Title: Observer news
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102144/00024
 Material Information
Title: Observer news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: M&M Printing Co., Inc
Place of Publication: Ruskin, FL
Publication Date: July 1, 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102144
Volume ID: VID00024
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text


Celebri:e s:ifeh\. hi\ e : Happ. 4th :'tIul\ h ilidal fri:im e\ en i'ie :e1....


IPH A:I D'
PAID


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OBS RV RT iNlWS



E OBSERVER NEWS


Independence Day special

for two Gold Star parents


SB, I.\ELODi .1-I.\E-.ON
n,"|-"',:,l:i:r : errne r nel
sons proudly serving the U.S. Ma-
J Fccc .II Ihii I l ricc i,* C- i- :'1ii r1-







rine Corps. Gunnery Sgt. Aaron
- .I|. -rOI' l rC.11'l rl I'll i .X r



Kenefick, a 1-yar man twice


:cifically aware oI:it' were their

beloved, handsome, square jawed
sons proudly serving the U.S. Ma-
rine Corps. Gunnery Sgt. Aaron
Kenefick, a 13-year man twice
named a "Marine of the Year" and
U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman 3rd
Class James Layton, dedicated to
the healing arts, assigned, as is
the custom, to serve as a marine
medic, came home on leave for
the holiday.
Layton, at 22 the younger of the
two, visited with his Dad, Brent,
and the rest of his substantial
family including five sisters, in
and around Modesto, Califor-
nia. Kenefick, 30, suggested to
his Florida-based mother, Susan
Price, that they make the 20-hour
drive to Amherst, N.Y, in the Buf-
falo area, to visit with his two lit-
See GOLD STAR PARENTS, page 16


Susan Price often turns to her
son's New Testament.
Melody Jameson photos


Brent Layton wears his son's
dog tags, keeping part of him
close.


The coast is clear here


* B. PENN FLETCHEP

RP UISKiN -- \\.hlc son'.. iI..s


B.h i F Sini gou, fo Pinstance, I
.JIrl d c!ii
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students from Seffner's Ev-
supervised programs for them
that we've work ed out with
recreation center staff," Cal-
domi said.

he said, pointing at the 52
students from Seffner's Ev-



lunch, and then swimming in
the afternoon."
Some had never fished be-
fore, while others put bait on
their hooks like old hands.
"Keep those hooks down!"
and "Watch out for the lines!"
were constant reminders to the
children packed together just
west of the boat ramp area.
Park Ranger Ken Sweeney
and Jacob Pettet of the recre-
See COAST IS CLEAR, page 15


Left, Marvin Bell. assistant
principal at Armwood High
School, says he works with
Hillsborough County's Parks.
Recreation & Conservation
C. Department every summer as
a second job because he likes
interacting with children of all
ages. He is shown with Kareem
S Delgado and the first catch of
the day. Above, staff from the
S'Parks & Rec' find some solace
in the shade of an outbuilding
at Simmons Park.
Penny Filecner pnoloZ


Mommy bloggers vs. the Gulf oil spill


* By Mitch Traphagen
mitch@observernews.net
RUSKIN The Gulf oil spill is
beyond enormous in magnitude.
Growing larger by the minute, the
public expects something to be
done but feels as though it is be-
yond the capabilities of any one
person. After all, what can one
person do to have an impact on
something of unimaginable pro-
portions?
Meet Cooper Munroe. She is
the self-described head mother of
TheMotherhood.com, a blog and
information website for mothers.
Munroe teamed up with Hebrew
National, the company known
for hot dogs, and organized local
bloggers in the Tampa Bay area to
make a difference in the still-un-
folding crisis.
Munroe refers to them as "mom-
my bloggers," mothers who are
reaching out and trying to make
a difference in their communities.
For the Tampa Bay event, a pic-
nic held at E.G. Simmons Park in


Ruskin on Saturday, she teamed
up with Caroline Jorgensen (aka
Morningside Mom), Tracey Hen-
ry (aka Suburban Diva), Janet
Dean (aka Green Mom Review)
and Connie Roberts (aka Brain
Foggles) to raise awareness and
resources for Save Our Seabirds,
Inc. and the National Wildlife
Federation. Each of the women,
also known by the name of their
blogs, have a commitment to their
families and to their communities.
With the crisis in the Gulf, they are
seeing a threat to both.
For Hebrew National, it was an
opportunity to make a difference at
a local level. The company started
as a mom and pop operation and is
today owned by ConAgra Foods,
the largest food producer in the
world with products found in an
estimated 96 percent of Ameri-
can homes. Local impact remains
a focus for the company through
community service projects such
as this one, known as the "Better
Than a Picnic-Picnic."


"Cooper [Munroe] is one of the of Hebrew National. "We're happy
most influential women in Amer- to be a part of this."
ica right now," said Wendy Weiss In an age where it is hard to find


IvIicn I rapnagen pnolo
Cooper Munroe, left, and Tampa bay area "mommy bloggers" and
their children gather for a "Better Than a Picnic-Picnic" sponsored
by Hebrew National and organized by Munroe, founderof TheMother-
hood.com to raise funds and awareness for Save Our Seabirds and
the National Wildlife Federation.


a way to make an impact in a big
world with complex problems,
Munroe and the mommy bloggers
are finding a way to do it.
"Let's face it, it's not a spill, it's
a disaster," Munroe said while
standing in the shade of a pic-
nic shelter on a crystal clear, but
scorching hot day. "Being able to
focus on the community and the
commitment people have to their
community, it's touching. It shows
how deeply people feel about
things."
The event was designed to raise
awareness; and also to collect
needed supplies for Save Our Sea-
birds, a local non-profit organiza-
tion, and the National Wildlife
Federation. The wish list from
Save Our Seabirds is long and in-
cludes everything from bleach and
laundry detergent to buckets, tow-
els and Dawn dish detergent.
Save Our Seabirds, based in
Sarasota, is headed by Lee Fox.
In 1991, Fox created the Tampa
See MOMMY BLOGGERS, page 2


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2 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Mommy bloggers
* Continued from page 1


Bay area's first Oiled Wildlife Pre-
paredness Program and Training
Manual. At the request of the Flor-
ida Department of Environmental
Protection, she also created the ar-
ea's first mobile oiled wildlife re-
sponse unit. Her organization has
been called into action in the past,
often to rescue injured birds, but
has experience with past oil spills
in Tampa Bay. The current Gulf
crisis, however, is far larger than
even Fox could have imagined.
Under the shelter, children made
natural bird feeders from pine
cones, using Crisco to allow the
bird seed to stick in place. The hot
dogs were cooking nearby and a
National Hebrew cow in an inflat-
able ring stood ready for the chil-
dren to ride. Music blared from the


Mitch Traphagen photo
Learning to make a difference
at a young age: Children at the
Better Than a Picnic-Picnic made
bird feeders from pine cones
using Crisco to allow the bird
seed to stick. Afterwards, they
made thank you cards for people
volunteering to contain the oil in
the Gulf.


speakers and everyone waited for
Elmo, the Sesame Street character,
to arrive. Afterwards, they made
thank you cards to be sent to some
of the volunteers working in the
Gulf to contain the oil.
"We are having some fun with
this at the same time," said blog-
ger Caroline Jorgensen. "We've
gotten a lot of response, it has been
encouraging."
The event revealed the power .'
of individuals working together.
Cooper Munroe contacted a na-
tional company and a handful of
local mothers to come together to
make a difference in the commu-
nity. They may be called "mommy
bloggers" but that belies the power ..
they have, the power everyone has, "
to affect change. To do something
that has an impact, regardless of ..
size, on a crisis of unimaginable .Pt-:c"a' -a :;
proportions. PostcardsMitch Traphag
On a hot Saturday in Ruskin, a Walking the Gasparilla parade with
small group of mothers did just events I have ever covered for thi
that. They made a difference. was something I'll never forget. C
To donate to Save Our Seabirds, female pirate krewe and, more sp
Inc., a 503(c)(3) nonprofit organi- (hello again, to you, too! Thanks
zation, visit www.saveourseabirds. thanks necessary, it was an honor
org, call 941-388-3010, or write one that stumps you someday. H
to Save Our Seabirds, 1708 Ken to Mrs. Shirley Dawley (thank yoL
Thompson Pkwy, Sarasota, FL, Pier from two weeks ago. This w
34236. The website contains a would cruise ships have to comp
there are a few places in the state
complete list ofneeded items. will know the one place this coul
To donate to the National Wild- (gasp) pick up a pen and take a s
life Federation, visit www.nwforg admiration of your neighbors. Sen
or call 800-822-9919. 210 Woodland Estates Blvd., Rus

FWC hears update on Black
The Florida Fish and Wildlife forts with other partner agencies
Conservation Commission (FWC) to focus resources in establishing
received an update on the Florida Florida as the undisputed Bass
Black Bass Management Plan on Fishing Capital of the World.
June 24 at the Commission meet- Tom Champeau, director of the
ing in Lake Mary. FWC's Division of Freshwater
The plan is an evolving strategy Fisheries Management, said, "The
that will incorporate all aspects of origin of this plan is based heavily
the FWC and better coordinate ef- on public input, and it will contin-


|en photo
i the Krewe of Charlotte De Berry was one of the most fun and exhausting
is newspaper. The sight of a few hundred thousand screaming people
)f course they weren't screaming for me they were interested in the
specifically, in the beads they had to give away. John and Linda Torchia
for writing) recognized it, as did Edward Socha (hello Commander! No
to be there) and Bill and Margie Galbreath (You got it! I will come up with
mmm...maybe today?). A note of very special honorable mention goes
u so much! I love getting real mail!) for recognizing the St. Petersburg
reek we have another iconic look at Florida. Where else in the world
ete with cars in rush hour traffic? Yep, we've got it all here. And while
e that could be the answer, the true hard core cruise ship aficionados
Id be. There's no harm in guessing so fire up your e-mail program or
shot at it. As always, almost nothing stands between you and and the
id your best guess to where@observernews.net or The Observer News,
kin, FL, 33570.

Bass Management Plan
ue to evolve based on the desires anglers' use, is already being re-
of our angling public and resource viewed by a citizens technical ad-
users." visory committee and FWC biolo-
Input for the plan has come from gists to create the first full working
surveys at fishing shows, fishing draft of a long-term, holistic plan.
club meetings or other venues dur- For updates on the plan and
ing the past six months. That infor- more background, visit MyFWC.
nation, along with scientific infor- com/Fishing.
nation about bass populations and


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 3


The June membership luncheon was catered by S&S Taco's & Stuff/
Pizza's & Stuff located in Riverview.
Business leaders meet
The Greater Riverview Chamber of Commerce's monthly membership
luncheon meeting, sponsored by the "Taking Care of Business" Leader-
ship Group, took place on June 22, at the Riverview Civic Center located
11020 Park Drive in Riverview. Chamber President-Elect, Sherri Walker,
reminded members of the importance and value of being a volunteer.
Following Sherri's message, the "Taking Care of Business" Leadership
Group facilitator John Mahoney and co-facilitator LisaMarie Wheeler pro-
vided the top ten reasons to be part of this dynamic networking group. Lori
Libhart provided excellent networking tips from her "Networking Do You
Fizzle or Sizzle!" training seminar series.


BBQ benefit
Once again, South Shore Ruskin
Chamber of Commerce members
are coming together to raise funds
for the Bloomingdale Library At-
tack Victim. As most are aware,
she continues to improve- slowly
but surely.
The event will be a BBQ/Music
Fest held on Saturday, August 2 lat
Simmons Park in Ruskin. The
event will be from 10am to 5pm.
There will be many activities for
the children, silent auction for the
adults, live music lineup, delicious
BBQ lunch and more. Tickets are
$8 per person. This includes lunch.
Kids under 12 are free. Tickets
can be purchased at the chamber.
Checks are to be made payable to:
Suntrust/Bloomingdale Library
Attack Victim.


For more in-
formation, cill
the South Slioic
Ruskin Ch.umn-
ber of Com-
merce at (X I
649-0400.


- f


Benjamin Marquez, MD named South Bay doctor of the year


South Bay Hospital is proud to an-
nounce that BenjaminMarquez, MD,
has been selected as the 2010 Doctor
of the Year. Dr. Marquez, who is a
Family/General Practice physician,
was chosen through submissions
from his peers, hospital employees
and volunteers, and members of the
community. He is an excellent rep-
resentative of South Bay Hospital's
medical staff, with nominations cit-
ing his medical expertise, compas-
sion, caring and patient advocacy
attributes. He is highly respected
among his peers, nurses and other
hospital staff.


"Dr. Marquez embodies the role of
Doctor of the Year through his con-
tinuous leadership, professionalism
and effective communication among
his health care team," said Sharon
Roush, Chief Executive Officer for
South Bay Hospital. "He listens to
the patient's needs, taking the time
to address medical concerns that the
patients and their family members
may have, and has a wonderful bed
side manner."
South Bay Hospital congratulates
Dr. Marquez on achieving this hon-
or and for his commitment to South
Bay Hospital, the staff and the com-


munities served by the hospital. For
more information, call Melissa Mor-
gan at 813-634-0496.


Dr. Benjamin Marquez


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Leo Michelina Michael Maestas
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expands staff
The award winning technical
team at Wilhelm Heating and Air
Conditioning, Inc. has recently ex-
panded. Leo Michelina, a resident
of Ruskin and graduate of East
Bay High School has been hired as
a senior technician. Michael Mae-
stas, also a graduate of East Bay
High School has been hired as an
installer. The new team members
will allow Wilhelm to respond
even quicker to customer calls.
The award winning administrative
team at Wilhelm Heating and Air
Conditioning, Inc also recently ex-
panded.
Wilhelm is a Carrier Factory
Authorized Dealer. This desig-
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the technical staff undergo rigor-
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certification. NATE is the North
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Inc. (NATE) program and is the
leading certification program for
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eration (HVAC/R) industry and
is the only test supported by the
entire industry. Wilhelm has been


A dog with arthritis can be more prone to constipation. This is
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to poop. They avoid even trying to go, which makes the problem
worse. Joint supplements and extra fiber in their diet can help keep
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Bridgett Willis, a native of Ruskin,
Florida and 2008 Graduate of the
South County Career Center has


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Ms. Willis will be able to provide
improved customer service.
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I often
read these
words by
Robert Bur-
k =, dette: "There
are two days
in the week
Positive about which,
Talk and upon
By William Hodges which, I
never worry.
Two care-
free days, kept sacredly free from
fear and apprehension. One of
these days is yesterday.... and the
other day I do not worry about is
tomorrow." These words help me
concentrate on today, rather than
allowing my mind to be distracted
by things that are over or may not
ever happen.
Fear is one of the most debilitat-
ing of all human ailments. It can
cause us to lose control of our bod-
ies. It can paralyze our mind and
cause us to act in a self-destructive


Fear


manner or prevent us from acting
in a manner that would allow us
to survive. Some say that fear is
the first instinctive sensation we
encounter at birth and, for many,
it is the last at the time of death.
The Bible (Job) says: "Upon earth,
there is not his like, who is made
without fear." My experience says
that this is an unquestionable fact.
There is no man born without fear.
Nor should there be, since rational
fear can be an ally that can keep us
from doing some very dangerous
things.
Fear ceases to be an ally when it
ceases to be rational. It is irratio-
nal fear that drives us to do what
can be self-destructive actions.
Fear also feeds on itself. Back in
450 BC, Sophocles wrote: "To him
who is in fear, everything rustles."
It boils down to this. The man who
is afraid of snakes will be the first
one to see one. When he does,
watch out! In fact, he need only


The staff at The Observer News and
M & M Printing wishes readers a

Happy Fourth of July


,p-


imagine he sees one and the situ-
ation can become deadly because
of the irrational fears the situa-
tion creates. There was a report
of a man who, while hiking in the
woods, felt a pain in his ankle. He
looked down and, because he was
wearing shorts, he could see that
his ankle was bleeding. He also
saw what he thought to be a snake.
Panic seized him and he ran to the
road, signaled to a car for help and
told the driver he had been snake
bit. While on the way to the hospi-
tal, he died of a heart attack caused
by fear and exertion. Oh, by the
way, an autopsy showed that the
puncture wound on his ankle
had been most likely caused by a
wooden stick or branch. His fear
had killed him.
Don't let your fears get out of
hand. Franklin D. Roosevelt is of-
ten quoted as having said, "Let me
assert my firm belief that all we
have to fear is fear itself." When


fear is irrational, he is absolutely
correct. Make sure your fear is ra-
tional, then take action to defend
against and overcome it.
AfterquotingFranklinRoosevelt,
I should give equal time to Eleanor
Roosevelt, who said, "You gain
strength, courage and confidence
by every experience in which you
really stop to look fear in the face.
You are able to say to yourself, 'I
lived through this horror. I can take
the next thing that comes along.'...
You must do the thing you think
you cannot do." Together their
messages seem to be: When fear
is real, face it. When fear is false,
dismiss it.
Hodges is a nationally recog-
nized speaker, trainer, and syn-
dicated columnist. Hodges may
be reached at Hodges Seminars
International, PO. Box 89033,
Tampa, FL 33689-0400. Phone
813-641-0816. Web site: http://
www.BillHodges.com.


Patriotic concert honors Veterans


The community is invited to a
free Patriotic Celebration Concert
presented by the Eastern Hillsbor-
ough Community Band and The
Plant City Community Choir.
The concert begins at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, July 2, at the Brandon
Recreation Center, 510 East Sadie
Street, Brandon.
The band and choir will perform
Fourth of July favorites, including
Armed Forces-The Pride of Amer-
ica, Battle Hymn of the Republic


and Stars and Stripes Forever.
The event is free and open to the
public, and reservations are not
required. Donations will be ac-
cepted.
For more information about the
band, call (813) 864-0287, email
infott@ehcb.or or visit www.ehcb.
org. For information about the
choir, call Joe Mendolia at (813)
263-4091 or visit www.pccommu-
nitychoir.com.


4 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


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JULY 1, 2010

THE OBSERVER NEWS
The SCC Observer &
The Riverview Current
210 Woodland Estates S.W.
Ruskin, FL 33570
813-645-3111
Fax: 813-645-4118
www.ObserverNews.net
Published Every Thursday
by M&M Printing Co., Inc. 645-4048
EDITORIAL:
Brenda Knowles ............Publisher/Editor
brenda@observernews.net
Mitch Traphagen.................Online Editor
mitch@observernews.net
Penny Fletcher..........Contributing Writer
penny@observernews.net
Melody Jameson......Contributing Writer
mr@observernews.net
Julie Ball.............. Press Releases/W riter
news@observernews.net
All press releases, news articles and
photos may be emailed to news@
observernews.net, faxed to 645-4118, or
mailed to Observer News, 210 Woodland
Estates Ave. SW Ruskin, FL 33570
SALES:
Vilma Stillwell... Display Advertising Rep.
vilma@observernews.net
Nan Kirk........... Display Advertising Rep.
nan@observernews.net
For current rates and circulation
information visit our website at
www.ObserverNews.net
CLASSIFIED / CIRCULATION:
Beverly Kay......... Classified / Circulation
beverly@observernews.net
PRODUCTION:
Chere Simmons....Graphic Arts / Layout
chere@observemews.net
Sue Sloan .............Composition / Layout
sue@observernews.net

The views expressed by our winters are not
necesssanly shared by The Observer News.


I--, - -


I


UMO E






JULY 1, 2010

How can I protect my child from cyberbullying?


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 5


A year ago, many did not know
what cyberbullying was. Today,
parents all over the country are
concerned about it, and want to
know what to do to prevent it.
Surveys indicate that around half
of all children are victims of cyber-
bullies at some point during their
time in school, and 11 percent of


children have been bullied in the
last 30 days. The Internet provides
a free and anonymous tool for bul-
lies to heap on the abuse.
"Our kids' online lives can some-
times be a mystery to parents," said
Mary Kay Hoal, COO of Your-
sphere.com, a positive place for
kids online. "Whether it's because
they set up multiple profiles on
social networking sites and hide
them from their parents or because
not every parent is technologically
savvy enough to see what is going
on, it's important for every parent
to know how to tell if their chil-
dren are victims of cyberbullies,
and how to prevent it and stop it
in its tracks."
Hoal has studied cyberbullying,
talked to parents around the coun-
try whose kids have been bullied
online, and uses unprecedented
measures to keep cyberbullies off
her website. Her tips for parents
to protect their children and to
spot signs if a parent suspects their


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child may be a victim of bullying
include:
Check for withdrawn behavior --
The American Academy of Child
and Adolescent Psychiatry sug-
gests that children who are being
bullied will act withdrawn, and
may be reluctant to go to school or
use the computer.
Look for signs of depression and
give your kids a hug -- Kids often
feel like something is wrong with
them when they are being bul-
lied and they may feel all alone.
Parents should remind their kids
that bullies largely thrive on the
reaction they get from their victims
and it's the bully that has the real
problem.
Teach your children -- "Be Kind
Online" is a proactive message par-
ents can share with their children.
It's an important first step towards
educating children about the way
they should treat others online.
Give your kids tools to protect
themselves -- The message shared
with children: "Don't respond. Tell
your Mom. Make a copy," gives
kids exactly the information they
need to make sure they can protect
themselves and an action plan for
parents if there is abuse.
Get their school or law enforce-
ment involved -- After the most
recent trouble in Massachusetts
that finds school officials being


named in lawsuits because of the
assertion that their inaction led to
the suicide of 15-year-old Phoebe
Prince, parents may find teach-
ers and guidance counselors will
be more proactive in halting or
preventing the bullying of their
students. Many bullies are victims
themselves, sometimes suffering
from problems at home. When the
school gets involved, it is more
likely that the bully's parents will
become aware of the problem and
help to resolve the situation posi-
tively for all the students affected.
If your child is ever threatened with
harm, contact your local police.
"We know far more about the
causes and devastating results of
cyberbullying than we ever did,
and it is incumbent upon everyone
in a child's life -- parents, friends
and school officials -- to take a
role in halting and preventing
cyberbullying," Hoal added. "The
Internet is an integral part of all our
lives, and the benefits for Internet
savvy kids are boundless, but there
can be a very concerning dark side
to our children's online interac-
tions. We need to eliminate those
pressures so our children can reap
the benefits of living in a world
made smaller by the Internet, and
promote an Internet culture that
focuses on the wonders of the on-
line world, and not its dangers."


