Title: Observer news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102144/00028
 Material Information
Title: Observer news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: M&M Printing Co., Inc
Place of Publication: Ruskin, FL
Publication Date: July 29, 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102144
Volume ID: VID00028
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text






July 29, 2010
Volume 54
Sjn!lber 27


P.R.S.T STD
PAID
RUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570
PERMIT NO. 8



THE OBSERVER NEWS


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See ELMIRA'S, page 17


Early primary election voting

set to begin; absentee ballots


now available
0 By MELODY JAMES

Signaled by
k' C ~biting television
.4' advertisements
"' and fliers filling
mailboxes, the 2010
election season now is underway
for South County voters.
In the next few weeks, absentee
ballots are made available, early
voting at certain sites is scheduled
and the area's most popular can-
didates' forum will be conducted
as the traditional primary election
day fast approaches.
The traditional primary in the
current election cycle is set for
Tuesday, August 24. On this date,
all of the South County precincts
will open, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., to serve
the region's registered voters in-
terested in supporting candidates
seeking election either as Repub-
licans or Democrats. The primary
ballot also will include candidates
for non-partisan offices.
However, candidates running
under smaller party banners or as
WRIs write ins or as NPAs -
no party affiliations will appear
only on the general election ballot
in November, according to Chuck
Smith, senior policy analyst in the
Hillsborough Supervisor of Elec-
tions office.
In addition, no proposed amend-
ments are included on the primary
election ballot. The several pro-
posed issues that have generated


controversy this year such as a
possible penny sales tax increase
for transportation purposes and
potential mandated opportunity
for voter weigh-in on land use is-
sues will appear only on the gen-
eral election ballot in November.
In the weeks before the August
24 election day, though, voters can
mark either absentee ballots or
participate in early voting.
Absentee ballots became avail-
able this week and can be request-
ed by calling the Hillsborough
Supervisor of Election office or by
making the request online through
the office's website. Completed
absentee ballots can be returned by
mail or given to election personnel
at either of the two South County
early voting sites until August 21.
But, by law, absentee ballots can-
not be turned in at precincts during
the primary election process on
August 24.
Early primary voting begins
Monday, August 9, and continues
through Saturday, August 21. For
South County voters, early ballot-
ing can be done at either of two lo-
cations, the SouthShore Regional
Library on 19th Avenue and the
Riverview Library on Riverview
Drive.
Meanwhile, many local candi-
dates are polishing their remarks
to be made at the South County's
See ELECTIONS, page 6


Concentration, coordination

and confidence


INSIDE
Bryan and Marilyn Custer have
always enjoyed the water with
their family. Now, using
Sa 40-foot, sloop-rigged
Motor sailer they are
Suffering injured war
veterans and their fami-
lies afternoon or sunset cruises
around the bay.


Dondre Williams, personal
trainer and strength coach, tells
students in a summer program
at Summerfield
S Crossings Elementary
School in Riverview
that they "are what
they eat" as he and
others give a program about
avoiding obesity.


* By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@pennyfletcher.com
GIBSONTON Shana Chevil-
lot started her son Alex in USA
Goju Karate just before his fourth
birthday.
She says it helps him concen-
trate. A little more than three years
later, when Alex dons his karate
suit, so does she. She says it helps
her with her balance.
Now the two of them take les-
sons at the same time Monday
and Wednesday nights from 6:30
to 7:30 p.m. at the Gardenville
Recreation Center, 6219 Symmes
Road in Gibsonton.
The traditional karate uniform is
called a Gi, pronounced "gee" and
is designed to hold up despite be-
ing gripped, pulled or tugged. But
watching the children's and adult
classes taught at the center last
week, I didn't see any pulling or
tugging. In fact, I didn't see any
confrontational behavior at all.
Instead, I saw Sensei Jim, who
works with the adults, and Sensei
Sarah, working with the children,
leading their charges in lessons of
self-discipline, respect, self confi-
dence and coordination.
Jim and Sarah Chambers ex-
plained that the term Sensei means
"teacher" in Japanese. They use it
as a title, to help students get in-
and stay in- the right mental state
during class.
The couple is originally from
Melbourne, but has lived in South
County for about 10 years. They


Penny Fletcher Photo
Jim Chambers strikes a pose
before demonstrating a new
move in his karate class at the
Gardenville Recreation Center.
Jim and his wife Sarah teach the
class at Gardenville and also at
Riverview Recreation Center ev-
ery Monday and Wednesday.
live in Riverview and also teach at
the Riverview Recreation Center,
7807 Capitano Drive, on Tuesdays
from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
"Children can start as young as
four," Jim Chambers said, and
there is no upper age for adults.
He said the skills learned in the
sport bolster both mind and body
and help with mental and physical
See CONFIDENCE, page 26


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2 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER JULY 29, 2010

Volunteer team teaches students to avoid obesity


* By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews. net
RIVERVIEW- Summer students
at Summerfield Crossings Ele-
mentary School were treated to a
fitness program July 22 given by a
volunteer team calling itself "Fit-
ness America."
A trio with varied experience,
the team consists of Sol Fried,
James Miller, and Dondre Wil-
liams, all of whom attend the Sun
City Center Fitness Center.
Fried, 89, got the three together
after hearing a speech by First


Lady Michelle Obama promot-
ing her "Let's Move" initiative to
fight childhood obesity.
After writing to Mrs. Obama,
Fried obtained permission from
the Hillsborough County School
Board to speak to students en-
couraging them to exercise, eat
right and get fit.
As chairman of the group, he
first got support from James Mill-
er, 82, a former college president
with degrees in Education and
Psychology, and Dondre Wil-
liams, 34. Williams is a certified


professional coach and trainer who
also gives motivational talks fol-
lowing a knee injury that took him
away from a professional basket-
ball career.
"When I heard Mrs. Obama say
that obesity is the leading cause
for military service rejection, I re-
alized just how large this problem
had grown," Fried said. "I knew I
had to do something."
Starting Feb. 9 with a talk on
Good Morning America and con-
tinuing throughout the following
months, Michelle Obama has con-


centrated on her four-pillar "Let's
Move" initiative: teaching parents
about good food and nutrition; im-
proving the quality of food served
inAmerica's schools; making good
food choices more affordable; and
getting people of every age into a
pattern of daily exercise.
The group from Fitness America
passed this message, along with
their own stories, to students in lo-
cal schools. Since getting together,
they have already gone to four
elementary schools: Lopez in Sef-
fner, Doby in Apollo Beach, Gib-


sonton and Summerfield Crossings
in Riverview.
"One in three kids in our schools
is obese," said Williams, as he gave
an interesting presentation stress-
ing, "You are what you eat."
Originally from New York City,
Williams moved to this area with
his family three years ago. Besides
coaching in Sun City Center and at
the University of South Florida, he
works with people on an individual
basis and may be contacted by email
at dondre.williams@gmail.com.
See OBESITY, page 22


jittt

Postcards Mitch Traphagen Photo
According to poet John Donne, "No man is an island." But people sure do like them. Islands that is.
There's just something cool about them. Visions of palms swaying in a tropical breeze have sent armadas
out... armadaing...or whatever. Regardless, they stand as visions in our very souls. Even an island that
is most visible while crossing a bridge at 70 miles-per-hour on 1-75 does that, it seems. Such as the one
shown on the Alafia River in Gibsonton last week. Ryan Almand (thanks for writing) recognized it right
off the bat as did Richard Brady (next time I really get lost, don't be surprised if I call), Carol Philips
(great to hear from you!), Michele Dunn (I've never been but would like to. Question: did the Australian
Cattle Dogs recognize it? They sound really cool!), Betty Tanner (I didn't know it was once called Buzzard
Island thanks for writing and sharing that!), Joanne Hollywood (yep, it does have a name, it seems -
Buzzard Island! Thanks for the note!), Edward Socha (always great to hear from you, Commander! Thanks
for writing!) and Bill and Margie Galbreath (great to hear from you my friends!). This week we seem to
have proof that they just don't make things like they used to. The case in point: this large, Victorian
houseboat. Where are we this week and what the heck are we looking at? Send your best guess to
where@observernews.net or write to 210 Woodland Estates Ave., Ruskin, FL, 33570. Hey this could
be a good form of transport for our future Postcards Tour of Florida!




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Sun Hill Medical Arts Building Suite 2
Sun City Center, Florida
Call for an appointment

813-634-9260
www.erasersinc.com


Penny Fletcher photo
S Dondre Williams, personal trainer and strength coach, tells students
- in a summer program at Summerfield Crossings Elementary School
in Riverview that they "are what they eat" as he and others give a
program about avoiding obesity.


*a m -- m- m m CLIP&SAVE m m m m -
' I



SNTO WERS



Upcoming Events!

August 12 10:00- 11:00 a.m.: Elder law attorney, Laurie Ohall
will discuss the importance of having basic estate planning docu-
ments in place, such as a durable power of attorney and health
care surrogate directive, and how these documents can help your
family save time and money if you become incapacitated. RSVP
prior to 8/10/10. Refreshments will be served.

August 17 2:30 3:30 p.m.: Alzheimer's Association Care-
giver Support Group. Join Katie Colwell Williams, MA, CMC
from Bayshore Geriatric Solutions, Inc. Listen to other caregiv-
er's journeys and find support and education. Visit with others
that may be experiencing similar problems; share some advice, a
laugh, or even a tear. RSVP prior to 8/15/10. Refreshments will
be served. alzheimer's association

SAugust 25 2:00 3:00 p.m.: You are cordially invited to a com-
Splimentary Wine and Cheese Social in our lovely main dining
room. RSVP prior to 8/23/10.

SAugust 26 10:00 11:00 a.m.: Join Donna Saatman, MD,
SNeurosurgeon, for an informative discussion on "The Spine."
Brought to you by South Bay Hospital. RSVP prior to 8/24/10.
Refreshments will be served.

SAugust 26 2:30 4:30 p.m.: Edmond Dubreuil MSW, RCSWI
mental health professional support group for those suffering from
Depression, loss or grief or are the caregiver of someone facing
Those issues. Pull up a chair and share with others in your situa-
Stion. RSVP prior to 8/24/10. Refreshments will be served.

SAugust 31 3:00 5:00 p.m.: "The Latest Innovations in Joint
SReplacement Surgery" by Edward Stolarski, MID, Board Certified
SOrthopedic Surgeon. Dr. Stolarski is an industry leader and de-
Sveloper of new approaches, specializing in hip and knee replace-
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813-634-3347
101 Trinity Lakes Drive Sun City Center, FL
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- ,






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 3


Hurricane Survival Planning; being a survivor rather than a victim


There is a lot we take for granted
in our everyday lives such as the
water that comes out of the spigots,
the power that lights our homes, the
roof over our heads, access to banks
and retail stores, and the coolness
and comfort from our air-condition-
ing. However, a hurricane or other
severe storm can interrupt these
services for unpredictable lengths
of time. The short periodic power
losses will be minor nuisances com-
pared to what could be the result of
a hurricane hitting our area.
Survival begins at home. Each
household should plan on being
able to survive for three days before
looking for any assistance from
your local, county, or state gov-
ernment or the Federal Emergency
Management Agency (FEMA).
There are a number of things that
you can have on hand to survive
an impending hurricane includ-
ing such supplies as food, water,
medication, fuel, lighting and cash.
You should also plan to evacuate or
seek shelter if it becomes necessary.
Know ahead of time where your
designated shelter is located before
you need it.
When a hurricane or tropical storm
is predicted to strike anywhere near
Tampa or has a projected course
to cross Hillsborough County you
should do two things immediately:
fill your car with gasoline and get
cash from a bank or automatic teller
machine (ATM). If power is lost,
none of these services will be avail-


able and these are two resources you
would eventually consume whether
a storm is approaching or not. You
should check with your Pharmacist
to see if your prescribed medica-
tions can be refilled early.
If an evacuation order was imple-
mented, what would you take, when
would you leave, where would you
go, and how would you get there?
Now is the time to determine what
to take if an evacuation order was
implemented. Important papers,
medications, cash, clothing should
top the list. Other things of value
or that cannot be replaced should
be stored in water tight containers
and placed securely in a closet or
cabinet.
The time to leave is when an
evacuation order issued. Often lo-
cal emergency management offi-
cials will issue a "voluntary evacu-
ation" advisory. Your personal
situation should influence whether
you leave when a voluntary evacua-
tion advisory is issued. If, for what-
ever reason, you should choose not
to evacuate, notify a family mem-
ber or neighbor and be sure to have
your three day's accumulation of
hurricane supplies on hand. Once
the storm hits, most likely no one
will be available to rescue you or
check on you until after it passes.
While our homes provide a sense of
security and safety, they are, none-
theless, vulnerable to the forces of
nature. If you absolutely cannot
evacuate you should go to a des-


ignated shelter rather than stay at
home.
Where you evacuate to should be
thought out ahead of the hurricane
season. You should have more than
one alternative location. Perhaps
when a storm threatens it is time
to make that visit or take that vaca-
tion that you have been putting off.
Make arrangements with family or
friends who do not live in the pro-
jected storm's path. Don't bank on
being able to make a reservation at
some distant hotel or motel, there
will be thousands of others evacuat-
ing as well. When a storm is head-
ed for Tampa, some very appeal-
ing destinations include Orlando,
Daytona, Miami Atlanta; anywhere
away from the storm.
For the most part, the majority
of evacuees will drive to their safe
haven destinations. Again don't
wait until the last minute to leave
or to fuel you car. The roads and
service stations will be overloaded
with folks in the same predicament
as you. If you cannot drive your-
self take a cab to the airport, train
depot of bus terminal. It may cost a
few dollars, but isn't your personal
safety worth it?
During periods of power outages,
keep your refrigerator and freezer
closed and open it only when you
absolutely must.
Fill your bath tub with water to
use to flush the toilet. Flush as of-
ten as necessary buy not necessarily
after every use.


Have a portable radio available in
order to keep up with the recovery
after the storm.
Keep a supply of common use
batteries on hand (AA, AAA, C and
D)
Sometimes portable wireless tele-
phones may not work but a regular
telephone wired directly to the wall
may.
If you have a golf cart, charge
the batteries early on. Remember
to check the water level in the bat-
teries.
Provide for your pet. Animals
are just as nervous during a storm


as humans. If you have a pet and
are going to a shelter, be sure it is
pet friendly. Have an animal crate
on hand to carry your pet to safety
whether you go to a shelter or evac-
uate. Don't forget to bring food and
water for Tabby or Fido.
Never use a generator indoors.
Respect storms, don't fear them.
Plan ahead and be a survivor not a
victim.

Bob Preston
The writer of this article is a Di-
saster Assistance Employee with
FEMA


Linda McCown joins Keller Williams Realty South Shore


Linda McCown has recently
joined Keller Williams Realty and
will be working from their Apollo
Beach and Sun City Center Offic-
es. Linda's prior real estate expe-
rience was primarily in the Annap-
olis, Maryland area where she was
the recipient of numerous awards
and was ranked among the Top 4%
of all REALTORS nationwide.
She has been licensed and selling
in Florida for three years.
Linda said, "I have a passion
for real estate and love what I do!
My experience is with all differ-
ent types of properties and work-
ing with both Sellers and Buyers.
Although my specialty is with lux-
ury waterfront properties, historic
homes, and golf course properties,


I also enjoy helping buyers look for
their first home or buyers search-
ing for a second home to enjoy for
vacations or after retirement. My
promise to clients is professional-
ism and exemplary service in their
real estate needs."
Team Leader Gary Kaukonen
said, "Linda has attained some re-
markable awards in real estate at
the local, state, and national lev-
els, including Life Member of the
Distinguished Sales Achievement
Club and member of the presti-
gious Masters Club of Anne Ar-
undel County. She holds both the
CRS and GRI professional desig-
nations and is a member of the In-
stitute for Luxury Home Market-
ing. We are proud to have her join


the Keller Williams team. Please
contact her at 813-633-3688."
Linda said, "I think the South
Shore is a great place to live!
When not working, I enjoy golf,
cultural events, travel, and spend-
ing time with my 90 year-old fa-
ther, Wellie Ent. Dad introduced
me to this beautiful area when he
moved here over 22 years ago.
When I discovered the Keller Wil-
liams business model, I could see
how it was truly changing the real
estate industry across the country.
It's great to be joining the excep-
tional sales professionals in the
South Shore Office."
To learn more about Keller Wil-
liams Realty, call Gary Kaukonen
at 813-641-8300.


M -,
Don't Buy T'II You Compare
nt B Iy; ..A. tI .;)(r..A.t .



DOVE INTERIORS rfl CARPET ONE MOR
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Yr "-t


Last year's event drew out many teachers.

Riverview Chamber welcomes new teachers
It's back to school time once again and on Thursday, Aug. 19, from 7:30am
until 9am the Greater Riverview Chamber of Commerce along with local
businesses will be welcoming new teachers and principals to the Riverview
area with a special breakfast, event program, goodie bags and raffle prizes.
This year's event will take place at Riverview High School.
Twenty two local schools will be supported this year with an estimated
150 teachers and principals in attendance. School supplies and teacher gift
donations are greatly appreciated and may be delivered to the Riverview
Chamber office located 10520 Riverview Drive; Riverview, FL. If you need
more information or would like to be a sponsor, stop by or call the Riverview
Chamber office (813) 234-5944, e-mail !il".:.P, ci1' ic_ Chamber.com or
visit www.riverviewchamber.com.



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FAMILY DENTISTRY


Kirk D. Parrott, D.D.S

Carl E. Friedman, D.D.S.

902 N. Tamiami Trail, Ruskin, FL 33570
(Across from Sweetbay Supermarket)
NEW PATIENTS WELCOME
(813) 645-6491
Members Amencan Dental Associaton, Ronda State Dental Associaton, Ronda West Coast Dental
Association, Manatee County Dental Association and Hillsborough County Dental Association


JULY 29, 2010






4 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
Winning is not "the only thing"


Positive
Talk
By William Hodges


A saying
often attrib-
uted to Vince
Lombardi
is "Winning
isn't every-
thing; it's the
only thing."
Personally, I
don't think
even a man
with Lom-


bardi's winning record would
believe that statement, or try to
defend it as true. In the heat of a
contest, he may well have said it,
but Lombardi loved the game and
his sense of honor would not have
allowed him to put winning above
the rules and honest playing of the
game. It is the kind of rhetoric that
spurs a team on to victories that
they may well have lost if they had
relied on logical thought. How-
ever, it is the kind of rhetoric that
has contributed to the disgrace and
downfall of many men and women
who might otherwise have been
great.
Think about the damage done to
former president Richard Nixon
when his re-election committee al-
lowed the will to win to become the
only thing and the laws of the land
to go out the window. Whether you


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when they are playing in the sand
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agreed with Nixon or not, none of
us know how much he might have
been able to accomplish had his
will to win not overcome his sense
of ethics.
Oliver North and Contragate is
another prime example of a good
man, or a group of men, as some
believe, who made the will to win
the primary focus and lost sight of
the fact that whether he liked the
rules or not, this is a country of
law. These laws were enacted by
elected delegates of the people, the
very people North swore to serve
and protect. His oath was set aside
by his desire to further his beliefs
and his will to win.
In the field of sports, this "win-
ning at any cost" philosophy has
caused a great deal of heartache.
Ben Johnson, a Canadian who was
a world-class athlete in the 100
meters and a world record holder
in that event, felt so much pressure
to win and do better than he had in
the past that he broke the rules and
indulged in drugs to give him an
edge. He got the edge he wanted.
In the 1988 summer Olympics in
Seoul, he surpassed his own re-
cord and won the gold medal. But
as Paul Harvey would say, here's
the rest of the story. Ben Johnson
tested positive for those drugs. He


was stripped of his medal and the
world's record. He brought shame
on himself and the country he was
representing. What is even more
sad is that most experts in the field
believe he had an excellent chance
of winning without the drugs.
There are examples in every field
of those who put winning first and,
in time, found their wins hollow
and their lives disgraced-preach-
ers who have flaunted the word
of God to aggrandize themselves,
stock brokers who devoured their
clients' savings to make a reputa-
tion for themselves, and doctors
who falsify studies just to get writ-
ten up in a medical journal. They
all put winning ahead of every-
thing else and paid the price.
I feel certain that if I had the
privilege of talking with Vince
Lombardi today, he would clarify
his comment. I'm sure he would
agree that the minute you break
the rules you have lost, even if no
one else knows it.
Hodges is a nationally recog-
nized speaker, trainer, and syn-
dicated columnist. Hodges may
be reached at Hodges Seminars
International, PO. Box 89033,
Tampa, FL 33689-0400. Phone
813-641-0816. Web site: http://
www.BillHodges.com.


Boat ramp
closes for
improvements
The Hillsborough County Parks,
Recreation and Conservation De-
partment (PRC) will close the
Ruskin Commongood Boat Ramp
Aug. 2 for approximately six
weeks for improvements.
The project cost is $45,000 and
includes paved parking, construc-
tion of a storm water retention area
and installation of handicapped ac-
cessible parking. Funding comes
from the Florida Boating Improve-
ment Program (FBIP), where a
portion of local boat registration
fees are sent back to counties for
boating improvement projects.
Ruskin Commongood is located
at 2nd St. SW and 1st Ave. NW in
Ruskin.
While this ramp is closed boat-
ers may use the Williams Boat
Ramp located at U.S. Hwy 41 and
the Alafia River or the ramps at
E.G. Simmons Park on 19th Ave.
NW in Ruskin. Additional boat
ramps are listed on the PRC Web
site at www.hillsboroughcounty.
org/parks/parkservices/BoatWeb.
pdf
Call (813) 307-1035 for addi-
tional information concerning the
Ruskin Commongood project.


Camp Bayou "Naturally Crafting" workshops


On Friday, July 30, Camp Bayou
will continue their "Crafting Natu-
rally" workshops from 9:30- 10:30
a.m. Camp Bayou is located 3
miles south of SR 674 at the end
of 24th St. SE in Ruskin. A $5 do-
nation helps pay for craft supplies.
This is the very last session where
they will do solar dyeing. If you


ill


IH


111M


want, bring a white cotton t-shirt
by July 23 (write your name on
it with indelible laundry marker).
Held in air-conditioned classrooms
for crafters aged 5 to 95. For more
information visit: www.campbay-
ou.org, email campbayou@yahoo.
com or call 813.363.5438.


OPEN 7 DAYS
9 AM to 9 PM


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6496 US 41 NORTH
(Located in Publix Plaza)
641-0068


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charged. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has
the right to refuse pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other
service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and
within 72 hrs. of responding to the advertisement for the fee service
examination or treatment. Senior citizen discount does not apply.
727 Cortaro Dr. (Behind Burger King)
Open Mon-Fi 8:30-5:00 813-633-2636


JULY 29, 2010
Award-Winning Newspapers
THE OBSERVER NEWS
The SCC Observer &
The Riverview Current
210 Woodland Estates S.W.
Ruskin, FL 33570
813-645-3111
Fax: 813-645-4118
www.ObserverNews.net
Published Every Thursday
by M&M Printing Co., Inc. 645-4048
EDITORIAL:
Brenda Knowles ............Publisher/Editor
brenda@observernews.net
Mitch Traphagen.................Online Editor
mitch@observernews.net
Penny Fletcher..........Contributing Writer
penny@observernews.net
Melody Jameson......Contributing Writer
mj@observernews.net
Julie Ball.............. Press Releases/W riter
news@observernews.net
All press releases, news articles and
photos may be emailed to news@
observernews.net, faxed to 645-4118, or
mailed to Observer News, 210 Woodland
Estates Ave. SW, Ruskin, FL 33570
SALES:
Vilma Stillwell... Display Advertising Rep.
vilma@observernews.net
Nan Kirk........... Display Advertising Rep.
nan@observernews.net
For current rates and circulation
information visit our website at
www.ObserverNews.net
CLASSIFIED / CIRCULATION:
Beverly Kay......... Classified / Circulation
beverly@observernews.net
PRODUCTION:
Chere Simmons....Graphic Arts / Layout
chere@observemews.net
Sue Sloan .............Composition / Layout
sue@observernews.net
The views expressed by our writers are
not necesssanly shared by The Observer
News, SCC Observer, The Riverview
Current or M&M Printing Co., Inc.

