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Title: Observer news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102144/00040
 Material Information
Title: Observer news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: M&M Printing Co., Inc
Place of Publication: Ruskin, FL
Publication Date: October 21, 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102144
Volume ID: VID00040
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Section B
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1O V SRING M IQ


Welcome to Topsy Turvy Week
Advertising has been elevated to the top of the page above the editorial content in this issue.
Enjoy our Topsy Turvy edition and support our advertisers who help to bring this free weekly publication to your neighborhood.


October 21, 2010
Volume 54
Number 39
2 Sections


P.R.S.T. STD
PAID
RUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570
PERMIT NO. 8


THE OBSERVER NEWS


Some amendments excite interest;

others not so much


* By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
SOUTH COUNTY Preparing
for the November 2 general elec-
tion ballot, about 200 South Coun-
ty voters assembled here last week
to review six proposed amend-
ments to the Florida Constitution.
They questioned and comment-
ed as Mickey Castor, president
of the League of Women Voters,
Hillsborough County chapter, pro-
vided a non-partisan overview of
each potential amendment during
a two-hour session in Community
Hall sponsored by the Sun City


Center Forum. The amendments
discussion was initiated by Mari-
lyn Balkany, SCC resident and
activist.
Amendment 2, which would
give a homesteaded property tax
break to deployed military person-
nel, prompted the most positive
reaction among the mostly retiree
audience. They applauded em-
phatically in obvious support of
U.S. troops currently posted in nu-
merous hot spots around the world
as Castor told them a vote for the
amendment would reduce property
taxes for military personnel while


also limiting property tax revenues
for counties and cities around the
state, plus place that limitation in
the state constitution from which it
could not be easily removed.
Their greatest concern was the
calculation and the length of time
the tax break would be effective.
Castor said the additional property
tax exemption would be commen-
surate with the amount of time
each home-owning member of the
U.S. armed forces, including the
Coast Guard, the National Guard
and their reserves, was on active
See AMENDMENTS, page 10


Ruskin fire station eyed for community cultural center
a By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
RUSKIN Al O-year-old dream
soon may be realized here.
For at least the last decade, local
leaders have talked about a dedi-
cated community cultural center,
preferably on a downtown site as
part of the long-term business dis-
trict revitalization. The conversa-
Melody Jameson tion turned determined as Ruskin's
Soon to be vacated, the Ruskin Fire and Rescue building (above), lo- formal Community Plan was ham-
cated in the heart of the community's business district, could morph mered out earlier in this decade,
into its next stage of usefulness in short order. The 4,600-square- citing the center as a specific ob-
foot, concrete block structure was earmarked for wide ranging com- jective.
munity functions October 6 with a formal resolution conveying it And, on October 6, Hillsbor-
in principle to the not-for-profit Ruskin Community Development
Foundation. See COMMUNITY CENTER, page I I


Go local: finding your home away from home


Finding the perfect pumpkin MitchTraphagen
The Great Pumpkin is alive and well in the pumpkin patch at Hydro
Harvest Farms at 1101 East Shell Point Road in Ruskin. Owners
John and Terrie Lawson have created a fun and, of course, spooky
pumpkin patch so you can find your special great pumpkin for Hal-
loween.


* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net
Within the first few minutes in
the city, I stepped outside of my
studio apartment on New York's
Upper West Side and looked down
the street to Central Park just 100
yards away. In the other direction
were beautiful brownstone build-
ings with tree-lined sidewalks out
front. Children were playing and
couples walked hand-in-hand to-
wards the park.
"Excuse me, could you tell me
where apartment 24 is?" a voice
behind me asked.
I turned to see a 30-something
year-old man carrying luggage
with airline tags still freshly at-
tached. A cab had just dropped
him off in front of my building. In
that instance, I became aware of
two things. First, he thought I was
a local a surprise considering
I had only been in the city for an
hour. Second, he was likely visit-
ing New York in the same manner


I was using a website like airb-
nb.com to rent an apartment rather
than a room in a hotel.
Airbnb matches travelers with


people who have apartments,
homes or even couches to rent. It
came to prominence during the
See HOME AWAY FROM HOME, page 12


A flutist performs outside of the Museum of Natural History, just a
short walk from my apartment. Staying in a residential neighbor-
hood changed my outlook on the city.


Are you familiar with where they stand on issues important
to you and your family?
Have questions about their official objectives in the next few years?
Ready to mark your general election ballot on November 2?
Join us and get face to face with the men and women who may be making
decisions for you and yours on county and state levels
Your Last Chance Candidates' Forum
10 a.m., Saturday, October 23
Hillsborough Community College/Southshore Campus
E. Shell Point Road at 24th Street N.E., Ruskin (East of Lennard High School)
(Elevator to second floor conference room)
Light Refreshments Non-Partisan Spanish-English Translator
Jointly sponsored by M&M Printing and its family of community newspapers The Ruskin Observer, The SCC Obsener, The
Riverniew Current, Hillsborough Community College/Southshore Campus, and Ruskin Community Development Foundation





2 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

ThuIrsday, Octobier-14l-2010






AlI Time Hi nIi


(next to Walgreen's)
809 N. Pebble Beach Blvd.
Sun City Center
813-634-3331 (ask for Coin Buyers)

URGENTLY NEEDED
* 1/2 Cents through Bust Dollars
* U.S. Commemorative Coins
* Proof & Mint Sets
* Pocket Watches
* Slot Machines (pre 1945)
* G.S.A. Dollars (Carson City)
* American Eagles (silver and gold)
* Rolex Watches


for Accumulations, Collections, Estates
S IViER IN S IGTO DLLR 1.5 d


1964 & earlier:
Halves ...............................5... 5 & up
Quarters ................................3.37 & up
D im es ................................... .1.35 & up
1965 1970:
Halves ............................. 1.75 per coin


*School Rings
* BIr~ -k~n .Tc'. cl il\
CI.1C %%C I
*B icic Ic tI

" G & WI \\i li, I pt ickc i 1 1i ii'di
*"Dcn ii I Dcn GN&I
*\iIIl Bfl'l) C- 7


Silver Dollars:
l87-Y1u4...........................16.00 & up
1921-1935 .............................. 15.00 & up
Fine plus or better
UNC, new rolls 1878-1904...... 550 & up
UNC, new rolls 1922-1925....... 360 & up
Huge Premiums For High Quality Uncirculated Rolls or Bags

--NI


* U.S. Gold Coins:
$1 I, $2o ,
7- ,5-Is33I
* K-R.nd d
* Esd'l (
* GckI Post *
* Nlplc Lal.
* P P tn '
* GC 'kI B.isr
* Inldu-lal GolII &


S125 to $2,000 & up
i,000 to $40,000 & up


STERLING SILVER A






OCTOBER 21, 2010


Complete comprehensive

eye exam for only $45.00.

Dr. Casey Maloney now seeing patients in Sun
City Center. Make your appointment today and
receive a comprehensive eye exam for only $45.

Let us adjust your glasses for FREE.
No appointment necessary.

When it comes to your vision,
experience matters. Schedule
your next eye exam with
Casey Maloney, OD. today.




Casey Maloney, OD P
Board Cerillied Oplometric Ph',, siciar f


1647 Sun City Center Plaza, Suite 202
Q i-nr P .........................


THE PATIENTAND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE PAYMENT, CANCEL PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR
ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR
THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 3


The Golf Club at Cypre Creek
1011 Cypress Village Blvd. Ruskin
FULL SERVICE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
"Don'tjust go out to eat..come and dine at Cypress Creek"
CRAS Ts.-


S Happy
SHour
3 to 7p.m.
EVERYDAY
Check our Lounge Menu
Serving: Tuesday till 4 p.m.
Wed. Sat. 11 a.m. to Close


Serving
Liver & Onions
with Bacon
Wednesday thru
Saturday evenings

$1099


S- - GOLF SPECIAL: - - - GOLF SPECIAL: -- --
ONE FREE ROUND OF GOLF: ONE FREE ROUND OF GOLF:
with purchase of another round of golf' with purchase of another round of golf
Rates;49 + tax before 12 p.m. '39 + tax after 12 p.m. Rate'491 + tax before 12 p.m. '395 + tax after 12 p.m.
Call for your Tee Time right now! Call for your Tee Time right now!
813-634-8888 813-634-8888
Oyvad w/this coupon Exp.10/31/10 Not vd w/any other offers nlyvalid w/this coupon Exp. 10/31/10 Not vlid w/any other offers


Christian Science Heals!

First Church of Christ, Scientist
204 2nd St. N.W. Ruskin, FL 33570
(813) 645-6102
Sunday Service.................................................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School ................................................ 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service............................................5:00 p.m.
All Are Welcome


FAMILY DENTISTRY


Kirk D. Parrott, D.D.S

Carl E. Friedman, D.D.S.

902 N. Tamiami Trail, Ruskin, FL 33570
(Across from Sweetbay Supermarket)
NEW PATIENTS WELCOME
(813) 645-6491
Members Amencan Dental Associaton, Flonda State Dental Association, Flonda West Coast Dental
Association, Manatee County Dental Association and Hillsborough County Dental Association



L '

By: Dana Dittmar, Executive Director
SCC Chamber News


When I moved into my first
apartment after college, a neigh-
bor left a nice bottle of wine on
my doorstep with a card saying
S "welcome to
the neighbor-
hood." I was
so touched by
this unexpect-
ed gesture, and
-L it stuck with
You, Me & me. A couple
Business of years later
By Dana Dittmar when my kind
beef benefactor
moved out, I
kept the tradition going by placing
a gift on the doorstep of the new
tenant. It made me feel great!
Technology may advance at light
speed and clothing styles may
change from year to year, but do-
ing something nice for someone
else never goes out of style. One
of the reasons I wanted this posi-
tion with the Chamber is because
the businesses in this area have a
long history and strong reputation
of helping one another. That has
never been more true than during
the past three years of our Great
Recession.
When I mentioned the Chamber
office badly needed new paint,


Sherwin Williams came through
and donated the paint. As word
of this spread, the phone began to
ring with local business people and
residents alike, volunteering to do
the actual painting. Someone else
donated flat screen monitors to
replace the bo\cs" that took up
most of our desks. And our neigh-
bor, Payant Financial, popped
over with an offer to help us host
a "Raise the Roof' Tailgate Party
in December to come up with the
money to fix our leaking roof.
There have been so many well-
wishers who have stopped by the
office to introduce themselves and
talk to me about the Chamber's fu-
ture direction. To a person, every
one of them left saying "If there is
anything you need or anything I
can help you with, all you have to
do is call me." The thing is, I know
in my heart they mean every word
and that's not only a huge comfort,
it's an inspiration as well.
It's neighbor helping neighbor,
businesses working with compli-
mentary businesses to not only
help each other, but to offer better
services to the community. That's
nice. And that never goes out of
style.


I


STKNOX
ALUMINUM
Office Address: OF RUSKIN
709 12th St. N.E.
Ruskin, FL 33570
IXvxEi o v iVXiE: WPV S


SOur Customers Are Our Best Advertisement" i
CHECK THE... Concrete Carports
SQuality Pool Enclosures Screen Rooms
Garage Screens Glass Rooms
SDifference Vinyl Windows Roof Overs
SPrice FA
813-645-3529 Lic. RX0057641 FAX: 813-645-7353


Ribbon cutting ceremony for Costco
On Oct. 12, Costco hosted a Greater Riverview Chamber of Com-
merce Ribbon Cutting Ceremony to celebrate the opening of their gas
station, located at 10921 Causeway Blvd., Brandon. Local businesses
came out to enjoy menu samples and learn why Costco takes pride in
providing the lowest fuel prices in the area. At no additional cost to the
consumer, Costco uses an additive that makes a cleaner burning fuel as
well as keeping the fuel injectors cleaner for better performance.


Free Shred-a-Thon
to fight identity
theft
Cotter Financial will hold its
third annual community Shred-a-
Thon from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on
Saturday, Oct. 23. The shredding
will take place in the parking lot
between 139 and 137 S. Pebble
Beach Blvd. and is open to the
public at no charge.
As in prior years, a large com-
mercial shredding truck will be on
the premises to make short work
of document destruction while
you watch. A video screen on the
truck allows you to observe the
actual shredding of your sensitive
documents.
More than 20,000 Floridians be-
come victims of identity theft each
year, according to Gary Cotter,
president of Cotter Financial.
To enable residents to easily and
safely dispose of sensitive docu-
ments, Cotter Financial sponsors
this annual event as a community
service. For more information, call
634-2000.





COTTER
FINANCIAL
YOUR MONEY. YOUR LIFE.


Local fitness club welcomes Healthways
SilverSneakers members at no cost


Curves of Apollo Beach is roll-
ing out the red carpet to members
of the award-winning Healthways
SilverSneakers Fitness Program,
the nation's leading exercise pro-
gram designed for older adults.
SilverSneakers members are now
eligible to join Curves of Apollo
Beach at no cost.
"We are so pleased to welcome
local SilverSneakers members to




Curve,


Curves of Apollo Beach," said
club owner Peggy Heinmiller. "As
you age, your risks for debilitating
disease increase, and being over-
weight or obese significantly adds
to that risk. At Curves of Apollo
Beach, we have programs that help
women of all ages do the three
most significant things they can do
to decrease their risks -- manage
their weight, exercise regularly,
and eat healthfully."
Curves is a very sup-
portive atmosphere.
Women are now enjoy-
ing the many benefits of


strength training -- protecting bone
density and avoiding osteoporosis,
strengthening supportive muscles
that protect joints and keep backs
healthy, and burning significant
calories through metabolically
active muscle mass.
There are 6,500 Curves locations
and more than 2.5 million women
in the U.S. who are eligible for the
SilverSneakers program.
For more information about
Curves of Apollo Beach, call
Peggy or Rosemary at 645-0909.


rl~.... C~,~~MEN&I


..............................................................................................................
.... ........ .... ...


