Title: Observer news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102144/00023
 Material Information
Title: Observer news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: M&M Printing Co., Inc
Place of Publication: Ruskin, FL
Publication Date: June 24, 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102144
Volume ID: VID00023
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text





June 24, 2010
Volume 54
Number 22
ObserverNews.net


THE


P.R.S.T STD
PAID
RUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570
PERMIT NO. 8



OBSERVER NEWS


S Heavy metal in God's waiting room


Bred for high nutrition, abundant flavor and bright color, the new Tasti-
Lee hybrid tomato has been released for seed production by the Univer-
sity of Florida's Gulf Coast Research and Education Center at Balm. The
new tomato, with its firm flesh and consistent shape, is expected to be
a contender for consumer favor in the fresh produce market as well as
a good choice for commercial growers. Melody Jameson photo

New healthful, flavorful,

colorful tomato developed


in South Count,
* By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
BALM Perhaps there's no
perfect tomato, but a University of
Florida plant breeder here has per-
fected a hybrid that's getting rave
reviews.
And considering how many there
are, that just may be saying some-
thing. Botanically a fruit, but treat-
ed in most cultures as a vegetable,
tomatoes are utilized around the
world, enjoyed fresh in a variety
of dishes, baked in numerous cas-
seroles, serving as basis for many
sauces and soups plus preserved by
canning. They come in some 7500
varieties around the globe, can be
sized from the can't-eat-just-one
grape to the jumbo hamburger-
suited beefsteak and in 2008 were
produced worldwide to the tune
of 130 million tons, according to
Wikipedia.
Then, there's the matter of to-
mato characteristics, both revered
and reviled going back to its ori-
gins, thought to be in Peru in the
early to mid-1500s. Spreading
from South America to Mexico
where the Aztecs apparently rel-
ished them cooked with peppers
and then through the Caribbean to
Europe where a Naples cookbook
mentioned them in 1692, and on to
North America where the heat-lov-
ing plants first turned up on Caro-
lina plantations, what would be-
come the red tomato also acquired
a bit of a checkered history.
Throughout its five centuries, it's
gotten good names and bad.
The Aztecs reportedly dubbed the
fruity veggie "tomatl" from which
"tomato" eventually evolved. But,


probably because of mild toxicity
in the plant leaves and stems, the
produce also was designated "wolf
peach" in Germany, consigned to
its werewolves. And, there was a
time in England when Brits feared
the fruit, refusing to eat it. On the
See NEW TOMATO, page 17


Mitch Traphagen
photo
Lightning
strikes over
Sarasota's
waterfront
as an
incomparable
day draws to
a close in the
place known
around
the world
as God's
waiting room.
The world
couldn't be
more wrong.


* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net
SARASOTA To much of the world, it is
known as "God's waiting room" a place where
old people go to die. To those who have never
been there, it is a city of early-bird dinners begin-
ning at 2 p.m. with lights out by 8 p.m. To the un-
informed, it is hair salons specializing in blue dye
and Buicks the size of Rhode Island driving in the
left lane eternally flashing the right blinker.
Joining the gigantic Buicks are the cars filled
with impatient tourists getting angrier by the sec-
ond because 640,000 local people are getting in
their way, burning precious minutes of their week-


long vacation from their self-inflicted misery else-
where.
So what's not to love about Sarasota?
The truth, however, is much different. If God does
indeed have a waiting room on Earth, and if Sarasota
is it, then that simply proves God's benevolence.
A mass of black, ominous clouds build over
Sarasota's downtown skyline of office and con-
dominium towers. Thunder rumbles and lightning
streaks across the sky. The people fishing off the
pier at Causeway Park a few blocks away barely
notice. Just to the east, financial firms and banks
encase themselves in brilliant blue glass, reflecting
See SARASOTA, page 16


Dads decide kids come first


* By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews. net
RIVERVIEW Eric Trout and
Michael O'Brien have two key
things in common: they put their
families first and they love to be
involved with community events,
especially those involving chil-
dren.
That's why they make good busi-
ness partners.
When interviewed last week
at Cici's Pizza in Summerfield
Square, it was evident that neither
had ended up in the field for which
they had trained and received their
degrees.
The reason is that both are put-
ting their families first, which
made them both gravitate to fam-
ily-friendly local businesses rather
than travel for other lines of work.
The son of long-time fish farm-
ers Irv and Linda Trout who owned
the Florida Fish Co-op that closed
in 1995, Eric decided to open Ci-
ci's rather than move to an area
where he could use his training as
a chemist with a PhD in molecular
biophysics.
"I'm just a local boy," Eric ex-
plained. "I was on the wrestling


team at Brandon High School and
I've been in the Brandon-Riv-
erview area since we moved here
from Pennsylvania when I was
10."
But there isn't much work in this
area for a molecular biophysicist,
Eric joked. "And I didn't want to
travel because of my kids."
Wanting to stay near his two
children, Adam, 10 and Alexa, 13,
who spend weekends and vacation
time with him following a divorce,
Eric decided to find something he
could do nearby; so he trained and
opened a Cici's Pizza franchise.
"I love it," he said as about 50
kids in green Staci's Learning
Station shirts walked through the
door. "We host all kinds of events
for groups from churches and civic
organizations, as well as field trips
for child care facilities and people
from the Parks and Rec(reation de-
partment)."
His business is approached near-
ly every week to sponsor a team or
event, but he can't take everyone.
"We're sponsoring the East Bay
Girl's Softball Team, the Lady
Indians softball team from East
See DADS, page 2


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Penny Fletcher Photo
Michael O'Brien, developer of Summerfield Square and recent part-
ner in Cici's Pizza there, shows his son Michael how the experts
make the finished product look best.






2 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Penny Fletcher photo
Eric Trout explains that
although they can't
sponsor everyone who
asks, they do their best
to sponsor as many
local events and teams
as possible. This year
they received plaques
for sponsoring East
Bay High School's Lady
Indians softball; the
East Bay Buccaneers
Cheerleading and
Football teams; and the
East Bay Bulls girl's
softball team.


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Dads
* Continued from page 1
Bay High School and the East Bay
Buccaneers cheerleading and foot-
ball teams this year," he told me.
"We donate money to the teams,
buy their shirts and hold fundrais-
ers."
They also hold fundraisers for
other nonprofit and civic groups,
like one of the more recent ones
held for Elmira's Wildlife Sanctu-
ary in Wimauma, he said. And they
sponsor the annual Relay for Life
and host events for the Wimauma
Church of God Campground dur-
ing that denomination's national
summer conference.
"I love being part of this com-
munity," Eric said. "If I had fol-
lowed molecular biophysics, I'd
have ended up somewhere in the
northeast."
Michael O'Brien says he doesn't
want to leave the area either.
Another native, Michael gradu-
ated from Jesuit High School in
Tampa followed by Florida State
University. His training in the hos-
pitality industry included running
hotels, motels and restaurants.
But he and his wife Jodi and
their son Michael wanted to stay
right here in Hillsborough County
where he grew up.
Michael got into real estate and
is now a developer with Coastal
Equity, which specializes in build-
ing and equipping medical offices
and entrepreneurs in all facets of


the medical industry.
His most recent venture was
Summerfield Square, the 18-acre
center just north of the Hess station
that occupies the northwest corner
of Big Bend Road and U.S. 301.
Like Eric, Michael says family
is very important to him. The day
of our interview, he was showing
his 11-year-old son how to make
pizzas.
"He felt like sleeping in today
so I didn't make him go to camp,"
Michael said, adding that he of-
ten lets his namesake experience
workdays with him.
When the original partners in Ci-
ci's left, Michael said he decided
to join Eric as a full partner. "The
place has been open since April
1, 2008, and it just seemed like a
good idea," he said.
Staci and Steven Bedenbaugh,
owners of Staci's Learning Station
child care in Riverview, brought a
busload of children to Cici's for a
field trip during our interview.
The daughter of lifelong Riv-
erview residents Joel and Cindy
Miltner, Staci also mentioned
having deliberately sought out a
business that would keep her near
home.
It seemed that growing up in
Riverview was an experience all
the business owners I spoke with
that day wanted to pass on to their
children.


Looking for something to do this summer? Consider the
19th Ave. NW in Ruskin. See a list of activities for all


SouthShore Regional Library off
ages on page 19 of this issue.


Penny Fletcher photo
Staci and Steven Bedenbaugh direct a group from Staci's Learning
Station in Riverview child care and camp on a recent field trip to
Cici's Pizza in Summerfield Square.


HOLIDAY DEADLINES
The Observer News office will be closed Monday, July
5, in observance of Independence Day.
Press releases, photos, and news items must be submitted
by 11 a.m. Thursday, July 1, for the July 8 edition t .
Display ads must be submitted by Friday, July 2, .-.
at 11 a.m. Classified ad deadline will advance to Friday, July 2, at 4:00 p.m. .
*- '-- -.*>Jd -i_j _j _j _j _j _j _j _j


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JUNE 24, 2010
Mmm ... eat Italian tonight


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 3


Behind the red door at "San Vito
Italian Restaurant & Pizzeria" in
the Village Shoppes on 19th Ave.
NE in Ruskin, Romolo Cocco-
glioniti prepares authentic Italian
dishes, New York Style pizza plus
his specialty, Romolo's Signature
Italian Taco.
Romolo and Rosa Coccoglioniti
have been in the restaurant busi-
ness for more than 25 years. As
a young man, Romolo worked
as an apprentice for top chefs in
Switzerland and northern Italy.
Rosa, however, took a differ-
ent path, learning the art of home
cooking from her talented and
resourceful mother. In the 1980s
the couple combined their cook-
ing expertise, moved to St. Peters-
burg and opened their first eatery,


"Da L'Italia Restaurant." Since
then, they have made their way to
Ruskin via deli ownership in Italy,
a family owned restaurant in New
Jersey and now their own taste of
Italy, the San Vito Italian Restau-
rant & Pizzeria.
Romolo and Rosa offer daily
lunch specials for $5.95 or $6.99
with non-alcoholic beverage.
The Italian eatery provides sanc-

Am I


Owners, Rosa and Romolo Coccoglioniti serve up delicious and au-
thentic Italian dishes at San Vito.


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tuary for office workers escaping
the confines of their cubicles and
day laborers seeking respite from
Florida's hot summer sun. It's
their opportunity to unwind, dine
inexpensively and enjoy home-
made food in cool wine cellar tem-
peratures.
Select from the menu anytime be-
tween 11 a.m. and 9 p.m.Tuesday-
Saturday. Reservations are not
required, but large parties are en-
couraged to call ahead. If dining-
in is not an option, call 813-645-
5351 for carryout. All pizza dough
is made fresh daily and cooked to
perfection in either a small 12" or
large 16" size.
Open the red door and eat Italian
tonight! You'll be glad you did.
Staxx party at
South Shore
Gallery
Stop by to see the newest collec-
tion during the Staxx party, Friday,
June 25 from 5-8pm and Saturday,
June 26 from I0am-6pm at the
South Shore Gallery located at 447
Apollo Beach Boulevard in Apollo
Beach. Staxx is an interchangeable
jewelry system that is affordable,
fun, fashionable and unique. It al-
lows you to create an unlimited
number and variety of individual
designs. All retired Staxx pieces
will be 30 percent off. All other
Staxx items will be 10 percent off
during this party time.
New Spanish version
ST. PETERSBURG --An infor-
mation-packed guide to environ-
mentally responsible boating and
angling in Hillsborough Bay in
Spanish is now available free of
charge from the Tampa Bay Es-
tuary Program and Audubon of
Florida's Florida Coastal Islands
Sanctuaries Program.
The newly printed Spanish ver-
sion of the very popular Hillsbor-
ough Bay Boater's Guide shows
information important to boaters,
including the new slow-speed
Manatee Protection Zone from the
Alafia River south to E. G. Sim-
mons Park in Ruskin. Also fea-
tured are such eco-landmarks as
the Alafia Bank Bird Sanctuary,
ranked among the nation's larg-


Camp Christina reopens after

renovations
On Thursday, June 17, 2010, the YMCA-Camp Christina held a Rib-
bon Cutting Celebration to introduce to the community, the beautiful ad-
ditions and renovations at the camp. The celebration began at 9:30AM
with several dignitaries and guests as Vice President, Cindy Sofarelli,
welcomed those in attendance. Reverend Jay Lippy gave the invocation.
A very special thank you was given to Dan Campo and the Campo fam-
ily for their generous contributions which have made both Phases I & II
a reality. Because of their generosity, more children and families have a
chance to learn, grow and thrive.
Also receiving special recognition were Dyke & Johnson Architects
and J.O. DeLotto & Sons Construction.
Phase I renovations include a new entrance, new fencing, renovated
basketball courts, paint ball course, disc golf course and new signage.
Phase II renovated facilities, include the new 1800 square foot culinary
teaching kitchen and additional classroom space, redesigned high ropes
course, Gaga Pit (Israeli dodgeball game) new 400ft double zip line and
a KaBoom! Playground.
Following the ribbon cutting festivities, a pancake breakfast was held
for all those in attendance and a tour was given to guests who wished to
get a first hand look at the scenic 55 acres and beautiful facilities.

of Hillsborough Bay boater's guide
est and most diverse bird colonies, to protect natural resources and
and the Manatee Viewing Center wildlife. Additionally, it identifies
at TECO's Big Bend facility, major shipping channels, seagrass
Important seagrass meadows, beds, manatee areas and shallow
publicly owned lands and habitat waters where boaters need to take
restoration sites also are identified special care. Printed on water-
on the color map included in the resistant paper, it is designed to


guide, and accompanying text and
photos showcase some of Hills-
borough Bay's most intriguing
inhabitants, including sharks and
rays, sea turtles and diamondback
terrapins, and a variety of the re-
gion's spectacular and charismatic
wading and shorebirds. The guide
outlines for Spanish readers the
special features of this estuary and
its ecosystems.
The guide informs boaters of
areas where access is restricted


be stored aboard a boat for handy
reference. Translation into Spanish
was provided by biologists Manny
Lopez, Alberto Martinez, and Ivan
Vicente.
Residents may obtain their free
Hillsborough Bay Boater's Guide,
in either English or this newly
available Spanish version, by call-
ing the Tampa Bay Estuary Pro-
gram at (727) 893-2765 or e-mail-
ing saveit@tbep.org.


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.-al






4 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
Are you marching in the parade
or watching it go by?


When I at- do that I find it very difficult to un-


tended a per-
formance by
the great ma-
gician, David
Copperfield,
his magic
Positive transformed a
Talk simple arena
By William Hodges into a won-
der world of
possibilities. It also transformed the
people watching. At least, it trans-
formed most of them.
Copperfields's show is very partic-
ipatory. He often asks the audience
to do some little thing to make them
players in the event rather than spec-
tators. At one point, with the arena
dark, he took a flashlight, held it
like a candle with the light reflected
upon his face, and remarked, "This
is like being at a campout. Let's all
sing Kum Ba Ya." Then he started
singing. Before you knew it, most
of the audience, which numbered
in the thousands, were singing with
him. Just as abruptly as he started
the singing, he stopped and said with
a smile, "That was dumb, wasn't it?
But it was fun." Yes, it was fun for
most of us. But I noticed some mem-
bers of the audience did not partici-
pate. They couldn't let themselves
go. They didn't dare to appear silly
in front of those around them. Those
people missed the experience of be-
ing part of the program; they chose
to remain spectators.
Life is like a parade; we can march
or we can watch it from the curb. I,
for one, enjoy marching. If at times,
I'm a little silly, then so be it. Espe-
cially if while doing so, I bring joy
to myself or those around me. How
sad the world would be if there had
never been an Emmet Kelly or a Red
Skelton. Neither was afraid to be just
a little bit silly-to be a participant
in life rather than a watcher. It's not
necessary to be silly to participate
in life, but it is necessary to get in-
volved-to be a part of the process.
There are so many exciting things to

South Shore
Republicans to meet
The July meet-
ing of the South
Shore Republi-
can Club will be
held Thursday,
July 1, at the
Apollo Bistro, 6520 Richies Way
Apollo Beach. Eat and Greet will
begin at 5:30pm and the meeting
starts at 6:30pm. Meet candidates,
elected officials, and hear great
conservative speakers. For more
information see www.SouthShor-
eRepublicanClub.org or email
President@SouthShoreRepubli-
canClub.org


No More Spoiled
Food
I have a magnetic dry erase cal-
endar on my freezer door. When I
open a refrigerated item that needs
to be used by a certain date once
opened, I mark it on my calendar.
This also works really well for
leftovers. I write the name of the
item on the date that it needs to
be used by. I've wasted a lot less
food, and since I see the calendar
on my freezer door every time I
open the fridge, it makes me much
more aware of what needs to be
used up.
Heather in CA
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derstand how anyone can be bored.
Every day newspapers present a
myriad of activities in which to be-
come involved.
Have you ever attended a meet-
ing where the speaker said, "Good
morning," and then received a fee-
ble response from the group? Then,
with more force, the speaker repeat-
ed "Good morning!" The response
became more forceful. Finally, on
the third try, all the watchers be-
came participants, and the speaker
received a resounding "Good morn-
ing!" The next time you are in a
meeting watch to see who the peo-
ple are who respond heartily the first
time. Those people are the marchers
in the parade of life. At a concert,
the people clapping their hands and
tapping their feet in time with the
music are the marchers in the parade
of life. They're involved with the
performance.
There are three kinds of people:
those who make things happen,
those who watch things happen, and
those who wonder what happened. I
believe the people marching in the
parade are the first group. I suspect
that the people at the David Copper-
field performance who didn't sing
Kum Ba Ya are a combination of the
other two groups. They watched but
still have no idea why the rest of us
had fun doing it. Until they join the
parade and get involved with life
and all that is going on around them,
they never will.


Hotline provides consumers with latest
information about Florida seafood


availability
TALLAHASSEE Seafood lov-
ers who are confused about the
availability of Florida seafood
products due to the Gulf oil spill
can now get daily updates about
the ongoing commercial harvest.
The Florida Department of Ag-
riculture and Consumer Services
has implemented a new toll-free
hotline at 1-800-357-4273 to pro-
vide consumers with current infor-
mation about the status of Florida's
open and closed fishing harvest
areas, the availability of seafood
varieties, and general pricing in-
formation.
"Because of the extensive news
media coverage of the Gulf situa-
tion, many consumers are confused
about whether Florida seafood is
being harvested and if it is avail-
able in stores and restaurants,"
Florida Agriculture Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson said. "We want
consumers to know that Florida's
commercial fishermen continue
to harvest wholesome seafood
products from the waters that are
unaffected by the oil spill. Florida
seafood is safe and plentiful."
Bronson said the telephone
hotline will be updated daily with
information about the Gulf situa-
tion. He also reminded consum-
ers that -- in addition to the Gulf
waters off Florida's west coast --
Florida's fishermen also harvest
numerous seafood varieties from


Don't miss this summertime

celebration with the Treble Clef Band


Enjoy a traditional

4th of July Picnic

lunch with all the trimmings...
hot dogs, hamburgers, corn on the cob,
baked beans and watermelon!


Thursday, July 1st
11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
in the Sun Towers Main Dining Room

R.S.V.P. 813-634-3347
No later than 6/28/10
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the ALintil^.i...
watels ol ll''
the ,il'
east cot N,
T II C
Florid, pen-
insula hi a
more illu ,ii i WU
1,300 inls .
of coastline,
and our commercial fishermen
continue to work hard to bring in
their catch for the enjoyment of
consumers," Bronson said. "The
commercial fishing industry is im-
portant to our state, and we want
consumers to know that they can
buy Florida seafood with confi-
dence."
The information that is available
by calling the 1-800-357-4273
hotline will also be posted online
at the Department's seafood web
site www.FL-Seafood.com where
consumers can also find links to
other pertinent web sites includ-
ing the Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection. Webcams
placed at various coastal locations
and in retail establishments will be
added to the web site later.
The Florida Department of Ag-
riculture and Consumer Services,
Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection, the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission, the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration, and
the U.S. Food and Drug Adminis-
tration are continually monitoring
water and product samples.
"If and when the quality of Flori-
da seafood is impacted by the spill,
we will take immediate action to
close the waters to commercial
seafood harvesting," Bronson
said. "Our commercial fishermen
take great pride in the quality rep-
utation Florida seafood products
have earned, and we would never
put any product on the market that


would tarnish this hard-earned
reputation."
















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JUNE 24, 2010


Award-Winning Newspapers
THE OBSERVER NEWS
The SCC Observer &
The Riverview Current
210 Woodland Estates S.W.
Ruskin, FL 33570
813-645-3111
Fax: 813-645-4118
www.ObserverNews.net
Published Every Thursday
by M&M Printing Co., Inc. 645-4048
EDITORIAL:
Brenda Knowles ............Publisher/Editor
brenda@observernews.net
Mitch Traphagen.................Online Editor
mitch@observernews.net
Penny Fletcher..........Contributing Writer
penny@observernews.net
Melody Jameson......Contributing Writer
mj@observernews.net
Julie Ball ..............Press Releases/W riter
news@observernews.net
All press releases, news articles and
photos may be emaied to news@
observerews.net, faxed to 645-4118, or
mailed to Observer News, 210 Woodland
Estates Ave. SW, Ruskin, FL 33570
SALES:
Vilma Stillwell... Display Advertising Rep.
vilma@observernews.net
Nan Kirk........... Display Advertising Rep.
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011I I4II






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 5


"Building Our Communities future"
" **>


MS. WEEDON
by Brendy Vasquez, Destinee
Juarez and Brandon Schelmety
Ms. Weedon has been a math
teacher at South County Career
Center for a year. Known as 'the
math geek,' Ms. Weedon is a great
math teacher. She always gets the
job done and that is to teach the
kids and help them with whatever
they need help in. She became a
math teacher because she really
loves math and she always wanted
to work with kids. She says, "I
have never wanted to teach any-
thing but math, because in math
you actually get to talk and teach
the kids, not just throw them a
textbook and have them learn by
themselves." She has one young-
er sister, who is currently at FSU
for Interior Design. Her hobbies
are playing soccer and beach vol-
leyball, cooking, scrap-booking,
reading and going to baseball and
hockey games. Her home town is
Hollywood, Florida, but when she
was young, she moved into the area
and attended Turkey Creek Middle
School and Durant High School.
After graduating, she attended the
University of South Florida. She
says, "College was a blast! I got
to meet people from all over the
world, take classes I was interest-
ed in, and got closer to my dream
job of teaching." As a teacher, she
is very organized, fun, exciting,
and independent. Ms. Weedon is
a very nice and carefree person
and she really likes South County
Career Center. Being in her class
has really helped me with all my
math. When she teaches it is like
she rubs her smartness off on the
kids that need it the most, so they
can be like her. I'm very thankful
to her, because now I do much bet-
ter in math. We all need teachers
like Ms. Weedon who don't give
up on students.


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MR. TISDALE
by Erica Jordan
Mr. Tisdale is the First Respond-
er teacher at South County Career
Center. Mr. Tisdale is very passion-
ate about emergency medicine and
wants to pass his knowledge on to
the students he teaches at South
County. He says, "I like the class
sizes at South County." Mr. Tisdale
has been teaching at South County
for 3 years. His advice to any stu-
dent looking to become a First Re-
sponder student is to continue to
learn. Mr. Tisdale shares his First
Responder knowledge with stu-
dents looking to go into that field.
He is very interactive and hands
on with the students he teaches at
South County, so it comes as no
surprise that he is married with a
little girl of his own.