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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 5


3rd annual back-to-school back-to-nature event planned


St. S.W a chdldth olwigwel



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After-school and homeschool activities
are offered
TechPlayzone, a science and technology center for young people,
offers competitive and engaging fun for after-school students and home
school students, during summer camps, and field trips. Kids are learning
and building teamwork skills while playing at TechPlayzone.
After-school clubs are $75/week. Homeschool classes are $25/
month. In addition to offering a 5-day-a-week after-school clubs and
home school classes, TechPlayzone also offers monthly classes. Classes
at TechPlayzone include typing classes, robotics classes, video game
creation classes, movie making classes, and web animation classes.
Monthly classes start at $45/month.
To enroll in any TechPlayzone classes, families can visit www.tech-
playzone.com or call (813) 684-7329. TechPlayzone is located at 13208
Boyette Road, 1/4 mile west of Bell Shoals Road.

Free summer food service available


Hillsborough County is offering
FREE nutritious lunches and after-
noon snacks at nearly 100 sites
now through Aug. 13. It is not
necessary to apply or register for

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CALL FOR FREE
INSPECTION 4
TERMITES?
ASK ABOUT TERMIDOR
BRANDON
PEST CONTROL
Phone: (813) 685-7711
Fax: (813) 685-3607
10 LocationsinFo


this program. Youth ages 18 and
younger may simply visit a partici-
pating site to eat a free lunch and/
or afternoon snack.
The Summer Food Service
Program provides a balanced
meal regardless of race, color,
sex, disability, age national ori-
gin or income during summer
vacation when school breakfasts
and lunches are not available.
This federally funded program is
operated by Hillsborough County
Family & Aging Services.
Last year, more than 623,000
free lunches and afternoon snacks
were served.
For more information, call (813)
272-5220, ext 351.


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Camp Bayou will host a morning
of hands-on fun -- getting back to
nature while getting the kids ready
for back to school from 9 a.m. to
noon on Saturday, Aug. 7. The
event is FREE, but pre-registration
is requested.
Easy online registration is pre-
ferred, click the link at www.
campbayou.org. If you don't have
internet access, call Camp Bayou
at (813) 641-8545 to make your
reservation. Be sure to leave your
name, number attending, child's
grade level and phone number. All
children must be accompanied by
an adult.
What happens on the morning
of the event? Sign in at the regis-
tration table. Kids can then start
learning at one of the fun and edu-
cational stops on the 'Big Lawn.'
After playing an eco-game, or
identifying butterflies or finding a
doodlebug, or any one of the many
activities at the nature stations,
kids receive a free school supply
item. Items given out include pens,
pencils, looseleaf paper, spiral
notebooks, and other useful items
-- while supplies last.
Raffle tickets will be drawn
on the half hour throughout the
morning for backpacks, Publix
Supermarket gift cards and more.
Don't worry about missing your
raffle number -- all winners will
be displayed on the board in the
activities area and in the regis-
tration area. You must, however,
claim your prize before 2 p.m. on
the day of the event.
Organizations planning to attend


Riverview Memorial
VFW Post #8108

Riverview Memorial VFW Post
#8108, 7504 Riverview Dr.
schedule is as follows:
Meetings: Men's Auxiliary --
1st Thursday at 7 p.m.
Ladies' Auxiliary --
2nd Tuesday at 7 p.m.
VFW Post --
2nd Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday:
Breakfast, 9 a.m. to noon, $6
Monday: Bar Bingo at 6:30 a.m.
Wednesday:
Spaghetti from 5 to 7 p.m. $6
Friday:
Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.;
Fish, $6; Combo, $7
Karaoke from 8 to ?
Saturday: Karaoke from 8 to ?
2nd Tuesday: Ladies' Auxiliary
Meeting at 7 p.m.
3rd Tuesday: VA Hospital Bingo
-- Leave Post at 6 p.m.
Every Wednesday:
$6 All-U-Can-Eat Spaghetti Dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m.
Carry-out orders available.
Call ahead -- 671-9845
1st Thursday:
Men's Auxiliary Meeting at 7 p.m.
2nd Thursday:
Post Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Every Friday:
Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.
(all you can eat fish -- $6)
Carry-out orders available.
Call ahead -- 671-9845
They also serve Chicken Tenders,
Shrimp or combos for $7.
Each dinner comes with fries,
coleslaw, and a hush puppy.
Every Saturday:
Karaoke by Jeff at 8 p.m.


Children sift through water at Camp Bayou.


include: SouthShore Regional
Library, Ruskin Branch Library,
Keep Hillsborough County Beau-
tiful, Hillsborough County Solid
Waste, Florida Department of
Forestry, Camp Bayou Nature
Center, Florida Master Natural-
ist Graduates, and Paleo Preserve
Fossil Museum.
Due to plans by Hillsborough
County Public Works to close 24th
St. SE between 14th Ave. and 21st
Ave. to do some ditch clearing,
there may be detour signs to help
guide attendees to Camp Bayou.
Gates open at 9 a.m. There will be
no early admittance.
Camp Bayou is a public/private
partnership between the non-profit
Ruskin Community Develop-
ment Foundation, Inc. (RCDF)


and Hillsborough County Parks,
Recreation and Conservation and
is located 3 miles south of S.R.
674 at the end of 24th St. SE in
Ruskin.
Camp Bayou is neither a camp-
ground nor a summer camp. It was
an RV park before the County's
ELAPP program purchased the
land, but it is now open for day use
onlyto the general public. Through
volunteers, donations, membership
and grants, the RCDF offers pre-
scheduled programs to schools,
youth groups, adult groups and
families plus it's open from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Thursday-Saturday for
passive recreational pursuits such
as wildlife watching. More in-
formation is on the web at www.
campbayou.org.


Football coach accepts check
Head football coach Bruce Gifford of the Riverview High School
Sharks accepts a check from Mike Self, S&S Tacos/Pizzas & Stuff,
with Jill Canavan, owner of Apollo Beach Cherry's and Tiger Hoffman,
president of South Shore Anglers. The trio sponsored a Blacktip Shark
Fishing Tournament on July 24, that netted the team enough money to
stencil the football field and purchase future equipment.


Ruskin VFW Post #6287

Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120 U.S. 41 N. has listed the following
weekly activities. Meetings are: American Legion on 1st Wednesday
each month; VFW and LAVFW on the 2nd Wednesday each month;
and MAVFW on the 3rd Thursday
each month.
Thursday, July 29 Bar Bingo
at 6 p.m.
Friday, July 30- Fish & Chips
from 5 to 7 p.m. Music by George
S Rabb from 7 to 10 p.m.
Saturday, July 31 American
Legion Steak Dinner from 5 to 6:30
Sp.m. Music by Calvin O from 7 to
10 p.m.
Sunday, August 1- Pub Stumpers Trivia Games from 4 to 7 p.m.
Kitchen open from 4 to 7 p.m.
Monday, August 2- Open.
Tuesday, August 3 Games in Lounge from 1 to 5 p.m. Kitchen
opens at 4:30 p.m. Bingo at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, August 4 American Legion Meeting at 7 p.m.


JULY 29, 2010






6 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Elections
* Continued from page 1
popular Balm Forum. A fixture on
the region's political landscape, the
forum is sponsored each election
season by the Balm Civic Asso-
ciation and draws candidates from
throughout the county seeking lo-
cal votes. All but two candidates
- Kevin Hagan and Josh Burgin,
both vying for county commission
seats have responded favorably
to the invitation, Marcella O'Steen,
association president, said.
This year the forum is slated for
6:30 PM, Wednesday, August 4,
in the Balm Civic Center at the
County Road 672 apex. Candidates
make three-minute presentations
and then take questions. However,
O'Steen noted, voters often learn
more about candidates and their
positions when the formalities end,
"everyone crowds around tables
laden with homemade desserts and
conversation flows freely. It's one
of our best opportunities to 'read'
our candidates," she added. On the
local level, South County voters
will have the chance to support
candidates seeking one district
county commission seat and two
county-wide commission seats. In
the district one commission slot,
currently filled by Rose Ferlita,
Republicans will be able to choose
between Sandra Murman and Trey
Rustmann. The unopposed Demo-
crat in that race will appear on the
general election ballot.
In the commission district 7 at-
large race, Republican incumbent
Mark Sharpe is being opposed by
newcomer Josh Burgin. Sharpe did
not draw any democratic opposi-
tion. Two other candidates, one a
NPA and the other seeking a WRI,
can only appear on the ballot in the
general election.
Another at large commission
seat is in play, but each of the three
candidates is running under a dif-
ferent banner and therefore will be
on the general election ballot.
Regarding county school board
seats affecting South County vot-
ers, the non-partisan district 4 seat
is being contested by Richard Bar-
tels, Jennifer Faliero, Stacy White
and Kirk Faryniasz.
Another school board seat, in


district 2, is being sought both by
Frank Hemandez and Candy O1-
son.
Primary voters also will be asked
to make choices for two non-parti-
san judicial seats which are filled
on a county-wide basis. Liz Rice
and Zilla Vasquez are contend-
ing for the Group 4 judicial seat
while Dick Greco Jr. and Lanell
Williams-Yulee want the nod for
the Group 10 seat.
At the state level, a total of 14
candidates are seeking Florida's
governorship, but most are NPAs
or running under a small party
banner without opposition and
therefore will appear only on the
November ballot.
South County primary voters
will be able to choose from Mike
McCalister, Bill McCollum and
Rick Scott on the Republican bal-
lot while Democrats will be con-
sidering either Brian P Moore or
Alex Sink.
Three Republicans want the
state's attorney general nomina-
tion: Holly Benson, Pam Bondi,
and Jeff Kottkamp. Two Demo-
crats also want the title: Dave
Aronberg and Dan Gelber.
Still on the state level, several
candidates are after the chief fi-
nancial officer's job and several
more are vying to become com-
missioner of agriculture. But, in
each case the candidates all are
running under different banners
without opposition in that party
designation and they will not be
on the primary ballot.
Legislatively speaking, no state
senate seat will appear on the pri-
mary ballot, but three state house
races will. Daryl Ervin Rouson,
April Danielle Sheffield and Mi-
chael Steinberg all are looking for
the Dem's nod in District 55. Ra-
chel V. Burgin and Marc Johnson
both want the District 56 Repub-
lican nomination. And in Dis-
trict 67, Jeremiah "JJ" Guccione,
Robert K. McCann and Greg Stu-
ebe all are looking for Republican
support.
Perhaps one of the strangest
twists in this early segment of the
2010 election season is in the race


JULY 29, 2010

Fundraiser at Palace Dinner

Theatre


for Florida's junior U.S. Senate
seat. A total of 22 candidates have
qualified, including Charlie Crist,
Florida's sitting governor. But 17
of them, including Crist, will not
appear on the primary ballot, most
because of no party designation.
The national senatorial candi-
dates on the primary ballot for Re-
publicans include William Escoff-
ery III, William Billy Kogut and
Marco Rubio. Democrats will have
more choices, from among Glenn
A. Burkett, Maurice A. Ferre, Jeff
Greene and Kendrick Meek.
Three congressional districts
will be on the primary ballot, each
of them touching the South Coun-
ty to a degree. In the largest SoCo
district, No. 12, Republicans will
be looking at John W. Lindsey Jr.
and Dennis Ross while District
12 Democrats will be considering
Lori Edwards and Doug Tudor. A
fifth candidate is running unop-
posed under the Tea Party banner.
In District 11, Eddie Adams Jr.,
Tony Buntyn, Thomas Castel-
lano and Mike Pendergast are the
GOP ballot candidates. Among the
Democrats, Tim Curtis is trying to
unseat incumbent Kathy Castor.
And, in the third congressional
district, No. 9, only Democrats
will be making choices, between
Anita de Palma and Phil Hindahl.
The GOP candidate has no opposi-
tion.
While early voting ballots and
absentees are collected and se-
cured before the traditional pri-
mary election day, their numbers
do not accrue until formal primary
count is tallied after the polls close
on election day, Smith noted.
Copyright 2010 Melody Jame-
son

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"Dessert an' a Show", an enjoy-
able evening fund-raising event to
benefit the Susan G. Komen breast
cancer cause, is on tap for Thurs-
day, August 5, at the Palace Dinner
Theater in Sun City Center.
The event has been arranged to
add to monies being raised by Ryan
Bennett, 19-year-old son of Keavie
and Sherill Bennett of Sundance,
who plans to participate in the 60-
mile, three day Susan G. Komen
walk to be held in October, begin-
ning in downtown Tampa.
Bennett said this week that to
date he has accumulated $2,400 on
the way to his $4,000 goal. While
Bennett has not personally been
touched by cancer, he lost his big
brother, Brent, about two years ago
when Brent died without warning
a short time after arriving on his
Central Florida college campus.
The younger Bennett has dedicat-
ed himself to charitable work in his
brother's name since that time.
Cost of the evening's entertain-
ment is $15 per person which cov-
ers dessert, a hot or cold beverage
and the live production "You, Me


and Our Skeletons" being staged
by Andy's One Man Show. Seat-
ing begins at 6 p.m. and the curtain
rises at 7 p.m.
Reservations can be made by
telephone at 813-938-5886.

Looking for a local
excursion?
Palmetto Historical Park
515 Tenth Avenue West
Palmetto, FL 34221
941-723-4991
Many historic buildings, includ-
ing the original post office, which
are filled with documents and ar-
tifacts. Educational programs and
tours are available upon request.
Manatee County Ag Museum
1015 Sixth Street West
Palmetto, FL 34221
941-721-2034
Exhibits which reflect the rich
agricultural heritage of Mana-
tee County are showcased at this
museum. An extensive research
library and a farm shop are also
on site, as well as a restored 1925
Model T pick-up truck.


When out in public with your dog, always
assume people don't appreciate your dog as
much as you do. Respect their rights not to
get jumped and slobbered on.
Drs. Ott, Slaughter & Waldy
-( Nearly 100years of experience
Voted Best Vet & Best Pet Services
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Provider of Free 5 j I ..I I I ... I I- l
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715 U.S. Hwy. 41 S. Ruskin 813-645-6411
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The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that
should not be based solely on advertisement. Before you
decide, ask us to send you FREE written information
about our qualifications and experience.







Zipperer's Funeral Home

Only onsite Crematory in S. Hillsborough County
Family owned and operated since 1979


Z 813-645-6130


1520 33rd St. S.E., Ruskin, FL 33570
www zipperersfuneralhome. cor Exp.8/31/10


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JULY 29, 2010










Copyrighted Material

A Syndicated Content

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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 7


Black Tip Shark Shootout winners
On June 11, Art, Mike and Maurice of Team Ruskin Bait and Tackle
won the 5th Annual Black Tip Shark Shootout with a 63 inch, 60 lb.
shark. Contestants were to weigh in at the end of the day at The Docks
restaurant.
Keep kids sun-safe at summer camp


Without proper sun protection,
a fun summer at camp can lead
to painful sunburns, premature
skin aging and skin cancer. Just
one severe sunburn in childhood
doubles the chances of developing
melanoma later in life.
Fi ci than one-third of chil-
dren between the ages of eight and
eleven wear sunscreen," said Perry
Robins, MD, President of The Skin
Cancer Foundation. "Parents need
to teach children from an early age
how to be sun-safe and reduce their
risk of skin cancer."
There are many things parents
can do to keep their kids sun-safe
at summer camp. You may want to
ask:
Are the camp counselors trained
in sun safety?
Are outdoor activities scheduled
in the early morning or late after-
noon? Ultraviolet (UV) rays are
most intense from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Are there adequate places for
campers to seek shade during out-
door activities?
Parents should also prepare their
children before they leave for camp
with a sun safety lesson, including
how to use sunscreen. An SPF 15+
sunscreen (water resistant formulas
are especially good) should be used
regularly. Apply 1 ounce (2 table-
spoons) of sunscreen to all exposed
areas, 30 minutes before going out-
side. Reapply every 2 hours and
right after swimming or sweating
heavily.
Remind children to cover those


Join us for a cup of coffee...

and a second opinion.


easy to miss
spots, such as the -.
back of ears and
neck, as well as
the tops of feet
and hands.
Parents should
also make sure
that children
know how to
cover up with sun-protective cloth-
ing. Ideal sun-safe clothing in-
cludes long-sleeved shirts and long
pants. Denim clothing is especially
protective. But since campers typi-
cally wear only t-shirts and shorts,
they should take some extra precau-
tions.
Wear t-shirts with a dense weave
in dark or bright colors.
If they won't wear a wide-
brimmed hat, a baseball cap is
better than nothing.
Wear UV-blocking sunglasses to
protect their eyes and the sensitive
skin that surrounds them.
With proper guidance, children
can learn to protect themselves and
enjoy summer fun without sacrific-
ing the health of their skin.The Skin
Cancer Foundation is the only glob-
al organization solely devoted to the
prevention, detection and treatment
of skin cancer.The mission of the
Foundation is to decrease the inci-
dence of skin cancer through pub-
lic and professional education and
research.
For more information, visit www.
SkinCancer.org.


-LL
FARG


During volatile and confusing markets, we understand that even
the most patient investors may come to question the wisdom of the
investment plan they've been following. We'd like to help and we
can start by offering a cup of coffee and a second opinion.

By appointment, you're welcome to come in and talk with us about
your investment portfolio. If we think your investments continue
to be well-suited to your long-term goals in spite of the current
market turmoil we'll gladly tell you so, and send you on your
way. If, on the other hand, we think some of your investments no
longer fit with your goals, we'll explain why, in plain English. And,
if you like, we'll recommend some alternatives.

Either way, the coffee is on us. For a free consultation, please
contact us and let us know if you prefer milk or cream. Togetherwe'llgofar

-1ANI- T


Richard C. Schneider
Associate Vice President Investments
1701 Rickenbacker Drive, Suite Al
Sun City Center, FL 33573
813-634-9214 800-365-1595
richard.schneider@wellsfargoadvisors.com


I Investment and Insurance Products: > NOTFDIC Insured > NO Bank Guarantee > MAY LoseValue
Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, Member SIPC, is a registered broker-dealer and a separate non-bank affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company.
2009 Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC. All rights reserved. 0809-4437 [79507-v1] A1434


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8 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


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INSTANT PAYMENT
for Accumulations, Collections, Estates
SILVER COINS PAYING TOP DOLLAR 11.00 per dollar


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III


II1.


1964 & earlier:
Halves ................................ 5 50 & up
S Quarters................................s2.15 & up
Dim es ..........................1....... 10 & up
1965 1969:
Halves ..........................1.50 per coin


Silver Dollars:
1878-1904 ............................. 14.00 & up
1921-1935 .............................. 15.00 & up
UNC, new rolls 1922-1925....... 300 & up
UNC, new rolls 1878-1904....... 550 & up
Fine plus or better. Huge Premiums For
Uncirculated Rolls or Bags.


URGENTLY NEEDED


WE BUY ALL FORMS OF GOLD & COINS
* School Rings U.S. Gold Coins:
* Jewelry t $1 to $20 ..................125 to $2,000
* Broken Jewelry 1795-1833 ..........5,000 to $40,000
* Chains K-Rands
* Bracelets Eagles
* Charms Gold Pesos
* Earrings (single or pairs) Maple Leaf
* Gold Watches (pocket or wrist) Pandas
* Dental Gold Gold Bars
* Wedding Bands Industrial Gold & Platinum


STERLING SILVER (i si
* Sterling Silver Bars .925 4
* .999 Silver Bars W
* Trays
* Sterling Flatware
* Candlesticks
* Tea Sets
* Jewelry
* Franklin Mint Sets Y l.i
* Danbury Mint Sets ,n.h


"We would like to extend a warm Thank You to
the many hundreds of residents from the Sun City
Center area whose trust and loyalty make our
continuing business in Sun City Center
ajoy and a privilege." -Paul and Bill /


'Sun State Collectibles 813-731-82814
Buying Rare Coins and Jewelry for Over 30 Years! Main Office
LIf you can't come to us...and your collection warrants...we'll come to you!


JULY 29, 2010

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JULY 29, 2010

Stone Crabs of Florida


While on a leisurely vacation on
Longboat Key I had the opportu-
nity to par-
ticipate in
some wild-
life view-
ing. Not
only were
there aquat-
Saturation ic species
Point to observe,
By Karey Burek but birds
galore--
starting with
a group of Roseate Spoonbills,
one of my favorites! From where
we were staying, it was just a short
stroll to some docks nestled in
shallower water. This enabled us
to see what was going on just be-
low our feet.
There were schools and schools
of what looked like thousands of


mosquito fish that vibrated along
the surface of the water, creating
ripples wherever they went. Her-
ons and egrets hung over the water
from mangrove branches waiting
to stealthily snatch the tiny fish
for their dinner. Just below the
surface and attached to part of the
dock were some oysters and upon
further observation, my dad and
brother pointed out a cool looking
crab that was working hard to get
inside some of the oyster shells.
This particular crab had stripes
on its legs and some massive look-
ing claws that gave this predator
the strength to snap open some of
the shells. The crab climbed on
top of the oyster and pushed down
with its claws and then got below
the oyster and yanked on it, easing
the shell open. This crab seemed
to know exactly what method to


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 9
Sun safety for drivers: new study links
skin cancers on left side with driving


use to get to its prey by using the
claws as its tools.
The large claws were a tell tale
sign that this was a Florida stone
crab, a delicacy in some parts of
the state. The claws are where the
meat is and from what I under-
stand the claws are harvested and
the crab is released back into the
ocean sans one claw. This particu-
lar species has two types of claws,
the larger is called the "crusher"
and the smaller is aptly named
the "pincer." The "crusher" claw
is harvested for consumption by
humans; however, the claw grows
back to its normal size within a
year.
Stone crabs will even drop a
claw if they are caught in tight
spaces or are attacked by a preda-
tor, much like some lizard species
do with their tails. This creates a
diversion and hopefully allows the
crab to get to a hiding spot away
from any danger. Did you know
that crabs can be either right or left
handed? If the crusher claw is on
the right, the crab is right-handed,
if it's on the left it is left-handed;
interesting fact I found while do-
ing research on crab species of
Florida.


A recent study from the St. Louis
University Medical School re-
vealed that nearly 53 percent of
skin cancers in the US occur on the
left, or drivers' side of the body.
Researchers believe the increase
in left-sided skin cancers may be
from exposure to UV (ultraviolet)
radiation while driving. With ap-
proximately 208 million licensed
drivers in the US, people need to
take precautions wherever they
can.
"People may be surprised to
learn that car windows don't pro-
vide complete sun protection," said
Perry Robins, MD, president of
The Skin Cancer Foundation. "Ul-
traviolet (UV) radiation reaches us
in the form of shortwave UVB and
long-wave UVA rays, but glass
blocks only UVB effectively."
Road trips make great summer
vacations, and they can be enjoyed
safely as long as people take pre-
cautions. The Skin Cancer Foun-
dation recommends the following
ways to protect your skin, particu-
larly when spending extended time
in the car.
Treat Your Vehicle to Window
Film
The sun's ultraviolet radiation
is associated with most cases of
skin cancer, which will affect one
in five Americans over a lifetime.
Although car windshields are par-
tially treated to filter out UVA, the
side windows let in about 63 per-
cent of the sun's UVA radiation;
rear windows are also unprotect-


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ed, leaving back seat passengers
exposed. There is, however, a so-
lution. Transparent window film
screens out almost 100 percent
of UVB and UVA without reduc-
ing visibility, and is available in
all 50 states. If you have window
film installed, remember that it
protects you only when the win-
dows are closed. When shopping
for window film, be sure to check
if the product has The Skin Cancer
Foundation's Seal of Recommen-
dation.
Keep Sunscreen in the Car
For those without window film,
sunscreen should be on hand for
quick reapplication during long
drives. The Skin Cancer Founda-
tion recommends reapplying every
two hours. Look for one with an
SPF of 15+ and some combination
of the following UVA-blocking in-
gredients: avobenzone, ecamsule,
oxybenzone, titanium dioxide, and
zinc oxide.
Wear Protective Sunglasses
UV-blocking sunglasses are one
of the strongest defenses against
eye and eyelid damage. For proper
protection, sunglasses should have
the ability to absorb and block 99
to 100 percent of both UVA and
UVB light. Wraparound styles with
a comfortable, close fit and UV-
protective side shields are ideal.
Polarized lenses to eliminate glare
are especially good when driving.
Also look to see if the glasses meet
ANSI and/or ISO standards for
traffic signal recognition, which
means that the lenses permit good
color recognition, especially for
tasks such as discriminating red
from green traffic signals.
Skip the Sunroof, Skip the
Convertible
Drivers' heads and necks receive
the most UV exposure, so it's no
surprise that the St. Louis Uni-
versity research team found over
82 percent of skin cancers on the
patients' heads or necks. A solid,
closed roof is your best bet. If
you have a sunroof or a convert-
ible top, wear a hat, preferably a
wide-brimmed one (3" or greater
all around). At the very least, be
sure to apply sunscreen to exposed
areas of the face, neck and scalp.
Keep a hat in the car, along with
your sunscreen and UV-blocking
sunglasses and you'll have a sun
protection travel kit to see you
safely to your destination.
About The Skin Cancer Founda-
tion
The Skin Cancer Foundation is
the only global organization solely
devoted to the prevention, detec-
tion and treatment of skin cancer.
The mission of the Foundation is
to decrease the incidence of skin
cancer through public and profes-
sional education and research. For
more information, visit, www.Sk-
inCancer.org.

