Title: Observer news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102144/00021
 Material Information
Title: Observer news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: M&M Printing Co., Inc
Place of Publication: Ruskin, FL
Publication Date: June 10, 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102144
Volume ID: VID00021
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text


I ,.u find yourselff on r r..cid Irip Ihs sumner
loc.krn for the best greoa., spocori in 1..-. n
recid .\il.;h Trophoger ortlicle on page 10


SBeqinrnnq iul, Ist Fl.orida residents cirn .ci:;h
.olr.- i.ler i.h frcm.r shc're or a s.lruclure fixedxd
ito shore for FPEE Details on page 17


SSil.er Ospre, SCqucidron. .'..cs gl.en c behind
the scenes look oi the foas-pcced donqero.u5
.k.orld ,f .c lest pil,,t Story on page 23


PR.S.T. STD
PAID
RUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570
PERMIT NO. 8


June 10, 2010
Volume 54
Number 20
observernews.net


THE OBSERVER NEWS


Undercover with the


Street Crimes Unit


Four of the eight members of the HCSO Street Crimes Unit: Deputy J. Han-
cock, Deputy Chris Girard (now Community Resource Deputy in Sun City
Center), Deputy B. Lee and Deputy R. Cadieux.
Mitch Traphagen Photo


* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net
RIVERVIEW A heavy squall had
just passed leaving a wet heaviness in
the air. The traffic on this busy Riv-
erview corner was unabated, however.
It was just after midnight and a group
of young men wearing jeans, t-shirts
and baseball caps gathered under the
overhang of a drive-thru bank. No one
seemed to notice. No one except for the
late-night cleaning guy inside the bank.
He stopped and stared for a moment
with only mild curiosity at the four
men huddled together near the teller
window. One of the men, Hillsborough
County Sheriff's Deputy Chris Girard,
pulled out a badge from under his
t-shirt. The cleaning man went back to
his work without so much as a nod. Just
another night in Florida.
Sergeant Joe Burt distributed sheets
of paper with information and photo-
graphs to the the four undercover offi-
cers. He briefed them on their target -
the kind of car he drove and an analysis
of how he was expected to behave.
They probably knew their target better
than his friends and parents did. They
didn't know exactly where or when
he would strike next but they knew he
would. At least until he got caught.
The four officers scattered around
that busy intersection in unmarked ve-
hicles. They weren't the run-of-the-mill
unmarked patrol cars, they were the
kind of vehicles that allowed them to
park in plain sight, yet still be invisible.
And for a long night, that is exactly
what they did.
Behind a closed door at the HCSO
District IV office in Ruskin is a dimly


Whatever l


Happened

About...
* By MELODY JAMESON
mj@observernews.net
... Gulf Oil Efforts
Effective immediately, the
Ruskin / SouthShore Chamber
of Commerce is collecting items
useful in cleansing and saving
coastal birds which become con-
taminated in the oil slick now
spreading across the Gulf of
Mexico.
Aiming to support restorative
efforts by the Suncoast Seabird
Sanctuary, the chamber office,
315 South Tamiami Trail in
downtown Ruskin, now is a col-
lection point for bottled water,
bleach, paper towels, toilet tis-
sue, heavy duty trash bags, PVC
plastic shelving, and gasoline
gift cards, according to Mela-
nie Morrison, chamber execu-
tive director. Area residents also
can make cash contributions at
the chamber office earmarked
for the sanctuary
r&lNh lU d rnlnritL it,1


lit room filled with glowing computer end i e t
screens. A handful of people work endeavors to
inside the room; they looked up with recover birds
some surprise when the door opened disabled in
and a stranger walked in accompanied mn-away oil
by a sheriff's deputy. They don't get fromanuncon
many visitors in that room. The people trolled well, she added. The col
at work inside are trying to get one step lecton program will continue as
ahead of crime. They aren't spying on as a need exsts Mo
you or your neighbors, they are trying said.
to keep tabs on the bad guys. They are Chamber offices are ope
looking into the past to figure out the Monday though Friday, 9 a.m.
future. They want to know what the bad to 4 p.m.
guys will do next and to whom they ...SHED Council
will do it. The South Hillsborough Eco-
The Hillsborough County Sheriff's nomic Development Council has
Office Street Crimes Unit is an effort added two new services one
that ties together all facets of old-fash- focused on listing properties and
ioned police work. They use informa- one dealing with area employ-
tion from the deputies on the street, ment to its website as part of
See UNDERCOVER OFFICERS, page 14 See WHATEVER, page 19

South County chamber committed

to overcoming barriers


* By MELODY JAMESON
mj@observernews.net
RUSKIN-Aiming to bridge language
barriers and embrace cultural differenc-
es, the Ruskin-SouthShore Chamber of
Commerce here is instituting programs
spotlighting Spanish-speakers and Lati-
no-owned businesses.
"There is no Hispanic chamber in
the South Hillsborough region to
serve Latino interests specifically,"
Melanie Morrison, the chamber's
executive director, noted this week.
Consequently, the organization has


recognized "it's up to us to encour-
age the cross connections" that can
benefit both Caucasian and Latino
populations, she added.
Those cross connections are tak-
ing several forms basic language
instruction for non-Spanish speak-
ers, educational assistance for La-
tino youngsters, material contribu-
tions when specific needs arise, and
translation of important information
into Spanish.
One example of the latter occurs
See LATINO BUSINESSES, page 8


I


display bUIU" cream "'

Prison art and sampler

of South County talent

is weekend fare
* By MELODY JAMESON
mj@observernews.net
South County artistry on paper, on stage, in vocal form
and expressed instrumentally will be on parade this week-
end in two novel events.
One opens Sunday as an exhibit of visual works titled
"Beauty Behind the Walls" and produced by prison inmates.
The other is summed up as "five hours of non-stop action" by
professional entertainers and slated for Saturday afternoon.
Both showcase the creativity and imagination of current
South Hillsborough residents. Both are open to the public
free of charge. Both offer their audiences the uncommon ex-
perience.
Some 150 prints of art work springing from the hands and
minds of women presently incarcerated at the Hillsborough
Correctional Institute in Balm have been hung in the gallery
at Brandon's Center Place, ready for the month-long exhibit
opening at 3 p.m. Sunday, according to Minnette Webster, art-
ist and teacher in the prison art program. Center Place, a fine
arts and civic gathering site, is located on Vonderburg Drive.
The works, collected over the last two years from a multi-
tude of creative expressions produced by the female inmates,
flow from a wide variety of media with which they can ex-
periment as they search for their most suitable approach to
preserving the objects they visualize, Webster said. The col-
lection contains works in watercolor, colored pencil, char-
coal, oil pastels, pen and ink, she added.
Their subjects also "run the gamut," noted Webster, work-
ing artist, arts instructor and outdoor arts exhibit coordina-
tor. There are brightly colored birds, both stylized and in
natural environments, landscapes and seascapes, floral still
lifes, scenes of war and unique takes capturing fleeting mo-
ments in the human experience. What's more, their methods
of bringing the imagined scene to the visual state that can be
shared range from very detailed to "simple but wonderful,"
See PRISON ART, page 16


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


JUNE 10, 2010






JUNE 10, 2010
DAR awards students savings bonds
Col. George Mercer Brooke
Chapter of Daughters of the Amer-
ican Revolution, Sun City Center,
presented three JROTC Awards
at East Bay, Spoto and Riverview
High Schools.
Each cadet received a DAR
JROTC Medal, a Certificate of
Award and a $100.00 US Saving
Bond. The three student recipients
were Colleen Hillyard of East Bay, Left to Right: Mary Mcntyre,
Jaresia Marks of Spoto and Jody Vice Regent; Jody Masterson;
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total joint replacements of hip, knee and
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Boutique carries
wedding apparel
Hangover's Boutique, LLC is
now consigning wedding apparel
as well as fine ladies apparel.
The consign-
ment store now //
specializes in
all sizes from
OOP to 4X,
which includes
beachwear to
beautiful cruise
gowns. This is
the third expansion of the store in
eight months and the excitement
continues to grow!
Hangover's celebrated their suc-
cess by hosting an Apollo Beach
Chamber coffee June 8, at their
1311 Apollo Beach Blvd. South
location. Call 813-645-5777 for
more information.



Elks hosts Cub
Scouts
Cub Scout 662 Pack meets on the
final Thursday of each month in
the Elks Lodge.
They held their
Blue and Gold
banquet in May
and will be off
for the sum-
mer before re-
turning in the
fall. Scout Master Bill Windham
presented the scouts their badges
and merit awards. Troop 662 pre-
sented a basketball with all their
signatures on it to Grace Bibisi,
and Lu Smith, in appreciation for
use of the Elks facility during the
2009-2010 season.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 3
New partnership promotes Florida
chicken


TALLAHASSEE -- The Florida
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services is teaming up
with Pilgrim's Pride, a North Flori-
da poultry processor, to let Florida
consumers know they can choose
chicken that is fresh and local, pro-
duced right here in the Sunshine
State. Shoppers at Sam's Clubs
across Florida can now look for
the colorful "Fresh from Florida"
logo and be assured that the chick-
en they are buying is the freshest
they can get.
"The logo will help Floridians
easily identify a safe, wholesome,
fresh Florida product," Florida Ag-
riculture Commissioner Charles
H. Bronson said. "When shoppers
see the logo, they'll know they've
found a product they can trust."
"Fresh from Florida" chicken
is chicken of the highest quality,
Bronson said. Raised antibiotic-
free on an all-vegetable diet, it
is processed in a state-of-the-art
facility in Live Oak that features
advanced air-chilling technology
to ensure quality and freshness.
Poultry producers and processors
in Florida must comply with strict
food-safety regulations.
Poultry producers in North Flori-
da also meet rigorous environmen-
tal standards. The Suwannee River
Partnership is a coalition of state,
federal, and regional agencies,
local governments, and private
industry representatives working
together to reduce nitrate levels in
the waters of the Suwannee Riv-
er Basin. Since 1999, when the
partnership began, 99 percent of
poultry farmers in the Suwannee
watershed have agreed to use "best
management practices." These
farming techniques significantly


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reduce the amount of animal waste
and other pollutants that enter wa-
ter resources.
Agricultural best management
practices help protect the environ-
ment, and so does buying food
that is produced closer to home.
Estimates indicate that the average
fresh food item travels about 1,500
miles from farm to table, a costly
trip in terms of air pollution and
carbon dioxide emissions. Eating
locally reduces those "food miles"
and your carbon footprint.
Another benefit of eating food
grown closer to home is that it
supports the local economy, an im-
portant consideration during these
difficult times. Poultry produc-
tion and processing are economic
mainstays for rural North Florida,
where over 80 percent of the state's
chicken production takes place. In
Suwannee, Lafayette, and Madi-
son counties, the poultry industry
has an overall economic impact of
$347 million annually. It supports
nearly 100 farms and creates 3,700
jobs.
"Choosing 'Fresh from Florida'
chicken helps ensure those jobs
will be here to stay," Bronson
said.
"Fresh from Florida" chicken is
already available at Florida Sam's
Clubs, where it is being featured in
in-store video promotions. Other
retailers are expected to join the
program in the upcoming months.
Visit http://www.florida-agricul-
ture.com/recipes/poultry/index.
htm for great recipes featuring
"Fresh from Florida" chicken in-
cluding "Cantaloupe with Chicken
Salad," "Curried Chicken, Green
Bean and Almond Salad" and oth-
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4 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
Communicating is a two way street


No mat-
ter what the
situation--
S boss -em-
ployee, wife-
>- husband,
parent-child,
Positive or neighbor-
Talk neighbor-
By William Hodges communi-
cating is
always a
two-way street. Here are some
suggestions that may help you to
get your message across or to be
sure that you are understanding the
messenger.
As the speaker, be sure you are
presenting your ideas in a manner
that can be understood by the lis-
tener. Don't try to impress others
with the fact that you are a college
graduate and have a huge vocabu-
lary. If the listener must go to a
dictionary to understand you, he or
she will quit listening long before
you stop speaking. On the other
hand, the listener does have a re-
sponsibility to speak up if he does
not understand the terms being
used. Asking for a quick clarifica-
tion of a specific term may prevent
misunderstandings later.
As the listener, get into the habit
of asking questions as the speaker
proceeds. Keep in mind, better a
question than a mistake. As the
speaker, welcome questions. It
shows the listener is paying atten-
tion and is trying to follow you.
Do not look at questions as chal-
lenges to your propositions, but as
additional opportunities to expand
your thoughts.
As either the speaker or the lis-
tener, try to paraphrase the other
person's remarks. For example,
the speaker says, "The sky was
a funny color between black and

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white." The listener, to get a better
picture in his mind and to ensure
he is seeing the same picture, re-
sponds with, "What you are saying
is the sky was gray." The speaker
responds, "Yes-gray, like char-
coal." Paraphrasing forced a more
complete meeting of the minds.
Our body language, as a speak-
er or a listener, can have a major
impact on whether the message
gets through. The body has cer-
tain mechanisms that respond to
threatening gestures or speech.
None of these mechanisms en-
hance communications, and most
of them hinder it. Avoid raising
your voice and making any threat-
ening gestures with any part of
your body, including your face,
if you want your message to be
received, unless your message is
intended to create fear in the lis-
tener. However, as a side effect
of this technique, be aware that in
creating fear, you may destroy any
opportunity for meaningful com-
munications. From the listener's
standpoint, body language can
be equally important. If you con-
tinue to shuffle through your mail
or read a report while someone is
speaking, the unspoken message
you are sending is that you are not
interested in what he or she has to
say. As a listener, give the speaker
your full attention and occasion-
ally give a nod or word of assent
to let the speaker know that you
are following.
Finally, Ed Howe said, "No man
would listen to you talk if he didn't
know it was his turn next." Always
be willing to allow the traffic to
move both ways on the street by
not monopolizing the conversa-
tion.
If you do these things, you will
be admired when you speak and
valued when you listen.

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Children and their chaperones from the Project Share program
sponsored by the Hope Fund for Children gatherat Bethune Park in
Wimauma.
Hope Fund celebrates a successful year
The kids ran 26 miles this year as part of the Marathon Kids program
to raise money to give to the vets to help them get vouchers for toiletries
and other necessary items at the hospital. They learned how to help
others and were rewarded by visiting the vets at the James A. Haley
Veterans' Hospital. Those who accompanied the children were Kiani
Mullins, a Leader in Training; Tasha Mingo, a Recreation Leader at Bet-
hune Park; Jose Martinez, Park Director; Carla Miles, the Hope Fund
Board President; Don and Ginny Williams, assistants in The Marathon
Kids program; Bruce Andersen, Marathon Kids founder; Joan Ander-
sen, a Hope Fund Board member, Chris Avella, also a Board member,
and Kayle Farr, a staffer at Bethune Park.
The Hope Fund for the children of Bethune Park, Wimauma is a 501C3
organization dedicated to: enhance educational opportunities and improve
health and general welfare of the children and their families; encourage
and aid children to excel through mentoring and tutoring programs; teach
children and women financial independence.
For information about the Hope Fund, or to volunteer to work with
children as a tutor, mentor, or reader, call Carla Miles at 634-4268. More
information is available at the Hope Fund's website: www.the-hope-fund.
org.









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JUNE 10, 2010
Award-Winning Newspapers
THE OBSERVER NEWS
The SCC Observer &
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Ruskin, FL 33570
813-645-3111
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For current rates and circulation
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JUNE 10, 2010

FRIDAY,
JUNE11
Brooks
and Dunn is
one of coun-
Get Out try music's
There most popular
and long run-
By Julie Ball andlongrun-
ning duos.
ulie@observernews.ne See them
live singing
hits like Red Dirt Road, My Maria
and Boot Scootin' Boogie possibly
for the last time, at 7:30 p.m. on
Friday, June 11 at the Ford Amphi-
theatre located at Interstate 4 and
U.S. 301 N., in Tampa. Jason
Aldean (Amarillo Sky, Big Green
Tractor ) opens. Tickets are $25-
$65. For more information or to
purchase tickets call 740-2446.

To kick off the Dive-In Movies
season, Toy Story will be on the
big screen. This will either help
older kids remember the movie or
set little ones up for Toy Story 3
which premieres in movie theaters
June 25. The first movie begins at
8 p.m. on Friday, June 11 at the St.
Pete Beach Aquatic Center located
at 7701 Boca Ciega Dr., in St. Pete
Beach.
Bring your noodles, floats and
chairs every Friday night for the
fun. Admission is limited to the
first 150 people, so get there early
because it's fun to float and swim
while your favorite films are show-
ing. This is a great excuse to hit the
beach while it's not so hot outside.
Admission is $3 per person, lim-
ited to first 150 guests; drinks,
snacks and glow jewelry will be
sold. For more information, call
(727) 363-9245.

SATURDAY, JUNE 12
Celebrating its 18th year, the
Caribbean Carnival will include
performances by Caribbean music
stars, live steel music, DJs, ethnic
foods and crafts. This year's
headliners include the 'Queen of
Soca' Alison Hinds and Shaggy.
Saturday highlights include Music
Mood & MC Ian Degoose Eligon
& Smallie (1 p.m.); Pan Jamboree
(1 p.m.); Kings & Queens Cos-
tume Competition (3 p.m.); Mayor
Greetings (4:30 p.m.); D-Nero and


June

10-14


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 5


CoCo Band (5 p.m.); Carimi (6
p.m.); and Daddy Yankee (8 p.m.)
The Pretty Girls Fete after-party
at the West Tampa Convention
Center will be Saturday night. The
carnival begins at noon on Satur-
day, June 12 at Vinoy Park located
at 501 Fifth Ave. NE, in St. Peters-
burg. Tickets range from $20-
$110. For more information or to
purchase tickets visit http://www.
tampacarnival.com/web/.

Florida International Reptile
Show features vendors with
reptile pets and everything related
to reptiles, raffles, seminars and
children's activities.


The show begins at 10 a.m. on
Saturday, June 12 at the Florida
State Fairgrounds located at Inter-
state 4 at U.S. 301 N., in Tampa.
Admission is $8, $5 ages 5-12, 4
and younger free.

Family Saturday. Families
are the Center Ring Stars in the
Circus Museum's Wagon Room,
with kid-friendly activities avail-
able for children of all ages at 1
p.m. on Saturday, June 12 at the
Ringling Museum of Art, located
at 5401 Bay Shore Rd., in Sara-
sota. Events include making a
circus banner, learning to juggle,
costume play and art activities.
Take in the museum's showpiece:


An amazing miniature display
of a real working circus, featur-
ing eight main tents, 152 wagons,
1,300 circus performers and work-
ers, more than 800 animals and a
57-car train. Saturday family day
is included with regular museum
admission. For more information,
call (941) 359-5700.

SUNDAY, JUNE 13
Chart-topping country music art-
ist Dierks Bentley will perform
following the 7:10 p.m. game
against the Florida Marlins. No.
1 hits including "Come a Little
Closer," "Feel that Fire," "Settle
for a Slowdown" and "What Was
I Thinking." Bentley has released
five studio albums and has a
sixth, Up on the Ridge, scheduled
for release this summer and is a
Grammy nominee. The concert is
free with Rays tickets. Tropicana
Field located at One Tropicana
Drive in St. Petersburg. For more
information or to purchase tickets,
call (727) 821-1071.A


Sibling Rivalry
Siblings always seem to be competitive, none more so than twins
Delaney and Caitlyn Poli. For four years of high school this rivalry
continued on the field. Caitlyn
attended Newsome and Delaney
attended East Bay. Both were
members of their school soccer
and flag football teams.
This year in soccerNewsome met
East Bay for the District Title. The
Wolves won. Caitlyn 1, Delaney 0.
A few months later Newsome met
East Bay for the girls' flag football
District Title. Not only did East
Bay win, but Delaney scored all 13
points in the 13-0 win. Delaney 1,
Caitlyn 1. Unless you count total
District Titles. Delany has one
soccer title and three flag football L-R: Caitlyn and Delaney.
titles to Caitlyn's two soccer titles.
Both also were selected to the Western Conference Federal Division
2nd Team in flag football. The rivalry will continue!


