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Penny
Fletcher gets
a blast from
the past in
Over Coffee
page 1B


Canoeing
down the
Ichetucknee in

Read Warren
Resen's latest
on page 7B


P.R.S.T. STD
PAID
RUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570
PERMIT NO. 8


November 18, 2010
Volume 54
Number 43
2 Sections


THE OBSERVER NEWS


Plants support, nourish, beautify...

and change lives


MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO
Historic boats are lovingly restored by hand at boatworks along the Cambridge,
Maryland, waterfront. Once the second largest port in Maryland, Cambridge now
primarily serves yachts of all sizes. P

Saying goodbye
Part t..o of on Obser. er .le.. s feat ure series ' /.
* b, MITCH TP-PH-GEN
nim k I ' ::.' i -r - r- ,..I , n- l llll.'Iq thl>l h.'klli h ll l I I
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1'Pll ol Midi ltu1iLA11A llinldil I danm did ..iiln0g 1cic1 \\1lhot.1 - -L
Anthony Wiener termed the BosWash Cor- ing it all. But the Chesapeake is also
ridor; 50 million people, nearly 20 percent temperamental and, in fact, can quickly be-
of the population, live in the region stretch- come downright grumpy.
ing from Washington, D.C. to Boston, on Last year I sailed for the Chesapeake from
only two percent of the U.S. land area. The Cape Cod, through New York City, then sail-
Chesapeake Bay, particularly the Eastern ing offshore in the Atlantic to Cape May, New
Shore, is a respite from the crowding. The Jersey. From there I sailed up the Delaware
bay plays a prominent role in our nation's Bay to the C&D Canal, which brought me
birth and history. While the Founding Fa- to the bay. The stark, desolate landscape and
others created the concepts in Philadelphia, the steel gray water of the Delaware instantly
much of the blood was shed for freedom on changed to calm, blue water with beauti-
these waters. fully wooded shorelines upon arriving in the
For a boater, the bay appears to be nirva- Chesapeake. On my first day in the bay, I had
na. There are hundreds of rivers and creeks an idyllic sail to the Sassafras River where I
offering protection from adverse weather. anchored not far from a small town.
There are also hundreds of historic, pic- See SAYING GOODBYE, page 11


* By MELODY JAMESON
mj@observernews.net
SUN CITY CENTER - Plants
and their produce, long the pur-
view of farmers close to the soil,
popular with nutritionists point-
ing to balanced diets, stock in
trade for landscapers into beau-
tification, are coming into their
own here as the tools of concen-
trated therapy.
In the hands of experienced
farmers, they grow bigger, more
colorful, more flavorful while in
the hands of skilled nutritionists
they get different cooking treat-
ments for varied tastes and in the
hands of dedicated landscapers
they make eye-catching patterns
enhancing the environment.
But, in the hands of trained ther-
apists, they change lives.
Leslie Fleming who, by vir-
tue of complex, university level
training and proven practice,
See PLANT THERAPY, page 10


MELODY JAMESON PHOTO
Aging hands, often afflicted by arthritis, can be
among the first to benefit from the multiple thera-
peutic advantages of horticulture practices. Phys-
ical motions inherent in planting functions and the
emotional soothing provided by green life envi-
ronments have been documented for centuries.


So many choices, so little time
Window of opportunity to change your Medicare plan ends Dec. 31
* By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews.net
SOUTH COUNTY - For many years I've written about the people in the communities
of South County- their issues and challenges- as well as the unusual, and sometimes heroic
or wonderful things they do.
I've done several stories about health care; described some of the latest and best pro-
cedures; sought out what's available in our area for those with little or no insurance; and
done investigation on what residents can expect from the State of Florida and the Federal
government as well.
While it's true the United States has some really good health care available, it is not ac-
cessible to many who need it most. And the difference between the health care 'haves' and
'have-nots' is painfully evident right here in South County.
I can make that statement without even consulting the World Health Organization be-
cause between Nov. 1, 2007 and Nov. 1, 2010, I had no health insurance.
See MEDICARE PLANS, page 18


Sun City Center CA candidates take on community questions


* By MELODY JAMESON
mj@observernews.net
SUN CITY CENTER - In less
than two weeks, members of the
Community Association here will
elect three directors for three-year
terms from among a field of five
who project little disagreement on
issues.
Distinguishing themselves primar-
ily by differences in backgrounds,
the group, including a sixth candi-
date who is a shoo-in, participated
in a candidates' forum last week,


answering written questions pro-
duced by an audience of about 200
residents.
Fielding queries presented by
moderator John Bowker were the
field of five consisting of Ed Barnes,
current CA president seeking a sec-
ond term as director, Art Erickson,
a newcomer to the community and
its governing board , David Floyd,
an appointed director fulfilling an
unexpired term and now running
for his first elected term, Ed Jacobs,
15-year resident active on many


fronts but standing for election the
first time, and Sam Sudman, also
active in community organizations
and running for election for the first
time.
The sixth candidate, Bob Black,
also a current director and board
vice president, is looking toward
serving the last year of an unexpired
term and has no opposition. Con-
sequently, he is likely to be elected
with a single vote.
Perhaps the question that dem-
onstrated the sharpest difference in


perspectives among the candidates
concerned potential opening to
public access the south side of the
community with a roadway linking
South Pebble Beach Boulevard and
U.S. 301. The question specifically
asked whether the north side of the
community should vote or have a
voice on such an issue.
Several candidates weighed in on
the matter. Barnes asserted such a
yes or no issue would have to be an
entire membership vote and Hoyd
See CA CANDIDATES, page 17


SALE EXTENDED


through Nov. 29


JOHN MOORE

* Better Products * Better Warranties
- |a
=C r


Family-Owned and Operated
813-633-7116
1629 Sun City Center Plaza
www.JohnMooreFloorCovering.com
SCC's Oldest & Most Trusted Flooring Dealer
SHOP AT HOME AVAILABLE
:all to schedule a FREE in-home measuring


Turning trash
into treasures
is what the
Recycled Yard
Art contest is
all about. See
page 16B


COBS
MELODY JAMESON PHOTO


The South
County Rose
Group will host
a Water Wise
speaker at their
next meeting.
See page 8B





2 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER

Monday, November -8-2010


a HGom Reac hel


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(next to Walgreen's) "--
809 N. Pebble Beach Blvd.
Sun City Center
813-634-3331 (ask for Coin Buyers)

URGENTLY NEEDED
* 1/2 Cents through Bust Dollars
* U.S. Commemorative Coins
* Proof & Mint Sets
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UNC, new rolls 1878-1904.......$560 & up
UNC, new rolls 1922-1925.......$380 & up
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1795-1833 ..........5,000 to $40,000 & up
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STERLING SILVER A






4 OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


More joy in the
holidays - plan to
avoid stress
For most people, the time period
which begins with Thanksgiving
and ends with New Year's Day is
the most stressful time of the year.
Here are
some ideas
M you might
- find help-
ful in main-
taining your
!sanity and
Positive protecting
Talk your health
By William Hodges throughout
the season.
1. Review
your to-do list for items that will be
causing you to do something with
which you are not familiar. If they
are not life- or career-threatening,
delay them until the new year. High-
stress periods are poor times to start
something new.
2. Look for days on your cal-
endar when you do not have a meal
or party commitment. Circle those
days and plan ahead to use them as
diet days. Overeating and eating the
wrong foods is a very familiar holi-
day ailment and can cause tremen-
dous stress to our system. Think of
your body as a machine which re-
quires fuel. The fuel you give it to-
day is what it will run on tomorrow.
3. Limit your intake of al-
cohol. One of the most destructive
things you can do to your body is
overload it with alcohol. I am not
telling you that you should not en-
joy a glass of wine with your meal
or a holiday drink with your friends.
What I am telling you is that the av-
erage person takes about one hour to
metabolize a drink. If you have more
than one drink per hour, you begin
to multiply the effect of the alcohol.
The more alcohol you drink, the
more possibility of problems that can
result in stress-saying something
you shouldn't, falling and hurting
yourself physically, getting a ticket
for DUI or, even worse, hurting or
killing someone while driving under
the influence. If you don't take the
first drink, you won't have to worry
about these stress inducers, but you
sure do if you take the second.
4. Don't overspend your in-
come. According to a number of
studies, the number one cause of
fights between husbands and wives
is money. The holidays do not have
to be a budget buster. Look at your
income and the real needs of those
around you. Then determine how
much you can spend without losing
sleep over it. A parent overstressed
with debt worries cannot give a child
the most important gift of all-love
and attention. What you will give is
your fear and tension.
With just a little advance planning,
we can approach the holidays with
a great deal of anticipation. This
period of peace on earth, good will
toward men should and can be a re-
spite from the routine of our normal
lives. Smile at all you meet, give
them the appropriate greeting, and
watch how they respond in kind.
There is a magic to this time of
year. It is a time when strangers
speak and offer good wishes. It is
a time the heavens truly do come
closer to the earth. It is not a time to
be stressed out.
"Hodges is a nationally recog-
nized speaker, trainer and syndicat-
ed columnist. He also hosts an in-
terview-format television program,
Spotlight on Government, on the
Tampa Bay Community Network
which airs Mondays at 8 p.m. and
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. (Bright
House channel 950, Verizon chan-
nel 30). The shows can also be
viewed at www.hodgesvideos.com.
Phone: 813-633-1523. Email: bill@
billhodges.com Website: www.bill-
hodges.com"


Dove Interiors offers healthier flooring installation


Dove Interiors Carpet One is proud
to offer the recently unveiled Health-
ier Living Carpet Installation -- the
first carpet installation system to
address growing consumer demand
for cleaner, healthier indoor air. In
response to rising concern about
indoor pollutants and allergies, Car-
pet One Floor & Home has created
the Healthier LivingTM Installation,
which uses the most advanced tech-
nology to clean the air of dust, odor-
causing bacteria, mold and mildew
that can trigger allergic reactions
during and after home-renovation
projects.
The way carpeting is installed can
dramatically reduce exposure to irri-
tants that can provoke serious allergy
and allergy-like symptoms. By mini-
mizing dust and odors, the cleaner,
healthier practices of the Healthier
LivingTM Carpet Installation promote
better home air quality, especially for
families in which allergies and dust
sensitivities are a hindrance. The
system also ensures that the subfloor
under the carpet is sanitized.
During the Healthier LivingTM
Installation, extra precautions keep
dust, bacteria and particles from
becoming airborne and moving
throughout the home when old car-
pet is removed, and new carpet is
installed. Coupled with some high-
tech steps to remove and prevent
mold, mildew and bacteria growth
under the carpet, this system is one-
of-a-kind.
These steps include:
* HealthinExTM -- an exclusive an-
timicrobial agent that disinfects, pro-
tects and diminishes mold, mildew
and bacteria -- is used to treat sub-
floors under the carpet. HealthinexTM
also traps microorganisms on the
surface so they cannot become air-
borne, and it provides a lasting, clean


Kimberly Scott (left), vice president along with Joan Miller (right),
president of Dove Interiors.


surface that resists mold growth.
* Throughout the installation, our
HomeGuard Care SystemTM ensures
that dust and particulates are con-
tained to and removed from the work
area. This includes using a HEPA
filter-equipped vacuum that will not
release dust back into the home be-
fore and after the cushion and carpet
are installed. Plastic sheeting is used
to keep dust out of other rooms. And
protective booties prevent tracking
of dirt, grit and contaminants in the
home.
* An antimicrobial premium carpet
cushion that blocks spills from seep-
ing through and inhibits growth of
mold, mildew and odor causing bac-
teria is used during the installation.
"Truly, not all flooring installa-
tions are created equal. We're very
excited that we are able to offer our
customer this superior installation
system," said Joan Miller of Dove
Interiors Carpet One. "With the
Healthier LivingTM Flooring Instal-
lation System, we're taking the extra
steps homeowners today expect for a
cleaner, healthier living environment


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In addition to all the great health
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Healthier LivingTM Installation is
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Dove Interiors Carpet One Floor
& Home has been serving the South-
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room is known for carrying a broad
selection of beautiful carpet, wood,
laminate, ceramic, vinyl, Hunter
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NOVEMBER 18, 2010
Award-Winning Newspapers
THE OBSERVER NEWS
The SCC Observer &
The Riverview Current
210 Woodland Estates S.W.
Ruskin, FL 33570
813-645-3111
Fax: 813-645-4118
www.ObserverNews.net
Published Every Thursday
by M&M Printing Co., Inc. 645-4048
EDITORIAL:
Brenda Knowles ............Publisher/Editor
brenda@observernews.net
Mitch Traphagen............... Online Editor
mitch@observernews.net
Penny Fletcher..........Contributing Writer
penny@observernews.net
Melody Jameson......Contributing Writer
mj@observernews.net
Julie Ball.............. Press Releases/W riter
news@observernews.net
All press releases, news articles and
photos may be emailed to news@
observernews.net, faxed to 645-4118, or
mailed to Observer News, 210 Woodland
Estates Ave. SW, Ruskin, FL 33570
SALES:
Vilma Stillwell... Display Advertising Rep.
vilma@observernews.net
Nan Kirk........... Display Advertising Rep.
nan@observernews.net
For current rates and circulation
information visit our website at
www.ObserverNews.net
CLASSIFIED / CIRCULATION:
Beverly Kay......... Classified / Circulation
beverly@observernews.net
PRODUCTION:
Chere Simmons....Graphic Arts / Layout
chere@observemews.net
Sue Sloan .............Composition / Layout
sue@observernews.net
The views expressed by our writers are
not necesssanly shared by The Observer
News, SCC Observer, The Riverview
Current or M&M Printing Co., Inc.

We Accept

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OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * 5


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Hade's'aleljh'Chrs rig
holda0 spri


The Brandon Choral Society
proudly performs George Fred-
erick Handel's epic masterpiece
'Messiah,' at 3 p.m. on Sunday,
Dec. 12 at St. Stephen Catholic
Church, 5949 Bell Shoals Rd.,
Valrico.
The program is the 3rd annual in
the choral group Christmas series
under the direction of Robert
Romanski, and accompanied on
the organ by Chris Westfall.
'Messiah,' the most well-known
of Handel's works, relates the story
of the life of Jesus. Perhaps the
most famous portion of the work
is the 'Hallelujah' chorus.
Robert Romanski currently
holds the titles of Director of
Music Ministries at Ruskin United
Methodist Church, Artistic Direc-


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tor and Principal Conductor for the
Mostly Pops Orchestra and Music
Director and Principal Conduc-
tor of the Tampa Bay Opera, and
serves as Adjunct Professor of
Music at the University of South
Florida, and Barry University, as
well as the Pinellas County center
for the Arts.
Chris Westfall is Director of
Music at St. Stephen Catholic
Church. Born and raised in central
Ohio, he brings over 30 years of
directing and accompanying expe-
rience to this endeavor.
Tickets for the concert can be
purchased in advance at Roydon
Music, 939 Oakfield Dr., Brandon,
for $10 and $12 at the door. Free
admission for children under 12.




Happy

Thanksgiving
from all of us at
M&M Printing, Inc.
and
The Observer News


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Take a behind the
scenes tour
Brandon Ballet's Home School
and Behind the Scenes tours at
161 E. Bloomingdale Ave., Bran-
don, are approaching quickly. This
is a friendly reminder to sign up
for one of their educational tours
of the Brandon Ballet to get an in-
depth look at what goes into mak-
ing a ballet. Dates and times vary.
There are two separate tours.
One is exclusively for home
schooled students, and the other is
for everyone, and both are free!
The tours will include a question
and answer session with the danc-
ers, a look into a company class, a
costume tour, and rehearsal view-
ing. Each participant will receive
an educational, interactive packet.
To reserve a spot on the tour, call
(813) 684-4282, or email dance@
brandonballet.com. The event
is free and each participant will
receive a coupon for $5 off each
Nutcracker ticket purchased.


Need to learn more about technology?
The Ruskin Branch Library, 1 Dickman Dr. SE in Ruskin, has a series
of classes meant to teach everything from email to the internet to those
beginning to learn about computers. They are all held in the Pauline
Dickman Lawler Community Room.
These classes are for adults only.
Email: Open an Account
Thursday, Nov. 18 * 3 p.m.
Open an e-mail account, compose and
send a letter. Basic mouse
and keyboarding skills are
recommended.
Email: Messages
Thursday, Nov. 18 * 4:15 p.m.
Read, forward, and delete messages.
Basic mouse and keyboarding skills
are recommended.
Email: Attachments and Address Book * Friday, Nov. 19 * 3 p.m.
Learn about sending attachments and creating address books.
Basic mouse and keyboarding skills are recommended.
Computers: An Introduction * Tuesday, Nov. 23 * 3 p.m.
Learn what you can do with a computer and gain a better
understanding of the Library's computer class offerings.
Internet: Introduction * Tuesday, Nov. 23 * 4:15 p.m.
Introduction to the Internet and related terminology. Basic mouse
and keyboarding skills are recommended.


Hillsborough County census response
count exceeds National average
With existing resources and no special funding, Hillsborough County
2010 Census questionnaire mail return rates exceeded the national and
state response rates.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the final 2010 Census National
Mail Participation Rate in Hillsborough County was 75 percent. That
was more than the national response rate (74 percent) and the Florida re-
sponse rate (74 percent). It also is a vast improvement over the County's
Census 2000 response rate of 70 percent.
Hillsborough County Commissioner Rose Ferlita chaired the Hills-
borough County Complete Count Committee. Hillsborough County's
Liaisons, representing the African-American, Asian American, Disabled,
and Hispanic communities, were the central core for outreach to those
respective communities. Sandra Sroka, ADA Affairs Liaison, and
Joyce Russell, African-American Affairs Liaison, were instrumental in
compiling a team of Coordinating Committee Members comprised of
community leaders in business, education, community-based organiza-
tions, recruiting, faith-based, local government and the media.
A key strategy to the Complete Count Census campaign was in using
electronic communications as a low-cost means of reaching large
numbers of a variety of audiences.
These included web pages, social media and email campaigns; a tele-
vision call-in program; and distributing electronic newsletters, flyers and
other announcements.
The Complete Count Committee even included low-tech methods of
getting county residents to be counted. These included outdoor signage on
business venues and school district signage, banners, handout materials,
community events, bus bench designs, a school children essay contest,
and questionnaire assistance centers.
The response rates within Hillsborough County were:
City of Plant City -- 75%
City of Tampa --73%
City of Temple Terrace -- 72%
Response rates of Florida counties of similar municipal size were:
Broward County -- 73%
Duval County -- 72%
Miami-Dade County -- 72%
Orange County - 72%
Pinellas County -- 76%



New Identities Hair Studio stylist
sharpens her skills in NYC


Elizabeth Griffin sharpened her
professional edge and took her
hair styling tal-
ent to the next
level recently
at the award-
U winning Red-
ken Exchange in New York City.
I Elizabeth Griffin was one of the
I dedicated salon professionals, who
* attended classes at the Redken Ex-
I change, the hair industry's leading
* resource for higher learning, and
* now brings you fresh and exciting
salon services.Along with stylists
from around the globe, Elizabeth
Griffin learned advanced tech-
niques in hair design and hair
color from leading experts in the
industry, bringing you the latest in
I wearable fashion hair trends.
m The Redken Exchange is the
I award-winning leading resource
I for higher learning in the profes-
I sional salon industry, and allowed
a Elizabeth to experience interactive,


i


hands-on attention.
With classes ranging from color
Basics to edi-
torial photo-
shoots, and
dressing the
bride among
others...it's no wonder that thou-
sands of salon professionals attend
The Redken Exchange from all
comers of the globe; making it a
great venue for exchanging tips
and techniques with other stylists
-- as well as getting the latest in-
formation on Redken haircare, hair
color, and styling products.
Consumers interested in fresh,
modem, innovative style or color
can call Elizabeth Griffin at New
Identities Hair Studio - South
Shore, at (813) 741-1177 to sched-
ule an appointment. Salon profes-
sionals can visit www.redkensa-
lon.com or call 1-800-545-8157
for more information regarding
classes at The Redken Exchange.


Riverview Memorial
VFW Post #8108
7504 Riverview Dr.
(813) 671-9845
MEALS
Wednesday Spaghetti Dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m.
Friday Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.
Sunday Breakfast from 9 a.m.
to noon
ENTERTAINMENT
Friday, Nov. 19 -- Jeff Olsen
Saturday, Nov. 20 -- Calvin 0
Friday, Nov. 26 -- Jeff Olsen
Friday, Dec. 3 -- Jeff Olsen
Saturday, Dec. 4 -- Calvin 0
Friday, Dec. 10 -- Jeff Olsen
CANTEEN HAPPENINGS
Bar Bingo on Monday at 6:30 p.m.
Bar Poker with Lori on
Wednesday at 1 p.m.
Fire in the Hole on Saturdays at
1 p.m.


Dance at
Manatee RV Park
The Manatee RV Park will host a
social dance from 7 to 10 p.m. on
Saturday, Nov. 20 at the Manatee
RV Park Hall, 6320 U.S. 41 S.
Music by 'Musical Memories.'
Bring your own refreshments; ice
is provided. Admission is $4 per
person and the public is invited.
Directions: 4 miles north of 1-75
or 7 miles south of Ruskin. For
more information, call J. Sullivan
at (813) 649-9150.


Riverview student
signs with UT
Riverview High School is
pleased to announce that Kayleen
Boatwright will be signing with
the University of Tampa.


mo


PAEVER INT DPONOTRETEORE
-STUCCO YOUR HOUSE AGAIN j


ki


I


NOVEMBER 18, 2010


aLIMITED . . . ROO C. AI.1Gsi
OFFER , x-ot- FexL. x wthInslaio


I








OBSEVER EWS* RIERVIW CRREN NOVMBE 18,201


The Ruskin Moose Lodge #813 is located at
1212 E. Shell Point Road, Ruskin * (813) 645-5919


Friday, Nov. 19
Saturday, Nov. 20

Friday, Nov. 26
Saturday, Nov. 27


Friday, Dec. 3
Saturday, Dec. 4
Friday, Dec. 10
Saturday, Dec. 11


Friday, Dec. 17
Saturday, Dec. 18

Friday, Dec. 24
Saturday, Dec. 31

Every Wednesday
Every Thursday
Every Friday

Every Saturday


7-11 p.m.
4-7 p.m.
7-11 p.m.
7-11 p.m.
12 noon
5-7 p.m.
7-11 p.m.
7-11 p.m.
7-11 p.m.
7-11 p.m.
5-7 p.m.

7-11 p.m.
7-11 p.m.
4-7 p.m.
7-11 p.m.
7-11 p.m.



5-7 p.m.
5-7 p.m.
5-7 p.m.


Double Shot
Moose Legion Chicken and Rib Fest
Karaoke with Kim Mullins
Gypsy Highway
Ohio State/Michigan Tailgate Party
Cancer Benefit Dinner
Karaoke with Kim Mullins
Shine On
Karaoke with Charlie Bums
Caribbean Cowboys
WOTM Annual Christmas Party
with Ham Dinner
Party with Kim Mullins
Charlie Bums
Moose Legion Dinner
Karaoke with Kim Mullins
Candlelight Vigil
New Year's Eve Party with
Taylor and Taylor
Spaghetti Dinner -- new and delicious
Wings (except Thanksgiving)
Fish Fry (except Christimas)
Live music


7-11 p.m. Karaoke by Kim


Drama booster club
Recently, drama students at Len-
nard High School in Ruskin pre-
sented 'Dracula,' a short two-act
play by Crane Johnson, in the LHS
Auditorium under the direction of
LHS drama teacher Joie Marsh.
"The performance of 'Dracula'
was wonderful," said Maria Gsell,
Assistant Principal of Curriculum
at Lennard. "The set, costumes,
story and acting were all top-
notch."
This was Joie Marsh's third year
at Lennard High School and as a
Drama and Reading teacher for the
Hillsborough County School Dis-
trict. A graduate of Florida South-
ern College with a B.A. in Theatre
Arts, Joie has produced five plays
at LHS and is herself a participant
in local theatre productions of the
Pelican Players' Club of Sun City
Center.
"I am really proud of our drama
students; they worked very hard
to produce this fall show in only
four weeks since district compe-
titions in drama are scheduled to
begin soon," said Joie. "They have
done a phenomenal job, and I see
a growing interest in the theatre
arts within our student body as a
result."
The school's growing drama
program has had a few obstacles
to overcome. Joie is the third full-
time teacher to supervise the pro-
gram since Lennard opened its
doors in 2006, and funding for sets,
costumes, and dramatic events has
been scarce. "Lately, we've been
breaking even financially from our


focuses on funds
performances, but we would really
like to enhance our productions,"
said Joie.
"For example, although the audi-
torium was originally equipped
with a limited sound system that
allows for handheld microphones
on the stage, that system has not
been practical for our dramatic
productions and we need a wire-
less microphone system that will
allow our young actors and ac-
tresses to be readily heard by the
audience. I think that we would
expand our audience in the com-
munities of Ruskin and Sun City
Center if they could hear our per-
formers more easily." Parents of
drama students at LHS agree.
This year, a group of drama par-
ents has organized a new LHS
Drama Booster Club to raise fund-
ing for the program. Led by Mary
Ferguson of Apollo Beach, Presi-
dent of the Drama Booster Club
and parent of a drama student
at LHS, the group hopes to raise
enough money to purchase a new
sound system by the school's next
theatre production to be performed
during the first weekend in March.
The new club is looking for local
business sponsors and patrons,
and has a series of fundraising
events planned for the next several
months.
For more information about
how to assist the new LHS Drama
Booster Club, call Mary Ferguson
at (813) 641-2884 or Joie Marsh
at Lennard High School at (813)
641-5611.