KP ladies 9 hole
league
Game: Best Ball
Played 7 June 2010

Team Winner with 37
Karen Bergmoser
Lorraine Rings


A stone crab pries open oysters.






10 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
Nominations sought for 2010 Moral
Courage Award
They've questioned author- The Hillsborough County Citi-
ity and rejected the status quo. zens Advisory Committee will
The past winners of Hillsborough review nominations and recom-
County's Moral Courage Award mend a finalist to the Hillsborough
have demonstrated exceptional County Commission. The Com-
ethical behavior and moral cour- mission will then select an award
age, and nominations are now be- recipient, and recognize this indi-
ing accepted to select a 2010 re- vidual or group at a future awards
cipient to add to the distinguished ceremony.
list of honorees. The deadline to Commissioners created the
submit a nomination is Friday, Moral Courage Award in 1992 to
Aug. 20, 5 p.m. recognize individuals and groups
Anyone may submit a nomina- who have courageously chal-
tion. All Hillsborough County all lenged government actions for the
residents individuals and groups betterment of the county and its
- are eligible to receive the award, residents, and demonstrated the
Nomination applications for the willingness to take a moral or ethi-
2010 Moral Courage Award are cal stand against decisions of gov-
available at www.hillsborough- ernment.
county.org/bocc Past award recipients include
(click on "Special Awards," then a staunch Sun City Center resi-
click on "Moral Courage Award"). dent advocate, a local government
Nominations should be submitted whistleblower and a civic group
by: email to jenkinsad@hillsbor- that protested against the installa-
oughcounty.org; fax to 813-276- tion of giant power poles in their
8495; mail to Hillsborough County neighborhood.
Communications Department For the complete list of past
Re: Moral Courage Award award recipients, visit www.hills-
P.O. Box 1110 boroughcounty.org/bocc
Tampa, FL 33601


Think globally,
Volunteers are needed to spend a
day at the beach on Sept. 25 for the
25th Annual International Coastal
Cleanup in Hillsborough County.
The International Coastal Clean-
up is the world's largest single-day
volunteer effort to help protect the
ocean and its wildlife. Each year
nearly a half a million volunteers
around the world spend a few
hours removing trash and debris
from beaches, lakes, rivers and
other waterways.
Last year, more than 3,100 vol-
unteers coordinated by Keep Hills-
borough County Beautiful cleaned
110 miles and 435 acres of shore-
line and collected almost 62,000
pounds of trash and 6,495 pounds
of recyclables in Hillsborough
County alone. Volunteers also
found birds and fish entangled in
fishing line.
"Our ocean is sick, and our ac-
tions have made it so. We simply
cannot continue to put our trash in
the ocean. The evidence turns up
every day in dead and injured ma-
rine life, littered beaches that dis-
courage tourists, and choked ocean
ecosystems," said Vikki Spruill,
president and CEO of Ocean Con-
servancy.
Call elder helpline
for support
The West Central Florida Area
Agency on Aging's Elder Help-
line offers support for the growing
numbers of caregivers and their
aging parents.
The Elder Helpline provides
information for older adults and
their caregivers by helping call-
ers make informed decisions about
available assistance. It is the start-
ing point in getting connected with
programs or services that can meet
the needs of the older adult or
caregiver. For more information,
please contact: (800) 96Elder or
(800) 963-5337.

Kings Point Ladies
18-Hole League
June 7 Game: Points
A Flt.
1st Rosa Gerry Plus 3
2nd(tie) Lindy Langlois, Lor-
raine Napier Plus 1
B Flt.
Ist(tie) Lorraine Fritzel, Col-
leen Walker Plus 2
2nd(tie) Gladys Lowrie, Rose
Riccardi Plus 1


act locally


According to the data accumu-
lated by the Ocean Conservancy,
trash in the ocean kills more than
one million seabirds and 100,000
marine mammals and turtles each
year through entanglement and in-
gestion. In 2008, the Ocean Con-
servancy reported that volunteers
found 443 ocean animals entan-
gled in fishing line, plastic bags,
six-pack holders and rope.
The event will take place from 8
a.m. to noon at locations through-
out Hillsborough County. A list of
these locations along with a regis-
tration form can be found at www.
khcbonline.org closer to the event
date. For more information on vol-
unteering, becoming a site captain
or sponsoring the event, contact
KHCB at (813) 960-5121.

The Self-Sustaining
Garden
Experienced gardeners know
this well, but the rest of us may
need a small
reminder.
While tend-
ing to your
plants in this
growing sea-
son, remem-
ber to allow
some plants/flowers to go to seed in
order to collect the seeds for next
year. Like a botanist, you can pick
and choose what grows best where
and tailor your garden to you. Re-
member to mark the seed packages,
and store them in a cool, dry and
dark place. Then, in the midst of
winter, start your babies growing.
What a treat! Also remember that
towards the end of summer, most
places put supplies on sale, which
you might need for your growing
project. Your garden can be almost
self-sustaining. Enjoy!
Cristina
Want to live better on the money you
already make? Visit com/index, cfm?TiIpsSyn> to find hun-
dreds of articles to help you stretch
your day and your dollar! Copyright
2010 Dollar Stretcher, Inc.


JULY 29, 2010
Caloosa CC Ladies
18-Hole Group
June 30 Net Best Ball Winners
Flight 1
1st Mary Jane Stutz net 75
Flight 2
1st Jan Harding net 72
2nd Karen Buono 74
3rd Lolita Johnson 76
Flight 3
1st Jean Atkins net 67
2nd(tie) Dale Nolta 77
Jerry Ramsey 77
3rd Lucille Lanese 78
Flight 4
1st Vera Thompson net 73
2nd Janis Ingram 81


Winner of Jimmy Peters Photo Print
Diane Ingram (left), Coordinator of the Manatee County Agricultural
Museum presents "Cracker Pack," a photo by local photographer Jimmy
Peters to Robyn Fergeson (right) of Sarasota. Mrs. Fergeson was the
winner of the photo through a drawing held during Jimmy Peters' Florida
Cowboy Photography Collection on exhibit at the museum. The museum
is located at 515 10th Avenue West (Old Main Street) in Palmetto.

South Shore 9/12 chapter meeting


The Tampa 9-12 Project "Orga-
nize-Educate-Mobilize" local South
Shore Chapter meets on Monday
nights from 7pm -8:30pm at Cen-
tury 21 Beggins Real Estate, 6542
US Hwy 41, Apollo Beach. Meet
guest speakers and candidates. The
group is a safe haven for patriots to
meet and discuss their views and


take action. The group is organized
by people who have core values,
principles, and a sincere belief
that our country's greatness stems
from the Constitution. Visit www.
tampa912.org for the 9 Principles,
12 Values, and more information
about the organization.


complimentary admission ana ugnt reJresnments.
CONTACT BELINDA YOCUM AT
(813) 633-4340 FOR MORE INFORMATION.


HOMEWOOD
RESIDENCE
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BROOKDALE SENIOR LIVING


Attn. Homeowners: New
special program just announced
that will buy back your old
windows for $100 trade-in plus
get up to $1500! It has recently
been announced by the IRS that
the "Emergency Economic
Stabilization Act of 2008"
has been continued into 2010.
This bill extended tax credits
for energy efficient home im-
provements (windows, storm
windows & doors). Work must
be "placed into service" while
rebates are still available. You
could be eligible for up to
$1500 in Federal Tax Credit.
All consultations are free.
WeatherTite Windows, an-
nounced a great savings plan.
Their $0 down and no interest
programs are great for homeown-
ers who are in need of energy
efficient and hurricane resistant
windows, sliding glass doors,
entry doors and siding now!


Personalized Assisted Living
Respect for Individual PreferencessM
Alzheimer's & Dementia Care
Daily Moments of SuccessM
3910 Galen Court
Sun City Center, FL 33573
(813) 633-4340
Assisted Living Facility # 9634
www.brookdaleliving.com


WeatherTite products come
with 6 great warranties, meet
stringent codes for hurricanes,
made to reduce homeowners
insurance and qualify for
2010 Federal Residential
Energy Tax Credit up to
$1,500.
In a bid to promote energy
efficiency most power com-
panies are offering up to $350
credit or discount using ener-
gy star rated products. These
products can also help you
save as much as 50% on hom-
eowners insurance.
This is an offer that in-
cludes lifetime product and
labor warranties as well as a
special 45% energy savings
and 100% financing with no
money down! Payments can
be as low as $69 per month.
All applications accepted!
As always, WeatherTite
is proud to offer special dis-


Manny DeBono Aced the 145
yard par 3 5th hole on the Sands
Course at Falcon Watch Golf
Course


LIFE CONCERNS
SUPPORT GROUP
Monday 1:30 3:00 p.m.
(including holidays)

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP
FACILITATED BY
LIFE PATH HOSPICE
This 8-week group meets on specific dates,
so participants must directly
register with Life Path Hospice.
Contact Diane Schnelly at (813) 357-5609.

FAMILY CAREGIVER GROUP
"Managing Stress
in the Caregiver Role"
2nd Tuesday
3:00 4:00 p.m.


counts to seniors and mili-
tary.
WeatherTite also encour-
ages all condo owners to call
as well, as WeatherTite will
be able to design a window or
door that meets and exceeds
all your association require-
ments. WeatherTite will work
with your association for the
proper approvals. Be one of
the first 5 in your development
and receive a 30% discount.
Call toll-free 24 hours a day
for a FREE in-home consul-
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and receive $100 trade-in for
each old window you replace!
These offers will expire
8/12/10.


813-908-0131

800-821-8483
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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 11


1 6B e hS hs


Program/Event Highlights
Week of August 1 August 7


Mouse Skills
Monday, Aug. 2 2 to 3 p.m.
Learn how to grip, move and click the buttons on the mouse.
Registration in person required no earlier than one hour
prior to the start of the program.

Keyboard Basics
Monday, Aug. 2 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.
Learn the keys on the computer keyboard.
Registration in person required no earlier than one hour
prior to the start of the program.

Toddler Time
Tuesday, Aug. 3 10:05 to 10:25 a.m. and 10:35 to 10:55 a.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 4 10:35 to 10:55 a.m.
For ages 2-3 years with a caregiver.
Stories, finger plays and songs make up this fun 20-minute program.

Story Time
Tuesday, Aug. 3 and Wednesday, Aug. 4 11 to 11:30 a.m.
For ages 3-5 years.
Stories, finger plays and songs make up this fun 30-minute program.
Seating limit: 20 children plus their parent/caregivers.

Scratchboard Drawing Class for Adults and Teens
Tuesday, Aug. 3 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Art Instructor Stephanie Grimes will demonstrate the
techniques of Scratchboard art and students will create their own
drawing. Materials will be provided. Limit 20. Registration required.
Call 273-3652 or visit the Information Desk at the Library.


Baby Time
Wednesday, Aug. 4 10:05 to 10:25 am.
For ages 0-24 months.
Share books, rhymes, songs, games and quality time together
during this 20-minute program.
Seating limit: 20 children plus their parents/caregivers.

Microsoft Office: Menus and Toolbars
Thursday, Aug. 5 12:15 to 1:15 p.m.
Learn about toolbars, menus and commands common to all
Office applications. Registration in person required no earlier
than one hour prior to the start of the program.

Microsoft Office: Graphics Objects
Thursday, Aug. 5 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.
Use the drawing toolbar, graphics and Word Art to enhance your
reports, presentations and other Office application outputs.
Registration in person required no earlier than one hour
prior to the start of the Microsoft Office programs.

Epic Teen Readers of SouthShore
Thursday, Aug. 5 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
For middle and high school students. Join us for our teen book
discussion as we critique and answer questions about I Am the
Cheese by Robert Cormier. Soda and snacks provided.

Bedtime Stories
Thursday, Aug. 5 7 to 7:30 p.m.
For ages 2-5 with a caregiver. Children may wear pajamas and
bring a blanket and favorite cuddly toy for this 30-minute program.

Wee Artists: Let's Create!
Friday, Aug. 6
10:30 to 11:15 a.m.
"Wee Artists," ages 3-5 years, will explore their creative side.
Join Art Educator Laurie Burhop and have some funcreating an art
project. Adult must be present. Limit 15. Registration required.
Call 273-3652 or visit the Information Desk at the Library.


Creative Artists
Manga Cartooning
Saturday, August 7
10:05 to 10:50 am.
For ages 6-9 years. Cartoonist Leah
Lopez will have students create
their own "Manga Cartoon." Limit
20. Registration required and avail-
able now at the Information Desk
or call 273-3652.

Back To School on the Web
Saturday, Aug. 7
11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
How parents and students can
use the Internet to prepare for
the 2010-2011 school year plus a
discussion of sites that offer free
educational aids.

If you think you might be interested
in joining Friends of the South
Shore library, visit the Book Sale
Room at the Library for a member-
ship application. For any additional
information, visit www.southshore-
friends.com. SouthShore Regional
Library is located at 15816 Beth
Shields Way (off 19th Avenue
between U.S. 301 and 1-75).
(813) 273-3652


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C a l 877-346-2435 THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON
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DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT.


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2These figures are effective as of 7/1/10. Based on a Life-Only annuity income for a policy purchased by a
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JULY 29, 2010







12* OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT JULY 29, 2010


U; r Cr1,HJ
It,4B n


k a .. .I
MRS. OLGUIN
By Maira Sanchez, Destinee
Juarez and Julie Martinez
Mrs. Olguin is the nurse assis-
tant at South County Career Cen-
ter. This year is her second year
working in South County; before
she came here, she used to work
at Ruskin Elementary for seven
years. She says she likes South
County, but it's a big change from
little kids to teens. She really miss-
es her little ones. Mrs. Olguin has
been married for five years. She
likes taking care of other people
and likes helping students. Mrs.
Olguin is a nice lady that cares for
other people's health. She helps
students when they have a head-
ache or stomachache. She talks to
the girls about being pregnant and
discourages us from having kids
at a young age. She helps people
with their personal problems. She
is great at what she does.


MRS. KRAMER
by Julie Burchfield, Gabriel
Rodriguez and Robert Hernandez
Mrs. Kramer is the Assistant
Principal's secretary and what a
difficult job it is! She has to help
Ms. Sawyer organize events and
help her with projects or anything
else she needs help with. She has
been working here at South County
Career Center since it opened back
in 2002. She is very fond of her job
because she enjoys working with
the students, regardless of whether
they're in trouble or not. When we
have to miss school because we
are sick or at the doctor's, Mrs.
Kramer always tells us not to
worry and to get better. When she
says that, it doesn't bother us as
much. Mrs. Kramer has two chil-
dren: a son who is twenty-nine,
and a daughter who is twenty-six.
Students like her because she is
nice and she will always listen to
what we have to say. She helps
students by giving bus passes and
parking tags for student's cars. She
also holds book bags and phones
for students.


Through the Eyes of the Students
School is out for the summer! Many students are vacationing with
their families, looking for part-time jobs, chilling out at the beach,
grabbing a movie or just hanging out with their friends. Their class-
room studies are on hold until school cranks up again in August.
The students at South County Career Center, however, have a summer-
time goal to complete that started with SCCC's teacher of the year, Don
Chase. The students wanted to express their gratitude to the faculty and
staff for all their help and guidance during the 2009-2010 academic
year. Don suggested students individually or collectively write brief
profiles about SCCC's educators, support staff and administrators.
Part one of their series Through the Eyes of the Students focused
on the teachers while part two highlighted the Guidance, Administra-
tive and Instructional staffs. This week, in part three of the series, the
emphasis is on non-instructional staff. s ig
Goo.


MR. KINCAID
by Maria Ramos
Mr. Kincaid joined South Coun-
ty sometime last year, but he
started as a social worker 10 years
ago at Ruskin Elementary School.
He likes to do anything involving
kids. Mr. Kincaid is not married
and does not have any children. He
started working as a social worker
when he thought to himself, "I
am going to start working to help
kids." Mr. Kincaid had an accident
earlier this year and hurt his knee.
It still causes him pain, but he
enjoys helping students with prob-
lems at home and at school, so he
doesn't mind all of the walking he
has to do. He tries to do the best he
can working as a social worker at
South County Career Center.



rp l ^


MRS. HOSKINS
by Matt Pangelinan
Mrs. Hoskins works here at
South County as one of the lovely
lunch ladies. She says she has been
working here for about four years,
"and I love every part of it!" She is
hard working and very, very nice.
She wakes up early every morn-
ing just to come to school, unload
the truck and make us breakfast.
She also tries to make more food
choices for the students so that we
don't have to eat the same thing
every day. She says, "If the stu-
dents and staff work together, they
can have a lot of potential. Stu-
dents just have to be in the right
state of mind."


N"mISTUCIlA

S AFI


OFFICER PORTER
by Juan Leal
The School Resource Officer
for South County Career Cen-
ter is Officer Porter, who retired
from the police department. One
of the most challenging parts of
his job is working with teens. He
likes to help people so that is why
he took the job at South County.
Officer Porter is a normal guy after
hours. He picks up extra work as
security at football games and his
hobbies are fishing and hunting for
deer and wild hogs. I feel better at
SCCC when Officer Porter is at
school doing his job.


MR-. IFORREST

MRS. FORREST l


by Julie Martinez and
Cristina Deyell
Mrs. Forrest (or Ms. Sue as stu-
dents know her) has been working
as a custodian at South County
Career Center for 3 years. She
loves her job at South County
because she only has to work 40
hours a week all year long, she
gets to be outside all the time, and
she gets a paid vacation. She helps
us by giving us a nice clean school
and by being a nice and kind cus-
todian to all the students here at
South County. She is cool to talk
to about things around the school
like what South County was like
when she first got the job here.
She talks about the best things
and worst things about working
as a custodian, like moving books
around and picking up the trash
people leave behind.



ei? 4'


S*,C
'~~~~ e~ip


*"
building g Our Communities' future'
:i


Free technology training available


Tampa Bay WorkForce Alliance
is providing free technology train-
ing to individuals in Hillsborough
County through an innovative
public-private partnership with
Workforce Florida Inc., the Agen-
cy for Workforce Innovation and
Microsoft. Through Microsoft's
Elevate America program, vouch-
ers for no-cost, online technology
training and certification are avail-
able through any of the state's 24
Regional Workforce Boards.
"Elevate America is a great
opportunity for employees and
businesses in our community,"
said Edward Peachey, President
and CEO of Tampa Bay Work-
Force Alliance. "These vouch-
ers will give our workforce the
training needed to compete in the
industries in this region that tie us


to the increasingly global, high-
tech economy."
Each training voucher is redeem-
able for one E-Learing course or
Certification exam. E-Learing
courses, available online, are self-
paced and offer beginning and
intermediate training on Micro-
soft Windows or on one of the
programs in the Microsoft Office
Suite. Vouchers can be accessed
directly by individuals or by
businesses interested in provid-
ing training opportunities to their
employees.
Career candidates in Hillsbor-
ough County can find an elec-
tronic voucher application by
visiting www.elevateamerica.
floridajobs.org/ or by e-mailing
elevateamerica@workforcetampa.
com. Vouchers are available for


MR. JOHNSON
by Melissa Mendoza and
Richard Hoskins
Mr. Johnson is a Custodian
Manager at South County Career
Center, and nobody here knows
this property better than he does.
His friend owned the land before it
became a school and Mr. Johnson
used to hunt here. In the 1920s, it
was an orange grove and in the
1960s it became a tomato farm
and held cattle when they weren't
growing veggies. In the time he's
spent here, he's seen panthers,
deer, alligators, hogs, and several
other types of animals. "You name
it I've seen it," he says. He has lived
in Florida for 35 years, and grew
up in Gibsonton. He is married and
has no kids. He says he became a
custodian because he needed a job.
In his spare time, he makes and
sells whips and knives. He also
likes to work out. He feels good
working at South County Career
Center after growing up here. He
has worked with the school system
for 11 years, and has been at South
County since 2002. Mr. Johnson
makes sure that the school looks
nice, plus everything at school is
taken care of and working well.
All the students like Mr. Johnson
because he'll take the time to talk
to us and answer our questions.


limited time; those interested in
applying for a voucher are encour-
aged to do so as soon as possible.
Florida vouchers are only avail-
able through Aug. 21 or while
supplies last. All vouchers must
be activated by August 21 and
Certification exam vouchers must
be activated and used by the same
date. E-Learning vouchers are
good for 12 months after the date
of activation.
Once in receipt of a voucher,
participants can use a personal
computer with an Internet con-
nection to access training or take
advantage of the computer support
services at participating regional
One-Stop Centers. For more infor-
mation, visit http://elevateamerica.
floridajobs.org.
Elevate America is part of


MS. SEUDATH
by Zorayda Ramos
Ms. Seudath works in the of-
fice as Mr. C's secretary here at
South County. She was raised in
Miami, FL, but moved to Tampa
in 2003. Before she came to South
County she was a stay-at-home
mom, taking care of her 6-year-old
daughter. Ms. Seudath is a hard
worker and also works throughout
the summer. She loves to work here
at South County, and is organized
and meticulous. Something Ms.
Seudath likes about South County
is to seeing students graduate from
South County. She says, "It's a
blessing and it makes me happy to
see them graduate. It's a very nice
experience at the time of gradua-
tion." Ms. Seudath is a big part of
the success here at South County
and the friendships she has with
the students has a positive effect
on how students work and how
they feel about coming to South
County Career Center.


rp r Go*


JASLYN WILLIAMS
by Jonathan Williams and
Destinee Juarez
Jaslyn Williams has been work-
ing at South County Career Cen-
ter since 2002, when the school
first opened. She says she enjoys
being a custodian because she re-
ally enjoys the students. When she
first began to work here, it was all
new to her but now it is all very fa-
miliar. Ms. Williams is originally
from Saint Christopher Island, also
known as St. Kitts. She has helped
us in so many ways because she
does her best keeping our school
clean.


Florida's ongoing efforts to pro-
vide resources to individuals and
employers seeking talent devel-
opment resources. Florida is the
24th state to participate in Elevate
America, a groundbreaking initia-
tive to prepare workers for the de-
mands of a 21st century economy.
Microsoft announced the Elevate
America program at the National
Governors Association Winter
Conference in February 2009. The
initiative is expected to provide up
to 1 million vouchers nationwide
for Microsoft E-Learning courses
and select Microsoft Certifica-
tion exams at no or low cost to
recipients. The program is a part
of Microsoft's overall efforts to
provide technology training for up
to 2 million people during the next
three years.