6 6 0S .
j b 6


MS. ORDAZ
by Ivan Tabora
Ms. Ordaz is a first year reading
teacher at South County Career
Center. She's from Cuban descent
and not married. Ms. Ordaz says
she became a teacher because she
wanted to really make a differ-
ence in the lives of the students.
She graduated 2 years ago with a
degree in English Education from
USF. She likes working at South
County Career Center because she
gets to know all of the students on
a personal level, and she enjoys
teaching them to appreciate read-
ing. She's my first reading teacher
in the USA and she has been very
good with me. She helps me with
my English and she is such a
friendly person.


MR. BESS
by Emmanuel Rivas
Mr. Bess is a math and science
teacher at South County Career
Center. He's been a teacher for 38
years. He always likes his job even
though it's difficult sometimes. He
won Teacher of the Year in 2008-
2009. "It was nice being Teacher
of the Year! It makes me feel ap-
preciated at South County." His
favorite hobby is playing tennis,
but ever since his foot went bad he
cant play. He also likes spending
time with his wife. He is an intel-
ligent math teacher and always fo-
cuses on teaching his students how
to improve their math skills. He
makes sure that everyone learns
to succeed in life and encourages
us to finish school and have better
futures.


Sb Go


MRS. BASHAM-SMITH
by Itzayana Elias, Araceli Perez,
Waymond Page and Izzy Rios
Mrs. Basham-Smith is a math
teacher at South County Career
Center, where she has been teach-
ing for three years and has worked
for a total of seven years. She says
likes her work because she is good
at it and because she can relate to
the struggle and complications of
dealing with math as a student. Al-
though Ms. Basham-Smith may be
quit the mathematician she was a
c student in high school. The most
important thing about her work is,
"to teach students right and explain
to them if they don't understand.
No, I'll never retire." Originally
hired as an assistant teacher, Mrs.
Basham-Smith went to college and
took classes online so she could get
her degree. In her own time, she
likes to ride on motorcycles with
her husband and their motorcycle
club, called the Buffalo Soldiers.
Mrs. Basham-Smith is cool with
her students and she knows how
to teach math. She helps us when
we don't understand and we have
been learning in her class. One stu-
dent says, "I think she is one of the
teachers who can raise students'
grades and help them to succeed
in life."


Through the Eyes of the Students
School is out for the summer! Many students are vacationing with
their families, looking for part-time jobs, chilling out at the beach,
grabbing a movie or just hanging out with their friends. Their class-
room studies are on hold until school cranks up again in August.
The students at South County Career Center, however, have a sum-
mertime goal to complete that started with SCCC's teacher of the year,
Don Chase. The students wanted to express their gratitude to the faculty
and staff for all their help and guidance during the 2009-2010 academ-
ic year. Don suggested students individually or collectively write brief
profiles about SCCC's educators, support staff and administrators.
Over the next couple months The Observer News will print these
profiles authored by the students of South County Career Center under
the title, Through the Eyes of the Students. In their own words the
teens will introduce teachers and staff to South County readers, thank
them for their continued support, and in some instances even share
individual classroom experiences.


MRS. FRATERCANGELO
by Zorayda Ramos
Mrs. Fratercangelo is an RN/
BSN (Registered Nurse/ Bachelor
of Science in Nursing) and has
been a Nursing Assistant teacher
at South County Career Center for
the past five years. Mrs. Fratercan-
gelo's motivation at South County
is seeing the value in her students,
wanting them to see the value in
themselves. She also says that stu-
dents at South County are unique
and have a need for other things
and face other obstacles outside
of school, which is why they are
here. She likes to see her students
get CNA (Certified Nursing Assis-
tant) certificates and get a pathway
to success. Mrs. Fratercangelo has
learned that if you respect stu-
dents they will respect you. She
says, "Rules without relationship
lead to rebellion." Mrs. Fratercan-
gelo has adopted three wonderful
children and was a foster parent
for 17 years. She has the heart
and the courage to help however
and whenever she can and really
makes the classroom a fun learn-
ing experience. She has made me
see that success is hard work and
to achieve something you have
to dedicate yourself to what your
goal is. Yet as strong and brave
as she is, Mrs. Fratercangelo has
gone through a rough last few
weeks due to the recent loss of her
daughter Christina. Christina was
someone that I would hear about
as a tough and caring person. Mrs.
Fratercangelo says, "She was my
special gift from God and still is."
She taught Mrs. Fratercangelo
how to care for kids here at South
County and for that I would like to
thank her. Christina made me have
a wonderful caring teacher who
goes beyond herself.


MR. DUTTON
by Elidia Rojas
Mr. Duttonjoined South County
Career Center this year. He al-
ways wanted to be a construction
teacher to teach students how to
make things. He left East Bay to
come and work at SCCC because
he wanted to teach building con-
struction. He was at East Bay
for about 4 years and had most
recently been a math teacher there
since they closed their construc-
tion shop. Mr. Dutton is known for
drinking too much coffee. He says
that he has tried to stop because it
was too much sugar and caffeine.
Mr. Dutton is a great teacher. He
encourages me to make good deci-
sions, to do my work, and to not
get in trouble anymore.


6 6 G


MS. ELIZARRARAS
by Cristina Davila
Mrs. Elizarraras is a math teach-
er at South County Career Center,
where she has been teaching for
two years. She has worked in the
school district for five years. All
of her students call her "Mrs. E"
because it's hard to pronounce her
full name. Mrs. E likes teaching
because she likes helping her stu-
dents out. Unfortunately, Mrs. E is
moving to McAllen, Texas at the
end of the year and won't be back
next year. Her husband is a doctor
and he will be starting as a resident
physician there this summer. Mrs.
E has four wonderful children with
her husband of nine years and in
her free time, she likes to run. Mrs.
E helps her students in the diffi-
culty of math, by paying attention
to her students and creating new
activities to learn math.

Continued on page 12


JUNE 24, 2010


TEACHERS 71


MR. SHAFFER
by Marisela Garcia and
Manny Meranvil
Mr. Paul Shaffer is currently the
culinary instructor at South County
Career Center, meaning he works
with students on improving their
skills in the kitchen as well as run-
ning a food service business. Mr.
Shaffer attended the University
of Kentucky and also the Univer-
sity of South Florida. He has both
his masters and bachelors degree.
Mr. Shaffer was an employee for
Tyson Foods as the Director of
U.S. Distribution. Mr. Shaffer has
also owned his own food service
business. For the past eight years
he has been teaching in the Hills-
borough County School District.
Mr. Shaffer came to South Coun-
ty because he wanted to return
the culinary program back to the
positive image that it once had.
Not only does he care about his
students, but he also cares about
the children in foster care. He is a
foster parent of two and also has
two biological sons. He has been
happily married for 35 years. He
loves to travel and cook. His fa-
vorite place that he has traveled to
was Colorado. He says that hiking
in the mountains and skiing was
the most incredible experience.
His favorite types of food to cook
are French and German foods. Mr.
Shaffer believes every student is a
shining star and can do anything if
they put their mind to it. He can
be firm at times but is also under-
standing. He wants to be known
as a teacher who has made a dif-
ference in the students' lives and
helped them become productive
adults after high school.


404 6






6 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Becoming Vegetarian


JUNE 24. 2010


I have tried
in the past
to cut all
meat out of
my diet and
1 it was a lot
Il harder than
Saturation I had imag-
Point ined. I had
help from
By Karey Burek goveg.com
as to how
to prepare meals I loved without
any protein from meat and yet the
call of burgers and grilled chicken
beckoned me back to the world of
meat eating. In my mind, I know
that I can live without eating meat
but wanting to live that way is the
choice that is difficult. Don't get
me wrong, I am not someone who
ate meat everyday, but a few times
a week I would partake. My mom
is the closest person to me that is
almost 100% vegetarian and has
opened my palette to what is be-
yond meat and potatoes. My friend
Lauren only eats fish; I guess she
would be considered a piscavore/
vegetarian and she is open to try-
ing all sorts of non-meat entrees.
I recently finished a wonder-
ful book by Jonathan Safran Foer
entitled Eating Animals, that has
put me over the edge and forced
me to examine my own behaviors
and where my food really comes
from and whether I truly want to
continue eating meat. There is a
website eatinganimals.com, based
on this book where readers can
post how this book has changed


their lives-yes, it is that power-
ful. I am not one to enjoy being
preached at, so I approached this
book tentatively, not wanting it to
be a one-sided account of all the
wrongs in the industry. I found
myself on a journey with the au-
thor in search of answers. An-
swers to questions about how our
food gets to our tables and what
is endured by the animals we eat
and what we are really putting in
our mouths. It is hard to handle
at times; I found myself squirm-
ing in my chair, partly because it
is disturbing and also because I
am a part of the promotion of such
activities by eating meat. It is an
account that covers how factory
farming came about and alterna-
tives to the practice, the difference
between wanting animal welfare
and animal rights, how farming
has changed and what people are
doing to change the norm. It was
plain language written in a way
that has influenced my life because
I can now say that I am a vegetar-
ian and yes this book has changed
my life; corny but true.
I found trips to the grocery store
very sterile because I am faced
with the finished product and have
no knowledge of how it actually
got there. I can tell you one thing,
if the smiling butcher asked me
to come in the back and choose
my chicken, cow or pig and then
watch as it went through the pro-
cess of becoming my dinner I
wouldn't be able to live with my-
self. So what makes it so different


when I pick up a pack of chicken
wings or a steak for supper, it isn't
like those parts are harvested out
of the ground? The difference is
I don't see the face, it is a piece
of meat-I refuse to acknowledge
it as flesh or muscle-it is neatly
packaged, cleaned of blood and
ready to be grilled for my enjoy-
ment. The question I ask myself is
if it's really worth it when there are
so many choices of protein filled
foods that aren't from the meat of
any animal? To me it's not, but
that is a personal choice that I have
been trying to make for years and
I don't condemn those that don't
choose the same path. We all have
our personal battles and I chose to
wage war on my food choices and
for the moment, my conscious is
beating my stomach.
I have decided to make this
choice for my health, life and what
I believe to be a moral and ethi-
cal shift in my thinking. Coupled
with finishing this book, I recently
acquired a much needed adaptor
so I can transfer old home mov-
ies to my computer; the movies
are over 20 years old. I am so in-
trigued with the little girl in these
films who set out to save animals,
save the world and explore nature.
I wonder if she would be proud
of my decision to continue in the
small footsteps she put in place for
me, to advocate for preservation of
life and happiness. I want to be-
lieve that she would be.


KP ladies 9 hole league Power Ball Scramble 5/3


Team Winner #1 with score of
33
Janet Balonick
Joan Leombruno


Liz Lister
Sally Repetti
Team Winner #2 with score of
34


Peggy Flippen
Lorraine Rings
Marilyn Vahovich
Joan Abrams


Memorial Day tournament winners
Winners in the Memorial Day golf 18 hole "team scramble"tournament
at the Caloosa Country Club on May 30 were all smiles. The winning
first place team of 6 included: LtoR. Vince Coniglio/Shirley Coniglio;
Paul Chabot/Mary Chabot and Wallace DeArment/Mary DeArment.


South Hillsborough Elks Lodge #2672's
Upcoming Activities
Every Wednesday Best Spaghetti in Town. All
-you- can- eat for $7. Open to all Elks and their
guests. Music by Bryan from 5 to 8 p.m.

Every Thursday Fun Night, Wii games avail-
able all evening till closing. S

Every Friday Seafood and Sandwiches for all
Elks and their guests from 5 7 p.m. Karaoke by Bryan from 5 to 8
p.m.

Saturday, July 10 Steak Fry Dinner/ Show/Dance for $15 for all
Elks and their guests. Dinner 5 to 6:30 p.m. Show 6:30 to 8:30
p.m.

Saturday, July 17 District Vice President visit for all Elks. Din-
ner $5.

Monday, July 26 Poor Man's Dinner for $5 in advance or $6 at
the door for all Elks and their guests.


LOBSTER FEA

TUESDAY and THURSDAY







JUNE 24 2010 BSERVE NEWS R--ERVEW-CURENT-*-CC-OBSRVER--


A quiet heroine is recognized, not
once, but twice in June


When I first met Alice Fry last
fall, her living room was filled
with tiny pillows made of all col-
ors and materials. They were part
of a project later named Pillows for


Over
Coffee
By Penny Fletcher
penny@observernews net


Patriots and
were headed
for her ga-
rage to join
the hundreds
of other
pillows in
boxes be-
ing readied
for troops in
Iraq and Af-
ghanistan.
At that


time, Alice told me they were tiny
so the soldiers could use them be-
tween their heads and the sand or
mud whenever they had a chance
to rest. Anything larger would
have been too bulky to fit into the
packs of heavy gear used on the
battlefield.
Her goal was to send 500 of these
tiny, soft pillows to her daughter
Susan Shepard who works on base
at Ft. Bragg, North Carolina, but
with the help of many groups and
individuals in South County, she
ended up with 1,500.
June 8, Alice was honored at a
Volunteer Recognition Ceremo-
ny at Ft. Bragg, North Carolina,
and given a Certificate of Thanks
by Vice Admiral William H.
McRaven.
"I want all the groups and indi-
viduals who worked on the pillows
and the churches and others who
served as drop-off points, and all
those who drove pillows from one
location to another, to know that
they are part of this award. If it


hadn't been for them, I would not
have received it," Alice told me
last week.
For the second time this year, she
had prepared good strong coffee
for us to share in her kitchen as she
told me about the recent events in
her life.
Her flight arrived in North Caro-
lina with about only an hour to
spare before the military ceremony
began, and the next day was just as
busy because her grandson James
(Susan's son) was graduating. The
day following that was his 19th
birthday, and also a celebration of
his acceptance into all four military
schools to which he had applied.
"He chose VMI (Virginia
Military Institute) because of his
love of science, math and tech-
nology," Alice explained. "Imag-
ine him having won four military
scholarships and being able to
choose!"
As we were talking about the
things the troops needed espe-
cially moist towelettes to wipe the
sand from their faces I noticed a
copy of South Bay Hospital's sum-
mer edition of its magazine, Living
Well on a nearby table and realized
it was Alice and her husband Bill
on the cover.
"Oh yes," the modest 80-year-
old said in a very matter-of-fact
manner like it was something we
all did every day, "That was be-
cause I saved his life."
I picked it up and read the fea-
ture article inside.
It seems Alice had recently gone
to a hospital-sponsored seminar
about strokes givenby South Bay's
Stroke Coordinator Kim McKell, a
Registered Nurse.


Penny Fletcher Photo
Alice Fry of Sun City Center was honored at Ft. Bragg, North Carolina
June 8 for the work she and her many South County volunteers did
on the Pillows for Patriots project highlighted in The Observer News


last fall.

"Thanks to the information I
learned there, I was able to evalu-
ate Bill," she told me. "It was a
privilege to have that knowledge
just when I needed it."
Thanks to Alice's fast action,
Bill is back volunteering at the
Sun City Center Computer Club
helping people with computer
problems or who just want to learn
new things.
Being that as of this writing it
is only the end of June, one can
only wonder what the rest of this
summer will hold for Alice.


*Perhaps you have '..,,a. tili
you likee to share. Or maybe you 'd
rather tell the community about
your favorite charity or cause:
or sound off about .i. ii., 1ii,,i you
think needs change. That's what
"Over Coffee" is about. It really
does matterr whether we actually
drink any coffee or not (,liri. ,rii, I
probably will). It's what you have
to say that important. E-mail me
any time at penny@observernews.
net and suggest a ,ii .,.i place.
No matter what's going on, I'm
usually available to share just one
more cup.


Self-testing easy
and accurate
(NAPSA) -- According to a study
presented at the annual meeting of
the Infectious Diseases Society of
America, self-testing for a serious
condition can be easy, accurate and
acceptable to many people.
The study showed that more than
99 percent of HIV results obtained
via self-testing matched those by
hospital workers. According to
Johns Hopkins researcher Charlotte
Gaydos, DrPH, participants had
no trouble distinguishing between
positive and negative results.
Nearly all participants said they
would "definitely or probably rec-
ommend" self-testing to a friend
and would "probably or definitely"
perform a test at home if it were
available. With further study, she
went on to say, home testing for
HIV might one day be as routine
as pregnancy testing.
"Rapid HIV testing works by de-
tecting antibodies against HIV, just
like the kits used by health care
workers for routine HIV testing,"
says Larry Siebert, CEO of Chem-
bio Diagnostics. Siebert went on
to note that rapid, point-of-care
(POC) tests such as those his com-
pany develops are single test car-
tridges, similar to pregnancy tests,
that use a small sample of oral
fluid or whole blood and deliver a
visual result in approximately 20
minutes-and one may serve as a
viable at-home HIV test.
"The hope for this test is that it
can help identify those HIV-posi-
tive individuals who are unaware
of their status and motivate them to
seek immediate medical attention
and early treatment," says Siebert.
Learn more online at www.chem-
bio.com.


Helping military families cope
with change


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(NAPSA)-There's good news
for our nation's service members
and military families that are tran-
sitioning home. Resources to sup-
port recovery and reintegration
exist to help our nation's warriors
and their families cope with the
injuries, stress and psychological
health concerns that can be ex-
perienced during the deployment
cycle.
When servicemen and service-
women return home, it's important
to remember that the transition
from deployment to base or civil-
ian life can impact not only service
members but also their entire fam-
ilies spouses, children, parents,
siblings and other loved ones. The
person who left is often not the
same person who will come back,
and the same is true for service
members' families. Feeling anxi-
ety about changing relationships in
a family can be a natural reaction
to deployment.
Fortunately, military families
don't have to experience this kind
of stress on their own. Resources
like the Real Warriors Campaign


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(www.realwarriors.net) offer sup-
port for those on the battlefield
and the home front. The campaign,
sponsored by the Defense Centers
of Excellence for Psychological
Health and Traumatic Brain Injury
(DCoE), promotes the processes
of building resilience, facilitating
recovery and supporting reintegra-
tionfor returning service members,
veterans and their families.
The program offers practical
articles and advice, including tips
for spouses of returning service
members and useful information
for those who are dealing with
deployment, as well as additional
resources available through part-
ners such as the National Mili-
tary Family Association. Real
Warriors Campaign volunteers
Maj. Jeff Hall and his wife Sheri,
experienced the challenges of re-
integration firsthand when Hall
returned from his second deploy-
ment to Iraq. "I could tell when he
walked in the door of the hangar,
he wasn't the same man," Sheri
said. "He would say things, and
his eyes would become black, and
that wasn't Jeff at all."
With the support of his com-
manding officer and his family,
Hall and his wife attended a treat-
ment program at the Deployment
Health Clinical Center, where they
interacted with service members
experiencing similar psychologi-
cal health concerns. "I thought
getting mental health help would
be the end of my career. It wasn't.
I'm a better soldier today because I
know that resources are available,
and they work," Hall said.
If you or a loved one is experi-
encing a psychological health con-
cern, there are resources available,
and they work. To learn more, visit
the Real Warriors Campaign Web
site at www.realwarriors.net.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 7


JUNE 24, 2010


'






8 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Scallop season has opened early


Fish Tales


Scallop
season has
opened early
this year,
two weeks
before the
scheduled
July first


ByJonie Maschek opening.
The early
open came from a request by Gov.
Charlie Crist to the Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission to
make sure Floridians could reap
scallop harvests before or if the oil
slick hit our shores.
Did you know that scallops are
an annual crop? They live and
grow every year, meaning they
hatch live spawn and then die in a
single year.
Last year it seemed to me there
weren't many scallops around, but
I was told that this year the scallop
crop is big.
Believe it or not, scallops can
swim. They are not like most
shellfish that affix themselves to
the bottom of the bay. They swim
by clapping their shells together as
they move in the water. They can
travel miles with the help of the
tides.
The tiny larvae from their spawn
develops into a shellfish which
can measure up to three inches by
opening season each year.
Scallops survive only in clear wa-
ter and abundant grass. They were
once numerous in Tampa Bay, but
due to pollution in 1950 they were
almost wiped out. They have come


C.A.R.E. Pets

of the week


bonny
Sonny is quite the rock star. He
shows off for all of his visitors. He
is a fun-loving Hound mix who
was brought into the shelter with
his sister Cher. Brother and sister
have been having a ball discover-
ing the doggy pool and their new
toys. Sonny wants his own group-
ies and is currently conducting
interviews. Forever homes only
need apply. As part of his adop-
tion, Sonny will be neutered, mi-
crochipped, and brought current
on his shots. C.A.R.E. is open 10
am to 3pm on Tues. Sat. For di-
rections visit www.CareShelter.
org or call 813-645-2273


Shadow
Shadow is a beautiful black do-
mestic short hair with a pretty
round face. Unfortunately his
owner couldn't keep him and had
to give him up for adoption. He is
current on his shots and neutered.
Visit Shadow and give him a life
in a forever home. There is special
pricing throughout the month of
June in honor of National Adopt
A Cat Month. C.A.R.E. is open
10 am to 3pm on Tues. Sat. For
directions visit www.CareShelter.
org or call 813-645-2273.


back in the passing years, but not
in the abundance they once were.
Scallops are in abundance from
the Pasco/Hernando line to the
Panhandle, where the waters have
not been polluted. In the Bay area,
good scalloping takes place in the
waters around the Long Boat Key
Bridge, where dozens of boats
gather and divers search the waters
for their catch of the tiny grey
white-shelled creatures.
In the waters around Piney
Point, schools of scallops have
been playing hide and seek. Mo-
tor slowly over grassy flats to find
your scallops, keep a keen eye on
the grass as you might just find an
abundance of them visiting togeth-
er in the grass in four feet or deep-
er water. A good family outing,
where the children can swim and
grab the scallops or grown-ups can
dive in deeper waters for them.
You might look for lots of boats
anchored together if you can't find
scallops. Be courteous and kind,
and get your own space in the area
before you set your anchor.
You must have a saltwater license
to harvest scallops, with legal take
of two gallons whole. If you clean
them, you can only have a half
pint, per person. Aboat of harvest-
ers may have 10-gallon whole or a
half-gallon cleaned or shucked per
boat.
Scallops are edible, but the only
part edible is the white muscle that
opens and closes the shell. To me,
it is a tedious job to clean scallops
and it takes many to make a meal.


They can be broiled or fried, put in
stews, or salads.
Gag grouper are most always out
in the deep, and not often close to
shore in the hot summer months,
but some lucky anglers found a
few strays in the ship channels.
Red grouper are hot this week
for those fishing in 50' of water or
deeper. A sure catch is using sar-
dines or pinfish.
Kingfish are swimming offshore
now, one or two may have been left
behind, but all catches that have
been reported to me were caught
in the deep offshore.
The most spectacular game fish
is still the tarpon, whose powerful
leaps from the water are still test-
ing the skills of the best of anglers.
Tarpon share ancient lineage.
Tarpon-like fish date back to pre-
historic times, dating to the Cre-
taceous Period 100 million years
ago.
Florida is known nationally for
its tarpon tournaments and the hot
spots of Florida are Boca Grande
Pass, and the Florida Keys, where
anglers from all over the world
come to make a catch of the Silver
King.
If you see a lot of bird activ-
ity, head in their direction. If they
are sitting on the water, bait fish
is close by. If they are flying in
flocks, they are chasing a school
of fish and looking for the small
fish left behind. Don't cast into the
school -- position your boat and let
them come to you, or make a long
cast ahead of them.