Alley Katzs plan Ruskin VFX
holiday party
The new South Shore senior sin- Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120
gles group will meet for a holiday weekly activities. Meetings are: A
party from 4 to 6 p.m. on Sunday, each month; VFW and LAVFW c
Dec. 5 at The Alley, 10221 Big and MAVFW on the 3rd Thursda
Bend Rd. (behind Applebees) in
the VIP Suite.
This group was organized for
those age 50+ for all the South
Shore area, which includes
Riverview, Sun City Center,
Apollo Beach, Gibsonton, Ruskin,
and Brandon, to provide a non-
threatening atmosphere for singles
to meet and have fun. All 50+
single seniors are invited! The
group meet once a month at The Birthday.
Alley for bowling and fun; a local Sunday, November 21- Music
restaurant for dining and dancing; Irish Nachos from 4 to 6 p.m.
and at other dancing opportunities. Monday, November 22- Taco
The $20 guest fee includes bowl- at 6:30 p.m.
ing, food, first drink, music and Tuesday, November 23-Games
prize. For more information, call opens at 4:30 p.m. Bingo at 6 p.n
Alice at (216) 577-2278 or Patti at Wednesday, November 24 - Mi
634-7171.

Rotarians sponsor Alafia Lighted
Boat Parade
The Rotary Club of Riverview is pleased to announce corporate spon-
sorship opportunities for the 27th Annual Alafia Lighted Boat Parade to
be held from 5 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 4. The celebration will again
take place at the International Independent Showmen's Association,
6915 Riverview Drive on the beautiful Alafia River in Riverview.
In the last 2 years their event featured 9 and 16 decorated boats, chili
cook-off contestants, festive music, entertain-
ment, silent auction, and affordable food. More
than 300 local children received free photos
0 with Santa Claus, and enjoyed the bright holi-
day lights of the Showmen's Club.
This year promises to be bigger and better
for 'children' of all ages. They expect to attract
over 1,500 people to this annual Riverview tra-
dition. All proceeds will fund charitable activities of Riverview Rotary.
Since its inception, the Riverview Rotary Club has been involved
in numerous service projects including College Scholarship Program
($24,000 awarded to date), The Alafia Lighted Boat Parade, High
School Interact (civic volunteering), Student Dictionary Distribution
(over 5,800 dictionaries to local elementary school children since pro-
gram began), Rotary's Camp Florida (camp for special needs children in
Brandon), Group Study Exchange, Reading Is Fundamental (more than
800 free books to local Head Start students), S4TL (Seminar For Tomor-
row's Leaders), Project C.U.R.E. (collection and distribution of medical
supplies to developing nations), Caribbean Partners, Polio Plus and The
Rotary Foundation.
Rotary International is an organization of business and professional
leaders united worldwide who provide humanitarian service, encourage
high ethical standards in all vocations, and help build goodwill and peace
in the world. In more than 165 countries worldwide, approximately 1.2
million Rotarians belong to over 33,000 Rotary clubs.


V Post #6287
U.S. 41 N. has listed the following
1merican Legion on 1 st Wednesday
in the 2nd Wednesday each month;
y each month.
Thursday, November 18- Bar
Bingo at 6 p.m. District 12 Bingo
VA Hospital at 7 p.m. MAVFW
Meeting at 7 p.m. Leo Cavanaugh
Birthday.
Friday, November 19- Fish
Fry from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Music by
George Rabb from 7 to 11 p.m.
Saturday, November 20 - Turkey
Shoot at 1 p.m. Music by Flip Side
from 7 to 11 p.m. Wonda Roberts

: by Bert & Sassy from 3 to 7 p.m.

Night from 5 to 7 p.m. Crew Night

s inLounge from 1 to 5 p.m. Kitchen
n.
ichelle Dye Birthday.


Ruskin Aglow
plans Christmas
party
Ruskin Aglow Christmas Party
will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
on Saturday, Dec. 4 at the home of
Denise Jurdensen, 10423 Ashley
Oak Dr., Riverview.Kristen Taylor
will minister and Paula Dufford
will play on the flute.
Bring covered dish; meat and
beverage will be provided. RSVP
Denise at (813) 677-9595 or Gloria
at (813) 633-9613.

Women's
networking group
to meet for lunch
Women on a Mission to Earn a
Commission (WOAMTEC) will
meet from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
on Wednesday, Dec. 1 at Embas-
sy Suites, 10220 Palm River Rd.,
Brandon/Tampa.
Join them for lunch and take the
work out of networking. Learn
more about them at www.woamtec.
com. For more information, email
aford@hillsborobank.com.


East Hillsborough
Democratic Club to
meet
The East Hillsborough County
Democratic Club will be celebrat-
ing their annual Holiday Party at
6:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 11
in Brandon at the Hilton Garden
Inn Tampa East/Brandon, 10309
Highland Manor Dr., Tampa. Go
to www.easthillsboroughdems.org
to register to attend by Dec. 3.
Ml ki l d f h


Rehearsal funds breast cancer research EHCD Cl
Because of the generosity of the standing room only crowd who on Tuesdc
attended Tropical Spice On Ice Dress Rehearsal show featuring the team, Restauran
elite skaters and Olympians Mark Ladwig and Amanda Evora, Sarasota in Brando
Memorial Hospital Breast Care
Center was the recipient of many
generous donations. The show was
free, but donations for SMH were
accepted. Tropical Spice On Ice
thanks the caring public for their
contributions to this important
cause. Ichard (Rick) Reed, oft
The skating team went on to Las Ruskin, FL, shot a hole-in-one
Vegas to compete in the Ice Skat- / on Nov. 4, 2010 on the 8th hole \
ing Institute Adult Nationals. Trop- at the Apollo Beach Golf Club of
ical Spice on Ice and several other Apollo Beach.
Ellenton Ice and Sports Complex He used a 8 Iron and drove
skaters placed third overall in team the ball 152 yards. It was on the
points out of forty-seven teams fly, no bounces. This feat was
from eighteen states. TSI won first witnessed by Ron Murphy.
place in the pattern skate and syn-
chronized dance events and a sec-
ond place in the production event.
Tropical Spice on Ice will next-
perform as part of the Ellenton
Ice and Sports Complex holiday
shows on Dec. 4 and 5. For more
information, call (941) 350-5491.


ur cadenllUdI 1ar1 or t Ae next
ub meeting at 6:30 p.m.
ay, Jan. 11 at Giordano's
it, 11310 Causeway Blvd.
n.


All events are open to qualified
Moose members and guests.


Lennard High School
2002 B.t Lri POWnt Rd., btmkW. . 33570
(813) 541-411


6 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT


NOVEMBER 18, 2010






NOVEMBER 18, 2010

Observations: Coming out on top


OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 7


By Mitch Traphagen
mitch@observernews.net
When I arrived in Cambridge,
Maryland, after a hectic week and
3,200 miles of driving, I went to a
local restaurant for dinner-to-go. I
placed my order and waited a few
minutes before it was delivered.
The cashier apologized for the
wait. I realized that I neglected
to order a drink so I pulled out my
wallet and asked if I could get one.
'Don't worry about it, honey," she
said as she gave it to me for no
charge. That is a place to which I
will return. Thanks to that simple
encounter, they have earned more
of my money.
A few nights later I visited a fam-
ily restaurant; a cool, retro-looking
place offering Greek and Italian
fare in a casual setting. I waited
and waited. Finally, a waitress
came by to ask if anyone had tak-
en my order. When I replied that
no one had, she said she would be
right back. She never came back.
Other people came in and were
waited on including a couple at the
table right next to me. The very
same waitress waited on them,
took their order and walked away.
I left. Their food looked excellent
and the prices were very reason-
able but there is just something
about being ignored - even for
only 15 minutes - that tightens
the stomach and brings up feelings


ranging from dejection to anger.
From there I drove a block to a
Chinese take-out restaurant. It
was the type found in virtually
every city of any size in America.
Even the menu that could double
as a placemat appeared identical
to several places in South Hills-
borough. They were happy to take
my money and the food was good.
When was the last time you saw a
Chinese take-out restaurant go out
of business? I can think of a few
large, buffet-style restaurants that
have gone under; but can't think
of a single take-out place that has
folded up. Restaurants are notori-
ous for going out of business, but
the Chinese take-out restaurants
appear immune to that.
According to Chinese Restaurant
News magazine, there are an esti-
mated 41,000 Chinese restaurants
in America - nearly three times
the number of McDonald restau-
rants. With $17 billion in annual
sales, it seems profitable to be in
the Chinese restaurant business.
Of course, owning a Chinese res-
taurant isn't a sure pathway to
success and I have no doubt there
are off-days at Chinese restaurants
- even if they do rarely go out of
business. Certainly, a young wait-
ress in a family restaurant can have
an off day as well. Lord knows I


have plenty of off days.
A waitress ignores you or your
Chinese take-out has white rice
instead of the fried rice you or-
dered... such are things that can
make you feel as though the world
has ripped you off. But in the big
scheme of things, it's not a big
deal.
It seems the world increasingly
rushes to judgment on almost ev-
erything. We see something post-
ed on the web or circulated in an
email, and if it fits our paradigms,
then we believe it regardless of
any evidence to the contrary. One
such rush to judgment is over the
decline of America. I'm sorry to
tell those of that paradigm: It sim-
ply isn't so. America is certainly
going through a rough patch, but
there will be an upswing. There is
always an upswing. More and
more people say, and believe, that
the United States doesn't produce
anything anymore. The truth is that
the U.S. is still the world's largest
manufacturer. Yes, China is catch-
ing up, but that only means that it
is time to stem the outgoing tide
of manufacturing jobs. We are the
only nation to have put a man on
the moon - we can turn that tide.
My personal goal is to stop my
own rush to judgment. I need to
question more, and discover more,


MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTO
A young waitress at a family restaurant demonstrated that you can
still come out on top after hitting a rough patch. Much like a tattered
U.S. Flag, the United States is going through a rough patch but will
most certainly emerge better and stronger than before.


before I come to conclusions. I
don't want to be the judge, jury
and executioner over anyone - be
they politicians or waitresses.
The next night I went back to
that family restaurant. The same
waitress immediately came over to
my table and was apologetic to a
degree that she became incompre-
hensible.
"Don't worry about it, it's OK -
we're good," I told her.
"It's not OK," she said. "I am
very sorry about making you wait


like that."
The service was extremely atten-
tive and fast, the seafood lasagna
was excellent and, as I left, I tipped
more than the customary 15 or 20
percent. The waitress seemed sur-
prised and happy to get a tip at all.
She thanked me again as I walked
out the door.
That waitress bested the Chinese
restaurant down the street and
earned more of my money. She
went through a rough patch but
came out on top.


Featuring Locally Grown Produce



NOW OPEN

Ruskin Tomatoes

are in!


Located at Elsberry Nursery Farms
NW corner Big Bend Road & U.S. Hwy. 41

Apollo Beach, FL


Hours: Tuesday - Friday 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.


www.backyard-produce.com

(813) 466-9585


SG O L Grand opening of
Sparkle N Sprinkle
atrdAy S AyriesC Sparkle N Sprinkle will hold their
W EEKDAY U RT Igrand opening on Friday, Nov. 19
$20 Saturday & Sunday (Prices Include Cart & Tax!) from 9am-6pm and Saturday, Nov


--- - -- - --- -- -- -
SBRING IN THISAD I
I Free Gift with Paid Greens Fee!
OFFER ON/SCCO2010 Expires 12/31/10

2802 Terra Ceia Bay Blvd. * Off Bus41 Just North ofPalmetto


20 from 9am -3pm. They provide
quality products for card making,
scrapbooking and paper crafting
including rubber stamps, glitters
and embossing powder. The store
is located at 2107 College Ave E
in Ruskin. For more information,
visit sparklensprinkle.com or call
642-0940.


�.A -






8 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER












SCopyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


SPermanent Makeup
~ Eyebrows, Liner acnd Lips ~-
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ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR
THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT


NOVEMBER 18, 2010


Terrific Kids at Gibsonton Elementary
Congratulations to the October 'Terrific K' of Gibsonton Elementa-
ry! The following students showed their peers what it means to be en-
thusiastic: Julisa Landahl, Jorge Huapilla, Mariah Wilbon, Haleigh Wat-
son, Triniti Yorks, Emmanuel Urgell, Jimmy Blackmon, Xavier Reome,
Brandon Watson, Anne Sandin, Barbara
Skeels, Nicole Nguyen, Tracy Cline, An-
gel Moore, Nyah Hickory, Darren Chen,
Alkeythia Watts, Joseph Hester, Nayely r
Garcia, Logan Dewolf, Jonas Larrabee,
Sauge Smith, Austin O'Steen, Sergio Delg- '.-
adillo, Carlos Lemus, Briana Potter, Alexis
Henry, Roselani Kemplin, Alyssa Delones, Dallas Winslow, Austin Eder,
Julio Lemus, Jason Diaz, Damian Freeman, Teagan Horvath.

Baked goodies for sale
The Summerfield Ladies' Club will be sponsoring a Holiday Bake Sale
in connection with the arrival of Santa and the Gift and Craft Show on
Saturday, Dec. 4.
This bake sale will include cakes, pies, cookies, pastries, fruit breads
and much more. All of these items will be modestly priced and make
wonderful hostess and teacher gifts.
The proceeds of this bake sale will be donated to the U.S. Marine Corp.
'TOYS FOR TOTS' program. Satisfy your sweet tooth and support this
wonderful program.








Family Owned & Operated
Nationwide Warranty Available Through American Car Care & NAPA

We Are a AAA Approved

Auto Repair Center




AEaelcop AUUTl IVAIROYA
w--T1"�"


WELCOME ABOARD Ryan
Esto, formerly of Pioneer Tire in
Riverview, and Carolyn Hogue.
Stop by and say hello!


Great Christmas Idea...
GIFT CERTIFICATES
AVAILABLE

We service and repair all makes
and models including:
VW, Mercedes,
Volvo, BMW
& other European lines
and Diesel Repair


Courtesy Shuttle Service Available * Towing Upon Request
2003 U.S. Hwy. 41 S. * Ruskin, FL
(exactly 1 mile south of SR 674/College Ave.)

(813) 645-0339
OPEN Monday through Friday * www.athomeauto.net
Lic# MVS51635

...r.... . BFGoodrich Distributor

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OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 9


from the

Brown
Heating & Cooling
Family to Yours


FREE U.V. Systems*
FREE Duct Cleaning*
FREE HEPPA Filtration*
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WE Service Al,
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Enjoy longer life, higher efficiency,
great capacity and fewer
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NOVEMBER 18, 2010


u M- 41 R


ca3]TiS y






10 - OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT* SCC OBSERVER


i


Voted Best of SouthShore

SUNSET GRILL 611 Destiny Drive * Ruskin, FL 33570
AT LITTLE HARBOR 813-645-7739 * www.staylittleharbor.com


Plant therapy
U Continued from page 1
can use HTR after her name fol
Horticultural Therapist Registered,
Knows of her own experience.
SWhile horticultural therapies now
Se. are being used in a wide variety oi
settings - hospitals, hospices, cor
rectional centers, rehabilitation fa
cilities, botanical gardens - Flem
ing's practice in SouthHillsborougl
primarily has been in assisted living
environments such as Plaza West
on the grounds of Freedom Plaza.
In this situation, the transform
tions can be comparatively small
but nonetheless life altering for
MELODY JAMESON PHOTOS g
s of dirt, trays of blooming plants and decorative flags were the participating individuals and their
kings of an afternoon horticulture session recently at Plaza West. families. Fleming talks of the
e, Leslie Fleming HTR (left, kneeling), a registered horticulture wheelchair-bound patient in as
rapist, talks one on one with "Miss Beverly" (right) about recol- sisted living visited daily by his
ions from her early life on a farm.




II



















Expanded Sunday Brunch


$1 59510 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

We have expanded to include:
SEntree & Carved Items * Omelette Station * Dessert Buffet
e Champagne * and more


wife of many years - a physically
difficult, emotionally wrenching
circumstance for any aging, close
couple.
Their daily conversation seemed
to center on his declining health, her
trials in getting to the facility. But
when introduced to therapeutic hor-
ticulture and the garden, li,.\ both
could enjoy one another and the
connection to nature," the therapist
relates. He became more indepen-
dent and willing to assume respon-
sibility as the common activities of
planting and watering raised beds
of blooms or making bird feeders
minimized his physical restrictions,
she adds. It was "healthier for both
of them and their relationship" as
they worked together to make "his
home as nice as possible" and the
tone of their visits was changed
markedly, Fleming recalls.
Degreed in a couple of areas re-
lated to political science, Fleming
did a 180 degree turn into profes-
sional gardening as her family grew
up. And it was during a decade as a
Master Gardener associated with
the Hillsborough County Extension
Service that she learned of the vari-
ous types of horticulture therapy,
she says.
While horticulture is the art and
science of growing plants, she ex-
plains, horticultural therapy is the
practice of engaging people in plant
and gardening activities to improve
their bodies, minds and spirits.
The practice has a long, illustri-
ous history dating back centuries.
In 1798, Dr. Benjamin Rush, a
signer of America's Declaration of
Independence, was documenting
how gardening improved the con-
ditions of his mentally ill patients.
And gardening was utilized in the
U.S. Veterans' Administration re-
habilitation programs for returning
WWII soldiers.
In the 1970s and '80s, Fleming
points out, research demonstrated,
for example, that shorter hospi-
tal stays and less medication were
needed by patients allowed a view
of the natural outside environment.
And, a recent Wall Street Journal
article on the subject notes a 2005
study of 107 cardiac patients which
showed their lower heart rates and
better dispositions after a one-hour
gardening class, compared with
similar patients in a generic class.
Today, the therapy is practiced
within four general categories:
therapeutic horticulture, social hor-
ticulture, vocational horticulture as
well as the horticultural therapy dis-
tinguished from therapeutic, Hem-
ing notes. Her practice is primarily
in the therapeutic area, she adds,
which takes her into healthcare and
residential facilities such as Plaza


Empty plant trays at the end of a horticulture therapy session in
Plaza West give Jean Willis HTA (standing, left), a certified assistant
in horticulture therapy, a good opportunity to discuss plant care
with assisted living residents. Among the primary benefits of such
therapies is useful practice for individuals with memory loss.


West where she tailors programs to
individual needs.
Twice a month, the therapist cre-
ates a gardening setting on the sec-
ond floor where residents, both am-
bulatory and in wheelchairs, gather
to practice activities designed to
help. They may select blooming
plants to be set in individual con-
tainer gardens or they may make
"tuffy muffies," choosing cut flow-
ers from bunches and tying them to
produce ribbon-wrapped bouquets,
exercising arthritic hands or dimin-
ishing decision making skills in the
process. They may sow plant seeds
in window boxes, thereby improv-
ing the pincer grasp, or water small
plants in trays with a range of tools
and thereby improve eye-hand co-
ordination. Or, they may draw rath-
er than carve faces on pumpkins,
enjoying the texture, weight, form
of the vegetable. Similar exercises
are done with various citrus fruits,
Fleming adds.
One of only 10 such therapists
in Florida, credentialed by the
37-year-old American Horticul-
tural Therapy Association, Fleming
charges for her services, but sug-
gests the satisfactions of witnessing
life-altering changes transform and
redirect people onto more positive
paths also is invaluable reward. She
points to just one of those situations
eloquently captured in writing by a
patient in an addiction program.
A victim of what the woman de-
scribed as "severe, sadistic child-
hood physical and sexual abuse at
the hands of my father and other
relatives," this client had turned to
alcohol, trying to drown the pain.
Addicted and diagnosed with a
post-traumatic disorder, she was
on the road back when she wrote
gratefully of "the role horticulture
played in my recovery." Work-
ing "in the greenhouse, or on the
grounds, was just what I needed at
the end of a long hard day of spiri-
tual, mental and emotional work,"
she declared. The patient went on
to thank the therapist for "your
quiet supportive manner," adding
"the work in God's earth soothed
me tremendously."
On her last day at her treatment
center, this patient scattered in her
facility garden the petals of a rose
she' d saved from her father's coffin
cover. She allowed she knew "I had
not laid him to rest" and recognized
she wanted, needed "to say good-
bye to him and move on with my
life as a free woman." Move on she
did, saying that with the help of the
garden she had come to "feel safe
and comforted."
"That," Fleming summed up,
"makes it worth it."
Copyright 2010 Melody Jameson


Tub
mal
Her
their
lect

,


a


NOVEMBER 18, 2010







NOVEMBER 18, 2010

Saying goodbye
U Continued from page 1


By evening, things had changed
rapidly. The National Weather Ser-
vice issued storm warnings for my
area as the sky turned from blue to
a bruised-looking black and blue.
As I went forward on the deck to
ensure the sails were secured for
rough weather, I looked up and saw
a wall of white approaching me. It
appeared as though the water in the
river was being sucked up into the
sky. I paused only for a moment to


marvel at that strange and frighten-
ing phenomenon and then tore back
into the relative safety of the cabin.
Within 30 seconds the wall struck,
laying my 18,000-pound boat near-
ly on its side. Looking out through
the portholes, I was alarmed to see
that the riverbank was gone and I
could see nothing but white. I had
no idea if my anchor was holding
or dragging and there was nothing
I could do about it if it were the


MITCH TRAPHAGEN PHOTOS
My wife Michelle flew in to help prepare the boat for the voyage
home. The tanks and lockers are full. It is time to sail home. Saying
goodbye to Michelle was the hardest part.


OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 11


latter. It was the first time in my
30 years of boating that I feared I
could actually lose my boat.
Although it felt much longer, the
wind passed within a minute or
two. Outside, the boat was a sham-
bles with full, heavy jugs of water
and fuel tossed across the cockpit,
a clear plastic windshield destroyed
and the American Flag that proudly
flew from the stem on a heavy teak
pole lost to the wind and rain. The
radio reported sightings of torna-
dos that downed trees and cut elec-
trical power to more than 50,000
homes in the area. I don't know if it
was a tornado that I saw approach-
ing me but I do know that I never
want to experience something like
that again. I also learned that the
calm, beautiful demeanor of the
Chesapeake Bay is sometimes an
illusion.
I returned to the Chesapeake last
week to prepare the boat for the fi-
nal leg of my voyage south to Flori-
da. The wind was blowing hard and
small craft advisories had been in
effect on the bay for nearly a week.
As the wind continued to blow,
my planned launch date came and
went. I had no desire to tempt fate,
knowing all too well that the bay
can be terrifying in a small boat.
There are certainly worse places
to be weathered in. Cambridge,
Maryland, is a friendly community
on the Choptank River. Founded
nearly a century before the Decla-
ration of Independence was writ-
ten, it is a bustling city with traf-
fic and development that seems to
defy its relatively small population.
During the age of sail, it was the
second largest port in Maryland
and today a city park that greets
visitors coming from the Baltimore


/ Washington area is centered upon
a large artistic rendition of a sail.
Along the waterfront, boat builders
restore skipjacks and other historic
boats to their former glory and the
well-managed city-owned marina
is surrounded by parks and historic
homes. The housing economy ap-
pears diverse with immaculately
kept mansions from yesteryear,
neglected mansions from the same
era, decrepit row houses and brand
new condominiums all lining the
waterfront.
The diversity is also reflected in
the notable residents that hailed
from Cambridge. It was the home
of Harriet Tubman, an escaped
slave and activist on the Under-
ground Railroad. A century later,
Tubman's spirit returned through
Gloria Richardson, a civil rights
leader who made Cambridge the
center of the civil rights movement
in 1962. The Cambridge Nonvio-
lence Action Committee targeted
desegregation in schools and public
buildings along with other social
injustices. Racial strife in the city
reached a point to which the Na-
tional Guard was called in - and it
remained for more than a year. The
'Treaty of Cambridge," negotiated
by the U.S. Justice Department and
Robert E Kennedy, began the road
to recovery in 1963. Today, while
it would be naive to think it doesn't
exist, there is no evidence of racial
strife in this community.
Cambridge was also home to
Beatrice Arthur, the actress of the
television shows Maude and The
Golden Girls. While attending
Cambridge High School, she was
named 'Wittiest Girl." And with
due reflection of the diversity of
the community, the city is the birth-


place of St- -
phen Allen *
Benson
who in 1856
became
the second * *
president of *
Liberia.
Just down the bay from Cam-
bridge, Tangier Island was the Brit-
ish staging point for the assault on
Baltimore in the War of 1812. That
battle provided Francis Scott Key
with the inspiration to write what
would become the National An-
them. Further south is Norfolk, the
last stop on the bay before entering
the Intracoastal Waterway. Norfolk
is home to the world's largest naval
base and is replete with American
history from the Revolutionary
War to World War II.
The winds have calmed on the
Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake
Bay but a cold front is barreling
across the nation, dumping heavy
snow on the northern plains. The
National Weather Service is pre-
dicting it will lose steam as it ap-
proaches the Chesapeake region
but I know better and will therefore
plan for the worst. It is time to sail
out of Cambridge and the Chesa-
peake Bay for the relatively pro-
tected confines of the ICW through
Virginia and the Carolinas.
But right now the weather is
beautiful. My wife Michelle flew
in to help prepare the boat for the
long cruise and we spent two days
running around town, filling tanks
and lockers on the boat. Beneath
the frantic activity was teamwork,
laughter, and the sharing of a mu-
tual dream; the life we first lived
and loved upon moving to Florida
15 years ago. Tomorrow I will have
to watch her slowly recede, waving
the entire time, as I motor out of
the harbor and the frenzied cama-
raderie of the past two days will be
replaced with acute loneliness. For
hours, or perhaps days, the laughter
we shared will echo in the quiet of
the empty cabin. Then slowly, in
the emptiness, comes the resolve
to get home. The weather is saying
go and tomorrow I will have to say
goodbye.


5oin our family for tbe i/olidays!
DON'T MISS OUT ON THE JOY AND WARMTH
OF THE HOLIDAY SEASON...ENJOY IT WITH FRIENDS.


The Holidays are a time for friends and family.
Traditional gatherings and good times.

There's still time to join the Pacifica Senior Living family and share
all the pleasures of the season with friends, both old and new.
And now, Pacifica Senior Living is making it easier with the exclusive
72/72 Program. Simply tour Pacifica Senior Living and make a
move-in commitment within 72 hours of your tour...and your
third month's rent is only $72*.
And to celebrate the season, you'll receive a free Holiday gift with
your tour of our community.
Pacifica Senior Living offers the very finest in compassionate and
attentive care, with individualized programs covering the full
scope of needs from assisted living to memory care.




SUN CITY
PACIFICA SENIOR LIVING
Assisted Living & Memory Care

813-938-2259 www.PacificaSunCity.com
3855 Upper Creek Dr., Sun City Center, FL 33570


*$72 is base rental only; assisted living fees are not included.


Q** Podiatric Medicine and Surgery


r] Sean D. Shanahan,

D.P.M., M.P.H.

3909 Galen Court, Suite B-1
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Phone: (813) 634-0664
Fax: (813) 634-0668


FEDERAL-\
TAX CREDIT


Lic#AL7290 [






12 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT* SCC OBSERVER

They won! SCC Photo Club tri-club contest
The Sun City Center Photo Club Rolf Sulzberger, Wild Bill Cody vainnah Frond Weaver by Gl
won the second annual Tri-Club by Glenn Laucks, Spires of Inspi- Laucks, Contrast in Architect
competition between the Sarasota ration by Matt Batt, Persistence at by Unknown, Organist in the
Camera Club, the Suncoast Cam- Yosemite by Rolf Sulzberger, Sa- by Patt Sulzberger
era Club and the Sun City Center
Photo Club. This is a prestigious
trophy since each club has many E
talented photographers.
Their thanks to all who offered
their photos for the contest and
especially to those whose photos
were selected by our panel.
The winning entries were:
Color Prints
Sunset at Roanoke Island by 'i. :.
Matt Batt, Butterfly Flexing His
Legs by Doug Moore, Good Morn-
ing, Honey by Doug Moore, Over-
looking Mt. Rushmore by Sharon
Bolton, A Chinese Finger Painter
by Wayne Bengston, Banjo Man
by Patt Sulzberger, Sugar & Spice Blue Bike by Stan Lipski.
by Patt Sulzberger, Dale Chihuly
Glass by Rose Stack, Cocktail
Hour by Marianne Strehar, Mill
by a Stream by Marianne Strehar,
Blue Mountains of Australia by
Marianne Wexler, Spools of Color
by Bill Leasy, Munchin' Lunch
by Matt Batt, Colorful Website
by Doug Moore, Thumbelina by
Joe Pehoushek, Feed Me by Rolf
Sulzberger, The Paula Dean Show
by Glenn Laucks, Cartegena Win-
dow by Marianne Wexler, Caveau
by Stan Lipski, Blue Bike by Stan
Lipski.
Monochrome Prints
Grandpa's Barn by Joe Pe--
houshek, Beach Tree by Stan Lip-
ski, A Beach at Craigleath by Lin-
da Hawkin, Bobcats at Home by
Mill by a Stream by Marianne Strehar.


From fKAUFMAN MAIL BAG
See betINSTITUer. Live etter
See better. Live better,


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- J.A.K.
A Insta-Sightm Cataract Surgery is the removal of the cataract without the use
* of needles (injections around the eye), patches or stitches.

Q . Why use Insta-SightTM Cataract Surgery?
- D.L.G.
A Insta-Sight�M is used because it provides vision instantly after cataract sur-
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chance of a heart attack or stroke. Since there are no injections around the eye,
there is no chance of inadvertent misdirected injection into the eye which can cause
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lids which may be the result of injections. I have been performing Insta-Sight
Cataract Surgery since 1992.

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Cataract Specialist
Certified Crystalens Surgon
Sun City Center
4002 Sun City Center
Blvd. (SR674)
(813) 634-9289

Zephyrhills
(813) 788-7616

Bushnell
(352) 568-0600


NOVEMBER 18, 2010


enn
ture
Sky


Persistence at Yosemite by Holt buizberger.


Postcards


PHOTO BY BRENDA SEXTON


I think Tampa has a public relations problem. In case you've never
heard of it, Tampa is a large city on Florida's Gulf coast conveniently
located 20 or so miles north of us. It seems they have trouble getting
people to visit - at least based on the fact that no one identified
the unidentifiable artwork located on Kennedy Avenue just across
from the County Center building. Unfortunately, I still have no idea
what it is. This week's photo is thanks to Postcards reader Brenda
Sexton. She did an outstanding job capturing a very cool Florida
image. And no, the shark isn't a hint and this isn't a Florida image
taken inside the commissioner's boardroom at the County Center
building. Heck, it's not even in Tampa because, as we all now know,
no one goes to Tampa. Tequila Tom of Apollo Beach may well know
where this is-- do you? Send your best guess or your own postcard
(a photo you have personally taken) to where@observernews.net
or mail to 210 Woodland Estates Blvd., Ruskin, FL, 33570. Fins to
the left! Fins to the right!















Free Skin Cancer


Screening Clinic

If you are concerned about a skin
growth, we would be happy to evaluate

Howard A. Oriba, M.D. Michael G. Caruso, M.D.
Dermatologists

4002 Sun City Center Blvd. * Suite B * Sun City Center FL 33573
(Corner of Upper Creek and Sun City Center Blvd)(Pink building with green roof)






C*A A\ V
81=3=15






NOVEMBER 18, 2010

The Small Thing
I have always liked little packag-
es, perhaps because I, myself am a
small thing.
I favor tiny
food and tiny
creatures. As
far as food
stuffs, I still
drink my
Saturation daily dose of
Point orange juice
out of a small
By KareyBurek carton with a
straw; I like
mini desserts; and am attracted to
sample size everything.
Small creatures have always held
a special place in my heart. I still
crawl around on the ground look-
ing at bugs and snakes, tadpoles
and fish. They amaze me because
they are so tiny, but they have such
detail in their natural design. For
instance, I came across a ringneck
hatchling that was caught in my
pool. It coiled up daintily on the
tile just above the water line until
my shadow startled it. The tiny
snake dove deep out of my reach
in an effort to save itself from what
it assumed was a predator. I final-
ly managed to scoop the snake out
and delivered it to a more suitable
wooded habitat in the bushes.
Ringneck snakes are tiny but they
have survival skills. This particu-
lar species of snake has the largest
geographic range of any snake in
North America. It can be found
up and down the east coast into
Canada and across the desert into


The ringneck snake is tiny, but you can clearly see his ring around
the neck.


the Pacific coast areas. The aver-
age full grown size of the ringneck
snake is a little over 12 inches, so
it maintains its small size through-
out life. It is easily identified by
the colorful orange/yellow ring
around its neck, with the rest of
the body a deep black or grayish
color. However, when you flip
this snake over, its belly is a bright
yellow and it has been known to
coil up and show its bright color-
ation when threatened.
Although tiny, ringneck snakes
still have venom in their saliva,
which they use to subdue their
prey. Some studies have shown
that this venom developed for a
feeding purpose rather than a pred-
atory defense. They are complete-
ly harmless to humans, but because
of their large numbers across the


United States, many studies have
proven that they are a vital part of
a healthy habitat and should be left
alone. Due to their high numbers,
they are not a protected species,
but more research and studies need
to be done to determine the impact
they have on the environment.
They do, however, help maintain
the population of invertebrates,
other small snakes and lizards lo-
cally. They can be found in any
type of habitat, however, research
has found that they are most abun-
dant in woody areas in the south-
ern region and do not travel above
2200 meters in the northern areas.
As part of my Thanksgiving rit-
ual of giving thanks, I give thanks
to all the small things that are just
under our noses and sometimes go
without being noticed.


See one doctor for all your needs!


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Corr Elementary Territic Kids
October Terrific Kids at Corr Elementary demonstrated the ability
to 'make a difference.' Recipients included: Pre-K -- Dillan Johnson,
Awad Khan; K -- Makenna Miley, Kinsey Bunce, Jose Blanco, Domi-
nic Maldonado, Shawn Sheppard, Isybelle Melendez, Dajiona Stokes,
Sasha Santiago, Yesenia Reyna; 1st -- Macie Webb, Timothy Salmon,
Orlando Arjona, Jazlyn Perez, Jorge Porras, Tra-
vis Bailey, Diego Escobar; 2nd -- Desiree Starke,
Johnny Fogarty, Ishtar Jimenez-Angeles, Justin -
Bussey, Lillia Rush, Leonardo Gamboa, Grace
Haerther; 3rd -- Isai Salazar, Aniyah Lucas, Josh-
ua Salmon, Trey Pryor, Ilee Coleman, Rodley Sylva; 4th -- Zhane Taylor,
Asya Campbell, Dakota Daley, Nazlie Casiano-Diaz, Steven Lin, Sergio
Rosales; 5th -- Kenescia Monroe, Camryn Hayes, Onell Lopez, Lorena
Deleon, Dawson Atwood, Molly Shaw, Tasani Durden.


Shutter & Blind Manufacturing Company
SHUTTERS ~ VERTICALS ~ FAUX WOOD & WOOD HORIZONTAL BLINDS ~ CELLULAR SHADES ~ SUNSCREEN SHADES
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Christmas festivities
unwrapped
The Summerfield Ladies' Club will
be holding their 'Annual Christmas
Party and Luncheon'on, Wednesday,
Dec. 1 at Freedom Plaza, Sun City
Center. A car pool will be formed at
the Summerfield Community Center
with a departure time of 11 a.m.
The members and their guests are
asked to bring non-perishable food
items for decorating the entryway
table and later donated to a Ruskin
Food Pantry.
The officers for the club year 2011
will be installed into office at this
luncheon and gratitude expressed to
the retiring officers.


OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 13



Jam Those Computers
By: Nancy Porter-Thai
What is
this malarkey about
being "unique?" Everywhere
we go we are categorized, typed, labeled,
classified, pigeonholed or grouped at sometime by
someone for something, somewhere. We are desig-
nated by personality types, body types, blood types
and type cast to fit into specific slots of young, old,
married, single, fat, skinny, sexy, witty, dull, tall,
short, to name a few. Each of us is conveniently
separated into sizes, shapes, and types, but never
by our "unique" and individual characteristics.
Our bodies, personalities and behaviors are grouped in a universal pro-
file that determines or predicts past or future behaviors. For example:
If you're a grumpy old goat now, you will most likely be a grumpy old
goat in the future. If you're passive, assertive, tenacious or lazy, there's a
predictable profile of who you will be in the future. Change is not in the
equation. We are a part of an all encompassing data bank full of catego-
ries that group, grab and grasp our "uniqueness" in the bowels of huge
computers. But, Rejoice! There is a way to foil those nerdy, algorithm
writing programmers.
We CAN reclaim our "uniqueness" by scrambling those computers
that sort us into categories based upon age and stage. We have to make
ourselves less predictable, less defined by supposition.
1. Don't act your age!!!!!
2. Be outrageous. Wear something that's not your style. Get out those
50's plaid pants and the 70's disco polyester.
3. Be bold. Try new things. If it's like you, do something that isn't. If
you're a recluse, be abonvivant. Tell a joke, even if you think you can't.
If you're an erasable codger, try being a kook. If you're uptight, let it
all hang out, (except in the one size fits no one hospital gowns that you
never want to be caught dead in.)
4. Try new things. Be open to changes that can make you "unique".
How about changing your hair color, your wardrobe, your exercises,
your daily routines, your habits and in some cases, your thinking.
Jumble up your life and those computers a little, by not prescribing
your life to a category. Define your "uniqueness" by exploring a new
world of being different than the norm. I don't think there's a category
for that. Our changes can scatter the data imposed upon us by
those expert nerds manning computers. Remember
the only thing you can't change in your
life is your blood type. They
Got Us There!






14 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT* SCC OBSERVER
Three new roofs protect 75 tots


A non-profit childcare center recently received three new roofs, gratis
(free), from Service Works, a Tampa-based roofing company.
"What beautiful work, and what a beautiful gift!" said Barbara Main-
ster, Executive Director of the non-profit Redlands Christian Migrant
Association, which operates the re-roofed RCMA Palmetto Child
Development Center. Service Works replaced three of the four building
roofs at the center, where 22 RCMA staff members care for nearly 75
children of migrant farmworkers.


Service Works donated all labor and materials for the project, which
was completed on Oct. 31. Mike Facundo, RCMA's Director of Facili-
ties, estimated the value at $21,000 to $25,000.
"Service Works is proud and honored to have taken part in this very
worthy project," said company President Jeff Anderson. "Many of our
valued staff and employees have benefited from programs like the Red-
lands Christian Migrant Association and this is our small way of giving
back. Good luck to RCMA."


NOVEMBER 18, 2010




C.A.R.E. is open from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.
For directions, visit www.CareShel-
ter.org or call (813) 645-2273.


Service Works replaced three roots at a non-profit childcare center
in Palmetto recently. They are (left to right): Luis Cervantes (top left), Workers from Service Works prepare a building at RCMA Palmetto
Juan Zuniga (bottom left), Juan Campos, Francisco Cilia, Freddy Child Development Center for a new roof.
Francisco, Richard Garza, and Tomas Guerra.

At Home Auto Care and Uniroyal� Tire support Rays AYSO


Misty
Misty, a hound mix, was found
as a stray. She is one adorable little
lady. Misty is very affectionate with
people and loves the company of
other dogs. She also has great house
manners. Misty needs an active fam-
ily and room to run. Misty has been
spayed, brought up-to-date on her
shots and micro- chipped. Misty's
approximate date of birth is March
1,2010.


As part of a successful team
effort, Rays AYSO has received
more than $1650 in both funds
and equipment from At Home
Auto Care and Uniroyal� Tire.
The national program, currently
in its 11th year, continues to be a
major supporter of youth soccer.
Partnering with its tire dealers,
Uniroyal� Tire has donated nearly


$13 million in funds and equip-
ment, including over one million
soccer balls, since 2000 through
the Uniroyal Soccer Program.
"This program is about giving
back and helping my community
in supporting our local youth,"
said Julie Davis from At Home
Auto Care. "Everyone at At Home
Auto Care is pleased to be taking


part in such a unique initiative. It's
great to see families in the store
and the parents are as appreciative
as the children to receive a free
soccer ball."
"We enjoy being able to offer
such a successful program to
our dealers and their communi-
ties again this year," said Ashley
Ramos, Uniroyal� Tire marketing


communications manager. "Pro-
viding a national program, which
is implemented on a local level,
wouldn't be possible without a
solid commitment from dealers
like At Home Auto Care."
For the latest information about
the Uniroyal Soccer Program and
Uniroyal� Tires, visit the brand's
website at www.UniroyalTires.
com www.uniroyaltires.com; to
find us on Facebook, visit www.
facebook.com/UniroyalSoccer. To
learn more about At Home Auto
Care, call Julie Davis, 645-0339
at 2003 U.S. Hwy. 41 South in
Ruskin, or visit www.athomeauto.
net www.athomeauto.net/.


Ulysses
Ulysses is a prince among lap cats.
He is very friendly and will approach
you looking for affection readily. He
has a fluffy tail that is constantly in
motion and will sit with anyone who
will give him the time. Bring home
this adventurer to settle into his for-
ever home. He is tired of wandering
the globe. Ulysses is neutered and
up-to-date on his shots. Ulysses was
born on May 1, 2010.


ANY FLUID FULL ENGINE :AC SERVICE
EXCHANGE DIAGNOSTIC SPECIAL

$20 OFFi $ $4995 $97 9
SValue91 =
ANY FLUSH . includes: Inspect beltscompressor&hoses,
Brakes,Transi Coolan Power Steering Check Engine Light On leaktest entire system. (Freon extra). Mostcars
|clesN ooter dsh o ts app es m added o stly.h De lytoe esponS ay be ad s lght c oa p wS h
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Additional charges for shop suppliesamaydobenade, ,Nohhvecoupnit
Ss eas I Additional chargesfor shop supplies may be added N o it her coupons orspecials.
Environmental disposal fee may apply in some are. See store for details Exp 223 0 E223 0
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DISC BRAKE SERV-: INSPECTION , & LUBRICATION
$20-o,"FREE v, S10"
O ectionoftires, bes&hoses,= OKendall
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front rotors, repack front e bearing (Ifhorn/lightsbrakes,shier ncudes up to 5 qts 5W20 , 0W3 r OW40
f e c t ; i . suspension, air and breather filter. , motor oil. Purolator oil filter Mostcars and light
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Additional parts/service often neeeua a t u itinal chares.Present coupon to recee savings. Valid only with coupon Not valid with any othe
Limited warranty - 12 months o 12,000 miles v No other discounts app . Additional charges for shop supplies coupons or specialsu. Coupon expires 1 2 0
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- H- . 60 AAA Autorized
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we have something

to smile about
The dental practice of zamikoff,
Klement, Jungman and Varga
welcomes Dr. Michelle Halcomb to
their staff. Dr. Halcomb comes to
Sun City Center with over 20 years
of dental practice experience.
She looks forward to developing
long lasting relationships with her
patients in order to give them the
best that dentistry has to offer.
NOW ACCEPTING
NEW PATIENTS Michelle Halcomb, D.D.S.


* Tooth Pain
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* Dental Implants
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* Dentures
* Bridges
* Porcelain veneers
* Cosmetic Dentistry
* Partials


813-634-3396
www.suncitycenterdental.com
703 Del Webb Blvd. W., Suite B
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Lic #6193 * Lic #9109 * Lic #11099 * Lic #15756 * Lic #D1713809


Christian Science Heals!

First Church of Christ, Scientist
204 2nd St. N.W. * Ruskin, FL 33570
(813) 645-6102
Sunday Service.................................................. 10:00 a.m .
Sunday School .................................................. 10:00 a.m .
W wednesday Service.......................................... 5:00 p.m .
All Are Welcome







NOVEMBE 18, 200-OBSERER-NEWS--R-VER -E----RENT - 1


Each story and advertisement in every issue of The Observer News begins with

an idea...and recently The Observer News was rewarded for its visualization in

both areas.


THE OBSERVER NEWS

along with its sister publications The SCC Observer and Riverview

Current, was presented with 21 awards at the Annual Awards

for Excellence ceremony sponsored by the Community

Papers of Florida (CPF). There were more than 1,000 entries

in numerous categories. The Observer family of newspapers


Congratulations are in order to the staff who wrote,

designed, photographed, and composed. Our readers and

advertisers are in aood hands!


, , ,-c _- , - , ,

In case otf an acciden...CONTACT USI
Hablamoes Espahol


S 8 Welco le Back,







SmRuSOnrT CLo B &


2nd Place
Credit: Chere Simmons
Brown Heating & Cooling,
Of Mice and Men, and Total
Automotive Services


, we are BROWN HEATING AND COOLING INC., 813-645-4632

and we have a deal that will make your Sweetie

say" i :
YOU i1"-EE "-- .-- T-- 6t- -"
� , , .:~mus=mi: 0ue u m p, i


Th lagyou dassi ied ad ,no r lnet workofstatide



1 -- -9aaatl


813-980-3673
mrion.11aterforaixcol
oflTAMPAtAY
bac.to Southeastampa By 1
rd 4C,49 ~A


the .. ..................... ..... .
es
have
AST
SVe're Teed Off About
0 Breast Cancer

Wm Help Us
* SCC Women's Golf Association 18 Hole Division
* SCC Women's Golf Association 9 Hole Division
*Caloosa Greens Ladies Golf Association
Rally For The Cure
by Sponsoring our Golf Tournament
Friday, October 23, 2009
Sandpiper Golf Course with
lunch following at SCC Community Hall
Make Sponsorship Checks Payable:
Maito: cure
1616 Bentwood Drve
Sun City Center, FL 33573
CompanyName
Contact
Address
Phone
Sponsorship Level
Be Sponsor $150-$299
Bronze Sponsor $300-$499
lsor 500-$999
io S1..............................+


Honorable
Mention:
Credit:
Mitch Traphagen
"Sailing Home...to
Florida"


3rd Place
Credit:
Penny Fletcher
D3ys3r F3.,h C.n(�r
S(ruggl s,:, keep up
vilh grcm vng 3r.3
h,-,mele i


Sailing 1-Rome.. .TH Florida


Credit:
Melody Jameson
"A father's fable
creates a reluctant
writer"


Credit:
Penny Fletcher
"Residents


plead to keep | Residents Plead to Keep Progran
� ' ' ', n


programs in
place"


HE SCC OBSERVER
Relief for Haiti rolling
across the South County





. * * . . . . : . -,
� ~ ~ ~ fs f.a..rme-,.-r.. s


Credit:
Penny Fletcher
"South county
fish farmers
lose thousands
as freeze kills
stock"


. THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT
A fathers fable creates AMit veOSras
H a reluctantwriter aM w
I- *.. : .= cemvr7 cfhokce
Whatever
- . - .r . Happei
� .*t -- . . , . " . . . - .

�iI 7 :..._.-. .- ..-


OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * 15


NOVEMBER 18, 2010


I






16 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


Manasota
Genealogical
Society to meet
The Manasota Genealogical
Society will meet from 9:30 a.m.
to noon on Tuesday, Dec. 7 at the
Manatee County Central Library
for a presentation by the Rev. Herb
Loomis titled 'The Genealogy of
Santa Claus Post Cards.'
Special interest group to follow
with 'Organizing Genealogical
Data in Your Computer.' For more
information, call Jean Morris at
(941) 722-5156 or visit www.
rootsweb.ancestry.com/~flmgs.


South County
Gives Back

Wilhelm Heating and Air Condi-
tioning is a drop site for Deputies
Darlin's .Toys and clothing dona-
tions for children age 10 to 15 can
be dropped off weekdays from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Wilhelm's,
802 4th St. SW (off College
Ave. West) in Ruskin. For more
information call Officer Budd at
813-672-7430.

