Title: Observer news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102144/00022
 Material Information
Title: Observer news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: M&M Printing Co., Inc
Place of Publication: Ruskin, FL
Publication Date: June 17, 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102144
Volume ID: VID00022
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text









THE


P.R.S.T STD
PAID
RUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570
PERMIT NO. 8



OBSERVER NEWS


T > Would-be young sailors

Learn more than seamanship
U By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net


Melody Jameson photo
Practicing all-important capsizing recovery, Jayne Millman
(back to camera), certified U.S. Sailing Association instruc-
tor, coaches one of her youngest students, nine-year-old
Taylor Robinson, during the first day of a week-long youth
sailing program offered by the Tampa Sailing Squadron at
its Apollo Beach facility on Tampa Bay.


APOLLO BEACH They arrive in swim
suits, clutching water bottles and lunch
bags, their safety gear slung over shoulders.
They range in age from seven to 17, may
be natural waterbugs or dedicated landlub-
bers, might be looking forward to the new
experience....or not.
They leave a week later, knowing knots,
reciting the critical parts of a boat, grasp-
ing the rudiments of guiding a vessel
powered only by wind...and, often, with
a new sense of self, an irreplaceable confi-
dence born of conquering a frontier.
This is the story of the Tampa Sailing
Squadron's 10-year-old youth sailing school
now getting underway here for the summer
season at the TSS quarters on Tampa Bay
The first of eight week-long training sessions
opened this week with the maximum number
of students 12 and most of them in this
first class of the feminine persuasion.
There wasn't much little girl squealing ol
teen-age angst on display, though, as their
teacher, 22-year-old USF student Jaync
Millman, dedicated sailor, sail boat owner
and certified U.S. Sailing Association in-
structor, introduced them to the subject. Noi
was there resistance as they cracked theil
new book, "Learn Sailing Right!," published
by the U.S. Sailing Association. Before the
week was over, Millman said, they would
work their way through the multiple chap-
ters, from rigging to returning shipshape,
See SAILORS, page 14


Mill Bayou development dene d
* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN a gf
mitch@observernews.net


Page 18
Visit one of the 21
State Parks within 100
miles of the area.


Page 12
A new developer in SCC
will close its transaction
with WCI June 22.


RUSKIN It would hardly seem to
be the place for a showdown between
a developer and residents. Mill Bayou
is a very narrow strip of land with trees
and scrub that stick out into the Little
Manatee River. From the gravel road
that leads to an existing private home
at the end of the sliver of land, Mill
Bayou doesn't appear remarkable -
except in that it still exists at all. The
trees and scrub are so thick the water
is barely visible. But it is easy to see
that Mill Bayou is one of the remain-
ing wild places on the Little Manatee
in Ruskin.
In 2006, the Hillsborough County
Board of Commissioners approved
a permit for 22 homes along the east
side of the Little Manatee near Mill
Bayou. At that time, the commission-
ers denied an additional permit to de-
velop the spit of land sticking out into
the river.
Last week, the developers, Little
Manatee Reserve, LLC, returned to
the BOCC armed with a court rul-
ing stating the commission did not
provide enough evidence to properly
deny the permit. The developers were
seeking permission to build eight
homes on the 46-acre tract containing


roughly nine acres of uplands.
The project was opposed by the
Sierra Club of Tampa Bay, which en-
couraged residents to make their opin-
ions known during the June 8 hearing
at County Center in Tampa. An esti-
mated 50 people showed up in oppo-
sition to the development. In a 6-to-1
vote, the commissioners voted again
to deny the application. Commission-
er Jim Norman cast the sole vote in
favor of the development.
Beth Griffiths, representing the Si-
erra Club, encouraged commissioners
to look beyond the immediate im-
pact.
"If we don't protect this wonderful
natural resource now, future genera-
tions will never have the opportunity
on this river," Griffiths said. "Look at
the big picture; take the long view."
Griffiths added that the Sierra Club
has spent millions of dollars while
working to protect and preserve the
river for recreational and wildlife pur-
poses.
Commissioner Kevin White moved
for denial of the application saying,
in part, "When you start looking at
the removal of trees and vegetation, I
See DENIED, page 15


-


MiLcn Trapnagen PnoLos
Volunteers and riders from Sammy Rides, a project dedicated to
the memory of a nine-year-old victim of pediatric cancer, take a
test ride from Simmons Park in Ruskin on June 12.

In SCC: Sammy Rides


* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net
SUN CITY CENTER- For five
seniors from Sun City Center, life
begins at (an average age of) 70. In
March of 2011, five men from the
retirement community will pedal
their bicycles 2,400 miles across
the country to celebrate the life
of a young girl who succumbed
to pediatric cancer. The endeavor,
named Sammy Rides, was found-
ed by Mike Libenson, whose
granddaughter, Sammy Rotman,
died from osteo sarcoma. She was
only nine years old. Libenson will
be joined on the ride by John Bear,
Mike Brown, Adolf Lex and Jim
Wheeler.
Next March, the five men will
leave Sun City, Arizona bound for
Sun City Center, Florida on bicy-
cles. Their 2,400 mile journey will
include stops at schools, hospitals,
corporations and local government
offices. Sammy Rides is a 501c3
nonprofit organization dedicated
to raising money and awareness to
defeat pediatric cancer. The riders
plan to arrive in Sun City Center
on May 11, 2011, to coincide with
festivities to celebrate the com-
munity's 50th anniversary. The
project includes hundreds of vol-
unteers, friends and neighbors.
Last Friday, the five men were


tested by physicians from the
University of South Florida for
endurance, strength and agil-
ity. Four of the men are over 70
years old, the fifth man is in his
mid-60s. On Saturday, with a film
crew from the American Associa-
tion of Retired People (AARP),
the riders and volunteers took off
from Simmons Park in Ruskin for
a test and training ride through the
area.
In addition to raising money
and awareness to fight pediatric
cancer, the group hopes to raise
awareness about Sun City Center
as an active and vibrant retire-
ment community. They also hope
to inspire their neighbors in the
community towards active volun-
teerism.
In the end, despite the lofty
goals of pedaling 2,400 miles
across the nation, the fundraising
and the media coverage, what will
push the riders through each mile
towards their goal is a nine-year-
old girl named Sammy who lost
her life far too early to a faceless
and senseless killer.
For more information visit
www.sammyrides.com. Also, stay
with the Observer News for fu-
ture updates about the project and
complete coverage of the journey
as it progresses. *


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ne 17, 2010
Volume 54
Number 21
verNews.net





2 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


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JUNE 17, 2010
Daniel F. Tempel joins Keller Williams
Realty South Shore
Dan Tempel, an experienced
real estate sales professional, has
joined the Keller Williams Realty
South Shore Market Center. Tem-
pel has held several public service
positions, with the most recent
being Director of Real Estate and
Development at the City of Lake- Vlll
land Housing Authority. Prior to
that, he owned and operated sev-
eral real estate companies in Min-
nesota, Colorado, and Florida
"Dan's broad experience will be
a great asset to our sales team as Daniel Tempel
well as to those consumers who
can best utilize Dan's expertise in Tempel stated, "I was attrac
the development and sale of large- to their cutting-edge busir
scale projects whether they are model that allows all licensees
mixed use, commercial, residen- become business partners from
tial, or involve property manage- first day they join the compa
ment," said Gary Kaukonen, team We share in the profits and the
leader. cisions of the company, whicl
Tempel has been involved in real a real difference in how most i
estate since 1985 and is currently estate companies are managed.
a licensed real estate Broker in the The South Shore Market Cei
State of Florida, a certified Hous- is located at 109 Harbor Vill
ing Development Finance Profes- Lane in Apollo Beach and inclu
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Degree in Management and Ad- Florida.
ministration from Metropolitan To learn more about Keller \
State University in St. Paul, Min- liams Realty, call Gary Kauko
nesota. at 813-641-8300.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 3


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Golf Scores Hogans Golf Club


5/22/10 SandPiper, Team 1-2-3
1st : Team B, total 119, 24 skins
(Carlin, Mowry, Shaver & daCos-
ta)


2nd: Team C, total 120 (Dispen
ziere, Peter, Nelson & Sparkman)
3rd: Team A, total 126 (Wood
Higgins, Kingston & Mayes)


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Frances Hereford of Southern Grace is shown drawing the winning
ticket for a raffle.


n Ruskin-Southshore Chamber hosts
afterhours
The Ruskin-SouthShore Chamber of Commerce's June after hours held
on June 10, 2010 was hosted by three businesses: Harriet's Flowers,
Southern Grace, and Wilhelm Heating and Air Conditioning. Each busi-
, ness had refreshments and special offers for the thirty guests in atten-
dance. Guests who visited all three venues were entered into a drawing
for a special door prize. The Resort and Club at Little Harbor provided
a gift certificate for a three day two night resort stay. The resort stay
was won by John Smith of H&R Block. For further details on up com-
ing chamber events please contact the Ruskin-SouthShore Chamber of
Commerce at 813-645-3808.


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Boat ramp
expansion planned
at E.G. Simmons
Park
Double your pleasure at Hills-
borough County's E.G. Simmons
Park. An expansion project will
soon double the boat ramp launch-
ing capacity at this popular park
that provides access to Tampa Bay
and the Gulf of Mexico.
This park improvement will pro-
vide a new 40-foot ramp and two
floating docks that will increase
safety and decrease the time need-
ed for water enthusiasts to launch
and load watercraft. The new
ramps and docks will mirror the
existing facility and be constructed
adjacent to the current ramp. The
existing ramp and docks will re-
main open during construction.
The Capital Improvement Proj-
ect (CIP) is joint-funded with a
grant from the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission. Cost of the project is
$476,500. Construction will begin
this month and is scheduled to be
completed in October 2010.
Boat launch fees at County
ramps are $5 a day or $100 for
a yearly pass. Passes are avail-
able at the Park Office located at
15502 Morris Bridge Road or by
downloading an application from
the Parks, Recreation and Conser-
vation Web site at: www.hillsbor-
oughcounty.org/parks/resources/
forms/AnnualPass.pdf.
The Parks, Recreation and Con-
servation Department manages
more than 20 boat ramps that pro-
vide access to both fresh and salt
water recreation areas. For a list of
boat ramps visit hIlp \%\% \ lullls-
boroughcounty.org/parks/parkser-
vices/BoatWeb.pdf.

Golf Scores Hogans
Golf Club
5/22/10 SandPiper, Team 1-2-3
1st : Team B, total 119, 24 skins
(Carlin, Mowry, Shaver & daCos-
ta)
2nd: Team C, total 120 (Dispen-
ziere, Peter, Nelson & Sparkman)
3rd: Team A, total 126 (Wood,
Higgins, Kingston & Mayes)
Individual Low-net: Don Mowry,
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4 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Goals are more
Although
it is never
too late to
plan for to-
morrow, the
younger you
begin, the
Positive more it will
Talk pay divi-
By William Hodges dends. If you
are in your
goldenyears,
this may be a column you wish to
send to the child or grandchild you
love so much.
In their senior year, students at a
major Ivy League university were
given a questionnaire. One ques-
tion was, "Do you have a clear and
specific goal for your life and have
you written a plan for accomplish-
ing it?" Of the graduating seniors,
3 percent indicated that they did.
A follow-up years later showed the
remarkable fact that the 3 percent
who had a clear goal and a plan for
accomplishing it amassed more
wealth than the combined wealth
of the other 97 percent. Do you
have a written goal? I hope you
do.
Even if you have not achieved
that goal, it is a good bet that you
are ahead of those who dreamed of
success but never solidified their
dream by writing it down. If you
do not have a written goal, here
are some ideas you might want to
consider when choosing a goal and
planning how to implement it.
1. A goal must be personal.
It must be something you want
for your own reasons, not because
someone else wants it for you. For
instance, when I began college,
my parents wanted me to become a
dentist. With all due respect to my
friends in the dental profession, I
could not picture myself spending
my life working on root canals.
Even though I paid lip service


than a direction
to that goal to make them happy,
it was not my goal and I was not
committed to it. I did not become a
dentist.
2. Goals must be measur-
able and they must be specific. To
simply say, "I want to be wealthy"
is neither measurable nor specific.
I must first determine what I be-
lieve wealth is and then determine
how much of it is necessary to
make me happy.
3. Goals must be attainable.
I hate the term "be realistic" be-
cause for the most part it is used
as a limiter. However, we must
look at our abilities-both mental
and physical-prior to determin-
ing whether or not a goal is attain-
able. If I'm 6 ft. 6 in. and weigh
300 lbs., choosing to be a jockey
is probably not a good goal. Even
if I lose a substantial amount of
weight, I will not meet the physi-
cal requirements of a jockey. On
the other hand, if I'm 4 ft. 11 in.,
it is not reasonable to assume-no
matter how hard I try-that I will
get a starting position as a center
for an NBA team.
4. Goals should be fun.
The saddest thing in life is not for
someone to work toward some-
thing and not get it, but rather to
work toward something, get it,
and then not want it. Remember,
a trip toward a goal is like climb-
ing a mountain. If you don't enjoy
crawling over hard ground and
wading through cold mountain
rivers, you will find that achiev-
ing the summit will leave you less
than satisfied. The trip is a big part
of the goal. Choose a goal that, in
reaching for it, you can enjoy the
trip.
Some things to remember about
goals: Make them yours, write
them down, monitor them, make
them physically and mentally ob-
tainable-and have fun.


Kiwanis members
Seated (left to right): Joe Nargolwala, Chair; College Scholarship
Committee (CSC); Seel Lundy, member (CSC); East Bay's Guidance
Resource Specialist Kayzie Weaver; Lennard's Guidance Resource
Specialist Layne Spotts; Chuck Wirick, member CSC; Delores Wil-
cox, member CSC. Standing: Lennard students Cesar Rodriguez
and Antinette Flores; and East Bay students Karen Phillips, Zolla
Calderon, Tristan Mosenthal and Darik Alger.


SCC Kiwanis Club Scholarship


recipients honored
Six high school graduates, four
from East Bay, and two from Len-
nard were honored at a SCC Ki-
wanis scholarship luncheon. They
were accompanied by their Guid-
ance Resource Specialists: Kayzie
Weaver from East Bay; and Layne
Spotts from Lennard.
The East Bay scholars are:
Derek Alger Will study at
Florida Gulf Coast University to
become a Civil Engineer.
Zoila Calderon Will enroll at
the University of Florida for Nurs-
ing.
Tristan Mosenthal Will take
up Civil Engineering at University
of South Florida.
Karen Phillips Enrolled for
first two years at Hillsborough
Community College, then major-


ing in Biology at University of
South Florida to become a veteri-
narian.
The Lennard scholars are:
Cesar Rodriguez Will take up
Mechanical Engineering Univer-
sity of North Florida.
Anjanette Flores Majoring in
Molecular Biology and Immunol-
ogy at the University of Miami.
The East Bay scholars will re-
ceive $1000 for one year for tu-
ition and/or books; the Lennard
scholars will receive $500.


JUNE 17, 2010
Award-Winning Newspapers

THE OBSERVER NEWS
The SCC Observer &
The Riverview Current
210 Woodland Estates S.W.
Ruskin, FL 33570
813-645-3111
Fax: 813-645-4118
www.ObserverNews.net
Published Every Thursday
by M&M Printing Co., Inc. 645-4048
EDITORIAL:
Brenda Knowles ............Publisher/Editor
brenda@observernews.net
Mitch Traphagen.................Online Editor
mitch@observernews.net
Penny Fletcher..........Contributing Writer
penny@observernews.net
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mj@observernews.net
Julie Ball.............. Press Releases/Writer
news@observernews.net
All press releases, news articles and
photos may be emalled to news@
observernews.net, faxed to 645-4118, or
mailed to Observer News, 210 Woodland
Estates Ave. SW, Ruskin, FL 33570
SALES:
Vilma Stillwell... Display Advertising Rep.
vilma@observernews.net
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nan@observernews.net
For current rates and circulation
information visit our website at
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beverly@observernews.net
PRODUCTION:
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chere@observemews.net
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sue@observernews.net

The views expressed by our writers are
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JUNE 17, 2010

Riverview
Memorial
VFW Post #8108
Riverview Memorial VFW
Post #8108, 7504 Riverview Dr.
schedule is as follows:
Meetings: Men's Auxiliary --
1st Thursday at 7 p.m.
Ladies' Auxiliary --
2nd Tuesday at 7 p.m.
VFW Post --
2nd Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday:
Breakfast, 9 a.m. to noon, $6
Monday: Bar Bingo at 6:30 a.m.
Wednesday:
Spaghetti from 5 to 7 p.m. $6
Friday:
Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.;
Fish, $6; Combo, $7
Karaoke from 8 to ?
Saturday: Karaoke from 8 to ?
2nd Tuesday: Ladies' Auxiliary
Meeting at 7 p.m.
3rd Tuesday: VA Hospital Bingo
-- Leave Post at 6 p.m.
Every Wednesday:
$6 All-U-Can-Eat Spaghetti Dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m.
Carry-out orders available.
Call ahead -- 671-9845
1st Thursday:
Men's Auxiliary Meeting at 7 p.m.
2nd Thursday:
Post Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Every Friday:
Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.
(all you can eat fish -- $6)
Carry-out orders available.
Call ahead -- 671-9845
They also serve Chicken Tenders,
Shrimp or combos for $7.
Each dinner comes with fries,
coleslaw, and a hush puppy.
Every Saturday:
Karaoke by Jeff at 8 p.m.

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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 5


It's registration
time
Registration for new students
at Lennard High School for the
2010-2011 school year will be
held Monday-Thursday, begin-
ning June 21 through Aug. 13,
by appointment only.
To make an appointment for
registration, call the school at
(813) 641-5611, ext. 225.


Handy homemade
cookies
Whenever I make chocolate chip
cookies, I save some of the dough
and freeze it. I put it in a large zip-
perbag, roll it out to about 1/2-inch
thickness, and then freeze. When I
want a few cookies for dessert, I
break off chunks, roll them into
balls, and bake them in the toaster
oven. No need to buy those 'ready
to bake' cookies ever again!
Esther B.
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Franki Vallejo selected for Gates Millenium Program


Franki Vallejo, a graduating
senior of Ruskin's Dr. Earl J.
Lennard High School, has been
awarded a scholarship from the
nation's largest and most suc-
cessful scholarship program, the
Gates Millenium Scholars Pro-
gram (GMS). The good-through-
graduation college scholarship can
be used at a college or university
of the recipients' choice and have
funding that can include graduate
study through a doctoral degree in
seven academic disciplines.
The scholarship covers tuition,
room, board and other covered
college expenses. In addition to
financial assistance, Gates Mille-
nium Scholars receive academic
support, mentoring and leadership
training. Franki Vallejo is one of
1,000 students around the coun-
try chosen to receive the GMS
scholarship. GMS Scholar Franki
Vallejo says, "I am speechless. It
is an honor to have received such a
prestigious award. Thank you Bill
and Melinda Gates!"
UNCF -- the United Negro
College Fund's management of
the Gates Millenium Scholars
Program is a partnership with the


-KANKI VALLtJU


American Indian Graduate Center
Scholars (AICGS), the Asian &
Pacific Islander American Schol-
arship Fund (APIASF) and the
Hispanic Scholarship Fund (HSF)
to serve Gates Millenium Schol-
ars in all fifty states, the District
of Columbia, American Samoa,
Federated States of Micronesia,
Guam, Puerto Rico and the U.S.
Virgin Islands.
"UNCF is proud of Franki
Vallejo for having been selected to
receive one of the country's most
prestigious and selective scholar-


Brandon Regional announces local scholarship recipients


Medical Staff Scholarship Chair
Keith Pautler, M.D., along with
Chief of Staff Andrew Daley,
M.D., congratulated recipients of
the $1,000 Doctor's Scholarship at
Brandon Regional Hospital. The
certificates were received by the
students at a dinner on May 25.
Dr. Daley presented each with
a certificate of acknowledgement
congratulating them for complet-
ing the application and essay pro-
cess, and acknowledging the next
steps in their future education.
The nine high school scholar-
ship recipients are from area high
schools and one is a member of the
hospital staff.
Recipients included: Anthony
Arguelles of Riverview High
School; Samuel Conner of Bloom-
ingdale High School; Ruben Garcia
ofDurantHigh School; Hetty Hong
of Spoto High School; Medjine
Jarbath of Brandon High School;
Justine Langkopp of Newsome
High School; Brandi Partridge of
Armwood High School; Stephanie
Petrie of Thomas Jefferson High
School; Claudine Raymond of
Lennard High School; and Nina
Zabel of East Bay High School.


