7th St., SW (beside
Beanies) to 613 24th Ave., SW. Lots of
household items, 9am-3pm.
Huge multi family yard sale. 7am-3pm.
11/26 & 11/27, Friday & Saturday. 10608
Dixon Drive, Riverview. Lots of stuff,
tools, clothing, old sewing machines,
dishes, toys & lots of variety antiques
including 1950 restored Chevy pickup.


sVCavary's

-h Thrift Store
Wed., Fri. & Sat.
9 a.m. - Noon
Women's
Mix & Match Sale
Buy 1 Top, Get
1 Pair of Pants FREE
Also 'Secret Sale'
1424 E. College Ave. * Ruskin
813-641-7790
Ministry of Calvarz Lutheran Church


Model Home & Consigned Furniture
& Accessories
Apollo Beach Shopping Center
6024 U.S. Hwy. 41 N. * Apollo Beach
(next to Westsbore Pizza)
* LayawayAvailable*
Closed Sunday & Monday'




Black Friday Estate Sale
209 Genet Ct., SCC. 8am-1 pm. Friday
& Saturday. Corner china cabinets,
small freezer, sofa sleeper, dining
room furniture, antique chest a drawer
& dresser, jewelry & much more.
Garage sale. 1602 Ventana Dr., off Cy-
press Village Blvd. Lots of stuff, cheap.
8am-1 pm. Nov. 26 & 27.
SCC 1723 S. Pebble Beach Blvd., 11/26
& 11/27. 8am-1l-pm. Misc. household
& decorating items, flooring, treadmill,
saw & more.
Pre moving sale. 8am. Friday & Satur-
day, 11/26 & 11/27.613 Oakmont Ave.,
SCC. Furniture, household & misc.
Tools, patio equipment, holiday decor
& dishes.

Moving Sale
Above The Rest!
1/2 off glassware & check out other
specials. New hours: Closed Monday.
Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday
10am-4pm. Friday & Saturday 10am-
3pm.139 S. Pebble Beach Blvd., SCC

312 ESTATE SALES


SETTIE'S

IsflES


741-0225
v Cell: 382-7536
Personalized
Service


Chc outyou

clasifed d. o lin

wwwobseverewsne


We re-cover or
make new
cushions


312 ESTATE SALES




Your home will be staged for
best results. Working in
Sun City Center for 23 years.
Please feel free to call about
the sale or its contents.
Bonded * Licensed
Cell: 508-0307
or Eve: 633-1173


Dealer in Gold & Silver Coins
Domestic & Foreign
15x or more
on SILVER COINS
(depending on market)
Call for private consultation or appointment
All transactions are strictly confidential
(813) 634-3816. Cell (813) 503-4189
"Your local dealer for over 20 years"


AAA Furniture
New & Gently Used Furniture

BUY & SELL
Daily Trips to SCC


6819 U.S. 301 S., Riverview
(813)677-8180







Let us get done in one day
what it takes the other
guys a week to do.
We will pack-up and
pick-up one room or the
entire house for a QUICK,
PROFITABLE, TROUBLE-
FREE EXPERIENCE.
CALL
BUTTERFIELD 'S
AUCTIONS




www.ButterfieldsAuctions.com
Butterfield Auctions AB2706/AU3549

360 GOLF CARTS
Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade. Char-
gers, parts all related. Ronny's Carts &
Parts. 813-645-4515 or 813-484-9855
We buy golf carts, any condition. We pay
top dollar for used carts, running or not.
Same day pickup. 813-300-0114

390 MISC. FOR SALE
Moving must sell. Sofa, chair, ottoman,
Dell computer, 23" TV, new 9" TV.
Treadmill w/weights. Call 813-645-0481,
Apollo Beach


425 SLIPS OR STORAGE
South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special-
izing in outside storage for RVs, boats &
trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay-
Storage.com

Ramey's Business Park
RV & boat storage & heavy equipment.
1/4 mile from Williams Park boat ramp.
813-410-9607 or 813-849-1469






511 HOUSES FOR SALE


KP Augusta on Lancaster, 2BR/2BA/2CG on Golf
Course, remodeled (ready to move in) ..... $89,500
SCC Worthington on Berry Roberts, NEWA/C and
II..... I " '1 i)0 0
SCC 2BR + Den, split bedrooms, 37x12 enclosed
lanai, !i, 1, .i .j n 1 -- 500
RENTALS
2BR/2BA near clubhouse, furnished..... $575/month
2BR/2BA Lanc., furnished, seasonal... $1600/month
SCC 3BR furnished home (annual) .... $1200/month