SCC Roamin' Oldies are joining
forces with the Braden Street
Cruisers for their 7th annual Toys
for Tots show, 10-2 at DeSoto
Square Mall in Bradenton on
Dec. 4. More than 100 collectible
and antique vehicles will line the
parking lot. Admission is free.
Donate a new unwrapped toy to
vote for your favorite show ve-
hicle. For more information www.
roaminoldies.com.

Proceeds from the Summerfield
Ladies Club holiday bake sale on
Saturday, Dec. 4 at the subdivi-
sion's community center will be
donated to the US Marine Corp
Toys for Tots program.

Our Lady of Guadalupe Food
Pantry will be the beneficiary
of the Sun City Center Com-
munity Thanksgiving service on
Wednesday, Nov. 24 at 7 p.m. at
Prince of Peace Catholic Church.
For every 18 cents, the Pantry is
able to buy 1 pound of food from
"Feed America." The Ministerial
Alliance hopes people will give
thanks by giving generously to the
offering for the Pantry.

Former alumni of East Bay High
School are raising money to fund
a scholarship in honor of retired
drama teacher Lynnette Lota.
The Lota Arts Scholarship will
be an endowment that awards a
$1,000 scholarship each year to
a performing arts student from
EBHS or Riverview High School.
$20,000 is needed to establish the
endowment. Donations can be
made via the Hillsborough Educa-
tion Foundation website at www.
educationfoundation.com. For
more information contact Jason
Ferguson at jason@fergusonlive.
com.

The Shoe Lab, Inc at 1202 1st
Street SW in Ruskin is collecting
gently worn shoes for Soles-
4Souls. If you bring your shoes to
The Shoe Lab, Inc. for donation
to S, lk, 4IIul, they will make
minor repairs to the shoes at no
cost to the donor. For more infor-
mation about The Shoe Lab, Inc.,
visit www.myshoelab.com and/or
www.shoerepairbymail.com


RCMA opens Head Start Centers
The Redlands Christian Migrant Association, a local not-for-profit or-
ganization, would like to announce that its Migrant Head Start Centers
will be open as of Nov. 15, 2010. They serve migrant farm working fami-
lies with priority given to families of children with special needs. They
are accepting applications, and would appreciate referrals of children
from migrant families that are in need of childcare services. The follow-
ing is a list of centers, with age requirements and contact info.
* Ruskin Migrant Child Development Center. Ages 6 weeks to 5 years.
Contact: Rebecca Galan at (813) 671-5275.
* RCMA Wimauma Campus Child Development Center. Ages 6 weeks
to 5 years. Contact: Hilda Leija at (813) 671-5278.
* RCMAEstancia Child Development Center. Ages 3-5 years. Contact:
Juanita Juarez at (813) 671-5285.
* RCMA Beth El Child Development Center. Ages 6 weeks to 5 years.
Contact: Sylvia Blanco at (813) 672-5165.
* RCMA Balm Child Development Center. Ages 6 weeks to 5 years.
Contact: Evelyn Soto at (813) 672-5332.
The local area office is located at 312 Highway 41 S. in Ruskin. If
you have any questions or need more information, call Miguel Fuentes
at (813) 671-5264.




RNMA


South Hillsborough Elks Lodge #2672
Upcoming Activities
Every Tuesday - Jam Session from 3 to 5 p.m. There is no charge
for all Elks and their guests.
Every Wednesday - Best Spaghetti in Town, $7, All-You-Can-Eat,
for all Elks and their guests. Music by Bryan from 5 to 8 p.m.
Every Thursday - Fun Night, Bar Bingo, Wii games available all
evening till closing.
Every Friday - Seafood and Sandwiches for all Elks
and their guests from 5 to 7 p.m. Karaoke by Bryan from
5 to 8 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 20 - Turkey Shoot for all Elks and their a
guests from 5 to 8 p.m. Menu is Sandwich Buffet, $3.
Sunday, Nov. 21 - Pot Luck Dinner for all Elks and their guests.
Bring your favorite dish.
Monday, Nov. 29 - Poor Man's Dinner for all Elks and their guests.
at 5 p.m., $5 in advance, $6 at the door. Menu: American Goulash.







Ziyperer's TuneraCl-(ome

Only Onsite Crematory in S. Hillsborough County
Family owned and operated since 1979


e I813-645-6130
' 1520 33rd St. S.F., Ruskin, FL 33570
www.zipperersfuneralhome.com
Exp. 12/31/10



Sun City

Dental Center
Voted #1 in Best of South Shore for 2010
Thomas A. DeVol, DeYOD.D.S., PA
New Patients & Emergencies Welcome

Full Mouth Series of: 1 Off
* X-RV ys oo Uwif
SX-Rays(0210) II
* Examln (0o0o) Full &Partial
* Regular
Cleaning (o) :: Dentures
SCoupon Must Be Presented
ForT J1($200 Value) At Time Of Estimate
Coupon Must Be Presented
At Time Of Estimate 1 5110,5120,5213,5214
Offers expire 11/30/10. Coupons must be mentioned at time of
scheduling appointment. The fee advertised is the minimum fee
charged. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has
the right to refuse pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other
service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and
within 72 hrs. of responding to the advertisement for the fee service
examination or treatment. Senior citizen discount does not apply.
727 Cortaro Dr. (Behind Burger King)
Open Mon-Fri * 8:30-5:00 813-633-2636


NOVEMBER 18, 2010
Free Florida-friendly landscaping
evaluations for neighborhood associations
Creating a low-impact, Florida-friendly landscape can be fun and
rewarding. But, where do you start? Hillsborough County Extension offers
free evaluation and guidance for neighborhood associations wanting to
build beautiful landscapes that help protect Florida's environment.
On-site landscape evaluations offered to officers or board members of
neighborhood associations will cover:
* The nine principles to a Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM
* An evaluation of existing landscaping
* Landscaping recommendations
* Information on Senate Bill 2080, the legislation of Florida-Friendly
LandscapingTM
Additional elements in the evaluation include:
* Overall design, selection and placement of plants
* Pruning practices
* Problem plants, such as diseased trees and invasive, non-native
plants
* Pest and disease issues; pesticide use on the property
* Nutritional deficiencies and the application of fertilizers
* Mulch -- type,
quantity and applica-
tion
* Irrigation (in-
ground) sprinkler sys-
tem operation and time
clock settings
This program is
available in many
counties. For more in-
formation, or to sched-
ule an evaluation, con-
tact Maria Carver, at
(813) 744-5519, ext.
142, or carverms@
hillsboroughcounty.
org. Program informa-
tion is also available
at http://hillsborough
fyn.ifas.ufl.edu/Comm-Assoc-FYN.html.
The Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM Community Association Out-
reach Program is funded by the Alafia River and Hillsborough River
Basin Boards of the Southwest Florida Water Management District and
the Hillsborough and Polk County Commissions.




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60,






OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 17


ART ERICKSON


ED JACOBS


DAVID FLOYD


SAM SUUMAN


SCC CA candidates


0 Continued from page 1
agreed, adding that the decision
would "affect all of us." Jacobs,
on the other hand, said in his view
it would be a south side decision
alone and Erickson said he did
not disagree with that outlook but
emphasized if such an opening oc-
curred it could constitute a "short-
cut" for "drive-by criminals."
Black pointed out that under hur-
ricane conditions such an opening
would be very useful as a means
of exiting the community and sug-
gested a gated entry designated for
emergency purposes only.
On several subjects, the candi-
dates clearly demonstrated their
basic agreement. Communications
- both between the CA board and
residents as well as between the
community and the world at large
- produced considered response
among them. Jacobs, a licensed
Florida attorney, pinpointed a lack
of communications between the


community and its onsite govern-
ing board as a big problem. "We' re
here to serve the residents of this
community and that is the only
reason. We're not here to promote
our own ideas unless they are ben-
eficial to community." He also
suggested that all CA board meet-
ings be recorded, with copies made
available in the CA office and li-
brary as well as published in print
and on the community website.
Floyd , who has called for cre-
ation of a comprehensive com-
munications plan, also noted that
work on information flow within
SCC is needed. The chemical and
biological scientist pointed out
that within months the community
will observe its 50th anniversary
and from that point looks ahead
to a "long future." He also un-
derscored the opportunity to work
with Minto Communities, the new
developer, and with ClubLink,
new owner of the golf courses, in


X-* S


B


F
G


ne
your
bor!


"MINI BINGO" Fri. & Sat., Nov. 19 & 20
10 Games $1/game (starts at 7:30 p.m.)




Do you suffer from

Post Herpetic Neuralgia (PHN)?

You may be eligible to participate in a clinical research
study to test an investigational drug for the relief of pain
in people with PHN. You may be eligible if you:
* Have been diagnosed with shingles over 6 months
ago and still have pain
* Are 18 to 80 years old

If eligible, you will receive at no cost:
* Study-related physical examinations
* Study-related medications
* Study-related laboratory tests
For more information, please call:


StdmnClnca ril
81-7181 WW.tdanlncltilIo
Ofie inTap&Su ityCne


promoting the community outside
SCC.
Asked for their views on the
SCC relationship with Kings
Point, Black and Floyd agreed on
the advisability of maintaining a
close cooperation between the two
sets of neighborhoods, with Black
noting that many Kings Pointers
are active in SCC clubs. He said
he believes more cross participa-
tion should be encouraged. And
Barnes, who did not disagree, of-
fered the view that the two differ-
ent lifestyles of the two commu-
nities probably precludes any full
merger of the two.
Sudman, with a background in
science, academics and business
plus lengthy history managing
non-profit entities, observed that
SCC is "at a crossroads," experi-
encing both changing demograph-
ics and changing conditions. He
called for exploring opportunities
to work with Minto and ClubLink
on such matters as uses of the
closed North Lake Golf Course


and maintenance of medians along
S.R. 674, also known as Sun City
Center Boulevard. A key ques-
tion is, he said,"what can we do to
make SCC more attractive?"
And Erickson, an electronics
technician who describes himself
as "analytical to a fault," pointed
out that at age 57 he offers a new
perspective, part of the changing
demographic in the community
noted by Sudman. He also sound-
ed a note of caution, suggesting


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
invites high school art students
across the state to participate in a
contest to create a piece of mana-
tee artwork that will be used on the
2011-2012 manatee decal.
Students in grades 9-12 in Flor-
ida should coordinate with their


The Golf Club at Cypreas Creek
1011 Cypress Village Blvd. * Ruskin
FULL SERVICE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
"Don't just go out to eat...come and dine at Cypress Creek"
CRZY8*PEIAS Te.-Sa.1am.-4p.


Happy
Hour


3 to 7p.m. EVERYDAY
Check our Lounge Menu
Serving: Tuesday till 4 p.m.
Wed. - Sat. 11 a.m. to Close


Call for your THANKSGIVING
RESERVATIONS $1999
Per person. Includes salad and dessert.
Turkey * Ham * Pork Shank
with mashed potatoes, yams, dressing
and vegetable
Stuffed Flounder * Prime Rib
with mashed potatoes and vegetable


i I.Voted o th BEST GOLF C lURS! o J.0.l ill.0..


- - - - - GOLF SPECIAL: - - - -
$10 OFF a
ROUND OF GOLF
Before 12 p.m.
UP TO 4 PLAYERS
Oly validw/this coupon � Exp. 11/30/10
Not valid w/any other offers


- - - - - GOLF SPECIAL: - - - -
$10 OFF a
ROUND OF GOLF
Before 12 p.m.
UP TO 4 PLAYERS
Onlyvald w/ths coupon Exp. 11/30/10
Not valid w/any other offers


that many new residents come to
SCC because of connections by
blood or friendship to other, long
term Sun City citizens, providing a
certain" continuity" in the process.
"Some people like the small town
atmosphere," he said, "be careful
what you wish for. There are two
sides to every issue. "
The election will be conduct-
ed Tuesday, November 30, and
Wednesday, December 1.
Copyright 2010 Melody Jameson


school's art teacher to submit the
artwork, because each school may
submit no more than five entries.
Home-schooled students also are
eligible to enter the contest. Con-
test details and forms are available
online at MyFWC.com /Manatee.
Manatee Decal Art Contest Re-
quirements:
* All entries must be the sole,
original work of the artist.
* Student artists must attend a
Florida public, private or home
school for high school, grades
9-12.
* Art teachers may submit no
more than five entries per school.
Home-school parents may submit
one student entry per home-school
group.
* The designs should be in full
color, using acrylic, gouache, oil,
silkscreen, woodcut and/or digital
art. The design may be realistic or
abstract, as long as the image de-
picts a recognizable manatee.
* Designs must be formatted to
an 11-inch by 8.5-inch horizontal
format. The winning image will
be cropped for an oval or circular
border.
* Artwork should be affixed to
a backboard and covered loosely
with a protective covering.
Entries must be postmarked on
or before Jan. 28, 2011. Failure
to follow any of the requirements
will disqualify entries from being
considered for the contest. FWC
artists and biologists will judge the
entries in February. The winning
design will be used to create a fi-
nal decal for distribution through
county tax collectors' offices
around the state.
To view previous manatee de-
cals, go to MyFWC.com /Mana-
tee. For more information, please
contact Bonnie Abellera at bonnie.
abellera@MyFWC.com or call
850-617-6052.
November is Manatee Aware-
ness Month in Florida. Manatees
become more visible in the riv-
ers and springs this month as they
move from the estuaries and bays
seeking warmer waters. As a re-
sult, boating speed zones changed
in many coastal counties on Nov.
15, and the FWC advises boaters
to be on the lookout for the endan-
gered Florida manatee.


ED BAHNES


BOB BLACK


Manatee decal art contest

for high school students


1st and 3rd THURSDAYS
Doors open at 5:30 p.m. * Early Birds 6:30 p.m.

igger Regular Games 7:00 .m. Co

Pots! FOOD! - * meet

'aster FUN! - neigh
ames! PRIZES!


I DENTAL

I PARTS

813-672-4900


New Patient Complete"
Exam & crown* 1 Denture*
Cleaning* $599 :

$79 599 799
I *Complete series of x-rays Each
D0210, comprehensive *ADA2750 Porcelain *Complete denture
oral exam D0150, Fused to High Noble to replace all upper
prophylaxis D1110 Metal Crown. D5110 or all lower
applies only in the New Patients Only Not Valid Ii teeth D5120.
absence of gum disease. With Other Offers or insurance ii dthtefero
New Patients Only Not Valid Discounts Expires 11/30/10 NotValid With Other Offers or
With Other Offers or Insurance Insurance Discounts Expires
Discounts Expires 11/30/10 11/30/10
13051 Summerfield Square Dr. * Riverview, Fl 33578
(Intersection of Big Bend Road & Hwy. 301)
www.GCDentalArts.com
The patient and any other patent responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay., cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination
or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment.


NOVEMBER 18, 2010






18 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


Medicare plans


* Continued from page 1
Most people who get sick and
go for tests and have treatments as-
sume this is the norm for everyone,
but it is not.
As I wandered through the maze
of clinics and hospital wards - es-
pecially during a cardiac incident in
the summer of 2009- I found hun-
dreds of people in the same shape
as I, and many far worse.
While it is true hospital emer-
gency rooms must stabilize anyone
brought in to keep them from dying,
only certain county hospitals that
receive a particular type of fund-
ing, including Tampa General and
Manatee Memorial, admit patients
without insurance to a floor after
stabilizing them in the ER.
Expensive tests as an outpatient,
like MRI's, CAT scans and cardio
tests?
Forget it. Show the insurance card
that will pay in full or don't let the
door hit you on the way out. Un-
less of course, you're prepared to
fork over the $3,000 to $10,000 (or
more) that these tests cost.
I'm basing these conclusions not
only on my own personal experi-
ence, but on the other people I've
met and written about in previous
news stories, like the woman dy-
ing of cancer who slipped through
the cracks of programs until it was
too late for even the Patient Advo-
cacy Center to help her; the heads
of clinics like ECHO in Brandon
and SunCoast Community Health
Center in Ruskin whose CEO's
told me outright that Gov. Charlie
Crist's "Cover Florida" program
didn't give any help to the people
who flood their waiting rooms ev-
ery day.
Cover Florida, initiated in January
of this year, costs between $300 and
$500 a month for a single person,
depending on which plan is cho-
sen, but the deductibles are too high
for people in the targeted income
range and the maximum limits for
hospital stays are way below the
actual costs, causing bankruptcies
and often loss of homes, simply be-
cause one family member got sick
and thought their insurance policy
would cover the bill.
Sure there are those who refuse
to pay for health care coverage
that make this problem worse. But
they're pretty much always young
and healthy. People like me - usu-
ally between the ages of 55 and 64-
or younger with a chronic disease,
aren't permitted to purchase poli-
cies at any price (even if we could
afford to).
So what do we do? Most of us just
continue to go without care until we
hit the emergency room and that
costs everybody more money in the
taxes they pay to support the coun-
ty-funded hospitals that must- by
law- admit and treat the uninsured.
The World Health Organization
agrees that our system is far from
perfect; with graphs on its Web site
showing that the U.S. is far from a


leader in health care and/or mortal-
ity rates.
Yet the picture changes radically
when you turn 65.
Rich or poor, healthy or riddled
with chronic conditions, at 65
Americans can get health care
through our Medicare system.
One of my doctors jokingly said
I was finally entering the "Holy
Land."
Unlike so many people who hate
hitting the "Big 65," I was like a kid
in a candy store knowing that No-
vember 2010 had finally come. No
longer could companies say I had
too many pre-existing conditions to
qualify for an insurance policy.
To me this meant I could finally
get tests and treatment when I need-
ed them.
Long before the big day arrived, I
began investigating what the choic-
es were and found a lot of things
some people I know who were al-
ready on Medicare said they didn't
know.
There were so many choices:
straight Medicare, with Parts A, B
and C to consider. And prescription
plan D. The supplementary policy
issue; and/or Advantage Plans.
It all seemed very confusing which
is why Medicare specialists say the
majority of people 'just say yes" to
the government form that gets sent
out about six months prior to a per-
son's turning 65. And they never
examine the issue any further.
The little red-white-and-blue card
simply asks if we want Medicare or
not. Saying "yes" means you end up
with straight Medicare and you may
later find that isn't what suits your
particular needs.
Having written so many health
care stories and having interviewed
people from local agencies, medi-
cal doctors, the Florida Governor's
office, and even the Department of
Health in Washington D.C., you'd
think I'd know enough to be able to
sign up for my own Medicare plan.
Well, of course I could have done
just that, like millions do.
But I understand the basics just
well enough to know there are many
ways Medicare-eligible residents
can get more bang for their buck.
Making comparisons, not just
once, but every year, is the key.
Experts explained to me that
since a person's health doesn't stay
static, it's a good idea to check your
coverage out each year during the
annual window of opportunity for
Medicare recipients to change their
policies. This window opens Nov.
15 and closes Dec. 31.
Maybe a new medicine has been
added to your daily routine. Or
there's been a change; for better
or worse- of some condition. Any
number of things could be a signal
that a different policy could give
you more of the benefits you actu-
ally use; maybe even for less money
than you're paying now.
I had heard about Medicare spe-
cialists, but I didn't want to deal


with a government agency or an
agent for an insurance company.
But was there another choice?
Wandering through the lobby of
the Kings Point Clubhouse I found
that there was.
There are people who register
as independent insurance agents,
which means they're freelancers
(like I am, only I do writing and ed-
iting and they compare policies).
The independent agent I met was
Anna Lonas and I spent quite a long
time talking with her and allowed
her to make the decision for me
based on what health conditions I
have and what medicines I take.
I have friends who are paying
much more than I am for 80/20
deals; where the insurance com-
pany pays 80 percent and they're
left to pay the remainder of the bill.
What I found was that for the same
cost as regular Medicare, about
$110 a month, I could purchase an
Advantage Plan that would cover
100-percent of my bills (after a
rather low deductible) with co pays
as low as $10 for my general prac-
titioner; and most of the cost of all
my medicines, even one I take for
which there is no generic.
Since I'm not the kind who goes
to a doctor for every headache or
bruise, I wanted something that
would cover the biggies best: like
my cardiac event in 2009.
It took about 48 hours for my in-
dependent Medicare specialist to
find one that fit the bill.
Since I paid nothing for the ser-
vice, I asked how could this be?
Independent specialists are not
paid by any one insurance company
but register with all the major (and
some smaller) companies that oper-
ate in a particular state. They'll be
paid by the company - not the client.
It's in their best interest to find you
the best deal for your particular situ-
ation so you'll keep coming back.
Sure, you can go to the Medicare
site and do the comparisons your-
self.
I tried that. On my third attempt,
I realized I was getting different
answers each time. One time I got
a good price and coverage for the
medicines, but the hospital cover-
age wasn't right. I went back on


PENNY FLETCHER PHOTO
Consulting with independent Medicare Specialist Anna Lonas who
comes from St. Petersburg to set up a table in the Kings Point Club-
house periodically helped me decide which option to take. Everyone
is encouraged to find an independent specialist who is not a repre-
sentative of any one insurance company during their annual oppor-
tunity to change plans which falls between Nov. 15 and Dec. 31.


line and tried to get more hospital
coverage and ended up with my
two most expensive medications
left unpaid.
"People need to examine exactly
what costs they're paying out of
pocket and how often they use that
service," Lonas told me. "Every pre-
scription plan has the same standard
coverage which is determined by the
government. But one company may
charge more than another for the
same drug. There may be a plan that
covers your more expensive drugs
but when you see that it isn't cov-
ering all your medications you auto-
matically turn it down. That may not
be a good solution because you may
be able to trade off a couple of cheap
prescriptions for a much lower out-


of-pocket cost on something else
that will hit you much harder, like
specialists or hospital coverage."
Once and awhile organizations
like AARP have seminars in South
County and bring people who can
answer specific questions but I
much prefer having a name with a
face I recognize that I can call any
time, without charge, knowing they
don't represent a particular compa-
ny, but represent me.
To reach Lonas, call (727) 215-
6237 or email her at alonas@jr-
stoner.com.
Or just Google in Independent
Medicare Specialists, Tampa Bay"
and find one yourself.
Just be sure to do it before this
year's deadline of Dec. 31.


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OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 19


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20 * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


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NOVEMBER 18, 2010










Sifting through some-

Sifting through some


Blasts from the past


The other night I was treated
to a look through a box of rare
finds when my neighbor, Betty
Johnson, brought out some of
the things she'd found while
going through her mother's pos-
sessions. Her mother had lived
with her until her death earlier
this year, and Betty didn't know
exactly what was stored in the
boxes she'd brought to her ga-
rage and store room, just that
they were filled with things her
mother, Patricia Johnson, had
saved. As it turned out, some
of the things she found had also
belonged to her grandmother
Nettie Fern Hannes, who moved
to Ruskin from Buffalo, N.Y.
around 1962 to be near Betty's
family, after her parents had al-


ready settled there.
While preparing for
the latest community-
wide garage sale held
in the Summerfield
area of Riverview
twice a year, Betty de-
cided she would open
the boxes and see if
there was anything
worth putting into the
sale. Besides, she said,
she needed to get rid of
some things to make
more room.