........................................................... ......... ...................................... .. ... .. ........... .....


~~~II~'li~;L"dE~""i~~


LICENSED


-- -







4 OBSERVR N


South County
voters get last
chance to check
out candidates
Local and state office candi-
dates who want to represent South
County's citizens in the years
ahead will be seeking their favor
in earnest on Saturday, Oct. 23.
The election season's last can-
didates' open forum, designed to
give area residents the opportu-
nity to question their would-be
representatives on multiple is-
sues, will be conducted from 10
a.m. to noon on the SouthShore
campus of Hillsborough Commu-
nity College in Ruskin, according
to Sandy Council, one of the or-
ganizers. The campus is located
on East Shell Point road at 24th
Street N.E. The event will be held
in the college's second floor con-
ference room accessed both by
elevator and by stairway.
The non-partisan, informational
forum is being sponsored for the
general public free of charge by
Hillsborough Community Col-
lege/Southshore, M&M Printing
and The Observer News, as well
as the not-for-profit Ruskin Com-
munity Development Foundation.
A dozen candidates, including
those seeking seats on the Coun-
ty Commission, on the County
School Board and in the State
Senate as well as the State House,
are expected to take part in the
open forum, going on the record
to present their best qualifications
and answer all questions from the
audience, Council said. With the
Nov. 2 general election just 10
days after the forum, Council said
she expects "some tough inquiries
and close scrutiny as voters focus
on the choices they will be mak-
ing" at their polling places.
Council also noted that at least
one English-Spanish translator
would be on hand to provide trans-
lations both of questions asked by
Spanish speaking attendees and of
the responses in English by can-
didates.
Light refreshments will be
served.


Drive longer with a

MICHELIN tiret and

drive away with


$


after mail-in rebate.


Get a $70 Prepaid
MasterCard Card
via mail-in rebate
when you buy
ANY set of four
new MICHELIN'
brand passenger
Sor light truck


tires October
ll 1 i14 through
~f. November 1 5,
2010, and
suLbmit a
redemption
form.

4 _


At Home Auto Care, Inc.
2003 S US Highway 41 Ruskin, Fl. 33570
(813) 645-0339
We Are a AAA Approved Auto Repair Center
www.athomeauto.net
Hours of Operation Mon-Fri 8:00 am 5:00 pm


Build up people with positive comments


Michael Troy Photography
Ribbon cutting ceremony for

DP Fitness & Wellness
On Oct. 8, Deb Peters, hosted a Greater Riverview Chamber of Com-
merce Ribbon Cutting Ceremony to celebrate the grand opening of her
business, DP Fitness & Wellness. Chamber members were treated to a
delicious breakfast as they learned about the purpose and goals of this
innovative approach to healthy living.
With no storefront or membership fees, DP Fitness and Wellness pro-
vides an overhaul of unhealthy lifestyle habits by coming to the client's
home and assessing food choices and physical fitness needs. After the
initial meeting and interview, a personalized plan is implemented and
weekly visits are scheduled.
By combining food choices, individualized exercise programs, and a
focus on health, Deb's goal is to make it as convenient as possible for
her clients to learn how to make healthy life choices. For more informa-
tion, contact Deb Peters by calling (813) 731-8767 or e-mail debpeters@
dpfitness.org.


I don't quite know when it start-
ed, but it is spreading and having
a darkening
effect upon
the world

S\ in. What's
spreading,
you ask?
Positive The open
Positivee season for
Talk cheap shots.
By William Hodges At first, I
thought it
might have started back in the late
'70s with the roasts that took the
place of testimonial dinners once
used to honor men and women
who deserved our esteem. You
might remember that Dean Martin
and the so-called rat pack-an apt
name for the group-popularized
the roast. It's also important to
note that most of that group spent
more time on psychiatrists' couch-
es than they spent in their own
beds. A more dysfunctional group
would be hard to find. Yet we, as a
society, are busy emulating them.
What does that say about us?
However, cheap shots did not
start with the rat pack. They were
just elevated to an art form by
them. Kipling wrote about the ver-
bal attacks on the military during
his time, in his poem "Tommy."
The final lines say it all. "For it's
Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an'
'chuck him out the brute!' But
it's 'Savior of 'is country' when


the guns begin to shoot; An' it's
Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an'
anything you please. An' Tommy
ain't a bloomin' fool-you bet that
Tommy sees!" Not too much dif-
ferent than today. During the Gulf
War, we could not do enough for
our brave young men and women
in uniform. Yet after they came
home, snide remarks filled the air,
often under the guise of humor.
A national columnist decided the
U. S. Postal Service was fair game
for her humor. She complained
vehemently that mail that was sup-
posed to be delivered in two days
was taking three. She made jokes
about Chicago being the "great
black hole" of the postal service.
I'd like to see her operate her office
without the U. S. Postal Service.
Today, it's common to hear the
term "snail mail." I can't imagine
carrying a letter all the way from
New York to California for 43
cents. No wonder our postal work-
ers are so frustrated when they are
made the butt of these very unkind
jokes. They, like you and me, are
honest, decent people doing the
very best job they know how. It
might be nice if, when we walk up
to the counter or see our mailman
on our street, we tell them how
much we appreciate the service.
The postal employees aren't
alone. Government employees of
all kinds take the same kind of
hit. I have a friend who works for
IRS. He would rather take a physi-


cal beating than disclose who he
works for, because he knows he
will have to listen to some horror
story disguised as a cute anec-
dote. Give these folks a break, too.
They're doing their best in a very
complex society to provide quality
service to all of us. A kind word
instead of a cruel joke will be ap-
preciated.
When we reach out and tell peo-
ple we really care about and ap-
preciate them, it can be just a little
bit scary, because we never know
how they will respond. It's much
safer to give backhanded compli-
ments that we can withdraw if we
are rebuffed. Keep in mind this
fact: Compliments build people
up and complaints or backhanded
compliments tear them down. Any
jackass can kick down a barn, but
it takes a craftsman to build one.
With people, are you a crafts-
man or a jackass? Stop the cheap
shots!
"Hodges is a nationally recog-
nized speaker, trainer and syndi-
cated columnist. He also hosts an
interview-format television pro-
gram, Spotlight on Government,
on the Tampa Bay Community
Network which airs Mondays at
8 p.m. and Wednesdays at 7:30
p.m. (Bright House channel 950,
Verizon channel 30). The shows
can also be viewed at www.hodg-
esvideos.com. Phone: 813-633-
1523. Email: bill@billhodges.com
Website: www.billhodges.com"


ATTN: Women Considering a Facelift


The Real Truth


About Facelifts
Limited Seating Seminar

Fri., Oct 29 2:30 p.m.
Club Renaissance Sun City Center
If you're thinking about getting a Facelift. don't
until you learn insider secrets that very few
plastic surgeons will reveal to you.
Get the important facts first. Attend "The Real
Truth About Facelifts."

What You Need to Know

Before Getting a Facelift
At this limited seating seminar you will learn:
How to get long lasting results without
the risk of general anesthesia;
How your recovery time can be far less
than what is required for most facelifts;
Why you can look ten years younger
with no one knowing you had a facelift.
Imagine how you'll feel as you look more
youthful while everyone tries to figure
out what's different about you; and
Four critical questions you must ask every
plastic surgeon you are considering.
Before getting a facelift, don't you owe it to yourself
to get the latest information so you can make the
right choice? Space is limited for this free event!
Pick up the phone and
call our seminar registration line at

877-346-2435
You'll be glad you did!
Dr F .:h.-rd D C' L te- ll.rI.:. .I Int.i eli-t .::.:.n:


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


OCTOBER 21. 2010






OCTOBER 21, 2010




Ray's G olf (arts Battrynrtion/" ting
Rentals Available- Trades Accepted
END of SUMMER SPECIAL Parts-Service- Sales
f Includes Hi Speed, Sand Bucket,
Mirror, New Trojan Batteries with
-oneyve arrwarrany n v


oete 6Volt Batteries G- CLUB (AR PR[EEDENTS
S469 +core,fees,
I and taxes starting at' l95
I Includes 18 Month Worronty Special Ends 10/31/10
SI 2 YEAR WARRANTY*
Complete V 1%t R tt ri. II.1 l
S complete 8V V ltteriKes I l See Associate for details
Se 813-634-6646 Publix Wal-Mart
519 +core,fees, NEW LOCATION SR674
and taxes (ART PAT ACCE((SSIBLE Ray's
Includes 18 Month Warrnty C 0o rf SR67 & US301 Golfart


Apollo Beach Woman's Club announces


upcoming activities
Community outreach programs
and fundraising activities are in
full swing for members of the
Apollo Beach Woman's Club.
Most recently, Barbara Lamneck
and Rosemary Kolodziejczak co-
chairs of Community Service,
with the help of many members
purchased underwear, shorts,
shirts and belts at the request of the
school nurses at Apollo Beach and
Doby Elementary Schools, both
of which serve the Apollo Beach
community.
For Thanksgiving, grocery store
gift certificates in the amount of
$100 each will be given to four
families in need, two each from
Apollo Beach and Doby Elemen-
tary schools.
During the Christmas holiday
season, the club will adopt two
families, one each from the two
elementary schools. An Angel Tree
will be available at the November
luncheon so members may take an
angel with a gift wish to fulfill and
return the wrapped gift with the
tag at the December meeting.
Lamneck and Kolodziejczak
also are collecting Box Tops for
Education and Campbell Soup
labels that later will be redeemed
to help provide supplies for school
classrooms.
The next ABWC fundraising
activity is the annual November
bake sale slated for Tuesday, Nov.
23, in front of the Apollo Meat
Market on Apollo Beach Boule-
vard, two days before Thanksgiv-
ing. Proceeds from this event also
support scholarship and commu-
nity activities.
The event is being organized by
Sonja Davidson, who is looking
for volunteers to set up, sell items,
and bake cakes, pies and cookies.
In addition to its philanthropic
work, members of the club also
enjoy enrichment activities which
include:
Book Club: The book group
meets monthly in members' homes


to discuss the latest novel members
have read. The Nov. 18 meeting
will feature the book Deep Shad-
ow by Rand Wayne White.
Bridge Club: Bridge players meet
the fourth Monday of each month
at 9:30 a.m. at the Apollo Beach
Golf Clubhouse on Golf and Sea
Blvd. Players contribute $3, with
two-thirds of the proceeds contrib-
uted to the scholarship fund.
Culture Club: Activities are orga-
nized monthly to introduce mem-
bers to the wide variety of places
of interest in the Tampa Bay area.
On Nov. 16, a trip to Soloman's
Castle is planned. On Dec. 16, the
group will see a Holiday Musical
treat at Ruth Eckerd Hall.
Garden Club: The group meets
each month for various activities
that include talks by horticulturists
or visits to nearby garden or horti-
cultural spots.
The club's next membership
meeting is Monday, Nov. 8 at
Doc's Grill at Summerfield Cross-
ing Golf Club in Riverview. The
program will feature Judy Nolas-
co, an Apollo Beach resident and
the new Academic Dean for the
South Shore campus of Hillsbor-
ough Community College, who
will bring the membership up-to-
date on the continuing expansion
of programs at the college to meet
their growing demand.
The cost of the luncheon is $16
and all are welcome. To make a
reservation, contact Regina Lesnau
at (813) 642-3305 orby e-mail rle-
SiitkII I(o10\\ u coitliln coin
ABWC dues are $20 annually
and can be sent to Judy Peck, vice-
president /membership at 6639
Cambridge Park Dr., Apollo Beach,
FL 33572.
The club also has a website
www.apollobeachwomansclub.
com which contains information
about the club's activities and
dates, officers names and copies of
the club newsletter.


Legislative meet and greet
The Ruskin-SouthShore Chamber of Commerce hosted a Legislative
Meet & Greet at The Resort & Club at Little Harbor in Ruskin on Oct.
13. Candidates who attended included,left to right: Sandy Murman, Ken
Hagan, John Dingfelder, Linda Saul-Sena, Greg Steube, Sally Harris,
and Z. J. Hafeez. The event was sponsored by TECO, Mosaic and Little
Harbor.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 5


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Locals win at martial arts competition
On Oct. 1, in Fort Myers T-N-T Academy, home of Oldskool Grappler
Martial Arts, brought its mixed martial arts win counts to 3-0 with victo-
ries by Juan 'Jay' Marerro,Yannick Dieth, and Mamood Mohammad.
The first of the three victories on Sept. 17 in Ybor City with the first
amateur MMA fight in Florida, Jay Marrero earned 'fight of the night'
accolades with the Art of Fighting promotion team.
Hosted by Amateur Fight Nation in Fort Myers at Harbourside Event
Center, Mamood Mohammad brought a unanimous decision victory, and
Yannick Dieth earned an 11 sec. KO win over his opponent.
T-N-T Academy offers an entire program for most any competitor, ath-
lete, discipline, or anyone looking for some confidence building. Some
of the programs are Judo, SAMBO, Jiu Jitsu, Wrestling and Muay Thai
kickboxing, with classes available 6 days a week and affordable family
plans, it's a great way to 'beat' the couch potato out of anyone at any age.
For more information, call (813) 443-5569.


Riverview Memorial
VFW Post #8108

Riverview Memorial VFW Post
#8108, 7504 Riverview Dr.
presents
MEALS
Wednesday Spaghetti Dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m.
Friday Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.
Sunday Breakfast from 9 a.m. to
noon

SPECIAL MEALS
Saturday, Nov. 6 -- Men's
Auxiliary Steak Dinner
ENTERTAINMENT
Friday, Oct. 22 -- Jeff Olsen
Saturday, Oct. 23 -- Calvin O
Saturday, Oct. 30 -- Jeff Olsen
Friday, Nov. 5 -- Jeff Olsen
Saturday, Nov. 6 -- Calvin O
Friday, Nov. 12 -- Jeff Olsen
Friday, Nov. 19 -- Jeff Olsen
Saturday, Nov. 20 -- Calvin O
Friday, Nov. 26 -- Jeff Olsen
Friday, Dec. 3 -- Jeff Olsen
Saturday, Dec. 4 -- Calvin O
Friday, Dec. 10 -- Jeff Olsen
EVENTS
Saturday, Oct. 30 -- Halloween
Party at 8 p.m.
Costume Contest
Karaoke with Jeff Olsen

CANTEEN HAPPENINGS
Bar Bingo on Monday at 6:30 p.m.
Bar Bingo with Lori on
Wednesday at 1 p.m.
Fire in the Hole on Saturdays at
1 p.m.


Community-wide
garage sale
The Summerfield Ladies' Club
is again sponsoring a community-
wide garage sale that will include
29 neighborhoods and 300 plus
family sales.
The date set for this fabulous
event is Saturday, Oct. 23, from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. Your choices are so
vast, they all cannot be mentioned.
Start early and stay all morning for
this treasure hunt.


Huth and Booth Photography

Ribbon Cutting Ceremony for
Downtown Divas
Recently, Downtown Divas hosted a Greater Riverview Chamber of
Commerce Ribbon Cutting Ceremony to celebrate their new boutique
location at 6128 Winthrop Town Center Ave. in Riverview.
Downtown Divas delivers metropolitan high fashion styles to bou-
tiques throughout Florida. The stores keep limited numbers of each style,
so you won't see other people wearing the same outfit as you. Stay ahead
of the trends in fashion, visit their store and allow their personal shop-
pers to get you cruising in Diva style.
For more information about Downtown Divas, call Camille Schwabe at
(813) 315-9887. For information about the Greater Riverview Chamber
of Commerce, visit www.RiverviewChamber.com or call the Riverview
Chamber office.


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THE OBSERVER NEWS
The SCC Observer &
The Riverview Current
210 Woodland Estates S.W.
Ruskin, FL 33570
813-645-3111
Fax: 813-645-4118
www.ObserverNews.net
Published Every Thursday
by M&M Printing Co., Inc. 645-4048
EDITORIAL:
Brenda Knowles ............Publisher/Editor
brenda@observernews.net
Mitch Traphagen.................Online Editor
mitch@observernews.net
Penny Fletcher..........Contributing Writer
penny@observernews.net
Melody Jameson......Contributing Writer
mj@observernews.net
Julie Ball.............. Press Releases/W riter
news@observernews.net
All press releases, news articles and
photos may be emailed to news@
observerews.net, faxed to 645-4118, or
mailed to Observer News, 210 Woodland
Estates Ave. SW, Ruskin, FL 33570
SALES:
Vilma Stillwell... Display Advertising Rep.
vilma@observernews.net
Nan Kirk........... Display Advertising Rep.
nan@observernews.net
For current rates and circulation
information visit our website at
www.ObserverNews.net
CLASSIFIED / CIRCULATION:
Beverly Kay......... Classified / Circulation
beverly@observernews.net
PRODUCTION:
Chere Simmons....Graphic Arts / Layout
chere@observemews.net
Sue Sloan .............Composition / Layout
sue@observernews.net

The views expressed by our writers are
not necesssanly shared by The Observer
News, SCC Observer, The Riverview
Current or M&M Pnnting Co., Inc.

We Accept

Audited by

VERIFICATION



Riverview Garden
Club meeting
The Riverview Garden Club will
host Cora Simon of Tomboy Tools
on Wednesday, Nov. 10 from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Riverview
Civic Center, 11020 Park Dr.,
Riverview.
All are invited.
For more information, call
Harriet Gord at (813) 727-6567.







6. OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT OCTOBER 21, 2010


SBarking is one of the ways dogs communicate. They
are asking for information about whether a person is
a threat, whether a person is going to interact with
them, or to let you know they are stressed.
Drs. Ott, Slaughter & Waldy
Nearly 100years of experience
S m) Voted Best Vet & Best Pet Services
Best Pet Resort with Medical Care
Provider of Free5z .. I A....1 I i
Founder of C.A.R. I ...... 1..,I
Ruskin Animal Hospital & Cat Clinic
715 U.S. Hwy. 41 S. Ruskin 813-645-6411
Mon./Wed./Thur./Fri. 7-5:30 (closed Thur 12-2) Sat. 7:30-1 Tues. 7-7


The Ruskin Moose Lodge #813 is located at
1212 E. Shell Point Road, Ruskin (813) 645-5919


Friday, Oct. 22 7-11
Saturday, Oct. 23 7-11
Friday, Oct. 29 7-11
Saturday, Oct. 30
Every Wednesday 5-7 p.
Every Thursday 5-7 p.
Every Friday 5-7 p.
Live music
Every Saturday 7-11]


All events are open to qualified
Moose members and guests.


p.m. Charlie Burns
p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins
p.m. Nickel and Dime
Halloween Dinner and Party
m. Spaghetti Dinner
m. Wings
m. Fish Fry

p.m. Karaoke by Kim


A look into the life


by Ryan Mattox
Lajes Field, Azores, AJES
Portugal -- Ever since it was
created during the early years of
America's entry into World War II,
the airfield on this small island in


Air Force Tech. Sgt. Tracy Diadone
the northeast Atlantic has been an
important crossroads for ships and
planes carrying people and cargo
to strategic locations throughout
Europe, Africa and the Middle
East.
Today, the son of an Apollo
Beach couple is one of only a little
more than 600 U.S. Air Force men
and women who operate a sort of
'pit stop' for military and commer-
cial aircraft. The small air base is
a refueling station where aircrews
can get fuel, rest, maintenance and
supplies before heading to their
final destination.
Air Force Tech. Sgt. Tracy
Daidone, son of Robert and Renee
Jones of Silver Falls Drive, Apollo
Beach, is the maintenance super-
intendent for the 65th Communi-
cations Group.
"As the communications squad-
ron maintenance superintendent,
I coordinate all communication
jobs that happen on Lajes," said
Daidone, a 1987 graduate of Kirby
High School in Memphis, TN.
"From servers pushing email and
data to airfield systems for flight
navigation, I affect it all. People are
great at what they do but everyone


needs a coach. I'm that coach."
Daidone and his fellow airmen
are part of the 65th Air Base Wing
tasked with playing an important
role in the fight against terrorism
by assisting with the movement of
war fighters, planes and
global communications
for commanders. This
small base with its huge
runway is located on the
small island of Terceira
in the Azores chain of
islands. With rolling
hills and green pastures,
it's an idyllic setting for
such an important mis-
sion.
"Lajes sits at a strate-
gic location in the Atlantic Ocean,"
said Daidone. "We can refuel and
extend the range of aircraft going
into the European or Southwest
Asian theaters. We also help our
allies transport their aircraft around
the world."
Although it is 900 miles from
the mainland, the Azores is a part
of Portugal and contains many
of the customs and traditions of
that country. From the running


Celebrating 36 Years in Business

CALL FOR FREE
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TERMITES? I
ASK ABOUT TERMIDOR
BRANDON
PEST CONTROL
Phone: (813) 685-7711
Fax: (813) 685-3607



ABCA holds public
meeting tonight
The Apollo Beach Civic Associa-
tion public meeting will take place
at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 21.
Guest speakers will include:
Mr. John Dingfelder-Democrat,
Candidate, County Commis-
sioner, District 1 and Mr. Andrew
Dorsey, Campaign Manager for
Mrs. Sandra Murman-Republican,
Candidate, County Commissioner,
District 1.
The public is invited to attend
this meeting, held at the Apollo
Beach Recreation Center, 664
Golf and Sea Blvd., to meet each
other and ask questions regarding
the upcoming election on Nov. 2.
The Apollo Beach Civic Asso-
ciation (ABCA) is an unbiased, or-
ganized group of volunteers estab-
lished to inform Apollo Beach
Residents of community issues
and upcoming events that impact
the Apollo Beach area.
Meetings are held at 7 p.m. on
the third Thursday of each month,
at the Apollo Beach Recreation
Center, 664 Golf and Sea Blvd.
For more information: PO. Box
3262, Apollo Beach, FL 33572 or
apollobchcivicassoc@tampabay.
rr.com.



of the bulls in the nearby city of
Praia da Vitoria just outside of
Lajes to the outdoor markets and
European-styled houses and farms,
the small island gives Americans
stationed here a slice of life that is
thoroughly European.
"Lajes is a unique community of
hard working people, a small town
feel where everyone knows each
other," said Daidone. "The coun-
tryside is beautiful and lush green
landscape, local food is amazing
and the local people are always
warm and inviting."
Assignments to Lajes range from
15 months to 24 months, depend-
ing upon whether or not an airman
is single or married. As with any
overseas location, the experience
they take away from here greatly
varies from person to person.
"I will remember fondly the
island and its people and Lajes
teamwork," said Daidone.
Just as their predecessors have
done for the past 67 years, Daidone
and his fellow airmen will continue
to be a strategically vital stop
between the U.S. and important
military missions overseas.


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Phone: (813) 634-0664
Fax: (813) 634-0668



Ruskin VFW Post #6287

Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120 U.S. 41 N. has listed the following
weekly activities. Meetings are: American Legion on 1st Wednesday
each month; VFW and LAVFW on the 2nd Wednesday each month;
and MAVFW on the 3rd Thursday each month.
Thursday, October 21- Bar
Bingo at 6 p.m. Men's Auxiliary


from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Music by You
2 Can from 7 to 11 p.m.
Saturday, October 23 Turkey
Shoot at 1 p.m. Music by Bert &
Sassy from 7 to 11 p.m.
Sunday, October 24- Irish
Nachos from 3 to 6 p.m.
Monday, October 25- $1 each
Taco Night from 4 to 7 p.m. Crew Night at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, October 26- Games in Lounge from 1 to 5 p.m. Kitchen
opens at 4:30 p.m. Bingo at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, October 27 Open.


Volunteers needed for Ruskin
Seafood Festival
The Ruskin-SouthShore Chamber of Commerce is looking for volun-
teers to work four hour shifts at the Ruskin Seafood Festival at E.G.
Simmons Park in Ruskin on Nov. 6 and 7. The festival begins Saturday
at 10 a.m. 5 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
This is a fun opportunity for individuals, civic organizations, youth
groups, or high school students to fulfill community service hours. Visit
www.ruskinchamber.org for details on getting involved as a volunteer at
the Ruskin Seafood Festival.


Aerial shot of Lajes Field, Azores, Portugal.


I



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STUCCO YOUR HOUSE AGAIN TM


I
I
I


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT


OCTOBER 21, 2010


CLMAE ROFCOTNGi -
11VA OP' le-Cte"le Lx. it Isuato








OCTOBER 21, 2010OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER* 7


FAMILY ITALIAN RESTAURANT


All entrees include warm bread and
a small house salad.



Chicken Marsala.......... 12.95
Chicken breast with mushroom
marsala wine sauce. Served with
side pasta.
Chicken Parmesan.......12.95
Breaded chicken breast served with
side pasta
Chicken Cacciatori......12.95
Chicken breast with mushrooms,
onions, peppers, light marinara
sauce served over pasta
Chicken Franchese...... 13.95
Lightly breaded chicken breast,
lemon butter wine sauce with side
pasta
Chicken Scarpariello..14.95
Sauteed with onions, mushrooms,
Italian sausage, pepeincini, black
and green olives, with light vinegar
over pasta


Homemade Tiramisu
Homemade Cannoli
NY-style Cheesecake
Specialty Desserts


Cappaini in Clam Sauce..........13.95
In wine or red sauce