*Reduced from $400,000 to $180,000
with 8'Doors, 12'Ceilings,Granite
*Waterfront Reduced
from $700,000 to $299,000
* Valencia Lakes 2/2 + den
$159,900
* 3/2 Waterfront MH w/dock
$39,000
*Waterfront Condo w/dock $195,000
*Bimini Bay 3/3 $199,000
*10 Acres on 672 $225,000
* 3.59 Acres,SeminoleTrl. $110,000
*Commercial Lot, Shell Pt. $89,000
* Plant City Estate, 2-Story Home, 4/3,
Pool, Spa,2.26 acres $340,000
* 3,423 sq.ft. Home on Terra Ceia Bay,
433 acres $1,100,000


511 HOUSES FOR SALE









* Seller Financing

Call
(813) 380-0064


* IMMACULATE, FURNISHED BAYFRONT CONDO:
2BR/2BA, split plan, open living area, breathtaking
view of water from most every room. Inside utility,
large balcony, covered parking. Come enjoy pools,
fishing pier, restaurant, tennis courts. $175,000.
Bring an offer.
* COMMERCIAL CORNER LOT, RUSKIN: h Acre
cleared, a block from U.S. 41, on busy street, close
to businesses and post office. $99,000.
Possible owner financing.
* OWNER SAYS 'BRING OFFER!' 3BR/2BA (1995)
doublewide, large screen porch, detached barn, on
1.34 acre fenced lot. Split BR plan, new cabinets in
kitchen, inside utility, new roof. $79,000.
* AFFORDABLE M-HOMES ON OWN LOTS:
2BR/2BA, across from golf course. New laminate or
new carpet, freshly painted inside, screen porch,
carport, shed. $42,500.1 BR/1 �BA, clean, furnished.
Screened porch, carport, utility shed + tool shed,
large lot. No Association fees. $35,000.







TO PLACE
A CLASSIFIED AD
L^ Call
Beverly
at
645-3111
ext. 201
or e-mail:

Beverly@observernews.net
20 words for $15.50 and
30C for each additional
word. Bold line $3.All
classified ads are paid in
advance. Deadlines are
Monday at 4 pm for
Thursday paper.


"- THRIFT STORE '
OPEN: Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Saturdoq 8 a.m. - 12 p.m.
1009 1st. Street 5../


N
U.
S- S.R.
w 4
1
IstSt Sw

THRFT
STORE -


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skin


674 E We Have
Furniture, Tool
DONATION DROP OFFS
TUES. TiHRU FRL ONLY PLEASE,
ALL DONATIONS MUST BE IN CLEAN
USEABLE CONDITION.


U U


Mon.-Sat.
9 a.m.-5 p.m.


-'II,.-,.


Quality Wicker & Rattan Fur-

2711 N. Macdill Ave. * Tampa, FL 33607
813-876-1566 Call for directions
Quality Furniture at Affordable Prices
* Dining * Seating * Bedroom * Patio * Much More
WE HAVE SOMETHING FOR EVERY ROOM
INSIDE AND ALL AREAS OUTSIDE


I


THE SHOPPER 3B


NOVEMBER 25, 2010


Riverview's
Best Kept
Secret


p


k







NOVEMBER 25, 2010


560 M.H. ON LOTS
Mobile home for sale Eastwood Mobile
Home Park, Gibsonton. Call Heather
813-677-5726

565 M.H. IN PARKS
Mobile home for sale in Ruskin. 55+
2br/1ba, completed remodeled, large
Florida room, nice back patio, com-
pletely furnished. Move-in ready. Lot rent
is very reasonable. Call 231-386-5758.
$9,700 obo.

2br/1 ba, completely furnished. Washer
/dryer, central heat & air. Bay window,
carpeted lanai. 12x26, carport 12x30.
Very clean, utility shed. $8,700. 813-
645-3482







610 WATERFRONT RENTALS
The Dolphin House, Apollo Beach,
efficiency apartments on water. Boat
docking /fishing. Pool, laundry. $185
weekly, $185 deposit. No pets. 813-
850-5217

Snoopy has made the
most appearances of any
Macy's Thanksgiving Day
Parade balloon.


611 HOUSES FOR RENT
Ruskin 3br/2ba, 3rd bedroom suited
for office or baby. Nice home with front
porch & large backyard. Great for couple
or small family. References & applica-
tion required. No smoking, no pets.
Monthly rent $875 plus security deposit.
lyr lease. 813-649-1599

Ruskin 3br/1 ba house, screened porch
on quiet street. Waterfront. Fish off the
dock. No smoking, no pets. Refer-
ences please. $450 biweekly $450
security deposit. 813-363-6001.