Lk_
Over
Coffee
By Penny
penny@obser


I knew that a couple of months
back, she had discovered a foot-
ball, encased in a plastic box,
signed by Tony Dungy, former
coach of the Tampa Bay Bucca-
neers and spokesman for the na-
tional fatherhood organization,
All Pro Dads.
But now, boxes of old maga-
zines and newspapers began to
show up. We looked through the
November 1963 edition of The
Post with a young Bob Hope
on the cover; a Lady's Circle
magazine featuring Jacqueline
Kennedy's "New Life," dated
December 1964, 13 months af-
ter the assassination of her hus-
band, and a 1964-1965 Smoke
Signals (the newspaper for East
Bay High School) with a photo-
graph of Hillsborough County's
former school superintendent,
and current Supervisor of Elec-
tions, Earl J. Lennard, when as
a (very young) teacher at East
Bay he had won


the county's Teacher of the Year
award.
Very interesting material turned
up in several saved editions of the
Ruskin Shopper and Observer,
which later became The Observer
News, including announcements
of "the new Thriftway grocery
store" which would be opening in
March 1976 and that same year,
a story about the 10 tons of steel
used to build what was referred
to as the Mixon Building; which
would become the future home of
this newspaper.
The prices in the full page ads
for Thriftway were interesting too,
with milk at 98� a gallon and ba-
nanas 17� a pound.
I know a lot of people wonder
why the shopping center by the
Ruskin Post Office is called Thrift-
way Plaza. Thriftway
was still there for sev-
eral years after I moved
to Ruskin from Braden-
ton in January 1980,
until it was destroyed
by fire and never re-
built.
Meanwhile, Betty
continued to pull pa-
Fletcher pers out of the big
vernews.net brown box and we
found several copies of
what might have been the first ex-
isting newspaper in South County,
The Ruskin-Sun City News. The
content showed it was not talking
about Sun City Center, but South
County's original Sun City south
of Ruskin that was obviously
then a bustling place. It also
had people reporting events in
Balm, Del Webb's Sun City,
Gibsonton, and Apollo Beach.
Announcements of parties,
birthdays, weddings and an-
niversaries were common then ri
and sometimes ads were mixed
in with news so you really had
to look to be sure which was
which.
The earliest date we could
find was July 1960 and we
could not find any start-up
date but saw that the weekly
publication sold for five cents
and had a circulation just over
4,500. The Ruskin-Sun City
News wasn't operating when I
moved here from Bradenton, so I
know it had gone out of business
before 1980. I'm sure if I asked
Jonie Maschek,


S Boostei
f Highly








- ' * i-


The Shopper & Observer News. and a
1965 issue of East Bay High School's newspaper Smoke
Signals. were found by Betty Johnson along with many
other keepsakes. At left. the school newspaper featured
a story on Earl Lennard who was a teacher at East Bay
for many years before becoming a School Board mem-
ber and presently the county's Supervisor of Elections.


who writes the Fish Tales column
for this newspaper she'd know,
because a few years back she sold
her series, A Piece of History, to
Hillsborough County for its His-
torical Library.
See BLASTS FROM THE PAST, page 3B


fill pallll
Navy Exhibit )t ir


Fall Con(er At E AFastl g H
: : -: .: . ... H i...


PENNY FLETCHER PHOTO
Betty Johnson of the Summerfield area of Riverview has made
some amazing finds in her garage and storage room since her
mother's death earlier this year. A third-generation resident of the
area, it seems her mother and grandmother kept a lot of things
she never knew they had including old newspapers, photographs
and a record of title to land she still owns in Ruskin that includes
every sale beginning in 1883.


Above. the
April 4. 1968. edition of


ar Barbecue
SSuccessful
..,. - M 1



























. . . .. .. .. ....
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2B * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


NOVEMBER 18, 2010


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Blasts from the past


* Continued from page 1B
It was funny to see (the night
before the Nov. 2 election) the
name Alex Sink as the signature
on the Certificate of Apprecia-
tion given to Betty's mother, Pat
Johnson, for her work on the
1993 United Way campaign at
her place of business, which
was then Gardiner Fertilizer,
one of the previous names for
what is now Mosaic, where Bet-
ty has worked in the accounting
department for the last 35 years.
At that time Sink was campaign
manager for the United Way.
There were some old family
photographs too, and a brochure
about the Hoover Dam which
probably belonged to her grand-
mother because as it turns out,
one of Betty's uncles helped
build it.
The most interesting thing I
saw was a bound book with a
soft, moccasin-type leather page
for the front, titled Abstract of
Title.
Now Betty had explained that
her mother was from Buffalo,
N.Y.,


and had met her dad while he was
in the Coast Guard up North. He
was from Arcadia, so they moved
to Florida after being married; had
their first child here; moved back
up North and had two children
while up there, and then bought
property and settled in Ruskin,
where two more children, includ-
ing Betty - who was the young-
est and the only girl of the five
siblings - were born.
The Abstract of Title began with
the sale of property (bought by
Betty's family in 1954, and which
she still owns today) in Ruskin's
old Colony Farms area- which is
14thAvenue near First Street S.W.;
the area that houses the Joyce Ely
Health Center and Ruskin Neigh-
borhood Service Center building.
The earliest recorded deed to it
was signed in 1883 in London,
England, for a price of $1 to Sir
Edward James and Lady Rosetta
Reed. The property changed hands
several times in the early days,
once being taken over in foreclo-


p


sure by the Florida Land Bank.
The earliest tax recorded on the
property is $31 in the mid 1880s.
Every change of hands from the
Reeds to the present day is re-
corded in the book, which appears
quite thick for a land transaction
account.
Betty says she knew her mother
was a "saver" but she didn't real-
ize some of the papers and maga-
zines had also belonged to her
grandmother. Each newspaper evi-
dently had some mention of a fam-
ily member, although she couldn't
find them all.
You never know what you're
going to find when going through
relatives' things after someone has
died. I still haven't figured out


what to do with the record albums
that belonged to an uncle who
worked on the Radio City Music
Hall sound stage center as an en-
gineer for nearly 40 years. Some
are pre-date vinyls and cut on only
one side because the performers
made mistakes and the albums
were never released.
So go through your attics and
garages. Having grown up in New
Jersey I almost said basement and
then remembered we don't have
basements in Florida.
You never know what you might
find!
*Perhaps you have something


you'd like to share. Or maybe
you'd rather tell the community
about your favorite charity or
cause: or sound off about some-
thing you think needs change.
That's what '"Over Coffee" is
about. It really doesn't matter
whether we actually drink any
coffee or not (although I prob-
ably will). It's what you have
to say that's important. E-mail
me any time at penny@ob-
servernews.net and suggest a
meeting place. No matter what's
going on, I'm usually available
to share just one more cup.


The equipment shown in the photo at left was
state-of-the-art in the 1970s when thieves stole
it from the Shopper & Observer News. It was
recovered by the government in Sarasota when
they raided a counterfeit operation in progress.
SBelow, advertisements are interesting to look at
in past editions. Some are still advertising in
he Observer News today.


Sir Edward James Reed of
Hextable in the County of
Kent, K.C.B.M.P. and Lady
Rosetta, his wife.
to


Deed Book K, page 289
DEED
Dated: Sept. 28th, 1883
Filed: Nov. 10th, 1885


The Florida Land and Mortgage
CompanY, Limlted ( & Company $1.00 & og & Vc
auly incorporated in England
under the Companies Acts 1862
to 1880)
Give, grant, bargain, sell, 1 onvey nd confirm unto
the said Company, its succesorsnd assigns for nF estate
of Inheritance in efec slle , saossionfree from
incebrtanceC etc.. the ds described in the following
schedule:
The schedule before referred to:
In Hillsborough County.


Sifnlcdt .J" Reed (SWel)
Roscttn Reea (seal)


Two oirct E-rittin CitY of London,
A know dged in ingd ' om of ,re-4 ee&KC.B.M."
1 68d LadyirRo.�aettd h"1e1011 R ee d - - .?
Acknoledg_ y Si d, r " , , xamination
England, 8C t,28,as , ' if, witth 9cppr- I
andr Lady RosettaRe "dh10 'nd Deputy Cof r of Lmeri
beforeP-ubHlitchen-Of'" of the United avo -ercaSre
Notary Pbi X fcer tijiaescrtbcdta are VO X
at London, England 'bro Cs that tVC aPPrx0 0Commisio
known to himt to be tepc * inl S I
the foregoing lnstruent.
expires ------


This deed is the first in the Abstract of Title book listing all sales of
Betty's land in Ruskin and is dated 1883. It is deeded to Sir Edward
James and Lady Rosetta Reed of London, England, at a cost of $1.
Although no taxes are recorded on this deed, later in the 1800s when
it changed hands the first recorded tax is $31.
Below, Harwell's IGA Foodliner ran a two page ad celebrating their
16th anniversary, in the March 11, 1976, issue of The Shopper & Ob-
server News.


U SOA OChe MHey WentV FA Cj
Round Steak
Top Round
=*LA Ceo. bw .l..
: Rump Roast
Sirloin Tip Roa
Cube Steak
GC.ubg Ca,.d B*eF
Brisket
*- MeRty 3-53b -
Spare Ribs

Ir. hd
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-E S$OPPef & OBSEVEq '176 .,

fl Ilarweln's 16th





$ 9 Ga ood Thru Thursday, Mar. 11,
b1 Friday, Mar. 12. & Saturday, Mar. 13, 1976


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APO 120oz


rl-d* T MuT E I *97 T SHOPPER A QBSEWV6n NEWS *. 31

Anniversary Sale - America's 200th Anniversary



CSLEBRATIOH

Second Big Week!
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TAMPA ABSTRACT AND TITLE INSURANCE CO.


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OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 3B


NOVEMBER 18, 2010


I


- -- ... t- . qes -






4B * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER
Community Thanksgiving funds go to Our Lady Food Pantry |


NOVEMBER 18, 2010


The Sun City Center community
Thanksgiving service will be at 7
p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 24, at
Prince of Peace Catholic Church.
The service is sponsored by the
Sun City Center Ministerial Asso-
ciation. Rabbi Philip Aronson will
be speaking.
Choirs and representatives of
Temple Beth Israel, Redeemer
Lutheran Church, St. Andrew
Presbyterian Church, St. John
the Divine Episcopal Church,
the United Community Church,
Prince of Peace Catholic Church,
Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic
Church LifePath Hospice, and the
United Methodist Church will all
take part.
The offering this year will go to
the Our Lady Food Pantry. The
food pantry serves an average of
125 families per week. Each one
receives a 50 lb. box of food. The
pantry has 70 volunteers who
work at different times. So far this
year, the Pantry has fed approxi-
mately 5,000 families and given
out 250,000 pounds of food.
All this is due to the good people
that give to the pantry. The Inter-
faith Council, who operates the
Nearly New Shop and the Greater
Sun City Center Association have
provided generous cash contri-
butions which enable the Pantry


Our Lady of Guadalupe Food Pantry: Tom Bullaro, Director; Anita
Bullaro, Co-director; Jack and Dot Elfers, the longest workers in the
pantry (15 years).


to buy more food. For every 18
cents, the Pantry is able to buy 1
lb. of food from 'Feed America.'
That means that for $20, they can
buy 80 lbs. of food. While they are
grateful for food donations, money
goes a very long way as well. They
are very grateful for any kind of
donations.
The Ministerial Alliance hopes
that many people from the com-


Trinity Baptist Audio/Visual Team gathers
Left to right: Ken and Deborah Fanning, Vi Davis, Ray Ellis, Sally
Millican, and Bill Reeves. This group is responsible for the preparation
and operation of audio/visual activities during worship services and spe-
cial programs. For more information on the church, call 634-4228.


Join the music
Find yourself singing in the shower or to a favorite tune on the car
radio or even in the rain?
If so, don't hide your talent. Why not consider joining the Women's
Chorus located in Sun City Center. Women from surrounding communi-
ties are always welcome. Rehearsals are Thursdays from 9-11 a.m. at St.
Andrew Presbyterian Church, 1239 Del Webb W and are currently in
SI full swing for the Christmas Concert scheduled
for Sunday, Nov. 28. Sound intriguing? For more
information, call Betty at 633-3862 or Mim at
634-1148.


Join MOPS
If you are a mom who is preg- Come and experi
nant or has a child newborn thru
kindergarten, desires to make new Jesus to cha
friends, wants to share the chal-
lenges and joys of motherhood, Sunday @ 9 & 11 AM * Se
is looking for opportunities for
personal growth through trusted www .aplace4
resources, enjoys giving back to
the community then YES! MOPS 2322 11th Ave. SE * Ru
is for you.
Group Meetings are the 1st and
3rd Wednesdays of every month A
until May 18, 2011, from 9:30 FREE INF
am- 11:30am. Cost is $5 per meet-
ing for refreshments and crafts (as Monday,
needed) To register for the waiting OZZIE
list, e-mail mops@southbay.cc. or , Sun Point Pla
call 813-677-0721. T ir ., I l


munity will turn out for the
Thanksgiving service, because
Thanksgiving is the only commu-
nity religious holiday that is pro-
claimed by the President, and one
that can be shared by people of all
faiths. They hope people will bring
their offerings of food, and also
give generously to the offering for
the Pantry.


Torah Tots
Congregation Beth Shalom's
monthly program for young chil-
dren and parents.
Do you want to...
*Introduce your child to the very
basic aspects of Torah, the Jewish
holidays, and Jewish values?
*Encourage a close Jewish bond
between you and your child?
*Provide your child with a posi-
tive, warm feeling about Congre-
gation Beth Shalom?
*Meet other Jewish parents and
children?
If yes, this is your chance at no
charge to you.
Who Can Attend?
*Preschool age children (4 and
under).
*Members and non-members.
*At least one parent and/or adult
relative must be in attendance.
Dates for monthly programs are:
Nov. 21; Dec. 5; Jan. 23; Feb. 20;
March 20; April 10; May 15 from
10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
For more information, contact
Natasha Rieger at natashaswr@
yahoo.com or 813.315.8866




CHURCH
ence the power of
rnge your life.
ervicio en Espafiol @ 6 PM

leveryone.org

skin, FL * 813.645.3337



ORMATIONAL SEMINAR
, Nov. 22 * 11 a.m.
'S BUFFET & GRILL
za * 3074 College Ave., Ruskin
IYIr.Ul ad d, CrptUatin m otio UIat Flrida


Naitonal Cemetery, Travel Protection, Payment Options,
Social Security, Veterans Benefits.
EVERYONE IS INVITED
Reserve your seat: 813-763-6480
or 863-944-3629 or bring this ad
Funeral Director: Richard Button (888) 713-1224
Lunch Served * Seating is Limited * First-Time Attendees Only, Please
ICS Cremation and Funerals
Serving All of Florida with Dignity and Reverence HOME VISITS
by Dedicated professionals AVAILABLE


CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH
^I Sunday Worship: Blended 8:00 a.m.
Contemporary 9:40 a.m. _ igBendRd .5
Nursery Provided |1
Pastor Jack R. Palzer Traditional 11:15 a.m.
5309 U.S. Highway 41 North * Apollo Beach A
(across fromMiraBay)www.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1305 ' N N

St. John the Divine Episcopal Church
Growing by Faith from Generation to Generation
\ / Rev. Tracy H. Wider - Church Office 813-645-1521
SUNDAY SERVICES: 9 am - Contemporary Service and Sunday School
at West Campus, S.R. 674 and 9th Street SE, Ruskin
8 am - Traditional Service and 11 am Holy Communion with Choir at East Campus
at 1015 Del Webb Blvd., SCC
All Worship Services with Holy Communion and Healing Holy Oil

Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (Behind Suntrust Bank)
ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: (Nov.-April ............................. 8:30 a.m. Day Care Available
Mon.- Fri.
Rev. John M. Bartha and all year) .........................10:45 a.m . a - 6 p.m.
Phone: 645-1241 Sunday School..... ............ 9:30 a.m. call 645-6198

REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH-ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center, FL33573-5354
Rev. Dr. Peter Stiller, Pastor * 634-1292
Saturday Worship: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion....First & Third Sunday * Bible Class...Thursday 10 am, Guests Welcome

First Church of Christ, Scientist
Ruskin - Sun City Center (813) 645-6102
204 Second St. N.W, Ruskin, Florida 33570
Sunday Service * Sunday School ............................................. 10AM
Wednesday Testimony Meeting ............................................... 5PM
Reading Room * Tuesday & Thursday.......................................1- 4 PM
ALL ARE WELCOME www.spirituality.com

F rienidship Baptist Chfrch Sunday WEEKLY SERVICES:
Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist) 9 a.m ......................Bible Study
1511 El Rancho Dr. 1 1 a.m ....................Bible Study
Sun Ciy Center, FL 33573 10 a.m. & 6 p.m............Worship
Sun City Center, FL 33573 a W
Phone/Fax: Wednesday
' 813-633-5950 6 p.m....Prayer Meeting/Bible Study

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC
Meets in the Social Hall of the Beth Israel Synagogue
S/V \1115 E. Del Webb Blvd.
Thursday, 7:00 PM - Call 633-0396
It is far easier to start something than to finish it.
AMELIA EARHART

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where God's Love is Shared"
U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL * 645.1121 * www.nbcor.org
Sunday School for all ages 9:30 AM SBC
Morning Worship 10:45 AM Wanted: People Who Want to Grow
Evening Worship 6:00 PM and Live for Jesus!
Full Wednesday Schedule for all ages

North River Church of Christ i
- Non-Instrumental-
13885 U.S. Hwy 301 South
(Just South of the Manatee County Line)
Minister: Howard Johnson Office 941-776-1134
Services: Sunday 10:00am, 11:00am & 6:00pm Office 41-776-1134
Wednesday 7:00pmr Home 813-754-1776

First Baptist Church of Gibsonton "
"We love because He first loved us." 1 John 4:19
Traditional Worship Service *Sunday School 9:30 A.M.
Old-Time Gospel Hymns *Morning Worship 10:30 A.M.
Nursery Available G Sunday Evening 6:00 P.M.
* Interpreter for the Deaf Mid-Week (Wed.) 7:00 PJVL. S
9912 Indiana St. * Hwy 41 & Estelle Avenue Malcolm S. Clements, Pastor
jGibsonton, FL 33534 -813-677-1301 J

J ek ~&d EVERETT TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ
1611 First St. SW * Ruskin, FL * 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL-
SERVICES: Sunday........................9:30 & 10:30 am.; 6:00 p.m .
Wednesday................7:00 p.m. -

Prince of Peace S Masses:
Sunday .......... 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., Noon
Catholic Church Saturday Vigil ............... 4:00 and 6:00 p.m.
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573 aily..................................... ...8:00 a.m.
Phone: 634-2328 * Fax: 633-6670 * Confessions:
www.popcc.org Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m. and Sat. 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.


FfRST BAPTIST CHURCH
of R ESIC -
I!jKT 820 COLLEGE AVE. W.
RUSKIN, FL 33570
645-6439
1 - .... 'ri www.fbcruskin.org
AResource for Families
Sunday School............................9:45 a.m .
Morning Worship............8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Dr. Barry Rumsey
Evening Service................ ..........6:00 p.m. CH K2IST SCHOOL
Wednesday Night Service..............7:00 p.m. THROUGH 12TH
Awana......................... .................7:00 p.m . GRADE


1







NOVEMBER 18, 2010


Spirituality Rather Than "Religion"


Beth Israel's Social Hall
1115 Del Webb E. * Sun City Center, FL
www.unitycommunityofjoy.com


Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
Tel. 813-298-7745


8 EMPOWERMENT CHRISTIAN CENTER
at SouthShore, Inc.
Worship I SUD.IY NOV 14 * 9:00A.M.
Service Schedule: Sundays........9 a.m. Thursdays........7:30 p.m.
6140 N. U.S. Hwy. 41 * Apollo Beach, FL 33572
(In the plaza with Blockbuster Video)
Pastor Deondrick Douglas * (813) 938-5815



THE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO THE SERVICES NOW WORSHIPPING IN THE "CHAPEL"
AT SUN CITY CENTER FUNERAL HOME 10:30 AM ON SUNDAYS
NO CREED...BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE
1851 RICKENBACKER DRIVE * 813-938-4955
Minister - DR. DAVID CAMPBELL


Southside Baptist Church
"A Warm, Loving & Friendly Church"
Looking for a church home?
Need the comfort of a warm and loving family?
Join us on Sunday to come home to the warmth of our church family.
Located in South Hillsborough County, just south of Stephens Road in old Sun City.
4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 S * Sun City, FL 33586 * 813-645-4085


"Getting to KnowYou" (Donuts & Coffee)................. 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................... ..........................9:30 am.
Sunday Morning Worship.........................................10:55 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service...............................................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service ....................................... 7:00 p.m.
Thursday Morning Prayer.........................................10:00 a.m.


Dan Collis, Pastor
Come join us to
learn about God's
Word and salvation
in Jesus Christ


dYnfeoTJLCeI�oc s& OGuroqofc5un WiC Genier
The Church of Open Hearts... Open Minds... Open Doors
1210 W. Del Webb Blvd. * 634-2539
, ^,,Worship Services:
, Saturday.............. 4:00 p.m.- Creason Hall (Traditional Service)
, Sunday....................8:15 a.m. in Sanctuary (Traditional Service)
9:30 a.m.- Creason Hall (The Oasis)
,Ifm F10:55 a.m. - Sanctuary (Traditional with Chancel Choir)
(H d Fellowship tim .. .. i , ' , .. 1. I', 1,,r ... 10:15a.m. and 11a.m. in Creason Hall
Godg'i � -ove un.S(CC 'MC.com
PASTORS: DR. WARRENLANGER, REV GARYBULLOCK
Communion First Sunday of Each Month



St. Andrew Presbyterian Church

Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.
Prayers with anointing for healing and
AI i wholeness during worship the second Sunday
of every month.
A Stephen Pastor: Dr. Gerald Iwerks
Ministry Church
Meet friends in Fellowship Hall after the Service
Refreshments served


1239 Del Webb Blvd. West
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Church is Handicap accessible


Phone: 813-634-1252
For Information visit:
www.standrewatscc.org


OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 5B


Obituaries
The Honorable Robert C.
Ballard
Robert C. Ballard, 88, formerly of
Charlotte, Michigan, recently of Sun
City Center, Florida, passed away
Saturday, Nov. 13, 2010 in Sun City
Center, Florida.
Born October 24, 1922 to L. M.
and Nellie (Collins) Ballard, Bob
was Probate Judge of Eaton County
Michigan for 20 years. Prior to being
elected Probate Judge, he was Eaton
County Prosecuting Attorney and had a
law practice in Charlotte, Michigan.
Bob was a member of the First
Congregational Church; Past Patron
of Maple City Chapter #218 Order of
Eastern Star; member of the Masonic
Lodge and Shrine Club; and past
President of the Lion's Club.
Bob was a devoted family man who
loved spending time with family and
friends. He enjoyed golfing, reading
and traveling.
He is survived by his loving wife Doris
of 64 years; daughters, Karen (Steve)
Piro and Linda (James) Bird of Piano,
Texas, and son Clark (Deb) Ballard of
Mason, Michigan; four grandchildren,
Allison Piro, Blake Piro and Alex Bird
of Piano, and Sarah Bird of Berkeley,
California, as well as many nieces and
nephews.
He was preceded in death by his
parents and two brothers, Edwin
Ballard of Kalamazoo, Michigan, and
Hal Ballard of Jackson, Michigan.
Donations in Bob's memory can
be made to the American Heart
Association.
http://honor.americanheart.org/site/
TR?pxfid=182561 &fr_id=1030&pg=fu
nd&et=ripqJVuP5Uf2rjhEvUDb6A..&
s_tafld=1061

Marie Joyce Yarborough
Hall
MarieYarborough Hall died November
10,2010. She wasthe wife of deceased
Legrand Hall. Survivors include her
daughter, Teresa Hall Zuromski (Tim)
of Apollo Beach, Florida; son, Clifford
Lee Hall (Patsy) of Hartsville, S.C.;
grandchildren and spouses, Lonnie W.
Mozingo, Jr. (Lindsey) Felicia Atkinson
(Ronald); Tiffany Zuromski, Joshua
Hall, Tara Zuromski.
Graveside services for Joyce Y Hall,
64, were held at 12:00 pm, November
12, 2010 at New Market Methodist
Cemetery directed by Brown-
Pennington-Atkins Funeral Home.


Norman Douglas (Bud)
Mallory
Norman Douglas ("Bud") Mallory,
89, of Sun City Center, Florida (and
formerly of Melbourne Beach, Florida)
died November 11, 2010, at South Bay
Hospital following a lengthy illness.
Dr. Mallory was born on January 1,
1921, in Des Moines, Iowa, the son of
the late Dr. Meredith and Mary Jones
Mallory. Following graduation from
Winter Park High School in 1937,
he attended the University of Illinois
and was graduated in 1941 with a BA
degree in Chemistry. Subsequently,
he was appointed to the United State
Military Academy and was graduated
in 1945 with a BS degree in Military
Engineering. He earned MS and PhD
degrees from the University of Virginia
in Nuclear Physics completing his
studies in 1952.
During twelve years of Army service,
Dr. Mallory specialized in atomic
weapons applications and research
and development including service on
the Manhattan Project in Los Alamos,
New Mexico. He later was employed
at the RCA Service Company Missile
Test Center in Cape Canaveral,
Florida, as Manager of Quality


Analysis, supervising a staff of 200
technical and professional employees.
Later, he served as President of M. A.
Smith Ranch, Inc., a large commercial
cattle ranch, and President of Mallory
Enterprises, Inc., a family-owned citrus
operation.
Dr. Mallory served on the Board
of Directors of many business
enterprises and civic organizations
including the Florida National Bank,
the St. John's Wire Company, Indian
River Cablevision, the South Brevard
YMCA, the Red Cross, the Holy Trinity
Episcopal Academy, to name a few.
Dr. Mallory was a member of the Phi
Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi,
Chi Psi, and the Raven fraternal and
honorary societies. He was an All-
American Lacrosse player and a Silver
Master Duplicate Bridge player.
Dr. Mallory's wife of 48 years, Mary
Smith ("Smitty") Mallory, and sister,
Mary Jane Mallory, predeceased him,
both dying in 1993.
He is survived by his wife of 14
years, Norma S. Mallory; a daughter
and a son, Sara M. Harned (Patrick),
and Dr. Norman D. Mallory, Jr. both
of Pass-a-Grille, Florida; three step-
children, G. Thomas ("Tommy") Walker
(Robin), of Jacksonville, Florida, Curtis
A. Walker (Theresa), of St. Augustine,
Florida, and Lana Hardaker (William
R. "Billy"), of Atlantic Beach, Florida;
and a brother, Dr. Meredith ("Speed")
Mallory, Jr. of San Antonio, Texas. He
is further survived by nieces, nephews,
step-grandchildren, other relatives and
many friends.
Family and friends are invited to a
celebration of Dr. Mallory's well-lived life
and his indomitable spirit on Saturday,
November 20 at 2581 East Vina Del
Mar Blvd., St. Pete Beach, Florida,
between 3:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Memorial contributions to the Holy
Trinity Episcopal Academy at 50 West
Strawbridge Avenue Melbourne,
Florida 32901, or any other charity are
requested in lieu of flowers.

