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Title: Observer news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102144/00038
 Material Information
Title: Observer news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: M&M Printing Co., Inc
Place of Publication: Ruskin, FL
Publication Date: October 7, 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102144
Volume ID: VID00038
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
        Page B 6
        Page B 7
        Page B 8
        Page B 9
        Page B 10
        Page B 11
        Page B 12
        Page B 13
        Page B 14
        Page B 15
        Page B 16
Full Text


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7,, I7*,,


Why go travel
abroad when
Florida's
islands are
just a few
hours away?
See page 8B


Photo club
September
winners
showcase
their talents.
Seepage 10B


Penny Fletcher
shares a cup
* ih SCC
Chamber's new
director.
See Over
Coffee page 5B


P.R.S.T. STD
PAID
RUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570
PERMIT NO. 8


October 7, 2010
Volume 54
Number 37
2 Sections


Bette Erikson holds her best
friend, Trooper, who got his name
because of the trials he had obvi-
ously endured before they met.

'Trooper'

blesses owner

who works to

see pets blessed
* By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews. net
SUN CITY CENTER Every
year pets are blessed by priests
and ministers around the world on
Oct. 4, the day that St. Francis of
Assisi, patron saint of animals and
ecology, is honored.
For residents all over South
County, this has become a commu-
nity event as Linda Cardamone and
Stephen Cooksey, owners of the
Three Legged Poodle pet specialty
shop on Imar Drive in Sun City
Center, open their doors (and patio
and parking area) to about 150 pets
and their owners each year.
Dogs, cats, birds (and any other
house pet) come on leashes and
in cages with owners of many
religious denominations and are
prayed for.
But the event is not sponsored
by a religious denomination. It is
spearheaded by the Unity Com-
munity of Joy, a nondenomina-
tional spiritual fellowship led by
Dr. Betty Martin-Lewis, a licensed
Unity teacher, who leads the Sun
City Center Unity group. Those
who belong to Unity describe it as
a nondenominational spiritual or-
ganization instead of a religion.
"There are many volunteers that
make the pet blessing possible, but
one stands out who has worked
tirelessly every single year behind
the scenes and is the real driving
force behind this annual event,"
said Carol Oschmann. "Bette Er-
ikson runs around soliciting food
from local restaurants, pulls to-
gether volunteers to gather tables
See PET BLESSINGS, page 11


HE


OBSERVER NEWS


Bees mysteriously

swarm RV park tree
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New vehicles

purchased for

SCC Security

Patrol
* By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
SUN CITY CENTER Two
new vehicles have been added to
this community's Security Patrol
fleet courtesy of three recent cash
contributions.
The two 2011 Hyundai sedans
were expected to begin service
this week following the detailing
that marks them as part of the vol-
unteer-based community security
force said Martha Finley, patrol
chief. Early in the week, the white
vehicles were being painted along
their doors with the bright blue in-
signia of the patrol, receiving the
newer style, low profile light bars
on their roofs and equipped with
the two-way radio systems that
keep them in constant communica-
tion with patrol dispatchers.
The latest vehicle purchases were
underwritten by recent substantial
See PATROL CAR, page 2


Voters get two last chances

up close with candidates


* By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
RUSKIN As the mid-term No-
vember election looms on the ho-
rizon, South County voters have
just two more public opportunities
to question their candidates before
marking ballots in their precincts.
An evening "meet and gI~i"
with county and state level office
seekers has been scheduled for
Tuesday, October 12, and a Satur-
day morning candidates Q and A
forum is set for October 23. Both
are strictly non-partisan, informa-
tional gatherings aimed at giving
voters last chances to air issues
with those who will represent
them during the next several years,
organizers said.
The Tuesday function will be
held from 5:30 to 7:30 PM in the
ballroom across the entry foyer
from the restaurant facility at the
Little Harbor Resort, according
to Melanie Morrison, executive
director of the Ruskin Southshore


Chamber of Commerce. Organized
by the chamber, the event is be-
ing sponsored by Tampa Electric
Company and Mosaic, she said.
Free of charge for chamber mem-
bers but with a nominal $5 charge
asked from non-members, it will
include a buffet selection of light
finger foods, Morrison added.
This candidate function will be
"strictly a meet and giI'.t" type of
gathering with no formal agenda
followed, the chamber director
noted. The objective is to give vot-
ers time to interact with the candi-
dates in a social setting, encourag-
ing conversation about candidate
positions on various topics of in-
terest to their potential constitu-
ents, she added.
Candidates for the three seats
on the Hillsborough County com-
mission that directly relate to the
South County area as well as those
seeking seats on the county school
board along with candidates for
See CANDIDATES, page 3


East Bay rings in the champions MitchTraphagen
The state champion East Bay High School girls softball team was recognized with championship rings before
the East Bay-Durant Homecoming football game on Friday. The championship rings, presented to each
player and coach from the team, were provided by the East Bay Alumni Association. The 2009-10 varsity
softball team went 24-7 for the season, ultimately shutting out Niceville for the State Championship on May
13 at the National Training Center in Clermont. It was East Bay High School's first state championship in
any sport in the 52-year history of the school. Star pitcher Kayla Cox returned from North Carolina State
University to attend the event. Cox is currently a freshman at the university and is a member of the NC
State Wolfpack softball team.


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Mitch
Traphagen
takes a look at
life and why
each of us
matter.
See page 9B






2 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Patrol car
* Continued from page 1


donations to the patrol, Finley not-
ed. A $15,000 grant forthcoming
from the Sun City Center Com-
munity Foundation combined with
a $29,000 bequest under the terms
of a local resident's will to gener-
ate $44,000 in acquisition funds.
In addition, $10,000 contributed
by the Nearly New shop operations
will supply gasoline to keep the
new vehicles on the road through-
out the community, she said.
The new additions bring the pa-
trol fleet to a total of five vehicles,
four of them late-model Hyundais
and one a 2008 Chevrolet Malibu,
Finley said. At one time, the fleet
was composed primarily of the
Chevrolets, but recurring problems
with the vehicle lights prompted
the change which is proving popu-
lar, the patrol chief added.
Despite repeated problems expe-
rienced by the patrol which meant
taking the Chevys out of service
time after time, "there were no
recalls" issued by General Motors
for the Chevrolets and no break
from the dealer," Finley noted.
The Hyundais, on the other hand,
so far have given reliable service
and are popular with the volunteer
drivers who pilot them around the
community, the patrol chief said.
"Several drivers have liked them
so much, they've bought them as
their personal cars," she added.
Moreover, the Hyundais, while
the product of a foreign company,


OCTOBER 7, 2010
Twins to this late model Sun City Center
Security Patrol car, two new Hyundai
sedans are scheduled to go into service
across the retirement community this
week. The two 2011 vehicles were
I purchased recently with $44,000 in
contributions provided by the SCC
Community Foundation and a resident's
bequest. Another $10,000 donated by
the Nearly New Shop will keep the white
vehicles with bright blue security patrol
insignia fueled and on the road, helping to
maintain the community's low crime rate
and rendering a range of services. The
new cars, equipped with radio systems to
maintain constant communications with
dispatchers, also sport the lower profile
light bars. An estimated 34 such vehicles
have patrolled the community's streets
during daylight and night time hours
throughout the volunteer organization's
Melody Jameson 30 year history.


are American-made in Alabama,
Finley noted. The manufacturing
plant employs U.S. citizens and
the dealership marketing the ve-
hicles is staffed by Americans, she
asserted.
In the course of two to three years
of service in the patrol fleet, driv-
en by a steady succession of dif-
ferent drivers each day and night
throughout the week, each vehicle
racks up about 80,000 miles, at
which point trade-in is considered,
Finley indicated.
And, throughout the patrol's 30-
year history, she estimated that 34
vehicles have served in the fleet.
The first car was numbered 22,
for reasons unknown, she added,
and the newest Hyundai will bear
number 56.
The SCC Security Patrol, found-
ed in 1981 as a small neighborhood
watch group, has grown over the
three decades to become a primary
community service organization,
supported by cash contributions
and the donated hours of hundreds
of volunteers who manage vari-
ous aspects, dispatch vehicles and
routinely patrol the entire residen-
tial community as well as close-
in business districts in order to
maintain one of the lowest crime
rates in the county. The patrol also
works closely with the Hillsbor-
ough County Sheriff's Office.
Copyright 2010 Melody Jame-
son


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OCTOBER 7, 2010 OBSERVER NEWS* RIVERVIEW CURRENT* SCC OBSERVER* 3


Candidates
* Continued from page 1
the Florida Senate and House of
Representatives have been invited
to participate, Morrison said.
Those wishing to attend are
asked to so advise the chamber of-
fice at 813-645-3808 during busi-
ness hours.
The Saturday Candidates Q &
A, jointly sponsored by the Ruskin
Community Development Foun-
dation as well as M&M Printing
and its Ruskin, Sun City Center
and Riverview newspapers, will be
held in the community conference
room on the Southshore campus of
Hillsborough Community College,
east Shell Point Road. The forum
will open at 10 AM, according to
Dr. Allen Witt, current foundation
president.
For approximately two hours,
voters will have the opportunity
to question county and state office
seekers after each has introduced
him or herself and outlined quali-
fications, Witt said. At this last
non-partisan South County forum
before the November 2 election,


the foundation president indicated
he would expect probing questions
about the number of serious issues
confronting both the county and
the state, and with strong implica-
tions for the southern region of the
county.
County commission candidates,
including those running for the
District One seat and those vying
for the two open at-large seats,
have been invited to join the fo-
rum discussion. Invitations also
have been extended to the four
individuals campaigning for two
school board seats that affect the
South County plus candidates for
state senate and state house posi-
tions representing the region.
The informational forum is open
to the public and free of charge.
Access to the second floor con-
ference room at the college is
provided both by elevator and
stairway. Light refreshments are
planned.
Copyright 2010 Melody Jameson


FWC's Florida Bass Conservation
Center wins national award
The American Fisheries Society, the nation's leading organization of
professional fisheries scientists, presented a 2009 Wallop-Breaux Out-
standing Project of the Year award to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission (FWC) at the Commission meeting in Lake Mary.
The award recognized the Florida Bass Conservation Center in the Sport
Fishery Development and Management Facilities category.
The Florida Bass Conservation Center is a hatchery and research fa-
cility in the Withlacoochee State Forest, near Webster, that is dedicated
to ensuring the conservation of Florida's four native species of black
bass: Florida largemouth bass, shoal bass, Suwannee bass and spotted
bass. Fish raised at this facility are essential to maintaining populations
throughout the state that are being challenged by habitat loss.
The FBCC was dedicated in February 2007 and was paid for in part by
federal Wallop-Breaux and State Wildlife Grants money, together with
state matching funds, and a Rural Economic Development Initiative
grant. The site includes an interpretive area and public fishing pond and
is open to the public during normal business hours.
For more information about the center and Wallop-Breaux, go to My-
FWC.com/Fishing.


Fall is here...and it's still

hurricane season


* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net
With the blissfully cooler tem-
peratures in the Tampa Bay area
recently, it is easy to forget that we
are still in the heart of hurricane
season. October, in fact, is one of
the busiest months of the season for
hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico.
This is no time to let your guard
down.
The Tampa Bay Regional Plan-
ning Council enlisted the assistance
of local and national weather me-
dia personalities to produce a video
showing a worst-case scenario for
the Tampa Bay area. In the video,
the fictional Hurricane Phoenix
strikes just north of Tampa as an
October Category 5 hurricane.
Meteorologists Steve Jerve from
WFLA channel 8, Tammie Souza
from WTSP channel 10, and Dr.
Steve Lyons from the Weather
Channel team up to bring a shock-
ing reality to the fictional hurricane
created at the National Weather
Service Office in Ruskin. Using
file footage from actual storm dam-
age, the video brings home the un-
imaginable danger of hurricanes. A
hurricane of that magnitude would
be far more devastating than most
bay area residents could conceive.
It has been decades since the Tam-
pa Bay area has had a direct hit by
a hurricane. On October 25, 1921, a
powerful hurricane, estimated to be
a Category 2 storm, made landfall
just north of Tampa bringing sus-
tained winds of 75 miles per hour
and more than eight and a half inch-
es of rain. Much of the city of Tam-
pa was flooded and several build-
ings in the area were destroyed. In
all, the late October hurricane killed
ten people, with seven unaccounted
for, and left behind millions of dol-


www.TampaBayCatPlan.org
TampaBayRPC


Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council video screenshot from YouTube com
WFLA meteorologist Steve Jerve takes part in a video from the Tampa
Bay Regional Planning Council that shows the worst case scenario
for a hurricane strike in the Tampa Bay area. The fictional hurricane
was created at the National Weather Service Office in Ruskin.


lars in damages.
Today, with a much larger popu-
lation, the Tampa Bay area faces
a much larger risk. In addition,
storage tanks at the Port of Tampa
could pose enormous environmen-
tal problems. The video shows the
aftermath of fictional Hurricane
Phoenix resulting in damage to
480,000 structures, 300,000 people
living in shelters, 30,000 people
missing and 165 dead.
According to insurance website
Insure.com, Tampa is considered
the third worst place for a hurri-
cane to strike, behind only Miami
and New York City. That website
estimates potential damages could
be $50 billion to the area.
Although it has been 80 years
since the last direct strike of a pow-
erful hurricane in the Tampa Bay
area, such storms do not play the
odds. There is no greater or lesser


likelihood of a direct hit. Tampa
is neither magically protected, nor
is it overdue. The area could eas-
ily be threatened by a hurricane
next week, or again next month, or
again next year--or not.
The hurricane season lasts un-
til Nov. 30. Despite the fall-like
weather in the past week, October
is not the time to let your guard
down in terms of hurricane pre-
paredness. The Tampa Bay Re-
gional Planning Council offers a
hurricane preparedness guide on
their website at www.tbrpc.org, as
do WFLA and WTSP, along with
other media outlets.
If you need a reminder, spend a
few minutes watching the TBRPC
video. It will bring home the need to
be prepared for the worst. The video
is available online at www.youtube.
com/watch?v=NUe-7nVbttk or at
www.tampabaycatplan.org.


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER -


OCTOBER 7, 2010


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4 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Taking stock -
We tend to take it for granted that
the new year always begins on Jan-
uary 1. But this is not necessarily
true. Many government employees
begin their
new fiscal
year on Oc-
4 tober 1 and
Corporations
start their
fiscal years
Positive at various
Talk times. Some
By William Hodges people con-
sider their
birthdays as
the beginning of their new year.
I can remember a time when the
television industry considered the
introduction of the new car mod-
els, and the advertising revenue
that it brought, as the beginning of
the new television season or year.
It really doesn't matter what date
you consider the one that starts
your year. What matters is that you
are ready for it when it comes. To
be ready for your new year, a re-
view of what has happened to you
in the past year is in order. Here
are some questions to ask yourself
as you do that review.
1. What have you learned over
the past year that you can use to
be healthier, happier and more
productive in the year to come?
More importantly, how do you
plan to use that information to bet-
ter your lot in life. Keep in mind
that knowledge is only potential
power. It becomes real power only
when used. How will you use it?
2. Who are your current friends?
The number of friends one has
is not nearly as important as the
quality of those friends. In choos-
ing friends, you should heed Con-
fucius who said, "Have no friends
not equal to yourself." When you
have one good friend, you should
count yourself wealthy.
3. Has your financial position


changed in the last year? True in-
dependence comes from a sense
of financial security. Financial
security does not just happen-it
must be planned. Do you have a
plan, and is it succeeding for you?
Don't hesitate to seek professional
advice.
4. How is your physical condi-
tion? As you age, the pounds just
seem to multiply. Exercise be-
comes more difficult because of
new little aches and pains. But a
good diet and exercise are your
two most valuable allies in your
quest to stay healthy. Do you have
a diet and exercise plan?
5. Do you have a good mental
attitude? A positive attitude is not
something that just happens. You
have to work at it. As the old song
says, "You have to accentuate the
positive, eliminate the negative
and don't mess with Mister in-
between." Read, watch or listen to
something positive every day.
John Wayne said, "Tomorrow is
the most important thing in life. It
comes to us at midnight very clean.
It's perfect when it arrives and it
puts itself in our hands. It hopes
we've learned something from yes-
terday." If you have answered the
above questions, you've learned
something. With that knowledge,
you can set a course for a produc-
tive, happy and healthy tomorrow.
"Hodges is a nationally recog-
nized speaker, trainer and syndi-
cated columnist. He also hosts an
interview-format television pro-
gram, Spotlight on Government,
on the Tampa Bay Community
Network which airs Mondays at
8 p.m. and Wednesdays at 7:30
p.m. (Bright House channel 950,
Verizon channel 30). The shows
can also be viewed at www.hodg-
esvideos.com. Phone: 813-633-
1523. Email: bill(billhodges.com
Website: www.billhodges.com"


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0pay.mnt fo t vm i n e i sperform aaet ofdtn 7h r7feoi


Public Discussion on the Proposed
Amendments to the Florida Constitution


Are you well-informed of the
proposed amendments to the Flor-
ida State Constitution that will be
on the November 2, 2010 ballot?
Do you un-
derstand the
pros and cons
S of voting for
S or against
these amend-
./ ments? If you
do not under-
stand the impact these amendments
will have on you as a voter and a
tax payer, you want to be sure to at-
tend a public discussion to be held
on Thursday, October 14th, at 2:00
p.m. in the CA Community Hall lo-
cated at 1910 South Pebble Beach
Blvd. Sun City Center.
This nonpartisan presentation and
public discussion is co-sponsored
by the SCC Women's Club, SCC
Men's Club and SCC Forum Club.
The speaker will be Mickey Castor,
President of The League of Women
Voters of Hillsborough County.
The League of Women Voters is
a nonpartisan organization in that
it does not support or oppose any
political party or candidate. Fol-
lowing the speaker's presentation
questions concerning these amend-
ments will be entertained but no
discussion concerning political
parties or candidates for elective
office will be allowed. The League
of Women Voters of Florida has re-
cently published a Pro/Con Guide
to help inform and educate voters
on these proposed amendments. It
is planned to have copies of this
guide available for your study at
this seminar.

Falcon Watch Ladies
9/3 Low Net
Flt. A
1st Marian Crowe 38
2nd Emma Gadd & Judi Gannon


Flt. B
1st Lorraine Fritzel 37


As a reminder, the six Amend-
ments that are presently on the No-
vember ballot are:
Amendment No. 1 which pro-
poses the repeal of the provision in
the State Constitution that requires
public financing of campaigns of
candidates for elective statewide
office who agree to campaign
spending limits.
Amendment No. 2 which pro-
poses additional homestead prop-
erty tax exemption for deployed
military personnel.
Amendment No. 4 which propos-
es the requirement that our Board of
County Commissioners must sub-
ject the adoption and amendment
of county comprehensive land use
plans to vote by referenda.
Amendments No. 5 and No. 6
concern redistricting. In short,
these Amendments are a result of
the Fair Districts effort and are in-
tended to set standards for drawing
the boundaries of legislative dis-
tricts after each census to reduce
gerrymandering.
Amendment No. 8 which pro-
poses a revision of the 2002 voter
mandated class size requirements
to current levels to enable immedi-
ate scheduling flexibility and bud-
getary relief for Florida's public
school districts.
The approval or disapprove of
these amendments will, in various
ways, have an impact on all of us so
be sure to attend this public discus-
sion to be held on Thursday, Oc-
tober 14th, at 2:00 p.m. in the CA
Community Hall.
For additional information or
questions call 634-7777

9 hole League
2nd Becky Burgardt 39
Flt. C
1st Mary Arpaia 37
2nd Terry Wynne 39
Flt. D
1st Ann Parisen 36


OCTOBER 7, 2010
Award-Winning Newspapers

THE OBSERVER NEWS
The SCC Observer &
The Riverview Current
210 Woodland Estates S.W.
Ruskin, FL 33570
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Fax: 813-645-4118
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Published Every Thursday
by M&M Printing Co., Inc. 645-4048
EDITORIAL:
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All press releases, news articles and
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mailed to Observer News, 210 Woodland
Estates Ave. SW Ruskin, FL 33570
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Current or M&M Printing Co., Inc.

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OCTOBER 7, 2010

Ruskin Woman's Club plans first
fundraiser of the year
Members of the Ruskin Woman's Club have been busy this summer
planning their first fundraiser of the current Club year. It will be their
third annual 'steak fry' and will be held from 5 to 8:30 p.m. on Satur-
day, Nov. 6 at the South Hillsborough Elks Lodge on U.S. Hwy. 41 S.,
Ruskin.
As well as the scrumptious steaks, there will be baked potatoes, salad,
and an array of desserts -- all homemade by the members. Music, a Silent
Auction, and a 50/50 drawing will round out the evening. The cost of the
tickets is $25 and they can be purchased from Betty Jo Council, Chair-
man, at 645-8228 or Bobbie Nell Strong at 645-3136.
Other fundraisers planned for the coming year are: The always love-
ly Christmas Tea in December; 2-Day Bazaar in March that consists
of a rummage sale, baked goods, and eat-in or take-out bean soup and
famous Cuban sandwiches; and a trunk show in April offering fashions
and food. Proceeds from these events support many, many charities as
well as several scholarships given each year.
The Club members are excited about a restoration that will be taking
place this fall when Paul Davis Restorations will take over the clubhouse
and work their magic. Of course, all work must be done so that it main-
tains its status with The National Historical Society.
The Club welcomes women in the area to join them in the fellowship
and accomplishments they achieve. Meetings are the first Wednesday of
each month at 2 p.m. If you would like to join or want information, call
Bobbie Nell Strong, president, at 645-3136.
In early summer the women get together and make hundreds of jars of
their famous watermelon pickles, and strawberry and blueberry jam -- all
offered for sale throughout the Club year.

Time for Trick or Treat Street


It's time once again for Trick
or Treat Street. The Hillsborough
County Sheriffs Office and Greater
Riverview Chamber of Commerce
along with
Riverview
High School y
are prepar-
ing for this
annual com-
munity event
that provides
children of all
ages a safe environment to share
in the tradition of Trick or Treat-
ing. This event is from 4 to 9 p.m.
on Saturday, Oct. 23 at Riverview
High School, 11311 Boyette Rd.,
Riverview.
There will be costume contests
for children of all ages with a $3
registration fee prior to Thursday,
Oct. 21 or $5 registration at the
event. Prizes will be awarded to
the winners in each age group: 0-3
years; 4-7 years; 8-11 years; 12
and older.
Registration ends 30 minutes
before each contest: Children 0-3
years costume contest begins 5
p.m.; 4-7 years at 5:45 p.m.; 8-11
years at 6:30 p.m.; 12 and older at
7:15 p.m.
New this year is a dog costume
contest and a live band from 8 to
9p.m.

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Sponsor with a $1,000 donation,
Gold Sponsor $500 or a Silver
Sponsor $250.
Prizes, small toys
and individually
Wrapped candy
donations are
welcomed and
appreciated. All
donations can be
delivered to the
Greater Riverview Chamber of
Commerce Office located at 10520
Riverview Drive in Riverview.
The fee for a booth entry is $45
for Riverview Chamber members,
and $75 for non-members. Local
churches, non-profit organizations
and civic groups are encouraged
to participate for a reduced booth
entry rate of $25. This is a great
opportunity for the community to
'see' who you are! Ribbons will
be awarded for booth design and
decoration in several categories.
Riverview High's various clubs
will once again be doing fund-
raising!
Admission is free but food,
games, inflatable rides and parking
will be available for an additional
cost. Parking is $3. Bracelets will
be available this year to allow un-
limited use of the inflatable rides.
Bracelets are $15 per child and can
be exchanged at the Tampa Bay
Lightning booth for a game ticket.
Sponsorship and Booth Entry
Forms are available online www.
RiverviewChamber.com or at the
Greater Riverview Chamber of
Commerce office, located 10520
Riverview Drive in Riverview.
To view pictures from last year's
event visit the Photo Gallery at
www.RiverviewChamber.com and
click on the link labeled: Trick or
Treat Celebration.