Mussels Marinara..................... 14.95
Served over Cappalini, with red or white
sauce
Shrimp Fradiavolo.................... 14.95
Served over pasta
Shrimp Alfredo...................... 14.95
Served over fettuccine pasta
Shrimp Scampi Italiano...........15.95
Garlic, Romano tomatoes, mushrooms,
lemon butter sauce over Cappalini
Zuppa DiPese............................. 18.95
Clams, mussels, shrimp, scallops, calamari.
Served over Cappalini with red or white
wine sauce
Grouper Portofino .............. 18.95
Grouper filet with clams, mussels, over
Cappilini pasta
Shrimp Marsala .....................15.95
Large shrimp sauteed with mushrooms and
wine marsala sauce over fettucini pasta


Veal Parmesan ...........................15.95
Veal Picatta............................... 16.95
Lemon butter, capers and artichoke hearts
Veal Marsala ........................... 16.95
Marsala sauce with mushrooms
Veal Rollitini.............................. 18.95
Stuffed with ricotta cheese


Friedari...........................7.95
With marinara sauce and lemons
Mozzarella Sticks .....................5.95
6 fried sticks with marinara sauce
Bruschetta.....................................5.95
Tomato and mozzarella on French bread
Stuffed Mushrooms ...............7.95
Stuffed with crab meat
Shrimp Cocktail.........................7.95
7 shrimp with cocktail sauce and lemons
Mussells........................................9.95
In red/white sauce



Bowl ..........4.95 Cup .................3.95
Chef's choice

AS~nscdatw
House Dressing: Balsamic Vinegar
House Salad.............................. 2.95
Crisp mixed greens, fresh veggies topped
with house dressing
Caesar Salad ...............................3.95
Crisp Romaine, crunchy croutons, creamy
Caesar dressing
Chicken Caesar Salad ...............7.95
Great Caesar salad topped with seasoned
grilled chicken breast
Shrimp Caesar Salad .................9.95
Great Caesar salad topped with shrimp
Italian Salad .............................. 5.95
Romaine lettuce, tomatoes, red onions,
mozzarella cheese, and black olives
Italian Chef Salad.......................7.95
Lettuce, tomatoes, ham, turkey, roast beef,
green peppers, onions, olives, Swiss and
American cheese with Italian dressing


(C4(es,
Served during Lunch only, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
All subs served on a fresh Italian hoagie roll
with chips. Add homemade fries for $1.50.
Chicken Parmesan ..................... 7.95
Eggplant Parmesan ....................7.95
Egg, Pepper, Onion, Cheese .....7.95
Philly Cheese Steak ...................7.95
This is a true Philly cheese steak just like
you get in Philly.
Mushrooms, onions, and peppers............ 8.95
A True Italian Classic..................7.95
Italian sausage, peppers and onions
Meatball Parmesan ....................7.95
Our famous homemade meatballs with
marinara and melted cheese
Italian Combo ...........................7.95
Salami, ham, roast beef, provolone cheese,
lettuce, tomatoes, onions, and Italian
dressing toasted or cold)
Pick 2 ........................................... 7.95
Salad, soup or 1/2 sandwich


C1asta
Mom's Lasagna ..........................10.95
7 layers of pasta, ricotta cheese, marinara,
mozzarella, parmigian Italian spices, ground
beef, baked to perfection!
Rigatoni a la Vodka Sauce......12.95
With chicken or Italian sausage
Fettucini Alfredo........................9.95
A dd chicken ........................................................ 3.00
Baked Ziti ..................................9.95
Spaghetti ...................................................10.95
Cheese ravioli with marinara sauce and
mozzarella
Manicotti......................................9.95
Eggplant Parmesan ..................10.95
With side pasta


Observations: Cheering on a triumph


The entire world cheered last
week when the 33 Chilean miners
emerged one-by-one to the surface.
Religion or political preference or
financial condition did not matter;
seeing those men rescued
was a universal reason to
feel good. It was some- -
thing humanity needed.
Good news has been in
short supply of late.
When the oil well was .-
capped in the Gulf of Obser
Mexico, that, too, was By Mitch
certainly good news. mitch@obse
But it was hard to cheer


knowing that millions of gallons
of crude oil were now floating (or
sinking) in the Gulf.
The 33 miners, clad in sunglasses
to protect their eyes from the rela-
tive darkness of two and a half
months trapped nearly a half mile
beneath the surface, were raised in
a rescue pod and greeted by fam-
ily members, friends, and mine and
government officials. The joy that
everyone on the scene displayed
was palpable. It was so intense and
sincere that it spread around the
world along with the live televi-
sion feed. I can't imagine anyone
watching it that didn't feel the hap-
piness. I would imagine most peo-
ple, regardless of where on earth
they were, felt a little bit of pride,
too. Something good had come
from something bad. Those miners
demonstrated that it is possible to
overcome unimaginable adversity
and emerge with a smile on your
face. It was a triumph for all of hu-
manity.
The day after the rescue, Brenda
Knowles, the editor and publisher
of The Observer News (and my
boss), sent me an email suggesting
a topic for this column. Brenda is a
dear friend and one of the smartest


er
Trn
3rvI


women I know. I've learned over
the years if something strikes her,
it is well worth paying attention. In
reading her email I realized that I
couldn't possibly ex-
press myself as well as
she did, so here are her
words:
t "Last night I watched
both the TV show Survi-
vor and the rescue of the
S miners in Chile, flipping
ationS back and forth between
aphagen channels. What a con-
ernews.net trast! While the TV per-
sonalities complained
about how hard their lives were and
about being cold, wet, uncomfort-
able all the while bickering with
each other, the REAL survivors
in Chile established an unprec-
edented level of endurance, unity,
leadership skills and spirituality.
The contrast was remarkable and
sad. Americans used to be known
for their sense of fairness, strength,
determination, and a "can do" at-
titude -- all of that was displayed
by the miners and their government
officials. Now too often we are
known for being poor role models,
and for greed and self-serving en-
titlements. How unfortunate for the
show (Survivor) that they actually
went up against real survivors. Do
you suppose anyone else saw this
contrast?"
I think a lot of people saw con-
trasts between those who whine
and complain and those who
emerge victorious from true adver-
sity. While the miners were by no
means perfect they now admit
that in the first days of their entrap-
ment, fist fights had broken out and
there was an incredible sense of de-
spair felt by all in the end, they
worked together and overcame
challenges that are inconceivable.


Americans are still all of the
things that we used to be known
for. By and large, Americans are
fair, strong, determined and have
a "can do" attitude. The world still
looks to us for leadership, and we
are still leading.
Seeing it from within, it is dif-
ficult to look good in an election
year. There are significant numbers
of people who are highly motivated
to tear down their opponents. One
party says that ~.lt il hini. is horri-
ble and getting worse. Another says


that i \ i. llini. is getting better. No
matter what guy is talking, it is al-
ways the other guy's fault entirely.
So, who is right? No one. No one is
right because an election is all just
a game. Once the election is over,
then those elected will get back to
some semblance of work until the
next election year rolls around and
it happens all over again.
It is an ugly, frustrating and often
nauseating process. But it remains
a process that is envied and ad-
mired around the world. That ugly


Mitch Traphagen
As a nation, it is hard to look good during an election year. At the
end of the day, however, it has been working for America for 234
years.


process works for this country and
it has been working for the past
234 years. Depending on the cir-
cumstances, some elections have
historically been worse than oth-
ers and certainly this election year
seems destined to be among the
worst. But I doubt very much that
it really will be. There have been
some pretty ugly elections in this
country long before any of us were
born -- and there will be more. But
if 33 men can emerge smiling from
a subterranean prison after two and
a half months, I am fairly confident
that we can survive an election
year. As with all things, this too,
shall pass.
If an Iliiiin. the political process
in the United States has mellowed
considerably over the centuries. In
1804, Aaron Burr, a sitting Vice
President of the United States, shot
and killed Alexander Hamilton, a
former secretary of the treasury, in
a duel. You don't see that kind of
thing going on anymore (yes, it's
funny to say, "I wish" but really,
you don't. That's not leadership).
Oh, and guess what? It was an elec-
tion year. Surprised?
The reality is that, regardless of
your politics, politicians are, by
and large, not going to make your
life better. Having seen the inner
workings of Washington, I know
that elected officials have their
hands full with the day-to-day
job of keeping things running. In
a sense, it is no different from a
typical household -- going to work,
earning money and paying the bills.
Along the way they take an occa-
sional night out for the odd Con-
gressional Proclamation and other
things that are important to some
and ignored by many.

See OBSERVATIONS, page 10


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER -


OCTOBER 21, 2010





8 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Upcoming
events:


Simmons Park
after dark
Hillsborough County Parks, Rec-
reation & Conservation will pres-
ent "Simmons Park After Dark,"
a haunted, spooky approach to a
Halloween celebration on Friday,
Oct. 29, 7 10 p. m., 2401 19th
Ave. N.W. in Ruskin. There is a
$2 fee per carload to get into the
park.
Hop aboard a thriller hayride to
be dropped in the middle of the
park's dark trails. Through this
guided trail (by the "de-ranged"
park rangers), you will visit places
you never knew existed in Sim-
mons Park: an insane asylum,
death row, frightful nursery and
clown town!
Providing you return from the
trails, you can take a stab at Farm-
er John's frightful dinner delights
from his Ghoulish grill.
Zombie frozen
A drinks also will
be available from
Kona Ice. For the
younger ones
(and those eas-
ily scared), there
will be a jumbo
screen featuring a children's Hal-
loween movie, starting at 8 p. m.
This event is free, so bring the
family and stay for dinner.
Boo Fest at
Hydro Harvest
Farms
Hydro Harvest Farms at 1101
Shell Point Rd East in Ruskin, is
having their 5th Annual Boo Fest.
This is a free event for everyone. It
will be on October 23 from 12-3.
They have pumpkin painting,
c C s, games
S .Il d lots ofpriz-
c i Plus, a giant
..-. Pumpkin Patch
S-op c all month
long! The kids
love it!
If businesses have any crafts,
goods, candies or little prizes to
donate, you can drop them by the
farm, or we will be glad to pick
them up.
Want to volunteer? Stop over on
Boo Fest day and say, Hi, I'm here
to help.


Congratulations!
Andrew Jacob Morales was
born Sept. 27, 2010 at 2:10 p.m.,
weighing in at 7 lb. 4 oz., 19/2
inches. Ashley Yeager and Homer
Morales, Jr. of Wimauma are the
proud parents. Troy Yeager and
Denise Dillard from Riverview
and Enriqueta and Homer Mo-
rales from Wimauma are the proud
grandparents.


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of Sun Citt Center presents
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10 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Observations
* Continued from page 7
The beauty of the United States
of America is that you can truly be-
come who you choose to become.
You have the freedom and the pow-
er to do as much or as little as you
like. If you are willing to invest in
the required education, you can be
a brain surgeon or a rocket scien-
tist. Or you can dig ditches. We al-
ways need ditches and that is hon-
est employment. You can become
an entrepreneur it's incredibly
easy in Florida and around the na-
tion. A business license can be had
for just a few dollars and voilA! You
are in business. Of course, the suc-
cess of that business depends upon
your hard work to make it success-
ful. Unless you want to start a haz-
ardous waste dump or a strip club,
your elected officials generally
don't much care what you do. It is
up to you.
Besides working hard (or not) for
what you want, the key, I think, is to
keep it positive. The world is wea-
ry of the bickering and bad news.
Thirty-three men in Chile showed
us all the right stuff. It is the stuff
most of us have somewhere inside.
It is the stuff that America was
founded on. It is the stuff that this
nation has succeeded with. It's still
here and it is happening every sin-
gle day in every city and state. Be a
decent person. Be considerate and
caring. Feel something for others.
Keep it positive. We will triumph.
We most certainly will triumph.


Amendments
* Continued from page 1
duty outside the U.S., Hawaii and
Alaska during the previous year.
As an example, she noted that a
soldier owning a home in Florida
and deployed overseas for a half
year could get a tax bill reduced by
six months.
The amendment, proposed by
state legislators, also would have
reduced statewide property tax rev-
enues by an estimated $13 million
if it had been effective in 2009-
2010.
The amendments which gener-
ated the most intense focus were
numbers 5 and 6, dealing with pro-
posed prohibitions on the redraw-
ing of legislative and congressional
districts following each population
census.
Sponsored by FairdistrictsFlor-
ida, an organization initiated by a
Miami area attorney, the proposed
amendments would require that
the districts of legislators and con-
gressmen be as equal in popula-
tion as possible, contiguous, using
the boundaries of county and city
borders as much as possible when
drawn periodically by the legisla-
ture.
In other words, Castor said, un-
der the amendments such districts
could not be created to favor or
disfavor any incumbent or any po-
litical party, nor could the redrawn
districts reduce the abilities of mi-
norities to participate in the politi-
cal process.
Differences in political persua-
sions were made clear as residents
in the audience presented opposing
viewpoints, some in favor of im-
posing the standards as outlined in
the amendments, others arguing the
downsides of the standards.
A vote against the amendments,
Castor suggested, could result in
many incumbents remaining in
office unchallenged. On the other
hand, a vote for the amendments
would, in addition to setting non-
political standards for redistrict-
ing and reducing gerrymandering
for political purposes, also would


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Melody Jameson
Prior to the forum covering proposed constitutional amendments
appearing on the upcoming general election ballot, Mickey Castor
(right), president of Hillsborough's League of Women Voters, shared
with Paul Wheat (left), a copy of The Florida Voter, the League's non-
partisan review of this election season's issues and candidates.
Wheat served as moderator of the discussion conducted in Sun City
Center and attended by about 200 Southshore voters. The 90-year-
old League long has taken active roles in the nation's election pro-
cesses, conducting candidate and issue debates, publishing infor-
mation and questioning would-be elected representatives.


protect minority voter participation
and likely increase competition
within elections. But a supportive
vote also could lead to litigation
over implementing the provisions.
The one amendment which has
been the most highly debated in
television advertising and com-
munity meetings during the current
election season did not raise many
hackles among the older voters.
Amendment 4, sponsored by
Florida Hometown Democracy -
another attorney initiative would
allow voters to weigh in through
the election process on proposed
changes to their county compre-
hensive land use plans. It would
require voter approval of develop-
ment proposals that conflict with
established land use plans. The
potential amendment has been vig-
orously opposed by development
interests around the state and en-


thusiastically supported by those
committed to slower growth.
Castor, maintaining her non-
partisan stance, observed only that
"this definitely is one where you
have to weigh the pros and cons."
Similarly, proposed Amendment
Ito repeal the existing provision in
the state constitution dealing with
political campaign financing elic-
ited little interest.
The original amendment was ap-
proved in 1998 by 64 percent of
Florida's voters and established the
campaign spending limits that can-
didates for statewide offices would
adhere to. In 2005, the state leg-
islature increased those spending
limits by 300 percent, dramatically
diluting the intent to hold down
campaign spending. In 2010, the
voluntary spending limit for candi-
dates seeking the office of governor
was just shy of $25 million.


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How well do you know your

candidates?

Join us and get face to face with the men and women who may be
making decisions for you and yours on county and state levels
Your Last Chance Candidates' Forum
10 a.m., Saturday, October 23
Hillsborough Community College/Southshore Campus
E. Shell Point Road at 24th Street N.E., Ruskin (East of Lennard High School)
(Elevator to second floor conference room)
Light Refreshments Non-Partisan Spanish-English Translator
Jointly sponsored by M&M Printing and its family of community newspapers The Ruskin Observer, The
SCC Observer, The RiverviewCi -.1 1 1111 ....... I .. ...... ........I 'College/Southshore Campus, and Ruskin
Community Development Foundation


The League of Women Voters of-
ficial position on the amendment is
that a vote for will reduce the num-
ber of candidates who can afford to
run, will increase the influence of
special interests in elections, will
eliminate what may have been the
most significant campaign reforms
in the state's history and may end
limits on campaign spending that
some believe is infringement on
freedom of speech.
Conversely, a vote against the
amendment would continue public
financing of campaigns of candi-
dates who qualify for it.
But, Amendment 8 which would
set new limits on the number of stu-
dents that can be assigned to each
public school teacher, did touch
a nerve among some attendees.
Since this amendment would alter
an amendment approved by voters
in 2002, one speaker asserted "we


can't keep changing with the chang-
ing of the wind." Yet another found
the proposed increases in classroom
student size "not unreasonable as
the population increases.
The amendment would increase
the number of students through
grade 3 from 18 to 21, through
grade 8 from 22 to 27 students and
through grade 12 from 25 to 30 stu-
dents.
A vote for the amendment is ex-
pected to allow more flexibility in
meeting class size requirements,
limit increases to no more than 5
and provide more local level con-
trol of student-teacher ratios. A vote
against amendment 8 will generate
more costs for the state in fully im-
plementing the original class size
standards and would discourage
the legislature from proposing class
size limits be eliminated.
Copyright 2010 Melody Jameson


OCTOBER 21, 2010


CC






OCTOBER 21, 2010


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Community Center
* Continued from page 1


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 11


am [XiWhLFF rIQ YlP Aiw&i


ough's Board of County Commis-
sioners (BOCC) gave solid shape
to the dream, formally agreeing in
principle to convey the soon-to-
be-vacated Ruskin Fire Depart-
ment building to the Ruskin Com-
munity Development Foundation
(RCDF) specifically as "a multi-
use community cultural and arts
center." The transfer is contingent
on a single condition submission
of a "financially feasible business
plan."
That plan, demonstrating how
RCDF will support long term
management and operation of the
new community feature, now is
being drafted, according to Sandy
Council, chairman of the local
leadership group working with
county officials. It is being formu-
lated by a sub-committee led by
Ron Wolfe, business consultant,
Ruskin resident and RCDF mem-
ber. Completion is expected by
late winter, Council said.
The timeline coincides with
the county's outlook on opening
the new Ruskin Fire Rescue sta-
tion on East College Avenue at 4th
Street. Finishing touches on the
new three-bay facility with an "old
Florida" appearance are antici-
pated by spring 2011, said Peggy
Hamric, a manager in Hillsbor-
ough's Real Estate Department.
Both staff and equipment are ex-
pected to be settled in the new sta-
tion by early summer.
The single story, soon-to-be for-
mer fire house, a long rectangular
concrete block structure enclosing
about 4,900 square feet of space,
is a nearly ideal site for the com-
munity's cultural center, Council
said. Facing the intersection of 1st
Street and 1st Avenue, it is located
in the heart of the downtown dis-
trict, easily accessed from three
primary thoroughfares, U.S. High-
way 41, College Avenue East and
East Shell Point Road. In addition,
it offers a raised ceiling section
"with good acoustics" at one end
and large openings suited to some
artistic activities, she noted. It also
is in a good structural condition
for use as a community center,
recently was reroofed, and is ad-
equately equipped with the neces-
sary plumbing and wiring. About
2,065 square feet of the space is
air conditioned. From a real estate
perspective, the site is valued at
$650,000, Council added.
Ultimately, it is envisioned that
a wide variety of community ac-
tivities, from education to perfor-
mance, from music, the graphic,
culinary and theater arts to exhib-
its and recognition of Ruskin's
rich historic past, can be housed
in the new center. Not yet named,


the facility is being referred to for
working purposes as the "John
Ruskin Cultural Center" or "The
Fire House Community Center."
Converting the vision to reality,
however, rests heavily on a work-
able business plan acceptable to
the county, Council cautioned. Ba-
sic expenses to be met will include
periodic insurance premiums,
regular building maintenance and
routine utility bills. Added to this
will be any interior modifications
to accommodate its new functions
as well as any needed supplies and
accessories related to various pub-
lic functions. The business plan
detailing how such expenses will
be handled must be "feasible,"
containing "true numbers," she
emphasized.
Council noted two specific
options for help with funding:
pledges of contributions and spon-
sorships backed by letters of com-
mitment provided by individuals
and organizations from the com-
munity at large and an already
existing relationship with the
U.S. Department of Agriculture.
USDA, long involved through its
rural assistance programs with un-
derwriting affordable housing in
the area, most recently partnered
with RCDF in exploring establish-
ment of a localized business incu-
bator in Ruskin. The two entities
did not reach agreement on creat-
ing the incubator, but RCDF will
discuss the proposed center serv-
ing a still rural community with
USDA authorities, Council indi-
cated. Yet another approach may
be grants, she added. This funding
type has been used successfully in
the past to help maintain another
RCDF project, the Camp Bayou
environmental learning center on
the Little Manatee River.
Council, once a teacher at Ruskin
Elementary School, also com-
mended the work of the 20-mem-
ber leadership committee which
concentrated in recent months on
formal proposal of the new center
for county commissioners. The
group represents major aspects of
the community including Hills-
borough Community College,
the Ruskin-Southshore Chamber
of Commerce, the Southshore
Arts Council, Fifth Third Bank ,
the Arts Council of Hillsborough
County, Friends of the Southshore
Regional Library, the Southshore
Roundtable and the Southshore
Symphony Orchestra, plus local
historians, she said. They did "a
heroic job," she added, creating "a
true community collaboration."
Copyright 2010 Melody Jame-
son


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Ruskin's new fire rescue facility (above) is taking shape rapidly in the northeast corner of the S.R. 674
(East College Avenue) and 4th Street intersection, a few blocks southeast of its current location. The
new station, designed with an "old Florida" look, is expected to receive personnel as well as the as-
signed collection of fire fighting and rescue vehicles next spring. The old facility at Ist and Ist is being
eyed as a community cultural center to house and showcase the community's wide array of artistic tal-
ent along with symbols of its rich history.






12 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Home away
* Continued from page 1
2008 party conventions in De
and the Twin Cities and has
expanded since.
New York City isn't a cheap r
to visit. Hotels that you would
to stay at, in places you would
to be, typically cost $300 or r
per night. Airbnb offers travi
the opportunity to cut that pric
more than two-thirds. My st
apartment in the beautiful U
West Side cost only $124 per n
I had the place to myself and
tranquility of not being jammed
a small room in a large hotel w
bunch of stressed-out tourists
provided for no additional ch
-- yet to me, it was priceless.
The ground-level studio a]
ment was spacious by New
standards. It included a small
full kitchen, a full-size refriger
cable with a new, large LCD
and wireless Internet access. I
the apartment owner when I arri
he answered a few of my questi
asked me to put the bedding