On windy days it is difficult to
cast fish; try drifting along the
grassy shallows and catch your
legal catch of trout.
Remember snook are only a
catch and release fish, as they
are still out of season. Season has
been closed since the freeze which
washed many dead fish ashore.
Get your kids hooked on fishing
by fishing for Spanish Mackerel
which are in all bay waters. They
are small, feisty and a great catch
for a young angler.
Boaters at E.G. Simmons Park
in Ruskin will double their boat-
ers' pleasure by the increased boat
launching capacity.
The sun is hot, wear light color
clothes, use your sunscreen, pro-
tect your eyes with a good pair of
polarized glasses, be safe with life
jackets for everyone aboard.

-- Aleta Jonie Maschek is a
member of Florida Outdoor
Press.


Shamble Caloosa
Greens Men's Golf
Assn 05/26
1st Wayne Zellers, John Fuqua,
Jack Duncan 192

2nd Gene Mueller, Ron
Chaban, Brad Wells 194

3rd Jerry Huebner, Bill
Schofield, Les Easton 199


JUNE 24, 2010
A Little Repair
Saves $200
We do a lot of shopping on
Craig's List for things we want that
we don't want to pay full price.
While purchasing an item from a
family that was moving, we asked
if they wanted to sell their lawn
swing, the kind that seats two and
has a canopy. It was rusty looking,
faded, and had green algae on the
cushions. New, it had to be $250.
The guy said that he would take $5
for it!
We brought it home and I got
to work. First, using a power drill
with a metal brush attachment, I
ground off all the rusty spots. You
can use a wire brush if you prefer.
I bought a small can of store brand
oil based rust preventer paint and
painted all the metal on the swing.
I bought new cushions for it at a
discount store and washed the
canopy.
It looks great and all together it
cost me $24 for the cushions, $8
for the can of paint, $5 for the
swing itself, and my time. By re-
using something that would have
otherwise gone to a landfill, I am
saving money and helping the
planet.
Shawna P in Barberton, OH
Want to live better on the money
you already make? Visit stretcher. corn/index. cfm ?TipsSyn>
to find hundreds of articles to help
you stretch your day and your dol-
lar! Copyright 2010 Dollar Stretcher,
Inc.


Score a great rate!


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JUNE 24, 2010

$% fO0


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 9


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


S Daily Breakfast, Lunch &
Dinner Specials

X 514 US Hwy. 41 South
oY- Ruskin 813-641-7437
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Free Mini Greenhouse
Casement windows can be used as
mini greenhouses. If your windows
have sliding storms and an inner
window that opens, you can start
seeds quite easily using your "mini
greenhouse." I use either small Dixie
cups, egg cartons cut length-wise, or
stryofoam coffee cups that are cut
down to size. Fill with potting soil
and plant your seeds. Line the cups
on the windowsill with the storm
window closed. Close the inner
window, and you have a mini green
house! If it gets too hot in there, just
open the storm a little. When the
plants get big enough to transplant,


you are all set.
The bag of soil cost me $2, the cups
cost me $1 and the seeds were $.25 a
packet. For under $4, I got about 48
plants growing, which would nor-
mally cost about $15 a flat. This is
not only easy, but also you can save
a lot of money by starting your own
plants, either flowers or vegetables.
H.T.
Want to live better on the money you
already make? Visit con/index. cfm?TipsSyn> to find hun-
dreds of articles to help you stretch
your day and your dollar! Copyright
2010 Dollar Stretcher, Inc.


Golf Scores Hogans
Golf Club
Wed, 5/26/10 Summerfield,
5779 yds Match
1st: Barry Kolin, 65
2nd : Fred Mayes, 69
3rd : Anna Kunley, 86

Reservations are required to play
withthe Hogans. Contact ArtSwal-
low@aol.com or visit http://ho-
gans-golf.com/. The Club is open
to all Sun City Center and Kings
Point residents and their guests.


1811 BEDFORD LANE G-166 $27,500
206 N ANDOVER PL #75......... $29,900
301 ANDOVER S PL................ $34,500
205 KINGS BLVD #C-65.......... $35,000
1902 DANDRIDGE ST D-18 .... $39,900
2230 GRN HAVEN DR............. $42,500
445 GLOUCESTER ............. $48,900
2202 HOLKHAM PL................ $52,900
204 GLENELLEN PL............. $53,000
2230 GRNWICH DR................ $56,900
502 FALLOW CT..................... $57,500
243 GLOUCESTER BLVD.,..... $59,800
1812 FOXHUNT DR ........... $59,900
2202 HIGHCLERE CIRCLE.... $63,000
1809 FOXHUNT #A................. $64,900
2111 HARTLEBURY WAY........ $64,900
2519 LANCASTER................... $68,900
2613 LANCASTER................... $74,500
2009 HAILDOM WAY.............. $74,900
2403 NANTUCKET GRN CT... $77,500
426 GLADSTONE PL ............. $78,000
2519 LARKIN DR................... $78,000
2109 HARTLEBURY WAY........ $79,000
2403 LANCASTER DR........... $79,900
2501 LARKIN DR................... $79,900
2478 NEW HAVEN................... $79,900
761 TREMONT GRNS ........... $85,000
317 KNOTTWOOD CT............ $89,500


710 MANCHESTER WDS D..... $89,900
1412 INGRAM ..................... $94,000
2421 LOCKSLEY ST................ $94,900
2223 IVAN CT..................... $95,500
1303 IDLEWOOD DR.............. $98,500
2408 OLD NATUCKET CT...... $98,500
2413 NANTUCKET FIELD...... $98,900
2426 NEW HAVEN CIR ........... $99,900
2414 NANTUCKET FLD WAY.. $99,900
601 MANCHESTER WDS DR. $109,000
2506 LONIGAN PL................ $109,900
2004 ACADIA GRNS.............. 111,900
1025 NORFORK ISLND CT... $115,000
2257 WORTHINGTON GRNS $119,000
923 OXFORD PARK DR......... $119,900
2218 MAYFIELD PALMS ...... $123,000
728 MASTERPIECE............... 124,990
755 MCDANIEL STREET...... $126,000
2019 NANTUCKET DR.......... $127,500
1915 INVERNESS GRNS DR.. $129,900
2022 INVERNESS GRNS........ $129,900
2133 ACADIA GRNS DR........ $134,900
2218 OLIVE BRANCH........... $136,900
2066 INVERNESS GRNS........ $138,500
2019 SIFIELD GRNS WAY..... $144,900
2072 SIFIELD GRNS WAY..... $153,900
2456 SIFIELD GRNS WAY..... $159,900
1002 CHELSEA GRNS CT..... $159,900


2126 SIFIELD GRNS WAY..... $179,000
1945 ACADIA GRNS DR........ $219,900
2487 KENSINGTON GRNS.... $224,900
2205 SIFIELD GRNS WAY .... $229,900
2419 KENSINGTON GRNS.... $233,500
2016 GRANTHAM GRN......... $235,000
2289 SIFIELD GRNS WAY..... $239,500
2116 SIFIELD GRNS WY....... $249,900



202 ISLIP WAY #13.................$69,900
1209 CHEVY CHASE...............$79,900
1502 BELLE GLADE AVE .......$93,000
1511 DANBURY DR................$99,900
804 LA JOLLA AVE .............109,500
1215 HACIENDA...................$109,900
1601 CLOSITER....................112,000
371 CLUB MANOR DR ..........$114,900
686 ALLEGHENY...................$119,900
1252 DEL WEBB W .............126,000
305 STONEHAN DR..............$134,900
408 BLACKHAWK CIR ..........$135,000
325 SIENA VISTSA PL...........$199,000
1802 ADREAN PL .................. 209,000
1943 S. PEBBLE BEACH ......8220,000
2433 DEL WEBB BLVD.,E......8229,000
1344 EMERALD DUNES DR..$315,000


2639 EDGEWATER FALLS DR.... $74,900
568 FLORIDA S CIR.................... 99,000
3302 RIVER ESTATES ........... $135,900
215 15TH NW ST...................... $145,000
11453 WALDEN LOOP.............. $172,500
10844 NEWBRIDGE DR............ $178,900
2607 YUKON CLIFF.................. $199,000
15921 COBBLE MILL DR,
VALENCIA LAKE................... $241,900
15836 COBBLE MILL DR,
VALENCIA LAKE................... $279,000
5729 TORTOISE PL .................. $345,000
5040 RUBY FLATS DR............... $560,000


401 INDIAN MEADOW,
WIMAUMA.....................................$99,000
406 INDIAN MEADOW,
WIMAUMA.............................. 79,000



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10 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
Treat yourself to a healthy breakfast


(NAPSA)-Eating a well-bal-
anced breakfast is a great way to
jump-start the day. It's also linked
to good nutrition, increased me-
tabolism and improved grades
and behavior among children. The
most important meal of the day
should not be skipped or skimped.
The good news is that a healthy-
breakfast is easy to achieve. Ac-
cording to professionally trained
chef Philip Jones, there's a mis-
conception that a nutritious break-
fast can't taste good. From turkey
sausage and Canadian bacon to
egg whites and whole grainbreads,
breakfast foods can have both ap-
petite appeal and good nutrition.
"The sky is really the limit on
the number of healthful options
you can prepare for breakfast,"
said Jones, president of Jones
Dairy Farm. "Items not typically
thought of as breakfast foods such
as pizza, burritos and sandwiches
are all great options if you incor-
porate wholesome ingredients like
low-fat proteins and fresh fruits
and veggies. Use your imagination
and you'll wake up looking for-
ward to the most important meal
of the day."
Jones also advises buying health-
ful ingredients your family actu-
ally enjoys eating. Items bought
solely for health benefits will most
likely sit unopened in your pantry
or refrigerator. He offers the fol-
lowing simple recipe for individu-
als on the go.
Hearty Breakfast Pitas
Makes 2 servings
8 Jones Dairy Farm All Natural
Golden Brown
Turkey Sausage Links
1% tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons chopped
onion
2 tablespoons chopped red or
green pepper
2 tablespoons chopped celery
4 eggs, slightly beaten


teaspoon salt
cup low-fat plain yogurt
2 pita breads, cut in half
1 tomato sliced thinly
Shredded low-fat Monterey Jack
cheese
Prepare sausage as directed on
package, slice thinly, set aside. Saute
onion, peppers and celery in oil in
large skillet on medium-high heat
about 5 minutes or until tender. Stir
in eggs, sausage and salt. Cook on
medium heat, drawing cooked por-
tion of eggs to center until all egg
mixture is almost set. Stir in yogurt.
Cook until egg mixture is complete-
ly set. Divide egg mixture evenly be-
tween pita halves. Add tomato and
sprinkle on cheese.
For more breakfast ideas, visit
www.jonesdairyfarm.com or call
(800) 563-1004.


A delicioUS, nutritious bre
can be easy to prepare.


JUNE 24, 2010


At Home Vacation
We live within an hour of De-
troit, Ann Arbor, and Toledo, so we
can take a week, pack a lunch each
day, and go to many things near us
for the day. For example, we may
spend one day each at the Detroit
Zoo, Toledo Zoo, Greenfield Vil-
lage, Henry Ford Museum, Lake
Erie, etc. By sleeping at home and
taking our lunches, we only have
the cost of a little gas and entrance
fees for a lovely day's adventure.
We also eliminate those hours
in the car hearing, "Are we there
yet?" I'm sure there are also many
places to go that have no fees.
Take a map and find places within
50 miles or so of home to visit and
discover what's in your "backyard"
that people from out of state come
to visit.
Dawn T
Want to live better on the money
you already make? Visit stretcher. corn/index. cfm ?TipsSyn>
to find hundreds of articles to help
you stretch your day and your dol-
lar! Copyright 2010 Dollar Stretcher,
Inc.

SCC Nine Hole Ladies
League 6/10
Game was throw out worst hole.
Winners were -
First Place Millie Stanek 24
Second Place tie
Jean Corbett and Jeanne Do-
herty 26


@* Podiatric Medicine and Surgery

Sean D. Shanahan,

D.P.M., M.P.H.
3909 Galen Court, Suite B-1
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Phone: (813) 634-0664
Fax: (813) 634-0668


CORRECTION: In last week's Fish Tales, the
website listed as spookplace.com should
have been spookpalace.com.


Senior Home Companions, Inc.
We Provide Loving, Non-Medical, In-Home Care
We pride ourselves on carefully matching our companion/
homemakers to meet the special needs of each individual
situation.
tua 813-980-3408

Hourly Overnight Care
S24-Hour Care Temporary or Long Term Care
S C www.SeniorHomeCompanions.com


Dr. Robert A. Norman
Board Certified Dermatologist


Dr. A. Theodosatos
Brandi Broughton, PA-C


Offering Botox, Restylane and various cosmetic
products and services
Same Day Appointments FREE Skin Screening
6322 U.S. Highway 301 Riverview
813-880-7546
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Members Amencan Dental Associaton, Ronda State Dental Associaton, Ronda West Coast Dental
Associaton, Manatee County Dental Association and Hillsborough County Dental Association
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I






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 11


Attn. Homeowners: New
special program just announced
that will buy back your old
windows for $100 trade-in plus
get up to $1500! It has recently
been announced by the IRS that
the "Emergency Economic
Stabilization Act of 2008"
has been continued into 2010.
This bill extended tax credits
for energy efficient home im-
provements (windows, storm
windows & doors). Work must
be "placed into service" while
rebates are still available. You
could be eligible for up to
$1500 in Federal Tax Credit.
All consultations are free.
WeatherTite Windows, an-
nounced a great savings plan.
Their $0 down and no interest
programs are great for homeown-
ers who are in need of energy
efficient and hurricane resistant
windows, sliding glass doors,
entry doors and siding now!


WeatherTite products come
with 6 great warranties, meet
stringent codes for hurricanes,
made to reduce homeowners
insurance and qualify for
2010 Federal Residential
Energy Tax Credit up to
$1,500.
In a bid to promote energy
efficiency most power com-
panies are offering up to $350
credit or discount using ener-
gy star rated products. These
products can also help you
save as much as 50% on hom-
eowners insurance.
This is an offer that in-
cludes lifetime product and
labor warranties as well as a
special 45% energy savings
and 100% financing with no
money down! Payments can
be as low as $69 per month.
All applications accepted!
As always, WeatherTite
is proud to offer special dis-


counts to seniors and mili-
tary.
WeatherTite also encour-
ages all condo owners to call
as well, as WeatherTite will
be able to design a window or
door that meets and exceeds
all your association require-
ments. WeatherTite will work
with your association for the
proper approvals. Be one of
the first 5 in your development
and receive a 30% discount.
Call toll-free 24 hours a day
for a FREE in-home consul-
tation. Mention this special
and receive $100 trade-in for
each old window you replace!
These offers will expire
7/8/10.

813-908-0131

800-821-8483
www.weathertitewindows.com
#CGC-1515541


SCC Walmart briefly evacuated
Mitch Traphagen photo
The Sun City Walmart store on State Road 674 and U.S.
Highway 301 was briefly evacuated on Tuesday morning,
reportedly due to problems with an air handler within the
store's ventilation system. Both customers and employees
were evacuated from the store as a precaution. The problem
was quickly handled by Hillsborough County Fire Rescue
and the store reopened at approximately 9 a.m. There were
no immediate reports of injuries. At left, customers and
employees stand behind HCFR trucks during the evacuation.




Pulse
Words in the national media


The Gulf oil spill
"I think it is a tragedy of the
first proportion that a private cor-
poration can be subjected to what
I would characterize as a shake-
down, in this case, a $20 billion
shakedown... I apologize. I do not
want to live in a country where
any time a citizen or a corpora-
tion does ....,,. ihi,,a that is i'.f ,i,-
mately wrong, is subject to some
sort of political pressure that is,
again, in my words, amounts to a
shakedown. So I apologize. "
U.S. Congressman Joe Bar-
ton to BP CEO Tony Hayward
during a Congressional hearing on
the Gulf oil spill, June 17, 2010
(Morning session)
"...ifo u, oi,,i. I said this morn-


ing has been misconstrued to the
opposite effect I want to apologize
for that misconstrued miscon-
struction. I apologize for using the
term 'shakedown'... and I retract
my apology to BP "
U.S. Congressman Joe Bar-
ton during a Congressional hear-
ing on the Gulf oil spill, June 17,
2010 (Afternoon session)

"They've agreed to put this $20
billion dollars in escrow. I don't
know what context Mr Barton was
making that remark but I'm glad
BP has accepted responsibility for
their actions."
U.S. House Minority Leader
John Boehner on Fox News, June
17,2010


AUTOI~ CARE.
W\ 1!M .'0


yAh A iT


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Through the Eyes of the Students (continued)


MS. BAKER
by Jestine Whitaker
Ms. Baker was born and raised in
Flourtown, Pennsylvania. She says
her greatest influences were her
ninth grade English teacher and her
father. Ms. Baker wanted to teach
because she liked working with
teenagers and because she wanted
to make a difference. She wanted
to be a reading teacher because
reading is a national problem and
because she enjoys the adventure
of exploring and imagining that
the books bring! South County has
helped her gain an understanding
of today's youth. It was hard when
she was a teen, but she says she
has gained the utmost respect for
how hard it is for teens today. Ms.
Baker is an amazing and outgoing
teacher and she tries to make ev-
ery day a good day. She hopes the
best for her students and she wants
to see us going somewhere in life.
Every day that I attend her class,
I learn something new, whether it
is a new word or a correct spell-
ing. Every student needs a teacher
like Ms. Baker to "help them help
themselves" go somewhere in this
world.


MR. CHASE
By Marisela Garcia
Mr. Chase is a reading teacher
at South County Career Center.
He has been teaching at South
County for the past two years, and
this is his third year working for
the school district. Mr. Chase used
to live in Korea where he was an
English teacher. He enjoyed every
moment of it because he would
help students learn a different lan-
guage and he would learn himself.
As the years passed, he met his
beautiful wife. They have been
happily married for four years. Mr.
Chase was a real estate agent for
two years after leaving Korea, but
decided to come back to teaching.
He enjoys what he does now and
loves helping students succeed and
become stronger for their future.
He pushes his students to always
do their best, especially on a read-
ing program called Fast Forward.
As his student, I don't like doing
it, but I can see improvement in
my reading skills and vocabulary.
I didn't realize it until I got it in my
head to really try, then I started to
see the changes in myself.





4.
'601


4f.


MAJOR COLES
by Modesto Hernandez,
Michelle Lumbreras, Niko
Baker and Antonio Garcia
Major Coles served in the Army
for 20 years because he wanted a
job where they would pay him to
learn and he could serve his coun-
try. He has always wanted to teach,
coach and mentor the youth of
America so when he retired from
the army, he became a JROTC
teacher. He came to South County
Career Center this year because it
gives him the opportunity to start a
JROTC program from the ground
up. JROTC is a class where you
learn discipline and citizenship
through classwork, military drill
and exercise. Major Coles shows
us how to march and fold a flag,
and next year he is going to show
the cadets how to spin and flip a
drill rifle. Every Thursday and
Friday we have physical training
(PT). In his class, there is even a
gym where you can work out. He
says that he enjoys the challenge of
teaching and enjoys South County.
He leads avery happy and success-
ful life with his wife, Mary Even,
and his two dogs, Max and Payne.
He is currently training for the tri-
athlon, which is an event where
competitors start with a swim,
then bike, then run. Major Coles
pushes us to try harder and teaches
us discipline while respecting us
as individuals. He teaches us the
importance of being better citizens
to develop our leadership and ethi-
cal values. Without his encourage-
ment, some students would give
up easily. He has changed lives in
so little time.


S 4 6.


MRK. WAKNIK
by Elidia Rojas
Mrs. Warner teaches several
classes at South County Career
Center, including marketing and
digital design. This is her second
year of working at South County.
Mrs. Warner used to work at East
Bay, but she came to South County
when they opened the computer
classes because, "I wanted to have
a smaller class size to make a big-
ger difference with the students I
met." Mrs. Warner wants all her
students to graduate from South
County Career Center and have
good jobs. She does her best to
make sure that will happen for all
of her students.


MR. KRAN I
by Bryan Judson and
Javier Gamez
Mr. Krantz has been a mechan-
ic for forty-five years and he can
tell you what's wrong with pret-
ty much any type of car: Ford,
Chevy, Honda and more. He has
been working on cars since the
age of twelve and he has a 1969
Ford Mustang GT that he likes to
work on in his free time. He also
enjoys going salt water fishing and
rebuilding model trains. He has re-
built model trains that are over 50
years old. He's been married for
11 years now and has two grown
sons. He says he is planning on
staying with his wife for a very
long time. He used to work at Arm-
wood high school, then transferred
to South County Career Center
and has been the auto tech teacher
here for about 3 years now. He's
a good instructor and he's taught
me a lot about motors. Some of
the teachers here at South County
get his classes to change the oil in
their cars. We also do their detail-
ing, change brakes, and rotate tires
while he teaches us. Mr. Krantz is
just one big help to South County
and the teachers and kids.


9 E st


MRS. GARDNER
by Preston Young
Mrs. Gardner has been a reading
teacher at South County Career
Center for eight years. Her motive
for being at South County is to
share what she has learned in her
many years of study and variety of
experiences with her students. For
example, she attended the inau-
guration of President Obama and
reported back to her students what
that experience was like. We're
glad Mrs. Gardner is here to share
everything that she has learned
with all of her students.


The Ruskin Moose Lodge #813 is located at
1212 E. Shell Point Road, Ruskin (813) 645-5919


Friday, June 25
Saturday, June 26

Every Wednesday


7-11 p.m Live music by George Bums
Women of the Moose Bazaar
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins
5-7 p.m. Chef's Choice Dinner


Every Thursday 5-7 p.m. Wings (the best I've every had)
Every Friday 5-7 p.m. Fish Fry
(beer batter, fried or baked)
Live music


Every Saturday night

All events are open to qualified
Moose members and guest.


Karaoke by Kim


ORLANDO, FL (AgPR) The
Nutrients for Life Foundation and
Florida FFA announced winners of
the 'Helping Communities Grow'
chapter recognition program
today at the 82nd Florida FFA
State Convention & Leadership
Conference.
First place was awarded to Bron-
son High School in Bronson, FL,
second place to Roosevelt Acade-
my in Lake Wales, and third place
to Eisenhower Middle School in
Gibsonton, FL.
"I truly believe there's no better
way to learn than through hands-
on activities," says Nutrients for
Life Foundation Executive Direc-
tor Harriet Wegmeyer. "These stu-
dents have not only learned about
the importance of fertilizer in
their communities, but they have
inspired others around them to
learn as well."
Students in each participating
FFA chapter developed communi-
ty-based programs based upon the
Nutrients for Life Foundation cur-
riculum, Nourishing the Planet in
the 21st Century.
The top three chapters were
awarded the following grants: First
place -- $6,000; Second place --
$3,000; and third place -- $1,000.
Chapters who did not place but
entered projects received $300
mini-grants for their participation.


Ruskin VFW Post #6287

Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120 U.S. 41 N. has listed the following
weekly activities. Meetings are: American Legion on 1st Wednesday
each month; VFW and LAVFW on the 2nd Wednesday each month;
and MAVFW on the 3rd Thursday
each month.
Thursday June 24- Bar Bingo at
6 p.m. Men's Auxiliary at 7 p.m.
Friday, June 25 Fish & Chips
from 5 to 7 p.m.
Saturday, June 26 Open.
Sunday, June 27 Open.
Monday, June 28- Wii Games
Sat 7 p.m.
Tuesday, June 29 Games in
lounge from 1 to 5 p.m. Bingo at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, June 30 Wii Games Bowling at 6 p.m.