Nine students received $1,000 scholarships from Brandon Regional
Hospital.


Dr. Daley explained that each of
the physicians on the medical staff
at Brandon Regional Hospital pay
annual dues that supplement the
scholarships. He credited Dr. Paut-
ler for overseeing the process and
selection of such worthy students.
Brandon Regional Hospital is a
407-bed acute care facility with
an accredited Chest Pain Center
for Percutaneous Coronary Inter-
vention (PCI), Certified Primary
Stroke Center and a Level III Neo-
natal Intensive Care Unit.


S* More than 74,000 babies have

-U. Baby Suites and their specialized
LADIES FINE APPAREL CONSIGNMENT SHOP centers, including The Neuro-
Pl .L 8stI CaIl Roomi % IFF science Center and The Heart and
S 1311 ApoiIo Beach Blvd., S. *cjF Summerfield
/ Apollo Beach, FL 33572 Zzes teacher chosen for
Beh li teacher chosen for
*A M NT *HI Space Academy
N Five Hillsborough County
SPublic School elementary teachers
and two middle school teachers,
including Latoya Desamour from
Summerfield Elementary School,
received scholarships to attend the
FAMILY DENTISTRY Honeywell Space Academy for
SEducators located at Huntsville,
Alabama locations and Kennedy
Space Center in Florida.
Kirk D. Parrott, D.D.S They were selected from more
than 1,200 teachers from around
Carl E. Friedm an, D.D.S. the world. Teachers will spend one
week of intensive classroom, labo-
T ian i Trail, Ruskin, FL ratory, and training time learning
902 N. Tamiami Trail, Ruskin FL 33570 how to use hands-on activities to
(Across from Sweetbay Supermarket) teach space science. The teachers
NEW PATIENTS WELCOME will take part in simulations and
(813) 645-6491 classes designed to engage their
students in science and math activ-
Members Amencan Dental Associaton, Ronda State Dental Associaton, Flonda West Coast Dental ities. Additionally, they will join
Association, Manatee County Dental Association and Hillsborough County Dental Association teachers from around the world in
astronaut-style training.


Vascular Center, offer the latest
diagnosis and treatment options
for neurological, spine and cardiac
conditions. The hospital also offers
emergency services with public
access to average wait times and
the latest in technology, including
robotic surgery for gynecologi-
cal and urological conditions and
CyberKnife for the non-invasive
treatment of select cancers.


ships," said Larry Griffith, UNCF
Vice President for GMS. "Getting
a college degree will open up a
whole array of opportunities that
will last the rest of his life. He and
his family are also setting an ex-
ample for students here in Ruskin
and around the country."
The 1,000 students selected this
year join the over 13,000 Gates
Millenium Scholars who have at-
tended more than 1,500 schools,
including Ivy League colleges,
flagship state universities and
UNCF member historically black
colleges (UBCUs).
Gates Millenium Scholarship
recipients have an average gradu-
ation rate of almost 80 percent,
higher than the graduation rate for
all college students, and higher
than the rate for high-income stu-
dents. "On behalf of the teachers
and staff of Dr. Earl J. Lennard
High School, we want to say how
very proud we are to have Franki
Vallejo chosen as a Gates Mille-
nium Scholar! Franki is a deserv-
ing candidate and we are proud
to have him as an alumnus!" says
Layne Spotts, College & Career
Counselor.

Pace University
announces
graduates
Over 3,600 Pace University stu-
dents graduated in four ceremonies
in May. Influential leaders in envi-
ronmental affairs, financial media,
corporate information technology,
and the psychology of women and
gender studies were this year's
commencement speakers.
Two students who graduated in
the Class of 2010 are: Bryan C.
Brown from Riverview received
a Bachelor of Science degree; and
Marsha P. Mckenzie from River-
view received a Master of Science
degree.

Apollo Beach
student makes
Merit List
Darlene C. Socorro of Apollo
Beach made the Merit List at
Darton College in Albany, GA, for
the Spring 2010 semester.
To qualify for the Merit List, a
student must be part-time and have
earned a 3.4 or higher grade point
average.


The Ruskin Moose Lodge #813 is located at
1212 E. Shell Point Road, Ruskin (813) 645-5919


Friday, June 18 7-11 p.
Saturday, June 19 7-11 p.
5-7 p.n
Sunday, June 20
Friday, June 25 7-11 p.
Saturday, June 26
7-11 p.
Every Wednesday 5-7 p.E
Every Thursday 5-7 p.E
Every Friday 5-7 p.n



Every Saturday night

All events are open to qualified
Moose members and guest.


m. Live music by Charlie Burns
m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins
n. Moose Legion Dinner
Father's Day Pancake Dinner
m Live music by George Burns
Women of the Moose Bazaar
m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins


n.
n.


Chef's Choice Dinner
Wings (the best I've every had)


a. Fish Fry
(beer batter, fried or baked)
Live music
Karaoke by Kim






6 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

When life is hardest,

blessings are easy to recognize


Most of us know too much about
that dreaded call in the middle of
the night. You know the one; the
call that signals that a loved one,
maybe a spouse or son or daughter,
is hospitalized or dead.
I've had several calls like that.
I buried two parents and a daugh-
ter; watched a healthy son fight
a growing disability; and lived
through every minute of the bone
cancer that took my late husband's
life.
Recently my 44-year-old daugh-
ter was the victim of a violent
crime in Jackson, Tenn., where she


r 1 7 -
Over
Coffee
By Penny Fletcher
penny@observernews.net


often spends
her sum-
mers near
her youngest
daughter.
Many of
you in South
County
know her.
She's been a
tax accoun-
tant and au-
ditor here for


about 10 years, several with the lo-
cal H&R Block, and several work-
ing for herself. Her name is Cindy-
Lou Wood and she's only 44.
Since she was injured May 7
she has had brain surgery twice in
Jackson, Tenn.
That's where I've been, and why
I've had no bylines.
There's no prognosis yet, be-
cause with brain injuries, that takes
a long time. Many of you know
that already. I've written enough
stories about memory loss; brain
injuries and families who have lost
everything because of one single
act or illness that I know you'll
understand what I'm about to say.
For me, these kinds of experi-
ences all have a single character-
istic worth noting: everything is
reduced to the basics. You breathe.
You move. You listen. Life goes
into slow motion. A fog surrounds
you for awhile, but after the time
when you don't feel anything,
each movement becomes strik-
ingly clear.
As you sit by a bedside watch-
ing white-clad hospital person-
nel insert tubes and IV's and take
enough blood to feed Dracula's
whole family, you think. You see.
You pray.
Nothing goes unnoticed.
The coffee the nurse brought me
was especially welcome. It was in
a white mug that felt heavy and hot
in my hands. The smell was won-
derful; unusual. Nothing like the
smell that comes from my two-cup
Mr. Coffee at home.
The blanket an aide supplied for
me so I could lie on the couch in
my daughter's room after she was
moved from Neuro-ICU felt soft
and comforting against my skin. I
ran my fingers over it, smoothing
out every wrinkle and then crum-
pling it up again.
During my occasional walks
down the hall to the brightly-col-
ored waiting room I noticed the
themes on each of the framed pho-
tographs on the walls. There were
gardens; flowers; flowing foun-
tains; all depicting a world filled
with beauty and life.
The basics become all-important.
Life. Breath. Bodily functions.
Can she eat? Talk? Use the bath-
room?
When these simple things oc-
cur, they are cause for celebration.
They are the life-giving signs that
become the thread uniting every-
one who plays a part.
I consider myself very, very for-
tunate to have had experiences that


keep me close to the basics. Life is
to be lived day by day for there is
no promise of tomorrow.
I see the beauty of the grass and
feel the wet dew between my toes
when I walk outside in the morn-
ing. The clouds all make patterns.
Looking at the sun through a palm
frond is a breath-taking sight and
music is like magic, no matter
what kind you prefer.
When my husband was alive,
we lived at the mouth of the Lit-
tle Manatee River in Ruskin. For
years, we stopped everything at
dusk and drank coffee on our dock.
The reason? We had learned that
the sun set in a different spot and
in a different color every month of
the year. Two of my sons can at-
test to the fact that whenever we
could, we were home and out on
that dock to see it.
I am always amazed when peo-
ple ask, "How did you live through
this or that?"
What choice have we? We sim-
ply live.
I choose to believe what the Bi-
ble (New International Study Ver-
sion) says in Romans, Chapter 8,
Verse 28: "And we know that in all
things God works for the good of
those who love him..."
The quote says "all things." Not
just the good things- like promo-
tions or new electronic toys or


vacations or happy family gather-
ings, but "all things."
Christians and Jews who have
faith in God (and a Fox news poll
taken in 2008 says 92 percent of
Americans claim they do) can still
find beauty in the world despite all
its wrongs and injustices and hurts
and failings.
I have to keep looking for it, be-
cause I know it's here.
Sometimes, it's just the feeling
of wind in our hair or sand beneath
our feet. Or, as I recently realized,
it can be as simple as picking up
a coffee cup and breathing in the
aroma that precedes the taste while
sitting under a warm, soft blanket
kindly offered by someone I've
never even met.

*Perhaps you have something
you'dliketo share. Ormaybeyou'd
rather tell the community about
your favorite charity or cause: or
sound off about something you
think needs change. That's what
"Over Coffee" is about. It really
doesn't matter whether we actually
drink any coffee or not (although I
probably will). It's what you have
to say that's important. E-mail me
any time at penny@observemews.
net and suggest a meeting place.
No matter what's going on, I'm
usually available to share just one
more cup.


JUNE 17, 2010


MANATEE COUNTY
Model train
social at
Historical Park
PALMETTO The Florida
Garden Railroad Society will be
visiting the Palmetto Historical
Park and Manatee County Ag Mu-
seum and bringing their model
trains with them. There will be
trains to look at and trains to play
with; trains inside, trains outside;
train crafts, train activities and
train movies.
This free family event will be
held Saturday, August 7, 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, August 8,
noon to 4 p.m.
The park is located at 515 10th
Ave. W Palmetto, FL 34221. For
information call (941) 723-4991 or
(941) 721-2034.
There will even be a raffle for
a great model train and Word of
Mouth BBQ will be selling meals
both days. Alex's Lemonade Stand
will be offering beverages and
proceeds will benefit childhood
cancer research.
Members of the Railroad Society
would love to talk with model train
enthusiasts both young and old.
Sponsored by R.B. "Chips"
Shore, Manatee County Clerk of
the Circuit Court, Manatee County
Agricultural Museum, Inc., the Pal-
metto Historical Commission & the
City of Palmetto. Visit the Park's
website at www.manateeclerk.com/
historical/PalmettoPark. aspx


JHappv

father's


Day
to our readers.


From the staff at
THE OBSERVER NEWS
THE SCC OBSERVER
and
THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT
www.ObserverNews.net
813-645-3111


Tee-up for a great rate!



M&I Premier


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South Shore 813-649-0400
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single tier. The following APYs are accurate as of 06/11/10and are subject to change at anytime: $.01-$24,999.99, APY is 0.05%; $25,000.00+,APY is 1.75%. This isa variable-rate accountant rates may change after the account is opened. Requires
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JUNE 17, 2010



T^-









Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 7
Fruit and veggie frozen pops are a fun
and tasty way to eat your veggies


(NAPSA)-It's hard work mak-
ing sure yourfamily has all the tools
they need to succeed. With busy
schedules, nutrition and healthy
habits often take a backseat. Plant-
ing the seeds for healthy habits in
the kitchen is a snap! Take advan-
tage of the season's abundance of
fresh fruits and veggies for a fresh
perspective on better eating habits.
Be Picasso of your plate by adding
foods of vibrant colors and crisp
textures.
Try these quick and easy tips for
putting more spring in your fam-
ily's step:
Tired of the same vegetable-
side dishes? Break old habits and
explore using fruit and vegetable
juices in salad dressings, glazes,
flavorful drinks and even desserts.
Turn your kitchen into a garden
extravaganza with lots of fresh
produce, fruit and vegetable juic-
es, and garden-inspired plates and
glassware.
Grow your own veggies. If
you don't have room for a garden,
consider a garden in a bottle. Cut a
plastic juice bottle in half, add soil


and see what you can grow.
How do you reuse your emp-
tyjuice bottles? Share your ideas at
www.oceanspray.com.
Fruit & Veggie Frozen Pops
4 cups Ocean Spray 100%
Juice or Light Juice Drink
Fruit & Veggie Cranberry
Strawberry Banana or
Tropical Citrus
8 5-ounce paper cups
8 6-inch squares of heavyduty
foil
8 wooden craft sticks
Pour 1/2 cup juice into each paper
cup. Place foil over tops of cups;
press and form around cups so top is
tight. With sharp knife, cut a small
slit in center of foil on each; care-
fully insert sticks in each cup so they
are standing up straight. Place cups
on tray or baking sheet with sides.
Place flat in freezer. Freeze over -
night or until solid. To serve, remove
foil; warm cups slightly with hands
to lift out or peel paper from frozen
pops. Makes 8 pops.
Visit www.oceanspray.com for
more tasty spring and summer
recipes.


Fruit and veggie frozen pops are a fun and tasty way to eat your veg-
gies and combat the Florida heat.

Sun City Center Nine Hole Women's Golf
League


"Tee to green" May 27.
Winners are:
First Place Jan Churchill 16.5


Second Place tie
Millie Stanek and Christel
Fraebel 19.


Join us for an informative presentation about
Hurricane Preparedness and Basic First Aid for
SPets by guest speaker, Dr. Michael Waldy, DVM,
with Ruskin Animal Hospital and Cat Clinic.
Don't miss this opportunity to get the knowledge
you need to take appropriate action for your pet's
safety in the event of a hurricane or tropical storm.

SWednesday, June 23 10 to 11 a.m.
Register to win a gift certificate to the
Three Legged Poodle Pet Boutique.
For reservations, call (813) 633-4340.


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Send your press
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E-mail:
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observernews.net
210 Woodland
Estates Ave. S.W.
Ruskin 33570
FAX 645-4118
^ ^






8 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Donate to fishermen in need


JUNE 17, 2010


The gulf
oil spill is the
main topic of
conversation
this week. It
isn't on how
many or
IFish Tales what size of
ByJonie Maschek fish that has
been caught,
but what will happen if our 'gulf
dies.' With so many people de-
pending upon our waterways for
a living, and some have already
lost their livelihood, a local bait
shop has come up with a way to
help these unfortunate anglers, and
captains.
Doug Fox of Ruskin Bait and
Tackle has come up with an idea
that will benefit those misfortunate
fishermen. His wife Sidney is the
author of the book of 'Haunted
Lilly.' She is a fantastic writer with
a background of working in Hol-
lywood and the author of several
screenplays. Her book is for sale
at Barnes & Noble, and I hope you
will go to B&N.com and purchase
a copy. I have read this book from
cover to cover and you will also be
so intrigued that you will not put it
down until you have come to the
last page.
Fifty percent of the sale of this
book will go directly to the fami-
lies who need it the most. The
monies will go to the men and
women who have made their liv-
ing harvesting the bounty of the
Gulf, and who are now being dev-
astated financially by this needless
manmade disaster.
Let me hear from you if you are
a church group or know families
of fishermen in need. We want to
help.
If you want to make only a do-
nation, go to SPOOKPLACE.com
and donate through PayPal.
We must not forget that many of
our birds, turtles and other wildlife
are also affected by the oil slicks


AIRPORT
TRANSPORTATION
Luxury Town Car

HOME
OFFICE
*CORPORATE


813-523-3610
carservicevip@yahoo.com
License # L796


on our waterways.
I will spearhead this for Ruskin
Bait and Tackle and you can reach
me daily at (813) 777-4920. I have
been writing this column for over
twenty years and my concern is
with you, the recreational, profes-
sional, and all captains of our area.
We have survived through many
hurricanes, chemical spills, closed
seasons and many law changes;
we will survive in this current situ-
ation.
You may reach Doug and Sidney
Fox at (813) 642-8771.
I received a phone call in re-
gard to tarpon, telling me that you
couldn't take a tarpon out of wa-
ter without being arrested. Sir, if
you have a legal tag on your fish-
ing license to catch a tarpon, why
would you get arrested? I only
suggest that you make a catch,
take a photo, and release him for
someone else to catch. This fish is
not edible. It is only a trophy fish.
Thanks for the call, and I am grate-
ful that you read my column.




Another game fish that is only a
catch and release now is the snook.
It seems that the summer weather
has brought back numerous snook
into our waterways, but due to the
cold winter where so many were
frozen and washed ashore snook
have been put on closed season
until further notice.
Just because you can't keep them
does not mean that you can't catch
them. Those who are deeply con-
cerned that the snook lives after
release, say that you should use a


circle hook, which is loaded with
live bait and most often the hook
will end up in the corner of the
snook's mouth and not deep.
A thin wire hook 6/0 will only
make a small hole in the fish's jaw.
If possible, try not to remove your
release fish from the water, grab
his jaw, and release the hook. If
you want a photo, take it as you
release the hook.
School is out for the summer.
When taking your children fishing
you will see many Spanish mack-
erel wandering from the Gandy
Bridge to the Skyway in schools.
This is a small fish, and a great one
for children to get 'hooked on fish-
ing.'
Talking with anglers this week I
found that fishing is 'as good as it
gets' any time of the year. You will
catch a fish if you drop a line into
the water. So many are out there
ready to grab your bait, and all you
need to do is pull him in for din-
ner.
Trout fishing is at its best. Many
catches are being made with live
shrimp and catches are legal keep-
ers. I was told that if it is a windy
day, don't try live bait on trout as
you will lose your bait before you
make the catch. Artificial bait is
great for windy days and the fish
will still strike on a fake shrimp
with a moving tail.
Amberjacks are racing across
our waterways making a big roar
with flocks of birds following. In
this school you might find permit
and red snapper joining them in the
ride. Don't toss your cast into the
school, try to cast ahead of them
or you will have your line cut off,
by the strength of this fish, as they
charge ahead.