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 5


east Rau wa7ntch


2010 Varsity Awards: MVP, Delaney Poli; Best Offensive Player,
Nicole Lock; Most Improved, Tiana Hill; Best Spirit, Taja Hammond,
and Best Defensive Player, Akeila Brown.

r,


2010 Junior Varsity Awards: MVP, Amber Jacobus; Best Offensive
Player, Bryanna Poli; Coach Greg Taplin; Most Improved, Alexis
Hardy; Best Spirit, Sasha Martinez; and Best Defensive Player,
Nereida Diaz.


Riverview Memorial
VFW Post #8108

Riverview Memorial VFW Post
#8108, 7504 Riverview Dr.
Meetings: Men's Auxiliary --
1st Thursday at 7 p.m.
Ladies' Auxiliary --
2nd Tuesday at 7 p.m.
VFW Post --
2nd Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
3rd Tuesday: VA Hospital Bingo
-- Leave Post at 6 p.m.
Monday: Bar Bingo at 6:30 a.m.
Wednesday:
Bar Poker from 1 to 5 p.m.
All You Can Eat Spaghetti Dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m. $6. Carry out.
Call 671-9845.
Friday:
Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.;
Fish, $6; Combo, $7. Comes with
fries, hush puppy and cole slaw
Bands at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday: Fire in the Hole from
1 to 2 p.m.
Karaoke by Jeff at 8 p.m.
Sunday:
$6 Breakfast from 9 a.m. to noon.


Democratic Club
to meet


Marine Corps
League meeting
The next meeting of the River-
view Detachment of the Marine
Corps League will be held at 7:30
p.m. onTues-
day, Oct. 5,
^,d, 6 at American
S Legion Post
O #148, 7240
U.S. Hwy.
4j 301 S. in
Riverview.
The Detachment would like to
invite all area Marines and FMF
Corpsmen to attend this meeting
and learn what they are all about.
For more information, call
Dennis Antle at (813) 835-0551
or visit our website at www.mcl-
riverview.org.


by Michael Cooper


The Girls' Flag Football team
finished last season with its best
record ever at 11-3. The team won
its third consecutive District Title
defeating Newsome 13-0 in the
championship game.
For the end of season banquet the
team reserved the private bowling
suite at "The Alley at Riverview"
for a night of bowling. Players also
received recognition for their ac-
complishments including varsity
letters and trophies.
Akeila Brown, Nicole Lock and
Stephanie Williams made Western
Conference Federal Division 1st
team awards while Delaney Poli
made 2nd team.
The 2011 seasonbegins inMarch.
For more team information, visit
ebhsgirlsflagfootball.com.


iilcnael 1roy rnotograpny, LLL

0 7 Marco Rubio visits Riverview
Chamber meeting
The Greater Riverview Chamber of Commerce's monthly luncheon
The East Hillsborough County took place on Sept. 28 at the Hilton Garden Inn Tampa Southeast. Host-
Democratic Club meets the 2nd ed by Bryan Thatcher of Thatcher Properties, the buffet luncheon was
Tuesday of every month at Gior- attended by approximately 250 members and guests. The guest speaker
dano's Restaurant, 11310 Cause- was Senatorial candidate Marco Rubio who received rousing applause
way Blvd. in Brandon. The next several times during his speech.
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. on Tues- Rubio focused on the issues facing our nation and explained the impact
day, Nov. 9. Visit their website at that entrepreneurship and small business owners have on this country,
www.easthillsboroughdems.org believing that these are the backbone of our nation. He campaigns for
for more information. limited government, controlled spending and traditional values. Rubio
Also, mark your calendar for chose to run for the Senate because he felt no one was representing these
the club holiday party on Satur- views.
day, Dec.11. More details will be Determined to run a positive campaign, Rubio kept his word and pre-
provided on the club's website in sented his views clearly and confidently. He closed his remarks with
the weeks ahead. Contact Angie a reminder to the crowd that all of us have a voice in the upcoming
Angel, President at EHCDClub@ November election and if we wish to be heard, we must accept our
yahoo.com if you have questions. responsibility as citizens of this great country and vote on Nov. 2.


Community
meeting planned
A community meeting for
residents of Southshore Falls is
scheduled for 11 a.m. on Satur-
day, Oct. 9, in the Southshore
Falls clubhouse meeting room.
"Continued discussion of
community objections to a
proposed rezoning that would
permit a professional office de-
velopment on Miller Mac Road
along the northern edge of
Southshore Falls is the primary
agenda item," said Bruce Davis,
one of the residents leading the
rezoning opposition. Attorney
John Dingfelder also has been
invited to the session.


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6. OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT OCTOBER 7, 2010


Lennard
cheerleading
fundraiser
Beef's on Apollo Beach Blvd.
in Apollo Beach will be hosting
Spirit Night for the Lennard High
School Cheerleaders from 4 to 8
p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 20.
From 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. there will
be Buccaneer Cheerleaders sell-
ing and signing 2011 calendars as
well with a portion of those pro-
ceeds going to Lennard Longhorn
Cheerleaders.
They are hoping to get a lot of
people in the doors. With the recent
school budget cuts, the cheerlead-
ers are having to pay for new pom
pons, uniforms, and competition
expenses.

West Coast
Porcelain artists
to meet
West Coast Porcelain Artists
will meet at 10 a.m. on Wednes-
day, Oct. 20 at Calvary Lutheran
Church in the Fellowship Hall,
5309 U.S. Highway 41, Ruskin.
Margaret Fowler of St. Peters-
burg will demonstrate painting
gooseberries. Encourage all who
enjoy china painting to attend and
bring supplies to paint.
For more information, call (813)
523-7538.


South Hillsborough residents do their part: The International Coastal Cleanup
Seventy-three South Hillsbor-
ough residents gathered at Shell
Point Marina on Sept. 25 to par-
ticipate in International Coastal
Cleanup Day. They gathered 1,005
lbs. of debris over a span of four-
teen miles of coastline.
The oddest item they collected
was a 1930s era kerosene hand
pump station similar to the type
they used at general stores selling
kerosene for lanterns and cooking.
Some items they collected were:
thirty-six toys, 360 beverage cans,
six balloons, fourteen bleach bot-
ties, six light bulbs, ten car parts,
and eight tires among many other
items. /


Take Care of the Earth


All that glitters
The Tampa Bay Mineral and Science Club will be hosting their 51st
annual show from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 23; and from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 24 at the International Independent Show-
man's Club, 6915 Riverview Dr., Riverview. Admission: Adults $5; chil-
dren 6-16 $3; and children under 6 (with parent); or active military with
ID will be admitted free.
They have over 40 vendors offering gems, minerals, beads, fossils,
tools and jewelry supplies. There will be live demonstrations through-
out the show. Wire Wrap classes will be available to make the beautiful
love knot bracelet. Door prizes will be drawn on the hour. There's also a
Chinese Raffle, silent auction, sand mine, grab bags for the kids, and lots
more. Free parking. Check the website at tampabayrockclub.com for a
$1 off adult admission.
For more information clubpresident@tampabayrockclub.com or call
(813) 684-2039 for details.


Left to right: David Townsend and Chris Smith of Mosaic present
Mosaic's Home Runs for Food check to Pat Rogers, Executive
Director of Feeding America Tampa Bay.

Mosaic 'Home Runs for Food'
Partners with Tampa Bay Rays
The Mosaic Company will donate $82,000 to Feeding America
Tampa Bay as a result of its 'Home Runs for Food' partnership with the
Tampa Bay Rays. Under the three-year commitment announced at the
start of the 2010 season, Mosaic is contributing $500 to the food bank
for every home run hit by the Rays during their regular season games
to help feed hungry families in the region.
"Mosaic's core mission is helping the world grow the food it needs,
and Home Runs for Food is a natural extension of that mission. We
are pleased that our support will help those in local communities who
need it most," said Bo Davis, Mosaic Vice President of Phosphate
Operations.


Night Hike
planned at Camp
Bayou
Join the folks at Camp Bayou
from 7 to 9 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 8
for a Night Hike followed by star-
gazing and s'mores. The hike will
show how effective night vision is,
so no flashlights allowed without
red filters.
Around the campfire, they will
chat about the fall constellations
and some of the ancient stories
that are associated with them,
plus learn about some of the space
-exploration missions currently in
progress.
This hike is an outreach event
for the Solar System Ambassador
program. For more on the pro-
gram, visit www.2.jpl.nasa.gov/
ambassador/.
Night Hike donation is $5 per
person. RSVP to campbayou@
yahoo.com or call (813) 363-5438.
Hike limited to 20 participants.
Camp Bayou is neither a camp-
ground nor a summer camp. It was
an RV park before the County's
ELAP program purchased the
land, but it is now open to the
general public for day use only.
Through volunteers, donations,
membership and grants, the RCDF
offers pre-scheduled programs
to schools, youth groups, adult
groups and families plus it's open
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday
through Saturday for passive rec-
reational pursuits such as wildlife
watching, nature photography and
trail walks. General admission is
still free.
The Camp Bayou Outdoor
Learning Center is a public/private
partnership between the non-profit
Ruskin Community Development
Foundation, Inc. (RCDF) and
Hillsborough County Parks, Rec-
reation and Conservation. Camp
Bayou is located 3 miles south of
SR674 at the end of 24th St. SE in
Ruskin.
More information is on the web
at www.campbayou.org or call
(813) 641-8545.


How to have the hardest
conversation of your life
Ali Davidson has a reality check that's about as difficult to read as it
is to talk about.
"If you're an adult, and your parents are still alive and in decent health,
it's likely that you'll have to take charge of their care at some point be-
fore they pass away," said Davidson, a life coach and former owner of
a home care agency who has authored the book It's Between You and
Me (www.itsbetweenyouandme.com). "Invariably, most adult children
do what they can to avoid the conversation with their parents about how
they will handle that moment when it is apparent they are no longer able
to care for themselves. Yes, it seems like it can be awkward and embar-
rassing, but it's also necessary if you intend to lovingly and intelligently
care for them as they get older."
Caregiving is a reality for many adult children today. More than 50
years ago, caregiving was not as necessary, as the average life expec-
tancy was barely over age 62. Today, the prevailing state of medical tech-
nology and care has advanced that life expectancy to 78, meaning that
the likelihood of needing extra care in those later years is far more likely
than even 20 years ago.
Davidson's message to children is simple -- it is far better to power
through the initial awkwardness of that conversation in order to achieve
a greater piece of mind, both for them and their parents.
"Despite our denial, tomorrow always comes," she added. "But what
your tomorrow will look like and feel like will depend on how ready you
are to embrace it. Caring for elderly parents can be very difficult for the
adult child, especially when a crisis is what typically creates the need for
a conversation about senior care. My hope is that people will begin to
think preventively when it comes to anticipating that need, and creating
a manageable plan to account for that moment."
The key parts of the equation for a successful discussion of elder-
care with parents resides in each party recognizing the other's primary
needs.
"Your parents need to know that they can maintain control over what
happens to them even when they need extra care," she said. "Children
can use this conversation as a way of giving their parents the opportunity
to design their lives through the aging years, when they are healthy, and
not clouded by the heightened emotions of a critical medical crisis that
necessitates immediate action. Children can also express their need for
peace of mind for when that time comes. The main benefit of having the
conversation now, rather than later, is that children and parents can work
out a plan cooperatively that addresses everyone's needs, so that if a trig-
ger event happens, families can act fast to protect the ones they love in
the manner that their loved ones have chosen.
About Ali Davidson
As a former owner of an in-home care agency, Ali Davidson worked
with seniors and their families for 9 years. During that time she helped
them negotiate the aging process with dignity and compassion. She de-
veloped training programs for her employees that ensured quality care
for her clients and a better understanding of the needs of seniors. She is
a certified Neuro-Linguistic-Programming Master Practitioner and has
counseled individuals, couples and families through her private practice,
focusing on communication, relationship, and healing old wounds. As
a Life Coach for the past two years she has helped clients in both their
personal and professional lives to reconnect to their passion, reach their
goals, and live to their fullest potential.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT


OCTOBER 7, 2010






OCTOBER 7, 2010

Facts about the naturalization process


A qualifying U.S. citizen rela-
tive is not always required for
naturalization. Permanent Resi-
dent status is required, but not all
Permanent Residents have a U.S.
citizen relative. Many Permanent
Residents have immigrated to the
United States based on refugee,
asylum and employment-based
petitions.
A petition for a child to im-
migrate to the United States can
be filed by either a U.S. citizen or
Permanent Resident.
There are many factors that
determine good moral character
for naturalization. One of the
factors is a person's criminal re-
cord, but there are many other
factors such as illegal gambling,
prostitution, polygamy, and lying
to gain immigration benefits.
There are three exemptions
for the required English language
testing. An applicant may be


eligible for an exemption of the
English language testing require-
ments if he/she meets one of the
following:
The applicant is over 50 years
old and has lived in the United
States as a Permanent Resident
for 20 years.
The applicant is over 55 years
old and has lived in the United
States as a Permanent Resident
for 15 years.
The applicant has a physical
or developmental disability or
mental impairment so severe that
it prevents the applicant from
acquiring or demonstrating the
required knowledge of English
and civics.
For further information about
the naturalization process, call
U.S. Citizenship and Immigra-
tion Services' customer service
line at: 1-800-375-5283.


E OT I TO

Dear Editor,
October 2 marked the 28th annual observance of World Farm Animals
Day, dedicated to exposing and mourning the suffering and death of 58
billion land animals in factory farms and slaughterhouses.
There have been undercover investigations showing male chicks
suffocated in plastic garbage bags or ground to death, their female coun-
terparts crammed together in tiny wire-mesh cages, pigs clobbered by
metal pipes and killed by hanging, and assorted farm animals skinned
and dismembered at the slaughterhouse while still conscious.
Studies have linked consumption of animal products with elevated
risks for heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, and other chronic killer
diseases. A 2007 United Nations report blames meat production for 18
percent of greenhouse gases, and the animal waste 'dead zone' in the
Gulf of Mexico is actually larger than the BP oil spill.
We're certainly much more aware of the devastating impacts of ani-
mal agriculture on animals, the earth, and humans -- than we were 28
years ago. This month, let's acknowledge all the suffering, disease, and
destruction connected with animal agriculture and adopt a plant-based
diet; it would do a world of good!

Rex Cover, Ruskin






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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 7


Fishing on Lake Minnewanka
Our last day in Banff was a bit
cooler than we had encountered


throughout
the trip, but
perhaps that
was due to
the fact that
we were in a
boaton a gla-
S cier fed lake.
Saturation The wind
Point whipping
By Karey Burek between the
mountains
surrounding us had us zipping up
our jackets and fighting to stand
in the patches of sun. Lake Minn-
ewanka is breathtaking in its beau-
ty; it is 17 miles long and averages
about 466 feet deep. It didn't seem
like a lake at all because it looked
as if it was infinitely wide.
Our mission, on this fishing voy-
age, was to catch some huge fish.
However, only two out of the four
of us were successful and the fish
were no longer than my forearm.
But we came back with some great
fishing tales and an experience we
will never forget. What made fish-
ing in this lake undeniably unique


The beautiful Lake Minnewanka!
were four very important things.
First, when you fish, it is catch
and release only for tourists. This
keeps the lake habitats and eco-


systems in good shape. The sec-
ond, live bait is banned. This cuts
down on the amount of fish caught
and injured because honestly they
didn't seem interested in my shiny
metal minnow. The third, there is
no re-stocking the lake. Therefore,
fishing season is short and sweet
only allowing fishing trips July-
October 1, which helps to keep the
fish from being caught during their
spawning season. This allows for
healthy reproduction of the spe-
cies. The fourth, there are only
three companies allowed to take
guests fishing on the lake. With
the lake being as gigantic as it is,
this cuts down on overfishing, in-
jury, crowding and environmental
degradation.
The entire trip to Banff was
amazing. It taught me a lot about
myself and the great outdoors, as
well as giving my family a shared
experience in the mountains. The
way that natural habitats are pro-
tected in Banff, creates an environ-
ment that people want to visit for
its beauty and majesty. Something
that should be considered impor-
tant everywhere.

Happy Fall from the
Observer News


J-_


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8 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
Caldecott Award winning author
and illustrator headlines Big Draw


Author and illustrator David
Macaulay, a Caldecott Award
winner and MacArthur "Genius,"
(The Way Things Work, Castle,
The Way We Work) will give a
free presentation at 6:30 p.m. Oct.
11 at HCC South Shore, 551 24th
Street North East, Ruskin.
As the keynote speaker for
Ruskin's third annual Big Draw,
Macaulay will offer a behind-the-
scenes look, using slides of his
work, at how an illustrated book
comes to be, including, as he says
"basic decision making, false
starts, u-turns, disasters, distrac-
tions," and success. He's interest-
ed in the fact that trying to draw
something ends up motivating a
person to learn more about the ob-
ject. Macaulay says, "Learning de-
pends on a willingness to ask ques-
tions and
T therefore to
be curious
and vulner-
able. Try-
ing to draw
something
forces a person to ask questions
about what they're looking it.
That's one way in which learning
begins."
Macaulay has been hailed not
only for his writing and illustra-
tion, but for his teaching. In addi-
tion to giving an entertaining and
thought-provoking talk on Mon-
day evening, he will be conducting
workshops for all eight-graders at
Beth Shields Middle School the
following day. The South Shore
Arts Council will follow up his
visit by having select local art-
ists provide further instruction as
some groups of students illustrate
their writing during Language Arts
classes. These events are made


SCC- WGA- Nine
Hole League
Played 9-16-10 -- game -- Low
Putts.
Winner Sandra Hurwitz -- 14
putts.


Author and illustrator David
Macaulay
possible by grants from Target and
the John Crawford Fund of the
Community Foundation of Greater
Sun City Center.
Above all, Macaulay's visit is de-
signed to encourage students who
might not otherwise be interested
in school. As he puts it, writing
and illustrating a book is "a pro-
cess that connects people young
and old with the world around
them. And in the end it will most
likely have crossed the boundar-
ies between 'art', science, math,
history, sports and so on--many of
the things that students may try to
avoid in a formal educational envi-
ronment." For further information
on events and workshops, visit
www.southshoreartscouncil.org or
call 813-259-6100.


Vote against the transportation
By: Philip Coates
Another year, another tax pro- jobs. They build the most prosper-
posal. On the ballot this Novem- ous country that had ever existed.
ber, a county-wide surtax of 1% to There is a tipping point when
be added to Florida's existing sales more voters will receive money
tax for light rail in Tampa. In or- than are paying it in in taxes. And
der to get more votes elsewhere in then the taxpayers are outvoted.
the county, the pretense is that 1/4 I don't know how close we are to
of the money will create road im- that in this country, but I know it's
provements, bikeways and the like dangerous to throw even another
South of Tampa. 1% into those scales. And that
But have we not been promised would be true even if the current
these things years ago? State and proposal were for a good cause.
local governments have long had But it isn't:
massive revenues from property, Buses are a more efficient form
sales tax and income tax voted for of public transit than light rail un-
these purposes. Do politicians cur- less you live in a densely-packed
rently spend money effectively and central city. And Tampa is not even
responsibly? Hardly. So here's the in the top fifty cities in population,
reasoning for increasing their rev- and certainly not in density.
enues: Let's hold substance abus- Light rail is only going to
ers accountable by giving them shuttle within metro Tampa. And
more of the very substance they even to do that would require more
have been abusing. funding from the state and federal
Before looking at this specific government. What if they don't
proposal, let's look at history: A come through?
hundred years ago, government in Florida already has one of the
the United States did much less and higher sales taxes in the United
taxes were extremely low. No fed- States.
eral income tax. No trillion dollar This new tax will give Hills-
government. And yet the country borough County the highest sales
was booming. The economy was tax in Florida. Do you think that
rocketing ahead. The standard of will attract jobs and businesses to
living rose steadily. America was move here?
history's greatest economic suc- The -worst- thing you can do in
cess story. But in the 21st century, a recession is increase taxes That
our economy is weak and slow to takes purchasing power out of the
grow. Why the change? Because private economy.
when you leave people their own One percent doesn't sound too
money, they buy things or save painful. But: "A billion here, a bil-
and invest. They take risks, create lion there. Eventually it adds up to


real money."





VACHON
6 o \\ i i h F I L





I-.






AI :,L '| il, ,.
-. f: i2 ,.l r- hi, ,.t.. "


OCTOBER 7, 2010

referendum

Sudden job creation? To lure
jobs and businesses in big num-
bers, you need many more incen-
tives than an extremely tiny rail
system which goes a few miles
and only serves the airport and a
single college and would still re-
quire other transportation links to
connect to it.
What about "eminent domain"?
Will people's homes be seized for
parking lots and rights of way?
Finally: Do you really believe it
when politicians make huge prom-
ises and show you lots of glossy
charts? Have they been truthful or
accurate in the past?
I have a counter-proposal, one
which will actually stimulate
growth and create jobs: A three
percent -cut- in all state and local
taxes and in spending.
----------------------
Philip Coates has taught and lec-
tured on civics and economics. He
is currently teaching at the Com-
munity Church College in Sun Cty
Center.

Kings Point Ladies 18
Hole League
September 13, Points
A Flt.
1st Emma Gadd Plus 5
2nd Mary McClafferty Even
B Flt.
1st Gladys Lowrie Plus 3
Cflt.
1st Nancy Sanders Plus 2


(

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What does Flo Vachon's devotion to animals
say about her as a real estate professional?

In a word, .


When Flo was a young girl, there was nothing she wanted more than a pet.
But she grew up in a large family and lived on a busy street, so adding a
pet to the mix just wasn't a possibility She recalls her mom telling her,
"Someday when you grow up, you can have all the animals you want." To
know Flo today, you know she took that statement to heart. Flo is a true
animal lover who owns a dog and a cat, and she devotes her time and
resources to local organizations such as C.A.R.E., an animal shelter, and
Feline Folks, an organization dedicated to humane feral cat management.

So what's this have to do with real estate? Well, quite simply, Flo cares. She
brings the same level of compassion and understanding to your move as
she does to the animals that mean so much to her. And with a track record
of real estate success of nearly 25 years, it's clear she's doing things right. To
make the most of your next move, Go With Flo. Call her today to schedule a
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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 9


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10 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Melody Jameson

Giants Camp Memorial dedicated


More than 100 guests
representing Gibsonton's famed
Tomaini family, concerned local
residents and officials last
week helped formally dedicate
the multi-feature memorial to
the mid-20th century tourist
resort built by the late gigantic
Al Tomaini and his diminutive
wife, Jeanie, on the south
shore of the Alafia River. The
collection of tiny white cabins,
bait house, roadside attractions
and restaurant was known far
and wide, a stopover popular
with tourists and locals alike
for many years. Now owned
by Mosaic, which also has
developed an expansive
environmental classroom
further west of the memorial
and operates a phosphate
processing plant on the river's
north shore, the site includes
a restored cabin (above)
described by Carol Phillips
(at the microphone), longtime
resident and member of
Gibsonton's civic group which
worked closely with phosphate
company to create the site. A


granite pedestal, topped with a
permanent replica of the huge
boot that for years symbolized
the Giant's Camp (upper left),
rises in front of the cabin
and recognizes the Tomainis
as community leaders. But
tears flowed most when Jim
Johnson, Mosaic public affairs
representative, (lower left)


presented grand daughter Tina
Tomaini a framed sole from
the actual boot found in one of
the cabins. The site, including
community welcome signage,is
enclosed within black wrought
iron fencing, preserving the
open and airy appeal that must
have attracted the Tomainis six
decades ago.