George W. Merrell
George W. Merrell, 84, a long-time
former resident of Williamsport, died
November 10, 2010 in Sun City Center,
Florida where he has lived in retirement
for several years. He is survived by his
wife Betty; sons Raymond, of Yakima,
Washington, George, Jr of Tierra
Verde, Florida, Charles, of Williamsport,
Pennsylvania; granddaughters Ashlee
Dominguez of Croston, Maryland; Erin
Kosteva of Reston, Virginia, Kathleen
Merrell of St. Petersburg, Florida;
grandsons George Merrell III of Tierra
Verde, Florida, Jonathan, Gregory, and
Justin all of Yakima, Washington, and
great granddaughters Vanessa, and
Lily of Croston, Maryland; and great
grandson Maxwell of Reston, Virginia.
George graduated from Williamsport
High School and Penn State University.
He was a veteran of World War II
serving in the Pacific Theater. He was
active in the Republican Party serving
as Pennsylvania State President of the
Young Republicans and National Vice
President. He enjoyed hunting and
fishing, Penn State football, and being
with his children and grandchildren.
He will forever be in our hearts and
always in our memories. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be made to
the American Heart Association in his
memory.

Jim John Popovich
Jim Popovich of Ruskin FL. died
Saturday November 6, 2010 in his
home. He was born October 20, 1946
in Chicago IL, the son of John Popovich
and Simone Palpart. Jim grew up in
Chicago IL, where he graduated from
CVS Vocational high school. After high
school Jim moved to Florida where he
earned a living as a musician. In 1974,
he started Ruskin Pool Service where
he worked for the remainder of his life.
Jim is preceded in death by his
parents John Popovich, Simone
Popovich and second wife Judy Long.
Jim is survived by his son, Jim
Popovich; daughter, Angela Popovich;
six grandchildren- John Long, Rachael
Long, Samantha Long, Luke Popovich,
Logan Popovich and Grace Popovich;
brothers and sisters, Dennis Popovich,
Mark Popovich, John Popovich, Shayle
Popovich and Nancy Hoagland.
A memorial service will be held at
11:00 A.M. Monday, November 22,
2010 at Destiny Church of Ruskin, 2124
11th Avenue S.E., Ruskin, FL 33570.


Saint Anne Catholic Cfkutc

Fr. John McEvoy

813-645-1714
SaintAnneRuskin.org

U.S. Hwy. 41 * 106 11th Ave. NE * Ruskin
SouthShore: r- . II , Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton
C MASSES
Saturday Vigil M ass................................................................. 5:00 p.m .
Sunday Mass..................................8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Holy Days....................................Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Daily ...................................................... M onday thru Friday 8:00 a.m.
Espahiol ............................. Domingo - 12:30 p.m.; Miercoles 7:30 p.m.
Confession..........................Wednesday 6:45 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.
Nursery Available for 10:00 a.m. Mass


Lorraine (Louise) W. Tyner
A memorial service will be held for
Lorraine (Louise) W. Tyner on Saturday,
November 20, 2010 at 11:00am at
Ruskin United Methodist Church, 105
4th Ave. NW, Ruskin, FL. A native of
Noblesville, In. Mrs. Tyner moved to
the area in 1951. She had lived at Villa
Maria Mobile Home Park and Irongate
Apartments before moving to Plaza
West ALF. She was a bookkeeper and
formerly worked for Ruskin Tomato
Growers and Sims Farms of Ruskin.
She was a member of Palma Ceia
Order of Eastern Star #243.
She was preceded in death by
her husband B W (Bill) Tyner. She
is survived by her daughter, Beth
Ann Elsberry of Palmetto, FL; a son,
William F. Tyner and his wife Lucinda
of Petersburg, TN; a niece, Dorothea
K. Dzenis of Bradford, Vermont; seven
grandchildren, Lynda K. Williford and
husband Allen, Seffner, FL., Renee
Gullick and husband Tim, Sarasota,
FL., Lori D. Elsberry, Palmetto, FL.,
Glenn Elsberry and wife Dawn, Ruskin,
FL., Justin Tyner and wife Sue, Lincoln,
NE., Dean Tyner and wife Tina,
Davenport, FL., Tracee Norris and
husband Chris, Jackson, MO., and 11
great-grandchildren.
In lieu of flowers the family requests
that those who wish, please make
donations to the Ruskin United
Methodist Church Building Fund,
The Shriners Hospital for Children,
12302 Pine Drive, Tampa, FL 33612
or Life Path Hospice 12973 N Telecom
Parkway, Ste. 100, Temple Terrace, FL
33637 in memory of Lorraine (Louise)
Tyner.


Earl (Bub) Wiser
Earl (Bub) Wiser, 65, passed away
at the Augusta VA Hospital in Georgia,
October 8, 2010. He was originally
from the Carson City/ Crystal area of
MI where he was the owner of Wiser
Construction and B&B Cafe. He lived
several years in the Ruskin area where
he worked for Privetts Tree Farm
& Landscaping as a mechanic and
troubleshooter.
He is survived by his wife Roberta
(Bobbie) and five sons: Stephen of MI,
William of CO, James of WA State,
Robert of NV, and Martin of GA; four
grandchildren, three sisters and
brothers-in-law, also several nieces
and nephews. He was a member of
the USAF during the Vietnam War.
Mrs. Wiser and sons can be reached
at 1354 Davis Bridge Rd, Williston, SC
29853 or by phone (803) 266-3182.



Plan to attend

ministry fair
Discover the vast treasure of tal-
ent that makes Prince of Peace a
vibrant parish. The Ministry Fair
will be held from 3 to 6 p.m. on
Thursday, Nov. 18 in Conesa Cen-
ter at Prince of Peace Church on
Valley Forge and S.R. 674.
The Fair is designed to show-
case the many varied ministries
at Prince of Peace Parish. There
will be creative projects, raffles,
door prizes and much, much more.
Something for everyone and all
are welcome to attend.
For those who are new to the
area, Prince of Peace R.C. Parish
encompasses the area bounded by
1-75 to the west, Big Bend Road
to the north, Polk County line to
the east and Manatee County line
to the south.






NOVEMBER 18, 2010


6B - OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER
South Shore Symphony Orchestra receives gift


At the first concert of their Win-
ter Concert Series on Oct. 17, the
South Shore Symphony Orchestra
received a gift of the score and parts
for Joseph Haydn's Symphony No.
25 in C Major from the congrega-
tion of United Community Church.
A ministry of the United Method-
ist Church of Sun City Center, the
South Shore Symphony Orchestra
began performing this past sum-
mer with three free concerts that
brought in over 2000 area music
lovers. The October 17 'Oktober-
fest' concert began with a fine read-
ing of Beethoven's timeless 'Sym-
phony No. 5,' as well as music by
Bach, Brahms and Strauss.
The South Hillsborough County
community has been very sup-
portive of the new regional sym-
phony orchestra whose next season
concert is to be held at the church,
1210 Del Webb Blvd. West in Sun
City Center, at 4 p.m. on Sunday,
Nov. 28. This holiday concert will


Left to rign are: uominicK Galati, resident OT me SSSu; uualey
Baldwin; and Nancy Meissner of the UCC.


include the ever-popular 'Nut-
cracker Suite' by Tchaikovsky
as well as musical favorites like
'Sleigh Ride,' 'Christmas Festival,'
and 'Bugler's Holiday.' Guedye St.
Jean will join the ensemble sing-
ing 'Gesu Bambino' and leading a


Chicken dinner is fundraiser
A chicken dinner, along with a raffle of many wonderful donated items,
is being held for the benefit of Lara, Shawn, and Nicholas Applegarth.
The dinner will be held from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 19 at St. John
the Divine Episcopal Church, 1015 Del Webb Blvd., Sun City Center
campus.
Tickets for this chicken dinner can be picked up or 'requested' for pick
up at the door from the church office at 645-1521. At the Applegarth's
request, all the proceeds from the dinner and raffle will be sent directly to
their son Nick's day care facility. The community is welcome.


Presbyterians get
looped
No, they didn't spike the commu-
nion grape juice!
St. Andrew Presbyterian Church
in Sun City Center recently installed
an inductive hearing loop system in
both the sanctuary and in Fellow-
ship Hall to make services and pro-
grams easier for hearing impaired
folks to experience. St. Andrew is
the first church in the area to install
a loop system in its sanctuary.
Inductive hearing loops trans-
mit sound through a wire loop in
the ceiling to telecoils in hearing
aids and suitable receivers. This
improves speech intelligibility of
hearing aid users by eliminating
background noise.
The Telecoil feature in hearing
aids was introduced by manufac-
turers many years ago and is known
as the 'telephone,' 'telecoil,' or 'T-
Coil' position on the hearing aid
switch. The feature makes it easier
for the hearing aid user to hear over
a telephone by picking up the sound
via the magnetic field generated by
telephone receiver. Inductive loops
like the one at St. Andrew exploit
this same technology and allow the
user to be essentially connected di-
rectly to the room's sound system.
If you have been missing out on
worship services because of having
to wear a hearing aid with the T-coil
feature installed, the answer may be
found at St. Andrew Presbyterian.


sing-along of holiday songs.
To learn more about the South
Shore Symphony Orchestra or to
purchase tickets, contact Dominick
Galati at (813) 667-7776 or visit
their website at www.thessso.org.

Concert for cans
Ruskin United Methodist Church
will be presenting a "Concert for
Cans" on Sunday, Nov. 21 at 2pm.
Guest stars will be Greg Sullivan
(violinist) and Matt Podschweit
(pianist). They will be presenting
a concert of great hymns, classi-
cal music, jazz, poetry and much
more. The
concert is free!
Admission is
an item of non-
perishable food
that will be do-
nated to the lo-
cal Community
Cupboard on SR
674. All donations will remain in
the local area. A love offering will
be taken at the concert.
Greg Sullivan currently lives
in Illinois with his wife, Lori and
their three children. Mr. Sullivan
has a Bachelor's and Master's de-
gree from the University of South
Florida. He has been a high school
teacher and music and youth min-
ister in Clearwater and at Bethany
Baptist Church in Moline, IL.
Matt Podschweit currently re-
sides in Colorado with his wife
and two teenage daughters. He is
a former minister on the worship
arts team at Heritage Church in
Rock Island, IL. He is an accom-
plished jazz keyboard player and
regularly performs with a number
of bands in the Midwest and in
Colorado.
Ruskin United Methodist Church
is located at 105 4th Avenue NW
in Ruskin. For directions or other
information, call the church office
at 645-1241.


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Seated left to right: Betty Streater, Sandra Nodruff, Hope Rund,
Rusty Mc Carty, Jerry Mc Carty, Audrey Vietzke, Pat Stover.
Standing left to right: Sr Minister Dr Michael Evans, Dodie Brown,
Thom Brown, Nancy Sayer, Bill Broberg, Moderator Anne Ginevan,
Mark Vietzke. Absent from photo: Jane Carey.
New members welcomed into church
The United Community Church at 1501 La Jolla Avenue, Sun City
Center, welcomed 13 new members into their church family. A reception
was held in the Great Hall following the service.

Thanksgiving dinner is served
The community is invited to United Community Church, 1501 LaJolla
Ave., Sun City Center for a Traditional Homestyle Thanksgiving dinner.
|i Share the holiday with them at noon on
Thursday, Nov. 25 in the Great Hall.
This catered buffet will include all of
your seasonal favorites from turkey and
ham to pumpkin pie. Tickets are $15 per
person and are available in the church
- office from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday
- - through Friday. Tickets are also available
during Fellowship time, 11 to 11:30 a.m.,
following the Sunday service. The church
office number is 634-1304.
Last day for reservations is Sunday, Nov. 21. Bring your family, friends
and neighbors to share the holiday.


Car wash by youth group
The youth from New Beginnings Fellowship will be holding a car wash
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 20
at Advanced Auto Parts, 16330 U.S. Hwy.
301 S., Wimauma.
Donations accepted. Support these young d
people and bring your car out for a good
cleaning. For information, call Betty Foun- g- .
tain at 645-3649.


P Please remember that chocolate is TOXIC to pets. If your furry friend
E-- treats his/herself to your box of chocolates, call your vet right away. It is
E-4 important to tell your vet the size of your pet, the type of chocolate, and
| quantity of chocolate to determine if or how toxic it is for your pet.
Drs. Ott, Slaughter & Waldy
Nearly 100 years of experience
* Voted Best Vet & Best Pet Services
* Best Pet Resort with Medical Care
* Provider of Free 5 Acre, Beautiful Dog Park
* Founder of C.A.R.E. Rescue Shelter
Ruskin Animal Hospital & Cat Clinic
715 U.S. Hwy. 41 S. * Ruskin * 813-645-6411
Mon./Wed./Thur/Fri. 7-5:30 (closed Thur. 12-2) * Sat. 7:30-1 * Tues. 7-7


Dr. Robert A. Norman
Board Certified Dermatologist


Dr. A. Theodosatos
Brandi Broughton, PA-C


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Same Day Appointments * FREE Skin Screening
6322 U.S. Highway 301 * Riverview
813-880-7546
Insurance accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, BCBS, Humana,
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OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 7B


"Way down upon the Suwannee River...."


Kayaking crystal clear water of Ichetucknee River.


* Article by WARREN RESEN,
Photos by JEANNE O'CONNOR
"Way Down Upon The Suwannee River"
These words were written in
a song by Stephen C. Foster, a
Northerner, who allegedly never
saw the river he made famous. It
is also the official song of the State
of Florida. The correct name of
this song is "Old Folks at Home,"
but "Suwannee River" is the name
prominently emblazoned in the ro-
tunda of the Florida State Capitol
in Tallahassee.
Memorializing a different time,
it tells of a part of Florida most
travelers usually drive through on
their way to other places. This is
the part of the state that locals call
"'The Real Florida."


Starting in Georgia in the Oke-
fenokee Swamp, the Suwannee
River meanders southwest for
about 266 miles eventually flow-
ing into the Gulf of Mexico at the
aptly named town of Suwannee.
From the Florida state-line
south to Live Oak, the river is
narrow with a section called Big
Shoals just above White Springs
being one of the very few stretches
of whitewater rapids, and the only
one with a Class III designation, in
the state and Florida. Steep ravines
and high limestone bluffs bracket
the river in this section, features
more typically associated with the
Southern Appalachian Mountains.
White Springs is where outdoor
activities and the Suwannee River
Wilderness Trail begin. From here,
the river still has a 170-mile run
before emptying into the Gulf of
Mexico. Kayaking on the Suwan-
nee River and kayaking or tub-
ing on the crystal clear spring-fed
Ichetucknee River are highlights
of any visit to this part of Florida.
The banks of the Suwannee
River around White Sulphur
Springs have been a place of ref-
~ "l


uge and restoration for visitors
and residents for centuries. White
Sulphur Springs was considered to
be a sacred healing ground to Na-
tive Americans. There is evidence
of habitation going back at least
7,000 years. This was also a major
entry point into Florida for mem-
bers of the Creek Nation, later
called Seminoles.
In the mid to late 1880s, White
Springs was the first, and at one
time, largest tourist destination in
the new state because of the sup-
posedly curative waters of the then
mineral springs. The first hotel was
built in 1835. At its heyday in the
late 1800s, there were 14 luxury
hotels and many boarding houses
to accommodate the visitors who
came by special excursion trains to
enjoy the river, the springs, and the
climate at White Springs. In 1903,
a structure that included treatment
rooms, a concession area, and an
elevator, was built over the spring,
the same year the Telford Hotel
was built.
Early in the 1900s, a massive
fire destroyed all but the venerable
See SUWANNEE RIVER, page 9B


Sam Cole, biologist, at Ichetucknee Spring State Park.


200 foot Carillon Tower in Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State
Park, White Springs.


NOVEMBER 18, 2010






8B OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


Program/Event Highlights
Week of November 21-27


NOVEMBER 18, 2010


South County Rose Group meeting
The South County Rose Group will meet at 2 p.m. on Sunday,
Nov. 21 at the Sun City Center United Methodist Church Com-
munity Room at 1210 Del Webb Blvd. West, Sun City Center.
The program this month will feature guest speaker Virginia
Overstreet with the Hillsborough County Extension Services.
She is the Water-Wise Coordinator for the agency and will
present a Water-Wise Workshop on the use of irrigation in the
landscape and an introduction to micro-irrigation. You will
receive a free voucher for a micro-irrigation kit that you can try
in your rose garden. Meetings are open to the public and all are
welcome to attend.


Santa Forever: Puppet Show
Monday, Nov. 22 * 10:15 to 10:50 a.m. and 11:15 to 11:50 a.m.
Presented by Creative Arts Theatre. For the young and the young at
heart. Put some humor into your holiday season. You can never get
too much of Santa Claus at this special time. In this amusing episode












of Santa's life, you'll discover that even he has bad days. Things
just aren't like they used to be back in the 'good ole days.' Santa is
considering retirement! But can anyone take his place? You'll chuckle
throughout this bunraku puppet show performed on a full-sized stage.
Mr and Mrs. Claus hope you are planning to attend. Free event is
provided by the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library.

Internet: Introduction and Searching Techniques*
Monday, Nov. 22 * 2 to 4:15 p.m.
Learn the basics of the Internet and World Wide Web. Learn how to
use search engines to find information and tips for evaluating what you
find. Basic mouse and keyboarding skills are recommended. Free
event is provided by the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library.

Toddler Time
Tuesday, Nov. 23 * 10:05 to 10:25 a.m. and 10:35 to 10:55 a.m.
For ages 2-3 years with a caregiver. Stories, finger plays and
songs make up this fun 20-minute program.

Story Time
Tuesday, Nov. 23 * 11 to 11:30 a.m.
For ages 3-5 years. Stories, finger plays and songs make up
this fun 30-minute program. Seating limit: 20 children
plus their parent/caregivers.

Game Zone
Tuesday, Nov. 23 * 5 to 7 p.m.
For middle and high school students. Get in the zone and join your
friends for some gaming fun with games such as Dance,
Dance Revolution, Guitar Hero 2, Rock Band and other
great games. Co-sponsored by Friends of the SouthShore
Regional Library and Domino's Pizza.

Baby Time
Wednesday, Nov. 24 * 10:05 to 10:25 a.m.
For ages 0-24 months. Share books, rhymes, songs, games and
quality time together while instilling a love of reading and
regular library visits in this 20-minute program. Seating limit:
20 children plus their parents/caregivers.

Toddler Time
Wednesday, Nov. 24 * 10:35 to 10:55 a.m.
For ages 2-3 years with a caregiver. Stories, finger plays
and songs make up this fun 20-minute program.

Story Time
Wednesday, Nov. 24 * 11 to 11:30 a.m.
For ages 3-5 years. Stories, finger plays and songs
make up this fun 30-minute program. Seating limit:
20 children plus their parent/caregivers.

Deaf and Hearing Connection Telephone Distribution
Wednesday, Nov. 24 * 1 to 3 p.m.
Presented by Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. (FTRI).
FTRI provides free specialized equipment and training to qualified
Florida residents who are deaf, hard of hearing or speech impaired.
The equipment enables them to place and receive phone calls.

All HCPLC Libraries Closed - November 25 and 26
for Thanksgiving Holiday

*Registration in person required no earlier than one hour
prior to the start of the program.

Interested in joining Friends of the South Shore library,
visit the Book Sale Room at the Library for a membership application.
For any additional information, visit www.southshorefriends.com.
SouthShore Regional Library is located at 15816 Beth Shields Way
(off 19th Avenue between U.S. 301 and 1-75). (813) 273-3652.


[ 813-634-CA


E Act No
and Qualify for
TECO Rebat
Q






NOVEMBER 18, 2010

Suwannee River


OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 9B


* Continued from page 7B
Telford Hotel. It was the only one
made of brick, not wood. The Tel-
ford has been upgraded and today
is still receiving guests. It's adver-
tised as a Bed & Breakfast, and it's
a delightful place to stay but the
public is invited to dine there also.
The dining room is a delight and
their food is delicious and reason-
ably priced. I found menu prices
for food in most area restaurants
considerably cheaper than many
other parts of the state.
White Springs, surrounded by
thousands of acres of public and


� X"


private lands, offers multiple rec-
reational activities: canoeing, bik-
ing and hiking trails, and excellent
hunting and fishing. The Historic
District, with lovely homes, crafts,
folk art and antique shops, of-
fers visitors a relaxing chance to
browse.
The most famous attraction in
the area is Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park, honor-
ing one of this country's most in-
fluential composers. The park is a
leader in celebrating Florida's cul-
tural traditions. (floridastateparks.
org/stephenfoster)


As a gateway to the Suwannee
River Wilderness Trail and the
Florida National Scenic Trail, the
park offers riverside cabins, a beau-
tiful campground, cultural events,
educational programs and outdoor
activities. The Museum and strik-
ing 200 foot Carillon Tower house
exhibits and dioramas from some
of Foster's most popular songs.
The event for which the park is
probably most noted is the annual
"Florida Folk Festival Memorial
Day Weekend." Over 400 singers,
dancers and storytellers entertain
on 15 stages with the addition of


YEAR END


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hundreds of artists and crafters and
much more.
A few miles south of White
Springs near Lake City, is the Spirit
of the Suwannee Music Park. Pri-
vately owned, and with more than
800 acres, it offers many activi-
ties similar to Stephen Foster Park
except that there are music events
throughout the year. The facility
was named "Best Live Music Ven-
ue in Florida" by Florida MIfiiihl
magazine. Their offerings are too
extensive to list here. To learn
more, go to their web site at musi-
clivershere.com.
Returning to the Suwannee River,
the middle stretch from Suwan-
nee River State Park to the town
of Branford is spring country. The
river widens, with numerous crys-
tal clear springs adding to the riv-
er's character and volume. Did you
know that as a state, Florida has
more springs than any country in
the world?
The lower Suwannee River, past
the town of Branford, runs wide
and deep making it a favorite area
for motor boats and paddlers. The


sandy banks become lower, sloping
gently towards the river. Anglers
on the lower Suwannee have their
choice of fishing for fresh or salt-
water species. This part of the Su-
wannee River supports the largest
population of Gulf sturgeon among
the region's coastal rivers.
All along the river, activities
are available for almost anyone:
kayaking, canoeing, motor boating,
fishing, tubing, hiking, birding and
equestrian. River camps are avail-
able for visitors who plan multi-day
paddling trips. RV and tent camping
sites are in abundance. Then there
are the hotels, motels and B&Bs,
most all of which are reasonably
priced. This of course is a purely
subjective observation. You should
check them out for yourself.
On this trip, I only had time to do
the upper section of the Suwannee
River. Hopefully I will soon return
and finish the journey.
Now go back to the top of this ar-
ticle and reread the title. How long
do you think it will take before the
song stops running through your
head?


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10B - OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


Making This Right


Beaches
Claims
Cleanup
Economic Investment
Environmental Restoration
Health and Safety
Wildlife


"Now Gulf seafood is coming back on the menu, so come on down,
we're open for business."
Bryan Zar
Co-owner, Restaurant des Families
Crown Point, LA


I grew up bussing tables at this restaurant. Last year, my wife, Brooke, and I
bought it. We were working hard to build a business, then the spill hit. BP said
they would try to make things right. But how was an energy company going to
help our restaurant?

