Title: Observer news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102144/00027
 Material Information
Title: Observer news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: M&M Printing Co., Inc
Place of Publication: Ruskin, FL
Publication Date: July 22, 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102144
Volume ID: VID00027
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text


P.R.S.T. STD
PAID
RUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570
PERMIT NO. 8
July 22, 2010
Volume 54
THE OBSERVER NEWS


ww .Obere es-e


Many factors combine to create

a diamond from the rough


* By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
RUSKIN Thanks to federal
stimulus dollars, a highly competi-
tive design, the good tim-
ing of a bad market and /
multiple agency co-
operation, a South
County ecological
gem is being pol- ''1
ished to sun-bright
shine here.
And, though still n-
der construction, noi cI l
open for public enjoyment,
the Lost River Preserve Habitat


Restoration Project already is be-
ing homesteaded, as intended, by
ospreys and spoonbills, raccoons
and reptiles, and marine life from
tiny to frying size.
Thei i v .:.-iu.!se, 78-acre preserve,
c..ii' iii-.m-dappled walking
i!r.! ..i nier arching tree cano-
-c meandering around
'ree-flowing salt and
fresh water lagoons,
is tucked between
the Little Mana-
tee River's south
shore and Little
See LOST RIVER PRESERVE, page 16


Ivillcn Irapnagen PnoTos
Governor Charlie Crist has named Tuesday, July 27, as American Victory Recognition Day. In celebration,
the American Victory Ship Museum will offer half price admission on Saturday, July 31 for tours of the
ship berthed at the Port of Tampa.


Tuesday is American Victory Day


* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net
TAMPA Carlton Majette
learned the value of work the hard
way. He had to do his job or die.
As an engineer during World War
II, there were no sick days and no
vacation time to leisurely stroll
the deck of his ship. Majette's job
of keeping the propellers turning
meant he and his shipmates could
live another day. Failure meant be-
coming a sitting duck, marked for
death on the high seas. His baptism
by fire into adulthood stayed with
him for the rest of his life. Nearly
40 years my senior, he worked al-
most every day I had known him.
And, he worked harder than most
people half his age. Carlton Majette
was a Merchant Marine.
The Merchant Marine kept the
war moving for America and all
her Allies. During peace time, they
move commercial cargo through
the waterways and across the
oceans. During wartime, they be-
come a branch of the U.S. Navy,
moving troops and cargo into war
zones. The history of the Merchant
Marine is long and noble.
While not a uniformed service,
the Merchant Marine is a civil-
ian auxiliary of the United States
Navy. In 1936, President Roosevelt
signed legislation that changed
the status of merchant mariners to
military personnel during wartime.
But their service to the nation long
predates that legislation. In 1775,


the Continental Congress issued
Letters of Marque to privateers,
authorizing acts by private citizens
to secure enemy ships in order to
interrupt the British supply chain
along the eastern seaboard during
the Revolutionary War. On June 12,
1775, a group of civilians in Maine
did just that when facing orders
from the British to unload ships or
face the consequences. They chose
the consequences and subsequently
captured a British schooner on be-
half of the future United States of
America.
Merchant Marine service contin-
ued through all of America's wars.


In World War II, the Merchant Ma-
rines suffered the highest casualty
rate of any branch of service, many
losing their lives in battle off enemy
coasts. During the Vietnam War,
merchant marines were responsible
for ferrying 95 percent of the cargo
used by U.S. armed forces.
Despite the 1936 legislation de-
claring status as military personnel,
despite their dedication and sac-
rifice, more than 50 years passed
before merchant mariners were
formally recognized for their ser-
vice to the nation. In 1988, Presi-
dent Reagan signed a bill granting
See AMERICAN VICTORY, page 14


Retirees targeted

in nasty new swindle

* By MELODY JAMESON mi@observernews.net
SUN CITY CENTER Question: When should you reject pleas for
help from traveling family, friends, neighbors or associates?
Answer: When those cries for assistance drop into your email inbox
and you can't verify the so-called facts involved.
Dubbed by the FBI the "stranded swindle," this scheme to separate
well-meaning Americans from their money today tops the bureau's
lengthy list of contemporary computer cons reviewed on its website.
It's also struck close to home. Just ask Bob and Cyrille Cobe, well
known in Sun City Center for their community leadership activities on
several fronts.
The scheme to skin hundreds of the Cobes' friends and associates be-
gan to unfold Friday, July 9, they said this week, although they were
completely unaware of it at the time.
Early that evening, a brief email under the subject line "My Flight"
See SWINDLE, page 2


Melody Jameson photo
Ecologist Tom Ries, who has shepherded the Lost River habitat res-
toration since its inception, uses an aerial graphic to demonstrate
features in the 78-acre preserve. Ries' not-for-profit Ecosphere Res-
toration Institute obtained more than $1 million in grants to under-
write the project.

Brandon 912 group welcomes

South County members


* By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews.net
RIVERVIEW Guyann Brack-
en-Fay has traveled to every one
of America's 50 states and many
countries of the world.
She didn't know it while travel-
ing, but understanding the differ-
ence between the needs of people
in states that make their living
with soybeans and corn and those
in states where industrial factories
and big businesses are king became
important to her as she took on her
latest role in life.
She and other South County resi-
dents are teaching the principles
they say made America great. As a
local organizer for the National 912
Coalition she has helped with rallies
and events, including decorating a
large float for the Fourth of July pa-
rade held annually in Brandon.
But 912's main interest is in


teaching citizens about American
government's true role.
Along with five other directors,
Guyann teaches citizens about the
three main documents that Ameri-
can government was founded upon:
The Declaration of Independence,
the Bill of Rights and the Constitu-
tion of the United States.
One of those directors, Mike
Smith of FishHawk Ranch in Riv-
erview, now retired from special
operations in the U.S. military and
with a master's degree in science
from the Florida Institute of Tech-
nology, is studying the documents
using a Webster's 1828 dictionary.
"It's important to know what our
founding fathers meant when they
used certain words in these im-
portant documents," Mike said in
See BRANDON 912, page 15


Amazing New System

0^st $ar te ^^- --- ?


\ N






2 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

New swindle Continued from page 1


appeared in the in boxes of some
500 local and distant computer users
named in the Cobes' address books,
including the entire congregation of
SCC's Beth Israel Synagogue, where
Bob is current president. The Cobes'
computer-based lists of addressees
had been hacked into by persons
unknown, the lists pirated in order
to set up an internet theft that poten-
tially promised the invisible thieves
many thousands of easy dollars.
The message, in Cyrille's name,
apologetically asked those in the
Cobe address books for urgent fi-
nancial help because she had been


robbed at gun point of her "bags,
cash, and cards and my cell phone..."
while on vacation in London, Eng-
land. "We still have our passports
and return tickets but currently hav-
ing troubles paying off the hotel bills
and also getting a cab..." the email
cleverly stated. Further, authorities
there "were not being 100% sup-
portive," the message complained.
The plea ended with "Please I need
you to loan me some money, will re-
fund you as soon as I'm back home.
I promise." The message, however,
did not ask for a specific amount or
provide any instructions for convey-


ing it to the seemingly stranded SCC
retirees. The thieves relied instead
on generous, concerned friends
reaching for the "reply" key, ask-
ing how they could help and possi-
bly promising the pending arrival of
emergency cash.
What actually transpired, as far
as is known, is that within an hour
that Friday night recorded ques-
tions from worried colleagues began
to pile up in the Cobes' telephone
voice mail. No, they could only ex-
plain initially from the comforts of
home, they had not sent the emailed
plea, had not made a recent trip to


- .A


NO
h A s q
Ir ~-e m.l-%m-


J -


England, certainly were not stranded
and absolutely had not been robbed
at gun point. It was all pure fiction.
"Cyrille is just fine," Bob would
joke as the Cobes tried to notify ev-
eryone, "but, we always can use a
few extra dollars."
Actually though, it was not enter-
taining. In fact, it was about as amus-
ing as a stolen wallet loaded with iden-
tifying information and checkbooks,
even though empty of any currency.
Cobes soon recognized the serious-
ness of their targeting, despite the fact
they were safe and no one, apparently,
was responding to the nefarious email,
thereby being ripped off.
Their computer system security
had been breached. At least some of
their closely held passwords had be-
come the property of crooks, prob-
ably off-shore thieves. All of their
online business transactions could
be exposed to persons unknown but
dedicated to stealing the credit
card purchases and payments, rou-
tine banking activity, investment
transfers, and more.
Within hours, the Cobes were wide-
ly reporting the stranded swindle a
con unsuccessful in their case in terms
of generating immediate booty but
highly successful in potentially pur-
loining valuable assets. They contact-
ed the Hillsborough County Sheriff's
office and were directed to the FBI,
Cyrille Cobe noted this week. They
filed a report with the Internet Crime
Complaint Center (www.IC3.gov)
and notified authorities at gmail.com,
their primary email account manager.
They scrambled to make more com-


plicated the passwords across their
system and to reset filtering param-
eters. They double checked the secu-
rity of their accounts with banks and
investment counselors, flagging them
for ongoing scrutiny.
"What else can we do?" Cyrille
Cobe asked rhetorically, recogniz-
ing that the hackers who hi jacked
their protected information probably
will not be identified and likely are
beyond the reach of U.S. law. Their
foreign location is clearly indicated
by the email message wording dem-
onstrating that English is not the
thieves' first language, both Cobes
pointed out.
In fact, this is one of the six pri-
mary "signs of a scam" underscored
by Microsoft on its comprehensive
"How to reduce the risk of online
fraud" site microsoft.com/protect/
fraud/phishping/reduce.aspx. Other
signals include generic greetings
such as "Dear Customer," urgings to
respond immediately, and requests
for personal information. The site
also provides advice on handling
fraudulent emails and details how to
prevent being victimized by a scam.
Nonetheless, "we're all vulner-
able," Cyrille Cobe summed up, "I
don't think anything is completely
secure."
Yet, there's also a positive aspect
of their situation, Bob Cobe assert-
ed. "We've been back in touch with
people we haven't seen in years;
because of this we've spoken to old
friends from Georgia and Texas and
Michigan and Rhode Island."
Copyright 2010 Melody Jameson


. Mitch Traphagn Photo
Mitch Traphagen Photo


With the flow of oil shut off (here's hoping it remains so), there is hope the beach at St. Pete Beach
pictured last week will remain as pristine as it is today. In any event, you don't need an excuse to visit
-just go. It will be well worth your while. The view of the historic Don Cesar Hotel is an added perk. Pat-
rick Supple (thanks for the note and the kind words I hope to hear
from you again soon!) got it as did Robin Greenwood (really enjoyed /T'. ". _
the tour of Elmira's all of you are doing great work out there) JUL E-z
and Bill and Margie Galbreath (I am continually impressed with your \ '-_-
knowledge of great Florida places and always enjoy hearing from
you. Thanks for the note and the kind words). Except for a two-year
vacation (of sorts) to the Midwest, I've lived in Florida since 1994. In
all of the years since, and all of the wonderful and bizarre things that
have happened here, just a glimpse of an island with palm trees is
still enough to fire up my imagination. I love islands with palm trees Wo II A "
and, fortunately, we have more than a few in our own backyard. As
is this one, shown on a postcard-perfect summer day. Where are we this week? Send your best guess
or even a postcard of your own to where@observernews.net. Or send a letter to 210 Woodland Estates
Blvd., Ruskin, FL, 33570. Sail on up and maybe I'll be there to take your lines. See you on the beach!


JULY 22, 2010


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2010






JULY 22, 2010

Moving pictures that will move you


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 3


Technology has advanced a wee
bit since the introduction of "mov-
ing pictures." From that accurate
description in the early part of the
last century, came the term "mov-
ie." And then
there were
"talkies" in
which sound
was incorpo-
" rated into the
Moving pic-
Observing tures. It took
the Web more than
two decades
By Mitch Traphagen for sound to
mitch@observernews.net be commer-
cially and
technologically feasible.
Today anyone can be a movie
producer and apparently a good
number of us have aspirations for
it as YouTube has skyrocketed to
the third most visited website on
the Internet. Only Google and Fa-
cebook generate more web traffic.
Out of billions of websites, being


third is quite a distinction. It seems
the fascination of moving pictures
hasn't yet worn off even after
more than a century.
Thousands of new videos are
added to YouTube and similar
sites every day but only a few have
resonated with the viewing public.
One of those is entitled, Seeing my
dog the day I got back from Af-
ghanistan. More than two million
people have viewed the absolute
joy that Gracie the dog felt as she
saw her human, Andrew Schmidt,
the moment he came home from
Kandahar in September, 2005. An-
drew's wife Jen shot the video of
Gracie's unrestrained joy. The clip
has even appeared on the Today
Show.
This is something that will not
only make you feel good, but also
give you a reason to smile. Check
it out at http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v ysKAVyXiOJ4.
Another video on YouTube will
cause you to wonder about human


4it Lightning strikes three of the tallest
Buildings in Chicago at the same time!
by Craig Shimala a


afterthestorm.
the Trip]-.
10 Lightiting
tithikes three at
the 111*11
buii.Ings I...

n..", for Howl


Image from Vimeo.com
Amateur photographer Craig Shimala captured a triple lightning
strike of three of Chicago's tallest buildings. His video is available
at vimeo.com


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endurance (and possibly cause you
to hold your breath for a moment
or two). This is not something the
normal human can do. The profes-
sionally produced video, entitled
Free Fall, shows world champion
free diver Guillaume Nery de-
scend into Dean's Blue Hole in the
Bahamas, the world's deepest blue
hole. He certainly takes his sweet
time doing so. The video descrip-
tion notes that it is an artistic proj-
ect and a work of fiction but also
that it was done entirely on "breath
hold", meaning that, yes, the guy
actually did this while holding his
breath. The video contains abso-
lutely stunning imagery and is well
worth a view. More than five mil-
lion people have already done so.
Check it out at http://www.youtube.
com/watch?v=uQITWbAaDxO.
After watching Free Fall, you
may think to yourself, \\o\\' I'd
like to produce stunning videos
too, but I can't afford tens of thou-
sands of dollars for camera gear
and a few thousand more for post-
production software!" Well, I'm
here to tell you that stunning video
production is as close as your iP-
hone.
A video on Vimeo.com was shot
and edited entirely on an iPhone
4 by some film students from the
University of Southern Califor-
nia's School of Cinematic Arts.
They persuaded a professional
actor into working for free, built
their own stabilizing gear for
shooting, and then edited the film
on the iPhone's iMovie app. The
entire project took 48 hours and
the results are truly amazing es-


Photo from Flickr (mkoerbel)
Director Michael Koerbel using the iPhone 4 to film Apple of My Eye.
The film was shot and edited entirely on the smartphone.


pecially when you consider we're
talking about a video shot on a cell
phone.
The film is entitled Apple of \ I
Eye and is well worth a look. The
producers also included very inter-
esting behind-the-scenes footage
(also shot using the iPhone) show-
ing how the film was produced. It's
a cool look at how far technology
has advanced, and certainly it will
serve as inspiration for aspiring
filmmakers. Check it out at http:/
vimeo.com/12819723.
Finally, sometimes being a suc-
cessful film maker is simply be-
ing in the right place at the right
time, as proven by Craig Shimala.
Shimala captured a triple light-
ning strike simultaneously hitting
three of the city's tallest buildings.
Check out his incredible footage,
shot with a Canon 7D camera, at
http://vimeo.com/12816548.


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For direct access to all the links
in this story, visit The Observer
News online atwww.observernews.
net. Click on News and Observing
the Web.

Quota permits

no longer

being mailed

The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
wants to make hunters aware that
beginning this year, quota permits
for general gun, archery, muzzle-
loading gun, family, youth, airboat
and track will not be mailed out to
successful applicants as they have
been in the past.
Instead, the FWC is allowing
hunters, who are awarded per-
mits in the random drawings, to
print the quota permits by going
to www.fl.wildlifelicense.com and
choosing "Limited Entry/Quota
then Pickup/Pay for Awarded Per-
mit." For detailed instructions on
how to do this, go to MyFWC.
com/Hunting and click "Limited
Entry Hunts," then "How to Print
Your Limited Entry Hunt Permit
Directly from the Website."
Hunters not having access to
the Internet or a printer can pick
up their awarded quota permits at
license agents or county tax col-
lectors' offices. But, be prepared
to give to the clerk, the 4-digit
hunt number of the hunt you were
awarded. Hunt numbers are listed
on the quota worksheets.
To check drawing results and
permit availability, hunters may
again go to MyFWC.com/Hunting
and click "Limited Entry Hunts."
Permits issued during phase I or
II can be downloaded or picked
up any time before the hunt ends.
However, if you obtain a quota
permit during the first-come, first-
served phase III, make sure to print
it out at the end of the transaction.
If you go through a license agent
or tax collector during this period,
you will receive your quota permit
from the clerk.
The exception is that mobility-
impaired quota hunt permits will
continue to be mailed to successful
applicants. Also, the legal game
tags used in South Florida dur-
ing track and airboat quota hunts,
which are still required, will con-
tinue to be mailed to the awarded
permit holders.

Looking for
furniture, vehicle,
yard sale?
Check
out the
classified
ads
beginning
on page
23.


i u~1server News o COU Pon iIxpi res u/5/i u T


I







4 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

The positive power of expectation Local dental group welcomes


Positive
Talk
By William Hodges


People
who expect
little from
life often
will get ex-
actly what
they expect.
The power
of positive
expectation
is one of the


most underrated powers we as hu-
man beings possess. The pessimists
among us expect nothing, so if they
don't get .ni hin0i,- they are not
disappointed. But more often than
not, since they don't expect to find
opportunities to grow and prosper,
they are unable to recognize oppor-
tunities when they appear. On the
other hand, the optimists continu-
ally expect to see good flowing to-
ward them, and they are in a favor-
able position to take full advantage
of whatever fate offers.
In sales especially, it is important
to maintain an attitude of positive
expectancy. Following World War
II, two salesmen were sent to sell
production equipment to Japanese
manufacturers. The first wrote
back to his company that the task
was impossible. He said the mar-
ket potential was poor because the
factories were in ruins and manu-
facturing methods were hopelessly
out of date. The second wrote back
that the market potential was ex-
cellent because the factories were
in ruins and needed new equip-
ment. He went on to say that, with
the new equipment being installed,
this would be a great time to intro-
duce new manufacturing methods
through the company's training
program. The second salesman
succeeded because he expected to
succeed and was open to the op-
portunities presented to him. What
opportunities are you missing be-
cause you aren't expecting to suc-
ceed?


Isaac Newton, in his third law of
motion wrote: "For every action,
there is an equal and opposite reac-
tion." My first law of expectancy
is: "For every problem, there is an
equal or greater opportunity." The
opportunity may not be readily
apparent, but it will be there. For
example, one cookie manufacturer
was plagued by scrap in the form
of broken cookies. For years, they
paid for the scrap to be hauled
away, since everyone agreed that
the market for broken cookies
was not broad enough to provide
a profit. Finally, just by chance, an
executive of the company noticed
his young niece crumble a cookie
and mix it into her ice cream.
The rest is history. Cookies and
Cream became a popular flavor of
ice cream; it is one that contains
cookie pieces-thanks to a little
girl and a man who refused to quit
looking for an answer to a problem
others had given up as unsolvable.
He lived with positive expectancy
and was open to the answer when
it presented itself. What solutions
are you overlooking every day be-
cause you are not open to them?
Edgar Watson Howe said, "There
is nothing so well known as that
we should not expect something
for nothing-but we all do and call
it hope." Maybe that's what posi-
tive expectancy is all about-never
giving up hope. For as long as we
have hope, we will continue to look
for answers. More importantly, we
will be open to those answers when
they appear, and we will be in a po-
sition to take advantage of them.
Hodges is a nationally recog-
nized speaker, trainer, and syn-
dicated columnist. Hodges may
be reached at Hodges Seminars
International, PO. Box 89033,
Tampa, FL 33689-0400. Phone
813-641-0816. Web site: http://
www.BillHodges.com.


new dentist
Local Dental Practice Welcomes
Dr. Michelle Halcomb The Sun
City Center dental practice of Za-
mikoff, Klement, Jungman and
Varga announce the addition of
Michelle Halcomb, D.D.S. to their
team. Dr. Halcomb comes to Sun
City Center with over twenty years
of dental practice experience. She
graduated from the University of
Minnesota School of Dentistry and
then served in the U.S. Navy for
six years, including duty aboard
the USS Lexington (AVT-16).
Following her naval career she re-
mained in Pensacola to pursue pri-
vate practice for the next 15 years.
Dr. Halcomb places a high prior-
ity on staying abreast of the latest
dental techniques. She attended
the prestigious Pankey Institute
and is a member of the Seattle
Study Club in Tampa, both nation-
ally recognized dental organiza-
tions that emphasize delivering
top quality care. Dr. Halcomb is a


Dr. Michelle Halcomb
member of both the Florida Dental
Association and American Dental
Association. She is also a member
of the Sun City Center Kiwanis.
Dr. Halcomb welcomes new pa-
tients at 703 Del Webb Blvd. W.,
Suite B., Sun City Center.


Balm Civic to host candidate forum


The Balm Civic Association will
be hosting a candidate forum on
Wednesday, Aug. 4 at 6:30 p.m.
The forum will be held at the Balm
Civic Center, located at the corer
of County Road 672 and Balm
Wimauma Road, 14747 Balm
Wimauma Rd.
All candidates running for Hills-
borough County Commissioner-
at-large districts 5 (Hosler, Hagan,
Saul-Sena) and 7 (Sharpe, Cosen-
tino, Stutzman, Burgin) have been
invited to attend. In addition, can-
didates for the School Board Dis-
trict 4 will be attending. They will
also have speakers on Amendment
4, Florida Hometown Democracy,
representing pro and con posi-
tions.