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 11


The Rev. Tracy Wilder, rector of St. John the
Divine Episcopal Church, blesses pets of every
denomination when they are brought to the
annual Blessing of the Pets. The event is held
around the time of the feast of St. Francis of
Assisi, patron saint of animals and ecology,
which falls on Oct. 4.


Pet blessings
* Continued from page 1

and chairs, signs up her friend Gari for music, and does
all the publicity."
I met with Bette, who has worked the event for four
consecutive years, just to get a few facts about how she
got involved, and was told a story that fully explains why
she cares so deeply about how animals are treated.
"We (in Unity) are very spiritual. Many of us also be-
long to the metaphysical group," Bette said. "We believe
everything happens for a reason, and everything in the
Universe is connected."
The former New Yorker has had many things some oth-
ers would call supernatural happen in her life.
"For instance, my whole life, I was told that my father
had died in an automobile accident," she told me. "Yet
when I was 50 years old, it was like I was reborn. My
younger sister found out that our mother had broken ties
with not only her family, but our father's family too, and
that my father was really still alive."
He was living in Denmark and the two made several
visits back and forth and met each other's families. 'We


CRPET
ONE^


had two wonderful years together
before he died," Bette said. '"The
timing was just right."
The timing of her best friend
Trooper coming into her life was
also just perfect, she said.
"I had this wonderful Maltese,
Bella Mia, from the time she was
small enough to fit in my hand
until she was 11 years old," she
said, showing me photographs of
her long-haired white furry friend.
"I loved her dearly but she got so
sick there was nothing we could do.
I lost her Sept. 3, two years ago. I
said I didn't want any more pets. I
didn't want to lose another friend."
But June 9 of that same year,
after going without a pet for nine
months, a friend who volunteered
at the C.A.R.E. no-kill animal shel-
ter in Ruskin called her and said
they'd found a pitiful dog that had
been badly abused and the shelter
was full. "She asked if I wouldjust
foster him until they could find
him a home," Bette told me.
The dog had been so badly beat-
en and possibly burned, that he
had no hair and his tail looked like
a pig's tail, short, curly and bare.
"He looked so pitiful and sickly,
and when I picked him up, I said,
'you're a real trooper to have gone
through so much and not only sur-
vived but still be so friendly and
loving'."
Bette kept him as a foster "par-
ent" and told C.A.R.E. she hoped
whoever adopted him would keep
the name Trooper because of what


he had been through without it
killing his loving spirit.
Slowly, Trooper began to fill out,
get his hair back, and got healthier
and healthier. Now it showed that
he was a Maltese.
Bette showed me the photo-
graphs of the two dogs- Bella Mia
and Trooper- and it was easy to see
how much alike they looked.
"I couldn't give him away. He
was sent to me for us to love each
other," she said.
And so Trooper stayed, and was
blessed Oct. 4 at the Three Legged
Poodle by the Rev. Tracy Wilder
of St. John the Divine Episcopal
Church that has sanctuaries in both
Ruskin and Sun City Center.
"Of all the invitations I sent out
with stamped self-addressed return
envelopes, Father Wilder was the
only one who responded," Bette
said, so she said she knew that too
was meant to be.
The priest had been holding pet
blessing ceremonies at St. John
the Divine every year, but this year
decided to show his full support
of a community-wide event by
only holding the one at the Three
Legged Poodle, which many in his
congregation attended as well.
I ~i. lung happens for a rea-
son," Bette said. "It is wonderful
when people of all beliefs come
together in unity."
Trooper didn't comment for this
story. But his smiling eyes have a
look that says he knows his owner
is right.


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decades>/ uTe hwa haM. 7 mnv L cqi to/ cieate' tmse,
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-.0* ..- so* :
Crossed Over October 9, 200

"You are the face of God, I hold you in my heart, you are a part of me..."
You Tube The Face of God (Singer/Writer: Karen Drucker)


OCTOBER 7, 2010






12 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


pI
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Making This Right

Beaches
Claims
Cleanup

Economic Investment
Environmental
Restoration
Health and Safety
Wildlife


I was born in New Orleans. My family still lives here. We have to restore the Gulf communities
for the shrimpers, fishermen, hotel and restaurant owners who live and work here.
Iris Cross, BP Community Outreach

No oil has flowed into the Gulf for weeks. But we know this is just the beginning of our
work. BP has taken full responsibility for the cleanup in the Gulf and that includes
keeping you informed.

Restoring Gulf Communities
We can't undo this tragedy. But we can help people get back on their feet. We have
been working with impacted communities since day one.

Partnering with local governments and community organizations, my job is to listen to
people's needs and frustrations and find ways to help. We have 19 community centers
and teams in four states, listening and helping.

Restoring The Economy
BP is here in Gulf communities with shrimpers, fishermen, hotel and restaurant owners,
helping to make them whole.

More than 120,000 claim payments totaling over $375 million have already gone to people
affected by the spill. We have committed a $20 billion independent fund to pay all legitimate
claims, including lost incomes until people impacted can go back to work. And none of this
will be paid by taxpayers.

BP has also given grants of $87 million to the states to help tourism recover and bring
people back to the Gulf beaches.

Restoring The Environment
We're going to keep looking for oil and cleaning it up if we find it. Teams will remain in
place for as long as it takes to restore the Gulf Coast.

And we've dedicated $500 million to work with local and national scientific experts on the
impact of the spill and to restore environmental damage.

Thousands of BP employees have their roots in the Gulf. We support over 10,000 jobs in
the region and people here are our neighbors. We know we haven't always been perfect,
but we will be here until the oil is gone and the people and businesses are back to normal.
We will do everything we can to make this right.


For general information visit: bp.com
For help or information: (866) 448-5816

restorethegulf.gov
Facebook: BP America
Twitter: @BP America
YouTube: BP

For claims information visit: bp.com/claims
floridagulfresponse.com


bp


2010 BP, E&P


OCTOBER 7, 2010


..........







OCTOBER 7, 2010 OBSERVER1516 NEWShRERECRNaS BRRuskin33573 13


Program/Event Highlights
Week of October 10 to 16
Discovering Collage
Sunday, October 3 1 to 3 p.m.
For the adults. Join artist Susan Hess on this Sunday afternoon
and learn about the process of a creating a collage.
Limit 20 students. Registration required. Call 273-3652
or visit the Information Desk at the Library.

Windows: Introduction*
Monday, October 11 2 to 3 p.m.
Learn the parts of a window, how to navigate in the
Windows environment, and file management.

Computers: Basics*
Monday, October 11 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.
Learn about the parts and basic terminology of computers.
Also covers basic purchasing considerations.

Toddler Time
Tuesday, October 12 10:05 to 10:25 a.m. and 10:35 to 10:55 a.m.
Wednesday October 13 10:35 to 10:55 a.m.
For ages 2-3 years with a caregiver. Stories, finger plays
and songs make up this fun 20-minute program.

Story Time
Tuesday, October 12 11 to 11:30 a.m.


Wednesday October 13 11 to 11:30 a.m.
For ages 3-5 years. Stories, finger plays and songs make up this
fun 30-minute program. Seating limit: 20 children plus
their parent/caregivers. Free event is provided by the
Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library

Baby Time
Wednesday, Octoberl3 10:05 to 10:25 a.m.
For ages 0-24 months. Share books, rhymes, songs, games
and quality time together while instilling a love of reading and
regular library visits in this 20-minute program.
Seating limit: 20 children plus their parents/caregivers.

Introduction to Genealogy
Wednesday, October 13 3 to 4 p.m.
Begin uncovering your family's past. Learn research strategies plus
how to organize and record your research. Seating limit: 20.
Free tickets will be available one hour prior to class.

PowerPoint: Introduction*
Thursday, October 14 12:15 to 1:15 p.m.
Learn the basics of slide design and layout to
create a professional-looking presentation.
Basic mouse and keyboarding skills are recommended.

PowerPoint: Textboxes, ClipArt and AutoShapes*
Thursday, October 14 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.
Adding text boxes, clipart and Autoshapes to your presentation.
Previous experience with Microsoft PowerPoint is recommended.

Bedtime Stories
Thursday, October 14 7 to 7:30 p.m.
For ages 2-5 with a caregiver.Make reading a family affair. Children
may wear pajamas and bring a blanket and favorite cuddly toy for


stories, songs and activities during
this 30-minute program.

Viewing the Night Sky
Saturday, October 16 11 a.m.
A family program. Join Astrono-
my enthusiast, Craig MacDougal,
as he takes you on a guided
tour of the night sky and how to
identify and view objects using a
telescope or binoculars. Contact
John Bostick for more informa-
tion 273-3652. All events are free
and funded by the Friends of
SouthShore Regional Library.

*Registration in person required
no earlier than one hour prior to
the start of the program.

If you think you might be inter-
ested in joining Friends of the
SSouth Shore library,
visit the Book Sale
Room at the Library
for a membership
application. For any
additional informa-
tion, visit www.
southshorefriends.
com. SouthShore Regional Library
is located at 15816 Beth Shields
Way (off 19th Avenue between U.S.
301 and 1-75). (813) 273-3652.


The Performin8 Arts Club
of Sun Citj Center presents

an evening ^

rddler*
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onth eOOf



LEW RESSEGUIEasTevy
EEN KEINSCMIDT as Golde
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Serenity Meadows Workshop: When you think
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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 13


OCTOBER 7, 2010






14 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Retirees again targeted with rip-off scheme


* By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
SUN CITY CENTER It all
looks so customary, so normal, so
official.
The very valid-appearing check
intherationalamountof$2,520.45
is made payable to the addressee
and seeminglydrawn on a Nebras-
ka bank. The instructions bearing
a New Jersey return address even
include telephone and facsimile
numbers, the former with an an-
swering voice mail. The various
commercial logos used are famil-
iar icons seen in large malls and on
street corners everywhere.
On first glance, it would be easy
to believe that someone in the
household at some point had ap-
plied for the extra income mystery
shopperopportunity; responding
to an advertisement, perhaps, or
online.
Andtheapplicationwassuccess-
ful. Services are needed; the gen-
erous advance payment proves it.
All that it takes are a few simple
steps; an easy, pleasant, profitable
experience, so it seems.
But, it's all a scam; a fairly elab-
orate con designed to shake out
a couple of thousand from each
of dozens if not hundreds of re-
cipients tempted byjusta touch of
greed. The investments in finding
targets plusthe paperand postage
are minor compared with the po-
tential return.
The basic scheme is not new; the
latesttwist,however,suggeststhat
themostinnocentcommunications
now place a great many people at
risk.
This is the conclusion reached


by an 84-year-old SCC widow
specifically targeted recently by a
"Bob Smith" purporting to repre-
sent "Survey in Motion," pretend-
ing to be an affiliate of"American
Research Group" using a Jersey
City, New Jersey location. In mid-
September,shereceivedthecheck
payable to her by name, correctly
addressedtoherhomeandaccom-
panied bydetailedinstructionsfor
handling the funds.
She was to deposit the enclosed
bank draft to her bank account,
spend $150 shopping among five
prominent stores, saving receipts
for the "Customer Satisfaction
Evaluation Tool" and, after al-
lowing for $130 in Western Union
charges, return $1,890.45 to"Cam-
paign Co-ordinator Bob Smith"
per instructions to be given in a
wrap-up telephone call.
It was to be a "training"exercise.
Actually, however, by the time the
marklearns thedeposited checks
useless, the shopping monies, the
Western Union chargesandthere-
batetothe"company"allcameout
of legitimate funds in the mark's
bank account.
"I was taken aboutfiveyears ago
for $5,000 in a lottery scheme,"
the SCC resident told The Observ-
er, which is protecting her iden-
tity. The pain of that experience
prompted her, she added, to turn
the most recent scam overto Hills-
borough County Sheriff's Deputy
Chris Girard, the community's re-
source officer. She knew she had
not applied to become a mystery
shopper, that the check had to be
a phony and that she would get
nothing but ripped off by follow-


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ing the instructions.
What she doesn't know is how
heraccurate nameand correctad-
dress, which are not listed in any
local directories, were obtained
by the would-be thieves. Her best
guess is that the thieves now are
buying the mailing listssoldon the
open market which are compiled
from readers who order magazine
subscriptions or shoppers who
place catalogue orders.
Girard does notdisagree. Healso
points to a thief's treasure con-
tained in some local publications.
There are places where it is pos-
sibletoobtain notonlynamesand
addresses, but also employment
and background information, he
noted, which the experienced con
artist uses to build rapport with
targeted individuals. Since it is not
possible to live in total anonymity,
he added, it is increasingly impor-
tantto remain alertand suspicious
of sudden windfalls arriving from
unknown locations.
In the case of the current mys-
tery shopper scam, Girard noted
thatcarefulinspectionofthemate-
rial discloses several instances of
conflicting information. He also
said he suspects this particular
con actually is being run out of
Canada. He commended the lo-
cal widow for her savvy response
to the attempt to defraud her and
said heisforwarding the materials
she received to the Federal Trade
Commission.
Any citizen receiving similarly
suspicious materials can do the
same. The FTC stores spammed
materials for use by investigating
agencies and accepts forwarded
examplesthrough span@uce.gov.
Copyright 2010 Melody Jameson


Melody Jameson
Examples of the authentic looking materials being sent SCC residents
targeted in a new twist on an old scam are accumulating on the desk
of Deputy Chris Girard, the retirement community's resource officer.
Con artists, suspected of working out of Canada, are trying to tempt
retirees into cashing substantial but phony checks, performing
supposed mystery shopping functions and then rebating remaining
funds from their personal accounts to the so-called employer.
Increasingly savvy residents are not falling for the scheme but are
notifying law enforcement instead.











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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 15


Ruskin RSRC has it all: new name, new features and


The
1212 E. S
Friday, Oct. 8
Saturday, Oct. 9

Friday, Oct. 15
Saturday, Oct. 16

Friday, Oct. 22
Saturday, Oct. 23
Friday, Oct. 29
Saturday, Oct. 30
Every Wednesday
Every Thursday
Every Friday
Live music
Every Saturday


Ruskin Moose Lodge #813 is located at
hell Point Road, Ruskin (813) 645-5919
7-11 p.m. Smokers
5-7 p.m. Christmas in October Dinner
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins
7-11 p.m. Taylor and Taylor
4-? p.m. Moose Legion Octoberfest
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins
7-11 p.m. Charlie Burns
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins
7-11 p.m. Nickel and Dime
Halloween Dinner and Party
5-7 p.m. Spaghetti Dinner
5-7 p.m. Wings
5-7 p.m. Fish Fry

7-11 p.m. Karaoke by Kim


All events are open to qualified
Moose members and guests.


new location
\\o\\ Outstanding. Beautiful."
These were a few of the praises
heard for the new South County
Family Support & Resource Cen-
ter, which enjoyed a week of grand
opening starting Sept. 16.
Aniria Wilson, and her fellow
employees, are excited about their
bright new location at 3030 E.
College Avenue.
"We're so proud of our new
location -- we changed our name
from Ruskin to South County to
denote our convenient destination.
Neighbors from each direction of
town tell us we are easy to locate.
"Our services, classes and events,
along with our dedicated staff and
volunteers, enhance the quality of
life for all families," says Maria
Negron of Healthy Start Coalition,
who serves as the Family Support
& Resource Center director.
"We're happy to continue our
successful partnership with Cath-
olic Charities in our newest en-
deavor," adds Maria. The South
County center will greatly benefit
from the two other Catholic Chari-
ties programs that will be housed
there: Partners of Hillsborough,
which supports relative caregivers
and the children who reside with
them, and REACH Counseling
program.
Luanne Panacek, PhD, CEO of
the Children's Board of Hillsbor-
ough County, Abby Evert, Direc-
tor of Family Support Services for
Catholic Charities, and H. Sheila
Lopez, Catholic Charities, COO,
spoke about the spirit of fam-
ily support at the Ribbon Cutting
Ceremony on Sept. 16.
Luanne reflected on how the
center has grown. In 2007, Ruskin
served 2189 people. This year the
number is almost at 4,000 and the
Center was isolated.
"We'll soon be off the charts,"
she adds about the convenient
location.
She also gave a special thank you


Luanne Panacek, Ph.D., Children's Board of Hillsborough County
CEO, from left, Pete Edwards, board member of Children's Board;
Maria Negron, FSRC director; Sheila Lopez, Catholic Charities COO;
and Abby Evert, Director of Family Support Services for Catholic
Charities, cut the ribbon at the beautiful new South County Center.


to Buddy Davis for his vision in
implementing the seamless move.
After the Rev. John F. McEvoy
gave a blessing for the build-
ing, Donaji Garcia, of Wimauma,
praised the number of services
offered to the community. She
signed up for computer classes,
which are taught in Spanish.
"I think this is outstanding. We're
glad to have a facility like this in
our area. It's a great location,"
says John B. Smith, president of
the Ruskin South Shore Chamber
of Commerce.
"Being a senior, I see what we
need and we have amazing needs
for seniors in our society," says
Gary Schumacher, also a cham-
ber member. He picked up FSRC
brochures to distribute at his home
owners association.
The South County FSRC's Fam-
ily Community Advisory Council
has been involved in every detail
of the move and continues to guide
its progress.


"We hope you'll visit the South
County Center, see their colorful
rainforest playroom, their seven
new computers with the latest
operating systems, and enjoy the
benefits this great community cen-
ter has to offer," says Maria.
This month, they offered child
development screenings, CPR
and first aid, toddlers' arts and
crafts, Kid Care registration and
computer classes.
During the grand opening week,
hundreds of visitors took home
calendars that outlined the many
opportunities to learn.
"If we do not have what you
need on the calendar, we encour-
age you to ask for it," says Maria
(www.familysupporthc.org).
Best of all, every event, no mat-
ter how big or small, at any FSRC
is offered at no cost to partici-
pants, thanks to funding from the
Children's Board of Hillsborough
County and Allegany Franciscan
Ministries.


Nautical flea market sails into
Apollo Beach
Buyers and sellers are invited to the Nautical Flea Market Fundraiser
for TSS Youth Sailing from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 9 at West
Marine Apollo Beach, 268 Apollo Beach Blvd. in Apollo Beach.
See some boating treasures and find some bargains! TSS Youth Sailing
is a federal 501(c)(3) and Florida non-profit organization teaching kids
and teens to sail -- a fun activity that fosters responsibility, teamwork,
and awareness. The flea market fundraiser is a twice yearly event, spon-
sored by West Marine Apollo Beach. (813) 645-6144.



Ruskin VFW Post #6287
Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120 U.S. 41 N. has listed the following
weekly activities. Meetings are: American Legion on 1st Wednesday
each month; VFW and LAVFW on the 2nd Wednesday each month;
and MAVFW on the 3rd Thursday each month.
Thursday, October 7-BarBingo
at 6 p.m. VA Hospital at 5:30 p.m.
Friday, October 8- Shirley
Turner's Birthday. Fish Fry from
4:30 to 7 p.m. Music by Rick Toledo
Duo from 7 to 11 p.m.
Saturday, October 9 Turkey
Shoot at 1 p.m. VFW Picnic at Ft.
) Desoto from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday, October 10- Irish
Nachos from 3 to 6 p.m.
Monday, October 11- $1 each Taco Night from 4 to 7 p.m. Crew
Night at 6:30 p.m. Planning Meeting at 6 p.m. House Meeting at 7
p.m.
Tuesday, October 12 Games in Lounge from 1 to 5 p.m. Kitchen
opens at 4:30 p.m. Bingo at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, October 13 Sue White's Birthday. VFW andLAVFW
Meeting at 7 p.m.


Annual Mystery Map event is
'A Day at the Beach'
Every year the Mystery Map Event at Little Manatee River State Park
has a different theme and this year it is 'A Day At The Beach.' That may
sound unusual for October, but after last year's event 'A Latin Fiesta'
was on the hottest day of the year, made them think of swimsuits instead
of serapes. So 'A Day at the Beach' was chosen. Now it looks like they
might need those serapes!
The event is open to hikers and horseback riders of all ages and starts
at 8 a.m. with last person out at 11:30 a.m. and ends at 2 p.m. The event
is planned for the entrees to have fun while enjoying the outdoors and
the park. Each participant is given a map of a trail to follow to reach the
theme activities to complete.
A mystery person has been timed
on the trail and the person who
completes the trail in the time
closest to the mystery person wins.
There are first, second, and third
place prizes donated by local busi-
nesses.
A donation of $20 per partici-
pant includes a delicious theme
lunch. Extra lunches and food are
available for spectators. There will
be a scale by Seminole Feed for
weighing horses, booth shopping,
music for stomping. All proceeds
benefit projects in the park.
The event is sponsored and
brought to you by The Friends of
Little Manatee River State Park,
Saddle Up Tack, Ace Hardware of
Summerfield/Big Bend, and The
Florida State Parks.
The event is located in the Park
Event Field just west of the park
entrance on Lightfoot Rd., just off
Hwy. 301, 4 miles south of Sun
City Center -- follow the signs.
For more information, call (813)
677-9291 or (813) 634-2228 orvis-
it www.friendssofthelittlemanatee.
com for special needs or for park
information, call (813) 671-5005.


OCTOBER 7, 2010


L






OCTOBER 7, 2010



0" j


Still Time to Register!
The Community Church Col-
lege, 1501 La Jolla Avenue, Sun
City Center, will be accepting late
registrations until Oct. 14. The fall
Semester runs from Oct. 11- Nov. R


18.
There are still openings available
for many of the
Trips and Tours
and the Classes.
STo register
call or visit the
office from,
8:30 Noon,
Monday thru
Thursday. The office is closed on
Friday. You may also register on-
line at www.cccinscc.org.
For more information call the
College Office at 813-634-8607 or
email Tri-C(0verizon.net


Preparing for 'opening night' are (from left to right): Brian Paskert,
Sandy Ottino, Fr. John McEvoy, Sheree Paskert, and Beverly Kay.

St. Anne begins bingo night
Attention all Bingo enthusiasts! Saint Anne Catholic Church will
be offering Bingo on the 1st and 3rd Thursdays of each month begin-
ning Thursday, Oct. 7. It will be held in the beautifully renovated Saint
Joachim Hall, located on the Church property at the intersection of U.S.
Hwy. 41 and 11th Ave. NE in Ruskin.
Organizers hope to provide an entertaining, enjoyable social evening
which will include numerous special games and jackpot prizes. Light
refreshments will also be available.
Cost to participate in this community event will average less than $1
per game! Early-bird games begin at 6:30 p.m, regular bingo starts at 7
p.m. The hall is large enough to comfortably accommodate 100 people,
and all South Shore residents are welcome!


Car wash to benefit youth services


With the help and for the benefit
of the youth environmental ser-
vices, Redeemer Lutheran Church,
located at 701 Valley Forge Blvd.,
Sun City Center, will be sponsor-
ing a car wash in the church park-
ing lot from 9 a.m. to noon on
Saturday, Oct. 9. The Thrivent Fi-
nancial Services will supplement
all donations. The rain date is Oct.
16.