The Helping Communities
Grow chapter recognition program
encouraged FFA students to help
the public become better informed
about plant nutrients, fertilizers
and related agricultural issues
through educational, community
building and hands-on activi-
ties. During the project, students
gained skills in leadership, public
speaking, team building and com-
munity awareness while increas-
ing knowledge of soil science and
agricultural issues.
Florida FFA Executive Director
Ronnie Simmons appreciates how
the hands-on activities foster a
greater agricultural understanding
among FFA students and play up
the competitive nature of schools
as they try to be best in the state.
"Helping students grow in their
personal development while learn-
ing agronomics makes this a win-
win for all involved," Simmons
says. "In agriculture and FFA,
we understand and appreciate the
power of our industry partnerships.
This program is a great example of
the impact that our partnerships
can have on our programs."
Florida has 320 FFA chapters
throughout the state in 225 high
schools and 95 middle schools.
For more information, visit
www.nutrientsforlife.org or call
(800) 962-9065.


Play pub
stumpers trivia
The Ruskin VFW Post 6287
presents a Pub Stumpers Trivia
League at 4 p.m. every Sunday,
starting July 11 at 5120 U.S.
Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin.
League members pay$2 per
person per week with all money
going to prizes. The kitchen is
open all week. Give your friends
a shout and get a team together
to face some friendly competi-
tion. There are excellent prizes
up for grabs.
For more information, call
(813) 645-2935.


Eisenhower 3rd place winner of the
FFA chapter recognition program


It's registration time
Registration for new students at Lennard High School for the
2010-2011 school year will be held Monday-Thursday, beginning
June 21 through Aug. 13, by appointment only.
To make an appointment for registration, call the school at (813)
641-5611, ext. 225.


12 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT


JUNE 24, 2010




JUNE 24, 2010


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URGENTLY NEEDED


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us-


OBSERVER NEWS


Tituesdaivjiun'I eJ62O
- I I I I' i Il~


1ilI


nbuy I Tcc m

INSTANT PAYMENT
for Accumulations, Collections, Estates
SILVER COINS PAYING TOP DOLLAR $11.50 per dollar
1964 & earlier: Silver Dollars:
HII\ ics5.75 & up s1 s- 1'-1i 14.00 & up
(Q)u.i.IC 12.87 & up 1 1 '- 5S15.00 & up
Dimes1.15 &- up UNC. nic\\ Iils ll- -22 ,- I'-5s300 & up
1965 1969: UNC, new rolls lz7zS-lyu4S550 & up
Halves1.50 per coin Fine plus or better. Huge Premiums For


I
WE BUY ALL FORMSO0

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STERLING SILVER
*SkIlimngF Sik BaI, 1-125
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Uncirculated Rolls or Bags.
F GOLD & COINS
U S Gi IL Coin
1I t, $ ,s125 to $2,000 & up
-I -IIS5,000. to $40.000 s up
I-R.nd, .


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* RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 13
|_ -mI | |
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14 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Keep cool in the springs around Florida


JUNE 24, 2010


S Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State
Park
Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park is a
rehabilitation center for injured
and orphaned West Indian mana-
tees until they are returned to the
wild. The park's centerpiece is a
first-magnitude freshwater spring,
which produces millions of gallons
of crystal-clear water each hour
with the spring outflow creating
the Homosassa River. Visitors are
given a rare opportunity to observe
Florida's native wildlife in a natu-
ral setting and can stroll along the
paved trails and boardwalks to see
manatees and alligators, black bear
and bobcats, and tiny Key deer and
otters at close range. Many birds
species, from colorful wood ducks
and roseate spoonbills to majestic
birds of prey and whooping cranes
also inhabit the park.
The park showcases native Flor-
ida wildlife, including manatees,
black bears, bobcats, white-tailed
deer, American alligators, Ameri-
can crocodiles, and river otters. At
the Wildlife Encounter programs,
snakes and other native animals
are featured. Recreational oppor-
tunities include picnicking, nature
study, and bird-watching. Plan 3
1/2 to 4 hours to tour the park. The
park is located at 4150 S. Suncoast
Boulevard, in Homosassa. For
more information, call (352) 628-
5343.
S Fanning Springs State
Park
Located on the Suwannee River,
this inviting source of cool, clear
water has attracted people for thou-
sands of years. Fanning Springs
now produces less than 65 mil-
lion gallons of water daily, mak-
ing it a second magnitude spring.
Historically, Fanning Spring was a
first-magnitude springs as recently
as the 1990s. Swimming or snor-
keling in the spring is a refreshing
activity on a hot day. Visitors can
enter the park by boat from the Su-
wannee River or by car from U.S.
19/98. Visitors enjoy the picnic
area, playground and sandy vol-
leyball court.
A boardwalk overlooks the
spring and river. White-tailed deer,
gray squirrels, red-shouldered







'
ii,1




Made in the
USA by
Americans
Let's put
Americans
back to
work!


A p IIULU UlI UlI IIIy IUIUIU
Greater Flamingo walking in the
water.
hawks, pileated woodpeckers and
barred owls are some of the ani-
mals seen in the park. Manatees
sometimes visit the spring during
the winter months. Five full-ser-
vice cabins are available for rent.
Overnight vehicle parking for
... .. .


primitive campers is not permit-
ted. Primitive camping is available
only for those arriving by foot, bi-
cycle or paddling on the Suwannee
River Wilderness Trail. Reserve a
kayak at least a day in advance of
your arrival by calling Suwannee
Guides & Outfitters at(352)542-
8331. Fanning Spring is located
at 18020 N.W. Highway 19. For
more information, call (352) 463-
3420.
SWeeki Wachee Springs
State Park
The mermaids at Weeki Wachee
Springs have delighted visitors
since 1947. Today, visitors can
still witness the magic of the mer-
maids, take a river boat cruise and
canoe or kayak on the Weeki Wa-
chee River. The 538-acre park fea-
tures a first magnitude spring and
a 4" '-sca.l submerged theatre for


watching the live mermaid show.
Buccaneer Bay offers a fun-filled
flume ride for thrill seekers of all
ages. The white sandy beach area
and covered picnic pavilions pro-
vide a relaxing day for your entire
family. Weeki Wachee's animal
shows provide audiences with an
entertaining and educational look
at domesticated birds and reptiles.
Weeki Wachee is located on U.S.
19 at the intersection of State Road
50, just north of Spring Hill and
south of Homosassa Springs.
SBlue Spring State Park
Blue Spring State Park covers
more than 2,600 acres including
the largest spring on the St. Johns
River. Blue Spring is a designated
Manatee Refuge and the winter
home to a growing population of
West Indian Manatees. The spring


.--- .-- .. --_-__ _


.. -. .. .



--. .. .-. .

-- .- .. .-- .:-





People swimming and snorkeling in the clear springs at Fanning Springs State Park.







SOu- Custome rs Are Our Best Advertisement. _ : . ..
3KNOX FOR M
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DOVE INTERIORS 2305 College Ave. E. Ruskin, FL* i ,,,-..-. ,,i i: .,r .) 1.
, CARPET ONE OM 813-645-8660
H-I II 1 .1 : i IT, : T, I 3 '., 1" ' I:.. .J ..I j.: 1: -r '). 1: 3 I -


Mermaids at Weeki Wachee
greet visitors.
and spring run are closed during
Manatee season, mid-November
through March, swimming or div-
ing with manatees is not permitted,
this rule is strictly enforced.
For centuries, the spring area was
home for Native Americans. The
spring's crystal clear, 73 degree
water can be enjoyed by swim-
mers, snorkelers, and certified
scuba divers with a partner. The
river is popular for fishing, canoe-
ing, and boating. River boat tours
are available; for reservations, call
St. Johns River Cruises at (386)
917-0724. The park has plenty of
picnic areas and a hiking trail. For
overnight stays, air-conditioned
cabins, a full-facility campground
and primitive campsites are avail-
able. This is a very popular park
on weekends. To ensure entrance
into the park, we recommend ar-
riving early, otherwise, the parking
area will be full and you may not
be able to enter, blue Spring State
Park is located at 2100 W. French
Avenue in Orange City. For more
information, call (386) 775-3663.


I as
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Present this coupon with your initial : On all International orders greater
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633-2636
General and Cosmetic Dentistry


Our Lab Tech Has 38+ Years Experience
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Refer 2 new patients and receive a $25 credit
toward your next visit.
Be sure to have your friend or family member mention your
name to receive the credit at time of scheduling.
Coupon must be mentioned at time of scheduling appointment. The fee advertised is the minimum
fee charged. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay,
cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed
as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the fee service examination
or treatment. Senior citizen discount does not apply.



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information on HunterDouglas
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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 15


Always

improving,

always

evolving, for

our customers,

employees and

community


I II


(lean & Tune Maintenance Special


NEW CUSTOMERS ONLY! Our technicians will thoroughly inspect, clean and tune
your Air Conditioning System, which is recommended by all manufacturers.
l This service will include:
Level and calibrate thermostat Check and clean condenser coil and
and humidistat cabinet
Get next Clean air filter or supply Inspect drain pan and flush drainlines
washable filter at no additional Add algaecide tablet to drain pan
ne FREE cost Inspect and test safety equipment (if
SIn FREE ....- -I,,-... .rIforle ak.applicable)


IIp lo mor
pur. I 'iij s.--:date.
ou ri: oppi
I 5aiiurdioiapF


nths from clean and tune separations and mold
New Customers only! Offer Check electrical connections for
loose or frayed wiring
0. Call TODAY to schedule Lubricate motors
ntment! 813-634-1144 Check AMP draws on motors
pointments are available for efficiency
SCheck Freon (refrigerant) levels


* Run test heat
* Check supply/return plenums
* Inspect lineset and insulation
You will also receive a detailed report
of the operation and condition of your
Air Conditioning System
MMMMMMMMMMMM


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electric bill with
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JUNE 24, 2010






16 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Sarasota's Lido Beach is powdery white sand, warm Gulf water
and peace within minutes of downtown and the St. Armands Circle
shopping district.


Sarasota's waterfront glows after a summer rainstorm.

Sarasota


Mitch Traphagen photos


* Continued from page 1
the setting sun. A short distance to
the west, across the John Ringling
Causeway Bridge, the sun is still
shining on the tourists finding the
best bargains on $300 Prada sun-
glasses at the shopping district of
St. Armands Circle. Back on the
fishing pier, an overweight man
in a t-shirt smiles courteously as
he walks past, carrying his fish-
ing gear and a 12-pack of beer. He
carefully places a glistening bottle
on the rail of the pier just across the
bridge from art galleries catering to
those for whom spending $10,000
on art is an afterthought with
less impact on their wallet than that
man's 12-pack had on his.
Sarasota is a hidden world-class
city. In a state not known for cul-
ture, it stands apart; it is a city filled
with museums, art galleries, music
and shopping. Only in Sarasota,
within a surprisingly short distance
and in an easy afternoon, is it pos-
sible to open an offshore bank ac-
count, wade out into the blue-green
waters of the Gulf of Mexico from
expansive and spectacular beaches
and then crack a beer with the guys
on the fishing pier. If one felt the
urge, the Budweiser could be cou-
pled with fresh croissants or pains
au chocolate from Le Macaron bak-
ery just over the bridge.
On Sarasota's Lido Beach, Ash-
ley Carnegie of Bradenton is beau-
tiful in her wedding dress. Techni-
cally she is now Mrs. Ashley Ward,
having just married Reginald Ward
of Eustis on the beach. A quarter of
a mile to the north, another couple
vows a lifetime of commitment and
love while friends and family clus-
ter around barefoot on the powdery
white sand. Afew hundred yards to
the south there is yet another clus-
ter of people; yet another wedding.
Nearby tourists, mostly youngish
parents with children, wade in the
warm water or build sand castles,
seemingly oblivious to what could
be the happiest day in the lives
of the six people getting married
around them. Somehow the wed-
ding dresses are not out of place on
this beach. It is not the first time
new lives have begun here.
Lightning streaks across the eve-
ning sky, thunder continues to rum-
ble and a few fat raindrops fall on
the pier at Causeway Park, but the
people fishing still don't seem to
notice. They live here; they know
that as quickly as the rain comes, it
will be gone. The fishing is good.
The beer is good. Just hanging out
on this pier is good and a few drops
of rain won't change that.
A few miles away, a more perma-


nent lightning bolt rests in Brian
Johnson's backyard. The yard art
would be instantly recognizable to
fans of classic hard rock. Johnson
is the frontman and the insanely
powerful voice of AC/DC, one of
the most successful rock and roll
bands in the history of music. The
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame leg-
end, along with his wife Brenda,
are year-around residents of Sara-
sota.
When Johnson is not touring
the world screaming out "Back
in Black" or "Shoot to Thrill" to
thousands of equally screaming
fans, he is at home in this town. In
contrast to the sometimes overly-
publicized causes celebres of his
fellow celebrities, Johnson puts
his money where his mouth is in
Sarasota, donating time and cash to
hospitals and charitable organiza-
tions throughout the city. His wife
is known for becoming personally
involved. Instead of invoking or
pleading with his fans to join his
causes from the stage after belting
out the tune "Hell's Bells," he qui-
etly turns around and hands over
some of the cash he has earned
from those fans to make a differ-
ence for people in his community.
According to a feature story in
the Sarasota Herald Tribune, when
the ringing of the Hell's Bells fades
away, Johnson enjoys spending his
time camping with his wife and
friends at a nearby RV park. Every-
thing in Sarasota, it seems, is unex-
pected. Who knew that God would
choose heavy metal over Muzak in
His waiting room?
The wedding parties are gone as


darkness envelopes the beach. The
12-packs and soda cans are near-
ly empty on the pier and tourists
mingle with locals over seafood at
Barnacle Bill's restaurant on U.S.
Highway 41. For the tourists, the
frustration associated with the mad
rush to get on with their vacation
is gone, fading like the sun setting
into the Gulf of Mexico just a few
miles away. What remains are un-
spoken thoughts and personal ques-
tions. "Why don't we live here?"
they silently ask themselves, while
smiling at their spouses happily
enjoying a fresh grouper sandwich;
all the while not knowing that their
spouses are asking themselves the
very same question.
Inside, while the locals kick back
and the tourists ponder, a large,
late model Buick slowly passes by
the restaurant, traveling 20 miles
per hour under the speed limit on
U.S. 41. The car is in the left lane
with the right blinker endlessly
flashing.
Visit the Observer News online
at www.observernews.net for maps
and links to the array of activities
and features offered by Sarasota.


I S I
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of Sarasota in St. Armands Circle.

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JUNE 24, 2010






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 17


New tomato


Sa Continued from page 1
S. other hand, the red tomato has
been called the "love apple," too.
At UF's Gulf Coast Research and
aEducation Center in Balm, part of
e hthe university's statewide IFAS
t (Institute of Food and Agricultural
A eSciences) network, they're just
calling their stand-out hybrid the
,e "Tasti-Lee."
Ten years in development, the
Tasti-Lee also is a tomato of mul-
No, tiple characteristics all of them
Long before a new hybrid becomes a tangible reality, months and highly desirable, points out Dr.
years can be spent in the laboratory conducting the research on Jay Scott, the UF professor and
which discovery rests. Here, Jay Scott, Ph.D., a UF professor and plant breeder who began the long,
plant breeder, examines just one of hundreds of pages that detail precisely detailed genetic process
the repetitive matches of various tomato characteristics which led aimed at creating a tomato com-
eventually to creation of the Tasti-Lee. Scott, a New Yorker who bining the best of all qualities.
earned his advanced degrees at Ohio State, has been associated Tasti-Lee, the result, is what most
with Florida's first university and its Institute of Food and Agricul- tomato aficiodos wan inh
tural Sciences for nearly 30 years. Melody Jameson photo


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fresh version healthful, flavor-
ful, colorful plus what farm-
ers value ship-ability as freshly
picked produce, without the green
harvest and gassing exercise. In
keeping with one of the Balm cen-
ter's primary missions verified
research and proven production
to help commercial agriculture -
his objective, Scott notes, was to
breed a tomato that would help
growers compete with the green-
house product in the supermar-
ket. Appealing to the consumer is
the commercial grower's primary
concern and many consumers opt
for greenhouse tomatoes based on
color, fresh appearance and there-
fore a perceived superior taste.
Consequently, this was a standard
to be attained.
It took a decade of breaking
down the genetic composition of
many, many different tomatoes,
mixing and matching the multiple
components to obtain the desired
characteristics while eliminating
the undesirable, as well as plant-
ing and growing the results in the
center's trial fields to achieve the
successful combination, but Tasti-
Lee is a winner, according to the
multiple panels who have tried it,
Scott says.
The hybrid tomato has 25 per-
cent more lycopene, a powerful
antioxidant thought to boost the
immune system, than any other
variety. Plus, Scott ticks off, it
has a more intense flavor, often
described as sweeter by tasters,
as well as a noticeably bright red


color. Then too, the hybrid's flesh
is firm holding in good juiciness
within a smooth, well shaped, tight
skin assets from the transporta-
tion perspective.
When subjected over several
years to evaluation by seven dif-
ferent panels, each composed of
30 sharp-tongued individuals, the
overwhelming report was positive,
Scott says. The variety evoked
high ratings, he adds, "more con-
sistently than any I've seen be-
fore." Three surveys of shoppers
in three different northern cities
sustained these findings.
The years of painstaking work
completed, Tasti-Lee named for
both a key quality and Scott's late
mother-in-law, Lee, who was a first
class tomato fan- has beenreleased
by the UF/IFAS center and now is
being re-produced for mass use by
a Dutch company, Bejo Seeds, Inc.
Seeds for the home gardener and
nurseries growing plants for com-
mercial growers are expected to be
available in early 2011.
Scott, the son of a New York
plant breeder who counseled him
to consider the challenges of plant
science when he was looking at
a career in fisheries and wildlife,
says the strength of the Tasti-Lee
variety is in its ability to produce a
flavorful tomato in a wide range of
environments. Flavor and firmness
are not often found in the same to-
mato, he sums up, adding "Dad
was right."
Copyright 2010 Melody Jame-
son


Melody Jameson photo
In his element, surrounded by acre upon acre of tomatoes in vari-
ous varieties, plant breeder Dr. Jay Scott shows off his high colored,
flavor packed favorite, the Tasti-Lee, just plucked from the vine. The
new hybrid, genetically speaking, is a descendant of the fruit traced
to origins in Peru 500 years ago. The Aztecs of Mexico also favored
the tomato as did Caribbean islanders and some Europeans, before
plants were set on Carolina plantations in the 18th century. Plant
leaves and stems also possess a mild toxicity and were avoided
in some cultures before science proved the nutritional value of the
fruit.


JUNE 24. 2010


5


)






18 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Mosaic's new digs focuses on healthy workers


* By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews.net
RIVERVIEW When Mosaic
Fertilizer, LLC constructed its new
building just east of Riverview,
company executives had health and
fitness on their mind.
At first, many workers were skep-
tical about bringing more than 400
administrative workers from dis-
tant locations to one office, but af-
ter checking out the benefits, most
were sold on the idea, explained
spokesman Russell Schweiss.
The new 113,000-square-foot
building is located at 13380 Circa
Crossing Drive, Lithia (actually
just off FishHawk Boulevard, one
block east of the Boyette Road-Bell
Shoals intersection in Riverview).
According to Schweiss, the staff
there supports more than 3,000 em-
ployees in the company's phosphate
mining and fertilizer manufacturing
operations across Florida and also
works with sales people all over the
world.
The headquarters was built on a
7-acre tract which appeared to be in
the center of most of its employees
commute using environmentally-
friendly features, he added.
For example, there's an on-site
gym with a personal trainer avail-
able to all employees at no extra
charge.
"We work with each individual in
a whole lifestyle management pro-
gram," said health fitness profes-
sional Kirsten Jordan. "We give per-
sonalized fitness advice and coach
toward specific goals to maximize
lifestyle and eliminate stress."
Another unique benefit available
in the facility is a medical clinic,
staffed by a Registered Nurse with
a physician on site one whole day
and one afternoon a week as well.
"Mosaic has seven clinics and six
nurses," Schweiss explained. "The
new one at the administration build-
ing, however, is equipped with the
most modern equipment, including
its own EKG machine to detect any
irregular heart rhythms."
Medication reviews, personal fit-
ness, hearing tests, EKGs, general
physical and lifestyle advice are all
offered, said Dr. Mark Glencross.
"Of course we also serve emer-


agencies and sick employees," added
Nurse Diane Clark.
The atmosphere was also deliber-
ately created to help eliminate stress
and let employees work collab-
oratively in a relaxed atmosphere,
Schweiss said. Each floor has con-
ference rooms that look like living
rooms, as well as a large confer-
ence room around a table. All have
almost floor-to-ceiling windows,
allowing natural light and a good
view. Each floor also has wi-fi and
its own kitchen with refrigerators,
microwaves, vending machines,
sinks and preparation areas and
some even a cappuccino machine.
"I was starting to think the cap-
puccino machines were a mistake
because the lines were so long when
they were first installed," Schweiss
said. "Then our fitness instructors
told us how many calories were in
each cup."
The lines have since shortened...
some.
The new building relied on the
latest "green" technology and land-
scaping, he pointed out.
The sad part is that the historic
building on U.S. 41 at Riverview
Drive just north of the Alafia River
Bridge will be demolished some-
time this summer.
Because so many changes have
been made to it since its construc-
tion in the 1920s as a replica of a
building in the Tennessee Valley, it
could not be classed as an historic
landmark.
"It just became inefficient to run
it," Schweiss said. "There were al-
ways plumbing problems, and heat-
ing and air conditioning problems.
And so many things had been ret-
rofitted it was harder each year to
keep up."
A date for demolition has not yet
been set, although it is expected to
happen sometime in the next 60
days.
"The (smaller) building behind
it will continue to serve as a train-
ing station for Mosaic employees
of all kinds," Schweiss stated.
"And the plant at that location will
continue to operate as usual. Only
the administrative personnel have
moved."


Postcards
Mitch Traphagen photo
I've heard that few residents of Paris actually visit the Eiffel Tower.
While the roadway on the St. Petersburg Pier isn't quite on par with
the Champ de Mars, the Pier is still a unique and iconic symbol of
the city. It is also a pretty cool place to hang out (literally, the air
conditioning inside is phenomenal coming in from the summer heat).
The top floor restaurant, from where last week's photo was taken,
offers a great view of both the city and of Tampa Bay. June Helveston
(as a former resident, you would certainly know! It's great to hear
from you!) recognized it as did Carol Everson (I wholeheartedly
agree everyone should visit it and the view is fantastic), John and
Linda Torchia (thanks for writing!) and Bill and Margie Galbreath
(Haven't been? Let's go! We'll pick up a gigantic chocolate shake for
the drive home). This week we have another iconic view and nothing
says "Welcome to Florida" like a week of drunken debauchery. Oh
wait, that was years ago. Today, nothing says that like a few hundred
thousand of your closest friends gathering (and screaming) for cheap
trinkets while having a great time in the sunshine. Yeah, New Orleans
has Mardi Gras but so do a half a dozen other cities these days. This
is totally unique to Florida. What is it and where are we? Send your
best guess to where@observernews.net. And yes, I have a load of
cheap trinkets of my own.


See more photos of Mosaic's new healthy building online at www.ObserverNews.net


The new administration building for Mosaic Fertilizer, LLC is at 13380 Circa Crossing Drive, Lithia,
which is one block east of the Boyette Road-Bell Shoals intersection in Riverview. Dedicated in April,
400 professional and administrative workers from former locations are now being moved to this
113,000-square-foot compound which has been designed specifically with health and fitness needs of
workers in mind.