The format for the forum is
straightforward- short preliminary
statements from the candidates
followed by a question and answer
session. Citizens are encouraged to
come prepared with plenty of good
tough questions for the candidates.
This will be the third candidate fo-
rum held in Balm in recent years
and it is expected that it will be an-
other well attended, informative,
and lively evening.
Refreshments will be served -
homemade goodies prepared by
Balm's good cooks!
The Balm Civic Association is
dedicated to preserving the rural
and agricultural heritage of his-
toric Balm.


JULY 22, 2010

Award-Winning Newspapers

THE OBSERVER NEWS
The SCC Observer &
The Riverview Current
210 Woodland Estates S.W.
Ruskin, FL 33570
813-645-3111
Fax: 813-645-4118
www.ObserverNews.net
Published Every Thursday
by M&M Printing Co., Inc. 645-4048
EDITORIAL:
Brenda Knowles ............Publisher/Editor
brenda@observernews.net
Mitch Traphagen.................Online Editor
mitch@observernews.net
Penny Fletcher..........Contributing Writer
penny@observernews.net
Melody Jameson......Contributing Writer
mj@observernews.net
Julie Ball.............. Press Releases/W riter
news@observernews.net
All press releases, news articles and
photos may be emailed to news@
observernews.net, faxed to 645-4118, or
mailed to Observer News, 210 Woodland
Estates Ave. SW, Ruskin, FL 33570
SALES:
Vilma Stlllwell... Display Advertising Rep.
vilma@observernews.net
Nan Kirk........... Display Advertising Rep.
nan@observernews.net
For current rates and circulation
information visit our website at
www.ObserverNews.net
CLASSIFIED / CIRCULATION:
Beverly Kay......... Classified / Circulation
beverly@observernews.net
PRODUCTION:
Chere Simmons....Graphic Arts / Layout
chere@observemews.net
Sue Sloan .............Composition / Layout
sue@observernews.net

The views expressed by our writers are
not necesssanly shared by The Observer
News, SCC Observer, The Riverview
Current or M&M Pnnting Co., Inc.

We Accept


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JULY 22, 2010

Celebrating 36 Years in Business

CALL FOR FREE
INSPECTION 4
TERMITES? I
ASK ABOUT TERMIDOR
BRANDON
PEST CONTROL
Phone: (813) 685-7711
Fax: (813) 685-3607
10 ocaio s inloidGerga. .nese


Riverview Memorial
VFW Post #8108

Riverview Memorial VFW Post
#8108, 7504 Riverview Dr.
schedule is as follows:

Meetings: Men's Auxiliary --
1st Thursday at 7 p.m.

Ladies' Auxiliary --
2nd Tuesday at 7 p.m.

VFW Post --
2nd Thursday at 7:30 p.m.

Sunday:
Breakfast, 9 a.m. to noon, $6

Monday: Bar Bingo at 6:30 a.m.

Wednesday:
Spaghetti from 5 to 7 p.m. $6

Friday:
Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.;
Fish, $6; Combo, $7

Karaoke from 8 to ?

Saturday: Karaoke from 8 to ?

2nd Tuesday: Ladies' Auxiliary
Meeting at 7 p.m.

3rd Tuesday: VA Hospital Bingo
-- Leave Post at 6 p.m.

Every Wednesday:
$6 All-U-Can-Eat Spaghetti Dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m.

Carry-out orders available.

Call ahead -- 671-9845

1st Thursday:
Men's Auxiliary Meeting at 7 p.m.

2nd Thursday:
Post Meeting at 7:30 p.m.

Every Friday:
Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.
(all you can eat fish -- $6)

Carry-out orders available.
Call ahead -- 671-9845

They also serve Chicken Tenders,
Shrimp or combos for $7.

Each dinner comes with fries,
coleslaw, and a hush puppy.

Every Saturday:
Karaoke by Jeff at 8 p.m.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 5


uoast juara uutter Lagle.'

Residents consider suing HOA


Several residents in the Coving-
ton Park subdivision may have no
other choice than to sue their own
homeowners' association. The
problem seems to be that the HOA,
after 8 years of homeowner con-
trol, is still not systematically and
equitability enforcing their own
adopted covenants, conditions,
and restrictions for the Covington
Park community.
These rules are important and
vital to ensure the safety of the
homeowners, sustain beautifica-
tion within the community, and
help maintain property values in
an otherwise depressed real estate
market.
Even though numerous attempts
have been made over the years to
get the HOA to either fine persis-
tent violators or have the necessary
maintenance performed and assess
the cost to the non-compliant ho-
meowner, the HOA continues to
make excuses for failing to act.
"The solution is really very
simple," according to resident Bob
Clayton, who is organizing the
potential litigation. "It's time for
the HOA board to be accountable
and do their job. The HOA needs
to either:
Authorize their management
company (Rampart) to aggres-
sively enforce the community's


covenants, conditions, and restric-
tions to the fullest extent allowed
or
Entertain a motion to abol-
ish the declaration of covenants,
conditions, and restrictions of
Covington Park."
"The HOA board has the author-
ity to act. Their continued lack of
enforcement has caused the situa-
tion to deteriorate rapidly because
residents realize that there is no
consequence for failing to abide
by the rules," states Clayton. "Any
resident of Covington Park is
welcome and encouraged to join
our efforts. If you would like more
information, call 443-1205."


Spa offers
beginner classes
Serenity Stream Yoga and Well-
ness Spa will be offering New-
bie Yoga with Tiffany Cantrell
from 7:15 to 9:15 p.m. beginning
Thursday, Aug. 5. It is a two-night
workshop that will cover the basics
of yoga.
Never seenyour toes, never mind
touched them? Thought you were
too tight, too tall, too old, too fill-
in-the-blank for yoga? Well, this
workshop is for you! This work-
shop will provide you with the
basics of yoga. They will explore
meditation, the breath, relaxation
techniques, yoga poses like the
Triangle and Warrior I and many
others. This workshop is geared
towards those individuals new
to yoga or those who want to get
back to the 'beginner's mindset.'
Come and experience all of the
great things yoga has to offer for
the mind, body and the spirit!
Tuition is $50 in advance or $55
(day of) for the 2-night workshop
to be held on Aug. 5 and 12. For
more information on the Newbie
Yoga workshop or any classes
offered at Serenity Stream Yoga &
Wellness Spa, call (813) 368-6546
or visit the website www.sereni-
tystream.com. You may also com-
plete the Wellness Questionnaire
under the Newcomers tab on our
website to get started with a free
wellness consultation.


Sea Scouts tour tall ship Eagle
Sea Scouts from Ship 185, Tampa Sailing Squadron, Apollo Beach,
were invited for a special tour of the Coast Guard training ship Eagle.
Bob Bettinger of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, Flotilla 75, Ruskin, made
arrangements with two current crew members who had served with his
son, Mickey Bettinger, who had also served on the Eagle in the early
1990s. It brought back a lot of memories for Mr. Bettinger who is also a
Coast Guard veteran who toured the Eagle in the 1950s.
The Eagle, originally named the Horst Wessel, is a three-masted barque
with auxiliary diesel power. It was built in 1936 as a German naval train-
ing ship. In 1945, after World War II, the ship was awarded to the Coast
Guard and renamed the 'Eagle.' In 1947, she became a training sail ship
for the Coast Guard Cadets. The ship has a normal crew of about 50 per-
sonnel, but, in the summer 150 cadets from the Coast Guard Academy
join the ship to learn and master the art of sailing a tall ship. The skills
of working as a team and the development of self-discipline will last a
lifetime for the crew members.
The Sea Scouts, who also train in sailing, will always remember their
visit and several have the dream of one day joining the Coast Guard and
hopefully be lucky enough to do a tour aboard the 'Pride of the Coast
Guard,' the tall ship 'Eagle.'
For more information about the Sea Scouts, contact Don St. Amour at
(813) 967-7718. For information about the Coast Guard Auxiliary, call
Fred Kramer at (813) 649-0830.


Coast Guard Guide Emmet explaining the ship's equipment.

Hillsborough County sponsors
back-to-school physical and
immunizations


Hillsborough County Public
Schools and the Back to School
Coalition of Hillsborough County
is hosting opportunities for free
physical and immunizations on
upcoming Saturdays.
Free school physical are avail-
able to any child entering a Florida
school for the first time in grades
kindergarten through 12. Parents
or legal guardians must accom-
pany their children at all times and
immunization records are required
for children to receive free im-
munizations. No sports, Head
Start, or day care physical will be
available.
School Board Chair Susan
Valdes will be present at the
Aug. 21 Northwest Hillsborough
County Health Center health fair,
which she has helped organize for
the past six years.


# ,- Hillsborough County
PUBLIC SCHOOLS

For more information, call the
number indicated for each site.

Saturday, August 14
9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Hillsborough Community Col-
lege SouthShore at 551 24th St.
N.E., Ruskin. Appointments are
required. For more information,
call (813) 443-3048.

Saturday, August 21
9 a.m. to noon
Crosstown Immunization Clinic,
Hillsborough County Health De-
partment at 4951 E. Adamo Dr.,
Suite 210, Tampa. Immunizations
and walk-ins only. For more infor-
mation, call (813) 307-8077.


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Ruskin VFW Post #6287

Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120 U.S. 41 N. has listed the following
weekly activities. Meetings are: American Legion on 1st Wednesday
each month; VFW and LAVFW on the 2nd Wednesday each month;
and MAVFW on the 3rd Thursday
each month.
Thursday, July 22 Bar Bingo at
6 p.m. MAVFW Meeting at 7 p.m.
Friday, July 23- Fish & Chips
from 5 to 7 p.m. Music by Rick
Bourbon from 7 to 10 p.m.
Saturday, July 24 Open.
Sunday, July 25- Pub Stumpers
STrivia Games from 4 to 7 p.m.
Kitchen open from 4 to 7 p.m.
Monday, July 26- Cribbage at 1 p.m. Wii Games at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, July 27 Games in Lounge from 1 to 5 p.m. Kitchen
opens at 4:30 p.m. Bingo at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, July 28 Wii Games at 6 p.m.


Left to right: Front row, Jana Roy, CG-Aux Bob Bettinger, Libby
Olsen, Jackson Penith, and Ryan Kiesge. Back row, Scout Master
Tom McMullen, Wesley Shaw, Marianna, CG Crew Guide Emmet, and
John Booth.
























uled at the SouthShore Regional Library for Saturday, July 31 from
10am to 2pm. Take a bag of books for $1. There will also be half priced
Copyrightedspecials and much more.Material

SyndicatedRuskin Moose eventsContent






Friday, July 23- Nickel and Dime
Saturday, July 24- Karaoke with Kim Mullins
Available from Commercial News Providers Book Sale

The Friends of the SouthShore Library used book sale has been sched-
uled at the SouthShore Regional Library for Saturday, July 31 from
10am to 2pm. Take a bag of books for $1. There will also be half priced
specials and much more.

Ruskin Moose events

Friday, July 30- Nickel and Dimers from 7-1pm.
Saturday, July 31- Karaoke with Kim Mullins
from 7 11pm.
Friday, July 30- Daydreamers from 7-11pm.
Saturday, July 31- Karaoke with Kim Mullins
from 7 llpm.

Weekly events
Chefs choice Dinner is every Wednesday night, from 5-7pm
Wings are every Thursday night, from 5-7pm.
Fish Fry is every Friday night, from 5-7pm.
Live music is every Friday night.
Karaoke by Kim every Saturday night.
All events are opened to qualified members and guests.








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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


JULY 22, 2010






JULY 22, 2010

Soaring


Oil coated
pelicans
seem to be
the symbol
of the Gulf
S oil spill, with
good reason.
Saturation There were
Point vivid and
By y B k disturbing
By Karey Burek photographs
taken of the
brown pelican and other bird spe-
cies completely wrapped in muck
that at first glance looked like
thick mud. But alas, it wasn't mud
but gooey oil.
Rescue efforts have been going
on since the first oil covered ani-
mal was spotted and it is still go-
ing on months later. Volunteers
are diligently working to clean up
and rehabilitate those species in-
fluenced by the oil spill. Rescued
and cleaned up Pelicans have been
driven to Fort De Soto Park, Sani-
bel Island and Sarasota to be re-
leased back into the wild, soaring
high above the oil free beaches.
Recently a group of pelican chicks
ranging from weeks to months old
had been rescued from the Louisi-

Golf Scores Hogans
Golf Club
6/19 SandPiper, K-skins

1st : Don Mowry, 4 skins
2nd: five-way tie @ 2 skins each
- Chip Wood,Jay Sparkman, Mac
McKay, Andy Betz & Ron Kings-
ton


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 7
Register your child for AYSO soccer


brown pelicans soar rnrougn me SKy at St. rere teacn.


ana area and brought down to Mi-
ami. They are currently staying at
the Pelican Harbor Seabird Sanc-
tuary in Miami until they are old
enough to fly.
The Brown Pelican is on the
Louisiana flag and State Seal, and
is considered to be the state bird
as well. They are also known to
symbolize self sacrifice because


Take Care of the Earth


ancient lore depicts stories of the
pelican feeding its chicks blood
from its own body when food was
unavailable.
I am still amazed at the beauty
and grace of this creature and love
to watch them soar overhead any
chance I get.


The local American Youth Soc-
cer Organization (AYSO) Region
1487 is having its registration day
for the fall season on Saturday,
July 24 at First Baptist Church of
Ruskin. With AYSO's Everyone
Plays philosophy, every player,
aged four and a half years old to
16 years old, is guaranteed to play
a minimum of half of every game.
AYSO is the right soccer program
for every player this fall whether
it's their first soccer experience or
they're a seasoned player that just
wants to make sure they're on the
field and not on the bench. The cost
for the 2010 fall season is only $60
per child for early registration and
$80 for those registering after Au-
gust 1.
WHO: Boys and Girls, four and
a half to 16 years old
WHAT: Registration/Evaluations
WHEN: July 24, Saturday from
9:00 a.m. until noon
WHERE: First Baptist
Church of Ruskin (In the Gym)
820 College Ave. West Ruskin, FL
813-645-6439 .


WHY: Every player plays in ev-
ery game. It's fun, affordable and a
great family experience.
For more information, visit the
church's website: www.fbcruskin.
org.:.r 1 : f.ir s.org
About AYSO
The American Youth Soccer Or-
ganization is the largest single-en-
tity youth soccer association in the
U.S. with over 600,000 registered
players and 225,000 volunteers.
AYSO develops and delivers qual-
ity youth soccer programs in a fun,
safe environment based on the 5
Philosophies of Everyone Plays,
Balanced Teams, Open Registra-
tion, Positive Coaching and Good
Sportsman-
ship. To F
learn more
about
AYSO and
how you
can be-
come a part
of AYSO,
contact (800)USA-AYSO or visit
www.soccer.org.


SBDC at USF is appointed contact for bridge loan applicants


The Florida Small Business De-
velopment Center Network (FS-
BDC), which includes the Small
Business Development Center
(SBDC) at the University of South
Florida (USF) has been appointed
the primary technical assistance
provider of the Florida Emergency
Bridge Loan program.
The Florida Emergency Bridge
Loan program was activated in
early June by Governor Crist to
assist businesses impacted by the
Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. The
Governor's Office of Tourism,
Trade & Economic Development
has allocated $5 million in an effort
to provide short-term emergency
funding to businesses in need of
immediate cash flow as a result of
being physically or economically

*rTOiIraiu


impacted by the oil spill.
"Small businesses are the back-
bone of our economy," stated Ei-
leen Rodriguez, SBDC at USF re-
gional director. "These short term
loans will provide the much need-
ed assistance for those who have
been impacted by the oil spill."
Short-term loans of up to $25,000
will be available to small business
owners impacted by the oil spill.
The loans are interest-free for 12
months. To apply, the business
owner must have been operational
for one full year prior to the Deep-
water Horizon Oil Spill and must
demonstrate physical damage or
economic injury as a result of the
oil spill.
In the Tampa Bay region, the
approved counties are: Hemando,


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Pasco, Pinellas, Hillsborough,
Manatee, and Sarasota. The SBDC
at USF has set-up a hotline for peo-
ple who seek assistance. The num-
bers are (813) 384-8232 (English)
and (813) 384-8233 (Spanish).
For more information about the
program, requirements and related
forms, visit: www.floridaoilhelp.
com.

Rice at the Ready
We love to eat healthy brown
rice, but it takes longer to cook
than white rice and there are times
that we need a meal quickly! In-
dividual "heat and eat" servings
of brown rice are over $2 for just
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AT HOME AUTO CARE
Courtesy Shuttle Service Available Towing Upon Request
2003 U.S. Hwy. 41 S Ruskin, FL
(exactly 1 mile south of SR 674/College Ave.)

813 645-0339
OPEN Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Lic# MVS51635
www.athomeauto.net
We are a AAA Approved Auto Repair Center
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If you have a

loved one with
1 \
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HOMEWOOD
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Daily Moments of SuccessM
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suffers from Alzheimer's or dementia is one of
life's great challenges. But the memory care
program at Homewood Residence at
Freedom Plaza can enhance the quality of life,
not just for your loved one, but for your entire
family as well. We understand the nature of
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in a program that focuses on Daily Moments
of Success.

If your family has a loved one with
Alzheimer's, then call us. We can talk about
the details later, but for now let's just talk.

Call (813) 633-4340 for more
information or to schedule
your personal visit.


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p YM ^^^^B~f^^B~f^^^fi~3M ^jCB^M^MCB Qi


MEI~dBUTH
.AVIX
RITOR






8 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


A place to go instead of court


Joan Noble has always been in
the helping professions. Maybe
that's why she chose to head up

nity Media-
tion Program
back in 1999
when it first
became a re-
ality.
Over But this
Coffee isn't the first
By PennyFletcher problem-
ByPennyFletcher resolution
penny@observernews.net position in
which Joan
- now 66 has been involved. In
fact, this (now) well-known com-
munity advocate began lifting
others up many years ago while a
Catholic Sister in the Order of the
Holy Names.
New Orleans born and Tampa
raised, Joan has six brothers and
sisters and a mother who at 96 is
still well enough to jaunt around
town.
"She even cooks and takes care
of her 94-year-old brother," she
said.
Professionally trained as a teach-
er and guidance counselor, Joan
continued to work helping others
after leaving the Convent.
Among the many things she has
undertaken, some of the highlights
she mentioned were counseling
at Hillsborough Community Col-
lege (where she has also taught)
and working with men and women
fighting their addictions at a meth-
adone clinic.
Married since 1983 to John
Morse, the couple has one child.
And her dedication to her work
has only increased with time.
In 1999, a $30,000 grant was se-
cured from the Dispute Resolution
Center in Tallahassee; an arm of
the Florida Supreme Court. It was
funded to keep cases from having
to go to court, thus saving taxpay-
ers money, she explained to me
last week in an interview at Sun-
Point McDonalds in Ruskin.
"It was originally so that we
could do contract mediation for
families in the jurisdiction of the
13th Circuit Court and also do re-


dress mediation with the post of-
fice," she explained.
At that time, Joan was a pro-
fessional mediator. She had been
helping resolve family issues
through mediation since 1979.
Since becoming affiliated with
the Community Justice Center she
had seen all kinds of cases from
animal nuisances to dissatisfaction
with business services; employee-
employer relations; unsuccessful
contract work; landlord tenant dis-
putes; homeowner's association
problems; and quarrels between
business partners.
"Sometimes, we have even seen
employers who have gone out of
business without paying their em-
ployees," she told me. "This usu-
ally creates terrible hardship on
the part of not only the employees,
but their families."
The best thing about the program
is that it is free to those who use
it.
It is not a 501 (3) C tax-free or-
ganization, because it is funded by
a governmental agency, so people
are not asked for donations. But
volunteer support in many areas
is always needed and training is
provided.
The only criteria for using their
services is that someone's claim
be "pre" or "post" lawsuit. In other
words, the time for mediation is al-
ways before a lawsuit is filed.
Individuals or businesses wish-
ing to request a mediation confer-
ence may obtain an intake form
by visiting the office in the new
SouthShore Regional service
Center, 410 30th St. S.E. Ruskin
Suite 100 (just off State Road 674)
Ruskin, 33570, or by calling (813)
672-7442.
The first person they will meet
is Sharon Applegate, who mans
the office and provides a variety of
services and referrals.
After a short retirement from
a 24-year career with Fireman's
fund Insurance Company where
she was an executive underwriter,
she joined the justice team about
eight years ago and does varied
office duties, arranges appoint-
ments and schedules, schedules


mediations and mediators, and re-
fers people to other agencies when
necessary.
Sharon says the best part of her
job is helping people, and the
worst part is taking harassment
from those she cannot help.
Volunteer mediators come from
all over the county, including Tam-
pa and Seffner even though events
and mediations mostly focus on
South County.
"We had no judicial presence
here," Joan told me. "This brought
the justice system to the people
who used to have to go to Tampa
or Plant City."
But people from other areas may
call and schedule an appointment.
When the center first opened, it
was the court's hope that it would
be a pilot for other similar centers,
built and staffed by volunteers
around the county to save court
docket time. That never material-
ized because of state and county
budget cuts, Joan said.
Yet this center is still keeping
many cases out of court.
In 2009, the center had 342 in-
quires. Of those, 175 desired in-
formation and 167 were referred to
other agencies, many to Bay Area
Legal Services which provides a
list of specific legal services on
a sliding scale to those who can-
not afford a private attorney. "To
use our services, both parties must
agree to mediation because we are
there to obtain a resolution. We are
not a court. We are there to prevent
many things from going to court so
the courts can concentrate on cases
that cannot be resolved in media-
tion," she said.
The county still funds these ser-
vices, as it does the elder justice
and child advocacy centers.
"There are 20 court circuits in
Florida, and we (in the 13th Judi-
cial Circuit) were extremely fortu-
nate that our commissioners saw
this need and have always sup-
ported it," she said in closing.
It is easy to see that the 13th Ju-
dicial Circuit, that covers South
County, would be much more
back-logged if not for this valu-
able service.