hamper before I left and wished
a good stay. For the next few c
the apartment was all mine.
It was a short walk to the Mus
of Natural History. The Gug
heim Museum was a beautiful
across Central Park and less th
block away were delis, restaur;
and markets both large and sma
I had visited New York twict
fore, both times spending sei
money for a short stay in a
town Hotel. On this visit, it
amazing how staying in a resi
tial neighborhood transformed
experience. The subway was
down the block and, with a
long MetroPass for just $8, I c
freely travel the city -- from Cl
town and the Canal Street barge
on just about everything in L(
Manhattan to the crowds and c
of Times Square and Broadwa


from home


Midtown. Then at night, I could go
home to my own place in a peaceful
and beautiful neighborhood. My in-
tegration into the neighborhood was
apparently visible as tourists seek-
ing information and directions in
subway stations frequently stopped
me, something I don't recall hap-
pening on previous trips.
Airbnb allows travelers to search
for a variety of accommodation
styles in cities around the world.
For the frugal traveler (and those
more socially inclined), it is pos-
sible to rent a couch, sharing a
place with the apartment owner for
as little as $10 per night. You can
rent your own room in a multi-room
apartment, or do as I did and rent
an entire apartment. You can even
rent single-family homes, although
not necessarily in New York City.
Many of the offerings are available
through people who travel frequent-
ly so they pick up a rent subsidy by
making their place available while
they're gone. The young man who
owned the apartment I rented was
just beginning to see the business
opportunity in Airbnb. He owned
three apartments in the city and was
making them all available, adjust-
ing his personal residence to what
was not rented out by others.
The website makes it easy to find
an apartment in virtually any neigh-
borhood in any big city around the
world. The problem is that, once
you find an apartment you like,
making contact with the apartment
owner is a hit or miss proposition.
While Airbnb has an availability
calendar for each listing, it is up to
the apartment owner to keep that
calendar updated. Sometimes they
do, and sometimes they don't. I
made nearly a half dozen inquiries
before I received a response. I rent-
ed that Upper West Side apartment
not only because it was a cool look-
ing place in a great neighborhood,


but also because the apartment
owner was extremely responsive.
His responsiveness, and the care he
takes in ensuring his apartments are
clean, well furnished and well kept,
is paying off for him. That apart-
ment is now booked solid well into
next year.
Renting an apartment from a
stranger requires a leap of faith that
does not exist when booking a hotel
room. Airbnb provides some assur-
ance for the traveler by holding the
rent payment for 24 hours after you
are scheduled to arrive. That way,
if a problem develops, you aren't
out of both a place to stay and your
money. If they don't hear from you
within 24 hours, they issue payment
to the apartment owner.
Airbnb is not just for travelers; it
could also be an income opportunity
for residents of the Sunshine State.
If you have a room to rent or even
your entire home, the website gives
you the opportunity to make your
residence available to winter vaca-
tioners. You set the house rules, and
you screen potential clients based
on your personal criteria. The trav-
elers pay the fees; there is no charge
to list your home for rent. With the
Republican National Convention
coming to Tampa in 2012, the de-
mand for housing will be extremely
strong, creating opportunities for
homeowners across the bay area.
Staying in a residential neighbor-
hood transformed my visit to New
York -- both personally and finan-
cially. I could never before have
afforded five days in a hotel in the
city and having my own place felt
like coming home each evening,
making it a more relaxing and re-
warding vacation. Finding the right
host via Airbnb was a challenge but
it paid off in the end. Other web-
sites such as vrbo.com (Vacation
Rentals By Owner) provide the
same general service on a slightly


different scale. Whether your va-
cation of choice is a cottage in the
Middle Keys or a villa in Tuscany,
chances are you'll find it by letting
your fingers do the walking across
your computer keyboard.
As a traveler searching for lodg-
ing, Airbnb offers several features
to help you find lodging that is right
for you. Afew tips would be to read
the reviews left by other travelers,


check the provided response rate of
the host and check Google's Street
View of the location. In all cases,
contact the host with any and all
questions before committing to a
listing -particularly if there are no
reviews or if Street View isn't pro-
vided. Never book lodging on any
"by-owner" website without first
contacting the host or property
manager.


Mitch Traphagen photos
Which would you choose for a relaxing vacation? Above, the Upper
West Side neighborhood in which I rented a studio apartment or,
below, Times Square in Midtown. The apartment was one third the
price of hotels in Midtown.


TUESDAY WEDNESDAY l


OCTOBER 21, 2010






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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 13
SThanks to all our
loyal customers!
I~4y1r i our 4FAI SE HABLA ESPANOL
We specialize in:
Deluxe Spa Nails, Freehand Design
Pedicure Waxing Face Masks
$2 Eyelash Extensions
S 2 and much more!
-Try out our brand 813-642-9193
new Massage 3802-A SR 674 (Cypress Village)
Pedicure Chair Next to Home Depot
HOURS: Monday-Saturday 9 a.m. 7 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. -5 p.m.


Dr. Robert A. Norman Dr. A. Theodosatos
Board Certified Dermatologist Brandi Broughton, PA-C

Offering Botox, Restylane and various cosmetic
products and services
Same Day Appointments FREE Skin Screening
6322 U.S. Highway 301 Riverview
813-880-7546
Insurance accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, BCBS, Humana,
Cigna, Aetna, Amerigroup, and many more



Sun City

Dental Center
Voted #1 in Best of South Shore for 2010
Thomas A DeVol, D.D.S., PA
New Patients & Emergencies Welcome

Full Mouth Series of: 1 f
X-Rays (0210) : 10/0 %fiI
Exaf (o iFull & Partiall
Regular
Cleaning (110) Dentures
SCoupon Must Be Presented
ForT 1($200 Value) At Time Of Estimate
Coupon Must Be Presented 511t 512 O521315214
At Time Of Estimate 5110, 5120, 5213, 5214
Offers expire 10/31/10. Coupons must be mentioned at time of
scheduling appointment. The fee advertised is the minimum fee
charged. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has
the right to refuse pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other
service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and
within 72 hrs. of responding to the advertisement for the fee service
examination or treatment. Senior citizen discount does not apply.
727 Cortaro Dr. (Behind Burger King)


Open Mon-Fri 8:30-5:00


813-633-2636 ,


C.A.R.E. is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.
For directions, visit www.CareShelter.org or call (813) 645-2273.


GATOR
Gator is a gorgeous Golden
Retriever mix. He has a spark that
makes everyone he meets smile.
He loves people and seems to like
other dogs. He can often be found
with his feet in the doggy pool or
his water bucket, looking goofy.
Gator is a great dog who deserves
a loving and active home. Gator is
neutered. He will be microchipped
and brought current on his shots
as part of his adoption. Gator was
born around April of 2009.


JOEY
Joey is a lap loving fellow with
a great attitude! He was found as a
stray apparently because of an un-
caring owner. Come by today and
play with this frisky feline. You
won't want to leave without him!
Joey is up to date on his shots
and will be neutered as part of his
adoption. Joey was bor around



*EO
is'


Frost Weed
I learned about a new flowering
plant that is native to this area of
Florida and
its name is
Frost Weed.
How fitting
S that I found
4 1 this plant as
the weather
Saturation is getting a
Point little cooler
and "frosty"
By Karey Burek for us Flor-
ida folks.
This particular wild flower is most
attractive in the Fall months, blos-
soming into bunches of white and
black speckled blooms that attract
bumble bees, butterflies and even
the rogue hummingbird.
This plant is an amazing survi-
vor. It can be planted anywhere,
regardless of the amount of shade
or sun exposure and is excellent
for the xeriscaping gardener. Af-
ter doing some research I found
that this plant will reproduce if
left to grow unattended; so if you
plan on planting it in your yard,
you may need to trim the blooms
so the seeds don't blow all over
the yard otherwise you may end
up with more Frost Weed than you
bargained for!
According to the garden blogs
online, the name Frost Weed is no
accident and it doesn't even come
from the frosty white blooms. In
cold weather the stems actually
will burst due to a hard frost and


a nifty frosty ice colored foam will have plenty of space because it can
ooze out, hence the name Frost grow up to eight feet tall, but be-
Weed. If you do plan on xeriscap- lieve me, the blooms and the wild-
ing with this plant, make sure you life it attracts is well worth it.


M%,






14 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


From KAUFMAN MAIL BAG
See better. Live better.


Q What is a cataract? C.T.R., Sun City Center

A The primary function of the lens is to refract and focus light on the
retina (the film of the eye) while remaining transparent (clear). The
lens is a bioconvex body (about the size of an M&M) with a diameter
of 9 mm and the thickness of 4 to 4.5 mm. The lens is 66% water (the
least hydrated organ in the body), the remaining bulk is composed mainly
of proteins.
Over time, the lens will harden, becoming cloudy. The loss of transparency
and clouding of the lens is called a cataract. It is a natural process that
occurs in most everyone over 50 years of age. We recommend that
cataracts be removed when they interfere with your vision.
www.KaufmanEyelnstitute.com


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


Stuart J. Kaufman M.D.
Cataract Specialist
Certified Crystalens Surgeon
Sun City Center
4002 Sun City Center Blvd.
(SR674)
(813) 634-9289
Zephyrhills
(813) 788-7616
Bushnell
(352) 568-0600


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


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With Special "No Cost Now Program!"


Attention Homeowners: A new
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the third window at no addition-
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gram makes it easy to replace your
old windows and doors with En-
ergy Star Rated products that are
eligible for the $1500 tax credit.
This limited time program makes
buying a quality window or door
at any budget easy and affordable.
WeatherTite Windows is the first
to announce a great savings plan,
$0 down and low monthly pay-
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homeowners who are in need of
energy efficient or hurricane resis-
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Payments can be as low as $69
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accepted.
Purchase as few as five windows
or just one door, and WeatherTite
will lock-in the price for your entire
home for the next 4 years. This al-


lows you to purchase the windows
you need now without worrying or
feeling pressured to replace all the
windows in your home.
WeatherTite products come with
6 great lifetime warranties. These
warranties are designed to insure
proper window installation. All
products are also built in Florida
and specifically for Florida cli-
mates. WeatherTite Windows de-
liver the ultimate barrier against
air and water infiltration and pro-
vide optimal energy efficiency.
Along with all these great re-
bates and incentives most electric
companies are offering up to $350
credit for using Energy Star rated
products. These products can also
help you save as much as 50% on
homeowners insurance.
This is an offer that includes
lifetime product and labor warran-
ties as well as up to a 45% energy
savings guarantee. This along with
100% financing means a window
or door can be designed to fit all


budgets and homes.
WeatherTite Windows has a win-
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whether your house is a single
family, high rise condo, or even a
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As always, WeatherTite is proud
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These offers will expire on
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www.weathertitewindows.com



By: Nancy Porter-Thai

Gatekeepers Galore
Gatekeepers. They're everywhere! Ticket takers, clerks,
cashiers, receptionists; they let you in or keep you out.
Passwords, bar codes, door locks, even snarling puppies are
gatekeepers. Fathers are notorious keepers at the gate of their
daughters, as are the parents of our grandchildren. A fancy night
out has a gatekeeper to meet you, greet you, and seat you. For the
sport enthusiasts, gatekeepers are coaches, referees, umps, and in
some instances, pushy parents. Fees, memberships and invitations
are those gatekeepers that assure exclusivity. Bankers, investment
funds, pin numbers and of course the I.R.S. are the usual gatekeepers of
our money. (Understandably, some folks prefer mattresses and socks).
Society functions because we empower gatekeepers to enforce the rules
and laws. Certificates, fees, licenses, diplomas, and special training are all
gatekeepers that se-
cure our participation
and protection in so-
ciety. The illc s" of
the world have power
as they are gatekeepers
of fashion, trends, and
the promotion of causes.
The health gatekeepers
of our bodies tout magi-
cal foods, exercise, and
vitamins that will insure
longevity. Everywhere
I go, gatekeepers go also.
They may direct and dictate
my life, but until I meet the
ultimate keeper of gates, St.
Peter, I, am the only gate-
keeper of my soul.


OCTOBER 21, 2010




i"t )I


Choice Western Meats
226 Apollo Beach Blvd.
813-645-2379
HOURS: Tues.- Fri. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Closed Sunday and Monday
We accept Debit Cards, Visa, MasterCard, Discover and EBT


Try our
HOMEMADE
SAUSAGES: *
* Fresh Kielbasa
* Mountain
Kielbasa 9
* Cheese &
Parsley
* Garlic
* Italian (hot and
mild)
* English Bangers
* Veal Italian
* Chicken Breast
Italian
* Cajun Chicken
* Greek Chicken
* Chicken Fiesta
* Bulk Breakfast
* Breakfast Busters
* Turkey Italian
(hot and mild) .f
* Habanero
Sausage
* Bratwurst
* Andouille
* Boudin


Try Our Pre-Cut

FILETS

$2, 3, $4
each

We have
Fresh-Ground

ANGUS

PATTIES
and

BLUE

CHEESE

PATTIES


.i~w
3


Fall festival hosted by Corr Elementary
Join Corr Elementary on Friday, Nov. 5 from 5pm to 8pm for their An-
nual Fall Festival! Your child may come dressed as his/her favorite Super
Hero and there will be a contest for Best of Costume! There will be bounce
houses, food such as chicken, rice, beans, hot dogs, nachos, plus, games,
prizes and Corr's Famous Cake Walk! Also available will be Kids Haircuts
for only $5 and all proceeds go to the Corr PTA along with a Special Mom's
Treat... a $5 Facial by a Mary Kay consultant with all proceeds also going to
Corr PTA. There will also be basket raffles. This is a great way to support the
PTA and help raise money for the school, teachers and students.
Several volunteers are needed to help run booths for an hour or two that
evening. If you are can volunteer send a note into your child's teacher with
your name, number and time you can volunteer. They also need cake donat-
ed for the cake walk! If you would like to donate a cake bring it to the Front
Office starting Wednesday, Nov. 3 and no later than 3pm on Nov. 5.
Booth Rental... if you have a service you would like to advertise you can
rent a table at the Festival for only $25 for the night. If you are interested
contact Georgina Romero at 672-5345.

Fall paper drive
The Mary and Martha House in Ruskin is launching its Fall 2010 'Paper
Drive.' With times as they are our facilities are at full capacity. Think of how
much toilet paper and paper towels women can go through. It is estimated
that one woman will use approximately 420 sq. feet of paper products per
week. Multiply this by 24 guests (women and children) times 30 days times
6 months. So the goal is to collect 1,814,400 sq. feet of paper products by
Dec. 1.
The community can participate by dropping off paper supplies at the ad-
ministrative office at 1009 1st St. SWin Ruskin. The Mary & Martha House
Inc. is a shelter for women and children in crisis, and supports two emer-
gency shelters as well as transitional housing in Ruskin.
The Mary & Martha House Board and Staff would like to thank the com-
munity for their continuing support; both through donations and by shopping
at our two retail stores. The Thrift Store is located at 1009 1st St. SW and
The Rose Boutique is located at 100 East Shell Point Road. For more infor-
mation or store hours, call (813) 645-7874.


I







OCTOBER 1, 2010-BSERVER-EWS-- RIERVIEW-CRRENT- 1


I Shutter & Blind Manufacturing Company
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[ Le *. .6 0r Na


U


Do you suffer from

Post Herpetic Neuralgia (PHN)?

You may be eligible to participate in a clinical research
study to test an investigational drug for the relief of pain
in people with PHN. You may be eligible if you:
* Have been diagnosed with shingles over 6 months
ago and still have pain
* Are 18 to 80 years old

If eligible, you will receive at no cost:
* Study-related physical examinations
* Study-related medications
* Study-related laboratory tests
For more information, please call:




813-01-831 WW.Std~ciiatii~


DANIEL LUALLEN
Army Pvt. Daniel Luallen has
graduated from One Station Unit
Training (OSUT) at Fort Knox,
KY, which included basic combat
training and advanced individual
training (AIT).
During the first nine weeks of
initial entry training (IET), the
trainee completed basic combat
training which included instruc-
tion in drill and ceremony, weap-
ons, marksmanship and bayonet
training, chemical warfare, field
training and tactical exercises,
marches, military courtesy, mili-
tary justice, physical fitness, first
aid, and Army history, traditions,
and core values.
During AIT, the soldier complet-
ed the armor crewman course to
receive skill training in conducting
tank unit defensive and offensive
combat operations. The soldier
was trained to operate, service
and maintain armor tracked and
wheeled vehicles, load and fire
tank weapon systems, perform
ammunition handling and supply
duties, and assist in target detec-
tion and identification.
He is the son of Craig Luallen
of Riverview and Kim Jaime of
Ruskin.
The private is a 2008 graduate of
East Bay Senior High School.


IN UNIFORM


CONNIE M. CAMPOS
Connie M. Campos graduated
from the Army ROTC (Reserve
Officer Training Corps) Leader
Development and Assessment
Course, also known as "Operation
Warrior Forge," at Fort Lewis, Ta-
coma, WA.
The 32 days of training provide
the best possible professional
training and evaluation for all
cadets in the aspects of military
life, administration and logisti-
cal support. Although continued
military training and leadership
development is included in the
curriculum, the primary focus of
the course is to develop and evalu-
ate each cadet's officer potential as
a leader by exercising the cadet's
intelligence, common sense, inge-
nuity and physical stamina. The
cadet command assesses each
cadet's performance and progress
in officer traits, qualities and pro-
fessionalism while attending the
course.
Cadets in their junior and senior
year of college must complete the
leadership development course.
Upon successful completion of the
course, the ROTC program, and
graduation from college, cadets
are commissioned as second lieu-
tenants in the U.S. Army, National
Guard, or Reserve.
The cadet is a student at Hofstra
University, Hempstead, NY.
She is the daughter of Jamie E.
and Wanda Campos of Riverview.
Campos is a 2007 graduate of
Riverview High School.


Alafia American Legion flea market
Alafia American Legion Post 148, located at 7240 U.S. Hwy. 301,
Riverview, holds a Sunday morning flea market from 7 a.m. to noon.
This event is open to the public and spaces are avail-
able on a first-come basis for $6. Tables can be rented -
for $5 each. Sunday breakfast is also available from 9 f,
to 11 a.m.
On Friday the post holds a fish fry from 5 to 7 p.m.
Take out orders are available. The public is invited to ,,
stop by the post and enjoy a delicious meal.
The canteen is now open for lunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Stop by and try one of Linda's daily specials.
For more information, call the post at 677-6529 or visit their website at
www.americanlegionalafiapost 48.org.

Camp Bayou fundraiser a success


An evening fundraiser was held
on Saturday, Oct. 16 at Camp
Bayou. Entertainment included the
Famundo All-Stars singing a range
of songs throughout the evening.
Delicious barbecued food was
provided by the pit-master from
Jay's Best Barbecue in Ruskin. A
selection of silent auction items
were up for bid which included
an applique quilt, custom jewelry,
home decor items and assorted
accessories.
Eighteen paintings were also
available for bid, coordinated by
Bruce Fallender of Sun City Cen-
ter. A 'Sneak Peek' of the prog-
ress of the renovation of the fish-
ing cabins, that were moved from
the old Giant's Camp, provided a
preview of the future fishing his-
tory exhibit to be created on the
oxbow.
Over $2500 was raised between
ticket sales, silent auction pur-
chases and outright donations col-
lected for the evening event. This
event was made possible by Camp
Bayou and Paleo Preserve volun-
teers with the help of these spon-
sors: Hillsborough County Con-
servation Services, Gulfstream
Gas Corp, All Steel Buildings
and Components, Sundance/All
Home Repairs, SunnyDay Paint-
ers, Southeast Glass & Mirror,
Sherwin Williams Paint, Lowe's --
Riverview, Apollo Meats, Sweet-


Cycling through
town
A group of cyclists meet at 8:30
a.m. nearly every Saturday, Sun-
day and most holidays at Panera
Bread at Hwy. 301 and Big Bend
Road for rides in Southeastern
Hillsborough County.
The average speed for rides is
typically in excess of 17 mph.
Helmets are required, headphones
are prohibited.
For more information, send an
email to Ibc\ clk i lmail coin


r.'.. y k .. -
Deborah Theisen
Sandy Council, RCDF president, talks about Florida's fishing
heritage at the cabin sneak peek during the Beef n' Bones at the
Bayou fundraising event.


Bay Supermarket, Winn-Dixie
Supermarket, Buddy's Home Fur-
niture, HCC SouthShore Campus
and Memorial Pharmacy.
Camp Bayou is neither a camp-
ground nor a summer camp. It was
an RV park before the County's
ELAP program purchased the land,
but it is now open for day use only,
open to the general public.
Through volunteers, donations,
membership and grants, the RCDF
offers pre-scheduled programs
to schools, youth groups, adult
groups and families plus it's open
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday
through Saturday for passive rec-


rational pursuits, such as wildlife
watching, nature photography and
trail walks. General admission is
still FREE.
The Camp Bayou Outdoor
Learning Center is a public-private
partnership between the non-profit
Ruskin Community Development
Foundation, Inc. (RCDF) and
Hillsborough County Parks, Rec-
reation and Conservation.
Camp Bayou is located 3 miles
south of SR674 at the end of 24th
St. SE in Ruskin.
More information is on the web
at www.campbayou.org or call
(813) 641-8545.


h.


ST


(813)-634-8310 OR (941)-524-2259


S U P P O R T O U R J T R O O P S!!JI


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 15


OCTOBER 21, 2010


LCALL645-311 toaycf


aft (






16 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER



* Dear Friends and Neighbors,
* Well, it's about over. All the mud slinging...I don't think *
* there's any mud left. The election date is November 2nd this year. ,
SIf you have not made a decision on the candidates, I would like to
recommend the following. God bless our troops. Be sure to...

SVote on November 2nd


US Senator
* Marco Rubio

* Rep. in Congress Dist. 11
* Mike Prendergast

* Governor and Lieutenant
Governor
SRick Scott and Jennifer
I Carroll

S Attorney General
Pam Bondi

S Chief Financial Officer
JeffAtwader

* Commissioner of
* Agriculture
* Adam IL Putnam

S State Senator Dist. 10
Ronda Storms

n1 m rm m m m m m


Thank you, Ron Budd *

State Representative -
Dist. 67
Greg Steube

Board of County U
Commissioners Dist. 1
Sandra Murman U

Board of County
Commissioners Dist. 2
Victor Crist

Board of County
Commissioners Dist. 5
Ken Hagan

Board of County
Commissioners Dist. 7
Mark Sharpe U

School Board Member -
Dist. 4
Stacy White
mmmmm mmmm


"What About Socialism?"
with Dr. D. James Kennedy
The Biblical explanation of Socialism and its
impact on society.
Film d Discussion 6.00 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 31st
Trinity Baptist Church
702 Del Webb Blvd. W Sun City Center, FL
KARL MARX 813-634-4228


Reddick Elementary School's
October Terrific Kids
Student recipients were: Natalia Acosta-Gomez, Darwin Martinez, Julius
Williams, Nephtalie Saintidor, Alexander Ambrocio-Cuevas, Emma Gomez,
Eriberto Rendon, Jose Galicia, Aaliyah Gomez, Alexis Navarro Alexander
Lopez, Cesar Jaimes-Vasquez, David Calderon,
Justin Corns, Anthony Rocha, Ernesto Soria, Ru-
ben Olivares, Ahtziri Cardenas, Alondra Munoz,
Zavion Carter, Angela Saenz, Pearl Cruz, David
Vazquez, Flor Venturo-Castro, Desiree Zertuche,
Isabella McNeff, Jehiel Jose-Ventura, Mark Onate, Esmeralda Valdiviez,
Carlos Rodriguez, Jose Guevara, Adrain Morales, Emily Hernandez, Ge-