12 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT


JULY 29, 2010






JULY 29, 2010

State recognizes July as Florida Rivers I


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 13


Mrnnri


Governor Charlie Crist recently
signed a proclamation honoring
July as Florida Rivers Month, rec-
ognizing the importance of protect-
ing the more than 50,000 miles of
rivers and streams flowing through-
out the state. Florida's famed water-
ways include the historic Suwannee
River made famous by folk musi-
cian Stephen Foster, the 310-mile
St. Johns River, one of only a few
rivers in North America that flows
north, and Northwest Florida's
Apalachicola River, which helps
supply 90 percent of Florida's oys-
ters by feeding Apalachicola Bay.
"Governor Crist's designation of
July as Florida Rivers Month comes
at a perfect time," said Jack Long,
Director of the Department of En-
vironmental Protection Southeast
District. "This summer, Floridians
and visitors to our state can explore
all that our beautiful rivers in South
Florida has to offer, and they can
see why it is important to protect
our waterways."
Floridians can help protect Flor-
ida's treasured rivers and streams
by practicing water conservation
habits in their homes and yards,
which can be as simple as turning
off the faucet while brushing or not
running sprinklers on rainy days.
By practicing "green" gardening
techniques, such as reducing fertil-
izer use or spreading mulch to pre-
vent erosion, residents can improve
the quality of the waters near their
homes. Residents can also help pro-
tect water quality supply, and stop


polluters by reporting environmen-
tal crimes and suspicious activities
at drinking water treatment plants
and water towers to your local po-
lice department and the State Warn-
ing Point (1-800-320-0519).
"Rivers are part of the unique
South Florida lifestyle that attracts
so many residents and visitors to
the Sunshine State," said South
Florida Water Management Dis-
trict Executive Director Carol Ann
Wehle. "Florida Rivers Month is a
perfect time to be reminded that we
are stewards of South Florida's wa-
terways, from the Kissimmee and
the Loxahatchee rivers to the fabled
River of Grass."
During the summer months, resi-
dents and visitors alike can go out-
side and enjoy some of Florida's
most famous rivers, such as:
The Indian River Lagoon wa-
tershed's land features date back to
420,000 years ago, shaped by the
rise and fall of the sea. The basin's
major waterbodies are three elon-
gated saline lagoons: Mosquito La-
goon, the Indian River Lagoon, and
the Banana River. These lagoons
separate mainland Florida from a
strip of barrier islands that extends
north and south of two unique land
features, Cape Canaveral and Mer-
ritt Island. More than 50 percent of
the Florida east coast fish catch and
historically 90 percent of Florida's
clam harvest came from the ba-
sin. The basin is also an important
producer of Florida's Indian River
citrus. Biological diversity is high,


with more than 4,000 animal and
plant species recorded, including
36 rare and endangered animal spe-
cies.
The Loxahatchee, Florida's first
federally designated National Wild
and Scenic River, winds its way
through Jonathan Dickinson State
Park, passing under a canopy of
centuries-old cypress trees. The riv-
er has a timeless beauty all its own,
featuring ecological and recreational
values that are unique in the United
States. Along the river and within
the park is coastal sand pine scrub,
a biological community so rare it
is designated "globally imperiled."
Other habitat types found within the
watershed include pinelands, hard-
wood hammock, freshwater marsh,
wet prairie, cypress swamps, man-
grove swamps, seagrass beds, tidal
flats, oyster beds, xeric oak scrub
and coastal dunes. These habitats
support diverse biological commu-
nities including many endangered
and threatened species such as the
manatee and the four-petal paw-
paw, a tree found only in Martin
and Palm Beach counties.
The Kissimmee River and
Fisheating Creek watersheds are
adjacent basins that both flow into
Lake Okeechobee and are part of
the greater Everglades ecosystem.
The Kissimmee River Basin ex-
tends from Orlando south to Lake
Okeechobee. The largest source of
surface water to Lake Okeechobee,
this basin is about 105 miles long
and has a maximum width of 35
miles. The northern portion of the


basin, referred to as the Chain of
Lakes, contains many lakes, some
of which are interconnected by
canals. The Kissimmee River was
originally a 103-mile-long shallow,
meandering river that was reconfig-
ured in the 1960s into a 56-mile-
long canal (renamed C-38) for
flood control. Much of it has been
restored today. Already, wading bird
populations in the restored river and
floodplain region have more than
tripled. Duck species including ful-
vous whistling duck, northern pin-
tail, northern shoveler, American


wigeon and ring-necked duck have
returned to the floodplain after be-
ing absent during the 40-plus years
that the system was channelized.
The restoration project is scheduled
to be complete by 2015.
To learn more Florida's waters
visit www.dep.state.fl.us or www.
protectingourwater.org for water-
shed specific information.
To view Governor Crist's Flor-
ida Rivers Month proclamation,
visit www.dep.state.fl.us/secretary/
news/2010/07/files/florida rivers.
pdf.


Tampa/Hillsborough Anti-Gang Task Force wins award


S Much,much Reading
A more!! Glasses

$10 'K


The Tampa/Hillsborough Com-
prehensive Anti-Gang Initiative
(CAGI) Task Force received top
honors last week in New Orleans
from the U.S. Department of Jus-
tice. The CAGI Task Force was
awarded the Outstanding Overall
Partnership/Task Force Award at
the annual Project Safe Neighbor-
hoods (PSN) Achievement Awards
ceremony.
This is an incredible honor for
Hillsborough County's Criminal
Justice Office and Code Enforce-
ment Department, as they help
make up the 26-agency Task Force.
The Florida Attorney General, Bill
McCollum, has adapted this model
for the state's Regional Gang Re-
duction Task Forces.
The CAGI Task Force was rec-
ognized for its teamwork, part-
nerships, and communication that


have helped create a sustainable
community to stop violent gang ac-
tivity. The Task Force's anti-gang
efforts, which include prevention
and intervention; enforcement
and prosecution; and helping gang
members re-enter society, make
up a powerful strategy for fighting
gangs and raising gang awareness.
Other primary local partners
in this initiative within Hillsbor-
ough County include the Hillsbor-
ough County Sheriff's Office and
Tampa Police Department, along
with juvenile/adult probation,
jails, foundations, businesses and
community based organizations.
State partners include the Florida
Department of Law Enforcement,
the Florida Highway Patrol, and
the Florida Department of Correc-
tions. Several federal agencies are
also partners including the United


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States Attorney's Office for the
Middle District of Florida, the FBI
and ATF. The U.S. Justice Depart-
ment's Middle District of Florida
includes Jacksonville to the North,
Orlando in the center of the state,
and Tampa south to the Ft. Myers
area.
U.S. Attorney A. Brian Albritton,
of the Middle District of Florida,
who nominated the CAGI Task
Force, said the Task Force demon-
strates "the power of partnership
which has resulted in positive so-
lutions to the gang problem in the
Tampa Bay area."
PSN is a Justice Department
initiative to reduce gun and gang
crime in the U.S. by networking
existing local programs to target
these crimes and deter violent
gang activity.

Caloosa Golf and
Country Club's
CWGA-18
June 23, "Tee to Green" tourna-
ment
First Flight
Bev Valentine 1st 39
Sally Heffeman 2nd 40
PearlAshe 3rd 41
Second Flight
Shirley Coniglio 1st 38
Lolita Johnson 2nd 42
Third Flight
Donna Gardner 1st 40
Lucille Lanese 2nd (tie) 42
Jerry Ramsey 2nd (tie) 42
Fourth Flight
Nancy Anspaugh 1st 42
Vera Thompson 2nd 43

SCC Women's Golf
Association (WGA)
June 17 Oaks/Lakes "Throw out
2 PAR 4's: 2 Front/2 Back (Net -
full hdcp)
Flight 1
1st Yvonne Kelly 45
2nd Judie Schafers 48
Flight 2
1st KiyokoAshendorf 45
2nd Jeannie Shivley 46






14 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Why Government debt matters to you
by Gary Foreman gary @stretcher.com


You see much in the media about
federal and state government debt.
Most of the reports concentrate on
the big picture: how many trillions
of dollars the U.S. federal govern-
ment owes or how many billions
short a particular state budget is.
But few seem to address what
that debt means to the average
person like you and me. How our
lives are changed by the debts that
our federal and state governments
take on.
According to USDebtClock.org
the average U.S. Federal Gov-
ernment debt per citizen is over
$42,000, and, they calculate that
the interest per citizen is at $2,800
per year.
So that means that you're paying
$233 per month just to cover the
interest. It's a little like you and
your mate are making a car pay-
ment every month for the rest of
your lives. This is not to buy you
a dependable set of wheels, but
to pay the interest on the money
that's already been borrowed in
your name.
For a family of four it's like hav-
ing two new cars stolen from your
driveway. If you're a car salesper-
son those are two cars that you
can't sell because the customer
can't afford them. If you're an au-
toworker, those are two cars you
don't get to build. Government
debt takes money out of our pock-
ets that could otherwise be spent
and create jobs.
Maybe your taxable income is

SCC Men's 18 hole
golf association
6/17- 2 Man team 2 low net to-
tal Sandpiper GC
White Tees
1st Jerry Hart, Bill Pachler (BD)
-4
2nd Bert Paulin, Jim Cosgrove
-1
3rd,tie Thomas R. Williamson,
James Rottman 0
3rd,tie King Slater, Bill Pachler
0
Green tees
1st Anthony Torre, Harold Geld-
back -16
2nd Carl Lingertot, Bud Tolley
(BD) -14


I
-S
w


low. In fact, maybe you don't pay
any taxes at all. So why should
you care? You're not going to be
paying any of that interest. That's
for someone wealthier than you.
Well, you're affected, too. Every
time that you go to borrow money
you'll pay more because you're
bidding against the government.
That's right. The government bor-
rows its money from the same
places that you do. So you have to
outbid them to borrow money for
your mortgage, car loan or credit
card account. Instead of borrowing
at 8% you'll need to pay 9 or even
10%. And, the more they borrow
the worse it gets.
You don't need to pay taxes or
borrow money to be affected by
government debts. If you benefit
from any government service you
can look forward to cuts in that
service. With more of the govern-
ment budget going to pay for inter-
est, there's less available to pay for
roads, school lunch programs or
any other government services.
So what should you do now to
protect yourself?
Expect to see government look
to save money in all areas. Be pre-
pared to receive lower benefits on
government programs including
Medicare, Medicaid, Social Se-
curity, even government pension
benefits. You may be fortunate and
not have your program cut. But,
you'd be foolish to think it couldn't
happen.
The next obvious step is to pay


Flight Champoin
Flight Champion 2009-2010 is
Jan Huber.


off any debt you currently owe.
That eliminates the need to com-
pete with the government to bor-
row money. Plus you'll have more
flexibility so you can adjust to a
changing financial environment.
Also, be prepared for inflation.
Unlike you and I, the government
can print more money. That al-
lows them to repay their debts in
cheaper dollars. However, there is
a cost. An increase in the money
supply will cause prices to go up.
And, we'll have inflation.
Some argue that government
debt doesn't matter. They say that
the government doesn't ever really
have to pay back debts. Govern-
ment can carry it forever. And,
maybe that's true. Up to a point.
But just like your family budget,
if you want to be able to keep bor-
rowing money you absolutley must
make your interest payments. Even
if that means that your family can't
pay rent or buy groceries.
The same thing is true for the
government. At some point the
government won't be able to pay
the interest due and still perform
essential government services. Ac-
cording to U.S. Controller General
David Walker, within 12 years the
largest item on the federal budget
will be interest payments.
You may hear the argument that
the government can't quit spend-
ing in a recession even if they
have to borrow the money being
spent. That ignores the simple
fact that every borrowed dollar in-


Presidents Cup winner
The Women's Golf Associa-
tion Presidents Cup winner: Lois
Scoppettuolo.


CENTER FOR SIGHT


creases the amount of interest that
we'll pay next year and every year
thereafter.
Someone might say that this ar-
ticle is political. It's not meant to
be. Debt doesn't care which politi-
cal party creates it. A dollar of debt
created by either party will have
the same effect on you. A state or
country can't continually spend
money it doesn't have. Any more
than you or I could.
I'll leave it up to you whether
you want to contact your elected
reps and tell them to balance any
budget they're responsible for.
But, I'll admit that paying for two
non-existent cars that aren't in my
driveway isn't very appealing.
And thinking that my children and
grandchildren will be paying for
them too is even less appealing.

Gary Foreman is the editor of
The Dollar Stretcher.com.


Sun City Center
Women's Golf Assoc.
9 hole Division played June 24
Game was "Low Putts"
Winners were:
First Place Marty Mallak 15
Three way tie for Second Place
- Pat Hoying, Christel Fraebel,
Dorothy Morris 16.


Falcon Watch La-
dies 18 Hole League
Individual Points 6/04
First Flight
First Linda Belanger +1
Second Flight
First Carol Salowitz +9
Second
Carolyn Clark +7


II


1647 Sun City Center Plaza, Suite 202
Sun City Center, FL 33573


William L. Soscia, MD
Cataract & Lens Replacement Surgeon
Fellowship trained and board certified ophthalmologist
providing cataract and lens replacement consultations.


Casey Maloney, OD
Optometric Physician
Board certified optometrist providing comprehensive
primary eye care, eye glass and contact lens prescrip-
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VALID FOR NEW CENTER FOR SIGHT PATIENTS ONLY. THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A
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JULY 29, 2010
Attend a public
workshop
Hillsborough County will hold a
series of public information work-
shops on the County's Floodplain
Management Plan and the Com-
munity Rating System program
to request input regarding the up-
date to the plan, areas of repetitive
flood losses, and the plan's goal
and objectives. A local workshop
will take place at There will be
general information provided and
a follow-up survey will be avail-
able at the workshop and on the
Hillsborough County website.
This project is part of Hills-
borough County's participation
with the National Flood Insurance
Program (NFIP) and an initiative
to reduce repetitive flood losses.
More information is available
at: www.hillsboroughcounty.org/
pgm/hazardmit/.
All meeting facilities are ADA
compliant. Any additional neces-
sary accommodations will be pro-
vided with 48-hour notice. Please
attend, we welcome your input.
DATE: Thursday, Aug. 5
TIME: 6:30 p.m.
PLACE: SouthShore Regional
Service Center, 410 S.E. 30th
Street, Ruskin

DATE: Thursday, Aug. 25
TIME: 6:30 p.m.
PLACE: Brandon Regional Ser-
vice Center, 311 Pauls Drive

For more information, please
call the Hazard Mitigation Sec-
tion, Planning & Growth Manage-
ment Department, at 272-5600.









& o ye Ti penmb, ereeap.
At the end oF a concert we held up our lighters...now it's cell
phones.
Laundry detergent had Free
glasses, dishes or towels
hidden inside the box?


You put baseball cards in the spokes
of your bike?
Moms stayed home and
were there For you
after school?
We played baseball
and no adults were
thereto 'help' with
the rules?
You accepted a
double-dog dare?
The TV had to warm
up before you
could watch it?

Mood rings were all
the rage?
We used words like
groovy, Far out, dig it,
boogie, peace, live.
etc.?
Your parents bought a
top-loading VCR that cost about
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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 15


JULY 29, 2010






16 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


- _=~ir.n~' -


t, k,
-L s-
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/ am from Louisiana and I know our beaches are our home,
our way of life and our livelihood. Protecting the coast and
cleaning up the beaches is very personal to me.
Keith Seilhan, BP Cleanup


Making This Right

Beaches
Claims
Cleanup
Economic Investment
Environmental Restoration
Health and Safety
W wildlife


For information visit: bp.com
deepwaterhorizonresponse.com
facebook.com/bpamerica
twitter.com/bp_america
youtube.com/bp


At BP we have taken full responsibility for the cleanup in the Gulf. We are
committed to keeping you informed.

Looking For Oil
Crews are cleaning Gulf Coast beaches 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
When oil is spotted, the Response Command Center is notified, a
Shore Cleanup Assessment Team (SCAT) is mobilized and cleanup begins
immediately. Cleanup efforts are being coordinated from 17 staging
areas in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. Over 33,000 people
are involved in the cleanup operation.

If you see oil on the beach, please call 1-866-448-5816 and we'll send a
team to clean it up.

Cleaning Up the Beaches
The number of people mobilized to clean up the beaches depends on the
size of the affected area. Individual teams can number in the hundreds,
and thousands of additional workers remain on-call. Working with the
Coast Guard, our teams continue cleaning up until the last bit of oil has
been removed. As a result, in most cases when oil reaches a beach, it is
even possible to keep it open.

Our Responsibility
Our beach cleanup operations will continue until the last of the oil has
been skimmed from the sea, the beaches and estuaries have been cleaned
up, and the region has been pronounced oil-free. And none of the costs
of our efforts will be paid by taxpayers.

Our commitment is that we'll be here for as long as it takes. We may not
always be perfect, but we will make this right.


For assistance, please call:
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
www.floridagulfresponse.com


2010 BP E&P


91-


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JULY 29, 2010






JULY 29, 2010


Above, Yelson, an endangered Amur
scratching his back through the fence.


Mitch Traphagen photo
Leopoard enjoys Kaprive


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* Continued from page 1

Deb Kaprive beside her, unwrap-
ping a peppermint candy.
Also in that dream are people that
she has never met; people who are
willing to dig into their pockets to
help her and the other animals who
live here. Elmira needs help she
needs your help, if you can pro-
vide it. It doesn't matter where or
how you live, she needs you in her
dreams.
Approximately 45 exotic ani-
mals have found a home in this
rural sanctuary. They have come
from private collections with own-
ers that could no longer control the
once small, cute, fuzzy creatures;
or from previous owners who have
made no provisions for the animals
that depended upon them. They
have come from other sanctuaries
and from zoos wanting to be rid of
animals that weren't quite perfect
enough for the public.
"All of them are beautiful but
you'll see some crossed eyes out
there," Kaprive said as she pre-
pared to introduce the animals.
Recently the staff at Elmira's was
asked to take part in a rescue. An-
other sanctuary was being closed
by the U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture and there were large cats that
needed a home. Elmira's couldn't
afford to say "yes"; but their souls
wouldn't allow them to say "no".
The cats were rescued.
None of the animals at Elmira's
can be returned to the wild. All
have been born in captivity and
have spent their lives depending
upon people. Like Elmira the bear,
all have names: Albert, Casper,
Lexi and Little Al. They will spend
the rest of their lives depending on
people. It is all they know.
"They aren't domestic but they
aren't wild," Kaprive said. "They
couldn't survive in the wild. This is
their forever home."
Albert is a good bear. At least
he nodded his head up and down
when I asked him if he was. In re-
ality, however, he probably wasn't
responding to my question as much
has he was to the sight of Kaprive
walking up to his cage. Sitting, he
wasn't much taller than a large dog.
He continued nodding and then he
reached out to her, placing an enor-
mous paw on the cage as she began
to speak to him. She asked if he had
enjoyed his breakfast.
Albert doesn't know anything
about recessions or layoffs or fore-
closures; but yet the economy has
had an impact on his life. Elmira's
Wildlife Sanctuary depends entire-
ly upon donations; the generosity
of others.
"There are no paid employees,"
Kaprive said. "Every copper penny
donated goes to the feeding and
care of the animals and the mainte-
nance of our humble facility."
The needs are large. The animals
must be fed regardless of the dona-
tions that come in. Volunteers fre-
quently dip into their own pockets
to make up the difference. Kaprive
and founder Robin Greenwood,
among others, have tailored their
lives and their finances around pro-
viding the animals their best pos-
sible forever home. Like the other
volunteers, they take nothing mon-
etarily. Costs to run the sanctuary
are around $3,500 per month.
In addition to food, the staff also


r~oc c t C ,' Kr


Elmira the bear enjoying
breakfast in her cage. Placed
roughly in the center of the
property, the namesake of the
wildlife sanctuary enjoys the
attention of the volunteers and
visitors. She particularly loves
peppermint candy.




h,,i't: '| I,:, ,. I !d J !.i',_ 'i !l '!i. 'd .l'i.i .i




approximately people who have
offered to help, et onll a handful
.have I:followed through.' : l.'




"People will call to volunteer and
then sayl, 'I want to hug a cougar,"
Kaprive said. "That's just not go-
niOI 0l i!' l'Q\ I, ,l l 'oid l e lh l' d !',I,!'




ing to happen. But I know there are-
people who are looking for some-
approximately 7do, people who have time. They
canoffered to help, yet only difference here."andful

have followed through.elp
"People will call to volunteer and
then say, 'I want to hug a cougar,'"
Kaprive said. "That's just not go-
ing to happen. But I know there are
people who are looking for some-

can really make a difference here."


How you can help


Elmira's Wildlife Sanctuary
depends entirely on donations.
The sanctuary is a 501(c)3
non-profit corporation staffed
entirely by volunteers and sup-
ported by members and private
contributions. Their stated mis-
sion is to provide continuing
care, life management and
enrichment to exotic and wild
animals in need of a home and
to provide educational oppor-
tunities to increase commu-
nity awareness of the needs of
these animals.
At this time, the sanctuary is
not open to the public, although
limited access to seeing the
animals is provided through a
membership program. Tax de-
ductible memberships begin at
$25 per year, although higher
amounts are appreciated.
Monthly donations may also be
made to help ensure stability
towards the ongoing needs.
Volunteers are also needed
for everything from main-
tenance on cages and the
grounds to office work.
Tax-deductible donations by
check may be sent to:
Elmira's Wildlife Sanctuary
PO. Box 63
Wimauma, FL. 33598
For more information or to
donate by credit card, visit
www.elmiraswildlife.org, email
info@elmiraswildlife.org or
call 941-776-8975. All emails
are directed to and answered
personally be Deb Kaprive. If
calling, please understand that
volunteers will likely be working
on the grounds and as such, it
may be necessary to leave a
message.


" a


Mitch Traphagen photo
A few months ago, Kaprive was
working three paying jobs. Today
her job at Elmira's is without a sal-
ary.
"We all survive by the Grace of
God and I'm at peace that there will
be opportunities when the time is
right," she said. "In the meantime
there are fundraising events to co-
ordinate, cages to clean and tigers
to feed. The resume is ready and
I'm practicing patience. I know ev-
erything happens for a reason."
Elmira's is a little like the Is-
land of Lost Toys from the classic
Christmas animation, Rudolph the
Red Nosed ReindeeN except these
aren't stuffed, stupid or soulless
creatures to be easily discarded by
the humans that promised to care
for them. They happily recognize
the people they love and trust. They
clearly experience joy. They clearly
show sadness and heartache.
When the sanctuary was forced
to move a few years ago due to the
death of one of the founders and
property owner, the animals were
terrified as they were herded into
cages and relocated to a place that
looked and smelled different. It is
not possible to sit down with a bear
or a tiger or a serval to explain to
them what is happening. As far as
they knew, it was the end of the
world.
But like all of us going through
hard times, they adjusted. Their
fears subsided and they have now
grown to love their new home. Like
us, they have come to know their
neighbors. Some are shy; some are
loud and boisterous; and some are
caretakers for others, such as the
tigers in adjoining cages, one lick-
ing the head of the other through
the chain links. Like humans, fa-
miliarity and something as simple
as touch goes a long ways towards
having a sense of comfort in this
life, of being reassured that every-
thing is OK.
Their joys are simple. Like a
house cat, Little Al began rubbing
his cheeks along the chain link
fencing of his cage when he saw
Kaprive approach. Little Al, an
enormous white tiger, is somewhat
inappropriately named, it would
seem. As Kaprive reached the
fence, he rose (only slightly) on his
back legs so their faces could meet
See ELMIRA'S, page 21


Soug J te ort


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 17


---

*

'""'""'"""""






18 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Local sailors share their passion with injured veterans


* By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
RUSKIN For wounded, war
weary American veterans, the dis-
tance between the hot, dry, hard
sands of the Middle East to the
gentle, lapping waves of Tam-
pa Bay is a lot more than half a
world.
Just ask Mike Jernigan, a U.S.
Marine who, in his first Iraqi tour,
sustained disabling injuries that re-
quired 30 surgeries in 12 months.
Jernigan, reared in the comfort-
conscious old northeast section of
St. Petersburg, was in the humvee's
gun turret that August day in 2004
when the explosive blew. Thrown
about 20 yards onto the hard sand
near Mahmudiyah, about 45 per-
cent of his skull essentially was
crushed, one hand was severely
damaged, his left knee took a
heavy hit.
Talking about it today, Jernigan
says "I don't remember it, but
they told me later that I was still
conscious and looking for my lost
rifle." Courtesy of that IED, the
young marine lost something more
- his sight. It would be only later
that the PTSD would envelope
him.
That day, just six years ago,
young Mike Jernigan, a St. Pete
High grad who had the world by
the tail, began the long journey
back through initial stabilization
in the closest field medical facil-
ity, through treatment and evalua-
tion in Baghdad, through more in-
tensive medical care in Germany,
through long term remediation
at Bethesda to a recent sailing
cruise on Tampa Bay.
And how did Jernigan, his wife,
the teen-age son they're raising
and a soft-coated, sloe-eyed Gol-
dador named Brittany come to be
sailing the bay last week?
It began not long after Bryan
and Marilyn Custer's oldest son,
Matt, joined the U.S. Army. Fol-
lowing him through basic, staying
in touch through various assign-
ments, keeping up with him on a
tour in Iraq, their empathy for the
nation's warriors at war soared.
They came face to face with war's
toll on America's combat vets


measured in the obvious twisted
or missing limbs, lost senses such
as sight and hearing, scars perma-
nently etched in skin, and deeper
- as well as the not-so-obvious
but still multiple manifestations
of post traumatic stress (PTSD) or
loss of normal mental and bodily
functions. Prostheses and wheel
chairs and attending therapists
bear irrefutable evidence.
Then, there are the wages of
war that can be extracted from
families of surviving warriors -
overwhelming new responsibil-
ity, financial hardship, shattered
confidence, worry, fear, insecurity,
depression.
"We wanted to do something for
them," says Marilyn Custer as she
recounts the unfolding events over
the last two years as they focused
efforts to express appreciation for
the awesome bravery and awful
sacrifices combat exposes.
--They incorporated "Freedom
Excursions, Inc." as a not-for-
profit entity with a five-member
board of directors in April, 2008,
and made its maiden voyage in
September, that year, Marilyn re-
calls. Since then they've made 35


boating or fishing trips, endeavor-
ing to give the men and women
who have purchased the nation's
freedom at high costs a few hours
of relaxed, no-stress enjoyment at
absolutely no charge.
The 37-year-old Lindsey mo-
tor sailer, equipped with a single
diesel engine, includes galley and
head, and is designed to sleep sev-
en comfortably in forward and aft
compartments. Nicknamed "Sun
Catcher," she is solidly built and
handles with ease, Bryan Custer
notes, plus she has the flatter decks
of older vessels which makes her
easier for some veterans to maneu-
ver around.
And maneuver they do, Mari-
lyn adds. Freedom Excursions has
hosted vets in wheel chairs, with all
manner of prostheses, sighted and
unsighted, from each of America's
wars and conflicts since WWII,
along with various members of
their families. Each veteran's ex-
perience is a story in itself, she
says, like the young soldier from
New York who had never been on
a boat nor caught a fish but glee-
fully reeled in his first from their
See VETERANS, page 26


The Golf Club at Cypresa Creek
1011 Cypress Village Blvd. Ruskin
FULL SERVICE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
"Don'tjust go out to eat..come and dine at Cypress Creek"
CRZY8*PEIASTus-Sa.1am.-4p.