Keeping Businesses Open
We figured they would tell us to take a number and wait in line.Instead, they
asked us if we could serve food to the workers,engineers, scientists, and local
residents they had hired to cleanup the spill. It kept us busy round the clock.
And we weren't the only ones. They hired a lot of local businesses and kept a
lot of people working. They have kept businesses up and down the Gulf open
and it's still making a difference.

Open for Business
BP asked us to share our story with you to keep you informed. Our restaurant's
open six days a week. Customers are filling our restaurant again and we think
it's a good time to come down to the Gulf Coast. And if we could make just one
request, please think of us when planning your next vacation. We're still here
and while it's been tough, we are still cooking. And we are just one of the
hundreds of great places ready to welcome you when you come down. So
don't wait. We're looking forward to seeing you.


For information visit: bp.com For assistance, please call:
restorethegulf.gov To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
facebook.com/bpamerica To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
twitter.com/bp_america To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
youtube.com/bp floridagulfresponse.com


� 2010 BP, E&P


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4*
101


NOVEMBER 18, 2010








NOVEMBER 18, 2010 THE SHOPPER 11 B


TO place an ad call THE SHOPPER
813.645.3111 ext. 201


Fax: 813.645.1792
$15.50
up to 20 words
300 addl. word
Deadline is Monday
at 4pm


M & M Printing Co., Inc
weekly publisher of the

The Observer News, The SCC Observer and The Riverview Current
210 Woodland Estates Ave SW
Ruskin, Florida 33570


100 Announcements
200 Farmer's Mkt
300 Merchandise
400 Marine
450 Transportation
500 Real Estate
550 Manuf. Housing
600 Rentals
650 Prof. Services
700 Services
800 Employment


105 PERSONAL


Ladies if you have painful cysts in your
breasts. I know of a solution. Call Diana
@ 813-562-7485

Do you love chocolate?
Want to lose weight? Call Diana. 813-
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FARMER'S MKT

200 _J


260 FRUITS/VEG.


Welcome back friends!
Morgan's Farm Market
now open 7 days a week. US 41 1
mile south of Little Manatee River.
813-645-5208.






310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana
St., Gibsonton (1 block off US 41,1 block
north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday thru
Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture,
lots misc. Ministry First Baptist Gibson-
ton. 813-671-0036 to donate

SCC Lions Club Multifamily Yard Sale:
Friday, November 19 and Saturday,
November 20, 8am-2pm. Items large,
small and in between. Good stuff
cheap! Two blocks east of Walgreens
off Rickenbacker at Quiet Place center
courtyard Gazebo.
Large yard sale. Nov. 19 & 20, 8am-
3pm. Nail tech table, large nail polisher
holder, baby girls items, lot of goodies.
6065 Golf& Sea Blvd., Apollo Beach.
Community yard sale. (22 households)
Saturday Nov. 20, 8am-2pm. New
Bedford Dr. area, SCC. Something
for everyone. 38 new NFL jackets,
refrigerator, sewing machine, electric
organ, craft supplies, tools, TV stand,
small household appliances, artwork,
clothing, computer monitor, decorative
items, outdoor furniture & misc. Watch
for signs.


r N UNCEM
NO 100 E


MULTI-PROPERTY AUCTION
11 AM * Wednesday, November 17
Auction On Site:
702 N. Pebble Beach Blvd., Sun City Center, FL


IHIGGENBOTHAM
cB 800-257-4161
n AUCTIONEERS otmA25 4 16
)1hAMigAThusaLINCm 18- genbotham.com
SA DLicesd ReaJEstate Broke
r Ser lGlobal M.E Hienbotham. CAI , FL Lic.# AU305 AB158


310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
6 = Cavanr's

lU Thrift Store
Wed., Fri. & Sat.
9 a.m. - Noon
Men's
Mix & Match Sale
Buy 1 Shirt, Get
1 Pair of Pants FREE
Also 'Secret Sale'
1424 E. College Ave. * Ruskin
813-641-7790
Ministryof Calvary Lutheran Church

Multi garage sale. Don't miss this one!
Friday Nov. 19 & Saturday Nov. 20.
8am-2pm. 2008 Captiva Court, SCC
(Cul-de-sac off New Bedford Drive, near
community hall). Household goods, fur-
niture, clothing, collectibles, Christmas
decorations, stereo, garden equipment,
rugs, artificial tree, men's bike.
2 family moving sale: Nov. 19 & 20, 8am-
noon, 1217 Fordham Dr. SCC. Roll out
trundle bed, pop-up frame, new bedding,
lamps, new croquet set, tent, games,
pictures, household items.

Holiday boutique. Saturday, 11/20.
Noon-5pm. Beaded jewelry, hand
painted objects, shop, visit. Refresh-
ment served. 1308 Lenox Greens, SCC.
813-634-1415
Muti family garage sale. Friday /Satur-
day, Nov. 19 & 20, 9am-2pm. Bryce
Court (off E. Del Webb), SCC. House-
hold, tools, electronics.
Yard sale: Friday, Saturday, Sunday,
8-2. Collectibles, something for every-
one. 11834 Cedar Field Dr. Riverview
(off Big Bend Road.)

Garage sale: Saturday, Nov. 20, 8am-
noon. Household and miscellaneous
items. 1744 S. Pebble Beach Blvd.,
SCC.
832 Oakmont Ave, SCC. Lots of collect-
ibles, lots of misc. & much more. 7am-?
Thursday & Friday, 11/18 & 11/19

Garage sale: Thursday 11/18 Saturday,
11/20, 9am-1 pm. Many new Christmas
decorations, lots of new Avon items
and gifts. Lots of miscellaneous. 1003
Ardmore Way, SCC.


310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Above the Rest
New hours, closed Monday. Tuesday-
Thursday, 10am-4pm. Friday &
Saturday, 10am-5pm. 139 S. Pebble
Beach Blvd. SCC. King trumpet tempo
w/case and accessories.

Yard sale: Friday & Saturday, Nov. 19-
20, 2207 Pleasant View Ave. in Ruskin
(Bayou Pass), 7am-2pm
Garage sale. SCC 1731 Coco Palm
Circle. Nov. 19 & 20, 8am-2pm. Variety
of new & used items. Come see!

Renaissance area garage sale, indi-
vidual households. Saturday, Nov. 20,
8am-2pm. Follow signs on S. Pebble
Beach Dr.

DVD. fax. copier, photo cell phone, tools,
linens, bath & kitchen items & misc.
Friday, Nov. 19, 8am-3pm. 1703 Aura
Court (off Del Webb West) SCC.
Friday & Saturday, 8am-3pm. Gold
chandelier, means sports coats, clothing
size 40, other small items. 1403 Del
Webb Blvd., W, SCC.

Apollo Beach. Caribbean Isles. 20+
park wide sale. 11/20, 9am-1 pm. Large
Mickey Mouse memorabilia, tools, drills,
rowder, table saw, TVs, furniture. Big
Bend Rd. south on US 41/ First right on
Elsberry Rd., Follow signs

Estate/Garage Sale
2219 New Bedford off Pebble Beach
SCC. Collection of Department 56
lighted houses & accessories. Love-
seat sleeper, some antiques, craft
items, art work, Bombay chest, game
table, large entertainment center, very
unusual handcarved chairs w/faces,
much more. Friday & Saturday, Nov.
19-20, 8am-1pm.




New Winter Hours:
M-F 9 to 5:30 * Sat 9 to 4:30

SENIOR
MONDAYS
are back!
Most items discounted
including Clothing,
Accessories, Collectibles, Art,
Books, and some Furniture.
Donations Needed
Please call (813) 645-5255
1311 3rd St. NE * Ruskin
(Behind St. Anne Church
& Next to Kennco Mfg.)

Big family yard sale: 7am-2pm., Sat. &
Sun, Nov. 20 & 21, 10608 Dixon Dr.,
Riverview. Lots of stuff, antiques, furni-
ture, tools, clothes, sewing machines,
dishes, toys, books.
Yard sale: Ruskin, Saturday, Nov. 20,
8am-noon, black desk & chair, vinyl
shutters, Palm Casual Bay chairs,
misc. items, 102 E. North Branch Rd.,
west Shell Point to 17th St. NWto east
North Branch
Moving Sale: 203 Cactus Flower Dr.
Kitchen, furniture, tools, misc. Thursday
& Friday, Nov. 18 & 19.

Huge yard sale. Saturday, 11/20, 7am-?
3304 Arrowsmith Rd, Sundance Com-
munity. Directions: 301 S. to Lightfoot
(turn right) go to Arrowsmith Rd &
turn left.
Advertise in the newspaper
that your community is
reading.


312 ESTATE SALES


312 ESTATE SALES




1908 N. Pebble Beach
November 19 & 20
8am-1 pm
Golf Cart, Small Freezer, Grill, Nice
Porch Furniture, White Wicker
Setee, Chairs & Comer Shelf, Green
Striped Sleep Sofa, Flowered Couch,
2 White Chairs, Wingback Chair,
Love Seat, Queen Mattress, Brass
Headboard, Thomasville
Dresser, Nightstand,
6-Drawer Light Chest,
Dresser & Nightstand,
Dining Table, China
Cabinet & Server (Honey
Color), Thomasville End Tables,
Round Glass Top Iron Coffee Table,
White Bookcases, TVs & Stands,
Bar Stools, Linens, Garage &
Kitchen, Pictures, Entry Table,
Lamps & Mirrors.
633-1173 or 508-0307


Anne's Estate Sales




2005 Western Golf Cart, Hummels,
Lenox & Waterford, Dining Room
Table w/Chairs, China Cabinet,
Loveseats (pair), Swivel Rocker,
Patio Set, Microwave, Twin
Bedroom Set, TVs, Dinette Table
w/Chairs, Collectables, Household,
Kitchen & Misc. Items.
www.AnnesEstateSales.blogspot.com


Let us get done in one day what it
takes the others guys a week to do.
We will pack-up and pick-up one room
or the entire house for a QUICK,
PROFITABLE, TROUBLE-FREE
EXPERIENCE.
CALL BUTTERFIELD's AUCTIONS




www.ButterfieldsAuctions.com
Butterfield Auctions AB2706/AU3549


Hunting for a job?
Check out the 800
Employment Section


1 I/A


2711 N. Macdill Ave. * Tampa, FL 33607
813-876-1566 Call for directions
Quality Furniture at Affordable Prices
* Dining * Seating * Bedroom * Patio * Much More
WE HAVE SOMETHING FOR EVERY ROOM
INSIDE AND ALL AREAS OUTSIDE

We are worth Delivery Available We re-cover or
the drive from HOURS: make new


Mon.-Fri. 10-6
Closed on Weekends


anywhere!


cushions


I~y


I


k\\UW t--T^-t--T^1--T^--^--^--^-t^


330 FURNITURE
36" x 48" table with 4 chairs, solid wood,
$130 for all. 941-776-3365

350 COMPUTERS
Hughesnet satellite dish, $100. Various
other electronics. Linksys router, Wild-
blue modem, etc. 941-776-3365

360 GOLF CARTS
Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade. Char-
gers, parts all related. Ronny's Carts &
Parts. 813-645-4515 or 813-484-9855

2007 Yamaha Electric golf/grocery cart.
Pull down rain /wind panels: windshield,
lights, turn signals, rear view mirror.
Purchased new 87 yr old driver. $3,500
firm. 813-629-0599
We buy golf carts, any condition. We pay
top dollar for used carts, running or not.
Same day pickup. 813-300-0114

390 MISC. FOR SALE

Sign Shop I/Talkin' Tee's
Golf cart lettering, graphic, magnets,
banners, bumper stickers, custom
license/ address plates, T-shirt
transfers. www.ruskinsignshop.com
813-938-7446

"Rally" scooter, red, two batteries, bat-
tery charger, basket. Very Good condi-
tion. Original cost $1,700, asking $650.
Can deliver. 813-689-6406






425 SLIPS OR STORAGE
South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special-
izing in outside storage for RVs, boats &
trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay-
Storage.com

Ramey's Business Park
RV & boa storage & heavy equipment.
1/4 mile from Williams Park boat ramp.
813-410-9607 or 813-849-1469


THE SHOPPER 11B


NOVEMBER 18, 2010


-'I


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�Al







12B THE SHOPPER





511 HOUSES FOR SALE





KP Augusta on Lancaster, 2BR/2BA/2CG on Golf
Course,remodeled(ready to move in)..... $89,500
SCC Worthington on Berry Roberts, NEWA/C and
It -.... II , % ' i)000
SCC 2BR + Den, split bedrooms, 37x12 enclosed
lanai, ,i,,li. .,i,,. , 1% - 500
RENTALS
2BR/2BA near clubhouse, furnished.....$575/month
2BR/2BA Lanc., furnished, seasonal.... $1600/month
SCC 3BR furnished home (annual) .... $1200/month

* NICE 2BR HOUSE A BLOCK FROM
RIVER, right in Ruskin. Carport, utility
room, deep lot, adjacent to beautiful
new house. $65,000.
* 3BR/2BA (1995) DOUBLEWIDE
HOME ON 1.34 ACRE: Split BR plan,
high ceilings, beautiful modern kitchen,
inside utility + W&D, large screened
porch, brand new roof. Lot is fenced.
$79,000. Bring us offers.
* RUSKIN COMMERCIAL RENTAL:
7,200 sq. ft. warehouse including air
conditioned offices, loading dock, 12 ft.
high rolling doors, security system,
1 acre lot. $2,200/month.



- aireTr


DICKMAN
. . .�INC.
REALTY
Celebrating 86 Years
1924-2010


511 HOUSES FOR SALE

* NEW LISTING!! Over 9 acres
in an area of new homes,
close to 1-75, just waiting to
be developed. $275,000.
* OWNER FINANCING available
with $5000 down. 2BR/2BA
manufactured home on nice
fenced lot. $45,000.
* PRICE REDUCED!!
BEAUTIFUL VACANT LOT in
Ruskin. Owner will consider
financing. $27,000.







520 ACREAGE FOR SALE

* 2 Lakefront Lots, Wolfbranch
Subdivision, 6th Street SE,
Ruskin. Owner financing.
$60,000.
*2.3 Acres (mol), 39th Ave.
SE, Ruskin. Owner financing.
$80,000.





Say you saw it in the Observer News


CALL
(813) 645-3211

Serving South Hillsborough
County since 1924.
www.dickmanrealty.com
dickman@tampabay.rr.com


WATERFRONT FANTASIA! Great 3BR/2BA/2CG on deep & wide Ruskin Inlet leading to
Tampa Bay. Features include dock & lift, seawall, sunroom, hardwood & tile floors, fresh
paint, split floorplan, lots of storage, light bright interior & the list goes on. Call today! Asking
$295,000. JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540.
MOVE-IN READY! Gorgeous 4BR/2BA/2CG in delightful area w/community pool, rec. hall,
and more. Home is in excellent condition with hardwood floors, great room, freshly painted
exterior, large screened lanai, privacy fenced backyard, stainless steel appliances, wood
cabinets, and much more. Must see to appreciate! Asking $149,000. JO ELLEN MOBLEY
645-1540.
OVER 1 AC. WITH 200' ON THE LITTLE MANATEE RIVER. Features include: maple
cabinets, Italian marble tile throughout, 5 sets of French doors, huge master bedroom,
plantation shutters, custom bookshelves, mother-in-law suite. This beauty also has tons of
storage, a 5-car garage, L-shaped dock with boathouse for the fishing and boating enthusi-
ast. $389,900. CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
UNLIMITED POTENTIAL!! Great commercial acreage located near Highway 41 in Ruskin
and close to planned shopping center. 3BR/1 BA house with detached garage on 1.4 acres
(mol) $ 299,000 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
GREAT BUSINESS LOCATION! Commercial site located close to Highway 41 in Ruskin with
over 200 feet of road frontage. Zoned General Commercial with county water & sewer. Mobile
home on property brings rental income. $234,900 KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE
WESTBROOK 748-2201 FOR DETAILS.
RUSKIN RENTAL! 3BR/2BA single family home with a two car garage. Brand new home with
nice split floor plan. Granite countertops and ceramic tile throughout. $950.00 per month with
one year lease and approved application. CALL ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
REDUCED PRICE!! 5 ACRES with 10 greenhouses! 3BR/2BA MH built in 2001. Special
features include: 20 x 30 workshop, 2 free standing double carports, 190 foot well, electric
gate and much more. Zoning is AR. $139,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE
WESTBROOK 748-2201
JUST REDUCED !! PLENTY OF ROOM! 3BR/2BA home on 4.55 acres. Room to expand or
enjoy the quiet. In-ground pool, green belted , zoned for horses and could be a fish farm as
tanks are set up. $250,000 CALL KATHY JACOBSON 624-2225
LAND 3.5 ACRES More or less on Hwy 674 or College Ave., zoned AR that could possibly
be rezoned for your business. Property has two septics, water and electric. NOW REDUCED
TO $175,000 CALL KATHY JACOBSON 624-2225
WE'RE TALKING SERIOUS and highly motivated sellers. Price just reduced on great
2BR/2BA condo in Kings Point. Stuart model is clean, light, bright, move-in ready. Enclosed
lanai with heat and air makes for additional living space. Utility room with golf cart storage.
Close to innumerable community opportunities and amenities. Don't miss out. $42,900 JUDY
ERICKSON 468-0288
CUTE, CLEAN, READY TO MOVE-IN: 1BR/1.5BA furnished Mobile home, screened porch,
double carport, roof over, utility shed + washer/dryer, storage & tool shed. Perfect winter,
retirement or starter home. No association fee, not in flood zone. $35,000. CALL CLAIRE
TORT 363-7250
2BRi2BA DOUBLEWIDE HOME, RUSKIN. Inside utility-rm, carport, and great attached
shed/workshop. Large lot with 2 driveways, detached shed and extra parking for your boat or
truck. Close to golf course. $55,900. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
PERFECT WATERFRONT LOT FOR BOATING & FISHING ! Deep water, huge new dock,
great wide riverfront. Lot has all utilities including sewer, iron gate & fence, and PD-MU zoning
allows M/Home or house. $239,000. Owner financing. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
WATERFRONT - NEW LISTING! This 2BR/2BA 2-car garage is just waiting for you to come
and finish the renovations! Property is complete with a nice in-ground pool and plenty of
parking for your boat both on land and water. Located just off the Ruskin Inlet this property
has a lot of potential but needs some TLC. $191,000 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
SUN CITY CENTER -- Exceptionally well maintained home with 2BR/2BA 2-car garage
located close to the golf courses, community center, shopping, and much more! This property
was built in 1994 and has a homeowner's association that includes yard maintenance so
there is little outside upkeep. Call today for more information or for an appointment to see this
lovely property. $139,500. CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
NOW IS THE TIME for a great opportunity to own a beautiful DUPLEX with 2BR/2BA on each
side. Separate enclosed laundry rooms as well as a lovely fenced yard & ample parking. All
utilities on separate meters. A/C units replaced in July and everything has been wonderfully
maintained. Each side currently rents for $900.00 per month. $195,000. CALL CATHY
GRIGGS 391-8653
CALLUS FORALLYOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS........645-3211
Donate your old functioning cell phones and drop off at our
office for use by the "Victims Assistance Program."
(Evening phone numbers)
Judy Erickson ................... 468-0288 Jim Grannon........................ 610-3485
Claire Tort........................ 363-7250 Kenn Antonelli .................. 786-3124
Kay Pye ........................... 361-3672 Kathy Jacobson .................. 624-2225
Cathy Griggs .................. 391-8653 Jo Ellen Mobley.................. 645-1540
Christine Nethers ............ 260-6335 LaRae Regis........................ 633-8318
Roxanne Westbrook............ 748-2201


560 M.H. ON LOTS
Mobile home for sale Eastwood Mobile
Home Park, Gibsonton. Call Heather
813-677-5726

565 M.H. IN PARKS
14ft wide mobile home on canal in Ha-
waiian Isle RV Resort, Ruskin. 2br/1 ba,
2 lanai, carport. Close to pool & club
house. $23,000. 813-641-2440






610 WATERFRONT RENTALS
The Dolphin House, Apollo Beach,
efficiency apartments on water. Boat
docking /fishing. Pool, laundry. $185
weekly, $185 deposit. No pets. 813-
850-5217

611 HOUSES FOR RENT
Ruskin 3br/2ba, 3rd bedroom suited
for office or baby. Nice home with front
porch & large backyard. Great for couple
or small family. References & applica-
tion required. No smoking, no pets.
Monthly rent $875 plus security deposit.
lyr lease. 813-649-1599

Ruskin 3br/1 ba house, screened porch
on quiet street. Waterfront. Fish off the
dock. No smoking, no pets. Refer-
ences please. $450 biweekly $450
security deposit. 813-363-6001.

S & R Properties
3, 2 & 1 bedrooms. No pets. Ruskin,
Gibsonton area. RV lots available 813-
310-1888 or 813-849-1469

612 APTS. FOR RENT
For rent: Efficiency apartments. Weekly
rates, utilities furnished 813-677-8789,
813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

Ruskin. 2br/1 ba apartment. $650 month-
ly includes water & yard maintenance.
$600 security deposit. No pets. 813-
672-0450

Ruskin Efficiency
Nice area $475 monthly or $695 sea-
sonal. Fully furnished, all utilities paid.
813-468-1264 or 813-787-7883





AVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE
OCCUPANCY
RIVERWOOD APARTMENTS

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments

Handicap Unit Available

Rental Rates Beginning
at $520 + Utilities

For Rental Information
call: (8131645-7320
TIDD 800-955-87711

709 Oceanside Circle,
SRuskin t2

Mon-Fri 8:00 AM- 4:00 PM
Equal Opportunity Proider a Employer


613 CONDOS FOR RENT
1 bedroom, 1.5 bath, furnished, Cov-
ered parking. $700 monthly, $1,200
seasonal, cable, water & amenities
included. 813-634-1162

Kings Point
SCC. 2br/1.5ba condo. Available im-
mediately. Furnished or unfurnished.
Washer /dryer. Yearly $700. Cable /
water included. 941-744-6383

Your best Advertising Buy!
The Observer News


620 ROOMS FOR RENT
Wimauma/ Sun City Center. Live in a
country setting that's clean, safe & quiet.
No alcohol or drugs. $440 per month.
nicely furnished includes all utilities and
basic cable. Must see to appreciate.
813-503-4592

Rent bedroom, share kitchen and bath,
furnished, utilities included, female pre-
ferred, $80/week. Gibsonton. Walking
distance Wal-Mart. Call Cheryl. 813-
244-2384

621 PLACES TO SHARE
Roommate wanted. 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
house, very clean. All appliances. Apollo
Beach, fresh water canal. $600 monthly.
813-789-7142

630 M.H. RENTALS
2br/2ba private lot. South of Gibsonton,
US 41. Call 813-927-2065

For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home near
shopping center in Gibsonton. 813-677-
8789, 813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With
A/C. 813-677-1086

Small 1 br/1 ba mobile home on lot. $125
weekly, all utilities included. Close to
downtown Riverview. Se Habla Espanol
813-325-5190

644 COMMERCIAL
Gibsonton area. Storage building 40x60.
24hr access. Secured 813-690-1836

645 OFFICE SPACE
600+ sf commercial office space. Great
rate. Highly visible at corner of US 41
& College Ave., Ruskin. Call 813-210-
6540 or email kristen@mobileeyecare.
corn


F_____19

uPFEI


651 BOOKKEEPING


QuickBooks�
Certified Pro-advisor Tutoring / instruc-
tion at your pace. Flexible hours. Full
bookkeeping service. (Bank recon /
payroll /data entry /tax prep via QB.
10+ years local service, Thea's Quick
Bookkeeping Inc, Ruskin 813-641-
1089

680 ADULT/CHILD CARE
Now accepting applications for enroll-
ment. Age 6 weeks -12yrs. Half or full
day. Ruskin United Methodist pre school.
Call 813-645-6198. CHC110087

HHA/ caregiver provider. Companion/
housekeeper seeking private duty. Well
trained & qualified. Flexible hours. Call
Janice 813-333-8405






705 CLEANING
Two Sisters & A Mop Cleaning Service.
Residential & commercial. Reasonable
rates. Free estimate. Bonded & insured.
Call 813- 919-2642


NOVEMBER 18, 2010
705 CLEANING

Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integrity.
Call for free estimate. 7days a week.
Move-in, move-out, rentals. Insured,
bonded, licensed. Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean

710 LAWN CARE

FloraScapes
Professional maintenance company
serving all your landscaping needs.
Residential & commercial. Ruskin,
Apollo Beach, SCC, Riverview. Li-
censed/insured. 813-333-3688

714 TREE REMOVAL

Professional Tree &
Landscaping. Sales: trimming, remov-
als, popcorn curbing, stump grinding,
clearing, hauling. Fill dirt/ top soil/
rock/ mulch. We barter for items of
value. Free estimate. Call Paul 813-
634-6041 or 813-751-9691

715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service. Cul-
vert sets, driveways, shell, crushed
asphalt, concrete, fill dirt, excavating,
mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963
Free estimates.