S & R Properties
3, 2 & 1 bedrooms. No pets. Ruskin,
Gibsonton area. RV lots available 813-
310-1888 or 813-849-1469


612 APTS. FOR RENT


For rent: Efficiency apartments. Weekly
rates, utilities furnished 813-677-8789,
813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

Ruskin. 2br/1 ba apartment. $650 month-
ly includes water & yard maintenance.
$600 security deposit. No pets. 813-
672-0450

Ruskin Efficiency
Nice area $475 monthly or $695 sea-
sonal. Fully furnished, all utilities paid.
813-468-1264 or 813-787-7883

Totally Furnished
Efficiency Electric paid, no pets, non
smoker. Ruskin area. $475 monthly
813-468-1264 or 813-787-7883

The first Thanksgiving in the
United States was held in
1621.


612 APTS FOR RENT





AVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE
OCCUPANCY
RIVERWOOD APARTMENTS

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments

Handicap Unit Available

Rental Rates Beginning
at $520 + Utilities

For Rental Information
call: (8131645-7320
[TDD 800-955-8771)

709 Oceanside Circle,
& Ruskin 2

Mon-Fri 8:00 AM -4:00 PM
Equal Opportunity Provider &Employer


613 CONDOS FOR RENT
Snow birds. January, February & March.
Apollo Beach. totally furnished, 2br/1 ba.
813-645-4145 or 813-642-0681

Kings Point
SCC. 2br/1.5ba condo. Available im-
mediately. Furnished or unfurnished.
Washer /dryer. Yearly $700. Cable /
water included. 941-744-6383

620 ROOMS FOR RENT
Wimauma/ Sun City Center. Live in a
country setting that's clean, safe & quiet.
No alcohol or drugs. $440 per month.
nicely furnished includes all utilitiities and
basic cable. Must see to appreciate.
813-503-4592

623 SEASONAL RENTALS
Twin tree. Seasonal Rental 2 bedroom.,
completely furnished. 813-938-3041

630 M.H. RENTALS
2br/2ba private lot. South of Gibsonton,
US 41. Call 813-927-2065

For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home near
shopping center in Gibsonton. 813-677-
8789, 813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With
A/C. 813-677-1086

Gibsonton/ Riverview area. 3 bedroom
modular home & (2) 2 bedroom mobile
homes for rent. Water, sewer, trash
included. No pets. 813-234-0992

645 OFFICE SPACE
600+ sf commercial office space. Great
rate. Highly visible at corner of US 41
& College Ave., Ruskin. Call 813-210-
6540 or email kristen@mobileeyecare.
com

















646 WAREHOUSE SPACE
Garage & mini storage rooms for rent.
Pirates Treasure Cove, Gibsonton.
813-677-1137
To Place
A Classified Ad
Call Beverly 813-645-3111
20 words for $15.50 and 300 for
each additional word. Bold line
$3. All Classified ads are pre-
paid. We take Visa, MasterCard
or Discover


651 BOOKKEEPING

QuickBooks�
Certified Pro-Advisor. Your office
or mine. Full bookkeeping services.
(training /software install /review /
POS /payroll /inventory /tax prep).
Hourly rates. 10+ years local
service. Thea's Quick Bookkeeping
Inc, Ruskin 813-641-1089. Email:
theahp@verizon.net

680 ADULT/CHILD CARE
Now accepting applications for en-
rollment. Age 6 weeks -12yrs. Half
or full day. Ruskin United Method-
ist pre school. Call 813-645-6198.
CHC110087

A Helping Hand
from a women who cares: Grocery,
meals, home, companionship, ap-
pointments. What ever is needed
when life happens. Call SCC resident.
Katarine, retired minister. 813-938-
3414







705 CLEANING
Two Sisters & A Mop Cleaning Service.
Residential & commercial. Reasonable
rates. Free estimate. Bonded & insured.
Call 813- 919-2642

Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integrity.
Call for free estimate. 7days a week.
Move-in, move-out, rentals. Insured,
bonded, licensed. Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean


710 LAWN CARE

Bill's Lawn Service
Licensed & insured. No contract.
Yearly, monthly or per cut. As low as
$25 per cut. 813-293-6840

FloraScapes
Professional maintenance company
serving all your landscaping needs.
Residential & commercial. Ruskin,
Apollo Beach, SCC, Riverview. Li-
censed /insured. 813-333-3688