Join the Women's
Chorus
Find yourself singing in the
shower, or to a favorite tune on the
car radio, or even in the rain?
If so, don't hide your talent. Why
not consider joining the Women's
Chorus located in Sun City Center.
Women from surrounding commu-
nities are always welcome.
Rehearsals are from 9 to 11 a.m.
on Thursday from 9-11 a.m. at
St. Andrew Presbyterian Church,
1239 Del Webb W. and are cur-
rently in full swing for the Christ-
mas Concert scheduled for Sun-
day, Nov. 28.
Sound intriguing? For more in-
formation, call Betty at 633-3862
or Mim at 634-1148.


-


chance
Join Friday night at the movies
'Second Chance,' on Friday, Oct.
8, at the Sun City Center United
Methodist Church, 1210 Del Webb
Blvd. W., SCC.
It is an inspiring story of un-
derstanding, giving and love, in
the spirit of Black Beauty. A car
accident leaves 10-year-old Sunny
Mathews unable to walk without
crutches.
She becomes emotionally with-
drawn and reluctant to communi-
cate with anyone around her. When
she moves, with her mother, next
door to a horse ranch run by for-
mer rodeo star Ben Taylor; Sunny
develops a fondness for Ben and a
mean crippled horse named Ginger
and then begins to make progress
on the road to recovery.

Voice of the Faithful
to meet
The Tampa Bay Affiliate of Voice
of the Faithful (8 years) will meet
from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. on Monday,
Oct. 11 at Our Lady of Guadal-
upe Mission, 16550 Hwy. 301 S.,
Wimauma, across Hwy. 301 from
Copper Penny Restaurant.
Meeting will include video pre-
sentation by noted author and
researcher (and probably the fore-
most living expert on sex abuse and
celibacy), Richard Sipe, speaking
on 'The Struggle with Sexuality &
Celibacy in the Catholic Church.'
All interested people are wel-
come; bring a friend. FREE. For
more information, contact Larry
Vaughan at 634-9904 or larry_
vaughan(@comcast.com.


CHURCH
Come and experience the power of
Jesus to change your life.
Sunday @ 9 & 11 AM Servicio en Espariol @ 6 PM

www.aplace4everyone.org

2322 11th Ave. SE Ruskin, FL 813.645.3337




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At National Cremation and Burial Society we have the
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Sunday Worship: Blended 8:00 a.m.
Nursery d Contemporary 9:40 a.m. BBndR
NurseryProvided i I
Pastor Jack R. Palzer Traditional 11:15 a.m.
5309 U.S. Highway 41 North Apollo Beach
(across from MiraBay) www.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1 305 N

St. John the Divine Episcopal Church
Growing by Faith from Generation to Generation
S Rev. Tracy H. Wider Church Office 813-645-1521
SUNDAY SERVICES: 9 am Contemporary Service and Sunday School
at West Campus, S.R. 674 and 9th Street SE, Ruskin
8 am Traditional Service and 11 am Holy Communion with Choir at East Campus
at 1015 Del Webb Blvd., SCC
All Worship Services with Holy Communion and Healing Holy Oil

Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (Behind Suntrust Bank)
ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: (Nov.-April .............................8:30 a.m. Day Care Available
Mon. Fri.
Rev. John M. Bartha and all year)......................... 10:45 a.m. 6 a.m.- 6 p.m.
SPhone: 645-1241 Sunday School....................... 9:30 a.m. call 645-6198

REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH-ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center, FL 33573-5354
Rev. Dr. Peter Stiller, Pastor 634-1292
Saturday Worship: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion....First & Third Sunday Bible Class...Thursday 10 am, Guests Welcome

First Church of Christ, Scientist
Ruskin Sun City Center (813) 645-6102
204 Second St. N.W, Ruskin, Florida 33570
Sunday Service Sunday School ........................................... 10 AM
Wednesday Testimony Meeting ....................................... 5 PM
Reading Room. Tuesday & Thursday............................... 1- 4 PM
ALL ARE WELCOME www.spirituality.com

SFriendship Baptist Chwrch Sunday WEEKLY SERVICES
Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist) 9 am ......................Bible Study
I 1511 El Ranch Dr. 11 a.m. ....................Bible Study
1511 El Rancho10 a.m. & 6 p.m...........Worship
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Phone/Fax: Wednesday
S813-633-5950 6 p.m.... Prayer Meeting/Bible Study

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC
Meets in the Social Hall of the Beth Israel Synagogue
1115 E. Del Webb Blvd.
Thursday, 7:00 PM Call 633-0396
It is important that human beings shall be united, but
not that they shall be uniform. ASHLEY MONGTAGU


NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where God's Love is Shared"
U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL* 645.1121 www.nbcor.org
Sunday School for all ages 9:30 AM SBC
Morning Worship 10:45 AM Wanted: People Who Want to Grow
Evening Worship 6:00 PM and Live for Jesus!
Full Wednesday Schedule for all ages

North River Church of Christ i
-Non-Instrumental -
13885 U.S. Hwy 301 South
(Just South of the Manatee County Line)
Minister: Howard Johnson Office 941-776-1134
Services: Sunday 10:00am, 11:00am & 6:00pm ce 41-6-
Wednesday7:00pm Home 813-754-1776

First Baptist Church of Gibsonton
"We lovtbecause He first loved us." 1 John 4:19
Traditional Worship Service *Sunday School 9:30 A.M.
Old-Time Gospel Hymns *Morning Worship 10:30 AM. q
Nursery Available Sunday Evening 6:00 P.M.
Interpreter for the Deaf id-Week (Wed.) 7:00 P.M.
9912 Indiana St. Hwy 41 & Estelle Ani 7u Malcolm S. Clements, Pastor
\Gibsonton, FL 33534 813-67l-1301

W c4me tA .: EVERETT TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ
1611 First St. SW Ruskin, FL 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL-
SERVICES: Sunday........................9:30 & 10:30 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday................7:00 p.m.

Prince of Peace Masses:
SSunday..........8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., Noon
Catholic Church Saturday Vigil ...............4:00 and 6:00 p.m.
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573 Daily.......................................... 8:00 a.m.
Phone: 634-2328 Fax: 633-6670 Confessions:
www.popcc.org Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m. and Sat. 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.


F"RST BAPTIST CHURCH

820 COLLEGE AVE. W.
RUSKIN, FL 33570
645-6439
www.fbcruskin.org
A Resource for Families
Sunday School.......................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship............8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. D
Evening Service.............................6:00 p.m. CH
Wednesday Night Service................7:00 p.m. T
Awana .......................................... 7:00 p.m.


CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH


ley.
Take a second


16 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


i\






OCTOBER 7, 2010








U nit piruaity Rather Than "Religion"
Spirituality Rather Than "Religion"


Beth Israel's Social Hall
1115 Del Webb E. Sun City Center, FL
www.unitycommunityofjoy.com


Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
Tel. 813-298-7745


THE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO THE SERVICES NOW WORSHIPPING IN THE "CHAPEL"
AT SUN CITY CENTER FUNERAL HOME 10:30 AM ON SUNDAYS
NO CREED...BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE
1851 RICKENBACKER DRIVE 813-938-4955
Minister DR. DAVID CAMPBELL


Southside Baptist Church
"A Warm, Loving & Friendly Church"
Looking for a church home?
Need the comfort of a warm and loving family?
Join us on Sunday to come home to the warmth of our church family.
Located in South Hillsborough County, just south of Stephens Road in old Sun City.
4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 S Sun City, FL 33586 813-645-4085


"Getting to KnowYou" (Donuts & Coffee) ....................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .........................................................9:30 am .
Sunday Morning Worship............................................ 10:55 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service...............................................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service ................................7:00 p.m.
Thursday Morning Prayer........................................ 10:00 a.m.


Dan Collis, Pastor
Come join us to
learn about God's
Word and salvation
in Jesus Christ


unine ofJCe/Sod si CAurclof6unQ Ciy Genie,'
The Church of Open Hearts... Open Minds... Open Doors
1210 W. Del Webb Blvd. 634-2539
Worship Services:
S Saturday................. 4:00 p.m. Creason Hall (Traditional Service)
Sunday.................... 8:15 a.m. in Sanctuary (Traditional Service)
9:30 a.m.- Creason Hall (The Oasis)
,i F h 10:55 a.m. Sanctuary (Traditional with Chancel Choir)
(. d i o Fellowship tim .. T,. i..,i,,n I.. r .. 1 0:15a.m. and 11 a.m. in Creason Hall
.od' love n L.SCCUNIMC.com
PASTORS: DR. WARRENLANGER, REV GARY BULLOCK
Communion First Sunday ofEach Month



St. Andrew Presbyterian Church

U Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.
Prayers with anointing for healing and
AI L wholeness during worship the second Sunday
of every month.


A Stephen
Ministry Church


Pastor: Dr. Gerald Iwerks
Meet friends in Fellowship Hall after the Service
Refreshments served


1239 Del Webb Blvd. West
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Church is Handicap accessible


Phone: 813-634-1252
For Information visit:
www.standrewatscc.org


Saint Annne Catholic Chukch

", Fr. John McEvoy
Pastor
813-645-1714
SaintAnneRuskin.org

U.S. Hwy. 41 106 11th Ave. NE Ruskin
SouthShore: r- .I I., Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton
C MASSES
Saturday Vigil M ass .................................................................. 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass..................................... 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Holy Days ....................................... Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Daily .......................................................M onday thru Friday 8:00 a.m.
Espaiol ................................Domingo 12:00 p.m.; Miercoles 7:30 p.m.
Confession.............................Wednesday 6:45 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.
1 Nursery Available for 10:00 a.m. Mass




} **, i


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 17


Obituaries


C.W. Gus Gilderbloom
Gus Gilderbloom,94, died September
27, 2010 in Sun City Center, Florida.
Gus was born in a sod house in Cope,
Colorado on June 9, 1916, the third of
three sons. He spent his early years
growing up and attending school in
Oskaloosa, graduating from Oskaloosa
High School at the age of 16 in 1933.
He tried his hand at many
occupations; selling shoes, working
in construction, serving the army
and making dentures as a dental
technician. He lived in California then
moved back to Oskaloosa in 1950
where he established Bloom Builders, a
successful barn building company. Gus
served as a city councilman and was
on the board of directors for Mahaska
State Bank. He was an enthusiastic
Rotarian. In 1978, he sold his business
and retired to Florida.


During retirement he enjoyed scuba
diving around the world with his wife
Jean. He played tennis at every
opportunity, flew his plane and took
up the violin again, playing in local
orchestras.
Gus considered his friends and family
as the most precious treasures in his
life. He will be loved and missed by all
who knew him.
He was preceded in death by his
mother, Edith Bowman Gilderbloom,
father, Murray Edward Gilderbloom,
his brothers, Murray and John and his
first wife, Mary. He is survived by his
wife of 40 years, Jean, his sons Mark
(Sue) and Tim, his daughter Martha
(Russ). He will be missed by his five
granddaughters, Shanda Mitchell
(Ron), Beth Piccirilli (Paul), Mary
Ann Wall, Jessica Morin (Eric) and
Nancy Wall. Five greatgrandchildren;
Colin Mitchell, Maddie Mitchell,
Angelina Piccirilli, Jake Piccirilli
and Grant Morin also survive him.
No service is planned. Remembrances
may be made to Southeastern Guide
Dogs, 4210 77th Street East, Palmetto,
Florida 34221.
Joseph L. Lewis
In Memory of Our Father, Joseph L.
Lewis, of Sun City Center, who passed
away on September 24, 2010. He was
born on March 17, 1921. He was the
beloved husband of Irmgard Lewis and
is survived by Scott J. Lewis of Sun City
Center, FL; his daughter Susan Lewis of
Belleville, WI; and his 3 grandchildren.
He served in the army in 1941, worked
for Liton Industries, & Electric Motor
Service. He had many friends and was
loved by all.


Trinity Baptist Singles enjoy a day out
Trinity Baptist Church Singles go out to lunch at various area restau-
rants after the Sunday worship services. The Singles, under the leader-
ship of Rose Colucci, look forward to a time of fellowship and a good
meal after the Sunday morning and evening worship services. For infor-
mation on the church, call 634-4228.


Cards Bibles Gits Jewelry


*Bibles Gifts *-jewelry


Hours:
Mon., Wed., and Fri.
9:30 a.m. 4 p.m.
Sunday 9:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m.


* Variety of Books
* Visit our Angel's Corner

Located at the United Methodist Church
1210 Del Webb W. Sun City Center, FL
813-633-8695


Zipperer's TuneraC -(ome

Only Onsite Crematory in S. Hillsborough County
Family owned and operated since 1979


813-645-6130

S1520 33rd St. S.E., Ruskin, FL 33570
www.zipperersfuneralhome.com
Exp. 12/31/10


Women with
cancer concerns
The Women With Cancer Con-
cerns group invites you to the
United Community Church, 1501
La Jolla Avenue, Sun City Center.
The meeting will be held on Fri-
day, October 8, from 1 to 3 pm.
The speaker will be Dr. Sophia
Edwards-Bennett from Moffitt
Cancer Center and she will address
a very important topic --- Breast
Cancer Update.
The meetings are free of charge
and no reservations are necessary.
Bring your family, friends, and
neighbors.
For information, contact Meet-
ing Facilitator, Hazel Martin at
813-642-9020.

Calvary Lutheran
to install new
Pastor
Calvary Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 5309 U.S. Hwy. 41 N.
in Apollo Beach, will install
Associate Pastor Reverend Derek
Matthew Hoven in a service at 4
p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 17.
A reception will immediately
follow. RSVP by Sunday, Oct. 10
to (813) 645-1305.


Love that pasta!

St. John the Divine Episcopal
Church is having another Spaghetti
Dinner from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on
Saturday, Oct. 9 at the Sun City
Center Campus.
Tickets for $8 can be purchased
in advance at the church office
or after each service at both
campuses.
Proceeds go to the Dominican
Republic mission fund. Bring your
neighbors and friends!


Metaphysical

lecture
Rev. Dr. Robert Tucker's sermon
examines the many metaphysi-
cal positions taken by Unitarian
Universalists and explains why,
according to the principles, such
pluralism is appropriate to be
nurtured, not feared. Dr. Tucker's
career has combined teaching
and ministry. He taught Religion,
Philosophy, Ethics and Logic at
Yankton College (Yankton, South
Dakota ) and at Florida Southern
College (Lakeland, Florida). He
has served congregations in Texas,
Illinois, South Dakota, Nebraska,
Virginia, and Florida.
This is the first Thursday of the
month and Dr. Tucker is here. It
is the beginning of monthly food
donations to Beth-El migrant farm
workers.
Coffee and conversation starts at
7 pm, Oct. 7, in the Social Hall at
1115 Del Web, East, Sun City Cen-
ter. The program begins at 7:30
pm. Visitors are welcome. For in-
formation, call 813- 633- 2349.



Caloosa Greens
Men's Golf Assn
09/11/2010 Individual Low Net
1st Jerry Huebner 51
2nd (tie) Michael Prach 53(tie)
Wayne Zellers 53
3rdLesterEaston 56






18 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Fish Tales
ByJonie Maschek

The Fall migration has entered
our waterways.
Anglers say that fishing is great,
if you know your waterways.


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everywhere, and have migrated
into our area.
Many are fishing for redfish
since the snook fishing opening
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Some anglers are fishing only
rivers, deep water canals, lakes and
creeks in this hot weather. Many
of the fish, looking for cooler wa-
ters, have made fishing great in the
canals and rivers.
I found some secrets revealed
by anglers this week. One tells me
that he throws a bag of chum over
the back of his boat while he is an-
chored and fishes on both ends of
his boat. He lands a fish from one
or the other end.
Fish only with the sun on your


back.
Don't go fishing if there was a
ring around the moon the night
before.
If you see cows laying down on
your way to fish, turn around and
go back home because the fish will
not bite this day.
If all the trees on the islands are
full of birds, go home -- a storm is
brewing.
If the moon is shining bright,
there is good fishing throughout
the night.


Annette's
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If dogs howl all night, don't go
fishing, there is trouble in sight,
and your fish won't bite.
Don't eat a banana while fishing
because it will attract mosquitoes.
If the tide is too low, the fish
won't show, so don't waste your
bait; go fishing at high tide when
the fishing is fine.
Take a can of sardines, eat if you
get hungry, or use for bait when
you run out.
If the stars shine bright, keep
fishing, many are in sight.
If the fish are jumping, keep
watch, be careful, something big
is coming.
If daytime fishing wear Polaroid
glasses, protect your eyes and you
can spot fish clearly in the water.
Wear loose clothes, be sure they
are light in color, to be safe from
the Florida sun.
Take an extra set of clothing
along.
Cast ahead of a school of fish, if
you cast into the school, you most
likely will get your line cut.
Spanish mackerel are delighting
anglers this week with catches of
two and four pounders.
Redfish are in the swim with
many tailing in the flats. If you
want to make a catch in the grassy
flats, turn off your motor, pole in,
as they will run to deeper water if
you spook them.
You may catch one per person of
legal size per day. A good fish to
bake and stuff with crabmeat.
Tarpon have been attracted to the
lights on bridges and piers. One
angler said he saw a lot of baby
tarpon, as well as some around 90
pounds.
Some hefty trout are being
caught in the Gulf. Those fishing
the bottom are having flounder for
dinner.
Fried freshwater catfish and hush
puppies are gracing many dinner
tables this week. Anglers fishing in
the fresh waters of both the Alafia
and Little Manatee Rivers have
caught many freshwater catfish.
Lake Manatee has yielded larger
than usual freshwater catfish this
week.
Many are boasting that during
these hot days fishing is better at
night. I hope you have all your
lights working and a spotlight;
check your navigation system be-
fore leaving.
Fish long, fish late, watch out for
one another, be safe, be kind.
Aleta Jonie Maschek is a mem-
ber ofFlorida Outdoor Press.

Cat Meow Auction
Feline Folks, a 501c3 organi-
zation, committed to 'Humane
Feline Management' announces
its 3rd Annual Cat Meow Auc-
tion on Wednesday, Oct. 27 at the
North Clubhouse
of Kings Point
on Hwy. 674 in I
Sun City Center.
Doors open at
4:30 p.m. Grant o .dio...
money is scarce FelineManagemen
in 2010 and this fundraiser may
be their only source to continue
community service.
Since 2007 they have spay/neu-
tered 1,535 cats and kittens and
socialized 447 cats and kittens
for adoption to forever homes. In
a perfect world those 1,535 cats
would have resulted in excess of
37,000 free roaming cats in the
community. Feline Folks are strictly
volunteers living in the communi-
ties they serve, Sun City Center,
Ruskin, Apollo Beach, Gibsonton,
Riverview and Wimauma.
If you want more information
on Feline Folks, visit their website
www.felinefolks.us.


i


SEPTEMBER 30, 2010







OCOE 7, 2010j_ OBERE NEWS RIEVE CURET SC OBEVE 1


Lone Pine RV Park
manager Dennis
Courtway called The
Observer about a swarm
of bees that rapidly
colonized a tree in his
park over the weekend.


Bee colony

The primary range of African-
ized bees in the United States is
in the southwestern states, though
they are also established in Flori-
da. Despite that, reports of attacks
from Africanized bees are rare in
Florida. The first reported stings in
Hillsborough County occurred in
2002. The sting of an Africanized
bee is not more potent than that of
a common European honey bee,
but what sets them apart is their
aggressiveness and their ability to
rapidly swarm and colonize.
Africanized bees were intro-
duced in 1956 by a beekeeper in
Brazil as a hybrid of European
(or western) honey bees with the
more aggressive African bees to
increase colony viability in tropi-
cal and sub-tropical climates. Once
released, the bees quickly spread
through South and Central Amer-
ica, eventually moving north to the
southern United States. According


Mitch Traphagen


* Continued from page 1


to the University of Florida, the ex-
pansion of the bees in the U.S. has
been slower due to climatic limita-
tions. Africanized bees do not sur-
vive in temperate climates as well
as European bees.
Also according to the University
of Florida, all honey bees, Euro-
pean and Africanized, will not
hesitate to defend their nest should
people venture too close. African-
ized bees are more easily agitated
than their western counterparts and
will attack more quickly and in
larger numbers. Children, the el-
derly, and those with handicaps are
at heightened risk due to lessened
ability to escape an attack. Attacks
in the U.S. are relatively rare, how-
ever, and most occur on people
who know a nest is present but ei-
ther choose not to remove it or at-
tempt to remove it themselves.
That certainly isn't an issue at
Lone Pine RV Park. Courtway has


called in the experts to resolve the
situation with his uninvited guests.
A Tampa biologist who reviewed
photographs from the swarm stated
that only a laboratory can distin-
guish between a European honey
bee and an Africanized bee, but
all bees should be given a healthy
amount of respect. If the bees at
Lone Park RV Park are African-
ized, a professional exterminator
will eradicate them. If they are
not, a professional beekeeper can
simply relocate them. Regardless,
he suggested that people remain at
least 100 feet away from nests of
such size.
By the time this story appears in
print, the bees should be gone. In
the meantime, Courtway greets the
residents of his park with a remind-
er to "watch out for his bee collec-
tion." Prior to Monday morning,
he didn't even know he had a col-
lection.


Mitch Iraphagen
Brandon Community Center nears

completion in Riverview
The 20,000 square foot Brandon Community Advantage Center
is nearing completion in the Winthrop Town Centre community
of Riverview. The $3.4 million center is being built with state and
federal funds and through an agreement with Winthrop developers
John and Kay Sullivan. It will be the only major community center
in the area, serving a population of up to 180,000 people. The
new center will be used for business, social, educational and
arts events as well as serving as a special-needs disaster shelter.
Winthrop Town Centre is located on Bloomingdale Avenue between
Providence and Watson roads. For more information visit www.
brandoncommunityadvantagecenter.org


TU S AY W DN S AYI


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 19


OCTOBER 7, 2010




20 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


IMPORTANT NOTICE:
If you are purchasing a new air conditioning system that qualifies for
the Florida Energy Rebate make sure the company you choose is going
to take care of the required load calculations and testing of your duct
system. Many AC companies are leaving it up to the customer to pay
for the required tests. This is a cost of $300-$500 per test, if it fails the
first time another full price test will be required. At Apollo Beach Air the
required load calculation and duct test is included with the purchase
of your qualifying air conditioning system. You may still need to pay a
rater to certify your duct system as required by the state but they will
already have been tested and you'll know that they will pass before
incurring that expense.