New arrivals
from Brandon
Regional
Hospital


Aiden John Benton was bomMay
29, 2010. Maria Brielle Benton of
Riverview is the proud mom.
Dante Joseph Davis-Noriega
was bornMay 20, 2010. The proud
parents are Nicole Davis and Brian
Noriega of Riverview.
Wesley John DeSmet was born
June 1, 2010. Kimberly and Eric
DeSmet of Riverview are the
proud parents.
Avery Corinne Sanchez was born
May 30, 2010. Elizabeth and Ja-
son Sanchez of Riverview are the
proud parents.


June

10-14


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Participants who honored veterans at Serenity Meadows are:
Hector Laureano, Don Grazano, Linton Camus, William Nelson,
Cheryl Nelson, Chuck Schlarbaum, Gary Pugh, Dana Conchar, Ken
Conchar, Jan Venzeio, Sam Venzeio, Harry Leinbach, Sue Leinbach,
Serena Galbreath, James Longshaw, Tam and Sean Flynn, Jim Bain,
Richard Pflug, Bill Rivera, Doug Rollick, Phyllis Benski, TC and MJ
Cobb, Debbie Zurinski-Jones, David Jones, Prince Grant, Kevin
O'Donnell and Tammy O'Donnell.

Remembering the fallen
In honor of Memorial Day the American Legion Post 148, The Ladies'
Auxiliary, SAL (Sons of American Legion) and the American Legion
Riders honored veterans by placing American flags donated by the
Legion on the gravesites of all veterans at Serenity Meadows.
In addition, members from the American Legion Post 148 also partici-
pated in a Memorial Service on Monday, May 31 at Serenity Meadows.
Members from the Bums Middle School Chamber Orchestra performed
various musical selections.
Commissioner Al Higginbotham was on hand as well as guest speaker
RearAdmiral Joseph H. Miller, United States Navy, Retired. Presentation
of Colors was performed by the Riverview High School N.J.R.O.T.C.
Color Guard. Father Michael Juran from St. Stephen Catholic Church
said a Prayer of Honor and Remembrance and the Riverview Marine
Corps League performed a Rifle Salute and TAPS. Michael Bohner,
General Manager of Serenity Meadows welcomed all attendees as well as
coordinated all efforts for the Memorial Day Service of Remembrance.



















0 6 11 Pill


Model Home & Consignled FLrniLtre & Accesconres.






6 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers
o


Gibsonton's Terrific Kids named
Kiwanis Club's Terrific Kids at Gibsonton Elementary for the month of
May showed their classmates and teachers what it means to be an overall
Terrific Kid. Dr. Harry Vildibill was a special surprise guest at their pro-
gram. He was Gibsonton Elementary's first Kiwanis Club sponsor.
The school's outstanding students are: Darren Chen, Luz Romones,
Anne Sandin, Kady Karppinen, Kaayla Helfrich, Samantha Kern, Jo-
sephine Guerra, Azareil Bruhnke, Anthony Phillips, Oksana Morales,
Breana Ortiz, Thaddeus Farr, Sara Gibson, Diana Ramos, Erik Del-
gadillo, Jamiley Romones, Diana Espinoza, Adriana Aguado, Virginia
Rosenberger, Justin Williams, Olivia Mellor, Amber Geisheimer, Caro-
line Prince.

Elks Lodge #2672 celebrates Flag Day


The Benevolent and Protective
Order of Elks is an active patriotic
organization. In 1898, a resolution
to be forwarded to the President of
the United States was proposed by
the Past Grand Exalted Ruler (Na-
tional President) Ned Hay.
"Resolved: That the Grand
Lodge...tenders to the President
of the United States its sympa-
thy in these trying moments and
its hearty interest in his every act
pertaining to the welfare of the
country, assuring him of loyalty
and devotion to the Flag and all it
symbolizes..." Eulogies to the flag
became a part of Elks ritual.
The Elks were the first and only
order in the United States to make
the observance of Flag Day man-
datory. The Flag Day Service was


and is color-r
ful, instruc-
tive and in-
spiring. Elks
began to hol
it publicly
throughout the nation. Many out-
side authorities feel that no other
group has done more to promote a
proper knowledge and respect for
the flag. Elks' influence, in fact,
was powerful in getting attention
for Flag Day, both in the Congress
and across the country.
Join them on June 13, at 2pm.
at the South Hillsborough Elks
Lodge #2672 located on US Hwy
41 in Ruskin for this beautiful and
educational tribute to the symbol
of our Nation. All are welcome.


BRINGING YOU THE FUTURE OF HEART CARE.
The county's newest in-hospital cardiac center takes heart care
to the next level for cardiac and vascular patients.

Patients can depend on the center for individualized care and advanced
diagnostic and interventional procedures. Cardiologists coordinate care
with other members of the healthcare team, including the surgery and
emergency departments to get you on the road to recovery.

We're bringing you the future of heart care ... so that you have the chance
to get back to normal more quickly, with less stress on the body and heart.

TOURS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME.
CALL (941) 745-7572.




(MANATEE HEART

AND VASCULAR CENTER
AT MANATEE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
www.manateememorial.com


Cardiac Diagnostic and Interventional Procedures
Cardiac catheterization, angioplasty, stenting, atherectomy, laser therapy, thrombectomy
and thrombolysis therapy, intracoronary ultrasound, valvoplasty, stress testing
Echocardiography and Diagnostics
2-D & 3-D echocardiography, 2-D & 3-D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE),
stress echocardiography
Electrophysiology Diagnostic and Interventional Procedures Radiofrequency ablations,
implantables, pacemakers, loop recorders, defibrillators, heart failure devices, tilt table
testing, intracardiac ultrasound
Peripheral Vascular Diagnostic and Interventional Procedures
Endovascular stent grafting of abdominal aortic aneurysm, limb salvage, angioplasty,
atherectomy, stenting, cryotherapy, carotid artery stenting, laser therapy, thrombectomy
and thrombolysis therapy
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Coronary bypass surgery, minimally invasive surgery, mitral valve repair and replacement,
aortic valve replacement, endoscopic vein harvesting





Become a fan Findlok
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THE NEW HEART AND VASCULAR CENTER

AT MANATEE MEMORIAL I


JUNE 10, 2010


. .






JUNE 10, 2010

The president's lament


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 7


In August, 2009, the headlines
weren't particularly comforting
to those of us working as con-
gressional staff members. Every
single day, it
seemed ,
there was a
new story, a
new video,
about chaos
and near-
Observations anarchy in
By Mitch Traphagen town hall
meetings
mitch@observernews.net across the
country.
The first town hall meeting for
Iowa's third congressional dis-
trict came after those headlines
had been well-established. Nota-
bly, that first meeting was held in
decidedly unfriendly territory -
the vast majority of people in the
small farm town were registered
to the other party. In normal years,
that would not have been an issue
- the congressman I worked for
easily crossed party lines. An Iowa
farmer and a man of integrity, he
saw his constituents, not his party,
as his responsibility. But this was
no ordinary year and these were
not ordinary times. Polarization
had come to Iowa.
The town hall meeting was
standing room only. The packed
room quickly overwhelmed the
air conditioning system on that hot
August day. Certainly, the tem-
perature would do nothing to cool
off the white-hot tempers that all
of us on staff had seen so vividly
displayed on the national news. In
the audience were members of the
national press, expecting to see the
worst from the crowd, making for
the best of headlines.
But a funny thing happened
at that meeting. The old-school
Congressman didn't try to spin
aiii\ ihiiini he simply told the truth.


Many in the crowd perhaps
most didn't necessarily agree
with his position but they couldn't
fault him for being honest.
One staff member worked the
crowd, carrying a wireless micro-
phone to people with questions. As
often as not, those questions made
the staff squirm. There were ques-
tions loaded and ripe for riot. The
person shuttling the microphone
was not only an extremely intel-
ligent and highly competent staff
member, she was also a veteran
of the Iraq War. She knew how to
handle herself among the hostiles
in the crowd. At the first tough
question, she tried to move on -
to find someone offering friendlier,
less incendiary ground. She want-
ed to protect the Congressman.
But the Congressman stopped
her. "Wait," he said. "I want to
hear this and I want to answer that
question."
And so it went for the next cou-
ple of hours. The Congressman
let people talk and he answered
them. He also listened truly
listened to what the people in
the crowd had to say. As a result,
honesty trumped chaos and anar-
chy in that room. I have no doubt
that several people came ready to
fight there were many people in
the crowd holding video cameras;
expecting to make a big splash on
YouTube with the latest town hall
meeting massacre of a member of
Congress. But it didn't happen. Ev-
eryone who wanted to speak was
offered the chance to do so and to
say what they wanted to say. The
Congressman answered them with
honesty. When someone is treated
fairly, it is hard to pick a fight.
There were no fights.
The next two town hall meetings
were much the same. The Con-
gressman acknowledged the anger,
put a stop to the cheering and then


explained his position. And then
he listened to their positions. He
didn't just talk, he communicated.
Not everyone went home happy
but at a minimum, they left feeling
respected.
George W. Bush and Barack
Obama now share in a specific
knowledge that only they and their
surviving predecessors can know:
there is no magic wand hidden in a
desk drawer in the Oval Office.
On September 12, 2001, Presi-
dent Bush discovered that he could
climb up onto the shoulders of an
American public that was rising in
anger; a public choosing fight in
the flight or fight decision. From
that lofty perch, he could and
did shout to the world that
America was not defeated.
On August 29, 2005, as the great
American city of New Orleans was
laid to waste by a force of nature,
he learned that the perch was not
so lofty from the shoulders of an
American public hunched over in
sadness and despair. Americans -
and the world watched for days
as a city in the world's most pow-
erful and proud nation crumbled
into near anarchy. The President
was blamed and reviled for mis-
management of the crisis.
Five years later, another disaster
is slowly unfolding and President
Obama is certainly realizing that
shouting out to the world from
the shoulders of an increasingly
cynical and weary public will not
stop the oil from gushing forth and
destroying the livelihood of thou-
sands of Americans along with the
environment. He is certainly learn-
ing that simply issuing orders from
the bully pulpit of the American
presidency the world's most
powerful platform is no solu-
tion at all. Some members of the
media and the public are calling
the oil spill "Obama's Katrina."


Mitcn Irapnagen Pnoto
United States Congressman Leonard Boswell of Iowa in his first
town hall meeting on health care reform last August.


Today, as in 2005, people are
entering the public forum ready to
fight. Blame is cast without ever
considering the notion that there is
very little the president can do. In
President Bush's case, can anyone
blame him for some hesitancy in
sending troops into New Orleans?
Think about it that's not how
things are done inAmerica. On the
few small scale cases in which it
had happened in the past, the results
were not good. There are so many
legal and constitutional issues sur-
rounding that, it would make your
head spin. If anyone out there be-
lieves that President Bush didn't
care about his fellow Americans
in New Orleans, you are deluding
yourself. The president didn't cre-
ate Katrina. The President didn't
want people to die, nor did he want
to watch the wholesale destruction
of a city. But at the same time, he
couldn't just swoop in on Air Force
One, wave his hand and make ev-
erything better. Did he make mis-
takes? Certainly he's human,
after all. And that is what we want
and need in a president. The presi-


dent is not a king, not a magician.
The president is and should be one
of us. Warts and all.
And now President Obama is
facing a crisis that he didn't create
but increasingly owns. Like Presi-
dent Bush, he is facing a serious
dilemma. The same people who
have accused him of being a social-
ist are now saying that he hasn't
done anything to take over and fix
the unfolding tragedy. But just as
President Bush could not person-
ally rescue people from rooftops
in New Orleans, President Obama
cannot be out in the Gulf scoop-
ing up oil with his bare hands. Is
he making mistakes? Considering
that oil has been gushing for near-
ly two months, it is safe to say that
mistakes have been made. The sit-
uation appears to be approaching
the point to which the only organi-
zation on earth with the discipline,
power and skills to tackle this is
the United States military. But that
is no small decision even when
weighing the consequences of de-
lay.
See OBSERVATIONS, page 8


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8 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Latino businesses


unere simmons pnolo
Historic buildings from Manatee County have been assembled in a
park at 515 10th Ave. W (Old Main Street) in Palmetto at the Histori-
cal Park and Ag Museum. The Park is host to a wide variety of pro-
gramming designed to appeal to people of all ages.

PALMETTO MANATEE COUNTY

ART-rageous Social at Historical

Park, Ag Museum


PALMETTO Palmetto His-
torical Park and Manatee County
Agricultural Museum's first social
of the summer will be an ART-
rageous Social, Saturday, June 12,
11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
This free family event will feature
art activities and crafts throughout
the park. Watch a Iho" to draw"
movie and practice what you learn,
do some painting, make a macaro-
ni creation and a gorgeous gecko.
Enter the watercolor contest which
will be judged for a prize.
A Scholastic Book Fair will be
held in the Carnegie Library with
a large variety of books avail-


able for purchase. Each child who
visits the social may select a free
book from the park's "Book Bins"
to take home. There will be con-
tests and drawings for books and
book fair gift certificates.
Word of Mouth BBQ will be sell-
ing sandwiches, hamburgers, and
hotdogs. Alex's Lemonade Stand
will be raising funds for childhood
cancer research. In addition, the
book fair will continue to be held
daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. June
14 25 (weekdays). The park is
located at 515 10th Ave. West, Pal-
metto. For more information call
941-721-2034 or 941-723-4991.


* Continued from 1
tonight (Thursday, June 10) when
a program on hurricane prepared-
ness will be conducted entirely in
Spanish. The 90-minute program, a
joint Hillsborough County-chamber
effort, begins at 6:30 PM in the sec-
ond floor conference room on the
Hillsborough Community College
SouthShore campus, immediately
east of Lennard High School. The
program was presented in English
on the preceding evening at the
same location.
A similar effort to ensure that in-
formation useful to residents whose
first language is Spanish was under-
taken a few weeks ago when HART-
line announced its new flex bus ser-
vices in the South County, Morrison
said. "We asked that schedules and
other important information also
be made available in Spanish," she
added. HARTline officials quickly
agreed and complied, she said.
Another recent example of the
chamber's Latino-consciousness
transpired May 6 when Morrison
was able to present a $1,000 schol-
arship to 17-year-old Jorge Vasquez
at the Hillsborough County Mi-
grant Education Program banquet.
Vasquez, a Lennard High School
graduate who has grown up in a
family migrating to work in crop
harvests but still maintaining a high
grade point average, plans to enroll
at HCC SouthShore on his way to a
college degree, Morrison said. The
scholarship was funded by chamber
members and the business group
wants to continue the award prac-
tice, she added.
Looking ahead, Morrison said
the chamber plans to partner with
the county's Back-to-School Co-
alition in connection with the an-
nual getting-ready event scheduled
for August 14 at HCC SouthShore
and will be conducting a shoe drive
in the fall designed to collect new
shoes for youngsters needing them
as they begin the 2010-11 school
year. Most of those youngsters will


be Hispanic, Morrison indicated.
Yet another Latino-flavored cham-
ber undertaking in 2010 is to be fa-
miliarizing English speaking mem-
bers with basic Spanish. "What does
a Hispanic business owner do when
the AC breaks down?," Morrison
asked rhetorically. Similarly, what
does a Latino family do when help
is needed with a home repair, she
added. "We've learned they often
will not contact an English-speak-
ing business owner even though that
businessman may be able to provide
the best service at the best price. It
shouldn't be that way. We need to
help the Latino community become
comfortable with making that first
contact."
Consequently, Morrison said
instruction in basic Spanish suf-
ficient to help English speakers
and Spanish speakers over the ini-
tial contact hurdle will be offered
chamber members before year's
end. The chamber executive said
she, personally, carries an English-
Spanish translation dictionary and


asks Spanish speakers to talk in that
language with her, encouraging her
to become more fluent in the second
language.
And, in the same vein, she said it's
become clear that Spanish speakers
obtain much of their information
from Spanish language radio. With
that factor in mind, she added, ap-
propriate public information issued
by the chamber soon is going to be
translated into Spanish and routine-
ly provided to the area radio stations
broadcasting in that language.
As for those who might assert that
newcomers to the United States who
do not speak English need not be ac-
commodated by Americans trying
to speak their language, the cham-
ber executive responded "that's old
thinking." It's in the best interests
of everyone to help non-English
speakers become integrated into the
larger community, she said, adding.
"at one time or another we all came
here from different worlds."
Copyright 2010 Melody Jame-
son


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Observations
* Continued from 7


Lacking a magic wand, perhaps
the mistake both presidents have
made is in not overruling overly
protective staff and spin doctors.
Perhaps the president should do
a better job of directly facing the
anger and fear to say, "Wait, I want
to hear this." I know full well that
President Bush cared deeply about
the people of New Orleans. I know
President Obama cares deeply
about the people along the Gulf
coast. But neither have done a
good job demonstrating the simple
act of being human. It is becoming
apparent that information about the
spill is being controlled and mas-
saged. What the public hears does
not seem to match the reality and
gravity of the situation. The result
is a feeling that honesty is lacking,
and, as such, respect is lacking.
Two months ago, I flew from
Tampa to Sioux Falls, South Da-
kota, to be at the hospital while
my mom had major heart surgery.
Less than an hour after she was
out of the operating room, my cell
phone rang. "How is your mom?"
I heard the Congressman ask. He
was calling from Washington, DC.
Congressman Leonard Boswell is
a very busy man with an enormous
amount of responsibility. I had no
idea he even knew she was having
surgery.
His call didn't change her medi-


cal condition, but it did change me.
He showed me that he genuinely
cared; and in doing so, he helped
me to redouble my commitment
to my mother's welfare over my
own desire to get on with my life
back in Florida. His simple, hon-
est act of compassion and respect
inspired me to be a better son, a
better person.
Americans are capable of mira-
cles. Respect, honesty and inspira-
tion are powerful things. Perhaps
the President could try what a
Congressman from Iowa already
knows. He might find it is almost
like having a magic wand.


Walter Robert
Moscoso, M.D. Edelman, M.D.

Retina Specialist, Cataract & Laser
Macular Surgeon,
Degeneration Glaucoma Specialist


MANATEE
SEYE CLINIC
EI I-. J [ iiJ-


Eric
Berman, M.D.

Eyelid Plastic
Surgeon,
Neuro-Specialist


Robert
Sambursky, M.D.

Cornea Specialist,
Cataract Surgery,
General Eye Care


(813) 633-3065

1515 Sun City Center Plaza


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JUNE 10, 2010






JUNE 10, 2010

Wild Mimosa
When I
think of "mi-
mosa" I think
of the uber-
decadent
breakfast
cocktail that
Saturation mixes orange
Point juice and
By Karey Burek champagne,
not a flower.
However,
I found myself standing in a field
of wild mimosa not too long ago.
I wasn't really sure what type of
flower I had stumbled upon, but
I knew they were special. Just
the look of them made me smile
because they were pink puffballs
that reminded me of powder puffs
for your face or another decadent
treat, the snowball. Snowballs are
most popular in the winter and are
a chocolate cake filled with cream
and covered in marshmallow and
pink coconut shreds; light and airy


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 9


just like these flowers.
I couldn't resist crawling around
on my hands and knees in order to
get a nose-full of these blooms. I
was careful not to kneel on any ant
hills and checked the flowers for
pollinators before I buried my face
in the soft puff of pink. The smell
was fresh and sweet; I was tempted
to pick one and rub it on my neck
and wrists so I too would smell as
delightful.
Although it is a beautiful bloom,
it is more times than not consid-
ered a weed because it crawls and
moves and can choke out crops due
to its stems and leaves. The leaves
found on the moving plant react to
wind, light and touch, closing up
when they feel resistance. There
are legends from Australia about
the mimosa flower being represen-
tative of love and faith, and yet oth-
er stories that have found medicinal
purposes for the plant.