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JUNE 24, 2010






JUNE 24, 2010

Students tasted
new products,
possible menu
items
The Hillsborough County Public
Schools Student Nutrition Serv-
ices Department hosted the first
annual Fresh Flavors -- Foods
for Body and Mind Expo on June
23, in the Strawberry Crest High
School dining room.









More than 130 students from
around the district tasted and rated
new products for the 2010-2011
school year menu.
Twenty-six products were tested,
including a turkey and egg frittata,
turkey/egg and cheese breakfast
burrito, curry chicken with rice,
fish tacos, southwest veggie roll,
and buffalo chicken flat bread.
Students rated each item a 'Love
It,' 'Like It' or 'Dislike It,' based
on the items' appearance, smell,
and taste.
The purpose of the tasting was
to entice more students to eat the
nutritionally balanced meals at
school.
Each student received a goodie
bag, including a door prize ticket
that went into a drawing to win
one of 20 iPod shuffles.
Strawberry Crest High School
is located at 4691 Gallagher Rd.,
Dover.


PROGRAMI/EVENT HIGHLIGHTS:
WEEK OF JUNE 27-JIJLY 3

Jack and Mlie Benislialk
\lonlda, June 28 7 io 8 p).m.
F:i j, 's- 5 l: F2 Fi F:. F ii'
S'- l \ jid if il l ,-i '.nlii 'd ki I .:\ iii i i 'C '!il.' i h,\ lIll
'' i lnd i l Jl I id !L'.IL ', .lC i '.i' I l di
.- l| l! ,ito \ !i !.1', 1 !',.,l I, Il| -nt.. h, !k \ o !h ">el l

P|' 'lwil l'd I:. i Bils N Pin'c's Pup. .' I Th !l l' F!l '' 'lil
i-. :,' '1 1: I F[ i id sf I H S,:'ulliSh!i:'i Pc,' Oi. L il j -

Su,''s l I)!
Tiiesda., June 29 2:30 io 3:30 p.m.

\ i l: ins | .inili X I-Al. -.ln
Tins i'' ' I hso i i .l Sun PeI V ll Ih 'i i: in

Illernel Securil\ : How io Proiecil \ourself from Tllrenls
\ ednesdan. June 30 2 to 4 p.m.
.,:,i i I':' C i l:. ul Cu!i'Cil h. i l li'i l lliicils siuCh i uilu~i '
:,!, .,! s'h !' I l !! !'l! !. l iJ I ,li l ,,! !. !.!inT ,:, :, .' !.! l s io p ,l il i lul'c l '
C i: ':r!!ll i i' l i.. i d l ii i .! '. l L' hi0 ,:, ii C' 'i h ul i li l '' id CCl-
Ih ii c ll i d i.iJ di l' iiiJ lu!d du i iI p. sl l .i C s i T sI i .I!l
, l, !.! '_ 'iI ,!i l 'iJ I 'J !.',' ,ks o ,". i0 l Ih 'i c is lhs Ih I C1. !' !:ill ". slI
:l h I l i .1i i .i dl I ': | onid hI lso: '.p' l iJ li I 1 i l l.1101 Cl l O ,f! "
WiAIh c s syCl s I!i:,ll !si '% :ilri lid 'il luss' n :i h,, l ihC ,:,il,
F!l '' ic!.'l n il:-! :, C h! no i h i i ,i l'n u !' ,: I,: 1 s.l ill :' i C ,s
,:,'m.':, I,'l i,,i ri l. :,f F !.:I |J. iF. W S E _- 'n s.:'! n!


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 19


Croc EncoiiiiIers
\ edn(esdla, June 30 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.


ThIi_ !p!,:','.i.'[ is p! ili ,:'! Ilh( L l:;,.,i- S,.iinnm Pc> hn.__. !'i,:,._ m _FL i .\'
"' '!il is p!:i,' ild'd I C.: Ih F Hi n l. I C S' :.ulhiSh:ici Pc'':,!.ii Lilhi i

Pol erPoiil: I: lirod iclion
Tlhursda.,.Jui 1 (12:15 o 1:15pnm)


i 'i: l ih, ..! !,.I:, ', I ll 'i.il ,:, Ih : i '! ,_ .!i iC i !1 i | '' ,l ,:,i leI
I; ll' I F i :id-. :' Ili S':iulh iSi:'i Pc' i .i: Lilhi.ir

Poi erPoinl: Texiboxes. Clil)\rl and Auloslhapes
Thur1sda(l.Juhl. I 1:30 io 2:30 p.m.
dd h i _'i 1 I" 1.,:,.**.1 C .''.i l lp j li .- _ill,:,_ la'! | I,:, ,:,. !.' '_l lil.i l :,!i
Pi("' r:,u9 ".!a. ''.. n i \ Hh hI ,:,9,:,!' P,:,\i C'P,:,i! i i_ 'e :'ni, i iT 'l
I F l l l Jh :'f Ij ij l ni S-:'i.il iSC r:'lh: P- '- I:l' .Ii l:;1l ll :


Epic Teen Readers of SoullhShore
Thu1rs(daiJul. I 5:30 lo 6:30 p.m.


':i iii i lli S[ i !i i ina 'i l o : .i l d i C' Cmi l' ;i' idc 'l
jiiu iiii -,:,! !i S ':,d .i .il Sii. !. !.',| ,:,' i le' F i ., !il !_g !.''!,:,' i-e'0
I;. I' I idn l i I<'l S:iuliSh,:li PC ':li.i Lihi -

Bedlimie Stories
Tliirsda. iJul I 7 o o7:30 |p.m.
F,:,i .__i'd I c '-5 \ illi Cii h i'


IC Fl H i :Cid ,! ICl P':'i l liS :ic'l : P _'- :'i. L lhii.i-


hli !.i 1 I i h B.:l:I. S.&!' P.::.in l i InI Li i.n ii ii iw!',.-! I iih'! il 'ih .

C:i!ni S.:iulliS ,i, P 'C ,:i.'i L ihii l- i !i .cilc .1d il !5 billi Sliid !! ,\.1
':,!T I"'l h 0 n1i. : lx i P n ii 'S 1, .1iJ i-- 5i, I, _" ,.5_


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--t - --* :- ---i- - LT - - 1-7 .. I






20 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


A day in the life of my wife


JUNE 24, 2010


She wakes to her iPhone alarm
at 5:30 a.m., lets the dogs out and
then sips coffee for 30 or so min-
utes alone on the lanai. At 6 a.m.,
if I'm not up already, she wakes me
with a gentle
nudge. As
recently as
a few years
ago, that
gentle nudge
was almost
Obs always ac-
Observations companies
By Mitch Traphagen by confusing
mitch@observernews.net and overly
complex
questions that, for reasons known
only to her, needed to be answered
right then. Through the years, how-
ever, she has learned that the first
words from her husband's lips
mumbled sleepily, "What the hell
are you talking about?" was no
way for either of us to start the day.
Now, the mornings begin with the
gentle nudge sans questions. The
questions, it seemed, could wait.
By 6:20, she walks into the back-
yard with collars and leashes to
take the dogs out for their daily
walk. All four of them go insane in
the exact same way they went in-
sane the previous morning and the
morning before that when they re-
alize it is time to walk around the
neighborhood. One goes beyond
insane and starts biting the other
dogs, almost screaming: "RE-
ALLY? WE'RE GOING FOR A
WALK? A WALK? OUTSIDE?
REALLY A WALK? YAY! WE'RE
GOING FOR A WALK!" She does
this despite the fact that they walk
at exactly the same time each morn-
ing her surprise and amazement
should have long since waned but
hasn't. For that particularly crazy
little dog, each day is a new begin-
ning and the walk is a surprise of
indescribable magnitude. Together,
the five of them head through the
back yard gate and out into the qui-
et neighborhood streets. In sum, the
four dogs are more than double Mi-
chelle's 118 pounds a fact that
occasionally makes itself known
through bloodied knees incurred
when a neighborhood animal on the
loose is seen or, perhaps when
a yard ornament is noticed. One of
the four loves yard ornaments and
black and white cats. The dog has
an enormous amount of admiration
and love for both, and as a result,
Michelle has occasionally been
dragged down the street as the oth-
er three hope to share in the excite-
ment of the often seen but always
forgotten, random yard ornament.
Certainly most of the neighbors
have come to know her the
shrimpy woman walking down the
middle of the street with a herd
of completely disparate dogs, two
with disabilities. A few neighbors
have made comments and most
probably think she is a dog walker
for hire.
One of the dogs has only three
paws. As a result, he hops along
happily until he wears out. There is
no warning or indication that he is
going to wear out he just plops
down in the street to die. Afew mo-
ments of that, and upon discover-
ing that he didn't die, after all, he
gets back up and continues hopping
happily along with the other dogs.
It is this dog that so loves lawn or-
naments. And black and white cats.
By 7:30 a.m. she is out the door
to her office in Tampa. More often
than not, she car pools with one or
two male co-workers. Each morn-
ing as she leaves I wonder if those
co-workers think she is insane.
I try to do my part by handling the
daily fur removal operation. I will
not walk the herd of dogs my wife


has attracted to our home, but I do
clean up after them. The quantity
of fur they shed does much to ex-
plain why they sleep all day. Since
they shed copiously and since they
aren't going bald, the dogs' bodies
must be working overtime to con-
tinually regrow fur. I assume it is all
of the fur-growing that makes them
so sleepy and lazy. Regardless, with
vacuuming a necessity and my not
walking them non-negotiable, I
clean up the staggering quantity of
fur. Each day at 5 p.m. the dogs are
in for their second major surprise
as I plug the machine into the wall
socket and turn it on. In a flash, 270
pounds of dogs are hightailing it for
comers and the slight, albeit tempo-
rary, protection of the dining room
table. Each and every day they run
terrified despite the fact the vacu-
um has never once sucked up a tail
or ripped off a paw or made any of
them disappear into the whirring
vortex.
By 5:30 p.m., Michelle arrives
home, sometimes carrying a pizza,
other times a few bags of grocer-
ies or some strange vegetables she
found at a roadside stand. The dogs,
of course, are surprised and amazed
that she has suddenly appeared.
They had apparently assumed she
was gone forever, perhaps sucked
into the vacuum when they weren't
looking.
Dinner occurs anytime between
then and 8:30 p.m. She then tack-
les cleaning up after the dogs in
the yard and then offers to rub my
shoulders as I try to work myself
into writing or editing mode while
sitting in front of a computer. Or,
she offers to help with program-
ming something on the latest work-
related computer project. Or she
makes a baked treat for dessert. On
any given weeknight she doesn't
kick back or take time for herself
for more than an hour if even
that. Come to think of it, it is rarely
even that.


She is usually asleep an hour or,
perhaps, three hours, before I am.
She almost never gets more than six
or seven hours of sleep.
She does more around the house
than I do. I can't stand dealing with
bills and bank accounts. She takes
care of that silently, knowing that at
any moment my head could explode
if I hear about the slightest financial
thing. I don't care about money. I
like to know there is enough in
the accounts to buy this or that but
that is about as far as I'm willing
to commit myself. She dusts way
more than I do and is much better
about loading the dishwasher or
simply washing dishes by hand -
a task that I prefer to put off until
we're down to the plastic utensils
left over from fast food takeout
and saved for reasons entirely un-
known. She offers to help more
than I do if I have to run to cover
a weekend event, she always volun-
teers to join me. I don't do the same
when she runs to the grocery store.
My feelings about the grocery store
are roughly on par with balancing
the checkbook.
I try to balance out the equation,
however, by making it seem as
though mowing the lawn is a hercu-
lean effort. I also balance it out for
real by fixing the cars. Michelle is
an automotive Antichrist. For some
reason, despite her best intentions,
our cars break down only when she
is driving them. Often the results
are dramatic. I once answered her
call for help, pulling up behind her
disabled car on 1-275 near down-
town Tampa to see her stuffing
chewing gum into a gushing hole in
the radiator.
To be honest, however, I don't
know if the vehicle maintenance
and rescue has equaled the daily
workload imbalance. To be really
honest, it hasn't. There are other
intangible things, too, but I'm not
sure they are enough added weight
to tip the scales.


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Mitch Traphagen Photo
Michelle taking the four dogs for their morning walk. She has since
gone to shifts, walking the craziest dog separately.


I believe if women were to dis-
appear from the face of the earth
tomorrow, 90 percent of the earth's
men would be dead within a year.
If nothing else, a steady diet of
Cheetos, Pop Tarts, Pizza Rolls
and beer would do them in. Wars,
however, would disappear because
without women to impress, striv-
ing for power would simply be too
much work. Who would want to
start or fight in a war when there's
a cupboard full of Pop Tarts in the
kitchen? On the plus side, since
Pop Tarts are finger food, the sink
full of dirty dishes would become
irrelevant. Death, however, would
be swift.
On the other hand, if men were
to disappear, women would likely
live on to a ripe old age in a world
filled with broken down cars.
Women would maintain standing
armies; but wars would be few and
far between. As fellow members
of the "fairer" sex, they know the
truth: women are crazy. No one
army would want to screw around


with another army because no one
would want to die that badly. Pub-
lic transportation would be huge
- and maintained at a steep price
worth paying by the incomparable
talent of those women exposed to
cars from their youth. Invariably,
they were better mechanics than
the men who flippantly handed
them their first wrenches. Those
women in charge of public trans-
portation would be driving Ferraris
and Lamborghinis on gloriously
empty highways. They wouldn't
be driving to impress anyone.
They would be driving because
they know there is absolutely noth-
ing in life like shifting from second
to third gear in a Countach at 80
miles per hour.
I'm going to mow the lawn now.
Given the heat, I'll walk into the
house a sad-looking mop of sweat
when I finish. If I play it right, Mi-
chelle will feel sorry for me. At least
I won't feel bad about skipping the
grocery run. I wonder if she'll pick
up some Pop Tarts?


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JUNE 24, 2010

Sea Scouts tour Coast Guard Cutters New arrivals
p F* I


Sea Scouts from Ship 185, Apollo Beach, were given tours of three
different types of Coast Guard Cutters that operate out of St. Petersburg.
Arrangements were made by Bob Bettinger of the Coast Guard Auxiliary
and the Captains of the three cutters planned tours to expose the young
sea scouts to the operations and duties of the Coast Guard.
The largest vessel, USCGC Venturous, is a 210-foot cutter designed
for Search and Rescue, plus the cutter and its crew work closely with
Caribbean nations pursuing narcotic traffickers as well as rescuing and
repatriating illegal migrants throughout the Caribbean Sea, the North
Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico.
The second vessel, the USCGC Joshua Appleby, is a working ship with
a 10-ton crane that has the primary mission of maintaining floating aids
to navigation on the west coast of Florida from Crystal River in the north
to the Florida Keys, and the east coast of Florida up to Port Everglades
and is responsible for 250 buoys.
The third vessel, the USCGC Vise, is a 75-foot tugboat that pushes
a 68-foot crane barge. The Vise is one of thirteen construction tenders.
Although its mission focus is the construction of fixed aids to navigation,
the Vise has been involved in the servicing of fixed and floating aids to
navigation, search and rescue, maritime law enforcement and homeland
security.
The Coast Guard did an excellent job of explaining their duties and
operations of the equipment that they use.
Everyone departed the cutters with a better understanding and appre-
ciation for the young men and women who serve in the Coast Guard.
The Coast Guard Auxiliary works under the command of Base St.
Petersburg and assists in patrols, radio watches, rescues and promotes
safety by boat inspections and teaching classes in navigation and opera-
tion of small craft.
The Sea Scouts are the young and future generation looking to the
water for a lifelong career. Members will gain skills in boat handling and
other water-based activities.
Both the Auxiliary and Sea Scouts are looking for individuals who
would like to participate in their programs.
For more information on the Sea Scouts, call Don St. Amour at (813)
967-7718. For information on the Coast Guard Auxiliary, call Fred
Kramer at (813) 731-6132.


Left to right: Front row, Jerry Routt. CG-Aux., Jackson, Samantha
Maxwell, Wesley Shaw, Austin Hall, John Swiger, Ryan Hall, Bob
Bettinge, CG-Aux. Back row, Drew Barrett, Don St. Amour, Tom
McMullen.


Sea Scouts aboard the Buoy Tender Joshua Appleby.


Auxiliary Coast Guard Bob Bettinger explains the equipment used
in the control room.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 21


trom Branaon
Regional
Hospital
Bryce Ventura Conson was bor
June 11, 2010. Terrena and Lennon
Conson of Apollo Beach are the
proud parents.
Evan Michael Dehne was bor
June 7, 2010. The proud parents
are Kadie Lucas and Jonathan
Dehne of Ruskin.


Caitlynn Riley 0 'Brien was born
June 8, 2010. Stacey Swilley and
Shawn O'Brien of Riverview are
the proud parents.
Andre Rashan Polite Jr was
born June 8, 2010. Letitia Temple
and Andre Polite of Riverview are
the proud parents.
Sofia Maria Rodriguez was born
May 19, 2010. AnaMaria and An-
thony Rodriguez of Riverview are
the proud parents.
Philip Avery Stephens was born
May 23, 2010. The proud parents
are Lindsey and Philip Stephens of
Riverview.


Riverview Memorial
VFW Post #8108

Riverview Memorial VFW Post
#8108, 7504 Riverview Dr.
schedule is as follows:
Meetings: Men's Auxiliary --
1st Thursday at 7 p.m.
Ladies' Auxiliary --
2nd Tuesday at 7 p.m.
VFW Post --
2nd Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday:
Breakfast, 9 a.m. to noon, $6
Monday: Bar Bingo at 6:30 a.m.
Wednesday:
Spaghetti from 5 to 7 p.m. $6
Friday:
Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.;
Fish, $6; Combo, $7
Karaoke from 8 to ?
Saturday: Karaoke from 8 to ?
2nd Tuesday: Ladies' Auxiliary
Meeting at 7 p.m.
3rd Tuesday: VA Hospital Bingo
-- Leave Post at 6 p.m.
Every Wednesday:
$6 All-U-Can-Eat Spaghetti Dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m.
Carry-out orders available.
Call ahead -- 671-9845
1st Thursday:
Men's Auxiliary Meeting at 7 p.m.
2nd Thursday:
Post Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Every Friday:
Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.
(all you can eat fish -- $6)
Carry-out orders available.
Call ahead -- 671-9845
They also serve Chicken Tenders,
Shrimp or combos for $7.
Each dinner comes with fries,
coleslaw, and a hush puppy.
Every Saturday:
Karaoke by Jeff at 8 p.m.


Diane Garly photo
Auxiliary unit presented with charter
The Ruskin American Legion Auxiliary Unit 389 was presented
with their Charter by District 15 President Pat Regan on June 13.
Present was left to right, first row, sitting down: Lois Wilson; Hilda
Neff; Michelle Dye;, and youngest member, Alysa Dye. Next row:
Natalie Ahlersmyer; Shirley May, Sgt. at Arms; Sue McBain, Jr.
Vice President; Michelle Budd; Martha Weirman, Chaplain; Joyce
Courchesne, Executive Committee; Gwen McCallister, Middle Is;
Lois McBride, President, Shirley Sheehy, Secretary/Treasurer; and
Pat Regan, District President. Also there, but not in picture was
Commander American Legion Post 389 Janet Taylor; photo by
Diane Garly. They are very active group and hope to grow. They
are serving Fish & Chips now from 5 to 7 p.m. every Friday for $7.
In July they will be having a Steak Dinner to help with the building
fund. This will be in conjunction with the American Legion. It's all
happening at the VFW Post 6287, 5120 U.S. Hwy. 41 N. in Ruskin. For
more information, call (813) 645-2935.










































Apollo Beach Civic Association

supports camp scholarship program
Kithenopn-fom- t 6 6
Al*we l6.bnfi afls:LeterVst :.0chneSo












grop6srvig ur ommnites

6 0 0 16 V i -1-
S 0 -0-0- r6n. =


The Apollo Beach Civic Asso-
ciation sponsored campers with a
$150 check given to Jack Reeder,
AB Park Manager at the Hills-
borough County Apollo Beach
Recreation Park.
The cost of this summer camp
program ranges between $100 to
$485 per child. With the economic
downturn, some families are strug-
gling to meet expenses and find it
difficult to afford. The scholarships
provide a financial relief for work-
ing parents so their children) can
be safe and involved this summer.
The ABCA goal is to remain
unbiased, to provide a source of


accurate information, a platform
to discussion and address issues of
importance to all of us. The pub-
lic is encouraged to get acquainted
and to share their expertise with the
Apollo Beach Civic Association.
Normal meeting date is at 7 p.m.
on the third Thursday of the month
at the Apollo Beach Recreation
Park, Golf to Sea Blvd.
For more information, contact
Barbara Compton, President, at
apollobchcivicassoc @tampabay.
rr.com, or mail to P.O. Box 3262,
Apollo Beach, FL 33572.
At present, the Civic Association
is on a hiatus.







22 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

An Icon is Gone
EBEHIND THE MIKE By: Michael A. Aun, http://www.aunline.com


JUNE 24, 2010


A E
I first met Art Linkletter on the
speaker's circuit. We shared a plat-
form on many occasions and were
together in Orlando, Florida before
a national association of real estate
professionals.
Right before I went on stage, Art
told me "break a leg." I proceed-
ed to give the entire speech and
walked off a darkened end of the
platform and, wouldn't you know
it? I broke a leg.
Such is life in the world of public
speaking. You meet the nicest peo-
ple in the world like Art Linkletter.
He recently died. An icon is gone.
Art almost reached his goal in life
to make it to age 100. Like my dear
friend Charlie Barcio, who is a
modest 106 years old, Art Linklet-
ter was a hero to many. And like
Barcio, Linkletter was orphaned
as a child. He was placed up for
adoption at the age of seven.
The ancient Chinese proverb
suggests that "The gem cannot be
polished without friction, nor man
perfected without trials."
Make no mistake; Linkletter had
plenty of "trials" in his 97 years
here on earth. A son, Robert, died
in a car accident in 1980. Another
son, Jack, died of lymphoma in
2007. The greatest challenge of
all was the loss of his 20 year old
daughter, Diane, who jumped to
her death from a sixth-floor Holly-
wood apartment. Art blamed drugs
and took up a crusade against them.
That defined the second half of his
life on the speaking circuit.
Art Linkletter was a friend to
many fellow professional speak-
ers. He held the prestigious CPAE
Speaker Hall of Fame honor be-
stowed by the National Speakers
Association. I first met him when
we were speaking together at the
1986 Toastmasters International
Convention where he received the
Golden Gavel Award, their highest
honor.
Art was best known for his tele-
vision shows "People Are Funny"
and "House Party" and "Kids Say
the Damdest Things," a line that's
repeated daily all over the world.
Among all the things Art Lin-
kletter was in life, I saw him first
and foremost as a very successful
businessman. He once told me that
he owned 74 different businesses
around the world. At one time, he
was the second largest landowner
in Australia, right behind the gov-
ernment.
Art once told me of the smart-
est and dumbest decision he ever
made in business. Walt Disney
had come to him to ask him to do
the kickoff for Disneyland back
in 1955, but he had no money and
couldn't pay him anything. Lin-
kletter not only agreed, but he got
his buddy, Ronald Regan, to help
out as well, successfully kicking
off the Disney dynasty.
Having no money to pay his
friend, Disney offered Linkletter
any concession that the park they
had not yet sold. Linkletter chose
the photo concession, which he
sold for millions a year later. "That
was the smartest decision I ever
made," he told me.
Years later, Disney called Lin-
kletter again and asked him if
he would join him on a flight to
Florida. Disney always felt that
the biggest mistake he made at


Disneyland was not purchasing
enough property. He had nowhere
to expand. The pair took a char-
tered aircraft and flew over a cen-
tral Florida swamp. "That's where
I'm going to put Disney World,"
Disney declared. "Do you want in
on the ground floor?"
"I told him he was nuts," Lin-
kletter joked later. "Boy was that
the dumbest business decision I
ever made!"
Linkletter was kind enough to do
the forward for my fourth book,
"The Toastmasters International
Guide to Successful Speaking"
(Dearborn Publishing/1996) and


had agreed to contribute to my
sixth book "It's the Customer, Stu-
pid!" (John Wiley & Sons/March
2011). We never got that done, but
his kindness and generosity will
always be remembered by me and
others.
Indeed, the proverb is true. "The
gem cannot be polished without
friction, nor man perfected with-
out trials." Art Linkletter, a native
Canadian, was not only an icon
and an institution. He was an in-
spiration to many for the way he
handled the trials and tribulations
of his long and illustrious life. We
will miss him so!