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Penny Fletcher Photo
Joan Noble, seated, coordinator of the Community Justice Center in
Ruskin, and Sharon Applegate who mans the office, tell about some
of the programs offered there. The center is supported by the 13th
Judicial Circuit which covers South County; its purpose being to
mediate many disputes that could otherwise end up in court.


Open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Friday, media-
tions are held during the day and
on some evenings, so it can also
accommodate people who work
during normal business hours.
Before the new building on 30th
Street was built, the center was
looking at other areas of the coun-
ty to move to, but there were more
volunteers in South County than
anywhere else, Joan said.
"These people are a gold mine,"
Joan said. "Wray Hiser, an attor-
ney from Ruskin, specializes in
foreclosures. He's from Ruskin
and really understands the local
issues. Dan Lavalley, also from
Ruskin, isn't an attorney he's
an accountant- but he's worth his
weight in gold. Beatrice Till, from
Till's Translations, helps with


English-to-Spanish translations on
a volunteer basis, and Fred Gal-
van, who spent 10 years living in
Mexico also translates.
"We have a 77-percent success
rate, which says a lot," she said.
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you'dliketo share. Ormaybeyou'd
rather tell the community about
your favorite charity or cause: or
sound off about something you
think needs change. That's what
"Over Coffee" is about. It really
doesn't matter whether we actually
drink any coffee or not (although I
probably will). It's what you have
to say that's important. E-mail me
any time at penny @observernews.
net and suggest a meeting place.
No matter what's going on, I'm
usually available to share just one
more cup.


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JULY 22, 2010

10 things not to do in a financial crisis


Tough economic times can have
consumers scrambling to cover
their monthly expenses, and many
are left wondering what they should
or should not do while weathering
the storm.
"While you might not be able
to avoid the financial challenges
that come with unemployment or
a major life event, there are things
you can do to minimize the impact
and help you get back on your feet
more quickly," said Rick Skaggs,
regional president for CredAbility
(formerly Consumer Credit Coun-
seling Service of Central Florida
and the Florida Gulf Coast). Cred-
Ability offers "10 Things Not to
Do in a Financial Crisis":
Don't stop paying your mort-
gage or rent.
If possible, stay current on your
mortgage or rent payments, as fail-
ure to pay can lead to foreclosure
or eviction. If you find yourself
unable to continue payments, talk
with your lender or landlord about
alternatives.
Don't quit your job-and care-
fully consider job changes.
Challenging economic times are
a great time to show your employer
how valuable you are. Taking on
extra assignments after layoffs can
help make your position more se-
cure. Before making a job change,
be sure it is the right move-as
new employees are sometimes the
first to go if layoffs occur.
Don't stop paying your insur-
ance premiums.
You could put your family in seri-
ous jeopardy if someone is injured
and out of work for a long time or
is involved in an accident, and you
are not insured. Stay current on in-
surance premiums, including home


and automobile insurance, disabil-
ity insurance, medical and life in-
surance and prescription plans.
Don't stop taking prescription
medications.
Prescriptions can be very costly
and you may be tempted to reduce
dosages or stop taking medications
altogether. Instead, talk with your
physician about generics or other
alternatives to your current medi-
cations. Also check your insurance
to see if you could benefit from
filling multiple months at a time or
ordering through the mail. Do not
risk further illness or other compli-
cations that can result from not tak-
ing prescribed medications.
Don't take out a car loan.
Even with favorable interest
rates and loan programs, a new car
will still mean 48-72 months of
payments. If you must buy a car,
save up and purchase a used car for
cash. Don't worry about getting a
stylish car-just reliable transpor-
tation that doesn't have a payment
attached to it. This may mean pur-
chasing from a private owner rath-
er than a dealer. Be sure to get a
thorough inspection of any vehicle
before your purchase and get an
idea of a car's value at the Kelly
Blue Book site (www.kbb.com).
Use the money you save by not
making payments to start a fund
for your next car purchase.
Don't add to your credit card
debt.
Avoid getting yourself deeper
in debt. Make at least minimum
monthly payments on any out-
standing credit card debt and work
to pay balances down as quickly as
possible.
Don't dip into retirement ac-
counts.


There are steep penalties and tax
implications when you make early
withdrawals from your retirement
accounts. Also avoid taking loans
against retirement accounts or in-
surance policies.
Don't use your home as an
ATM or plan major purchases.
If you have equity in your home,
it may be tempting to take the eq-
uity out to help meet you monthly
obligations. This will only add
to your long term debt and cre-
ate added financial stress. Do not
take the equity out to pay for your
child's college education, purchase
a new vehicle, or make other ma-
jor purchases. This isn't the time
to start a major home renovation
or plan a lavish family vacation.
Of course, you want to maintain
your home so that everything is in
working condition, but consider a
change in paint color and a couple
new pillows instead of new furni-
ture. Family fun doesn't have to
involve travel and theme parks-
look for less expensive alternatives
close to home.
Don't stop saving.
Even if you have to reduce
the amount you are saving each
month, try and keep saving. If your
employer offers a match to a 401 K
or other plan, strive to at least save
enough to get the match. If you
have used your emergency fund, or
have less than 3-6 months saved,
save what you can each month to
build the account.
Don't be afraid to ask for help.
Seeking the help of a reputable,
professional credit counselor can
not only ease your stress, it can
be just the tool you need to begin
working toward financial freedom.
A counselor can help you priori-


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 9


tize your debts, communicate with
your creditors, and help you de-
velop a long term plan to manage
your money.
CredAbility is one of the lead-
ing nonprofit credit counseling
and education agencies in the
United States, serving clients in all
50 states plus Guam, Puerto Rico
and the US Virgin Islands, in both
English and Spanish. In addition to
providing counseling via telephone
and internet, CredAbility operates
28 offices across the southeast,
including 25 offices where people
can receive in-person counseling.
CredAbility is accredited by
the Council on Accreditation and
is a member of the Better Busi-
ness Bureau and the National
Foundation for Credit Counsel-
ing (NFCC). Governed by a com-
munity-based board of directors,
CredAbility is funded by creditors,
clients, contributors and grants
from foundations, businesses and
government agencies. CredAbility
provides 24/7 service by phone at
800.251.2227 and online at www.
CredAbility.org

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biscuits freeze well. When ready
to eat them, defrost, sprinkle with
water, and heat in a medium oven
for five minutes. They will not be
as good as fresh-baked, but al-
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10. OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT JULY 22, 2010


Through the Eyes of the Students
School is out for the summer! Many students are vacationing with
their families, looking for part-time jobs, chilling out at the beach,
grabbing a movie or just hanging out with their friends. Their class-
room studies are on hold until school cranks up again in August.
The students at South County Career Center, however, have a sum-
mertime goal to complete that started with SCCC's teacher of the year,
Don Chase. The students wanted to express their gratitude to the faculty
and staff for all their help and guidance during the 2009-2010 academic
year. Don suggested students individually or collectively write brief
profiles about SCCC's educators, support staff and administrators.
Part one of their series Through the Eyes of the Sudents focused on
the teachers. In this week's edition the Guidance, Administrative and
Instructional staffs are highlighted and thanked by the students.


MRS. RILEY
by Christina Deyell
Mrs. Riley has been a guidance
counselor for 28 years and has
been at South County for the past
8 years. She wanted to become a
guidance counselor because she
loves to help students create more
opportunities for their lives.
Her favorite thing about being
a guidance counselor is that she
likes to see her kids progress and
grow in life and to do good things
in their future. Mrs. Riley lives at
the beach because she loves fish,
and living by the water. She says,
"it's calming and relaxing and it
relieves all my stress." We would
all be lost without Mrs. Riley. We
love having her here with us at
South County.

t. o 6666


ulp -


MRS. HOFFMAN
by Kayla Kelly and
Tania Dominguez
Mrs. Hoffman, Guidance Coun-
selor at South County Career
Center for the past 8 years, grew
up around the Tampa Bay area, in
Tampa, Brandon, and Anna Maria
Island. When Mrs. Hoffman was
younger, she wanted to be in the
circus. She even practiced a rope
trick called The Spanish Web.
Fortunately, she never had any
accidents. As she matured she
realized that the circus was not
the best option for a long-term
career for someone that wanted a
family. She adds that her greatest
achievement was raising her chil-
dren and grandchildren and she
is very proud of them, but she is
also proud of her degrees. In addi-
tion to her bachelor's degree, she
has two master's degrees: one in
criminology and one in education
and guidance. Before she became
a guidance counselor, she was a
family mental health counselor,
but she saw the need to help school
age young people. She wanted to
become a guidance counselor be-
cause she feels that it's important
to start working with the youth
before they finish high school, get
in the work world and start fami-
lies so they can become successful
members of society. Mrs. Hoffman
has been making a big impact on
South County's students as they
grow and start life as young adults.
She helps a great number of stu-
dents each day with her strong
words and helpful advice to find
solutions to life's problems. When
someone is down, she always has
the power to lift a spirit.

0j b
6-66 A


pL' ADMIN I


MR. CHAZARES
by Marisela Garcia and
Victorino Nava-Sanchez
Mr. Chazares is the principal at
South County Career Center and
he has been working here for nine
years. When he first started work-
ing at South County, he was an
Assistant Principal for Curriculum
and then became the Principal in
2006. Before he came to South
County he worked at Riverview
High School as a Human Rela-
tions Specialist and as an Assis-
tant Principal. Mr. Chazares hasn't
always been in education, though.
Before he entered the school
system, he was a security man-
ager for the Dallas Cowboys. He
says he enjoyed it while it lasted!
Although he is originally from
Mexico, the last time he went to
Mexico was in 2001. Mr. Chazares
has been married for 12 years and
has 3 children. He likes to go to the
beach and play with his kids. 'Mr.
C,' as we all know him, enjoys his
job and is driven by the thought
of helping all students 'turn it
around.' If we need help or advice
on any kind of problems we can go
to him and he will help us in any
way that he can.

666 A 6OA


by Waymond Page
Ms. Sawyer is the Assistant Prin-
cipal at South County Career Cen-
ter. She was born in Tampa and she
grew up in Palm Beach Gardens.
Ms. Sawyer's dream as a child
was to be an anchor woman for the
local news station. When she was
in school, she made straight As
and was in the honors society and
the national honors society. Ms.
Sawyer has been working at South
County for seven years and plans
to be the assistant principle next
year as well. People may think that
her job is pretty easy. Many people
do not know that she has to create
the master schedule, put every stu-
dent schedule together, and handle
all building issues. Furthermore,
she is in charge of safety for each
and every student. Out of all the
things Ms. Sawyer has done for the
school it still doesn't come close to
all the things she has done for the
students. When I had a problem
with my schedule, she resolved it
for me. I know that I can go to her
if I have any other problems.


MRS. THOMAS
by Destinee Juarez
Mrs. Thomas is from Plant City
and works at South County Career
Center as the program advisor. The
program advisor helps students get
in to HCC and High Tech Cen-
ters and get scholarships, recruits
for our school, schedules guest
speakers, helps with fieldtrips,
and assists the principal with other
assigned duties. She used to work
at Mullrennan Middle School as
Career specialist. She has helped
us in many ways, is very nice and
available when we need to talk.


#d 1 i


by Modesto Hernandez
Mr. Banks is an assistant teacher
at South County Career Center. He
used to be a full time teacher here,
but he decided to make a change
because he still wanted to help
students without being a full time
teacher.
He has been married for 20 years,
and has two small Shih Tzu dogs.
They weigh about ten pounds each
and he cares about them a lot.
Mr. Banks is changing people's
lives because a lot of students
know him and get along very
well with him. Without him, some
teachers would not have someone
to sub for them when they have to
be out.

.0 6


by Karen Ortiz
Mr. Thomas is the Tech Resource
at South County Career Center he
has been working on computers
for over 17 years. You could say
has had a variety of experiences.
Before coming to South County,
Mr. Thomas worked as a social
studies teacher at Plant City High
School. Before that, he worked
at Stetson College of Law, Nokia
Mobile Phones and Raymond
James Financial. Mr. Thomas met
his wife while they both worked
at Plant City High. They had one
date and the next week they got
married! They now have two
beautiful daughters name Gabby
and Lilly. Scuba diving, traveling
and gardening are just a few of Mr.
Thomas' hobbies. He helps our
school (and me) by keeping our
computers running so we can do
our work.


MR. BRICAULT
by Melissa Degollado, Richard
Blevins and Robert Hernandez
Mr. Bricault is the AST (Aca-
demic Support Time) teacher here
at SCCC. AST is a classroom
where students go to get a pass if
they are tardy or to study if they
can't stay focused in class. He is
also in charge of the tools for the
automotive tech program. Before
he came to South County, he was a
court clerk for the courthouse. He
was also an opera singer in Italy.
He has a farm at home with about
60 animals and 30 or more orange
trees. He has all types of animals
like cows, ducks, chickens, geese,
dogs, and miniature horses. He has
been married for 37 years, has no
kids and loves working at South
County Career Center. He's a great
teacher and when we need help, he
always takes the time to help us out
with our work or give us advice.
For example, one student was in a
lot of trouble because of his smok-
ing habit. Mr. Bricault gave him
a word of advice that helped him
quit smoking. He warns us if the
bell is about to ring so we won't
get marked tardy.


&.0.06


MR. SHAFFER
by Brenda Cruz, Vanessa
Carrillo and Michelle Garcia
Mr. Shaffer runs the success lab
at South County Career Center. He
helps students write resumes and
makes sure they are ready to enter
the work force after they gradu-
ate. He graduated from Brandon
High School and is taking online
classes at the University of Phoe-
nix toward his Elementary Educa-
tion degree. He likes reading in his
free time because, "it allows me to
travel around the world." He chose
to work at South County because
it was an opportunity to try some-
thing new and to work with his
adopted dad, South County's cu-
linary teacher, Paul Shaffer. Yes,
he is adopted and has adopted
brothers and sisters, too. Mr. Shaf-
fer lived his life in a foster home
until 16, when the Shaffer family
adopted him. Without Mr. Shaffer
in this school, students wouldn't
know how to write a resume and
wouldn't be as well prepared for
college and jobs. He contributes
to South County in other ways too.
He organized a book fair this year
which raised $500 for the school.



4c- s


%% A

"Bullding Our Communities future


IVIS. ,UUULSUIMI
by Keith Cox and
Marcus Johnson
Ms. Coulson is a very special
person at South County Career
Center. She is the reading coach,
which means she helps the teach-
ers teach reading as part of their
lessons. She is also the reading
coach at Simmons Career Center
in Plant City, which is why she is
only at South County Wednesdays,
Thursday and Fridays. Ms. Coul-
son says that Simmons is differ-
ent from South County. Simmons
has three different schools in one
and they take in a different type of
student from South County. She
said that she loves the students
and the teachers, but misses being
a classroom teacher. Ms. Coulson
jokes that she is a single parent.
"My animals are my kids." She
has a horse and a dog. Also, Ms.
Coulson directs the teachers on
reading skills for the students in
South County Career Center. She
helps the school by showing the
students and teachers better read-
ing skills. She is very important to
both schools.


1d


MRS. TRINIDAD
by Jocelyn Aguirre, Jose Davila
and Teresa Rios
Mrs. Trinidad has been work-
ing at South County for one and a
half years as a Bilingual Aide. She
says she likes to work for South
County because she feels like she
can makes a difference in the stu-
dent's education and give them
advice. She also likes working for
South County because her sister
is a senior here. She believes in
the importance of an education so
that in the future you can work in
ajob which you enjoy. Mrs. Trini-
dad and her husband also pastor a
church here in Ruskin and in her
spare time she enjoys taking pic-
tures because she says, "it's a way
to enjoy many memories." She
likes Chinese food and a Mexican
candy called "Tamarindo." Mrs.
Trinidad helps a lot of students at
South County with their English.
One student says, "Her work ben-
efits me in my other classes, but
not just me. She helps anyone who
needs it."







2803 John Sherman Way
Ruskin, FL 33570-2500
(813) 233-3335


994 66


ft ^ft *


U.


10 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT


JULY 22, 2010


INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF I






JULY 22, 2010

So you think it's hot in Florida...


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 11


I have been
on vacation
to Arizona,
Nevada and
points of
interest out
West.Thanks
Fish Tales for your in-
ByJonie Maschek quiries and
E-mails.
Leaving Tampa on a plane, we
connected to our non-stop flight
in Atlanta to Las Vegas. With 400
vacationers aboard, the flight was
not boring. We followed the cap-
tain's flight route from a monitor
on the back of the seat in front
of us, which showed the plane
advancing from state to state.
We also had scrolls across the
screen of height information and
points of interest. After a smooth
land in the City of Lights, we
were escorted to our condo on the
southern tip of the famous strip,
which became our headquarters
for seventeen days.
Many in Florida think our 900
weather is deploring. Go to Las
Vegas -- the weather each day of
our stay was 1080 to 1140 with
no humidity. Several pools at our
condo were points of relief from
the hot weather.
Las Vegas has 336 days a year of
sunshine. Because of this dry, hot
desert climate, no one has a lawn
to water, and no lawn mowers are
around. Their lawns are rocks or
imitation grass. What flowers you
see are those that survive in rocks
and sand.


Interesting to note that the City
of Las Vegas' water department
will pay you $1.50 per foot to tear
out your grass lawn and put in
rocks or artificial turf.
Las Vegas suffers a water short-
age. You wonder how this could
happen when Hoover Dam was
built within miles of the city. In
1935 when the dam was finished,
Las Vegas had only the small Fre-
mont Strip, and few people.
Today they have two million
people and no water, because in
1935 they didn't need the water
in Las Vegas and sold a hundred


Joni Maschek with 'Elvis' on the
strip in Las Vegas.

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nia and various other large cities.
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is searching for means to survive.
Lake Mead, built by Hoover Dam,
does supply water to Las Vegas.
We took the Hoover Dam tour
and found it to be well worth our
time. It is located in the Black
Canyon area of Nevada, on a two-
lane road, which for years has
been partially a dirt road. This is
a favorite route for those living in
California and traveling to Las Ve-
gas, which has made a backup of
traffic for hours and miles into Las
Vegas. After all these years, a new
highway is now being constructed
to eliminate this congestion.
Boulder City was built for
Hoover Dam workers, who would
sleep in sleeping bags under the
stars and in tents. People from all
states traveled west in hopes of a
job, with five thousand jobs avail-
able to build Hoover Dam.
They worked for 50 to 60 cents
per hour seven days a week. If
they stayed home one day, their
job was gone and someone else
went to work. Those in the high
risk, height and low depth jobs
were paid $1.10 per hour.
Before the dam was completed,
housing and small stores were built
in Boulder City. It is interesting to
note that today in 2010 Boulder
City is the most expensive place to
live in Las Vegas and it is the only
place that gambling is not allowed.
It is the home of many celebrities.
This trip is well worth the cost and
time.
Big news as I write this is that
the famous oil spill off the coast
of Louisiana has been capped. Our
fishing is safe once again. I hope
business is picking up for all who
depend upon our waterways for
their living.


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A frenzy of redfish are invading
the mangrove roots of our water-
ways. I hope your cast is a great
one.
Many have taken cover in the
shade of the mangroves.
Simmons Park has redfish swim-
ming in its canals and many are
enjoying their one legal catch a
day.
Snook are still roaming our wa-
terways, but are not a legal catch.
You may catch and release, until
the Commission gives an OK for
you to keep one. The season was
closed due to the kill during the
cold freeze we experienced.
Spanish mackerel are in the
chase by many anglers. It's a small
pan fish, but fun to catch.
Flounder are still anglers' choice
of dinner fare. It's a lean white
meat that can be cooked many
ways.
Sheepshead is a regular catch
from those pier or bridge fishing.
It is a lean white meat and good for


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your diet.
A wonderful sight to see was
the Colorado River, which was as
clear as glass. One could see fish
of all types sailing by in the calm
mirror-like vision of the water. It
was probably what our Little Man-
atee River once looked like 100
years ago.
Watch the weather, fish together,
wear your life jackets, be safe and
kind to each other.

-- Aleta Jonie Maschek is a
member of Florida Outdoor
Press.



Before Kids Come
Indoors
I save all of my small pieces of
bar soap. I cut off the bottom of a
pair of pantyhose, put the pieces
into it, and tied it to an outside
faucet. Now, there is no more need
to run inside to wash dirty hands.
This is great for the kids, and it
saves money, too.
Mary O.
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JULY 22. 2010


12 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Grandchildren: "My Heart... The Breath Of My Life"
a BEHIND THE MIKE By: Michael A. Aun, http://www.aunline.com


I am
such a
shameless
promot-
er. I just
got back
from the
National
Speakers
Association Annual Convention
held at the World Marriott in my
own back yard here in Orlando,
where I proudly walked around
with dozens of pictures of my
brand new granddaughter Ashley
Elizabeth Aun.
I even bribed the audiovisual
guy to put her picture up on the
big screen at the annual Speaker
Hall of Fame banquet. Each mem-
ber of the NSA Speakers Hall of
Fame gets a slide. Most put their
business mug up. I prefer a fam-
ily picture, and this year I had my
beautiful little granddaughter up
there with me.
The NSA Speakers Hall of Fame
has its share of hotshots in it- Ron-
ald Reagan, Colin Powell, Art Lin-
kletter, Paul Harvey, Dr. Norman
Vincent Peale, Zig Ziglar, Tom
Peters, Ken Blanchard and dozens
of others you'd recognize at the
drop of a hat. And then there are a
bunch of nobody's like yours truly,
who are also in it. None got a big-
ger round of applause than Ashley
Elizabeth, whose picture I proudly
substituted in my place.
Since this is my first grandchild,
I am permitted to do unabashed
bragging. As the old Welsh proverb
goes, "Perfect love does not come
until the first grandchild." And if
that first baby is a little girl, then
this calls for unsurpassed, immod-
est boasting and as well as limitless
spoiling. It's a grandfather's job!