Happy

'4 .H Hour
3 to 7p.m.
EVERYDAY
Check our Lounge Menu
Serving: Tuesday till 4 p.m.
Wed. Sat. 11 a.m. to Close


JULY DINNER SPECIALS
Wed.-Sat. 4-8p.m.
Tues. Openfor lunch, restaurant closes at 4p.m.
Wed: Prime Rib ....................$ 199
Thur: Liver & Onions.................... $999
Fri: Fried Catfish.....................10"9
Sat: Pasta Night ...................... 10"9
Restaurant Closed Sunday & Monday


S- - - GOLF SPECIAL: ------ - - GOLF SPECIAL: - - -
ONE FREE ROUND OF GOLF ONEFREE ROUND OF GOLF
with purchase of another round of golf with purchase o0 iil Ii .. .....1.I .. .Ii I
SGood for 1 PLAYER on 2 DIFFERENT DAYS I Good for 1 PLAYER on 2 DIFFERENT DAYS
I Rates: 4995 + tax before 2 p.m. 3995 + tax after 2 p.m. I Rates: 4995 + tax before 2 p.m. 3995 + tax after 2 p.m. I
SCall for your Tee Time right now! Call for your Tee Time right now!
813-634-8888 813-634-8888
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Melody Jameson photo
Shaded by the bimini of Freedom Excursions' 40-foot motor sailer,
Leslie (right) and Mike (left) Jernigan share finger foods during a
recent sunset sail on Tampa Bay. Jernigan, a U.S. Marine who lost
both eyes and sustained other injuries in Iraq, grew up in St. Pe-
tersburg accustomed to water sports and was able to renew his
enjoyment of the bay courtesy of the Ruskin-based not-for-profit
that reaches out to wounded veterans. Leslie's son, Caleb, (back-
ground) preferred an unobstructed view from the aft deck.


Anne Pidgeon's WONDERFUL WORD of

COLORFIELD FARMS
=S^ Nursery, Garden Center and Gifts
Fully Stocked with Citrus, Mango and Fruit Trees, Shrubs, Planters
Native Plants, Butterfly Plants, Herbs and Flowers



Mango



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Saturday and Sunday


July 31- August 1

Educational Demonstrations:

10 AM: Growing Tropical Fruit in
Central Florida

NOON: Mango Mania,
Culinary Demonstration

2 PM: Mango Tree Basics

4 PM: Selecting a Mango Variety


Mango Tastings

All Day

Open 7 Days: 9-6


Florida Department of Agriculture Registration Number 47229964


JULY 29, 2010


8221 Hwy 674 Wimauma, Florida 33598

(813) 833-2545


www.colorfieldfarms.com
Exactly Five Miles East of Hwy 301


z






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 19


Neighborhood yard sale for charity
Summerfield Beef 'O' Brady's located at 13326 Lincoln Rd.,
Riverview, will be hosting a Community Yard Sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
on Saturday, Aug. 14 to celebrate their 4th anniver-
Ssary. All proceeds from space rental and raffle tick-
et sales will benefit Mended Little Hearts, a local
non-profit group that supports children with heart
defects and heart disease and their families.
A 9 x 15 space can be rented for $15. The price
includes one 6' table and all advertising of the
S Community Sale. The entire $15 will be donated
to Mended Little Hearts. You can call Beef '0'
Brady's at (813) 672-4411 to reserve your space or come into the restau-
rant. There are a limited number of spaces available.
Feel free to call Kate Dumas at (813) 672-4277 with any questions!


Talk with Commissioner Beckner
and voice your concerns and ideas
Hillsborough County Commissioner Kevin Beckner, District 6,
Countywide, is hosting office hours in the community the last Friday of
every month from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
The community office hours provide residents the opportunity to meet
with the Commissioner and voice their concerns about, and ideas for,
their community without having to travel to County Center in downtown
Tampa.
No appointment is necessary to meet with Commissioner Kevin
Beckner. Residents are seen on a first-come, first-served basis.
The July community office hours are from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on
Friday, July 30 at the Ruskin Branch Library, One Dickman Drive, S.E.,
Ruskin.


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SOLAR-X
642-3914
Call Bob Harris, SCC Resident
37 Years of Experience
in the Sun City Center Area



10O/o


OFF*
I p- r: :' i 1 -
I -_ I .i . l:i-r iI


OSCAR
Oscar is no grouch! He is a sweet
black and white male domestic
short hair. Now that he is an adult,
he is anxiously waiting to go to
his forever home. Oscar quietly
looks at you with his big eyes.
We wonder what he is thinking. If
you speak "Oscar," please come
to the shelter and be his translator.
Although, he is probably saying,
"Pick me! Pick me!" Oscar will
be neutered, microchipped, and be
current on his shots as part of his
adoption. He was born in Decem-
ber of 2009.
C.A.R.E. is open 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. on Tues. Sat. For directions
visit www.CareShelter.org or call
(813) 645-2273.

S. bi2E'b


CLOONEY
Clooney is a male Jack Russell
mix. He was brought to the shelter
because his owner could no longer
care for him or his three family
members. Clooney is very friendly
and loves belly rubs. He arrived
at the shelter and leaped right into
a volunteer's arms. Clooney has
been neutered, microchipped, and
brought current on his shots. He
was born in June of 2008.
C.A.R.E. is open 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. on Tues. Sat. For directions
visit www.CareShelter.org or call
813-645-2273.

60 asb



Feline Folks
conducts low cost
spay/neuter clinic
Feline Folks will conduct its
Low Cost Spay/Neuter Clinic
(OFF) Operation Feline Fix for
free-roaming cats on Saturday,
Aug. 21 at C.A.R.E in Ruskin.
There is a $10 fee per cat or
kitten (must weigh 3 pounds).
For an appointment, call (813)
944-7651.







Dedicated to Humane
Feline Management


I


I


JULY 29, 2010






20 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Music and poetry light up their life


I first met Shari Keller in the
Metro PCS store on Big Bend
Road in Riverview. That was six
months ago or more. I wrote her
name and telephone number on a
scrap of paper, thinking she might
be an interesting interview in the
future.
As usual,
little scraps
of paper
get lost in
large files,
especially
my "future
Over interview"
Coffee file that is
Fl r packed full
By Penny Flecher of interest-
penny@observernews.net ing people
I meet just
about every day.
Last week, while withdrawing
some papers to throw away notes
on people I've interviewed during
the last few months, the little scrap
of paper with Shari's telephone
number came out, attached to a
large yellow-lined legal sheet.
As it turned out, neither she,
nor her daughter, Suzanne Ma-
rie Keller-Becker, had forgotten
our first meeting. They both just
thought I forgot.
Originally from Michigan, Shari
moved to Florida with her husband
Charles, owner of Keller Tree ser-
vice, and her two children in Janu-
ary 1988 because of the warmer
weather.
Suzanne Marie almost died sev-
eral times as a baby, starting when
she was less than a week old, be-
cause of shallow breathing. As it
turned out, Florida weather was
as good for her health as it was
for her parents when they stopped
shoveling snow.
The reason Shari originally in-
terested me proved to be true. An
artist in many ways, she sings,
writes electronic music tracks,
and poetry. While a lot of her po-
etry is patriotic, much is also about
the way people act toward others.
Flowing with feelings, it can best
be described by reading it, which
you may do online at www.poetry-
poem.com/poetluver. She and her
daughter are thinking of publish-
ing a book of poems. She has more
than 50 completed, and there are
always more on the way.
Her Web site says that "Poetry
that impacts the world as a whole,
and for the world to understand
that 'peace' is the ultimate key to
the survival of mankind and that
there is a common bond that we
all share around the world, not one
that we should be proud of, but
a bond none the less. It is called
tragedy."
Some of her poetry written the
day after Sept. 11 tragedy was
published in the 2003 Anthology
of the American Poets Society.
But lately, her poetry writing
has taken a back seat to her music,
as she and her son David (known
locally as DJ) work on their new
electronic sound tracks.
Shari started singing as a child
with her mother's encouragement.
"My mother was in the group
Sweet Adelines a national group

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with chapters in different places."
Sweet Adelines is a woman's bar-
bershop sound of melody and har-
mony.
By the time she was 12, she was
writing her own songs and playing
piano, organ and guitar.
"English and history infatuated
me, and music and poetry give
me the chance to use both," Shari


said.
She isn't easily daunted. While
in Holy Angels Catholic School
in Sturgis, Mich., she shattered
the windows during a recital. She
also lip-synced her way through a
concert when she had pneumonia
rather than not show up and re-
ceive the "demerits" she figured
she would get as a no-show.


Shari Keller's music and poetry are accented by
drawings she has created of herself and her son.


Penny Fletcher photo
impressionistic


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The music continues in her Gib-
sonton home but now it's a techno
sound. She mixes the tracks first
and then writes the vocals. She
and her son, now 24, are constant-
ly working on experimental tracks.
She hopes to find a sponsor inter-
ested enough in her music to help
her cut some studio recordings. So
far, she's published her songs her-
self, without the help of high-tech
equipment, from her computer.
Their music can be heard at
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the mix of sound should tell a
story."
*Perhaps you have something
you'dliketo share. Ormaybeyou'd
rather tell the community about
your favorite charity or cause: or
sound off about something you
think needs change. That's what
"Over Coffee" is about. It really
doesn't matter whether we actually
drink any coffee or not (although I
probably will). It's what you have
to say that's important. E-mail me
any time at penny@observemews.
net and suggest a meeting place.
No matter what's going on, I'm
usually available to share just one
more cup.


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L C IRA'S
* Continued from page 17


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 21


with fur touching skin between
the links of the fence. Being in the
presence of the people they know,
hearing familiar and calming voic-
es and, for Elmira, the occasional
peppermint candy, are the things
that bring them joy.
But that joy is reserved for those
who have earned it. Kaprive, Green-
wood and a handful of other volun-
teers have dedicated themselves to
earning the trust and love of these
animals. Many of them will not au-
tomatically trust those they do not
know.
"A lot of people expect this to be
a petting zoo," Kaprive said. "We
aren't a petting zoo. We are a sanc-
tuary."
The economy is slow and there
are plenty of people that need help
these days. But unlike people, these
animals can't apply for food stamps
or unemployment benefits. They
can't seek out even menial or low
paying jobs. They only know what
they've been taught since birth: Hu-
mans will take care of them. Now
Elmira's is fulfilling the promises
made by others.
But for the generosity and com-
passion of a land owner providing
affordable rent; but for the gener-
osity of people keeping promises
to creatures that have nowhere else
to go; but for the dedication of a
handful of volunteers, Elmira, Al-
bert, Casper and the other animals
would not have a home. As the say-
ing goes, "There, but for the Grace
of God, go I".
Elmira may dream from an an-
cient memory of things she has
never known of streams, mead-


ows and damp woods under a clear
blue sky. Perhaps you, too, are in
those dreams, standing just out
of sight behind a tree hearing the
crinkle of cellophane as a woman
named Deb unwraps a peppermint
candy, watching as the bear gently
takes the candy into her mouth and
happily crunches down on it. It's a
good dream.
On Saturday, July 31from 9 a.m.
to 3:30 p.m., the Copper Penny
Restaurant on U.S. Highway 301 in
Sun City Center will donate 25per-
cent of their proceeds to Elmira s
Wildlife Sanctuary. The fundraiser
is open to the public.
To meet some of the animals at
Elmira s ;hi,. hi video and a pho-
to gallery, visit The Observer News
online at www.observernews.net.


A leopara name Ivionju.


At left are two of
the cats at the
sanctuary. For
the 45 animals
at Elmira's, the
presence of the
humans they
have come to
love and trust
is as important
as the food they
need to survive.


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"I am looking forward to being
able to make my way around the
grocery store," says Anne Gordon,
60, of Sarasota. For a year and half,
Anne has essentially lost her ability
to do the simple things in life be-
cause she has impaired vision due
to cataracts, a clouding of the natu-
ral lens of the eye. Left untreated,
cataracts can lead to significant
loss of sight or even blindness.
Anne will be among 29 people
receiving free cataract surgery at
Center For Sight's AAAHC-ac-
credited surgery center in Sarasota.
For more than a decade, Center For
Sight has partnered with Mission
Cataract USA, a national non-prof-
it organization, to help eliminate
blindness due to cataracts. Cata-
ract Surgeons Joshua Kim, M.D.,
William J. Lahners, M.D. and Wil-
liam L. Soscia, M.D. perform free
cataract surgery, a procedure which
includes the replacement of the
eye's cloudy lens with an artificial,
intraocular lens (IOL). Patients can
see the difference almost immedi-
ately following the procedure.
To qualify for free cataract sur-
gery, applicants must meet certain
guidelines:
* U.S. citizens
* Without any insurance including
Medicare or Medicaid
* Must be at or below the national
poverty level
The criteria are established by
Mission Cataract USA, and each
qualifying candidate is prescreened
by the participating physicians.
CenterFor SightMedical Director
William Lahners, M.D. performed
Anne's surgery. She considers the
whole event to be divine interven-
tion. Anne is looking forward to
going back to her writing and pet
therapy volunteer work.
Participating in Mission Cataract
is a gift from the staffs perspective


as well. "We are all committed to
Mission Cataract. It's a privilege
being involved in a program that
is truly bringing clear vision to life
and helping improve the quality of
life for so many," comments Dr.
Lahners.
About cataracts: Aging is the
#1 factor in developing cataracts;
about half of Americans older than
65 have some degree of this cloud-
ing of the lens. Exposure to the sun
and cigarette smoke can increase
the risk. The symptoms may be
subtle: blurred vision, sensitivity to
light, glare or halos around objects,
faded colors and poor night vision.
About AAAHC: Accredita-
tion by the Accreditation Associa-
tion for Ambulatory Health Care
(AAAHC) is a voluntary process
through which an organization is
able to measure the quality of its
services and performance against
nationally recognized standards.
The accreditation certificate held
by Center For Sight is a symbol
that an organization is committed
to providing the highest quality
health care and has demonstrated
that commitment by measuring up
to the Accreditation Association's
high standards.
With locations throughout South-
west Florida, Center For Sight is
the nation's leading multi-disci-
plinary practice providing patients
worldwide with advanced health-
care in ophthalmology, dermatol-
ogy, cosmetic facial surgery and
hearing services. Under the clinical
direction of David W Shoemaker,
M.D. and William J. Lahners,
M.D., F.A.C.S., Center For Sight
has eight offices located in Bra-
denton, Sarasota, Sun City Center,
Venice, Englewood and North Port.
For more information, visit www.
centerforsight.net or call (800)
941.6956.


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22 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Break out the tinfoil hats!


When something goes viral on
the web, that means it has rapidly
attracted the attention of millions
of people. That "something" is of-
ten a video,
but it could
also be a doc-
ument or a
photograph.
While the
source is of-
Observing ten ignored,
the Web the imagery
becomes
By Mitch Traphagen ubiquitous.
mitch@observernews.net One such
photograph
is of a cat wearing a tinfoil hat. On
millions of message boards across
the web, when someone sounds a
little too conspiratorial, someone
else will invariably post the photo
of the cat in the tinfoil hat in re-
sponse. For those not in the know,
the tinfoil hat is intended to ward
off the evil mind rays whether
from aliens or from our very own
government.
In my fairly brief and limited role
as a U.S. Government employee, I
can say with a reasonable amount
of confidence that unless you are
out buying rocket-propelled gre-
nade launchers, or the components
of a nuclear bomb, or are actively
discussing assassinating someone;
the government, and all of the se-
cret organizations within, doesn't
much care what you say or do.
Sorry to break that to you. They
really don't care what you talk to
your wife and friends about. They
don't care if you complain about
taxes or politicians. There are no
mind rays or dark rooms filled
with people monitoring your every
word and thought (although you
may find out different should you
actually try to buy a RPG launcher
but for everyone else, you're in the
clear from my experience).
That, of course, doesn't stop the
conspiracy theories from forming
and growing. The web is a conspir-
acy theorist's dream come true. If
you put it in print, it has to be true,
right? My neighbor had a friend
whose cousin's sister's brother-in-
law saw death camps being built
in rural Georgia. And that sentence
of fourth or fifteenth-hand reports
is not much of an exaggeration -
a photo a few years ago of a bunch
of stacked plastic boxes near some
railroad tracks somehow became a
photo of coffins for death camps
being built by President Bush
(and today are being called death
camps built by President Obama).
C'mon, seriously? Death camps?
Why would the government want
them? To maintain power? I have
a feeling that after eight years
in the White House, George W.
Bush (and every other president)
couldn't wait to get the heck out.
Conspiracies are a big part of the
web. As such, today we will rec-
ognize them and and even advance
them by showcasing some really
cool technology that on the surface
appears to be innocent; but when
given some (twisted) thought,
could be used for nefarious, evil
purposes. Break out the tinfoil and
let's uncover some truth.
A research lab from the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania has sev-
eral videos of really cool things
people are calling quadrocopters.
They are basically small, radio-
controlled helicopters with a twist
- they have four rotors. The re-
search lab calls them quadrotor
robots and the video shows them
picking up 2x4 boards. Several of
them even work together to pick
up bigger boards.
The optimists among us might
think, "Cool! Those things could


be used to deliver pizza!" But the
conspiratorial among us will see
a darker purpose: These things
could be used by "them" (whoever
"them" is) to silently fly through
our open bedroom windows at
night to kill us in our sleep. And
yes, there are blog posts about
this.
A second research lab video only
adds weight to the conspiracy by
using the title, "Aggressive Ma-
neuvers for Autonomous Quadro-
tor Flight". In fact, the video even
shows one with terrifying purpose
and precision flying through an
open window, as if p..i ... in, for
your very own window.
Check it out for your-
self at: www.youtube.com/
watch?v YBsJwapanWI. The
aggressive maneuvers vid-
eo is at: www.youtube.com/
watch?v=MvRTALJp8DM.
Next we have a really cute little
robot from Japan designed to act
like a human baby. It rolls around
just like a baby, it will turn its head
to look at you, and it will even
blink its (rather large) eyes. The
video is in Japanese, but according


to the person who uploaded it to
YouTube, the robot has the intel-
ligence of a one- or two-year-old
baby and has the senses of sight,
hearing and touch. The thing is
awfully cute and seeing it on its
back and kicking its little robot
feet, is pretty impressive from a
technology standpoint. Maybe,
just maybe, the promise offered
to the Baby Boom Generation by
watching The Jetsons may come
true in our lifetime after all. The
whole Jetson family and millions
of young Boomers loved Rosie the
Robot (although I did think she
was kind of snotty sometimes -
but in a good way).
Ah, but of course there is a
darker side to this cool technol-
ogy. How do we know that robot
won't eventually decide we aren't
smart enough, or good enough, to
live? How do we know that armies
of little baby robots won't form to
kill us all? Yeah, it's all fun and
games seeing the cute little things
blink their eyes, but just imagine
waking out of a deep sleep to one
staring at you from your bedside.
A cute little baby robot designed


might be best to take our chances.
I would love to have an autono-
mous quadrocopter around the
house. Heck, I might even let the
baby robot play with it.

For direct links, visit The Ob-
server News online at www.ob-
servernews.net. Click on News
and then Observing the Web.


Obesity
U Continued from page 1


In a letter to Mrs. Obama, Fried
said he hopes other groups around
the country will take up the cause
and address students on the ben-
efits of exercise and proper diet.
He especially wanted her to
know that many seniors are in full
support of her efforts to "down-
size" children and growing adults
before they suffer the health prob-
lems associated with too much
weight gain.
Fried says that 45 years ago his
daughter convinced him to stop
smoking. That would have been
when he was 44 years old. "This
taught me a good lesson," Fried
said. "One that I had learned many
years before and one that I have
never since forgotten. Good hab-
its, those which bring health to our
minds and bodies, are far easier to
learn than the bad ones that hurt
us.
Fried said he and his fellow Fit-
ness America buddies don't want
to take over the job of parents, but
instead they want to aid them in
helping them learn the importance
of keeping television and comput-
er screen time down; eating meals
as a family whenever possible; and
walking more places, including up
and down stairs, to get more exer-
cise.
The three definitely practice
what they preach.
"The value of exercising, along
with the proper diet, cannot be
overstated. Your futures as our na-
tion's leaders are important," Fried
told the students at Summerfield
Crossings as they sat on the caf-
eteria floor.
When asked about some of
the meals they are served in the
school's cafeteria on a regu-
lar basis, many students named
pizza, French fries and spaghetti,
although they sometimes get to
choose chicken sandwiches, and
fried chicken and corn nuggets as
the main part of their meal.
"Kids who run out of money,
and sometimes the free-lunchers,
usually get cheese sandwiches and
peanut butter and jelly," one boy
said. He said his older brother,
who is in middle school, gets the
same choices, although the older
students also have the ability to
purchase extra items (including
sodas and snacks) there.


While it is true that most kids
love McDonalds and Burger King,
perhaps the First Lady's concen-
tration on America's school lunch
cafeterias is her best idea of all.
Everyone is aware it is cheaper
to feed a large family (or thou-
sands of students) macaroni and
cheese or large helpings of mashed
potatoes than to give them proper
amounts of vegetables, dairy, fruit
and meat.
For more information on Fit-
ness America in South County, or
to request a presentation at your
child's school, contact Sol Fried at
sfried25@tampabay.rr.com.


Model train social
at museum
PALMETTO Palmetto Histor-
ical Park and Manatee County Ag-
ricultural Museum's second social
of the summer will be a "Model
Train Social." Held over two days
Saturday, August 7 from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. and Sunday, August 8, from
noon to 4 p.m., this family event is
sure to please any train lover.
The Florida Garden Railroad So-
ciety will be visiting and bringing
their model trains. There will be
trains to look at and trains to play
with; trains inside and trains out-
side; train crafts, train activities,
and train movies.
Included will be a Thomas the
Tank Engine set-up as well as a
Tropicana set-up. There will even
be a raffle for a model train offered
by the Railroad Society. The mem-
bers of the Railroad Society love to
talk with model train enthusiasts,
both young and old. Come visit the
park and have a great time.
Word of Mouth BBQ will be
selling lunches on both days and
Alex's Lemonade Stand will be
raising funds for childhood cancer
research.
This family event is FREE! The
park is located at 515 10th Ave.
West, Palmetto. For more infor-
mation, call 941-721-2034 or 941-
723-4991. This event is sponsored
by R.B. Chips Shore, Manatee
County Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Palmetto Historical Commission,
Manatee County Agricultural Mu-
seum, Inc., and the City of Pal-
metto.


Penny Fletcher photo
Jim Miller and Sol Fried of Sun City Center represent Fitness Amer-
ica a nonprofit team that goes to local schools to encourage stu-
dents to eat right and exercise. Fried got the idea after listening to a
speech given by First Lady Michelle Obama saying that obesity has
become the leading cause of rejection by the military and writing
her a letter.


march )of dimes
march for babies"


Photo courtesy of Wally Glenn (http://gwally.com/news/000778.php)
The most famous of the tinfoil hat photos is from a man named
Wally Glenn, who shot this photo to be humorous. He succeeded,
although is rarely credited for his creativity and contribution.