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Get in touch with
your Basic Spirit
Get in touch with your Basic
Spirit from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday,
July 9 at the South Shore Gallery,
located at 447 Apollo Beach Blvd.
in Apollo Beach.
Shop for new items from Basic
Spirit -- pewter designs that are
created to touch the heart and
delight the spirit.
There will be poetry readings
by local author Angela Delagoa,
along with a wine tasting courtesy
of Apollo's Bistro. Receive a 10
percent discount on Basic Spirit
items bought or ordered during the
event. For more information, call
(813) 645-0483.


Marine Corps
League to meet
The next
meeting of the
Riverview De-
tachment of the
Marine Corps
League will be
held at 7:30 p.m.
on Tuesday, July 6 at American
Legion Post 148, 7240 U.S. Hwy.
301 S., Riverview.
The Detachment would like to
invite all area Marines and FMF
Corpsmen to attend this meeting
and learn what they are all about.
For more information, call
Dennis Antle at (813) 835-0551 or
visit www.mclriverview.org.


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decide, ask us to send you FREE written information
about our qualifications and experience.


Ruskin VFW Post #6287

Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120 U.S. 41 N. has listed the following
weekly activities. Meetings are: American Legion on 1st Wednesday
each month; VFW and LAVFW on the 2nd Wednesday each month;
and MAVFW on the 3rd Thursday
each month.
Thursday, July 1 VA Hospital
at 5:30 p.m. Bar Bingo at 6 p.m.
Friday, July 2 Fish & Chips
from 5 to 7 p.m. Music by Gene
Cannon from 7 to 10p.m.
Saturday, July 3 Hall rented.
Sunday, July 4 4th of July
> Party. Hot Dogs and Hamburgers
from 1 to 4 p.m. Bring a dish food.
Music by You 2 Kan from 5 to 7 p.m.
Monday, July 5- Cribbage at 1 p.m.
Tuesday, July 6 Games in Lounge from 1 to 5 p.m. Kitchen opens
at 4:30 p.m. Bingo at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, July 7 Wii Games Bowling at 6 p.m. American
Legion Meeting at 7 p.m.






6 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
d o


SCopyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers






-- .


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Caloosa Country
Club Women's
18 hole league
ABC 1 Best Ball net results.
5/26/10
Team 1
Ann Skinner 1st 56
Dolore Phelps
Nancy Cleary
Team 2
Bobbie Campbell 2nd 57
Dessie Mahoney
Betty Burke
Team 3
Beverly Valentine tie 3rd 58
Lyn Noyes


JULY 1, 2010
Charity poker run
Freedom Excursions will be host-
ing a charity Poker Run on July
10 with registration starting at 10
a.m.. The fee to participate is $15
per person and includes one hand
and lunch at the Ellenton VFW.
Additional hands can be purchased
for $5. Any mode of transportation
is welcomed; this is not just for
motorcycles. There will be Best
Hand, 2nd Best Hand and Worst
Hand Prizes, Door Prizes, Music,
and 50/50. There will also be a
raffle with the First Prize a Round-
trip airfare on AirTran anywhere in
the continental U.S. ($1,000 val-
ue) Second Prize is a 3day/2night
stay at The Resort at Little Harbor
with /2 day fishing excursion with
the AnaBanana Fishing Company
($995 value). Raffle tickets are
$10 and can be purchased, in ad-
vance, at the Apollo Beach Cham-
ber of Commerce and on July 10
at participating VFW, American
Legion, Moose and Eagle Lodges.
Freedom Excursions is a non-
profit group working with the
Tampa VA Hospital and vets who
have suffered physical and psy-
chological wounds taking "in-pa-
tients" on outings involving fish-
ing, sailing and other recreational
water sports. They also offer this
opportunity to any honorable dis-
charged or still serving member of
the Armed Forces. Their mission
is simple: To provide a fun and
educational "Day on the Bay" for
those who know the stress of mili-
tary life; encourage and inspire
them to recuperate, reintegrate,
and rekindle relationships. Heal-
ing Heroes One Wave at a Time.


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www.GCDentalArts.com
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72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment.


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SSend Us Your News
The Observer
News
210 Woodland
: Estates SW, Ruskin
: FAX 645-4118
or E-mail: News@
SObserverNews.net
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South Hillsborough Elks Lodge #2672's Upcoming
Activities
Every Wednesday Best Spaghetti in Town $7, All You Can Eat, for all Elks
and their guests. Music by Bryan from 5 to 8 p.m.
Every Thursday Fun Night, Wii games available all evening till closing.
Every Friday Seafood and Sandwiches for all Elks and their guests from 5 7
p.m. Karaoke by Bryan from 5 to 8 p.m.
Saturday, July 10 Steak Fry Dinner/ Show/Dance for $15.00 for all Elks and qa I
their Guests. Dinner 5 to 6:30 p.m. Show 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. starring Lynn
Spins.
Saturday, July 17 District Vice President visit for all Elks.- Dinner $5. Menu:
Swiss steak, mashed potatoes, vegetables, rolls, butter and dessert.
Monday, July 26 -Poor Man's Dinner for $5. advance and $6 at the door for all Elks and their guests.
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Nature and Children Celebrate Fourth of July with Florida seafood


Saturation
Point
By Karey Burek


Did you
know that
June is
the Na-
tions Great
Outdoors
month? The
Children and
Nature Net-
work pro-
claim that
June is the


perfect time to get outside and ex-
plore the natural world. So what
are you waiting for-get to the
beach, woods, parks, rivers and
creeks! Sounds like a grand plan,
but what about all the parks and
preserves closing down or shorten-
ing their hours due to budget cuts?
Kind of puts a damper on teaching
children to respect and love the
natural world when you show up
for a day of fun in exploring the
woods and the gates are locked.
I may be a little slanted in my
view that natural places should be
explored by kids and adults alike
due to my upbringing. However,
I am more than a little disappoint-
ed with the idea that some of my
favorite places are becoming less
accessible. I am a hike guide at a
local preserve and take my role as
mentor, teacher and environmental
educator as a strongly influential
position. I say this not to toot my
own horn but because it only takes
one time for a child or adult to be
inspired or in awe of nature; and
that one moment can last a life-


time. Without accessible natural
spaces such experiences will be
limited at best.
Recent study documentedby the
Children and Nature Network was
aimed at measuring the attitudes
of the American public and their
understanding of the importance
of "direct experiences in nature for
children's healthy development."
The survey indicated that most of
the adults do understand the physi-
cal development and the develop-
ment of love and respect for nature
directly through the exposure to
nature-based experiences. How-
ever, most did not understand the
"cognitive, emotional and social
benefits" from the experiences.
Another issue is safety. Even
though the public reported positive
attitudes toward children being ex-
posed to nature-based experiences
there are concerns with hazards of
allowing children to be out in the
woods and would prefer the safety
of the indoors.
Here's something I bet you
didn't know-dirt can make you
smarter! A recent study in the field
of microbiology confirms there
are bacteria in the environment,
specifically in dirt, that work as an
antidepressant and could increase
learning. To read the entire article,
visit sciencedaily.com. Just one
more reason to play in the dirt,
plant a garden of flowers, veggies
and fruits, and get outdoors.


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OPEN Monday through Friday www.athomeauto.net


TALLAHASSEE -- With many
Americans making plans for
Fourth of July get-togethers, some
consumers are wondering if they
will be able to celebrate with Flor-
ida seafood products. The answer
is, "Absolutely!" Florida seafood
products continue to be harvested
from waters unaffected by the Gulf
oil spill and are available for ev-
eryone's enjoyment. So, get your
grill ready to fire up and enjoy all
of your Florida summertime sea-
food favorites.
"Because of the extensive news
media coverage of the Gulf situa-
tion, many consumers are confused
about whether Florida seafood is
being harvested and if it is avail-
able in stores and restaurants,"
Florida Agriculture Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson said. "We
want consumers to know Florida's
commercial fishermen are harvest-
ing wholesome seafood products
from clean waters. Florida seafood
is safe, plentiful and available."
Seafood lovers can get daily up-
dates about the ongoing commer-
cial harvest by calling the toll-free
Florida Seafood Hotline at 1-800-
357-4273 or by visiting www.
FL-Seafood.com. There they can
get current information about the
status of Florida's open and closed
fishing harvest areas, the availabil-
ity of seafood varieties, and gen-
eral pricing information.
Visitors to the web site can also
view the activity at various sea-
food establishments located in
Florida's Panhandle Gulf Coast
region. To help promote public
awareness about the availability
of Florida seafood, webcams have
been placed at several restaurants
and seafood retail markets to show


that "Florida is in business." The
seafood establishments being fea-
tured are located in Pensacola,
Santa Rosa Beach, Tallahassee,
Destin and St. George Island. We-
bcams are operational during nor-
mal business hours for each estab-
lishment.
"I invite consumers to check out
the webcams and see first-hand that
Florida seafood is being harvested
and made available for sale ev-
ery day," Bronson said. "Florida's
seafood markets and restaurants
are in business, and they would
greatly appreciate your patronage.
Our seafood industry workers are
doing their part, and we hope that
consumers will help out by enjoy-
ing delicious Florida seafood at
home and when dining out."
Consumers can find an exten-
sive list of Florida seafood retail
markets and restaurants online at
www.fl-seafood.com/consumers/
wheretobuy.htm.
Whether cooking indoors or out-
doors, Florida seafood can make


this year's Fourth of July celebra-
tions a hit. Below are a few recipes
to get you started, and many more
are available at www.fl-seafood.
com/recipes/.

Wine-Steamed Clams
Ingredients
2 dozen Florida littleneck
clams, rinsed well
2 cups white wine
1 small Florida red onion,
sliced
2 tablespoons Florida garlic,
chopped
2 teaspoons fresh ginger,
chopped
1 tablespoon fresh Florida ci-
lantro, chopped
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon whole black pep-
percorns
1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup Florida lemon juice

Preparation
Place all ingredients except


Wine steamed clams offer a fresh taste of Florida seafood.


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clams in a large sauce pan. Sim-
mer on medium heat for 3 min-
utes; add clams and cover. Simmer
until clams open, stirring fre-
quently. Transfer clams to a large
bowl. Boil remaining liquid until
reduced to 1 cup. Pour broth over
clams and serve.
Yield
4 servings


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER -


JULY 1, 2010


P.f. f ,


- --p-






8 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Proposed hospital site up for rezoning;


state hearing still looming


* By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
St. Joseph's Hospital South, a
proposed new acute care facility
approved for a Big Bend Road site,
is moving closer to reality with ap-
plication for the rezoning neces-
sary before ground is broken.
The four-unit, not-for-profit
local St. Joseph's Hospital net-
work is seeking unified rezoning
by Hillsborough County of the
72-plus acres it now owns at Big
Bend Road and Simmons Loop
where its next and fifth facility
is planned. The network includes
the main hospital Tampa campus,
a woman's hospital, a children's
hospital and the new St. Joseph's
North.
Simultaneously, St. Joseph's and
Hospital Corporation of America's
South Bay Hospital continue to
prepare for a November hearing
scheduled to air St. Joseph's chal-
lenge of a prior state approval
given South Bay/HCA for its pro-
posed relocation to land essentially
across the road.
The St. Joseph's petition for re-
zoning of all of its Big Bend Road
holdings under a Planned Develop-
ment Hospital and Medical Ser-
vices designation is set for public
hearing on July 26 before a county
zoning master, according to Hills-
borough records. The application
encompasses eight property par-
cels totaling 72.36 acres.
The unifying rezoning came into
play when St. Joseph's added to
acreage it has held on the south
side of Big Bend Road east of 1-75
for more than 25 years. "Essential-
ly, we squared up the site, creating
a more rectangular property," said
Lisa Patterson, hospital spokesper-
son, of recent acquisitions which
added approximately 15 more
acres to the proposed hospital site.
Some of the property is classified
with an AS-1 zoning which per-
mits only agricultural- single fam-
ily uses.
If the rezoning application is
approved in late July, the matter
then progresses to Hillsborough's
Board of County Commissioners
for final acceptance. That meeting
date is not yet known.
The South County hospital cam-
pus design process will not be
undertaken until appropriate re-
zoning is in place, Patterson said.
However, she noted that entrance
to a new St. Joseph's Hospital built
on the site running east from the
Simmons Loop intersection with
Big Bend Road would be from
the widened loop roadway, not
from Big Bend Road. New traffic
signalization in the area is antici-
pated, she added.
The proposed facility's work-
ing name at the present time is
St. Joseph's Hospital South, dis-
tinguishing it from another recent
addition to the hospital network,
St. Joseph's Hospital North, a new
acute care installation built in the
northwest part of the county. St.
Joseph's South would not mirror
St. Joseph's North and would be
both designed and built by differ-
ent contractors, Patterson added,
yet probably would "have the
same feel" as the new northwest
Hillsborough hospital, Patterson
said. A virtual tour of St. Joseph's
North can be seen on the facility's
website accessed at www.stjoseph-
snorth.com.
If rezoning approvals are ob-
tained the design phase accom-
plished and construction begun in
a timely manner, the spokeswom-
an said the new hospital could be


completed in 2015. The project
should be begun no later than Oc-
tober, 2011.
Long before that time, however,
at least one more issue requires
resolution in the thorny and twist-
ing saga of two hospital networks
competing for state approvals to
build new full service facilities on
neighboring acreages. Their com-
petition dates back several years,
spanning at least two petition/ap-
proval cycles, and its history is
marked by both rejections and ap-
provals issued at one time or an-
other to both by Florida's Agency
on Health Care Administration as
well as by court rulings on chal-
lenges raised by one contesting the
other's approvals.
At the present time, HCA's South
Bay Hospital, part of a nationwide,
for profit network, has AHCA ap-
proval to build a facility replacing
its Sun City Center area unit on its
acreage in the same vicinity of the
proposed St. Joseph's South but on
the north side of Big Bend Road.
AHCA's approval of the St. Jo-
seph's plan to build on its site on


the south side of Big Bend Road
- approval on which the local net-
work now is relying followed a
district court of appeal finding ef-
fectively in support of the St. Jo-
seph's proposal.
Asserting that it is inconceivable
two acute care hospitals could op-
erate successfully across the road
from one another in the South
County service market, St. Jo-
seph's questions AHCA approval
of the South Bay relocation plan.
For its part, South Bay, continu-
ing to operate in its present loca-
tion west of Sun City Center, cur-
rently is remaining substantially
mum on the subject. Melissa Mor-
gan, South Bay spokesperson, said
this week only that from the hos-
pital's perspective, "nothing has
changed."
Attorneys for the two hospital
networks at the present time are
slated to go head to head in hear-
ings set for November 4 5, No-
vember 8 10, and November 15
- 19, before an administrative law
judge.
Copyright 2010 Melody Jameson


Chere Simmons photo
Marie Kelly enjoys pancakes and bacon at last month's breakfast.
Pancakes, scrambled egg breakfast
this Sunday
The youth group of Sun City Christian Center is sponsoring a Pancake
and Scrambled Egg Breakfast this Sunday, July 4, in the church Fel-
lowship Hall, 17566 US Hwy. 301 South, Wimauma (2 miles south of
SR 674). Serving will begin at 9 a.m. and end just prior to the morning
service which begins at 10:30 a.m.
The group is asking for donations that will be used to send students
to camp this month. For your donation you'll be treated to pancakes or
scrambled eggs, bacon and coffee or orange juice.
For more information visit the church calendar on their website at
www. SunCityChristian.com
Come breakfast with your family and stay for the uplifting message
delivered by Pastor Arlen Beck. Music by Crimson.


Score a great rate!


Call or visit today.


South Shore

813-649-0400


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single tier. Thefollowing APYsare accurate as of 06/25/10 and are subject to change atany time: $.01-$24,999.99, APY is 0.05%; $25,000.00+, APY is 1.75%. This isa variable-rate account and rates may change after the account is opened. Requires
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JULY 1, 2010






JULY 1, 2010
UF marine researchers rush to collect samples as oil threat grows


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 9

2011 Mini-grant


GAINESVILLE, Fla. In a
race against time, University of
Florida marine researchers are
hurrying to collect underwater ma-
rine algae samples in the Florida
Keys while an ever-growing Gulf
oil spill steadily migrates toward
Florida, already reaching the Em-
erald Coast in the Panhandle.
Hendrik Luesch, Ph.D., an as-
sociate professor of medicinal
chemistry at the UF College of
Pharmacy, took his research team
to Long Key last week in hopes
of advancing early drug discover-
ies that may yield cancer-fighting
properties hidden in marine algae.
It's an expedition he has made an-
nually for four years, but this year
it seems there might be a limit on
how long the ecosystem will yield
its specimens.
According to federal and inde-
pendent scientists, as much as 2.5
million gallons of oil per day are
spewing from a pipe in the Gulf of
Mexico that engineers have failed
to seal.
"Cyanobacteria, or organisms
that overgrow coral reefs, are
shown to produce drug-like com-
pounds that may be exploited for
biomedical purposes such as anti-
cancer drugs," Luesch said.
The warm waters and mild year-
round temperatures allow marine
life to flourish in the Keys, cre-
ating a predatory environment
among these organisms, Luesch
said. In order to survive, marine or-
ganisms develop defense systems,

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but it also stretches the use of the
bottle. You aren't throwing away
the perfectly good polish collected
on the bottom!


Capt. Cindy Lewis, a scientist at the Keys Marine Laboratory in Long
Key, takes University of Florida pharmacy researcher Hendrik Lu-
esch and four of his lab members to a reef collection site about 10
feet deep near Marathon on June 10, 2010.


sort of like a chemical survival kit.
Researchers use these toxic chemi-
cals as the basis for creating drugs
that can target and fight cancers.

"It's the biodiversity that makes
the Florida Keys a hot spot for re-
searchers," Luesch said.
At the same time, the coral reefs
are also a very sensitive ecosys-
tem, he said. For example, the ex-
tended chill in the tropical waters
last January caused sea turtles to
become cold-stunned and killed
more than 85 percent of reefs in
certain areas, according to Cynthia
Lewis, a biological scientist at the
Keys Marine Laboratory in Long

1
Carol R. in Palmyra, NJ
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Key, where the UF researchers
collected specimens.
Scientists in Florida don't know
what to expect, she said.
"We are concerned and watch-
ful," she said. "We don't know
how far the marine impact may
go."
Only two weeks earlier, Lewis
and nine other scientific teams un-
der the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission took
baseline samples on the Gulf and
Atlantic coasts from Key Largo to
Key West to establish pre-impact
marine wildlife assessments, Lew-
is said.
One challenge with his research,


Luesch said, is the randomness of
finding an organism and the length
of time it takes to isolate and test
a compound for its specific drug-
producing qualities. Environmen-
tal variables may change, which
means the organism may change
as well.
"We may find an interesting spe-
cies, but it takes months of research
just to isolate the active compound
and analyze the properties in our
lab," Luesch said. "Attempts to
re-collect often fail because we do
not always see the same organism
again."
Two compounds from the oceans
have been developed into drugs
that are on the market today -
one treats cancer, and the other is
a pain reliever. Fourteen more are
in clinical trials. Scientists simply
don't know how many biological
organisms are in the ocean, Luesch
said, but marine organisms often
produce multiple compounds, and
he estimates that more than 90 per-
cent have not yet been discovered.
What does the largest-ever oil
spill disaster mean to Luesch and
his research?
"I am thinking what everyone
else in the United States and in
the world is thinking what a ca-
tastrophe this is for mankind and
especially the area in the Gulf of
Mexico," he said. "Secondly, I am
concerned for the marine discov-
ery efforts by our groups and other
groups in this area."