rardo Rocha, Jose Zertuche, Maria Gallardo, Gissel Reyes, and Peani Cruz.

AMikids YES Fall Festival
AMIkids YES would like to invite you to their Fall Festival from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 30 at 4337 Saffold Rd.,Wimauma.
They are asking for a $10 donation per ticket or $25 for 3 tickets for the
drawing. First prize is a 4-day cruise for two donated by Carnival Cruise
Lines; second prize is a new 42" Plasma HDTV donated by Buddy's Home
Furnishing and Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick, LLP; third prize is a round of
golf for a foursome at the Tampa Palms Golf and County Club located in
Tampa, donated anonymously; fourth prize is $250 cash donated anonymous-
ly.
AMIkids YES is also asking for $7 donation per lunch, which will include
chicken or ribs, baked beans, corn on the cob, and soda. Raffle tickets will
be sold in advance at the door. All proceeds will be used to help purchase
recreational equipment, supplies, and educational software for the youth at
AMIkids YES campus. For more information, call Cheryl Redford at (813)
671-5213.


ABWC learns self defense for seniors


The Apollo Beach Woman's Club
had an informative meeting on Oct.
13 with a program on Self-Defense
for Seniors given by Paul Peck. The
ABWC was founded in 1959 for the
purpose of contributing to commu-
nity development, including provid-
ing college scholarships to Apollo
Beach high school graduates. In
addition to its fund-raising efforts
to support its scholarship program,
ABWC members enjoy cultural and
social activities offered by the Gar-
den Club, Book Club, Culture Club
and Bridge Club.
Membership in the club is open
to all women in Apollo Beach and
surrounding communities. For more
information on membership or other
information on the club, call Judy
Peck at 813-746-1072.


From left to right, Judy Peck, Vice President of Membership, Paul
Peck, Black Belt Karate Expert, Louise Smith, Vice President of Pro-
grams.


OCTOBER 21, 2010






OCTOBER 21, 2010


Penny Fletcher Photo
Ray Weedon of Apollo Beach
spends time fundraising for the
Moose lodge because he wants
to help the children that live at
Moosehart, near Chicago, all of
whom have lost their parents
or suffered other tragedies that
have removed them from their
homes, and also Moosehaven
home for elderly Moose mem-
bers near Jacksonville.


Fundraising

for kids and

elderly a

passion for

Apollo Beach

man
The strangest coincidence led
to my Over Coffee interview this
week. I transposed two numbers
when dialing
and thought
I had left a
message for
my "helpful
handyman"
to call me
back. Over
When Ray Coffee
Weedon By Penny Fletcher
of Apollo
Beach called penny@observernews.net
out of (what I
thought was) the blue, I thought it
was strange, as we hadn't had any
contact in years; not since he was
active on the board at the Apollo
Beach Chamber of Commerce.
I thought I had left a message
with the man I call when I get
stuck in the middle of a household
project. Like when I took off my
garbage disposal to unclog it and
then couldn't get it to work after I
put it back on. And the time I got a
hole in a wall plastered, and almost
immediately afterward watched as
the new piece of wallboard fell
backwards and disappeared be-
tween the walls.
I don't even want to talk about
my "plumbing" experience. The
visual is pretty ugly.
But whenever I get in a real mess
trying to work on my house I usu-
ally end up calling the brother of
an old friend who can fix whatever
it is I should have called him to do
in the first place.
And that's what I thought I did
last week.
Instead, I had left a message on
Ray's phone saying that I needed
him to call me as quickly as pos-
sible, so I suppose he was as con-
fused about the purpose of our
conversation as I was.
Once we realized why we had
each other on the phone I asked
him what he'd been up to since
we'd spoken last and his answer
prompted me to ask if I could do
an Over Coffee column with him.
Since his busy chamber days,


The Truth about Mirabay
Mirabay is one of the finest communities in Florida. It offers unrivaled waterfront liv-
ing, gracious homes, spacious townhouses, lovely villas, and even waterfront estates.
Mirabay's developer, Newland, has with great foresight provided an amenities package
that 1i .l..... .i.. fI i ..... fi,... boat livery, spectacular poolwith slide,lighted tennis
courts, exercise facilities bar none, a highly regarded after-school program, morning
childcare for exercising moms and dads, and a snack bar for those who are hungry
Mirabay is a Community Development District (Harbor Bay CDD) which means that it
functions very much like any other independent, small town. There are exceptions. Zon-
iin.. iii,.-1. IdI I ,, ,ii ii 1 uniform quality throughout the neighborhood are in the control of
homeowners sub-associations under the direction of a master homeowners association.
Governance of the Mirabay CDD is by an elected Board of Supervisors, numbering five
people serving 4-year terms. The Board of Supervisors is responsible for ownership and
maintenance of common properties, including streets, community amenities, access to
the community through gatehouses, and establishing annual budgets and overseeing ex-
penditures of the funds to maintain and operate these areas.
As we speak, Mirabay is coming to the end of a long and very expensive 11. li. ii. '1, ,1 1 1i'.
in 2007 against the original contractor who built the seawalls in the community. A trial
date is set for September 2011. If this goes to trial, it will settle a liability claim for more
than $28 million and legal expenses and remediation costs of over $2 million. These re-
mediation c.z.. i. I.I 1 1,. .1'.i-".... ". 11 be returned to the community upon the successful
conclusion of this matter. It is critical to hold the course in this effort-much is at stake.

Trouble in Paradise
Due to a unique confluence of circumstances, the November 2 election will choose three
supervisors who will determine Mirabay governance for the next four years. Note that
three Supervisors are a majority of the five-member board. In an unprecedented move, a
group of three peopl.. fi ii i,,,,..-i I,.i 1. i,,. are campaigning to take control of Mirabay
through its CDD. These people, campaigning on a platform promising radical cutting of
expenses and fees while lacking specific positions on important issues will, in fact, en-
danger all that we expected when we invested our money in our homes and the Mirabay
lifestyle. Resale values have plunged due to the economy We cannot further endanger
our investment through reduced amenities, minimized gate control, hiring of cheap, in-
effective landscapers, and turning our community into just another under-maintained,
understaffed, half empty development where there are more houses and lots for sale than
i,.i ,. .. ,. .. ...i ,. residents.
No one bought a home in Mirabay with the promise that it was the cheapest place to live
in the Bay Area. Indeed, we all bought homes based on our desire to live in an upscale,
gated, waterfront community; offering facilities and amenities unavailable for the price
anywhere else in Florida. Ask your neighbors and remember your own first impression
of Mirabay
I am Millard (Rip) Ripley. I presently serve as supervisor, seat three-Mirabay I am
proud of what we have accomplished by surviving the bankruptcy of builders and the
nonpayment of off-tax-roll assessments, as well as paying for unexpected attorneys
fees-all within our annual budgets. In spite of all the problems, the Board of Supervi-
sors has been able to lower responsibly your assessments for calendar year 2010-2011. I
am an independent supervisor and exercise iiill,..I.i.ii.i. I i.,,i..l. and action. For more
information about me, see my blog Mirabaytodayblogspot.com, or ask any of your neigh-
bors for a copy of my campaign flyer. Should you have other questions, feel free to call
me at my home 383-5946.

Vote For

Millard (Rip) Ripley
PaidpoliticaladertisementbyMillardRipleyforSuperisor HarborBay CDD, Seat3. Approved by MillardRipley


he's been head-over-heels in-
volved with the Moose Lodge in
Ruskin, not just socializing, but
raising funds for projects that aid
children and the elderly.
I don't know much about what
fraternal organizations actually
do, so it gave me an idea. I'd start
with the Moose and gradually,
sometime during the next months
(not consecutive weeks of course)
contact the Elks, Eagles, and any
other organization I don't know
much about and find out what
they're up to.
In the case of Ray's involvement
with the Moose, our conversation
turned out to be very informative.
A 36-year Moose originally from
Columbus, Ohio, where he was in
the insurance business, Ray has
been with the local Moose lodge
on E. Shell Point Road in Ruskin
for about six years.
While he's not retired, and
spends his work time appraising
mobile homes, keeping a hand in
the insurance business, and manag-
ing rental properties and two con-
dominium associations, he joined
Moose because it was a fraternal
organization. He said he likes its
goals of providing for housing and
education for 500 children and
teens at Mooseheart in Illinois and
350 elderly at Moosehaven near
Jacksonville.
1\klaI both parents were
killed, or some other type of trag-
edy left them without family and
a home," he told me, explaining
the Mooseheart mission. The kids
have a nice place to live and are


educated; prepared for college or a
trade, whichever they choose.
Meanwhile, elderly Moose
members can live at Moosehaven
whether they can afford to pay or
not.
"It's certainly worth the $60 a
year dues," he said. "And it's es-
pecially nice for women, because
the Moose has a separate wom-
an's group, Women of the Moose,
not just an auxiliary to the men's
group. Women who come in alone
can feel comfortable there because
no one is permitted to say inappro-
priate things to them."
But with 1,200 local members,
Ray said the lodge had outgrown its
social quarters, while the banquet
room was only rented out once and
awhile. So recently he was one of
a group that spearheaded enlarging
the main area, where the bar and
grill are. 'That's the place that gets
the most use," he told me.
A portion of the banquet room
was taken to enlarge the widely-
used social area. Ray said he
worked hard on the plans.
"It's not just 'another beer joint'
but a place where the whole fam-
ily can have a good time," he ex-
plained. 'The next thing we're
having is a Halloween party for
our members' children."
They also have a chaplain who
visits people who need spiritual
help.
"At the end of the year, the mon-
ey we don't use for upkeep goes to
Mooseheart and Moosehaven, and
we can go to any of the 120 lodges
in Florida and be welcomed," he


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said.
Funny how a mistake in dialing
can end up teaching you some-
thing you didn't know!
*Perhaps you have something
you' like to share. Ormaybe you'd
rather tell the community about
your favorite charity or cause: or
sound off about something you
think needs change. That's what
"Over Coffee" is about. It really
doesn't matter whether we actually
drink any coffee or not (although I
probably will). It's what you have
to say that's important. E-mail me
any time at penny@observernews.
net and suggest a meeting place.
No matter what's going on, I'm
usually available to share just one
more cup.


Welcomes Back
AMY HANCOCK
Specializing in
Foiling Highlighting
Low Lighting Fades
Clipper Cuts
Come in to welcome her back!



CANDIDATES' FORUM
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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 17


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18 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Stone crab
season has
opened.We
now face the
question of
supply and
demand. If
Fish Tales there is a lot
ByJonie Maschek out there the
price will be
low, but if there is not a lot this
year the price will be high. They
have been slow showing up in the
gulf waters so far, but the season is
open until May 15.
Traps are set for stone crabs.
When harvesting, only the claw is
taken and they are released minus
a claw, which soon grows back.
Be very careful removing a claw,
as a crab can crush clams and
oysters, so guess what he could
do to one of your fingers. There
is a right way and a wrong way of
removing the crab's claw. If it is
not removed correctly it will kill
the crab.
Before you take the claw be
sure it is legal. It must measure
23/4" from the joint to the tip of the
lower finger. Most environmental-
ly concerned people will only take
one claw from the crab so that it
still has a claw to defend himself.
Hold the crab's body firmly
as you grasp the claw with your
fingers, press the claw down and
away from the body. If the break
is clean, you did it right. If meat is
hanging out, the crab will die. The
state law requires the crab to be
returned to the water after the claw
is removed. Most crabs regrow a
claw within a year or two.
Many divers catch their own
stone crabs. Scuba divers can be
seen around bridges. You must
be very careful of strong currents
and be an experienced diver to do
this. It is much safer to have traps.
You are required to have a saltwa-
ter fishing license to harvest stone
crabs. The use of hooks, spears, or
any device that would injure the
crab is prohibited.
Often stone crabs are found
around rocks. At times at seawalls.
If you are crabbing and scuba div-
ing, always put a flag up even if
you are in shallow water. Stone
crabs can be found by wading,
looking at low tide around rocks
and seagrass.
Stone crabs may live to be 8
years old and through the span
of time could have played several
hundreds of thousand of eggs. For
some reason very few live to be
adult crabs.
You may harvest one gallon of
stone crab claws per person or two
gallon of stone crab per vessel,
whichever is less. It is illegal to
have in possession a whole stone
crab.
Florida is the commercial capi-
tal for shellfish. Last year Florida
stone crabbers harvested 2.4 mil-
lion crab claws, a dockside value
of 19 million. Over 90 per cent
came from the Gulf of Mexico.
To enjoy a stone crab meal, boil
the claw for 8 minutes at 1600,
wash in cool water, then cover
with ice. This will keep the meat
from sticking to the shell.
Add a Ruskin head of lettuce or
romaine, some boiled eggs, chunks
of crab meat, and you have a great
salad. You may add any dressing,
but I like mayonnaise on mine.
Fall has arrived and you will find
a wide variety of migratory fish
swimming our way.
Some are catching pompano that
are in our area since the weather
has cooled down. Catches have
been made along the shores using
sand fleas and sardines for bait.
You can find sand fleas by dig-
ging in the sand after the incoming


waves have subsided.
Many freeze sand fleas, or put
them in a five gallon pail of dirt,
to have on hand for the next fish-
ing trip.
Grouper are in the shallows
this week looking for food. Gag
grouper have been caught around
the ship channels and some at the
mouth of the rivers. Change your
tackle for shallow fishing; you
don't need a heavy weight to drop
your hook and bait.
Lots of flounder are in the swim.


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week? It is a lean white meat fish,
good for your health, and will give
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Red fish are on the move. You
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fried catfish and hushpuppies. The
freshwater catfish can be caught in
the fresh water of the Alafia and
the Little Manatee Rivers. These
rivers also yield the best of large-
mouth bass in the area. If you are a
freshwater angler, don't look for a
lake, boat up the rivers to the fresh
water.
Enjoy our fall weather, always
fish together. If you fish by boat,
leave a note at home or on your car
outlining your fishing plans of the
day.


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Saturday, Oct. 23
1' -11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
,.^ Xi v ;r, ~Parking Lot Between
t73 lt7 137 and 139 S. Pebble Beach Blvd.
. Sun City Center
To help combat identity theft and promote recycling, Cotter Financial is pleased to host our third
annual Shred-A-Thon. So gather your unwanted records and papers
and join us on Saturday, October 23rd.
* Prevent identity theft. Shred unwanted documents clean out clutter
* Protect personal information while protecting the environment
* On-site industrial shredding truck with monitor lets you watch your papers being shredded
* Shred-A-Thon is sponsored as a community service by Cotter Financial, LLC

For information, please call 634-2000





An Important FREE Briefing for Those Trying to Stay Retired

An Important FREE Briefing for Those Trying to Stay Retired


Many are finding it challenging to maintain income with today's
one-two punch of low interest rates and market volatility. Certified
Financial Planner Gary Cotter offers ideas on ways to achieve
dependable income sources based on common sense concepts and
the latest investment research. This is a program you won't want to
miss. You'll come away with sensible, fresh ideas you can use.


Tuesday, October 26,2010
10:00 a.m.
The Golf Club at Cypress Creek
Light refreshments served

Call 634-2000 for reservations

No financial products are sold at our briefings.


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Securities offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 19


OCTOBER 21, 2010




20 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


IMPORTANT NOTICE:
If you are purchasing a new air conditioning system that qualifies for
the Florida Energy Rebate make sure the company you choose is going
to take care of the required load calculations and testing of your duct
system. Many AC companies are leaving it up to the customer to pay
for the required tests. This is a cost of $300-$500 per test, if it fails the
first time another full price test will be required. At Apollo Beach Air the
required load calculation and duct test is included with the purchase
of your qualifying air conditioning system. You may still need to pay a
rater to certify your duct system as required by the state but they will
already have been tested and you'll know that they will pass before
incurring that expense.


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OCTOBER 21, 2010











Support local


' growers while


k enjoying fresh


produce


0 By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews.net
Wouldn't it be great to know the fruits and veg-
etables you're consuming aren't shot full of chemi-
cals to hold their color and give them a longer shelf
life?
What if you knew Mr. Brown from Plant City
grew the berries on your table and Mr. Smith
from Pasco County had planted and tended
all the squash, eggplant and salad
greenq4
\\hat if every tomato you
sunk your teeth into,
year round, was Ruskin
grown?
Well, as of December
11, South County resi-
dents can assure them-
,Ial es of these things while
o tbea..uin local grower's business
ib\ hlrpping at a new Fanner's
\I. lkl which will be open on Sat-
Sii~id%.,\ Irom 8 a.m. to noon
r- I l h, inrmer's Market will be held
Seil Iln ti b parking lot of St. John the
I a, In i episcopal Church, on the
s btll a1 (State Road 674 and 9th
l Aic.1 E. in Ruskin as one of the
%2 \, I ll church plans to make the
mE 1nt' n eided to refurbish the build-
ing which has been in existence at that loca-
tion since the early 1960s.
"We wanted to do something to enable us to
paint and fix up our sanctuary and make some
much-needed repairs," said Annie Hunter, an
Apollo Beach resident and church song leader
who is working hard on the Fanner's Market
Committee.
But the job of locating and signing up the
growers of fruits, vegetables and citrus has
fallen to Jayna Hamel who runs Elsberry
Farms Nursery on the comer of Big Bend
Road and U.S. 41 in Apollo Beach. Jayna and
her husband Bernie, a longtime employee of
Plants of Ruskin, know the area's growers.
"When you buy fruits and vegetables in
the stores they' ve been treated for color and
shelf life," Jayna explained. "We'll know
where ours come from, and how they've
been grown. We're only going to deal with
locals, maybe as far away as the surrounding
counties but no farther, so b L le t iln1 will
be backyard garden fresh."
Jayna says she hopes to gather enough
growers to keep the market going year round
with seasonal stock. "There's such an impact
on fresh food's nutritional value when it's
treated for the long-haul. Not to mention
the emissions," she added.
Jayna has already started tomato plants
and green peppers, some of which are
growing eight to ten on a vine. She is seek-
ing farmers with peas, and pole beans, egg-
plant and all other locally-grown produce and fruits.
Both Jayna and Bernie come from fanning families and have also
formally studied agriculture.
"We'll have spices in pots you can take home and grow in your
kitchen too," she said, pointing to the basil she has started herself.
She also called my attention to one of her "special brands" of toma-
to, that is called \ Iiilg-i.w, Lifter" because the first year after the man
invented it put it on the market he paid off his mortgage, she said.
Jayna has started a Web site www.backyard-produce.com but it is
still under construction.
Growers who are interested in becoming a part of the Fanner's Mar-
ket are encouraged to email her at bypapollobeach@gmail.com or go
on FaceBook and put Back Yard Produce in the search bar. She may
also be reached at (813) 466-9585.
Meanwhile, Annie is seeking crafters to rent parking lot spaces at
$20 apiece during the hours the market is open.
"Every weekend we see all these people selling things along the
sides of the roads, which is illegal," she said. "We're going to see that
they get applications to come on board so that would make them legal.
I think it's a win-win situation for everybody."
Annie's preference for contact by crafters or other sellers is email
at anniemall@verizon.net but she may also be reached at (813) 645-
8366.


Penny Fletcher
Jayna Hamel shows off her tomato plants at Elsberry Farms Nursery
on the corner of Big Bend Road and U.S. 41 in Apollo Beach. Hamel is
seeking local produce growers to sell their fruits and vegetables at a
new Farmer's Market which will be open on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to
noon starting Dec. 11 in the parking lot of St. John the Divine Episco-
pal Church on the corner of State Road 674 and 9th St. SE in Ruskin.
Crafters and other artists are also welcome to rent space to sell their
wares.


Herbs will also available to take home and grow fresh in your kitchen
or on your porch.


These locally-grown green peppers are growing up to 8 and 10 on a
vine.





2B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


rasj ojg Ig ribie Jtmsi
WMI^^^HIalBff^NI^" H rjIFB i^L, ^-^^Bl^^B^B P' oBI^B^^ nor 1^y bMI~ le. -r j'BTB^^'BFBi^^im


-Ao

Dangers of Not Investigating and Treating Your Leg Veins: Failure of vein valves causes problems that are
more than just uncomfortable or unsightly. They can lead to problems that are dangerous, even life-threatening. These
can now be very effectively averted by modern vein treatment a simple ultrasound investigation and a simple, painless
office treatment! Delay will only allow your legs to worsen. Once valves have failed, the condition of the legs gradually
and progressively deteriorates.
Clots: Varicose veins are prone to inflammation with clots, i.e. phlebitis. The risk of deep vein clots is increased 400%
with superficial phlebitis. These are the type of blood clots that can kill you!
Cellulitus: Stasis Dermatitis is more than unsightly and uncomfortable. It is dangerous. The sickened skin can become
infected and lead to life threatening sepsis.
Medication Side Effects: Swollen ankles, night cramps/Charley horses, "secondary" restless leg symptoms, venous
stasis eczema and venous ulcers, are all often treated with temporizing, palliative medications. A lady with swollen
ankles from failed vein valves (and not from congestive failure or renal failure), does not have to increase her risk of
stroke and problems of potassium and other electrolyte loss by taking diuretics (eg. Lasix). She often only needs to have
a simple treatment to fix her veins. Similarly, risking, cramp meds, quinine, Requip, sleep medications, prolonged topical
steroids, and prolonged wound care medications and others for the conditions above is, with modern vein treatments,
often unnecessary and foolish.
The Domino Effect: People whose legs hurt or feel extraordinarily "tired" are not as active. This inactivity leads to
increased weight and decreased cardiovascular health. People with nocturnal cramping (night cramps, Charley horses
and a variety of "secondary" restless symptoms) are often sleep deprived. People with unsightly legs often have a dimin-
ished quality of life...they no longer go to the beach and they stay inside more because walking about all covered up in
Florida heat is difficult.
Deterioration: Vein problems usually begin very gradually. Your mother or father's terrible legs began with just a few
thin spider veins perhaps and a little aching. Early detection of failed valves by ultrasound is very simple and treatment
is painless. These are key to preventing escalating future problems. Act now. This is a continually deteriorating condition
until treated...What ARE you waiting for?!
L 1


ICE Air 0 + I I
Uir,, S


OCTOBER 21, 2010


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OCTOBER 21, 2010


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Ish Wednesday


Picture of Florida panther courtesy of Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Study: Florida panther

population in better shape than

before; still a long way to go


Are you concerned about the state of



Social Security?