JULY 29, 2010


to kill carried into your bedroom
through an open window by a
silent, aggressive Autonomous
Quadrocopter.
Take a look for yourself in this
video from a Japanese television
news report: www.youtube.com/
watch?v=SE2VCwYDjxO.
After seeing all of this, you
may well decide, as I have, that it






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 23


Observations: The happy trails between life and death


By Mitch Traphagen
mitch@observernews.net
Michelle and I met Art and his
wife in the Ruskin marina
where we lived. Art had a beautiful
boat and he owned a small busi-
ness in Tampa with his brother.
"I'm going to sell my business and
go cruising," he said.
Over the years, like our other
friends in the marina, we all
worked towards that goal. Going
cruising was the fulfillment of
living aboard untying the dock
lines and sailing off into the sunset
for adventures "out there." Finally,
Michelle and I reached our goal.
We waved goodbye to our friends
and we puttered off towards the
Gulf of Mexico in our boat over-
loaded with everything we thought
we would need (and, it turns out,
a bunch of stuff we didn't) for six
months sailing through the Baha-
mas and into the Caribbean. When
our adventure was over and we
returned to the little marina, Art
and his wife were still there. They
had a bigger and better boat and
their adventure would certainly be
more comfortable once the work of
preparing it was done. "I'm going
to sell my business and we're
going to go cruising," he said.
A few years later, Michelle and
I moved off our boat and into a
house a few miles away. Over
the passing months, we lost touch
with some of our marina friends
until one day I heard that Art and


his wife did finally leave. But their
dream of cruising was cut dramati-
cally short, ending aground not far
away near Sarasota. It turns out
that Art discovered he was dying.
They made a last ditch effort to
live their dream, but they were too
late.
Art was a good and generous
man. He was a man of faith, he
worked hard and he died young.
He died before he could realize his
dream.
I'm not afraid of dying -- it is,
after all, one thing that all of us
have in common. No mortal has
ever survived life -- everyone
eventually dies. I am, however,
afraid of attempting to live when
it is too late, afraid of making that
last-ditch effort at living while life
escapes me. I am afraid of being
on my deathbed with thoughts of,
"I wish I would have..."
I learned a lot from Art. Over the
years, we talked about religion and
lines ("ropes" for the land-bound)
but the most important thing I
learned from him is what scares
me the most. I learned that some-
day it will be too late. The worst
part is, that it may be something
that catches me by surprise.
The economy is for the
moment, anyway in the tank
and we all have complaints about
this guy or that guy. It turns out
that all too often we see our fellow
man as either lunatics or idiots.
But there is nothing happening in


the economy that is preventing me
from holding on to my friends a
little tighter, a little longer. There's
nothing a politician has said or
done that prevents any of us from
telling our kids or our spouse or
our friends, "I love you." No lu-
natic or idiot has prevented me
from at least trying to pursue my
dreams.
I'd been given this lesson before
when my father passed away at
the age of 43. At 15-years-old, I
was almost completely unaware of
my surroundings yet I knew that
he had dreams. In retrospect I see
that he fulfilled many of them. My
Mom, was left financially secure
and each of his four children grad-
uated from college. We've all been
blessed to carry his passion in our
hearts. But I also know there were
things he wanted to do; things that
will forever remain undone.
That, of course, will almost al-
ways be the case. It seems that as
humans, we are unfinished works.
Yet if we learn from those who
have gone before us, perhaps we
can see the fallacies of the things
that cause us angst.
The headlines today are streams
of bad news: foreclosures, layoffs
and predictions of other horrific
things. Put down the newspaper,
shut off AM radio or close your
Web browser once in a while,
and hug your wife or husband -
and hold on a few seconds longer
than you normally would. Go to


Mitch Traphagen Photo
This is a photograph of one of my happy trails. The destination
didn't really matter, the journey was important.


the beach, watch St. Petersburg
light up in the sunrise, and greet
a friend with a handshake -- using
both hands. And then say your
dreams aloud: "I'm going to..."
Those dreams may not be fulfilled
in the way you envision after
all, an old saying is men plan, God
laughs. but that doesn't mean
you shouldn't make plans or that
you shouldn't take steps towards
making them happen.
We've all been given the gift of
life and it is up to us to decide how
to use it. We can make a last ditch
effort while life escapes us or we
can do what is possible to enjoy
the journey. Thanks to Art and my
Dad, I have learned that the adven-


ture is not in the destination; but in
the experience. Laughter, joy and
tears are earned along the way and
the things we pick up on the jour-
ney are the things we carry with us
for life. The destination is merely
a milepost with, perhaps, a photo-
graph or two.
Roy Rogers and Dale Evans ap-
parently knew all of that. They
didn't sing about a happy desti-
nation or a happy fulfillment of
dreams they sang about happy
trails. The journey itself is what
leads to the fulfillment of our
dreams. Let your journey begin
today.
I wish you fair winds, smooth
sailing and happy trails.


*0 Podiatric Medicine and Surgery

Sean D. Shanahan,

D.P.M., M.P.H.

3909 Galen Court, Suite B-1
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Phone: (813) 634-0664
Fax: (813) 634-0668















Free Skin Cancer


Screening Clinic

If you are concerned about a skin

growth, we would be happy to evaluate

Howard A. Oriba, M.D. Michael G. Caruso, M.D.
Dermatologists

4002 Sun City Center Blvd. Suite B Sun City Center FL 33573
(Corner of Upper Creek and Sun City Center Blvd.)(Pink building with green roof)





CAL" AOVV
813=634= 1455 l


Ybor Grille

Spanish Restaurant e Food & Spirits51~


105 E. Shell Point Road Ruskin, FL 813-641-7300
Daily Summer Lunch Specials
From I 1:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.* DINE-IN ONLY


Monday.....................................................Picadillo*
Tuesday ................................................... RopaVieja*
Wednesday....... Arroz con Polio (Chicken &Yellow Rice)*
Thursday.............................................. Puerco (Pork)*
Friday................................................. Fish Sandwich
Open Mon.-Thurs. 11-8 Fri.& Sat. I 1-8:30 Sun. 11-7


* Includes: Entree, Black
Beans, Rice & Plantains


Gret-FSH I"C IS at S9. o unas
3 / 0 0 I.


AAA Discoun'

ANY FLUID FULL E.NG.INE A/C SERVICE.
EXCHANGE :: DIAGNOSTIC SPECIAL

$20 OFF $4995 $97
SANY FLUSH Includes: inspect belts
Transmission, Coolant, Power Steering 1e compressor & hoses,
BrakeTransiss lan owerSteer Check Engine Light On? Sea e system reonisextra). Most cars
Most vehicles. No other discounts apply, stvehes Nother discounts apply and light trucks. Valid only with coupon.
Additional charges for shopsupplies may added Mt vehevalid wihother uponsuorspecials.
S Environmental disposal fee may apply in some areas ,z ddi ee store sfor shop suppes may e added W Exp ons o spec. 9/2/10as
See store for details. Exp. 9/2/10 -o -e o "e
2-WHEEL FRONT MAINTENANCOIL NGE
DISc BRAKESERV. INSPECTION & LUBRICATION

-,',,IIFREE va 1end$109
$20 OFF REE 3995 10
Incudesisual inspection of tires,bels&hoses, OK dll
FREE BRAKE CHECK New brake pads, resurface Include Vsuaspes i onf tirs belts es 8nd
frt, epa ont eelbearing (if horn/lights, brakes, shockslstruts exhaust wipers Includes up to 5 qts 5W20 10W30, or 10W40
apliabeO, add brake fluid, inspect hydrauic system suspension, air & breather mor oil Puator il Most cars and light
Appitoable0 padra/e uide oinspeedet extrauc scostem. Most carslilght trucks. Disassembly to perfect inspection may trucks. Please call for appointment.
Additional partsiservice often needed at extra costatal charges. Present coupon toreceie savings Valid only with coupon. Not valid with any other
Limited warranty 12 months o 12,000 miles which No other discounts apply.Additional charges for shop supplies coupons or specials Coupon expires 8/12/10
comes first.No other discounts apply.Valid only with coupon may be added. See store for details. Exp. 9/2/10
Notvaid ith other coupns.Exp9/2/10 DEALER ALTERNATIVE


.60 AAA Autorized
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JULY 29, 2010






24 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Photo Hazel Martin
Standing left to right: Lieutenant Colonel (Ret.) Kathy Champion,
Mission Board Secretary Alice Tolley, Southeastern Guide Dogs
CEO Titus Herman, and Angel the Guide Dog.

Southeastern Guide Dogs receive funds
It was a great day when the Mission Board of The United Community
Church, 1501 La Jolla Avenue, Sun City Center, presented a gift check to
the Southeastern Guide Dogs, as a Mission of the Month.
Accepting the gift was Lt. Colonel (Ret.) Kathy Champion. Kathy
graduated from the Pl\ s For Patriots" program that serves Veterans
with visual impairments. This service is provided free of charge for
qualified Veterans. The program receives no funding from the govern-
ment and relies solely on the contributions from donors like the United
Community Church. For more information call 941-729-5665 or email
www.guidedogs.org.


Estate planning seminar


A Financial Seminar is being
conducted by Spencer Faircloth
at Trinity Baptist Church for in-
terested residents, Thursday, July
29, from 2-4 p.m. Mr. Faircloth
is a church member who is a re-
tired SunTrust Bank Trust Officer.
A guest speaker will be Attorney
Joseph F. Pippen, Jr. Among the



Learn from Your
Trash
I learned how to save more
money by just "checking my own
garbage" each week. I was amazed
at the products I had overbought,
didn't like, couldn't use before
they spoiled, etc. The items in-
cluded food, personal products,
and clothes. It also was a great
reminder of the cost of carryout
foods from fast food/regular res-
taurants.
Sheila F. in Vardaman, MS
Want to live better on the money
you already make? visit stretcher. corn/index. cfm?TipsSyn>
to find hundreds of articles to help
you stretch your day and your dol-
lar! Copyright 2010 Dollar Stretcher,
Inc

CWGA 18 Caloosa
C.C.Women's 18 hole
golf league
Throw out 2 holes(front-bank).
Full-handicap.6/9
Flight 1
Mary Lou Underwood 1st 54
Bobbie Campbell 2nd 57
Jeanne Kolls 3rd tie 58
Ann Skinner 58
Flight 2
Terry Cox 1st 57
Shirley Coniglio 2nd 58
3rd Flight
Donna Gardner 1st tie 55
Hazel Winklmann 55
Jean Atkins 2nd 57
Geggy Lang 3rd 59
Dale Nolta 4th 60

Golf Scores Hogans
Golf Club
Tuesday, 6/1/10
Course: Apollo Beach, 5845
Match play

1st : Rich Lucidi, 87, net 55
2nd : Fred Mayes, 96, net 71
3rd : Mac McKay, 107, net 75


topics covered are: Understand-
ing Wills, Titling Property/Avoid-
ing Probate, Understanding Trusts,
and Avoiding Taxes/Estate Taxes.
This will be a four session seminar.
There is no charge for this semi-
nar. Call Trinity Baptist Church at
634-4228 to register.


Vacation Bible School
- Saddle Ridge Ranch
Saddle up! From August 2-6
enjoy a week of adventure with
Northside Baptist Church for
their Saddle Ridge Ranch Vaca-
tion Bible School. Each day from
6 to 8:30pm preschool aged chil-
dren through adults can celebrate
at 1301 N. US Hwy 41 in Ruskin.
For more information call 813-
645-1121.

Voice of the
Faithful to meet
The Tampa Bay Affiliate of Voice
of the Faithful (8 years) will meet
at 1:30-3:30 on Monday, Aug. 9, at
Our Lady of Guadalupe Mission,
16550 South Hwy 301, Wimauma
(across Hwy 301 from Copper
Penny Restaurant). The meeting
will continue with a discussion re:
"Sexual Abuse, Financial Mishan-
dling." All interested people are
welcome. The discussion is free.
For more information, 633-8780
or suzannelynch3 @verizon.net



Bible study offered
Womens Interdenominational
Bible Study meets each Monday,
9-11am, in Creason Hall, UMC of
Sun City Center, 1210 Del Webb
Blvd. for in-depth study, music,
prayer and fellowship. For more
information, call (813) 633-9083.


CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH
SundayWorship: Blended 8:00 a.m.
Contemporary 9:40 a.m.
Traditional 11:15 a.m. BI BrendRd.
Nursery Provided CrossRoads: Bible Study, Worship: Wed. 7 p.m. .
Pastor Jack R. Palzer
5309 U.S. Highway 41 North Apollo Beach B
(acrossfrom MiraBay) www.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1305 Y N

St. John the Divine Episcopal Church
Growing by Faith from Generation to Generation
\R ev. Tracy H. Wider Church Office 813-645-1521
SUNDAY SERVICES: 9 am Contemporary Service and Sunday School
at West Campus, S.R. 674 and 9th Street SE, Ruskin
8 am Traditional Service and 11 am Holy Communion with Choir at East Campus
at 1015 Del Webb Blvd., SCC
All Worship Services with Holy Communion and Healing Holy Oil


Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (Behind Suntrust Bank)
ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: (Nov.-April .............................8:30 a.m. Day Care Available
Mon. Fri.
Rev. John M. Bartha and all year)......................... 10:45 a.m. 6 am. 6 p.m.
SPhone: 645-1241 Sunday School....................... 9:30 a.m. call 645-6198

REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH-ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center, FL 33573-5354
Rev. Dr. Peter Stiller, Pastor 634-1292
Saturday Worship: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion....First & Third Sunday Bible Class...Thursday 10 am, Guests Welcome

First Church of Christ, Scientist
Ruskin Sun City Center (813) 645-6102
204 Second St. N.W, Ruskin, Florida 33570
Sunday Service Sunday School ..................................................10 AM
Wednesday Testimony Meeting ........................................................... 5 PM
Reading Room Wednesday................................................. 4 4:50 PM
ALL ARE WELCOME www.spirituality.com

F"RST BAPTIST CHURCH

L 820 COLLEGE AVE. W.
I RUSKIN, FL 33570
645-6439
P J.. www.fbcruskin.org
Sl A Resource for Families
Sunday School.........................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship............8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Dr. Barry Rumsey
Evening Service............................6:00 p.m. CHRISTIANSCHOOL
K-2
Wednesday Night Service................7:00 p.m. THROUGH 12TH
Awana............................................7:00 p.m GRADE


IaCK row: Douay Rennert ana lll vvinnanam. Dontom row: uee
Rennert, Sandy Carmean and Alana Phan

New members of Destiny Church
Recently 5 new members were accepted into Destiny Church. Each
person completed a 13 week course of study that includes the beliefs
of the church, its vision and an assessment of their gifts and talents for
ministry.


Trinity Baptist women visit HCI
Several members of the Trinity Baptist Church Women's Fellowship
in Sun City Center received a tour of the Hillsborough Correctional In-
stitution women's prison in Riverview. Warden Rhodene Mathis, far
left, greeted the ladies. Nancy Williams, next to Mathis, who is a church
member and prison volunteer organized the tour. Several ladies from
Trinity volunteer as teachers and mentors in this first National Faith-
Based/Character Building facility.


S riendship Baptist Church
Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist)
S1511 El Rancho Dr.
SSun City Center, FL 33573
Phone/Fax:
_'' 7 813-633-5950


Sunday
9 a .m ................
1 1 a .m .............
10 a.m. & 6 p.m.


.Bible Study
.Bible Study
.....Worship


Wednesday
6 p.m.... Prayer Meeting/Bible Study


Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC
Meets in the Social Hall of the Beth Israel Synagogue
1115 E. Del Webb Blvd.
Thursday, 7:00 PM Call 633-0396
Live and let live is not enough; live and help
live is not too much. Orin E. Madison


NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where God's Love is Shared"
U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL 645.1121 www.nbcor.ora
Sunday School for all ages 9:30 AM SBC
Morning Worship 10:45 AM Wanted: People Who Want to Grow
Evening Worship 6:00 PM and Live for Jesus!
Full Wednesday Schedule for all ages

North River Church of Christ _
Non-Instrumental-
13885 U.S. Hwy 301 South
(Just South of the Manatee County Line)
Minister: Howard Johnson Office 941-776-1134
Services: Sunday 10:00am, 11:00am & 6:00pm ce 41- -11
Wednesday7:00pm Home 813-754-1776

First Baptist Church of Gibsonton
"We love because He first loved us." 1 John 4:19
TraditionalWorship Service *Sunday School 9:30 A.M.
Old-Time Gospel Hymns *Morning Worship 10:30A.M. I
Nursery Available Sunday Evening 6:00 P.M.
Interpreter for the Deaf Mid-Week (Wed.) 7:00 P.M. I
9912 Indiana St.* Hwy 41 & Estelle A- 1 "Malcolm S. Clements, Pastor
Gibsonton FL 33534 -." .. .. 813-67-1301 J

Wlcoe ,& Ae EVERETT TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ
1611 First St. SW Ruskin, FL 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL-
SERVICES: Sunday ........................9:30 & 10:30 a.m.: 6:00 p.m .
Wednesday................7:00 p.m.

PRINCE OF PEACE CATHOLIC CHURCH
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573
Phone 634-2328 Fax 633-6670
Masses: Sunday ........................................................... 8:00, 10:00 a.m., Noon
Saturday Vigil ................................................ 4:00 p.m .
Daily......... .... ...... ............. ................ ............... 8:00 a.m .
www.popcc.org Confessions: Monday Friday 7:30 a.m., Saturday 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.


JULY 29, 2010






JULY 29, 2010

Negatives can become positives
* BEHIND THE MIKE By: Michael A. Aun, http://www.aunline.com


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 25


SO n e
thing that
is consis-
tent with
all cham-
pions is
that they
turn nega-
tives into
positives. They never let their
shortcomings become the domi-
nating factor in their lives. They
build around the negative so that it
becomes surrounded with positive,
and thus eliminating that which is
less than perfect in their lives.
Perhaps there is no greater exam-
ple than the story of Shelly Mann.
She was born with polio and no one
ever expected her to be much of
anything in life. She would always
be dependent upon those around
her, so her doctors said. She was put
into a pool. Her first stroke nearly
drowned her as she could barely
hold her arms up. She was three
months behind every other polio
victim in that pool. Her first stroke
she ever took in swimming took her
three months. Which one would you
pick to be an Olympic Champion?
Certainly not Shelly Mann.
To make the story brief, she devel-
oped that first stroke into a stronger


stroke. And slowly but surely she
turned the negative in her life into
the positive. Her coaches watched
as she improved and how she de-
veloped into a champion swimmer.
And finally, the world watched her
with tears in her eyes as she climbed
on the box to receive the Gold Med-
al in International Olympic Games
as the breaststroke champion of the
world.
Do you know how many of the
greatest leaders in America were
stricken with some kind of illness
or negative in their lives?
Think of Lincoln. He didn't have
much education.
He failed in business in '31;
He was elected to the legislature
in '32;
He failed again in '33;
He was defeated for the legisla-
ture in '34;
His sweetheart died in '35;
He suffered a nervous break-
down in '36;
He was defeated for speaker in
'38;
He was defeated for lecturer in
'40;
He was defeated for Congress
in '43;
He was elected to Congress in


He was defeated for Congress
in '48;
He was defeated for Senate in
'55;
He was defeated for Vice-Pres-
ident in '56;
He was defeated again for Sen-
ate in '58;
And he was elected President
of the United States of America in
1860.
If we had the tenacity of purpose,
the kind of commitment to a cause
that Abraham Lincoln had, then
we'd succeed at anything we do.
Think of Teddy Roosevelt, as he
fought to recuperate from a crip-
pling illness. He became known as
Rough Rider Teddy Roosevelt.
Think of Jack Kennedy, as he
fought back an injury that kept him
in pain throughout his adult life.
These men turned the negatives in
their lives into the positives. They
took the negative and they made
them challenges. That's how they
succeeded.
Are you aware that every single
atom in the world consists of a
negative and a positive? The elec-
trons are negative and the protons
are positive. Now the negatives can
come and go. But the center of the
atom is the positive proton.
Do you want to know what it
takes in life that makes for great-
ness? It's the centering of your life
in the positive. That's what makes
the difference. If you'll make your
nucleus one of positive nature, no
matter how much negative there
is around you, you will succeed at
anything that you do. If you can
conceive it in your mind that it is
possible, then it is possible. Doing
it is then only a matter of a process
that must be completed.


Photo Hazel Martin
Standing left to right: Assistant Minister Reverend Ruth Richardson
and Metropolitan Ministries Executive Assistant Linda Shaw

Backpacks of hope
The United Community Church, 1501 La Jolla Avenue, Sun City Cen-
ter, August Mission of the Month, is a Metropolitan Ministries Project,
"Backpacks of Hope."
Consider providing a Backpack of Hope for one of the five thousand
needy children in the Tampa Bay region. The backpacks and school
supplies may be deposited at any time in the collection barrels found in
the Church Narthex. You may also call Metropolitan Ministries at 813-
209-1000 or log on to www.metromin.org for further information. Re-
member hope lives here!

THE OBSERVER NEWS

Submit press releases by 4pm, every Thursday, to:
news@observernews.net
or online at www.observernews.net


Unit y
S1 pirituality Rather Than "Religion"
Beth Israel's Social Hall
1115 Del Webb E. Sun City Center, FL Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
www.unitycommunityofjoy.com Tel. 813-298-7745


i THE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO THE SERVICES NOW WORSHIPPING IN THE "CHAPEL"
AT SUN CITY CENTER FUNERAL HOME 10:30 AM ON SUNDAYS
NO CREED...BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE
1851 RICKENBACKER DRIVE 813-938-4955
Minister DR. DAVID CAMPBELL


QdJif/eJoR /eAos/ Gourv ofSun C/Gy Genier
The Church of Open Hearts... Open Minds... Open Doors
1210 W. Del Webb Blvd. 634-2539
S Worship Services:
Saturday.................. 4:00 p.m.- Creason Hall (Traditional Service)
i Sunday................ 8:15 a.m. in Sanctuary (Traditional Service)
9:30 a.m. Creason Hall (The Oasis)
S Fe p 10:55 a.m. Sanctuary (Traditional with Chancel Choir)
i( d Fellowship tim .. j 1. I ,;,, I.. r .. 10:15a.m. and 11a.m. in Creason Hall
ffGod strove n._%"".S CCI MC.com
PASTORS: DR. WARRENLANGER, REV GARY BULLOCK
Communion First Sunday ofEach Month


St. Andrew Presbyterian Church

1 Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.
Prayers with anointing for healing and
I wholeness during worship the second Sunday
of every month.
A Stephen Pastor: Dr. Gerald Iwerks
Ministry Church


1239 Del We
Sun City Cei
Church is Ha


Meet friends in Fellowship Hall after the Service
Refreshments served

-bb Blvd. West Phone: 813-634-1252
enter, FL 33573 For Information visit:
ndicap accessible www.standrewatscc.org


e SOUTHSIDE
Prehing the BAPTIST CHURCH
4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 South
(4 miles south of Ruskin)
DAN COLLINS, PASTOR JIM KRAUSE, MUSIC DIRECTOR
COMMUNITY INVITED
BIBLE STUDY 9:30 AM
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE 10:55 AM
SUNDAY EVENING SERVICE 6:00 PM
WEDNESDAY PRAYER SERVICE 7:00 PM
ADULTS, YOUTH, CHILDREN
For information, call 645-4085 Monday-Thursday




Saint Anne Catholic Ckutchk

Fr. John McEvoy
Pastor
813-645-1714
SaintAnneRuskin.org

U.S. Hwy. 41 106 11th Ave. NE Ruskin
SouthShore: r .1 I 1. Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton
C^ MASSES `
Saturday Vigil M ass ................ ........................................ 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass..................................... 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Holy Days....................................... Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Daily .....................................................M onday thru Friday 8:00 a.m.
Espatiol................................ Domingo 12:00 p.m.; Miercoles 7:30 p.m.
Confession.............................Wednesday 6:15 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.
SNursery Available for 10:00 a.m. Mass






The nae/of 1he1LOD1is1


Organizing Toiletries
I've read in magazines about
people shopping in their own
closet, but I always assumed it was
just for clothes. Then last Decem-
ber I found myself buying razors
to shave my legs and I kept think-
ing I was sure I had razors some-
where in the big linen closet next
to the bathroom. I went home and
dug in the closet and found a pack
of razors and several other items
I'd forgotten about. So I'd had
enough.
That Sunday I checked the ads
in the paper and found out a lo-
cal craft store was selling video
boxes for $1.50. I bought 15 of
them. I chose VCR boxes because
they were smaller and more eas-
ily stackable in the closet than the
traditional plastic bins. And they
were much less expensive. I la-
beled each video box with a type
of product, such as soap, razors,
dental, body wash, makeup, and
cotton balls. Then I went to work.
It took me longer than I thought,
but now that I'm done, the closet
is completely organized.
Now, whenever I use something
up, instead of going to the store, I
go to the closet. Since I was always
a sale shopper, I found that I had a
big stash of things that had gotten
shoved to the back of the closet
and upper shelves and forgotten.
Jerri B.
Want to live better on the money
you already make? Visit stretcher.com/r/99.htm> to find
hundreds of articles to help you
stretch your day and your dollar!
Copyright 2010 Dollar Stretcher,
Inc.