Cpl. Ashton L. Rinker
Marine Corps Cpl. Ashton L.
Rinker, son of Terry J. Rinker, of
Riverview, Fla., recently reported
for duty with Headquarters and
Service Battalion, Marine Corps
Base Camp Butler, Japan.
Rinker is a 2003 graduate of Riv-
erview High School of Riverview,
Fl. and joined the Marine Corps in
April 2004.


Jonathan M. Sebourn
Jonathan M. Sebourn has en-
tered Basic Cadet Training at the
U.S. Air Force Academy, Colo-
rado Springs, Colo., in preparation
to enter the first academic year at
the academy. The six-week, two-
phased orientation program must
be successfully completed by the
cadets prior to entering their fresh-
man year. The training prepares
men and women to meet the rigor-
ous mental and physical challeng-
es experienced by new cadets.
Phase one involves personal in-
processing, orientation, and train-
ing in the fundamentals of being a
cadet. Cadet trainees are prepared
to adjust from civilian to military
life and disciplines, and learn
proper wear of the uniform, salut-


There is a rule, you know.
I call her what my granddaddy
called me- "hyetti." It's an Arabic
word which, roughly translated,
means "my heart" or "my life." Lit-
tle Ashley is "my heart... the breath
of my life."
I figure I will allow her to date
early on, maybe age 30 or so. We
were watching her NASCAR race
together today and I am convinced
she loves Dale Jr. as much as her
"Jiddo," the Lebanese word for
grandfather.
Weighing in at a modest 6 pounds
5 ounces, little Ashley was so anx-
ious to see me that she arrived 17
days early, but still managed to be
18 inches long. Hearts are break-
ing all over Florida as I write this.
I expect the boys are already lining
up to call on her. I'm so afraid she'll
meet males like me, so I will have
to go to great pains to protect her
from such predators.
I have every intention of spoiling
this kid rotten. There will always
be hugs and cookies available for
her little tiny hands, and my heart
will always be open and full of
love for her.
I think I will begin Christmas
shopping shortly. After all, it is
August and you can't wait too long.
Don't want to miss the bargains.
Since I am in the life insurance
business, I figure a little million-
dollar policy will be a nice start for
her. Wouldn't want her to go with-
out some coverage.
I held her for three hours this af-
ternoon and we talked. Well, actu-
ally, I did most of the talking but
little Ashley was very attentive.
I could see it in her eyes, never
blinking just taking it all in. Her
little life is less than a week old
and she already has an awareness

ing policies and procedures, drill
and ceremony, marching, and liv-
ing quarters standards.
During phase two, cadets train
outdoors living in tents while
learning to function in field condi-
tions. Cadets apply and practice
team work, cohesion and learn
to deal with physically and men-
tally demanding situations. They
complete the obstacle, confidence,
assault, and leadership reaction
courses, and participate in a rescue
mission termed Operation War-
rior.
He is the son of Patricia Padilla
of Sharpsburg, Ga., and Kenneth
Sebourn of Riverview, Fl.
Sebourn is a 2009 graduate of
East Coweta High School, Sharps-
burg.


level that makes me feel twenty
years younger. This is God's way
of compensating us for growing
old.
An hour or two with your grand-
child makes you feel young again.
Anything longer than that, rumor
has it, causes you to age quickly. I
am here to testify that that is simply
not the case. I figure I better enjoy
her unconditional love as long as I
can. Once she becomes a teenager,
she will probably want to have
nothing to do with this old geezer
that spoiled her as an infant.
There's nothing more delightful
than a grandchild fighting to get
on your lap. There's nothing more
wonderful than to watch a little
one run into a grandfather's arms.
At least that's the way I envision it
with Ashley. There can't be a better
place to be than in Jiddo's lap, right
Ashley?
Our job as grandparents is to
sprinkle love and stardust over our
grandchildren's lives. Now I begin
to understand why God rested on
the seventh day- his grandchildren
must have been out of town.
I figure it's my job to introduce
little Ashley to as much mischief as
possible. I figure I am supposed to
be a little bit grandparent, a little
bit teacher, a little bit mentor and
a little bit "best friend." I suspect
her parents might think me a scal-
lywag, but being the common rival
for little Ashley, I would expect no
less from them.
So in parting, the only thing I
don't like about Ashley after a
week of presence here on earth is
that she won't take her afternoon
nap and she won't let me take mine
either. Welcome to the world my
dear hyetti!


The Alley hosts networking event
On July 14, The Alley at SouthShore, 10221 Big Bend Road, Riv-
erview, FL, hosted a special multi-chamber After Hours event from 5-8
PM. The theme for this special networking event was a Beach Luau and
everyone enjoyed the summer time beach music, games and prizes. Stop
by The Alley for more information or call (813) 672-8353 or visit www.
funatthealley.com.

Shorter Showers


We had some trouble with the
kids shutting off the bathroom
lights, so I installed a timer to the
light fixture. It shuts off in 15 min-
utes, so most showers take less
than 15 minutes now.
Lizabeth
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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 13


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14 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Visiting the SS

American Victory









Open Tuesday through
Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m., and Sunday and Monday
from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Admission is $10 for adults,
$8 for seniors and veterans,
$5 for children ages 4-12, and
free for children 3 and under.
Admission will be half-price
on July 31 to celebrate SS
American Victory Recognition
Day

Tours are self-guided,
however, tour arrangements
may be made in advance by
calling 813-228-8766.

The ship is located behind
the Florida Aquarium at 705
Channelside Drive. Parking
is available in the public ramp
across the street.

Only a few spaces on the ship
are air conditioned, although
the decks and many of the
companionways benefit from
a sea breeze. During the
summer months, visiting early
in the day is recommended.


American Victory Day


* Continued from page 1
veteran status to merchant mari-
ners who served in wartime. Prior
to that law, merchant mariners
were excluded from veterans ben-
efits given to other members of the
armed forces.
Today, the U.S. Merchant Ma-
rine fleet numbers more than 400
ships and includes nearly 70,000
members. Each ship in the service
is American flagged and staffed,
moving cargo up and down riv-
ers, along the coasts and across the
oceans. In 1998, that fleet of ships
was reduced by one. The SS Amer-
ican Victory was an aging hero at
anchor near Norfolk, Virginia, as
part of the reserve fleet. At 53 years
of age it was determined her service
as a veteran of three wars would
come to an end in a scrap yard. At
the last moment, however, she was
rescued, slated for preservation as a
museum and a living monument to
the service, heroism and dedication
of the Merchant Marine. Today,
she is berthed at the Port of Tampa.
One of only three operational ships
of her class remaining in existence.
By the mid-1940s, the United
States had ramped-up industrial
production for World War II to a
level unprecedented in history. On
June 20, 1945, the SS American
Victory was launched as a mer-
chant vessel to carry cargo into the
Pacific theater. She was built in a
mere 55 days. A Victory-class ship
named for the American University
in Washington, DC, her name was
also prophetic. At her launching,
American victory in the war was
nearly assured.


B=


After the war, she changed oceans
and began carrying supplies to Eu-
rope under the Marshall Plan. She
served during the Korean War and
then in the Vietnam War, with char-
tered service for commercial cargo
in years of peace.
In the 1960s, she nearly became
part of the U.S. Naval Fleet in an
ambitious plan to outfit ships with
military supplies to be staged around
the world near "flash points" in or-
der to enhance global U.S. military
readiness. Had that happened, she
would have been re-christened as
the USNS Ci, il..-. By the mid-
1960s the plan had been scrapped
and the SS American Victory was
eventually placed into an anchor-
age near Norfolk for reserve fleet
vessels, where she would remain
for nearly two decades. In 1985,
she underwent a $2.5 million refit
for restoration to operational readi-
ness. Afterwards, the ship's log
shows she steamed just 26 hours
before returning to her anchorage
in the reserve fleet.
Through her history, she became
a part of the fleet that built America
into a superpower. She circumnavi-
gated the world carrying everything
from bombs to telephone poles. She
successfully fended off hurricanes
and, ultimately, the scrap yard to
arrive at the Port of Tampa in 1999
as a museum.
Berthed behind the Florida
Aquarium, the SS American Vic-
tory is open to the public for self-
guided tours seven days a week.
From stem to stem, her decks are
open for roaming at leisure, along
with the officers and crew quarters,
the galley, mess hall, hospital and
other parts of the ship. The Ameri-
can Victory is more than a floating
museum, she remains in operation-
al state and thus her engine room
and cargo holds are not open to the
public, although a good look at one
of five holds has been opened for
public viewing from one of the up-
per decks.
In recognition of her service,
both in support of America's mili-
tary and now as a public resource,
Governor Charlie Crist has named
Tuesday, July 27, as SS American
Victory Recognition Day in Flor-


Merchant Marine ships were armed during wartime to defend the
crew and cargo. Above, the American Victory's forward cannon, now
demilitarized, keeps a watchful eye on the decidedly friendly cruise
ship, the Carnival Legend, at the Port of Tampa.


ida. To celebrate this distinction,
the American Victory Museum
will offer half-priced admission on
Saturday, July 31 from 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. The event will also include
free cake and coffee, along with
frozen treats, and arts and crafts for
children.
Former WFLA News anchor Bob
Hite has long been a supporter of
the SS American Victory and of
Tampa's maritime history. Through
his years of reporting on issues sur-
rounding Tampa Bay, he has played
a significant role in the renewal of
the city's v .icrFri.:.ii With a U.S.
Coast Guard Master 100 Ton li-
cense, he is also a member of the
Merchant Marine.
"Tampa wouldn't exist without
the port," Hite said. "For years the
city of Tampa turned its back on the
bay. It's great that we now have the
Florida Aquarium celebrating the
marine environment and right there
alongside it is the American Victo-
ry celebrating our maritime history.
The ship exemplifies our maritime
heritage."
As an operational ship, much of


the SS American Victory remains
in its original state. As such, stairs
are narrow and steep and most
doorways contain high thresholds,
something non-mariner visitors
should keep in mind. Of course that
is also what makes up the charm
and magic of seeing it. Visitors are
able to experience the ship much as
the crew did over her long history.
Carlton Majette passed away a
few years ago. As I quietly walked
the decks of the American Vic-
tory and peered into the cabins, I
thought about him, a decent man of
integrity from Ruskin who became
a good friend. Through this ship, I
can see a side of him that I had nev-
er known. Just before departing, a
museum volunteer offered a look
inside the engine room. Peering
into the cavernous space contain-
ing the ships engines and boilers, I
could imagine Carlton as a young
man, competently working to keep
the ship moving, to keep America
moving. In my mind I could see
him as I looked down through four
decks, a proud Merchant Marine
working hard to save the world.


Mitch Traphagen photo

S Self-guided tours
wander throughout
the ship including the
galley where meals
were prepared.


Mitch Traphagen photo
Tours are self-guided leaving visitors free to roam all outside decks,
along with the crew and officers quarters, crew mess, hospital and
other areas of the ship.


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JULY 22, 2010


Exp.8/31/10






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 15


Guyann Bracken-Fay of Riverview and Newt Gingrich, former
Speaker of the House, talk at length at a Local Leaders' Community
Roundtable March 31. The nonpartisan event was a Jobs Summit
held at the Vinoy Hotel in St. Petersburg that worked with area busi-
ness leaders and jobless residents on the topic of how to best ap-
proach "putting America back to work."


Brandon 912
* Continued from page 1
a telephone interview last week.
"How can we hold our elected of-
ficials to something if we aren't ab-
solutely certain what the intent and
meaning of these words originally
were?"
Both Mike and Guyann say that
the end of the (last) Bush admin-
istration and the beginning of the
Obama administration was what
rallied them to action.
Bailouts; government control;
out-of-control spending; and espe-
cially taking the rights of the people
as though they worked for the gov-
ernment, instead of the government
working for them, challenged them
to take active roles.
"What has been happening started
a long time ago," Guyann began.


"The Constitution has been chipped
away, a little piece at a time. Like
a cancer spreading, little pieces and
bits are being taken away."
The country was founded by en-
trepreneurs who used their inge-
nuity to build families, businesses
and farms, Guyann said. "Property
rights are important. The right of
ownership is important," she said.
She herself grew up as the young-
est child of four in a family in In-
diana where her parents owned a
general store that sold dry goods
and gas and her dad also worked as
postmaster.
She studied computer program-
ming and electrical engineering and
then worked in industrial sales of
parts that kept factories running. It
was through that job that she met
her husband Patrick in Michigan in
1992.
Since moving to South County
she has become a nonpartisan po-
litical fireball, rallying people to
attend meetings and learn about
elected officials, and especially to
learn how to become candidates
themselves.
"We have to win our country back
at the voting booth," she said in an
interview in Riverview last week.
"We have to put principals before
party and make our officials live
up to their oath. Everything seems
to have become a power grab since
FDR started taking our Constitu-
tional rights away."
She didn't realize at first that she
would become a political organizer
of any kind. She was simply attend-
ing the Tampa 912 group meetings.
But then she saw a need to begin a
chapter in Brandon, so Feb. 26, she
founded one which now encompass-


es all of South County. This group
meets on Mondays in Riverview at
the Barn Theater on Bloomingdale
Avenue at 7 p.m., with between 20
and 50 in regular attendance. The
local 912 group also holds a study
group based on DVDs made by the
National Center for Constitutional
Studies on Thursday nights.
The Thursday night group rotates
meeting places so newcomers are
encouraged to either show up on a
Monday first, or check out upcom-
ing events on the group's Web site,
given at the end of this story.
Besides much studying and dis-
cussion, they've made a float for
the Brandon July Fourth parade that
was decked out as the USS Con-
stitution; met with Newt Gingrich,
former Speaker of the House, at a
Jobs Summit in St.Petersburg; and
marched on Washington united
with other Constitutionally-based
groups.
All volunteers, the local group is
run by six directors, Guyann and
Patrick, Mike, Scott Cutler, Steve
Chambers and John Costigliola.
"Our aim is to help restore, not
transform, our country to what our
founding fathers meant for it to be,
and to do that, we must understand
the exact meaning and context of
the wording in our founding docu-
ments," Mike said.
The group hopes to attract many
more members and help some of
them train to become candidates for
office before the next election.
To find out more about them,
visit the Web site, liiil \ \ !.ion-
don912.org or simply show up on a
Monday night at 7 p.m. The Barn
Theater at Winthrop, 11349 Bloom-
ingdale Ave., Riverview.


Jean Muehlendyck, foreground, waves an American flag while pro-
testing with the Brandon 912 organization at the Tax Day Rally April
15 in front of O'Brien's Irish Pub on Lumsden Road in Brandon. The
group started as a break off from the Tampa 912 organization, and
now has many members from all over South County.


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16 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


What once
was a farm
road through
hundreds of
ornamental fish
ponds now is
a sun dappled
walking trail
in the new
Lost River
Preserve habitat
restoration
project between
the Little Manatee
and Little
Cockroach Bay.
Ecologist Tom
Ries, designer
and project
manager, stops
to enjoy his
handiwork.
Melody Jameson photos


It was the single most costly element in the Lost River Preserve
project, but this culvert under Canal Street connected a former dead
end canal cut in from Tampa Bay with new salt and freshwater la-
goons critical to the habitat restoration.


A little undisturbed grooming, a tasty little lunch...what more could
Roseate Spoonbills and a companionable Curlew ask for on a sunny
summer afternoon? The birds are among an increasing volume of
wildlife settling in near the fresh and salt water lagoons created as
part of the Lost River restoration project.

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Refer 2 new patients and receive a $25 credit
toward your next visit.
Be sure to have your friend or family member mention your
name to receive the credit at time of scheduling.
Coupon must be mentioned at time of scheduling appointment. The fee advertised is the minimum
fee charged. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay,
cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed
as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the fee service examination
or treatment. Senior citizen discount does not apply.

Nwai &Eme n A ls M E


Lost River Preserve
* Continued from page 1


Cockroach Bay. It probably will be
accessed only from Canal Street,
west and north of Gulf City Road,
according to Forest Turbiville, en-
vironmental manager in Hillsbor-
ough County's Parks, Recreation
and Conservation Department.
Hillsborough's Environmental
Lands Acquisition and Protection
Program (ELAPP) accepted most
of the site as a donation and will
assume maintenance responsibili-
ties when the project is completed.
Lost River Preserve mostly was
a 50-year-old, long abandoned or-
namental fish farm pockmarked
with more than 200 overgrown
pools when Tom Ries, an ecolo-
gist who operates the not-for-profit
Ecosphere Restoration Institute,
Inc., and Turbiville began infor-
mally tossing around design ideas
in mid-2007. ELAPP had added
the property to its conserved lands
list but had no money for any im-
provements; no funds to restore the
habitat properly, to enhance the ad-
jacent natural fishery, to create pas-
sive recreation.
Nonetheless, Ries came up with
a plan that essentially opened up
a dead end canal cut inland from
Tampa Bay originally to create
waterfront residential home sites
- and then linked the canal to two
large, irregularly-shaped lagoons
dug out among the old pools. The
watery links, facilitated by a sub-
stantial new culvert under Canal
Street, would produce both a salt
water environment and a fresh water
setting. The design also made use of
old interior fish farm roadway, con-
verting it to trails. The plan even
converted a couple of still- sturdy,
former Tampa Electric Company
utility poles to osprey high rises
with the help of new platforms.
It all looked good on paper, but
in the halls of a financially strapped
Hillsborough County government
looking at massive personnel lay-
offs and staff furlough days, there
was no funding to be found. And
implementing the design would not
be a small-ticket job, Ries figured.
Cutting the culvert in under Canal
Street, clearing the heavy over-
growth of nuisance exotics like


Brazilian Pepper and Melaleuca,
combining the old ponds with big
digs all would run into consider-
able sums, he calculated.
The Southwest Florida Water
Management District's SWIM
(Surface Water Improvement and
Management) program saw merit
in the proposed plan and was will-
ing to kick in $200,000. The Gulf of
Mexico Foundation, headquartered
in Texas, was in for $65,000. Still
significantly shy of the total need-
ed, Ries was ready to make a start
on the preserve with the combined
quarter million dollars, seeing com-
pletion maybe five years ahead, he
told The Observer recently.
Then, without any anticipation
of success, he also tossed the de-
sign into a pot of such plans be-
ing considered by the National
Oceanographic and Atmospheric
Administration (NOAA), applying
through his non-profit for backing
with federal stimulus money. More
than 810 projects were reviewed by
NOAA, with three Florida plans
earmarked for funding, Ries said.
Two of them are on the east coast
and one located on the central Gulf
Coast a multi-faceted, multi-ben-
efit design dubbed the Lost River
Preserve. The NOAA grant totaled
$750,000.
With more than $1 million made
available, Reis quickly swung into
action on the preserve, taking bids
for the major work components -
and got another surprise. In a de-
pressed economy, with far fewer
jobs than contractors to do them,
original cost estimates were radi-
cally reduced in some instances
cut in half, the ecologist said. The
$1 million could be stretched fur-
ther than anyone had imagined.
Consequently, Lost River Pre-
serve's 43-acre Phase I, currently
being settled by numerous wildlife
families, is nearing completion.
The exotic plants are gone and
osprey circle over a new nest a
killdeer parent marshals her young
on a lagoon shoreline that wanders
southward, wading shore birds
pursue their individual interests
side by side in the newly created
estuarine marsh. The last big job


Early Dining Special


in Phase I is setting native plants
across the acreage, joining the re-
cently-planted 330 Sabal Palms -
Florida's state tree that's expected
to fill out the canopy. The Phase I
work could be wrapped up in Sep-
tember, Ries said.
Meanwhile, permitting is under-
way for two aspects of Phase II, a
26-acre section destined to become
both wetland and upland environ-
ments, plus another nine acres re-
quiring little work but positively
affected by the planned improve-
ments. Phase II could be finished
by the end of the year, the ecolo-
gist estimated. It was the size of the
NOAA grant that made Phase II
possible, he added.
Lost River Preserve represents
environmental science's best ef-
forts to "mimic Mother Nature"
as closely as possible, restoring
habitat even to the "frog ponds" or
surface depressions that fill with
water and attract the amphibians
during the rainy season but later
dry up, Ries noted. It also has gen-
erated jobs that otherwise would
not have existed, should elevate
property values in the surrounding
area, will contribute to better water
quality, and can serve as a passive
recreation site offering fishing,
birding, hiking, he added. Perhaps
even more importantly, the new
sheltering lagoons are expected to
considerably recover and support
the area's fishery.
It is this latter consideration that
Gus Muench, Hillsborough Coun-
ty native and a lifelong fisherman
who lives in the vicinity, pointed
to as he praised the project. This
nursery effect, environments where
young marine life can flourish and
grow, nourished by the natural de-
tritus, is essential to maintaining a
healthy fishery, he asserted. "It's a
great project," he added, "a really
worthwhile project."
Neither Ries nor Turbiville could
pinpoint a specific opening date for
the Last River Preserve. But, both
indicated an opening observance
is a distinct possibility. They re-
ally won't mind showing off the
region's newest jewel.
Copyright 2010 Melody Jameson


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JULY 22, 2010
Summer time fun doesn't mean children
are immune
* Medical expert shares health tips for parents


Now that it's summer, chances
are your kids are by the pool or out
playing in the park. And with this
increased outside activity comes
increases in insect bites, accidents
and other seasonal health issues.
Sometimes this usually means a
trip to the doctor's office, but what
if parents are conscious of over
treating their children with tradi-
tional medicines and want to seek
natural alternatives?
As a physician trained in both
standard and holistic medicine-
-and as a parent herself--Lauren
Feder, MD presents the facts
about children's health in her
books Natural Baby and Childcare
(Hatherleigh Press) and The Par-
ents' Concise Guide to Childhood
Vaccinations (Hatherleigh Press),
just released in a digital edition for
ebook lovers.
Among alternative solutions to
the common summer childhood
concerns, Dr. Feder offers these
suggestions:
Bee Stings and Insect Bites.
Summer is about being outside,
and having to share the space with
Mother Nature which also means
more insect stings and bites. Dr.
Feder recommends the following
natural medicines: Apis mellifica


is a homeopathic medicine known
for the effects of a bee's sting.
Ledum palustre is well-known as
an acute homeopathic for bites,
stings and wounds. Both are avail-
able in tablet and topical forms.
Bumps and bruises. Accidents
and other types of trauma are a fact
of life. As a busy mother of boys,
Dr. Feder knows to expect com-
plaints after a soccer match or a
day at the beach. Arnica montana
(Arnica) is the homeopathic first
line treatment for injuries-big and
small. Arnica comes as chewable
tablets to topical gels and creams.
Colds. Catching a chill on a late
summer afternoon following a day
of sun and fun can lead to colds
with runny noses and congestion.
When possible avoid extreme tem-
perature changes of heat outside
and cold air conditioning inside.
Onion slices on a plate by the bed
help clear sinuses during the night.
Allium cepa is a homeopathic
remedy for early colds and runny
noses. Vitamin C, Echinacea and
other immune boosters can speed
the healing process.
So keep your children safe and
naturally well this summer while
enjoying the good weather and all
the season has to offer.