* When will the Social Security Trust Fund be exhausted?
* How can I maximize the benefit I receive?
* Is it possible to increase my benefit if I am already getting
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* If I die, what will my spouse receive?

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Wed., Oct. 27 at 3:00 p.m.
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Social Security Administration. Kay has over ,,, ,. '"''
34 years of Social Security experience. 0
Light refreshments will be served. A
Limited seating. Call or email to reserve your seat.
RSVP to Jarrod Rutledge orJason Heinzelmann at
(813) 283-8413 or (813) 240-6655 or email
info@providentwmg.com by Monday, Oct. 25, 2010.
Securities offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC Investment Advice offered
through IFP, a Registered Investment Advisor and separate entity from LPL Financial.

Halloween social at ag museum
PALMETTO If you are looking for a fun, safe way to celebrate
Halloween, then creep, crawl, fly, slink or ooze your way to Palmetto
Historical Park and Manatee County Ag Museum. You're sure to have a
hauntingly good time. We'll be lurking for you!
A Halloween Social is scheduled for October 29 from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at
the Palmetto Historical Park & Manatee County Ag Museum, 515-10th
t Ave. W., Palmetto, FL 34221, 941-721-2034, www.manateeclerk.com/
Shistorical/PalmettoPark.aspx
Activities will include-
Trick-or-Treating (bring your own bag!)
Enter the 6:30 p.m. costume contest
Games and crafts
Follow the Ag Museum's yellow brick road
Fortune telling by Professor Marvel
( >* -Solve a mystery with Scooby in the library
Visit a wishing well
Enjoy Alex's Lemonade Stand and bake sale
SDemetrio's Pizza will be on hand selling their delicious pizza for $2
a slice. That's a monster of a deal!
Sponsored by R.B. "Chips" Shore, Manatee County Clerk of the Circuit Court, Manatee
County Agricultural Museum, Inc., the Palmetto Historical Commission & the City of
Palmetto.


GAINESVILLE, Fla. In 1995,
conservation managers made a des-
perate bid to save the Florida pan-
ther from extinction and released
eight female pumas imported from
Texas in hopes they'd breed with
native males.
Fifteen years later, the Florida
panther population has increased
threefold, and while the species
remains in peril, the big cats now
have a better chance for survival.
Two new research papers-in
the journals Science and Biologi-
cal Conservation-document the
breeding program's success and
outline an unusually long, collab-
orative effort among agencies. The
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission, National Park
Service and the National Cancer
Institute's Laboratory of Genomic
Diversity have been conducting
field and lab work on panthers
since the 1980s.
University of Florida scientists
joined the effort in 2005, analyz-
ing data and conducting popula-
tion modeling studies.
"What we found was that the
panthers that had a mix of Texas
and Florida genes were more ge-
netically diverse, had fewer defects
and were, in general, surviving bet-
ter," said Jeff Hostetler, a doctoral
student with UF's Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences.
There were about 25 panthers
left in the state when the eight Tex-
as pumas were brought to Florida.
There are now more than 100, con-
centrated mostly between Miami
and Naples.
"The big picture is that things
have improved from a genetic
standpoint for the population,
coinciding with an increase in
population," said Dave Onorato, a
panther expert with the state Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission's Florida Panther Project.
"The evidence is pretty clear that
there has been a positive impact on
the population."
Listed as an endangered species
since 1967, the Florida panther was
designated the official state animal
in 1982. Despite its popularity, the
species was in dire straits by the
early 1990s and the cats suffered
from numerous inbreeding-relat-
ed problems: poor sperm quality,
heart defects, parasites and infec-
tious diseases.


The first generation of kittens
born to the Texas females was a
much more robust group, but fu-
ture litters may eventually display
problems linked to inbreeding.
"The population does need to get
larger so that it's not as dependent
on periodic supplementations of
new genetic material," Onorato
said.
Another major issue is that the
cats require so much space, espe-
cially males, which are more ter-
ritorial than females, said Warren
Johnson, a geneticist with the Na-
tional Cancer Institute.
Close proximity to humans could
pose problems, although Johnson
pointed out that people in the west-
ern U.S. often live close to pumas.
While time-consuming and ex-
pensive, the research has been
invaluable, Johnson said. The les-
sons scientists have learned from
panthers, especially in terms of in-
fectious diseases and inherited dis-
orders, are applicable to humans,
he said.
"In essence, in-depth studies of
wild populations can teach us a
lot," he said.
The Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission's role in the
panther research is supported fi-
nancially by sales of the Florida
"Protect the Panther" license plate,
the state's third most popular spe-
cialty plate, as of 2009.
Madan Oli, a population ecology
professor who led the UF team,
said because scientists have stud-
ied panthers so consistently for so
long, the amount and variety of
data collected from the carnivores
were stunning and valuable.
Researchers used radio-trans-
mitter collars on larger cats and
outfitted kittens with something
akin to the microchips used for
cats and dogs. The microchips let
them identify individual panthers,
and the collars gave them precise
information about where the adult
cats roamed.
Oli echoed other research team
members' assessment of the find-
ings: A population of 100 panthers
is much better than 25, but there's
still a long way to go.
"As far as persistence of the spe-
cies ... the outlook remains tenu-
ous, but it's definitely a whole lot
better than it was," he said.


Cowj'l Mit Oii


rl







4B. OBSERVER NEWS* RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER OCTOBER 21, 2010


0 0

--- ----------------- -----
|- s2 Off Bronze or Silver
$4 Off Gold $5 Off Platinum
Full Service Car Wash Only
Regular price $11.99, *15.99, 19.99 & *25.95
Not valid with other specials or discounts. $1.50 extra for vans and SUVs
Expires 11/15/10 OBN
HOURS: M-F 8 am-5:3------ pm Sat 8 am-5----------- pm Now Open Sundays am-4 pm
HOURS: M-F 8 am-5:30 pm Sat. 8 am-5 pm Now Open Sundays 10 am-4 pm
- -5


;%: Southshore
I Present y Sports & Recreation
mm st.ertrrIbuiv lio

SHosted by Come see all the great e p o
HtA dy outdoor activities that
SI, can be found in Florida- Oct.23 & 24
kB Chamber of Commerce especially South Saturday 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Neer Garden sponsored by: Hillsborough County! Sunday 10 a.m. 4 p.m.
'seUf/Na I Admission: 5
;'~: c, .\.\ Tampa Electric Children under 10 admitted FREE!
Southshore Community For tickets or information contact
SC r the Chamber at (813) 645-1366 or
SEvent Center abeachchamber@tampabay.rr.com
302 Noonan Branch Road Vendors include:
.- .. .. .. ..


I~.----------------------------~
Hand Wax with Platinum Wash
| $4995
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-- __Expires 11/15/ 10 OB
Come Experience Our SERVICE!


we have something

to smile about
The dental practice of zamikoff,
Klement, Jungman and varga
welcomes Dr. Michelle Halcomb to
their staff. Dr. Halcomb comes to
Sun City Center with over 20 years
of dental practice experience.
She looks forward to developing
long lasting relationships with her
patients in order to give them the
best that dentistry has to offer.
NOW ACCEPTING
NEW PATIENTS Michelle Halcomb, D.D.S.


* Tooth Pain
* Crowns
* Dental Implants
* Sedation Dentistry
* Tooth Whitening


* Dentures
* Bridges
* Porcelain veneers
* Cosmetic Dentistry
* Partials


813-634-3396
www.suncitycenterdental.com
703 Del Webb Blvd. W., Suite B
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Lic #6193 LIC #9109 LIC #11099 LIC #15756 LIC #D1713809


Attend Hope Fund's Breakfast and Bingo


Kindergarten students are all smiles
Eight students from Collins Elementary School were chosen as Sep-
tember Kindergarten Citizens of the month. The award is sponsored
by the SCC Pizza Hut and recipients include: Haley Arifaj, Brenna
Barney, Anad Charles, Sasha Novikov, Gianna Palacios, Maddie
Robinson, Hudson Schneller, and Allie Williams.


Falcon Watch Ladies 9 Hole League


Crazy Scramble 9/17/10

1st Judi Gannon 92
Marty Gifford
Ro McEvoy


2nd Judy Delaney 106
Patty George
Rosie Ricciardi
Janine Johnson


Golf Scores Hogans Golf Club


9/15, Course: Summerfield,
Play: Skins

1st: two-way tie @ 8 skins each
- Fred Mayes & Paul Maki
2nd: Terry Seipelt, 4 skins


Low-net: Paul Maki, 72
Low-gross: Terry Seipelt, 87

Also playing: Dave Diehl, Bill
Poirier, Anna Kuhnley & Jerry Eg-


Join breakfast and bingo at the
Community Hall, 1910 S. Pebble
Beach Blvd., in Sun City Center,
on Saturday, Oct. 30, between
8:30 and 11 a.m., and enjoy a
wonderful breakfast with friends
and neighbors.
For only $6, you'll receive
a large omelet of your choice,
a bagel and cream cheese or a
Danish, orange juice, and coffee
or tea. After breakfast play bingo
for cash prizes, if you wish. Bin-
go cards cost a bit extra. Bingo
begins at 9:30 a.m. All are wel-
come! Tickets are available at the
door.
Breakfast and Bingo, which is
held twice a year, is a major fund-
raiser for the Hope Fund for Chil-
dren. The Fund is an all volunteer,
non-profit organization that spon-
sors and runs programs for at-risk
children who attend the after-
school and summer activities at
Bethune Park in Wimauma.
The children served need an ex-
tra boost to help them get a good
start in life. The Hope Fund pro-
vides mentoring and tutoring, ex-
tra help with reading and math, a
running program (Marathon Kids)
that emphasizes self esteem and
physical fitness, a computer lab,
field trips, a gardening program,
sex and drug classes for older
children.
Bethune Park is part of The
Hillsborough County Parks, Rec-
reation, and Conservation Dept:
the Hope Fund is not. There is a
fee to attend the Park. The Hope


Chris Avella reads to a student.
Fund also provides scholarships
to those children whose families
cannot afford the costs required to
send them to the Park. Because we
have seen a decrease in property
taxes, the cost to attend programs
at Bethune Park has tripled. Your
help is needed more than ever.
By attending Breakfast and Bin-
go you will help the children. The
Hope Fund has no administrative
costs. All funds raised go to help
the children. Call Carla Miles at
(813) 634-4268 if you like kids


and would like to volunteer an
hour a week, or for more infor-
mation regarding The Hope Fund
and/or Breakfast and Bingo.
Note that all of the children
speak English. Also, check out
the Fund's website at www.The-
Hope-Fund.org.
You might see a goblin or two
at this month's B&B! The next
Breakfast and Bingo will be held
on April 30.


4B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


OCTOBER 21, 2010







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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 5B


OCTOBER 21, 2010






6B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


E


:r of Commerce


Area Chamber of Commerce




Tuesday, November 9
8 a.m. 2 p.m.


Community Hall:
1910 S. Pebble Beach Blvd.
Sun City Center, FL 33573


For more information,

call (813) 634-5111
Ext. 101 or 102


PO


* FREE to the public

* 50/50 raffle

* More than 50 businesses showcasing products and

services

* Bingo, compliments of Pat Zaidel, Sun City Center

Chamber Ambassador

* Eye Associates mobile van

* Outside food concessions courtesy of member

service organizations and houses of worship

* FREE blood pressure checks


TAMPA ELECTRIC


Q~xtedions


THE SCC OBSERVER


jPeter~bur~

Vme%


mA Ao B ethS hyn


Program/Event Highlights
Week of Oct. 24 Oct. 30


Internet: Safe Browsing*
Monday, Oct. 25 2 to 3 p.m.
Learn how to surf the Internet while avoiding common scams
and pitfalls that can compromise your security.
Internet: Malicious PC Software*
Monday, Oct. 25 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.
Learn about different types of malicious software,
how they get on the personal computer, how to remove them,
and precautions to take when using the internet.
Toddler Time
Tuesday, Oct. 26 10:05 to 10:25 a.m. and 10:35 to 10:55 a.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 27 10:35 to 10:55 a.m.
For ages 2-3 years with a caregiver. Stories, finger plays
and songs make up this fun 20-minute program.
Story Time
Tuesday, Oct. 26 11 to 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 27 11 to 11:30 a.m.
For ages 3-5 years.Stories, finger plays and songs make up
this fun 30-minute program. Seating limit:
20 children plus their parent/caregivers.
Baby Time
Wednesday, Oct. 27 10:05 to 10:25 a.m.
For ages 0-24 months. Share books, rhymes, songs, games and
quality time together while instilling a love of reading and regular
library visits in this 20-minute program. Seating limit:
20 children plus their parents/caregivers.
Deaf and Hearing Connection Telephone Distribution
Wednesday, Oct. 27 1 to 3 p.m.
Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. (FTRI) provides free
specialized equipment and training to qualified Florida residents
who are deaf, hard of hearing or speech impaired. The equipment
enables them to place and receive phone calls.
Presented by FTRI.


FCAT on the Web for Parents
Wednesday, Oct. 27 7 p.m.
A seminar for parents with school age children that will guide you
through all the resources available to you on the Internet to assist
your child in passing the all-important FCAT.

Excel I: Introduction*
Thursday, Oct. 28 12:15 to 1:15 p.m.
Layout, entering data, inserting rows and columns,
and other techniques.

Excel II: Formatting*
Thursday, Oct. 28 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.
Learn different formats for expressing numbers in
a spreadsheet. Excel I is recommended.

Bedtime Stories
Thursday, Oct. 28 7 to 7:30 p.m.
For ages 2-5 with a caregiver. Make reading a family affair.
Children may wear pajamas and bring a blanket and favorite cuddly toy
for stories, songs and activities during this 30-minute program.

"Wee Artists Halloween Art Project"
Friday, Oct. 29 10:30 to 11:15 a.m.
'Wee Artists,' ages 3-5 years, come and create an art project
celebrating Halloween with art educator Laurie Burhop.
Adult must be present. Limit 15. Registration required.
Call 273-3652 or visit the Information Desk at the Library.

Let's Celebrate Halloween!*
Saturday, Oct. 30 10:30 a.m. to noon
'Creative Artists,' ages 6-9 years, will create an art project
celebrating Halloween. Join Art Educator, Laurie Burhop, for
a scary good time. Program is limited to 18 children and registration
required. Call 273-3652 or visit the Information Desk.

*Registration in person required no earlier than one hour
prior to the start of the program.

If you think you might be interested in joining Friends of the
South Shore library, visit the Book Sale Room at the Library
for a membership application. For any additional information,
visit www. southshorefriends.com. SouthShore Regional Library
is located at 15816 Beth Shields Way (off 19th Avenue
between U.S. 301and 1-75). (813) 273-3652.


Easy pet return
offered
To help area residents increase
their chances of finding a lost pet,
the C.A.R.E. no-kill animal shelter
in Ruskin is offering free micro-
chips to area residents for a limited
time. Microchips are implanted
between your pet's shoulder
blades and, if the pet ever becomes
lost and subsequently found by a
stranger, the pet could be taken
to any veterinary office or animal
shelter and they would be able to
'read' the chip information with a
standardized microchip reader.
The chip maker would then be
able to identify who the chip was
registered to and could help the
finder get in contact with you.
These clinics are made possible by
a grant from the Sun City Center
Community Foundation and are
being implanted in pets through
the generosity of the staff at the
Boyette Animal Hospital.
The first microchip implant clinic
will be held from noon to 4 p.m. on
Saturday, Nov. 13 at the Boyette
Animal Hospital, 10931 Boyette
Rd., Riverview. An appointment is
required. Quantities of microchips
are limited and owners must bring
proof that their pet is current on its
rabies vaccination in order to have
the pet chipped.
To make an appointment, call
Boyette Animal Hospital by Fri-
day, Nov. 12. Additional free clin-
ics will be offered in upcoming
months at other locations. If you
have any questions, call C.A.R.E.
at 645-2273 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
any Tuesday through Saturday or
call Boyette Animal Hospital at
671-3400 for an appointment.


16 1%


Sponsors:


OCTOBER 21, 2010





OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 7B


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8B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


I:


- u- Ys


5.z
A1


Making This Right

Beaches
Claims
Cleanup

Economic Investment

Environmental
Restoration
Health and Safety
Wildlife


/ was born in New Orleans. My family still lives here. We have to restore the Gulf communities
for the shrimpers, fishermen, hotel and restaurant owners who live and work here.
Iris Cross, BP Community Outreach

No oil has flowed into the Gulf for weeks. But we know this is just the beginning of our
work. BP has taken full responsibility for the cleanup in the Gulf and that includes
keeping you informed.

Restoring Gulf Communities
We can't undo this tragedy. But we can help people get back on their feet. We have
been working with impacted communities since day one.

Partnering with local governments and community organizations, my job is to listen to
people's needs and frustrations and find ways to help. We have 19 community centers
and teams in four states, listening and helping.

Restoring The Economy
BP is here in Gulf communities with shrimpers, fishermen, hotel and restaurant owners,
helping to make them whole.

More than 120,000 claim payments totaling over $375 million have already gone to people
affected by the spill. We have committed a $20 billion independent fund to pay all legitimate
claims, including lost incomes until people impacted can go back to work. And none of this
will be paid by taxpayers.

BP has also given grants of $87 million to the states to help tourism recover and bring
people back to the Gulf beaches.

Restoring The Environment
We're going to keep looking for oil and cleaning it up if we find it. Teams will remain in
place for as long as it takes to restore the Gulf Coast.

And we've dedicated $500 million to work with local and national scientific experts on the
impact of the spill and to restore environmental damage.

Thousands of BP employees have their roots in the Gulf. We support over 10,000 jobs in
the region and people here are our neighbors. We know we haven't always been perfect,
but we will be here until the oil is gone and the people and businesses are back to normal.
We will do everything we can to make this right.


For general information visit: bp.com
For help or information: (866) 448-5816


restorethegulf.gov
Facebook: BP America
Twitter: @BP America
YouTube: BP


For claims information visit: bp.com/claims
floridagu If response.com


2010 BP, E&P


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www.zipperersfuneralhome.com
Exp. 12/31/10


Rare hummingbirds visit Florida this time of year


The colorful broad-billed hum-
mingbird.
(Photo courtesy of Danny Bales)


Between now and early spring,
rare hummingbird species from
out West turn up in Florida on their
way to their winter homes in the
tropics.
Ruby-throated hummingbirds
are year-round residents through-
out Florida, but many from up
North also pass through here on
their annual migration to Central
America. Floridians who put up
hummingbird feeders or grow red
or orange tubular flowers may get
a glimpse of one of at least nine
additional species that have been
recorded in Florida, including
rufous, black-chinned, Calliope,
buff-bellied, broad-billed, broad-
tailed, white-eared, Anna's and Al-
len's hummingbirds. There's also
an extremely slim chance they'll


see a rare Bahama woodstar visit-
ing South Florida from the Carib-
bean.
One rufous hummingbird, band-
ed in Tallahassee last January,
was recaptured six months later in
Alaska, 3,350 miles away.
The challenge to nature lovers is
spotting them. The most common
adult hummingbird in Florida is
only 33 inches long, bill tip to tail
tip, and it rarely holds still, darting
rapidly from flower to flower. It is
smaller than some moths.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
has a few tips for residents who'd
like to help hummingbirds load up
on energy-generating food before
they make their journey over the
Gulf and to supplement overwin-


tering birds' diets.
"You can pick up a humming-
bird feeder for a few dollars,"
said Mark Kiser, coordinator of
the FWC's Great Florida Birding
Trail. "Mix a solution of one part
white granular sugar and four parts
water, bring it to a boil, let it cool
and load it into the feeder. Store
extra amounts in the refrigerator to
have on hand."
The FWC warns bird lovers not
to substitute brown sugar or honey
for the sugar. Both can be toxic to
hummingbirds.
Some authorities suspect add-
ing red food coloring to the sugar
solution may also be harmful to
hummers.
"That's not necessary, anyway,"
Kiser said. "Just having red on the
feeder is enough to attract hum-
mingbirds."
FWC biologists say it is ex-
tremely important to clean the
feeder and fill it with fresh sugar
solution at least once a week in
the winter and twice a week in the
summer to avoid spoilage, which
may make the birds sick. Soap and
water works if you rinse it well,
but a vinegar-and-water solution
is better. Rinse and then fill the
reservoir half full of hot water, add
a splash of vinegar and shake it
or scrub with a bottle brush, then
rinse. Feeders that easily disas-
semhble re hest


Another way to attract hum-
mingbirds is to plant native veg-
etation that produces nectar that
is part of their natural diet. Kiser
recommends firebush, coral hon-
eysuckle, trumpet creeper, cross
vine, red buckeye, coral bean,
necklace pod, Geiger tree, cardi-
nal flower, Florida flame azalea,
butterfly milkweed and standing
cypress.
North Florida and Panhandle
residents have the best chance of
encountering the species from
Western states, and South Florida
residents are most likely to see the
ruby-throated hummingbirds that
remain in Florida through the win-
ter, although some Western spe-
cies also turn up there. Most ruby-
throats migrate to Central America
until it's time to head north again
next spring.
"It's always a treat to see a hum-
mingbird, hovering at a feeder or
flower," Kiser said, "and this time
of year the variety of species you
see makes it even more exciting."
The FWC publication "Planting
a Refuge for Wildlife" offers more
tips for attracting wildlife to your
yard. The publication is available
for download from the "In Your
Backyard" link at MyFWC.com/
Viewing. For answers to ques-
tions on hummingbirds, call biolo-
gist Mark Kiser, 850-488-9478.


A ruby-throated hummingbird gathers nectar. (Photocourtesy of Danny Bales)


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 9B


SUNROOMS SCREEN ROOMS


SCash Discounts! <
*f No money down <


Experience
DAVID J. Reputation
S BRATE Dependability
IALUMINUMI
& CONSTRUCTION CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE
Brate Built Construction CBC#1250631
1544 27th St. S.E. C:< 2
Ruskin, FL 33570 "
bratebuiltconstruction@yahoo.com ,


Postcards Mitch Traphagen
A lot of readers joke about waiting for the new car they won for correctly guessing each week's
Postcards. The truth is, if I had a new car to give away, I would have already handed the keys over to
Bill and Margie Galbreath, who would now be cruising around searching for new Postcards in their
new Ferrari or Mercedes. The further truth is that I don't have the budget to make a replacement key
for one of those cars. Bill and Margie (thanks for the note -- it is so good to hear from you. Standing
in front of the Sandman Motel, it's easy to envision a time when there were dozens of Mom and Pop
businesses here) were the sole winners last week. Color me impressed. This week we have a Postcard
that is nothing stellar photographically but includes two unusual things: The first is the only road
sign I have ever seen that has musical notation. The second is a spooky looking guy hanging out
by the road. I have absolutely no idea who he was but he certainly looked like he belonged there.
At least he belonged there in 1870. Where in Florida can you sing along with the road signs? Send
your best guess or a happy tune to where@observernews.net or mail to 210 Woodland Estates
Blvd., Ruskin, FL, 33570.






10B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Ministry Retreat
is this weekend

The Domer Family is having a
Ministry Retreat Weekend, Oct. 21-
23. The theme for the weekend is
'Getting Used to the Family of God.'
The meetings will be held at the
Church of God Cafeteria Building,
5408 Center St., Wimauma.
The meetings will have old-fash-
ioned southern Gospel style music
performed by several different sing-
ers and there will be preaching in
each service. The service times are as
follows: Thursday, Oct, 21, 10 a.m.,
2 and 7 p.m.; Friday, Oct. 22, a la-
dies' meeting at 10 a.m. and a men's
meeting at 10 a.m., then both groups
come together for meetings at 2 and
7 p.m. On Saturday, Oct. 23 services
will be at 10 a.m., 2, and 7 p.m.