Ruskin Elementary names Terrific Kids
Terrific Kids for the month of May at Ruskin Elementary school num-
bered 48. Their character trait for the month was cooperation. Students
include: Mario Cruz, Nailea Portillo, Shelby Leathers, Carlos Gonza-
lez, Gustavo Sanchez, Samuel Guerra, Hailie Guerra, Miguel Santos,
Jany Hernadez- Veliz, Alexandria Smith, Viviana Ward, Desiree Varela,
Katherine Olivares- Lopez, Jocelyn Diaz, Ximena Alvarez, Elijah Guer-
ra, Diana Barrientos, Morgane Rogers, Grace Simpson, Cesar Maza-
Morales,Victor Ochoa, Nicholas Hunter, Jessenya Baltazar, Camden
Smith, Erika Gomez, Courtney Elchin, Francis Gomez, Meleni Calixtro,
Allana Millner, Brooklyn Regier, Nicole Garza, Marcos Rocha, Cody
Valdez, Karla Villalon, Jason Guerra, Jeremy Willson, Perla Blanco, De-
nise Otriz, Brian Sanchez.
Kiwanis members: Seel Lundy, Dee Wilcox. Principal- Lisa Amos,
Guidance Counselor- Megan Gibbs. Students not present for pictures
were:Yesenia Reyna, Mariah Trujillo, Karina Reyna, Monserrat Villa-
balos, Ruby Robles, Maelis Jamies, Dylan Butler, Alyza Lopez, Alex
Garza.

The Cheapest Bookstore


If you like to read, the best place
to buy books is at a thrift store. I
volunteer at a thrift store and we
sell paperbacks for $.25 and hard-
backs for $.50. Generally, we have
so many that we sell them two for
the price of one. Check out your
local thrift store.


Lori in Port St. Lucie, FL
Want to live better on the money
you already make? Visit stretcher. corn/index. cfm ?TipsSyn>
to find hundreds of articles to help
you stretch your day and your dol-
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Crafting Naturally
Workshops offered
Don't let the summer heat stop
you from enjoying the wonders of
nature!
Throughout the summer, Camp
Bayou will present "Crafting
Naturally" workshops each Fri-
day starting June 4 from 9:30-
10:30am. Each session will intro-
duce one or more craft techniques
using or highlighting a natural el-
ement. Crafts are varied and will
interest participants with skill lev-
els from beginner to intermediate.
Advanced crafters are welcome to
attend to share their knowledge
and expertise. Since there will be
at least two crafts offered each ses-
sion, one geared for kids and the
other for adults, this workshop is
appropriate for crafters aged 5
to 95. A one-time donation of $5
helps pay for craft supplies plus
one or all of the summer sessions.
June's schedule of crafts:
June 11- cross-stitchjelly jar lids
and twig picture frames
June 18- crazy quilt squares and
pressed flower notepad
June 25- natural dyed fabric and
beaded bracelets
Check the calendar at www.
campbayou.org for future session
themes.
Crafters will be invited to dis-
play and/or sell their creations at
the Holiday Open House Saturday,
Dec. 4. Participation in the Open
House is not required but encour-
aged.
Crafts not really your style?
There will be a photography con-
test this year with winning pho-
tos displayed at the Open House
and other venues around South
Hillsborough. Look for last year's
winners in a display at the South-
Shore Regional Library starting in
June. Rules and details will be an-
nounced in the near future.
For information on any of the
programs at Camp Bayou contact
Dolly at campbayou@yahoo.com
or call 813-363-5438.
Camp Bayou is neither a camp-
ground nor a summer camp. It was
an RV park before the County's
ELAP program purchased the land
but it is now open for day use only,
to the general public. Through vol-
unteers, donations, membership
and grants, the RCDF offers pre-
scheduled programs to schools,
youth groups, adult groups and
families plus it's open from Thurs-
day- Saturday from 9am-2pm for
passive recreational pursuits such
as wildlife watching, nature pho-
tography and trail walks. General
admission is still free.
The Camp Bayou Outdoor
Learning Center is a public- pri-
vate partnership between the non-
profit Ruskin Community Devel-
opment Foundation, Inc. (RCDF)
and Hillsborough County Parks,
Recreation and Conservation.
Camp Bayou is located 3 miles
south of SR674 at the end of 24th
St SE in Ruskin. More information
is on the web at http://www.camp-
bayou.org or call 813-641-8545.

KP Ladies 9 hole golf
league
Game: Bingle Bangle Bangle
Points Game May 10, 2010

Flight A Winners
Judy Trombley 9
3/way tie with 8
Marsha Marshall 8
Karen Bergmoser 8
Sue Watkins 8


I his otfer is valid in Florida only. his account has 10 balance tiers. At anytime, interest rates and annual percentage yields (APYs) ottered within two or more consecutive tiers may be the same. When this is the case, multiple tiers will be shown as a
single tier. The following APYs are accurate as of 06/04/10 and are subjectto change atany time: $.01-$24,999.99,APY is 0.05%; $25,000.00+, APY is 1.75%.This is a variable-rate account and rates may change after the account is opened. Requires
a minimum opening deposit of $25,000.00 from funds new to M&I Bank or its affiliates. Publicfunds are not eligible forthis offer. Available for businesses with annual sales of $1 million or less. Fees could reduce earnings on the account.Products
and services subject to bank/credit approval. Member FDIC 02010 Marshall & Ilsley Corporation 10-311-347


Flight B Winners
Bev Buteau
2/way tie with 9
Peggy Flippen
Susie Potratz


AFY






10 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Road food, history and a chuckle or two


JUNE 10, 2010


Road Food!
It is summertime in Florida and
that says that people with the
means to do so are getting the heck
out of here. Actually, I like the heat
and humidity; it's helping to thaw
out parts of my body still frozen
from the past few years in Iowa.
But for those on their way to cooler
climes, the question is, as always,
where can we get some decent food
on the road? I've spent a good bit
of time on the nation's highways
over the past several years, but I'm
hardly an expert. Despite plans and


Observing
the Web
By Mitch Traphagen
mitch@observernews.net


dreams to
the contrary,
I somehow
end up at
places with
drive-thru
windows.
Enter
Roadfood.
com. This
is a website
dedicated
to find-


ing good eats along the highways
and byways of America. From the
best hot dogs in the nation to find-
ing out where you can get a huge
hunk of ham tossed over fried eggs
and potatoes served on the skillet,
Roadfood has the places to eat.
The website allows you to search
by city for restaurants, but the most
useful feature is its discussion fo-
rums. There you can find up-to-
the-minute information about the
best and worst of everything, from
the hoi polloi to the hoity-toity,
along any route you take. And if
you can't find what you are look-
ing for, just post your question and
a roadfood warrior will almost cer-
tainly fill you in.
Visit www.roadfood.com.
A compelling window to
the past
Photographs from the past are
like having a window through
which to view our ancestors. It is
simply fascinating to see how peo-
ple lived, to see the things we take
for granted either just being con-
structed or not yet even imagined.
Last week we visited a website
called shorpy.com that contained
high resolution photographs from
the past. This week I offer a collec-
tion of Civil War era photographs
offering hope and heartbreak with
stunning clarity. The site offers a
long forgotten glimpse into the
personal horrors of the war with
a troubled nation still hopeful and
building for the future as a back-
drop. There is a photograph of
President Lincoln's inauguration


in front of the partially completed
U.S. Capitol dome. There is de-
struction, beauty and determina-
tion in the photographs of children
in uniform; the dead who, even a
century and a half later, should not
be forgotten; the cities and their
architecture; the generals and the
privates.
In all there are 258 photographs,
most from the Library of Congress,
compiled on a single page for easy
viewing. The website is: www.
mikelynaugh.com/VirtualCivil-
War/New/Originals2/index.html.
It is well worth a look through this
very fascinating window to our na-
tion's past.
Laughter the best medicine
It is tough watching the news
today. Sometimes it seems we are
living in an era of bad news that
is getting worse by the hour. The
economy and the oil spill don't
exactly provide fodder for laugh-
ter. The photos of the oil covered
birds are enough to keep me away
from the news in general. I'm not
particularly a softie (OK, so I am.
Sue me), but a few of those photos
have torn my heart out. I now open
up CNN and other news websites
with one eye closed and my finger
on the mouse ready to bolt.
Somehow in this environment,
The Onion, a news parody web-
site, has provided an opportunity
for a chuckle or two in a faux news
report on a subject that is entirely
void of any humor whatsoever.
Young people love to use the phrase
"LOL," which stands for Laughing
Out Loud, in their text messages,
but how often do they really mean
they literally laughed out loud?
Well, I laughed out loud (or at least
chuckled a bit) when I read The
Onion's article. Before I get to the
link, there is a strong disclaimer:
if your sensibilities are such that
you'd rather not see a commonly
used, but crude four-letter (OK, it's
frequently an eight-letter) word on
your computer screen, you won't
want to read the article. It is replete
with the single expletive. In fact,
I can't even directly give you the
link in this family newspaper be-
cause it includes the expletive. As
such, if you work at an elementary
school or on a computer screen vis-
ible to customers, I would have to
describe it as NSFW (not safe for
work) viewing. But the article does
provide a humorous, apolitical and
unique take on a crisis and, after
all, the Reader's Digest taught all
of us (over the age of 40, at least)
that laughter is the best medicine.
Heaven knows we could use a bit


Pulse

The Economy
"...most ofthe ;,. iil in startup [businesses] was propelled by 35- to 44-year-
olds, followed by people 55 to 64. Forget Internet whiz kids in their 20 's. It's the
gray-heads who are taking the reins of the new startup economy. "
The New York Times, June 1, 2010, Entrepreneur or Unemployed
by Robert B. Reich
"A 'home of one's own 'has been the emblem ofprosperity and stabil-
ityfor a very long time. The idea is rich with psychological and cultural
significance, but we have come to an economic juncture where we must
re-examine even our most cherished beliefs. We can begin by o'. hir,,i,
our definition of the American Dream."
The Wall Street Journal, June 7, 2010, Homeownership Is Overated
by Richard Florida
"It's worth remembering that while the daily countdown on the Iran
hostage crisis helped create a famous television show, it was an unruly
economy that ultimately upended Jimmy Carter s presidency. "
The Washington Post, June 7, 2010, Obama's double bind: Oil and
the economy by E.J. Dionne Jr.
Loose Lips
"Tell them to get the hell out ofPalestine."
Hearst Newspapers reporter Helen Thomas answering a question
about Israel during an interview with Rabbi David Nesenoff of Rab-
biLive.com on May 27. Thomas, a long-time White House correspon-
dent, announced her retirement on June 7 in the wake of her comments.


of laughter these days.
Since I can't post the actu-
al URL, I created a masked
URL for the purposes of this
article -visit http://tinyurl.
com/2e893xx. Or, to make
it easier, visit our website at
www.observernews.net to
simply click on the link in
this article under Observing
the Web.
Again, if expletives vio-
late all that you hold dear,
don't bother with the article.
Even if you are OK with
it, you may still find your-
self offended but I'd be
surprised if you didn't also
catch yourself chuckling at
least once or twice.


LiDrary OT congress Image Tromwww.mlKelynaugn.comvirtualuivilvvar/New/uriginalsz/inaex.ntm
A Civil War era photo of Trinity Church in Washington, DC, with the U.S.
Capitol Building under construction in the background.


SouthShore Arts Council





ARTS EXPO

FREE TO THE PUBLIC
Saturday June 12
1:00 to 6:00 p.m.
Borini Theater, Kings Point
Sun City Center, Florida
Bring your friends out to enjoy the day
Schedule of Events
1:00 Nathan Coe-Marsh Illusionist
2:00 Scenes and Arias
Clint Shepherd (lyric baritone/dramatic tenor)
Victoria Pelagia (coloratura soprano)
3:00 Youth in Movement Brandon School of Dance Arts with Ms.
Cory-Jeanne Murkami Houck-Cox
4:00 From Russia with Love Eleonora Lvov concert pianist
5:00 Idiot Princess of the Last Dynasty Peter Klappert poet
5:30 Almost a Home A one-act play by the Pelican Players


SouthShore Arts Council wishes to acknowledge the following individuals
and organizations without which this free event could not have been accomplished:
* The Community Foundation of Greater Sun City Center Funding this event
* Ed Brown MC -Well-known and well-loved figure in the SouthShore community
SJim Smith -The ultimate sound professional
* Kings Point Borini Theater
SMichael Angelo Videographer
* Frank Weder Pianist at the Vinoy


I I


MOFFETT ORAL SURGERY

& DENTAL IMPLANT CENTER


Jeffrey V. Moffett, D.M.D., P.A.


Big Bend Professional Park
13136 Vail Ridge Drive Riverview, FL 33579

813-677-3331

www.MoffettOralSurgery.com

Hours: Monday Friday 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Most Insurance Accepted
Ntos OxdeandL -gSeatonAvalal






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 11


Enjoy Florida seafood for your summer celebrations


TALLAHASSEE -- With June
kicking off the summer recre-
ational season, you can make your
get-togethers with family and
friends even more enjoyable with
delicious Florida seafood, which is
safe, plentiful and available.
State officials believe that inten-
sive news coverage of the oil spill
in the Gulf of Mexico has left some
consumers with the mistaken im-
pression that Florida seafood is ei-
ther unavailable or in limited sup-
ply. Officials remind consumers
that the oil spill has not impacted
all the waters of the gulf and that
Florida's commercial fishermen
continue to harvest seafood prod-
ucts from these clean waters.
In fact, the Florida Wildlife and
Conservation Commissioner, at
the request of Florida Agriculture
Commissioner Charles H. Bron-
son, opened summer oyster har-
vesting areas in the gulf early this
year.
"With demand for safe Gulf
oysters at a peak, this action ben-
efits both our oyster industry and
consumers alike," Bronson said.
"The opening of the summer oys-
ter harvest should be viewed by
consumers that all gulf seafood in
restaurants and markets is safe and
wholesome."
Bronson is reminding consumers
that all seafood products harvested
from the closure line to shore -- in-
cluding grouper, snapper, sword-
fish, golden tilefish, mullet, blue
crab, oysters, clams, flounder,


sea trout, shrimp and others -- are
safe.
"If and when Florida waters are
impacted by the spill, we will take
immediate action to close the wa-
ters to commercial seafood harvest-
ing," Bronson said. "Our commer-
cial fishermen take great pride in
the quality reputation that Florida
seafood products have earned, and
we would never put any product
on the market that would tarnish
that hard-earned reputation."
There are over 80 types of na-
tive seafood available in Florida.
The Department's Bureau of Sea-
food and Aquaculture Marketing
has developed numerous recipes
that feature many different types
of Florida's fish and shellfish. In
addition to these samples below,
more great Florida seafood recipes
can be found at http://www.fl-sea-
food.com/recipes.
Florida Grouper Coconut
Florentine
Ingredients:
2 tablespoons olive oil
4 6-ounce Florida grouper fillets
2 cloves Florida garlic, crushed
1 teaspoon fresh Florida ginger,
peeled and grated
2 cup Florida red onion, diced
and divided
1 % cups canned light coconut
milk
2 tablespoon fresh Florida lime
juice
/2 cup fresh Florida cilantro,
chopped


*0 Podiatric Medicine and Surgery

Sean D. Shanahan,

D.P.M., M.P.H.

3909 Galen Court, Suite B-1
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Phone: (813) 634-0664
Fax: (813) 634-0668 1
















Free Skin Cancer


Screening Clinic

If you are concerned about a skin

growth, we would be happy to evaluate

Howard A. Oriba, M.D. Michael G. Caruso, M.D.
Dermatologists

4002 Sun City Center Blvd. Suite B Sun City Center FL 33573

(Corner of Upper Creek and Sun Cit Center Blvd.)(Pink building with green roof)







81=6 4 iAl45


1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 splash hot pepper sauce
4 Florida plum tomatoes, diced
1 Florida red bell pepper, diced
1 Florida green bell pepper,
diced
1 10-ounce bag Florida spinach,
washed
Preparation:
In large saut6 pan over medium-
high heat, saut6 fillets in 1 table-
spoon olive oil 2-3 minutes per
side until browned. Remove fillets
and set aside. Add garlic, ginger
and 1/4 cup onion to pan; cook un-
til tender. Add coconut milk, lime
juice, cilantro, soy sauce, and hot
pepper sauce. Bring to a boil and
add fillets; simmer 1 minute until
fillets are opaque in center. In a
separate large saut6 pan, heat re-
maining 1 tablespoon of olive oil
over medium-high heat. Saut6 re-
maining 1/4 cup onion, tomatoes,
bell peppers and spinach until
greens are just wilted. Serve fillets
on a bed of spinach mixture.
Yield: 4 servings


Herb-Potato Crispy Mullet
Fillet
Ingredients:
canola oil for frying


Walk-In Oil Changes
Welcome

We service and
repair all makes and
models including:
VW, Mercedes,


1 Florida egg, beaten
1 tablespoon water
1 cup mashed potato flakes
1 envelope dry Italian salad
dressing mix
'/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon dried parsley
flakes
4 6-ounce Florida mullet fillets
Florida lemon slices
Preparation:
In a deep pan, heat 1 inch of oil to
375 degrees F. Whisk together egg
and water in a shallow dish. Com-
bine potato flakes, Italian dressing,
cayenne pepper and parsley flakes
in a separate shallow dish. Dip fil-
lets into egg wash then into potato
mixture to coat. Cook the fillets in
hot oil for 4-5 minutes, browning
on each side. Drain on absorbent
paper and serve with lemon slices.
Yield: 4 servings


Spicy Oysters with Mango
Dip
Ingredients:
3 cups vegetable oil
1/2 cup sour cream
34 cup bread crumbs
1 mango, pureed
34 cup flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
*1 *I r. BIf,


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2 teaspoons curry powder
2 tablespoons honey
1/2 teaspoon white pepper
1 teaspoon paprika
1 pint shucked Florida oysters
Preparation:
Make dip by combining sour
cream, mango puree, salt and
honey. Refrigerate until needed.
Heat oil to 350 degrees F. Com-
bine bread crumbs, flour, curry
powder, pepper and paprika. Drain
oysters and dredge in bread crumb
mixture; fry in hot oil. Serve with
mango dip.
Yield:
4-5 appetizer portions


Golf Scores -
Hogans Golf Club
Wednesday, 5/12/10
Course: Summerfield, 5779 yds
Play: K-skins
1st : two-way tie @ 6 skins each
Ron Kingston & Don Mow
ry
2nd : three-way tie @ 2 skins
each Chip Wood, Anna Kuhn
ley & Rich Lucidi
Low-net & Gross: (3 skins) Don
Mowry, 68/89
Reservations are required to play
withthe Hogans. Contact ArtSwal-
low@aol.com or visit http://ho-
gans-golf.com/. The Club is open
to all Sun City Center and Kings
Point residents and their guests.

AIRPORT
TRANSPORTATION
Luxury Town Car

HOME
OFFICE
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Distributor ~pir OPEN Monday through Friday www.athomeauto.net


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Nationwide Warranty Available Through American Car Care & NAPA

We Are a AAA Approved


Auto Repair Center


JUNE 10, 2010







12. OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT JUNE 10, 2010


The Ruskin Moose Lodge #813 is located at
1212 E. Shell Point Road, Ruskin (813) 645-5919


Friday, June 11
Saturday, June 12

Friday, June 18
Saturday, June 19

Sunday, June 20
Friday, June 25
Saturday, June 26

Every Wednesday
Every Thursday
Every Friday


Every Saturday night


7-11 p.m.
7-11 p.m.
5-7 p.m.