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Gross Minus Hncp A & B
Flights

A Flight
1st Tie 53 Jack Gillich
Al Chesnes


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Milt Ericson
B Flight
1st 51 Curt Gadd
2nd 52 Roy Cotner
3rd 55 Bob Stuckey


Thinking about
Christmas in July?
Calling all SouthShore busi-
ness owners! Ruskin Elementary
School's multi-cultural committee
is planning it's first "Festival of
Trees Around the World" on Satur-
day, December 4, 2010 from 9am-
5pm. They are asking interested
businesses to
consider donating
a creatively deco-
rated Christmas
tree which can be
live or artificial.
The trees will be
auctioned off as a
fundraiser for the
school. Brochures will be passed
out, giving recognition for each
tree as well as advertisements in
the Observer news. If you or your
employees are interested, please
call Cheryl Jones at 634-8091 or
Jennifer Teddy at 629-0432 for
more details.

Taking Kids Out to
Dinner
Here is a way to be able to eat
out with children for less (less
money and less struggle). For an
occasional treat, we like to eat out.
When our children were young,
we fed them their dinner at home
before we went out to a restaurant.
Then at the restaurant while we
had our dinner, our children had an
ice cream dessert. Dinner out this
way was always more pleasant and
less expensive.
Lorraine in NH
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you already make? Visit stretcher. corn/index. cfm ?TipsSyn>
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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 17

How pets can help you heal


Man's best friend really can do a
lot more than fetch.
Studies have shown for years
how pets can help us emotionally
as well as physically. They can
give us a sense of purpose; help
ease loneliness and isolation, while
helping us to keep our blood pres-
sure and cholesterol levels low, as
well.
Just ask Sara Krill, author of
the book My Pal Lou: The Story
of Me (www.lbgpublishing.com),
who recalled how her faithful
beagle Louie eased her pain when
she was recovering from a painful
hysterectomy brought on by endo-
metriosis.
"I can't describe the heartache of
the decision I finally had to make
to have the surgery," she said.
"I had always wanted children,
but the pain of the endometriosis
became too much to bear, often
bringing me literally to my knees.
I knew that once I had the surgery,
there would be no chance whatso-
ever that I could have a child of
my own. That being said, perhaps I
transferred those maternal feelings
to the way I treated Lou, but the
truth is that my relationship with
him helped to heal me, and kept
me whole during one of the most
difficult periods of my life."
Krill understands that to some,
treating a pet like a member of the
family instead of just a dog can
seem a bit extreme, but her bond
with Lou was fulfilling and recip-
rocated by her faithful canine.
"The truth is, I was never really
much of a 'dog person,"' Krill
added. "I went to the pet store to
get a comb for my cat, but there I
was, face pressed against the glass,
eye to eye with this soulful beagle.


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I named him right then and there,
uttering 'Hello, Lou,' while at the
same time arguing that I was not
going to bring home a dog. Part
of me wanted to just get the cat
comb and go home, but something
changed for me with that moment,
and I never regretted since."
Krill discovered the subtle nu-
ances of Lou's personality, how he
could be playful one minute, but
protective the next.
"The day I came home from the
hospital, he was so happy to see
me, that he knocked me over when
he greeted me," she said. "As
physically painful as that was, my
heart was singing that my friend
missed me so much. I lay in my
bed, enveloped in the happy haze
of painkillers, with my Lou at my
side. He lay next to me, his head
up and alert, as if to say he was
my guard and he was on the job.
Little things like that, along with
the way he could make me smile
with a simple tilt of his head or the
way he'd cling to my side, kept me
in good spirits."
Krill later returned the favor
when Lou developed cancer, and
required expensive chemotherapy
to stay alive.
"Many pet owners would have
simply put him to sleep, but I
knew he wanted to live, so I spared
no expense to heal him the way he
would have healed me if our situa-
tions were reversed," she said. "It
was worth it. When he did pass
away, he knew he had been loved
and cared for as a member of my
family, and I would not have had it
any other way."


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18 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Rehabbed birds given new life in Tallahassee


Three pied-billed grebes, which
were rehabilitated and survived
impacts of the Deepwater Ho-
rizon oil spill, were released on
Lake Talquin near Tallahassee on
Thursday. The birds were given
quite a distinguished send off into
the wild with Gov. Charlie Crist.
All three birds immediately took
to the waters of Lake Talquin.
"It's gratifying to play a small
role in getting these birds back
into the wild where they belong,"
Crist said. "It's a special thing to
realize how important wildlife is,
how beautiful our state is and the
importance of protecting wildlife,
beaches and businesses."
Dr. Heidi Stout, executive direc-
tor of Tri-State Bird Rescue & Re-
search brought three oiled grebes
to Lake Talquin. The birds were
rescued from beaches on Perdido
Key, Miramar and Gulf Breeze
and then successfully rehabilitated
by Tri-State. Tri-State and the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service (US-
FWS) have been coordinating all
recovery and rehabilitation efforts
for wildlife impacted by the oil
spill in Florida with assistance and
support from the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion (FWC). James Burnett, man-
ager of St. Marks National Wildlife
Refuge, represented the USFWS
and also assisted in releasing the
birds. Nick Wiley, executive direc-
tor of the FWC, also was on hand
to assist with the release.
"It's definitely a team effort,"
Wiley said. "The scientists strate-
gically found the best release area
so the birds have the best chance
for survival."
Stout said she was confident the
grebes would stay on Lake Talquin
and not attempt to return to the
sites where they had been rescued,
covered in oil.
"The state and federal agencies
involved in this project are reason-
ably assured the birds won't go
back to the oiled areas," Stout said.
"This is a beautiful location and a
perfect spot for them to thrive."
Lake Talquin was chosen for its
marshy shores and large body of
fresh water, which will provide
plenty of insects and fish for the
birds to eat. Pied-billed grebes are
year round Florida residents and
usually nest in fresh water.
Tri-State has been contracted by


BP to provide wildlife assistance
with species that are impacted by
the oil spill. All rehabilitation ef-


forts are coordinated through US-
FWS and Tri-State.
"Through strong partnerships,


such as the USFWS and Tri-State, said.To report oiled wildlife, call
we are saving birds and giving the Oiled Wildlife Hotline number
them a fighting chance," Wiley at 866-557-1401.


Two of the three pied-billed grebes that had been oiled and re- Gov. Charlie Crist assists with the release of a rehabbed pied-billed
habbed swim in their new home on Lake Talquin, near Tallahas- grebe into Lake Talquin.
see. (FWC photo)
(FWC photo)


Things to do in neighboring Manatee County
Model train social at museum


PALMETTO Palmetto His-
torical Park and Manatee County
Agricultural Museum's second
social of the summer will be a
"Model Train Social." Held over
two days Saturday, August 7 from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, Au-
gust 8, from noon to 4 p.m., this
family event is sure to please any
train lover.
The Florida Garden Railroad So-
ciety will be visiting and bringing
their model trains. There will be
trains to look at and trains to play
with; trains inside and trains out-
side; train crafts, train activities,
and train movies.
Included will be a Thomas the
Tank Engine set-up as well as a
Tropicana set-up. There will even
be a raffle for a model train offered
by the Railroad Society. The mem-
bers of the Railroad Society love to
talk with model train enthusiasts,
both young and old. Come visit the
park and have a great time.
Word of Mouth BBQ will be
selling lunches on both days and
Alex's Lemonade Stand will be
raising funds for childhood cancer
research.
This family event is FREE! The
park is located at 515 10th Ave.


Pulse


The coming stamp bubble?
/i:. i ,,i the [Forever] stamps at the old price and selling at the new
one would bring a 4.5 percent return at a stroke. Not bad when a one-
year Treasury billyields 0. 31 percent. And ifa $4,500 gain on a $100, 000
investment does 't seem life-changing, think of the rewards to a bank
with a billion to invest. Many would unleash economic Armageddon for
less. "
The New York Times, The Next Financial Crisis (the Stamp Bub-
ble?) by Eduardo Porter, July 18, 2010

Bad economy? What bad economy?
"Low-cost carrier Norwegian Air Shuttle on Monday announced an
order for 15 new Boeing 737-800jets, giving Boeing Co. 85 new orders
on the first day of the Farnborough International Air hi. II Earlier
Monday, Dubai s Emirates Airlines said it would buy an additional 30
wide-body 777jets from Boeing, with a listprice of more than $9 billion.
And General Electric Co. s aircraft-leasing unit said it was ordering 40
new 73 7-800s, an order valued at about $3 billion..."
The Wall Street Journal, Boeing Gets 85 New Orders onAir Show's
First Day by Peter Sanders, July 19, 2010

The Prius effect, perhaps? Or maybe it's the extra
billion people...
"The fact that China overtook the U.S. as the world's largest energy
consumer symbolizes the start ofa new age in the history ofenergy, "IEA
chief economist Fatih Birol said in an interview. The U.S. had been the
biggest overall energy consumer since the early 1900s, he said. "
The Wall Street Journal, China Passes the U.S. as World's Biggest
Energy Consumer by Spencer Swartz, July 19, 2010


West, Palmetto. For more infor-
mation, call 941-721-2034 or 941-
723-4991. This event is sponsored
by R.B. Chips Shore, Manatee
County Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Palmetto Historical Commission,
Manatee County Agricultural Mu-
seum, Inc., and the City of Pal-
metto.


Emerson Point Park
5801 17th Street W, Palmetto
941-748-4501
History comes alive at this 1,200
year old Indian village that con-
tains the largest remaining Indian
Mound on Florida's west coast.
Visitors can explore the temple
mound and surrounding middens
that were home to native Indian
tribes.


Palmetto Historical Park
515 10th Avenue W, Palmetto
941-723-4991
Historic buildings, original post
office, filled with documents and
artifacts, many of which are part
of the Carnegie exhibits are fea-
tured at this historical park that
also contains the Ag Museum and
the Heritage Chapel. Educational
programs and tours available.


Financial LONG-TERM & HEALTHCARE

PLANNING: Know Your Options

As Americans live longer, the need for long-term care becomes more likely Join
us on July 27 at Homewood Residence at Freedom Plaza as long-term care
specialist Christa Jerome with New York Life will help you understand the
particulars about financial long-term care planning. Elder Law Attorney, Laurie
Ohall will discuss the importance of having Healthcare Advance Directives in place
to protect "The Patient's Right to Decide."
Don't miss this opportunity to learn about important issues affecting your
healthcare and financial security.

Tuesday, July 27 10 11 a.m.

Complimentary refreshments.
For more information, call (813) 633-4340.


HOMEWOOD
RESIDENCE
-FREEDOM PLAZA-
BROOKDALE SENIOR LIVING


Personalized Assisted Living
Alzheimer's & Dementia Care
3910 Galen Ct., Sun City Center, FL 33573
(813) 633-4340
www.brookdaleliving.com
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JULY 22, 2010






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 19


Forgotten and taken for granted


Thousands of cars pass Fol-
low That Dream Parkway on U.S.
Highway 19 in Yankeetown every
day. Few of the people in those cars
probably notice it. And of the few
that do, a good number of them
likely think it is somehow Disney-
related. It sounds Disney-related. At
best, the road warrants a moment's
thought as
people pass
through on
their way
to Tampa,
Gainesville
or Tallahas-
Observations see.
By Mitch Traphagen The collec-
mitch@observernews.net tive mind of
any genera-
tion tends to
be a narcissist. As a society we feel
secure in our place in history. We
invented the computer, the Intemet,
and championed civil rights a cen-
tury after the nation descended into
a bloody hell over human property
rights. We have made our mark,
surely we will not be forgotten.
Perhaps that is what the gen-
eration that invented the wheel
thought. The truth is, we don't re-
member them at all. We take their
triumph for granted, and we know
nothing of those who so dramati-
cally changed the world.
In 1961, Hollywood came to
Yankeetown. State Road 40, also
known as Follow That Dream
Parkway, ends with a stunning vista
of the Gulf of Mexico. Like much
of the natural gulf coast, it was also
a place filled with scrub and un-
derbrush. A film crew changed all
of that, bringing in sand and palm
trees to build a tropical paradise for
a movie.
Elvis Presley was just 26-years-
old when he went to Yankeetown
to film Follow That Dream. He
was already well outside the orbit
of just any star of the day. To say
that he made a splash in the little
towns along the coast of Florida
would be an understatement. The
locals scratching out their humble
livings mingled with the stars as
they traveled by limousine. Things
were different then, there was no


grumbling or resentment; nor were
there guards to keep the locals at
bay. Dozens of photos exist of the
iconic young man posing with local
residents, smiling and connecting
with the unwashed masses. Stories
have been told and re-told of locals
meeting and joking around with
Presley. Several were even paid to
appear in the film, fishing, some-
thing they normally did for recre-
ation, from a bridge on State Road
40 alongside Presley.
Crowned by paupers, Elvis was
the King. In Yankeetown and Crys-
tal River, he was royalty within
reach. He graciously went out of
his way to leave them with that im-
pression, at least. Elvis contributed
greatly to those people at that time.
He gave them something to smile
and dream about.
Nearly half a century later, the
bridge is still there but nothing
marks the spot where Elvis sat with
a bamboo fishing pole. Except for
a fading sign six miles up the road,
there is nothing there at all that
says, F l~ i was here." The tropi-
cal paradise created for the film has
largely returned to what it was be-
fore the King arrived and the locals
still fish from the bridge, although
today they do so in the shadow of
cooling towers from a nuclear pow-
er plant.
History remembers only a very
select few people. Despite our be-
lief that we are somehow differ-
ent and that our time has been the
greatest of all, time is relentlessly


turning the pages. Someday that
bridge will be torn down by people
who have no idea who Elvis Pres-
ley was.
But go there today, close your
eyes and maybe you can see it,
or perhaps, feel it: Elvis, the film
crew, and even the locals were on
top of the world in 1961. With your
eyes closed, you may be able to
hear their laughter and feel the maj-
esty they felt. In your mind's eye
you may even catch a glimpse of
what it looked like being at the top
of the world, thinking that it would
last forever.
A short distance north, another
sort of history played out in Rose-
wood. There is no majesty and
laughter lingering in the air from
the events that took place in early
January, 1923. Through the course
of six days, five innocent people,
including two women, were mur-
dered by a mob over an accusation.
By the end of the first week of that
year, at least seven people were
dead; and Rosewood, a predomi-
nately black community supporting
a school, churches and businesses,
had effectively been wiped off the
face of the earth.
If there are ghosts in Rosewood
today, I don't think they are angry.
They could be confused, perhaps,
about how the same species that
can build the Louvre, or devote
themselves to art, or teaching other
people's children could turn into a
bloodthirsty mob bent on murder. I
don't think they know the answer
lr ~


Mitch Traphagen Photo


Waici letineshlais


at

SUNSET LOUNGE


at PAMIA PEACI
Featuring:

1/2 Pound PBud & 'ud Light

Angus Purger =L Longnecs
staring at .
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SWith choice of one side
Live Entertainment
Wednesday Thru Sunday

611Deftny Drive
RusKin, FL.
813-645-32q1


IMIILII Itrapllhy ll rIIhLt
Other than a fading road sign six miles away, there is nothing on
this bridge on Follow That Dream Parkway near Yankeetown to say,
"Elvis was here"


to that. Hopefully God knows. Cer-
tainly someone should.
In 1994, Governor Lawton Chiles
signed a bill to provide $2.1 million
in compensation to the Rosewood
massacre survivors for the loss of
their property. In 2004, Governor
Jeb Bush dedicated a permanent
historical marker along State Road
24 in Rosewood, creating a book-
mark in the turning pages of his-
tory.
The most profound contribu-
tions to human history are forgot-
ten and taken for granted. Ask a
young person about Jonas Salk
and you'll likely get a blank stare
in return. Polio has been forgotten
(in this country, anyway) and that
it no longer exists allows us to take
Salk's incredible contribution to
humanity for granted. But then ask
that same young person about Hit-
ler and you'll likely see a different
response.
Rosewood is a permanent mark-
er for something we've deemed
should not be forgotten. Elvis, on
the other hand, is a fading road
sign. That is how it should be. Al-
most everyone in the whole of hu-
man history has been forgotten; but
that doesn't mean they didn't con-
tribute. Rather, it means they did
- and so much so, they helped to
build a world in which we no lon-
ger even need to remember them.
We can only hope that someday
we, too, shall be forgotten by his-
tory. If we live right, we will ben-


efit our children to such a degree
they will take our contributions for
granted. Our best and most selfless
hope is be remembered in the form
of accomplishment so powerful
and universal that it can be taken
for granted, just like those who in-
vented the wheel. At best we should
warrant a fading road sign and not a
permanent marker.
This is our time. Enjoy it, en-
joy your time. Perhaps even savor
some of the time of those who
came before us, such as imagining
a young Elvis fishing from a forgot-
ten bridge. But then walk away be-
cause today is all we really have.
Contributing, rather than scar-
ring, hopefully someday our spir-
its, wherever they may be, will take
pride in being taken for granted
and forgotten. For the first genera-
tion with the capability to destroy
all life, simply fading into history
would be an unparalleled triumph.
Because if we have been forgotten,
that means we actually managed to
not exterminate the planet despite
our ability to do so.
The majesty of our ideals is a
shiny new road sign for our genera-
tion. Yet the pages of history keep
turning and the sign will fade until
one day, like us, it will be gone. By
simply following our dreams, our
children will be free to follow their
dreams, thus serving as both our
legacy and our redemption. If we
achieve that, we did good. We did
really good.


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stua 813-980-3408

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** Podiatric Medicine and Surgery

Sean D. Shanahan,

D.P.M., M.P.H.

3909 Galen Court, Suite B-1
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Phone: (813) 634-0664
Fax: (813) 634-0668


Dr. Robert A. Norman Dr. A. Theodosatos
Board Certified Dermatologist Brandi Broughton, PA-C

Offering Botox, Restylane and various cosmetic
products and services
Same Day Appointments FREE Skin Screening
6322 U.S. Highway 301 Riverview '
813-880-7546
Insurance accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, BCBS, Humana,
Cigna, Aetna, Amerigroup, and many more


mcmwr_=


JULY 22, 2010






20 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Soldier says thanks to United Methodist
On July 4, Captain Michael Dill, U.S. Army, visited Ruskin United
Methodist Church to thank the congregation for its "Care Packages" and
prayers. He was also the guest of honor at their Fourth of July Picnic.
Michael was on leave from Tarin Kowt, Afghanistan, where he is de-
ployed as part of the 101 st Airborne from Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Mi-
chael and his troops have received care packages from the church during
this year. Over the last two years, Ruskin United Methodist Church has
sent over 200 packages to troops in Iraq and Afghanistan as part of their
"Keep in Touch with Troops" mission program.


Clifford and Grace Beaumont
Congratulations on 75 years
Clifford and Grace Beaumont will celebrate their 75th wedding an-
niversary on July 26. They were born and married in western New York
where they also raised three daughters: Lois, JoAnn and Jean. They
owned Beaumont's GLLF later Agway until their retirement in 1965.
Forty-five years ago they decided to move to Hillsborough County. They
are now surrounded and supported by their family who live nearby. Cliff
and Grace have five granddaughters and nine great grandchildren. Their
secret for a successful life together for three quarters of a century? Marry
the right one the first time!


Sun City Christian
Center hosts VBS
WIMAUMA Sun City Chris-
tian Center will be hosting Vaca-
tion Bible School next week, July
26 through 30, from 6:00 to 8:30
p.m.
The theme for this year is Hero
Headquarters. At Hero Headquar-
ters, kids will meet unlikely Bible
heroes who are often overlooked.
The church is located at 17566
US 301 South, Wimauma, www.
suncitychristian.com. For more
information call 633-1188. Parents
may register their child on the first
night or online at www.vacation-
bibleschool.com/s3c.