Couple celebrated golden anniversary
Ben and Kay Jones of Ruskin, Florida celebrated their 50th/Golden
Wedding Anniversary. The couple was married June 8, 1960, in Winston
Salem, North Carolina. Ben ahd Kay are the parents of three childern,
two sons, Cole and Paul and a daughter, Kim. Their extended family
includes two daughters in-law, Cheryl and Carolyn, and a son-in law,
Bobby Bartling, and their grand children, Bonnie, Timothy and Zachary.
They were honored at a reception, hosted by their childern, June 5, 2010
which included their family and friends to help celebrate this special
time in their lives.


*-. CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH
SundayWorship: Blended 8:00 a.m.
Contemporary 9:40 a.m.
Traditional 11:15 a.m. ftBigBend R.
Nursery Provided CrossRoads: Bible Study, Worship: Wed. 7 p.m. H
Pastor Jack R. Palzer
5309 U.S. Highway 41 North Apollo Beach A
(acrossfrom MiraBay) www.calvarylutheranchurch.ne 645-1305 N

St. John the Divine Episcopal Church
Growing by Faith from Generation to Generation
Rev. Tracy H. Wider Church Office 813-645-1521
SUNDAY SERVICES: 9 am Contemporary Service and Sunday School
at West Campus, S.R. 674 and 9th Street SE, Ruskin
8 am Traditional Service and 11 am Holy Communion with Choir at East Campus
at 1015 Del Webb Blvd., SCC
All Worship Services with Holy Communion and Healing Holy Oil


Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (Behind Suntrust Bank)
ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: (Nov.-April ............................8:30 a.m. Day Care Available
Mon. Fri.
Rev. John M. Bartha and all year)......................... 10:45 am. 6 a.m.- 6 p.m.
SPhone: 645-1241 Sunday School....................... 9:30 a.m. call 645-6198

REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH-ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center, FL 33573-5354
Rev. Dr. Peter Stiller, Pastor 634-1292
Saturday Worship: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion....First & Third Sunday Bible Class...Thursday 10 am, Guests Welcome

First Church of Christ, Scientist
Ruskin Sun City Center (813) 645-6102
204 Second St. N.W, Ruskin, Florida 33570
Sunday Service Sunday School .......................................................10AM
Wednesday Testimony Meeting .................................... .................5 PM
Reading Room Wednesday....................................................... 4 4:50 PM
ALL ARE WELCOME www.spirituality.com

FfRST BAPTIST CHURCH
of -
S820 COLLEGE AVE. W.
RUSKIN, FL 33570
645-6439
.- www.fbcruskin.org
A Resource for Families
Sunday School ............................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship............8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Dr. Barry Rumsey
Evening Service...........................6:00 p.m. CHRISTIANSCHOOL
Wednesday Night Service................7:00 p.m. THROUGH 12TH
Awana.............................................7:00 p.m. GRADE


60 years and counting
Joe and Donna King will celebrate 60 years of marriage on June 25.
The couple married in 1950 and have lived in Ruskin for 51 years. They
were in the nursery business for 25 years under the name Florida Aza-
lea Specialists. The couple has three sons, Mike, David and Jeff King
plus a daughter, Kathy Hercules. Mike, Jeff and Kathy all live in Ruskin
while their brother David lives in Jennings, FL. In addition to their four
children, the Kings have 10 grandchildren, Kristy, Julie, Joseph, Angela,
Brian, Jesse, Eric, Alicin, Chris and Lauren plus a great granddaughter,
Lilah.















Celebrating 55 years
Carolee and Tod McGinley of Sun City Center will celebrate their 55th
wedding anniversary on June 25, 2010. The couple married in 1955 at St.
Thomas Catholic Church in South Minneapolis, Minnesota.
The service was performed before friends and relatives by Monsignor
Henry Ever of Marlboro, MA. He was an uncle of the groom who was
assisted by Fr. Frank Shea of Wayzata, MN. Paul McGinley, a brother of
the groom was the best man.
The couple spent many years in Edina, Minnesota and Sudbury, Mas-
sachusetts before coming down to Sun City Center in 1991. The couple
raised three sons, Joe McGinley of Norton, MA, Dan McGinley of Ash-
ford, CT, and Steve McGinley of Seminole, FL. There are five grandchil-
dren in the family.


Friendship Baptist Church
Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist)
I 1511 El Rancho Dr.
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Phone/Fax:
I1i 813-633-5950


WEEKLY SERVICES:


Bible Study
Bible Study
.....Worship


Sunday
9 a .m ...............
1 a .m ..............
10 a.m. & 6 p.m.


Wednesday
6 p.m.... Prayer Meeting/Bible Study


Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC
Meets in the Social Hall of the Beth Israel Synagogue
1115 E. Del Webb Blvd.
Thursday, 7:00 PM Call 633-0396
We all make mistakes but everyone
makes different mistakes.
Ludwig von Beethoven

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where God's Love is Shared"
U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL 645.1121 www.nbcor.org SBC
Sunday School for all ages 9:30 AMSB
Morning Worship 10:45 AM Wanted: People Who Want to Grow
Evening Worship 6:00 PM and Live for Jesus!
Full Wednesday Schedule for all ages

North River Church of Christ
-Non-Instrumental-
13885 U.S. Hwy 301 South
(Just South of the Manatee County Line)
Minister: Howard Johnson Office 941-776-1134
Services: Sunday 10:00am, 11:00am & 6:00pm o e 41-7 -
Wednesday7:00pm Home 813-754-1776

First Baptist Church of Gibsonton
"We love because He first loved us." 1 John 4:19
Traditional Worship Service *Sunday School 9:30 A.M.
Old-Time Gospel Hymns *orngWohip 10:30AM.
Nursery Available Sunday Evening 6:00 P.M. X
Interpreter for the Deaf id-Week (Wed.) 7:00 P.M.
9912 Indiana St. Hwy 41 & Estelle Avi1u 'Malcolm S. Clements, Pastor
\Gibsonton, FL 33534 813-677-1301

Wj c~m& a m. EVERETT TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ
1611 First St. SW Ruskin, FL 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL-
SERVICES: Sunday........................9:30 & 10:30 a.m.; 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday................7:00 p.m. ----.

PRINCE OF PEACE CATHOLIC CHURCH
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573
Phone 634-2328 Fax 633-6670
Masses: Sunday ........................................................... 8:00, 10:00 a.m., Noon
Saturday Vigil ................................................ 4:00 p.m.
D a ily ....................................................... .. 8 :0 0 a.m .
www.popcc.org Confessions: Monday Friday 7:30 a.m., Saturday 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.


I






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 23


m TaOllW" H'- ---' ---1-2"= 'w1jirj Associate Conference Minister of SW FL Dr. Jean Simpson, Circle
New Beginnings Fellowship hosts Leader Hazel Martin, Women's Fellowship President Marius Johns
and 2nd Vice President of Women's Fellowship Sally Erath
art auction Florida Women's Conference
On Saturday, June 26 from 10am to 2pm New Beginnings Fellowship Three members of the Women's Fellowship from the United Com-
will be hosting an Art Auction featuring the artwork of Chris Giddens, unity Church, 1501 La Jolla Avenue, Sun City Center, attended the
local young man with a wonderful talent. Although born with a physical State Conference in Sebring, FL. The Florida United Church of Christ
handicap Chris works with spray paint to create his beautiful works of Women selected "Gathering at Miriam's Well" as their theme this year.
art. There will also be demonstrations. One half of the proceeds from
the sale of Chris' art work will be donated to the building fund for thee with SHARE
church. The church is located at 1120 27th St SE Ruskin. For more Save with SHARE
information, contact Betty Fountain at 645-8848. SHARE is dedicated to provid- Celebrate the first week-


Sing to the world
On Sunday June 27 New Begin-
nings Fellowship will enjoy the
beautiful gospel music provided
by special guests Wayne and Mary
Barlow. Rev. Bill Baker will bring
the message at the 10:30am ser-
vice. The church is located at 1120
27th St. SE. Ruskin. For more in-
formation, call Rev. Lewis Brady
at 654-1018.


Movie night
Friendship Baptist Church
wishes to remind everyone of the
monthly movie to be shown at
5pm on the last Saturday of this
month, the 26th of June. At inter-
mission, goodies prepared by the
ladies of the church are available
at no charge. The film on Saturday
is "The Early Years ofB. G. Join
them at 1511 El Rancho off Rte.
674 in Sun City Center.


U nity quality
SSpirituality Rather Than "Religion"


Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
Tel. 813-298-7745


THE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO THE SERVICES NOW WORSHIPPING IN THE "CHAPEL"
AT SUN CITY CENTER FUNERAL HOME 10:30 AM ON SUNDAYS
NO CREED...BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK..BUT THE BIBLE
1851 RICKENBACKER DRIVE 813-938-4955
Minister DR. DAVID CAMPBELL


QcniJedf7Ae1/od/ CGurc ofcun CQi6 Genler
The Church of Open Hearts... Open Minds... Open Doors
1210 W. Del Webb Blvd. 634-2539
\ Worship Services:
Saturday................. 4:00 p.m.- Creason Hall (Traditional Service)
Sunday....................8:15 a.m. in Sanctuary (Traditional Service)
9:30 a.m. Creason Hall (The Oasis)
10:55 a.m. Sanctuary (Traditional with Chancel Choir)
Fellowship timid T I... i ., I...;,,. I-.. r .... 10:15a.m. and 11 a.m. in Creason Hall
odf' is xove nTT.SCCLMNC.com
PASTORS: DR WARREN LANGER, REV GARYBULLOCK
Communion First Sunday ofEach Month


St. Andrew Presbyterian Church

\ Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.
Prayers with anointing for healing and
J& wholeness during worship the second Sunday
of every month.
A Stephen Pastor: Dr. Gerald Iwerks
Ministry Church
Meet friends in Fellowship Hall after the Service
Refreshments served


Phone: 813-634-1252
For Information visit:
www.standrewatscc.org


ing savings on high quality food.
Anyone can join. Many specials
are available on meats and pro-
duce. Packages are ordered one
month and picked up the follow-
ing month. Plan to attend, the June
pickup and learn details about on-
line ordering, which will start in
July.
Pickup for SHARE is located at
Ruskin Methodist Church at 105
4th Ave. NW in Ruskin. Place
your order on Saturday, June 26
between 8:30am and 9:30am. It is
time to save with SHARE.


end in summer in the


Florida outdoors.



Gti^"^B


Ruskin Church of Christ
611 2nd Ave. NW Ruskin, FL 33570
Don White, Minister 813-361-1415
Sunday Bible Enrichment .......................................... 10:00 a.m .
W orship......................... ....... ... ............... 11:00 a.m .


SOUTHSIDE
ing Pple BAPTIST CHURCH
Preaching the Word BAPTIST CHURCH
4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 South
(4 miles south of Ruskin)
DAN COLLINS, PASTOR JIM KRAUSE, MUSIC DIRECTOR
C i COLmNUrNITY INVITED
BIBLE STUDY 9:30 AM
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE 10:55 AM
SUNDAY EVENING SERVICE 6:00 PM
WEDNESDAY PRAYER SERVICE 7:00 PM
ADULTS, YOUTH, CHILDREN
For information, call 645-4085 Monday-Thursday



Saint Anne Catlhlic ChuW c

Fr. John McEvoy
Pastor
813-645-1714
SaintAnneRuskin.org

U.S. Hwy. 41 106 11th Ave. NE Ruskin
SouthShore: A p. .11. Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton
C MASSES
Saturday Vigil M ass................................................................ 5:00 p.m .
Sunday Mass..................................... 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Holy Days....................................... Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Daily ......................................................... M onday thru Friday 8:00 a.m.
Espaiol .............................Domingo 12:00 p.m.; Miercoles 7:30 p.m.
Confession.............................Wednesday 6:15 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.
Nursery Available for 10:00 a.m. Mass


Obituary

lona A. Mathias
lona A. Mathias, 95, passed away
June 3, 2010. She was born January
19, 1915 in Everly, Iowa. lona and her
late husband of 62 years, Dr. Charles
M. Mathias, lived in Niles and Warren,
Ohio before retiring to Sun City Center,
Florida. She is survived by nieces and
nephews.
lona attended the University of Iowa
Business College and worked with the
US Government as a legal secretary
before her marriage to Dr. Mathias.
She also was a volunteer for 15 years
with Meals on Wheels, for 30 years
with the American Red Cross and for
20 years as a Girl Scout leader.
Dr. and Mrs. Mathias enjoyed
traveling, especially their historic
globe-circling adventure via the private
chartered Supersonic Concorde.
A memorial service will be held at
10:00 am. Monday, June 28, 2010 at
Freedom Plaza, Sun City Center, FL.
Interment will be at the Florida
National Cemetery, Bushnell, Florida.
Memorials can be made to the
American Red Cross, American Cancer
Society, or LifePath Hospice Sun City
Center in lieu of flowers.


In Loving .I.-I,'0,'ry
A9drian Sanchez jr.
1989 2009


God looked around his garden
And found an empty place,
He then looked down upon the
earth
And saw your tired face.
He put his arms around you
And lifted you to rest.
God's garden must be beautiful
He always takes the best.
He saw the road was getting
rough
And the hills were hard to climb.
So he closed your weary eyelids
And whispered, 'Peace bethine'.
It broke our hearts to lose you
But you didn't go alone,
For part of us went with you
The day God called you home.
Love, Mom, Dad, Chris, Roxy,
Rochy, Mario, JJ, Alex
_and family


Kids and Crusts
My children are at the age where
they are picky about eating the
crust on bread. To save money
and decrease waste, I cut the
crusts off the bread before making
sandwiches or toast and store the
crust in a zipper bag in the freezer.
When I have a full bag, I thaw and
then bake in a single layer on a
cookie sheet on low heat until they
are crispy. I then throw them in my
food processor and grind them into
breadcrumbs. I store these in a zip-
per bag in the freezer until I need
them for a recipe. I enjoy these
breadcrumbs more than the store
bought as these are made with
whole wheat bread. Just add a few
herbs to taste and you have great
homemade breadcrumbs!
Tina K.
Want to live better on the money
you already make? Visit stretcher. com/index. cfm?TipsSyn>
to find hundreds of articles to help
you stretch your day and your dol-
lar! Copyright 2010 Dollar Stretcher,
Inc.


Beth Israel's Social Hall
1115 Del Webb E. Sun City Center, FL
www.unitycommunityofjoy.com


1239 Del Webb Blvd. West
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Church is Handicap accessible


I I


I


JUNE 24, 2010


I -,


I






24 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


.....- .--- -- ,,
Pam Treadwell, Margaret Kuss, Roxann Seeley (standing) Dolores
Whitfield and Uta Kuhn.
Sun City Center 50th anniversary
celebration plans underway
Sun City Center's 50th anniversary is on May 10, 2011. On that date,
at 10am, there will be a Celebration Parade of approximately two miles
which will kick off a whole year of parties and events put on by different
organizations.
The best of Sun City Center will be represented in this Celebration
Parade dignitaries, clubs, local social organizations, local service orga-
nizations, etc. will be joining to show their support. There will be music,
laughter and fun.
The Parade Committee Roxann Seeley (Chair), Uta Kuhn, Margaret
Kuss, Pam Treadwell and Dolores Whitfield are working to line up par-
ticipants, vehicles, decorations and the like. Let's not forget Ann Marie
Leblanc who is Chair of the entire year-long celebration of the Sun City
Center's 50th Anniversary. Ms. Leblanc is planning the route and obtain-
ing the permits for the parade.
If there is anyone with an open convertible or open, tram-like vehicle,
willing to drive some of the parade participants, your help is needed.
Call Dolores Whitfield at 642-9156.

Golf Scores
Hogans Golf Club
5/24/10 Apollo Beach, 6495/5845 C m an r
Play: White T's vs Senior T's COme and expert
best low net Jesus to cha
st : Senior T's Jay Sparkman
& Rich Lucidi, 56, 10 skins Sunday @ 9 & 11 AM Se
2nd : White T's Chip Wood &
Frank Carlin, 64 www.aplace4
Individual Low-net: Jay Spark
man, 62 2322 11th Ave. SE Ru


IN UNIFOlM



Kevin B. Lopez
Kevin B. Lopez has graduated
from Officer Candidate School
(OCS) at Fort Benning, Columbus,
Ga., and was commissioned as a
second lieutenant in the U.S. Army.
During the 14 weeks of training,
the officer candidate received "basic
soldiering" instruction in leadership,
professional ethics, soldier team de-
velopment, combined arms tactics,
weapons defense, combat water sur-
vival, squad drill, intelligence, field
training exercises, day and night
land navigation, confidence ob-
stacle course, common core tasks,
communications, staff and general
military subjects, and physical fit-
ness tests which include three, four
and five-mile runs, and foot march-
es between 5-10 mile routes.
The candidate is tested on leader-
ship skills and team work abilities
required of a commissioned officer.
Students learned to utilize acquired
skills to function in "leader and fol-
lower" positions in squad and pla-
toon sized elements, and evaluated
in various leadership garrison po-
sitions while in a stressful and de-
manding field environment.
He is the son of Jocelyn D. Bueno
of Apollo Beach. Lopez received a
degree in 2007 from Florida State
University.



CHURCH
ence the power of
rnge your life.
ervicio en Espafiol @ 6 PM

leveryone.org

skin, FL 813.645.3337


Summer Choir
The last Sunday of June, July and
August presents an opportunity for
anyone who always has wanted to
sing in a group or Church Choir.
There are no tryouts, auditions,just
a desire to sing. Just show up in
the Rehearsal Room United Com-
munity Church at 1501 La Jolla
Avenue, Sun City Center at 9:15
am on June 27, July 25 and August
29. There will be a short rehearsal
and then you will be a part of the
Choir for a day, or longer if you
really like it. For information con-
tact Tara Swartzbaugh, Director of
Music at 813-835-8206.


JUNE 24, 2010
The Razor's Edge
I have spent a small fortune on ra-
zors in my lifetime. I have to use the
pricier ones (Venus(r) to be exact)
and those are very expensive (even
with a coupon!). Needless to say, I
was so excited when I heard about a
very handy tip to make razors last for
a very, very long time. After every
shave, most people just place their
razor back in the caddy or shower
organizer still wet. Wrong! After ev-
ery use, you should dry your razor
and then return it to wherever you
store it. This will increase the life of
your razor from just a week to two
to three months! Depending on the
texture of hair, it can last even lon-
ger. I now have some friends who
can use the same razor for up to four
months. Imagine having to buy only
three razors a year. It was explained
to me like this. Do you throw away
a steak knife after only a few uses?
Of course not! So why do that to
your razor? Make sure those razors
are clean and dry after every use!
Kelly
Want to live better on the money you
already make? Visit com/index. cfm?TipsSyn> to find hun-
dreds of articles to help you stretch
your day andyour dollar! C 2010 Dol-
lar Stretcher, Inc.


Zipperer's Funeral Home

Only onsite Crematory in S. Hillsborough County
Family owned and operated since 1979


Z 813-645-6130


1520 33rd St. S.E., Ruskin, FL 33570
www.zipperersfuneralhome com Exp.8/31/10


Manatee Memorial Hospital is the first in Manatee County to offer EsophyXTM,
a new surgical choice for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD),
or heartburn, without making any incisions in the patient's body.

How Does It Work?
The EsophyX device is inserted into the body through the patient's mouth, using a
standard endoscope, not through an incision. That means patients have no external
skin incisions, no internal cutting, fewer adverse effects or complications and quicker
recovery times.
Studies show an 80 percent improvement in quality of life and the reduction or
elimination of heartburn symptoms among patients who have had the procedure.
Surgeons at Manatee Memorial Hospital use the EsophyX system to perform
incisionless procedures to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), or heartburn.

For more information, call (941) 745-7204

Physicians are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Manatee Memorial Hospital.
The hospital shall not be liable for actions or treatments provided by physicians. Facebook is a registered trademark ofFacebook, Inc.


The EsophyX system, from EndoGastric
Solutions, allows doctors to restore the
natural valve that stops acid from
causing heartburn.




SManatee

Memorial Hospital
206 Second Street East
Bradenton, FL 34208
www.manateememorial.com
Become a fan Fok






JUNE 24, 2010

Begin making emergency plans for pets


TALLAHASSEE, FL Florida
Agriculture and Consumer Serv-
ices Commissioner Charles Bron-
son is reminding Floridians to
create an emergency response
plan for their animals as hurri-
cane season approaches. Bronson
says people should not wait until
the last minute to think about how


Don't wait until the last minute
to plan for your pet or livestock.

they are going to evacuate or shel-
ter their animals during a disaster.
People may need to leave their
homes quickly and a well thought
out plan will help ensure the safety
of animals and the peace of mind
of their owners.
Bronson's Division of Animal
Industrywebsitehttp://www.doacs.
state.fl.us/ai (click on "Emergency
Management") links to numerous
websites that provide informa-
tion about pet friendly emergency
shelters and hotels. There is also


extensive emergency preparedness
information for owners of large
and small animals.

Some tips for people with
animals include:

Pets and Small Animals
Leaving pets behind during an
evacuation is not recommended
because the animals can easily
be injured, lost or killed. Owners
should find out now if any local
boarding facilities or veterinary
offices can shelter their animals
in an emergency. They should also
contact hotels outside their imme-
diate area to determine which
allow animals and whether there
are any size restrictions.
Keep ID tags and vaccinations
up to date.
Prepare a pet evacuation kit,
including food and water for
one week, a manual can opener,
medications, medical/vaccina-
tion records, a pet carrier, and
bedding.
When traveling, properly secure
pets in the vehicle.

Horses and Livestock
During an emergency, the time
you have to evacuate your horses
will be limited. With an effective
emergency plan, you may have
enough time to move your horses
to safety. Livestock are difficult to
evacuate so it is important to make
plans to shelter them in place
safely.
Keep vaccinations and other
health requirements up to date.
If possible, make arrange-
ments in advance for evacuation of


horses. Know where you can take
your horses for shelter along your
evacuation route.
Make sure your horse trailer
is "ready to go" or other transport
arrangements are prepared well in
advance.
Include animal handling equip-
ment and a supply of feed and
water.
Carry your vaccination record,
Coggins test and health papers
with you.
Have a point of destination be-
fore departure and be sure to evac-
uate early to avoid traffic delays.
If evacuation is not possible:
Reinforce your barn, and out-
buildings with hurricane straps or
other devices.
Secure or remove anything that
could become blowing debris.
Open gates or remove fencing
so that animals may move to high
ground in a flood and to low-lying
areas during high winds.
Install a hand pump for your
well and fill enough large contain-
ers with water for your animals for
at least a week.
Identify alternate water and
power sources. A generator with
a safely stored supply of fuel may
be essential, especially if you have
electrical equipment necessary to
the well being of your animals.