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill dirt,
topsoil, sand, crushed rock & asphalt,
driveway culverts. Loader, backhoe,
grading, bushhog, discing. Install Sep-
tic System & drain fills. CFC#1427021.
813-645-1883

735 TRANSPORTATION

At Your Service
Transportation to Tampa airport /
charters /cruise ship. Excellent prices.
Call Express Transportation 813-731-
9283 for rates

Will transport out of state. All trailers,
bumper pull, gooseneck travel trailers,
fifth wheel trailers, horse trailer, boats,
car & heavy objects. Enclosed trailer
also available to haul, etc. 813-477-
3054

740 MISC. SERVICES

Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks, boat
lifts & seawalls. Free inspection. Heck-
er Construction Co. 813-236-9306

In Your Home
Pet Care
813-767-7225. Affordable, licensed,
bonded, insured. References avail-
able. email: olivertort@aol.com Oliver
& Company


TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED ADb
L^ Call

at
645-3111
ext.201
or e-mail:
Beverly@observernews.net
20 words for $15.50 and 30C for each
additional word. Bold line $3. All classified
ads are paid in advance. Deadlines are
Monday at 4 pm for Thursday paper.
\ ._________________


Classified Is Convenient


"- THRIFT STORE
OPEN: Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 8 a.m. -
Saturdoaq 8 a.m. - 12 p.m.
1009 1st. Street S.W.
U Ruskin
w s.R.674 E We Havl

I Furniture,I
stS DONATION DROP OF
TUES. TfHRU FRL ONLY P
TI-T 1T ALL DONATIONS MUST BE I
STORE USEABLE CONDITION


U U


3 p.m.




re
IFO

Too!
F5
PLEASE,
IN CLEAN
N.







NOVEMBER 18, 2010






870 GENERAL

New After School Program
needs Director/ Teacher.
A candidate for the position of direc-
tor/ teach of South Shore Arts after
care Ministry (SAM) shall be grounded
in basic Christian doctrine, having &
professing faith in Jesus Christ. He /
she shall agree to uphold the church
personnel policies. He/ she must
have managerial skills necessary to
successfully direct SAM as well as
facilitate a class in one of the visual or
performing arts. Please mail or submit
your resume to the church office. Attn:
SPRC, 1210 Del Webb Blvd West,
SCC., Fl 33573 or visit the church to
apply for the position. You can also
find full description online at www.
sccumc.com




Stylist

Booth Rent Only


Shelly's

Styling Salon


813-633-3755






0o KIN

ow Taking Application

for Packing House

I h i
Behind 5th 3rd Bank

6415-6'131


880 PART-TIME


Activity assistant. Friendly attitude a
must. To greet members, assist with
special events,: includes setting &
cleaning up. Computer literate & great
customer service skills. Able to work
weekends & holidays. Call Pat @ 813-
641-3616

Check out your

classified ad @ www.

observernews.net


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Abortion Not an Option? Consider
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cal Expenses Paid. Loving, Financially
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Atty Ellen Kaplan (#0875228)

ADOPTION A warm, loving, financially
secure home awaits your newborn. Ex-
penses paid. Call Barbara at 1-888-
908-9078 or Attorney Charlotte Danciu
1-800-395-5449. Bar #307084

ADOPTION Give Your Baby The Best
In Life! Living Expenses Paid. Many
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* ADOPTION * * IS LOVE * Absolute
devotion, close-knit family, lots of Love,
security awaits 1st baby. Margie. Ex-
penses paid. 1-800-552-0045 FLBar
0247014

100AC MATURE HARDWOODS on
Kentucky River - dockable. Great hunt-
ing/ ATV trails, 25 minutes from Natural
Bridge & Red River Gorge. $1500/ac
Non-negotiable. Possible owner financ-
ing. 864-376-8800


FLEXIBLE SHIFTS, COMPETITIVE PAY...
EXPERIENCED CNAs NEEDED!
Must have Level 2 background screening, CPR training, valid FL driver's
license and reliable transportation. Visiting Angels will verify license,
check driving record, background screen and all references as well as
verify medical clearance for ability to provide quality care for an agency
that provides our senior citizens with the continued independence
allowing them to remain in their own homes!
EXPERIENCED CAREGIVERS---REWARDING POSITIONS
Call 813-752-0008 to schedule an appointment/interview
*Must be willing to work throughout I
Eastern Hillsborough County nVt t'-' A els.S
License NR#30211328 MASSISTCE SERVICES *




OWN A NIEW HOMEA

WIHN SMONESYSOWN!!


A community of affordable homes
exclusively for first-time homebuyers!


(813)672-7889 www.fhome.org
(813) 672- 7889 www.flhome.org


* Phase III Now Availablel
* 2 Swimming Pools and a Clubhouse
* 3,4 and 5 Bedrooms, 1 and 2 Garages
* Popular Ruskin Location
* USDA Self-Help Housing program -- help
build your home in exchange for a down
payment
* No money down, easy to qualify
* Non-profit agency works for you
-Hablamos Espafiol ~




BAYOUPASS
S.. r, r. e homebuns er 80% of medianinm e. Call for del.


870 GENERAL


ADOPTION 866-633-0397 Unplanned
Pregnancy? Provide your baby with
a loving, financially secure family.
Living/Medical/Counseling expenses
paid. Social worker on staff. Call
compassionate attorney Lauren Fein-
gold (FL Bar#0958107) 24/7

ADOPTION 888-812-3678 All Expens-
es Paid. Choose a Loving, Financially
Secure family for your child 24 Hrs 7
Days Caring & Confidential. Attor-
ney Amy Hickman. (Lic. #832340)

*DIVORCE* BANKRUPTCY Starting
at $65 *1 Signature Divorce *Missing
Spouse Divorce "We Come to you!"
1-888-705-7221 Since1992

Pregnant? Considering Adoption? A
childless, successful woman seeks to
adopt & needs your help! Financially
secure. Expenses Paid. Call Margie
or Adam. 1-800-790-5260 FL Bar
#0150789

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOP-
TION? Talk with caring adoption
expert. You choose from families na-
tionwide. Living Expenses Paid. Call
24/7 Abby's One True Gift Adoptions.
866-413-6298

ACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOL DI-
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accredited high school diploma fast! Not
a GED. Call Now! 1-888-355-5650

AIRLINE MECHANIC - Train for high
paying Aviation Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if qualified - Job
placement assistance. Call Aviation
Institute of Maintenance 866-314-6283

AVIATION MAINTENANCE/AVIONICS
Graduate in 14 Months. FAA Approved;
financial aid if qualified. Job placement
assistance. Call National Aviation
Academy Today! 1-800-659-2080 or
NAA.edu

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast Afford-
able & Accredited PACE Program Free
Brochure. Call Now! 1-800-532-6546
ext. 16 www.continentalacademy.
com

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA FROM
HOME. 6 - 8 weeks. Accredited. Get
a Diploma. Get a Job! Free Brochure.
1-800-264-8330 www.diplomafrom-
home.com

Tired of Being In Debt? Decrease Your
Debt - Increase Your Income $10k+ in
Credit Card or IRS Debt New Laws Have
Passed to Protect You! Free Consulta-
tion1 -888-482-1873

Boats; 1000's of boats for sale www.
floridamariner.com ; reaching 6 million
homes weekly throughout Florida. 800-
388-9307, tide charts, broker profiles,
fishing captains, dockside dining and
more.

JC'SBUILDING SALES CARPORTS
Starting at $595. Garages, Sheds &
Barns. Galvanized Steel. 2-styles,
13-colors. Any Size. Florida Certified.
Call Anytime 386-277-2851 Fax: 386-
277-2852. jcsmetalbuildings.com

Assemble Dollhouse Miniatures from
home! Excellent pay! Year Round! Call
1-877-489-2900 or Visit us online at
www.TinyDetails.com and get started
today!

ASSEMBLE MAGNETS & CRAFTS
from Home! Year-round Work! Excellent
Pay! No Experience! Top US Company!
Glue Gun, Painting, Jewelry, More! Toll
Free 1-866-844-5091

$$ EARN EXTRA INCOME $$ Working
from home. $5.00 for every envelope
Processed with our sales brochures.
Guaranteed!! Free Information. 1-800-
210-2686 or visit: www.funsimplework.
com

Earn Extra Money Fast from Home Be
Your Own Boss & Set Your Own Hours
You Keep 100% of all the Profits! Go
to: www.havefund.com

Earn up to $150 per day. Under cover
Shoppers needed to judge retail and
dining establishments Exp Not Re. Call
1-888-601-4861

Got a Job but NEED More Money?
Struggling with $10,000+ in credit card
debt? Settle Your Debt NOW! Increase
your income! Free Consultation & Info
888-458-1454

For infor. about the ads in
Community Papers of Florida.,
call Beverly 813-645-3111


CPF STATEWIDE
Sales Representatives Wal-Mart Inc.
needs experienced Sales Represen-
tatives / Market Researchers to work
for (3) months and get paid contact
dee_clerk417@yahoo.com

GEORGIA LAND- IRA/401 K? (Pre-Tax
Money) Use your retirement fund without
penalty. Great investment! double your
retirement savings! Riverfront Develop-
ment, private boat ramp, 3acre tracts
$4950/acre. Owner 912-529-6198

HOMES & LAND Special Financing
Available Any Credit! Low Down! View
properties at: www.roselandco.com
; Or call Rose Land & Finance Corp.
866-937-3557

LAND LIQUIDATION! 20 acres $0
Down, $99/mo. Near Growing El Paso,
Texas. Guaranteed Owner Financing,
NO CREDIT CHECKS! Money Back
Guarantee. FREE Map/Pictures. 1-800-
843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com

NC MOUNTAIN LAND MOUNTAIN
TOP TRACT 2.6 acres, private, large
public lake 5min away, owner must sell,
only $25,500. 1-866-789-8535

No Credit - Bad Credit - No Problem
Brand New Manufactured Home in a
Gated Community under $500/month.
Open Mon-Sat.! Call Today 888-841-
6091

NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS
Spend the holidays in the mountains and
start a family tradition! Even the family
pet iswelcome! Foscoe Rentals 1-800-
723-7341 www.foscoerentals.com ;

Donate Vehicle Receive $1000 Grocery
Coupon Noah's Arc Support No Kill
Shelters, Research to Advance Vet-
erinary Treatments Free Towing, Tax
Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted
1-866-912-GIVE

RV spot for rent on Hutchinson
Island. Beach access, heated pool,
tennis court, marina with boat slips.
Great area, great fishing. 352-347-
4470.
Call Bevely 813-645-311 for infor.


THE SHOPPER 13B

CPF STATEWIDE
SELL/RENT YOUR TIMESHARE FOR
CASH!!! Our Guaranteed Services will
Sell/ Rent Your Unused Timeshare for
CASH! Over $78 Million Dollars offered
in 2009! www.sellatimeshare.com ;
(877)554-2430

SOUTH CAROLINA 2 acres in the
Santee Cooper Lake area. Near 1-95.
Beautiful building tract $19,900. Ask
about E-Z financing, low payments. Call
owner: 803-473-7125

TENNESSEE MTNS 435ac w/timber,
creek, river, natural gas well, springs,
city water, utilities, trails $1800/ac. 2
tracts possible. Good hunting. No state
income tax. www. tnwithaview.com
1-888-836-8439

TENNESSEE SOUTHEAST Variety
of homes & land. Mountain, valley,
farms, wooded tracts, gated community.
1-800-516-8387 George Hamilton Land
& Auction, TAL1557 www.hamiltonauc-
tion.com

Increase Male Size. Gain 1-3 Inches
Permanently. FDA Medical Vacuum
Pumps, Testosterone, Viagra, Cialis.
Free Brochures! 619-294-7777 Code:
"FREE Pills-5" www.DrJoelKaplan.
com

Quality Oxygen Concentrators at Low
Prices! Great Buys on Portable and
Home Units. New, Used, and Rentals
Available. 1-877-303-9318 Represen-
tatives Available 7 Days a Week.

VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg!! 40
Pills + 4 FREE for only $99. #1 Male
Enhancement, Discreet Shipping. Save
$500 Buy The Blue Pill Now! 1-888-
777-9242

Donate your Car Truck or Boat to
HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND Free 3
Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free
Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of.
1-866-905-3801

MOVIE EXTRAS To Stand In The
Background For a Major Film Produc-
tion. Experience Not Required, Earn Up
To $200/Day. All Looks Needed. Call
877-335-0217


THE SHOPPER


THE OBSERVER NEWS * THE SCC OBSERVER * THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT

To place a classified ad
call 813-645-3111 Ext. 201;
fill out the form below and fax to
813-645-1792; or mail this form to
The Shopper
210 Woodland Estates Ave. SW* Ruskin, FL 33570

DEADLINE: Up to 20 words
Ad and payment must
be received by 4:00 p.m. I 1 5.
Monday for publication in 300 for each
that week's edition. additional word


I Name:

Address:


City:

Daytime Phone:


classification:


State: __ Zip:__


Ad copy as you wish it to appear:


LI- ----- -- ----- -- ------ - -----
I
IL -----___-----__-----
h - - - - - - - - - - - -






-I-4B- -O-SER-E- NEWS-*-R-VERV-E--CURRENT- - -C- OBSERVER-NOVEMBER 18, 2010


BUSINESS & TRADE DIRECTORY


Lic. #CMC056816
AIR-CONDITIONING,
HEATING & REFRIGERATION
Complete Sales, Service,
Installation & Repair
Amana and Senior
Trane Dealer Discount
John R. Bowman, Jr., Owner
(813) 633-2703



SOLARl ESIG 911 C
' . O.A Bs N6




















BUSINESS
E U






















DIREFORY YOUPF, R )N....
Call Us 645-3111Z

tResidential Commercial



FEE tm EOBSRFnanciEng vabe S
BUSINESS
TRADE erenc e









ForDIRECoRY YourProtection...

















CAll your adverPising

more information
(813)CallUs 645-3111











Newww.ObserverNews.net

FREE Estimates * Financing Available

lWe Cary Workers'UCamp 1
L__ For Your Protectio i EBB





Save AK 0IO O N


Call your advertising
representative today for
more information
(813) 645-3111
www.ObserverNews.net


A CAC1816456
A-PL S
Airconditionin & eating
634-8679
Sales * Service * Installations
Servicing all major brands
Preventive maintenance
Ice machines & Refrigeration
Fall Special
$ 49.00 service call



SELF ARREST BONDS
COURT DATES 664-0056
WARRANT CHECKS
BIG JOHN'S
BAIL BONDS
641-8400
FAMILY BONDSMAN
STATE FEDERAL
24 HOUR SERVICE
JOHN L. VATH
2100 Orient Road * Tampa, FL. 33619
Fax: (813) 628-8739



Need Work Done
Around the House?

Turn to PHIL
Your Handy Person!
RIVERSIDE GOLF & BOATING CLUB RESIDENT
www.mrhandyperson.com

Serving
* APOLLO BEACH
* RUSKIN
* SUN CITY
CENTER





25+ Years Experience
UInsured
813-649-1418
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net


Proudly Serving: Sun City Center
Ruskin * Apollo Beach * Riverview
and surrounding areas
Member SCC Chamber of Commerce





CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE
OFFICE 813-333-6320
CELL 813-777-9808
Frank Shaft
FL Certified Roofing Contractor
CCC# 1327713
www.ApolloBeachRoofmg.com
PalmTreeRoofing@gmail.com
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net


Complete Sales * Service
Repair. Installation
SERVICING ALL MAKES AND MODELS
24 Hour Service * Financing Available
Lic. #CAC1815928







RELIABLE

* Ceiling Fans
* Outlets
* Lighting
* Panel Upgrades
* FREE Estimates

813-645-7000
Listed with Sterling Management and
Sun City Center Community Association
Lic. #EC13002936



















Sou Hares
f ,l Plumbing

* Service & Repairs
* Repipes * Water Heaters
* New Construction
* Remodels & Additions


All Types of Roofing
New Roofs & Repairs
* Shingle * Tile * Metal * Hot Tar
No job too big or too small!
SERVING SINCE 1973
* Ruskin * Sun City Center * Kings
Point * Apollo Beach * Riverview
"ALL MY CUSTOMERS ARE DRY
FRIENDS WHEN QUALITY COUNTY"



" F ChmkberMem6er
P.O. Box 551 * Ruskin, FL 33570
www.customroofing.us
Bonded & Insured * Lic. #CCC1326907





*No project over $1000.
No electrical, gas, or
plumbing, and nothing
structural.


I AC REPAI^^R/AE


I145 21st ST. N.W. * RUSKIN
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net


PAUL WOOD PLUMBING, INc.
State Certified Plumbing Contractor
#CFC1427697
Residential
� Commercial
* Certified Backflows
* Stoppages
* Service and Repairs
* FREE Estimates * 24-Hour Service
Licensed * Bonded * Insured
(813) 641-1387





R&D Septic Inc.
Complete Septic System
* New/Repair
S Fill Dirt
* Pump Repair
* Site Work




www.ObserverN ews.net
www.ObserverN ews.net
www.ObserverN ews.net
www.Oberver^ws^ne


Lf vIfl A/ I tIAT , Ik
SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS
Residential and Light Commercial
Family Owned & Operated
* No Relvolving Technicians
* Quality Service,* Sales,
* Installation, =
* Most Replacement
Parts on Hand
(813) 263-6503
>






Over 30 Years Experience
* COMMERCIAL / * RESIDENTIAL
South Bay -*
I Electric Co.I
of Rukin SERVICE
LICENSED %UPGRADES
BONDED ALL TYPES
INSURED OF WIRING
ER00126636 RENOVATIONS
* SECURITY LIGHTS * CEILING FANS
* SWITCHES & OUTLETS * SPAS & DOCKS
Limited Senior Citizen Discount of 10%
=m expires 11/30/10


Unstuff those
SUN VIEW closets! There's
WINDOW CLEANING, INC. somebody's
* Exceptional Service * bargain in there!
Registered at Kings Point Sell yur
Listed Vendor of: Unwanted
SCC Community Association items in the
AB Chamber Member classified!
813-944-8478 THE OBSERVER NEWS
Licensed Insured Bonded 813-645-3111 ext. 201
Fax 813-645-1792


A FREE Estimates
S Lic. #CFC057969
A+ Rating Bonded � Insured


-Mary Ann Wilhelm
Owner/Director
#CAC 1814397

Wilhelm Hour

- 641-1811
FACTORY
DEALER 802 4th St. S.W.
"'aM ' (Off ConllegeAve. West)
Ruskin, Florida
Turn to the Experts
www.wilhelmac.com



Bob's Mobile Fix-It Center
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured
We Fix It All!
Customer Satisfaction Guaranteed!
Registered with SCC Community Association
* Attic Stairs * Ceiling Fans *
Cabinets * Flooring * Interior
Painting * Gutter Cleaning
Call for FREE Estimate
(813) 671-7870
Robert Gerstenschlager



'Timothy Sutton, LLC
INTERIOR EXTERIOR
PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
PRESSURE WASHING
29 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN OHIO
NOW SERVING FLORIDA
LICENSED BONDED INSURED
813-727-1013
LIC. #PA2809



,HIGH POWER,

Pressure Washing

813-442-9441
WYATT EARP ' '
WATER DOG
"I'm he gfor you.BJ







NOW OPEN
4 ~LOOKING
FOR EXTRA
STORAGE
SPACE
FOR YOUR...
BOAT
645-5222 CAMPER
cell: 240-2049 ETC.
1501 33rd St. SE ANY SIZE
Ruskin, FL 33570


14B * OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


NOVEMBER 18, 2010


493-2JOHN861





OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER * 15B


Harvest



2011 SONATA
All New & Redesigned! IU- j


(7


- w


Stylish- oSpacious ts
490 0^^ $4000 Less Than Accord ". Unsurpassed amount of standard safety features.-- 4
^^^^^BTTTTTT^TilTTTT~mTTTT*y


-I-


.6&M


I..... k'iF


5 Star Safety Ratings


200 LATR
0BestValueIn Is Clasas3


Affordable & Fuael Effident
Hyundais get up to MPG's*

P 29,l..p .


Guaranteet1TratseAllowance)


$300
( HYUnDRI
Assurance
-... .. ......


$4000 LEASE 3j ),f 6 Rugged SALE E, E .
Less Than FOR TH Capability,
RAV4 WEASE Comfort & Style


~JrW


LEASE BU bifilrJ Revolution In Design, LEASE ( ~~ flf 3
*I u)I a uqJrI Perfortnance FRE
VermS ~& Value $2a


Performance,
Technology,
Safety & Quality


LEASE fl'l 35H
FOR NH


E~bg) We will beat any -I-j-
fe, Wother Hyundai dealer
All/Pre Guarant$0te0'
1--0.eor pay you S' ia
All prices are plus tax, tag and are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. t Lease down payment requirement: '10 Elantra- $3495 , Elantra Touring - $1999, Genesis Coupe - $2199, '11 Sonata $3500,'10 Tucson - $2499, '10 Genesis Sedan - $3799. All offers are with approved credit
and some cannot be combined. *Expected range for most drivers, your actual mileage may vary depending on how you drive and maintain your vehicle. *e* On the Accent. As listed on Monroney sticker. Special APR offers on select models, see us for details. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Advertised vehicles subject to prior sale.
Programs subject to change without notice. Must finance thru Hyundai Motor Finance. - Comparable Models. tt Must present signed buyers order from accredited Hyundai Dealer on same model & equipment. A $3000 guaranteed trade allowance cannot be combined with any other offers, offer only good on new vehicles.


- -


NOVEMBER 18, 2010


to MPG
TO HW .Y,


331







16B - OBSERVER NEWS * RIVERVIEW CURRENT * SCC OBSERVER


First Place: Orchid and Hummingbird Sculpture by Bob Dick- Second
ey.


Third Place and People's Choice Award:
Night Watchman by Stephen Taylor.


Hillsborough County Announces 2010 Recycled Yard Art Winners


Hillsborough County Extension
is proud to announce the winners
of the 2010 Recycled Yard Art
Contest held at the Hillsborough
County Fairgrounds Oct. 13 - 17.
This contest was open to all Coun-
ty residents and all age groups.
Entries were created mostly with
recycled or recyclable materials
and were able to withstand the
elements for outdoor display. The
results are:
First Place Prize $100 - Bob
Dickey for his Orchid and Hum-
mingbird Sculpture. Bob created
his Orchid and Hummingbird
Sculpture from shovels and a tree
limb from his garden.


Second Place Prize $75 - Myr-
tle Cail for her Backyard Bling.
Myrtle created her Backyard Bling
with old vases, bowls, saucers, a
paint bucket, and metal rods.
Third Place Prize $50 - Stephen
Taylor for his Ubilam - The Night
Watchman. Stephen created the
Night Watchman from used auto
parts and scrap shipyard metal.
People's Choice Award Prize
$100 - Stephen Taylor for Ubilam
- The Night Watchman.
Elementary School First Place
Prize $100 - Ethan Fernandez for
his Snowman.
Middle School First Place Prize
$100 - Dowdell Middle School for


their School of Recycled Bottle
Fish.
High School First Place Prize
$100 - Tiffany Goller for her Re-
cycled Wishing Well/Water Sys-
tem for Indoor Plants.
For more information on the
2010 Recycled Yard Art Contest
and other programs held by the
County's Extension Office call
(813) 744-5519.
The 2010 Recycled Yard Art
Contest is a yearly contest spon-
sored by Hillsborough County Ex-
tension, the County's Solid Waste
Management Division, and by the
Hillsborough County Fair.


1,1a /.-..-. i County Extension is a co-
operative service of Iio 1. .-,.-. , County
Board of County Commissioners and the
University of Florida. The Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an
Equal Opportunity Institution authorized
to provide research, educational informa-
tion and other services only to individuals
and institutions that function with non-
discrimination with respect to race, creed,
color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual
orientation, marital status, national ori-
gin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S.
Department of Agriculture, Cooperative
Extension Service, University of Florida,
IFAS, Florida A & M, University Coop-
erative Extension Program, and Boards of
County Commissioners Cooperating.
Right, High School First Place:
Wishing Well/Water System for
Indoor Plants by Tiffany Goller.


NOVEMBER 18, 2010