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Tarpon season is in full swing.
Egmont Key, Sunshine Skyway
and, of course, south to Boca
Grande are sure spots to make
your catch. You will find some
who didn't follow the pack and are
soaring in our local waters around
the ship channels.
Threadfish herring and blue
crabs are the favorite baits to make
your catch. This is by far the oldest
fish you will catch, as the tarpon is
probably around sixty or seventy
years old. So, with this in mind, go
slow, approach these giants with
a slow motion so as not to spook
them as they have surely dodged
many hook, line and sinkers in
their lifetimes.
Not only do we have the great-
est fishing in our saltwater, but in
our fresh water we have the best
largemouth bass fishing as well as
freshwater catfish, and numerous
pan fish.
You will need a freshwater fish-
ing license for lakes and upper riv-
er fishing; and a saltwater license
where the river mixes with the gulf
waters.
Those fishing from land are ever
grateful of the reversed law, where
you are now able to fish from land
without a license. This takes place
July 1, 2010.
The Old Salts Fishing Club ladies
will hold their tournament on Sat-
urday, June 26 at Madeira Beach
Municipal Marina. Members entry
fee is $55, non-members $75.
Watch the weather, fish together,
be courteous and kind. Donate to
fishermen in need.

-- Aleta Jonie Maschek is a
member of Florida Outdoor
Press.


Kings Point winner
Kings Point Ladies 18 Hole
League has announced that Mary
McClafferty is club champion of
the 18 hole league for 2010. The
event was held in April 2010.
Golf Scores: SCC
Womens Golf
Association


Thursday, May 13, 2010
8:00AM
Sandpiper: Palms/Oaks
"Spring Fling Eclectic"
Flight A:
1st Jan Huber 59
2nd Annetta Pucci 60
3rd -Yvonne Kelly 61
4th -Marcia Morris 62
-Judie Schafers 62
Flight B:
1st Connie Toussaint 59
2nd Kiyoka Ashendorf 61
3rd Laura Cole 62
4th Ilene Hemingway 6
5th Susan Wyckoff 63
6th Suzanne White 66
7th Laura Hammaker
Tie Lois Gluntz 67
Flight C:
1st Jean Mooney 60
2nd Beverly Heil 62
3rd In-Sook Kim 62


1

Tie




2
3
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decide, ask us to send you FREE written information
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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 9


At the mercy of the sea and public opinion


Most parents are reluctant to hand
over the car keys to their 16-year-
old children. A few parents, how-
ever, are
somehow
able to hand
over a 40-
foot sailboat
and stand
on the dock
and wave as
Observations their teen-
By Mitch Traphagen aged daugh-
mitch@observernews.net ter heads out
to sea to sail
around the world alone. Today,
two of those parents have become
the object of scorn and accusations
in blog posts across the Web.

"The wind is beginning to pick
up. It is back up to 20 knots and
I am i. \' i,. oi that by midnight
tonight I could have 35-50 knots
with gusts to 60 so I am off to sleep
before it really picks up. "
-- Posted by Abby Sunderland at
9:49 AM (from Abby's Blog, sol-
oround.blogspot.com)

Some time after making that blog
update from the vast nothingness
of the Indian Ocean, 16-year-old
Abby Sunderland went missing at
sea.
I have a few thousand miles un-
der my keel at sea. I've spent over-
nights under sail well out of sight
of land. I have been mesmerized
and terrified by the beauty and


power of the ocean. At sea, I've
seen my place in this world. I am
but a small, insignificant collec-
tion of cells and thoughts on a vast
ocean of life.
Sunderland set sail alone from
Marina Del Rey, Calif., in her
sailboat, Wild Eyes, hoping to set
a record to become the youngest
person to sail nonstop around the
world. It is a record her brother
Zac briefly held before another
teenager took the title from him.
On June 9, she made a final
post to her blog describing having
battled winds of over 50 knots and
being very busy with keeping her
sails up and patching them when
the winds overpowered them.
Two thousand miles off the
coast of Madagascar, both of her
emergency satellite beacons were
activated. The beacons, known as
EPIRBs, are the last line of defense
for those at sea. Activating one
means that you have abandoned all
hope. It is not an act that is done
lightly, nor is it taken lightly by
those around the world dedicated
to monitoring the signals. In Sun-
derland's case, that two of them
went off was most worrisome.
It was assumed that one of them
was attached to a survival suit, de-
signed to be set off by a person in
a life raft or in the water.
Moments after the beacons were
activated, the US Coast Guard,
along with NOAA, began working
with Australian search and rescue


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officials. Thanks to the EPIRBs,
finding the needle in a haystack,
or rather, a young girl in thou-
sands of miles of ocean, made the
job somewhat easier. Thirty foot
waves and heavy winds, made the
job infinitely more difficult.
Sunderland was well beyond the
range of any rescue helicopter. The
nearest ship was two days away
from the location provided by the
EPIRBs. In the meantime, there
was no way to know if she was
dead or alive. The EPIRBs would
continue to chirp until the batteries
died, regardless of whether or not
her heart was still beating. Quan-
tas Airlines sent out a jet which
finally answered the question. She
was alive. Her sailboat had been
dismasted. She was effectively at
the mercy of the sea. Two days
later, she was picked up in good
health by the French fishing ves-
sel, Ile De La Reunion. It will be a
few days before her family can see
her, the rescue ship is a long way
from land.
What kind of parents could or
would do such a thing? With my
limited experience as a foster par-
ent for three teenage girls, I can't
answer that question. I can't imag-
ine it. But I do know that a rush to
judgement is a mistake. That this
young girl had the confidence and
ability to sail halfway around the
world alone is a huge testament to
both her and her parents. That she
was able to fight through storms in
one of nature's most violent places
and survive to tell the tale says
much about how her parents could
stand on the dock in Marina Del
Rey and wave goodbye as their lit-
tle girl sailed off over the horizon.
To many older people, teenage
girls in a generic sense (meaning
those not our own) are often per-
cieved as barely literate shopping
mall rats. They leave overly dra-
matic and frequently embarrassing
posts on Facebook. They seeming-
ly expend all of their efforts and
energy appearing to be something
they are not. In hindsight, adoles-
cence is rarely pretty.
Abby Sunderland appears to
be none of that. She is a young
woman with the confidence to
sail away alone from her family,


Mitch Traphagen Photo
Sailing into the ocean alone is not for the faint of heart. Here, I am
only a dozen or so miles off the coast of New Jersey. Solo teenage
sailor Abby Sunderland was 2,000 miles from the nearest land when
she was rescued after her sailboat was dismasted during a storm.


friends and the shopping mall into
the unknown and unforgiving sea.
That is no small feat for anyone of
any age. She possessed the skills
and ability to sail halfway around
the world; and then had and main-
tained the state of mind to survive
the worst that could be thrown at
her. Abby Sunderland is a young
woman who will accomplish
things in life. She is capable of
great things. We need more young
people like her.

/ i,.,i.."-, on board has been
really friendly. They have come a
long way out of their way to help
me and I am so thankful that they
did. My mom has told me about all
that the dittrrent rescue groups did
to help find me. So thank you to
all of you. I had only hoped that a
ship would pass by me within afew
weeks. I am really in awe. Thank
you to everyone involved. "
--Posted by Abby Sunderland at
12:57 PM, June 13, 2010

It is true that by going out alone
on the ocean and then activating
her EPIRBs, she risked the lives of
those who rescued her. In fact, one
of the crew from the fishing vessel
fell into the ocean during the res-
cue and he, himself, needed to
be saved. But they volunteered for
the job. The rescue organizations
volunteered for it, too. It is their
job, their responsibility. It is what
they do. The crew of the fishing
vessel understands what she was


trying to accomplish. They aren't
angry or resentful. They are proud.
Their pride comes from not only
fulfilling the traditions of the sea
in helping a fellow mariner in dis-
tress but also in associating with
an impressive young woman who
chose searching for the frontier
over shopping at Ambercrombie
and Fitch. She wanted to push the
boundaries. She wanted to break
new ground. This young American
woman attempted something for
which America used to be known
- she chose the path of the heart
over the path of convenience. It
didn't work out this time but I
have no doubt, there will be a next
time. Her courage, ambition and
skill at such a young age are things
this nation should applaud.

"The story of Wild Eyes is over
but my story is still going. I'm still
out on the ocean headed to a little
island called Kerguelen and then
will be on another boat for ten
days up to an island near Mada-
gascar From there I will eventu-
ally make it home. So, on goes my
adventure!"
Abby (from her blog, June 13,
2010)

Since her rescue, she has been
quoted as saying she wants to try
again. To that, I say "Fair winds,
Abby. Follow your dreams. Make
America proud."
It is clear she has what it takes
to do so.


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JUNE 17, 2010







10. OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT JUNE 17, 2010


Welcome to the Wayback Machine


In at least one respect, the future
is going to be ugly. Someday, the


Observing
the Web
By Mitch Traphagen
mltch@observemews.net


young peo-
ple prone to
posting the
obscene and
obnoxiouson
their Face-
book pages
are going to
be running
the coun-
try. A few
may even
seek elected


office. Today, the campaign sea-
son is negative and nasty enough
to turn off pretty much everyone
with functioning brain cells. Can
you imagine what it will be like a
decade or so from now when those
youthful indiscretions come out in
campaign advertising? How about
when those same young people,
now more mature and educated, sit
down for interviews for high pay-
ing jobs in major corporations? I
can see it now, the corporate inter-
viewer asking the young hopeful
to explain why in 2010 they wrote
"Yo, my boss is a dumb[bleep].
I [bleeping] hate his [bleep]. Ur
ma friends tho so I can tell u the
truth."
Yeah, good luck with the job.
It is an oft-repeated sentiment
that what you put on the Web stays
on the Web. A few weeks ago, I


told you about Openbook, a web-
site that allows anyone to see the
bizarre and obnoxious in their
natural state through unsecured
Facebook postings. But history
on the Web involves far more than
just Openbook. There is an orga-
nization dedicated to preserving it
in all of its wonder, promise and
nastiness. Welcome to the Internet
Archive Wayback Machine.
The Wayback Machine is a very
cool website dedicated to archiving
the Web. Given the bazillion or so
websites out there, that is no small
feat. According to the organizers,
the true number is over 150 billion
websites. I would imagine that
after a billion or so, most people
would stop counting. The archive
stretches back to 1996, the very
early publicly accessible World
Wide Web. Thanks to a donation
from the Mellon Foundation, the
Wayback Machine archived two
billion sites in 2007 alone. It cur-
rently consists of two petabytes
(yep, that's a new one for me as
well) of data and is growing by
20 terabytes a month. It contains
more text than is in the Library of
Congress.
The Wayback Machine is easy
enough to use: simply type in the
address of your favorite website,
click on the "Take Me Back" but-
ton and you'll be presented with
what has been archived over the


years. Clicking on one of the links
will show you the website as it was
on the moment it was cataloged. It
provides a fascinating look into the
not too distant (but oh so far away)
past; as well as offering a glimpse
of the rapid evolution of the Web
as we know it today. Due to the gi-
normous size of the archive, key-
word searching is not possible.
It is important to know that be-
cause of the size of the archive and
the popularity of the site, searches
may take some time to complete
(tip: after you click on the "Take
Me Back" button, go yell at the
microwave to hurry up cooking
your pizza rolls the search should
be complete before you return).
For those of us who are less than
discrete (OK, obnoxious), I don't
think a delay in searching will
necessarily stop a future campaign
competitor or employer from find-
ing out that you were a moron in
your youth. It might be best to
keep that to yourself right here in
the present.
The Internet Archive Wayback
Machine is located at www.ar-
chive.org/web/web.php.
As a bonus and for added fun,
click on the "Moving Images" tab
near the top of the page. From there
you can find all sorts of cool stuff
including information from 1950
on how to be a teenager. Sure, now
they tell us.


06ges-et hei WeklyActviie

Ruki EaleOE4g 5

-205 st StBS..

Rusk-ti6 FL337
(83 64 -2922 6
*he-FE6431's Gnera-Membrshi
metig ar-el t76 6ont e Is n
3rd hursay o eah moth. he Ldie

Thrsa 6 7pm.echm-t, .ndte6aleRie mmbr me




Mondays t 6*p~m
Ths ee'sDnnrsan Seia*Atiite







FeaheSYor es-at6 6
* S-nday,-June B0
Father's B Day innr-frm 5to 7**m
Rafln *f*lremetbndea*4pm


Ruskin VFW Post #6287

Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120 U.S. 41 N. has listed the following
weekly activities. Meetings are: American Legion on 1st Wednesday
each month; VFW and LAVFW on the 2nd Wednesday each month;
and MAVFW on the 3rd Thursday
each month.
Thursday, June 17 Bar Bingo
at 6 p.m.


Friday, June 18
from 5 to 7 p.m.


/ Saturday, June 19 Open.
Sunday, June 20 Open.
Monday, June 21- Wii Games at
7 p.m. Cribbage at 1 p.m.
Tuesday, June 22 Games in lounge from 1 to 5 p.m. No bingo.
Wednesday, June 23 Parade Meeting at 5:30 p.m. Wii Games
Bowling at 6 p.m. American Legion Auxiliary Meeting at 7 p.m.


-Fish & Chips


What are your kids going to eat?
Hillsborough County will participate in the Summer Food Service Pro-
gram June 15-Aug. 13 to provide FREE nutritious lunches and afternoon
snacks to children at almost 100 sites throughout Hillsborough County.
The purpose of the Summer Food Program is to provide a balanced
meal regardless of race, color, sex, disability, age, national origin or in-
come during summer vacation when school breakfasts and lunches are
not available.
Applications or eligibility are not required. Summer Camp registration
is not a requirement. Summer Food Program sites are located at schools
and other locations in the community to provide meals to all children
in the surrounding area, in addition to those enrolled in summer school.
Any child age 18 and under can visit a participating site to eat a free
lunch and/or afternoon snack.
The Summer Food Service Program for Children is federally funded
and operated by the Hillsborough County Health & Social Services De-
partment.
The Summer Food Program sites are in geographical areas of where 50
percent or more of the children qualify for free or reduced price meals
during the school year.
For more information, call the Summer Food Program for Children, at
272-5220, ext 357.


Preventing engine
failure
Maybe most people already
do this. I had no idea! I have my
oil changed regularly but was a
little behind. When making turns
recently, my oil light went on and
off.
After a while, I decided to check
my oil. It didn't even register on
the stick! I could have ruined my
engine. I mistakenly thought the
light would stay on if I needed to
add oil. I suggest those with older
cars (I have a 10-year-old minivan)
periodically check their oil!
S.
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you already make? Visit TheDollar-
Stretcher. cor to find hundreds of ar-
ticles to help you stretch your day and
your dollar!
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Board recognizes Entire T-N-T team reaches podium
. arart V.- 1


erle *c I
attendance

i <) Hillsborough County
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
0 &I6Wia g 'WgW/I

The Hillsborough County School
Board recognized the follow-
ing students at the June 15 board
meeting for having perfect atten-
dance from kindergarten through
12th grade.
Students recognized are: Alyssa
Carson ofAlonso; Jing Lin ofArm-
wood; Kyle Yerdon of Armwood;
Deborah Shin of Durant; Willine
Simbert of East Bay; Ferzan Turan
of Gaither; Britney Koch of King;
and Vivian Bramlett of Plant City.
Students are considered to have
perfect attendance if they have
never missed a day of school
throughout their elementary
and secondary education. These
students had perfect attendance
during the 2009/2010 school
year despite the suspension of
attendance incentives.
All of the students have gradu-
ated. School representatives will
also attended the meeting to rec-
ognize their students. Each of
the graduates was presented with
items memorializing and reward-
ing their achievements.


Even with a third of the T-N-T
team new to judo, all team mem-
bers were in the top three of their
divisions. They are well on their
way to building momentum for the
State Championships June 19 and
20 in Lakeland. "Our club is very
excited about our recent growth
and we continue to encourage oth-
ers to try judo," says Sensei Scott
Ferry.
Judo, a martial art without punch-
es and kicks, helps to increase fit-
ness, strength, flexibility, coordi-
nation and balance.
With an emphasis not on medals
or even winning, but more about
character, sportsmanship and cor-
rect technique being the consis-
tent message from the four USA
Judo State, Regional and National
coaches which were very pleased
with the team's performance.
The Rattler Round-Up was held
on May 29 in Delray Beach, FL at
the Atlantic High School gymna-
sium. Twenty-five to thirty teams
from around the state were in
attendance.
The T-N-T team included: Emily
Naylor, 12, Novice Intermediate
Girls (1st); Kiana Lassalle, 12,
Novice Intermediate Girls (1st);
both students at Eisenhower Mid-
dle School, but in different weight
divisions as well as Cameron


Wayne Taylor, Kurt Huertas, Bradley Thompson, Jason Huertas,
Carlos Lassalle, David Roman, Emily Naylor, Kiana Lassalle,
Jessica Guidry, Sensei Scott Ferry and Cameron Lassalle after their
matches.


Lassalle, 9, Novice Intermedi-
ate Boys (1st), a student at Corr
Elementary; Jessica Guidry, 13,
Novice Juvenile A, (2nd), a student
at Freedom High School; Jason
Huertas, 14, Juvenile A (1st), a
student at Barrington Oaks Middle
School; Bradley Thompson, 17,
Novice Senior Men (1st), a student
at East Bay High School; as well
as David Roman (3rd) and Wayne
Taylor (1st) who both competed
in the Master Men's category in


different weight divisions.
Bradley Thompson of River-
view, isn't new to judo, but he
is new to the Tampa Bay and to
T-N-T Academy of Judo. He began
training at 5 years old in Dayton,
OH and continued until he was 7
years old. "I got back into judo
because I love it and I had finally
found a dojo (Judo School) in the
city where I live which wasn't the
case in the previous two places
I've lived. I found T-N-T after an


internet search for an area dojo,"
Bradley said.
His last match was against Elliot
Angilot from Onikusu Judo Dojo
in Ft. Lauderdale, and he used
a move called O soto gari which
means major outside reap, to
defeat his opponent.
Bradley said, "I was happy that I
did so well even though it has been
10 years since my last competition.
I felt Sensei Scott had prepared me
well which gave me confidence in
my abilities.
T-N-T Academy's dojo is located
at 7817 Commerce Street, River-
view, one block northwest of the
intersection of U.S. Hwy. 301
and Riverview Drive (just north
of the Alafia River). For more
information, call (813) 443-5569
or visit their website at www.tnt-
academyofjudo.com. Judo is an
Olympic sport that combines take-
downs and throwing techniques
with ground control and submis-
sions, including arm locks, chokes
and pins.
The American College of Sports
Medicine calls judo 'The safest
contact sport for children under
the age of 13.' T-N-T Academy
also offers dance, Muay Thai,
tumbling, Sambo, and is looking
to add Yoga, Zumba and/or Pilates
classes.