They are asking for a donation of
$10 per person at the door, and if you
bring a group of folks, there is a dis-
count on the tickets. For more infor-
mation, call 1-321-258-5921.


Crafters
showcase talents
This will be Nancy Lonsing-
er's fourth Craft Fair Show at
The United Community Church,
1501 La Jolla Avenue, Sun City
Center, on Saturday, Nov. 6, from
8:30-1pm.
Shoppers lookforNancy's table
with their Christmas list in hand.
Some of the favorite fabrics for
her famous "Potato Pockets" are
of dogs, cats, birds and red hats.
Every "Potato Pocket" comes
with directions to produce tasty,
microwave potatoes in minutes.
They make the perfect mailable
gift as they are light in weight
and won't break.
New to her table this year
are reindeer heads with big red
noses. They can be stuck in the
ground or hung on a door. Also,
her angels are a repeat favorite.
Shop for new, mostly hand-
made items, enjoy a morning
coffee and tasty treat from the
Bake Sale booth and complete
your day with a delicious lunch.
For further information about
the fair, contact Craft Chairper-
son Harry Friedenreich at 813-
634-5969.


Beth Israel
Congregation
holds adult
education series
The Jewish Congregation of Sun
City Center, located at 1115 Del
Webb Blvd. E. in Sun City Cen-
ter, will host a series of lectures
dealing with Life Cycle Decisions
which face us all. All sessions start
at 7 p.m.
On Wednesday, Oct. 27, Life
Path Hospice Executive, John Wil-
bur Jr. will speak.
The following Wednesday, Nov.
3, Charles Segal, President of Se-
gal Funeral Home will be their-
speaker.
Concluding the series on Nov.
10, Elder law attorney Gerald
Hemmes Jr. of the firm of Gerald
and Emma Hemmes will discuss
legal issues affecting Seniors, in-
cluding but not limited to Medic-
aid, Estates and end of life deci-
sions.
All speakers will be introduced
by Rabbi Phil
fAronson of Beth
Israel. For more
information, call
(813)642-8981.


Diane Snider
Bill McLeish, Don Herring, Shirley Nauman and the store manager.

Christmas shop early at St. Andrew
Presbyterian Church
On Sunday, Oct. 24, volunteers from the One World Gift Shop will
bring hand-crafted items made by men and women from over 15 third-
world countries to sell during coffee hour (10:30) and after the second
service (11:30).
The One World Gift Shop is an all-volunteer non-profit shop housed
rent-free in the First Presbyterian Church (Tampa) property. Income is
used to purchase more merchandise from brokers and missions working
with crafts persons to enable them to support their families. Any income
not used to purchase additional inventory is donated by One World to
local Tampa charities. This project is sponsored by the St. Andrew Pres-
byterian Church Mission Committee. For additional information contact
Sally 634-4936.


CHURCH
Come and experience the power of
Jesus to change your life.

Sunday @ 9 & 11 AM Servicio en Espafiol @ 6 PM

www.aplace4everyone.org

2322 11th Ave. SE Ruskin, FL 813.645.3337


OCTOBER 21, 2010





CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH
Sunday Worship: Blended 8:00 a.m.
Nursy Contemporary 9:40 a.m. '"
Nursery Provided
Pastor Jack R. Palzer Traditional 11:15 a.m.
5309 U.S. Highway 41 North Apollo Beach
across from MiraBay) www.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1305

E- St. John the Divine Episcopal Church
L Growing by Faith from Generation to Generation
\Rev. Tracy H. Wider Church Office 813-645-1521
SUNDAY SERVICES: 9 am Contemporary Service and Sunday School
Sat West Campus, S.R. 674 and 9th Street SE, Ruskin
8 am Traditional Service and 11 am Holy Communion with Choir at East Campus
at 1015 Del Webb Blvd., SCC
All Worship Services with Holy Communion and Healing Holy Oil

Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (Behind Suntrust Bank)
ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: (Nov.-April .............................8:30 a.m. Day Care Available
Mon. Fri.
Rev. John M. Bartha and all year)......................... 10:45 a.m. 6 a.m 6- .m.
t Phone: 645-1241 Sunday School.......................9:30 a.m. call 645-6198

REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH-ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center, FL33573-5354
Rev. Dr. Peter Stiller, Pastor 634-1292
Saturday Worship: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion....First & Third Sunday Bible Class...Thursday 10 am, Guests Welcome

First Church of Christ, Scientist
Ruskin Sun City Center (813) 645-6102
204 Second St. N.W, Ruskin, Florida 33570
Sunday Service Sunday School .......................................... 10AM
Wednesday Testimony Meeting ............................................ 5PM
Reading Room Tuesday & Thursday.........................................1- 4 PM
ALL ARE WELCOME www.spirituality.com

Friendcship B ptist Church Sunday WEEKLYSERVICES
Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist) 9 a.m ......................Bible Study
1511 El Rancho Dr. 11 a.m. .................... Bible Study
Sun City Cener, FL 33573 10 a.m. & 6 p.m............Worship
Sun City Center, FL 33573
S Phone/Fax: Wednesday
813-633-5950 6 p.m....Prayer Meeting/Bible Study

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC
Meets in the Social Hall of the Beth Israel Synagogue
1115 E. Del Webb Blvd.
Thursday, 7:00 PM Call 633-0396
We make a living by what we get, we make a life
by what we give. WINSTON CHURCHILL

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where God's Love is Shared"
U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL 645.1121 www.nbcor.orf
Sunday School for all ages 9:30 AM SBC
Morning Worship 10:45 AM Wanted: People Who Want to Grow
Evening Worship 6:00 PM and Live for Jesus!
Full Wednesday Schedule for all ages

North River Church of Christ i
-Non-Instrumental-
13885 U.S. Hwy 301 South
(Just South of the Manatee County Line)
Minister: Howard Johnson Office 941-776-1134
Services: Sunday 10:00am, 11:00am & 6:00pm
Wednesday7:00pm Home 813-754-1776

First Baptist Church of Gibsonton
"We lovebecause He first loed us." 1 John 4:19
TraditionalWorship Service "Sunda) School 9:30A.M. l
Old-Time Gospel Hymns *Morning worship p 10:30A.M.
Nursery Available Sunday Evening 6:00 P.M.
Interpreter for the Deaf Mid-Week (Wed.) 7:00 P.M. '
9912 Indiana St. Hwy 41 & Eselle Aenuue Malcolm S. Clements. Pastor
\Gibsonton, FL 33534 813-677-1301

WIJCme &A e. EVERETT TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ
1611 First St. SW Ruskin, FL 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL-
SERVICES: Sunday........................9:30 & 10:30 a.m.; 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday................7:00 p.m.

Prince of Peace Masses:
Sunday ..........8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., Noon
Catholic Church Saturday Vigil ...............4:00 and 6:00 p.m.
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573 Daily..........................................8:00 a.m.
Phone: 634-2328 Fax: 633-6670 W Confessions:
www.popcc.org Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m. and Sat. 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.


F RST BAPTIST CHURCH a 4.

820 COLLEGE AVE. W.
RUSKIN, FL 33570
645-6439
Swww.fbcruskin.org
A Resource for Families 4
Sunday School ............. ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship............8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Dr. Barry Rumsey
Evening Service..........................6:00 p.m. CHRISTI2SCHOOL
Wednesday Night Service........7:00 p.m. THROUGH 12TH
Awana........................7:00 p.m. GRADE






OCTOBER 21, 2010








Unity No
SSpirituality Rather Than "Religion"
Beth Israel's Social Hall
1115 Del Webb E. Sun City Center, FL Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
www.unitycommunityofjoy.com Tel. 813-298-7745



THE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO THE SERVICES NOW WORSHIPPING IN THE "CHAPEL"
AT SUN CITY CENTER FUNERAL HOME 10:30 AM ON SUNDAYS
NO CREED...BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE
1851 RICKENBACKER DRIVE 813-938-4955
Minister DR. DAVID CAMPBELL

Southside Baptist Church
"A Warm, Loving & Friendly Church"
Lookingfor a church home?
Need the comfort of a warm and loving family?
Join us on Sunday to come home to the warmth of our church family.
Located in South Hillsborough County, just south of Stephens Road in old Sun City.
4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 S Sun City, FL 33586 813-645-4085
"Getting to KnowYou" (Donuts& Coffee)....................9:00 a.m. Dan Cols, Pastor
Sunday School ...........................................................9:30 am. an polls, Pastor
Sunday Morning Worship ...................................... 10:55 a.m. Comejoin us to
Sunday Evening Service......................................... 6:00 p.m. learn about God's
Wednesday Evening Service.......................................... 7:00 p.m. Word and salvation
Thursday Morning Prayer............................................ 10:00 a.m. in Jesus Christ



Q&i/e fJJe/Aoi/ GCurcof cun CGiy Cenler
The Church of Open Hearts... Open Minds... Open Doors
1210 W. Del Webb Blvd. 634-2539
S Worship Services:
Saturday................. 4:00 p.m. Creason Hall (Traditional Service)
l Sunday.....................8:15 a.m. in Sanctuary (Traditional Service)
9:30 a.m.- Creason Hall (The Oasis)
S10:55 a.m. Sanctuary (Traditional with Chancel Choir)
SFellowship tim .... T 1.. ,;,,. I. r .... 10:15a.m. and 11a.m. in Creason Hall
Gd''SC Ce LTT 1N.SCCli'C.com
PASTORS: DR. WARRENLANGER, REV GARYBULLOCK
Communion First Sunday ofEach Month



St. Andrew Presbyterian Church

I |Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.
Prayers with anointing for healing and
I wholeness during worship the second Sunday
of every month.


A Stephen
Minlitrv Crhurch


Pastor: Dr. Gerald Iwerks
Meet friends in Fellowship Hall after the Service
Refreshments served


1239 Del Webb Blvd. West
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Church is Handicap accessible


Phone: 813-634-1252
For Information visit:
www.standrewatscc.org


Saint .Anne Catholi Chu.'ch

4M Fr. John McEvoy
Pastor
813-645-1714
SaintAnneRuskin.org

U.S. Hwy. 41 106 11th Ave. NE Ruskin
SouthShore: r- j .I I. Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton
C^ MASSES `
Saturday Vigil M ass ........... .......... .................................. 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass..................................... 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Holy Days....................................... Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Daily ......................................................... M onday thru Friday 8:00 a.m.
Espatiol ...............................Domingo 12:00 p.m.; Miercoles 7:30 p.m.
Confession.............................Wednesday 6:45 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.
Nursery Availablefor 10:00 a.m. Mass




II have / ben rciid it hrs adII no1




me.0-
Gal2: 20 0 0


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 11 B


KARL MARX


What About Socialism?"
with Dr. D. James Kennedy
The Biblical explanation of Socialism and its
impact on society.
Film & Discussion 6.00 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 31st
Trinity Baptist Church
702 Del Webb Blvd. W Sun City Center, FL
813-634-4228


Tapping into your core
SCC Unitarian Universalist Fellowship program on Oct. 21 will fea-
ture Brock Leach and his program "Exposing Yourself." He will discuss
tapping sources of core belief that motivate our lives, living them out
more fully, and better understanding our vulnerabilities. Brock Leach
is Intern Minister at the UU Church of Tampa, a Resident Chaplain at
Tampa General Hospital and a seminary student at Meadville Lombard
Theological School.
Coffee and conversation starts at 7 pm, Oct. 21, in the Beth Israel So-
cial Hall at 1115 Del Web, East, Sun City Center. The program begins at
7:30 pm. Visitors are welcome. For information, call 813- 633- 2349.

Southland Quartet playing at River's Edge
Southland Quartet from Cross City, FL will be coming in concert at
10:30 a.m. on Sunday, Oct. 24 to River's Edge Baptist Church, located
at 18050 U.S. Hwy. 301 S., inside the Masonic Youth Park (look forban-
ners near the entrance).
There will be a donation taken during the intermission. Everyone is
welcome, so plan on being there! For more information, call Pastor Mike
at (813) 598-3480.


The Jesse, Bogle, Carlson, Seale, and Johnson children celebrate
Halloween 2009 at Bible4Tots, Saint Anne Church, Ruskin.
Halloween costume party with Bible4Tots
Join Bible4Tots from 10:30 a.m. to noon on Thursday, Oct. 28 for a
Halloween costume party! Healthy drinks and snacks welcomed. Bring
a pumpkin for your child to paint! Parents and children are invited to
dress up for an everybody wins costume contest! Free! Fun! St. Anne's
Catholic Church, Ruskin. For more information, call Jen Carlson (941)
726-2326 or St. Anne's offices for more information. Bible4Tots is
held every Thursday morning from 10:30 to noon in St. Anne's Parish
Center.


Northside Baptist Fall
Festival
Northside Baptist Church, locat-
ed at 1301 Hwy. 41 N. in Ruskin,
will host a free Fall Festival on
Sunday, Oct. 31 from 6-8 pm.
They will have a bounce house,
face painting, food, hay ride, a
trunk or treat, candy, a cake walk,
games, and other treats. Whole-
some costumes only. Join in on fun
for the whole family!


SHMA conducts
Community Sing
South Hillsborough Ministerial
Association [SHMA], an organized,
interactive group of local church
ministers and congregations com-
mitted to the work of the Lord Je-
sus Christ in South Hillsborough
County, will conduct its monthly
'Community Sing' on Monday, Oct.
25 at the Iglesia De Dios, located at
320 15th St. SE, Ruskin, FL begin-
ning at 7 p.m. The 'prelude' begins
at 6:45 p.m. For more information,
call (813) 850-5027.


Fall Front Porch Sing
Join the Fall Front Porch Sing Gospel sing on Saturday, Oct. 23 begin-
ning at 5pm at New Beginnings Baptist Church (formerly Harney Rd.
Baptist Church) located at 8910 N. US Hwy. 301 in Tampa.
Bring your lawn chairs, sit under the stately oak trees and
enjoy both the weather and music. The featured group this d
month will be the Southland Quartet from Old Town, FL.
Other local singers will also be singing. Refreshments will
follow in the fellowship hall. For more information, call Larry at 813-
765-0651.

Go where we can, go while we can
First Baptist Church, 9912 Indiana Ave., Gibsonton, will be having
their Annual Missions Conference Oct. 24-27. Service time is 6 p.m.
Sunday and at 7 p.m. Monday through Wednesday. Every year in the fall
they bring Nationals from various countries to participate in the Confer-
ence.
This year, from the Philippines will be Edgar Tamayo, Chad Mahiney,
Edito Pagayunan, and Francisco Jardenil; Jason Francis from Grenada
will be going to Zimbabwe. They have two deaf men from St. Lucia,
Kendal Severin and Zach Harlow. Jason Francis from Grenada will
interpret for them. Also, from Panama, Genaro Hernandez and Fernando
Justiniani.
These services will be very inspiring and a blessing. Everyone is invited
to come. For more information, call (813) 677-1301.


Obituaries


Tibor Kurucz
Tibor Kurucz, 88, died peacefully
in the home of his daughter Susan
in Harrisburg on October 14, 2010.
Born in Toledo, OH to Ladiszlaus and
Mary Kurucz on October 7, 1922, he
was preceded in death by his one
true love, Doris A. Durney to whom
he was married for 65 years before
her death on April 29, 2008. He was
a graduate of Macomber High School
and the University of Toledo. He was a
mechanical engineer for Mettler Toledo
Scale where he worked for 35 years
before retiring to Sun City Center, FL
where he resided for 22 years before
moving to Harrisburg to be near his
beloved children and grandchildren.
Tibor proudly served his country
in the European Theatre and was a
decorated WWII army veteran having
received a Purple Heart Medal, Bronze
Star Medal with 2 Oak Leaf Clusters,
Distinguished Unit Medal, Good
Conduct Medal, World War II Victory
Medal and the European African Middle
Eastern Campaign Medal with 2 Bronze
stars.
As a young man he enjoyed sports
and later became an avid golfer. He
also enjoyed bridge and crosswords
and was an active member of the First
United Methodist Church for most of his
life.
Tibor was always hard working
and was a devoted family man. He
is survived by his children Kenneth
(Kathy) of Walbridge, OH, Karen
Kester (Duane) of Sun City Center,
FL, Ronald of Scottsdale, AZ (Lieuen),
Christine Currier (David) of Mesa, AZ,
Richard of Centerville, OH, Susan
DiSanto (Mark) of Harrisburg, PA,
Barbara Olson (Richard) of Saline, MI
and Deborah Muehlbach (Craig) of
Downingtown, PA, 11 grandchildren
and 2 great-grandchildren, his brother
Alador, of Toledo and sister-in-law Alice
Oberly of Toledo. In addition to his wife,
he was predeceased by his daughter
Kathleen Criscio, parents and brothers
Louis, Steve, and Albert Kurucz. Tibor
was a role model for his family and was
respected by all who knew this quiet,
gentle man. He will be deeply missed.
Visitation will be at Neill Funeral
Home, Derry St, Harrisburg from 10:30
to 11:30AM on Friday October 22, 2010
followed by a brief memorial service for
the family. He will be interred with his
wife at Fort Indiantown Gap. Online
condolences may be made to www.
dignitymemorial.com.

Emilie H. Mirsch
Emilie H. Mirsch, 87, a long-time
resident of Sun City Center and most
recently Tampa, passed away on
October 11, 2010. She moved to Sun
City Center with her late husband, John
W Mirsch, in 1978.
Emilie was a member of United
Community Church, active in Sun City
Center for many years, and an avid
golfer. Mrs. Mirsch is survived by two
daughters, Mary M. Swift of Fairfax,
VA; and Rebecca M. Laughlin of New
Market, MD; five grandchildren, and one
great-grandchild. She is also survived
by a brother, Clifford M. Hubbs, Jr. of
Macungie, PA.


doi:







12B THE SHOPPER


-^ THE SHOPPER
To place an ad call THE H
813.645.3111 ext. 201
Fax: 813.645.1792 CLASSIFIEg AI VEITIS1N
$15.50
up to 20 words M & M Printing Co., Inc
Saddl. word weekly publisher of the

D e is M y The Observer News, The SCC Observer and The Riverview Current
Deadline is Monday 1 olo.,and Iato. A o,


OCTOBER 21, 2010


105 PERSONAL

Now Open
Brown Bag Subs "Best Cuban
around". 5212 SR 674. Wimauma 813-
938-5811

Bon Worth's Customer appreciation
day. Oct. 23, 9am-5:30pm. 1517 Sun
City Center Plaza, SCC. Refreshments,
prizes. 10% of total purchase

115 LOST& FOUND
Found Scotty looking little black dog in
vicinity of US 41 & 4th Ave., Ruskin. Call
813-645-2972 to identify





260 FRUITS/VEG

FALL FESTIVAL at
Brown's Grove Farm Market

HAVE A
SFUN-FILLED
WEEKEND!
Saturday & Sunday,
October 23-24
10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
SPumpkin Patch Hayride Crafts
BBQ Face Painting Pumpkin
Painting Live Music Pony Rides
Farm Fresh Produce
12255 Hwy. 301 N. Parrish
(941) 776-2710






310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana
St., Gibsonton(1 block off US 41,1 block
north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday thru
Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture,
lots misc. Ministry First Baptist Gibson-
ton. 813-671-0036 to donate

Multi carport sale. Something for ev-
eryone. Saturday, Oct. 23, 8am-2pm.
Vintage dishes, Apothecary bottles.
1324 & 1329 New Bedford Dr & 107
Carswell, SCC.

Yard sale. Saturday, 10/23, 9am-?
Woodland Estates, Ruskin. Lot 39.
Kitchenware, clothes, misc.


w 4
1
1st St S.W.


T-RIFT
STORE


310 GARAGE /YARD SALE


T *fSo
New Winter Hours:
M-F 9 to 5:30 Sat 9 to 4:30

SENIOR
MONDAYS
are back!
Most items discounted
including Clothing,
Accessories, Collectibles, Art,
Books, and some Furniture.
Donations Needed
Please call (813) 645-5255
1311 3rd St. NE Ruskin
(Behind St.Anne Church
& Next to Kennco Mfg.)

1533 27th St., SE. South SR 674, 6ft
tall cedar wardrobe, milk glass, china tea
cups, children clothes $1. many misc.
Friday 10/22, 8am-noon. Saturday,
10/23, 8am-2pm.

Hide-A-Way RV Parkwide sale. 2.5
miles south of Ruskin on US 41. Friday
& Saturday, Oct. 22 & 23, 8am-1pm.
17ft bass tracker boat 60hp no trailer,
camping equipment, tow bar Falcon
11 by Roadmaster. Household items,
clothes, jewelry, Hall teapot & pitcher,
depression glass, lots of misc. Some-
thing for everyone. Produce stand on
Saturday morning

Community Wide
garage sale. Summerfield Crossing,
Oct. 23, 8am-2pm. 29 Neighborhood
participating, 300+ family sales. Trea-
sure & bargains for everyone.

Garage sale. Multi family. Friday &
Saturday, 8am-1pm. Many household
things. Something for everyone. 379
Club Manor Dr., SCC.

Neptune Village community garage sale.
Oct. 23, Saturday, 2525 Gulf City Rd.,
Ruskin. 8am-?. Great buys.


Communi* Yard Sale
Friday, Oct. 22 through
Sunday, Oct. 24

8 a.m. until
the day is over

IRONGATE APARTMENTS
1820 Blair Castle Circle
(ustoff19thAve. E& 12th StreetNE Ruskin)
(813) 645-8800


310 GARAGE /YARD SALE
Large selection of outdoor flower pots,
yard tools, some indoor & outdoor fur-
niture, handyman tools & lots of misc.
1729 South Pebble Beach Blvd, SCC.
Friday, Oct. 22, 8am-?

Ruskin 103 College Ave. West. Girls size
3T-8. Women small clothing, furniture,
costumes, lots of toys & household
items. Oct. 22 & 23.

Down sizing. Household & other items.
Lots of $1 items. Panther Trace subdivi-
sion. 12622 Ocelot Place, Saturday, Oct.
23, 8am-noon

Above The Rest
between WinnDixie & CVS. 139 S
Pebble Beach Blvd, 20% off antiques:
jewelry, collectibles, glassware, primi-
tives items & handbags. Free 11am-
12:30pm beef hot dogs, chips & pop.

SCC 1513 New Bedford. 7:30am-5pm.
Thursday, Friday & Saturday, Oct. 21,
22, 23. Tools, vacuum, fishing, lighting
fixtures, hot wheels, potato pockets,
fabric, misc.

Multi family garage sale. Furniture, appli-
ances & much more. 8806 Riverlachen
Way (Hampton Channels) off Riverview
Dr., Oct. 22 & 23, 8ma-2pm.

K&M Estate Sales
Final Sale
1605 New Bedford Dr. SCC, Oct. 22 &
23, 8am-2pm. All items priced to sell.
Everything must go. No half price day.

Misc. items, cosmetics, computer items.
Raleigh mountain trail mens bike (M-20)
$75. Dining set, w/4 chairs, brand new
$400. Oct. 22, 8am-2pm. 322 Faircross
Circle (off Club Manor) SCC

Neighborhood street sale. 2300 block
Lyndhurst Dr. & 2300 block Del Webb
West, SCC. Oct. 22 & 23, Friday &
Saturday, 8am-1pm. Something for
everyone.


SCalvary's
y nael attic
SThrift Store
NOW OPEN Wednesday,
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. Noon
"The Livin' Large Sale"
Women's
Large TOPS
Buy 1, Get 1 FREE
Also 'Secret Sale'
1424 E. College Ave. Ruskin
813-641-7790
AiniLstrzJ oTalvar Lutheran church


312 ESTATE SALES
Estate sale. 5040 Ruby Flats Dr., Valen-
cia Lakes (US 301 just north of SR 674)
10am-4pm. Oct, 22, 23, 24 also 29 & 30.
Furniture, household goods, tools


MARIE E.RUDY
ESTATE
SALES

Serving the
SouthShore
Area


312 ESTATE SALES


312 ESTATE SALES


Let us get done in one day what it
takes the others guys a week to do.
We will pack-up and pick-up one room
or the entire house for a QUICK,
PROFITABLE, TROUBLE-FREE
EXPERIENCE.
CALL BUTTERFIELD'S AUCTIONS




www.ButterfleldsAuctions.com
Butterfield Auctions AB2706/AU3549


Headlamp Regulations More often than not
you'll find the following sentence: "By law, your
vehicle's headlights must be turned on from a half
hour after sunset until a half hour before sunrise.



CALL
Paul B. (813) 645-3211

DICKMAN Serving South Hillsborough
R E L INC. County since 1924.
Celebrate 86 www.dickmanrealty.com
Celebrating 86Years dickman@tampabay.rr.com
1924 -2010
NOW IS THE TIME FOR A GREAT OPPORTUNITY to own a beautiful duplex
with 2BR/2BA on each side. Separate enclosed laundry rooms as well as a lovely
fenced yard & ample parking. All utilities on separate meters. A/C units replaced
in July and everything has been wonderfully maintained. Each side currently rents
for $900.00 per month. $195,000 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
BANK APPROVED SHORT SALE CYPRESS CREEK!! This beautiful
3BR/2BA 2-car garage home is waiting for you. This home has been nicely
maintained both inside and out and is the lowest priced property that you will find
on the market today in this beautiful community. Call today to make this home
yours! $84,900 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
REDUCED!! This cute home has it all! 4BR/2BA, family room, game room and
more! $84,000 CALL KATHY JACOBSON 624-2225
INVESTOR SPECIAL!! 2005 duplex with 2BR/1BA, 832 sq. ft. and other unit is
3BR/2BA, 1040 sq. ft. Both units rented. Bring all offers. Must move. $125,000
CALL KATHY JACOBSON 624-2225
NEED SOME ROOM TO SPREAD OUT? Fenced one acre lot (MOL) like new
2BR/2BA doublewide & 20 x 26 shop with a carport, electric hookup for a RV, new
roof in 2005. Country living close to town! $119,900 KAY PYE 361-3672 or
ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 FOR DETAILS.
SPACIOUS POOL HOME IN RUSKIN! 3BR/2BA with screen-enclosed inground
pool. Extra large yard & 2-car garage with opener. Nicely landscaped.House has
split bedroom plan, breakfast bar & pantry. Close to Little Manatee River.
$149,900. ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 or KAY PYE 361-3672
BEAUTIFUL WATER SUNSETS from this well maintained duplex. Each side has
1BR/1BA, on an oversized lot. Great view of the Little Manatee River and a
springfed pond. Live in one side and rent the other. $124,900. KAY PYE
361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
COMMERCIAL SITE located close to Hwy. 41 in Ruskin with over 200 feet of
road frontage. Zoned General Commercial with county water & sewer. Mobile
home on property brings rental income. $234,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or
ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