Unity in Brandon
has moved

Daily Word readers, are you
looking for a spiritual home of like
minded people who study Unity
principles? Unity in Brandon
meet on Sunday mornings at 10:30
at the historic Brandon Woman's
Club at 129 N. Moon Avenue in
Brandon. Call 813-263-6155 for
more information. They look for-
ward to meeting you!


Alex and friends musical program
On July 23 at 7pm, a group of 20 youth from the South Shore com-
munity will present a musical program to benefit the Dominican Re-
public Project of the Episcopal Diocese of South West Florida at the
East Campus of St. John the Divine Episcopal Church at 1015 East Del
Webb Blvd., Sun City Center. This year the project will complete ba-
sic construction of both a church and
a school. The Dominican Republic
Project was begun in the fall of 1998
by a challenge of $25,000 matching
funds grant by St. John the Divine
Episcopal Church in Ruskin. In a let-
ter to Fr. Gene Laughran rector of St.
John the Divine at that time, the Rev.
Rick Lindsay wrote: "Using the gift
from St. John the Divine as a catalyst,
many churches have responded generously. The real joy in all this is the
realization that the Dominican people, the Dominican Episcopal Church,
and new church start ups, will benefit tremendously from all the efforts,
particularly your parish's leadership challenge."
This program has been organized by well-known local East Bay High
School singer Alex Buitrago who has invited friends to join him in this
event. Talent will be drawn from East Bay High School, Lennard High
School and the University of South Florida. This program will be a cel-
ebration for the 6 youth and adults from St. John the Divine who went
on mission to the Dominican Republic from St. John the Divine in June.
A free-will offering will be taken to benefit the Dominican Republic
Mission.


Manual Savings
Always save the manual that
comes with appliances. Recently
my refrigerator's ice dispenser
stopped dispensing cubes. Only
crushed ice came through. I called
the Maytag repair service and was
told it would cost a minimum of
$95 for them to come out and then
$95/hour plus the cost of parts. I
declined their services. My hus-
band dug around and found the
manual and the solution.
He carefully unscrewed the ice
storage unit, pulled it out and all
around it was small cubes that had
fallen out and apparently disinte-
grated. As they got smaller, they
clogged up the dispensing mecha-
nism. It took five minutes to clean
it out and saved us at least $190.
His repair didn't cost one cent!
I've been careless about saving
these manuals. My husband, on
the other hand, is obsessive about
it and saved the day.
Fran M.
Want to live better on the
money you already make? Vis-
it cfm?TipsSyn> to find hundreds
of articles to help you stretch your
day and your dollar! Copyright
2010 Dollar Stretcher, Inc.

Kings Point Ladies 18
Hole League
June 14 Game: Points

A Flt.
1st (tie) Marilyn McCormick,
Linda Suh Plus 3
2nd Lorraine Napier Plus 1
B Flt.
1st Nancy Sanders Plus 7
2nd Colleen Walker Plus 4
C Flt.
1st Marge Miller Plus 7
2nd(tie) Mary Arpaia, Judy
Marr Plus 5


CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH
I ,'-I SundayWorship: Blended 8:00 a.m.
Contemporary 9:40 a.m.
Y Traditional 11:15a.m. BIgBIend.
Nursery Provided CrossRoads: Bible Study, Worship: Wed. 7 p.m.
Pastor Jack R. Palzer
5309 U.S. Highway 41 North Apollo Beach A s
(ac ro m MiraBay) www.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1305 yf N

St. John the Divine Episcopal Church
Growing by Faith from Generation to Generation
Rev. Tracy H. Wider Church Office 813-645-1521
SUNDAY SERVICES: 9 am Contemporary Service and Sunday School
at West Campus, S.R. 674 and 9th Street SE, Ruskin
8 am Traditional Service and 11 am Holy Communion with Choir at East Campus
at 1015 Del Webb Blvd., SCC
All Worship Services with Holy Communion and Healing Holy Oil


Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (Behind Suntrust Bank)
ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: (Nov.-April ............................. 8:30 a.m. Day CareAvailable
Mon. Fri.
Rev. John M. Bartha and all year)......................... 10:45 a.m. 6 a.m. 6 p.m.
SPhone: 645-1241 Sunday School....................... 9:30 a.m. call 645-6198

REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH-ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center, FL33573-5354
Rev. Dr. Peter Stiller, Pastor 634-1292
Saturday Worship: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion....First & Third Sunday Bible Class...Thursday 10 am, Guests Welcome

First Church of Christ, Scientist
Ruskin Sun City Center (813) 645-6102
204 Second St. N.W, Ruskin, Florida 33570
Sunday Service Sunday School ....................................................... 10AM
Wednesday Testimony Meeting ....................................................... 5 PM
Reading Room Wednesday.......................................................4 4:50 PM
ALL ARE WELCOME www.spirituality.com

FfRST BAPTIST C-HJURCH

L"aln 820 COLLEGE AVE. W.
RUSKIN, FL 33570
645-6439
Swww.fbcruskin.org
L -d A Resource for Families
Sunday School ............................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship............8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Dr. Barry Rumsey
Evening Service.......................6:00 p.m. CHRISTANSCHOOL
K-2
Wednesday Night Service................7:00 p.m. THROUGH 12TH
Awana........................................... 7:00 p.m GRADE


S friendship Beptist Chlrch
Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist)
1511 El Rancho Dr.
Sun City Center, FL 33573
SPhone/Fax
813-633-5950


Sunday
9 a. m...
S 1 a.m.
10 a.m.


WEEKLY SERVICES:
....................Bible Study
....................Bible Study
& 6 p.m............Worship


Wednesday
6 p.m.... Prayer Meeting/Bible Study


Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC
Meets in the Social Hall of the Beth Israel Synagogue
1115 E. Del Webb Blvd.
Thursday, 7:00 PM Call 633-0396
Everyone is taking a stand these days and so there is a lot
of standing around. James Bevel

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where God's Love is Shared"
U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL 645.1121 www.nbcor.org S
Sunday School for all ages 9:30 AM SBC
Morning Worship 10:45 AM Wanted: People Who Want to Grow
Evening Worship 6:00 PM and Live for Jesus!
Full Wednesday Schedule for all ages

North River Church of Christ
Non-Instrumental-
13885 U.S. Hwy 301 South
(Just South of the Manatee County Line)
Minister: Howard Johnson Office 941-776-1134
Services: Sunday 10:00am, ll:00am & 6:00pm ce -7 -114
Wednesday7:00pm Home 813-754-1776

First Baptist Church of Gibsonton
"We love because He first loved us." 1 John 4:19
Traditional Worship Service *Sunday School 9:30 A.M. l
Old-Time Gospel Hymns *Morning Worship 10:30A.M. l
Nursery Available II Sunday Evening 6:00 PM.
9912 Indiana St. Hwy 41 & Estelle i au 'Malcolm S. Clements, Pastor
,Gibsonton, FL 33534 813-67-1301

WJcfe a&d EVERETT TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ
1611 First St. SW Ruskin, FL 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL-
SERVICES: Sunday................ 9:30 & 10:30 a.m.; 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday................7:00 p.m.

PRINCE OF PEACE CATHOLIC CHURCH
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573
Phone 634-2328 Fax 633-6670
Masses: Sunday ........................................................... 8:00, 10:00 a.m., Noon
Saturday Vigil ................................................ 4:00 p.m .
D aily ........................................................ .. 8 :00 a.m .
www.popcc.org Confessions: Monday Friday 7:30 a.m., Saturday 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.









OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 21


Vacation Bible School offered


Ruskin and Sun City Center, Aug.
2-6: St. John the Divine Episcopal
Church is offering two separate
Vacation Bible School programs.
"High Seas Expedition," for young
children 4-10 will be held at the
Ruskin Campus, 705 9th Street,
S.E., from 5:45-8:45 p.m. A pro-
gram for youth entering 6th grade


and higher will be held at the Sun
City Center Campus, 1015 E. Del
Webb Boulevard, from 6-8:30 p.m.
Both programs begin with dinner
and feature Bible-learning, crafts,
music, games, and a mission proj-
ect. There is no charge to attend.
Please call (813) 645-521 for in-
formation or to register.


Michael Levy, Jr. exhibits his talent of bass guitar during Vacation
Bible School.
Using talents for God
Disciples of Christ Christian Fellowship, 7732 Gibsonton Drive, Gib-
sonton, FL, held its annual Vacation Bible School, "Using Your Talents
for God", June 28- July 1. Children identified one special talent that
they committed to developing and using to help others. Attendees were
coached as they practiced their talents, created talent books as momen-
tos, and ended the week with a talent show.



CHURCH
Come and experience the power of
Jesus to change your life.
Sunday @ 9 & 11 AM Servicio en Espariol @ 6 PM

www.aplace4everyone.org

2322 11th Ave. SE Ruskin, FL 813.645.3337


[C OMUITOF@lJOYI


Beth Israel's Social Hall
1115 Del Webb E. Sun City Center, FL
www.unitycommunityofjoy.com


Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
Tel. 813-298-7745


( THE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO THE SERVICES NOW WORSHIPPING IN THE "CHAPEL"
AT SUN CITY CENTER FUNERAL HOME 10:30 AM ON SUNDAYS
NO CREED...BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE
1851 RICKENBACKER DRIVE 813-938-4955
Minister DR. DAVID CAMPBELL


Q~dnued oJ eIdo&i s CGS urcqofcun Ciy Genfer
The Church of Open Hearts... Open Minds... Open Doors
1210 W. Del Webb Blvd. 634-2539
.... Worship Services:
\ Saturday.................. 4:00 p.m.- Creason Hall (Traditional Service)
S Sunday....................8:15 a.m. in Sanctuary (Traditional Service)
9:30 a.m. Creason Hall (The Oasis)
ff F h10:55 a.m. Sanctuary (Traditional with Chancel Choir)
( od 7 o e Fellowship tim .. ...1 T. I..,., ,Ir. I r .. 1 0:15a.m. and 11 am. in Creason Hall
^God ov ove .S(% CC 'MC.com
PASTORS: DR. WARRENLANGER, REV GARYBULLOCK
Communion First Sunday ofEach Month


St. Andrew Presbyterian Church

\ Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.
Prayers with anointing for healing and
J& wholeness during worship the second Sunday
of every month.


A Stephen
Ministry Church


Pastor: Dr. Gerald Iwerks
Meet friends in Fellowship Hall after the Service
Refreshments served


1239 Del Webb Blvd. West
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Church is Handicap accessible


Phone: 813-634-1252
For Information visit:
www.standrewatscc.org


New members welcomed to TrinityBaptist
Trinity Baptist Church recently welcomed new members. From left to
right are Lewis Briggs, Senior Pastor Dr. Ron Churchill, and Shelby and
Bill Turley. For information on the church, please call 634-4228.



THE OBSERVER NEWS


Submit press releases by 4pm,
every Thursday, to:
news@observernews.net
or online at
www.observernews.net


g OUTSIDE
Preachingsthe BAPTIST CHURCH
4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 South
(4 miles south of Ruskin)
DAN COLLINS, PASTOR JIM KRAUSE, MUSIC DIRECTOR
CO nIMMUrLNITY INVITED
BIBLE STUDY 9:30 AM
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE 10:55 AM
SUNDAY EVENING SERVICE 6:00 PM
WEDNESDAY PRAYER SERVICE 7:00 PM
ADULTS, YOUTH, CHILDREN
For information, call 645-4085 Monday-Thursday




Saint Anne Catholic Chluck

Fr. John McEvoy
Pastor
813-645-1714
SaintAnneRuskin.org

U.S. Hwy. 41 106 11th Ave. NE Ruskin
SouthShore: j. .11. i Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton
C MASSES `
Saturday Vigil M ass.................................................................... 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass..................................... 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Holy Days....................................... Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Daily .....................................................M onday thru Friday 8:00 a.m.
Espaiol ................................Domingo 12:00 p.m.; Miercoles 7:30 p.m.
Confession............................. Wednesday 6:15 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.
1 Nursery Available for 10:00 a.m. Mass





through theva lleyoftheshad
of eah.,I *il0fe r o eil, or 0ouar
wit me., y urrodan yo r 0taf, he


John Berube
John Berube, 88, a member of Trinity
Baptist Church, passed away on June
21. He moved from Massachusetts to
Sun City Center in 1997. One of the
"Greatest Generation", he served in
the Army Air Force during World War
II. John was an Industrial Engineer
before retirement. In his leisure time
he enjoyed cross-country skiing, golf,
bridge and traveling. The "Best Popcorn
Maker in the World" is survived by his
wife of 64 years, Jeannette (Jan); son
Jack and wife Kathy; daughter Susan
and husband Donald, and their children
and grandchildren. Interment service
will be at the Florida National Cemetery,
Bushnell, FL, on July 23 at 2:30 p.m.

Juanita Raines Braga
Juanita "Nita" Raines Braga, 73, of
Ruskin was born September 21 1937
and died June 24, 2010. She was
buried on July 7, 2010 in Homestead,
FL. Arrangements by made by Branam
Funeral Home with burial at Palm
Woodlawn, Naranja, FL.


>1


Worn Out Socks
Rather than discarding unmated
or worn out socks, I cut them down
the front to within three inches
of the toe and then slip them on
my Swiffer@. After giving them
a spray of Endust, I use them
to mop the hardwood floor. The
stretchiness of the socks makes
them easy to put on the Swiffer
head, and the cut sides of the socks
are easily stuffed into the appro-
priate holders. After each use, I
remove the sock and put it in the
laundry.
Norma
Want to live better on the money
you already make? Visit stretcher.com/r/99.htm> to find
hundreds of articles to help you
stretch your day and your dollar!
Copyright 2010 Dollar Stretcher,
Inc.


Extra Frozen Veggies
When I use frozen vegetables
from a bag for dinner, I save a
small portion in the bag in one spot
in the freezer. It's usually too much
for the two of us to finish the whole
bag anyway. Then when I make
soup, I have small amounts of dif-
ferent frozen vegetables ready to
add to my soup. A small amount of
different vegetables adds color and
nutrition to all kinds of soups.
Judy W.
Want to live better on the money
you already make? Visit stretcher.com/r/99.htm> to find
hundreds of articles to help you
stretch your day and your dollar!
Copyright 2010 Dollar Stretcher,
Inc.


Obituaries


JULY 22, 2010






22 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Program/Event Highlights
Week of July 25 ~ July 31


Creative Artists: Let's Make a Splash!
Monday, July 26 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
"Creative Artists," ages 6-9 years, will create an art project
with the summer theme "Let's Make a Splash!" with
Art Educator Laurie Burhop. Limit 18. Registration is required.
Call 273-3652 or visit the Information Desk at the Library.

Internet: Safe Browsing
Monday, July 26 2 to 3 p.m.
Learn how to surf the Internet while avoiding common scams
and pitfalls. Registration in person required.

Internet: Malicious PC Software
Monday, July 26 3:15 to 4:15 p.m.
Learn about different types of malicious software,
how to remove them, and precautions to take when using
the internet. Registration in person required.

Make a SPLASH! Razzmatazz Entertainment
Monday, July 26 7 to 8 p.m.
For kids ages 5-1. Razzmatazz Entertainment's Lowell Tauszik
makes a splash using ventriloquism and magic to present a fun,
interactive show promoting summer reading and the use of the library.

Toddler Time
Tuesday, July 27 and Wednesday, July 28
10 to 10:25 a.m. and 10:35 to 10:55 a.m.
For ages 2-3 years with a caregiver.
Stories, finger plays and songs make up this 20-minute program.

Story Time
Tuesday and Wednesday, July 27-28 11 to 11:30 am.
For ages 3-5 years.
Stories, finger plays and songs make up this fun 30-minute program.
Seating limit: 20 children plus their parent/caregivers.





0

FAMILY DENTISTRY


Kirk D. Parrott, D.D.S

Carl E. Friedman, D.D.S.

902 N. Tamiami Trail, Ruskin, FL 33570
(Across from Sweetbay Supermarket)
NEW PATIENTS WELCOME
(813) 645-6491
Members Amencan Dental Association, Flonda State Dental Association, Flonda West Coast Dental
Association, Manatee County Dental Association and Hillsborough County Dental Association





10 MINUTE


OIL CHANGE
Includes:
Change Oil (up To 5 ots.) 14 Point Check and Top Off
SOil Filter Replaced Chassis Iubed
ISu" Automatic

OilEprs OFF Transmission Flush
Full Service Oil Change E Amrica's
Regular $29.95 Using 10w-30 or 5w-20 0
or FREE CARWASH! (Ride-thru-Express) Mo
Valid only with coupon. Coupon Cars
can not be combined or used with sale (<25 Savings) Oil Express
items. Coupon expires 08/15/10 OBN Coupon expires 08/15/10 OBN
America's 3852 SUN CITY BLVD. RUSKIH/SUH CITY CENTER
(NEXT TO CHECKERS) MONDAY FRIDAY
HO Appointment Hecessary 8A.M. TO 6P.M.
Satisfaction Guaranteed SATUDAY
Oil Express 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed 8A.M. TO 5 P.M.


JULY 22, 2010


WOW! Wonders of Water
Tuesday, July 27 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.
What do you know about H20? Discover the science of water.

Game Zone
Tuesday, July 27 5 to 7 p.m.
For middle and high school students.
Join your friends for some gaming fun with Dance,
Dance Revolution, Guitar Hero 2, Rock Band, etc.

Baby Time
Wednesday, July 28 10:05 to 10:25 a.m.
For ages 0-24 months.
Share books, rhymes, songs, games and quality time together.
Seating limit: 20 children plus their caregivers.

Deaf and Hearing Connection Telephone Distribution
Wednesday, July 28 1 to 3 p.m.
Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. (FTRI) provides
free specialized equipment and training to qualified Florida
residents who are deaf, hard of hearing or speech impaired. The
equipment enables them to place and receive phone calls.
Presented by Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. (FTRI).

Moonlight Stories: Osirisi African Folklore
Wednesday, July 28 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Moonlight Stories: Osirisi African Folklore is an African anthology
incorporating audience participation, including fun-filled call and
response type songs, mesmerizing African drumming and dance.

Excel III: Performing Calculations
Thursday, July 29 12:15 to 1:15 p.m.
Learn about the functions and complex formulas and how
to use them in calculations. Excel II is recommended.
Registration in person required.

Excel: Charts & Graphs
Thursday, July 29 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.
Create and format charts from data for visual emphasis.
Previous experience with Microsoft Excel is recommended.
Registration in person required no earlier than one hour
prior to the start of the program.


Bedtime Stories
Thursday, July 29
7 to 7:30 p.m.
For ages 2-5 with a caregiver.
Make reading a family affair.
Children may wear pajamas
and bring a blanket and favorite
cuddly toy for stories, songs
and activities during this
30-minute program.

Buk-A-Bag Used Book Sale!
Saturday, July 31
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
$1 for a Bag of Books!!
All books in Book Sale Room
will be half-price!!
You can pick from hundreds of
other books on sale, fiction and
non-fiction, and pay only $1 for
as many as you can cram into a
grocery bag! Proceeds support all
of the special Library programs
you see listed here each week.
Sponsored by The Friends of the
SouthShore Regional Library.

If you think you might be interested
in joining Friends of the South
Shore library, visit the Book Sale
Room at the Library for a member-
ship application. For any additional
information, visit www.southshore-
friends.com. SouthShore Regional
Library is located at 15816 Beth
Shields Way (off 19th Avenue
between U.S. 301 and 1-75).
(813) 273-3652


Trs your Eyecare I to Sp~lecialists 1


Walter Robert
Moscoso, M.D. Edelman, M.D.
Retina Specialist, Cataract & Laser
Macular Surgeon,
Degeneration Glaucoma Specialist


MANATEE
EYE CLINIC
fell yr^iag.ua i


~xq


Kblk
Eric
Berman, M.D.
Eyelid Plastic
Surgeon,
Neuro-Specialist


Robert
Sambursky, M.D.
Cornea Specialist,
Cataract Surgery,
General Eye Care


(813) 633-3065
1515 Sun City Center Plaza


Financial LONG-TERM & HEALTHCARE
PLANNING: Know Your Options
As Americans live longer, the need for long-term care becomes more likely. Join
us on July 27 at Homewood Residence at Freedom Plaza as long-term care
specialist Christa Jerome with New York Life will help you understand the
particulars about financial long-term care planning. Elder Law Attorney, Laurie
Ohall will discuss the importance of having Healthcare Advance Directives in place
to protect "The Patient's Right to Decide."
Don't miss this opportunity to learn about important issues affecting your
healthcare and financial security.

Tuesday, July 27 10- 11 a.m.
Complimentary refreshments.
For more information, call (813) 633-4340.


HOMEWOOD
RESIDENCE
-FREEDOM PLAZA-
BROOKDALE SENIOR LIVING


Personalized Assisted Living
Alzheimer's & Dementia Care
3910 Galen Ct., Sun City Center, FL 33573
(813) 633-4340
www.brookdaleliving.com
SReg US Patent and TM Office 52130 ROP040710 Assisted Ling Facilty # 9634 52130 ROP040710o


. .........