10 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT


JUNE 17, 2010


~






JUNE 17, 2010
Canoeing in Mangroves


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 11


A lazy
Sunday was
spent with
my friend
SBen explor-
ing some
cool wa-
Saturation terways in
Point the Gulf of
Mexico. We
By Karey Burek headed out
early and
were the lone paddlers on the wa-
ter. We decided to take a canoe
this time, instead of a low riding
kayak. As we launched into the
calm water at Eagles Point fish
started to jump all around us and
we passed birds that were care-
fully watching us silently move
through the water. As we ventured
into slightly deeper water a group
of cow nose rays glided by and we
could see stingrays lying in the
sand beneath us.
We stopped paddling and float-
ed, watching the Osprey dive for
fish; slapping the water all around
us. As we ventured further into
the mangroves we saw stingrays
as big as a truck tire, the largest
I have ever seen in the wild. We
snuck up on schools of fish and
horseshoe crabs scuttling along the


SUNSET GRILL
AT LITTLE HARBOR


bottom. As we continued on our
journey a Bonnet head shark swam
gracefully past us and toward the
opening to the Gulf. We canoed
close to the mangroves so we
could observe birds feeding in the
shallows. Two Roseate Spoonbills
flew out from the dense trees; Ibis
clung to the branches and eyed us
as we floated toward a sea grass
bed.
I wanted to remember this pris-
tine habitat as it is now, because


who knows if in a few weeks or
months the same wildlife will
abound. The oil spill weighed
heavily on our minds as we ven-
tured through the clear shallows.
If the oil reaches this far and coats
the mangroves the habitat and
wildlife will be greatly devastated.
Mangroves are considered to be
"walking trees" because their roots
are exposed and look like fingers
sticking in the sand holding up the
green foliage. According to flor-
-I


Cow nose rays glide past our canoe near Eagles Point.


The view as we head out in the waterways.


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12 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

New home developer coming to Sun City Center


JUNE 17, 2010


* By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
SUN CITY CENTER Like
many residents coming here from
other parts, a Canadian-grown
home builder transplanted to Flori-
da decades ago is poised to become
the retirement community's eighth
- and probably last developer.
Minto Communities, LLC, an
Ottawa company which moved
into the Florida market some 20
years ago, is to close a purchase
transaction with WCI Communi-
ties on June 22, giving it buildable
land for 800 to 1,000 new homes
in several neighborhoods of SCC
and Kings Point. The Minto acqui-
sition does not include any of the
existing amenities in either com-
munity and the incoming home
builder does not assume any war-
ranty responsibilities for previ-
ously built houses under terms of
the sale.
This overview was offered by
two Minto representatives, Mi-
chael Belmont, executive vice
president, and William Bullock,
vice president overseeing the West
Central Florida region, during
a SCC Community Association
meeting last week.
Of the total number of dwell-
ings yet to be built, approximately
half are foreseen as single fam-
ily homes in several of the master
plan units on SCC's south side,
Bullock said, while the other half
is to be in the villa format, two
dwellings to a structure, in Kings
Point. And, while the interiors of
the new homes may be arranged in
differing configurations, appear-
ances will be consistent with pres-
ent neighboring housing stock, he
added. The Minto focus accentu-
ates great rooms and kitchens, the


Michael Belmont, Minto VP.
Melody Jameson photo


executive noted.
The single family dwellings are
expected to range in square foot-
age from the high 1400s to 2200
and to price out between $180,000
to $300,000, he said. New KP
villas are anticipated to run from
$150,000 to $200,000 in sizes
ranging from the high 1300s to
1700 square feet.
On SCC's south side, Minto's
proposed purchase includes an
estimated 54 undeveloped lots in
Unit 271, 55 lots in Unit 272 and
another 21 buildable homesites in
Unit 276 all of which already
are platted and where zoning al-
lows four to six homes per acre,
Paul Wheat, longtime CA leader
recently retired, pointed out fol-
lowing the company presentation.
But, Wheat added, two additional
units, 274 and 275 which encom-
pass the former Ben Sutton Golf
School property contiguous with
SCC's Renaissance section, total
a little over 60 acres and have not
been platted out.
Asked about the possibility of
more, higher density multi-family
housing in that area of the commu-
nity, Bullock asserted that, from the
current market perspective, Minto
sees only single family housing on
those parcels at the four or six-per-
acre density. Its acquisition from
WCI gives his company a total of
1,400 entitlements, Bullock said,
but this is greater density than the
company plans to use.
In addition, the estimated SCC
half of potential new housing in
the projected 800 to 1,000 range
dovetails with provisions of the
"Letter of Credit" that accom-
panies the multi-faceted "1984
Agreement," critical documents
that have guided developer-com-
munity leadership interactions for
the last 25 years. The LOC calls
for developer compensation for
new homes to be built conveyed
in advance to the CA to help its
directors operate the network of
amenities and campuses that serve
the recreational interests of all cur-
rent and incoming CA member
residents. That compensation for
the not-yet-built dwellings in SCC
proposed by Minto previously was
provided to the CAby WCI.
Regarding the company's time-
table to implement its SCC devel-
opment plans, Bullock said Minto
soon will establish its local offices,
probably in the former WCI new
home sales center on the south side
of S.R. 674, east of 1-75. However,
the unplumbed model houses WCI
built into the sales center will not
become Minto models, he added.


Minto plans to build several sam-
ples of its homes as models but
spotted across the retirement com-
munity, the area VP said, adding
he could not yet pinpoint specific
sites.
By early fall, Bullock said his
company would begin gearing up
"soft sales" or presales of its hous-
ing stock and kick off a promotion-


William Bullock, Minto VPICen-
tral Florida. Melody Jameson photo


al campaign featuring all of Sun
City Center. Plans also are in the
works for a formal grand opening
as the holiday season approaches,
probably scheduled in November,
he added.
Minto, founded in Canada and
building in both the Ottawa and
Toronto areas, has been involved
with a long list of residential com-
munities on Florida's East Coast as
well as a growing list on the Gulf
Coast, Belmont emphasized. The
company has built single family
housing in sections of Lakewood
Ranch, the huge community near
the Manatee-Sarasota County line
as well as in southeast Hillsbor-


:NC


ough's massive FishHawk Ranch
and at Tampa's Grand Hampton.
Many of its communities are fea-
tured on its website, www.minto-
fla.com.
Bullock said Minto considers
SCC al\\.li a top performer"
throughout its 50-year history and
pointed to 300 resales of homes
across its various neighborhoods
in 2009 during a market downturn
as testament to its continued desir-
ability.
As for completed build-out, Bull-
ock noted a good estimate involv-
ing fewer than 1,000 new homes
would be five to eight years.
( 2010 Melody Jameson


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The New York Times, June 13, 2010, Insults Across The Water by
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directed at BP)

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question that might have saved us a lot of pain in recent months if both
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the last decade."
The New York Times, June 10, 2010, BP's Mess, and Wall Street's
by William D. Cohan

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failings of big government. Partisan politics obscures the linkage, with
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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 13


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14 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Sailors
* Continued from page 1


from trimming sails to terminol-
ogy, following diagrams and put-
ting in practice what they learned
under the shade house next to the
lagoon.
After their lunch break, they
took to the water, ready to expe-
rience their first onboard lesson
- recovery from a capsize. One by
one, flotation devices secured, sun
screen amply applied, each scram-
bled into an eight-foot TSS pram
with a single masted sail, listened
carefully as Millman and her aides
towed boat plus student to the cen-
ter of the small inner harbor, ex-
plaining the process. The little ves-
sel would tip onto one side, sliding
the novice sailor into the drink
where, grasping the boom, she
would disconnect the sheet and,
with help, right the boat, climb
back aboard and begin bailing the
seawater taken on. Eagerly, with-
out complaint and without fail, the
tiniest grade schooler to the tallest
adolescent performed perfectly, as
instructed.
A little review, another round
with knots and the first six-hour
day was over. Many lingered,
chatting, comparing notes, ask-
ing questions, as parents arrived
to transport young sailors-to-be
home.
They come from across east and
south Hillsborough, a few are sons
and daughters of sailing parents,
some have never set foot on a
boat, for many sailing will be more
avocation than vocation, Millman
said, but all will take something
useful away at the end of the week
- in addition to their certificates of
achievement.
As their time together unfolds,
she will teach them basic rules of
navigation and safety positions,
how to rescue a man overboard and
how to sail backwards, the prin-
ciples of tacking and jibbing. But
most importantly, she added, she
wants them to enjoy themselves as
they learn; get a taste of the wind
in sails, salt spray off the bow and
the thrill of doing what once was


not even dreamed of.
Millman, who soon will earn a
degree in international studies and
dreams of taking her 29-foot sloop
to distant foreign ports, speaks af-
fectionately about the young man
from a farming family in East
Hillsborough who had neither
knowledge of nor interest in boats
when he arrived for a week-long
course. Then he went out on the
water, and was transformed, she
said, "he had found his element
and couldn't get enough!" Then,
too, occasionally, there are stu-
dents who will take the course re-
peatedly simply because they revel
in the environment, she said.
There are no specific pre-requi-
sites imposed on students in the
youth sailing program, Millman
noted, and swimming competence
is not a particular issue, "but a stu-
dent with a real fear of the water
is not likely to enjoy or learn in
the weeklong course." Each day,
though, youngsters participating
do need their life jackets, closed-
toe shoes, whistles, water, sun
screen and lunch. The cost for the
week is $250 per student, with a
reduced rate applied when two or
more students in the same class
are from the same family. The
maximum number of students that
can be accommodated during the
summer-long program is 96, Mill-
man said, and 65 slots currently
are filled.
The growing annual popular-
ity of the introductory sailing pro-
gram also has prompted TSS spon-
sorship of another aspect of youth
oriented sailing. Summer-long
training on Saturdays for young-
sters with basic sailing skills who
are interested in racing under sail
now is taking shape, Millman said.
The nominal per-student cost each
Saturday has been set at $10.
The objective, she indicated, will
be much the same. "We want them
to develop confidence in them-
selves; in their ability to take care
of themselves and their boats."
Copyright 2010 Melody Jameson


JUNE 17, 2010


Melody Jameson photo
In the safety of
the small inner
harbor at the sail-
ing squadron's
headquarters in
Apollo Beach,
veteran sailor and
instructor Jayne
Millman (hand on
mast) encourages
a young sailing
program student
as the small TSS
pram capsizes.
Assistant John
Siger waits in case
rescue is required
as the youngster
learns how to
handle a vessel
capsized and tak-
ing on water. It was
the first lesson of
the first day on the
water.


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Almost as important at staying afloat is knowing how to tie a variety
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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 15


Denied


* Continued from page 1
am not opposed to that and I am
not opposed to growth and devel-
opment. But we must make our
growth and development smart.
Once we start removing trees and
vegetation and reading the re-
port, over 250 native plants to
Florida those things cannot be


replaced. We need to look and lis-
ten to the people most affected and
impacted by these decisions," he
said, referring to those opposed to
the project.
Upon Commissioner Mark
Sharpe's second of the motion
to deny, the audience broke into
cheers and applause. *


Mitch Traphagen Photo
For the second time, the
Hillsborough County Board
of Commissioners denied
an application to build
eight homes on a narrow
spit of land along the Little
Manatee River in Ruskin.


an hi


Iitii


I
I


Postcards Mitch Traphagen Photo
No one recognized the Bubble Room on Captiva Island? (Pictured
below). OK, now I'm convinced that we need the "Weird and Wonder-
ful Florida Tour." It's the Bubble Room! Who else has it? No one but
Florida, that's who! Justina Horvath (Justina, it is always wonder-
ful to hear from you! Thank you for writing.) gets double honorable
mention, however, for making two guesses. In fact, if the Observer
could afford to give away new cars for each correct guess, I'd make
sure she got one for effort (no, we can't. Sorry). This week we have
a vista that hopefully a few of us will recognize. Here's a hint: the
photo for this postcard
was not taken in Iowa.
Do you know where
this is? Send your best
guess to where@ob-
servernews.net. Who
knows? You may win a
new car! Actually, I do
know. You won't. But
you will get some grati-
tude and a brief mo-
ment of fame! Almost
as good, right?


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16 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Making This Right

Beaches
Claims
Cleanup
Economic Investment
Environmental Restoration
Health and Safety
Wildlife


For information visit: bp.com
deepwaterhorizonresponse.com
Facebook: BP America
Twitter: @B PAmerica
YouTube: BPplc


My name is Darryl Willis and I'm responsible for overseeing BP's claims
process in the Gulf Coast. I was born and raised in Louisiana. At age 70,
my mother lost her home to Hurricane Katrina. Afterwards, she experienced
enormous frustration. So I know first hand that when tragedy strikes on a
scale like this, people need help without a lot of hassles.

How To File A Claim
To speed that help, BP's Claims Center is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week. The number is 1-800-440-0858. When someone calls, they'll find out
how to submit their claim and can schedule a face-to-face meeting with
one of our claims specialists. They can also file online at bp.com/claims.

Replacing Lost Monthly Income
Our focus has been on helping the fishermen, small businesses and
others who aren't able to work until the spill is cleaned up, by making
payments to replace their lost monthly income. These payments will
continue for as long as needed. When we talk, we'll help people
determine which documents they need. We will then be in touch in
four days or less and can issue them a check right on the spot.

So far, we have paid more than 19,000 claims, totaling more than $53 million.
We have nearly 700 people assigned to handle claims and 25 walk-in
claims offices in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. We have
promised to honor all legitimate claims and we will. We want all Americans
to know that these efforts will not come at any cost to taxpayers.

Our Responsibility
I volunteered for this assignment because this is my home. Doing this
right is important to me. My commitment is that we will keep you
informed, and we'll be here as long as it takes. We may not always be
perfect, but we will make this right.


For assistance, please call:
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
www.floridagulfresponse.com

bp



A~^ ^^W


2010 BP, E&P


JUNE 17, 2010






JUNE 17 2010 BSERVE NEWS *R--ER-EW-CURENT-- SC OBSEVER--1


CHER
Cher is a lovely Hound mix who
was brought to the shelter with her
brother Sonny.
Cher seems to be the leader of
the duo. She is very smart and
loves attention.
Since arriving at the shelter,
Sonny and Cher have been having
a blast discovering the doggy pool
and meeting new friends. Cher will
certainly keep you entertained.
As part of her adoption, Cher
will be microchipped, spayed, and
brought current on her shots.


SOPHIE
Sophie is a female tabby with white feet. She and her two siblings
were brought to C.A.R.E. as scared little kittens. Sophie has come out of
her shell more and more each week. You will often find her hanging out
with her brother in the cat tower. She is quick to purr on approach. Do
you have space in your heart and home to help this lady grow? As part
of her adoption, Sophie will be spayed, brought current on her shots, and
microchipped
C.A.R.E. is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. For
directions, visit www.CareShelter.org or call (813) 645-2273.


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Camping? Make
sure to travel a
well-lit path
(NewsUSA) -- Whether your
escape to nature involves a day of
hiking, tenting overnight or RV-
ing, a little planning will go a long
way in making your experience
enjoyable.
You know, of course, to bring
graham crackers and marshmal-
lows, but your light source can
make or break your trip.
Most of us are used to seeing
streetlights and headlights at night
-- it's easy to forget how dark it
gets in the woods. Every camper
should cary a flashlight. You
will also need a larger light that
provides enough illumination to
work by.
Most people associate propane
lanterns with the great outdoors,
but these lanterns aren't necessar-
ily the best option. Propane lan-
terns can be noisy and cannot be
used in tents or campers, and you
will need to pack and carry fuel.
Because propane lanterns produce
heat, they are a burn hazard.
LED worklights provide a safer
and easier option. One light, the
Might-D-Light (www.might-d-
light.com), proves especially use-
ful, as its hinge can be moved to
create either a large spray of light
or directional lighting for close
work. The Might-D-Light, which
can attach to most metal surfaces
with its rare earth magnets, hang
from a hook or stand upright, is
hands-free, so you can use it while
performing tasks that require both
hands, such as setting up a tent af-
ter dark or striking matches. The
Might-D-Light can be recharged
with an AC/DC adapter, so as long
as you drive to your campsite, you
won't have to carry batteries or
fuel.
How can the Might-D-Light
make your trip more enjoyable?
It lends itself to a variety of situa-
tions, including:
SAny activity that takes place in
your tent or camper. Need to grab a
sweater from your pack? With the
Might-D-Lite, you won't have to
fumble with a flashlight or create
a potential fire hazard by taking
your propane lamp indoors.
Playing games. Unless you plan
on going to bed as soon as the sun
sets, you'll want to bring games
to play after dark. With a hands-
free folding light, you'll have no
trouble dealing cards or besting
everyone at slapjack.
Keeping cool. LED lights don't
emit heat, so using the Might-D-
Lite won't create a sweltering
campsite.
Hiking. The Might-D-Light
folds for compact storage and is
far more durable than a propane
lantern, making it ideal for back-
country trips.
Around pets and children. With
an LED light, you don't have to
worry about spilled fuel or burs.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 17


JUNE 17, 2010









Enjoy these Florida State Parks: they're just one tank f ) away


Many adventures can be found
within a short car ride from any-
where in Florida. With 160 state
parks from Pensacola to Key
West, exploring Florida's natural
and cultural treasures is easy and
close-to-home.
Plan your alttrdIhle family get-
awayfrom the Florida State Parks
website at www.floridastateparks.
org. Simply indicate the start-
ing point to locate Florida state
parks within a 100-mile radius.
World-class beaches, crystal-clear
springs, rivers, lakes, ornamental
gardens and historic sites provide
the perfect backdrop for a state
park adventure.


* Myakka River State Park
One of the oldest and largest
state parks protects one of the
state's most diverse natural areas.
The Myakka River, designated as
a Florida Wild and Scenic River,
flows through 58 square miles of
wetlands, prairies, hammocks,
and pinelands. Visitors can enjoy
wildlife viewing from a board-
walk that stretches out over the
Upper Myakka Lake, then take to
the treetops with a stroll along the
canopy walkway. The park's river
and two lakes provide ample op-
portunities for boating, freshwa-
ter fishing, canoeing, and kayak-


A sugar mill surrounded by trees at the Yulee Sugar Mill Ruins.


ing. Hikers can explore trails that
cross large expanses of rare Flor-
ida dry prairie. Scenic lake tours
are offered daily on the world's
two largest airboats. Full-facility
campgrounds and primitive camp-
sites are available. Five palm log
cabins, built in the 1930s by the
Civilian Conservation Corps, have
been modernized for comfortable
lodging. Located nine miles east
of Sarasota at 13208 State Road
72, (941) 361-6511.
* Ybor City Museum
Don Vicente Martinez Ybor
came to the frontier near Tampa
and built a city that became the
"Cigar Capital of the World."
From the opening of the first cigar
factory in 1886 until the 1930s,
Ybor City flourished. This urban
park is dedicated to the preserva-
tion of Ybor City's unique cultural
heritage. The museum, housed in
the historic Ferlita Bakery, traces
the rich cultural history of Ybor
City and the cigar making indus-
try. The museum has self-guided
exhibits, with written and audio
information, and a video presen-
tation. La Casita, a restored cigar
worker's house, is open for view-
ing 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Guided tours
are available Monday through Sat-
urday. Located at the comer of 9th
Avenue and 19th Street in Tampa.
(813) 247-6323.


Roseate spoonbills in flight at Myakka State Park, Sarasota.