Live music by Cross Creek Band
Karaoke with Kim Mullins
WOTM Dinner


7-11 p.m. Live music by Charlie Bums
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins
5-7 p.m. Moose Legion Dinner
Father's Day Pancake Dinner
7-11 p.m Live music by George Bums
Women of the Moose Bazaar
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins
5-7 p.m. Chef's Choice Dinner
5-7 p.m. Wings (the best I've every had)
5-7 p.m. Fish Fry
(beer batter, fried or baked)
Live music
Karaoke by Kim


All events are open to qualified
Moose members and guest.


Vacations from school can be learning


opportunities
(NAPSA) -- Vacations from
school can serve as opportunities
for children and teens to brush
up on essential skills, and rein-
force what they learned during the
school year.
Research shows that if students
are not actively engaged in learn-
ing and practicing skills during
vacation months, they lose some
of what they were taught during
the school year.
According to the National
Summer Learning Association,
students typically score lower on
tests at the end of the summer than
they do at the beginning of the
summer.
Many students lose about two
months of grade level equivalency
in mathematical computation skills
over the summer months. Fortu-
nately, there are steps parents can
take to keep their children engaged
and interested in learning.
Here are a few tips to help:
Schedule in visits to museums,
trips to points of historical inter-
est and exposure to nature through
zoos and aquariums. All of these
can be great learning experiences
and lead to further reading and dis-
cussion.
Take your children to the
library. If your child likes movies
or television shows, watch them
together and then encourage your


child to take out books on related
subjects.
Use online resources such as
those provided by Discovery Edu-
cation, the leading provider of
digital content to schools across
the country.
These resources include:
The Siemens We Can Change
the World Challenge, an environ-
mental sustainability challenge for
grades K-12.
Ready Classroom, a program
that educates parents, teachers and
students of all ages about severe
weather and disaster preparedness
for classrooms, families and even
pets.
The Take Me Fishing 'Explore
the Blue' online initiative, which
engages teachers, students and
parents in the importance of out-
door recreational activities and
conservation.
Energy Balance 101, a free
wellness resource for elementary
teachers, students and families,
which aims to deliver tools and
information to help students make
decisions for a healthy lifestyle.
To access these free resources,
visit http://school.discoveryeduca-
tion.com. Discovery Education is
a division of Discovery Commu-
nications, whose networks include
Discovery Channel and Animal
Planet.


ABWA to meet
The SouthShore Charter Chapter
of the American Business Women's
Association is proud to announce
that the speaker for their June
meeting will be Kathleen Peters,
Vice President Public Affairs,
Clearwater Regional Chamber of
Commerce.
The chapter meets at 5:30 p.m.
on Monday, June 21 at Apollo
Bistro, 6502 Richie's Way, in
Apollo Beach. If you would like
to attend this dinner meeting,
contact Penny Smith at 645-4829
or psmith@hrblock.com to reserve
your seat. Dinner is $16 including
tax and gratuity.
The Mission of the American
Business Women's Association is
to bring together women of diverse
occupations and to provide oppor-
tunities for them to help them-
selves and others personally and
professionally through leadership,
education, networking support and
national recognition.

Lounge sponsors
honorary mayor
Incognito Lounge is sponsoring
a 'Sharil Nenarella for Honorary
Mayor' night by donating proceeds
from certain drinks and pizzas to
her campaign on from 4 to 8 p.m.
on Sunday, June 13.
Funds received will help
Nenarella in her campaign to raise
money for the ABCC and the
American Red Cross. Best dressed
in red contest for anyone wanting
to participate! Plan to attend and
enjoy music by 'Shake & Bake.'


On May 25, the annual Mr. East
Bay competition took place. The
auditorium was packed beyond
capacity and the crowd was
pumped. Thirteen girls and seven-
teen boys signed up for the compe-
tition totalling 30.
They were classified by weight
division and judged on mandatory
posing and their own personal rou-
tines that they compiled. To com-
pete in a competition shows deter-
mination and will power.
This year's winners were Justin
Vogel who won the title of Mr.
East Bay and Samantha Boyette
for Ms. East Bay.
Girls placing for lightweight
were: second place, Kayla Cox;
third place, Alicia Hall. Medium
placing was: first place, Alyssa
Hall; second place, Amy Rachel;
third place, Kalii Bolin.
Boys' lightweight was: first
place, Conner Kenny; second
place, Josh Vogel; third place,
Matthew Laine.
In the middle weight class: first
place, Justin Vogel; second place,
John Tuy; third place, Preston
Cruz.
In the heavyweight competition
first place, Jason Rodriguez; sec-
ond place, Calvin Sanders; third
place, Forrest Meredith. Josh
Vogel won this year's Best Poser.
Talk about the 2011 Mr. and Ms.
East Bay competition has already
begun.


Ruskin Eagles elect officers
for 2010-2011
F. St. Jacques............ Past Worthy President
S. Chase.................... Worthy President
S. Chase.................... Worthy Vice President
B. Fletcher................ Worthy Chaplain
F T S. Schmitz ................ Worthy Conductor
M. Roush.................. Worthy Inside Guard
M. Drapeau .............. Worthy Secretary
T. Smeaton............... Worthy Treasurer
W. Dixon............... Worthy 5-year Trustee
B. Lelliot.................. Worthy 4-year Trustee
A. Lord.................... Worthy 3-year Trustee
D. Kober................... Worthy 2-year Trustee
S. Mayfield............... Worthy 1-year Trustee


......................................

Ice CreamSocial


JUNE 15tI
2:00 PM

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SUNTOWERS
A RETIREMENT & REHABILITATION COMMUNITY
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Celebrating 36 Years in Business
CALL FOR FREE
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Congratulations to 2010 Mr. and
Ms. East Bay


Ruskin VFW Post #6287

Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120 U.S. 41 N. has listed the following
weekly activities. Meetings are: American Legion on 1st Wednesday
each month; VFW and LAVFW on the 2nd Wednesday each month;
and MAVFW on the 3rd Thursday
each month.
Thursday, June 10- Bar Bingo
at 6 p.m.
Friday, June 11 Fish & Chips
from 5 to 7 p.m. Music by You 2 Kan
Karaoke from 7 to 11 p.m.
Saturday, June 12 Open.
Sunday, June 13 American
SLegion Ladies' Auxiliary will be
presented with their Charter at 2
p.m. All welcome to watch.
Monday, June 14- Wii Games at 7 p.m. Cribbage at 1 p.m.
Tuesday, June 15 Games in lounge from 1 to 5 p.m. No bingo.
Wednesday, June 16 Parade Meeting at 5:30 p.m. Wii Games
Bowling at 6 p.m.


12 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT


JUNE 10, 2010


4~3L
,,,.,




OBSERVER NEV


--tuesd alv ,il'-u8 n0 16


Gold Hits aWori

ecorljHjg i II


JUNE 10, 2010


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Iatesl
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VS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 13
_ore IL

~~T dcome in
|'n foru the
l ? II I Id


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NL I. I.


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bbuly Ibcm

INSTANT PAYMENT
for Accumulations, Collections, Estates
SILVER COINS PAYING TOP DOLLAR 11.00 per dollar
1964 & earlier: Silver Dollars:
-Hl,\ s 5.50 & up Is X- 1'-'i 4 14.00 & up
:Q(2.75 ii .1 &- up I 1'--'35 S13.00 & up
/ Dime- s.1O & up UNc. nu \\ ills l"'- 2'25 s300 & up
1965 1969: UNC. nc\\ rtlls Iss- 1-14 s550& up
H.l\ c- S1.50 pl I Li 'll d r Fine plus or better. Huge Premiums For
Uncirculated Rolls or Bags.
WE BUY ALL FORMS OF GOLD & COINS
School Rin,. US G. CoIdC ns
m Jewelry $ $1 to $20 .................125 to $2,000 & up
Broken Jewelry 1795-1833 ..........5,000 to $40,000 & up
Chains K-Rands
,Go11dd Pc,,- o
*E r ln iw,,ii Ic K i* Er ld '2Iyplc Lca
O, \\G i ld iLh I pt'kcI t \\ r Iii sii1 P.man da.1
Dcn GI GId & G GId B.i
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SSTERLING SILVER
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TeRefre shmen tsa uppie
n ki FiiScklnll ll i Yln Sin ie y
Danbuir Minit S'ci', i


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14 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Undercover officers-


* Continued from 1
investigations from detectives, and
the data in their computers in an
attempt to get a handle on crime. It
is old-fashioned law enforcement
in almost every sense, except for
the advanced technology and the
philosophy behind the unit. They
don't simply want to investigate
crimes that have already occurred.
They want to know where crimes
are going to occur and be there
to put an end to it.
One perp at a time if ...the ui
necessary. officers mig
At 2 a.m., traffic care
is still flowing at a each of
brisk pace along the businesses
Riverview thorough-
fare. The undercover saying, 'I
officers were focused tonight. Yo
on one business that But the
the analysis indicated do that. 1
might be the next advertise tl
victim of the man
they sought. He had recently been
released from jail and, shortly after
his release, a series of break-ins
began to occur. The break-ins were
scattered around Hillsborough
County but the HCSO analysis
had detected a pattern. The Street
Crimes Unit narrowed the pos-
sibilities to a few locations and
rolled the dice on one of them.
The sheriff's office has suffered
from the economic recession and
reduced budgets along with every-
one else in the state. They simply
didn't have the resources to cover
every location.
On that night, there could not
have been a safer comer in all of
Florida. While they were focused
on a specific business, all of the
undercover officers kept their eyes
open for anything and everything.
None of the men were rookies
and all have long since learned to
expect the unexpected.
The end result was that, without
knowing it, more than a dozen
businesses and hundreds of people
passing through that intersection
and shopping at a nearby 24-
hour superstore were protected
on that night. Nothing bad could
have happened there without an
immediate and forceful response.
From a public relations standpoint,
the undercover officers might
have left cards at each of the many
businesses in that area saying, "We
were here tonight. You are safe."
It would have been a powerful
message to let the public know
that those officers were there for
them tn nrntpet nnd tn serve But


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they couldn't do that. They don't
advertise themselves. They need to
remain in the background, hidden
in plain sight, to be effective.
On the surface, the Street Crimes
Unit is right off the screen from
a prime-time television police
drama. It is cool technology and
investigative work coupled with
undercover cops staking out and
putting away the bad guys. Most
deputies would privately admit
that it is a prominent
lercover and exciting assign-
it have left ment. The reality,
Sat of course, is always
te many different than the
That area perception. The
Officers in the unit
are required to adapt
are safe." to a highly varied
couldn't schedule. They work
ey don't days through much
,mselves... of the week and then
possibly overnight
on their next shift. Weekend plans
are difficult to make because their
weekends are often determined by
what the analysis reveals about the
latest bad guys they are tracking. It
is not a nine-to-five job.
Overnight stake outs are just that
long nights sitting behind the
wheel of cars waiting and watch-
ing. Something might happen,
but perhaps not. Even with their
advanced investigative work, there
is no certainty. And again, there is
the need to be prepared for the un-
expected. Overnight stakeouts are
events spent on edge, ever vigilant,
fueled by coffee; but without
bathroom breaks. The undercover
officers can't leave their cars or
their posts for even a minute to
answer the call of nature, because
that is a minute in which they
could miss something. Or, it could
be a minute in which they might
be noticed by the bad guy.
At 4 a.m., with the bars closed,
traffic begins to lighten. People
continue to shop at the 24-hour su-
perstore, entering and then leaving
the store with their just purchased
cereal, shaving cream and cheap
toys (for their children, hopefully
asleep at that hour). Four in the
morning in a 24-hour superstore is
decidedly not the Florida people
see in the tourist ads. At that store,
on that comer, no one has the
slightest idea that nearby are four
highly experienced undercover
officers waiting and expecting to
stop a crime in progress.
From behind the wheel of an in-
exnensive and not nerfectlv clean


JUNE 10, 2010


imported car built earlier in the
decade, HCSO Corporal Bob La-
Barge pulls out a pair of night vi-
sion goggles. Through the goggles,
the bank drive-thru where they met
a few hours ago lit up like the sun;
and the dark shrubs and weeds
on the nearby comer glowed as
if bathed in an alien daylight.
Certainly, there was no one hiding
in wait to rob the late night cereal
and shaving cream shoppers. The
goggles were expensive, and they
were purchased with money from
LaBarge's own pocket. Like most
officers in the sheriff's office,
investing in the job is worthwhile.
They live here, too. Their kids live
here. And they want to protect you
as they would protect their own
families.
Traffic began to pick up again
at 5 a.m. as the morning shift
workers and the Type-A person-
alities began the rush to their jobs.
Watching it unfold throughout a
long night, there is a remarkably
fine line between the closing-the-
bar crowd and the stressed-out
office workers getting an early
jump on the workday. They only
barely avoid each other, although
perhaps sometimes they do with
tragic results.
By 6 a.m., traffic was flow-
ing with the normal heaviness
found everywhere in Tampa Bay;
and the four undercover officers
decided to pull the plug. The bad
guy didn't show. But in the end,
he didn't get away, either. He was
arrested in South Hillsborough


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eight hours later on suspicion of a
crime. The Street Crimes officers
would have preferred to have
caught him in the act, but they
caught him nonetheless. Almost
certainly, there will be a next
time.
As silently and discretely as
they spent the night on that busy
intersection in Riverview, the four
undercover officers disappeared
into the morning. In a few hours,
they would be back at work. And
on another night, perhaps tonight,
T **a"' I ^ I J
P:, **


somewhere on an intersection in
South Hillsborough, people and
businesses will be more safe than
they can possibly imagine bad
guys will be less so. Someone
out there, hiding in plain site, is
anticipating the bad guy's moves;
and they want nothing more than
to stop him.
A bad guy, getting cuffed, might
think the cops got lucky; or that
he was simply unlucky. The truth
is, they were waiting for him.
They were expecting him.


Mitch Traphagen Photo
Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office Sergeant Joe Burt leads the
Street Crimes Unit from the HCSO District IV office in Ruskin. The
mostly undercover unit merges old-fashioned police work with high
technology in an effort to stop crime as it happens.


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 15


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16 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


...... ..:: ': ,
;te'"1


Prison art
* Continued from 1
she added.
All of which dovetails with Web-
ster's artistic philosophy. "Try
everything once," she encourages
her students, "and the fun things
twice." Under her tutelage, they
learn to experiment, sometimes
discovering talent they did not
know they possessed. "I'm very
proud of them," Webster added.
Webster began the art instruction
program at the prison seven years
ago. It now consists of three class
levels beginner, advanced begin-
ner and advanced and two other
teachers join Webster in guiding
about 20 inmate students in each
class, she estimated.
The program pays multiple divi-
dends, Webster asserted. "They
work together and help each oth-
er. There is no squabbling among
them and they find such a feeling
of accomplishment" when they are
able to implement their instruction,
recreating on paper something first
seen only in their imaginations.
It is that innate and learned cre-
ativity committed to paper that
will speak perhaps pointedly but
always silently to viewers of their
exhibit this month. The inmates, of
course, cannot attend or take any
other part in the exhibit or its open-
ing, Webster pointed out, and their
original works are retained in the
prison, with matted prints of their
work comprising the actual exhibit
displays.
The Saturday showcase of South
County art begins at 1 p.m. in Kings
Point's Borini Theater. This "Arts
Expo" is being presented for the
first time by the SouthShore Arts
Council and is intended both to
show off South Hillsborough talent
and to express appreciation to the
Greater Sun City Center Commu-
nity Foundation which in the last
year helped finance the council's
major programs, including the an-
nual Big Draw event, said Melanie


I E


Hubbard, a council member.
The five-hour showcase, struc-
tured to allow audience members
to choose their favored forms of
art, opens with performance by Na-
than Coe-Marsh, an illusionist in
the David Copperfield genre. Coe-
Marsh, a professional performer, is
the son of Ruskin artists and teach-
ers Dolores Coe and Bruce Marsh.
The 2 p.m. hour is dedicated to
operatic theater, with lyric bari-
tone Clint Shepherd and coloratura
soprano Victoria Pelagia present-
ing several scenes and arias from
works that will be familiar to opera
enthusiasts.
In a fitting transition from opera
to ballet, a troupe from the Brandon
School of Dance Arts composed of
students nine to 18 years of age is
scheduled to present ballet num-
bers at 3 p.m. under the direction
of Cory-Jeanne Houck-Cox.
Eleanora Lvov, a concert pianist,
is to take the stage at 4 p.m. to per-
form works of Chopin, in a trib-
ute to the artist's Russian heritage
dubbed "From Russia with Love."
The last hour of the afternoon
showcase begins at 5 p.m. with
poet Peter Klappert reading from
his published work, "Idiot Prin-
cess of the Last Dynasty." The pre-
sentations wrap up with a one-act
play presented at 5:30 p.m. by the
Pelican Players. Titled "Almost A
Home," the storyline involves two
older individuals, perhaps touched
by dementia of second childhood,
who undertake to run away.
Throughout the expo, art work
produced by council members, also
will be easeled in the clubhouse
lobby, available for purchase from
the artists.
The prison art exhibit is to re-
main on display Monday through
Friday during business hours in the
Center Place gallery until Wednes-
day, June 30.
C 2010 Melody Jameson


IPLOYERS...


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a position
available?
Run your "Help Wanted"
ad FREE in The
Shopper to find just
the right fit for your
business.
Place your 20-word ad weekly until the
position is filled or this promotion ends.
SReach thousands of readers in South Hillsborough
County, and even more online. Ads must be
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JUNE 10, 2010
Shoreline fishing licenses free to residents, beginning July 1


The shoreline fishing license for
Florida residents to catch saltwater
fish from shore or a structure af-
fixed to shore cost $9 last year, but
this year it's free, beginning July
1.
The Florida Legislature repealed
the shoreline license fee during the
past session. However, legislators
retained the license requirement to
prevent a more-costly federal reg-
istration fee from taking effect in


Florida.
Resident anglers who obtain the
shoreline license over the phone
or Internet still will have to pay a
convenience fee to the vendor. The
convenience fee is $2.31 for Inter-
net sales at www.fl.wildlifelicense.
com or $3.33 for phone sales at
888-FISH FLORIDA (888-347-
4356).
Only Florida residents qualify
for a no-cost shoreline license, and


the license does not cover fishing
from a boat or fishing from a lo-
cation or structure accessible only
by boat. That requires a regular
saltwater fishing license: $17 for
residents; for nonresidents the cost
is $17 for three days, $30 for seven
days or $47 per year.
There are some exemptions for
license requirements. More infor-
mation is available at MyFWC.
com/License.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 17


10


E -I
q~
~~f~l


Fox & Friends Animal Hospital

has RELOCATED


'Sb --- A-M I.W.-w r..-. - .... I

to 1024 Cypress Village Blvd.
(across form The Golf Club at Cypress Creek)
19th Ave.NE


Formerly at 793 Cortaro Drive
SCC's Animal Hospital
Since 1989
HOURS: 8-5 Mon.-Fri.. 8-12 Sat.
813-633-2443


Fox &
Friends
Animal
Hospital


*O"
ce SSC~


Postcards Mitch Traphagen photo
With only two people out of tens of thousands of readers recognizing
last week's photo of Fort Dade on Egmont Key at the mouth of
Tampa Bay, I had an idea. I think it would be fun to organize a tour
of all the weird, wonderful, nostalgic places that Florida has to offer.
I tell you, the tour would last for years and along the way we could
stop in to every mom and pop greasy spoon to compare notes and
strategize about the next stop. This state has some seriously cool
stuff and I think we need to see it all. Just plan on being back
in, oh... say 2019. Fort Dade was built to protect Tampa Bay during
the Spanish-American War. It was really a small town out on that
little island they even had a bowling alley. Many remnants and
even many streets still exist. It is such a cool place. Bill and Margie
Galbreath (it is well worth a visit great guess and thanks for the
note) recognized it as did Pam Chambers (great to hear from you!),
who even narrowed down the location on this island. In this week's
honorable mention category, we have the tale of three Jerrys. Jerry
Foppe (thanks for writing!), the former Where in South Hillsborough
master himself, Jerry Foster, and Jerry Alexender (you can't make
that stuff up great to hear from you!), all with near misses. This
week we have what could be one of the first stops in the Weird and
Cool Stuff in Florida Tour. I hope I'm not the only one to know where
this is because believe me, people you don't want me as the tour
leader. Send your best guess to where@observernews.net. Clear out
a few years on your schedule, tour details to follow.