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applications
available June
25
Applications will soon be avail-
able for neighborhood associa-
tions interested in obtaining up
to a $2,500 Hillsborough County
mini-grant to help improve their
communities. Applications will
be available through the Hillsbor-
ough County Office of Neighbor-
hood Relations (ONR) and online
at www.hillsboroughcounty.org/
onr.
Mini-grants are available to
fund community projects in neigh-
borhoods located in unincorpo-
rated areas and cities (Plant City,
Tampa, Temple Terrace) within
Hillsborough County. In addition,
grants are available to neighbor-
hoods in unincorporated Hills-
borough County for tree-planting,
low-irrigation and clean-up. Pre-
vious grant-funded projects in-
clude shrub and flower planting,
subdivision entrance signs, play-
ground equipment, neighborhood
festivals, crime watch programs,
Web sites, newsletters, education
activities and more.
Applications will be reviewed
by the Neighborhood Mini-Grant
Committee and approved by the
Board of County Commissioners.
Recipients will be notified by Nov.
30. Only one grant will be award-
ed per qualified neighborhood as-
sociation.
Neighborhood associations in-
terested in applying for a mini-
grant must attend an orientation
class. These classes are scheduled
throughout Hillsborough County
in June and July, and ONR staff
will be on hand to explain the ap-
plication process, grant criteria,
qualifying projects and answer
questions neighborhood leaders
may have. The schedule for these
mandatory orientation classes is as
follows:
Thursday, July 1, 6:30 p.m.
Bloomingdale Public Library,
1906 Bloomingdale Ave., Valrico,
FL 33594.
Tuesday, July 6, 6:30 p.m.
Brandon Regional Service Cen-
ter, 311 Pauls Drive, Brandon, FL
33511.
Wednesday, July 21, 10 a.m.
SouthShore Regional Service
Center, 410 30th St. S.E., Ruskin,
FL 33570.
Mini-grant applications will be
accepted through Friday, Aug. 13,
5 p.m. via drop-off, mail or fax:
Drop off or mail (must be post-
marked by Aug. 13) to: Office of
Neighborhood Relations, 601 E.
Kennedy Blvd., First Floor, Tam-
pa, FL 33602 Fax: 813-276-2621
The Mini-Grant Program was
established in 1988 by the Hills-
borough County Board of County
Commissioners to improve and re-
vitalize communities, and strength-
en neighborhood associations.
ONR serves as a liaison be-
tween neighborhood associations
and county departments. For more
information, call ONR at 813-272-
5860 or visit www.hillsborough-
county.org/onr.
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10. OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT JULY 1, 2010


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JULY 1, 2010


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JULY 1, 2010
Florida State Parks and pristine beaches open

for July fourth getaways


TALLAHASSEE The Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection's (DEP) Florida Park
Service encourages residents and
travelers to visit Florida's state
parks and pristine beaches this
July 4th weekend. The Deepwater
Horizon oil spill in the Gulf has not
impacted any of Florida's shoreline
and all 160 Florida State Parks, in-
cluding 24 state park beaches along
the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, are
open for public enjoyment.
"With miles of beaches, springs,
lakes and trails and some of the best
snorkeling, kayaking, camping,
hiking and fishing opportunities
in the world, Florida State Parks
are the perfect destination for a
holiday getaway with family and
friends," said DEP Secretary Mi-
chael W. Sole. "From Pensacola to
Key West, Florida's state park's are


/t


A family bikes on a trail towards
the Gulf of Mexico.

home to some of the most beauti-
ful coastal environments, which
remain open for the public to enjoy
this holiday weekend."
Florida State Parks offer a wide
variety of activities for any interest,
including:


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fishing and the park offers one of
the most popular full service camp-
ing areas in the state.
St. Andrews State Park, in
Panama City, is well known for
its sugar white sands and emerald
green waters. This park has more
than 1.5 miles of beach on the
Gulf of Mexico and Grand Lagoon.
Water sports enthusiasts can enjoy
swimming, snorkeling, scuba div-
ing, kayaking, and canoeing. Two
fishing piers, aj etty and a boat ramp
provide ample fishing opportunities
for anglers.
Caladesi Island State Park,
near St. Petersburg, is one of few
completely natural islands along
Florida's Coast. The 661 acre park
is only accessible by boat or ferry
and was rated America's best beach
in 2008.
Lover's Key Island State Park,
in Fort Myers, is a popular desti-
nation for canoeing and kayaking
throughout inner waterways and in
Estero Bay and the Gulf of Mexico.
Hiking is also a popular activity
along the Black Island Trail a 2.5
mile adventure through maritime
hammock along the canal banks of
Black Island.
Bahia Honda State Park, in
Big Pine Key, is one of Florida's
southernmost state parks, known
for beautiful beaches, magnificent
sunsets and excellent snorkeling.


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Boardwalk leads to the beach on the Gulf of Mexico at Caladesi Is-
land Park in St. Pete.


Visitors can picnic on the beach,
swim or relax and enjoy balmy
sea breezes. Anglers can fish from
shore or bring a boat and launch at
the boat ramp.
Oleta River State Park, located
on Biscayne Bay in the busy Miami
metropolitan area, is Florida's larg-
est urban park. Offering a variety of
recreational opportunities, the park
is best known for miles of off-road
bicycling trails. Visitors can rent
kayaks, canoes, and bicycles.
Tomoka State Park, in Ormond
Beach just north of Daytona, is a
popular park for wildlife viewing
and offers a full service camping
facilities. The park's waters are
popular for canoeing, boating and
fishing. The park also protects a
variety of wildlife habitats and is a


birdwatcher's paradise, with more
than 160 species sighted.
Amelia Island State Park, an
easy drive from Jacksonville,
protects more than 200 acres of
unspoiled wilderness. The park is
one of the few locations on the east
coast that offers horseback riding
on the beach and riding tours along
the shoreline. Fishermen can surf
fish along the shoreline or they can
wet their line from the mile-long
George Crady Bridge Fishing Pier
which spans Nassau Sound.
For a complete listing of Florida's
160 state parks, activities and Me-
morial Weekend events, visit www.
floridastateparks.org or follow
www.Twitter.com/FLStateParks.


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We like the granola and fruit type
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once in a while, we buy a box of
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I put together a booklet, using a
small photo album and 4x6 index
cards. Each card went in a plastic
sleeve of the album and gave step-
by-step instructions for a particu-
lar chore. It seemed to be easier for
the kids to break it down this way,
rather than just have me say "clean
the bathroom." After a while, the
instructions were not needed, but
they are still there for quick refer-
ence.
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12 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Just a bite of dessert?
Make it with blueberries!


(NAPSA) -- No matter what they
say, when it comes to dessert, size
matters. Keeping portion size under
control is easy when you make
"Blueberry-Lemon Teasers."
Use convenient products -- fresh
blueberries, frozen pound cake,
and instant pudding -- and your


Warm-weather palate pleasers.
little desserts are easy and quick
to make.
Get started by rinsing the blue-
berries then pat dry. Whip up the
instant pudding and set it aside.
Now make cake crumbs. One
way to do it fast is to cut off about
one third of a 10.75-ounce frozen
pound cake and, with the coarse
side of a grater, grate crumbs into
a bowl. Another way is to chop
the cake into pieces and pulse in
a food processor until you have
coarse crumbs. If you want to make
crumbs from homemade cake,
freeze it first for easier handling.
To assemble the desserts, line up
six small glasses and stack about
two tablespoons each of the cake,
the pudding and the fresh blue-
berries in the glasses; repeat until
all the ingredients are used. A
spoonful of whipped cream tops
them off.
Serve the "Blueberry-Lemon
Teasers" immediately or cover
with plastic wrap and refriger-
ate for up to 24 hours. Dessert is
ready when you are and at just 172
calories per serving, you can kick
back and enjoy a guilt-free dessert
that delivers plenty of flavor with
creamy texture and juicy blueber-
ries in every bite.
Summer is blueberry season
and a good time to enjoy fresh
blueberries every day. Blueber-
ries can be found in supermarkets,
superstores, farmers markets and
roadside stands. At www.nab-
cblues.org/upick.htm or www.pic-
kyourown.org you can find a list
of U-Pick blueberry farms.
For loads of blueberry recipes,
nutrition information and more, go
to www.blueberycouncil.org.


Blueberry-Lemon Teasers
1% cups low-fat milk
1 package (3.4 ounces) instant
lemon pudding mix
2 cups fresh blueberries
11/2 cups crumbs (about 4 oz.)
from frozen reduced-fat
pound cake
1/2 cup sweetened
whipped cream
In medium bowl
with electric mixer
or wire whisk,
blend milk and
pudding mix for 2
minutes; set aside
for 5 minutes to set.
Into six 6-ounce
glasses, evenly
divide half of the
cake crumbs, pud-
ding and blueber-
ries; repeat. Cover
and refrigerate
until ready to serve.
Just before serving,
top with a swirl of
whipped cream.
Variations: Use other instant
pudding flavors, such as vanilla,
cheesecake, coconut or banana.
Yield: 6 portions
Per portion: 172 calories; 3.7
protein; 35 g carbohydrates; 2.6
g total fat; 1.3 g saturated fat; 7 mg
cholesterol; 303 mg sodium; 1.4 g
dietary fiber.


GAINESVILLE, FL From
the clinic to the courtroom, one of
the University of Florida's premier
type 1 diabetes experts is leading
the battle against the disease on all
fronts.
Desmond Schatz, M.D., medical
director of the Diabetes Center of
Excellence, was part of a team that
won a civil suit for Jeff Kapche, a
detective living with type 1 diabe-
tes. For their efforts, the American
Diabetes Association will present
its 2010 Public Policy Leadership
Award to Schatz, Dr. Ralph De-
Fronzo and Dr. James Gavin, and
the attorneys who worked on the
case.
Members of the Kapche litiga-
tion team will accept the award on
Friday, the first day of the ADA's
70th Annual Scientific Sessions in
Orlando.
Kapche, 41, a police veteran at
the sheriff's office in Fort Bend,
Texas, was denied his dream job
as a special agent with the FBI,
which claimed that daily insulin
injections could interfere with his
ability to perform in unpredictable
situations.
The bureau's unofficial policy
dictated that agents manage their
disease with an insulin pump,
which continuously manages glu-
cose levels. Schatz provided expert
testimony to disprove the myth
that pumping is superior to stick-
ing monitoring glucose levels
with a portable blood test when
it comes to managing the disease.
"I cited many instances in which
I believed he would do just as well
as he was already doing with in-
jections of insulin, and that he
didn't need a pump," said Schatz,
a professor and associate chairman
of pediatrics in the UF College of
Medicine. "In fact, going on an in-
sulin pump in an FBI-designated


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area such as Iraq could for him
be detrimental to not only his
health, but also to the security of
the United States. To insist (so) in
his particular case, when his blood
glucose control was so outstand-
ing even before...was definitely
wrong."
The federal court ruling in Kap-
che v. Holder set a precedent that
people cannot be denied employ-
ment based on disease manage-
ment. Schatz asserted that, indeed,
therapy always needs to be tailored
to a patient's individual needs and
should consider his or her support
system, family dynamics and fi-
nancial situation.
Schatz has served the ADA in
several administrative roles, in-
cluding on the board of directors
with ADA attorney John Griffin.
Griffin, who has diabetes, also
represented Kapche in a similar
discrimination suit against the San
Antonio Police Department, which
denied Kapche a job for the same
reason.
"I chose Dr. Schatz to be a mem-
ber of the legal team because he is
supremely competent, has great
interpersonal skills and has an
extensive scientific background,"
Griffin said. "He also has a very
passionate sense of patient rights.
He is an advocate not just of medi-
cine, but of the legal rights of pa-
tients. He has an innate sense of
human dignity."
Schatz studies the prevention
and treatment of type 1 diabetes,
formerly known as juvenile diabe-
tes, which occurs in only 5 to 10
percent of all cases. In type 1 dia-
betes, the body does not produce
its own insulin, which is necessary
for converting sugar into energy.


Worldwide, there is a growing
incidence of not only type 2 dia-
betes, the obesity-related disease,
but of type 1 as well. The number
of diabetes diagnoses grows by 3
percent each year, particularly in
children under age 10.
"(Diabetes) is a tremendous bur-
den to both the individual and to
society and our roles both as advo-
cates and scientists cannot let up,"
Schatz said. "We have to eventu-
ally be able to reverse and prevent
the disease."
Schatz is the principal investiga-
tor for multiple research projects
funded by the Juvenile Diabetes
Research Foundation and the Na-
tional Institutes of Health, includ-
ing a program called TrialNet, a
multicenter national and interna-
tional group of investigators that
test therapies to prevent disease in
patients and their families.
Other projects focus on reversing
type 1 diabetes using stem cells
from umbilical cord blood and
examining the immune system's
influence on development of the
disease. He is also involved in an
NIH-funded study that genetically
screens newborns for diabetes in
North Central Florida. Beyond
Florida, he serves on external ad-
visory boards for studies in Israel
and Australia funded by the NIH
and Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention.
Schatz said he would like to see
greater advocacy efforts by all
health-care providers, patients and
their families.
"Together, obviously, as a united
voice we are far stronger," he said.
"This should be at local, state,
federal and, indeed, international
levels."


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JULY 1, 2010 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 13
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14 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Romance writing sells despite hard times


Maybe it's the desire to escape
harsh realities. Or maybe it's just
that readers like fast-moving sto-
ries. But in the midst of hard times,
romance writers still sell plenty of
books.
The data from Romance Writers
of America proves it.
Sally Schoeneweiss's words
grabbed me
the minute
I read the
first para-
graph of her
book, Ports
of Call.
Over I was read-
Coffee ing the Eng-
lish version,
By Penny Fletcher of course.
penny@observernews.net But MIRA
Books has
published Ports of Call in many
other languages around the world.
So as I turned the pages, I could
easily imagine someone sitting by
La Seine with the Eiffel Tower as a
backdrop, reading the French ver-
sion, the cover of which I had just
photographed not a mile from my
Riverview home.
Until I interviewed Sally- who
often writes under her maiden
name, Sally Fairchild- I didn't re-
alize how "romance novels" had
grown since I hadn't read that
genre for more than thirty years.
"They aren't bodice rippers any-
more. They have good plots and
wonderful writing," Sally told me
as we finished off a pot of coffee at
the Village Inn.
She should know. Not only has
Sally written three books that are
published and distributed world-
wide by major publishers, she is
president of a three-county chapter
of Romance Writers of America
and active in the Tampa Area Ro-
mance Writers group.
Her first major-league book,
Born to the Game, was published
in 1988 by Ballantine Books, fol-
lowed in 1989 by White Lies.
But Sally enjoys business too,
and runs an on line literary market-
ing and promotion service called
Talk Ink at www.talkink.com.
So how did this (obvious) ro-
mantic begin her career, and how
did she come to be a resident of
Apollo Beach?
As she began her tale, I could
immediately tell it would be as
exciting as one of her novels so I
poured more coffee and took lots
of notes.
Sally's writing career began in
her twenties although she didn't
know it then. Her university stud-
ies had trained her for far differ-
ent opportunities in interior design
and retail marketing.
But Sally took a job as a "Gal
Friday" at Seattle's communi-
ty newspaper, The Capitol Hill
Times, and learned every job it
took to keep the paper going from
selling classified ads to doing page


LWL
Sally Schoeneweiss of Apollo
Beach often writes under her
maiden name, Sally Fairchild.


design, while being assigned all
kinds of stories from profiles on
local people to "How to Bake an
Apple Pie."
"To this day, apple pies are my
specialty," she told me jokingly. "I
had to bake a bunch of them to get
it just right."
While married to Rudi Schoe-
neweiss, a frequently transferred
executive who died suddenly in
2007, she traveled the globe. Some
of the places she has lived include
Hawaii, Colorado, Arizona and
Long Island.
"It was while living on Long Is-
land that I met a working romance
author and I thought, I could do
that. At least typewriters were
portable," she said. "I had been
looking for something I could do
where I could stay home with the
children because Rudi was away a
lot."
So while her children were
young, she did a lot of writing in
the hours just before, and just af-
ter, midnight. A habit she still pos-
sesses.
Having grown up the youngest
of six siblings in Worcester, Mass.,
Sally began to use her life experi-
ences to base her plots.
Having a husband who was trans-
ferred around the world helped as
she got to live in foreign countries
and on cruise ships for the Holland
America Line and later Carnival
Cruises.
She continued her studies too;
one of which was learning Ger-
man so she could communicate
with her in-laws.
"As we moved around, books
were my friends because they were
always there," she said. "I was in a
tiny little bookstore in Scottsdale,
Arizona where you could barely
walk between the stacks when I
first noticed the Harlequin books.
(For which she now writes.) I just
love bookstores and libraries. I get
very upset when they talk about
cutting funding to libraries."
Around the same time as her
move to Arizona, she met romance
author Barbara Bretton who had
just sold a manuscript. Again she
remembers thinking, "I could do
that."
Then in Miami, she became ac-
quainted with a Katherine Falk
who started the magazine Roman-
tic Times out of a closet in her
home that has since grown into a
national magazine and sponsored
many events and conferences.
"Katherine was the one who
started the Love Train. There was
a documentary about it, with the
train going from town to town
picking up people along the way.
This was the woman who helped
discover people like Fabio," she
explained. "People I met would
say, years later- oh, I think I saw
you on the Love Train when it
showed on television."
Also while in Miami, Sally found
out that bestselling author Heather
Graham lived close to her, in Co-
conut Grove, and she wrote to her.
"She has written over 100
books," Sally said. "But she was
so friendly and introduced me to a
group of romance writers there. Fi-
nally we decided to form a chapter
of Romance Writers of America.
It has more than 10,000 members
nationally and is really a wonder-
ful group." Now Sally is president
of a local chapter active in Tampa
Bay.
She also got into promoting writ-
ers because of her background in
marketing. "I started with person-
alized phone cards, back before
cell phones when you had to use
a card to bill your home number
if you were traveling. I would put


book promotion on the cards. 1liia
spiraled into other promotional
ideas, bookmarks, cards, and
postcards. Lots of things.
One day after I had designed
a card for Heather (Graham)
she called the president of
Avon Books and
suggested we
start doing pro-
motion for their
authors."
So they did.
That collabor-
ative spirit is one
of the things Sal-
ly says she likes
about being in-
volved with this
particular group
of writers.
"They're
friendly and
helpful. It's just
a great group,"
she said, show-
ing me a list of romance writers.
"I enjoy being on the same list as
the national best-sellers, like Nora
Roberts and Heather Graham. Me
and my three books!"
But there's been a fourth in the
making for quite some time, Or-
chid Isle. She has a contract for its
publication but she just hasn't had
the "muse" to write it since Rudi's
death.
\L.i' I". I will," she said. "But
we were married over 40 years.
It's really hard to go on without
him."


- For
now, Sally is
enjoying her writing groups and
the company of her three dogs
and occasionally visiting her three
grown children and three grand-
children.
To find out more about Romance
Writers of America, visit www.
rwanational.org.
The group is getting ready for its
national conference in July, which
will be held this year in Orlando,
attended by about 2,000 people,
including authors, agents and pub-
lishers.


Members are also
', preparing for its 30th
Sl Annual Anniversary
Cruise in January.
Sally says new mem-
bers are always welcome.
*Perhaps you have something
you'dlike to share. Ormaybe you'd
rather tell the community about
your favorite charity or cause: or
sound off about something you
think needs change. That's what
"Over Coffee" is about. It really
doesn't matter whether we actually
drink any coffee or not (although I
probably will). It's what you have
to say that's important. E-mail me
any time at penny@observernews.
net and suggest a meeting place.
No matter what's going on, I'm
usually available to share just one
more cup.


Bronson urges vaccinations for horses as EEE cases rise


TALLAHASSEE Florida Ag-
riculture and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H. Bronson
is urging horse owners to get their
animals vaccinated following an
upsurge in the number of Eastern
Equine Encephalitis cases. Sentinel
chickens that serve as an early warn-
ing of the existence of the disease
are also being diagnosed with EEE
in areas of the state that are not usu-
ally affected.
So far this year there have been 16
confirmed cases of EEE in horses.
While that is not an unusually high
number, seven of the cases were re-
ported on Wednesday, June 23, from


counties scattered throughout the
state.
"Most of the cases have been in the
central and north central part of the
state which is normal," Bronson said.
"But we are also seeing increased
EEE and West Nile Virus activity in
sentinel chickens in the southern part
of the state, including Martin County
which has not had EEE detected in
30 years. In addition, there has been
a confirmed case of EEE in a horse
in both Collier and Okeechobee
counties. So I want to remind horse
owners of the importance of getting
their animals vaccinated."
EEE is a viral disease that affects


the central nervous system and is
transmitted to horses by infected
mosquitoes. Signs of the virus in-
clude fever, listlessness, stumbling,
circling, coma and usually death.
The disease is fatal in horses in 90
percent of the cases.
Bronson says the majority of cases
of EEE and other mosquito-bome
diseases can be prevented through
proper vaccinations. Horse owners
are urged to check with their vet-
erinarian to make sure their animals
have received current vaccinations
and booster shots against EEE and
West Nile Virus, and that these shots
are kept up to date.