CHURCH-
Come and experience the power of
Jesus to change your life.
Sunday @ 9 & 11 AM Servicio en Espariol @ 6 PM

www.aplace4everyone.org

2322 11th Ave. SE Ruskin, FL 813.645.3337






26 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Veterans
* Continued from page 18
deck. Or, the physically impaired
vet who carefully made his way
to the bow, spread his arms to the
sea, the sun, the wind and declared
"I'm free."
It was something like the feelings
Mike Jemigan and his wife, Leslie,
expressed as the motor sailer bore
them, her son, Caleb Allen, plus
Brittany the Goldador who rarely
leaves Mike's side, around the bay
for a recent sunset cruise. As Bry-
an Custer and Caleb investigated
the finer points of the main sail,
Leslie and Marilyn engaged in girl
talk and Mike shared pieces of his
journey from traumatically injured
fighter to husband and father.
After doctors did all that they
could, saving his life but remov-
ing his damaged eyes, the marine
was medically discharged by the
corps. No longer able to do what
he was trained to do fight a war;


fitness as well as teach strong self
defense.
Ron Garner, 42, started learning
the techniques by taking his three
boys, now 8, 13 and 20. Then he
began taking lessons himself. Ron
has only been at it four years, and
has already obtained a Brown
Belt.
Belt ranking denotes proficiency
from levels 10 Kyu (Japanese for
lesson) to No. 1. From there you
go into Black Belt categories which
are numbered from 1 to 10 with 10
being the highest. The belts are col-
ored from white to green to purple
and then go to brown and black.
The colors supposedly denote the
depth of concentration and profi-
ciency of the participant.
Major David C. Lyles of Riv-
erview's FishHawk Ranch is sta-
tioned at MacDill Air Force Base
in Tampa but trains and helps teach
with the Chambers. A Black Belt
himself, he often leads exercises at
the recreation center.


defend his country he returned to
his hometown, trying to deal with
the after effects, get a handle on
the life stretching out before him,
prove he was self sufficient with-
out eyes. Restlessly, he returned
to the Washington, D.C., area and
determined he would get a college
degree. What ensued, though, was
a lot of alcohol and a lot of anger,
he admits softly.
Leslie entered his life when the
tall blonde from Richmond caught
sight of him in an Alexandria, VA.,
establishment as he partied with
buddies and approached him to
say "thank you for my freedom."
In time, their long distance friend-
ship blossomed into a relationship;
they were married by a justice of
the peace in 2008 and united again
in a great formal beach wedding
celebration at Nag's Head in 2009.
It was such a terrific event enjoyed
by so many they figure they'll do it
again in five years, they say.


The exercises of the USA Goju
Katate are part of the national USA
Goju Organization; its symbol a
fist over an American flag. Estab-
lished in 1964, the organization
has a style that requires trainees
to concentrate and push on to new
and higher levels. It instills con-
cepts that all things are possible,
we all start at the bottom, nothing
is free and that everyone works.
"We never say 'I can't,' but find
a way to accomplish a goal," Jim
Chambers said.
When they begin, they sit in a
concentration stance with their
eyes closed. "We must first get
into the correct mentality," he ex-
plained.
Although karate teaches self
defense, it also helps the body's
need for exercise and improves the
mind, Sarah added.
To find out more, or to register,
either show up at the times and
places mentioned earlier in this
story, or call the Chambers at (813)
695-6138.


It has not been all clear sailing,
however. The PTSD cropped up.
Mike struggled to manage his an-
ger. Leslie tried to be patient, un-
derstanding. They took advantage
of marriage counseling.
Today, they are at home in north-
ern St. Petersburg and both are
back in school, this time on the St.
Pete campus of the University of
South Florida; Mike going for a
degree in history, Leslie aiming for
a psychology degree. They plan to
put their educations to work, see
Caleb through college and even-
tually to retire to a beach. Caleb,
now enrolled at Berkeley Prep,
says in a few years he probably
will be in the U.S. Naval Academy
at Annapolis, the fourth generation
in their combined families to serve
the country with military commit-
ment.
Of his wife, Mike says "Leslie
changed my life; she helped me
settle down and has shown me
how to be a family again." For her
part, Leslie says when she gazes
at her charming husband, "I don't
see disability" but rather a partner
who teasingly calls her "Tater" and
jokes about their imagined future
cooking show dubbed "Tater and
the Blind Guy."
The first to receive a trained
companion dog from the Paws for
Patriots program at Southeastern
Guide Dogs, Mike also assists with
fund raising activities on behalf of
the Palmetto-based organization
and will be speaking about VA ser-
vices for blind vets at the upcom-
ing Blinded Veterans Association
national conference in D. C.
Custers are doing much the same
as they make presentations about
Freedom Excursions around the
area. Most of the money to sup-
port the operation to date is out of
their pockets, supplemented with
a few donations, they say, and
they want to do more. They have
teamed up with other captains to
provide charter fishing trips in the
Gulf and dolphin encounters from
Clearwater Beach, even once put
22 patients on a 60-catamaran to
skim along the Manatee River, but
there are many more injured vets
to reach out to.
And, now there's a dream boat


spotted; a $478,000, 80-foot,
multi-deck houseboat with a lift on
the stem to both raise wheelchairs
to the first deck and lower certain
patients into the water for adaptive
water sports. This vessel would
accommodate many more veterans
and their families, Marilyn points
out wistfully.
Of course, expanded service re-
quires more help. So, the organi-


zation also is building a volunteer
base to assist with the many jobs
large and small that make a cruise
successful.
Anyone who wants to "Catch
the Wave" and "honor the bravest
heroes" can contact the Custers by
email at marilyn@freedomexcur-
sions.org. The website address is
www.freedomexcursions.org.
Copyright 2010 Melody Jameson


Melody Jameson photo
Ship captain Bryan Custer, a Hillsborough County Sheriff"s traf-
fic investigator when he's not charting the course of the non-profit
Freedom Excursions as its board president, got competent help with
unfurling sails from 14-year-old Caleb Allen during a recent Free-
dom Excursion sunset cruise with Caleb's family on Tampa Bay. The
teen-ager plans to follow the family tradition, becoming the fourth
generation dedicated to military service, and as a U.S. Navy officer.


Early Dining Special


Penny Fletcher Photos
Sarah Chambers teaches her students concentration, discipline
and respect along with their weekly self defense lessons.


4-Course meal for 2 people for under $30
Available from 4:00-7:00 p.m. Monday thru Thursday
Soup, Salad, Entree and Dessert

SPECIAL DISCOUNT COUPON
TWO$

CAN 2995 10% Off
DINE Your Meal
FOR 2 9 Valid thru 8/12/10 Not valid with any other offer
-----------------------------.....


2 for 1
Draft Beer
and Wine







SUNSET GRILL
AT LITTLE HARBOR


--. ll.' ---" "11

611 Destiny Drive Ruskin, FL 33570
813.645.8119 staylittleharbor.com


Confidence
* Continued from page 1


JULY 29, 2010







JULY 29. 2010 THE SHOPPER 27


-= = THE SHOPPER
To place an ad call
813.645.3111 ext. 201
Fax: 813.645.1792 L
$15.50
up to 20 words M & M Printing Co., Inc
300 addl. word weekly publisher of the
Deadline is Monday The Observer News, The SCC Observer and The Riverview Current
Deadline is Monday )I 114- -CA


0 12 Woodland Estates Ave SW
Ruskin, Florida 33570


100 Announcements
200 Farmer's Mkt
300 Merchandise
400 Marine
450 Transportation
500 Real Estate
550 Manuf. Housing
600 Rentals
650 Prof. Services
700 Services
800 Employment


105 PERSONAL

Yoga Classes!
offered at Covington Park Clubhouse.
Every Wednesday 10am, Thursday
10am & 6pm. All levels welcome. Call
April for info.
813-695-0762

F FARMER'S MK

L16- 20


260 FRUITS/VEG.


Morgan Farms
Closing Saturday, July 31. Thanks
for your patronage. We will see ya'll in
the fall.





310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Garage sale. 306 13th St., SW, Ruskin.
Friday & Saturday, July 30 & 31, 8am-?
Toys, books, household. Low prices.
Yard sale. Friday & Saturday, July 30 &
31.12012 Bridge Point Lane, Summer-
field 9am-3pm. Furniture, appliances,
household items.
Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana
St., Gibsonton (1 block off US 41,1 block
north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday thru
Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture,
lots misc. Ministry First Baptist Gibson-
ton. 813-671-0036 to donate

Huge Yard Sale
Leather couch, furniture, toys, clothes
& housewares. Saturday, 7am-noon.
7601 Devonbridge Way
Covington Park, follow signs.




New Summer Hours:
T-F 9 to 4:30 Sat 9 to 3:30

SENIOR
TUESDAYS

Most items discounted
including Clothing,
Accessories, Collectibles, Art,
Books, and some Furniture.
Donations Needed
Please call (813) 645-5255
1311 3rd St. NE Ruskin
(Behind St. Anne Church
& Next to Kennco Mfg.)


310 GARAGE /YARD SALE

~a Cavary's
yy naelAttic
) Thrift Store
NOW OPEN Wednesday,
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. Noon

50% OFF
All
GLASSWARE
1424 E. College Ave. Ruskin
813-641-7790
Ministry of Calvary Lutheran Church


Garage /moving sale. 1426 Deirdre Dr.,
Ruskin. Furniture, household, kitchen,
electronics, movies, tools. To much too
list. July 31. 7am-2pm.
Moving sale. Everything goes! Furniture,
wall decor, yard tools, dishes, tools &
more. 11613 Cummins Rd., Riverview
Saturday, 8am-3pm.
Friday & Saturday. Hunting, fishing,
camping, military items. Restaurant
equipment also Large selection of flea
market items for dealers. Beach Ave
& Restwood Dr., Gibsonton. 813-677-
9634

311 AUCTIONS

Auction Thursday, Aug. 19
5pm. 602 Lenna Ave., Seffner. Except-
ing quality consignments. Antiques,
jewelry, collectibles & more. JGS Auc-
tions. 813-789-4129 for info. AB-2840

312 ESTATE SALES





Dealer in Gold & Silver Coins
Domestic & Foreign
12% and over
on SILVER COINS
(depending on market)
Call for private consultation or appointment
All transactions are strictly confidential
(813) 634-3816. Cell (813) 503-4189
"Your local dealer for over 20years"


rETTIE'S

TTIII
fsTsf1TE
S~fLES


741-0225
Cell: 382-7536
Personalized
Service


312 ESTATE SALES

MARIE E. RUDY ESTATE SALES
(413) 883-6148
916 Sago Palm Way
Apollo Beach
(Apollo Beacd Blvd. totoo toSago Palm)
Fri.& Sat.,July30 &31
8 a.m.to 1 p.m.
2002 Yamaha V-Star Classic, 9,000
miles. Unique Collectibles: Dale
Earnhardt,NASCAR, Avon Cars,
Cranberry Glass,Avon Red Dishes,
Wedgwood. Figurines: Arnart 5th
Ave, Occupied Japan, Franklin Mint,
Abingdon, Princess House, Saji,
Chokin, Faberge Eggs, Lenox.
Antiques: Seth Thomas Clock,
Maple 4-Poster Bed, Cigarette Table.
Vintage: United Billiards Pool Table,
40s Rattan Living room Set, 9/11
Collectibles, many Xmas Decora-
tions,Tools,Yardscape, Bar Room,
Neon Signs and Furniture.
This House is Full...Come and See!


Let us get done in one day what it
takes the others guys a week to do.
We will pack-up and pick-up one room
or the entire house for a QUICK,
PROFITABLE, TROUBLE-FREE
EXPERIENCE.
CALL BurERFIELD'S AUCTIONS




www.ButterfieldsAuctions.com
Butterfield Auctions AB2706/AU3549





Saturday, July 31 & Sun.,Aug. 1
9 a.m.to4 p.m.
812 Bunker View Dr.
Apollo Beach (behindgolfcourse)
Large Furniture, Bedroom Set, Adjustable
Air Bed, California King, Sofa, Loveseat,
Recliners,21'Trophy Boat w/Trailer,
and Misc. Household Items.


312 ESTATE SALES

M I


Your home will be staged for
best results. Working in
Sun City Center for 23 years.
Please feel free to call about
the sale or its contents.
Bonded Licensed
Cell: 508-0307
or Eve: 633-1173

314 ANTIQUES/COLLECTIBLE
Wanted Canadian early dollars & misc.
silver. Early large & small Canadian
paper money. CBI memorabilia. Call
813-503-4189

330 FURNITURE

Furniture
Perfect condition-Costs were $100
to $750 @; Priced at $45 to $125 or
best offer. Two large desks, one with
bookshelf tower, both with file drawers,
oak color; three small desks with file
cabinets, five desk lamps and misc.
items. Must sell. Call Sharon or Steve
813-645-1045; 813-765-0845
Like new (2) recliners, sofa, wool carpet
$150 each,. obo. 813-645-7236
California /king 3 pc platform bedroom
set. Solid pine $400 Call 831-645-
3531
Washer & dryer $60 each. Dining table
w/ leaf /4 chairs $100. Small wood table
w/ 4 chairs $25. Computer desk $25.
Moving boxes. 813-938-3046

335 MUSIC
Small accordion with case, very good
condition. $125. 813-645-6343

336 TV, STEREO, RADIO
Emerson 27" TV, very good condition
$100. 4yrs old. Phone 813-645-0377

360 GOLF CARTS
Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade. Char-
gers, parts all related. Ronny's Carts &
Parts. 813-645-4515 or 813-484-9855
We buy golf carts, any condition. We pay
top dollar for used carts, running or not.
Same day pickup. 813-300-0114

390 MISC. FOR SALE
One cemetery plot. Ruskin memorial.
Call 813-645-6343

You can read
the entire
newspaper online
@ www.observernews.net


410 BOATS
Boat davits for sale. (local) By appoint-
ment only call 813-645-2259 or 813-
323-1967

425 SLIPS OR STORAGE
South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special-
izing in outside storage for RVs, boats &
trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay-
Storage.com

Ramey's Business Park
RV & boaf storage & heavy equipment.
1/4 mile from Williams Park boat ramp.
813-410-9607 or 813-849-1469






511 HOUSES FOR SALE





SCC Sierra in Greenbriar, oak floors, replumbed,
interior redecorated. Over 1,500 sq. ft
$134,900
SCC Worthington 3BR/2BA, 2,500 sq. ft., solar
heated spa, new flooring, caged patio, vacant
$249,000
RENTALS
2BR/2BAFum. on Gloucester .................$750/month
2BR/2BA, 2-car garage in Greenbriar.. $1000/month
2BR/2BA, near clubhouse, furnished..... $600/month

GORGEOUS RIVERFRONT ACRE LOT:
cleared, with just a few trees, over 105' on
water, breathtaking view of river. Peaceful,
secluded, always a cool breeze, only minutes
from town and shopping. $250,000. Adjacent
acre lot with water view, offered at $65,000.
VERY AFFORDABLE HOUSES IN RUSKIN,
NO HOA, NO CDD:
S2BR/1.5BA, enclosed FL room, carport,
county water/sewer, large comer lot: $58,000.
S3BR/1BA, new CHA, plumbing & sewer, utility
room, carport, 1/3 acre fenced lot: $64,500.
2BR/1BA, carport, new metal roof, storage
shed, 1 block from river: $65,000.
DOUBLEWIDE FOR $48,000! 2BR/2BA,
enclosed FL room, huge MBR, inside utility
room, carport, workshop/storage shed and
new large CHA. Handicap accessible. Nice lot.






515 VILLAS FOR SALE

Sun City $46,900
2br/2ba, 1,200 sf, carport. Totally up-
dated to new. Owner 813-850-1173


| s2 Off Bronze or Silver

*4 Off Gold $5 Off Platinum
I Full Service Car Wash Only I
S Regular price *11.99, *15.99, *19.99 & *25.95
Not valid with other specials or discounts. $1.50 extra for vans and SUVs
__I Expires 9/1/10 OBN
HOURS: M-F 8 am-5:30 pm Sat- 8 am-5 pm Now Open Sundays 10 am-4 pm -
HOURS: M-F 8 am-5:30 pm Sat. 8 am-5 pm Now Open Sundays 10 am-4 pm -
I ri~ U... I ____ -


I Hand Wax with Platinum Wash
I I
I $4995 I
I $10 extra for vans and large SUVs
Expires 9/1/10 oN
_ ---Come Experience Our SERVICEB
Come Experience Our SERVICE!

-- 9 f1 V
JY4 w


at 4pm


MARIE E.RUDY
ESTATE
SALES

Serving the
SouthShore
Area


marie.mdy54@yahoo.com
813-938-5103


THE SHOPPER 27


JULY 29, 2010


Ir -rr 0,33 maw







28 THE SHOPPER





560 M.H. ON LOTS
Mobile home for sale Eastwood Mobile
Home Park, Gibsonton. Call Heather
813-677-5726

565 M.H. IN PARKS
Gibsonton. Newly renovated, 1br, MH.
Roof over, shed, screened room, CHA,
tile floors, partially furnished. $6,500.
Low down payment, owner financing.
813-310-0396

Small mobile homes/travel trailers with
Florida room addition. From $1,000.
River Oaks RV, on Little Manatee 813-
645-2439






610 WATERFRONT RENTALS
The Dolphin House, Apollo Beach,
efficiency apartments on water. Boat
docking /fishing. Pool, laundry. $185
weekly, $185 deposit. No pets. 813-
850-5217

Efficiency. Furnished Detached/private,
one person, 55+, no pets. Nice Ruskin
location/ neighborhood. Waterfront,
satellite, utilities included. $550. 813-
645-3047

611 HOUSES FOR RENT
For rent SFR, Apollo Beach. $950, avail-
able immediately. 1 st & deposit to move
in. Call for showing 813-482-6374

SCC house for rent. 2br/1.5ba, com-
pletely renovated from inside to outside.
Monthly rent $795 plus security deposit
with yearly lease. Please call 813-649-
1599 for details

2 homes
812 & 629 La Jolla
Sun City Center, 2br/2ba. $795 each
monthly, carport, laundry room. Lease
required. 813-643-1274

Apollo Beach. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1car,
garage, furnished, fenced yard. $850
monthly plus deposit. 813-645-7723

S & R Properties
3, 2 & 1 bedrooms. No pets. Ruskin,
Gibsonton area. RV lots available 813-
310-1888 or 813-849-1469

House for rent in Sun City Center. Spa-
cious 2br/2ba, fully renovated on golf
course/ nature preserve. Yearly rental
$850.419-261-2849

Sun City Center. Remodelled 2,100 sf.
3br/2ba/2cg w/ patio, golf course w/
water. Designer extras. Pet ok. $1,000
monthly. 813-767-5005

612 APTS. FOR RENT
Apollo Beach 1 bedroom, 1 bath. Refrig-
erator, range, dishwasher, carport, patio,
yard. 813-645-4145 or 813-642-0681

For rent: Efficiency apartments. Weekly
rates, utilities furnished 813-677-8789,
813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

613 CONDOS FOR RENT
Kings Point adult community, 1 br/1.5ba,
fully furnished. $725 includes cable
TV, 3 pools, workshops, health club,
water, sewage/ 813-633-4007 /813-
928-1971


630 M.H. RENTALS
For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home near
shopping center in Gibsonton. 813-677-
8789, 813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With
A/C. 813-677-1086

For rent. One bedroom RV, includes
electric & water. $150 weekly. Perfect for
on person. No pets. 813-690-0768

New mobile homes w/ lower rates.
Water, garbage & pest control in-
cluded.
2 Weeks Free
L&N Trailer Park, Gibsonton. 813-
381-4830

644 COMMERCIAL
Gibsonton area. 40x60 building on 1/2
acre. $1,000 monthly 813-690-1836

645 OFFICE SPACE








We will note underpriced!

Prices starting at
*250 per month




646 WAREHOUSE SPACE
Garage & mini storage rooms for rent.
Pirates Treasure Cove, Gibsonton.
813-677-1137







651 BOOKKEEPING

QuickBooks
Certified Pro-advisor Tutoring / instruc-
tion at your pace. Flexible hours. Full
bookkeeping service. (Bank recon /
payroll /data entry /tax prep via QB.
10+ years local serves, Thea's Quick
Bookkeeping Inc, Ruskin 813-641-
1089

661 BUSINESS OPP.

Elder Housing Investors
wanted for single housing. Call 813-
482-6374

675 UPHOLSTERY
Cushions & light weight upholstery.
35yrs experience. Quality workmanship,
quality materials, quality advice. My
Upholstery Shop. 813-982-0832

680 ADULT/CHILD CARE
Professional care provider in your home.
Errands/ light housekeeping/ prepare
meals, etc. Dependable & reasonable
rates. References available. Call Brenda
813-633-4590

Caregiver
Will take care of you or your loved.
one. Full/ part-time. Experienced. Sal-
ary negotiable. Certified. Phil or Janna
813-633-8906


680 ADULT/CHILD CARE
Caregiver/CNA Licensed by the state of
Florida for home health duties & assis-
tance. CPR certified. Honest & reliable.
Full-time & part-time. Salary negotiable.
Call Sue 813-677-9691







705 CLEANING

Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integrity.
Call for free estimate. days a week.
Move-in, move-out, rentals. Insured,
bonded, licensed. Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Sun City Center
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean

Two Sisters & A Mop Cleaning Service.
Residential & commercial. Reasonable
rates. Free estimate. Bonded & insured.
Call 813- 713-6197

Becky's At Your Service
Cleaning. Licensed & dependable
cleaning service, for all your clean-
ing needs. Free estimates. Call today
813-672-9215

Wilkleen Cleaning
We do it right the first time. Expe-
rienced in house & office cleaning.
Licensed/ insured. Give us a call.
813-390-6815

Johanna's Cleaning Service
Reliable house cleaner. 7days a week.
Ruskin, Apollo Beach, Sun City Cen-
ter. 25% off 1 st cleaning.
813-677-5680

The Cleaning Expert. Where service &
quality comes first. 20% offw/ ad. Move-
in/ mover-out/ residential/ commercial.
Free estimate. Licensed & insured.
813-877-7647

Green Team
Home /office cleaning. Windows
cleaned. Pressure washing, yard
maintenance. Call Dee 813-777-1221.

706 PRESSURE WASHING

2 Guys
Popcorn Edging & Pressure Washing.
We do new & cap old edging. We also
do pressure washing, roofs, houses,
driveways & sidewalks. Lowest prices
guaranteed. Call Steve 813-220-8489

Pressure Washing
Home maintenance & repairs. Mobile
homes, roofs, driveways. Quality
workmanship. 40 yrs experience.
Insured/ Lic #235598. Free estimate.
HomeMinders of West Florida LLC.
Bobby 813-767-1460 or Curtis 813-
362-4841

708 MOVERS
Affordable Moving & trash Hauling.
Specializing in delivery /estate sales.
One piece or whole house. Loading &
unloading moving trucks/ storage units.
Free estimate. Dave 813-447-6123

710 LAWN CARE
Bill's Lawn Service Residential & com-
mercial. Cut, edge, trim, Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Riverview, Gibsonton. Licensed./
insured. 813-293-6840 New accounts
welcomed.