* Hillsborough River State P
Opened in 1938, Hillsborough
River State Park is one of Florida's
first state parks; this original CCC
Park is divided by the -.s ifi- flow-
ing Hillsborough River with a set of
Class II rapids. The river provides
opportunities for fishing, canoeing,
and kayaking; a canoe/kayak launch
is available at parking lot #4. Some
of our amenities are the Spirit of the
Woods Cafe which is open 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. seven days a week. This
concession provides breakfast and
lunch daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.,


camping and picnic supplies, and
a variety of memorable souvenirs.
Canoes and bikes can be rented
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and all rental
equipment must be returned by 4
p.m. Hikers can walk over seven
miles of nature trials. The park of-
fers full-facility camping and a
youth/group tent campground. A
primitive campsite is available via
foot trail; reservations are always
recommended. The Park is located
at 15402 U.S. 301 N, Thonotosassa,
Florida 33592, (813) 987-6771.


* Yulee Sugar Mill Ruins
Historic State Park
This site was once part of a thriv-
ing sugar plantation owned by Da-
vid Levy Yulee. Yulee was a mem-
ber of the Territorial Legislative
Council, and served in the U.S.
House of Representatives and U.S.
Senate after Florida statehood.
The park contains the remnants of
the once-thriving 5,100-acre sugar
plantation: a forty-foot limestone
masonry chimney, iron gears, and
a cane press. The steam-driven
mill operated from 1851 to 1864
and served as a supplier of sugar
products for southern troops dur-
ing the Civil War.
The park is located at State Road
490, Homosassa, Florida. The
phone number is 352-795-3817.
* Anclote Key Preserve
State Park
Located three miles off the coast
of Tarpon Springs, Anclote Key
Preserve State Park is accessible
only by private boat or ferry ser-
vice. The 403-acre park is home
to at least 43 species of birds, in-
cluding the American oystercatch-
er, bald eagle and piping plover.
A picturesque 1887 lighthouse
stands as a sentinel on the south-
ern end of the island. Visitors can
swim and sunbathe at the beach,
fire up a grill and enjoy a picnic
or pitch a tent and enjoy a night of
primitive camping under the stars.
There are no provisions offered on
the island, so be prepared to bring
your own water and supplies. Fer-
ry service to the island is offered
by Sun Line Cruises (727) 944-
4468 and Sponge-O-Rama (727)
943-2164. These ferries both leave
from Tarpon Springs' historic
Sponge Docks. Ferry services do
not drop visitors off for overnight
camping. You must have your own
transportation to stay overnight.
Dogs are only allowed on North
Anclote Bar.
The park is located at #1 Cause-
way Boulevard, Dunedin, Florida
34698, (727) 469-5942.
There are 21 State Parks
within 100 miles of Tampa
listed on the website at:
www.floridastateparks.org


The Ferlita
Bakery at
the Ybor City
Museum State
Park: Savor the
Flavor of a Rich
Past.


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18 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


JUNE 17, 2010






JUNE 17, 2010


PROGRAM/EVENT HIGHLIGHTS:
WEEK OF JUNE 21-25


MS Movie Maker: Introduction
Monday, June 21 2 to 3 p.m.
Introduction to the Microsoft Movie Maker window layout, and
how to create, edit and save a video.Registration in person required
no earlier than one hour prior to the start of the program.

"Family Portraits"
Tuesday, June 22 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Pat Herzberg will teach students how to create a portrait.
Adult/child will draw each other. Bring in a few photographs
to draw from. Children must be at least 6 years old.
Visit the Information Desk or call 273-3652 to register.

MS Publisher: Introduction
Thursday, June 24 12:15 to 1:15 p.m.
Introduction to the Publisher window layout, toolbars, creating
new documents, and insertion of text and picture frames.
Registration in person required no earlier than one
hour prior to the start of the program.

Teen Iron Chef
Thursday, June 24 3 to 4 p.m.
You and your team must turn the mystery ingredient into delec-
table dishes. Win over the judges and win the game! Allez cuisine!

If you think you might be interested injoining Friends of the South
Shore library, visit the Book Sale Room at the Library for a member-
ship applications.
For more information, visit www.southshorefriends.com. South-
Shore Regional Library is located at 15816 Beth Shields Way (off
19th Avenue between U.S. 301 and 1-75) (813) 273-3652.




Reward children's accomplishments
with effective incentives


(NewsUSA) -- Celebrating a
child's milestones does wonders
for building character and self-
esteem, but parents aren't always
sure how to acknowledge their
child's accomplishments. Will
a quick hug suffice? Or do you
need to throw a party for the entire
school class?
Mostly, children just want to
know that their parents take an
active interest in their lives -- you
don't have to rent a houseboat ev-
ery time a child comes home with
an "A" on a test. But you don't
want to ignore a big accomplish-
ment, either, unless you want your
child to think that nothing he or she
does will ever please you. Besides,
commemorating an extra-special
moment could help preserve fond
memories for years.
For example, if your child's 4-H
project or success on the basketball


team ends up in a news article, you
should consider getting the article
matted and framed. One company,
PlaqueMakerPlus (www.plaque-
makerplus.com), will duplicate
the newspaper or magazine article
with a full-color imprint on a met-
al sheet, then frame the article in
an elegant black frame. The frame
displays a metal plaque containing
your choice of text.
Whether displayed on your
mantle or on your child's wall, the
framed news article will become
a keepsake commemorating your
child's accomplishment -- some-
day, you may even want to show it
to your grandchildren.
You can also frame certificates
or ribbons, or give your child a
memory frame in which to display
Scout badges. You can even pur-
chase your own trophies to give to
your children.
If the way to the heart is through
the stomach, cook your child's fa-
vorite meal or visit a favorite res-
taurant to celebrate a big accom-
plishment. You can also reward
your child with more of your time.
For example, you could commit a
day to an activity that your child
enjoys, like visiting a theme park,
shopping at the mall or going on
a hike. Older children and teens
tend to want to celebrate with their
friends. For them, a sleepover or a
party at a mini golf course might
be the best way to celebrate their
success.
For more information, visit


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 19


Catching spawning
UF study shows
Cold weather delayed large-
mouth bass spawning, says a
University of Florida expert whose
research suggests anglers should
enjoy the opportunity for easy
catches, despite naysayers.
In Florida, the bass usually begin
spawning in January or February
but this year they started at least
a month late, said Mike Allen,
a fisheries professor with UF's
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences.
Largemouths are the state's most
popular freshwater game fish. To
spawn, male bass make shallow
nests in the sand, court females,
and then protect the eggs and
hatchlings for several weeks.
Males guarding nests are notori-
ously aggressive, striking anything
that moves. The fish are easy to
catch, but it's commonly believed
that spawning-season fishing re-
duces bass populations. Allen's
latest study suggests that notion is
rarely true.
The findings were published
in the current issue of the jour-
nal Transactions of the American
Fisheries Society.
"We found that in most cases,
spawning area closures won't
improve bass populations, for a
couple of reasons," he said. "One
is, there's a lot of catch and release
nowadays. The other is, if you lose
some nests, the ones that are left
have higher survival rates."
Catch and release is the practice
of setting fish free, rather than
keeping or "harvesting" them. In
2008, Allen and colleagues pub-
lished a study showing that the
percentage of largemouth bass
harvested by anglers had fallen by
half since the 1980s.
When nesting male bass are har-
vested or if they're released af-
ter a long delay their nests are
likely to be invaded by predators
such as bluegill, which gobble up
eggs and hatchlings.
However, the young bass that
survive face less competition for
food and shelter, giving them a


Florida bass won't deplete populations,


better chance at reaching adult-
hood, Allen said.
The study used mathematical
models to predict changes in two
types of bass populations. One was
typical of southern states, with fast
growth rates, early maturation and
high natural mortality. The other
had the opposite qualities, typical
of northern states.
Allen and biological scientist
Daniel Gwinn, the study's other
author, gathered data on anglers


researchers from the Illinois Natu-
ral History Survey. They'll catch
nesting bass in two Florida lakes
and four Canadian lakes to see if
it influences the number of young
that reach adulthood.
If there is no decrease, some of-
ficials might want to reconsider
their policies, Allen said.
Wildlife managers in some
northern states prohibit bass fish-
ing during spawning, arguing that
it protects bass populations. Local
------------------t' TH -^ 's 4 ---- .


AP photo/University of Florida/IFAS/Tyler Jones
In this photo released by the University of Florida's Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences, fisheries ecologist Mike Allen, right, dis-
cusses largemouth bass research with graduate student Bobby
Harris, at a private pond near Hawthorne, FL. Harris was about to
enter the water in search of nesting bass. Allen recently published
a study showing bass populations seldom benefit when lakes are
closed to fishing during spawning season.


catching bass during spawning
seasons in three states. The re-
searchers plugged the data into
mathematical models representing
several types of restricted and un-
restricted fishing.
The results showed that prohibit-
ing bass fishing during spawning
season would only boost popula-
tions in waters where very high
percentages of spawning bass are
caught.
"Those conditions are pretty
rare," Allen said.
To test his findings in the
field, Allen is collaborating with


Gardening projects help children
flower
(NewsUSA) -- American parents may bond with their children by
taking them to farmers' markets or showing them how to grow potted
plants, but in other areas of the world, grow-
ing plants may literally help keep families
together.
In Ecuador, for example, children were
often left alone while their parents went
into the city to work. Because children had
to take care of the home while their parents
were away, many stopped going to school.
ChildFund International, an organization
that focuses on working with children, as
well as with families, local organizations
and communities to create environments in
which children can thrive, decided to take a
unique, community-wide approach to solv-
ing this problem -- by growing a garden.
ChildFund Ecuador started training the community in flower and vege-
table cultivation, as well as business administration. The local bank,
which ChildFund helped develop, gave local fathers the loans that they
needed to build greenhouses for roses, carnations and tomatoes. Today,
more than 285 families now use their greenhouses as their primary source
of income, so the parents don't have to migrate into the cities to work,
and children can attend school regularly.
The Actively Engaged Mayan Women, or Mujeres Emprendedoras
Mayas, in rural Tecpan, Guatemala, are using macro tunnels -- or mini-
ature greenhouses -; to grow tomatoes, thereby creating income and
improving food security for their families. As the women become more
able to create their own income, they also gain the ability to better care
for their children.
In ChildFund Uganda, children and their parents planted more than
10,000 eucalyptus trees and 5,000 pine trees to create two new forests.
In an area where environmental degradation has reduced the quality of
life, the new forests provide inexpensive firewood, protection against
soil erosion and an economic boost, as the trees provide timber for hous-
ing and other projects.
"Forests will be a major source of timber, which will be mainly used in
house construction, and houses are very important to us," said 14-year-
old Nalubega Florence, a student at St. Andrew Primary School.
To learn how you can help communities come together through the plants
that they grow, visit ChildFund International at www.ChildFund.org.


anglers don't always agree, he
said.
In Florida, no spawning-season
restrictions on largemouth bass are
likely, Allen said. But the study
may have implications for pro-
posed fishing restrictions on other
species.
"This research shows that
protecting fish just to let them
spawn won't improve sustain-
ability," Allen said. "If overfish-
ing happens, we will need a larger
closing to reduce annual fishing-
related mortality closing over a
longer time or a larger area."

Maximum garden
veggie, mininum
garden space
Using the square foot gardening
method instead of a regular large
garden yields more vegetables and
takes much less time, space and
water. In short, this organic gar-
dening method uses raised beds
with only a 6" depth of a compost/
peat moss/vermiculite mixture.
The plants are planted close to-
gether with a prescribed number
of plants in each square foot. The
garden is tended from the outside,
so no soil is compressed. All the
space is used for production.
I learned everything I needed to
know online and did not ever buy a
book (though you can check your
library). I found websites that had
economical suggestions, such as
using an old
bed frame or
bookshelf for
the raised bed
box. I spent a
total of $45 for
vermiculate
and peat moss to fill three 4'x4'
beds. This will feed my family of
vegetable eaters all summer and
the vermiculite and peat moss will
last me for many years. My only
yearly cost is seeds.
Kristel W
Want to live better on the money
you already make? Visit stretcher. corn/index. cfm?TipsSyn>
to find hundreds of articles to help
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20 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
It is all small stuff
EBEHIND THE MIKE By: Michael A. Aun, http://www.aunline.com


JUNE 17, 2010


When things in your life seem
almost too much to handle, when
24 hours in a day are not enough,
remember the old story about the
mayonnaise jar and the two lem-
onades.
A professor stood before his phi-
losophy class and had some items
in front of him. When the class
began, he wordlessly picked up a
very large and empty mayonnaise
jar and proceeded to fill it with
golf balls.
He then asked the students if
the jar was full. They agreed that
it was.
The professor then picked up a
box of pebbles and poured them
into thejar. He shook thejar lightly.
The pebbles rolled into the open ar-
eas between the golf balls. He then
asked the students again if the jar
was full. They agreed it was.
The professor next picked up a
box of sand and poured it into the
jar. Of course, the sand filled up ev-
erything else. He asked once more
if the jar was full. The students
responded with a unanimous 'yes.'
The professor then produced two
beers from under the table and

Protect Boys' Pants
My son goes through pants at
an amazing rate. After he wore
through the knees on several pairs
after only wearing them a couple
times, I decided I had to do some-
thing. I've found that sewing or
ironing knee patches on the in-
side of the jeans or pants before
they get holes will extend their
life dramatically. Initially, I was
concerned the patches would rub
my son's knees, but he says that he
doesn't even feel them. Since I've
started doing this, he actually out-
grows his pants!
Karen G. in Haymarket, VA
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to find hundreds of articles to help
you stretch your day and your dol-
lar! Copyright 2010 Dollar Stretcher,
Inc.


8 Days a Week
If you normally grocery shop ev-
ery week, try spending your nor-
mal budgeted amount for food, but
try to last eight days until the next
shopping trip. Shop and spend the
budgeted amount for food and try
to last until eight days instead of
seven again. In two weeks, you
have saved two days on food. In
seven weeks, you should be able
to save one whole week's grocery
money. Using this tip, in a year,
you should save over seven weeks
of your food budget! In my house,
seven weeks at $80 per week will
save me $560 per year.
Janet M. in Brant Rock, MA
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poured the entire contents into the
jar effectively filling the empty
space between the sand. The stu-
dents laughed.
"Now," said the professor as the
laughter subsided, "I want you to
recognize that this jar represents
your life. The golf balls are the
important things---your family,
your children, your health, your
friends and your favorite passions.
If everything else was lost and only
they remained, your life would still
be full."
He continued, "The pebbles are
the other things that matter like
your job, your house and your car.
The sand is everything else, i.e.
the small stuff ." In life, there are
two rules: Rule # 1- Do not sweat
the small stuff. Rule # 2 Most of it
is small stuff! "If you put the sand
into the jar first," he added, "there
is no room for the pebbles or the
golf balls. The same goes for life. If
you spend all your time and energy
on the small stuff you will never
have room for the things that are
important to you."
Pay attention to the things that are
critical to your happiness. Spend
time with your children. Spend time
with your parents. Visit with grand-
parents. Take time to get medical
checkups. Take your spouse out to
dinner. Play another 18.
There will always be time to clean
the house and fix the disposal. Take
care of the golf balls first, the things
that really matter. Set your priori-
ties. The rest is just sand.
One of the students raised her
hand and inquired what the lem-
onade represented. The professor
smiled and said, "I am glad you
asked."
"The lemonade just shows you


that no matter how full your life
may seem, there is always room for
a couple of drinks with a friend."A
favorite poem sums it up best.

Don't Quit
Author Unknown

When things go wrong, as they
sometimes will,
When the road you're trudging
seems all uphill,
When the funds are low and the
debts are high,
And you want to smile, but you
have to sigh,
When care is pressing you down
a bit, Rest, if you must, but don't
you quit.
Life is queer with its twists and
turns,
As every one of us sometimes
learns,
And many a failure turns about,
When he might have won had he
stuck it out;
Don't give up though the pace
seems slow- You may succeed with
another blow.
Often the goal is nearer than, It
seems to a faint and faltering man,
Often the struggler has given up,
When he might have captured the
victor's cup,
And he learned too late when the
night slipped down,
How close he was to the golden
crown.
Success is failure turned inside
out-- The silver tint of the clouds
of doubt,
And you never can tell how close
you are, It may be near when it
seems so far,
So stick to the fight when you're
hardest hit-- It's when things seem
worst that you must not quit.


CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH
-I'l) SundayWorship: Blended 8:00 a.m.
Contemporary 9:40 a.m.
STraditional 1:15 a.m. B endRd.
Nursery Provided CrossRoads: Bible Study, Worship: Wed. 7 p.m. P
Pastor Jack R. Palzer
5309 U.S. Highway 41 North Apollo Beach | A Bs
(across rom MiraBay) www.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1305 T= S

St. John the Divine Episcopal Church
Growing by Faith from Generation to Generation
Rev. Tracy H. Wider Church Office 813-645-1521
SUNDAY SERVICES: 9 am Contemporary Service and Sunday School
at West Campus, S.R. 674 and 9th Street SE, Ruskin
8 am Traditional Service and 11 am Holy Communion with Choir at East Campus
at 1015 Del Webb Blvd., SCC
All Worship Services with Holy Communion and Healing Holy Oil


Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (Behind Suntrust Bank)
ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: (Nov.-April ............................. 8:30 a.m. Day Care Available
Mon. Fri.
Rev. John M. Bartha and all year)......................... 10:45 a.m. 6 a.m. 6 p.m.
SPhone: 645-1241 Sunday School....................... 9:30 a.m. call 645-6198

REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH-ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center, FL33573-5354
Rev. Dr. Peter Stiller, Pastor 634-1292
Saturday Worship: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion....First & Third Sunday Bible Class...Thursday 10 am, Guests Welcome

First Church of Christ, Scientist
Ruskin Sun City Center (813) 645-6102
204 Second St. N.W, Ruskin, Florida 33570
Sunday Service Sunday School ....................................................... 10 AM
Wednesday Testimony Meeting .....................................................5 PM
Reading Room Wednesday.......................................................4 4:50 PM
ALL ARE WELCOME www.spirituality.com

FfRST BAPTIST C-HURCH
of .
L"a 820 COLLEGE AVE. W.
RUSKIN, FL 33570
645-6439
www~fbcruskin.org
SA Resource for Families
Sunday School ............................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship............8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Dr. Barry Rumsey
Evening Service...........................6:00 p.m. CHRISTAN SCHOOL
Wednesday Night Service................7:00 p.m. THROUGH 12TH
Awana................... ................... 7:00 p.m GRADE


St. Anne Church honors 2010 graduates
Father John McEvoy, pastor of Saint Anne Catholic Church in Ruskin
recently celebrated the Annual Graduation Mass honoring its graduates
of the Class of 2010. Pictured above from left to right are: (Front Row)
Brittany Rotger, Erika Bloodgood, Haley Parker, Valeria Ortega, Justin
Carter; (Middle Row) Frank Giardina, Christopher Remus, Alex Hampe,
Ignacio Lopez Jr., Edward Livesay; (Back Row) Antwan Perez, Semi-
narian Justin Paskert, High School Youth Director Sandy Bloodgood, Fr.
John McEvoy, and Fr. Nelson Restrepo.