714 TREE REMOVAL

Professional Tree &
Landscaping. Sales: trimming, remov-
als, popcorn curbing, stump grinding,
clearing, hauling. Fill dirt/ top soil/
rock/ mulch. We barter for items of
value. Free estimate. Call Paul 813-
634-6041 or 813-751-9691

715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Fill-Land Clearing
Dozer & loader work, driveway & sep-
tic fill, & shell hauled. Robert Carver,
813-634-4962. Beeper 813-267-6217

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill dirt,
topsoil, sand, crushed rock & asphalt,
driveway culverts. Loader, backhoe,
grading, bushhog, discing. Install Sep-
tic System & drain fills. CFC#1427021.
813-645-1883

Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service. Cul-
vert sets, driveways, shell, crushed
asphalt, concrete, fill dirt, excavating,
mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963
Free estimates.

720 HOME MAINT.

Expert Handyman
30yrs experience in repairs & fine fin-
ishing. Very meticulous, clean, sober &
prompt. Insured. Call Paul Beauregard
813-641-8228


THE SHOPPER

LAS ADE -

THE OBSERVER NEWS * THE SCC OBSERVER * THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT

To place a classified ad
call 813-645-3111 Ext. 201;
fill out the form below and fax to
813-645-1792; or mail this form to
The Shopper
210 Woodland Estates Ave. SW * Ruskin, FL 33570

DEADLINE: Up to 20 words
Ad and payment must
be received by 4:00 p.m. 1 5 50
Monday for publication in 30� for each
that week's edition. additional word


I Name:

Address:


City:

Daytime Phone:


Iblassification:


State: __ Zip:__


CALL
1iPauB. (813) 645-3211

DICKMAN Serving South Hillsborough
. INC. County since 1924.
REALTY
REA T www.dickmanrealty.com
Celebrating 86 Years dickman@tampabay.rrcom
192-2010 dickman@tampabay.rr.com
1924-2010
MOBILE HOME with a great deal of potential, but needs TLC. Own your land and no CDD or HOA
fees Possible owner financing Just reduced to $27,000. CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE
WESTBROOK 748-2201
STEAL ME, STEAL ME!! 4 8 Acres Jim Walter home bordering creek Detached two story barn
Complete privacy, but just minutes to 1-75 and shopping Short sale, but a good price of $105,900.
CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 for preview.
COMMERCIAL ZONING IS FEATURED ON THIS PRIME PROPERTY ON HWY 674. Existing
home is older, but would make great office Over 300 ft of hwy frontage and 2 acres of land adjacent
to new site $799,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672
ALMOST 5 ACRES FILLED WITH OAKS ANDAZALEAS. Easy access to Hwy 301 & 1-75 Corner
location and two parcels Older family home that needs your tender loving care 3BR/2BA, C/H/A, old
Oak flooring Fish house with % bath Bring the kids and animals and turn them loose $249,900.
CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
RUSKIN RENTAL! 3BR/2BA single family home with a 2-car garage Brand new home with nice split
floor plan Granite countertops and ceramic tile throughout $900.00 per month with one year lease
and approved application CALL ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
SKYLINE, SERENITY, SUNSETS and so much more to enjoy at beautiful Bahia Beach Check out
these 2BR/2BA bayfront condos overlooking wide expanse to catch a glimpse of cruise ships,
sailboats, dolphins, St Pete, skyway bridge, native birds, and native plants Nice open layout Near
pool, restaurant, beach, future shops Starting at $174,900. JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
YOU'LL HAVE SO MUCH TO BE THANKFUL FOR if you can get one of these outstanding
waterfront homes Sizes to fit your needs include charming, nicely decorated and furnished 1BR/1BA
on wide waterway with dock for $219,000. Then there's the 4BR/3BA on the Little Manatee acreage
with latest in updates, pool, dock, innumerable niceties for $439,000 JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
WATERFRONT - NEW LISTING! This 2BR/2BA 2-car garage is just waiting for you to come and
finish the renovations Property is complete with a nice in-ground pool and plenty of parking for your
boat both on land and water Located just off the Ruskin Inlet this property has a lot of potential but
needs some TLC $191,000 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
SUN CITY CENTER -- Exceptionally well maintained home with 2BR/2BA and a 2-car garage
located close to the golf courses, community center, shopping, and much morel This property was
built in 1994 and has a home owner's association that includes yard maintenance so there is little
outside upkeep Call today for more information or for an appointment to see this lovely property
$139,500 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
NOW IS THE TIME for a great opportunity to own a beautiful DUPLEX with 2BR/2BA on each side
Separate enclosed laundry rooms as well as a lovely fenced yard & ample parking All utilities on
separate meters A/C units replaced in July and everything has been wonderfully maintained Each
side currently rents for $900 00 per month $195,000 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
INVESTOR SPECIAL!! 2005 DUPLEX with 2BR/1BA, 832 sq ft and other unit is 3BR/2BA, 1040
sq ft Both units rented Bring all offers Must move $125,000 CALL KATHY JACOBSON 624-222!
FANTASTIC WATERFRONT HOME! Relaxing water, quick access to beautiful Tampa Bay
3BR/2BA with boat dock , woodburning fireplace, storage, fruit trees and much more Very well
maintained Owner very motivated -- bring all offersill $210,000 CALL KATHY JACOBSON
624-2225
WATERFRONT FANTASIA! Great 3BR/2BA 2-car garage on deep & wide Ruskin Inlet leading to
Tampa Bay Features include dock & lift, seawall, sunroom, hardwood & tile floors, fresh paint, split
floorplan, lots of storage, light bright interior & the list goes on Call today Asking $295,000. JO
ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540.
MOVE IN READY! Gorgeous 4BR/2BA 2-car garage in delightful area w/community pool, rec hall,
and more Home is in excellent condition with hardwood floors, great room, freshly painted exterior,
large screened lanai, privacy fenced backyard, stainless steel appliances, wood cabinets, and much
more Must see to appreciate Asking $149,000. JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540.
IMMACULATE, ELEGANTLY FURNISHED CONDO, KINGS POINT! 2BR/2BA + Den, 2-car
garage, high ceilings, split BR plan, bright living area, modern kitchen, breakfast nook, inside utility
and pleasant wrap-around screened patio Move-in-ready $117,900. CALL CLAIRE TORT
363-7250
GREAT 2BR/2BA DOUBLEWIDES, ON OWN LOTS, RUSKIN: Could be great winter/retirement/
starter homes These 2 spacious homes have bright living area, large MBR & MBA, screened porch,
carport and both are completely furnished I Not in flood zone, no association fee, reasonable taxes
$67,500 and 74,500. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
RUSKIN CONCRETE 3BR/2BA BLOCK HOUSE FOR $55,900. Tile floors, screened porch,
carport, beautiful lot Needs some TLC and appliances, but good roof, and great potential CALL
CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
CALL US FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS........645-3211
Donate your old functioning cell phones and drop off at our
office for use by the "Victims Assistance Program."
(Evening phone numbers)
Judy Erickson .................. 468-0288 Jim Grannon........................ 610-3485
Claire Tort................... 363-7250 Kenn Antonelli .................. 786-3124
Kay Pye ...................... 361-3672 Kathy Jacobson .................. 624-2225
Cathy Griggs ..... ......... 391-8653 Jo Ellen Mobley.................. 645-1540
Christine Nethers ............ 260-6335 LaRae Regis........................ 633-8318
Roxanne Westbrook............ 748-2201


Ad copy as you wish it to appear:
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4B THE SHOPPER







NOVEMBER 25, 2010

723 PAINTING

Boston Frank's Int
painting & pressure washing. Most
homes painted for $799. Complete!
Call Frank today 813-309-3415. Other
services available.

735 TRANSPORTATION
Will transport out of state. All trailers,
bumper pull, gooseneck travel trailers,
fifth wheel trailers, horse trailer, boats,
car & heavy objects. Enclosed trailer
also available to haul, etc. 813-477-
3054

740 MISC. SERVICES

Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks, boat
lifts & seawalls. Free inspection. Heck-
er Construction Co. 813-236-9306

In Your Home
Pet Care
813-767-7225. Affordable, licensed,
bonded, insured. References avail-
able. email: olivertort@aol.com Oliver
& Company

Amish type house cleaning, cooking /
baking service. Any diet. One time or a
weeks worth. Call Ruth 813-447-1986,
to reserve. Also light maintenance
work.






820 CLERICAL
Ruskin construction office seeks part-
time office help, weekday mornings.
Good communication & organizational
skills are a must, as well as basic com-
puter skills. Duties would include:
answering phones, scheduling appts.
filing, etc. with possibility of expanding
position. Cheerful & motivated. Call 813-
649-1599, between 8am-4pm.