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 15

The coast is clear
U Continued from page


a^nC -
^Se'at* 3J**

r -uol^1'


Jacob Ciders says he loves the feel of sand and water.


ation center staff explained how to
put the hooks and bait on the lines
and how to cast. It took some time
but all the children seemed interest-
ed enough to wait their turn.
"I caught the first fish," said Kar-
eem Delgado. "It's a trout!"
Armwood High School's Vice
Principal Marvin Bell showed sev-
eral how to remove the fish from
the hook. He says he works with
the Parks, Recreation & Conserva-
tion Department's children's' pro-
grams every summer because he
likes working with kids of all ages.
Other counselors from Evans Park
who helped out at the event were
Jeff Miller, Renee Graham and Ja-
cob Pettet.
While Graham and Miller are full
time employees, Pettet just takes
the job in the summer. Recent East
Bay High School graduate, he said
he is headed for Warner University
in Lake Wales in the fall to study
sports management and teaching.
"This is great experience for me,"
he said while baiting hooks for the
crowd. Pettet explained that he is
attending on a baseball scholarship
and wants to combine his love of
the game with his love of teaching
young children.
"That's what makes this the perfect
summer job for him," said Bell.
After a picnic lunch on tables un-
der the trees at the east end of the
park, the children ran down to the
swimming area.
Besides rec staff and park rang-


with little or no change since fees
were enacted Nov. 1.
John Brill, spokesman for all
Hillsborough County's parks said
the $2 fee per carload ( for up to
eight people) is still a bargain.
"It was either start charging fees
or close the park and the residents
all knew it," he said of the once-free
facilities.
For families that use the parks of-
ten, there is an annual family pass
for $100 (also good for up to eight
people) for any one year from the
date the pass is purchased; not the
rest of the fiscal year.
"If they buy the pass on June 25,
it's good until the next June 25,"
Brill said. "And those with an an-
nual pass can change parks, even in
one day."
So if they get to one park and de-
cide to go to another, either because
of the crowds or for whatever rea-
son, they can do so without extra
payment.
Annual park passes for individuals
are available for $50 a year and boat
ramp annual passes for $100 which
are good at any ramp, he explained.
Some of the boat ramps have an

/ IMMEB L


those without the annual pass.
"It works out pretty well," Brill
said. "We don't have enough people
to staff the ramps all the time but
most people are pretty honest. And
when we drive through, we look at
the vehicles and if someone seems
to be abusing the privilege, we take
down the license plate number and
take it from there."
That hasn't happened nearly as
often as people would expect, he
said.
Applications for passes are avail-
able at any county park but can-
not be purchased anywhere but
the Hillsborough County Regional
Parks Administration Office, 15502
Morris Bridge Road, Thonotosassa,
FL, 33592. People can just pick up
the applications at their local park
and then mail them in with check or
money orders.
They can also be obtained by call-
ing the regional administration of-
fice at (813) 987-6240.


ers, three lifeguards from Simmons -
Park were also on duty as the chil-
dren charged into the water.
,Fortunately, the roped-off swim-
ming area at the park gradually gets
Recent East Bay High School graduate Jacob Pettet baits hooks for
... ....deeper, instead of just dropping off some of the 52 children from Evans Park in Seffner who spent June 23
Penny Fletcher photos like some areas of the Bay, which at Simmons Park on a field trip. Pettet plans to study both sports man-
Park Ranger Ken Sweeney untangles lines, baits hooks, and tells makes it easier to keep children agement and teaching at Warner University in Lake Wales using the
the children what kinds of fish they can expect to catch in this area within safe areas, baseball scholarship he earned last year. Pettet took the summer job
of the park. The park has stayed busy all year, at the recreation center because he says he loves working with kids.


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16 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Gold Star parents


* CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
tie sisters, their families and other
assorted New York kinfolk. Both
families, enjoying the company of
their standout young men, did the
traditional American 4th of July
thing hot dogs, burgers, beans
and potato salad at cookouts, easy
conversation around bonfires, ah-
hhhing over celebratory fireworks.
The weather was good, the familial
bonds even better.
The two families had good reason
to relish the time with their young
warriors. It was no secret on either
coast that the furloughs preceded
postings to Afghanistan.
Two months and four days later,
on September 8, 2009, "Gunny"
Aaron Kenefick and "Medic"
James Layton, died together in the
service of their country. They were
killed in a furious fire fight with
Afghan insurgents in eastern Kunar
Province near the Pakistan border.
Reports indicate Layton was killed
giving medical assistance to the
mortally wounded Kenefick. They
were pinned down near an isolated
Afghan village, running out of


ammo, waiting for
air cover. An em-
bedded U.S. news-
paper reporter later
described it as "a
trap." Faithful to the
Marine Corps. com-
mitment, however,
their bodies were
retrieved despite the
pervasive danger by


"Being

Star pa

not a cl

want tc
Brent


a 21-year-old Kentuckian, Marine
Cpl. Dakota Meyer.
That July 4th, 2009, holiday leave
was the last time Susan Price and
Brent Layton saw their sons alive.
Kenefick's mother, Susan, back
in Florida that warm September
evening, was driving to a Brandon
Chamber of Commerce function
when she received a call from close
friends. Upon arrival, they urged
her, stay in the car; they wanted to
meet her momentarily, they said.
Susan Price drove into the parking
lot and then she knew; knew with
the certainty of a sledge hammer to
the chest. Price, who herself served
three years in the U.S. Army, rec-
ognized the two officers striding to-
ward her car. Supportively, gently,
with the infinite consideration mili-
tary extend especially their own,
they broke the news. Soon, literally
surrounded by caring friends able
to take over, she let go of reality.
The ensuing hours are foggy.
In California, three time zones
away, Brent Layton, too, was in a
vehicle that September afternoon.
His cell phone buzzed. He was
needed at home, the caller said. He
went home to meet another pair of
casualty assistance officers. His
only son was gone, they regretfully
told him, killed in action. A retired
law enforcement officer, municipal
and county, Brent Layton had seen
death close up, but not this person-
al. This was different; still is.
Susan Price and Brent Layton,
still strangers, had just formed a
terrible bond. Their sons came
home one last time. They buried
their children. They accepted the
casket flags. They received the
double Purple Hearts because both
boys had sustained earlier shrapnel
wounds. They grieved and cursed
the fates and cried for solace and
prayed for the will to keep going.
They had joined the ranks of Amer-
ica's Gold Star parents, ranks of
thousands parents of service peo-
ple killed in defense of the country.
Independently, they asked, in ef-
fect, "is this all"? Independently,
they concluded "it cannot be."
Today, Price and Layton no lon-
ger are strangers. Connected ini-
tially via the internet, they shared


first grief and then determination.
Two weeks ago, they met at the
Little Harbor Resort near Ruskin
to discuss in person how to pool
their skills and create a campaign
to raise a nation's awareness. Sur-
rounded by U.S. Air Force families
from MacDill taking part in a "day
at the beach," hosted free of charge
by the resort, the two parents began
plotting their campaign.
Americans, they fear, have be-
come desensitized as the longest
war in the country's history staggers
on in Afghanistan. Layton relates a
recent incident in California when
another man, hearing of Layton's
son's sacrifice, cursed the young
medic. Punches were thrown. Lay-
ton came away feeling he had vin-
dicated his boy; the resulting sore
shoulder a reminder. Price speaks
of the insensitivity of those who
ask "aren't you over it, yet?"
Young American men and wom-
en, dedicated to their country, are
paying heavily every day, the two
parents asserted, and their families
are suffering every deprivation, in-
cluding the ultimate
loss. What's called
a Gold for, regardless of
rent is political persua-
sion, they said, is
ub you an enhanced re-
spectfulness for the
Sjoin." military on the front
Layton lines, heightened
public awareness of
the sacrifices being
made by soldiers as well as their
families, plus acknowledgements
to those who shoulder heavy field
packs over choking dust terrain
in suffocating heat or bitter cold,
forfeiting comforts as simple as a


warm shower for weeks at a time,
so that folks at home can have an-
other day off, around the backyard
grill, observing the nation's Inde-
pendence Day.
For his part, Layton recently
wrapped up an effort in California
that finally adds that state to the
26 in the nation which issue Gold
Star license plates the kind of
campaign that involved buttonhol-
ing political figures all the way up
to the governor's office, he noted.
"But, it's a done deal," he added
with a touch of pride.
It's that experience that Price,
known in her family as "General
Mom," wants to work with a na-
tional public awareness campaign,
she said. Consequently, she and
Layton, during his visit, began
roughing out a website and devel-


oping a plan of action aimed at cre-
ating a network with organizations
sharing similar objectives. Two
non-profits that they immediately
tapped into are the American Ideals
Foundation founded in Ruskin and
the Freedom Excursions sailing ex-
peditions for injured veterans oper-
ated by another Ruskin family.
Ultimately, they said, they envi-
sion something as elaborate as a
resort retreat for returning military
and their families.
"There's a lot of work to do,"
Price acknowledged, "but this also
is healing for us."
"Being a Gold Star parent is not
a club you want to join," Layton
said, suggesting that the campaign
to elevate public appreciation of
the Gold Stars the nation's fallen
soldiers itself honors the lives of


their sons.
"The boys left a torch; we're
picking it up," Price added.
Price and Layton said they
planned to go separate ways this
July 4th, 2010 the first anniver-
sary of their last holiday with their
sons. Each would spend the holiday
with family members on opposite
coasts, remembering, cherishing,
celebrating the lives of their off-
spring, Price said. They planned
to continue the Gold Star aware-
ness campaign strategizing later
this month in California. It is, she
added, what they must have been
prepared over a lifetime to do.
Copyright 2010 Melody Jameson



tCer^tuljW


Computers that talk. Et tu, Watson?


"You know my methods, Wat-
son." Sherlock Holmes used that




SSir Arthur
C "" Conan
D Doyle.
Observing Being el-
the Web ementary,
e it seems
By Mitch Traphagen likely that
mitch@observernews.net W a t n
did indeed
know Holmes' methods. But
could Holmes have guessed Wat-
son's methods? Did he even care
or was he just a flaming narcis-
sist who just assumed everyone
knew? Of course he wasn't -
he was a brilliant fictional detec-
tive who gave the world a won-
derful story line and a few really
great phrases. Besides, even if
he had known something about
the methods of his 19th century
associate, there is no way even
Holmes could have deduced
the methods of the 21st century
Watson.
Watson lives. Actually, he
lives to play Jeopardy. Watson
is a computer designed by IBM
to bring computing into an era
that was ruined nearly 40 years
ago by Star Trek. In the 1960s,
Captain Kirk would talk to the
computer on board the Starship
Enterprise and it would answer.
He didn't need to use a keyboard
or a mouse or even phrase his
questions in a way the computer
would understand. He just talked
to it. It was a heady time in the
60s, those of us as children then
grew up knowing beyond any
doubt that by 2010, we'd have


flying cars and jet packs. Based
on those expectations, a conversa-
tional computer really didn't seem
like much of a hurdle.
But for an entity made up of wire
and silicon chips, human conver-
sation is a huge deal. Bigger, even,
than making a car fly. Nuances in
human conversation don't work
well with a computer that func-
tions exclusively in a binary world
of ones and zeros.
A recent New York Times Maga-
zine article made the Holmes /
Watson connection to IBM's Wat-
son computer. Watson (the com-
puter), however, was not named
for Holmes' fictional sidekick but
in honor of Thomas J. Watson, the
founder of IBM. Yet the analogy is
apt.
In 1996, an IBM computer
named Deep Blue became the
first machine to beat a reigning
world chess champion in a game
of chess. The champion, Garry
Kasparov, lost the game but won
the battle, winning three of the fol-
lowing five games. The next year,
however, Deep Blue came back to
defeat Kasparov, winning the best
part of six games.
Thirteen years later, IBM is
back with Watson, the computer
designed to play Jeopardy. Why
Jeopardy? Because it is a game
that requires knowledge and a
thorough understanding of the
subtleties of the English language.
Contestants in the game are pre-
sented with often nuanced, some-
times pun-like clues to answers to
which they must provide the ques-
tions. If a computer can manage
Jeopardy, that is awfully close to
a computer that can communicate
fully with humans.
As for the Times analogy, it is apt


because, as the article points out, a
Jeopardy clue such as, "The name
of this hat is elementary, my dear
contestant," immediately brings
forth an image of Sherlock Hol-
mes to us humans because we've
frequently heard and stored away
the phrase, "It's elementary, my
dear Watson." We simply learned
it. But to a computer, there are no
equivalent neural pathways to trav-
el for odd tidbits of information.
The computer can't "remember"
anything that it hasn't specifically
been told, nor can it make induc-
tive leaps. The words, "elemen-
tary" and "my dear contestant"
mean nothing to it because there is
no neural pathway leading to "It's
elementary, my dear Watson."
Watson, however, was designed
to forge its own neural pathways
through the brute force of comput-
ing power. It takes the clue phrase
and comes up with a list of pos-
sible connections and then nar-
rows down that list until it comes
to what it feels is the best answer:
Holmes' deerstalker hat.
Watson isn't connected to the
Web for data collection. Instead,
IBM's research team input untold
pages from books and research pa-
pers to provide its basis of knowl-
edge. It doesn't Google anything,
it relies on the "brain" and knowl-
edge IBM gave it.
Watson is a computer that is de-
signed to go beyond data to look
for hidden meanings in human
speech. IBM sees the business po-
tential for a computer that can un-
derstand humans and give them the
answer they really want which
may or may not be from the ques-
tion they actually asked.
Yes, your home PC can talk. But
just ask it, "How's it hanging to-


day?" and you won't want to wait
for the reply. It not only has no
idea; it doesn't much care. Com-
puters may be able to speak but,
until Watson came along, they
have been unable to actually con-
verse.
Now, how 'bout getting to
work on those flying cars and jet
packs?
You can play Jeopardy against
Watsononthe web, courtesy ofthe
New York Times at www.nytimes.
com/interactive/2010/06/16/
magazine/watson-trivia-game.
html
In this version of the game, you
are given a distinct advantage -
Watson will wait for you to make
the first move. One of the most
interesting aspects of the interac-
tive game is seeing the list of re-
sponses that Watson considered.
It gives you a bit of an insight
into the mind of the computer. As
it were... of sorts... I think...
To read the article, visit www.
nytimes .com/2010/06/20/
magazine/20Computer-t.html.
For more information and a
video about Watson, visit www.
research.ibm.com/deepqa.
The Watson Trivia Challenge
11-111 -d- I


Image from www.nytimes.com
Watson and the New York Times
gives you a chance to try your
hand at beating a computer at
Jeopardy.


JULY 1, 2010






'JULY 1, 2010


LILLIE
Lillie is a most beautiful young
female cat with subtle shades
of gray and beige and plenty of
white. She is just the most laid
back and relaxed cat in the shelter.
And what a friendly and lovable
girl she is. Visit C.A.R.E. and give
Lillie a forever home. And while
you're at it check out Lillie's beau-
tiful kittens. A recent mom, Lillie
will be spayed, microchipped and
brought up-to-date on their shots.
Special pricing in June in honor
of National Adopt-A-Cat Month.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 17

KOBE
Kobe is a sweet male Chihuahua mix. He was brought to the shelter
with three other family members. He is the shy one of the pack. With a
little sweet talking he will be in your arms with his head tucked under
your chin. Kobe does show off when his mom, Hildy, is around. He must
be a momma's boy! Kobe is looking for a patient owner who will help
him transition to the next phase of his life, a forever home. Kobe has
been neutered, microchipped, and brought current on his shots. DOB:
March '09.
C.A.R.E. is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. For
directions, visit www.CareShelter.org or call (813) 645-2273.


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Feline Folks spay/
neuter clinic for
free-roaming cats
Feline Folks will conduct its
Low Cost Spay/Neuter Clinic
(OFF) Operation Feline Fix for
free-roaming cats on Saturday,
July 17 at C.A.R.E in Ruskin.
The price is $10 per cat or kitten
(must weigh 3 pounds). Call (813)
944-7651 for an appointment.

Looking for
part-time work?
A few years ago, I was attempt-
ing to make a living at selling real
estate in rural Virginia. I did fairly
well, but because I was an inde-
pendent contractor, I didn't have
any health insurance benefits. My
husband was sick, and I had two
preschoolers. I took a job driving
a school bus in order to get health
insurance benefits. The benefits
package was phenomenal. My cost
for a family plan with medical and
dental was about $550 per month.
I made a per diem as a bus driver,
so it wasn't an hourly rate, but $45
per day at 4.5 hours equals $10 per
hour.
If you figure 19 school days per
month, I didn't have much left
over after they took out for health
insurance, but it was worth it. The
school district I worked for was so
desperate for drivers that moth-
ers were permitted to take their
small children (including those in
car seats) with them on the bus.
The bus garage installed seat belts
for my kids when I was driving a
bus that didn't have any seat belts.
I didn't have to pay for childcare
while driving because my two
little ones went with me. I didn't
have a CDL (Commercial Driv-
ers License) when they hired me,
so they trained me. I still have my
CDL, and I've made good use of it
after leaving Virginia.
I'm grateful for the experience I
gained and for the kids that I got to
know and love. It's an experience I
wouldn't trade for anything.
Linda B.
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Goodbye goodie
bags
Do the moms a favor at your
child's next birthday party and
forget the little take home bags
full of clutter. Instead, make a
more memorable gift by making a
group picture of the kids. You can
either send the photo with a thank
you card or make a postcard using
your computer. Then send them to
the children a few days after the
party.
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I






18 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Affordable sun
shade
We live in the desert and sum-
mers often reach 115 degrees.
Windows in two of our bedrooms
face west, getting full afternoon
sun. Even with the vertical blinds
closed and solar screens on the
outside, both rooms used to get re-
ally hot every afternoon.
Last month, I bought white quilt-
ed fabric, cut it to window size plus
about three inches for the top hem,
surged the raw edges, and hung
them with an inexpensive tension
rod next to the glass. Both win-
dows are about 45" long and 72"
wide, so I made two curtains for
each window that can be opened
from the middle and fastened to
hooks on the sides for early morn-
ing light.
Our computer is right next to one
window and I have really noticed
how cool the room is staying. Also,
the white fabric blocks the heat
but still lets in a lot of light. I'm
sure this $50 investment is going
to help lower our air conditioning
and winter heating bills a lot. Just
wish I had thought of it years ago!
Janice D. in Henderson, NV
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you already make? Visit stretcher. com/index.cfm?TipsSyn> to
find hundreds of articles to help you
stretch your day and your dollar!
C 2010 Dollar Stretcher, Inc.


RSI61EMIMI[6VEb LION iBRAR
1519 Bt Sild ay-Rski 37


PROGRAM/EVENT HIGHLIGHTS:
WEEK OF JULY 4-10

Library will be Closed
Sunday, July 4 and Monday, July 5

Toddler Time
Tuesday, July 6 10:15 to 10:35 a.m.
For ages 2-3 years with a caregiver.

High Seas Adventures
Tuesday, July 6 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Part of the Library's Summer Reading program.

Baby Time
Wednesday, July 7 10:05 to 10:25 a.m.
For ages 0-24 months.
Seating limit: 20 children plus their parents/caregivers.

Story Time
Wednesday, July 7 11 to 11:30 a.m.
For ages 3-5 years.
Seating limit: 20 children plus their parent/caregivers.

Micetronauts: Custom Puppets
Wednesday, July 7 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Micetronauts: Custom Puppets entertain.

Internet: Searching Techniques
Wednesday, July 7 6 to 7 p.m.
Learn how to use search engines. Registration in person
required no earlier than one hour prior to the start of the program.

PowerPoint: Effects and Transitions
Thursday, July 8 12:15 to 1:15 p.m.
Learn about adding effects and transitions to your presentation.
Registration in person required no earlier than
one hour prior to the start of the program.


JULY 1, 2010



Developing a Strategy for Research Success:
How to Analyze Your Ancestry Evidence and Plan
Thursday, July 8 2 to 4 p.m.
Presented by Sharon Tate Moody, C.G.
Seating limit: 25. Registration in person required
no earlier than one hour prior to the start of the program.

Teen Chess Club
Thursday, July 8 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
For middle and high school students. Beginners to experts welcome!

Art Instructors Opening Gallery Reception
for the John Crawford Art Studio Instructors' Exhibit
Thursday, July 8 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Thirteen art instructors who teach art classes in the
John Crawford Studio will be exhibiting their work:
Tim Gibbons, Minnette Webster, Pat Herzberg, Cory Wright,
Melissa Miller-Nece, Brenda Eastep, Anne Walker, Bruce Marsh,
Diane Simon, Leah Lopez, Susan Hess, Stephanie Grimes
and Laurie Burhop. The public is invited to this free event.
Light refreshments will be served.

Bedtime Stories
Thursday, July 8 7 to 7:30 p.m.
For ages 2-5 with a caregiver. Children may wear pajamas.