Women of Trinity Baptist visit
Hillsborough Correctional Institution
A group of women from the Trinity Baptist Church Women's Fellow-
ship, went on a recent tour of the Hillsborough Correctional Institution in
Balm. This facility is the first in the Nation women's faith-based/charac-
ter building prison. The tour was coordinated by prison volunteer, Nan-
cy Williams, far left. Before the ladies entered the compound, Warden
Rhodene Mathis, 2nd from left, greeted the group and recognized those
who presently volunteer at the prison and thanked them for the donations
the women's fellowship has provided to the facility.


S riendship B ptist Chlrch
Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist)
1511 El Rancho Dr.
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Phone/Fox
S 813-633-5950


WEEKLY SERVICES:


Bible Study
.Bible Study
.....Worship


Sunday
9 a.m ...............
S 1 a .m ..............
10 a.m. & 6 p.m.


Wednesday
6 p.m.... Prayer Meeting/Bible Study


Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC
Meets in the Social Hall of the Beth Israel Synagogue
1115 E. Del Webb Blvd.
Thursday, 7:00 PM Call 633-0396
We all make mistakes but everyone
makes different mistakes.
Ludwig von Beethoven


NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where God's Love is Shared"
U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL 645.1121 www.nbcor.org S
Sunday School for all ages 9:30 AM SBC
Morning Worship 10:45 AM Wanted: People Who Want to Grow
Evening Worship 6:00 PM and Live for Jesus!
Full Wednesday Schedule for all ages

North River Church of Christ i_
Non-Instrumental -
13885 U.S. Hwy 301 South
(Just South of the Manatee County Line)
Minister: Howard Johnson Office 941-776-1134
Services: Sunday 10:00am, 11:00am & 6:00pm
Wednesday7:00pm Home 813-754-1776

SFirst Baptist Church of Gibsonton
"We love because He first loved us." 1 John 4:19
Traditional Worship Service *Sunday School 9:30 A.M.
Old-Time Gospel Hymns morningg Worship 10:30AM.
Nursery Available Sunday Evening 6:00 P.M.
Interpreter for the Deaf id-Week (Wed.) 7:00 P.M.
9912 Indiana St. Hwy 41 & Estelle Anu Malcolm S. Clements, Pastor
\Gibsonton, FL 33534 813-677-1301

WJcfe &Ae EVERETT TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ
1611 First St. SW Ruskin, FL 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL-
SERVICES: Sunday........................9:30 & 10:30 a.m.; 6:00 p.m. A L
Wednesday................7:00 p.m.

PRINCE OF PEACE CATHOLIC CHURCH
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573
Phone 634-2328 Fax 633-6670
Masses: Sunday ........................................................... 8:00, 10:00 a.m., Noon
Saturday Vigil ................................................ 4:00 p.m .
D aily ........................................................ .. 8 :00 a.m .
www.popcc.org Confessions: Monday Friday 7:30 a.m., Saturday 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.


C4







JUNE 17, 2010

Obituaries


Dorothy Blake
Dorothy Blake was born into this
life in 1925. She had a very difficult
childhood, and yet she rose above
that. She had three siblings, LeRoy
Pearson, Irene Clauson Haavig (Bob),
and Ken Clauson (Ann). Dorothy went
home to be with Jesus on June 1,
2010. Dorothy was a beauty all of her
life, from a beautiful young woman, to
a graceful 85-year-old who inspired her


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 21


family by never giving up hope. She
was the beloved wife of Orbin Noel
Blake-who passed away in March of
1990. She was the loving Mother of two
daughters, Sandra Casey (widow) of
Sun City Center, Fl. and Denise Axtell
(Keith) of Naperville, IL. She was the
proud and devoted Grandmother of
Cindy Lewandowski Carlson (Jimmy),
David Steffes, and Step-Grandma to
Brian Axtell (Tricia) and Kevin Axtell
(Michele), and was the happy and
loving Great-Grandma to Cindy's 5
children, Josh Lewandowski, J.J.,
Jamie, Joey and Johnathon Carlson,
plus 6 Step Great-Grandchildren. She
also had many nieces and nephews.
Dorothy was a hard diligent worker all
of her life, working from the time she
was 16 years old as a soda jerk plus
other types of jobs, then later in industry
as a key punch operator. She lived on
the south side of Chicago, Burbank, St.
John, Munster and then retired to St.
Petersburg, Florida in 1983 and finally
to Sun City Center in 1993. Dorothy
was often involved in card parties, bus
planning committees, neighborhood
association matters and knew all the
animals in her neighborhoods. Later
in life she would watch ice skating
programs and any program with Cesar
Milan and animals. Dorothy also leaves


Zipperer's Funeral Home

Only onsite Crematory in S. Hillsborough County

Family owned and operated since 1979


Z 813-645-6130


1520 33rd St. S.E., Ruskin, FL 33570

www zipperersfuneralhome. com Exp.8/31/10


Unitu ,.,w,,..
U n i y Spirituality Rather Than "Religion"
Beth Israel's Social Hall
1115 Del Webb E. Sun City Center, FL Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
www.unitycommunityofjoy.com Tel. 813-298-7745


t THE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO THE SERVICES NOW WORSHIPPING IN THE "CHAPEL"
AT SUN CITY CENTER FUNERAL HOME 10:30 AM ON SUNDAYS
NO CREED...BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE
1851 RICKENBACKER DRIVE 813-938-4955
Minister DR. DAVID CAMPBELL


Q n&/eofJeAoS / o s C urc aoS/qu, C(/4 Cen/er
The Church of Open Hearts... Open Minds... Open Doors
1210 W. Del Webb Blvd. 634-2539
,.--" Worship Services:
S Saturday................. 4:00 p.m. Creason Hall (Traditional Service)
*, Sunday.....................8:15 a.m. in Sanctuary (Traditional Service)
9:30 a.m. Creason Hall (The Oasis)
F 10:55 a.m. Sanctuary (Traditional with Chancel Choir)
Fellowship time T .... T ,. 'i .. ,, -.. r .... 10:15am. and 11 a.m. in Creason Hall
Go'-sfe "".Snw.(CC UNI(.iom
PASTORS: DR. WARRENLANGER, REV GARYBULLOCK
Communion First Sunday ofEach Month


St. Andrew Presbyterian Church

| Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.
Prayers with anointing for healing and
J& wholeness during worship the second Sunday
of every month.
A Stephen Pastor: Dr. Gerald Iwerks
Ministry Church
Meet friends in Fellowship Hall after the Service
Refreshments served


1239 Del Webb Blvd. West
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Church is Handicap accessible


Phone: 813-634-1252
For Information visit:
www.standrewatscc.org


behind her beloved cat Amber. Her
family, friends, neighbors and lots of
animals will miss her. There will be a
celebration of life service on Sunday,
June 27, 2010 at 4:00 p.m. at the Kings
Point Club House, Sun City Center
with Pastor Shirley Dail officiating.
Arrangementsare by Serenity Meadows
Funeral Home, Riverview.

Betty M. Eaton
Betty M. (Fox) Eaton, 86, passed
away on Monday, June 7, Betty went
to live with her Lord after a lengthy
and courageous battle with cancer.
Her loving husband of 65 years Wilbur
was at her side. Born in York, Pa,
on December 6, 1923, she was the
daughter of the Late Ira E. and Carrie
(Runkle) Fox. She was a graduate of
William Penn High School in the class
of 1941.
While a resident in York, she was
employed by Bell Telephone Company,
the York Hospital, the former Bowen
Defense Plant and Watson's Gift
Shop. Betty was an avid golfer as a
member of the Bon-Air Country Club
in Glen Rock, Pa. After moving to Sun
City Center, Florida 25 years ago,
she continued golfing as a member of
Sandpipers Golf Club, North Lakes Golf
Club and Caloosa Greens. She was a
member of Sun City Center Community
Association and AARP.
She is survived by a sister Sarah
Kopp and husband Max and a sister-in-
law Joyce Fox all of York, PA., Godsons
Eric Luckenbaugh, Ocean City, MD,
David Luckenbaugh of Myerstown,
MD., Derek Bowman of Dover, PA
and a goddaughter, Julie Reynolds
of Bainbridge, PA, several nieces,
nephews, cousins and many friends
still living in the York Area.
Reverend Ruth Richardson will
conduct a Memorial Service at United
Community Church in Sun City Center,
where Betty was a member for 25
years. The service will be June 25 at
11:00am
A graveside service for family and
friends will be at Mt. Rose Cemetery,
York, PA on July 9 at 11:00am. with a
visitation and luncheon to follow at the


home of her niece Gale Bowman.
In lieu of flowers, donations in Betty's
name can be made to Lifepath Hospice,
3723 Upper Creek Drive, Ruskin,
Florida 33573 or to United Community
Church, 1501 La Jolla Avenue, Sun
City Center, FL. 33573.
Her husband Wib would like to thank
Reverend Ruth Richardson and Linda
and her green team from hospice for
their loving support and care during
Betty's illness.
Arrangements are under the direction
of Sun City Center Funeral Home, 1851
Rickenbacker Drive, Sun City Center,
Florida.

Mary W. Hibbs
Mary Watson Hibbs of Sun City
Center, FI and formerly of Uniontown,
PA, went to be with her maker on
Saturday, June 12. She was born
August 9, 1918 in Ursina, PA to Lottie
Wills Watson and James B. Watson.
She was preceded in death by her
husband Wilbur; son J. Phillip and twin
brother James.
A graduate of Confluence High
School and California Normal School,
she completed her post graduate
work at California, Pitsburgh and
Duke Universities. She graciously
served her Lord in the Community and
church in many ways: as an educator
in the Uniontown Area School District
for 25 years; filling numerous roles at
Great Bethel Baptist Church; various
community works including the Service
League and Delta Kappa Gamma; and
later at Sun Towers in Sun City Center
as a volunteer.
She will be lovingly missed by all
she has touched but especially her
siblings; Robert and wife Marjorie;
Betty Ingle and husband Dick; Barbara
Anne Stroud and husband Elvin;
and Tom; her son, Roddy and wife
Ruthann; and daughter-in-law Marsha;
nephew, Holbert and his wife Anna;
grandchildren, great grandchildren,
nieces, nephews. A memorial service
was held at Sun Towers Chapel and will
be held at Great Bethel Baptist Church,
Uniontown, PA at a later date.


Ruskin Church of Christ
611 2nd Ave. NW Ruskin, FL 33570
Don White, Minister 813-361-1415
Sunday Bible Enrichment .......................................... 10:00 a.m.
W orship......................... ....... ... ............... 11:00 a.m .



i*gpe 4 SOUTHSIDE
reahngPhe Wo BAPTIST CHURCH
S4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 South
(4 miles south of Ruskin)
DAN COLLINS, PASTOR JIM KRAUSE, MUSIC DIRECTOR
CO]LLUNIITY INVITED
BIBLE STUDY 9:30 AM
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE 10:55 AM
SUNDAY EVENING SERVICE 6:00 PM
WEDNESDAY PRAYER SERVICE 7:00 PM
ADULTS, YOUTH, CHILDREN
For information, call 645-4085 Monday-Thursday



Saint Anne Catholic Ckahck

Fr. John McEvoy
Pastor
813-645-1714
SaintAnneRuskin.org

U.S. Hwy. 41 106 11th Ave. NE Ruskin
SouthShore: r- '. I I, Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton
C MASSES
Saturday Vigil M ass....................................................... 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass..................................... 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Holy Days....................................... Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Daily ......................................................... M onday thru Friday 8:00 a.m.
Espatiol................................ Domingo 12:00 p.m.; Miercoles 7:30 p.m.
Confession.............................Wednesday 6:15 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.
SNursery Available for 10:00 a.m. Mass /

'1 f


Beatrice May Morrison
Beatrice May (Irwin) Morrison, 92,
of The Inn at Aston Gardens in the
Courtyards, Sun City Center passed
away on May 21, 2010. She was
preceded in death (2006) by her
husband, Kenneth W. Morrison; was
mother of Stephen C. of Allison Park,
PA and Alan B. (wife Sheryl) of Hollis,
NH; grandmother of Shawn (wife
Andrea) and Dawn (Morrison) Zaph
(husband Alan); great-grandmother of
Trevor and Nolan Morrison, Lauren and
Avery Zaph.
Bea was born in Manchester, CT on
September 4, 1917, the daughter of
Francis and Letitia (Magee) Irwin and
resided in Manchester and Glastonbury,
CT She worked at Conn Mutual Life
and Aetna Ins. Companies, Pratt and
Whitney Aircraft, and Allied Electric
before retiring to Florida in 1992. She
wasamemberofCenterCongregational
and South Manchester United
Methodist Churches in Manchester
(CT) and United Community Church
of SCC, FL. Bea, Ken and the boys
camped throughout the US and Canada
in the 1950s, enjoyed the family camp
Rabbit Run in Fizwilliam/Jaffrey, NH in
the 1960s and 1970s, traveled to the
Caribbean, Latin America, and Western
Europe after retiring. they loved to go
dancing and frequent musical events.
Bea was blessed with a beautiful voice,
loved to sing, and was a member of
several church choirs in CT and FL.
After Ken's passing, she enjoyed four
good years with her extended family at
The Inn.

In Loving I'.L.i'oIY

/arvlSanvicle
6//2010

A Cife long friend who knew
no stranger. Good eartedand
free spirted. one, yet never to
6e forgotten. Loved y his ex-
tended fami y and numerous
friends, esyeciaty TPar, Dan-
ny, cris, Shawn, andfaylor
family.


Happy Father's
Day to dads
everywhere!






22 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Octogenarians tie the knot at SCC
senior-living community
Bob Hill and Ellen Sheffield didn't know each other when they moved
to Aston Gardens at The Courtyards in Sun City Center. But each had a
special feeling even before they moved in that they would fall in love
with the active senior-living lifestyle there. What they never imagined,
was they'd be married some day to each other.
When Hill, 84, and Sheffield, 88, finally did meet, the warmth of friend-
ship quickly flourished. They began dating at a Valentine's Day dance
at the community's clubhouse in February, and soon fell in love. The
couple tied the knot May 15. Many Aston Gardens residents and staff,
as well as the couple's grown children, attended the wedding reception.
"At this point in our lives, it's about friendship and companionship," said
Hill. "We're not going to be raising a family, but we are going to spend
the rest of our lives together. We enjoy each other, it's fun."
Aston Gardens at The Courtyards is located in downtown Sun City
Center, near Tampa. The community offers rental-based senior-living
environment that includes independent living, assisted living and mem-
ory care.


No-Car Day
Give your car a day of rest and
your bank account will reward
you. How many times do you run
out to pick up one thing that you
really can do without or can wait
to have? While at the store, you
impulse buy a couple more things.
By having a "no errands day," you
can save money on gas and those
impulse buys as well as gain time
in your day. I find that when I can't
just run out to pick up something
to eat, I creatively use what is in
Caloosa C.C.
Women's 18 hole
League 5/12&5/19
Flight 1
Beverly Valentine 1st 61
Mary Jane Stutz 2nd 63
Bobbie Campbell 3rd 65
Flight 2
Jan Harding 1st 61
Val Pelkowski 2nd 62
Dottie Morgan 3rd 63
Flight 3
Lucille Lanese 1st 62
Ruth Ann Phelan tie 2nd 63
Judy Taylor 63
Lolita Johnson tie 3rd 64
Sue Daveler 64
Shirley Coniglio 64
Flight 4
Dessie Mahoney 1st 59
Jackie Wrigley 2nd 62
Vera Thompson 3rd 64
Laura Horwath 4th 66

Caloosa Men's golf
Bill Devine Group
winners 5/13
Game: 54 individual
There were 9 Gold Tee Players;
First Place: Jack Morton Second
Place: Bob Brown and Arnold
Schuppert
There were 24 White Tee Play-
ers;
Tie for First Place: Paul Flora
and Bill Noyes
Third Place: Jose Rodriguez
Tie for Fourth Place: Walt Taney
and Charles Reeves
Sixth Place: Russ Stutz Tie for
Seventh Place: Noel Kohn and
Gary Adcock
Ninth Place: Allen Bell


the cabinets. Thus, it saves on the
food budget, too. If you do this on
your day of worship, make an al-
lowance to go to church or temple
and then start your car rest day.
Melisa V
Want to live better on the money
you already make? Visit stretcher. corn/index. cfm?TipsSyn>
to find hundreds of articles to help
you stretch your day and your dol-
lar! Copyright 2010 Dollar Stretcher,
Inc.


22 OBSERVER NEWS, RIVERVIEW CURRENT, SCC OBSERVER


Exploring the Mighty Love of God
For kids from 5 years (starting Kindergarten in
September) to 5th grade.
Bible-learning activities, teamwork-building games,
create crafts to take home.
Monday to Friday June 21-25, 2010
8:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. (lunch included)

REGISTER BY JUNE 16
Faith Formation Office
106 1 Ith Ave. N.E. Ruskin
For more information call Cindy
813-865-8222


Nominees sought
for Disability
Advocacy Awards
The Hillsborough County Alli-
ance for Citizens with Disabilities
is seeking nominations for the an-
nual Disability Advocacy Awards,
which honors local individuals and
organizations that have contribut-
ed to improving the lives of people
living with disabilities in Hillsbor-
ough County. Deadline is June 28
The award winners will be rec-
ognized at the Disability Aware-
ness Expo at MOSI, 4801 E.
Fowler Ave., in Tampa. The event
will take place Saturday, July 24,
10 a.m. 2 p.m.
The awards include:
Outstanding Community Ser-
vice Award, which recognizes an
individual, group or organization
for outstanding accomplishments
and contributions to the commu-
nity through courageous advocacy,
education and diligent persistence
in pursuing goals that improve the
quality of life for persons with dis-
abilities.
Outstanding Accessible Places
for People Award, which hon-
ors an individual, organization or
place in Hillsborough County, for
developing innovative ideas that
improve life and accessibility for
individuals with disabilities.
Outstanding Youth/Young Adult
Service Award, which pays tribute
to a young person or youth group
who volunteers their time to make
a positive impact in the lives of
people with disabilities.
Nomination forms are available
at www.hillsboroughcounty.org/
liaisons/ada and click on the nomi-
nation form; or contact Raquel Pe-
verini at (813) 974-8616.


Pictured are Dotty Guerrera, who is enlightening Bill and Sally
McLeish and others, about another form of worship.

St Andrews holds town hall meeting
St. Andrew Presbyterian Church holds a Town Hall meeting to share
ideas about Contemporary Worship service with approximately 100 in
attendance at a Praise and Pizza party.
















Free Skin Cancer


Screening Clinic

If you are concerned about a skin

growth, we would be happy to evaluate

Howard A. Oriba, M.D. Michael G. Caruso, M.D.
Dermatologists

4002 Sun City Center Blvd. Suite B Sun City Center FL 33573

(Corner of Upper Creek and Sun City Center Blvd)(Pink building with green roof)







*A \ AV


CHURCH
Come and experience the power of
Jesus to change your life.
Sunday @ 9 & 11 AM Servicio en Espariol @ 6 PM

www.aplace4everyone.org

2322 11th Ave. SE Ruskin, FL 813.645.3337


Trinity Baptist redecorates
Trinity Baptist church recently decided to paint and redecorate the of-
fices of the two pastors. One Sunday, Jim Feist, the Minister of Music,
jokingly said that since he didn't have an office, he thought that it would
be nice if the wheel stop in his parking space was painted. To have some
fun, one of the church members decided to do that and the wheel stop
and parking area was painted purple. Shown in the photo is Jim Feist
with his fancy parking spot. For more information about the church, call
634.4228.