Catch more customers
^g" in our 'web'
Boost your business by utilizing The
Observer News' improved Website.
Consumers ARE ON THE WEB, so
that's where you need to be too.
Call your sales rep today
www.ObserverNews.net 813-645-3111.
www.ObserverNews.net


LtC


Ci

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FRE






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I Noon Tues., June 22nd



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6 p.m. Tues., June 15th
6 p.m. Tues., June 29th


Open: Monday -


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www.brandonpainrelief.com
807 S. Parsons Ave. Brandon, FL 33511
1 2 mile south of Hwy 60
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18 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


The Gulf oil spill is a tragedy that never should have happened.

W e w ill get it done. And while we were deeply disappointed that the recent "top kill" operation
S. was unsuccessful, we were also prepared. The best engineers in the world
W e w ill m a ke t h is rig ht. are now working around the clock to contain and collect most of the leak.

As they do that, BP will continue to take full responsibility for cleaning up
the spill.

We have organized the largest environmental response in this country's history.
More than three million feet of boom, 30 planes and over 1,300 boats are
working to protect the shoreline. When oil reaches the shore, thousands of
people are ready to clean it up.

Thirty teams of specialists are combing the shore along with US Fish and
Wildlife, NOAA and Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries. If wildlife is affected,
rescue stations have been set up to take care of them. Experts have been
flown in from around the country. And BP has dedicated $500 million to watch
over the long-term impact on marine life and shoreline.

We will honor all legitimate claims. We will continue working for as long as it
takes. And our efforts will not come at any cost to taxpayers.

We understand that it is our responsibility to keep you informed. And to do
everything we can so this never happens again.

We will get this done. We will make this right.

www.bp.com
www.deepwaterhorizonresponse.com

For assistance or information, please call the following 24/7 hotlines:
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858 bp





www.floridagulfresponse.com


BP Exploration & Production Inc.


JUNE 10, 2010






JUNE 10, 2010

Whatever happened...


* Continued from page
its ongoing efforts to '
the local economy," acc
to Fred Jacobsen, counc
marketing director.
The council has af-
filiated with commer-
cial real estate listing
company LoopNet
and with the online
employment service,
Monster, Jacobsen said.
first relationship now all
erty owners to list their
cial land or buildings f
lease at no charge. Bus
ties either local or distal
review the listings for p
locations. No broker or t
fees are involved, Jacob
The affiliation with
gives employers opportu


openings for local employees only
'kick start or to conduct nationwide searches.
ording Plus, local workers can view
cil postings at no charge, he
said. In addition, re-
sume help and other
tools are available
through the Monster
connection.
The council's web-
site address is www.
The shedcouncil.com. The
lows prop- listing feature is located through
r commer- the "property" link and the em-
for sale or ployment access is under "re-
iness enti- sources."


nt also can
possible re-
ransaction
sen noted.
Monster
inity to list


Dr. Robert A. Norman
Board Certified Dermatologist


...Riverview Fest
Some 60 area businesses, includ-
ing more than a dozen local res-
taurants and their best taste treats,
are participating in the Greater


Dr. A. Theodosatos
Brandi Broughton, PA-C


Riverview Chamber of Commerce
2010 Summer Fest set for Father's
day, June 20, in and around the
Barn Theater at Winthrop. The
venue is located on Bloomingdale
Avenue, between Providence and
Watson.
Designed to showcase the many
aspects of the business commu-
nity, the event is expected to in-
clude close to 100 vendors under
shelter and under tents when it
opens at 1 p.m. that Sunday, said
Tonya Doran, chamber executive
director. "With a children's play
area, including bounce houses and
games, it'll make for a great Fa-
ther's Day drop by," Doran added.
Summer Fest is free of charge,
open until 5 p.m., with plenty of
free parking.
Vendor space rates vary accord-
ing to location. Information and
arrangements available at 813-
234-5944.

...Former KP Chief
Neal Desch, chief of security
in Kings Point for six years until
last summer, has taken his experi-
ence as a former police officer and
counselor trained in dealing with
domestic abuse to the airways.
The Neal Desch Life Improve-
ment Show currently is on inter-
net radio at www.pirateradio.com
weekday mornings 9 a.m. to noon,
he said this week. Desch, who lost
a sister to domestic abuse, inter-
views guests and discusses a wide
range of topics pertinent to a posi-
tive life from the Tampa broadcast
studio. The one-time condomin-
ium community security officer
also lectures and writes on related
issues. He said he's interested, too,
in establishing his own internet ra-
dio outlet.
Copyright 2010 Melody Jame-
son


Effircient


IfM PA L DIAVIS


Serving Tampa --. .. ivIolI Remeoauion &
Since 1966 RRESTORATION Prevention
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Y.... 813-984-2700 1-888-473-7669


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 19


The Cortez Schoolhouse was constructed in 1912. The building was
the second schoolhouse for the community of Cortez, which was
established in the 1880s as a fishing village. Today, the schoolhouse
is the home of the Florida Maritime Museum at Cortez.


Consider Cortez when
CORTEZ (Manatee County) -
When you need to slow your life
down a bit and want to get away
from the chaos of the city for a
brief time, put Cortez on the top
of your getaway list. You can take
a stroll through the entire village
in less than an hour. However, you
will probably want to take longer
as you ponder history and find
yourself flashing back in time to
Florida's early days.
The Florida Maritime Museum
is somewhere in the past, but the
harbor is a modern museum facil-
ity housed in the restored historic
1912 Schoolhouse located on the
park-like grounds of the Cortez
Nature Preserve.
Here you will find pieces of the
almost forgotten past. Exhibits
focus on the maritime heritage of
Florida's Gulf Coast. Don't miss
the boat shop where historic ves-
sels are restored and recreated.
The Museum is a joint project of
the Florida Institute for Saltwater
Heritage (FISH), the Cortez Vil-
lage Historical Society, the Mana-
tee County Clerk of Circuit Court,
and the Manatee County Board of
County Commission.


looking for a day trip
The museum is located at 4415
119th Street W, Cortez, Florida
34215. Hours of operation are
Tuesday through Saturday 9 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. Call 941-708-6120
for more information. Admission
is free.
The Florida Maritime Museum
at Cortez is surrounded by a na-
ture preserve and is adjacent to the
FISH Preserve. Come for a day
and learn about the past while hik-
ing through restored wetlands to
Sarasota Bay.
While in the area don't forget to
visit the nostalgic Star Fish Com-
pany Seafood Restaurant and Mar-
ket, 12306 46th Ave., Cortez, FL
34210.
For more history on the area visit
http://cortezvillage.org.

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20 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
Care Pets of the Week


Spanky
Spanky is a unique looking male
Bulldog mix with marble col-
ored eyes. This spunky little guy
kept appearing in the neighbor-
hood of the person who finally
brought him to C.A.R.E. Spanky
welcomed a bath and a bed at the
shelter. He appears to be good with
most dogs, walks easy on a leash,
is housebroken, and pretty laid
back overall. He is happiest dur-
ing cuddle time. Do you have an
empty lap with Spanky's name on
it? Spanky will be neutered, mi-
crochipped, brought current on his
shots, and treated for Heartworm
as part of his adoption.
C.A.R.E. is open 10am to 3pm
on Tues. Sat. For directions visit
www.CareShelter.org or call 813-
645-227.


Clogging classes
offered for all ages
Buckshot Cloggers invites any-
one interested in fun and exercise
to come and join them for an hour
of dance every week. Dance is a
great workout for all ages. Pres-
ently they are teaching at three
sites in southshore and are offer-
ing classes for children and adults.
Each class is geared to age and
ability. For more information call
Brenda Eaton at 633-3366.


JUNE 10, 2010

South Hillsborough Elks Lodge 2672's
Upcoming Activities
Thursday, June 10- All-You-
Can-Eat Soup and Salad Bar for
all Elks and their guests from 4
to 6 p.m. Wii games available
all evening till closing.
Friday, June 11- Seafood
and Sandwiches for all Elks
and their guests from 5- 7 p.m.
Karaoke by Bryan from 5 to 8
p.m.
Sunday, June 1 3- Flag Day Celebration at 2 p.m. for everyone.
Monday June 1 4- Poor Man's Dinner for $5 advanced and $6 at
the door for all Elks and their guests.


BooBoo
BooBoo is a mostly white do-
mestic short hair mix. She was
brought into C.A.R.E. when her
owners had health problems and
could no longer take care of her.
She is acclimating well to the shel-
ter and is responding to all the love
shown her by the volunteers. Visit
this beautiful girl and give her the
home she deserves. BooBoo is
spayed and will be microchipped,
and brought current on her shots.
C.A.R.E. is open 10am to 3pm
on Tues. Sat. For directions visit
www.CareShelter.org or call 813-
645-2273.


Riverside Golf
SUMMER LEAGUES
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$20.00 .................after noon Reserve your tee time today
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Valid only with this coupon. Exp. 9/30/10 versidebarandglle.com
Golf Lessons 20 Open Tues.-Sun.
Imp .P... 8. 6 I5 0 III I n


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 21


(ALL WHO


IN


UNIFORM

Victor M. Hernandez


Charleene N. Robbins
Air Force Airman 1st Class Char-
leene N. Robbins graduated from
basic military training at Lackland
Air Force Base, San Antonio, TX.
The airman completed an in-
tensive, eight-week program that
included training in military dis-
cipline and studies, Air Force core
values, physical fitness, and basic
warfare principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits toward
an associate in applied science
degree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
She is the daughter of Theresa
Robbins of Riverview.
Robbins is a 2005 graduate of
Riverview High School.


4U


Air Force Airman Victor M.
Hernandez graduated from basic
military training at Lackland Air
Force Base, San Antonio, TX.
The airman completed an in-
tensive, eight-week program that
included training in military dis-
cipline and studies, Air Force core
values, physical fitness, and basic
warfare principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits toward
an associate in applied science
degree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
He is the son of Herminia
Hernandez of Riverview.
Hernandez graduated in 2005
from Newsome High School,
Lithia, and received a bachelor's
degree in 2009 from the Univer-
sity of South Florida, Tampa.


Boat ramp expansion planned
Double your pleasure at Hillsborough County's E.G. Simmons Park.
An expansion project will soon double the boat ramp launching capacity
at this popular park that provides access to Tampa Bay and the Gulf of
Mexico.
This park improvement will provide a new 40-foot ramp and two
floating docks that will increase safety and decrease the time needed
for water enthusiasts to launch and load watercraft. The new ramps and
docks will mirror the existing facility and be constructed adjacent to
the current ramp. The existing ramp and docks will remain open during
construction.
The Capital Improvement Project (CIP) is joint-funded with a grant
from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Cost of
the project is $476,500. Construction will begin this month and is sched-
uled to be completed in October 2010.
Boat launch fees at County ramps are $5 a day or $100 for a yearly pass.
Passes are available at the Park Office located at 15502 Morris Bridge
Road or by downloading an application from the Parks, Recreation and
Conservation Web site at: www.hillsboroughcounty.org/parks/resources/
forms/AnnualPass.pdf.
The Parks, Recreation and Conservation Department manages more
than 20 boat ramps that provide access to both fresh and salt water recre-
ation areas. For a list of boat ramps visit http://www.hillsboroughcounty.
org/parks/parkservices/BoatWeb.pdf.

Winner gets to name Guide Dog

puppy
When Eva Heakin of Panther Ridge purchased a ticket to visit West-
water Construction's 'In The Doghouse' Show Home in Lake Club, she
never expected her visit would have a long-lasting impact. Her ticket
stub was the winning raffle entry and the prize was selecting the name
for a Southeastern Guide Dog puppy.
Eva, who coincidently uses a service dog named Gracie to assist with
various tasks, has selected the name 'Oko.' "It means 'eye' in Polish.
Being of 100 percent Polish descent, I thought it was a fitting name for
a dog that will be someone's eyes."
Chris and Lynne McNamee opened their home to visitors last month
as a way to raise funds for Southeastern Guide Dogs of Palmetto. "We
wanted to do something to show our appreciation for all that Southeast-
ern does," stated Chris, a graduate of the school. Over the week the show
home was open, the McNamees raised nearly $4,000 for the school that
provides their services to the visually impaired at no charge and with no
government funding.
About Southeastern Guide Dogs: Established in 1982, Southeastern
Guide Dogs' mission is to create and nurture a partnership between a
visually impaired individual and a guide dog, facilitating life's journey
with mobility, independence and dignity. Through their programs Paws
for Independence, Paws for Patriots, and Gifted Canines they have more
than 800 active guide dog teams across the nation and continue to add
more than 70 teams annually, all at no charge to the guide dog recipient,
thanks to the generous support of donors and volunteers. Visit www.
guidedogs.org for further information.


The nose knows:
UF to help train experts in sniffing out
oil spill-contaminated seafood
To keep consumers safe from seafood that could be tainted by the
Gulf oil spill, regulatory officials will rely on an incredibly sophisti-
cated, delicate tool: the human nose.
Next month, University of Florida researchers will help government
seafood inspectors learn to use their sense of smell to evaluate seafood
products harvested from the Gulf of Mexico. The training is meant to
keep consumers from eating seafood tainted with oil spilled in the wa-
ter following the April 20 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon offshore
drilling rig.
Seafood harvested in the Gulf may have ingested the water-soluble
chemicals, making it dangerous for human consumption.
Scientific instruments can perform the same task but take much
longer to get results, said University of Florida professor Steve Otwell,
who has led UF's professional seafood sensory school since it began in
1995. The instruments can only run about 20 to 30 samples in a week,
and at a cost of $700 per sample, are expensive.
Those instruments rely on electronic recognition signals and can
detect chemicals in much smaller concentrations, down to parts per
billion. But the nose can quickly detect levels that are considered un-
healthy-and when it comes to getting seafood from the ocean to a
diner's plate, the clock never stops ticking.
"Sensory analysis can be a very powerful tool," said Otwell, a profes-
sor of food science and human nutrition with UF's Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences. "And it can be recognized for regulatory
purposes. But only if you are trained to do it and it's proven that you
have the ability to do it."
For years, Otwell said, UF has taught government inspectors and food
industry professionals to evaluate seafood for freshness and consumer
appeal, so it made sense to have UF lead the contaminant-detection
training.
In the last two weeks, UF officials have been freezing baseline sam-
ples of fresh, uncontaminated seafood to use in the training, expected
to be held in mid-June on the Gainesville campus. UF will also help
officials in Texas, Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi set up similar
training.
The Food and Drug Administration and Department of Commerce
are the federal regulatory agencies that oversee seafood safety.
During the four-day training, which will be based on techniques
learned from earlier oil spills such as the Exxon Valdez in 1989, a group
of about 25 inspectors and regulators will learn protocol for handling
seafood samples and examine different types and levels of contami-
nated seafood. They'll be tested on their ability to sniff out polycyclic
aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs in fish, shrimp and crab, Otwell
said.
And if history's any guide, some of them won't pass the smell test.
"You know from your own personal experience that some people can
smell better than others," he said. Some are gifted sniffers, he said,
while others make lifestyle choices, such as smoking, that hinder their
ability.
The training is an attempt to "educate and sharpen" a sense that's
naturally there, he said.
As evidence of the olfactory system's power, Otwell points to things
like just mowed grass, or spring flowers, and how a whiff of something
can evoke memory.
For doubters, he offers this challenge: Hold your nose. Pop a slice
of cheese in your mouth. Once you're mid-chew, let yourself breathe
normally.
"The difference is phenomenal," he said. "The nose is a powerful
instrument. If you don't believe it, take the cheese test."


What is the Great Florida Birding Trail?


The Great Florida Birding Trail
is a program of the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission, supported in part by the
Florida Department of Transporta-
tion and the Wildlife Foundation
of Florida. This 2,000-mile, self-
guided highway trail unifies nearly
500 birding sites throughout Flor-
ida. Modeled after the successful
Great Texas Coastal Birding Trail,
this ambitious project features de-
tailed guide booklets and special
highway signs identifying Bird-
ing Trail sites. Free guide booklets
contain site descriptions, direc-
tions, and maps showcasing the
wonderful birding opportunities
in Florida. Each Birding Trail sec-
tion consists of a series of clusters,
with each cluster containing one to
15 sites highlighting communities
and special ecosystems like the
Lake Wales Ridge.
The Great Florida Birding Trail
is divided into four sections.
The East Florida Section
opened in November 2000.
The West Florida Section fol-
lowed in November 2002.
The Panhandle Florida Section
opened in May 2004.
The South Florida Section
opened in January 2006, complet-
ing this statewide trail.
The Birding Trail has designated


nine "gateway" sites at excep-
tional birding locations. There are
two or three gateways located in
each trail section. Gateways have
staffed visitor centers and serve as
hubs for Birding Trail information.
Each gateway has a special kiosk
with birdwatching tips and intro-
ductory information regarding the
Birding Trail. Loaner optics can be
checked out for free for a day with
a driver's license or major credit
card at all gateway locations. Or
stop by and pick up a copy of the
free trail guide booklets.
Traditionally, only local birders


CANOEING AND
CAMPING
Combining a camping trip
with a canoe trip is a great way to
enjoy nature, get some exercise
and escape the hassles of today's
hectic, fast-paced world.
The very first thing on
your list should be life jackets
and they should be worn not
stored. Waterproof dry sacks
for tents, sleeping bags, clothes
and anything else you want to
keep dry is probably next in
importance.
Other essential items for your
checklist are rainsuits, insect
repellent, sun screen, first aid
kit, matches or lighter, flashlight
and extra batteries, rope, duct
tape, extra clothes, a cooler with
plenty of food and drink, eating
utensils, garbage bags and even
a cell phone just in case of an
emergency.
Fun things to bring include
fishing equipment, nature books,
a tape recorder for recording
the sounds of nature and a
video camera or digital camera
for capturing all the memories
of your camping and canoeing
adventure.
Larry Whiteley is host of the award-
winning Outdoor World" Radio
For more tips, log onto
basspro.com



Protection while
painting
Save old window shades for
small painting jobs. Open them
to use as a barrier when painting.
They can be rolled up and stored
in a small place when dry and then
reused when needed. Secure with a
rubber band.
Judy S. in Picayune, MS
Want to live better on the money
you already make? Visit stretcher. con/index cfm? TipsSyn> to
find hundreds of articles to help you
stretch your day and your dollar!
C 2010 Dollar Stretcher, Inc.


atlon mtr rllo. M Atpublicity w

t edeal ad state sites thrt






knewbird inabout it h e great birding siteslocal







sites to spread out birdwatchers
knthe surrabout the grnat birding communities.
in their area. Most publicity went
to federal and state sites, such
as J.N. "Ding" Darling National
Wildlife Refuge and Everglades
National Park. The Great Florida
Birding Trail groups prominent
birding sites with smaller local
sites to spread out birdwatchers
and their eco-tourism dollars into
the surrounding communities.
Broad-based support and grass-
roots community investment will
make the Great Florida Birding
Trail a success for Florida and for
our feathered friends.