"People will have enough to deal
with in protecting themselves and
their families during a natural dis-
aster or other emergency," Bronson
says. "If they have a plan in place
for pets and livestock, that is one
less thing they will need to worry
about at the last minute."


Ii' [4t''1!.Ii1'^td tl(' 'N1


Walter
Moscoso, M.D.

Retina Specialist,
Macular
Degeneration


Robert
Edelman, M.D.

Cataract & Laser
Surgeon,
Glaucoma Specialist


MANATEE
jEYE CLINIC
g-F-=o ga[SE ia


Eric
Berman, M.D.

Eyelid Plastic
Surgeon,
Neuro-Specialist


Robert
Sambursky, M.D.

Cornea Specialist,
Cataract Surgery,
General Eye Care


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 25

UF marine researchers rush to collect
samples as oil threat grows

GAINESVILLE, FL In a race
against time, University of Florida
marine researchers are hurrying to
collect underwater marine algae
samples in the Florida Keys while
an ever-growing Gulf oil spill
steadily migrates toward Florida,
already reaching the Emerald
Coast in the Panhandle.
Hendrik Luesch, Ph.D., an as- Capt. Cindy Lewis, a scientist
sociate professor of medicinal at the Keys Marine Laboratory
chemistry at the UF College of in Long Key, takes University
Pharmacy, took his research team of Florida pharmacy researcher
to Long Key last week in hopes Hendrik Luesch and four of his
of advancing early drug discover- lab members to a reef collec-
ies that may yield cancer-fighting tion site about 10 feet deep near
properties hidden in marine algae. Marathon on June 10, 2010.
It's an expedition he has made
annually for four years, but this year it seems there might be a limit on
how long the ecosystem will yield its specimens.
According to federal and independent scientists, as much as 2.5 million
gallons of oil per day are spewing from a pipe in the Gulf of Mexico that
engineers have failed to seal.
"Cyanobacteria, or organisms that overgrow coral reefs, are shown
to produce drug-like compounds that may be exploited for biomedical
purposes such as anti-cancer drugs," Luesch said.
The warm waters and mild year-round temperatures allow marine life
to flourish in the Keys, creating a predatory environment among these
organisms, Luesch said. In order to survive, marine organisms develop
defense systems, sort of like a chemical survival kit. Researchers use
these toxic chemicals as the basis for creating drugs that can target and
fight cancers.
"It's the biodiversity that makes the Florida Keys a hot spot for
researchers," Luesch said.
At the same time, the coral reefs are also a very sensitive ecosystem,
he said. For example, the extended chill in the tropical waters last Janu-
ary caused sea turtles to become cold-stunned and killed more than 85
percent of reefs in certain areas, according to Cynthia Lewis, a biologi-
cal scientist at the Keys Marine Laboratory in Long Key, where the UF
researchers collected specimens.
Scientists in Florida don't know what to expect, she said.
"We are concerned and watchful," she said. "We don't know how far
the marine impact may go."
Only two weeks earlier, Lewis and nine other scientific teams under
the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission took baseline
samples on the Gulf and Atlantic coasts from Key Largo to Key West to
establish pre-impact marine wildlife assessments, Lewis said.
One challenge with his research, Luesch said, is the randomness of
finding an organism and the length of time it takes to isolate and test a
compound for its specific drug-producing qualities. Environmental vari-
ables may change, which means the organism may change as well.
"We may find an interesting species, but it takes months of research
just to isolate the active compound and analyze the properties in our
lab," Luesch said. "Attempts to re-collect often fail because we do not
always see the same organism again."
Two compounds from the oceans have been developed into drugs that
are on the market today one treats cancer, and the other is a pain re-
liever. Fourteen more are in clinical trials. Scientists simply don't know
how many biological organisms are in the ocean, Luesch said, but ma-
rine organisms often produce multiple compounds, and he estimates that
more than 90 percent have not yet been discovered.
What does the largest-ever oil spill disaster mean to Luesch and his
research?
"I am thinking what everyone else in the United States and in the world
is thinking what a catastrophe this is for mankind and especially the
area in the Gulf of Mexico," he said. "Secondly, I am concerned for the
marine discovery efforts by our groups and other groups in this area."


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26 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Making This Right

Beaches

Claims
Cleanup
Economic Investment
Environmental Restoration
Health and Safety
Wildlife


For information visit: bp.com For assistance, please call:
deepwaterhorizonresponse.com To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
Facebook: BP America To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
Twitter: @BP America To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
YouTube: BPplc www.floridagulfresponse.com


My name is Darryl Willis and I'm responsible for overseeing BP's
claims process in the Gulf coast. I was born and raised in Louisiana.
At age 70, my mother lost her home to Hurricane Katrina. Afterwards,
she experienced enormous frustration. So I know first hand that
when tragedy strikes on a scale like this, people need help without
a lot of hassles.

Independent Claims Compensation Fund
Working with the President, we've created a $20 billion fund to satisfy
all legitimate claims. This fund will be administered by a highly respected
independent overseer and will not come at any cost to taxpayers.

How To File A Claim
To speed help, BP's Claims Center is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week. The number is 1-800-440-0858. When someone calls, they'll
find out how to submit their claim and can schedule a face-to-face
meeting with one of our claims specialists. After meeting, we will
be in touch in four days or less and can issue them a check right on
the spot. They can also file online at bp.com/claims.

Replacing Lost Monthly Income
Our focus has been on helping the fishermen, small businesses and
others who aren't able to work until the spill is cleaned up, by making
payments to replace their lost monthly income. These payments will
continue for as long as needed.

We have already paid tens of thousands of claims amounting to
more than $100 million. We have recently simplified and accelerated
the payment of commercial large loss claims. Over one thousand
people are here to help in 33 walk-in claims offices in the Gulf. We
have promised to honor all legitimate claims and we will.

Our Responsibility
The Gulf is my home. Doing this right is important to me. My
commitment is that we will keep you informed, and we'll be here
as long as it takes. We may not always be perfect, but we will
make this right.


bp


JUNE 24, 2010







June 24. 2010 THE SHOPPER 27


To place an ad call
813.645.3111 ext. 201
Fax: 813.645.1792
$15.50
up to 20 words
300 addl. word
Deadline is Monday
at 4pm


THE SHOPPER

OLION:1 AFRT01111 I I

M & M Printing Co., Inc
weekly publisher of the
The Observer News, The SCC Observer and The Riverview Current
210 Woodland Estates Ave SW
Ruskin, Florida 33570


The Observer News will
be closed Monday,
July 5 in observance
of Independence Day.
Deadline for classified
line ads will move to
Friday, July 2 at 4pm. for
the July 8 edition


105 PERSONAL
Coin collector. Not a dealer. Interested in
silver & gold coins. Will offer better price
than dealer. 813-645-1082





260 FRUITS/VEG.

Morgan Farms
Fresh produce, ice cold watermelon,
fresh seafood, live blue crabs & more
US 41, One miles south of the Little
Manatee River. Tuesday thru Sunday,
10am-6pm. Closed Mondays. 813-
645-5208

280 PETS
Female tiger cat. lyr old. Free to good
home. Neutered. 813-938-3395





310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Large moving sale. 6/24, 6/25 & 6/26.
1706 Safford Park Dr., Ruskin. Furniture,
sofas, chairs, tools, collectible. Every-
thing must go.
Garage sale. 13306 Silvercreek Dr.,
Summerfield Crossings. Grill, TV,
clothes, more. A little bit of everything.
Saturday, June 26, 9am-noon.
SCC street sale. 300 block of Linger
Lane. Saturday, June 26, 8am-lpm.
Tools, workbench, small refrigerator,
appliances, clothes & household items.
A little bit of everything.






1906 WEDGE CT.
Caloosa Country Club Estates
Beige Sofa & Chair w/Ottoman,
Two Round Dining Table Sets
w/Four Chairs, Oak Armoire,
L-Shaped Desk w/Credenza, Small
China Cabinet, Desk Chairs,
Toshiba 36" TV, Brass Floor Lamp,
Silks, Pictures, Blue Floral Round
Rug, S/S GE Refrigerator, Large
Stainless Barbeque, Many Knick-
knacks, Dolls, Small Appliances.

(813) 14-991


310 GARAGE /YARD SALE





Model Home & Consigned Furniture
& Accessories
Apollo Beach Shopping Center
6024 U.S. Hwy. 41 N. Apollo Beach
(next to Westshore Pizza)
LayawayAvailable
Closed Tues., Wed & Sunday



Moving. Must sell contents of house.
Everything has to go. One piece or all.
By appointment only 813-447-6123
Ruskin.
Tennessee Club Garage & bake sale.
misc. items 7:30am-5pm. Friday June
25. Rain or Shine. 1001 Yellowbird
Place, SCC. Info. 813-633-5069
Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana
St., Gibsonton (1 block off US 41,1 block
north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday thru
Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture,
lots misc. Ministry First Baptist Gibson-
ton. 813-671-0036 to donate
Moving sale. Saturday, 8am. No early
birds. End of Apollo Beach Blvd right
to 6611 Surfside Blvd. Furniture, house-
hold, fishing boating, clothes yards of
fabric & misc. items.
Moving sale. King & queen waterbed.
Tents, more. 537 Frandor Place, Apollo
Beach. 8am-2pm. Friday & Saturday,
6/25 & 6/26


Don't miss the

Humongous
WOTM BAZAAR


THRIFT STORE
OPEN: Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 8 a.m. 3 p.m.
Saturday 8 o.m. 12 p.m.


N w
U.
S.Re
w 4
1st St SW.

TORFT
STORE


1009 Ist


Street S.W.
:uskin


674 E We Have
Furniture, Too!
DONATION DROP OFFS
TUES. THRU FRL ONLY PLEASE,
ALL DONATIONS MUST BE IN CLEAN
USEABLE CONDITION.


U U


310 GARAGE /YARD SALE
Beds, 8x10 wool area rug, roll top desk,
furniture & more. Great deals! Noon-
5pm. 6/26 & 6/27, Saturday & Sunday.
3505 Myrtle Tree Lane. (off 36th St,
behind Bob Evans).


0 Cafvary's

u Thrift Store
NOW OPEN Wednesday,
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. Noon

50% OFF
ALL GLASSWARE

1424 E. College Ave. Ruskin
813-641-7790
Ministry ofCalvary Lutheran church

312 ESTATE SALES

AAA Furniture
New & Gently Used Furniture

BUY & SELL
Daily Trips to SCC


Mon.-Sat.
9 a.m.-5 p.m.


B


6819 U.S. 301 5., Riverview
(813)677-8180


Let us get done in one day what it
takes the others guys a week to do.
We will pack-up and pick-up one room
or the entire house for a QUICK,
PROFITABLE, TROUBLE-FREE
EXPERIENCE.
CALL BUTTERFELD's AUCTIONS




www.ButterfieldsAuctions.com
Butterfield Auctions AB2706/AU3549


TIES
STflTE
SfiLES

741-0225
Cell: 382-7536
Personalized
SService

Advertise in the newspaper
that your community is
reading.


331 APPLIANCES
Refrigerator side by side, almond $200.
Stove, ceramic top, almond $150. Micro-
wave over the stove, white 2yrs old $60.
We remodeled kitchen. 813-633-4035

354 MEDICAL ITEMS
Scooter with leather cover, lift & hitch.
$900. 3 in 1 commode, never used.
$100. 813-767-3039
Like new, blue, electric lift chair. $300.
Call 813-634-4935

360 GOLF CARTS

6()-umaCapr
SWE TAKE YOU FARTHER
of Sun City Center
New & Used GOLF CARTS
SALES & SERVICE


6 Volt 8 Volt
SComplete Set Complete Set
$479* $529*
I II
*Plustaxand applicable *Plus taxand applicable
fees Installed with core fees Installed with core
exchange Exp 7/51/10 1 exchange Exp7/31/10
I---------------------*
I FREE Golf Cart Service I
S(69.99 Value) Exp 7/31/10 1

1649 SCC Plaza Suite 103
(next to Chamber)
Sun City Center, FL
Golf cartswanted. Buy sell, trade. Char-
gers, parts all related. Ronny's Carts &
Parts. 813-645-4515 or 813-484-9855
2000 Western golf cart. SCC. Top of the
line. Excellent condition, PioneerAM/FM/
CD. Extras. Must see! Asking $2,300
obo. 813-634-3055
We buy golf carts, any condition. We pay
top dollar for used carts, running or not.
Same day pickup. 813-300-0114
Golf cart 2008, Easy Go. Like new, all
customized. Must see. $4,995. Call Don
Stanley. 813-634-1350





425 SLIPS OR STORAGE
South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special-
izing in outside storage for RVs, boats &
trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay-
Storage.com


425 SLIPS OR STORAGE

Ramey's Business Park
RV & boat storage & heavy equip-
ment. 1/2 mile from Williams Park.
813-410-9607 or 813-849-1469

-F


455 AUTOMOBILES


$Fast Cash$
Cars, trucks & Vans. Dead or alive.
813-626-5733, 813-924-6255 Free
Hauling. God Bless





511 HOUSES FOR SALE




Cypress Creek Ventana
3BR/2BA plus den, open
plan. Great view of 3 sand
traps, large lanai with
pool/spa, 3-car garage,
1950 sq. ft. $259,900
(813) 355-1512

FABULOUS BAYFRONT CONDO,
great views of Tampa Bay, St. Pete & Skyway,
and unique sunsets! 2BR/2BA elegantly
furnished, open floor plan, large balcony,
covered parking. Amenities include pools, fishing
pier, restaurants & tennis courts. $209,000.
GORGEOUS LOT ON RIVER, OWNER
FINANCING: Deep water, large dock, great view
of water, great fishing! Beautiful fence and gate,
all utilities on site. Ready for your dream home or
mobile home. $239,000.
UNIQUE WATERFRONT LOT, close to 1
cleared acre with few trees, over 105 ft. on
water, peaceful, secluded, with always a cool
breeze. Just minutes from town & shopping.
$250,000.
COMMERCIAL RENTAL: Large warehouse &
A/C offices, 2BA, insulated roof, loading dock,
roll-up doors, over 1 acre lot.
$2,200n/o. +deposit.





Please Recycle This Paper


10 MINUTE


OIL CHANGE
Includes:
Change Oil (Up To 5 Ots.) 14 Point Check and Top Off
SOil Filter Replaceds Chassis lubed

S05 0 Automati
O pres OFF Transmission Flush
Full Service Oil Change America's
Regular $29.5 Using 10w-30 or 5w-20
or FREE CARWASH! (Ride-thru-Express) Most
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can not be combined or used with sale (S25 Savings) Oil Expre
items. Coupon expires 08/15/10 OBN Coupon expires 08/15/10 OBN
America's 3852 SUN CITY BLVD. RUSKIN/SUN CITY CENTER
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Collectibles Crafts
* Used and Old Desirable Items


THE SHOPPER 27


June 24, 2010


R







28 THE SHOPPER

511 HOUSES FOR SALE


IS


MAKE OFFER!!
SCC Sierra in Greenbriar, oak floors, replumbed,
interior redecorated. Over 1,500 sq. ft.....$134,900
NEW ISTING, Condo in The Knolls, near private pool
...in the $40s
SCC Worthington 3BR/2BA, 2,500 sq. ft., solar heated
spa, new flooring, caged patio, vacant............. $249,000
RENTALS
2BR/2BFurn. on Gloucester.......................$750/month
2BR/2B, 2-car garage in Greenbriar........ $1000/month


515 VILLAS FOR SALE

Sun City Bargain!
1st floor, spacious 2br/2ba condo.
King's Point, gated 55+ community,
great community amenities. Appraised
$65K asking $53,900. Owner, 813-
850-1173






560 M.H. ON LOTS
Mobile home for sale Eastwood Mobile
Home Park, Gibsonton. Call Heather
813-677-5726

565 M.H. IN PARKS
Manatee RV park 55+ all amenities, low
lot rent. Great Florida room, furnished,
washer /dryer included $3,900 owner
financing, no interest. 813-938-1686,
813-415-4403


565 M. H. IN PARKS


14ft wide mobile home on canal in Ha-
waiian Isle RV Resort, Ruskin. 2br/1 ba,
2 lanai, carport. Close to pool & club
house. $23,000. 813-641-2440






610 WATERFRONT RENTALS
The Dolphin House, Apollo Beach,
efficiency apartments on water. Boat
docking /fishing. Pool, laundry. $185
weekly, $185 deposit. No pets. 813-
850-5217

611 HOUSES FOR RENT
SCC house for rent. 2br/1.5ba, com-
pletely renovate from inside to outside.
Monthly rent $795 plus security deposit
with yearly lease. Please call 813-649-
1599 for details

Apollo Beach 3br/2ba/2cg on Jamaica
Isles. Newly painted, new carpet, nice
quiet neighborhood. $1095 monthly
plus security. 813-645-2448 or 813-
416-6221

One bedroom plus loft. Cedar interior. In
country near SCC. $140 weekly plus de-
posit, included water, sewer & garbage.
813-335-2877

612 APTS. FOR RENT
Ruskin apt. 2br/1ba, no pets, washer
& dryer hookups. $590 monthly plus
deposit. 813-645-1801


Have a nice day


612 APTS FOR RENT


Bahia Beach area. Nice apartment for
rent. 2br/1 ba. $650 monthly. $800 with
electric. Call Susan 813-352-0510

Sun City Center
Furnished or unfurnished 1 br/1 ba,
lanai across from CA complex. New
carpet, tile. Garage. $785 monthly
includes water. 1 CA dues, annual
rental. KLM Realty H. Carl McGary,
broker 813-679-4701

613 CONDOS FOR RENT




NEW Condos
and Townhouses
(off7thAve. NE in Ruskin)
3BR/2BA Condos with screened
lanai.$900 per month.
3BR/2.5BA Townhouse with garage.
$1000 per month.
3BR/2.5BA Townhouse (1842 sq. ft.)
with garage. $1200 per month.
(Water & Basic Cable Included)
with approved application
and 1 year lease
SMove-in Incentives





620 ROOMS FOR RENT

Wimauma, want to live in a country
setting that's clean & quiet. No alcohol
or drugs. $135 weekly, nicely furnished
room includes all utilities & basic cable.
813-503-4592

630 M.H. RENTALS
Ruskin 1br/1ba mobile home on quiet
street. Waterfront, fish off dock. Utilities
included. No smoking, no pets. Best
suited for single person or couple. Refer-
ences needed. Rent $175 weekly plus
$300 deposit. 813-363-6001

For Rent: Clean Mobile
Homes With A/C.
813-677-1086

For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home near
shopping center in Gibsonton. 813-677-
8789, 813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

3br/2ba doublewide, fireplace, CHA,
large private lot near Kings Point. Please
call 813-645-4708 or 813-892-5802

For rent. One bedroom RV, includes
electric & water. $140 weekly. Perfect
for on person. No pets. Also 2br trailer
813-690-0768

New mobile homes w/ lower rates.
Water, garbage & pest control
included.
(2 Weeks Free)
L&N Trailer Park, Gibsonton.
813-381-4830

Two bedroom $165 weekly, plus secu-
rity deposit. R & M Mobile Home Park
in Gibsonton. 813-677-7509

For rent or sale. Riverhouse 2br/1ba,
Little Manatee River. Fish off dock,
boat lift. Ruskin. 813-210-0162 or
813-690-1836,

631 M.H. LOT RENTALS
Lot for rent or sale. For mobile home
or RV. 1/2 block from Little Manatee
River. Located on 39th St., Ruskin.
$320 monthly. 813-210-0162 or 813-
690-1836

646 WAREHOUSE SPACE
Garage & mini storage rooms for rent.
Pirates Treasure Cove, Gibsonton.
813-677-1137

The Observer News will
be closed Monday,
July 5 in observance
of Independence Day.
Deadline for classified
line ads will move to

Friday, July 2 at 4pm. for

the July 8 edition


705 CLEANING


Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integrity.
Call for free estimate. 7days a week.
Move-in, move-out, rentals. Insured,
bonded, licensed. Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean

Summertime and the living is easy!
Let professional interiors simplify your
summer. (Barbara's back!) General /de-
tailed residential cleaning & organizing
services, available at reasonable rates.
Interiors & exteriors windows cleaned.
No job too big or small. Free estimates.
Licensed & insured. Call Barbara 813-
260-7262 (25yrs experience /references
available).

Green Team
Home /office cleaning. Windows
cleaned. Pressure washing, yard
maintenance. Call Dee 813-777-1221.

708 MOVERS
Affordable Moving & trash hauling.
Specializing in delivery /estate sales.
One piece or whole house. Loading &
unloading moving trucks/ storage units.
Free estimate. Dave 813-447-6123

710 LAWN CARE

M & C Mower Repair
Parts & service. Authorized warranty
center. Commercial & residential. 725
14th St., Wimauma. 813-938-3226

Most lawns $20. Sod installation, pres-
sure washing, welding & much more.
Free estimate. 813-526-1456

FloraScapes
Professional maintenance company
serving all your landscaping needs.
Residential & commercial. Ruskin,
Apollo Beach, SCC, Riverview. Li-
censed/insured. 813-333-3688

715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill dirt,
topsoil, sand, crushed rock & asphalt,
driveway culverts. Loader, backhoe,
grading, bushhog, discing. Install Sep-
tic System & drain fills. CFC#1427021.
813-645-1883

Fill-Land Clearing
Dozer & loader work, driveway & sep-
tic fill, & shell hauled. Robert Carver,
813-634-4962. Beeper 813-267-6217

Advertise in the newspaper
that your community is
reading.