Savings up to:

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OCTOBER 7, 2010








The Fabulou


flavors of


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2B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Cars, blues and BBQ
lions, tigers and bear
A day of classic cars, BBQ sandwiches and live blu
was hosted by Elmira's Wildlife Sanctuary to raise
for the non-profit organization dedicated to saving
animals. The event was held Saturday at the Rivers
and Boating Resort in Ruskin. The Classic Car Cru
kicked off at 2 p.m. with grilled burgers and hotdog
evening was highlighted by a dinner of BBQ sand
and live music from the south's own Eric Culberso
Band. Culberson is a 17-year musical veteran with
out. For information about upcoming events or ho\
can help, visit www.elmiraswildlife.org.


r ECK


Ci


DISCOMFORT


Treatment is
Non-Surgical &
Non-Invasive


OCTOBER 7, 2010
Television spot
welcomes
"A New Day
in the Gulf"
A television spot promoting
Florida's commercial fishing
industry will air in the Panhan-
dle Gulf region the first week of
September. Stations in Pensa-
cola, Panama City and Tallahas-
see will begin broadcasting the
30-second spot on Labor Day
and continue for two weeks.
The spot will also air on cable
stations statewide from mid-
September through October,
which is Seafood Month.
Produced by the Florida De-
partment of Agriculture and
Consumer Services and titled
"A New Day in the Gulf," the
TV spot promotes the follow-
ing message:
"After a difficult summer,
it's a new day in the Gulf. And,
with this renewed optimism,
tomorrow looks even brighter.
Florida's commercial fishermen
are getting back to what they do
best: Bringing in today's fresh
catch for you to enjoy. Safe,
wholesome Florida seafood is
available at your local fish mar-
Mitch Traphagen ket or seafood restaurant. It's
C hard to image Florida without
fI seafood, and, thankfully, we
don't have to. Florida's fishing
s tradition continues. And now,
let's enjoy!"
ues music View the video at http://www.
funds fl-seafood.com/NewDay/


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Your Chamber is going through
quite a transition this fall, and I am
thrilled to be a part of it! As the new
Executive Director, I see the possi-
bilities as limit-
less and the fu-
ture wide open.
Even though I
have been a part
of the Sun City
Center business
You, Me & community for
Business several years,
By Dana Dittmar there is still
much to learn.
With over 350
members, it may take awhile to per-
sonally visit each one, but that is my
goal for the next three months. It's
important to know what our mem-
bers need and want, and to encourage
non-member businesses to join with
us. This will take me out of the of-
fice quite a bit, but we will have our
new office manager, Lisa Farlow, at
the helm. Lisa brings a strong and
dynamic background to the job and
we are lucky to have found her.
We will miss our former office
manager and interim president,
Vicky Brown, as she and her hus-
band start their new life in Pensa-
cola. Vicky has been the backbone


of the Chamber for several years and
we can't thank her enough for her
contributions to the health and well-
being of the local business commu-
nity. Fortunately, she has promised
to leave us her email address so we
can consult her from time to time.
The two new kids on the block will
surely be contacting her for advice!
As I said, it may take me awhile to
get around to seeing everyone, so if
you want to come by the Chamber
and introduce yourself, Lisa and I
will make sure the coffee is on. With
the refreshing cooler air of fall, it's
the perfect time to stroll around the
stores and shops, offices and work-
places. (Anyone have a golf cart
they'd like to donate to the Cham-
ber for a tax deduction?) I'm look-
ing forward to being re-acquainted
with old friends and meeting new
ones and getting to know everyone
better.
We're eager to hear your ideas
for where you want the Chamber
to chart the course. Do you want
more events? More e-business and
e-communication? More network-
ing opportunities? We want to hear
from you. Your ideas matter. And
this is YOUR Chamber.


For more information, call the Clihnlcr at (813) 634-5111
or e-mail SCCCIhin ,r( ai, ., ',in.

Breast cancer fundrasier


'The Breast of Times' 3-day
walk team will host a Bingo Night
on Sunday, Oct. 17 at Incognito
Lounge, 131 Har-
bor Village Lane
in Apollo Beach in
the Sweetbay Plaza.
They will have a
meet and greet at 4
p.m. and start playing at 5 p.m.
Cost is $5 for 20 bingo cards. Ad-
ditional cards are available for $1
for 2 cards or $5 for 20 Cards.
They will be playing 10 rounds
and the prizes are various items


donated by local businesses (Mary
Kay, Pampered Chef, Jewels by
Park Lane, etc). They will also be
hosting raffle drawings.
Incognito Lounge will also
donate $3 for every pizza ordered.
Drink specials are the 'Pinktini'
and Mike's Hard Pink Lemonade
with a portion donated as well.
Players that wear pink will receive
3 free raffle tickets. Event is open
at all ages.
RSVP to Incognito Lounge at
(813) 645-9700 or darwing6@
verizon.net.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 3B


SCC Chamber News


I vvial- m Sva vv alh


Hog Hunt permits
available for fall/
winter
Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District land managers plan to
hold a series of hog hunts on District
land this fall and winter to help re-
duce the wild hog population.
Beginning at 9 a.m. on Oct. 11,
prospective hunters can purchase
permits for these hunts on the Dis-
trict's web site at WaterMatters.org/
hoghunts/. Permits will be available
on a first-come, first-served basis
through 5 p.m. on Oct. 25, or until
they are sold out. The cost is $50 for
each permit.
Wild hogs, which are not native to
Florida, feed by rooting with their
broad snouts and can leave an area
looking like a plowed field. They
prey on native wildlife, compete with
native species for food and transmit
diseases to other wildlife, livestock
and humans. Additionally, hogs may
facilitate the spread of exotic plant
species by transporting seeds and/or
providing germination sites through
rooting.
Damage from hogs is occurring
more frequently and with increasing
severity.
Here's where and when the hunts
will be held:
Upper Hillsborough Preserve-
Alston Tract, Pasco County; Nov.
16-18 and Jan. 11-13
Conner Preserve, Pasco County;
Feb. 15-17 and March 2-4
Halpata Tastanaki Preserve, Mar-
ion County; Nov. 16-18 and Feb.
22-24
Green Swamp Wilderness Pre-
serve-Hampton Tract, Polk County;
Dec. 7-9
The District-managed properties
will be temporarily closed to the
public during the hog hunts. Only
permitted hunters will be allowed
access.
In addition to obtaining a permit
online, maps and hunting rules of
the areas where the hunts will take
place are available on the District's
web site.


pay ridiculous pric-
es to see a ball go over a net,
through a goal, in a hole, through
a goalie, and wherever else balls go to
make it big.
Avid fans bet money on a ball, sit in stands in
freezing weather, fry in the heat, or get soaked in
the rain, just to be a part of some adventure centered
on a ball. Sports enthusiasts spend days and nights in
front of the television looking at the final destination
of a ball. Scheduled television programming could
be delayed or canceled awaiting a ball's last move.
Our nation's fans love being a part of the travels
of balls and follow them everywhere.
The ball mania begins with the little
tykes. Parents start driving little
leaguers to their ball games
all over the city


Se -
fore children have
their second teeth. Meals are
postponed, consumed, or missed
completely, on the whim of a ball and a
call of a coach. When attending their kids'
games, seemingly genteel parents can throw
tantrums they would never tolerate in their own
children, all because of the bounce of a ball.
Monday night football, Saturday golf matches and
Sunday tennis keep fans glued to their television sets
and away from their family and spouses. Divorce
lawyers make a fortune off obsessions with the
ball. Let us unite and call a time-out. Let's give
all the beat-up balls a much needed rest and
go on a family outing. It could really be
a ball!


Free Skin Cancer


Screening Clinic

If you are concerned about a skin

growth, we would be happy to evaluate

Howard A. Oriba, M.D. Michael G. Caruso, M.D.
Dermatologists

4002 Sun City Center Blvd. Suite B Sun City Center FL 33573

(Corner of Upper Creek and Sun Cit Center Blvd.)(Pink building with green roof)






CA*L IV


Get a jump on your holiday shopping by attending our Freedom Plaza's Fall Festival
and Craft Show. If you prefer, you can begin with a tour of our community, featuring a
condominium lifestyle with all the benefits of long-term care through Life Care protection.
Browse a variety of crafts and hidden treasures
Tour our condo-style two bedroom apartments
Learn how you can save up to 30% off a spotlight apartment today
Entertainment, fall activities and pie baking contest
SSupport the Hillsborough County Sheriffs Emergency Services
with a purchase of a hot dog, chips and soda for only $2

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22 9 A.M. 2 P.M.
For more information, Call at (813) 634-1824.
FOLLOW EVENT SIGNS. (Rain Date: Friday, October 29)


09
FREEDOM PLAZA
SUN CITY CENTER
BROOKDALE SENIOR LIVING


A Life Care Community
Exceptional Experiences Every Day"
1010 American Eagle Blvd., Apt. 114
Sun City Center, FL 33573
www.brookdaleliving.com


Sponsored by the Retired Officers'Corp Open to folks from all walks of life Exceptional Expenences Every Day is a Service Mark of Brookdale Senior Living Inc Nashville TN, USA 51111EF-ROP01-1010


OCTOBER 7, 2010


g a a


Life Is A Ball, After All?
by Nancy Porter-
Thai
Balls don't have it easy. They are
kicked, punted, slammed, bounced, hit, and
flung through hoops. Our world is obsessed
with the ball. Futures, careers, memberships, and
scholarships are made and lost, around the activ-
ity of a ball. Trophies, ribbons, medals, jackets and
rings are rewards for carrying a ball into excellence.
I don't know of anything else in our culture that
demands so much time, effort and money.
Athletes are paid big bucks because of their
experience and expertise with the ball. Fans
worship the ball and revel and cheer
when it's in the right hands making
the right moves. We stand
in line for hours a n


A






4B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
Military members entitled to retroactive payments


Military members whose service
was involuntarily extended, or
whose retirement was suspended
between Sept. 11, 2001 and Sept.
30, 2009, due to stop loss are
entitled to retroactive payments
of $500 for each month they were
extended, according to Depart-
ment of Defense officials. But the
deadline to receive those benefits
is rapidly drawing to a close. The
deadline to apply for the benefits
is Oct. 21, 2010.
"You served with honor. You did
your duty. And when your coun-
try called on you again, you did
your duty again. Now, it's time
to collect the special pay that you
deserve," said President Barack
Obama during a recent White
House announcement.
Only about 58,000 of the 145,000
eligible claims have been paid,
leaving more than $300 million
available to eligible veterans. The
average payout for each veteran is
close to $4,000.
The President said that the pro-


gram has caused some confusion
and skepticism among those who
have served. "Some veterans think
this is some sort of gimmick or
scam, or that it's a way for the gov-
ernment to call you back to service.
Nothing is further from the truth.
You worked hard. You earned this
money. It doesn't matter whether
you were active or reserve, wheth-
er you're a veteran who experi-
enced 'Stop Loss' or the survivor
of a service member who did if
your service was extended, you're
eligible," said Obama.
The 2009 War Supplemental
Appropriations Act established the
Retroactive Stop Loss Special Pay
and throughout the past year the
services have been reaching out to
eligible veterans, service members
and their families through direct
mail, veteran service organizations
and the media. But by law there is
no authorization to make payments
on claims submitted after Oct. 21,
2010.
Eligible members should print,


complete and sign Department
of Defense Form 2944, Claim
for Retroactive Stop Loss Pay-
ment. They must then select the
appropriate method for submitting
their claim form based upon their
service requirements.
The information can be found on
their service's stop loss website,
accessible from www.defense.
gov/home/features/2010/0710_
stoploss/, or call: Army: (877)
736-5554; Navy: (901) 874-4427;
Marine Corps: (877) 242-2830 and
Air Force: (800) 525-0102.


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feeling pressured to replace all the
windows in your home.
WeatherTite products come with
6 great lifetime warranties. These
warranties are designed to insure
proper window installation. All
products are also built in Florida
and specifically for Florida cli-
mates. WeatherTite Windows de-
liver the ultimate barrier against
air and water infiltration and pro-
vide optimal energy efficiency.
Along with all these great re-
bates and incentives most electric
companies are offering up to $350
credit for using Energy Star rated
products. These products can also
help you save as much as 50% on
homeowners insurance.
This is an offer that includes
lifetime product and labor warran-
ties as well as up to a 45% energy
savings guarantee. This along with
100% financing means a window
or door can be designed to fit all


budgets and homes.
WeatherTite Windows has a win-
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whether your house is a single
family, high rise condo, or even a
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OCTOBER 7, 2010

Flowers and Feng Shui
October 2010 Monthly FengShui Tip...from www.
fengshuil 08.com
mBy Kathy Mann, Feng Shui consultant


Several years ago, a floral
wholesaler in Miami contacted
me. She had designed some Feng
Shui flower arrangements that she
wanted to present to buyers at a
trade show. She hired my services
to help educate these buyers on
what Feng Shui was and how these
items could be sold in their stores.
How clever! She did very well.
Grandmaster Lin Yun taught us
many transcendental adjustments
using flowers. Here are just a few
powerful methods worth mention-
ing, flowers to assist in negotiating
contracts, bringing harmony in a
commercial environment, creating
wealth, creating a romantic rela-
tionship, selling any form of real
estate, chi adjustments space
clearings and assisting a healing
situation. These powerful meth-
ods are always available when you
need them.
The floral broker made up a
lovely yellow flower arrangement
for health. She combined the use
of flowers and color for the Bagua
area, the Feng Shui energy map of
a home, relating to health. Red
arrangements are wonderful for
any part of the Bagua and are espe-
cially auspicious for wealth, fame/
reputation and career. Planting
red flowers without thorns outside
your front door can be most help-
ful in many situations. Pink was
fantastic for romance and loving
relationships. Flowers in any Ba-
gua area can be used as an adjust-
ment. Watch and feel the differ-
ence it makes.
There is another level to using
flowers, their specific meaning
passed on through the generations.
Some of these meanings may be
specific to a culture. In the BTB


world of Feng Shui there is a col-
lection of study on just landscape
which includes many types of
flowers. Grandmaster Lin Yun al-
ways recom-
mended using
fresh fragrant
flowers in his
secret meth-
ods he passed
on to us.
As always,
use your own personal connection
with flowers. If a sunflower makes
you happy, it may be just the ray
of sunshine you will find benefi-
cial in the office when the tensions
get high. Sometimes, flowers you
love may notbe available at certain
times of the year. Maybe an exotic
arrangement is just what you need
in the bedroom this week. Using
as many colors that are available
may ignite your creativity, seeing
and feeling all the possibilities that
exist. It is usually a great idea to
place a mirror beneath your vase
of flowers. You may even place a
cloth underneath the mirror. Inten-
tion, purpose and a sincere heart is
what you bring to make these en-
hancements work well.
Enjoy flowers in your home and
work environments this month.
Place them with your heart cen-
tered mindfulness and a positive
clear intention to enhance your
needs in this time and space. Cele-
brate and enjoy their visual beauty,
the wonderful energy they bring
and the incredible aroma that will
bless you over and over again.
Call for your Fall Feng Shui
Consultation today at 813-288-
2688 or visit her website at www.
fenghsuil08.com
Kathy Mann


Summerfield Crossings

Elementary Terrific Kids
Students who were Terrific Kids for the month of September include:
Alayna Blake, Alex Irvin, Alexia Hemandez, Alfred Jerome, Amanda Simp-
son, Ana Campos, Angelina Arnaud, Ariana Jerome. Ashlvn C edo. Atavle
Rubin, Ayah Elaboudi, Brendan Brown, Carly
Blake, Catherine Corniello, Christain Pacheco,
Daniela Munoz, Donnie Coffield, Hailey Fitch,
Hailey Miller, Havannah Nance, Heavin Liberg,
Ilianan Despotis, Isabelle Moccia, Jack Moglia,
Jackson Kincaid, James Tanis, Jane Vaca, Jasmine Epps, Jesse Myers, John
Britton, Josiah Hennings, Josiah Liwag, Julianna Derkowski, Keley Scales,
Kenzie Spradley, Lexxus Thomas, Madison Denis, Madison Perinovic, Mar-
quise Dey, Maxwell, Michaela Malinowsky, Mikayla Benigni, Samantha
Lutz, Stephonie Comeille, Steven Lata, Taina Estevez, Tatem Chase, Tat-
jana Christian, Tayler Wetterstrom, Thomas Costa, Valeria Marin, Zaileah
Cozart.
Eastern Airlines Silverliners meeting


For their next meeting, Florida
Gulf Coast Chapter of Eastern
Airlines Silverliners International
will visit the Southeastern Guide
Dogs in Palmetto, FL and take a tour
of the facilities at 10 a.m. on Satur-
day, Oct. 16. While there the chapter
will present the organization with a
$600 check.
Silverliners is composed of former
flight attendants who flew for East-
ern Airlines. There are several chap-
ters throughout the United States and


each supports a local philanthropy.
Membership is also open to former
flight attendants who flew for other
airlines.
Those residing in Hillsborough
County may obtain membership
information from Adrienne Love at
(813) 677-2909 or Barbara Reed at
(813) 671-3078. Pinellas residents
may contact Sally Painter at (727)
785-5053 or Marilyn Livengood at
(727) 726-2061.







OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 5B


New chamber director goes one-on-one


The first thing Dana Dittmar
wants to do is find out what her
members need, and want, most.
As the new executive
director of the Sun City
Center Chamber of Com-
merce, Dana says she
will be going through the
membership directory to
speak with someone from
each and every member Over
business: if they don't de- Coffi
cide to call her first. By Pen.
"I hope people will penny@
make appointments and
really talk to me. I need
to know what they want from the
chamber. Do we need to hold more
events, have more networking,
classes and seminars, or concen-
trate more on E-business? I want
to know what they think."
Dana is no stranger to Sun City
Center. Previously, she was mar-
keting director at South Bay Hos-
pital but left the area in 2002 to
take a similar but higher position
in Boca Raton. She returned to this
area because she felt it was home.
Until recently, she has been
working with a nonprofit state-
wide grant program educating
business owners and managers on
the benefits of hiring older work-
ers.
"I loved it, because mature
workers have so much experi-
ence they're easy to advocate for,
but the grant ran out," she told me
as she sat in her new office in the
chamber building at 1651 Sun City
Center Plaza.
In a recent interview with cham-
ber board chairman John Luper, I
had been told the job of directing
the chamber would be changed
from the way it had been operating
for many years.
The former director, Elaine
Brad, who actually held the title
of President, kept it running so
smoothly for so long the board did
not want to make any changes. But
since Elaine quit to get married,
and Vicki Brown, who worked
with Elaine and has been acting
as interim director, is moving out
of the county, John had said the
board thought it was a perfect time
to examine the duties of those run-
ning day-to-day operations and see
what needed to be updated, espe-


DEFY LAYOUT
^ GRAVITY

The October 21st issue of

THE OBSERVER NEWS
is designated as
TOPSY TURVEY week!
This issue flips ads and news
content from the bottom to the
top. See how your ad can be at
the top of the heap.
Call 813-645-3111
or your sales representative
today.


e<
ny
-L.


cially in light of all the new tech-
nology available.
"Instead of the director being
detail oriented and
working mainly from
the office, we need
someone now who
will be in the commu-
nity doing one-on-one
with residents even if
that means outsourc-
e ing things like book
Fletcher work," John had told
S ... me.


useivernews.neI


I asked Dana about
this, and she said that


was exactly what had interested
her most in the position.
As of Oct. 2, Dana's new Office
Manager- Vicki's replacement-
had just been hired. She is Lisa
Farlow, who was previously an
auditor with a nationally-known
title insurance group. Lisa has also
held ajob in Ohio as an operations


manager with a company that had
her organizing trade shows and
managing vendors.
"Lisa will be the perfect per-
son to run this office," Dana said.
Meanwhile, her own plan is to get
her paperwork organized quickly
and then get out "on the street."
'The possibilities are endless
right now," she told me excitedly.
"I want to get the message to the
residents that they need to support
the local businesses. Especially
the people who can get around
in their golf carts. What if those
small businesses can't make it in
this economy? You can't take golf
carts to Brandon or Bradenton."
Shopping locally will help ev-
eryone, Dana said. Shoppers don't
have to drive through traffic in
their cars, and the shops can stay
open, and even expand.
By the time this story comes out,
Dana said she hopes to already be


talking with businesses. "I have to
find out what they need first, and


I plan to go right
down the mem-
bership directory
list so I can speak
to every single
one who doesn't
call me first."
People who
know Dana know
she is persistent.
An 18-year
breast cancer sur-
vivor, she orga-
nizes an annual
event at Relay
for Life, and her
Aqua Viva Divas,
which is the lo-
cal chapter of the
Blue Thong Soci-


This year, they're doing the Oct.
16 Alzheimer's Memory Walk.


...I want to get the
message to the
residents that they
need to support the
local businesses...
what if those small
businesses can't make
it in this economy? You
can't take golf carts to
Brandon or Bradenton.

99
Dana Dittmar


ety, holds events (like last year's
bachelor auction in Apollo Beach)
for cancer and other causes.
Y'


Penny Fletcher
The first thing Dana Dittmar wants to do as the new executive director of the Sun City Center Area
Chamber of Commerce is to find out what her members need, and want, most. She says she will be go-
ing through the membership directory and calling on someone from each and every member business,
if they don't decide to call her first. Dana took over the position, which had been vacant for several
months after Elaine Brad quit to get married, just last week.


At the same time,
she's planning the
first chamber event,
which is the Nov.
9 Business Expo at
the Sun City Cen-
ter Community Hall
where all South
County residents can
come and see what
chamber member's
businesses have to
offer.
"We are currently
seeking sponsors,
renting booth space
and looking for ven-
dors," Dana said. It
will certainly be a
busy first month on


the job.
The 360-member chamber meets
once a month for luncheons and
has speakers. People who want to
become involved are urged to con-
tact her by email, at sccchamber@
aol.com; visit their Web site, www.
suncitycenterchamber.org; or call
(813) 634-5111.
Dana says she and her husband,
Kevin, owner of Premier Auto
Body, are glad to be back in town
and that she is looking forward
to talking to both residents and
chamber members in the very near
future.
Sitting down with her in her of-
fice talking about the future Dana
was very hopeful and upbeat. I
send her Best Wishes on the new
position. Helping businesses in
this economy will not be a cushy
job!
*Perhaps you have something
you'd like to share. Or maybe you'd
rather tell the community about
your favorite charity or cause: or
sound off about something you
think needs change. That's what
"Over Coffee" is about. It really
doesn't matter whether we actually
drink any coffee or not (although I
probably will). It's what you have
to say that's important. E-mail me
any time at penny@observernews.
net and suggest a meeting place.
No matter what's going on, I'm
usually available to share just one
more cup.


"A little
corner of Italy
in Ruskin!" .

Buy 2 Entree (
Dinners & Get a a,

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Members Amencan Dental Associaton, Fonda State Dental Associaton, Fonda West Coast Dental
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," "


I


OCTOBER 7, 2010






OCTOBER 7, 2010


6B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
-A a


CA

Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


Hole-i
A hole in one was recorded on
September 7, 2010 by Nick Violet-
ti using a 5 wood on Sandpiper GC
Oaks course hole #8, 189 yards.
This event was witnessed by
Nick's playing partners Louis Se-
vera, Don Churchill and Harold
Hodge.

Hogans Golf Club
8/26, Riverside back- 9, match
1st: Ed Weber, 48
2nd : Bill Poirier, 53
3rd :Art Swallow, 55


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c Address: OF RUSKIN
Ruskin, FL 33570


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Phone: (813) 634-0664
Fax: (813) 634-0668


Sava Cafe celebrates new location
Sava Cafe in Apollo Beach celebrates the opening of their new loca-
tion and their 3 year anniversary. The modem coffee shop with a Euro-
pean twist recently relocated to 143 Harbor Village Lane in the Sweetbay
Plaza in Apollo Beach.

Field of Honor Ceremony
The Veterans Council of Hillsborough will be conducting a Field of
Honor Ceremony at the Veterans Memorial Park & Museum located just
south of the Florida State Fairgrounds at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 9 at
3602 U.S. Highway 301 North, Tampa.
This ceremony is open to the public
and it is conducted every three months
to honor those who have given their
lives in the War on Terrorism. The
names of every Soldier, Sailor, Airman,
Marine and Coast Guardsman who died
during the last three months are read aloud and a flag is placed in the
field in their honor adding to the more than 5000 flags that have already
been placed there. Alafia American Legion Post 148 from Riverview
will conduct this ceremony. For more information, contact Walt Raysick
at 653-4924 or e-mail at wraysick@dverizon.net.



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within 72 hrs. of responding to the advertisement for the fee service

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Open Mon-Fri 8:30-5:00 813-633-2636


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 7B


DEFY LAYOUT GRAVITY

The October 21st issue of

THE OBSERVER NEWS

is designated as TOPSY TURVEY week!