JUNE 10, 2010


" 10






22 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Enjoy the weather and fish together


JUNE 10, 2010


The oil
spill con-
tinues to be
a hot issue
with anglers
from coast
to coast, but
Fish Tales it is not an
ByJonie Maschek issue in our
waterways
yet.
If you plan to go tarpon fishing,
have the right gear, heavy line and
leaders and hooks that will hold a
rpon.
Your bait is important. Most say
hey are using blue crabs for tar-
on bait; some swear that thread-
fin herring gets you a tarpon with
every cast.
Tarpon are still soaring in the
air. Some anglers say you will not
find them in the heat of the day. It
is best to go tarpon fishing in the
evening or at dawn. This is a tro-
phy fish only -- so snap a photo,
and release him. You can hang
one on your wall from the photo,
as a good taxidermist is able to
construct one for you.
Fish Tampa Bay for your tarpon
catch because if you travel all the
way to Boca Grande Pass, you will
be in a swarm of so many boats
that you will have a difficult time
finding a spot to cast your line.
As you chase the tarpon across
the bay, you might catch a permit,
since they run in schools with the
tarpon. Permit legal size measures
not less than 11" or more than 20
fork. Some refer to this fish as a


round pompano. Food value of
this catch is considered good. The
average size is 3 lbs.; the largest
recorded permit is 20 lb. 2 oz.
If you are fishing the flats this
week, with water around 10' deep,
an easy target is trout. They are
schooling over the grassy flats
enjoying the warm weather. Your
legal catch is four per harvest per
day in the Southern region.
Since the water is warm and get-
ting warmer each day, I am told
those schools of fish are Spanish
mackerel. Legal catch is 12" fork
and 15 per day per harvest. This
is a pan fish with average weight
of 28 oz., with food value listed
as excellent. It may be difficult
to catch one in the school without
breaking your line. I suggest you
try and move ahead of the school,
without spooking them and then
make your cast.
With the hot weather and warm
water, cobia is an easy target. This
is a fighting game fish of strength
and vigor, with soaring antics. Co-
bia is an edible catch. Their natu-
ral food is most anything alive.
Average size 11 lbs., with a record
catch of 149 lbs. This fish is found
all over the world. Be sure to bleed
properly before eating.
We have four sharks common to
our waterways and often caught
along our shores.
Hammerhead shark are lurking
around our waterways. They are
eating stingrays. The largest on
record reached 1,200 lbs. and was
20' long. I caught one about 3' feet


RCMA Wimauma Academy's Terrific Kids
RCMA Wimauma Academy is honored to recognize the following
students as their Terrific Kids for May 2010: front row: Jessica En-
riquez, second row: Paola Estrada, Juan Calixtro, Jennifer Gamez,
Melissa Jaimes, third row: Jose Hernandez, Yuritzel Luviano, Ivan
Guerra, fourth row: Odilon Valencia, Selena Perez, Absent from
photo: Angel Maldonado. The group is joined by Kiwanis members
Helen and Sala Halm and Program Specialist Heather Hanson.


long and he pulled and tugged at
my line for forty-five minutes,
until finally coming to the surface.
I pumped that pole back and forth,
finally landing him and then re-
leasing him back into the water.
Blacktip shark is common here
and is edible. It is named blacktip
because of the black fin markings.
Cut in fillets, soak in milk, batter
in cornmeal or flour and deep fry
for a delicious meal.


dawn, so avoid swimming at this
time. They feed on bait fish; avoid
swimming where bait fish are
schooling. Don't go swimming
into the mouths of rivers or bays,
as that too is where sharks go feed-
ing. The odds of a shark attack is
one in 11.5 million.
Redfish are feeding at high tide
in the deeper waters, and on low
tide, you can find them in the shal-
lows. Not too many catches have


6& \ -WdOOLM
Avery Fleeharty of Berkely Springs, WV, great grandson of Norma
Fleeharty of Freedom Plaza, gets help from Captain Brook Wallace with
his 33in redfish catch.


The Bull shark is dangerous and
often found in fresh as well as salt
water, resting in the shallows. It
can be as large as 8' long.
The Tiger shark is also danger-
ous and has been measured as
large as 17' long.
Sharks feed between dust and

SouthShore
Democratic club
The SouthShore Democratic
Club will meet Thursday, June 10
at the South-
Shore Public
Library on,
19th Ave.
To reach the *
Library go.
North on Cy-
press Village Blvd. to 19th Ave,
turn right to the first left, Beth
Shields Way.
Susan Smith, of the Hillsbor-
ough County Democratic Execu-
tive Committee will be the feature
speaker. Coffee social starts 1
pm; meeting 1:30. For more in-
formation go to www.southshore-
democraticclub.org or call 813-
634-6013.


Finally, answers to your Medicaid questions.


Free Medicaid Information Seminar
Tuesday, June 15th 2 p.m.

South Shore Regional Library s \s
15816 Beth Shields Way SeanW cott
Ruskin, Florida Elder Law Attorney
3233 East Bay Drive Largo Florida 33771
727 539 0181
Please call Rachel for more information at 800-823-5571
FLMedicaid.com

SFind out the legal way to avoid being
impoverished by nursing home costs.
SLearn how to save your assets, your house, car,
and way of life and still obtain long-term nursing
care.

Easy to understand explanations of how Medicaid
works by elder law attorney Sean W. Scott, Esq.

SNew, up-to-date information for 2010, includes the
most recent federal Medicaid law changes.


The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should
not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you
decide, ask us to send you free written information about
our qualifications and experience.


been reported this week. It seems
the redfish has been playing hide
and seek, diving into deep holes to
stay out of the heat. Artificial lures
will lure a strike from the redfish
if they surface to eat. If they are
in the grassy flats tailing best you
have a weedless jig on the end of

Golf Scores Hogans
Golf Club
Monday, 5/10/10
Course: Diamond Hill,
6136/5833 yds
Play: Match
1st : Frank Carlin, 72
2nd : Fred Mayes, 73
3rd : Art Swallow, 74
4th: Ron Kingston, 77


your pole.
I talked to a group of anglers
who were boasting of their King-
fish catches of over 40 lbs. each.
These monster catches were made
offshore in 50-60' of water.
Sheepshead are still the favorite
catch of those staying ashore and
fishing from piers. It is a great
food value catch with a snow
white firm meat. served broiled,
baked, or fried.
Those kayaking in the rivers are
doing freshwater fishing, boating
great catches of largemouth bass
and freshwater catfish. Fish the
upper waters of both the Alafia
and Little Manatee Rivers.
A Blacktip Shark Shootout for
cash and prizes, sponsored by The
Docks Bar and Grill in Apollo
Beach is $100 per angler. Each
angler will be placed with a team
on a boat. Price per boat is $200.
Fishing dates are June 11 and 12.
Shootout benefits pediatric cancer.
Stop by The Docks for more infor-
mation.
Enjoy our weather and fish to-
gether.
-- Aleta Jonie Maschek is a
member of Florida Outdoor
Press.


Get Paid to
Exercise
Rather than pay for a gym mem-
bership, my husband and I deliver
the paper. We get paid to walk ev-
eryday instead of paying to go to
a gym. Both of us are getting in
shape and making a few bucks as
well.
Gayle P.
Want to live better on the money
you already make? Visit stretcher. com/index. cfm?TipsSyn>
to find hundreds of articles to help
you stretch your day and your dol-
lar! Copyright 2010 Dollar Stretcher,
Inc.


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Office Address OF RUSKIN
709 12th St. N.E.
Ruskin, FL 33570

"Our Customers Are Our Best Advertisement"
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Welcome to...

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Thomas A. DeVol, D.D.S., P.A.

633-2636
General and Cosmetic Dentistry


Our Lab Tech Has 38+ Years Experience
Same Day Relines and Repairs New Dentures and Partials
Thomas A. DeVol, D.D.S., PA., Practicing Dentistry for 23 Years
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Refer 2 new patients and receive a $25 credit
toward your next visit.
Be sure to have your friend or family member mention your
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Coupon must be mentioned at time of scheduling appointment. The fee advertised is the minimum
fee charged. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay,
cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed
as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the fee service examination
or treatment. Senior citizen discount does not apply.

NewPatens&Em ergenciesCM






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 23


Silver Osprey Squadron offers behind the scenes look at military headlines


* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net
SUN CITY CENTER Retired
US Navy Captain Philip Yates was
not facing an easy crowd. Among
those listening to him at Freedom
Plaza were veterans of wars. The
men and women in attendance
knew a thing or two about how
the world works and about the
military. But being a former test pi-
lot, Yates has certainly faced chal-
lenges before. As with his career,
his presentation was a resounding
success. His audience seemed to
hang on every word.
The Silver Osprey Squadron,
part of the Association of Naval
Aviation, meets monthly at the Pla-


za Club at Freedom Plaza. Lunch
is served for a reasonable price,
which can be paid in advance or,
for a slightly higher amount, at
the door. The meeting features a
prominent guest speaker provid-
ing unique perspectives and one-
of-a-kind opportunities to look
behind the press releases and the
headlines. The group is headed by
Commander Bo Heininger (USN,
ret.).
The guest speakers aren't there
to gloss over the subject, they
provide a realistic briefing to men
and women who expect no less. In
May, the speaker was a member of
the US Southern Command report-
ing on operations in Haiti after the


earthquake. Last week, it was Cap-
tain P .:.d ;-" Yates, the test pilot.
Yates' story involving the ground-
up creation of a then-secret military
jet in 2000 and 2001, was a fasci-
nating, behind-the-scenes look at
the highly technical, fast-paced and
dangerous world in which he lived.
Yates carried his audience through
from the initial concept to sitting at
the controls for the first flights.
"...I did a vertical takeoff and
then accelerated out supersonic
[from the hover takeoff] to come
back and land at Edwards [Air
Force Base]," he said as part of the
presentation. "It was the greatest
thrill to do what I did."
For those in the audience, it was


a thrill to simply hear his story. Af- ing former officers, enlisted per-
terwards, Yates answered questions sonnel and interested civilians.
and posed for photographs. For information about upcoming
Monthly Silver Osprey meetings meetings, contact Bo Heininger at
are for anyone interested in Navy, boheining@gmail.com or call 813-
Marine and Coast Guard and other 634-4236.
forms of military aviation includ-


MULTI-SERVICE DESIGN CONCEPT
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Mitch Traphagen photos
Retired US Navy test pilot Captain Philip "Rowdy" Yates poses with
Commander Bo Heininger (USN, ret) after the presentation.


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1629 Sun Ci
(near SCC Post Office)
Family Owned and
Operated
Golf Cart Accessible


y Center Plaza

MOHAWK
HARDWOOD FLOORING


captain Yates provides the audience ot the silver Usprey Squadron
with a behind the scenes look at the creation of a fighter jet, from
concept to sitting behind the controls for the first flight.


Alligator hunters must

resubmit applications


wacR4, wein6esij 's


at

SUNSET LOUNGE


at PA-MIA PEACPI
Featuring:

1/2 Pound PBud & 'ud Light

Angus Purger Longneck
staring at .




SWith choice of one side
Live Enertainment
Wednesday Thru Sunda

611DeftnyDrive
'Ruscn, FL.
813-645-32q1


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
is working to get things back on
track after learning about a prob-
lem with alligator hunting permit
applications. Active Outdoors, the
company that provides the FWC's
licensing and permitting system,
said a coding error resulted in the
recording of incorrect
harvest period choices
for many of the Florida
alligator hunting appli-
cations.
The FWC has taken
steps to ensure that Active Out-
doors has fixed the problem, but
because the company was unable
to recover customers' selected har-
vest periods, new applications will
have to be submitted before a ran-
dom drawing can be conducted and
permits issued. The agency will be
accepting new applications through
June 14. Everyone who previously
submitted an application will have
to resubmit a new application dur-
ing the new application period.
Meanwhile, Active Outdoors gen-
eral manager David Dutch issued
the following statement:
"Active Outdoors, vendor for the
FWC licensing system, recently
discovered we had an issue with
the alligator application process
that requires applicants to resubmit
their applications. We deeply regret


I


this error, and we understand and
sincerely apologize for the incon-
venience caused to FWC staff and
its constituents.
"In addition, Active Outdoors, in
furtherance of our commitment to
FWC and its constituents, is waiv-
ing all convenience fees for online
Internet purchasers of the licenses
awarded as a result of
the random draw. Florida
residents buying online
will save over $9. Active
Outdoors will forego an
estimated $75,000 in
revenue from these waived conve-
nience fees while covering all costs
of the online purchase, including
processing the payment and print-
ing/mailing the license."
Erin Rainey, head of the FWC's
Recreational Licensing Section,
said prospective gator hunters had
submitted 9,681 applications during
the original application period. The
FWC is contacting all applicants via
e-mail or the U.S. Postal Service to
inform them of this issue.
The FWC had planned to post the
results of the random drawing on its
website on May 27, but resolving
the problem made that impossible.
The start of the alligator hunting
season, Aug. 15, will not be de-
layed.
For more information about gator
hunts, visit MyFWC.com/Gators.


I


mcmwr_=


JUNE 10, 2010






24 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


The school that is being built by the locals and mission volunteers.

Buy a hamburger for a good cause
Five Guys Restaurant on 301 at Big Bend Road is donating 15 percent,
of all orders placed on Wednesday, June 16 from 5-8 p.m. Anyone com-
ing in to place a food order, will need to say they are from St. John the
Divine Episcopal Church when they order. A check will be donated to
the church to help fund their mission trip to the Dominican Republic.



Laywoman of the year chosen


The Women's Fellowship of the
United Community Church, 1501
La Jolla Avenue, Sun City Center,
has chosen Gwen Haegert as their
Woman of the Year.
Gwen has been a beacon of
light and inspiration to her church,
community, and all of her family
and friends. One needs only to
read of her involvement with the
church, community and volunteer
work to understand how hard she
works, her total commitment to
all her endeavors and that she re-
ally, truly cares about people, their
needs, safety and comfort. Her
dedication inspires others to be-
come involved, give of their time
and energy and share in the joy of


Enjoy a movie
During the summer months,
Friendship Baptist located at 1511
El Rancho Dr. will continue its
monthly movie schedule. The next
free movie, including homemade
goodies baked by church mem-
bers, is scheduled for Saturday,
June 26. For
more infor-
mation about
the church
and its activi-
ties call 813-
633-5950.




NCWS continues
philanthropy

Steve Molnar, liturgist for
NCWS (Nondenominational
Christian Worship Services) pre-
sented checks totaling $1300 to
Dolores Berens, President of Sa-
maritans Alzheimer's Auxiliary.
The love offering was given for the
month of May. Mr. Molnar stated,
"Since our ministry is composed
of all volunteers, we have an ad-
vantage, in that we have zero costs
and can donate every penny of our
love offerings to many local non-
profit organizations." For more
information regarding NCWS, call
Jim Butner at 634-3114.





B \
~-


Gwen Haegert
Gwen Haegert


church, music, reading, and volun-
teer work.


.I


F- --


Unity in Brandon plans tag yard sale
In preparation for their move Unity in Brandon is holding a Tag Yard
Sale Saturday, June 12, from 8 am to 2 pm and Sunday, June 13, after
church from 12:30 to 3 p.m. at their present location 115 Margaret St.,
Brandon. Items include housewares, furniture, pictures, spiritual books
from the bookstore and office furniture. Hot dogs and cold drinks will
be available for sale.
The church will be changing locations and will be holding their first
worship service at the Woman's Club of Brandon on Moon Ave. in Bran-
don on July 4 at 10:30 a.m. For more information call 813-263-6155.


Friendship Baptist holds flag ceremony
On Memorial Sunday, Friendship Baptist held a flag ceremony hon-
oring the veterans from all wars. Ex- marine, Sgt. Bill Mayfield, was
escorted up the center aisle by the members of the choir, as he presented
the U.S. flag, at the altar. The choir sang a medley of patriotic hymns.


Caulkins speaks at
New Beginnings
Fellowship

On Sunday June 13 at the
10:30am service New Beginnings
Fellowship will be blessed to have
Darryl Caulkins as a special guest
speaker. Caulkins has ministered
to this congregation many times.
The church is located at 1120 27th
St SE Ruskin. For more informa-
tion, call Pastor Lewis Brady at
654-1018.


Summer Choir
The last Sunday of June, July and
August presents an opportunity for
anyone who always has wanted to
sing in a group or Church Choir.
There are no tryouts, auditions,just
a desire to sing. Just show up in
the Rehearsal Room United Com-
munity Church at 1501 La Jolla
Avenue, Sun City Center at 9:15
am on June 27, July 25 and August
29. There will be a short rehearsal
and then you will be a part of the
Choir for a day, or longer if you
really like it. For information con-
tact Tara Swartzbaugh, Director of
Music at 813-835-8206.


,.- CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH
W'lj SundayWorship: Blended 8:00 a.m.
Contemporary 9:40 a.m.
Traditional 11:15 a.m. Bg BendRd.
Nursery Provided CrossRoads: Bible Study, Worship: Wed. 7 p.m.
Pastor Jack R. Palzer
5309 U.S. Highway 41 North Apollo Beach
(acrossfrom MiraBay) www.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1305 N |

[ St. John the Divine Episcopal Church
Growing by Faith from Generation to Generation
I Rev. Tracy H. Wider Church Office 813-645-1521
SUNDAY SERVICES: 9 am Contemporary Service and Sunday School
at West Campus, S.R. 674 and 9th Street SE, Ruskin
8 am Traditional Service and 11 am Holy Communion with Choir at East Campus
at 1015 Del Webb Blvd., SCC
All Worship Services with Holy Communion and Healing Holy Oil


Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (Behind Suntrust Bank)
ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: (Nov.-April ............................. 8:30a.m. Day Care Available
Mon. Fri.
Rev. John M. Bartha and all year)......................... 10:45 a.m. 6 a.m.- 6 p.m.
SPhone: 645-1241 Sunday School....................... 9:30 a.m. call 645-6198

REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH-ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center, FL 33573-5354
Rev. Dr. Peter Stiller, Pastor 634-1292
Saturday Worship: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion....First & Third Sunday Bible Class...Thursday 10 am, Guests Welcome

First Church of Christ, Scientist
Ruskin Sun City Center (813) 645-6102
204 Second St. N.W, Ruskin, Florida 33570
Sunday Service Sunday School ...........................................10AM
Wednesday Testimony Meeting ...........................................................5 PM
Reading Room Wednesday..................................................4 4:50 PM
ALL ARE WELCOME www.spirituality.com

FIRST BAPTISTJ CHURCH

820 COLLEGE AVE. W.
RUSKIN, FL 33570
645-6439
www.fbcruskin.org
A Resource for Families
Sunday School ............................9:45 a.m .
Morning Worship............8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Dr. Barry Rumsey
Evening Service...........................6:00 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCHOOL
Wednesday Night Service................7:00 p.m. THROUGH 12TH
Awana............................................. 7:00 p.m. GRADE


Friendship Baptist Chi rch
Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist)
1511 El Rancho Dr.
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Phone/Fax:
813-633-5950


C4


WEEKLY SERVICES:


Sunday
9 a .m ................
1 1 a .m ..............
10 a.m. & 6 p.m.