"Creative Artists" Create a T-Shirt Design
Saturday, July 10 10:30 a.m. to noon
For children 6-9 years. Students will bring in a clean T-Shirt and
create a design on separate sheet of paper that will be transferred
to the T-Shirt. Limit 20. Registration required. Call 273-3652.

Great Books Discussion
Saturday, July 10 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Patrick DeMarco, will moderate a discussion of
Gulliver Travels by Jonathan Swift.

Money Saving Tips with Carrie the Coupon Queen
Saturday, July 10 4 to 5:15 p.m.
Carrie helps consumers maximize savings to minimize spending.


All programs are sponsored by Friends of the SouthShore Library.
If you think you might be interested in joining Friends
of the SouthShore Library, visit the Book Sale Room at
the Library for a membership applications.
For any additional information, visit www.southshorefriends.com.
SouthShore Regional Library is located at 15816 Beth Shields Way,
off 19th Avenue between U.S. 301 and 1-75. (813) 273-3652.


Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content .




Available from Commercial News- providers


____j






JULY 1, 2010

BILL TURNER R EMEMBIElS ..


by Mark Dunn
I was introduced to Bill Turner
by a friend and a coworker of mine
who knows of my passion for the
history of South Hillsborough
County. Bill and his wife Shirley
currently live in Sun City Center,
but Bill originally moved to Ruskin
in 1929. The opportunity to speak
with someone so knowledgeable
about life in our community during
that era was a marvelous treat. Bill
and his wife graciously invited me
to their home and we spoke about
many of his experiences growing
up in the Ruskin area, his military
career, and fond memories of life
in an earlier day of South County.
Bill relocated from Ybor City to
Ruskin with his parents 80 years
ago at the tender age of two. His
father Jess Turner worked on the
Atlantic Coastline railroad. The
trains he worked on traveled from
Venice north to Ruskin, then on-
ward to Thomasville Georgia
where Jess would get off. The train
would continue to Chicago where
it would turnabout and travel back
south. Passengers and mail were
the primary load for these trains,
not the nationally known Ruskin
tomato.
Bill's mother tended to him, his
sister, and the family's 20 acre farm
that was adjacent farmland owned
by the Villemaires. The Villemaire
family is large and their past is in-
tertwined with the history of the
South County community. Bill's
mother possessed great strength
and fortitude that kept the fam-
ily and farm successful for many
years during the Great Depression
and in a challenging southern cli-
mate. They raised hogs, chickens,
cattle, tomatoes, strawberries, and
watermelon. They would often
sell their produce at the Farmer's
Market on Hillsborough Avenue in
Tampa. The family would be there
by 1:00 am so the buyers could
have their produce on the road by
sunup. Bill remembers purchasing
hamburgers for a nickel and Cuban
sandwiches for a mere dime. After
harvesting strawberries the family
would clean and neatly stack them
into quart containers. Eight-year-
old Bill Turner would then drive
his mother around Ruskin in the
family car to peddle the strawber-
ries to permanent and seasonal
residents.
Air conditioning wasn't the only
"luxury" they did without in those
days. There were several years
the family did not have an auto-
mobile or Jess needed it to get to
the train depot. During those times
the family would have to walk to
church or to one of the local stores
for common goods and food. Bill
remembers general stores owned
by the Bakers and the Lavendars
at the intersection of College Ave.
(Hwy. 674) and Highway 41. Nei-
ther have been in existence for


IN


IJNIFN(HM


many years. Bill also remembers
two stores owned by the Willis',
one by the Little Manatee River on
old Highway 41 and the other by
the railroad tracks on 41.
Most of the streets they traveled


were composed of sand and dirt,
mosquito infested and rutted with
sandspurs. The only road of any
substance was Highway 41 which
consisted of asphalt brick and con-
crete curbing to keep the bricks
in. Eventually it was paved over
but Bill does not recall when. He
says that in certain locations you
can still see the original bricks that
were paved over. And yes, just in
case you were wondering, they of-
ten had no shoes to traverse in.
Bill's family attended the old
Ruskin Methodist Church where
he was baptized. The current
building is not the same as it was
then, although it is roughly on the
same property. The old church
was a pinewood building without
electricity, lights, windows, and
running water. When attending
church Bill's mother would bring
a quart jar of water to quench their
thirst. During the winter an old
woodstove was used for heat. At
Christmas a pine tree would be
cut, placed in the church and deco-
rated with candles.
When I asked Bill about the
theater he provided an answer that
I did not expect. In the 1930s and
early '40s, movies were shown
at the old chamber of commerce
located by the current Ruskin
library on the south side of Marsh
Creek. The Ruskin library was
not in existence then. No popcorn
or soda was served. A gentleman

Efrain A. Costa
Army Pfc. Efrain A. Costa has
graduated from basic combat
training at Fort Jackson, Colum-
bia, SC.
During the nine weeks of train-
ing, the soldier studied the Army
mission, history, tradition and
core values, physical fitness, and
received instruction and practice
in basic combat skills, military
weapons, chemical warfare and
bayonet training, drill and cere-
mony, marching, rifle marksman-
ship, armed and unarmed combat,
map reading, field tactics, military
courtesy, military justice system,
basic first aid, foot marches, and
field training exercises.
He is the son of Efrain and
Sylvia Costa of Riverview. Costa
is a 2003 graduate of Riverview
High School.


from the projector and the second
spool mounted. It was common for
viewers never to see the contents
of the second spool because fights
would generally break out during
this intermission.
Another popular event at the old
Chamber of Commerce was the an-
nual Tomato Festival. A real crowd
pleaser was the tomato fight which
pitted the Florida boys against the
Georgia boys in a messy, heated
contest.
In 1937, Bill became a member
of Ruskin's first boy scout troop.
Troop #47 met at the Ruskin Wom-
an's Club on Hwy. 41. Also known
as the George Miller home, it was
the former residence of Ruskin
College president George M. Mill-
er. Bill showed me several pictures
from the troop's first and second
year. Most of the boys were not
able to continue the scouting pro-
gram because they were needed at
home to earn money. The days of
The Great Depression were chal-
lenging for everyone including the
Turner family.
In 1932, at age 5, Bill began first
grade at Ruskin School. It was a
beautiful red brick building with a
bell tower, auditorium, and stage.
The school was located in the
same place as the current Ruskin
Elementary School, on the South-
east corner of the intersection of
College Ave. and Hwy. 41. Before
Bill ever attended Ruskin School

Pierre J. Cyr
Army National Guard Pvt. Pierre
J. Cyr has graduated from basic
combat training at Fort Jackson,
Columbia, SC.
During the nine weeks of train-
ing, the soldier studied the Army
mission, history, tradition and
core values, physical fitness, and
received instruction and practice
in basic combat skills, military
weapons, chemical warfare and
bayonet training, drill and cere-
mony, marching, rifle marksman-
ship, armed and unarmed combat,
map reading, field tactics, military
courtesy, military justice system,
basic first aid, foot marches, and
field training exercises.
Cyr is the son of Crystal Cyr
of Ruskin. The private is a 2009
graduate of East Bay Senior High
School, Gibsonton.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 19


would drive from Ruskin to Tampa
every Saturday night with a 16 mil-
limeter black and white film. Two
spools were needed to show the
entire movie. When the first spool
was completed, it was removed


for military personnel at Omaha
Beach, the east coast of Africa, and
the Philippines. In fact Bill was
part of an armada being developed
to invade Japan when the atomic
bomb was dropped, eliminating
the need for invasion.

Ezequiel Alfaro
Army Pvt. Ezequiel Alfaro has
graduated from basic infantry
training at Fort Benning, Colum-
bus, GA.
During the nine weeks of train-
ing, the soldier received training
in drill and ceremonies, weap-
ons, map reading, tactics, military
courtesy, military justice, physical
fitness, first aid, and Army history,
core values and traditions. Addi-
tional training included develop-
ment of basic combat skills and
battlefield operations and tactics,
and experiencing use of various
weapons and weapons defenses
available to the infantry crewman.
He is the son of Herminia Alfaro
of Apollo Beach.
Alfaro is a 2009 graduate of East
Bay High School, Gibsonton.


someone stole the bell out of the
tower. Since Bill's family had a
small hand held bell it became his
duty to ring that bell for the start
of school, recess, lunch, and the
end of school. In those days the
class size was extremely small and
each teacher instructed two grade
levels in the same room. Bill's 1st
and 2nd grade teacher was Mrs.
Humphrey, his 3rd and 4th grade
teacher was Ms. Fowler. This was
during a day and age where many
teachers had to board at a local
family's home because their salary
was so small.
Sadly, before Bill graduated
from Ruskin school it mysteriously
caught on fire. It appeared that Bill
would have to complete his school
year at Wimauma School but in-
stead he attended the old Sun City
school, south of the Little Manatee
River. He referred to the area as
"the old studio place" referencing
Sun City's early beginnings as a
movie production center.
The Great Depression and World
War II brought about many chang-
es and challenges for everyone.
This was also true for the Turner
household as well. In 1943 Bill en-
listed in the Merchant Marines. He
was merely 16 years old.
Bill was one of the rare service
people to have participated in the
Atlantic and Pacific war zones. He
served in the engine room of the
Merchant Marine cargo ship Frank
R. Stockton. Ship construction
during the war was conducted at a
frenzied pace; an entire cargo ship
could be built in only 29 days. The
expedient production time would
often cause problems for the ship
and its crew. Typical cargoes
for the Stockton were halftracks,
ammunition, and food supplies


Meticulous planning and packing
of the cargo onto ships was vital.
Injuries or even death to personnel
and damages to the ships could be
caused by improper storage on the
ships. If the armored vehicles were
not secured properly, they could
roll and ram into the sides of the
ship like a battering ram. The ship
was almost sunk on more than one
occasion when the halftracks rolled
to a different position and upset its
balance. Unsecured supplies would
often shift and injure or kill crew-
members. A more obvious danger
was enemy ships. Being cargo
ships they were designed to carry
freight, not for warfare and were
often easy targets for enemy ships.
It was not uncommon for an arma-
da of 100 ships strung out for many
miles in the ocean to be guarded by
only four destroyers on each of its
sides. It was dangerous and daunt-
ing work for a 15-year-old.
Interestingly enough the service
personnel in the Merchant Marines
during World War II did not re-
ceive veteran status for almost 44
years after the war was over. Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan signed legis-
lation granting them veteran status
including the honor and privileges
that accompanied the designation.
Like many other servicemen
from the South County area, Bill
moved closer to a city to take
advantage of more plentiful and
higher paying jobs. He lived in
Tampa and worked in the TECO
power plants. After 42 years, he re-
tired and moved back to Ruskin. In
1976 he and Shirley purchased the
home owned by longtime Ruskin
veterinarian and philanthropist Dr.
Hal Ott. They lived in the house
for 13 happy years. Then they sold
it and purchased a gorgeous sail-


boat. They docked the boat at the
Bahia Beach Marina and lived on
it for several years. During part of
this time, Shirley worked at South
Bay Hospital. Some of their fond-
est memories are of the sailing
trips they took with friends.

Erik J. Anaya
Army National Guard Pvt. Erik
J. Anaya has graduated from basic
combat training at Fort Jackson,
Columbia, SC.
During the nine weeks of train-
ing, the soldier studied the Army
mission, history, tradition and
core values, physical fitness, and
received instruction and practice
in basic combat skills, military
weapons, chemical warfare and
bayonet training, drill and cere-
mony, marching, rifle marksman-
ship, armed and unarmed combat,
map reading, field tactics, military
courtesy, military justice system,
basic first aid, foot marches, and
field training exercises.
He is the son of Erik Anaya of
Riverview, and Debra Anaya of
Homosassa and a 2009 graduate of
the FL Youth Challenge Academy.


Bill Turner received an honorable discharge in 1945.






20 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Sun City's Art Russo, passionate USTA Florida volunteer,


passes at 82


United States Tennis Association
(USTA) Florida extends condolenc-
es to the family of USTA Florida
volunteer Virge "Art" Russo (1927-
2010), who died peacefully in his
sleep last week at age 82 in Sun
City Center, Fla. Upon moving to
Florida in 1989, Russo became an
active volunteer for USTA Florida,
making strong contributions to the
Adult Competitive and Volunteer
councils on which he served, and
with organizing Florida's Super Se-
nior Grand Prix tournament circuit.
"In Art's humble fashion he re-
quested no service and his ashes
will be placed under a tree next to
his daughters," said Russo's long-
time friend and top-ranked Florida
competitive player Larry Turville.
"Art made a huge contribution to
USTA Florida in many areas and
in particular as the chairman of the
Super Senior Grand Prix for many
years. He was a great mentor to me
and a wonderful person. I will miss
him a lot."
Russo was an Air Force veteran
who was part of the historic Berlin
Airlift. He moved to Florida and
took to tennis late in life, but took
to it with a passion.
"Tennis was my life, since the
first time I played tennis with my
wife in 1975," Russo said last year.
"I didn't want to just sit on my butt
[in retirement], I wanted to go out
and play tennis, and I also wanted
to contrib-
ute some-
thing."
Last
year upon
receiving
the USTA
Florida





South Shore
Christian Women
meet

South Shore Christian Women's
Connection presents UMBREL-
LAS by Inspirational speaker, Ann
Parrish, who will entertain with
stories about, "Bugs in my teeth
and other white knuckle stories
from a motorcycle enthusiast."
The presentation and luncheon
will be held at Club Renaissance,
2121 South Pebble Beach Blvd.
on Thursday July 8. Doors open at
1 am, luncheon and program from
11:30am-1:30pm. Reservations or
cancellations before noon Mon-
day, July 5. Cost is $17 inclusive.
All ladies welcome, no member-
ship required. Sponsored by South
Shore Christian Women's Connec-
tion, Affiliated with Stonecroft
Ministries.
Call 938-4320 or 383-7540 or
email atlll bullCi c(- -lii il 1coin for
more information.


Inspirational speaker, Ann Par-
rish.


Male Merit Award, one of USTA
Florida's highest honors, he re-
flected on his years of service to the
Florida tennis community.
"Right now I believe the Merit
Award...that's it...I've achieved my
goal," said Russo last year upon re-
ceiving the award, and comparing
it to the many tennis honors he has
received throughout his career. "I'll
never make the hall of fame," he
said smiling, "but I've achieved my
goal with the Merit Award."
In additional to national recogni-
tion from the USTA as a recipient
of the USTA Senior Service Award,
as a player Russo traveled to Ger-
many, Austria, Australia, Turkey,
Singapore, and Japan to participate
in ITF World Championships Ten-
nis senior events, representing the
United States.
"Art will be tremendously missed
by his USTA Florida family," said
USTA Florida President Donn Da-
vis. "He was an extremely knowl-
edgeable tennis enthusiast and one
of the most kind and thoughtful
people you'd ever want to meet. He
was for many, many years a fixture
on our Adult Competitive Council
and in recent years, he was the driv-
ing force on our Volunteer Council
behind our updated and streamlined
awards system. He was a good
friend, one from which I sought
council on more than one occasion,
and I will miss him dearly."
Russo retired from his tennis ac-
tivities shortly after receiving the
USTA Florida Male Merit Award
last year. USTA Florida's Lynne
Salus, the organization's volunteer
development and meetings man-
ager, worked closely throughout
the years with Russo on the Vol-


unteer Council and in his work on
the Awards Committee, where for
years he in turn helped to honor the
commitment of other USTA Florida
volunteers.
"Art was a wonderful volunteer
and friend," Salus said. "He was a
very humble man and didn't want to
be in the limelight. Although win-
ning the Merit Award was truly a
highlight in his life and something
he was very proud of and excited
about. He did a phenomenal job as
the Awards Committee chair. Al-
though I knew that he was retiring
for all the right reasons in Decem-
ber, I was very sad to see him leave
our volunteer corp. He touched my
life in a way that I will always trea-
sure and he will truly be missed."
Since tennis and USTA Florida
were such a special part of Russo's
life, the family has requested that
donations be made to the USTA
Florida Section Foundation, 1
Deuce Court, Suite 100, Daytona
Beach, Fla., 32124. Notes may be
sent to his family at 1304 Caloosa
Lake Court, Sun City Center, Fla.,
33573.


CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH
SundayWorship: Blended 8:00 a.m.
Contemporary 9:40 a.m.
Traditional 11:15 a.m. i BaBendRd.
Nursery Provided CrossRoads: Bible Study, Worship: Wed. 7 p.m.
Pastor Jack R. Palzer
5309 U.S. Highway 41 North Apollo Beach A
(acrossfromMiraBay) www.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1305 N

St. John the Divine Episcopal Church
Growing by Faith from Generation to Generation
Rev. Tracy H. Wider Church Office 813-645-1521
SUNDAY SERVICES: 9 am Contemporary Service and Sunday School
at West Campus, S.R. 674 and 9th Street SE, Ruskin
8 am Traditional Service and 11 am Holy Communion with Choir at East Campus
at 1015 Del Webb Blvd., SCC
All Worship Services with Holy Communion and Healing Holy Oil


Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (Behind Suntrust Bank)
ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: (Nov.-April .....................8:30 a.m. Day Care Available
Mon. Fri.
Rev. John M. Bartha and all year)..................... 10:45 a.m. 6 am 6 pFm
SPhone: 645-1241 Sunday School ....................... 9:30 a.m. call 645-6198

REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH-ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center, FL 33573-5354
Rev. Dr. Peter Stiller, Pastor 634-1292
Saturday Worship: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion....First & Third Sunday Bible Class...Thursday 10 am, Guests Welcome

First Church of Christ, Scientist
Ruskin Sun City Center (813) 645-6102
204 Second St. N.W, Ruskin, Florida 33570
Sunday Service Sunday School .................................................. 10AM
Wednesday Testimony Meeting .................................................... PM
Reading Room. Wednesday....................................................4- 4:50 PM
ALL ARE WELCOME www.spirituality.com

F"RST BAPTIST CH U.RCH

820 COLLEGE AVE. W.
RUSKIN, FL 33570
645-6439
t %www.fbcruskin.org
A Resource for Families
Sunday School............................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship............8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Dr. Barry Rumsey
Evening Service...........................6:00 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCHOOL
K-2
Wednesday Night Service................7:00 p.m. THROUGH 12TH
Awana.............................................7:00 p.m. GRADE


Couple announces engagement
Jack and Joyce Kennedy of Valencia Lakes, Wimauma, Florida announce
the engagement of their daughter, Jacqueline Anne (Jackie) of Orlando to
Brad Michael Garretson of Orlando, son of Gary and Donna Garretson of
Orlando. All were formerly residents of Wellington, Florida. Jackie is the
granddaughter of Grace Mantel and the late Gerald Mantel of Kings Point.
Jackie was proposed to in a very special way. Knowing her love for ani-
mals, Brad planned an outing at Discovery Cove in Orlando where they
could interact with the dolphins. A dolphin swam over to Jackie with a
buoy that said, "Jackie, will you marry me?"
Miss Kennedy graduated from Wellington High School in 1997 and from
Florida Atlantic University with a B.A. in Psychology in 2001. Currently
she helps Brad with his computer business while doing work for medical
offices part-time.
Brad attended Wellington schools until he moved to Orlando with his
family in his junior year at WHS. He graduated from Cypress Creek
High School in Orlando in 1996. He attended Valencia Community Col-
lege studying for his degree in Computer Science while taking specialized
courses in computers outside of the campus setting. His love of computers
became his living. He now owns his own business, CLogic Group. The
wedding date is October 10, 2010, with a marital mass and reception in the
Tampa area.


fLnj
CHURCH
Come and experience the power of
Jesus to change your life.

Sunday @ 9 & 11 AM Servicio en Esparfol @ 6 PM

www.aplace4everyone.org

2322 11th Ave. SE Ruskin, FL 813.645.3337


S riendship Baptist Church
Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist)
1511 El Rancho Dr.
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Phone/Fax:
i' 813-633-5950


Sunday
9 a .m ...............
1 a .m ..............
10 a.m. & 6 p.m.


Bible Study
Bible Study
....Worship


Wednesday
6 p.m.... Prayer Meeting/Bible Study


Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC
Meets in the Social Hall of the Beth Israel Synagogue
1115 E. Del Webb Blvd.
Thursday, 7:00 PM Call 633-0396


We all make mistakes but everyone
makes different mistakes.
Ludwig von Beethoven


NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where God's Love is Shared"
U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL 645.1121 www.nbcor.org C
Sunday School for all ages 9:30 AM SBC
Morning Worship 10:45 AM Wanted: People Who Want to Grow
Evening Worship 6:00 PM and Live for Jesus!
Full Wednesday Schedule for all ages

North River Church of Christ i
Non-Instrumental-
13885 U.S. Hwy 301 South
(Just South of the Manatee County Line)
Minister: Howard Johnson Office 941-776-1134
Services: Sunday 10:00am, 11:00am & 6:00pm ce 41-6- 4
Wednesday 7:00pm Home 813-754-1776

SFirst Baptist Church of Gibsonton
"We love because He first loved us." 1 John 4:19
Traditional Worship Service *Sunday School 9:30 A.M.
Old-Time Gospel Hymns ; *Morning Worship 10:30 AM.
Nursery Available Sunday Evening 6:00 PM.
SInterpreter for the Deaf Mid-Week (Wed.) 7:00 P1.
9912 Indiana St. Hwy 41 & Estelle alcolm S. Clements, Pstor
MaGibsonton, FL 33534 ...813-617-1301

We" e Ae. EVERETTrr TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ f
1611 First St. SW Ruskin, FL 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL--
SERVICES: Sunday... ........................9:30 & 10:30 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday................7:00 p.m. -,-3

PRINCE OF PEACE CATHOLIC CHURCH
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573
Phone 634-2328 Fax 633-6670
M asses: Sunday ........................................................... 8:00, 10:00 a.m ., Noon
Saturday V igil ................................................4:00 p.m .
D a ily ................................................................ 8 :0 0 a .m .
www.popcc.org Confessions: Monday Friday 7:30 a.m., Saturday 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.