This issue flips ads and news content from
the bottom to the top. See how your ad
can be at the top of the heap.
Call 813-645-3111
for your sales
representative
today.


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Riverside Goll


$23.00............ before noon

U20.0 ............... after noon
18.00 ...............after3 pm
Includes 18 holes and cart. Tax Included
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Steaks, Seafood, Burgers
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OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Tuesday-Saturday 11-8 pm
Sunday 11-3 pm
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we have somethir

to smile about
The dental practice of zamikoff,
Klement, Jungman and Varga
welcomes Dr. Michelle Halcomb to
their staff. Dr. Halcomb comes to
Sun City Center with over 20 years
of dental practice experience.
She looks forward to developing
long lasting relationships with her
patients in order to give them the
best that dentistry has to offer.
NOW ACCEPTING A
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Sun City Center, FL 33573
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N


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iD.D.S.






nan
ynPa


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I I


OCTOBER 7, 2010


Some think it's tacky, others think it's neat,
but the Sykes Building in downtown Tampa
is truly an amazing feat of engineering. Who
would have guessed that a beer can could
be 454 feet tall? In all honesty, I think it is
extremely cool and there is nothing tacky
about it. The tower, formerly known as
Rivergate Tower, is a true bay area landmark.
Construction on the 32 floor building began
in 1986 and it is the sixth tallest building in
Tampa. Velma Watson (thanks for writing
- it's great to hear from you!) got it as did
Kathleen Baldwin (ooohhh! A 30 story hike?
Give him my condolences! It's great to hear
from you!), Syl Dahl (I want to hear more about
the Exploding Chicken! I will watch my email.
Thanks for writing), Ron Greenwood (thanks
for the note, Ron! I think I'll start doing the
same with airport visitors), Robin Greenwood
(thanks for the note, Robin! We had a great
time with the fabulous BBQ and listening to
the Eric Culberson Blues Band. Keep us all
updated at www.elmiraswildlife.org, please!)
and Bill and Margie Galbreath (it is definitely
something to see! Thanks it is so good to
hear from you!). This week we have something
that could easily be found via Google, but
try to resist the path of convenience. Do you
know where this is?
Have you visited it?
I'm looking forward to
Shearing (and sharing)
Your stories. Email
Swhere@observernews.
net or send a postcard
to 210 Woodland
Estates Blvd., Ruskin,
FL, 33570. I'd save
a spot for you at the
picnic table but I don't
think there is one.


0400007


Vil i.: SI el







8B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


J traveling to the Carib-
bean usually means
visiting tropical islan
with white sand beac
warm turquoise waters and pal
trees. Sound familiar? This is 1
theme Florida's Tourism Bure,
uses to lure visitors to a place
where we already
live. By
Traveling to Memb
Florida's islands Wr
can be done faster, One
cheaper and with less
hassle then distant, of Fl
supposedly romantic
islands. And, if the
weather turns bad
here, you can always pack up
go home. There are other diffe
ences that make traveling with
Florida more enjoyable.


Ent,-ance to the Sandppe

On Florida's islands, the nati
speak a passable English. There
no exchange rate to figure on f
chases and most delightful of;
you are not constantly assault
by vendors, cab drivers or toui
operators.
When people think of Florid
islands, the Florida Keys usua
come to mind. But there are m
islands on both coasts of the st
On this trip I visited Longboat
Key, an island directly west of
Sarasota on the Gulf of Mexic
At 12 miles long, it is fairly la
as islands go but only a quarter
mile wide at its widest point.
The housing is upscale and
lawns are immaculately main-
tained. Actually, it was almost
perfect for me so it was a delig
to find the tiny Sandpiper
Inn, almost hidden amongst
the condos, time shares and
hotels.
The Sandpiper Inn is a
reminder of Florida the way
it was before development.
The Inn has been here for
more than 50 years and it
was wonderful being in
a resort where the rooms
were not cookie cutter
motel units. The eleven stu-
dio, one and two bedroom
units are all fully equipped
efficiencies giving guests a
choice of eating in or din-
ing out.
Getting to the beach was


ds
hes,
Im
the
au


WAI
er: Fl
iters
in
oric
art


?RR
ori
Ass
IC
d<
tic


as easy as a stroll down a lushly
landscaped path, not through a
crowded lobby. The white sand
beach was virtually deserted.
Mary Lou and Richard, the
Inn's managers, take a personal
interest in seeing that all of their
guests are comfortable and have
everything needed
EN RESEN during their stay.
do Outdoor They like to refer to
sociation the Sandpiper Inn as
1 series "Forgotten Florida,"
those places that
a Travel were here long be-
les fore the condos and
limited beach access.


beach goers. Both
locations are so
close to the Sand-
piper Inn that you
can easily do both
stops in one day.
The biggest
decision one has to
make on vacation
is, "Where do we
go for dinner?" I
do have one sug-
gestion before you
leave the serenity
of Sandpiper Inn
for your evening
out. Sit in the


Now that I was Sandpiper Inn's
and there, what to do? Without those gazebo, or in a chaise
r- pesky Caribbean Island tour the beach, to enjoy c
iin guides, how could I find my way magnificent sunsets
around? Easy. There are brochures of Mexico.
everywhere The north end of I
about area Key is the most histc
attractions the island. It was an
and just up village and part of tl
the road is still there in the visa
a helpful the Mar Vista Docks
jf Chamber of Restaurant and Pub.
Commerce. waterfront institution
Get in began life in 1912 a
your car fishing and bait shack
and travel It the 1940s it switc]
a few miles over to a beer and bl
south to St. joint. Over the years
Armand's was expanded into a
Circle to service restaurant w
enjoy fabu- keeping its historic
lous dining flavor.
-r .a, and shop- Specializing in fre
ping. It is a seafood, but also off
lives circular version of Worth Avenue ing more humble far
re is in Palm Beach and Rodeo Drive diners have the opti
pur- in Beverly Hills with more than of eating inside the
all, 150 specialty shops. Boutiques, conditioned restaura
ed jewelry shops, art galleries, res- sitting outside and e
r taurants and most important, ice- ing fresh breezes wh
cream parlors are on every block. overlooking the wid
a's One particular place of note is the bay. A sister restaura
dly Columbia restaurant right on The the BeachHouse, bo
iany Circle. The restaurant has been owned by Ed Chiles
tate. here for more than 50 years while of Florida' s late gov
its flagship store in Tampa has Lawton Chiles, is ju
been operating for 105 years. It's north on Anna Maria
o. a unique place to stop for lunch or land directly on the
rge dinner, of Mexico. What a c
r If you'd like to spend time in to dine there watchil
a honky-tonk environment, just Florida sunset while
north of Longboat Key is Bra- phins rolled lazily ju
denton Beach on Anna Maria What else is there
too Island. Here are the touristy shops Longboat Key or, fo
ght and restaurants familiar to resort ter, on almost any ol
island
anytd
All
are a
from
kaya
ing, t
even
But t
even
than
cultu
Saras
Sar
few
is kn
arts,
all ki
6 s year o/d n7anaee en f1ed 6a Br-adenton M- ingll k
eunDCexeing t


considering the
many offerings
of the property
and especially
in comparison
with other
venues today.
I would like to
suggest to the
management
of this museum
that they either
reconsider the
pricing policy
or at least make
s eo 's ae. ln ,5 ca a d'sZ uro vacatio o aoit clear to visi-
eamr vtieW) of te n/i ha ose (Ca' d iZn) firom ite ka' tors up front.
My last
se lounge on Selby Gardens and museums, evening on Longboat I dined at a
one of the most specifically the magnificent small restaurant, on the water of
over the Gulf Ringling Museum of Art. Visitors course, a few miles south of the
can spend the better part of a day Sandpiper Inn. Located on the bay
ongboat at this one location viewing its side of the island, PattiGeorge's is
oric part of museums, yes there are several, a contemporary American restau-
old fishing and the gardens. Entry to all rant offering a small but ambi-
hat history is venues is included in the price, or tious menu of foods from around
tge of the world prepared and presented
side in their own unique style. For
This those discriminating diners who
n demand gourmet food, this restau-
s a rant is highly recommended. Oh
ck. yes, before leaving this table talk,
hed there is one more location you
urger might want to learn about.
it The Sandpiper Inn has complete
full kitchen facilities for guests, but
while part of the fun of traveling is ex-
1 ; ploring new places and eating in
different restaurants. If you like to
-sh eat breakfast out, you are in luck.
fer- Across Gulf of Mexico Drive,
re, within walking distance of the
on Sandpiper Inn, is the Blue Dol-
air phin Cafl. They serve more food
nt or then a person should reasonably
njoy- be expected to eat at one meal and
while at very reasonable prices. Try it
le for breakfast or lunch. I found it a
ant great way to start the day.
th C+cuas c/own Jac4,Ve LeC/aile 5sand- So the next time you get the
son in, 5 h l ,zl p/anue on Si. 4ri-land urge to vacation on a tropical
7ernor C(c/e. ;eh a /'~//e powder and island with white sand beaches,
st pai'nt you can ,e Wha youzz an't warm turquoise waters (at most
a Is- Jaec/;e LeC/are beaches) and palm trees, for-
Gulf get the planes and cruise ships,
delight it was so I thought. just get into your car and go to
ng a beautiful The Ringling Mansion, named Florida's islands. You'll find your
three dol- the Ca' d' Zan, (House of John), tropical paradise without having
Ist off shore. is indicative of the wealth and to endure the indignities of airport
to do on opulence of that era and the first security or be weight limited by
)r that mat- floor of the mansion is included in your possessions. And, you can
f Florida's the $25 entrance fee. However, if bring the kitchen sink, literally.


ds? Just about
iing you like.
vater sports
available,
swimming,
king, jet ski-
to fishing and
parasailing.
.his area has
more to offer
most in the
iral heart of
sota.
rasota, just a
miles away,
own for fine
theatre of
minds includ-
he circus,


you want to see the
second floor, it is $5
more and must be
done in the com-
pany of a docent.
Should you also
want to visit the
third floor, then it is
an additional $20 in
addition to the fee
for the second floor.
These additional
fees were never ex-
plained to me when
I paid my entry fee
at the front desk
In my opinion the
general admission fThe aaw
fee is fairly priced Beach on


o-), ljarf--en f'esen, on Sandp'er-
Lon ocat Key.


OCTOBER 7, 2010






OCTOBER 7, 2010


Observations
By Mitch Traphagen
mitch@observernews.net


Living


a life


that


matters


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 9B


After waiting in a long line
at a local convenience
store, my turn arrived and
I swiped my credit card into the
card reader to pay for my purchas-
es. Nothing happened. I looked up
and the kid working as the cashier
kindly told me that I had swiped
my card into the wrong machine. It
was then, sensing the growing im-
patience of those in line behind me,
that I realized I had become the old
person I would sometimes become
impatient with. You know, the
older man or woman who seems
befuddled by the ATM asking in
no uncertain terms how much they
would like to withdraw.
By resolving to join the befud-
dled, older crowd, however, I am
recognizing my limitations. There
are at least two things that I am
now, in my increasingly elderly
state, unable to tolerate. I can't
have caffeine after 10 a.m. without
still being wired hours later and I
can no longer stomach the com-
ments sections of news websites.


I Ul T E RN AT IO r.j AL


Simply put, I don't want to be suf-
focated by the words of the tiny
minority of angry idiots.
Newspapers, of course, believe
in freedom of speech. I am able to
make a living because of it. I have
the freedom, within sensible lim-
its, to write what I want in these
pages. There is no government
agency, corporation or even the
editor or publisher telling me what
to write. I am the embodiment of
freedom of speech and I naturally
believe that freedom extends to all
Americans, not just those working
in the press.
To the latter point, I am concep-
tually in favor of comment sections
on news websites. People should
be able to weigh in on the news
- in both positive and negative
terms. Historically, that has hap-
pened through letters to the editor.
If you write a letter to the editor of
The Observer News, refrain from
using profanities or being outra-
geously offensive (in other words,
you just need to use the common


FREEDOM 4 SEAS


Mitch Traphagen
In Sun City Center, an elderly man checks into what will be his last home -- a room in a hospice house.
Our lives may differ but our fate is the same. This man's life mattered. Your life matters.


sense your parents taught you) and
include your name; your letter will
be published in the pages of the
newspaper. Your opinion matters
and you have the opportunity to get
space in print to air your thoughts
and concerns. That forum, reach-
ing tens of thousands of readers, is
available to everyone equally.
Unfortunately, comment sections
on news websites generally do not
have those standards they tend
to be anonymous. You can be any-
one you want behind the safety
of your computer. You can say
anything you want. The result is
that comment sections are rarely
forums for intelligent discourse,
but rather they tend to devolve
into anger and shouting matches.
Thanks to the anonymity of the
web, a handful of people tend to
cause trouble for the sensible and
considerate majority. That handful
of troublemakers is generally suc-
cessful in bringing all of us down
into the mud, forcing the lowest of
lowest possible denominators.
A recent case in point involves
the St. Petersburg Times and an
article on the tragic death of Neil
Alan Smith. Mr. Smith, 48, was
struck by a hit-and-run driver
while riding his bicycle home
from his job as a dishwasher in a
St. Petersburg restaurant. He died
at Bayfront Medical Center six
days later, just a few days short
of his 49th birthday. Shortly af-
ter the article was posted to the


Times' website, a reader posted in
the comment section of the story
that if Mr. Smith was working as
a dishwasher at the Crab Shack at
the age of 48, surely he is better
off dead.
Wow. Just wow. A man working
to support himself dies in a terrible
and senseless accident and some-
one out there has the callousness
to publicly state that he is better
off dead since he was a mere dish-
washer in a restaurant.
The web editors from the Times
removed the comment, deeming it,
in their words, "an offensive and
insensitive insult to a dead man's
friends and family." Most of us
would agree that to trivialize a
man's life and tragic death is the
very definition of offensive and
insensitive. Unfortunately, such
comments are not unusual. Look
for any article on a tragedy there
is no shortage of them and you
will see arguments breaking out
among the readers in the attached
comment sections. The words "of-
fensive" and "insensitive" do not
begin to describe the inhuman be-
havior that invariably results when
a handful of people are unable to
responsibly manage freedom of
speech. It is, consistently, the same
handful of people spouting venom
and sadistically reveling in their
own obnoxious behavior.
In most cases, the death of Mr.
Smith would not register on the
media radar again until (and if) the


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hit-and-run driver was apprehend-
ed. Even then, barring the perpe-
trator being a young and attractive
schoolteacher or a high-profile
elected official, that story would
be buried deep inside the news-
paper, along with the other short
articles about people and things
that few know and fewer still care
about. However, something in that
comment again, an everyday
occurrence in comment sections
- struck a chord at the Times. To
their indubitable credit, staff writer
Andrew Meacham wrote a moving
and honest article about how Neil
Alan Smith mattered. Meacham
painted an honorable and truthful
portrait of an honest man whose
life was tragically cut short an
article that allowed those of us
who never met Mr. Smith to know
something of him and to shed a
tear for him.
Comment sections are good
for business. Including them in
articles tends to increase traffic,
which in turn increases advertising
and ad revenue. The management
of The Observer News has made
the conscious decision to maintain
journalistic standards by not al-
lowing anonymous comments on
our website. Instead, The Observer
News has recently created a Face-
book page where comments can
be made on our stories. The paper
does not earn additional revenue
from that; but it does open a forum
for our readers and, because you
need to be logged into Facebook to
use it, does not allow for anonym-
ity. That brings the web up to the
same standard as newspapers have
for letters to the editor.
We do hope to hear from you -
whether on Facebook or through
your letters to the editor. While
we love the positive comments,
we are also grateful for opposing
comments. For me personally, un-
derstanding your concerns gives
me the opportunity to be a bet-
ter writer and to better serve you
through this newspaper. That is,
after all, my job. You matter. Your
concerns matter. Just as Neil Alan
Smith matters.
I may be increasingly gray-
haired and befuddled, but I will
never ignore you. We are all in this
together; in life and while waiting
in line at the ATM. The angry, in-
sensitive idiots notwithstanding,
we all matter, no matter who or
what we are.

The Observer News Facebook
page is at http://ww.facebook.
com/observernewstampabay.

The Observer News website is
www.observernews.net.


FEBRUARY 20-27, 2011


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THE MARCELS



THE PASSIONS
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THE BOBBETTES











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10B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


SCC Photo Club announces-

September competition --

winners
Winners have been announced in the September competition for the
Sun City Center Photo Club.
In the digital division, winners were Carol Downing, beginner level,
with a silver for New Photo Logo; Nancy Williams, beginner level, with
a silver for Tahoe Ski Country, and golds for Inquisitive Mallard and My .
Backyard View; Al McPhillips, intermediate level, with bronze awards
for Vertigo and Beauty and the Beast; Pradeep Nijhawan with a bronze -
award for Statuesque Centurion; and Matt Stears with a silver for Wine
Glass Reflections.
In the print division, beginner level winners were Raymond Kahle with
a gold award for Beach Fun; Allen Maser with gold awards for Reflec-
tions Along the Mein-Danube Canal and Budapest Beggar, and a silver
for Forest Fire and Regrowth; and George Seeley with gold awards for
A Flower & A Friend and Breakfast at Dawn, and a bronze for Thirsty
Bear.
Also in the print division, at the intermediate level, Glenn Laucks
received a gold for The Paula Deen Show, and a silver for Finito; and
Marianne Strehar received a bronze for Flaming Leaves.
In the advanced level, Matt Batt received bronze awards for Lizard of
the Sidney Opera and Sunset at Roanoak Island; Joe Pehoushek received
bronze awards for Thumbelina, Lighting the Way and Greenland Village;
and Rolf Sulzberger received a bronze for Day Lily.
For more information on the club and its activities, see their website
at www.photoclubscc.com or visit the learning lab at 960D Cherry Hills
Drive.



In the print division at the intermediate level, Glenn Laucks received a silver for Finito



We're Tee'd Off About *


Breast Cancer

Help Us FORTH CURE
In the advanced level, Rolf Sulzberger received a bronze for Day SCC omen's Golf Association 1 8 Hole Division
Lily. SCC Women's Golf Association 18 Hole Division
SCC Women's Golf Association 9 Hole Division
Caloosa Greens Ladies Golf Association

Rally For The Cure

by Sponsoring our Golf Tournament
Friday, October 22, 2010
Sandpiper Golf Course with
lunch following at SCC Community Hall

SMake Sponsorship Checks Payable:
Susan G.
KO f en
Mail to: FOR THE
In the print division, beginner level, Raymond Kahle won a gold Mrs. Connie Holl : ,
award for Beach Fun. 1616 Bentwood Drive
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Company Name
Contact
Address _

Phone :
Sponsorship Level
Base Sponsor .............$150- $299
Bronze Sponsor .............$300- $499
Silver Sponsor ............$500- $999
Gold Sponsor.................... $1000+
*.........................................................

For More Information, Call:
Karen Stanhope 633-2232 Ruth Kramer 634-7919
In the digital division, beginner level, Nancy Williams received gold


OCTOBER 7, 2010









OCOBR7,210TESHPEIB


100 Announc
TaclTH SHO200 1Farmer's


813.645.3111 ext. 201 400 Marine
Fax: 813.645.1792 FIIi AIlVEr TIIiN 450 Transpor
$ 0@ p1I500 Real Esta
$15.50 550 Manuf. Hc
up to 20 words M & M Printing Co., Inc 600 Rentals
300 addl. word weekly publisher of the 650 Prof. Se
Deadline is Monday The Observer News, The SCC Observer and The Riverview Current 700 Services
,_n A, r210 Woodland Estates Ave SW 800 EmDlovm


"' '


lent


115 LOST & FOUND
Found orange tabby cat, approx. 3yrs
old in vicinity of South Pebble Beach &
New Bedford Dr, SCC. Call 813-633-
0787 to identify






310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Nautical Flea market. Oct. 9. West
Maine, 268 Apollo Beach Blvd. 9am-
2pm. Youth sailing fundraiser. Buy or
sell. Treasures/ bargains.

Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana
St., Gibsonton (1 block off US 41,1 block
north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday thru
Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture,
lots misc. Ministry First Baptist Gibson-
ton. 813-671-0036 to donate

Friday& Saturday, 8am-2pm. Milk glass
punch bowl & cups, children clothes,
chairs, glassware. Across from CARE.
1533 27th St., SE, Ruskin

Ruskin
United
Church THRIFT HOUSE

SPECIALS EVERY
WEEK!

Household Items
S* Furniture -

Clothing

Much, more
Open Fri. & Sat. 9 a.m. 2 p.m.
109 W. Shell Point Road Ruskin

Friday, Oct. 8, 8am-2pm. 403 Stoneham
Dr., SCC. Furniture, patio set, household
goods, designer handbags, clothes &
much more.

Huge moving sale. Friday & Saturday,
8am-lpm. 1810 Saffold Park Dr.,
Ruskin. Furniture, large rustic bar, Rat-
tan furniture, lots of tropical accessories
& much much more.

Spooktacular
Multi family yard sale. Tools, furni-
ture, antiques, books, clothing, PS2
games, collectibles, more. Households
on Allegheny, Tahoe, North Lake,
Vincennes Drives. Follow signs. Friday
& Saturday, 8am-1pm.

Multi family garage sale. Something for
everyone. 2047 Prestancia Lane, SCC.
Saturday, Oct. 9, 8am-1pm.

3 family sale. Oct. 9th only. 8:30am-?
Holiday items, household, toys, movies,
clothes, firewood. 5527 Hillsborough St.,
Wimauma.

Multi family garage sale. Lots of misc.
items. 515 Apollo Beach Blvd., Friday
8am-? & Saturday 8am-noon

Garage sale. Friday, Oct. 8, 8am-2pm.
Several on Fairway Ridge Ct. SCC.
Misc. items, clothes, lamp, tools etc.

2 family yard sale. 9608 Pineridge
Ave., off US 301, Riverview. Friday &
Saturday, 8am-3pm. Kids, women's &
men's items.

E-MAIL
Classified@observemews.net


310 GARAGE /YARD SALE




New Winter Hours:
M-F 9 to 5:30 Sat 9 to 4:30

SENIOR
MONDAYS
are back!
Most items discounted
including Clothing,
Accessories, Collectibles, Art,
Books, and some Furniture.
Donations Needed
Please call (813) 645-5255
1311 3rd St. NE Ruskin
(Behind St.Anne Church
& Next to Kennco Mfg.)


Upscale Resale Shop
Our prices are better than any estate
sale. Don't give it away, consign it. If
you cannot have a sale at your place,
we can have it at ours. Above The
Rest. 813-431-5550. 139 S Pebble
Beach Blvd., Between WinnDixie &
CVS. Stop in for a free gift.

Friday & Saturday, 8am-2pm. Misc,
clothes, original art, note cards, Ohio
state items, color TV, TV cart, books,
collectibles. 1603 Cloister Dr., SCC.

Yard sale. Household goods, furniture,
electric recliner chair, clothes, lots of
misc. Friday & Saturday, Oct. 8 & 9,
9am-1pm. 704 Reading Place., SCC
(off Rickenbacker)

All good things. 509 Lively, SCC. 8am-
1pm. Friday & Saturday, 10/8 & 10/9.
Linens, dishes, bedspread, candles,
clothes.

Linen World home parties. Also catalog
parties. Have a party and earn free
merchandise. Audrey 813-541-1126 .
Remember Christmas is coming.