JULY 22. 2010 THE SHOPPER 23


T II THE SHOPPER
To place an ad call
813.645.3111 ext. 201
Fax: 813.645.1792 I
$15.50
up to 20 words M & M Printing Co., Inc
300 addl. word weekly publisher of the
Deadline is Monday The Observer News, The SCC Observer and The Riverview Current
Deadline is Monday )I 114- -CA


0 12 Woodland Estates Ave SW
Ruskin, Florida 33570


100 Announcements
200 Farmer's Mkt
300 Merchandise
400 Marine
450 Transportation
500 Real Estate
550 Manuf. Housing
600 Rentals
650 Prof. Services
700 Services
800 Employment


310 GARAGE /YARD SALE


105 PERSONAL
Local History books. Sun City Cen-
ter Plaza, Suite 204-A. Aleta Jonie
Maschek. 2nd story building by post
office. Weekday 10am-4pm.

Yoga Classes!
offered at Covington Park Clubhouse.
Every Wednesday 10am, Thursday
10am & 6pm. All levels welcome. Call
April for info. 813-685-0762

115 LOST& FOUND
Lost in vicinity of Rhodine Rd, Riverview
area. Male Chihuahua mix, approx.. lyr
old. Cream w/ orange markings. Bluish
gray eyes w/ reddish purple. Child's pet.
813-526-3181

--41



310 GARAGE/YARD SALE

Christmas in July
Everything 1/2off. Aleta's Boutique,
Sun City Center Plaza, Suite 204-A.
Weekdays 10am-4pm. 2nd story build-
ing by post office.
Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana
St., Gibsonton (1 block off US 41,1 block
north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday thru
Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture,
lots misc. Ministry First Baptist Gibson-
ton. 813-671-0036 to donate
July 23 & 24. 208 7th Ave., NW. 3 fami-
lies. Furniture, household items, medical
supplies & equipment, electronics, cloth-
ing, antiques, vintage steel guitar.

1810 Saffold Park Dr.,
Ruskin. Something for everyone.
Household, fishing, tools & clothes.
8am-1pm. July 24,


^=^Sc Calvary's

i Thrift Store
NOW OPEN Wednesday,
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. Noon

50% OFF
All Children's
Clothing
1424 E. College Ave. Ruskin
813-641-7790
MinistrJ ofCiavary Lutheran Church


Model Home& Consigned Furniture
& Accessories
Apollo Beach Shopping Center
6024 U.S. Hwy. 41 N. Apollo Beach
(next to Westshore Pizza)
., LayawayAvailable -
closed Tues., Wet Gsunday



Garage sale. Friday only. 7/23. SCC
1211 W. Del Webb Blvd. 7:30am-
11:30am. Everything priced to sell. 1/2
priced from 11 am-11:30am.
Garage sale. 1810 & 1812 N. Pebble
Beach Blvd., SCC. Thursday & Friday,
8am-1pm. Furniture, decor, clothes &
misc.
Moving sale. July 24 & 25, 8am-1pm.
TVs, 3pc brown sectional, assorted
glassware, appliances, misc. 1716 Fla-
mingo Lane, SCC.
Friday & Saturday. Hunting, fishing,
camping, military items. Restaurant
equipment also large selection of flea
market items from dealers. Beach Ave
& Restwood Dr., Gibsonton. 813-677-
9634
Garage sale. Furniture, household,
linens, books, dryer. Something for
everyone. Friday & Saturday, 8am-2pm.
2221 W. Lake Dr., Wimauma

Huge Yard Sale
Leather couches, furniture, toys,
clothes & houseware. Saturday, 7am-
noon. Covington Park, follow signs.
312 ESTATE SALES





1307 Sweeney Dr., Ruskin
Saturday 7/24 9:30-3

2008 Dodge Challenger with a Hemi
Engine, Motor Home, Kabota B-1750
Tractor, Tons of Tools, Household
Goods, Lawn Mowers, Generator,
Craftsman Compressor, Honda
4-Wheel All-Terrain Vehicle, Power
King Front End Loader, Welding
Equipment, Motor Hoist, Chain Saw,
Floor Jack, Electric Wench, and Lots
More! Interesting and Fun Sale! Sale
Conducted by Palma Sola Sales.
(Numbers given out at8a.m.)


"- THRIFT STORE '
OPEN: Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 8 am. 3 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. 12 p.m.


N w
U.
w 4
1st St SW.


TSIFTOR
STORE


1009 Ist_


R


Street S.W.
uskin


674 E We Have
Furniture, Too!
DONATION DROP OFFS
TUES. THRU FRL ONLY PLEASE,
ALL DONATIONS MUST BE IN CLEAN
USEABLE CONDITION.


U U


312 ESTATE SALES


mae.rudy54@yahoo.com
813-938-5103





336 CLUB MANOR DR.
(off Pebble Beach S.)
July 23 & 24 8am-1 pm
Recliner Couch, Roll Top Desk,
Ethan Allen End Tables, Hutch &
Table w/6 Chairs, Long Bookcase,
Round Maple Coffee Table, King
Maple Poster Bed, Maple Twin
Beds w/Dresser & Mirror, Maple
8-Drawer Chest, 4 Henry Link
Wicker Straight Back
Chairs, Small Desk, Misc.
01 _*--_ 0~1_-- T 4-_ -_ a^


312 ESTATE SALES


Let us get done in one day what it
takes the others guys a week to do.
We will pack-up and pick-up one room
or the entire house for a QUICK,
PROFITABLE, TROUBLE-FREE
EXPERIENCE.
CALL BUTTERFIELD'S AUCTIONS




www.ButterfieldsAuctions.com
Butterfield Auctions AB2706/AU3549


TTIE^'S
,STFITE
SMFLES

S741-0225
a Cell: 382-7536
Personalized
Service


Chairs, China, Linens, A-
Kitchen, Folding
Wheelchair, TV, Men &
Women's Clothes.
633-1173 or 508-0307
633-1173 or 508-0307 Dealer in Gold & Silver Coins
Domestic & Foreign
12% and over
AAA Furniture on SILVER COINS
New & Gently Used Furniture (depending on market
Callfor private consultation or appointment
BUY & SE L All transactions are strictly confidential
U & S LL (813) 634-3816. cell(813) 503-4189
Daily Trips to SCC "Yourlocaldealer forover20years"


Mon.-Sat.
9 a.m.-5 p.m.


6819 U.S. 301 S., Riverview
(813)677-8180

To Place a classified ad
fax to 813-645-1792









** NOTE DATE & TIMES **
THIS SALE IS WORTH
THE DRIVE!
Located Off HWY 301 &
BIG BEND RD. (Follow Signs)
Contents Include: OUT OF
THIS WORLD Antiques!
200-Year-Old Italian Figural/
Cherub-Faced Chest & Marble
Top Figural/Cherub Entrance
Table w/Mirror! Tall Square
Glass Display Cabinet, Antique
China Cabinet Ornate Antique
Chest, Antique Black Cedar
Chest Drop Leaf Table w/4
Chairs, Like New Sharp 52" Flat
Screen TV Wine Cabinet, Sofas,
Diamond Back Gas Grill, Patio
Table w/Chairs, Bike,
Household & Misc. Items.
TOO MUCH TO LIST!
PLEASE PARK ON
SAME SIDE OF SALE DUE TO
EMERGENCY VEHICLES.
See You There!


NETTIE'S ESTATE SALES
Home: 741-0225 Cell: 382-7536
2336 Emerald Lake Dr.
Sun City Center
Thurs. & Fri., July 22 & 23
7 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Contents include:
BEAUTIFUL Cherry 4-Poster Full
Size Bedroom Set, Brass Queen
Size Bed, White Dresser
w/Mirror, Wicker Rocking Chairs,
Wicker Furniture, NICE Living
Room Set (Sofa, Loveseat &
Wing Back Chair) White
Entertainment Center, Coffee,
End & Lamp Tables, Office Desk,
Women's Clothing, Life Vests,
Patio Table w/Umbrella, Grill,
Tools, Very Old Watercolors of
George & Martha Washington,
Household & Misc. Items.
PLEASE PARK ON
SAME SIDE OF SALE DUE TO
EMERGENCY VEHICLES.
See You There!


335 MUSIC
Lowrey Holiday organ with cards, disks,
books & bench. New condition $2,550.
813-634-3836

360 GOLF CARTS
Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade. Char-
gers, parts all related. Ronny's Carts &
Parts. 813-645-4515 or 813-484-9855
We buy golf carts, any condition. We pay
top dollar for used carts, running or not.
Same day pickup. 813-300-0114


390 MISC. FOR SALE
Selling sofa bed, 2 love seats, recliners,
treadmill, speakers, HP printer. Perfect
condition, stereo cabinet. 802 Birdie
Way, Apollo Beach.
Food concession trailer, fully equipped.
Fryer /griddle /state fire extinguisher
system. Also commercial cotton candy
machine, popcorn popper, assorted
restaurant equipment. Call Barb 813-
624-8989






425 SLIPS OR STORAGE
South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special-
izing in outside storage for RVs, boats &
trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay-
Storage.com

Ramey's Business Park
RV & boat storage & heavy equipment.
1/4 mile from Williams Park boat ramp.
813-410-9607 or 813-849-1469







510 HOUSES FOR SALE


KINGS POINT VERY CLEAN
FURNISHED CONDO: 2BR/1.5BA,
enclosed lanai, carport. A stone throw from
golf course & pond, close to recreation
center & pools. Washer/dryer in 1/ bath.
$31,900
NEAT 2BR/2BA M-HOME across from
golf course. Split BR plan, newly painted
inside, new laminate floors or carpet,
screen porch, carport, shed. $52,500
BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED
FURNISHED 2BR/2BA bright & spacious
doublewide. Open living/dining room with
bay windows, inside utility room, screen
porch on one side, open porch on other
side, carport, 3 sheds, newer roof!
Fabulous corner lot! Now $67,500


PIECES
YouwantthingstobeperfectWell, have
totally renovated and remodeled DW52 model
with 20ceramictile floors. Everything --
I mean everything is new and an upgrade
from the original. Plusthis house is totally
furnished with quality.This home is decorator
perfectYou will not find anything better in
SunCityCenter. $134,900.

AQUARIUS
AnyAquarius will go wild with this renovated
2BR/2BA home on South Lake. Gorgeous water
view,upgraded Idthen&baths,fronttoback
family room with ceramictilefloor, indoor
laundry,large corner lo Motivated seller.
$128,500.
LIBRA
You'rea leader,not a follower.Youthinktothe
future and demand quality.I have the perfect
home foryou. Renovated waterfront with
screened pool, new seawall, French doors,
granite counters,space for everything.This
home will take your breath away! Justthink,
you can live here! Call mefora leisurely
inspection.$299,000.

BOBGARDl' IN


at 4pm


MARIE E. RUDY
ESTATE
SALES

Serving the
SouthShore
Area


THE SHOPPER 23


JULY 22, 2010


Riveiviem(s
Best Kept
Secret


I


4F ff







24 THE SHOPPER

511 HOUSES FOR SALE






SCC Sierra in Greenbriar, oak floors, replumbed,
interior redecorated. Over 1,500 sq. ft......$134,900
NEW ISTING, Condo in The Knolls, near private pool
...in the $40s
SCC Worthington 3BR/2BA, 2,500 sq. ft., solarheated
spa, new flooring, caged patio, vacant............. $249,000
RENTALS
2BR/2B Fum. on Gloucester.......................$750/month
2BR/2B, 2-car garage in Greenbriar........ $1000/month
KP, Pets OK, 3BR/2BA, fumished................ $900 /month


515 VILLAS FOR SALE

Sun City Villa
$49,900. 1st floor, spacious 2br/2ba
condo. King's Point, gated 55+ com-
munity, great community amenities.
Like new. 813-850-1173







560 M.H. ON LOTS

Mobile home for sale Eastwood Mobile
Home Park, Gibsonton. Call Heather
813-677-5726

565 M.H. IN PARKS

Gibsonton. Newly renovated, 1br, MH.
Roof over, shed, screened room, CHA,
tile floors, partially furnished. $6,500.
Low down payment, owner financing.
813-310-0396


JULY 22, 2010


565 M.H. IN PARKS

Small mobile homes/travel trailers with
Florida room addition. From $1,000.
River Oaks RV, on Little Manatee 813-
645-2439







610 WATERFRONT RENTALS

The Dolphin House, Apollo Beach,
efficiency apartments on water. Boat
docking /fishing. Pool, laundry. $185
weekly, $185 deposit. No pets. 813-
850-5217

Apollo Beach 2br/2ba, comfy, furnished
condo. A/C, pool, tennis courts, dock.
Quiet community. Seasonal? Long
term? Rent negotiable. TECO welcome.
440-666-1330

611 HOUSES FOR RENT

For rent SFR, Apollo Beach. $950, avail-
able immediately. 1 st & deposit to move
in. Call for showing 813-482-6374

Apollo Beach 3br/2ba/2cg on Jamaica
Isles. Newly painted, new carpet, nice
quiet neighborhood. $995 monthly plus
security. 813-645-2448 or 813-416-
6221

SCC house for rent. 2br/1.5ba, com-
pletely renovated from inside to outside.
Monthly rent $795 plus security deposit
with yearly lease. Please call 813-649-
1599 for details


Classified Works


CALL
Paul B (813) 645-3211

DICKMAN Serving South Hillsborough
INC. County since 1924.
REALTY
REALTY www.dickmanrealty.com
Celebrating 86 Years dickman@tampabay.rr.com
1924 -2010
WATERFRONT HOME! CANAL WATER, EASY ACCESS TO THE BAY. 3BR/2BA with
boat dock, storage, nice fruit trees and fireplace. Well maintained. Seller motivated.
$210,000 CALL KATHY JACOBSON 624-2225
2BR/2BA DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE in the Riverbreeze gated community. Fully furnished,
utility shed with washer and dryer. Park has clubhouse, swimming pool, and shuffle-
board. $ 55,000. CALL KATHY JACOBSON 624-2225
1.4 ACRES with county water and sewer available. Ideal for your estate home or build up
to 4 homes on this property. Mostly cleared corner lot within minutes to schools,
churches, restaurants and recreation. Asking $133,000. CALL JO ELLEN MOBLEY
645-1540.
AFFORDABLE MOBILE HOME/HOUSE SITE in the country but not far from the city.
Roomy corner lot with over one acre mostly cleared. Priced to please at only $59,900.
CALL JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540.
OWNERS HAVE FINISHED IMPROVEMENTS to property that has great commercial
potential. New stucco exterior ready for your business/office. Near downtown Ruskin and
major highways on a well-traveled street. Owner will consider financing or renting.
$130,000 CALL JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
NEWLY LISTED 3BR/2BA home in Ventana with sellers who don't want to "wait for the
market to come back." Priced to sell NOW at $126,000. Light, open, great room floor plan
with split bedrooms, vaulted ceilings, screened porch, 2 car garage. Nicely landscaped
yard, convenient location. CALL JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
OVER 6 ACRES of beautiful secluded, wooded acreage, one-of-a-kind waterfront view.
Property has M/H, well & septic. Two folio numbers. 165 ft. riverfront. $495,000 CALL
KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
REDUCED!! GREAT COMMERCIAL LOCATION ON HIGHWAY 41! 2530 sq.ft. metal
building with 3-phase power, dust collection unit, 6" sloped concrete floor for drainage,
two 10' doors and three 8' doors. Three other very well maintained office buildings on the
1.43 acre property. Combined parking could easily accommodate 30 cars. $599,000
CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
2.5 ACRES REDUCED TO $114,900. Mobile on property does not remain. Peace and
quiet in the country on 21st Ave. SE. Motivated seller. CALL KAY 361-3672 or
ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
COMMERCIAL SITE located close to Hwy. 41 in Ruskin with over 200 feet of road
frontage. Zoned General Commercial with county water & sewer. Mobile home on
property brings rental income. $234,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE
WESTBROOK 748-2201
REDUCED AGAIN !! Well maintained 2BR/1.5BA waterfront condo with a 30' Dock will
accommodate sailboats and larger boats. $99,999 CALL ROXANNE WESTBROOK
748-2201 or KAY PYE 361-3672
PERFECT FAMILY POOL-HOUSE, ALREADY REDUCED! 3BR/2BA 2-car-garage, on
double fenced lot. Freshly painted, new carpet, tiles in living area, large screen porch
overlooking pool and nicely landscaped backyard. Now $154,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT
363-7250
AFFORDABLE 3BR HOUSE ON 1/3 ACRE FENCED LOT: great condition, newer CHA,
plumbing & sewer, newly repainted inside. Utility-rm, carport, large new shed in
backyard. $64,900. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
CHARMING FLORIDA CRACKER HOUSE ON LARGE CORNER LOT: 2BR/1.5BA,
enclosed Fla-Rm, inside utility-rm, double carport. Home is on county water & sewer.
$58,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
SELLERS ARE LOOKING FOR OFFERS: 2BR/2BA doublewide, handicap accessible,
with enclosed porch, huge MBR, inside utility, carport & storage shed. Large new CHA.
$51,500. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
BEAUTIFUL PROPERTY -- SUN CITY CENTER. 2BR/2BA 2-car garage home built in
1994 has been meticulously maintained with new a/c in 2006, a new roof in 2007 and
much, much more. Call today to see this beautiful property which is priced to sell at
$139,500. CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
WHAT A BARGAIN!! A great opportunity to own a 2BR/2BA manufactured home for
under $50,000. Call today to see this nicely maintained home available for only
$49,000.CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
CALL US FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS........645-3211
Donate your old functioning cell phones and drop off at our
office for use by the "Victims Assistance Program."


(Evening phone numbers)
Judy Erickson ..................... 468-0288 Jim Grannon.... ...............
Claire Tort................... 363-7250 Kenn Antonelli ....................
Kay Pye .............................. 361-3672 Kathy Jacobson .....................
Cathy Griggs ..................... 391-8653 Jo Ellen Mobley.....................
Christine Nethers ............... 260-6335 LaRae Regis...........................
Roxanne Westbrook............ 748-2201


610-3485
786-3124
624-2225
645-1540
633-8318


611 HOUSES FOR RENT

Gibsonton. 7008 Mottie Rd. 3br/1.5ba,
eat-in kitchen, living room, dining room,
family room & bonus room with washer &
dryer. All appliances, large fenced yard.
$975 monthly $1,000 security deposit.
813-672-1933 or 813-220-4525

House for rent in Sun City Center. Spa-
cious 2br/2ba, fully renovated on golf
course/ nature preserve. Yearly rental
$850.419-261-2849

Sun City Center. Remodelled 2,100 sf.
3br/2ba/2cg on golf course. Pets ok.
$1,000 monthly. 813-767-5005

House for rent. 3 bedrooms. Gibson-
ton area. $150 weekly $500 deposit.
Garbage included. First & last week.
Background check. 813-671-1184

S & R Properties
3, 2 & 1 bedrooms. No pets. Ruskin,
Gibsonton area. RV lots available 813-
310-1888 or 813-849-1469

612 APTS. FOR RENT

For rent: Efficiency apartments. Weekly
rates, utilities furnished 813-677-8789,
813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

Apollo Beach 1 bedroom, 1 bath. Refrig-
erator, range, dishwasher, carport, patio,
yard. 813-645-4145 or 813-642-0681

Ruskin. One bedroom, one bath, central
air. Recently remodeled. $135 weekly.
$265 move in fee. 813-966-4050

613 CONDOS FOR RENT

Kings Point adult community, 1 br/1.5ba,
fully furnished. $725 includes cable
TV, 3 pools, workshops, health club,
water, sewage/ 813-633-4007 /813-
928-1971




NEW Condos
and Townhouses
(off7thAve.NE in Ruskin)
3BR/2BA Condos with screened lanai.
$850 per month.
(Water & Basic Cable Included)
2BR/2.5BA Townhouse with garage.
$1000 per month.
(Water & Basic Cable Included)
3BR/2.5BA Townhouse (1842 sq. ft.)
with garage. $1150 per month.
(Water & Basic Cable Included)
with approved application
and 1 year lease
SMove-in Incentives





615 TOWNHOMES FOR RENT

Kings Lake townhome for rent. $900
monthly. 1,134sf, 2br/2ba. screened la-
nai, washer, dryer. Call 813-677-8701

621 PLACES TO SHARE

Roommate wanted. 55+ Kings Point
gated community. Share 2br/2ba condo.
$500 monthly, no deposit. Clubhouse &
amenity inclusive. 813-404-8071.

630 M.H. RENTALS

For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With
A/C. 813-677-1086

New mobile homes w/ lower rates.
Water, garbage & pest control in-
cluded.
(2 Weeks Free)
L&N Trailer Park, Gibsonton. 813-
381-4830

For rent 2 bedroom trailer $520 monthly
$140 deposit or $130 weekly. No pets.
South of Gibsonton off US 41. 813-
690-0768

For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home near
shopping center in Gibsonton. 813-677-
8789, 813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

Ruskin 1br/1ba mobile home on quiet
street. Waterfront, fish off dock. Utilities
included. No smoking, no pets. Best
suited for single person or couple. Refer-
ences needed. Rent $175 weekly plus
$300 deposit. 813-363-6001

E-MAIL
Classified@observemews.net


630 MH RENTALS

45+ 3br/2ba mobile home, 5 miles from
SCC, on private lot, partially furnished.
Very nice. No children. short or long
term. $600 monthly plus electric. 813-
634-5875

644 COMMERCIAL

Gibsonton area. 40x60 building on 1/2
acre. $1,000 monthly 813-690-1836

646 WAREHOUSE SPACE

Garage & mini storage rooms for rent.
Pirates Treasure Cove, Gibsonton.
813-677-1137






675 UPHOLSTERY

Cushions & light weight upholstery.
35yrs experience. Quality workmanship,
quality materials, quality advice. My
Upholstery Shop. 813-982-0832

680 ADULT/CHILD CARE

Professional care provider in your home.
Errands/ light housekeeping/ prepare
meals, etc. Dependable & reasonable
rates. References available. Call Brenda
813-633-4590

Caregiver
(non medical) full-time/ part-time. One
or more hours. Experienced. Salary
negotiable. Resume on request. Phil
or Janna 813-633-8906







705 CLEANING

Cheri's Cleaning Service
& In Home Care. Best service in town.
Just like family.Call 813-956-2452.

Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integrity.
Call for free estimate. 7days a week.
Move-in, move-out, rentals. Insured,
bonded, licensed. Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean

The Cleaning Expert. Where service &
quality comes first. 20% offw/ ad. Move-
in/ mover-out/ residential/ commercial.
Free estimate. Licensed & insured.
813-877-7647

Wilkleen Commercial Cleaning
We do it right the first time. Expe-
rienced in house & office cleaning.
Licensed/ insured. Give us a call.
813-390-6815


YOUR NAME:

ADDRESS:


CITY/STATE/ZIP

DAYTIME PHONE:

up to 20 words

$15.50
includes listing on web
300 for each additional word over 20

|CLASSIFICATION

AD COPY AS YOU WISH IT TO APPEAR
AD COPYAS YOU WISH IT TO APPEAR


705 CLEANING

Green Team
Home /office cleaning. Windows
cleaned. Pressure washing, yard
maintenance. Call Dee 813-777-1221.

Becky's At Your Service
Cleaning. Licensed & dependable
cleaning service, for all your clean-
ing needs. Free estimates. Call today
813-672-9215


706 PRESSURE WASHING

HomeMinders
of West Florida LLC. Home mainte-
nance & repairs. Pressure washing &
remodeling. With over 40yrs experi-
ence in Florida. Quality workmanship.
Insured/ Lic #2088831. Free estimate.
Curtis 813-362-4841 or Bobby 813-
767-1460

708 MOVERS

Affordable Moving & trash Hauling.
Specializing in delivery /estate sales.
One piece or whole house. Loading &
unloading moving trucks/ storage units.
Free estimate. Dave 813-447-6123

710 LAWN CARE

We create outdoor living! Lawn re-
placement, sod installation, delivery,
landscaping & more. Free estimate.
813-317-9883

Montoya's Landscaping
Sod removal & installation. Resi-
dential & commercial landscaping &
mulching. Trees & palm trimming,
Free estimate. Best price guaranteed.
813-770-1881 or 813-633-2485

Terry's Lawn Service
Free estimates. Mowing, trimming,
edging. Home 813-634-2856, cell 813-
317-7679

FloraScapes
Professional maintenance company
serving all your landscaping needs.
Residential & commercial. Ruskin,
Apollo Beach, SCC, Riverview. Li-
censed/insured. 813-333-3688

Your best Advertising Buy!
The Observer News


The Shopper
The Observer News
The SCC Observer
The Riverview Current


Mail payment
or drop payment to:
210 Woodland Estates Ave.
Ruskin, FI. 33570

CALL IN YOUR AD TO:
645-3111 ext. 201
OR FAX IT TO:
645-1792


DEADLINE:
Ad and payment
must be received by
4 p.m. Monday








JULY 22, 2010
715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill dirt,
topsoil, sand, crushed rock & asphalt,
driveway culverts. Loader, backhoe,
grading, bushhog, discing. Install Sep-
tic System & drain fills. CFC#1427021.
813-645-1883

Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service. Cul-
vert sets, driveways, shell, crushed
asphalt, concrete, fill dirt, excavating,
mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963
Free estimates.

Fill-Land Clearing
Dozer & loader work, driveway & sep-
tic fill, & shell hauled. Robert Carver,
813-634-4962. Beeper 813-267-6217

720 HOME MAINT.

Experience carpenter. Needs work will
fix anything. Free estimate. Call Dave
813-447-6123. 27yrs in finish work.
Guaranteed quality service.

740 MISC. SERVICES

Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks, boat
lifts & seawalls. Free inspection. Heck-
er Construction Co. 813-236-9306

Oliver & Company
Pet Sitting
813-767-7225. Licensed, bonded,
insured. Member of Pet Sitters Inter-
national. References available, email:
olivertort@aol.com







810 MEDICAL







SUNTOWERS
RETIREMENT CO M MUNITY

CNAs
Sun Towers Retirement
Community is seeking CNAs
for our Assisted Living Facility.
Med Tech preferred, but will
train the right person.
Interested candidates should apply to:
101 Trinity Lakes Drive
Sun City Center, FL 33573
(813) 634.3347


810 MEDICAL

Medical facility has an opening for a pa-
tient care coordinator. Applicant should
be a people person, willing to learn &
interested in growing with our practice.
If interest please email your resume to
Info@armandshearing.com


SUNTOWERS
RETIREMENT COMMU N ITY

RN UNIT MANAGER
SUN TERRACE HEALTH
CARE CENTER is seeking the
ideal candidate to manage a 45-bed
rehab unit in our SNF. Qualified
applicants will possess prior LTC
experience, strong organizational
skills, attention to detail and
management experience.
Competitive salary and benefits
with tremendous growth potential.

Fax resume to (813) 633-1356
or email to
cmartinez@suntowersretirement.com








SUNTOWERS
RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

RN SUPERVISOR
3 p.m.-11 p.m. Monday-Friday
position for our 109-bed SNF.
Qualified applicants will possess
strong organizational skills,
attention to detail and management
experience. Competitive salary
and benefits.
Apply to:
Sun Terrace Health Care Center
105 Trinity Lakes Drive
Sun City Center, FL 33573
(813) 634-3347, ext. 122


SUNTOWERS
RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

OCCUPATIONAL

THERAPISTS
SUN TERRACE HEALTH
CARE CENTER
is hiring PRN & Full-Tunme
Occupational Therapists for
inpatient & outpatient.
Excellent benefits package and
opportunities for growth.
Interested candidates should apply at
105 Trinity Lakes Drive
Sun City Center, FL
(813) 634-3347 ext. 134
or email resume to
vkosky@suntowersretirement.com


To Place
A Classified Ad
Call Beverly
813-645-3111
20 words for $15.50 and
300 for each additional
word. Bold line $3. All Clas-
sified ads are prepaid. We
take Visa, MasterCard or
Discover


OWA NE SHM

WIT NOMOEY OWN!


A community of affordable homes
exclusively for first-time homebuyers!

ULO ,nrA HOME P= oROTRSM
(813)672-7889 www.flhome.org


* Phase III Now Available!
* 2 Swimming Pools and a Clubhouse
* 3, 4 and 5 Bedrooms, 1 and 2 Garages
* Popular Ruskin Location
* USDA Self-Help Housing program -- help
build your home in exchange for a down
payment
* No money down, easy to qualify
* Non-profit agency works for you
-Hablamos Espaiol ~




BAYOUPASS
I nr r, r..r.re homebty uner 80% of me i income. Cal fordeilr


870 GENERAL

At Home Auto Care is looking for ex-
perienced mechanic. M-F work week.
Call 813-645-0339 for more info. DFWP,
valid Drivers License a must. Prefer non
smoker. Bring all certifications.

Hair stylist needed for busy salon. Sun
City Center area Call Sue's Salon 813-
634-7022

Reliable hairstylist with clientele, need-
ed. Reasonable booth rental. Village
Plaza Beauty Salon. Call Mary or Kim
813-634-5044

COMMUNITY PAPERS
OF FLORIDA
(CPF STATEWIDE)

AS SEEN ON TV Major Collector Pay-
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CASH PAID for your unused, unexpired &
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DIRECTV FREE Best Package for 5
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org.

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ADOPTION Give Your Baby The Best In
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who truly cares about you. 1-800-852-
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Are you pregnant? Considering adoption?
Young, married couple seeks to adopt.
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Become a commercial Model/Actor Earn
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CPF STATEWIDE
OWNER MUST SELL this NC Mountain
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ROOF REPAIRS CALL 24/7 Flat Roof &
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1-877-572-1019

SURROGATE MOMS NEEDED! $18,000
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com ;

WANTED 20 Homes To showcase our
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AVIATION MAINTENANCE / AVIONICS
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HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast Afford-
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BURIED IN CREDIT CARD DEBT Over
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FORECLOSURE ASSISTANCE You
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Boats; 1000's of boats for sale www.flori-
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** BODYGUARDS WANTED ** FREE
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$$ EARN EXTRA INCOME $$ Working
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tions, Wildlife & more! 1-800-858-0701
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Government Now Hiring! Average federal
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249-8739 www.Work4Gov.ORG

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**Excellent Investments!!


THE SHOPPER 25

CPF STATEWIDE
Heat & Air Jobs Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program. Hands on environ-
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Job Placement Assistance! 1-877-994-
9904

$1,380 weekly guaranteed. Stuff envelopes
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888-870-7859 binvestmentsinc@yahoo.
com

EARN 7% (apr) paid monthly or flat
20% (apr) return on REO's (Bank owned
property, Port St Lucie). Min $2650 invest-
ment. 561-662-0034, 561-471-1413 www.
ptcfinancialcorp.com ;

ATTENTION HUNTERS! KENTUCKY
LAND AUCTION, August 12th, 6pm. 1,994
Acres part in renowned Whitetail deer area
of Christian Co. Large & Small Tracts.
1-800-451-2709 or schraderauction.com.

Coastal Waterfront Land Sale 7/24/10.
Only $89,900 Direct Atlantic Ocean Ac-
cess! Adjoining lot sold for $309,900!
All amenities complete! Paved roads,
underground utilities, club house & pool.
Excellent financing. Call now 877-888-
1406, x2613

DIRECT WATERFRONT with Sandy
Beach Shoreline! Only$37,900. Wooded,
park-like setting on one of Alabama's top
recreational waterways with gorgeous
sandy shoreline. All amenities completed.
Boat to Gulf Mexico! Excellent financing.
Call now 1-866-952-5302, x5457

DON'T RENT WHEN YOU CAN OWN!
Pasco & Hernando County Properties.
Owner financing, For Sale/Rent/Lease
Options 1 Bedroom, 2 Bedrooms, 3
Bedrooms. Low down payment. Williams
Realty 813-478-3404

GEORGIA NORTH GEORGIA MOUN-
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Weekly stay includes free night. Cavender
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virtual tour at www.cavendercreek.com ;
1-866-373-6307

Hard to find B4 zoning property for sale
or lease on Highway 484 in South Marion
County. 4,700 sq footbuilding on 1 acre.
Great for church, clubs, meetings, etc.
For info contact Realtor Anthony White,
352-547- 3137.

NC MOUNTAIN HOMESITE BEST LAND
BUY! 2.5acres, spectacular views, paved
road. High altitude. Easily accessible,
secluded. Bryson City. $45,000. Owner
financing: 1-800-810-1590 www.wildcat-
knob.com ;

N.C. MOUNTAIN LAND SUMMER SPE-
CIAL! Owner financing only 5% interest
w/5% down! lacre acres from $200/
month. Huge mountain views. Gated com-
munity w/amenities. Close to Asheville.
828-460-6595

SANTEE COOPER LAKE AREA. South
Carolina. 2 acres, near 1-95. Beautiful
building tract $19,900. Ask about E-Z
owner financing, low payments 803-473-
7125

SELL/RENT YOUR TIMESHARE FOR
CASH!!! Our Guaranteee Services will
Sell/Rent Your Unused Timeshare for
Cash! Over $78 Million Dollars offered
in 2009! www.sellatimeshare.com ; (800)
882-0296

TENNESSEE SOUTHEAST Variety of
homes & land. Mountain, valley, farms,
wooded tracts, gated community. 1-800-
516-8387 George Hamilton Land &
Auction, TAL1557 www.hamiltonauction.
com ;

VIRGINIA MOUNTAINS GALAX AREA
6 acres on river, great fishing, private,
reduced! $59,500. Call owner now! 866-
275-0442

Male Size Enlargement FDA Medical
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Donate Vehicle Receive $1000 Grocery
Coupon Noah's Arc Support No Kill
Shelters, Research to Advance Veterinary
Treatments Free Towing, Tax Deductible,
Non-Runners Accepted 1-866-912-GIVE

Donate your Car Truck or Boat to HERI-
TAGE FOR THE BLIND Free 3 Day
Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing,
All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 1-866-
905-3801

ADOPTION 866-633-0397 Unplanned
Pregnancy? Provide your baby with a
loving, financially secure family. Liv-
ing/Medical/Counseling expenses paid.
Social worker on staff. Call compas-
sionate attorney Lauren Feingold (FL
Bar#0958107)24/7

ADOPTION 888-812-3678 All Expenses
Paid. Choose a Loving, Financially
Secure family for your child 24 Hrs 7
Days Caring & Confidential. Attorney
Amy Hickman. (Lic. #832340)


SUNTOWERS
RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

REHAB AIDE
SUN TERRACE HEALTH
CARE CENTER
is seeking a motivated, customer
service oriented individual to assist
our rehab department with
individual/supervised/group
programs. The ideal candidate
must possess current CNA cert.
Great pay w/benefits.
Interested candidates should apply at
105 Trinity Lakes Drive
Sun City Center, FL
(813) 634-3347
or email resume to
vkosky@suntowersretirement.com









BUSINESS & TRADE DIRECTORY
THE OBSERVER NEWS THE SCC OBSERVER THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT


WHOLESALE A/C
Indoor Air Quality Specialists
TheBestPriceAround
I WeMatdiAnyPice
FREE ESTIMATES and QUOTE
Licensed Insured Bonded
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Cell: (94) 237-730
emal:sivimunzsyhooc


IU T IB B DL R AL R A


OUAN DOEA?




z_ TNIEOBS ERERNEWS

BUSINESS
TRADE
DIRECTORY YOU' (ON...

Call Us 645-3111



Timothy Sutton, LC
INTERIOR EXTERIOR
PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
PRESSURE WASHING
29 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN OHIO
NOW SERVING FLORIDA
LICENSED BONDED INSURED
813-727-1013
LIC. #PA2809


COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL
SSouthBay -
S Electric Co. -
\ofRuskin
S\ SERVICE
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BONDED ALL TYPES
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Need Work Done
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Serving
t* APOLLO BEACH
RUSKIN
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25+ Years Experience
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813-649-1418
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iene Plumbing
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REPLACEMENT
WINDOWS

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Let someone
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Look in the
Business & Trade
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IROOFIN-G R FRO GONEETC


I LEAKS NO ON E \


Residential Commercial
New Roofs Re-Roofs Tile
Tile Repairs Hot Tar/Flat Decks
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FREE Estimates Financing Available
24 Hr. Emergency Service
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For Your Protection BBM
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Over35yrs. Experience
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Repairs Reroof
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[ NOW OPEN I


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cell: 240-2049
150133rd St. SE
Ruskin, FL 33570


LOOKING
FOR EXTRA
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SPACE
FOR YOUR...
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ETC.
ANY SIZE


Ce sr


Roofing
FloridaCertiel RoofingContrcor

Proudly Serving: Sun City Center
Ruskin Apollo Beach Riverview
and surrounding areas
Member SCC Chamber of Commerce







CELL 813-777-9808
Frank Shaft
FL Certified Roofing Contractor
CCC# 1327713
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All Types of Roofing
New Roofs & Repairs
SShingle Tile Metal Hot Tar
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SERVING SINCE 1973
Ruskin Sun City Center Kings
Point Apollo Beach Riverview
"ALL MY CUSTOMERS ARE DRY
FRIENDS WHEN QUALITY COUNTY"
RBB
Ruskin &
Sun CSG Center
ChamberMember
P.O. Box 551 Ruskin, FL 33570
www.customroofing.us
Bonded & Insured Lic. #CCC1326907





*No project over $1000.
No electrical, gas, or
plumbing, and nothing
structural.


R&D Septic Inc.
Complete Septic System
*New/Repair
Fill Dirt | ~ T
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Residential
c l Commercial
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Insured
Bonded
"SEE A BLUE SKY VIEW"
*10% Off First service

813-641-3256


Ai f
ENT.. INC.
Lic. #CMC056816
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HEATING & REFRIGERATION
Complete Sales, Service,
Installation & Repair
Amana and Senior
Trane Dealer Discount
John R. Bowman, Jr., Owner
(813) 633-2703


Complete Sales Service
Repair Installation
SERVICING ALL MAKES AND MODELS
24 Hour Service Financing Available
Lic. #CAC1815928

Senior& Military
Discounts


LVIN'S A/ 9 H AIIN
SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS
Residential and Light Commercial
Family Owned & Operated
No Revolving Technicians
Quality Service,* Sales,
Installation -AD
Most Replacement -
Parts on Hand "
(813) 263-6503
< CAC 1814336 Ruskin


Mary Ann Wilhelm
Owner/Director
#CAC 1814397

Wilhelm Hourvice

-' 641-1811
FACTORY
SDEALERO 802 4th St. S.W.
a (Off College Ave. West)
Ruskin, Florida
Turn to the Experts
www.wilhelmac.com


~~ ~9IGNSIInc.n


SELF ARREST BONDS
COURT DATES 664-0056
WARRANT CHECKS
BIG JOHN'S
BAIL BONDS
641-8400
FAMILY BONDSMAN
STATE FEDERAL
24 HOUR SERVICE
JOHN L. VATH
2100 Orient Road Tampa, FL. 33619
Fax: (813) 628-8739


* Ceiling Fans
* Outlets
* Lighting
* Panel Upgrades
* FREE Estimates

813-645-7000
Listed with Sterling Management and
Sun City Center Community Association
Lic. #EC13002936


SFREE Estimates
-I-
, Lic. #CFC057969
A+ Rating Bonded Insured


PAUL WOOD PLUMBING, INC.
State Certified Plumbing Contractor
#CFC1427697
Residential
S* Commercial
Certified Backflows
Stoppages
Service and Repairs
* FREE Estimates 24-Hour Service
Licensed Bonded Insured
(813) 641-1387
It 12^


26 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


JULY 22, 2010





OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 27


2010 TUCSON a
All Ne%% & Redesigned! J -41


eGaranteed TradeAllowance)

s(B(oJoi


S39'
T gHWY


#4 43 -qqT m
2010ELANTR~A


est Value 2011SONATA AllNew & Redesigned!
In Its Class Stylish & Spacious


T109H s11,990


In Stock Now!


2010 ATA FE Rugged Capablility,
o TA FE Comfort & Style

17,990


- I


Awad-innngHyuda Quliy Bckd B Aeria' Bet arrnt

10 Year 1100,000 milel~-I
Powertrain Limited Warranty


2010 ACCENT
-:41~


Affordable & Fuel Efficient
AL" $9987


2010 ELANTRA Touring





Most Interior Room In Its Class
LsE 239 S
FOR 24
MW ONTH
$23 LEASES


2010 GENESIS
r-iC' wI^B^


Revolution In Design, Performance & Value
FOR 36
MONTH
L EASEi


Performance, Technology, Safety & Quality
FO 399 36
LE $ 0 36
MONTH
399 LEASE'


WP ie uaWe will beat anyU
C lve w lP other Hyundai 5.j -
Lgfiua dealer or pay you
All prices are plus tax tag and are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. t Lease down payment requirement: '10 Elantra- $2999, Elantra Touring $1999, Genesis Coupe $2199, '10 Tucson $2499, '10 Genesis Sedan $3799. All offers are with
approved credit and some cannot be combined. *Expected range for most drivers, your actual mileage may vary dependingon how you drive and maintain your vehicle. ** On the Accent. As listed on Monroney sticker. A For model year 2008. Based on volume manufacturers as included in the EPATM
Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Fuel Economy trends: 1976-2009 Report. Hyundai and Kia listed separately. Acura included in Honda listing. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Advertised vehicles subject to prior sale. Programs subject to change without notice. tt
Mut nresent siged buvers order from acredited Hyndai Dealer on same model & equipment. $3000 garanteed trade allowance cannot be combined with any other offers, offer only good on new vehicles. Snecial APR offers on selet models see us for details.


Manatee Ave. WISR64- Exit 220 West

,
-TCorlez Road


itate Road 70


1 M


'I


JULY 22. 2010


.8 ll .


~ili


N t






28 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


I grew up on the Gulf Coast. I know these waters. And I'm
doing everything I can to clean them up.
Fred Lemond, BP Cleanup Operations


Making This Right

Beaches
Claims

Cleanup
Economic Investment
Environmental Restoration
Health and Safety
W wildlife


For information visit: bp.com
restorethegulf.gov
facebook.com/bpamerica
twitter.com/bp_america
youtube.com/bp


BP has taken full responsibility for the cleanup in the Gulf. And that includes
keeping you informed.

Searching For And Cleaning Up The Oil
Every morning, over 50 spotter planes and helicopters search for oil off the
coast, heading to areas previously mapped with satellite imagery and infrared
photography. Once oil is found, they radio down to the 6,000 ships and
boats of all sizes that are supporting the cleanup effort and working to collect
the oil. These are thousands of local shrimping and fishing boats organized into
task forces and strike teams, plus specialized skimmers mobilized from as far
as the Netherlands.

We have recovered more than 27 million gallons of oil-water mixture from
the Gulf. Other methods have also helped remove millions of additional
gallons of oil from the water. We've deployed more than 8 million feet of
boom to protect beaches and sensitive wildlife areas.

Hurricane Preparedness
In the event of a hurricane, our first priority is keeping people safe. In
coordination with the Coast Guard and local officials, we may suspend
operations temporarily but have organized to resume them as soon as possible.

Our Responsibility
We have already spent more than $3.2 billion responding to the spill and on
the cleanup, and none of this will be paid by taxpayers. We will work in the
Gulf as long as it takes to get this done. We may not always be perfect but
we will do everything we can to make this right.


For assistance, please call:
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
www.floridagulfresponse.com


o 2010 BP, E&P


JULY 22, 2010


bp


e~h"i&




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