JULY 1, 2010


C4









OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 21


SCC Methodist present Voices of Freedom
The United Methodist Church of Sun City Center, 1210 Del Webb
Blvd. West, is presenting Voices of Freedom at 9:30am and 11am on
Sunday, July 4. With quotes from our American forefathers to scripture
to newly composed narrative and music, Voices of Freedom explores
the meaning of freedom in a spiritual context. With original music by
Joseph Martin, these special worship services will feature the church's
fine Chancel Choir accompanied by a nine piece professional brass and
percussion ensemble. Local vocalist Kathy
Straub will also perform Proud to be an Amer-
ican. The congregation will be sharing in
God of the Ages, America the Beautiful and
God Bless America. The text was written by
parishioner Carol Stewart, and the hour-long
work is sure to make all "proud to be Ameri-
cans!" All worship services are free and open
to the public. For more information about this and other special worship
services at the United Methodist Church of Sun City Center, call Jeff
Jordan, Director of Music and the Arts, at 813-634-2539.



Beth Israel

The Jewish Congregation of Sun City Center
1115 Del Webb Blvd. East
Sun City Center (813) 634-2590
SHABBAT SERVICES FRIDAY EVENING AT 7:45 PM
TORAH STUDY SATURDAY AT 12 NOON
Rabbi: Philip Aronson Cantor: Dr. Sam Isaac


Un iritlity tr li
SSpirituality Rather Than "Religion"


Beth Israel's Social Hall
1115 Del Webb E. Sun City Center, FL
www.un itycommun ityofjoy.com


Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
Tel. 813-298-7745


t THE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO THE SERVICES NOW WORSHIPPING IN THE "CHAPEL"
AT SUN CITY CENTER FUNERAL HOME 10:30 AM ON SUNDAYS
NO CREED...BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE
1851 RICKENBACKER DRIVE 813-938-4955
Minister DR. DAVID CAMPBELL


( iT/e JetIos/ Gurc o/,uof City Cenier
The Church of Open Hearts... Open Minds... Open Doors
1210 W. Del Webb Blvd. 634-2539
Worship Services:
S, Saturday................. 4:00 p.m. Creason Hall (Traditional Service)
1 Sunday....................8:15 a.m. in Sanctuary (Traditional Service)
9:30 a.m. Creason Hall (The Oasis)
y F i 10:55 a.m. Sanctuary (Traditional with Chancel Choir)
SFellowship time ... T .... I,.; .. I. r .... 10:15am. and 11 a.m. in Creason Hall
Gfod~sl ov- e ww '."CC UlI M.c.om
PASTORS: DR. WARRENLANGER, REV GARYBULLOCK
Communion First Sunday ofEach Month


St. Andrew Presbyterian Church

I Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.
Prayers with anointing for healing and
J& wholeness during worship the second Sunday
of every month.
A Stephen Pastor: Dr. Gerald Iwerks
Ministry Church
Meet friends in Fellowship Hall after the Service
Refreshments served


1239 Del Webb Blvd. West
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Church is Handicap accessible


Phone: 813-634-1252
For Information visit:
www.standrewatscc.org


Obituaries


Unity in Brandon moving

Unity in Brandon will move
to its new location July 4. Wear
patriotic colors of red, white, and
blue in celebration of the move
Sunday, July 11 when Dr. Deri
Ronis will speak.
The new location is at the Bran-
don Woman's Club, 129 N. Moon
Ave., Brandon. Check the web-
site for a map: unityinbrandon.
org. The phone number is 813-
263-6155. Dr.Deri Ronis, minister


Trinity Baptist choir performs
The Trinity Baptist Church choir as they prepare to perform at the an-
nual Memorial Day ceremony. The choir, under the direction of Pastor
Jim Feist, performs during the Sunday service as well as outside events.
For information on the church, please call 634-4228.


Voices of Freedom
Voices of Freedom will play on
Sunday, July 4 from 9:30-11a.m.
at United Methodist Church, 1210
Del Web Blvd. W Quotes from
our American forefathers to scrip-
ture to newly composed narrative
and music, Voices of Freedom ex-
plores the meaning of freedom in a
spiritual context. Chancel Choir
accompanied by a nine piece pro-
fessional brass and percussion
ensemble: Our Heritage of Faith,
Community of Faith, If My Peo-


ple, Prayer of Our Time, God of
Ages, America the Beautiful, etc.
For more information, call Jeff
Jordan, Director of Music and the
Arts 813.634.2539.


Sp SOUTHSIDE
Loving People
Preacingheoe BAPTIST CHURCH
S W4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 South
(4 miles south of Ruskin)
DAN COLLINS, PASTOR JIM KRAUSE, MUSIC DIRECTOR
CL- LCOLUINITY INVITED-
BIBLE STUDY 9:30 AM
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE 10:55 AM
SUNDAY EVENING SERVICE 6:00 PM
WEDNESDAY PRAYER SERVICE 7:00 PM
ADULTS, YOUTH, CHILDREN
For information, call 645-4085 Monday-Thursday




Saint Anne Catkolie Chuteh

Fr. John McEvoy
Pastor
813-645-1714
SaintAnneRuskin.org

U.S. Hwy. 41 106 11th Ave. NE Ruskin
SouthShore: r- .I .1., Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton
0 MASSES
Saturday Vigil M ass....................................................... 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass..................................... 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Holy Days....................................... Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Daily ......................................................... M onday thru Friday 8:00 a.m.
Espatiol................................Domingo 12:00 p.m.; Miercoles 7:30 p.m.
Confession......................... Wednesday 6:15 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.
1 Nursery Available for 10:00 a.m. Mass








pro0- spe o n o o ham0ou
plnstogie ouhoe nda0u


Jack Eastep
Jack Eastep, 63, passed away
Saturday, June 26, 2010 after a two
year battle with brain cancer.
He is survived by his wife Brenda;
his mother, Julia; four children Jeffrey
(Kim), Stewart (Melissa), Wesley
(Jenny), and Kathleen. He also leaves
behind four grandchildren: Ivy, Alexia,
Stewart and Sarah, and three sisters:
Julie Christian, Kathy Merhzad, and
Cindy Zimmer.
He worked in Information
Technologies for 35 years, loved
sailing, camping and traveling. He was
a member of Northside Baptist Church.
In lieu of flowers, donations can be
made to Life Path Hospice or Tish Brain
Tumor Center at Duke University.
Memorial Service will be held at
Northside Baptist Church Thursday,
July 1 at 6pm.

/ n Loving lMemory

Christie ellffonzalez
Seyt 18 i'C--- Juy 2, 2007


We thought of you with love
today, but that is nothing new.
We thought about you yester-
day
and days before that too.
We think of you in silence, we
often speak your name.
Now all we have is memories,
and your picture in a frame.
Your memory is our keepsake,
with which we'll never part.
God has you in his keeping,
we have you in our hearts.
Harry Gonzalez Jr. &
The Lopez Family


Henry Carrai
Henry Carrai passed away on May
10, 2010 of natural causes in Sun City
Center. He is survived by his loving wife,
Gloria Carrai;his daughter, Phoebe
Carrai of Cambridge, Ma; his daughter
Sue Carrai, his son in law, Mark Rohr
and his grandson, Nathan Rohr of
Woburn, MA. He led a very happy and
musical life playing in the Swing Band,
the String Orchestra and singing in the
choir at Prince of Peace Church. There
was a small funeral at Prince of Peace
Church on May 13, 2010 and there will
be a Memorial Mass said in Sandwich
,MA in August 2010. Donations can be
made to the SCC Emergency Squad.


JULY 1, 2010






22 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


4-;I 2'4~ ~c ,- - - ~u r~
IL.~~- -- -
2 -e --L ~
-- -i --II -c -f -ila -
-r --
-- -C -J ~
-- -- -s-
-, -5~C.1F 4-

-- -~- c4 c -Y
~ --- -


--46'b '


/ am from Louisiana and I know our beaches are our home,
our way of life and our livelihood. Protecting the coast and
cleaning up the beaches is very personal to me.
Keith Seilhan, BP Cleanup


Making This Right


Beaches
Claims

Cleanup

Economic Investment

Environmental Restoration

Health and Safety

W wildlife


For information visit: bp.com
deepwaterhorizonresponse.com
facebook.com/bpamerica
twitter.com/bp_amenca
youtube.com/bp


At BP we have taken full responsibility for the cleanup in the Gulf. We are
committed to keeping you informed.

Looking For Oil
Crews are cleaning Gulf Coast beaches 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
When oil is spotted, the Response Command Center is notified, a
Shore Cleanup Assessment Team (SCAT) is mobilized and cleanup begins
immediately. Cleanup efforts are being coordinated from 17 staging
areas in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. Over 33,000 people
are involved in the cleanup operation.

If you see oil on the beach, please call 1-866-448-5816 and we'll send a
team to clean it up.

Cleaning Up the Beaches
The number of people mobilized to clean up the beaches depends on the
size of the affected area. Individual teams can number in the hundreds,
and thousands of additional workers remain on-call. Working with the
Coast Guard, our teams continue cleaning up until the last bit of oil has
been removed. As a result, in most cases when oil reaches a beach, it is
even possible to keep it open.

Our Responsibility
Our beach cleanup operations will continue until the last of the oil has
been skimmed from the sea, the beaches and estuaries have been cleaned
up, and the region has been pronounced oil-free. And none of the costs
of our efforts will be paid by taxpayers.

Our commitment is that we'll be here for as long as it takes. We may not
always be perfect, but we will make this right.


For assistance, please call:
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
www.florndagulfresponse.com


@ 2010 BRP E&P


bp


JULY 1, 2010







JUL 100TESOPR2


=- l THE SHOPPER
To place an ad call THE SHOPPER
813.645.3111 ext. 201
Fax: 813.645.1792 L
$15.50
up to 20 words M & M Printing Co., Inc
300 addl. word weekly publisher of the
Deadline is Monday The Observer News, The SCC Observer and The Riverview Current
Deadline is Monday )I 114- -CA


at 4pm


0 12 Woodland Estates Ave SW
Ruskin, Florida 33570


The Observer News will
be closed Monday,
July 5 in observance
of Independence Day.
Deadline for classified
line ads will move to
Friday, July 2 at 4pm. for
the July 8 edition


105 PERSONAL
Prayer to St. Jude. May the Sacred
Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified,
loved & preserved throughout the world,
now & forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus
pray for us. St. Jude worker of miracles
pray for us. St Jude helper of the hope-
less, pray for us. Say this prayer 9
times a day by the 8th day your prayer
will be answered. It has never known to
fail. Publication must be promised. My
prayers have been answered. VS


FARMER'S MKT

^^E200


260 FRUITS/VEG.


Morgan Farms
Home grown produce, ice cold water-
melon, fresh seafood, live blue crabs
& more. Special orders on seafood call
Dani 813-892-8456. US 41, One miles
south of the Little Manatee River. New
summer hours Thursday thru Sunday,
10am-6pm. 813-645-5208





310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana
St., Gibsonton (1 block off US 41,1 block
north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday thru
Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture,
lots misc. Ministry First Baptist Gibson-
ton. 813-671-0036 to donate
Garage /retirement sale. Retired teacher.
Office/school items, books, audio tapes,
household, dishware, movies, furniture,
glassware. Thursday thru Saturday
plus? 7am-?? 2006 El Rancho, SCC.
July 1, 2 & 3. 9am-? La-Z-Boy rocker
recliner, new clothes, shoes, glassware,
bedding sets & much more. 401 Ricken-
backer Dr., SCC


SCalvary's
y nael ttic
e Thrift Store
NOW OPEN Wednesday,
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. Noon

25% OFF
EVERYTHING
in the store
1424 E. College Ave. Ruskin
813-641-7790
Ministnj ofCalvary Lutheran Church


310 GARAGE /YARD SALE



New Summer Hours:
T-F 9 to 4:30 Sat 9 to 3:30

SENIOR

TUESDAYS

Most items discounted
including Clothing,
Accessories, Collectibles, Art,
Books, and some Furniture.
Donations Needed
Please call (813) 645-5255
1311 3rd St. NE Ruskin
(Behind St.Anne Church
& Next to Kennco Mfg.)

Yard sale. Saturday, July 3, 8am-2pm.
Furniture, TVs, clothes, books, misc.
13208 Laraway Court, Riverview.

Need a Sale?
Estate or moving sales, we do it all.
Clean before & after, sort, organize,
price, advertise & our promise to you
that we make old things look new
& new things look newer. Call you
personal coordinator, Wanda or Angie
for an appointment. 813-662-3888 or
813-431-5550

312 ESTATE SALES





Dealer in Gold & Silver Coins
Domestic & Foreign
12% and over
on SILVER COINS
(depending on market)
Call for private consultation or appointment
All transactions are strictly confidential
(813) 634-3816. cell (813) 503-4189
"Your local dealer for over20years"


pITTIE'S
,STfITE
0l1LES

741-0225
SCell: 382-7536
Personalized
Service


Advertise in the newspaper
that your community is
reading.


312 ESTATE SALES


Let us get done in one day what it
takes the others guys a week to do.
We will pack-up and pick-up one room
or the entire house for a QUICK,
PROFITABLE, TROUBLE-FREE
EXPERIENCE.
CALL BUTRFmwIE.D'S AUCTIONS




www.ButterfleldsAuctions.com
Butterfield Auctions AB2706/AU3549


MARIE E.RUDY
ESTATE
SALES

Serving the
SouthShore
Area


Your home will be staged for
best results. Working in
Sun City Center for 23 years.
Please feel free to call about
the sale or its contents.
Bonded Licensed
Cell: 508-0307
or Eve: 633-1173


345 OFFICE SUPPLIES

Office Furniture
For sale. Conference table & chairs,
reception room furniture, reception-
ist desk, five desks, state of the art
phone system with eight phones, three
executive chairs, short file cabinets,
refrigerator & microwave. Pay pennies
on the dollar. Sharon Van Loan, Golf&
Sea Realty 813-765-0845

360 GOLF CARTS
Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade. Char-
gers, parts all related. Ronny's Carts &
Parts. 813-645-4515 or 813-484-9855

Golf cart 2008, Easy Go. Like new, all
customized. Must see. $4,995. Call Don
Stanley. 813-634-1350
We buy golf carts, any condition. We pay
top dollar for used carts, running or not.
Same day pickup. 813-300-0114

Please Recycle This Paper


390 MISC. FOR SALE
New Troy Built generator. Briggs &
Stratton motor. Never used. 8,000 start,
5,550 watts. $500 firm. 813-313-6838
Jack LaLane power juicer, paid $120
used 3 months $75. Dell desktop, small
scratch on flatscreen, external C drive
added $50, (works ok). Epsom printer
w/ unopened inks $50. HP printer,
fast $60. Alpha Smart lightweight NEO
notetaker, advertised in Writers Digest
for $280 w/ software & case. like new
$150. Antique rare vinyl & pre-vinyl 78
albums. Operas, show tunes, news
broadcasts from 1930s. Two unreleased
Bing Crosby "Fluffs" from sound stage
collectors. 813-672-2727






425 SLIPS OR STORAGE
South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special-
izing in outside storage for RVs, boats &
trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay-
Storage.com

Ramey's Business Park
RV & boat storage & heavy equipment.
1/4 mile from Williams Park boat ramp.
813-410-9607 or 813-849-1469





511 HOUSES FOR SALE
Cypress Creek area. Elegant La Paloma
Village home 4br/2ba/2cg, 2214 sf with
pool, ungraded laminated flooring in liv-
ing area. Gourmet kitchen with Corian
counter tops, all wood kitchen cabinets
& new appliances. Move-in condition.
Just reduced & priced at $229,900.
Prudential Robertson Realty, Call Bob
Ippoliti 813-362-2103

For Rent or Sale
1025 Bluewater Dr., SCC on water
with awesome view, irrigation from
pond, two master suites & inside utility
room, 2 car garage & convenient loca-
tion. For sale $119,900 with optional
owner financing. Annual rental $1,100
monthly Sharon Van Loan, Golf& Sea
Realty 813-765-0845


MAKE O FEKI
SCC Sierra in Greenbriar, oak floors, replumbed,
interior redecorated. Over 1,500 sq. ft......$134,900
NEW LISTING, Condo in The Knolls, near private pool
..in the $40s
SCC Worthington 3BR/2BA, 2,500 sq. ft., solar heated
spa, new flooring, caged patio, vacant............. $249,000
RENTALS
2BR/2BFumn.on Gloucester.......................$750/month
2BR/2B, 2-car garage in Greenbriar...... $1000 /month


511 HOUSES FOR SALE

WIMAUMA
322 Like New. Valencia Lakes. $195,000
2.5 Acres. Lonesome Acres. $82,000
3.59 Acres. Seminole Trail. $110,000
*10 Acres on S.R. 672. $225,000
RIVERVIEW
3/2 TH w/Garage. Close to Mall. $169,000
TERRA CEIA BAY
4.33 Acres. 3,423 sq. ft. $1,400.000
GIBSONTON
*3/2 Pool Home +1/1 House on 41 $260,000
3/2 Mobile Home. Needs Septic. $40,000
APOLLO BEACH
3/2 Waterfront Mobile. 55+. $49,000
3/2/1 w/Large Backyard. $175,000
4/3.5/2 Hemingway Estates. $199,000-$320,000
2/2 Waterfront Condo. $195,000
3/3 in Bimini Bay. $199,000
RUSKIN
3/1 on Duplex Lot + Duplex Lot. $67,000
S4/1.5 on 8.5 Acres + Barn. Plans. $320,000
Mobile on Little Manatee River. $259,000
Commercial Lot. Shell Point W. $89,000



FABULOUS BAYFRONT CONDO,
great views of Tampa Bay, St. Pete &
Skyway, and unique sunsets!
2BR/2BA elegantly furnished, open floor
plan, large balcony, covered parking.
Amenities include pools, fishing pier,
restaurants & tennis courts. $209,000.
GORGEOUS LOT ON RIVER, OWNER
FINANCING: Deep water, large dock, great
view of water, great fishing! Beautiful fence
and gate, all utilities on site. Ready for your
dream home or mobile home. $239,000.
NEAT 2BR/2BA M-HOME across from
golf course: split BR plan, bright living
area, new laminate or carpet floors,
screen porch, carport, shed. $52,500.
CUTE 2BR HOUSE, owners need to sell.
Carport, newer metal roof, shed in backyard,
great location a block from river. $65,000.


515 VILLAS FOR SALE


Sun City Bargain!
1st floor, spacious 2br/2ba condo.
King's Point, gated 55+ community,
great community amenities. Appraised
$65K asking $53,900. Owner, 813-
850-1173

530 HOMESITES OR LOTS
Lot for sale. For mobile home or RV. 1/2
block from Little Manatee River. Located
on 39th St., Ruskin. $320 monthly. 813-
210-0162 or 813-690-1836



M. H. HOUSIN


560 M.H. ON LOTS


Mobile home for sale Eastwood Mobile
Home Park, Gibsonton. Call Heather
813-677-5726

Check out our web site
observernews.net


* 2 Off Bronze or Silver

$4 Off Gold $5 Off Platinum
Full Service Car Wash Only
Regular price $11.99, $15.99, $19.99 & $25.95 -
Not valid with other specials or discounts. *1.50 extra for vans and SUVs
ll- -Expires 8/1/10 NOBN

HOURS: M-F 8 am-5:30 pm Sat. 8 am-5 pm Now Open Sundays 10 am-4 pm
MA' 3 TT ET


Hand Wax with Platinum Wash
$4995
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Expires 8/1/10
I -_ Come Experience Our SERVICE
SCome Experience Our SERVICE!