870 GENERAL
Looking for a dock builder. Experience
preferred. Call 813-363-3678

Need experienced cabinetmaker for
projects to be done Christmas. I have
shop & tools. Seek someone with some
skills & knowledge. Call 813-245-2713
ask for Mike


870 GENERAL


ow Taking Application

for Packing House

I hi|
Behind 5th 3rd Bank

645-6431


COMMUNITY PAPERS
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* Phase III Now Available!
* 2 Swimming Pools and a Clubhouse
* 3, 4 and 5 Bedrooms, 1 and 2 Garages
* Popular Ruskin Location
* USDA Self-Help Housing program -- help
build your home in exchange for a down
payment
* No money down, easy to qualify
* Non-profit agency works for you
-Hablamos Espaiol ~




BAYOUPASS
Offer open toimt- hme iinebusyer under 80% of median inome.Callfordelals.


THE SHOPPER 5B
CPF STATEWIDE
MOVIE EXTRAS To Stand In The
Background For a Major Film Produc-
tion. Experience Not Required, Earn Up
To $200/Day. All Looks Needed. Call
877-335-0217

NOWHIRING: Companies desperately
need employees to assemble products
at home. No selling, any hours. $500
weekly potential. Info. 1-985-646-1700
DEPT. FL-820

LAND LIQUIDATION! 20 acres $0
Down, $99/mo. Near Growing El Paso,
Texas. Guaranteed Owner Financing,
NO CREDIT CHECKS! Money Back
Guarantee. FREE Map/Pictures. 1-800-
843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com

NC MOUNTAIN LAND MOUNTAIN
TOP TRACT 2.6 acres, private, large
public lake 5min away, owner must sell,
only $25,500. 1-866-789-8535

No Credit - Bad Credit - No Problem
Brand New Manufactured Home in a
Gated Community under $500/month.
Open Mon-Sat! Call Today 888-841-
6091

NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS
Spend the holidays in the mountains and
start a family tradition! Even the family
pet iswelcome! Foscoe Rentals 1-800-
723-7341 www.foscoerentals.com ;

RV spot for rent on Hutchinson
Island. Beach access, heated pool,
tennis court, marina with boat slips.
Great area, great fishing. 352-347-
4470.

SELL/RENT YOUR TIMESHARE FOR
CASH!!! Our Guaranteed Services will
Sell/ Rent Your Unused Timeshare for
CASH! Over $78 Million Dollars offered
in 2009! www.sellatimeshare.com ;
(877)554-2430

SOUTH CAROLINA 2 acres in the
Santee Cooper Lake area. Near 1-95.
Beautiful building tract $19,900. Ask
about E-Z financing, low payments. Call
owner: 803-473-7125

GAIN MALE SIZE! FDA Medical
Vacuum Pumps. Gain 1-3 Inches Per-
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Free Pills! 619-294-7777 Code: FL
www.DrJoelKaplan.com ; (Discounts
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VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg!! 40
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Donate Vehicle Receive $1000 Grocery
Coupon Noah's Arc Support No Kill
Shelters, Research to Advance Vet-
erinary Treatments Free Towing, Tax
Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted
1-866-912-GIVE

Donate your Car Truck or Boat to HERI-
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Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing,
All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 1-866-
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TOO MANY BILLS? Too many credit
cards, payday loans, medical bills? In
financial distress? Call A.D.S. for im-
mediate help! 1-888-790-4660 X10.
Member of BBB. www.mydebtfree.com


How can I


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FLOCK...


without


By placing your classified ad in our network of statewide

newspapers you can reach


'r 5.2 million homes in Florida

S The Florida Community Paper Advertising Network

S' works with over 125 publications throughout the

. 4' - . state. Place one ad and reach millions! It's that

S a easy. Call Beverly today for details at

S813-645-3111 Ext. 201.


OWN A NEW HOME

WITH NO MONEY DOWNH I


'*-^


low ,'' N^ ' M^









TRADE DIRECTORY


Lic. #CMC056816
AIR-CONDITIONING,
HEATING & REFRIGERATION
Complete Sales, Service,
Installation & Repair
Amana and Senior
Trane Dealer Discount
John R. Bowman, Jr., Owner
(813) 633-2703


A-PLUSh

634-8679
Z rill r_' t-. l.:e i t _ll t ,:- , -
: ,n I n11 . Ir:,t _n,:
P i '. *: I' , [l' -.!! -t !- - !-t'-

Fall Special
$ 49.00 service call


Complete Sales * Service
Repair* Installation
SERVICING ALL MAKES AND MODELS
24 Hour Service * Financing Available
L.c nCACi 181 59228