LIKE TO GOLF? TRAVEL? PLAY? CREATE? DO NOTHING? Let someone
else worry about the lawn, pool, maintenance while you take advantage of
coming & going as you please to one of the great condos on the market.
2BR/2BA, nice layouts, convenient locations. $44,900 to $189,000. JUDY
ERICKSON 468-0288
REDUCED $20,000! IMMACULATE BAYFRONT CONDO, FULLY
FURNISHED! 2BR/2BA, large balcony with extensive view of Tampa Bay,
covered parking. Come enjoy pools, fishing pier, restaurants &tennis courts. Now
$175,000. CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
FABULOUS RIVERFRONT LOT, OWNERS FINANCING: Deep water, huge
dock for your large boat, great fishing, great wide view of river. Utilities on site,
elegant iron gate & fence, PD-MU zoning (house, manufactured or mobile-home).
$239,000. CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
REDUCED $100,000! COMMERCIAL ACRE PROPERTY: 230 ft along U.S. 41
in Ruskin, cleared with 2 small rentals, sewer in place. Great business opportu-
nity. Now $299,000. CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION! Oversized corner building lot within
walking distance to recreation, churches, schools and the like but on a quiet lane.
Just under % acre and partially cleared. Zoned Residential Single Family. Asking
$60,000. JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540.
ALMOST ONE & ONE HALF ACRES to build that dream home and have room
to spare. Partially cleared and level with county water and sewer available.
Dead-end street with little traffic. Much potential. Asking $133,000. JO ELLEN
MOBLEY 645-1540.
CALLUS FORALLYOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS........645-3211
Donate your old functioning cell phones and drop off at our
office for use by the "Victims Assistance Program."


100 Announcements
200 Farmer's Mkt
300 Merchandise
400 Marine
450 Transportation
500 Real Estate
550 Manuf. Housing
600 Rentals
650 Prof. Services
700 Services
800 Employment


at 4pm Ruskin, Florida 33570


"- THRIFT STORE "
OPEN: Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 8 a.m. 3 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. 12 p.m.


1009 1st. Street S.W.
Ruskin
S.R 674 E We Have
Furniture, Too!
DONATION DROP OFFS
TUES. TiRU FRI. ONLY PLEASE,
ALL DONATIONS MUST BE IN CLEAN
USEABLE CONDITION.


U U


marie.rudy54@yahoo.com
813-938-5103


(Evening phone numbers)
Judy Erickson ..................... 468-0288 Jim Grannon.... ...............
Claire Tort .......................... 363-7250 KennAntonelli .....................
Kay Pye ............................. 361-3672 Kathy Jacobson .....................
Cathy Griggs ..................... 391-8653 Jo Ellen Mobley.................
Christine Nethers .............. 260-6335 LaRae Regis...................
Roxanne Westbrook............ 748-2201


Ruskin, Florida 33570


610-3485
786-3124
624-2225
645-1540
633-8318


at 4pm







OCTOBER 21, 2010

312 ESTATE SALES





Your home will be staged for
best results. Working in
Sun City Center for 23 years.
Please feel free to call about
the sale or its contents.
Bonded Licensed

Cell: 508-0307
or Eve: 633-1173


360 GOLF CARTS

Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade. Char-
gers, parts all related. Ronny's Carts &
Parts. 813-645-4515 or 813-484-9855

We buy golf carts, any condition. We pay
top dollar for used carts, running or not.
Same day pickup. 813-300-0114

390 MISC. FOR SALE

Portable generator, 3,000 watts w/2 120
VAC outlets. Never used. $125. 20ft Alu-
minum ext. ladder, like new $50. Hedge
trimmer 15" B&D $15. 813-633-4002







425 SLIPS OR STORAGE

South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special-
izing in outside storage for RVs, boats &
trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay-
Storage.com

Ramey's Business Park
RV & boat storage & heavy equip-
ment. 1/4 mile from Williams Park
boat ramp. 813-410-9607 or 813-849-
1469


THE SHOPPER 13B

SERVICES^^
^^^^^^^-7 A^ri Ari


455 AUTOMOBILES

2004 Lincoln LS, Luxury 6 cyl model,
many extras, air condition & heated
seats, pearl metallic, grey leather in-
terior, excellent condition $8,500 obo.
813-633-1334 one owner

Toyota Prius 2005. 34,000 miles, ga-
raged, new tires, excellent condition
$12,395 obo. 813-391-4561

459 MOTORCYCLES

2008 Honda 750 Shadow Aero, 7,200
miles, windshield, highway bar, floor
boards. Red & White. Great bike for
women. Asking $5,500 obo. 813-240-
9009

E-MAIL
Classified@observernews.net






511 HOUSES FOR SALE

Ruskin, Riverbend community.
3br/2ba/2cgs, 1,500 sf living space,
large lot. Short sale approved. $79,900.
813-671-2445 or 813-857-3372



II.


2BR/2BA (split bedrooms), side entry garage, vaulted
ceilings, over 2000 sq. ft, family room and 37x12
enclosed lanai........................................ $187,500
SCC Worthington 3BR/2BA 2,500 sq. ft., solar
1.. ,..I i. ... i ..... .. cagedpatio....... $249,000
RENTALS
BR/1.5BA..... ........................... .............$600/m month
2BR/2BA, near clubhouse, furnished..... $575/month
2BR/2BAon Gloucester furnished..........$700/month
3BR/2BA, 2car garage, pet areain KP Canbe
rented furnished or unfurnished..............$900/month


I.---------------------------------------------------



THE SHOPPER

I
THE OBSERVER NEWS THE SCC OBSERVER THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT

To place a classified ad
call 813-645-3111 Ext. 201;
fill out the form below and fax to
813-645-1792; or mail this form to
The Shopper
210 Woodland Estates Ave. SW Ruskin, FL 33570

DEADLINE: Up to 20 words
Ad and payment must
be received by 4:00 p.m. $ 50
Monday for publication in 306 for each
that week's edition. additional word


I Name:
Address:
Address:
I


City:

Daytime Phone:


Classification:

I


State:


__ Zip:


Ad copy as you wish it to appear:


I_______________ ______________



I ______________




I_______________ ______________



I ______________


511 HOUSES FOR SALE

OWNER FINANCING with $5000.00
down! 2BR/2BA manufactured, large
fenced yard. $45,000.
OWNER FINANCING! Beautiful
building lot, cleared and ready for the
home of your dreams. $27,000.
SUN CITY CENTER. Beautifully
maintained 2BR/2BA 2-car garage
single family home. $139,500.







GREAT STARTER HOME OR INCOME
PROPERTY: 2BR/1.5BA house, enclosed
lanai, inside utility room, 2-car carport, new
roof, county water & sewer, on large corner
lot with huge oak trees. $58,000.
NEAT, CLEAN, MOVE-IN READY!
Furnished 2BR/2BA (1988) doublewide on
its own lot, enclosed Florida room, utility
room, carport & shed. Great kitchen with
island, large pantry and eat-in space,
walk-in closets in both BR, double roof,
cement driveway, irrigation system & more.
Close to golf course community. $74,500.
COMMERCIAL CORNER LOT, RUSKIN:
12Acre cleared, conveniently located a
block from highway, close to businesses
& post office, zoned CN $99,000.
Possible owner financing.








/-SC




560 M.H. ON LOTS

Mobile home for sale Eastwood Mobile
Home Park, Gibsonton. Call Heather
813-677-5726

565 M.H. IN PARKS

Mobile home for sale. 2br/1ba, CHA,
completely furnished. Washer/ dryer.
Renovated. Very clean, large Florida
room, carport, utility shed. Ruskin.
$8,700. 813-645-3482







610 WATERFRONT RENTALS

The Dolphin House, Apollo Beach,
efficiency apartments on water. Boat
docking /fishing. Pool, laundry. $185
weekly, $185 deposit. No pets. 813-
850-5217

Efficiency on waterfront lot. Ruskin. Nice
neighborhood. One person 55+, no pets.
Satellite TV, all utilities included $500
monthly. 813-645-3047

611 HOUSES FOR RENT

SCC. 2br/2ba, 55+ community, clean,
close to shopping. Super quiet & safe
neighborhood $795 monthly. 813-
363-1941

Ruskin, quaint 3br/2ba home with front
covered porch. Well suited for 1-3
people. Monthly rent $950 with signed
lease. No smoking. No pets. Security
deposit & references required. Please
call 813-649-1599

For rent. 1 bedroom house, between
Gibsonton & Apollo Beach. No pets.
813-690-0768

S & R Properties
3, 2 & 1 bedrooms. No pets. Ruskin,
Gibsonton area. RV lots available 813-
310-1888 or 813-849-1469

612 APTS. FOR RENT


630 M.H. RENTALS


For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With
A/C. 813-677-1086 705 CLEANING


Ruskin, 1br park model for rent. No
smoking, no pets, references needed.
Weekly rent $100 includes utilities, $200
security deposit, 6 month minimum. Call
649-1599 8am-4pm.

For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home near
shopping center in Gibsonton. 813-677-
8789, 813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

2br/2ba private lot. South of Gibsonton,
US 41. Call 813-927-2065

One bedroom furnished, water & electric
included. $165 weekly, plus security
deposit. R & M Mobile Home Park
Gibsonton. 813-677-7509

Gibsonton/ Riverview area. (2) 2 bed-
room mobile homes for rent. Starting at
$165 -$175 weekly, waste, sewer, trash
included. No pets. 813-234-0992

Riverview, mobile home, 2br/2ba in 55+
park, includes water & trash. Gated com-
munity. $700 monthly plus $500 deposit.
813-789-5448

For rent. 1 bedroom trailer. Water, elec-
tric included. Good for single or couple.
Private $125 wk. $250 moves you in.
813-677-9691

645 OFFICE SPACE

600+ sf commercial office space. Great
rate. Highly visible at corner of US 41
& College Ave., Ruskin. Call 813-210-
6540 or email kristen@mobileeyecare.
com

646 WAREHOUSE SPACE

Garage & mini storage rooms for rent.
Pirates Treasure Cove, Gibsonton.
813-677-1137







651 BOOKKEEPING

QuickBooks
Certified Pro-advisor Tutoring / in-
struction at your pace. Flexible hours.
Full bookkeeping service. (Bank recon
/payroll /data entry /tax prep via QB.
10+ years local service, Thea's Quick
Bookkeeping Inc, Ruskin 813-641-
1089

680 ADULT/CHILD CARE
Now accepting applications for enroll-
ment. Age 6 weeks -12yrs. Half or full
day. Ruskin United Methodist pre school.
Call 813-645-6198. CHC110087

Personal assistant. Transportation er-
rands, etc. References upon request.
Call 813-633-2653

Night time child care. Licensed home
Ruskin/ Apollo Beach. Hourly, nightly,
weekly rates. Family discount. 0-12yrs.
Monday/ Saturday, 6pm-6am. Reserve
care for your next event. 813-600-3762.
FH431464

Turn your unwanted items
into cash. Call the classified
department to place your ad
813-645-3111


Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integrity.
Call for free estimate. 7days a week.
Move-in, move-out, rentals. Insured,
bonded, licensed. Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean

The Cleaning Experts
Where service & quality comes first.
20% off w/ ad. Move-in/ mover-out/
residential/ commercial. Free estimate.
Licensed & insured.
813-877-7647

Becky's At Your Service
Cleaning. Licensed & dependable
cleaning service, for all your clean-
ing needs. Free estimates. Call today
813-672-9215

Florangel
Cleaning Service
Homes, Free estimate. Honest, reli-
able, references available. Moving
in or moving out. 813-325-3290
Fdclisa68@yahoo.com

710 LAWN CARE

M & C Mower Repair
Parts & service. Authorized warranty
center. Commercial & residential. 725
14th St., Wimauma. 813-938-3226.
Pickup & delivery &

FloraScapes
Professional maintenance company
serving all your landscaping needs.
Residential & commercial. Ruskin,
Apollo Beach, SCC, Riverview. Li-
censed/insured. 813-333-3688

All You Need
We create outdoor living! Lawn
replacement, sod installation, delivery,
landscaping & more. Free estimate.
813-317-9883

Henry's Lawn Maintenance.
Landscaping needs. Rock, mulch, tree
service. Pressure washing. Monthly
lawn maintenance. Licensed & in-
sured. Free estimates. 813-477-3054

714 TREE REMOVAL

Professional Tree
& Landscaping. Sales: trimming,
removals, popcorn curbing, stump
grinding, clearing, hauling. Fill dirt/ top
soil/ rock/ mulch. We barter for items
of value. Free estimate. Call Paul 813-
634-6041 or 813-751-9691

Cedric Williams Tree Service/ profes-
sional landscaping. 20yr experience.
Quality work, reasonable rates, licensed
& insured. Call Kathy 813-645-9249
anytime (24hrs).

715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill dirt,
topsoil, sand, crushed rock & asphalt,
driveway culverts. Loader, backhoe,
grading, bushhog, discing. Install Sep-
tic System & drain fills. CFC#1427021.
813-645-1883


ONA NW OM

WIT NOMOEY0OWN!


A community of affordable homes
exclusively for first-time homebuyers!

FoRnIDA OMEa RTEwRSHIMeP
(813)672- 7889 www.flhome.org


For rent: Efficiency apartments. Weekly
rates, utilities furnished 813-677-8789,
813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

Advertise in the

newspaper that your
community is reading.


*Phase III NowAvailable!
* 2 Swimming Pools and a Clubhouse
* 3,4 and 5 Bedrooms, 1 and 2 Garages
* Popular Ruskin Location
* USDA Self-Help Housing program -- help
build your home in exchange for a down
payment
* No money down, easy to qualify
* Non-profit agency works for you
-Hablamos Espafiol -




BAYOUPASS
,: r.I. Irl, r, rmre homebLMers uder 80% of median hcmme. Call for details.


Ju -A







14B THE SHOPPER

715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Fill-Land Clearing
Dozer & loader work, driveway & sep-
tic fill, & shell hauled. Robert Carver,
813-634-4962. Beeper 813-267-6217

Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service. Cul-
vert sets, driveways, shell, crushed
asphalt, concrete, fill dirt, excavating,
mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963
Free estimates.

716 CONCRETE

Concrete Finishing
Patios' driveways' sidewalks'.
Licensed & insured. Call Steve Sim-
mons 813-503-8764. Lic#201587

720 HOME MAINT.

Boston Frank's Int
painting & pressure washing. Most
homes painted for $799. Complete!
Don't miss out. Call Frank today 813-
309-3415. Other services available.

SCC Handyman/ interior painting. Avail-
able for general home repair & quality
work at competitive prices. Call John
813-810-0256

735 TRANSPORTATION

At Your Service
Transportation to Tampa airport /
charters /cruise ship. Excellent prices.
Call Express Transportation 813-731-
9283 for rates

740 MISC. SERVICES

In Your Home
Pet Care
813-767-7225. Affordable, licensed,
bonded, insured. References avail-
able. email: olivertort@aol.com Oliver
& Company

Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks, boat
lifts & seawalls. Free inspection. Heck-
er Construction Co. 813-236-9306






870 GENERAL


I Behind 5th 3rd Bank
645-5431

When should or shouldn't I use a
horn? Car Horns and Defensive Driving
The use of car horns is governed by
commonsense ratherthan actual legisla-
tion. With driver safety in mind, you'll find
many DMV driver manuals recommend
using a car horn in the following situa-
tions: To alert a bicyclist who appears
ready to stray into your lane....


870 GENERAL


TO PLACE
A CLASSIFIED AD

Call
Beverly
at
645-3111
ext. 201
or e-mail:

Beverly@observernews.net
20 words for $15.50 and
30C for each additional
word. Bold line $3.All
classified ads are paid in
advance. Deadlines are
Monday at 4 pm for
Thursday paper.


COMMUNITY PAPERS
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OCTOBER 21, 2010

CPF STATEWIDE
GEORGIA MOUNTAINS NORTH
Income producing 3 log cabins
on 4.5ac. Creekside. Fully fur-
nished, Recently appraised. All
for $495,000 or will sell separately.
706-253-8000 www.npgbrokers.
com;

Hard to find B4 zoning property
for sale or lease on Highway 484
in South Marion County. 4,700 sq
footbuilding on 1 acre. Great for
church, clubs, meetings, etc. For
info contact Realtor Anthony White,
352-547- 3137.

Montana, Wyoming, Alaska, New
Mexico, acreage starting at $485/
acre. Owner financing O.A.C. Great
building sites, Brokers welcome.
Guaranteed access, insured title,
warranty deed. 1-800-682-8088
www.rmtland.com

NC MOUNTAIN LAND MOUNTAIN
TOP TRACT 2.6 acres, private,
large public lake 5min away, owner
must sell, only $25,500. 1-866-
789-8535

SELL/RENT YOUR TIMESHARE
FOR CASH!!! Our Guaranteed
Services will Sell/Rent Your Un-
used Timeshare for Cash! Over
$78 Million Dollars offered in 2009!
www.sellatimeshare.com ; 877-
554-2430

SOUTH CAROLINA 2 acres in
the Santee Cooper Lake area.
Near 1-95. Beautiful building tract
$19,900. Ask about E-Z financing,
low payments. Call owner: 803-
473-7125

TENNESSEE MTNS 435ac w/
timber, creek, river, natural gas
well, springs, city water, utilities,
trails $1800/ac. 2 tracts possible.
Good hunting. No state income
tax. www. tnwithaview.com 1-888-
836-8439

Increase Male Size. Gain 1-3
Inches Permanently. FDA medical
Vacuum Pumps, Testoseroone,
Viagra, Cialis. Free Brochures!
619-294-7777 Code: "Free Pills-5"
www.DrJoelKaplan.com

VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg!!
40 Pills + 4 FREE for only $99. #1
Male Enhancement, Discreet Ship-
ping. Save $500 Buy The Blue Pill
Now! 1-888-777-9242

Donate Vehicle Receive $1000
Grocery Coupon Noah's Arc Sup-
port No Kill Shelters, Research to
Advance Veterinary Treatments
Free Towing, Tax Deductible,
Non-Runners Accepted 1-866-
912-GIVE

Donate your Car Truck or Boat to
HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND Free
3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible,
Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken
Care Of. 1-866-905-3801

Place a Garage/Yard Sale
Ad $15.50 for 20 Words


The Florida Community Paper Advertising Network reaches













homes in Florida
*homes in Florida Placement in over 125 free community publications P

throughout the state of Florida Be a c
Easy, fast, very affordable
For complete details call Beverly at 813-645-3111 x201






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 15B


T. INC.
Lic. #CMC056816
AIR-CONDITIONING,
HEATING & REFRIGERATION
Complete Sales, Service,
Installation & Repair
Amana and Senior
Trane Dealer Discount
John R. Bowman, Jr., Owner
(813) 633-2703


SELF ARREST BONDS
COURT DATES 664-0056
WARRANT CHECKS
BIG JOHN'S
BAIL BONDS
641-8400
FAMILY BONDSMAN
STATE FEDERAL
24 HOUR SERVICE
JOHN L. VATH
2100 Orient Road Tampa, FL. 33619
Fax: (813) 628-8739


lii UIW Owner/Di cor
E #CAC 1814397
SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS 24 Hour
M .Residential and Light Commercial heervice
Complete Sales* Service Family Owned & Operated
Repair Installation NoRevolving Technicians 641-1811
SERVICING Au MAKESAND MODEL-s Quality Service, Sales
24 Hour Service Financing Available Installation, a FACTORY
Lic. #CAC1815928 Most Replacement A ArORZED 802 4th St.S.W.
Parts on Hand (OffCoegeAve.W
(813) 2636503 Ruskin, Florida
S Senio.itry (813) 263-6503 Turn to the Experts
S Discounts CAC iR143a6 Ruskin www.wilhelmac.com


oX) I


', r'H,-t


Michael's
Custom Cabinets


* Complete Remodel or
Reface Kitchen or Bath
Custom Cabinets
SBuild New Entertainment
Center to fit Larger TVs

813-245-2713
Mike Leeper, Owner
Business Owner 20+ Years


* Ceiling Fans
* Outlets
* Lighting
* Panel Upgrades
* FREE Estimates

813-645-7000
Listed with Sterling Management and
Sun City Center Community Association
Lic ;oCr3innmo'K


Need Work Done
Around the House?

Turn to PHIL
Your Handy Person!
RIVERSIDE GOLF & BOATING CLUB RESIDENi
www.mrhandyperson.com


* COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL
^ SouthBay
Electric Co.
of Ruskin SERVICE
iM SERVICE
LICENSED UPGRADES
BONDED ALL TYPES
INSURED OF WIRING
ER00126636 RENOVATIONS
Over 30 Years Experience
SECURITY LIGHTS CEILING FANS
SWITCHES & OUTLETS SPAS & DOCKS
Limited Senior Citizen Discount
of 10% expires 10/31/10


A1ll Phase


Crftma
CalWRE
(83 0925


F sL-j F-


Serving
* APOLLO BEACH
RUSKIN
SUN CITY
CENTER


Timothy Sutton, LC
INTERIOR EXTERIOR
PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
PRESSURE WASHING
29 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN OHIO
NOW SERVING FLORIDA
LICENSED BONDED INSURE
813-727-1013
Y r A ^^^^


76A ei-"


Residential Commercial
New Roofs Re-Roofs Tile
Tile Repairs Hot Tar/Flat Decks
Ventilation Leaks Repaired
FREE Estimates Financing Available
24 Hr. Emergency Service
Senior Citizen Discount
We Carry Workers' Comp
For Your Protection BEE
- Lic #CCC1325993 Bonded Insured


Save 10% on

web advertising
Call your advertising
representative today for
more information
(813) 645-3111
www.ObserverNews.net


A- A&J
Hares
S rec. Plumbing
Experience
Service & Repairs
* Repipes *Water Heaters
New Construction
Remodels & Additions


SFREE Estimates
-V
-- Li. #CFC057969
A+Rating Bonded* Insured


U.


Roofing
loridaCertifiedRoofng Contractor

Proudly Serving: Sun City Center
Ruskin Apollo Beach Riverview
and surrounding areas
Member SCC Chamber of Commerce


CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE
OFFICE 813-333-6320
CELL 813-777-9808
Frank Shaft
FL Certified Roofing Contractor
CCC# 1327713
www.ApolloBeachRoofmg.com
PalmTreeRoofing(-)gmail.com


25+ Years Experience
wInsured
813-649-1418


All Types of Roofing
New Roofs & Repairs
SShingle Tile Metal Hot Tar
No Job too big or too small!
SERVING SINCE 1973
Ruskin Sun City Center Kings
Point Apollo Beach Riverview
"ALL MY CUSTOMERS ARE DRY
FRIENDS WHEN QUALITY COUNTY"



SunCityCuenter
ChanberMenber
P.O. Box 551 Ruskin, FL 33570
www.customroofing.us
Bonded & Insured Lic. #CCC1326907


PAUL WOOD PLUMBING, Ic.
State Certified Plumbing Contractor
#CFC1427697
Residential
Commercial
Certified Backflows
Stoppages
Service and Repairs
* FREE Estimates 24-Hour Service
Licensed Bonded Insured
(813) 641-1387
Z =_ am


R&D Septic Inc.
Complete Septic System
* New/Repair
*Fill Dirt
SPump Repair
Site Work


f Printing Company, Inc.
Elabllshed In 19 .1
For All Your Printing Needs
Serving the South Shore Communities
Since 1968
Call for a quote
(813) 645-4048
210 Woodland Estates Ave. SW
Ruskin, FL 33570
nr~rWu mmnrinfine enm


NOW OPEN


645-5222
cell: 240-2049
1501 33rd St. SI


LOOKING
FOR EXTRA
STORAGE
SPACE
FOR YOUR...
R.V.
BOAT
CAMPER
ETC.
ANY SIZE


SUN VIEW
WINDOW CLEANING, INC.
*ExceptionalService-
Registered at Kings Point
Member of:
SCC Community Association
Apollo Beach Chamber
813-944-8478
Licensed Insured Bonded


OCTOBER 21, 2010


1l4a 2slSt N. W RIISKIN


JOHN493-2861


..,..





16B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Sun City Center Plaza



S;cmom


Sl


Keller Williams Realty


* Sun City Center
* 813-634-7629


(PINCHNA*PENNYII
POOL'PATIO*SPA
The Perfect People For A Perfect Pool

1505 Sun City Center Blvd. SCC, FL 33573
633-0000 store194@pinchapennystores.com


, I I I I
TITLE _T (
"C, 'Y,7 '7. -


Complete Real Estate Closing & Title Services
Locally Owned & Operated
(Fax) 633-1789
mail@southbaytitleinc.com
936 Cypress Village Blvd., Suite A SCC, FL 33573
Underwritten by OLD REPUBLIC National Title Insurance Co.

PADCO Home Inspections, Inc.
Professional Inspections Since 2003
,- Serving West Central Florida


Dana B. Larrow
NACHI certified #05031992
INSURED
813-416-1724


PADCO2005@tampabay rr com www.Homelnspection4U. net
Got House? Need Inspection? Get PADCO!


HILLSBOROUGH TITLE
www.hillsboroughtitle.com
350 E. Bloomingdale Ave.
Brandon,FL33511
813-655-4000

ALSO:
Good Samaritans
* Good Samaritans Mission
Men's Club of
EmIer


- 2 p.m.


Ribbon Cutting at Noon

FREE HOT DOGS FREE DRINKS
Some food provided by Costco
"OVAH" The Hill D.J.
Come visit these vendors:


JOHN MOORE
Be r .Irll .^l'l- -c .B irfe i im-,




1649
(next tc
Picking Out The Right Flooring Since 1987 S,
813-633-7116 New
Outstanding Service, Unsurpassed Selections
1629 Sun City Center Plaza
(near SCC Post Office)
www.JohnMooreFloorCovering.com
VISA



Ameriprise
Finwaicial
JOHN PRICE
\ Managing Director
1609 SCC Plaza SCC, FL 33573


813-634-5677

-FREEDOM PLAZA
FREEDOM PLAZA


Al SuI CI i CN FR
Coinnie Leiko.,
tS131634-1S24
\ 1. 1 Fic. doim Pl.iz.a 11.111.
IN(. .1m11hI.c1.i E.igle BI d,SCC




GOLF
&CARS
SYAMAHA
-ClubCar


S.. ...,'",U"""' ..... 1605 SCC Plaza
SI Imrc Sun City Center, FL
\\ 1 um (Idll R(ld lialndo -
si3-h.s4-.3333 I 81 3-633-7843
,I 1NI3-7N7-h77S I


L- l4umaCar
of Sun City Center
MATT AARON

ell: 813-766-7138
lumaCarSunCity.com
ales@alumacar.com
I sCC Plaza Suite 103
o SCC Chamber of Commerce)
un City Center, FL
& Used GOLF CARTS

S\C


.J


HOMEWOOD
RESIDENCE
-FREEDOM PLAZA-
BROOKDALE SENIOR LIVING
BEV HURLEY
Sales & Marketing Manager
Main 633-4340 cell 784-8650
bhurley@ brookdaleliving.com
3910 Galen Ct., SCC, FL 33573
Facility #9634


S Lee Collis, MCC, Manager
906 N. Pebble Beach Blvd.
ST,\ Sun City Center, FL
813-634-3318


PREMIER DESIGNS
t I I is .
Vicki Franklin -'
Irllllr I .r ll, ll i r. ,
645-7232 -.


I


DANIEL B. OWENS
:" : i:l.:nl V.,:- Pr : J.:Ilnl
1- I -C In
C N ;
CO.


Come Join The Fun!



Sat., Oct. 23


Zeda g'e4a~ce
Stye Seteow. lac.
1649 ai mOtifg Oenfer Taza- #S
aim Oifg Oe~ier, F/2 335?73

634- 74,6


SEMI-ANNUAL SCC SHRINE CLUB
Pancake Brunch
Sunday, Oct. 24
9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Tickets $5 (sold at the door)
South Community Hall on
S. Pebble Beach Blvd., Sun City Center


SPancakes & Sausage
ALL YOU CARE TO EAT
y Proceeds are for the benefit of the sun city Center
SShrine Club. Payments are not tax deductible or
.I^ charitable contributions.


600 N. Westshore Blvd., Suite 502
Tampa, FL 33609
(Cell) 727-463-3763
Email: dbowens@bbandt.com

Assoc.:
Highest in Customer
Satisfaction -2010
Highest in Mortgage Sales
Satisfaction 2009





SHERLOCKS
HOME INSPECTION
Tom Kenney 813-598-4285
Chiet Home Inspector 509 E. Hilda, Brandon, FL 33510
Email: ThomasKenneyl 7@aol.com
FLReg. #G07038700003 ic. #2296R9007 /
rndii,,nt ,, P,, ,,,,, ..
'" I.. '.." hh .l

Partners Funding
CORRESPONDENT MORTGAGE LENDER
LOWEST RATES AVAILABLE
Cal for a FREE Consultation with our
Mortgage Specialist
813-634-3235
815 Cypress Village Blvd., SuiteA
Sun City Center, FL 33573
ERIC D. HECKMAN
ericpfsc@tampabay.rr.com
www.partners funding.com


10 a.m.


BELLA CUCINA
Family Italian Restaurant


1507 SCC Plaza
813-634-7521


B R () o K I)
SrNIOR Ll\






All American Title
Tim .. Stoner
.119 1811IM E 4I i -k
S 13-149-L97411


ollsolft


IJurruAMr


inm


OCTOBER 21, 2010


a


CE:FP




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