M & C Mower Repair.
Parts & service. Authorized warranty
center. Commercial & residential. 725
14th St., Wimauma. 813-938-3226

Terry's Lawn Service
Free estimates. Mowing, trimming,
edging. Home 813-634-2856, cell 813-
317-7679

FloraScapes
Professional maintenance company
serving all your landscaping needs.
Residential & commercial. Ruskin,
Apollo Beach, SCC, Riverview. Li-
censed/insured. 813-333-3688

Montoya's Landscaping
Sod removal & installation. Resi-
dential & commercial landscaping &
mulching. Trees & palm trimming,
Free estimate. Best price guaranteed.
813-770-1881 or 813-633-2485


Classified Works


710 LAWN CARE
We create outdoor living! Lawn re-
placement, sod installation, delivery,
landscaping & more. Free estimate.
813-317-9883

S & L Lawn Mower Repair.
1601 US 41 S. Ruskin, Fl. 33570.
Free pickup & deliver.
813-305-6666



2 o&S Laown Care, Inc.
Professional Lawn Care Service
Residential & Commercial
*Total Lawn Maintenance
Landscaping/Sod/Mulch
Landscape Maintenance
Irrigation Monitoring & Repair
FREE EST1MATES/REASONABLE RATES
813-645-7266
www.bandslawncare.com
"Your LocalLawn Care Professionals I"


715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill dirt,
topsoil, sand, crushed rock & asphalt,
driveway culverts. Loader, backhoe,
grading, bushhog, discing. Install Sep-
tic System & drain fills. CFC#1427021.
813-645-1883

Fill-Land Clearing
Dozer & loader work, driveway & sep-
tic fill, & shell hauled. Robert Carver,
813-634-4962. Beeper 813-267-6217


JULY 29, 2010

715 FILL DIST/HAULING

Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service. Cul-
vert sets, driveways, shell, crushed
asphalt, concrete, fill dirt, excavating,
mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963
Free estimates.

720 HOME MAINT.
Experience carpenter. Needs work will
fix anything. Free estimate. Call Dave
813-447-6123. 27yrs experience in fin-
ish work. Guaranteed quality service.

740 MISC. SERVICES

Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks, boat
lifts & seawalls. Free inspection. Heck-
er Construction Co. 813-236-9306

Oliver & Company
Pet Sitting
813-767-7225. Licensed, bonded,
insured. Member of Pet Sitters Inter-
national. References available, email:
olivertort@aol.com

"TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
L Call

at
645-3111
ext. 201
or e-mail:
Beverly@observernews.net
20 words for $15.50 and 30C for each
additional word. Bold line $3. All classified
ads are paid in advance. Deadlines are
Monday at 4 pm for Thursday paper.


/M m CALL
Paul B. (813) 645-3211

DICKMAN Serving South Hillsborough
RL INC. County since 1924.

RE t Y www.dickmanrealty.com
Celebrating 86Years dickman@tampabay.rr.com
1924 2010
AWESOME PROPERTY in SUN CITY CENTER!! This lovely home boasts 2BR/2BA
2-car garage and is ready and waiting for you! Built in 1994 this home has been
meticulously maintained with new a/c in 2006, a new roof in 2007 and much, much
more. Sun City Center has much to offer with golf courses, tennis, softball, two indoor
pools plus over 200 clubs and various other activities. A golf cart friendly community
to local shopping and activities and it is conveniently located to airports, beaches,
Tampa, Sarasota & St. Petersburg. Come and enjoy the Florida lifestyle today!!
$139,500 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
REDUCED AGAIN, NOW CHEAPEST DOUBLEWIDE IN TOWN! 2BR/2BA, open
living-dining room area, enclosed porch, huge MBR, inside utility, carport & storage
shed, new CHA, handicap accessible. $48,500. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
GREAT TIME TO BUY WATERFRONT HOME: Very nice 3BR/2BA, screen porch,
den, large inside utility-rm, beautiful lot on canal going to bay, seawall & boatslip. Just
repainted inside, move-in-ready $169,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
BAYFRONT CONDO REDUCED, OWNER LOOKING FOR OFFERS! 2BR/2BA,
open floor plan, immaculate condition, large balcony overlooking Tampa Bay, St. Pete
and unique sunsets, covered parking. Come enjoy pools, pier, restaurants & tennis
courts. Now $195,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
GORGEOUS RIVERFRONT LOT, OWNER FINANCING: Deep water, large new
dock, great fishing. All utilities there ready for your dream home (or mobile-home).
$239,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
INVEST NOW, BUILD LATER! Great location on busy State Road 674. 3BR/2BA
house amid huge oak trees, but value is in the land. 2.1 acres with SMU6 land use.
Multiple possibilities. $799,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672
UNLIMITED POTENTIAL!! Great commercial acreage located near Highway 41 in
Ruskin and close to planned shopping center. 3BR/1BA house with detached garage
on 1.4 acres (mol) $299,000 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WEST-
BROOK 748-2201
NEED SOME ROOM TO SPREAD OUT? Fenced one acre lot (MOL) like new
2BR/2BA doublewide & 20 x 26 shop with a carport, electric hookup for a RV, new
roof in 2005. Country living close to town! $119,900 KAY PYE 361-3672 or
ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 FOR DETAILS.
REDUCED!!! WATERFRONT DUPLEX ON THE LITTLE MANATEE RIVER in
Ruskin. Quiet area with dock on a spring-fed pond and river frontage. Beautiful
sunsets! Great saltwater and freshwater fishing! 15 minutes by boat to Tampa Bay!
1BR/1BA on each side. $124,900 CALL ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 or
KAY PYE 361-3672
INVESTOR SPECIAL!! 2005 duplex with 2BR/1BA, 832 sq. ft. and other unit is
3BR/2BA, 1040 sq. ft. Both units are rented. Bring all offers. Must move. $125,000
CALL KATHY JACOBSON 624-2225
WATERFRONT HOME! CANAL WATER, EASY ACCESS TO THE BAY. 3BR/2BA
with boat dock, storage, nice fruit trees and fireplace. Well maintained. Seller
motivated. $210,000 CALL KATHY JACOBSON 624-2225
LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION! Oversized corner building lot within walking
distance to recreation, churches, schools and the like but on a quiet lane. Just under
34 acre and partially cleared. Zoned Residential Single Family Asking $67,000. JO
ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540.
14 COUNTRY ACRES but not far from amenities. Deep well for farming use or build
your dream home. Surrounded by estate homes and lots of privacy Currently leased
for farming but Seller willing to listen. Call today Asking $395,000. JO ELLEN
MOBLEY 645-1540.
CAN THIS BE FOR REAL?? Please give me an excuse to show you that this ideal
setting does exist. We'll start with wonderful 2BR/2BA,3rd BR/den/office option, many
great features in just under 1600 sq. ft. for $209,900. Then we'll check out the huge
clubhouse, pool, activity rooms, tennis & pickleball courts, calendar of events, and
numerous other amenities advertised on TV and in newspapers. CALL JUDY
ERICKSON 468-0288 soon.
CALL US FORALLYOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS........645-3211
Donate your old functioning cell phones and drop off at our
office for use by the "Victims Assistance Program."
(Evening phone numbers)
Judy Erickson ..................... 468-0288 Jim Grannon........................... 610-3485
Claire Tort........................... 363-7250 Kenn Antonelli ..................... 786-3124
Kay Pye .............................. 361-3672 Kathy Jacobson ..................... 624-2225
Cathy Griggs ..................... 391-8653 Jo Ellen Mobley..................... 645-1540
Christine Nethers ............... 260-6335 LaRae Regis........................... 633-8318
Roxanne Westbrook............ 748-2201


THRIFT STORE
OPEN: Wed., Thurs. & Fri, 8 aom. 3 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. 12 p.m.
1009 1st. Street S.W.
UN Ruskin
s .R. 674 We Have
w 4 E
sS Furniture, Too!
st DONATION DROP OFFS
TUES. THRU FRL ONLY PLEASE,
TI-RFT ALL DONATIONS MUST BE IN CLEAN
STORE S USEABLE CONDITION.








JULY 29, 2010






810 MEDICAL

Sun City Center busy Internal Medical
Office is looking for a
Certified Medical Assistant
or LPN
Full-time, Monday thur Friday. Must
be flexible, customer service oriented,
team player. Please fax resume & sal-
ary requirements to: 813-634-4595


SUNTOWERS
RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

REHAB AIDE
SUN TERRACE HEALTH
CARE CENTER
is seeking a motivated, customer
service oriented individual to assist
our rehab department with
individual/supervised/group
programs. The ideal candidate
must possess current CNA cert.
Great pay w/benefits.
Interested candidates should apply at
105 Trinity Lakes Drive
Sun City Center, FL 33573
(813) 634-3347
or email resume to
vkosky@suntowersretirement.com


870 GENERAL

Cash Kwik Manager /teller. Qualifica-
tions: Basic computer /cash handling,
type 30-35 wpm, no criminal, drug
free, reliable, honest & have good
transportation $9/10 hr, full-time, non
smoker. Apply at Cash Kwick, 2107 E.
College Ave., Ruskin or fax resume to
813-641-3760

Hair stylist needed for busy salon. Sun
City Center area Call Sue's Salon 813-
634-7022


I, '..


YOUR NAME:

ADDRESS:

CITY/STATE/ZIP

DAYTIME PHONE:

up to 20 words

$15.50
includes listing on web
300 for each additional word over 20


SCOPYAS YOU WISH IT TO APPEARIFICAON

AD COPY AS YOU WISH IT TO APPEAR


870 GENERAL

General maintenance person needed
ASAP. Full-time/ permanent. English
mandatory Call 813-645-1098






SUNTOWERS
RETI REM ENT COMMUNITY

FT SERVERS

FT DIETARY AIDES
Sun Towers Retirement
Community has positions
available for customer service
oriented individuals. Must have
previous food service experience.
Interested candidates should apply to:
101 Trinity Lakes Drive
Sun City Center, FL 33573
(813) 634-3347



COMMUNITY PAPERS
OF FLORIDA
(CPF STATEWIDE)

CASH PAID FOR DIABETIC TEST
STRIPS! New, sealed & unexpired. Most
brands, shipping prepaid. We pay the
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DIRECTV FREE Best Package for 5
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Every baby deserves a healthy start. Join
more than a million people walking and
raising money to support the March of
Dimes. The walk starts at marchforba-
bies.org.


The Shopper
The Observer News
The SCC Observer
The Riverview Current


Mail payment
or drop payment to:
210 Woodland Estates Ave.
Ruskin, FI. 33570

CALL IN YOUR AD TO:
645-3111 ext. 201
OR FAX IT TO:
645-1792


DEADLINE:
Ad and payment
must be received by
4 p.m. Monday


CPF STATEWIDE

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SURROGATE MOMS NEEDED! $18,000
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WANTED 20 Homes To showcase our
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$99.95 FLORIDA CORP. $154.95 FLOR-
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or call Miami-Dade .. (305) 854-6000
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. (813) 871-5400 St. Pete . (727)
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Toll Free . (800) 603-3900. Spiegel &
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AIRLINE MECHANIC Train for high
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AVIATION MAINTENANCE / AVIONICS
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16 www.continentalacademy.com


CPF STATEWIDE
NEED YOUR HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA?
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accredited. EZ pay. Free brochure. www.
diplomaathome.com ; Call 800-470-4723

DIRECT WATERFRONT with Sandy
Beach! Only $34,900. Wooded, park-like
setting with gorgeous sandy shoreline on
one of Alabama's top recreational water-
ways. All amenities completed. Boat To
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1-866-952-5302, x5463

BURIED IN CREDIT CARD DEBT Over
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dollars. Call Credit Card Relief for your
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FINANCIAL DISTRESS? BETTER BUSI-
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help immediately! Credit cards? Bills?
Collections harassment? Need relief?
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4660 x10

FORECLOSURE ASSISTANCE You
don't have to lose your home!! Most ALL
mortgages fall short of a Forensic Audit
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HomeForeclosureRemedies.com

We buy structured settlements, insurance
annuities, lawsuit settlement payments.
Why wait? Call 123Lumpsum Today!!!
1-877-966-8669

Boats; 1000's of boats for sale www.flori-
damariner.com ; reaching 6 million homes
weekly throughout Florida. 800-388-9307,
tide charts, broker profiles, fishing captains,
dockside dining and more.

ASSEMBLE MAGNETS & CRAFTS from
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No Experience! Top US Company! Glue
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Earn up to $150 per day. Under cover
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SEARS HOME IMPROVEMENT has
openings for inside marketing reps. PT
positions. Earn great money talking to
customers. Call 1-800-379-8310. Retirees
always welcome. EOE/DFWP.

$1,380 weekly guaranteed. Stuff envelopes
at home. Full/part-time. No experience
necessary. Deposit required-refundable.
888-870-7859 binvestmentsinc@yahoo.
com

ATTENTION HUNTERS! KENTUCKY
LAND AUCTION, August 12th, 6pm. 1,994
Acres part in renowned Whitetail deer area
of Christian Co. Large & Small Tracts.
1-800-451-2709 or schraderauction.com

DON'T RENT WHEN YOU CAN OWN!
Pasco & Hernando County Properties.
Owner financing, For Sale/Rent/Lease
Options 1 Bedroom, 2 Bedrooms, 3
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Heat & Air Jobs Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program. Hands on environ-
ment. Nationwide certifications and Local
Job Placement Assistance! 1-877-994-
9904


THE SHOPPER 29

CPF STATEWIDE

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Treatments Free Towing, Tax Deductible,
Non-Runners Accepted 1-866-912-GIVE

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virtual tour at www.cavendercreek.com ;
1-866-373-6307

Hard to find B4 zoning property for sale
or lease on Highway 484 in South Marion
County. 4,700 sq footbuilding on 1 acre.
Great for church, clubs, meetings, etc. For
info contact Realtor Anthony White, 352-
547- 3137.

NC MOUNTAIN HOMESITE BEST LAND
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financing: 1-800-810-1590 www.wildcat-
knob.com ;

N.C. MOUNTAIN LAND SUMMER SPE-
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w/5% down! lacre acres from $200/
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828-460-6595

NC MOUNTAINS Cabin Shell, 2+acres
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Bankfinancing 866-275-0442

SANTEE COOPER LAKE AREA. South
Carolina. 2 acres, near 1-95. Beautiful
building tract $19,900. Ask about E-Z owner
financing, low payments 803-473-7125

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1-800-755-8953 www.sunsetranches.com

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Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork
Taken Care Of. 1-866-905-3801

Movie Extras Stand In The Background
For Major Film Production. Experience Not
Required, Earn Up To $200/Day. All Looks
Needed. Talk To Live Representative.
888-664-5279


OWNANW O




A community of affordable homes Phase III Now Available!
exclusively for first-time homebuyers! 2 Swimming Pools and a Clubhouse
-w v 3, 4 and 5 Bedrooms, 1 and 2 Garages
xAmToNa F VR MA, IV Popular Ruskin Location
.,,. ........ USDA Self-Help Housing program -- help
(813)672 7889 www.flhome.org build your home in exchange for a down
payment
No money down, easy to qualify
Non-profit agency works for you
-~Hablamos Espailol -


BAYOUPASS
.. r u.1, ..4..:.u- r-r ef unah d median income.Cdlfrdedis.


thrugou te state of Florid
"Esfstve
Forcomletdeais
S 6.


. ..... .... .... ......... ...........






30 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


THE OBSERVER NEWS THE SCC OBSERVER THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT


Ai f
ENT.., INC.
Lic. #CMC056816
AIR-CONDITIONING,
HEATING & REFRIGERATION
Complete Sales, Service,
Installation & Repair
Amana and Senior
Trane Dealer Discount
John R. Bowman, Jr., Owner
(813) 633-2703



EIGSInc.


w.e w0, 7*4.(-

I LEAKS NO ON E \


Residential Commercial
New Roofs Re-Roofs Tile
Tile Repairs Hot Tar/Flat Decks
Ventilation Leaks Repaired
FREE Estimates Financing Available
24 Hr. Emergency Service
Senior Citizen Discount
We Carry Workers'Coamp 4
For Your Protection BB
- Li #CCC1325993 *Bonded Insured =;
8 8s20218
www uddysrooflng~com


SELF ARREST BONDS
COURT DATES 664-0056
WARRANT CHECKS
BIG JOHN'S
BAIL BONDS
641-8400
FAMILY BONDSMAN
STATE FEDERAL
24 HOUR SERVICE
JOHN L. VATH
2100 Orient Road Tampa, FL. 33619
Fax: (813) 628-8739



Need Work Done
Around the House?

Turn to PHIL
Your Handy Person!
RIVERSIDE GOLF & BOATING CLUB RESIDENT
www.mrhandyperson.com
Serving
APOLLO BEACH
RUSKIN
SUN CITY
CENTER
KINGS POINT





25+ Years Experience
Licensed & Insured
813-649-1418


Over35yrs. Experience
LOCAL* PROMPT
Repairs Reroof
Inspections
( 1 O ( 1
78-94 641-76A


NOW OPEN


645-5222
cell: 240-2049
150133rd St. SE
Ruskin, FL 33570


LOOKING
FOR EXTRA
STORAGE
SPACE
FOR YOUR...
R.V.
BOAT
CAMPER
ETC.
ANY SIZE


Complete Sales Service
Repair Installation
SERVICING ALL MAKES AND MODELS
24 Hour Service Financing Available
Lic. #CAC1815928


< rS^ E Senior& Military
Discounts


Roofing
FloridaCerifleRoofgContracwor

Proudly Serving: Sun City Center
Ruskin Apollo Beach Riverview
and surrounding areas
Member SCC Chamber of Commerce







CELL 813-777-9808
Frank Shaft
FL Certified Roofing Contractor
CCC# 1327713
www.ApolloBeachRoofing.com
PalmTreeRoofing@gmail.com


Coeedsorg


LVIN'S A/ HATIIN
SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS
Residential and Light Commercial
Family Owned & Operated
No Revolving Technicians
Quality Service,* Sales,
Installation,
Most Replacement -
Parts on Hand "
(813) 263-6503
< CAC 1814336 Ruskin






SCeiling Fans
Outlets
Lighting
Panel Upgrades
FREE Estimates

813-645-7000
Listed with Sterling Management and
Sun City Center Community Association
Lic. #EC13002936


I I








I r






-~ 1 A &J
Hares
,sznce Plumbing
Experience n
Service & Repairs
Repipes Water Heaters
New Construction
Remodels & Additions


All Types of Roofing
New Roofs & Repairs
SShingle Tile Metal Hot Tar
No job too big or too small!
SERVING SINCE 1973
Ruskin Sun City Center Kings
Point Apollo Beach Riverview
"ALL MY CUSTOMERS ARE DRY
FRIENDS WHEN QUALITY COUNTY"


Ruskin &
Sun City Center
1ChamberMember

P.O. Box 551 Ruskin, FL 33570
www.customroofing.us
Bonded & Insured Lic. #CCC1326907





*No project over $1000.
No electrical, gas, or
plumbing, and nothing
structural.


Mary Ann Wilhelm
Owner/Director
#CAC 1814397

Wilhelm Hourvice

-' 641-1811
FACTORY
DEALER 802 4th St. S.W
a (Off College Ave. West)
Ruskin, Florida
Turn to the Experts
www.wilhelmac.com





COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL
I South Ba -
SElectric Co.
\ofRuskin/ R
i SERVICE
LICENSED UPGRADES
BONDED ALL TYPES
INSURED OF WIRING
ER00126636 RENOVATIONS
OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE
SECURITY LIGHTS CEILING FANS
SSWITCHES & OUTLETS SPAS & DOCKS

105 21 ST. N.W. RUSKIN










REPLACEMENT
WINDOWS

Lowest price
around!

RANY HOMSO


PAUL WOOD PLUMBING, INC.
State Certified Plumbing Contractor
#CFC1427697
Residential
S* Commercial
Certified Backflows
Stoppages
Service and Repairs
* FREE Estimates 24-Hour Service
Licensed Bonded Insured
(813) 641-1387





R&D Septic Inc.
Complete Septic System
*New/Repair
*Fill Dirt -
*Pump Repair
*Site Work -

Call R k


WHOLESALE A/C
Indoor Air Quality Specialists
TheBestPriceAround
SWeMatchAnyPrice
FREE ESTIMATES and QUOTE
Licensed Insured Bonded
CAC1816079








Let someone
else do that
heavy work.

Look in the
Business & Trade
Directory


ROUAN DOEA?




i-EOBSoERVERNEWS

BUSINESS
TRADE
DIRECTORY YOU'RE (ON...

Call Us 645-3111


Timothy Sutton, LC
INTERIOR EXTERIOR
PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
PRESSURE WASHING
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813-641-3256


JULY 29, 2010





OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 31


2010 TUCSON 4
All New & Redesigned!


Guaranteed Trade)Alolwanceo

S-R;-Isses


S39'
TIHWY


2010 ELANTRA


Best Value 201 SONATA All New & Redesigned!
In Its Class O Stylish & Spacious


E 10O92 11,990
LEASEtMNT


In Stock Now!


2010 A A E Rugged Capablility,
SANTA FE Comfort& Stle

BY17,990


Come See Why
Thousands of Local Drivers
Are Switching To Hyundai


2010 ACCENT


Affordable & Fuel Efficient
sALE $9,987

2010 GENESIS Coupe
r2-1 c


- -


Awad-innngHyuda Quliy Bckd B Aeria' Bet arrnt
10 Year / 100,000 Mile~-1
Powertrain Limited Warranty1C~I
5 Yer/6,00 Mils (umpr-t-Bumer oveage


2010 ELANTRA Touring
31 .,l_


S1D0503
Most Interior Room In Its Class
'seS239 "E
FOR 24
E MONTH
$23 ^ 1LEASEI


2010 GENESIS
Ep2"^B,"


Revolution In Design, Performance & Value
FOR 36
M1IONTH
$25 1LEASEI


Performance, Technology, Safety & Quality
OR 36
S MONTH
LEEASE'


w_ aUnt We will beat anytt
Llewl other Hyunda $
ricedealer or pay you _56
All prices are plus tax tag and are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. t Lease down payment requirement: '10 Elantra- $2999, Elantra Touring $1999, Genesis Coupe $2199, '10 Tucson $2499, '10 Genesis Sedan $3799. All offers are with
approved credit and some cannot be combined. *Expected range for most drivers, your actual mileage may vary depending on how you drive and maintain your vehicle. ** On the Accent. As listed on Monroney sticker. A For model year 2008. Based on volume manufacturers as included in the EPATM
Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Fuel Economy trends: 1976-2009 Report. Hyundai and Kia listed separately. Acura included in Honda listing. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Advertised vehicles subject to prior sale. Programs subject to change without notice. tt
Must present signed buyers order from accredited Hyundai Dealer on same model & equipment. $3000 guaranteed trade allowance cannot be combined with any other offers, offer only good on new vehicles. O Special APR offers on select models, see us for details.


I11


l1h1'


SManatee Ave. WISR64-J Exit220 West I


Cortez Road
-rrSlaleRoad70--------- Exil217BWesl


i,


, ai


JULY 29, 2010


r4~7r~r~rS~


IL




32 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


We yIre ringing g ack Smiles!
ife can be a challenge when you suffer from leg pain.
There is no reason to endure chronic pain!
Mountcastle Vein Centers can help! Live Life Pain Free!
"HOW TO HAVE LEGS THAT LOOK AND FEEL YOUNGER"
NO PAIN NO DOWNTIME NO SCALPEL
THIS IS A NON-SURGICAL PROCEDURE.
SAFE AND EFFECTIVE! ,
MEDICARE AND MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED

Dr. Mountcastle has performed over
5,000 successful non-surgical procedures since 2006.
Daniel J. Mountcastle M,D,,FAAEM, Board Certified, Mountcastle Vein Centers is staffed with board certified physicians.
Ohio State UniversityCollege of Medicine who only specialize in vein treatment and care.
New technology has paved the way for our physicians to now treat Peripheral Vein Disease
(PVD) without surgery or harmful medications.
Today's treatments have so advanced that patients have no physical restrictions after their
EVLT (Endovenous Laser Treatment) procedures, and are encouraged to continue right away
with their normal everyday routines and activities.
Peripheral Vein Disease is easily diagnosed with a medical history, and by performing an
ultrasound in one of our local offices.
Cutting edge ultrasound technology allows the physician and patient to immediately view
ultrasound images that clearly indicate venous insuffiecency.
The ultrasound is performed in under 40 minutes and leaves no doubt about whether a patient is
suffering from venous insufficiency or PVD.
If you've had an ultrasound lying in a horizontal position a good portion of the circulatory vein
system in your legs could be missed.
Mountcastle Vein Centers performs all ultrasounds in an standing position to insure an accurate
diagnosis of Peripheral Vein Disease.

CALL US TODAY FOR A FREE CONSULTATION.
MEDICARE, AND MOST INSURANCES PAY FOR TREATMENT.


Maaounttc aste

ein Centers
4040 UPPER CREEK DRIVE, SUITE #105 SUN CITY CENTER 33573

__813-634-1333


Coon Plbe5ai


[C; C, 3rrog v


Swww.mountcastleveincenters.com


JULY 29, 2010




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