Handmade items Nurse scrub tops,
quilts, purses, pocketbooks, aprons,
hats, bibs. Oct. 9, Saturday, 9am-1pm.
625 Flamingo Drive., Apollo Beach.

4 family yard sale. 9am-2pm. Oct. 8 & 9.
Furniture, sports stuff, household items,
clothes & stuff. 10012 Penninsular Dr.,
Gibsonton

Multi family garage sale. Friday & Satur-
day, Oct. 8 & 9, 8am-1 pm. 1609 Solitaire
Palm Way, Apollo Beach. Great stuff.

3CafVariy's

n. fThrift Store
NOW OPEN Wednesday,
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. Noon
JEANS Sale
All Types of Jeans
Buy 1, Get 1 FREE
Also 'Secret Sale'
1424 E. College Ave. Ruskin
813-641-7790
Ministry of Calvar Lutheran Church


312 ESTATE SALES
Estate sale. Apollo Beach Coin, 5916
Fortune Place. Gold & silver jewelry,
coins, vintage & costume jewelry.
We Buy
coins, gold & silver jewelry. 9am-
4pm. Saturday, Oct. 9


312 ESTATE SALES


Anne's Estate Sales ,






Hot Thb, Leather Sofa, Loveseat & Recliner;
Georgetown Mahogany Table & Chairs,
Server, China Cabinet, Buffet; Black Knight
Tangiers Huhenberg Bavarian Dishes
(Large Set), Wesio Exercise Bike, Korg
Concert Piano, Vintage Saxophone, Oriental
Rug, Total Gym, Iron Man Treadmill,
Craftsman Tool Boxes, Craftsman Tools, &
Other Tools, Drill Press, Full-Sized Bed,
Craftsmatic Twin Beds (2), Ladders,
Linens, Doll Collection, Kitchen Items &
Lots of Misc. Items.
www.AnnesEstateSales.blogspot.com




Your home will be staged for
best results. Working in
Sun City Center for 23 years.
Please feel free to call about
the sale or its contents.
Bonded Licensed
Cell: 508-0307
or Eve: 633-1173


The Observer News
will be opened
Monday, Oct. 11


Let us get done in one day what it
takes the others guys a week to do.
We will pack-up and pick-up one room
or the entire house for a QUICK,
PROFITABLE, TROUBLE-FREE
EXPERIENCE.
CALL BUTERFIELD'S AUCTIONS




www.ButterfleldsAuctions.com
Butterfield Auctions AB2706/AU3549




I




fl02alel


Contents Include: Nice
Living Room Furniture, Blue
Sofa, Blue Loveseat, Blue
Chair w/Ottoman, Leather
Rocker/Recliners, La-Z-Boy
Recliner, King Size Bed,
Hand Painted Queen
Bedroom, (2) Entertainment
Centers, TVs, Tall Bookcase,
Hand Painted Kitchen Table
w/Chairs, Coffee, Lamp &
End Tables, Sea Captain's
Cedar Chest, Household &
Garage Items.
Please Park on Side of Sale
due to Emergency Vehicles.
SEE YOU THERE!


312 ESTATE SALES


sTfITE

5flLES

741-0225
Cell: 382-7536
Personalized
Service


mare.mdy54@yahoo.com
813-938-5103


330 FURNITURE
Couch recliner both ends & matching
reclining chair $300. Sanyo DVD $25,
Toshiba 20" TV $50. Walker w/ slides
$15. 813-634-8034

331 APPLIANCES
Whirlpool electric range white w/ black
trim. 4.5 cu ft, self cleaning oven. Very
good condition. $75. 813-634-6052

354 MEDICAL ITEMS
Mobility Scooter. The Golden Com-
panion 2. Gently used $500. 813-381-
0163

Brown lift chair for sale. Fabric protected,
remote control, very good condition.
Used only 6 weeks. 813-781-8506

360 GOLF CARTS
Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade. Char-
gers, parts all related. Ronny's Carts &
Parts. 813-645-4515 or 813-484-9855

57 Chevy Club Car golf cart. Red, 4
seater, golf bag, carrier, lights, signals
& security kill switch on batteries. Trunk.
Paid 14k in 2005. Best offer, over 5k.
813-390-0239

390 MISC. FOR SALE
Lined pink, floor length Traversing
drapes under 13ft valances with pleated
ends & 5 swags, including sheers & rods
$150 813-634-6052


w 4
1
1st St S.W.

TfRFT
STORE


390 MISC. FOR SALE
Box springs & mattress, king size w/
headboard/ footboard/ frame. Couch &
chair, miter saw with laser table saw &
grinder. All like new $1,500. obo. 813-
260-3289

Sign Shop ITalkin' Tee's
Golf cart, vehicles, boats magnets,
banners, bumper stickers, custom
license/ address plates, T-shirt
transfers. www.ruskinsignshop.com
813-938-7446

395 WANTED TO BUY
Wanted lap top computer 15" screen or
personal computer (that's no to old) Call
813-634-7082






425 SLIPS OR STORAGE
South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special-
izing in outside storage for RVs, boats &
trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay-
Storage.com

Ramey's Business Park
RV & boa storage & heavy equipment.
1/4 mile from Williams Park boat ramp.
813-410-9607 or 813-849-1469





455 AUTOMOBILES
2003 Camary for sale. Silver, grey inte-
rior, all power, new tires. Great condition
43,000 miles. $7,900. 813-781-8506

2000 Mercury Grand Marque, 20k miles,
new battery, new tires lyr old. $4,000
obo. 813-633-6090


TO PLACE
A CLASSIFIED AD
SCall
Beverly
at
645-3111
ext. 201
or e-mail:

Beverly@observernews.net
20 words for $15.50 and
30C for each additional
word. Bold line $3.All
classified ads are paid in
advance. Deadlines are
Monday at 4 pm for
Thursday paper.


MARIE E. RUDY
ESTATE
SALES

Serving the
SouthShore
Area


THRIFT STORE "
OPEN: Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 8 am. 3 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. 12 p.m.
1009 1st. Street S.W.


Ruskin
S.R.674 E We Have
Furniture, Too!
DONATION DROP OFFS
TUES. THtRU FRL ONLY PLEASE,
ALL DONATIONS MUST BE IN CLEAN
S USEABLE CONDITION.


U U


THE SHOPPER 11 B


OCTOBER 7, 2010


Ruskin, Florida 33570


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ements
Mkt
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station
lte
housing

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12B THE SHOPPER





511 HOUSE FOR SALE









*Valenda Lakes 2/2 + den
$169,900
3/2 Waterfront MH w/dock
$39,000
Cypress Creek/Ventana 3/2 w/fish
pond & 10K walk-in tub $169,900
*Bimini Bay 3/3 $199,000
10Acres on 672 $225,000
359 Acres,SeminoleTrl. $110,000
*Commercial LotShell Pt $89,000




The Observer News
will be opened
Monday, Oct. 11


LOW PRICES, LOW INTEREST RATES:
BEST TIME TO BUY A HOUSE...
3BR/1.5BA, enclosed Florida room,
carport, county water & sewer, newer roof.
$58,000.
3BR/ BA, new CHA, new plumbing &
sewer, utility room, carport, fenced lot.
$58,500.
2BR/1BA, carport, utility room, newer
metal roof, shed, a block from River.
$65,000.
...OR A MOBILE HOME
Prices starting at $42,500 for 2BR/2BA
single or doublewides on their own lots.
BRING US OFFERS!


aireTr


511 HOUSES FOR SALE


eaR


2BR/2BA (split bedrooms), side entry garage, vaulted
ceilings, over 2000 sq. ft., familyroom and 37x12
enclosedlanai........................................ $187,500
SCC Worthington 3BR/2BA 2,500 sq. ft., solar
I. I i .... i...., cagedpatio........ $249,000
RENTALS
1BR/1.5BA .... ......... ..................................$600/m month
2BR/2BA, near clubhouse, furnished..... $600/month
2BR/2BAon Gloucester, furnished ..........$700/month
3BR/2BA 2 car garage, pet area in KPCan be
rented furnished or unfurnished ..............$900/month


Great home on lovely,
peaceful street with
beautiful trees, back
yard on golf course.
Sit outside on the
patio to watch the
golfers play or enjoy
the view. 2BR/2BA home, open floor
plan, plenty of storage. Call Larry
at (813) 892-8255 or Vickie at (813)
892-8256.
% Larry Bruni Realtor
KE ER (813) 892-8255
WILIAMS,
Realty LarrybHomes@yahoo.com
South Shore thebruniteam.com



515 VILLAS FOR SALE

Sun City Condo
Kings Point, gated 55+ community,
2br/2ba, 1,200sf., carport, like new,
many amenities. $39,900, terms. Va-
cant move now 813-244-6875








560 M.H. ON LOTS
Mobile home for sale Eastwood Mobile
Home Park, Gibsonton. Call Heather
813-677-5726


565 M.H. IN PARKS
12x56, 2 bedroom 1 bath in 55+ park,
10x20 lanai & 12x12 shed, roof over,
carport, central air /heat, furnished +
washer/ dryer. $9,000. 813-645-6915

Riverview. 24x32, 2br/2ba, vinyl screen
room enclosure. Lake front lot, 55+,
much more! Only $34,900! Call now!
813-5071660

E-MAIL
Classified@observernews.net


RENTAL


610 WATERFRONT RENTALS
The Dolphin House, Apollo Beach,
efficiency apartments on water. Boat
docking /fishing. Pool, laundry. $185
weekly, $185 deposit. No pets. 813-
850-5217

611 HOUSES FOR RENT
Ruskin, quaint 3br/2ba home with front
covered porch. Well suited for 1-3
people. Monthly rent $950 with signed
lease. No smoking. No pets. Security
deposit & references required. Please
call 813-649-1599

SCC. 2br/2ba, 55+ community, clean,
close to shopping. Super quiet & safe
neighborhood $795 monthly. 813-
363-1941

Sun City Center. Remodelled 2,100 sf.
3br/2ba/2cg w/ patio, golf course w/
water. Designer extras. Pet ok. $1,000
monthly. 813-767-5005

S & R Properties
3, 2 & 1 bedrooms. No pets. Ruskin,
Gibsonton area. RV lots available 813-
310-1888 or 813-849-1469

612 APTS. FOR RENT
For rent: Efficiency apartments. Weekly
rates, utilities furnished 813-677-8789,
813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

Riverview 2br/1 ba, CHA, water, garbage
& maintenance included. $600 monthly
$600 deposit. 813-239-4293 or 813-
645-2193


613 CONDOS FOR RENT
1 bedroom, 1.5 bath, furnished, Cov-
ered parking. $700 monthly cable,
water & amenities included. 813-634-
1162

Furnished, 2br/1ba, washer, dryer,
enclosed lanai. 55+, No pets. $750 with
lease, plus deposit. 813-677-6775

619 VILLAS FOR RENT
Kings Point 55+, 2br/2ba, newly reno-
vated, fully furnished, washer /dryer /
lanai. Within walk to main clubhouse.
Lease plus utilities. Call 813-677-7512
, leave message.

620 ROOMS FOR RENT
Wimauma, want to live in a country
setting that's clean & quiet. No alcohol
or drugs. $110 weekly, nicely furnished
room includes all utilities & basic cable.
813-503-4592

624 VACATION RENTALS

Snowbirds Vacation Special
1 br, fully furnished, cable, washer,
dryer, screened porch. Deck on water
in Apollo Beach. All utilities included.
Low deposit. Weekly or monthly. No
pets. $200 weekly $800 monthly. Call
Bob 813-645-4117

630 M.H. RENTALS
2br/2ba private lot. South of Gibsonton,
US 41. Call 813-927-2065

One bedroom furnished, water & electric
included. $165 weekly, plus security
deposit. R & M Mobile Home Park
Gibsonton. 813-677-7509

One bedroom house & 1 & 2 bedroom
trailer. Between Gibsonton & Apollo
Beach. No pets. 813-690-0768

For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With
A/C. 813-677-1086

Ruskin, 1br park model for rent. No
smoking, no pets, references needed.
Weekly rent $100 includes utilities, $200
security deposit, 6 month minimum. Call
649-1599 8am-4pm.


OCTOBER 7, 2010

630 M. H. RENTALS
For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home near
shopping center in Gibsonton. 813-677-
8789, 813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

1 or 2 bedroom units. Furnished/ unfur-
nished. Linens/ kitchenware included.
Rice Creek RV Resort, Riverview. Ame-
nities. Small pet ok. 813-205-8771

Mobile home, 2r/2ba in 55+ park, in-
cludes water & trash. Gated community.
$700 monthly plus $700 deposit. 813-
789-5448

645 OFFICE SPACE
600+ sf commercial office space. Great
rate. Highly visible at corner of US 41
& College Ave., Ruskin. Call 813-210-
6540 or email kristen@mobileeyecare.
com

646 WAREHOUSE SPACE

Garage & mini storage rooms for rent.
Pirates Treasure Cove, Gibsonton.
813-677-1137






651 BOOKKEEPING

QuickBooks
Certified Pro-advisor Tutoring / in-
struction at your pace. Flexible hours.
Full bookkeeping service. (Bank recon
/payroll /data entry /tax prep via QB.
10+ years local service, Thea's Quick
Bookkeeping Inc, Ruskin 813-641-
1089

652 ACCOUNTING
Accounting, bookkeeping & consult-
ing services. Software & accounting
training. Cleanup & prepare for year
end. QuickBooks Certified Proadvisor.
DeSmidt Consulting Inc. www.desmid-
tconsulting.com 813-938-3608 Based
in Wimauma/ Riverview.

680 ADULT/CHILD CARE
Now accepting applications for enroll-
ment. Age 6 weeks -12yrs. Half or full
day. Ruskin United Methodist pre school.
Call 813-645-6198. CHC110087


> ^ CALL (813) 645-3211
PaulB.N Serving South Hillsborough County since 1924. Celebrating 86 Years

DICKMAN www.dickmanrealty.com 1924 2010


R E A L T Y dickman@tampabay.rr.com

PERSNICKETY?? The white glove pair has just gone through this newly listed 2BR/2BA condo in Kings Point to PRICE REDUCED!! Beautiful building lot in Ruskin situated on a quiet street with water views. Close to schools,
make it move-in ready for you. Light, bright, flowing plan. Newer water heater, roof, a/c, washer & dryer. KPW. shopping and much, much more! The lot is 80 x 160 MOL and utilities are available. Owner will consider financing
Lots of community amenities and activities available. And they're asking less than its 1984 sales price. Retired or -- call today for more details. $27,000. CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
working, active or lazy, social or not, it would be foolish not to check out what could be your ideal home. Just NEW LISTING IN RUSKIN! Built in 1927 this amazing 2BR/1BA 2-story home has been partially renovated and is
$45,900 JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288 waiting for you! This residential property features an enormous 40 x 80 (mol) detached garage offering unlimited
IMPROVED PROPERTY, IMPROVED PRICE! Recently remodeled commercial building has reduced price to potential for many uses and is located on over 1/2 acre! Call today for details. $110,000 CALL CATHY GRIGGS
make its potential even more positive. New stucco exterior and refurbished interior, near downtown Ruskin, 391-8653
major highways, and on well-traveled street. Owner will consider holding mortgage. Now only $114,900 JUDY RUSKIN RENTALS!! 3BR/2.5BA Townhouse with 1-car garage. Brand new unit with over 1700 sq.ft and a
ERICKSON 468-0288 screened lanai. Basic cable and water are included in the rent. $1150 per month. 3BR/2BA Condos with 1200
GREAT BUY! Enjoy beautiful sunrises from your private patio overlooking the wide salt water channel and views sq.ft. for $850.00 per month with a one year lease. CALL ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
of Tampa Bay from your front door and kitchen! Very well maintained and upgraded corner unit 2BR/2BA LOOKING FOR A FISH FARM OPPORTUNITY? Check out this 6.6 acres m.o.l. with fish ponds, storage building,
Waterfront condo. Both bathrooms have been completely remodeled with new ceramic tile, tub/showers, toilets county water, well, septic and mobile home pad. Property has also been rezoned for duplexes. There's so much
and very stylish cabinets. $149,900 CALL ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 or KAY PYE 361-3672 potential! Asking $140,000 with possible owner financing. JO ELLEN MOBLEY,-645-1540.
COZY 2BR/1BA ON LARGE CORNER LOT, SPECIAL FEATURES INCLUDE: County water & sewer wood RUSKIN 1 ACRE COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ALONG US 41: zoned CG, lot is cleared and has all utilities and 2
burning stove, nice large bedrooms, almost new washer & dryer, large bonus room and much more. $99,000. small rentals. 230 ft frontage on Hwy as well as access by back street. Great opportunity for a new business.
CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 $299,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
BRAND NEW HOME, never lived in, ready to movie in. Not a short sale. Close to school and shopping. CALL LARGE ACREAGE AND A HOUSE RIGHT IN TOWN! 8.7 acres, mostly cleared and fenced, with
KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 $125,000. 3BR/2BA/Garage house and detached barn, conveniently located close to main Hwy, still secluded. Horses and
JUST REDUCED!! NEW LISTING! 5 Acres with 10 greenhouses! 3BR/2BA MH built in 2001. Special features pets welcome. $399,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
include: 20 x 30 workshop, 2 free standing double carports, 190 foot well, electric gate and much more. Zoning is BUY THIS FABULOUS RIVERFRONT LOT NOW, BUILD LATER Owner will finance. Deep water, large new
AR. $154,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 dock, great fishing and wide view of river, right in Ruskin. All utilities on site, elegant iron gate and fence, PD-MU
NEW LISTING!! THIS ONE IS A MUST SEE. 3BR/2BA with 2-car garage. It sparkles and shines with too many zoning (house or Manufact/Mobile-Homes). $239,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
upgrades to list. Brand new 135 mph storm windows protect this near perfect home. It is unique in every way. RUSKIN POOL HOUSE ON ALMOST /2 ACRE FENCED LOT: 3BR/2BA, 2-car-garage, repainted inside, new
Private backyard with large patio for backyard fun! Priced at $179,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE carpet in BR, tiles in living areas, large scr.porch overlooking pool and nicely landscaped backyard. Home sits on
WESTBROOK 748-2201 one lot, 2nd lot could be built or resold. $154,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
OVER 1 AC. WITH 200' ON THE LITTLE MANATEE RIVER. Features include: maple cabinets, Italian marble tile IMMACULATE BAYFRONT CONDO, OWNER LOOKING FOR OFFERS: 2BR/2BA, beautifully furnished, large
throughout, 5 sets of French doors, huge master bedroom, plantation shutters, custom bookshelves, balcony offering extensive view of Tampa Bay, covered parking. Amenities include pools, fishing pier, restaurants,
mother-in-law suite. This beauty also has tons of storage, a 5-car garage, L-shaped dock with boathouse for the tennis courts. $195,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
fishing and boating enthusiast. $389,000. CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 GREAT STARTER HOME OR RENTAL: Charming Fla Cracker house, 2BR/1.5BA, enclosed lanai, inside utility,
2.5 ACRES REDUCED TO $114,900. Mobile on property does not remain. Peace and quiet in the country on 21st 2-car-carport. Newer roof, county water & sewer, large corner lot. $58,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
Ave. SE. Motivated seller. CALL KAY 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 DOUBLE LOT to build your dream home. No deed restrictions. No homeowner association fees. Just under 3/4
REDUCED!! OVER 8 ACRES REZONED FOR 5 HOMES. One well and septic in place.Located at the deadend acre, cleared, within a stone's throw to most major conveniences. Reduced to $60,000. Call for more info today!
of 30th St SE on west side. 330 Ft of road frontage. Priced to sell at $154,900. ROXANNE WESTBROOK JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540.
748-2201 or KAY PYE 361-3672. 14 COUNTRY ACRES but not far from amenities. Deep well for farming use or build your dream home.
JUST REDUCED!!! Over 6 acres of beautiful secluded, wooded acreage, one-of-a-kind waterfront view. Property Surrounded by estate homes and lots of privacy. Currently leased for farming but Seller willing to listen. Call today.
has M/H, well & septic. Two folio #s. 165 ft. river front. $399,000 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE Asking $395,000. JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540.
WESTBROOK 748-2201
PRIME LOCATION CLOSE TO HWY 41 w/easy access to 1-75 pole barn w/bath & small living quarters. Property
formerly a nursery. Now has cows grazing. Approx. 45 usable acres. Phase one environmental survey & traffic NOIWIS THE TIME TO BUY!!
study completed. $3,300,000 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
REDUCED AGAIN!! 5 ACRES with easy access to 1-75. Perfect for Landscape/ Nursery business. Property CALL US FORALLYOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS.........6453211
complete with irrigation & commercial grade well. 2000 sq. ft. metal building & an 1800 sq. ft. gutted home & shop. L ......
Reduced $374,900 KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 for details.
INVESTOR SPECIAL!! 2005 duplex with 2BR/1BA, 832 sq. ft. and other unit is 3BR/2BA, 1040 sq. ft. Both units i i c p a d o
rented. Bring all offers. Must move. $125,000 CALL KATHY JACOBSON 624-2225 D nate l fntining c p a t our
TURNKEY PROPERTY in SUN CITY CENTER!! This lovely home boasts 2BR/2BA, 2-car garage and is ready
and waiting for you! Built in 1994 this home has been meticulously maintained with new a/c in 2006, a new roof in ofce fr the" Pr
2007 and much, much more. Sun City Center has much to offer with golf courses, tennis, softball, two indoor o Vllc As tn I
pools plus over 200 clubs and various other activities. A golf cart friendly community to local shopping and o *
activities and it is conveniently located to airports, beaches, Tampa, Sarasota & St. Petersburg. Come and enjoy
the Florida lifestyle today!! $139,500 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653







OCTOBER 7, 2010
680 ADULT/CHILD CARE

HHA/ caregiver provider. Companion/
housekeeper seeking private duty. Well
trained & qualified. Flexible hours. Call
Janice 813-333-8405

RN seeking live-in companion position
to elderly female. Will assist with care,
meal preparation & light housekeeping.
Excellent references & security check
upon request. Call Brenda 1-239-362-
7783






705 CLEANING

Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integrity.
Call for free estimate. 7days a week.
Move-in, move-out, rentals. Insured,
bonded, licensed. Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean

708 MOVERS

Affordable Moving & Trash Hauling.
Specializing in delivery /estate sales.
One piece or whole house. Loading &
unloading moving trucks/ storage units.
Free estimate. Dave 813-447-6123

710 LAWN CARE

Henry's Lawn Maintenance.
Landscaping needs. Rock, mulch, tree
service. Pressure washing. Monthly
lawn maintenance. Licensed & in-
sured. Free estimates. 813-477-3054

M & C Mower Repair.
Parts & service. Authorized warranty
center. Commercial & residential. 725
14th St., Wimauma. 813-938-3226.
Pickup & delivery &



2 -&S Lawn Care, Inc.
Professional Lawn Care Service
Residential & Commercial
Total Lawn Maintenance
Landscaping/Sod/Mulch
Landscape Maintenance
Irrigation Monitoring & Repair
FREE ESTIMATES/REASONABLE RATES

813-645-7266
www.bandslawncare.com
"Your Local Lawn Care Professionals I"


714 TREE REMOVAL

Professional Tree
& Landscaping. Sales: trimming,
removals, popcorn curbing, stump
grinding, clearing, hauling. Fill dirt/ top
soil/ rock/ mulch. We barter for items
of value. Free estimate. Call Paul 813-
634-6041 or 813-751-9691

Cedric Williams Tree Service/ profes-
sional landscaping. 20yr experience.
Quality work, reasonable rates, licensed
& insured. Call Kathy 813-645-9249
anytime (24hrs).