. Senior& Military
- discounts


SELF ARREST BONDS L -[-, -L - -
COURT DATES 664-0056 1 -l) 1 -'
WARRANT CHECKS I~ I3 1 - 1 I1
BIG JOHN'S .Cel,,ng Fans
BAIL BONDS :o,2,
641-8400 * Panel Upgrades
FAMILY BONDSMAN * FREE Estimates
STATE FEDERAL
24 HOUR SERVICE 813- "45-000
JOHN L. VATH Listed with Sterling Mlanagement and
2100 Orient Road * Tampa, FL. 33619 Sun City Center Community associationn
Fax: (813) 628-8739 Lic, #EC 13002936


HANDMA
Exeienced

AU Phas

Crftma

Ual"ARE


f:.. -



'-' THE OB,-0 RNE N

BUSINESS
TRADE
DiecroRv YOU'RE ON...

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"w e O 7a"-e 7"


Residential * Commercial
New Roofs e Re-Roofs * Tile
Tile Repairs * Hot Tar/Flat Decks
Ventilation * Leaks Repaired
FREE Estimates * Financing Available
* 24 Hr. Emergency Service
* Senior Citizen Discount
We Carry Workers'Comp
For Your Protection
L- _ iLn [(C I j"'i'ij * Iu.'da * In.uirI '--.


Save 10% on
web advertising
Call your advertising
representative today for
more information
(813) 645-3111
www.ObserverNews.net


Need Work Done
Around the House?

Turn to PHIL
Your Handy Person!
RIVERSIDE GOLF & BOATING CLUB RESIDENT
www.mrhandyperson.com
Serving
S APOLLOO BEACH
* RUSKIN
* SUN CITY
f CENTER





25+ Years Experience
mInsured
813-649.-141R


Sf A&J
� Hares
35 "Yrs Plumbing
Experience
* Service & Repairs
* Repipes * Water Heaters
* New Construction
* Remodels & Additions


A] FREE Estimates
- -
L LiC iCFC057969
A Rating Bondea * Insurea


Roofing
Florida Certifed Roofng Contrdor

Proudly Serving: Sun Cilr Center
Ruskin * Apollo Beach * Rheniew
and surrounding areas
Member SCC Chamber ol Comn, erce


CILL TODt FOR FREE ESTrIMATE
OFFICE 813-333-6320
CELL 813-777-9808
Frank Shaift
FL Cemfied Roofing Contracior
CCC I32-I;
ww .ApolloBeachRooing.com
Palm TreeRooflingfg mail.com


All Types of Roofing
New Roofs & Repairs
* Shingle * Tile * Metal * Hot Tar
No job too big or too small!
SERVING SINCE 1973
* Ruskin * Sun City Center * Kings
Point * Apollo Beach * Riverview
"ALL MY CUSTOMERS ARE DRY
FRIENDS WHEN QUALITY COUNTYS-



SansCkyCenter
Chamber Menber
P.O. Box 551 - Ruskin, FL 33570
www.customrooflng.us
Bonded & Insured * Lic uCCC 1326907


) project over $1000.
o electrical, gas, or
Imbing, and nothing
structural.


BONDED ALL TYPES
LICSED OF WIUPGRADESING

ER00126636 RENOVATIONS
* SECURITY LIGHTS * CEILING FANS
* SWITCHES & OUTLETS * SPAS & DOCKS
Limited Senior Citizen Discount ol 10%
I MF Zexpires 11130110


145 21st ST. N.W. * RUSKIN
www.ObserverNews.net
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PAUL WOOD PLUMBING, INC.
State Certified Plumbing Contractor
#CFC 1427697
- Residential
� : Commercial
o"''." *, �Certified Backflows
. Stoppages
. Service and Repairs
* FREE Estimates * 24-Hour Sernice
Licensed * Bonded * Insured
(813) 641-1387





R&D Septic Inc.
Complete Septic System
* New/Repair
*Fill Dirt I/- I
* Pump Repair
* Site Work - i




www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net


SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS
Residential and Light Commercial
Family Owned & Operated
* No Revolving Technicians
* Quality Seriice,- Sales,
* Installation, -
* N0osl Replacemeni
Parts on Hand
(813) 263-6503


Timothy Sutton, �LC
INTERIOR EXTERIOR
PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
PRESSURE WASHING
29 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN OHIO
NOW SERVING FLORIDA
LICENSED BONDED INSURED
813-727-1013
LIC. #PA2809


-,1 HIGH PO WER,

Pressure Washing

813-442-9441
WYATT EARP * ,
WATER DOG (
"I'm he g for you.B
* Licensed
* Insured


NOW OPEN
( - LOOKING
FOR EXTRA
SSTORAGE
SPACE
FOR YOUR...
LS� * R.V.
BOAT
645-5222 CAMPER
cell: 240-2049 ETC.
1501 33rd St. SE ANY SIZE
Ruskin, FL 33570
Coeedsorg


SUN VIEW
WINDOW CLEANING, INC.