'e' ^ 6S ^^
E-^ '3 ,- O -


made.rudy54@yahoo.com
813-938-5103


THE SHOPPER 23


JULY 1 2010







24 THE SHOPPER
565 M.H. IN PARKS
Small mobile homes/travel trailers with
Florida room addition. From $1,000.
River Oaks RV, on Little Manatee 813-
645-2439

14ft wide mobile home on canal in Ha-
waiian Isle RV Resort, Ruskin. 2br/1 ba,
2 lanai, carport. Close to pool & club
house. $23,000. 813-641-2440






610 WATERFRONT RENTALS
The Dolphin House, Apollo Beach,
efficiency apartments on water. Boat
docking /fishing. Pool, laundry. $185
weekly, $185 deposit. No pets. 813-
850-5217

611 HOUSES FOR RENT

For Rent, Immaculate
1224 W. Del Webb, SCC. charming
2br/2ba single family home on golf
course, with water view & enclosed
lanai, new carpet & ceramic tile, nicely
furnished. Annual $950, seasonal
$1,400 monthly. Bring your toothbrush.
Owner/agent realtor Sharon Van Loan
813-765-0845

For Rent, Spacious
368 Club Manor, SCC. 2br/2ba villa
on golf course, two master suites,
ceramic tile & new carpet, fresh paint,
seasonal rent. Furnished /unfurnished.
$950. Neutral throughout for your
personal touch. Owner/ agent realtor,
Sharon Van Loan 813-765-0845

SCC house for rent. 2br/1.5ba, com-
pletely renovate from inside to outside.
Monthly rent $795 plus security deposit
with yearly lease. Please call 813-649-
1599 for details

S & R Properties
3, 2 & 1 bedrooms. No pets. Ruskin,
Gibsonton area. RV lots available 813-
310-1888 or 813-849-1469

55+ Community
2br with carport /laundry room, with
lawn care, water, sewer, trash col-
lection, fitness & recreation card.
813-634-9695


611 HOUSES FOR RENT

812 & 629 La Jolla.
Sun City Center, 2br/2ba. $895
monthly, carport, laundry room. Lease
required. (2 homes). 813-643-1274

Gibsonton /Riverview area. 3br/1.5ba,
eat-in kitchen, living room, dining room,
family room & bonus room with washer &
dryer. All appliances, large fenced yard.
$975 monthly $1,000 security deposit.
813-672-1933 or 813-220-4525

Sun City Center
2br/2ba/2cg on bass filled lake Com-
pletely remodeled. 3 pools /fitness
center. $995 monthly. 813-500-1657

612 APTS. FOR RENT
Riverview 2br/1 ba, CHA, water, garbage
& maintenance included. $600 monthly
$600 deposit. 813-239-4293 or 813-
412-0089

2br/1ba, CHA, block. Electric, water,
garbage, dishwasher w/ dryer. $800
monthly $200 weekly. Call 813-352-
0510

613 CONDOS FOR RENT



NEW Condos
and Townhouses
(off7thAve. NE in Ruskin)
3BR/2BA Condos with screened lanai.
$850 per month.
(Water & Basic Cable Included)
3BR/2.5BA Townhouse with garage.
$1000 per month.
(Water & Basic Cable Included)
3BR/2.5BA Townhouse (1842 sq. ft.)
with garage. $1150 per month.
(Water & Basic Cable Included)
with approved application
and 1 year lease
SMove-in Incentives a




The Observer News will be closed
Monday, July 5 in observance of Inde-
pendence Day. Deadline for classified
line ads will move to Friday, July 2 at
4pm. for the July 8 edition.


619 VILLAS FOR RENT

Sun City Center
Fully furnished. Immaculate
2br/2ba/2cg in 55+ Clubhouse, 3
pools, golf. 6 months or monthly avail-
able. Tricia 239-293-6771

For Rent, Clean
409 Faraday Trail, Kings Point. Enjoy
2 passes for many amenities. Fur-
nished 2br/2ba, villa w/ laundry room
& lanai, close to shopping & clubs.
Mrs. Sparkle cleans here. Unit is do
comfortable. Seasonal rent. $1,100
minimum one month. Call Sharon Van
Loan at Golf& Sea Realty Realtor.
813-765-0845

630 M.H. RENTALS

For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With
A/C. 813-677-1086

For rent. One bedroom RV, includes
electric & water. $140 weekly. Perfect
for one person. No pets. Also 2br trailer
813-690-0768

New mobile homes w/ lower rates.
Water, garbage & pest control
included.
(2 Weeks Free)
L&N Trailer Park, Gibsonton. 813-
381-4830

3br/2ba DWMH on one acre private lot
near 1-75 & SCC. CHA, porches, pets
OK. 813-645-4708, 813-892-5802 or
352-543-5566

For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home near
shopping center in Gibsonton. 813-677-
8789, 813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

Ruskin 1br/1ba mobile home on quiet
street. Waterfront, fish off dock. Utilities
included. No smoking, no pets. Best
suited for single person or couple. Refer-
ences needed. Rent $175 weekly plus
$300 deposit. 813-363-6001

Two bedroom $165 weekly, plus secu-
rity deposit. R & M Mobile Home Park
in Gibsonton. 813-677-7509

644 COMMERCIAL
Gibsonton area. 40x60 building on 1/2
acre. $1,000 monthly 813-690-1836


645 OFFICE SPACE












$250 per month





646 WAREHOUSE SPACE
Garage & mini storage rooms for rent.
Pirates Treasure Cove, Gibsonton.
813-677-1137







680 ADULT/CHILD CARE
Ruskin United Methodist preschool, ap-
proved VPK provider is now accepting
applications for the fall School star Aug.
24 Call 813-645-6198, CHC-110087


JULY 1, 2010

680 ADULT/ CHILD CARE
Now accepting applications for enroll-
ment. Age 6 weeks -12yrs. Half or full
day. Ruskin United Methodist pre school.
Call 813-645-6198. CHC110087

Caregiver/ companion. Live in capabil-
ity. AM to PM. Kings Point resident &
Apollo Beach resident. Can Jan 813-
226-7217

Licensed male CNA available. Part-time,
evenings & weekends for in-home care.
Licensed/ references available upon re-
quest. 813-309-0298, ask for Shane






705 CLEANING

Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integrity.
Call for free estimate. 7days a week.
Move-in, move-out, rentals. Insured,
bonded, licensed. Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean

Experienced, organized, reliable quality
cleaning. Many years experience with
quality homes & particular clients. Refer-
ences available. Call Kay today for free
estimate. 813-447-4771


N=< CALL (813) 645-3211
PauDMAN Serving South Hillsborough County since 1924. Celebrating 86 Years

DICKMAN- Swnwww.dickmanrealty.com 1924 -2010


R E A L T Y dickman@tampabay.rr.com

RUSKIN COMMERCIAL RENTAL: Huge warehouse + Air Condit. Office space, 2BA insulated roof, loading NEW COMMERCIAL LISTING! Great commercial property with 158 ft of frontage on Highway 41 (1.04 acres
dock, roll-up doors security system, 1 acre lot: $2,200 /mo + deposit. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 MOL). Property is zoned Cl (commercial intensive) and is currently rented to an auto/service/repair garage.
HORSES WELCOME: this Ruskin property offers 8.8 acres mostly cleared and fenced, 3BR/2BA house with Special features include: huge building (3,192 sq.ft.) with new roof, three bays, two offices, and lots of room for
garage, large detached barn, and perfect secluded location, close to main Hwy & shopping. $399,000 CALL storage. Adjacent property with 128 feet (MOL) of waterfront is also for sale. $279,000 CALL KAY PYE
CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
COMMERCIAL ACRE ON US 41: cleared, long frontage on Hwy, zoned CG. Property has 2 small rentals sold REDUCED!! OVER 8 ACRES REZONED FOR 5 HOMES. One well and septic in placeLocated at the
as-is. Great business opportunities. All utilities on site. $399,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 deadend of 30th St. SE on west side 330 Ft of road frontage. Priced to sell at $154,900 .ROXANNE
WESTBROOK 748-2201 or KAY PYE 361-3672.
GORGEOUS LOT ON RIVER, OWNERS FINANCING:eep water, large dock, greatfishing! Elegantly GREAT LOCATION NEAR THE RIVER! 3BR/2BA pool home with an extra large yard. Very well maintained
fenced and gated, all utilities on site, PD=MU Zoning (House, M/Home). $239,000 CALL CLAIRE TORT property on over 1/3 acre lot. Screened pool was recently re-coated. $159,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or
363-7250- ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
RUSKIN GREAT 3BR2BA POOL, HOUSE ON 2 FENCED LOTS: repainted, recarpeted, tiles in living area, WATERFRONT!!! Calling all boaters and fishermen or anyone just wanting to live in paradise!! Enjoy the
large screen porch overlooking pool and backyard, 2-car garage. Home on 1 lot, second lot nicely landscaped. beautiful views of the Ruskin Inlet from most rooms in this nicely maintained 3BR/2BA, 2-car garage home.
$159,000 CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 Located on a quiet cul-de-sac this property has an enclosed pool/spa as well as an open deck, dock, davits
AFFORDABLE CLEAN 3BR/1BA HOUSE ON 1/3 ACRE FENCED LOT: freshly repainted, new plumbing & and much, much more. Call today and make an appointment to see this lovely home! $260,000 CALL CATHY
sewer, new central air & heat, utility -room, carport, large shed in backyard. Low taxes, no HOA. Now $54,500 GRIGGS 391-8653
CALL CLAIRE TORT, 363-7250 BEAUTIFUL PROPERTY -- SUN CITY CENTER. 2BR/2BA, 2-car garage home built in 1994 has been
NEAT 2BR/2BA M-HOME ACROSS FROM GOLF COURSE: split BR plan, open living area, new meticulously maintained with new a/c in 2006, a new roof in 2007 and much, much more. Call today to see this
laminate/carpet floors, screen porch, carport, shed. $52,500 CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250 beautiful property which is priced to sell at $139,500 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
WATERFRONT HOME, JUST REDUCED $10,000. Very nice 3BR/2BA+ den, recently repainted, large inside INVESTOR SPECIAL!! 2005 Duplex with 2BR/1BA, 832 sq. ft. and other unit is 3BR/2BA, 1040 sq. ft. Both
utility-rm, screen porch, double attached carport. Large canal lot on canal, seawall & boat slip. Move-in ready. units rented. Bring all offers. Must move. $125,000 CALL KATHY JACOBSON 624-2225
Now $169,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250. LAND 3.5 ACRES More or less on Hwy 674 or College Ave zoned AR that could possibly be rezoned for your
READY FOR DEVELOPING! 5 acres (MOL) in a area of tremendous growth with easy access to 1-75. business. Property has two septics, water and electric.NOW REDUCED TO $175,000 CALL KATHY
3BR/2BA on property has been gutted, now ready to be remodeled. 30x60 metal barn included. $374,900 JACOBSON 624-2225
CALL ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 or KAY PYE 361-3672 TRIED AND TRUE! This 3BR/2BA ranch home has stood the test of time. It was built to last and needs a
NEED SOME ROOM TO SPREAD OUT? Fenced one acre lot (MOL) like new 2BR/2BA double wide & 20x26 family to call it home. Features a large living/dining room combo, eat-in kitchen, oversized inside utility, large
shop with a carport, electric hookup for a RV, new roof in 2005. Country living close to town! $119,900 KAY inground pool and more. All on over 3 acres. Asking $169,500. JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540.
PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 FOR DETAILS. 14 COUNTRY ACRES but not far from amenities. Deep well for farming use or build your dream home.
COZY 2BR/1BA ON LARGE CORNER LOT, SPECIAL FEATURES INCLUDE: County water & sewer, wood Surrounded by estate homes and lots of privacy. Currently leased for farming but Seller willing to listen. Call
burning stove, nice large bedrooms, almost new washer & dryer, large bonus room and much more. $99,000. today. Asking $395,000. JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540.
CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 ACTIVE, OPPORTUNITY-FILLED COMMUNITY OF VALENCIA LAKES. New 2BR/2BA home has 3rd BR
REDUCED!! ROOM TO STRETCH! 2BR/1 BA on a 180' x 173' fenced lot. Clean and well maintained property option, all the latest features you can imagine, and a terrific location. You must come and check out the
with a one car garage, carport, enclosed porch, nice size utility room and extra storage buildings. $89,000 amenities including clubhouse, cafe, heated pool, tennis, racquetball, basketball, clubs, trails, parks. RV and
CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 boat storage available. Pets welcome. $209,900 JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
ALMOST 5 ACRES FILLED WITH OAKS AND AZALEAS. Easy access to Hwy 301 & 1-75. Corner location NEWLY LISTED 3BR/2BA home in Ventana with sellers who don't want to "wait for the market to come back."
and two parcels. Older family home that needs your tender loving care. 3BR/2BA, C/H/A, Old Oak flooring. Priced to sell NOW at $126,000. Light, open, great room floor plan with split bedrooms, vaulted ceilings,
Fish House with 1 Bath. Bring the kids and animals and turn them loose. $269,000. CALL KAY PYE screened porch, 2 car garage. Nicely landscaped yard, convenient location. JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
NEW LISTING! 5 ACRES with 10 greenhouses! 3BR/2BA MH built in 2001. Special features include: 20 x 30 NOWIS THE TIME TO BUY!!
workshop, 2 free standing double carports, 190 foot well, electric gate and much more. Zoning is AR.
$159,000 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 CALL US FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS......... 645-3211
LISTING! Enjoy beautiful sunrises from your private patio overlooking the wide salt water channel and views
of Tampa Bay from your front door and kitchen! Very well maintained and upgraded corner unit 2BR/2BA
WATERFRONT CONDO. Both bathrooms have been completely remodeled with new ceramic tile, 1 p I ff
tub/showers, toilets and very stylish cabinets. $149,900 CALL ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 or KAY our
PYE 361-3672
GORGEOUS LOCATION on golf course with easy access to nature trail only minutes away! 2BR/2BA (2105 o for b te "Vici s A i e
sq.ft.) with open floor plan and Mexican tile, updated kitchen with Corian counters, formal dining room, tan
screened porch and beautiful backyard. $139,900 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK
748-2201


THRIFT STORE '
OPEN: Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 8 a.m. 3 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. 12 p.m.
1009 1st. Street S.W.
U.N Ruskin
S- .R. 674 We Have

st. Furniture, Too!
st DONATION DROP OFFS
TUES. TttRU FRL ONLY PLEASE,
TRt IFT ALL DONATIONS MUST BE IN CLEAN
STORE USEABLE CONDITION.







JULY 1, 2010

705 CLEANING


Green Team
Home /office cleaning. Windows
cleaned. Pressure washing, yard
maintenance. Call Dee 813-777-1221.

Becky's At Your Service
Cleaning. Licensed & dependable
cleaning service, for all your clean-
ing needs. Free estimates. Call today
813-672-9215

710 LAWN CARE

M & C Mower Repair.
Parts & service. Authorized warranty
center. Commercial & residential. 725
14th St., Wimauma. 813-938-3226

FloraScapes
Professional maintenance company
serving all your landscaping needs.
Residential & commercial. Ruskin,
Apollo Beach, SCC, Riverview. Li-
censed/insured. 813-333-3688

Terry's Lawn Service
Free estimates. Mowing, trimming,
edging. Home 813-634-2856, cell 813-
317-7679



t &SLawn Care, Inc.
Professional Lawn Care Service
Residential & Commercial
*Total Lawn Maintenance
Landscaping/Sod/Mulch
Landscape Maintenance
Irrigation Monitoring & Repair
FREE ESTIMATES/REASONABLE RATES

813-645-7266
www.bandslawncare.com
"Your LocalLawn Care Professionals I"

715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Fill-Land Clearing
Dozer & loader work, driveway & sep-
tic fill, & shell hauled. Robert Carver,
813-634-4962. Beeper 813-267-6217

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill dirt,
topsoil, sand, crushed rock & asphalt,
driveway culverts. Loader, backhoe,
grading, bushhog, discing. Install Sep-
tic System & drain fills. CFC#1427021.
813-645-1883

Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service. Cul-
vert sets, driveways, shell, crushed
asphalt, concrete, fill dirt, excavating,
mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963
Free estimates.

720 HOME MAINT.

Sunshine Handyman Service.
20yrs experience. Honest, depend-
able. Quality workmanship with
lowest prices. Local references. Free
estimate. Satisfaction guaranteed.
727-831-2089/813-325-3562

723 PAINTING

Professinaal Inside Painting
40yrs experience. SCC Resident. No
job too small. Serving SCC, Ruskin,
Apollo Beach. Jim 813-642-0466

740 MISC. SERVICES

Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks, boat
lifts & seawalls. Free inspection. Heck-
er Construction Co. 813-236-9306


740 MISC SERVICES

Oliver & Company
Pet Sitting
813-767-7225. Licensed, bonded,
insured. Member of Pet Sitters Inter-
national. References available. e-mail:
olivertort@aol.com


EMPLOYMENT^

^BE00l


810 MEDICAL


870 GENERAL


AC Service tech. Great position for
flexible person who wants to learn the
service end of business. Experience
& good attitude necessary. Unlimited
growth potential for right person. Apollo
Beach Air 813-645-0381

Hair stylist needed for busy salon. Sun
City Center area Call Sue's Salon 813-
634-7022

Laborer Part-time/ full-time. Mainte-
nance, janitorial & grounds keeping.
Must attend safe environment training.
Criminal history background check. Re-
sume to Price of Peace Catholic Church.
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, Fl 33573
or email: Maureen@popcc.org.

Teacher Secondary School.
Teaches Math, Computer Science,
Science & Social Studies to 11th &
12th grade students with learning dis-
abilities. Must have a BS in education
& eligibility for Florida Educator's Cer-
tificate in mathematics, grades 9-12.
Send resume to: Center Academy,
Attn D Stone, 10518 Riverview Dr.,
Riverview Fl. 33578


OWN ~~ANE14M

WIT0N MOEYDOWH


A community of affordable homes
exclusively for first-time homebuyers!

FLORmIA HOME .PARTE RSHI
(813) 672- 7889 www.flhome.org


* Phase III Now Available!
* 2 Swimming Pools and a Clubhouse
* 3,4 and 5 Bedrooms, 1 and 2 Garages
* Popular Ruskin Location
* USDA Self-Help Housing program -- help
build your home in exchange for a down
payment
* No money down, easy to qualify
* Non-profit agency works for you
-Hablamos Espafol ~




SBAYOUPASS
,:m ,.I. Ip rl, r, rmrle homer years under 80% of median me. Call for details.


SUNTOWERS
RETIREMENT COMMON ITY

RN UNIT MANAGER
SUN TERRACE HEALTH
CARE CENTER is seeking the
ideal candidate to manage a 45-bed
rehab unit in our SNF. Qualified
applicants will possess prior LTC
experience, strong organizational
skills, attention to detail and
management experience.
Competitive salary and benefits
with tremendous growth potential.

Fax resume to (813) 633-1356
or email to
cmartinez@suntowersretirement.com


870 GENERAL

Cargiver needed for elderly lady. 2
or 3 days per week. 3hr per day. Call
813-634-2810, SCC





SUNTOWERS
RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

PLANT OPERATIONS
TECHNICIAN
Needed for our retirement
community. The ideal candidate
will possess experience w/plant
maintenance to include boilers,
compressors, generators and
general maintenance of apartment
buildings. Excellent customer
service skills a must.
Please apply to
Sun Towers Retirement Community
101 Trinity Lakes Drive
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Fax resume to (813) 634-1356
or email
shelmer@suntowersretirement.com

875 TRADES

General Maintenance technician need-
ed. HVAC systems & equipment knowl-
edge necessary. Valid Florida DL. Com-
petitive wages. Mail resume: PO Box
934, Ruskin, FI 33575 or email: Filters@
Verizon.net or fax 813-649-0702

COMMUNITY PAPERS
OF FLORIDA
(CPF STATEWIDE)

CASH PAID for your unused, unexpired
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brands considered. Call Linda 888-973-
3729 for details! Or www.cash4diabet-
icsupplies.com ;

DIRECT SAVE $29/mo For A Year!
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1-800-216-7149

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bies.org.

NC MOUNTAIN HOMESITE BEST
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NEW Central Air Conditioners and
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Usually Free Delivery. From $1450.
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PROFLOWERS Christmas Decor and
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Abortion Not an Option? Consider
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cal Expenses Paid. Loving, Financially
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Atty Ellen Kaplan (#0875228)

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Social Worker who truly cares about you.
1-800-852-0041 #133050

Boats; 1000's of boats for sale www.
floridamariner.com ; reaching 6 million
homes weekly throughout Florida. 800-
388-9307, tide charts, broker profiles,
fishing captains, dockside dining and
more.


CPF STATEWIDE
ADOPTION 866-633-0397 Unplanned
Pregnancy? Provide your baby with
a loving, financially secure family.
Living/Medical/Counseling expenses
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compassionate attorney Lauren Fein-
gold (FL Bar#0958107) 24/7

ADOPTION 888-812-3678 All Expens-
es Paid. Choose a Loving, Financially
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ney Amy Hickman. (Lic. #832340)

*DIVORCE* BANKRUPTCY Starting
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1-888-705-7221 Since1992

Pregnant? Ayoung married (10+ years)
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mom/devoted dad. Financial security.
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FL. Bar#0150789

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOP-
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Living Expenses Paid. Call 24/7 Abby's
One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-
6298.