.Bible Study
Bible Study
.....Worship


Wednesday
6 p.m.... Prayer Meeting/Bible Study


Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC
Meets in the Social Hall of the Beth Israel Synagogue
1115 E. Del Webb Blvd.
Thursday, 7:00 PM Call 633-0396
We all make mistakes but everyone
makes different mistakes.
Ludwig von Beethoven


NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where God's Love is Shared"
U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL 645.1121 www.nbcor.org
Sunday School for all ages 9:30 AM SBC
Morning Worship 10:45 AM Wanted: People Who Want to Grow
Evening Worship 6:00 PM and Live for Jesus!
Full Wednesday Schedule for all ages

North River Church of Christ
Non-Instrumental-
13885 U.S. Hwy 301 South
(Just South of the Manatee County Line)
Minister: Howard Johnson Office 941-776-1134
Services: Sunday 10:00am, 11:00am & 6:00pm ce 41- -11
Wednesday7:00pm Home 813-754-1776

SFirst Baptist Church of Gibsonton
"We lovebecaune He fir!t loved us." 1 John 4:19
Traditional Worship Service *Sunday School 9:30 A.M.
Old-Time Gospel Hymns *MVorning Worship 10:30A.M.
Nursery Available i Sunday Evening 6:00 P.M.
Interpreter for the Deaf Mid-Week (Wed.) 7:00 P.M.
9912 Indiana St. Hwy 41 & Estelle Anu Malcolm S. Clements, Pastor
\Gibsonton, FL 33534 813-677-1301

W'c4m" e Ae. EVERETT TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ
1611 First St. SW Ruskin, FL 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL-
SERVICES: Sunday........................9:30 & 10:30 a.m.: 6:00 p.m .
Wednesday................7:00 p.m. --

PRINCE OF PEACE CATHOLIC CHURCH
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573
Phone: 634-2328 Fax: 633-6670
Masses: Sunday.............................................................8:00, 10:00 AM, Noon
Saturday Vigil.................................................. 4:00 PM and 6:00 PM
Daily ...................... ... .... ..... ... .......... 8:00AM
www.popcc.org Confessions: Monday Friday 7:30am, Saturday 8:30am and 3:00pm


JUNE 10, 2010


imaak







JUNE 10, 2010


Obituaries


Clara "Sue" Boin
Clara "Sue" Boin, 93 of Sun City
Center passed away on May 22,
2010. She was preceded in death by
her husband Robert E. Boin and son
Robert A. Boin. Mrs. Boin is survived
by her son Richard Boin, grand-
daughters Michele Grimes and Lisa
Hart and 4 great-grandchildren: Shelby,
Brook, Madison and David. A memorial
service will be held in NJ.


Betty Joe Carter
Betty Carter passed away Sunday,
June 6, 2010. She is survived by many
family and friends. Service will be held
at Sun City Center Funeral Home on
Thursday, June 10. Viewing at 5pm and
service at 6pm. For more details, log on
to suncitycenterfuneralhome.com


Charles L. Parish
June 3, 1922- June 2,
2010
Charles Lafayette Parish Sr., 87,
passed away at his home peacefully
and in comfort, surrounded by his
daughter Leslie Strunk and her family.


Charles Parish was born in Panama
City, Florida and as a child moved to
the Washington, D.C. area. As a young
adult he made the decision to serve his
country and enlisted in the US Army
Air Force on October 1, 1942. As an
Aviation Cadet he received training
with the 813th Bombardier Training
Squadron at Midland Army Airfield
in Midland, TX. He then served in
the European Air Offensive where he
completed 36 bombing missions over
Northern France. After returning to
the states Charles was awarded the
commission of Second Lieutenant upon
entering Flight School on November
13, 1943. First Lieutenant Charles L.
Parish was discharged on September
17, 1945 from Fort Sam Houston,
TX. He was awarded the following
medals: Distinguished Flying Cross,
Air Medal with 3 Oak Leaf Clusters and
EAME Campaign Medal with 2 Bronze
Service Stars. He was a Hero to his
family. During his time in World War II,
he carried an accordion with him during
his travel, and such began his love for
music. He taught himself to play the
Steel Guitar and could play most any
instrument he happened to pick up. He
was not one for reading music, so all of
his music was played from ear. It was
apparent that he had music in his soul,
he could most always be found with his
fingers and feet tapping, humming or
whistling a tune. In May of 1949, he
married the love of his life Mary Louise
Flynn. The couple and their children
lived on both the Western and Eastern
Shore of Maryland. In the 1980's
he retired as an Automobile Body
Mechanic Manager, left their home
in Parsonsburg, MD and moved to
Ruskin; where he and his wife enjoyed
the relaxation of retired life and the
opportunity to continue to play the
music he so loved. He was a member
of the American Legion and VFW, as
well as the Manasota Steel Guitar Club.
On August 8, 2009, during a return
trip to Maryland to visit with family
and friends, he was presented with a
Proclamation from the County Council
of Wicomico County Maryland, naming
August 8, "Charles L Parish Day".
What will his family and friends


UnityUED
1 Spirituality Rather Than "Religion"
Beth Israel's Social Hall
1115 Del Webb E. Sun City Center, FL Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
www.unitycommunityofjoy.com Tel. 813-298-7745


THE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO THE SERVICES NOW WORSHIPPING IN THE "CHAPEL"
AT SUN CITY CENTER FUNERAL HOME 10:30 AM ON SUNDAYS
NO CREED...BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE
1851 RICKENBACKER DRIVE 813-938-4955
Minister DR. DAVID CAMPBELL


Q(dnieJfJCe/io is CAwurcqofun CGiy Genler
The Church of Open Hearts... Open Minds... Open Doors
1210 W. Del Webb Blvd. 634-2539
Worship Services:
Saturday................. 4:00 p.m. Creason Hall (Traditional Service)
S Sunday.....................8:15 a.m. in Sanctuary (Traditional Service)
9:30 a.m. Creason Hall (The Oasis)
F10:55 a.m. Sanctuary (Traditional with Chancel Choir)
(.d. o e Fellowship tim ... ,,..i I.. I..r .... 10:15a.m. and 11a.m. in Creason Hall
a.odis love un(.(CCU'MC.com
PASTORS: DR. WARRENLANGER, REV GARY BULLOCK
Communion First Sunday ofEach Month


St. Andrew Presbyterian Church

\ Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.
Prayers with anointing for healing and
J& wholeness during worship the second Sunday
of every month.


A Stephen Pastor:
Ministry Church
Meet friends in F
Ref

1239 Del Webb Blvd. West
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Church is Handicap accessible


Dr. Gerald Iwerks
fellowshipp Hall after the Service
reshments served


Phone: 813-634-1252
For Information visit:
www.standrewatscc.org


remember about him? They will
remember his love for music both
country and big band. His sense of
humor and beautiful blue eyes, that
his favorite treats were always cookies
and candy. They will remember his
quiet and laid back personality, and
his dedication, unconditional and
unspeakable love for his family and
friends. They will remember the respect
that he gained from all he came into
contact with. His friends will remember
him most of all for the smooth and
unique way he could make the steel
guitar sing. Dad, you are and forever
will be greatly missed and will always
remain fondly in the hearts of those that
knew and loved you.
His wife, Mary Louise; sister, Doris
St. Clair; and grandson Daniel "Big
D" Strunk preceded him in death. To
cherish fond memories he leaves
his brother, Jesse M. Parish (Helen)
of Parsonsburg, MD, three children,
Charles L. Parish Jr. of Oakhurst, CA,
Diane P. Salyer (Steve) of Vienna, VA
and Leslie P Strunk (Frank) of Ruskin.
Six grandchildren, Charles L Parish
III, Krista Camacho (Milton) both of
Chesapeake VA, Cari Narvaez (Juan),
Timothy Strunk (Katrina), Matthew
Strunk (Danielle) all of Ruskin.
Elizabeth Gomez (Mike) of Oakhurst,
CA. Four great grandchildren, Sarah
Miller of Chesapeake, VA; brothers
Noah and Luis Narvaez, Cheyanne
Boyd, all of Ruskin, and many nieces
and nephews, along with a large circle
of friends.
A memorial service will take place
on Sunday, June 13 at 3:00PM at the
Hospice Chapel in Sun City Center,
Florida. Interment will follow at a later
date when he will be placed to rest
with his beloved wife and grandson.
Memorials in memory of Charles can
be sent to LifePath Hospice, 12973 N.
Telcom Parkway, Suite 100, Temple
Terrace, FL 33637 or The "Big D"
Scholarship Fund at Ruskin Christian
School, 820 College Ave W., Ruskin,
FL, 33570. Arrangements were under
the direction of Southern Funeral Care.
Online condolences and memorials:
www.southernfuneralcare.com


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 25

In Jforing Yemory of
h i /i ; I.;i .l II
June 8, 1989 Septemberr 8,
2007


Chris Rodriguez
Chris Rodriguez Sr. 46, of Ruskin,
FL passed away June 2, 2010. Chris
was born in Austin, TX and was raised
in Ruskin. He is survived by the love
of his life, Rosita Lorenzo and six
children, Anita (Juan Carlos), Quickers
Jr. (Liliana), Fabian, Michael, Amanda,
Marcos, and five beautiful grandchildren,
Juan Jr., Abigail, Haley, Jamie, and
Fabian Jr. He is also survived by three
brothers, Ricky (Gracie), Phillip, and
Sedonio Jr. and one sister, Melinda
also plenty of uncles, aunts, nephews,
nieces, cousins especially Sarah. He
was a special father, grandpa, brother,
and uncle. He will be missed dearly,
forever loved and never forgotten.
Viewing will be held at Zipperers
Funeral Home on Wednesday, June
9 from 6-8pm and Thursday, June 10
from 9:30-11am.


Ruskin Church of Christ
611 2nd Ave. NW Ruskin, FL 33570
Don White, Minister 813-361-1415
Sunday Bible Enrichment .......................................... 10:00 a.m.
W orshipp......................... ....... ... .............. 11:00 a.m .



S OUTSIDE
Loving People SOUTHSIDE
Preachingthe Word BAPTIST CHURCH
4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 South
(4 miles south of Ruskin)
DAN COLLINS, PASTOR JIM KRAUSE, MUSIC DIRECTOR
COMMUNITY INVITED
BIBLE STUDY 9:30 AM
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE 10:55 AM
SUNDAY EVENING SERVICE 6:00 PM
WEDNESDAY PRAYER SERVICE 7:00 PM
ADULTS, YOUTH, CHILDREN
For information, call 645-4085 Monday-Thursday



Saint }Anne Catholic Chutch

Fr. John McEvoy
Pastor
813-645-1714
SaintAnneRuskin.org

U.S. Hwy. 41 106 11th Ave. NE Ruskin
SouthShore:- j I .. Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton
C MASSES
Saturday Vigil M ass....................................................... 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass..................................... 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Holy Days....................................... Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Daily ......................................................... M onday thru Friday 8:00 a.m.
Espatiol ................................Domingo 12:00 p.m.; Miercoles 7:30 p.m.
Confession............................. Wednesday 6:15 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.
Nursery Available for 10:00 a.m. Mass


Happy 21st Birthday!
We love you and miss you.
Dad, Mom and Ryan


Sn loving memory of

PhiChpI (CP) Combs
3 24/1986- 6 12/2004

Love always,
.'.lo, Travis, 'Dad & Tamicy




Sound the Shofar
meeting scheduled
On Sunday, June 20, at 2:00pm
SouthShore Regional Library
Community Room, 15816 Beth
Shields Way, Ruskin, Steve and
Tawnie Manning will discuss unity
in the body of Messiah. Call Chris
813-641-0580, or David 813-477-
1517 for more information.


Take an Inventory
I have a bad habit of stocking
up on toiletries and such, forget-
ting that I already have enough at
home. I cleaned out my cupboards
and made my own "store" on a
shelf in my storage area. I "shop"
there first when running low on
shampoo, soap, toilet paper, etc.
Another tip is when I discover
that some shampoo and condition-
ers don't work for me, rather than
throw them out, I find other uses.
Shampoo can be put in liquid soap
dispensers for hand washing. Con-
ditioners are very good for shaving
legs and work very well as hand
lotion.
Linda
Want to live better on the money
you already make? Visit TheDollar-
Stretcher. com to find hundreds of ar-
ticles to help you stretch your day and
your dollar! Copyright 2010 Dollar
Stretcher, Inc.



Kings Point Ladies
18 Hole League 5/3
Game: Low Net
A Fit.:
1st MaryMcClafferty 52
2nd Lorraine Napier 53
3rd Mary Sundeen 55

B Flt.:
1st Rosa Gerry 55
2nd Shirley Junk 56
2nd Lindy Langlois 56


Kings Point Ladies
18 Hole League 5/10
Game: Front Nine, 1/2 handicap
AFlt. 1st Place (tie)
Mary Hoyt, Linda Suh 25
BFlt. 1st Place
Virginia Clelland 23
2nd Place
Shirley Junk 25
C Flt.lst Place
Colleen Walker 24
2nd Place Elle Warming 25







26. OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER JUNE 10, 2010


Are you a keeper?
BEHIND THE MIKE By: Michael A. Aun, http://www.aunline.com


One day a man's wife died, and
on that clear, cold morning, in the
warmth of his bedroom, he was
struck with the pain of learning
that sometimes there is no tomor-
row. No more hugs, no more spe-
cial moments to celebrate together,
no more phone calls just to chat,
no more "just a minute dear..."
Sometimes, what we care about
the most gets all used up and goes
away, never to return before we
can say goodbye, or to say "I love
you."
So while we have it, what best
serves us is to love it, care for it,
fix it when it is broken and heal
it when it is sick. This is true for
marriage, and old cars, and chil-
dren with bad report cards, and
dogs with bad hips, and aging par-
ents and grandparents. We keep
them because they are worth it...
and because we are worth it.
Some things we keep -- like a
best friend who moved away or a
sister-in-law after divorce. Some
people make us happy, no matter
what. Other people make us sad,
despite the many good things about
them. To forgive is the most re-
warding thing one can do. Forgive
others, if for no other reason than
selfish reasons. Do it for yourself
if not for them.
A man once hired me to give a
speech for his company and later
called on me for a follow-up con-
sulting assignment. He was angry
at a former business partner and
wanted to hire me to help find a
way to "get even."
My answer to him was simple. If
you want me to do the devil's work
I will charge you triple my normal
fee, payable in advance with re-
sults unconditional. Further, you
must follow my advice totally and
unconditionally. If you do, I will
refund your full fee. If you do not,
I will donate the fee to a charity.
He paid me my fee. When the
check cleared, I called on him to
do my face-to-face consulting as-
signment. He had an evil look in
his eye and could not wait until I
unveiled the "devil's plan" to get
back at his former partner who had
cost him dearly.
I handed him a note with two
simple words written on it- "For-
give him." He went ballistic,
threatening to sue me for the fee
and much more. I reminded him
of our unconditional contract and
suggested that he think about the
advice.
It took him nearly a month to
call me back, but when he did, he
apologized for his behavior and
said that this was the best advice
he had ever been given. He had
harbored all this anger and frustra-
tion over losing over a million dol-
lars because of his former partner.
The partner was not simply a busi-
ness acquaintance; he was a fellow
Deacon in his church and married
to a family member.
When my client finally forgave
him, it was as if a huge burden had
been lifted from his own shoulders
and the gesture of forgiveness lit-
erally drove the former business
partner nuts. I supposed the guilt
of his actions and the forgiveness
of the partner were both so totally


foreign to him that he could not
stand it.
I offered my client the refund
of his money and he insisted that
I donate it to charity and even of-
fered to match it to me personally.
I refused.
Life is important, like people we
know who are special... and so, we
keep them close!
Are you a "keeper"? Some
people love us-- not because of us
but in spite of us. They love you
unconditionally with all our flaws
and shortcomings. Why? I sus-
pect it is because we are "keepers"
and are worth hanging onto.
Suppose one morning you never


wake up do all your friends know
you love them? I was thinking...I
could die today, tomorrow or next
week, and I wondered if I had any
wounds that needed to be healed,
friendships that needed to be re-
kindled or three words that needed
to be said.
Let every one of your friends
and your family know that you
love them. Even if you think they
do not love you back. You would
be amazed at what those three lit-
tle words and a smile can do. And
just in case I am gone tomorrow,
remember I love you!


Couple celebrates 75 years of bliss
Gorden and Genevieve Beall of Illinois celebrated their 75 wedding
anniversary on May 25 at Aston Gardens in Sun City Center. The couple
have three daughters, Janet, Jeanne and Sue; five grandchildren, Cindy,
Jim, Cheri, Joey and Jane; and three great- grandchildren, Cameron, Ra-
chel and Ella.




CHURCH
Come and experience the power of
Jesus to change your life.
Sunday @ 9 & 11 AM Servicio en Espafiol @ 6 PM

www.aplace4everyone.org

2322 11th Ave. SE Ruskin, FL 813.645.3337


SUN POINT Apollo Beach,
Ruskin, SunCity /uer, ncys
Fully
AUTOMOTIVE &uad
Insured
4 H O Bonded
*Tune Ups Oil Changes A/C Work Brake Specialist
SElectronic Fuel Injection Specialist Complete Engine Diagnostic Se Habla Espanol
S"BRAKE'SPECIAL" - -F ,- OIL CHANGE
I A 9 IncludesLabor,Turn TUNE-UP SPECIALI $2 5Mostcars
Light Trucks. I Call for Pricing I light
55 Per Ax e + Pads I2 trucks









Zipperer's Funeral Home

Only onsite Crematory in S. Hillsborough County
Family owned and operated since 1979


Z 813-645-6130


1520 33rd St. S.E., Ruskin, FL 33570
www.zipperersfuneralhome.con Exp.8/31/10


I I I =I 8IAi 1 I
Jericha Lopez and Chairperson of the Scholarship Committee Jo
Prater.
Scholarship Sunday honors students
Scholarship Sunday was celebrated at the United Community Church,
1501 La Jolla Avenue, Sun City Center, on Sunday, June 6, 2010. Six
seniors graduated this year after having received 4 years of financial
assistance from the church. A reception was held following the service.
Featured in the photo is Jericha Lopez and Chairperson of the Scholar-
ship Committee Jo Prater. Jericha will be graduating from USF with a
degree in Biomedical Science and she will be attending USF this fall for
a second degree in nursing.


Trinity Baptist gets a makeover
Trinity Baptist Church, in Sun City Center, decided to have the mem-
bers gather to repaint the exterior of the church, just like an old fashioned
"barn raising." Scheduled for an entire week, these men finished the
work in just two days. The women of the church made a wonderful
lunch for the painters each day. For information about the church, call
634.4228.



FAMILY DENTISTRY


Kirk D. Parrott, D.D.S

Carl E. Friedman, D.D.S.

902 N. Tamiami Trail, Ruskin, FL 33570
(Across from Sweetbay Supermarket)
NEW PATIENTS WELCOME
(813) 645-6491
Members Amencan Dental Associaton, Fonda State Dental Associaton, Fonda West Coast Dental
Association, Manatee County Dental Association and Hillsborough County Dental Association



Saint .Anne Catiokic Clutie

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL










Exploring the Mighty Love of God
For kids from 5 years (starting Kindergarten in
September) to 5th grade.
Bible-learning activities, teamwork-building games,
create crafts to take home.
Monday to Friday June 21-25, 2010
8:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. (lunch included)

4 REGISTER BY JUNE 16
SFaith Formation Office
106 1lth Ave. N.E. Ruskin
For more information call Cindy
i 813-865-8222


I .@M I6


26 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


JUNE 10, 2010


-I
^







June 10, 2010 THE SHOPPER 27


T-= THE SHOPPER
To place an ad call
813.645.3111 ext. 201
Fax: 813.645.1792 L
$15.50
up to 20 words M & M Printing Co., Inc
300 addl. word weekly publisher of the
Deadline is Monday The Observer News, The SCC Observer and The Riverview Current
Deadline is Monday )In 1111-41-4 r --CIA/


0 12 Woodland Estates Ave SW
Ruskin, Florida 33570


100 Announcements
200 Farmer's Mkt
300 Merchandise
400 Marine
450 Transportation
500 Real Estate
550 Manuf. Housing
600 Rentals
650 Prof. Services
700 Services
800 Employment


280 PETS


105 PERSONAL
Coin collector. Not a dealer. Interested in
silver & gold coins. Will offer better price
than dealer. 813-645-1082

Kings Point Limo
Licensed & insured. Resident chauf-
feur & owner. Discount prices to any
airport & seaport. Also bus charter's
813-634-1357


FARMER'S MKT

L kES 20


260 FRUITS/VEG.


Sliver queen corn & u-pick peas. 5574
SR 674, Wimauma. For infor. call 813-
634-1162


{OUR NAME:


ADDRESS:


CITY/STATE/ZIP

DAYTIME PHONE:

up to 20 words
$15.50
includes listing on web
300 for each additional word over 20


SCOPY AS YOU WISH IT TO APPEARSIFICATION
AD COPY AS YOU WISH IT TO APPEAR:


Free kittens. Tame, 8 weeks old. Solid
black. Call 813-645-6553






310 GARAGE/YARD SALE

V Cavary's


u Thrift Store
NOW OPEN Wednesday,
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. Noon

50% OFF
All Children's
Clothing
1424 E. College Ave. Ruskin
813-641-7790
Minister of Calvary Lutheran church


Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana
St., Gibsonton (1 block off US 41,1 block
north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday thru
Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture,
lots misc. Ministry First Baptist Gibson-
ton. 813-671-0036 to donate


Model Home & Consigned Furniture
& Accessories
Apollo Beach Shopping Center
6024 U.S. Hwy. 41 N. Apollo Beach
(next to Westsore Pizza)
C f LayawayAvailable *
Closed Tues., Wed. & Sunday



Classified Is Convenient


The Shopper
The Observer News
The SCC Observer
The Rivervlew Current


Mail payment
or drop payment to:
210 Woodland Estates Ave.
Ruskin, Fl. 33570

CALL IN YOUR AD TO:
645-3111 ext. 201
OR FAX IT TO:
645-1792

DEADLINE:
Ad and payment
must be received by
4 p.m. Monday


310 GARAGE /YARD SALE
6/12 & 6/13. 208 & 308 7th Ave., NW,
Ruskin. Clothing, household items,
lift recliner, electronics, & much much
more.