715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill dirt,
topsoil, sand, crushed rock & asphalt,
driveway culverts. Loader, backhoe,
grading, bushhog, discing. Install Sep-
tic System & drain fills. CFC#1427021.
813-645-1883


715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service. Cul-
vert sets, driveways, shell, crushed
asphalt, concrete, fill dirt, excavating,
mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963
Free estimates.

Fill-Land Clearing
Dozer & loader work, driveway & sep-
tic fill, & shell hauled. Robert Carver,
813-634-4962. Beeper 813-267-6217

716 CONCRETE

Concrete Finishing
Patios' driveways' sidewalks'.
Licensed & insured. Call Steve Sim-
mons 813-503-8764. Lic#201587

720 HOME MAINT.

Experience carpenter. Needs work will
fix anything. Free estimate. Call Dave
813-447-6123. 27yrs experience in fin-
ish work. Guaranteed quality service.

Boston Frank's Int
painting & pressure washing. Most
homes painted for $799. Complete!
Don't miss out. Call Frank today 813-
309-3415. Other services available.

735 TRANSPORTATION

At Your Service
Transportation to Tampa airport /
charters /cruise ship. Excellent prices.
Call Express Transportation 813-731-
9283 for rates

740 MISC. SERVICES

Rooms refreshed. I will resdeign room
(s) or stage your home for a quick sale.
Certified redesigned/ stager. Call Kathy
813-634-7214

In Your Home
Pet Care
813-767-7225. Affordable, licensed,
bonded, insured. References avail-
able. email: olivertort@aol.com Oliver
& Company

Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks, boat
lifts & seawalls. Free inspection. Heck-
er Construction Co. 813-236-9306







810 MEDICAL






SUNTOWERS
RETI RE M E N T COMMUNITY

PHYSICAL AND
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPISTS
SUN TERRACE REHABILITATION
is hiring PRN & Full-Time Physical
Therapists & Occupational Therapists
for inpatient & outpatient.
Excellent benefits package and
opportunities for growth.
Interested candidates should apply at
105 Trinity Lakes Drive
Sun City Center, FL
(813) 634-3347 ext. 134


ONA NW OM

WIT NOMOEY OWN!


A community of affordable homes
exclusively for first-time homebuyers!

FLORIDA HOME PARTZZoRSMHI
(813) 672- 7889 www.flhome.org


*Phase III NowAvailable!
* 2 Swimming Pools and a Clubhouse
* 3,4 and 5 Bedrooms, 1 and 2 Garages
* Popular Ruskin Location
* USDA Self-Help Housing program -- help
build your home in exchange for a down
payment
* No money down, easy to qualify
* Non-profit agency works for you
-Hablamos Espafiol ~




SBAYOUPASS
,:I.II,,,p Lr ie hrn ryers under 80% of median cme. Call for deils.


870 GENERAL







*ow Taking Application

for Packing House


Behind 5th 3rd Bank

645-6431




Stylist

Booth Rent Only


Shelly's

Styling Salon


813-633-3755


SUNTOWERS
RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

CERTIFIED
DIETARY MANAGER
SUN TERRACE HEALTH
CARE CENTER, located in Sun
City Center, is seeking a CDM
for our 109-bed skilled nursing
facility. The ideal candidate will
possess 2+ years of experience,
strong organizational and
management skills, be detail
oriented and a team player.
Competitive pay and benefits.
Qualified candidates should
Fax resume to (813) 633-1356
or email resume to
rcombee@suntowersretirement.com



COMMUNITY PAPERS
OF FLORIDA
(CPF STATEWIDE)
CASH PAID FOR DIABETIC TEST
STRIPS! New, sealed & unexpired.
Most brands, shipping prepaid. We pay
the most & fast! Call Linda 1-888-973-
3729 or www.cash4diabeticsupplies.
com ;

COLLECTORAMA SHOW Lakeland
Center 701 WLime, Lakeland October
8 -10, 2010 Fri / Sat 10-6, Sunday 10-4
$3.00 Weekend Admission Buy Sell
- Trade Coins Currency Stamps -
Antiques- PaperAmericana Postcards
- Military Toys Collectibles Gold, Sil-
ver Free Handful of Money for Young-
sters Door Prizes New Virgin Island
Quarters Info: Edward 561-392-8551

DIRECT DEALS! FREE Prof Installa-
tion! 5 Mos Free! 285+Channels when
you get NFL Sunday Ticket for $59.99/
mos. for 5 mos. New Cust. only. Direct
Sat TV 1-888-436-0103

DISH BEST OFFER EVER! $24.99/
mo (for 1 year.) 120+ Channels, FREE
HD! FREE DVR Upgrade! PLUS, Call
NOW& SAVE Over $380! CALL 1-866-
573-3640

Every baby deserves a healthy start.
Join more than a million people walk-
ing and raising money to support the
March of Dimes. The walk starts at
marchforbabies.org.

FREE GPS! FREE Printer! FREE MP3!
With Purchase of New computer. Pay-
ments Starting at Only $29.99/week.
No Credit Check! Call GCF Today.
1-877-212-9978

LOCALLY SERVING 40 STATES Di-
vorce $50 $300* Money Back Guar-
antee! Covers children, etc. *excludes
gov't fees 1-800-522-6000 ext. 700
Baylor & Associates, Est. 1973

Donate Vehicle Receive $1000 Grocery
Coupon Noah's Arc Support No Kill
Shelters, Research to Advance Vet-
erinary Treatments Free Towing, Tax
Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted
1-866-912-GIVE


CPF STATEWIDE
VONAGE Unlimited Calls Around The
World! Call the U.S. AND 60+ Countries
for ONLY $24.99/Month 30-Day Money
Back Guarantee. Why Pay More?
1-877-872-0079

Abortion Not an Option? Consider
Adoption. It's a Wonderful Choice for
an Unplanned Pregnancy. Living/Medi-
cal Expenses Paid. Loving, Financially
Secure Families Await. 1-877-341-1309
Atty Ellen Kaplan (#0875228)

ADOPTION Give Your Baby The Best
In Life! Living Expenses Paid. Many
Loving, Financially Secure Couples
Waiting. Call Jodi Rutstein, an Attorney/
Social Worker who truly cares about you.
1-800-852-0041 #133050

High School Diploma Fast! Accredited!
At Home! Or Online! www.worldhope-
academy.org ; 305-270-9830

Earn up to $150 per day. Under cover
Shoppers needed to judge retail and
dining establishments Exp Not Re. Call
1-888-601-4861

ADOPTION 866-633-0397 Unplanned
Pregnancy? Provide your baby with
a loving, financially secure family.
Living/Medical/Counseling expenses
paid. Social worker on staff. Call
compassionate attorney Lauren Fein-
gold (FL Bar#0958107) 24/7

ADOPTION 888-812-3678 All Expens-
es Paid. Choose a Loving, Financially
Secure family for your child 24 Hrs 7
Days Caring & Confidential. Attor-
ney Amy Hickman. (Lic. #832340)

*DIVORCE* BANKRUPTCY Starting
at $65 *1 Signature Divorce *Missing
Spouse Divorce "We Come to you!"
1-888-705-7221 Since1992

Pregnant? Considering Adoption? A
childless, successful woman seeks
to adopt & needs your help! Finan-
cially secure. Expenses Paid. Call
Margie or Adam. 1-800-790-5260
FL.Bar#0150789

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOP-
TION? Talk with caring adoption
expert. You choose from families na-
tionwide. Living Expenses Paid. Call
24/7 Abby's One True Gift Adoptions.
866-413-6298

WANTED 20 Homes To showcase our
Solar Products and Lifetime Exterior
Paint. Call to see if your home qualifies.
CRC016377 CVC056656 1-877-
292-3120

AIRLINE MECHANIC Train for high
paying Aviation Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if qualified Job
placement assistance. Call Aviation
Institute of Maintenance 866-314-6283

AVIATION MAINTENANCE/AVIONICS
Graduate in 14 Months. FAA Approved;
financial aid if qualified. Job placement
assistance. Call National Aviation
Academy Today! 1-800-659-2080 or
NAA.edu

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast Afford-
able& Accredited PACE Program Free
Brochure. Call Now! 1-800-532-6546
ext. 16 www.continentalacademy.
com

BURIED IN CREDIT CARD DEBT Over
$10,000. We can save you thousands of
dollars. Call Credit Card Relief for your
Free Consultation: 1-866-640-3315

Boats; 1000's of boats for sale www.
floridamariner.com ; reaching 6 million
homes weekly throughout Florida. 800-
388-9307, tide charts, broker profiles,
fishing captains, dockside dining and
more.

METAL ROOFING. 40 yr Warranty -
Buy direct from manufacturer. 30/colors
in stock, all accessories. Quick turn
around. Delivery available. Gulf Coast
Supply & Mfg. 888-393-0335 www.
GulfCoastSupply.com

ASSEMBLE MAGNETS & CRAFTS
from Home! Year-round Work! Ex-
cellent Pay! No Experience! Top US
Company! Glue Gun, Painting, Jewelry,
More! Toll Free 1-866-844-5091

ATTN: COMPUTER WORK. Work
from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 Part
Time to $7,500/mo. Full Time. Training
provided. www.KTPGIobal.com or call
1-888-304-2847

Donate your Car Truck or Boat to
HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND Free 3
Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free
Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of.
1-866-905-3801


THE SHOPPER 13B

CPF STATEWIDE
$$ EARN EXTRA INCOME $$ Working
from home. $5.00 for every envelope
Processed with our sales brochures.
Guaranteed!! Free Information. 1-800-
210-2686 or visit: www.funsimplework.
com

SWIM SPA LOADED! 3 Pumps, LED
lighting, OZ Cover, Never used $8995.
Hot Tub, Seats 6 5HP, 220, 28 jets.
$2695. Can deliver. 727-851-3217

HOMEWORKERS NEEDED!!! Full &
Part Time Positions Will Train On-Line
Data Entry, Typing Work, E-mail Read-
ing, PC/Clerical Work, Homemailers,
Assembling Products. Hurry, Spots Go
Fast! www.Jobs WorkAtHome.com

$1,380 weekly guaranteed. Stuff en-
velopes at home. Full/part-time. No
experience necessary. Deposit required-
refundable. 1- 888-247-2057 binvest-
mentsinc@yahoo.com

BUY N.C. MOUNTAIN LAND NOW! Low-
est prices ever! Bryson City 2.5acres,
spectacular views, paved road. High
altitude. Easily accessible, secluded.
$45,000. Owner financing: 1-800-810-
1590 www.wildcatknob.com

Cheap Apartments! From $500 per
month. Thousands of apartments avail-
able at discounted rates. Call 1-800-
524-9780 Now!

GEORGIA BLUE RIDGE MOUN-
TAINS-10 ACRES w/1000ft. on trout
stream, Cutcane Road paved frontage,
county water, building ready, rare find,
$109,000. Owner financing, E-Z terms/
low down. 706-364-4200

GEORGIA ESCAPE THE STORMS &
HEAT! Beautiful weather, year round.
Low Taxes. Homesites/Mini-Farms:
1.25acres to 20acs. from $3750/acre.
Near Augusta & Macon. Owner Financ-
ing from $199/mo. 706-364-4200

GEORGIA MOUNTAINS NORTH In-
come producing 3 log cabins on 4.5ac.
Creekside. Fully furnished, Recently
appraised. All for $495,000 or will sell
separately. 706-253-8000 Agents
welcome.

Hard to find B4 zoning property for sale
or lease on Highway 484 in South Marion
County. 4,700 sq footbuilding on 1 acre.
Great for church, clubs, meetings, etc.
For info contact Realtor Anthony White,
352-547- 3137.

No Credit Bad Credit No Problem
Brand New Manufactured Home in a
Gated Community under $500/month.
Open Mon-Sat.! Call Today 888-841-
6091

SELL/RENT YOUR TIMESHARE FOR
CASH!!! Our Guaranteed Services will
Sell/Rent Your Unused Timeshare for
Cash! Over $78 Million Dollars offered
in 2009! www.sellatimeshare.com;
877-554-2430

SOUTH CAROLINA 2 acres in the
Santee Cooper Lake area. Near 1-95.
Beautiful building tract $19,900. Ask
about E-Z financing, low payments. Call
owner: 803-473-7125

TENNESSEE MTNS 435ac w/timber,
creek, river, natural gas well, springs,
city water, utilities, trails $1800/ac. 2
tracts possible. Good hunting. No state
income tax. www. tnwithaview.com
1-888-836-8439

TENNESSEE OBEY RIVER. By Own-
er, 5 Acres. River front, deep swimming
area. $19,900. Owner financing. Call
931-839-6141

VIRGINIA MOUNTAINS GALAX AREA
6 acres on river, great fishing, private,
reduced! $59,500. Call owner now!
1-866-275-0442

HIP REPLACEMENT PROBLEM? Pain,
mobility loss from hip surgery with
Zimmer Durom Cup, Depuy ASR/XL.
Receive minimum $50,000 compen-
sation or no fee. FREE Consultation
1-888-GARRETT.

VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg!! 40
Pills + 4 FREE for only $99. #1 Male
Enhancement, Discreet Shipping. Save
$500 Buy The Blue Pill Now! 1-888-
777-9242

GEORGIA MOUNTAINS NORTH In-
come producing 3 log cabins on 4.5ac.
Creekside. Fully furnished, Recently
appraised. All for $495,000 or will sell
separately. 706-253-8000 www.npg-
brokers.com

Movie Extras To Stand In The Back-
ground For a Major Film Production.
Experience Not Required, Earn Up
To $200/Day. All Looks Needed. Call
888/664-5279.






14B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


BUSINESS & TRADE DIRECTORY


ENT. INC.
Lic. #CMC056816
AIR-CONDITIONING,
HEATING & REFRIGERATION
Complete Sales, Service,
Installation & Repair
Amana and Senior
Trane Dealer Discount
John R. Bowman, Jr., Owner
(813) 633-2703























PAINTING











WALLPAPERING
Timothy Sutton, LC




29 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN OHIO
NOW SERVING FLORIDA
LICENSED BONDED INSURED
813-727-1013
LIC. #PA2809










Residential Commercial
New Roofs Re-Roofs Tile
Tile Repairs Hot Tar/Flat Decks
Ventilation Leaks Repaired
FREE Estimates Financing valuable
24 Hr. Emergency Service
SSenior Citizen Discount
We Carry Workers' Camp .
_ For Your Protection EB
Lic #CCC1325993 Bonded Insured -




Save 10%o on
web advertising
Call your advertising
representative today for
more information
(813) 645-3111
www.ObserverNews.net


Complete Sales Service
Repair* Installation
SERVICING ALL MAKES AND MODELS
24 Hour Service Financing Available
Lic. #CAC1815928


S^ Sen iomfiltary




SELF ARREST BONDS
COURT DATES 664-0056
WARRANT CHECKS
BIG JOHN'S
BAIL BONDS
641-8400
FAMILY BONDSMAN
STATE FEDERAL
24 HOUR SERVICE
JOHN L. VATH
2100 Orient Road Tampa, FL. 33619
Fax: (813) 628-8739



Need Work Done
Around the House?

Turn to PHIL
Your Handy Person!
RIVERSIDE GOLF & BOATING CLUB RESIDENT
www.mrhandyperson.com


APOLLO BEACH
RUSKIN
SUN CITY
CENTER





25+ Years Experience
zInsured
813-649-1418
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net


Proudly Serving: Sun City Center
Ruskin Apollo Beach Riverview
and surrounding areas
Member SCC Chamber of Commerce




CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE
OFFICE 813-333-6320
CELL 813-777-9808
Frank Shaft
FL Certified Roofing Contractor
CCC# 1327713
www.ApolloBeachRoofing.com
PalmTreeRoofing@gmail.com
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverNews.net


ACIR EMl PA /A II
SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS
Residential and Light Commercial
Family Owned & Operated
No Revolving Technicians
Quality Service* Sales,
Installation, .
Most Replacement
Parts on Hand
1(813)263-6503



S RELIABLE

* Ceiling Fans
SOutlets
" Lighting
SPanel Upgrades
* FREE Estimates

813-645-7000
Listed with Sterling Management and
Sun City Center Community Association
Lic. #EC13002936


















A&J
Hares
35 Y. Plumbing
Experience
Service & Repairs
Repipes *Water Heaters
New Construction
Remodels & Additions


All Types of Roofing
New Roofs & Repairs
SShingle Tile Metal Hot Tar
No Job too big or too small!
SERVING SINCE 1973
Ruskin Sun City Center Kings
Point Apollo Beach Riverview
"ALL MY CUSTOMERS ARE DRY
FRIENDS WHEN QUALITY COUNTS"


'SunCSCenter
"F ChkberMeCnber
P.O. Box 551 Ruskin, FL 33570
www.customroofing.us
Bonded & Insured Lic. #CCC1326907





*No project over $1000.
No electrical, gas, or
plumbing, and nothing
structural.


Mary Ann Wilhelm
Ownedr/Director
#CAC 1814397

Wilhelm "or
Wilhelm 2Service

-' 641-1811
FACITORY
AHOZED R 802 4th St S.W.
gjalI (Off College Ave. West)
Ruskin, Florida
Turn to the Experts
www.wilhelmac.com









L CR SERVICE
LICENSED UPGRADES
BONDED ALL TYPES
INSURED OF WIRING
ER00126636 RENOVATIONS
Over 30 Years Experience
SECURITY LIGHTS CEILING FANS
SSWITCHES & OUTLETS SPAS & DOCKS
Limited Senior Citizen Discount
of 10% expires 10/31/10


F- LkjIF


145 21st ST. N.W. RUSKIN



Positive

news
for positive people.


R&D Septic Inc.
Complete Septic System
* New/Repair
*Fill Dirt
*Pump Repair
*SiteWork




www.ObserverNews.net
www.ObserverN ews.net
www.ObserverN ews.net




SUN VIEW
WINDOW CLEANING, INC.
SExceptionalService*
Registered at Kings Point
Member of:
SCC Community Association
Apollo Beach Chamber
813-944-8478
Licensed *Insured *Bonded


Let someone
else do that
heavy work.

Look in the
Business & Trade
Directory


Doug's Hourly Muscle
Movers & Packers
'Musce with Hustle'
(813) 887-3036
(941) 722-8315
(727) 545-9332
20% OFF st hour ofwork
FREE Boxes
with packing service
FREE use of 10 Wardrobe
Boxes on day ofmove



PAuL WOOD PLUMBING, Inc.
State Certified Plumbing Contractor
#CFC1427697
Residential
Commercial
Certified Backflows
Stoppages
Service and Repairs
FREE Estimates 24-Hour Service
Licensed Bonded Insured
(813) 641-1387





NOW OPEN
4l- LOOKING
y- ^ ~FOR EXTRA
STORAGE
SPACE
FOR YOUR...
^ R.V.
BOAT
645-5222 CAMPER
cell: 240-2049 ETC.
1501 33rd St. SE ANY SIZE
Ruskin, FL 33570


F0*



Wishing you 100%
Enjoyment ofyour
Clean Windows
Lic./Ins./Reg. KP+SCC CA
Serv. 5CC since 2006
Residential Specialist
Pete Wincle, LLC
(813) 633-2888


B FREE Estimates
Lic. #CFC057969
A+Rating Bonded*Insured


U.


OCTOBER 7, 2010


JOHN493-2861





OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 15B


FallI SIilU 1 V"

2011 SONATA !
.All Nwt & RdtlIiizned!


Stylish Spacious
$4000 Less Than Accord
Unsurpassed amount of
standard safety features.


H.'yf'g1. T eI tli nt
^^^^^^STSW tT'W~ i T W'TT~~


THIS EEK!
THIPs WEK!


EEII


5 Star Safety Ratings


Affordable & Fuel Effi t
Hyundais get up toQ0 MPG's*

T.- 2m29 P ........


0Guaranteeiraowanc)


diga


e HYunoRI
Assurance


$4000 LEASE 36 Rugged SALE f
Less Than FOR LEH Capability,
RAV4" LASE Comfort & Style


-Ii^LL r-1-


#6i422


LBE Bl 2 *UY Revolution In Design, LEASE O N
FOR Perforance LEA&1SE


Performance, LEASE @fD flA) 35
Technology, FOR
Safety & Quality $3EASET


We will beat any tt
w/Pricf an e other Hyundai dealer
..... or pay you
All prices are plus tax, tag and are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. Lease down payment requirement: '10 Elantra- $3495 Elantra Touring $1999, Genesis Coupe $2199, '11 Sonata $3500,'10 Tucson $2499, '10 Genesis Sedan $3799. All offers are with app ed credit
and some cannot be combined. *Expected range for most drivers, your actual mileage may vry depending on how you drive and maintain your vehicle. ** On the Accent. As listed on Monroney sticker Specil AP offers on select models, see us for details. Photos are for illustration purposes only. advertised vehicles subject to prior sale.
o av-nl -hieet tnoehanogewithnllt nnti tfco e th NTntnr inane (nnarahle Modnel, tt Mt nr p ent igedl by-r nrler rfne eeiter l Hy taiDeale o L n llnn&nt A ipet ollaranteetdtrade allnwanee eannnth e enah inel annthranff-r, nfferonnly onnodnn new ehiele


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2010 MANTRA
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OCTOBER 7, 2010


2010 CCEN
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Affordble & uel Eficien


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16B OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


IDiaingioJ)
BeM w" f 1


OCTOBER 7, 2010


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Dangers of Not Investigating and Treating Your Leg Veins: Failure of vein valves causes problems that are
more than just uncomfortable or unsightly. They can lead to problems that are dangerous, even life-threatening. These
can now be very effectively averted by modern vein treatment a simple ultrasound investigation and a simple, painless
office treatment! Delay will only allow your legs to worsen. Once valves have failed, the condition of the legs gradually
and progressively deteriorates.
Clots: Varicose veins are prone to inflammation with clots, i.e. phlebitis. The risk of deep vein clots is increased 400%
with superficial phlebitis. These are the type of blood clots that can kill you!
Cellulitus: Stasis Dermatitis is more than unsightly and uncomfortable. It is dangerous. The sickened skin can become
infected and lead to life threatening sepsis.
Medication Side Effects: Swollen ankles, night cramps/Charley horses, "secondary" restless leg symptoms, venous
stasis eczema and venous ulcers, are all often treated with temporizing, palliative medications. A lady with swollen
ankles from failed vein valves (and not from congestive failure or renal failure), does not have to increase her risk of
stroke and problems of potassium and other electrolyte loss by taking diuretics (eg. Lasix). She often only needs to have
a simple treatment to fix her veins. Similarly, risking, cramp meds, quinine, Requip, sleep medications, prolonged topical
steroids, and prolonged wound care medications and others for the conditions above is, with modern vein treatments,
often unnecessary and foolish.
The Domino Effect: People whose legs hurt or feel extraordinarily "tired" are not as active. This inactivity leads to
increased weight and decreased cardiovascular health. People with nocturnal cramping (night cramps, Charley horses
and a variety of "secondary" restless symptoms) are often sleep deprived. People with unsightly legs often have a dimin-
ished quality of life...they no longer go to the beach and they stay inside more because walking about all covered up in
Florida heat is difficult.
Deterioration: Vein problems usually begin very gradually. Your mother or father's terrible legs began with just a few
thin spider veins perhaps and a little aching. Early detection of failed valves by ultrasound is very simple and treatment
is painless. These are key to preventing escalating future problems. Act now. This is a continually deteriorating condition
until treated...What ARE you waiting for?!
I I


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