SURROGATE MOMS NEEDED!
$18,000 Compensation. Healthy,
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openarmsconsultants.com ;

WANTED 20 Homes To showcase our
Solar Products and Lifetime Exterior
Paint. Call to see if your home qualifies.
CRC016377 1-877-292-3120

$99.95 FLORIDA CORP. $154.95
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Free information packet: www.ame-
rilawyer.com or call Miami-Dade .
. (305) 854-6000 Broward . (954)
630-9800 Tampa... (813) 871-5400
St. Pete... (727) 442-5300 Orlando
... (407) 898-5500 Toll Free... (800)
603-3900. Spiegel & Utrera. PA. L.
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AIRLINE MECHANIC Train for high
paying Aviation Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if qualified Job
placement assistance. Call Aviation
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AVIATION MAINTENANCE/AVIONICS
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financial aid if qualified. Job placement
assistance. Call National Aviation
Academy Today! 1-800-659-2080 or
NAA.edu

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able& Accredited PACE Program Free
Brochure. Call Now! 1-800-532-6546
ext. 16 www.continentalacademy.
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NEED YOUR HIGH SCHOOL DIPLO-
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brochure. www.diplomaathome.com ;
Call 800-470-4723

Bad Credit, No Credit, Low Income, No
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BURIED IN CREDIT CARD DEBT Over
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dollars. Call Credit Card Relief for your
Free Consultation: 1-866-640-3315

FINANCIAL DISTRESS? BETTER
BUSINESS BUREAU "A-" rated com-
pany can help immediately! Credit
cards? Bills? Collections harassment?
Need relief? Call Ancora Debt Solution
1-888-790-4660 X10

HUGE RV LIQUIDATION Priced
thousands below retail value. Hun-
dreds for Sale. We also have FEMA
Spec Models starting at $2000-$5000.
Hurry! Won't Last Long. 1-866-594-
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ASSEMBLE MAGNETS & CRAFTS
from Home! Year-round Work! Ex-
cellent Pay! No Experience! Top US
Company! Glue Gun, Painting, Jewelry,
More! Toll Free 1-866-844-5091

** BODYGUARDS WANTED ** FREE
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OK. Excellent $$$. Full & Part Time.
Sign On Bonus. 1-615-228-1701. www.
psubodyguards.com

$$ EARN EXTRA INCOME $$ Working
from home. $5.00 for every envelope
Processed with our sales brochures.
Guaranteed!! Free Information. 1-800-
210-2686 or visit: www.funsimplework.
com

Earn up to $150 per day. Under cover
Shoppers needed to judge retail and
dining establishments Exp Not Re. Call
1-888-601-4861


THE SHOPPER 25

CPF STATEWIDE
GOVERNMENT JOBS Earn $12.00-
48.00/hr. Full Medical Benefits Paid
Training. In Health Care, Admin/Cleri-
cal, Law Enforcement, Finance, Public
Relations, Wildlife & more! 1 800 858-
0701 ext. 2004

Movie Extras to Stand in the Background
for a Major Film Production. Experience
Not Required, Earn Up to $200/Day. All
Looks Needed. Call 888-664-5279

NOWHIRING: Companies desperately
need employees to assemble products
at home. No selling, any hours. $500
weekly potential. Info. 1-985-646-1700
DEPT. FL-820

FLORIDA KEYS Marathon. Luxurious
Oceanfront vacation homes. 1-6 Bed-
rooms. Private Pool, hot tub, docks &
more! Weekly & long weekend rates.
Last Minute Specials 1-888-564-5800

GEORGIA LAND & HOMESITES -
Beautiful country subd. just off US1.
Great investment! Half acre tracts $75/
month & up. MH's welcome. Others
available; www.HickoryHammockProp-
erties.com ; Owner Financing 912-585-
2174; 912-526-9964

Hard to find B4 zoning property for sale
or lease on Highway 484 in South Marion
County. 4,700 sq footbuilding on 1 acre.
Great for church, clubs, meetings, etc.
For info contact Realtor Anthony White,
352-547- 3137.

MOUNTAINS OF NC Reduced forquick
sell. Charming log cabin on 1.5 ac only
$69,900. Vaulted ceilings, covered
porch deck and private. Minutesto lake.
Needs finishing. 828-286-1666

NC MOUNTAINS Highlands area,
50 acres w/50' waterfall. NC's largest
private natural waterfall, majestic views,
over 3000' elevation, Creek frontage,
large timber, secluded. chestnutcov-
ecreek.com Owner: 478-731-7072

New Virginia Heartland/Mountain Prop-
erty FSBO! Blue Ridge Pkwy, 3000Ft
Elv. Mountain Views, Rivers/Streams.
Native Trout, golfing. Must sacrifice! I'll
finance $39,900 877-803-5318

NORTH CAROLINA Be cool in the
Mountains. Efficiency to 5-br houses &
condos. Fully equipped. Views, pools,
golf, tennis & more. Sugar Mountain
Accommodations & Realty staysugar.
com 1-800-545-9475

NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS
Beat the heat & head to the mountains!
Book your vacation today; even the
family pet's welcome! Monthly rentals!
Foscoe Rentals 1-800-723-7341 www.
foscoerentals.com

SANTEE COOPER LAKE AREA. South
Carolina. 2 acres, near 1-95. Beautiful
building tract $19,900. Ask about E-Z
owner financing, low payments 803-
473-7125

STOP RENTING!! GOVT & BANK
FORECLOSURES! From $500 Down,
$250 Per Month. Over 900 Exclusive
Homes!! No Banks! Owners Will Fi-
nance! Bad Credit OK!! Visit: www.
rebuildUS.com ;

DISH BEST OFFER EVER! $24.99/
mo (for 1 year.) 120+ Channels, FREE
HD! FREE DVR Upgrade! PLUS, Call
NOW& SAVE Over $380! CALL 1-866-
573-3640

TN LAND BANK FORCED LIQUIDA-
TION of Smoky Mtn/Lake Property.
Closeout sale! July 9-10-11. Priced
pennies on the dollar! All reasonable
offers accepted! Amenities! Map &
Pricing: 877-644-4647 x500

Waterfront Sale! July 3rd Prime Dock-
able Deepwater! Was $499,000. Now
$149,000 Ocean Access! Was $89,900
NOW $34,900 Pay No Closing Costs!
Bonus: free sewer tap fee with purchase
($3500 VALUE) Excellent Financing.
Call now 877-888-1406, x2598

AAAA** Donation. Donate Your Car
Boat or Real Estate, IRS Tax Deductible.
Free Pick-Up/Tow Any Model/Condition
Help Underprivileged Children Outreach
Center. 1-800-939-4543

Donate Vehicle Receive $1000 Grocery
Coupon Noah's Arc Support No Kill
Shelters, Research to Advance Vet-
erinary Treatments Free Towing, Tax
Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted
1-866-912-GIVE

Donate your Car Truck or Boat to
HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND Free 3
Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free
Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of.
1-866-905-3801

VIRGINIA MOUNTAIN CABIN Galax
area. Brand new! Great views, private,
fishing in stocked trout stream! 2 acres,
$159,500. Call owner, 1-866-275-0442


SUNTOWERS
RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPISTS
SUN TERRACE HEALTH
CARE CENTER
is hiring PRN & Full-Tnme
Occupational Therapists for
inpatient & outpatient.
Excellent benefits package and
opportunities for growth.
Interested candidates should apply at
105 Trinity Lakes Drive
Sun City Center, FL
(813) 634-3347 ext. 134
or email resume to
vkosky@suntowersretirement.com






26 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


THE OBSERVER NEWS THE SCC OBSERVER THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT


ENT., INC.
Lic. #CMC056816
AIR-CONDITIONING,
HEATING & REFRIGERATION
Complete Sales, Service,
Installation & Repair
Amana and Senior
Trane Dealer Discount
John R. Bowman, Jr., Owner
(813) 633-2703




Let someone
else do that
heavy work.

Look in the
Business & Trade
Directory


I "e w 7* O \


Residential Commercial
New Roofs Re-Roofs Tile
Tile Repairs Hot Tar/Flat Decks
Ventilation Leaks Repaired
FREE Estimates Financing Available
24 Hr. Emergency Service
Senior Citizen Discount
We Carry Workers'ConCmp
For Your Protection BBE
S Lic #CCC1325993 Bonded Insured ";
81s 8202
wwwbuddysrooflng~com


SELF ARREST BONDS
COURT DATES 664-0056
WARRANT CHECKS
BIG JOHN'S
BAIL BONDS
641-8400
FAMILY BONDSMAN
STATE FEDERAL
24 HOUR SERVICE
JOHN L. VATH
2100 Orient Road Tampa, FL. 33619
Fax: (813) 628-8739



Need Work Done
Around the House?

Turn to PHIL
Your Handy Person!
RIVERSIDE GOLF & BOATING CLUB RESIDENT
www.mrhandyperson.com
Serving
APOLLO BEACH
S RUSKIN
SUN CITY
CENTER
KINGS POINT





25+ Years Experience
Licensed & Insured
813-649-1418


Over35yrs. Experience
LOCAL* PROMPT
Repairs Reroof
Inspections

( 8 3 O R ( 1 3
78*04 4-76 A


Complete Sales Service
Repair Installation
SERVICING ALL MAKES AND MODELS
24 Hour Service Financing Available
Lic. #CAC1815928


< rS^ E Senior& Military
Discounts


Roofing
FloridaCerielRoofingContrcwor

Proudly Serving: Sun City Center
Ruskin Apollo Beach Riverview
and surrounding areas
Member SCC Chamber of Commerce







CELL 813-777-9808
Frank Shaft
FL Certified Roofing Contractor
CCC# 1327713
www.ApolloBeachRoofing.com
PalmTreeRoofing@gmail.com


WLVIN'S A/l HAYIN
SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS
Residential and Light Commercial
Family Owned & Operated
No Revolving Technicians
Quality Service,* Sales,
Installation, lk
Most Replacement
Parts on Hand "
(813) 263-6503
< CAC 1814336 Ruskin



Unstuff those
closets! There's
somebody's
Bargain in there!
SSell your
S unwanted
Sites in the
classified!
THE OBSERVER NEWS
813-645-3111 ext. 201
Fax 813-645-1792


















H-A f A&J
Hares
AEsc Plumbing
Experienced
Service & Repairs
Repipes Water Heaters
New Construction
Remodels & Additions


All Types of Roofing
New Roofs & Repairs
SShingle Tile Metal Hot Tar
No job too big or too small!
SERVING SINCE 1973
Ruskin Sun City Center Kings
Point Apollo Beach Riverview
"ALL MY CUSTOMERS ARE DRY
FRIENDS WHEN QUALITY COUNTY"


Ruskin &
Sun CSG Center
ChamberMember
P.O. Box 551 Ruskin, FL 33570
www.customroofing.us
Bonded & Insured Lic. #CCC1326907





*No project over $1000.
No electrical, gas, or
plumbing, and nothing
structural.


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LICENSED U R ECS
BONDED ALLPE
INSURED ,!"H OF WIRING
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OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE
SECURITY LIGHTS CEILING FANS
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105 21 ST. N.W. RUSKIN


PAINTING
FREE ESTIMATES
Interior Faux Finish
SColor Consulting
Power Wash





PAUL WOOD PLUMBING, INC.
State Certified Plumbing Contractor
#CFC1427697
Residential
S* Commercial
Certified Backflows
Stoppages
Service and Repairs
FREE Estimates 24-Hour Service
Licensed Bonded Insured
(813) 641-1387




NOW OPEN
.4Jl, LOOKING
FOR EXTRA
S ^ STORAGE
SPACE
FOR YOUR...
t04 s. R.V.
BOAT
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cell: 240-2049 ETC.
1501 33rd St. SE ANY SIZE
Ruskin, FL 33570
Coee tor
FOR RV, ETC.g^^^^^
imiedSpace ow Aaiabl


REPLACEMENT
WINDOWS

Lowest price



I *
HomelTax: (8I3)i64-904
Ce&(83) 477-3792
CBC 152135Insu~red@Bone


Mary Ann Wilhelm
Owner/Director
#CAC 1814397

Wilhelm e Hourv

-' 641-1811
FACTORY
ALERO 802 4th St. S.W.
a (Off College Ave. West)
Ruskin, Florida
Turn to the Experts
www.wilhelmac.com


* Ceiling Fans
* Outlets
SLighting [ ,I1
* Panel Upgrades
* FREE Estimates

813-645-7000
Listed with Sterling Management and
Sun City Center Community Association
Lic. #EC13002936


Timothy Sutton, LC
INTERIOR EXTERIOR
PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
PRESSURE WASHING
29 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN OHIO
NOW SERVING FLORIDA
LICENSED BONDED INSURED
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LIC. #PA2809


B FREE Estimates
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, Lic. #CFC057969
A+ Rating Bonded Insured


_ res Save 10% on

Ws8 web advertising

SCall your advertising
representative today for more
information (813) 645-3111
www.ObserverNews.net


Residential
wD Commercial
Licensed
Insured
Bonded
"SEE A BLUE SKY VIEW"
*10% Off First service
813-641-3256


JULY 1, 2010





OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 27


Weekend


Event


8 :'.l"2


39..



201o ELATA Best Value
2010ELANTRA In Its Class

n109., $s11,990


Guaran to oil
3 '0T0 i eAIlowancej-


2011 SONATA AllN & Redesigned!
Stylish & Spacious
FOR 36
5 MONTH
LEASE'


/ 8APR 48M0
thru 07/06/10


2010SANTA FE Rugged Capablility,
o7A A FE Cofort & Stle
BYs17,990


- -


Awad-innngHyuda Quliy Bckd B Aeria' Bet arrnt
10 Year 1100,000 milel~-I
Powertrain Limited Warranty


2010 ACCENT
* ul; 1


2010 ELANTRA Touring
31 -


Affordable & Fuel Efficient Most Interior Room In Its Class
SALE 239 24
$9,987 $2 3 1EASEI


2010 GENESIS Coupe
.o n.g ...


2010 GENESIS
r. T, I.


Revolution In Design, Performance & Value Performance, Technology, safety & Quality
FOR $36 FOR 36
E MONTH MONTH
$25 1,EASE3 99 1,EASEi


We will beat any t
ewP a another Hyundai 5SS l
,=0_____gaan dealer or pay youth
All prices are plus tax tag and are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. t Lease down payment requirement: '10 Elantra- $2999, Elantra Touring $1999, Genesis Coupe $2199, '11 Sonata $3500,'10 Tucson $2499, '10 Genesis Sedan $3799. All
offers are with approved credit and some cannot be combined. *Expected range for most drivers, your actual mileage may vary depending on how you drive and maintain your vehicle. ** On the Accent. As listed on Monroney sticker. A For model year 2008. Based on volume manufacturers as included
in the EPATM Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Fuel Economy trends: 1976-2009 Report. Hyundai and Kia listed separately. Acura included in Honda listing. 0% APR on 2010 Santa Fe. In lieu of other incentives.. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Advertised
vehicles suhiect to nrior sale. Program suhiect to hange without notice. tt Mut nresent siged huvers order from accredited Hyndai Dealer on same model & equipment. $3000 garanteed trade allowance annot h combined with an other offer, offer only good on new vehicles.


Manatee Ave. WISR64 -- Exit 220 West I
0
-T Corlez Road


itate Road 70


1 M


'I


JULY 1. 2010


- --~


~ili


N t






28 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
0 1


She's an angel!
Madison Leigh Giurbino was born at 9:48 p.m. Monday, May
24 at St. Joseph's Women's Hospital. She weighed 6 Ibs. 8 oz.
and was 19.75 inches long. Her parents are Chelsey and Mark
Giurbino of Riverview. Her maternal grandparents are Robin and
Peg Knowles of Ruskin and Brenda Knowles of Apollo Beach.
Her paternal grandparents are Patricia Giurbino of Vienna, Ohio
and Michael Giurbino of Kingsville, Ohio.


Shrimp in the wild taste far superior \


* By WARREN RESEN Member Florida
Outdoor Writers Assn. w630@aol.com
What are the makings for a great
three course meal while you're
watching your favorite team on TV?
A mess of cold shrimp with a side
of hot sauce and a cold beer. Does
it get any better? Not when you de-
mand only the best.
Most people have no idea, and
probably don't care, that the shrimp
they buy in the market and eat in res-
taurants is most likely farm raised.
Is there a difference between farm
raised and the wild variety? Think
free range beef and chicken or more
to the point, wild salmon versus
farm raised. You pay a little more
for the "real" thing but the taste is
superior.
However, we may no longer have
much of a choice because of what's
going on in the Gulf and the shape
of the shrimp fishing industry in
general. Shrimp fishing is now more
of historical interest than thriving
industry in many areas.
About 50 years ago a shrimp fleet
found a home in the sparsely popu-
lated Yankeetown area of northern
Florida. Jack Sparks, who claimed
to be one of the first shrimp fish-
erman in the area, arrived with his
shrimp boat "Queenie. "
He told me that, "the late 80's
and early 90's were the heyday for
shrimp fishing in that part of the
Florida Gulf. On a good night a boat
could haul in a catch worth hun-
dreds of dollars and there might be
as many as 100 boats from all over
the Gulf Coast to work the offshore
100 mile St. Martin's Reef." Jack
stated with some conviction, "that
naturally caught shrimp are far su-


perior in taste and texture to farm
raised ones. "
Now, unable to compete with farm
raised shrimp, some of the remain-
ing shrimpers net shrimp for bait.
Many boats just sit abandoned and
rusting on the riverfront, of interest
mainly to photographers and paint-
ers.
During a recent trip to St. Simons
Island in the Golden Isles of south
east Georgia, I took a trip on a con-
verted shrimp boat, the "Lady Jane"
captained by Larry Credle, or just
plain Capt. Larry. Unlike so many
former shrimp boats that have been
consigned to the scrap heap, Capt.
Larry spent more than a few years
converting this working shrimp boat
to a floating class room and tour
vessel.
According to Capt. Larry, in SE
Georgia there were approximately
1,000 registered shrimp boats in
1980. Today there are less than 300
and their catch runs about 3 to 4
million pounds annually versus one
million pounds weekly from shrimp
farms and foreign imports.
After it was revamped, the "Lady
Jane" was licensed to take passen-
gers on excursions. Capt. Larry runs
tours to show how netting shrimp
was, and is still done, by the active
fleet. The "Lady Jane" is a shrimp
trawler and the only one on the east
coast licensed by the USCG to carry
up to 49 passengers.
During a two hour cruise on the
waters of St. Simons Sound, mem-
bers of the crew gave passengers
a college level education about
shrimping in the southeast United
States. Then Capt. Larry ordered
the crew to drop the shrimp net over


the stem of the "Lady Jane. This is
done several times during the cruise
and in different locations. When the
net is brought up and the catch emp-
tied on the sorting table, the variety
of sea life displayed amazed the pas-
sengers. After all this is a major salt
water bay so there's no telling what,
besides shrimp, will be caught
When I was on the ship, the catch
included a large variety of fish, blue
claw crabs, horseshoe crabs and to
the delight of the assembled multi-
tude, even one Hawksbill sea turtle.
The Hawksbill was measured, pho-
tographed and released.
Another highlight of the cruise is
the shrimp boil. The catch is broiled
and passengers are free to peel and
eat as many shrimp as they like. And
this is the point at which passengers,
up close and personal, can taste the
difference between fresh caught and
farm raised shrimp.
The "Lady Jane" does do some
real shrimping, but for most of the
year, Capt. Larry offers a variety of
programs and trips to keep the cash
register ringing. "Lady Jane" can be
rented for weddings, sunset cruises,
diving and bottom fishing as well as
dolphin sightseeing. But the ultimate
trip is the one he calls, "The Ashes to
Sea Program." Yes, burial at sea. A
round trip for friends and family but
not for the main participant.
If you are traveling scenic Route
17 in the Brunswick, Georgia, area
and have a couple of free hours,
take this unusual and educational
boat ride. "Lady Jane" is docked
at Spanky's Restaurant, marshside,
where you can get your fill of south-
ern cooking and, of course, fresh
seafood.


p 4i


Lady Jane ready for passengers.


uatcn coming in.


I .. .--r 01-
Hawksbill turtle...measured and released.


Sun City

Dental Center
Voted #1 in Best of South Shore for 2010
ThomasA. DeVol, D.D.S., PA
New Patients & Emergencies Welcome

Full Mouth Series of 1 % ff
I* X-Rays(0210) : /0
Exam i(o) Full & Partial1
Regular1 L
Cleaning o(1o): Dentures
For ($200 Value) Coupon Must Be Presented
Coupon M B Presented) At Time Of Estimate
At Time Of Estimate I' 5110, 5120, 5213, 5214
-----------------------
Offers expire 7/31/10. Coupons must be mentioned at time of
scheduling appointment. The fee advertised is the minimum fee
charged. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has
the right to refuse pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other
service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and
within 72 hrs. of responding to the advertisement for the fee service
examination or treatment. Senior citizen discount does not apply.
727 Cortaro Dr. (SweetBay Plaza)
Open Mon-Fri 8:30-5:00 813-633-2636


JULY 1, 2010


Photos by Warren Resen


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