Registered at Kings Point
Listed Vendor of:
SCC Community Association
AB Chamber Member
813-944-8478
I , . . . . . l � .i . . l . l.. .


-Mary Ann Wilhelm
Owner/Director
#CAC 1814397

Wilhelm Sour


FACTORY
A-641-1L811

DEALER 802 4th St S.W.
Daa . (Off CollegeAve. West)
Rumkin, Florida
Turn to the Experti
www.wilhelmac.com



Bob's Mobile Fix-It Center
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured
We Fix It All!
Customer Satisfaction Guaranteed!
Registered with SCC Community Association
* Attic Stairs * Ceiling Fans *
Cabinets * Flooring * Interior
Painting * Gutter Cleaning
Call for FREE Estimate
(813) 671-7870
Robert Gerstenschlager


493-2JOHN861


6B * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


NOVEMBER 25, 2010





OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 7B


2011 SONATA'5"
All New & Redesigned!l


r7


i w


Stylish * Spacious 7
$4000 Less Than Accord *. Unsurpassed amount of standard safety features.


Hyundi...TheItellient*


UAQ LITY
........... MPGFSI
IM O R E ....... SAVINGS


5 Star Safety Ratings


,--


Affordable & Fuel Effi aent
Hyundais get up to Q MPG's"

............


GuaranteedTraIAllowanc


q > HYUnDRI
Assurance
-..........


$4000 LEASE36 ,Rugged SALE $a
Less Than FOR IONTH Capability,
RAV4" LEASE2 Comfort & Style


T 21' "1


LSE B UY*LI Revolution In Design, LEASE Sf- Ifljo3
)4FORale FORs Performance FOR TH
MR �Iftw& Value


4604I22


Performance, LEASE E'fl) 35
7^ ^, FOR 36~i
Technology, FOR ON H
Safety & Quality $ 3 EASET


tow PricOother Hyundai dealer-
________or pay you
All prices are plus tax tag and are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. Lease down payment requirement: '10 Elantra- $3495, Elantra Touring - $1999, Genesis Coupe - $2199, '11 Sonata $3500,'10 Tucson - $2499, '10 Genesis Sedan - $3799. All offers are with appved credit
and some cannot be combined. Expectedrange fo most drive, you actual mileage may vary depending o how you dri and maintain your vehicle. ** On the Accent. As listed on Monroney sticker Special AP offer on select models, see us for details. Photos for illustration purposes only. Advertised vehicles subject to por sale.
Proa111s sllheet to ehanoe without otiee. Must finanee thenl ;ylnulai Moto, Fiennee. - Comparable Modlels. ltt usnpeent siged bhllem noed- fi111ared~ritedl HyundlaiDeal-ronn samle n-del & equlipmllent. A 3000 latanteed trade allnwanee eannnt be ennlhinerdwth any nth- fersi off- ornly ogood on new ehieles.


- I


uj9, 7sA,
BetVleI n tsCls


NOVEMBER 25, 2010


|UP MPG
STO HWY*


T4 T7, p
31


"U~tl 4lL,';


4900





8B * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


'5-


1/


Visit Germany, 4
Switzerland,
Poland, Holland,
SPuerto Rico,
Mexico, and
Africa....all
in one place.


b'/h


Saturday, December 4, 2010

9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Ruskin Elementary School Cafeteria

101 E. College Ave., Ruskin
(follow signs to cafeteria)
$5 entrance fee per adult * Children 12 & under free
Entry fee gets you a passport to the

P/ 11aiiiiiiiiiiiiA'


SILENT AUCTION
to purchase decorated
Christmas trees.
Bidding ends at 4 p.m.
Pictures
with me


1 ARTS & CRAFTS ENTERTAINMENT
d * Make & Takes * Martial Arts
* International Food * Dancing * Carolling
Items For Sale * Singing
Food & Beverage Tickets Required 251 each
Also available for sale:
Pastries, Coffee & Juice in the morning * Pizza & Drinks in the afternoon
Visit Santa's Corner and the Reading Corner.
Tour of all the beautifully decorated trees.
Bid in the silent auction and you could be taking one home with you!
Designed by The Observer News/M&M Printing Co., Inc.


NOVEMBER 25, 2010