JUNE 17. 2010







June 17, 2010 THE SHOPPER 23


-T cl THE SHOPPER
To place an ad call
813.645.3111 ext. 201
Fax: 813.645.1792 L
$15.50
up to 20 words M & M Printing Co., Inc
300 addl. word weekly publisher of the
Deadline is Monday The Observer News, The SCC Observer and The Riverview Current
Deadline is Monday )I 114- -CA


0 12 Woodland Estates Ave SW
Ruskin, Florida 33570


100 Announcements
200 Farmer's Mkt
300 Merchandise
400 Marine
450 Transportation
500 Real Estate
550 Manuf. Housing
600 Rentals
650 Prof. Services
700 Services
800 Employment


105 PERSONAL
Coin collector. Not a dealer. Interested in
silver & gold coins. Will offer better price
than dealer. 813-645-1082





260 FRUITS/VEG.

Morgan Farms
Fresh produce, ice cold watermelon,
fresh seafood, live blue crabs & more
US 41, One miles south of the Little
Manatee River. Tuesday thru Sunday,
10am-6pm. Closed Mondays. 813-
645-5208





310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana
St., Gibsonton (1 block off US 41,1 block
north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday thru
Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture,
lots misc. Ministry First Baptist Gibson-
ton. 813-671-0036 to donate
Yard sale. 1709 E. Shell Point Rd. 8am-
? Saturday only. Some furniture, lots of
children's items. Everything must go.
4 family sale. 725 Fox Hills, SCC. Thurs-
day, Friday & Saturday. New brides
gown, new/ used baby clothes, golf balls,
household, clothing. 813-642-9171
Big garage sale. Friday & Saturday,
2306 Lloyd Dr., Ruskin (off Universal)
8am-? Furniture, clothes, tools, etc.
Moving sale. Everything must go. To
much too list. From clothes to furniture,
antiques. Thursday thru Saturday. 8am-
1 pm. 510 Frances Circle, Ruskin. US41
south to Universal Dr.

zz CaCvary's
yy^ngdeitt-ic
SThrift Store
NOW OPEN Wednesday,
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. Noon
Father's Day Sale
50% OFF
All Men's Apparel
1424 E. College Ave. Ruskin
813-641-7790
ministry of Calvar Lutheran Church

Classified Is Convenient


310 GARAGE /YARD SALE



New Summer Hours:
T-F 9 to 4:30 Sat 9 to 3:30

SENIOR
TUESDAYS

Most items discounted
including Clothing,
Accessories, Collectibles, Art,
Books, and some Furniture.
Donations Needed
Please call (813) 645-5255
1311 3rd St. NE Ruskin
(Behind St. Anne Church
& Next to Kennco Mfg.)

Garage & bake sale. misc. items 7:30am-
5pm. Friday June 25. Rain or Shine.
Tennessee Club. 1001 Yellowbird Place,
SCC. Info. 813-633-5069
Garage sale. 1727 S Pebble Beach Blvd,
SCC. Dryer, children clothing. A little bit
of everything. June 18/19. 8am-1 pm.

312 ESTATE SALES


F-flaTSIE


741-0225
Cell: 382-7536
Personalized
Service






Dealer in Gold & Silver Coins
Domestic & Foreign
12% or more and over
on SILVER COINS
(depending on market)
Call for private consultation or appointment
All transactions are strictly confidential
(813) 634-3816. cell (813) 503-4189
"Your local dealer for over 20 years"
),1 "4 ['lra ~v)L, Jl


312 ESTATE SALES

MARIE E.RUDY
ESTATE
SALES




311 Carlyle Blvd.
Ruskin, FL 33570
marie.rdy54@yahoo.com
813-938-5103

To Place
A Classified Ad
Call Beverly 813-645-3111
20 words for $15.50 and 300
for each additional word. Bold
line $3. All Classified ads are
prepaid we take Visa, Master-
Card or Discover










YOU HAVE NEVER SEEN
A SALE LIKE THIS ONE!
Contents include: Museum
QualityAntiques! German Figural
Sideboard w/Matching Figural
Marble Top Server, Oriental
Black Lacquer Tea Table w/Six
Chairs, King & Queen Lion Head
Chair Set, Gorgeous Framed
Mirror, Antique Entrance
Table/Commode, Rare Antique
Clocks (German, French &
Italian), Antique Dresser
w/Mirror & Hand-Carved Table
w/Carved Chairs (belonged to
Royalty), Paintings that were
once held in The New York Stock
Exchange. Bronze Pictures by
Erastus Dow Palmer, Breathtak-
ing Hand-Carved King Size Bed,
Sofas, Wing Back Chair, Coffee,
End & Lamp Tables, Elegant
White Queen Bedroom Set,
Patio Furniture, Household &
Misc. Items. Too Much to List!
TRUST US --YOU MUST
COME TO THIS SALE!
We will be taking bids on the
Rare Antiques Thursday-Friday.
However, all other items will be
50% off on Saturday, as usual.
PLEASE PARK ON
SAME SIDE OF SALE DUE TO
EMERGENCY VEHICLES.
See You There!


312 ESTATE SALES

WE BUY ESTATES
in the Sun City area or
take consignments on
your ENTIRE HOUSE
We also come and pick it up!!


www.ButterfleldsAuctions.com
Butterfield Auctions AB2706/AU3549

331 APPLIANCES
Washer & dyers, working $50 both.
941-538-2894

335 MUSIC
Lowrey Organ. Royale SU-500, Cherry
cabinet, 500 song titles/ instrumental
setups, loads of presets. $12,500. 813-
679-4701

354 MEDICAL ITEMS
Electric scooter, excellent condition.
Free Rider, red, new batteries, good
tires, headlight, turn signals. Will deliver
$1,400 after 6pm. 813-642-9096

360 GOLF CARTS
Golf cart 2008, Easy Go. Like new, all
customized. Must see. $5,500. Call Don
Stanley. 813-634-1350
Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade. Char-
gers, parts all related. Ronny's Carts &
Parts. 813-645-4515 or 813-484-9855
We buy golf carts, any condition. We pay
top dollar for used carts, running or not.
Same day pickup. 813-300-0114

390 MISC. FOR SALE

(2) Cemetery Lots
Ruskin Memorial Park. Reasonable.
2 for the price of one. 813-642-8887
Not home, leave message & number.





411 SAILBOATS




New sail with
window.
Excellent
condition.
$400 obo
within 15 days.
U'^TT^


425 SLIPS OR STORAGE
South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special-
izing in outside storage for RVs, boats &
trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay-
Storage.com

-S1jgy1I


455 AUTOMOBILES


$Fast Cash$
Cars, trucks & Vans. Dead or alive.
813-626-5733, 813-924-6255 Free
Hauling. God Bless
2001 Dodge Stratus is damaged on
driver side, but motor & transmission
is good. Asking $1,000. obo. 813-633-
8477






511 HOUSE FOR SALE





Cypress Creek Ventana
3BR/2BA plus den, open
plan. Great view of 3 sand
traps, large lanai with
pool/spa, 3-car garage,
1950 sq. ft. $259,900
(813) 355-1512


RUSKIN CHEAPEST HOMES,
NOT SHORT SALE, NOT FORECLOSURE!
Great 3BR/1BA, utility room, carport, new
plumbing, new CHA, repainted, large fenced
yard, shed. Low taxes, no HOA. $64,900.
Cute 2BR/1BA, newer metal roof, utility
room, carport, shed in backyard, great
location a block from river, next to
brand new house. $65,900.
*1.17 ACRE CORNER LOT, with electric
& well, ready for the house/mobile home
of your dreams. Secluded, close to town
& shopping! $59,900.
RENTAL: 3BR/2BA 2-car garage house,
Apollo Beach. $950/mo. + deposit.
COMMERCIAL RENTAL: Large warehouse
& A/C offices, 2BA, insulated roof, loading
dock, roll-up doors, over 1 acre lot.
$2,200/mo. + deposit.






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Advertising Buy!
The Observer News


M $2 Off Bronze or Silver

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Full Service Car Wash Only
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04


THE SHOPPER 23


June 17, 2010







24 THE SHOPPER


511 HOUSE FOR SALE


SCC Sierra in Greenbriar, oak floors, replumbed,
interior redecorated. Over 1,500 sq. ft.....$134,900
Hampton "Expanded," w/enclosed lanai, new
kitchen, furnished, golf cart........................... $64,500
SCC Worthington 3BR/2BA, 2,500 sq. ft., solar heated
spa, new flooring, caged patio, vacant............. $249,000
RENTALS
2BR/2B Furn.on Gloucester.......................$750/month
2BR/2B, 2-car garage in Greenbriar........ $1000/month




*1520 DANBURY DR.- Newon
the market.Totally new from the
studs out,and the rafters down.
Fully furnished with quality.
A must see. $134,900.

*1710 DANBURY DR.-All the
advantages of waterfront
without the expense. Beautiful
condition. Come see! $128,500.

712 RIVIERA DR.- New paint,
new kitchen, newer roof,formal
dining room, screened lanai.
Only $92,000.



CONDO -1 BR/1.5BA. NEEDTO
SETTLE ESTATE.Asking $21,000.
No reasonable offer refused.
This would be the best buy in
Hillsborough County.







515 VILLAS FOR SALE

Sun City Bargain!
1st floor, spacious 2br/2ba condo.
King's Point, gated 55+ community,
great community amenities. Appraised
$65K asking $53,900. Owner, 813-
850-1173






560 M.H. ON LOTS
Mobile home for sale Eastwood Mobile
Home Park, Gibsonton. Call Heather
813-677-5726


{OUR NAME:


ADDRESS:


I3TY/STATE/ZIP

DAYTIME PHONE:

up to 20 words
$15.50
includes listing on web
300 for each additional word over 20


SCOPY AS YOU WISH IT TO APPEARSIFICATION

AD COPY AS YOU WISH IT TO APPEAR:


610 WATERFRONT RENTALS
The Dolphin House, Apollo Beach,
efficiency apartments on water. Boat
docking /fishing. Pool, laundry. $185
weekly, $185 deposit. No pets. 813-
850-5217

611 HOUSES FOR RENT
SCC house for rent. 2br/1.5ba, com-
pletely renovate from inside to outside.
Monthly rent $795 plus security deposit
with yearly lease. Please call 813-649-
1599 for details

Apollo Beach 3br/2ba/2cg on Jamaica
Isles. Newly painted, new carpet, nice
quiet neighborhood. $1095 monthly
plus security. 813-645-2448 or 813-
416-6221

S & R Properties
3, 2 & 1 bedrooms. No pets. Ruskin,
Gibsonton area. RV lots available 813-
310-1888 or 813-849-1469

612 APTS. FOR RENT
Ruskin apt. 2br/1ba, no pets, washer
& dryer hookups. $590 monthly plus
deposit. 813-645-1801

Sun City Center.
Furnished or unfurnished 1 br/1 ba,
lanai across from CA complex. New
carpet, tile. Garage. $785 monthly
includes water. 1 CA dues, annual
rental. KLM Realty H. Carl McGary,

613 CONDOS FOR RENT
1 bedroom, 1.5 bath, furnished, Cov-
ered parking. 55+, Kings Point. all ame-
nities. $700 monthly 813-634-1162








* 3BR/2BA Condos. $900 per month.
* 3BR/2.5BA Townhouse with garage.
$1000 per month.
* 4BR/2.5BA Townhouse (1842 sq. ft.)
with garage. $1200 per month.
(Water & Basic Cable Included)

with approved application
and 1 year lease
Move-in Incentives *


Have a nice day


The Shopper
The Observer News
The SCC Observer
The Riverview Current


Mail payment
or drop payment to:
210 Woodland Estates Ave.
Ruskin, Fl. 33570

CALL IN YOUR AD TO:
645-3111 ext. 201
OR FAX ITTO:
645-1792

DEADLINE:
Ad and payment
must be received by
4 p.m. Monday


620 ROOMS FOR RENT
Wimauma, want to live in a country
setting that's clean & quiet. No alcohol
or drugs. $135 weekly, nicely furnished
room includes all utilities & basic cable.
813-503-4592

630 M.H. RENTALS

For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With
A/C. 813-677-1086

Two bedroom $165 weekly, plus secu-
rity deposit. R & M Mobile Home Park
in Gibsonton. 813-677-7509

For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home near
shopping center in Gibsonton. 813-677-
8789, 813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

Private 3br/2ba doublewide on one acre
near SCC & 1-75. CHA, porch & fireplace
813-645-4708 or 813-892-5802 leave
message

Riverhouse 2br/1ba, Little Manatee
River. Fish off dock, boat lift. Ruskin.
No pets. $1,000 monthly. $700 security.
813-690-1836, 813-210-0162

Ruskin 1br/1ba mobile home on quiet
street. Waterfront, fish off dock. Utilities
included. No smoking, no pets. Best
suited for single person or couple. Refer-
ences needed. Rent $175 weekly plus
$300 deposit. 813-363-6001

For rent. One bedroom RV, includes
electric & water. $140 weekly. Perfect
for on person. No pets. Also 2br trailer
813-690-0768

New lower rates. New mobile homes
for rent. Family park. L & N Trailer
Park, Gibsonton.
(2 Weeks Free)
813-381-4830

631 M.H. LOT RENTALS
Lot for rent for mobile home or RV. 1/2
block from Little Manatee River. Located
on 39th St., Ruskin. $320 monthly. 813-
210-0162


645 OFFICE SPACE


We will note undepriced!

Prices starting at
$250 per month




646 WAREHOUSE SPACE
Garage & mini storage rooms for rent.
Pirates Treasure Cove, Gibsonton.
813-677-1137


SERVICES^^

^H700~


705 CLEANING


Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integrity.
Call for free estimate. 7days a week.
Move-in, move-out, rentals. Insured,
bonded, licensed. Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean

Green Team
Home /office cleaning. Windows
cleaned. Pressure washing, yard
maintenance. Call Dee 813-777-1221.


708 MOVERS


Affordable Moving & hauling. Special-
izing in delivery from estate sales. One
piece orwhole house. Loading & unload-
ing moving trucks/ storage units. Free
estimate. Dave 813-447-6123

Advertise in the newspaper

that your community is

reading.


709 PRESSURE WASHING


TWO GUYS
PRESSURE WASHING
Pressure Washing Soft Scrub
for Shingle Roofs Pool Lanai
Driveways. Sidewalks
*Whole House Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED





710 LAWN CARE

FloraScapes
Professional maintenance company
serving all your landscaping needs.
Residential & commercial. Ruskin,
Apollo Beach, SCC, Riverview. Li-
censed/insured. 813-333-3688



L&SLoawn Care, Inc.
Professional Lawn Care Service
Residential & Commercial
*Total Lawn Maintenance
Landscaping/Sod/Mulch
Landscape Maintenance
Irrigation Monitoring & Repair
FREE ESTIMATES/REASONABLE RATES
813-645-7266
www.bandslawncare.com
"Your Local Lawn Care Professionals !"


JUNE 17, 2010

710 LAWN CARE
Most lawns $20. Sod installation, pres-
sure washing, welding & much more.
Free estimate. 813-526-1456

M & C Mower Repair
Parts & service. Authorized warranty
center. Commercial & residential. 725
14th St., Wimauma. 813-938-3226

715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service. Cul-
vert sets, driveways, shell, crushed
asphalt, concrete, fill dirt, excavating,
mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963
Free estimates.

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill dirt,
topsoil, sand, crushed rock & asphalt,
driveway culverts. Loader, backhoe,
grading, bushhog, discing. Install Sep-
tic System & drain fills. CFC#1427021.
813-645-1883

Fill-Land Clearing
Dozer & loader work, driveway & sep-
tic fill, & shell hauled. Robert Carver,
813-634-4962. Beeper 813-267-6217

720 HOME MAINT.

Sunshine Handyman Service.
20yrs experience. Honest, depend-
able. Quality workmanship with
lowest prices. Local references. Free
estimate. Satisfaction guaranteed.
727-831-2089/813-325-3562

Place a Garage/Yard Sale
Ad $15.50 for 20 Words


/- CALL
aul B. (813) 645-3211

DICKMAN Serving South Hillsborough
R .A INC. County since 1924.
REALTY
Cebrating 86 www.dickmanrealty.com
Celebrating 86 Years dickman@tampabay.rr.com
1924 -2010
NEWLY LISTED 3BR/2BA home in Ventana with sellers who don't want
to "wait for the market to come back." Priced to sell NOW at $126,000.
Light, open, great room floor plan with split bedrooms, vaulted ceilings,
screened porch, 2-car garage. Nicely landscaped yard, convenient
location. JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
1.4 ACRES WITH COUNTY WATER AND SEWER AVAILABLE. Ideal
for your estate home or build up to 4 homes on this property. Mostly
cleared corner lot within minutes to Schools, Churches, Restaurants and
Recreation. Asking $133,000. CALL JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540.
BOATER'S DELIGHT!!! Awesome waterfront property in Ruskin located
on a quiet cul-de-sac overlooking the Ruskin Inlet. This nicely maintained
3BR/2BA, 2-car garage has a swimming pool, hot tub, and much, much
more. Call today for an appointment to see this lovely property and make
it your own! $260,000 CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
REDUCED!! AWESOME WATERVIEW! 3BR/2BA with 120 feet of water-
front and just minutes to the Bay! Special features include: dock with lift,
fresh paint inside & out, ceramic tile & more. $350,000 KAY PYE
361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
2.1 ACRES COMMERCIAL on busy State Road 674. 3BR/2BA house
but value is in the land. SMU6 land use. Buy now and build later. Multiple
possibilities. $799,900 KAY PYE 361-3672
LOCATION! LOCATION! Gorgeous 4.7 Acre Parcel (MOL) in a very
convenient location, minutes from Hwy 674 and 1-75. Great area for a
small development or your own private estate! Well and septic in place.
$179,900 KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
UNLIMITED POTENTIAL!! Great commercial acreage located near
Highway 41 in Ruskin and close to planned shopping center. 3BR/1BA
house with detached garage on 1.4 acres (mol) $299,000 CALL KAY
PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
BACK ON THE MARKET!! This cute home has it all. 4BR/2BA, family
room, game room and more. $92,000 CALL KATHY JACOBSON
624-2225
FABULOUS BAYFRONT CONDO, great views of Tampa Bay, St. Pete &
Skyway, and unique sunsets! 2BR/2BA elegantly furnished, open floor
plan, large balcony, covered parking. Amenities include pools, fishing
pier, restaurants & tennis courts. $209,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT
363-7250
RUSKIN 3BR/2BA POOL HOUSE ON 2 LOTS: recently repainted, tiles
in living area, new carpet in BRs, large screen porch and deck overlook-
ing pool and large backyard, 2-car-garage. Home on 1 lot, 2nd lot has
great landscaping & shady trees. $159,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT
363-7250
GORGEOUS LOT ON RIVER, OWNERS FINANCING: deep water,
large dock, great view of water, great fishing Beautiful fence and gate,
all utilities on site. Ready for your dream home or mobile-home
$239,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
UNIQUE RIVERFRONT LOT, close to 1 cleared acre with few trees, over
105 ft. on water, peaceful, secluded, with always a cool breeze. Just
minutes from town & shopping. $250,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT
363-7250
CALL US FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS........645-3211
Donate your old functioning cell phones and drop off at our
office for use by the "Victims Assistance Program."
(Evening phone numbers)
Judy Erickson ..................... 468-0288 Jim Grannon........................... 610-3485
Claire Tort ........................... 363-7250 KennAntonelli ..................... 786-3124
Kay Pye .............................. 361-3672 Kathy Jacobson ..................... 624-2225
Cathy Griggs ..................... 391-8653 Jo Ellen Mobley..................... 645-1540
Christine Nethers ............... 260-6335 LaRae Regis........................... 633-8318
Roxanne Westbrook............ 748-2201







June 17, 2010

720 HOME MAINT,

David the Handy Man LLC. If it needs
to be repaired, replaced or installed call
me. 813-310-5027. Free estimates.
Insured

726 ROOFING

G Horn
Roofing
Free Estimate
Repairs, reroof, inspections.
Over 35 yr Experience
Local/ prompt. Lic# RC29027076 Call
813-787-9047 or 813-641-7699

740 MISC. SERVICES

Oliver & Company
Pet Sitting
813-767-7225. Licensed, bonded,
insured. Member of Pet Sitters Inter-
national. References available, email:
olivertort@aol.com

Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks, boat
lifts & seawalls. Free inspection. Heck-
er Construction Co. 813-236-9306







860 SALES

Start today! Sell Avon, $10 to start. Free
internet. 40% commission. Sells itself.
Call Laura 813-409-2647

870 GENERAL

Sunroom & screen room installers need-
ed for full time employment with Ruskin
based business. Experience is a must!
Also need some tools & a Florida drivers
license. Dependability & good work ethic
are a must. Good communications skills
a plus. Call 813-649-1599 to apply

Firework Stand Operators!
Help wanted. Male or female, no
experience necessary. Excellent pay.
Apply at 8820 US 301, Riverview. 813-
677-1874

Service tech/installer. Great position for
flexible person who wants to learn instal-
lation & service end of business. Some
experience & good attitude necessary.
Unlimited growth potential for right per-
son. Apollo Beach Air 813-645-0381

Driver wanted. Nights & weekends
required. Clean driving recorded. Drug
free work place. 813-944-2918



TO PLACE
A CLASSIFIED AD

L Call
Beverly
at
645-3111
ext. 201
or e-mail:

Beverly@observernews.net
20 words for $15.50 and
30C for each additional
word. Bold line $3.All
classified ads are paid in
advance. Deadlines are
Monday at 4 pm for
Thursday paper.