'OUR NAME:


ADDRESS:


I3TY/STATE/ZIP


DAYTIME PHONE:

up to 20 words
$15.50
includes listing on web
300 for each additional word over 20


D COPYAS YOU WISH IT TO APPEAR

AD COPY AS YOU WISH IT TO APPEAR


SERVICES

700 A


The Shopper
The Observer News
The SCC Observer
The Riverview Current


Mail payment
or drop payment to:
210 Woodland Estates Ave.
Ruskin, FI. 33570

CALL IN YOUR AD TO:
645-3111 ext. 201
OR FAX IT TO:
645-1792

DEADLINE:
Ad and payment
must be received by
4 p.m. Monday


CALL
Paul. (813) 645-3211

DICKMAN Serving South Hillsborough
INC. County since 1924.
REALTY
REAi a www.dickmanrealty.com
Celebrating 86 Years dickman@tampabay.rr.com
1924 2010
THIS BEAUTIFUL PROPERTY boasts 2BR/2BA, 2-car garage and is located in Sun
City Center. Built in 1994 this home has been meticulously maintained with new a/c
in 2006, a new roof in 2007 and much more. Sun City Center has much to offer with
golf courses, tennis, softball, two indoor pools plus over 200 clubs and various other
activities. A golf cart friendly community to local shopping and activities and it is
conveniently located to airports, beaches, Tampa, Sarasota & St. Petersburg. Come
and enjoy the Florida lifestyle today!! $139,500 CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
RUSKIN GREAT 3BR/2BA POOL HOUSE ON 2 FENCED LOTS: repainted,
recarpeted, tiles in living areas, large screen porch overlooking pool and backyard,
2-car garage. Home on 1 lot, second lot nicely landscaped. $159,000. CALL CLAIRE
TORT 363-7250
AFFORDABLE CLEAN 3BR/1BA HOUSE ON 1/3 ACRE FENCED LOT: freshly
repainted, new plumbing & sewer, new central air & heat, utility-room, carport, large
shed in backyard. Low taxes, no HOA. Now $64,500. CALL CLAIRE TORT
363-7250
NEAT 2BR/2BA M-HOME ACROSS FROM GOLF COURSE: split BR plan, open
living area, new laminate/carpet floors, screen porch, carport, shed. $52,500. CALL
CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
WATERFRONT HOME, JUST REDUCED $10,000 I Very nice 3BR/2BA + Den,
recently repainted, large inside utility-rm, screen porch, double attached carport.
Large lot on canal, seawall & boatslip. Move-in-ready. Now $169,000. CALL CLAIRE
TORT 363-7250
JUST REDUCED!! PLENTY OF ROOM! 3BR/2BA home on 4.55 acres. Room to
expand or enjoy the quiet. In-ground pool, green belted zoned for horses and could
be a fish farm as tanks are set up. $210,000 CALL KATHY JACOBSON 624-2225
2BR/2BA DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE in the Riverbreeze gated community. Fully
furnished, utility shed with washer and dryer. Park has club house, swimming pool,
and shuffleboard. $55,000. CALL KATHY JACOBSON 624-2225
BEAUTIFUL TREESY ACREAGE with great potential for development or building
that dream home you've waited for. Eleven acres m.o.l. in quiet area near new
schools, public library, community college and so much more. You'll love the pristine
setting, clean air and nature abounding. So much potential! Take a look today! Asking
$550,000. JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540.
NEW LISTING! 2BR/2BA 1-car garage home on .99 acre (MOL) with river frontage!
Beautiful setting with a wonderful view of the river. $185,000 CALL ROXANNE
WESTBROOK 748-2201 or KAY PYE 361-3672
WATERFRONT DUPLEX ON THE LITTLE MANATEE RIVER in Ruskin. Quiet area
with dock on a spring fed pond and river frontage. Beautiful sunsets! Great saltwater
and freshwater fishing! 15 minutes by boat to Tampa Bay! 1BR/1BA on each side.
$150,000 CALL ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 or KAY PYE 361-3672
NEW LISTING! 2 homes on 1.39 acres on the LITTLE MANATEE RIVER and a
freshwater pond. 4BR/3BA home (2380 sq.ft) and a 1 BR/1.5BA with 1731 sq.ft. and
a boathouse. $450,000 CALL ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 or KAY PYE
361-3672
REDUCED!! GREAT COMMERCIAL LOCATION ON HIGHWAY 41! 2530 sq.ft.
metal building with 3 phase power, dust collection unit, 6 inch sloped concrete floor
for drainage, two 10' doors and three 8' doors. Three other very well maintained office
buildings on the 1.43 acre property. Combined parking could easily accommodate 30
cars. $599,000 CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
GOLF COURSE FRONTAGE with optional membership in Renaissance Club. Great
expanded St. Augustine model features 3BR/2BA, lots of natural light, views of pond,
conservation area, fairway. Split plan, bonus room, many possibilities and opportuni-
ties. Just $235,000. CALL JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
CALL US FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS........645-3211
Donate your old functioning cell phones and drop off at our
office for use by the "Victims Assistance Program."
(Evening phone numbers)
Judy Erickson ..................... 468-0288 Jim Grannon........................... 610-3485
Claire Tort......................... 363-7250 KennAntonelli ..................... 786-3124
Kay Pye............................... 361-3672 Kathy Jacobson ................... 624-2225
Cathy Griggs ................... 391-8653 Jo Ellen Mobley..................... 645-1540
Christine Nethers .............. 260-6335 LaRae Regis ...... ........ 633-8318
Roxanne Westbrook............ 748-2201


JUNE 24, 2010

715 FILL DIRT/ HAULING

Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service. Cul-
vert sets, driveways, shell, crushed
asphalt, concrete, fill dirt, excavating,
mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963
Free estimates.

720 HOME MAINT.
Experience carpenter. Needs work will
fix anything. Free estimate. Call Dave
813-447-6123. 27yrs in finish work.
Guaranteed quality service.

Sunshine Handyman Service
20yrs experience. Honest, depend-
able. Quality workmanship with
lowest prices. Local references. Free
estimate. Satisfaction guaranteed.
727-831-2089 /813-325-3562

740 MISC. SERVICES

Oliver & Company
Pet Sitting
insured. Member of Pet Sitters Inter-
national. References available, email:
olivertort@aol.com

Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks, boat
lifts & seawalls. Free inspection. Heck-
er Construction Co. 813-236-9306


You can find your

classified ad online

www.observernews.net







820 CLERICAL
Receptionist needed part-time forweek-
ends, for a fast paced real estate office
in Sun City Center. Computer knowledge
a plus! Please either call 813-634-5517
for appointment or fax resume to 813-
634-8281

870 GENERAL

Teacher Secondary School
Teaches Math, Computer Science,
Science & Social Studies to 11th &
12th grade students with learning dis-
abilities. Must have a BS in education
& eligibility for Florida Educator's Cer-
tificate in mathematics, grades 9-12.
Send resume to: Center Academy,
Attn D Stone, 10518 Riverview Dr.,
Riverview Fl. 33578

Need packing & shipping person. 10-15
hrs/week. Be able to multi task & great
with customers. Bilingual preferred. Call
813-645-0763







June 24, 2010

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and Candy All For $9,995. Call
1-888-753-3430 AIN#B02000033
Call Us: We Will Not Be Under-
sold!

AIRLINE MECHANIC Train for
high paying Aviation Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if
qualified Job placement assistance.
Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance
866-314-6283

AVIATION MAINTENANCE/AVION-
ICS Graduate in 14 Months. FAA Ap-
proved; financial aid if qualified. Job
placement assistance. Call National
Aviation Academy Today! 1-800-659-
2080 or NAA.edu

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast
Affordable & Accredited PACE
Program Free Brochure. Call Now!
1-800-532-6546 ext. 16 www.conti-
nentalacademy.com

FLORIDA KEYS Marathon. Luxuri-
ous Oceanfront vacation homes.
1-6 Bedrooms. Private Pool, hot
tub, docks & more! Weekly & long
weekend rates. Last Minute Specials
1-888-564-5800


CPF STATEWIDE

Bad Credit, No Credit, Low Income,
No Problem! Guaranteed Help! Free
Call Now! 1-800-439-0512

BURIED IN CREDIT CARD DEBT
Over $10,000. We can save you
thousands of dollars. Call Credit Card
Relief for your Free Consultation:
1-866-640-3315

FINANCIAL DISTRESS? BETTER
BUSINESS BUREAU "A-" rated com-
pany can help immediately! Credit
cards? Bills? Collections harass-
ment? Need relief? Call Ancora Debt
Solution 1-888-790-4660 X10

Boats; 1000's of boats for sale www.
floridamariner.com ; reaching 6 million
homes weekly throughout Florida.
800-388-9307, tide charts, broker
profiles, fishing captains, dockside
dining and more.

METAL ROOFING & STEEL BUILD-
INGS. Save $$$ buy direct from
manufacturer. 20 colors in stock
with trim & access. 4 profiles in 26
ga. panels. Carports, horse barns,
shop ports. Completely turn key
jobs. All Steel Buildings, Gibson-
ton, Florida. 1-800-331-8341. www.
allsteel-buildings.com ;

2001 SOFTAIL DUCE Locking hard-
bags, detach windshield, fuel injected,
factory security system 9400 miles
in two tone red & black. contact me
stevenpparker@live.com

ASSEMBLE MAGNETS & CRAFTS
from Home! Year-round Work! Ex-
cellent Pay! No Experience! Top
US Company! Glue Gun, Painting,
Jewelry, More! Toll Free 1-866-844-
5091

**BODYGUARDS WANTED** FREE
Training for members. No Experience
OK. Excellent$$$. Full & Part Time.
Sign On Bonus. 1-615-228-1701.
www.psubodyguards.com

$$ EARN EXTRA INCOME $$ Work-
ing from home. $5.00 for every
envelope Processed with our sales
brochures. Guaranteed!! Free In-
formation. 1-800-210-2686 or visit:
www.funsimplework.com

Earn up to $150 per day. Under cover
Shoppers needed to judge retail and
dining establishments Exp Not Re.
Call 1-888-601-4861

GOVERNMENT JOBS Earn $12.00-
48.00/hr. Full Medical Benefits Paid
Training. In Health Care, Admin/
Clerical, Law Enforcement, Finance,
Public Relations, Wildlife & more! 1
800 858-0701 ext. 2004

OWNER SAYS SELL! Deep Dock-
able COASTAL WATERFRONT
only $79,900. Direct Ocean Access.
Adjoining lot sold for $309,900! All
amenities complete! Paved roads,
underground utilities, club house,
pool. Excellent financing. Call now
877-888-1406, x2580


CPF STATEWIDE

Heat & Air Jobs Ready to Work? 3
week accelerated program. Hands
on environment. Nationwide certi-
fications and Local Job Placement
Assistance! 1-877-994-9904

GEORGIA LAND & HOMESITES -
Beautiful country subd. just off US1.
Great investment! Half acre tracts
$75/month & up. MH'swelcome. Oth-
ers available; www.HickoryHammock-
Properties.com ; Owner Financing
912-585-2174; 912-526-9964

GEORGIA Quiet, Country Living in
Central GA. 4acre-5acre Private lots.
Only 20mins. to Walmart Owner fi-
nancing $110/mo. Call 678-644-0547
for pictures or www.CountryLots.net

NC MOUNTAIN HOMESITE BEST
LAND BUY! 2.5acres, spectacular
views, house pad, paved road. High
altitude. Easily accessible, secluded.
Bryson City. $45,000. Owner financ-
ing: 1-800-810-1590 www.wildcat-
knob.com

NC MOUNTAINS Brand new! Moun-
tain Top tract reduced to $19,500!
Private, near Boone area, bank
financing, owner must sale, 866-
789-8535

New Virginia Heartland/Mountain
Property FSBO! Blue Ridge Pkwy,
3000Ft Elv. Mountain Views, Rivers/
Streams. Native Trout, golfing. Must
sacrifice! I'll finance $39,900 877-
803-5318

NORTH CAROLINA Be cool in the
Mountains. Efficiency to 5-br houses
& condos. Fully equipped. Views,
pools, golf, tennis & more. Sugar
Mountain Accommodations & Realty
staysugar.com 1-800-545-9475

SANTEE COOPER LAKE AREA.
South Carolina. 2 acres, near 1-95.
Beautiful building tract $19,900. Ask
about E-Z owner financing, low pay-
ments 803-473-7125

STOP RENTING!! GOVT & BANK
FORECLOSURES! From $500
Down, $250 Per Month. Over 900
Exclusive Homes!! No Banks!
Owners Will Finance! Bad Credit
OK!! Visit: www.rebuildUS.com ;

TENNESSEE MTNS 435ac w/tim-
ber, creek, river, natural gas well,
springs, city water, utilities. Eight
miles of trails $1800/ac. Will divide
into 2 tracts. www.tnwithaview.com
; 1-888-836-8439

TN LAND BANK FORCED LIQUIDA-
TION of Smoky Mtn/Lake Property.
Closeout sale! July 9-10-11. Priced
pennies on the dollar! All reasonable
offers accepted! Amenities! Map &
Pricing: 877-644-4647 x500

Movie Extras To Stand In The Back-
ground For a Major Film Production.
Experience Not Required, Earn Up
To $200/Day. All Looks Needed. Call
888-664-5279


THE SHOPPER 29

CPF STATEWIDE

Donate Vehicle Receive $1000 Gro-
cery Coupon Noah'sArc Support No
Kill Shelters, Research to Advance
Veterinary Treatments Free Towing,
Tax Deductible, Non-Runners Ac-
cepted 1-866-912-GIVE

Donate your Car Truck or Boat to
HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND Free 3
Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free
Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care
Of. 1-866-905-3801

Movie Extras To Stand In The Back-
ground For a Major Film Production.
Experience Not Required, Earn Up
To $200/Day. All Looks Needed. Call
888-664-5279

OWNER SAYS SELL! Deep Dock-
able COASTAL WATERFRONT
only $79,900. Direct Ocean Access.
Adjoining lot sold for $309,900! All
amenities complete! Paved roads,
underground utilities, club house,
pool. Excellent financing. Call now
877-888-1406, x2580

Hard to find B4 zoning property for
sale or lease on Highway 484 in South
Marion County. 4,700 sq foot building
on 1 acre. Great for church, clubs,
meetings, etc. For info contact Realtor
Anthony White, 352-547- 3137.

NC MOUNTAINS- Highlands area, 50
acres w/50' waterfall. NC's largest pri-
vate natural waterfall, majestic views,
over 3000' elevation, Creekfrontage,
large timber, secluded. chestnutcov-
ecreek.com Owner: 478-731-7072

DISH BEST OFFER EVER! $24.99/
mo (for 1 year.) 120+ Channels,
FREE HD! FREE DVR Upgrade!
PLUS, Call NOW& SAVE Over $380!
CALL 1-866-573-3640

ROOF REPAIRS CALL 24/7 Flat
Roof & Mobile Home Specialist.
Free Certified Inspections. Lic/Ins
CCC1327406. All Florida Weather-
proofing & Construction 1-877-572-
1019

FLORIDA KEYS Marathon. Luxuri-
ous Oceanfront vacation homes.
1-6 Bedrooms. Private Pool, hot
tub, docks & more! Weekly & long
weekend rates. Last Minute Specials
1-888-564-5800

BURIED IN CREDIT CARD DEBT
Over $10,000. We can save you
thousands of dollars. Call Credit Card
Relief for your Free Consultation:
1-866-640-3315

Heat & Air Jobs Ready to Work? 3
week accelerated program. Hands
on environment. Nationwide certi-
fications and Local Job Placement
Assistance! 1-877-994-9904

GEORGIA Quiet, Country Living in
Central GA. 4acre-5acre Private lots.
Only 20mins. to Walmart Owner fi-
nancing $110/mo. Call 678-644-0547
for pictures or www.CountryLots.net






30 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


THE OBSERVER NEWS THE SCC OBSERVER THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT


ENT., INC.
Lic. #CMC056816
AIR-CONDITIONING,
HEATING & REFRIGERATION
Complete Sales, Service,
Installation & Repair
Amana and Senior
Trane Dealer Discount
John R. Bowman, Jr., Owner
(813) 633-2703




Let someone
else do that
heavy work.

Look in the
Business & Trade
Directory


I "e w 7* O \


Residential Commercial
New Roofs Re-Roofs Tile
Tile Repairs Hot Tar/Flat Decks
Ventilation Leaks Repaired
FREE Estimates Financing Available
24 Hr. Emergency Service
Senior Citizen Discount
We Carry Workers'ConCmp
For Your Protection BBE
S Lic #CCC1325993 Bonded Insured ";
81s 8202
wwwbuddysrooflng~com


SELF ARREST BONDS
COURT DATES 664-0056
WARRANT CHECKS
BIG JOHN'S
BAIL BONDS
641-8400
FAMILY BONDSMAN
STATE FEDERAL
24 HOUR SERVICE
JOHN L. VATH
2100 Orient Road Tampa, FL. 33619
Fax: (813) 628-8739



Need Work Done
Around the House?

Turn to PHIL
Your Handy Person!
RIVERSIDE GOLF & BOATING CLUB RESIDENT
www.mrhandyperson.com
Serving
APOLLO BEACH
S RUSKIN
SUN CITY
CENTER
KINGS POINT





25+ Years Experience
Licensed & Insured
813-649-1418


Over35yrs. Experience
LOCAL* PROMPT
Repairs Reroof
Inspections

( 8 3 O R ( 1 3
78*04 4-76 A


Complete Sales Service
Repair Installation
SERVICING ALL MAKES AND MODELS
24 Hour Service Financing Available
Lic. #CAC1815928


< rS^ E Senior& Military
Discounts


Roofing
FloridaCerielRoofingContrcwor

Proudly Serving: Sun City Center
Ruskin Apollo Beach Riverview
and surrounding areas
Member SCC Chamber of Commerce







CELL 813-777-9808
Frank Shaft
FL Certified Roofing Contractor
CCC# 1327713
www.ApolloBeachRoofing.com
PalmTreeRoofing@gmail.com


WLVIN'S A/l HAYIN
SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS
Residential and Light Commercial
Family Owned & Operated
No Revolving Technicians
Quality Service,* Sales,
Installation, lk
Most Replacement
Parts on Hand "
(813) 263-6503
< CAC 1814336 Ruskin



Unstuff those
closets! There's
somebody's
Bargain in there!
SSell your
S unwanted
Sites in the
classified!
THE OBSERVER NEWS
813-645-3111 ext. 201
Fax 813-645-1792


















H-A f A&J
Hares
AEsc Plumbing
Experienced
Service & Repairs
Repipes Water Heaters
New Construction
Remodels & Additions


All Types of Roofing
New Roofs & Repairs
SShingle Tile Metal Hot Tar
No job too big or too small!
SERVING SINCE 1973
Ruskin Sun City Center Kings
Point Apollo Beach Riverview
"ALL MY CUSTOMERS ARE DRY
FRIENDS WHEN QUALITY COUNTY"


Ruskin &
Sun CSG Center
ChamberMember
P.O. Box 551 Ruskin, FL 33570
www.customroofing.us
Bonded & Insured Lic. #CCC1326907





*No project over $1000.
No electrical, gas, or
plumbing, and nothing
structural.


6093mNC


LICENSED U R ECS
BONDED ALLPE
INSURED ,!"H OF WIRING
CER00126636 RENOVATIONS
OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE
SECURITY LIGHTS CEILING FANS
'SWITCHES & OUTLETS SPAS & DOCKS

105 21 ST. N.W. RUSKIN


PAINTING
FREE ESTIMATES
Interior Faux Finish
SColor Consulting
Power Wash





PAUL WOOD PLUMBING, INC.
State Certified Plumbing Contractor
#CFC1427697
Residential
S* Commercial
Certified Backflows
Stoppages
Service and Repairs
FREE Estimates 24-Hour Service
Licensed Bonded Insured
(813) 641-1387




NOW OPEN
.4Jl, LOOKING
FOR EXTRA
S ^ STORAGE
SPACE
FOR YOUR...
t04 s. R.V.
BOAT
645-5222 CAMPER
cell: 240-2049 ETC.
1501 33rd St. SE ANY SIZE
Ruskin, FL 33570
Coee tor
FOR RV, ETC.g^^^^^
imiedSpace ow Aaiabl


REPLACEMENT
WINDOWS

Lowest price



I *
HomelTax: (8I3)i64-904
Ce&(83) 477-3792
CBC 152135Insu~red@Bone


Mary Ann Wilhelm
Owner/Director
#CAC 1814397

Wilhelm e Hourv

-' 641-1811
FACTORY
ALERO 802 4th St. S.W.
a (Off College Ave. West)
Ruskin, Florida
Turn to the Experts
www.wilhelmac.com


* Ceiling Fans
* Outlets
SLighting [ ,I1
* Panel Upgrades
* FREE Estimates

813-645-7000
Listed with Sterling Management and
Sun City Center Community Association
Lic. #EC13002936


Timothy Sutton, LC
INTERIOR EXTERIOR
PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
PRESSURE WASHING
29 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN OHIO
NOW SERVING FLORIDA
LICENSED BONDED INSURED
813-727-1013
LIC. #PA2809


B FREE Estimates
-I-
, Lic. #CFC057969
A+ Rating Bonded Insured


_ res Save 10% on

Ws8 web advertising

SCall your advertising
representative today for more
information (813) 645-3111
www.ObserverNews.net


Residential
wD Commercial
Licensed
Insured
Bonded
"SEE A BLUE SKY VIEW"
*10% Off First service
813-641-3256


JUNE 24, 2010





OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 31


,d


-35l
g1


Sa l l i


All New & Redesigned!
Stylish & Spacious
Unsurpassed amount of standard safety features


[ **5StrSf.I


Come See Why
Thousands of Local Drivers
Are SwitchingTo Hyundai


All New &
Redesigned!


2010 SANTA FE


Rugged Capablility,
Comfort & Style

4=1!0


#62423


ELANTRA
S39"= Best Value
c- JIn Its Class


2010 ELANTRA Touring 2010 GENESIS Coupe
Nor ~


2010 GENESIS
r-1977 111111111111111


-E"


Eolw1Prrji ej Guar?@Mtee


We will beat any
other Hyundai
dealer or pay you


All prices are plus tax, tag and $599 dealer fee and are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. O Special APR offers on select models, se I ,.. I r, . . .. i 99,
Genesis Coupe $2199, '11 Sonata $3500, '10 Tucson $2499, '10 Genesis Sedan $3799. All offers are with approved credit and some cannot be combined. *Expected range for most drivers, .
Accent. As listed on Monroney sticker. A For model year 2008. Based on volume manufacturers as included in the EPA'- Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Fu I ' I .
Honda listing. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Advertised vehicles subject to prior sale. Programs subject to change without notice. tt Must present signed buyers order from accredited Hvundai Dealer on same model & equipment.


i ll 1


JI I


Mfti


Manatee Ave. WISR64 J -Exit 220 West -L-

z Road
-rCorez Road


tate Road 70


2010 TUCSON


On Select Models


1 m


I I


2010 ACCENT


Affordable & Fuel Efficient Most Interior Room In Its Class Revolution In Design, Performance & Value Performance, Technology, Safety & Quality
SALE $9 R 239 24 FOR Q59 36 LEAE OR 36
$23 ^ LEASE' $25EE AS 399 EAS


LEASE~i ~1


JUNE 24, 2010


-ruWJ
!I


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4CEr>


SM5 ttt*1





32 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


ID Leg Pain: Aching, Tired, Heavy Legs, Tender Varicosities, Painful Calves.
SLeg Cramps: Night Cramps,'Charley Horses', Nocturnal Cramping.CITY CENTER

SBlue Feet: Corona Phebectasia blue veins at the foot and ankle.SUN BLVD., STE. 113A
LARGO, FL.33777 .77...8 569 1 ISLA DEL SOL ST. PETERSBUR




SSwollen Ankles: Swelling, increasing at the end of the day or when traveling.w Port Ri
El Leg Pain: Aching, Tired, Heavy Legs, Tender Varicosities, Painful Calves.
E- Leg Cramps: Night Cramps, 'Charley Horses', Nocturnal Cramping.
O] Blue Feet: Corona Phlebectasia blue veins at the foot and ankle.
F- Swollen Ankles: Swelling, increasing at the end of the day or when traveling.
E Leg Skin Changes: Red/Brown Discoloration, Ulceration, Eczema, Itching & Burning.
E Night Aching Restlessness, Movement, Cramping: 'Secondary' Restless Leg Symptoms.
EI Varicose Veins: Bulging surface veins.
E Spider Veins: Surface small red veins and larger purple 'reticular' veins.
O Exertional Pain: Muscle pain, cramping on walking (possible arterial claudication).
D Neuropathy vs. Vascular Symptoms: numb, painful, tingling, and/or cold feet.
If you answered yes to one or more of these questions, please call us and bring this questionnaire in for a

FREE EDUCATIONAL CONSULTATION on VENOUS INSUFFICIENCY
NO PAIN, NO DOWNTIME, VERY EFFECTIVE COVERED BY MEDICARE & INSURANCES


CALL for aFREE
Educational Consultation on
VENOUS
INSUFFICIENCY



.ouunnctM.D., FAAEM, Board
Ohio StaeUiversity College of Medic


Varicose Veins and Spider Veins t
Swollen Ankles, Leg Cramp.
Skin Discoloration an


JUNE 24, 2010




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