A community of affordable homes
exclusively for first-time homebuyers!

FLOa RIDR 7OM PfRTNERSHIP
(813) 672 7889 www.flhome.org

wdkwilo-os-,ia


* Phase III Now Available!
* 2 Swimming Pools and a Clubhouse
* 3, 4 and 5 Bedrooms, 1 and 2 Garages
* Popular Ruskin Location
* USDA Self-Help Housing program -- help
build your home in exchange for a down
payment
* No money down, easy to qualify
* Non-profit agency works for you
-Hablamos Espafiol




BAYOUPASS
i;ni r,:, ,,- hie homebuyrs under80% of median in me. Call for devils.


THE SHOPPER 25


870 GENERAL

Teacher Secondary School.
Teaches Math, Computer Science,
Science & Social Studies to 11th &
12th grade students with learning dis-
abilities. Must have a BS in education
& eligibility for Florida Educator's Cer-
tificate in mathematics, grades 9-12.
Send resume to: Center Academy,
Attn D Stone, 10518 Riverview Dr.,
Riverview Fl. 33578

Wanted: Handy man & general main-
tenance worker. 40hrs week. Call;;
813-677-6640

COMMUNITY PAPERS
OF FLORIDA
(CPF STATEWIDE)

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STANT CASH CREDIT Hottest new
Secret! No credit checks You're Ap-
proved/Guaranteed! Rush Lsase for
application: C&R 28E Jackson#C193,
Chicago, IL 60604 1-800-439-0512

Ashley Furniture up to 70% Off. No
Credit Check. $10,000 Credit Line.
Huge Showroom Delivery Every-
where Tampa Discount Furniture
And Mattress Outlet.com 813-978-
3900

Boats; 1000's of boats for sale www.
floridamariner.com ; reaching 6 million
homes weekly throughout Florida. 800-
388-9307, tide charts, broker profiles,
fishing captains, dockside dining and
more.

Need Sod? St. Augustine $100 Bahia
$69 per pallet. Delivery and Installation
Available. Free Estimates 1-888-99-OB-
Sod or place your order online at www.
OBGarden.com ;

ASSEMBLE MAGNETS & CRAFTS
from Home! Year-round Work! Ex-
cellent Pay! No Experience! Top US
Company! Glue Gun, Painting, Jewelry,
More! Toll Free 1-866-844-5091

** BODYGUARDS WANTED ** FREE
Training for members. No Experience
OK. Excellent $$$. Full & Part Time.
Sign On Bonus. 1-615-228-1701. www.
psubodyguards.com

$$ EARN EXTRA INCOME $$ Working
from home. $5.00 for every envelope
Processed with our sales brochures.
Guaranteed!! Free Information. 1-800-
210-2686 or visit: www.funsimplework.
co m


CPF STATEWIDE
Earn up to $150 per day. Under cover
Shoppers needed to judge retail and
dining establishments Exp Not Re. Call
1-888-601-4861

GOVERNMENT JOBS Earn $12.00-
48.00/hr. Full Medical Benefits Paid
Training. In Health Care, Admin/Cleri-
cal, Law Enforcement, Finance, Public
Relations, Wildlife & more! 1 800 858-
0701 ext. 2004

NOWHIRING: Companies desperately
need employees to assemble products
at home. No selling, any hours. $500
weekly potential. Info. 1-985-646-1700
DEPT. FL-820

ESCAPE THE HEAT! Avoid population
& pollution on your 40 AC Ranch Protect
Your Family! Year round Outdoor Fun!
State of Wyoming $995/Down, $397/
Mo. Call Owner: Robert 925-788-9933

FLORIDA KEYS Marathon. Luxurious
Oceanfront vacation homes. 1-6 Bed-
rooms. Private Pool, hot tub, docks &
more! Weekly & long weekend rates.
Last Minute Specials 1-888-564-5800

GEORGIA LAND & HOMESITES -
Beautiful country subd. just off US1.
Great investment! Half acre tracts $75/
month & up. MH's welcome. Others
available; www.HickoryHammockProp-
erties.com ; Owner Financing 912-585-
2174; 912-526-9964

GEORGIA LAND & HOMESITES -
Washington County near Augusta.
acre 20acres starting @ $3750/acre.
County approved, incredible investment,
Beautiful weather. Low taxes. Owner
financing from $199/mo. Hablo Espanol,
706-364-4200

Georgia Mountains Blue Ridge
10Acres w/1000ft. on trout stream,
paved frontage on Cutcane Rd, county
water, building ready, rare find, priced
immediate sale, $129,000. Owner Fi-
nancing 706-364-4200

GEORGIA Quiet, Country Living in
Central GA. 4acre-5acre Private lots.
Only 20mins. to Walmart Owner financ-
ing $110/mo. Call 678-644-0547 for
pictures or www.CountryLots.net

IRS PUBLIC AUCTION WEST PALM
BEACH, FL 4br/2ba screened lanai.
217 Bilbao Street. Open House 6/28,
Sale 6/29, 10am. Registration 9am.
Sharon Sullivan 954-654-9899 www.
irssales.gov

NC MOUNTAIN HOMESITE BEST
LAND BUY! 2.5acres, spectacular
views, house pad, paved road. High
altitude. Easily accessible, secluded.
Bryson City. $45,000. Owner financ-
ing: 1-800-810-1590 www.wildcatknob.
com

NC MOUNTAINS Brand new! Moun-
tain Top tract reduced to $19,500! Pri-
vate, near Boone area, bank financing,
owner must sale, 866-789-8535


CPF STATEWIDE

NORTH CAROLINA Be cool in the
Mountains. Efficiency to 5-br houses &
condos. Fully equipped. Views, pools,
golf, tennis & more. Sugar Mountain
Accommodations & Realty staysugar.
com 1-800-545-9475

NORTH CAROLINA BEECH MOUN-
TAIN Safe, cool, quiet. Fully equipped
1-7 bedroom chalets, condos & cabins.
Some pet friendly! Daily, weekly,
monthly rentals available. www.cool-
beechmountain.com ; 1-800-368-7404

OWNER SAYS SELL! Deep Dock-
able COASTAL WATERFRONT only
$79,900. Direct Ocean Access. Adjoin-
ing lot sold for $309,900! All amenities
complete! Paved roads, underground
utilities, club house, pool. Excellent
financing. Call now 877-888-1406,
x2580

SOUTH CAROLINA Santee Cooper
Lake Area. 2 acres, near 1-95. Beautiful
building tract $19,900. Owner financing
803-473-7125

STOP RENTING!! GOVT & BANK
FORECLOSURES! From $500 Down,
$250 Per Month. Over 900 Exclusive
Homes!! No Banks! Owners Will Fi-
nance! Bad Credit OK!! Visit: www.
rebuildUS.com ;

TENNESSEE MTNS 435ac w/timber,
creek, river, natural gas well, springs,
city water, utilities. Eight miles of trails
$1800/ac. Will divide into 2 tracts. www.
tnwithaview.com ; 1-888-836-8439

Donate Vehicle Receive $1000 Grocery
Coupon Noah's Arc Support No Kill
Shelters, Research to Advance Vet-
erinary Treatments Free Towing, Tax
Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted
1-866-912-GIVE

Donate your Car Truck or Boat to
HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND Free 3
Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free
Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of.
1-866-905-3801

Pregnant? A young married (10+ years)
couple seeks to adopt. Will be full-time
mom/devoted dad. Financial security.
Expenses Paid. Call Karen & Andy (ask
for Michelle/Adam). 1-800-790-5260
FL. Bar#0150789

TN LAND BANK FORCED LIQUIDA-
TION of Smoky Mtn/Lake Property.
Closeout sale! July 9-10-11. Priced pen-
nies on the dollar! All reasonable offers
accepted! Amenities! Map & Pricing:
877-644-4647x500


Advertise in the newspaper I -
that your community is ipp e y p t
reading.








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26 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


THE OBSERVER NEWS THE SCC OBSERVER THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT


ENT., INC.
Lic. #CMC056816
AIR-CONDITIONING,
HEATING & REFRIGERATION
Complete Sales, Service,
Installation & Repair
Amana and Senior
Trane Dealer Discount
John R. Bowman, Jr., Owner
(813) 633-2703




Let someone
else do that
heavy work.

Look in the
Business & Trade
Directory


THE LAWN BARBERS
(813) 938-3649 1
Pocketbook Friendly
*FREE Estimates
AllYour Lawn Care Needs
Palm Tree Trimming
Handyman Services
SERVING SOUTH HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY



PAUL WOOD PLUMBING, INC.
State Certified Plumbing Contractor
#CFC1427697
Residential
Commercial
,',lj Certified Backflows
.j Stoppages
S< Service and Repairs
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(813) 641-1387
'- = -S


SELF ARREST BONDS
COURT DATES 664-0056
WARRANT CHECKS
BIG JOHN'S
BAIL BONDS
641-8400
FAMILY BONDSMAN
STATE FEDERAL
24 HOUR SERVICE
JOHN L. VATH
2100 Orient Road Tampa, FL. 33619
Fax: (813) 628-8739






No Hassle Pricing 25 Years Eperience
ALL PHASES -- From Quality
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Timothy Sutton, LLC
INTERIOR EXTERIOR
PAINTING
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S & "WR'e-R. 0 _fg Spe


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Complete Sales Service
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SERVICING ALL MAKES AND MODELS
24 Hour Service Financing Available
Lic. #CAC1815928

Senior& Military
Discounts


ijiPalm Nee"
Roofing


Proudly Serving: Sun City Center
Ruskin Apollo Beach Riverview
and surrounding areas
Member SCC Chamber of Commerce







CELL 813-777-9808
Frank Shaft
FL Certified Roofing Contractor
CCC# 1327713
www.ApolloBeachRoofing.com
PalmTreeRoofing@gmail.com


WLVIN#'SA/l 9 A IN
SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS
Residential and Light Commercial
Family Owned & Operated
No Revolving Technicians
Quality Service,* Sales,
Installation,
Most Replacement
Parts on Hand "
(813) 263-6503
< CAC 1814336 Ruskin




SAPOLLO
CONSTRUCTION
& ENGINEERING
OA Lie. #EC 0002376
* Serving the Southshore
since 1987
* No job is too small
* For all your electrical and low
voltage needs
* Licensed, Bonded & Insured
813-645-4926



Need Work Done
Around the House?

Turn to PHIL
Your Handy Person!
RIVERSIDE GOLF & BOATING CLUB RESIDENT
www.mrhandyperson.com
Serving
APOLLO BEACH
RUSKIN
SUN CITY
CENTER
KINGS POINT





25+ Years Experience
Licensed & Insured
813-649-1418


All Types of Roofing
New Roofs & Repairs
Shingle Tile Metal Hot Tar
No job too big or too small!
SERVING SINCE 1973
Ruskin Sun City Center Kings
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"ALL MY CUSTOMERS ARE DRY
FRIENDS WHEN QUALITY COUNTY"


Ruskin &
Sun CiG Center
ChamberMember
P.O. Box 551 Ruskin, FL 33570
www.customroofing.us
Bonded & Insured Lic. #CCC1326907





*No project over $1000.
No electrical, gas, or
plumbing, and nothing
structural.


6093mNC


*COMMERCIAL *-RESIDENTIAL
ISouth Ba -
SElectric Co.
of Ruskin '-
LICENSED UPGRADES
BONDED ALL TYPES
INSURED OF WIRING
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OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE
SECURITY LIGHTS CEILING FANS
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.
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REPLACEMENT
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Lowest price
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NOW OPEN
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t so0 o R.V.
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cell: 240-2049 ETC.
1501 33rd St. SE ANY SIZE
Ruskin, FL 33570
Coee tor
FOR RV, ETC.g^^^^^
imiedSpace ow Aaiabl


* Ceiling Fans
" Outlets
Lighting
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FREE Estimates

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Listed with Sterling Management and
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Lic. #EC13002936







I .










H- 1 A&J
Hares
ene. Plumbing
SService & Repairs
*Repipes Water Heaters
New Construction
Remodels & Additions


Mary Ann Wilhelm
Owner/Director
#CAC 1814397
Wilhelm ""
Wilhelm Service

-' 641-1811
FACTORY
SA LOER 802 4th St. S.W.
a (Off College Ave. West)
Ruskin, Florida
Turn to the Experts
www.wilhelmac.com


SFREE Estimates
-I-
,L Lic. #CFC057969
A+ Rating Bonded Insured


roN_ Save 10% on

Ws8 web advertising

SCall your advertising
representative today for more
information (813) 645-3111
www.ObserverNews.net


Residential
wDn Commercial
Licensed
Insured
Bonded
"SEE A BLUE SKY VIEW"
*10% Off First service

813-641-3256


JUNE 17, 2010





OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 27


-'35,,
(;i


- iLLU I


Sa l l i


.Ujj.UJ


All New & Redesigned!
Stylish & Spacious
Unsurpassed amount of standard safety features


[ **5StrSf.I


Come See Why
Thousands of Local Drivers
Are SwitchingTo Hyundai


All New &
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2010 SANTA FE


Rugged Capablility,
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4=1!0


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ELANTRA
399= Best Value
In Its Class


2010 ACCENT
l1T7Ii" Rp


2010ELANTRA Touring 2010 GENESIS Coupe
1-. t i 7 "


2010 GENESIS
r-1977 111111111111111


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Eolw1Prrji ej Guar?@Mtee


We will beat any
other Hyundai
dealer or pay you


All prices are plus tax, tag and $599 dealer fee and are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. O Special APR offers on select models, se I ,.. I r, . . .. i 99,
Genesis Coupe $2199, '11 Sonata $3500, '10 Tucson $2499, '10 Genesis Sedan $3799. All offers are with approved credit and some cannot be combined. *Expected range for most drivers, .
Accent. As listed on Monroney sticker. A For model year 2008. Based on volume manufacturers as included in the EPA'- Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Fu ' I I I I 1.1
Honda listing. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Advertised vehicles subject to prior sale. Programs subject to change without notice. tt Must present signed buyers order from accredited Hvundai Dealer on same model & equipment.


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Manatee Ave. WISR64 J -Exit 220 West -L-

z Road
-rCortez Road


tate Road 70


2010 TUCSON


On Select Models


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Affordable & Fuel Efficient Most Interior Room In Its Class Revolution In Design, Performance & Value Performance, Technology, Safety & Quality
SALE $9 8 7 239 A 24 LEFOR 259 36 LESE OR36
$23 LEASE' $2 E E EASt


LEASE~i ~1


JUNE 17, 2010


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28 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER JUNE 17, 2010

Life is no Bed of Roses when

..u suffer with Leg Pain!
SMountcastle Vein Centers can help!
OVER 5,000 SUCCESSFUL





SAT A L I Daniel J. Mountcastle, M.D., FAAEM, Board Certified,
EU CATI NAL CON ISLTATIO N Ohio State University College of Medicine
NO PAIN NO DOWNTIME NO SCALPEL
THIS IS A NON-SURGICAL PROCEDURE.
SAFE AND EFFECTIVE!
MEDICARE AND MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED
u LECTURE
DaUie Kingspoint Club House
ein Centers A Thursday, June 17, 2010
Ve Cen Uters? At 2:00 PM
MOUNTCASTLE VEIN CENTERS IS HOSTING AN AFTERNOON LECTURE
FEATURING DANIEL J. MOUNTCASTLE, .D., FAAEM, BOARD CERTIFIED, OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
THE TOPIC IS PERIPHERAL VEIN DISEASE (PVD) AND LEG PAIN. DR. MOUNTCASTLE WILL BE SPEAKING IN DEPTH
ON THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF VEIN DISEASE, WITH A QUESTION AND ANSWER SESSION.
"HOW TO HAVE LEGS THAT LOOK AND FEEL YOUNGER"
Thursday, June 17, 2010 AT 2:00 PM
LOCATION: Kingspoint Clubhouse, Sun City Center
REFRESHMENTS, HOURS D' OEUVRES, AND DOOR PRIZE DRAWING
SEATING IS LIMITED, SO PLEASE CALL IN YOUR RSVP TO 813-634-1333
DON'T MISS THIS INFORMATIVE SESSION WITH DANIEL J. MOUNTCASTLE, M.D.

ouna tc as tCe

q ein Centers
4040 UPPER CREEK DRIVE, SUITE #105 SUN CITY CENTER 33573
___813-634-1333__


Bfr Afe


ILorn Phebcts


[S .lho :r~lts~


www.mountcastleveincenters.com




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