1819 Granville (Greenbriar) SCC.
Books, lamps, pictures, some clothing
& lots of misc. Priced to sell. June 11,
8am-2pm.

Indoor moving sale. June 11 & 12. Furni-
ture, household items & misc. 133 19th
St., NW, off Shell Point Ruskin.

312 ESTATE SALES


AAA Furniture
New & Gently Used Furniture

BUY & SELL
Daily Trips to SCC


Mon.-Sat.
9 a.m.-5 p.m.


6819 U.S. 301 S., Riverview
(813) 677-8180

WE BUY ESTATES
in the Sun City area or
take consignments on
your ENTIRE HOUSE
We also come and pick it up!!


I www.ButterfleldsAuctions.com
Butterfield Auctions AB2706/AU3549





1962 WOLF LAUREL DR.
(off Pebble Beach S.)
June 11 & 12-8am-1pm
E-Z-GO Golf Cart, 5-pc. King Suite,
4-pc. Queen Suite w/Canopy Bed,
Dining Table & Hutch, Kitchen Table
w/6 Chairs, Sofa, Chair & Ottoman,
Love Seat, Sleep Sofa, Yellow Garden
Room, Sofa, La-Z-Boy Recliner, 2
Comer Desks, 1 Parlor Desk & Chair,
Patio Furniture, Coffee & End
Tables, Curio, Sewing Machine,
Refrigerator, Freezer, Misc.
Garage, Linens & Kitchen,
Lamps, Pictures, Silks, Bakers
Rack, Area Rugs, TVs, Stereo,
Comforters (Twin, King & Queen).
633-1173 or 508-0307


Anne's Estate Sales 1





1998 Oldsmobile Regency Sedan, Club Car
Golf Cart, Leather Sofas, Entertainment
Centers, Curio Cabinets, Recliners, Lots of
Ballroom Dancing Clothing & Equipment,
Stereo, Dinette Table w/Chairs, Queen
Bedroom Suite, Singer Sewing Machine,
Sofa/Sleeper, TVs, Lots of Artwork,
Wheelchair, China Hutch, Desk w/Chair,
Bookcases, Computer Desk, Bar Stools,
Appliances: Washer & Dryer, Refrigerator,
Stove, Microwave; Garage Cabinets, Tools
(Electric & Manual). COLLECTABLES: 1800
Autograph Books, Vintage Books, Jewelry
(Silver & Gold), Coins and Knife Collection.
Build-a-Bear Supplies, Polly Pocket Dolls,
Waterford, Household, Kitchen & Misc.
wwwJAnnesEstateSales.blogspot.com


312 ESTATE SALES


SIETTIE'


5 [LES


741-0225
Cell: 382-7536
Personalized
C ~Service


Dealer in Gold & Silver Coins
Domestic & Foreign
12% or more and over
on SILVER COINS
(depending on market)
Callforprivate consultation or appointment
All transactions are strictly confidential
(813) 634-3816. cell (813) 503-4189
"Yourlocal dealer for over 20years"

330 FURNITURE
Twin bed, dresser, mirror, night stand
$200. Couch & love seat $100. Glass top
table w/ 4 chairs $75. 813-260-3397

335 MUSIC
Lowrey Organ. Royale SU-500, Cherry
cabinet, 500 song titles/ instrumental
setups, loads of presets. $12,500. 813-
679-4701

354 MEDICAL ITEMS
New wheelchair $150. Rose color reclin-
er lift chair, 3 positions, $150. Transport
Wheelchair $50. 813-410-3656

360 GOLF CARTS
Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade. Char-
gers, parts all related. Ronny's Carts &
Parts. 813-645-4515 or 813-484-9855

We buy golf carts, any condition. We pay
top dollar for used carts, running or not.
Same day pickup. 813-300-0114


544umaCar of Sun City Center


S6 volt 8 Volt
Complete Set Complete Set
$479" $529*
*Plus tax and applicable *Plus tax and applicable
fees Installed with core fees Installed with core
exchange Exp 6/30/10 1 exchange Exp6/30/10
I FREE Golf Cart Service
S(69.99 Value) Exp 6/30/10
L---------------

1649 SCC Plaza Suite 103
(next to Chamber)
Sun City Center, FL


390 MISC. FOR SALE
Sleeper sofa, love seat, wing chair
& ottoman, matching $350. Weslo
incline treadmill $175. Maytag washer
& Whirlpool dryer $180. All excellent.
813-645-4429 or 813-641-0882

Miami Suns Tike with basket. Very good
condition Delivery included. $200 obo.
813-340-2245

Bicycle built for two. Soft red,3 speed,
front & read brakes, excellent condition.
Good gas mileage! $100. 813-633-
6969 or 813-777-4468


425 SLIPS OR STORAGE
South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special-
izing in outside storage for RVs, boats &
trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay-
Storage.com






455 AUTOMOBILES

$Fast Cash$
Cars, trucks & Vans. Dead or alive.
813-626-5733, 813-924-6255 Free
Hauling. God Bless

458 SERVICE/PARTS
Windstar Van (2002) Good for parts
only. 813-645-1605

461 TRAVEL TRAILERS
27' Sandpiper travel trailer 2003 w/
slidder. Excellent condition. Little sun
faded, 1 side. Fully furnished $14,000
obo. 813-967-4637






511 HOUSE FOR SALE

'i s o a -


NEW STINGS
SCC Sierra in Greenbriar, oak floors, replumbed,
interior redecorated. Over 1,500 sq. ft.....$134,900
Hampton "Expanded," w/enclosed lanai, new
kitchen, furnished, golf cart...............................$64,500
SCC Worthington 3BR/2BA, 2,500 sq. ft., solar heated
spa, new flooring, caged patio, vacant............. $249,000
RENTALS
2BR/2B Funm.on Gloucster .......................$750/month
2BR/2B, 2-car garage in Greenbriar....... $1000 /month

Have a nice day
NEAT 2BR/2BA M-HOME across from
golf course: split BR plan, bright living
area, new laminate or carpet floors,
screen porch, carport, shed. $52,500.
PERFECTLY REMODELED 2BR/2BA
DOUBLEWIDE: New kitchen &
appliances, new floors, new CHA, sold
nicely furnished. Carport, utility shed,
washer & dryer. Low taxes, no HOA!
$56,500.
CUTE 2BR HOUSE, owners need to sell.
Carport, newer metal roof, shed in
backyard, great location a block
from river. $65,000.
AFFORDABLE, CLEAN 3BR/1BA
HOUSE: Repainted inside, new CHA,
new plumbing & sewer, carport, utility
room plus washer & dryer, large shed,
1/3 acre fenced lot. $67,500.






515 VILLAS FOR SALE

Sun City Villa
2br/2ba, 1250 sf. absolutely like new,
King's Point, gated 55+ community,
A real bargain! $53,900. Owner, 813-
850-1173

Place a Garage/Yard
Sale Ad $15.50
for 20 Words


at 4pm


HOME-GROWN PRODUCE
NEW SUMMER HOURS beginning June 14
Open Tues.-Sun. 10-6 Closed Mondays
This Week's Soecials
Vine-Ripe Ruskin TOMATOES 69 LB.
Large Seedless Ice Cold $o00
WATERMELON EA'
Sweet Georgia PEACHES 99 LB.
Fresh Shelled or by the Bushel PEAS
FRESH SEAFOOD
Open Thursday-Sunday
This Week's Specials at the Seafood Shanty
Fresh MULLET $19 LB.
Live BLUE CRABS l5"WDZ.
OYSTERS CLAMS SHRIMP
Homemade Milk Shakes & Shortcakes
(Saturday& Sunday only)
Hwy. 41
(1 mile south of Little Manatee River)
RUSKIN 813-645-5208
Gift Cards Available Credit Cards Accepted


THE SHOPPER 27


June 10, 2010


Rivervievi(s
Best Kept
Secret


L (813)







28 THE SHOPPER





560 M.H. ON LOTS
Mobile home for sale Eastwood Mobile
Home Park, Gibsonton. Call Heather
813-677-5726

565 M.H. IN PARKS
2br/lba furnished, double car/ carport,
2 screened lanai's, metal roof over. 55+
park near US 301 & Big Bend. $6,500
obo. 813-677-9792






610 WATERFRONT RENTALS
The Dolphin House, Apollo Beach,
efficiency apartments on water. Boat
docking /fishing. Pool, laundry. $185
weekly, $185 deposit. No pets. 813-
850-5217

611 HOUSES FOR RENT
Apollo Beach 3br/2ba/2cg on Jamaica
Isles. Newly painted, new carpet, nice
quiet neighborhood. $1095 monthly
plus security. 813-645-2448 or 813-
416-6221

To Place a

classified ad

Call Beverly

813.645.3111. ext. 201


612 APTS. FOR RENT

Sun City Center
Furnished or unfurnished 1 br/1 ba,
lanai, across from CA complex. New
carpet, tile. Garage. $785 monthly
includes water. 1 CA dues, annual
rental. KLM Realty H. Carl McGary,
broker 813-679-4701

613 CONDOS FOR RENT
1 bedroom, 1.5 bath, furnished, Cov-
ered parking. 55+, Kings Point. all ame-
nities. $700 monthly 813-634-1162




Tremont at Bay Park
(off7thAve. NE in Ruskin)
3BR/2BA Condos. $900 per month.
3BR/2BA Townhouse with garage.
$1000 per month.
S4BR/2.5BA Townhouse (1842 sq. ft.)
with garage. $1200 per month.
(Water & Basic Cable Included)
with approved application
and 1 year lease
SMove-in Incentives




615 TOWNHOMES FOR RENT
Townhouse for rent. Apollo Beach
2br/1.5ba w/ boat slip & lift. $1,050
monthly plus deposit. Available July
1st. 813-420-6449


620 ROOMS FOR RENT
On Apollo Beach golf course. Private
bath & private entrance. $500 monthly
plus 1/2 utilities. 813-938-1604

Wimauma, want to live in a country
setting that's clean & quiet. No alcohol
or drugs. $135 weekly, nicely furnished
room includes all utilities & basic cable.
813-503-4592

630 M.H. RENTALS


710 LAWN CARE


M & C Mower Repair
Parts & service. Authorized warranty
center. Commercial & residential. 725
14th St., Wimauma. 813-938-3226

FloraScapes
Professional maintenance company
serving all your landscaping needs.
Residential & commercial. Ruskin,
Apollo Beach, SCC, Riverview. Li-
censed/insured. 813-333-3688


For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With 715 FILL DIRT/HAULING
bileA/C. 813-677-1086 MHomesers TruckinWith
A/C. 813-677-1086 Myers Trucking


Rent. 8'x22' RV on private property. All
utilities included in rent. $90 weekly.
Ft. Lonesome. 813-634-4050 or 813-
495-7481

Two bedroom $165 weekly, plus secu-
rity deposit. R & M Mobile Home Park
in Gibsonton. 813-677-7509

For rent. One bedroom RV, includes
electric & water. $140 weekly. Perfect
for on person. No pets. Also 2br trailer
813-690-0768

Ruskin 1br/1ba mobile home on quiet
street. Waterfront, fish off dock. Utilities
included. No smoking, no pets. Best
suited for single person or couple. Refer-
ences needed. Rent $175 weekly plus
$300 deposit. 813-363-6001

For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home near
shopping center in Gibsonton. 813-677-
8789, 813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

New lower rates. New mobile homes
for rent. Family park. L & N Trailer
Park, Gibsonton.
(2 Weeks Free)
813-381-4830

646 WAREHOUSE SPACE
Garage & mini storage rooms for rent.
Pirates Treasure Cove, Gibsonton.
813-677-1137






672 WINDOW TREATMENTS
Al's Window Tinting. Residential, com-
mercial & (mobile) auto. Serving greater
Tampa & surrounding counties. Call
727-403-2323 for free estimate. www.
gulftint.com







705 CLEANING

Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integrity.
Call for free estimate. 7days a week.
Move-in, move-out, rentals. Insured,
bonded, licensed. Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean

Green Team
Home /office cleaning. Windows
cleaned. Pressure washing, yard
maintenance. Call Dee 813-777-1221.

706 PRESSURE WASHING


TWO GUYS
PRESSURE WASHING
Pressure Washing Soft Scrub
for Shingle Roofs Pool Lanai
Driveways Sidewalks
*Whole House Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED





You can find your
classified ad
online @
www.observernews.net


Backhoe & Tractor Service. Cul-
vert sets, driveways, shell, crushed
asphalt, concrete, fill dirt, excavating,
mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963
Free estimates.

Fill-Land Clearing
Dozer & loader work, driveway & sep-
tic fill, & shell hauled. Robert Carver,
813-634-4962. Beeper 813-267-6217

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill dirt,
topsoil, sand, crushed rock & asphalt,
driveway culverts. Loader, backhoe,
grading, bushhog, discing. Install Sep-
tic System & drain fills. CFC#1427021.
813-645-1883

726 ROOFING
G Horn
Roofing
Free Estimate
Repairs, reroof, inspections.
Over 35 yr Experience
Local/ prompt. Lic# RC29027076 Call
813-787-9047 or 813-641-7699

740 MISC. SERVICES

Oliver & Company
Pet Sitting
813-767-7225. Licensed, bonded,
insured. Member of Pet Sitters Inter-
national. References available, email:
olivertort@aol.com

Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks, boat
lifts & seawalls. Free inspection. Heck-
er Construction Co. 813-236-9306






870 GENERAL
Service tech/ installer. Great position for
flexible person who wants to learn instal-
lation & service end of business. Some
experience & good attitude necessary.
Unlimited growth potential for right per-
son. Apollo Beach Air 813-645-0381


JUNE 10, 2010
870 GENERAL
Firework Stand Operators! Help
wanted. Male or female, no experience
necessary. Excellent pay. Apply at 8820
US 301, Riverview. 813-677-1874

Rent fireworks tent. Make thousand's.
Hillsborough/ Pasco/ Pinellas County.
For more infor. call 813-234-2264

Sunroom & screen room installers need-
ed for full time employment with Ruskin
based business. Experience is a must!
Also need some tools & a Florida drivers
license. Dependability & good work ethic
are a must. Good communications skills
a plus. Call 813-649-1599 to app

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Abortion Not an Option? Consider
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1-800-852-0041 #133050

ADOPTION 888-812-3678 All Expens-
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Secure family for your child 24 Hrs 7
Days Caring & Confidential. Attor-
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ONA NW OM

WIT N MOEYDOWH


CALL
Paul B (813) 645-3211

DICKMAN Serving South Hillsborough
INC. County since 1924.
R E A L T www.dickmanrealty.com
Celebrating 86 Years dickman@tampabay.rr.com
1924-2010
FOR RENT: 1 BR or 2BR furnished duplex on small canal close to Bay on
West Shell Point. $700. and $800. monthly. JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
BEAUTIFUL SECLUDED RIVERFRONT ACREAGE! Over 6 acres, M/H
on property but of no value. 165' riverfront. $495,000. CALL KAY PYE
361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
200' ON THE LITTLE MANATEE RIVER! Dock with boathouse. 4BR/3BA
5-car garage. Italian marble tile throughout, 5 sets of French doors, huge
master bedroom, and even a mother-in-law suite. Could you ask for more!
Now priced at $449,900. CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WEST-
BROOK 748-2201
5 ACRES OF PRIVATE COUNTRY LIVING! 3BR/2BA manufactured
home, workshop, double carport & lots and lots of trees. 10 greenhouses,
wood burning fireplace, irrigation system, electric gate & motion lights.
$159,000. CALL KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK
748-2201
PRICED RIGHT -- COMMERCIAL ACREAGE IN RUSKIN! County water
& sewer, 200' road frontage, perfect for small business. M/H on premises
brings in rental income. Adjacent property negotiable. $234,900. CALL
KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
BRING YOUR BOAT & MOVE IN!!! This beautiful waterfront property is
located on a quiet cul-de-sac in Ruskin and is the perfect location for
boaters, fishermen or anyone just wanting to live in paradise!! Enjoy
panoramic views of the Ruskin Inlet from most rooms in this nicely
maintained 3BR/2BA, 2-car garage home. This property has an enclosed
pool/spa as well as an open deck, dock, davits and much, much more. Call
today and make an appointment to see this lovely home! $260,000 CALL
CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION! Oversized corner building lot within
walking distance to recreation, churches, schools and the like but on a quiet
lane. Just under /4 acre and partially cleared. Zoned Residential Single
Family. Asking $67,000. JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540.
PRICE REDUCTION -- FISH FARM READY, 2.54 acres with well, spetic
and electric service. Green belted, ready for your horses and cattle.
$140,000 CALL KATHY JACOBSON 624-2225
JUST LISTED: RUSKIN GREAT 3BR/2BA POOL HOUSE ON 2 LOTS :
repainted, new carpet in BR, tiles in living areas, large screen porch and
deck overlooking pool and backyard, 2-car garage. Home sits on 1 lot, 2nd
lot is nicely landscaped and fenced. $159,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT
363-7250
REDUCED: BEAUTIFUL CANALFRONT manufactured home, 3BR/2BA,
bright open living-area, bay windows overlooking water, huge modern
kitchen, inside utility. Screen porch, seawall, davits, shed/workshop. Now
$140,000! CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
WATERFRONT HOUSE REDUCED $10,000: Very nice 3BR/2BA + Den,
recently repainted, lots of cabinets in kitchen, large inside utility-room,
screen porch, double attached carport. Large lot on canal, seawall & boat
slip. Move-in-ready. Now $169,900. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
DON'T MISS THIS 3BR HOUSE FOR $67,500! Great condition, new CHA,
new plumbing & sewer, inside repainted, utility-rm, carport, large shed, 1/3
acre fenced yard, low taxes, no HOA! CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
CALL US FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS........645-3211
Donate your old functioning cell phones and drop off at our
office for use by the "Victims Assistance Program."
(Evening phone numbers)
Judy Erickson ..................... 468-0288 Jim Grannon........................... 610-3485
Claire Tort ...... ............ 363-7250 KennAntonelli .................... 786-3124
Kay Pye .............................. 361-3672 Kathy Jacobson ..................... 624-2225
Cathy Griggs ..................... 391-8653 Jo Ellen Mobley..................... 645-1540
Christine Nethers ............... 260-6335 LaRae Regis........................... 633-8318
Roxanne Westbrook............ 748-2201


* Phase III Now Available!
* 2 Swimming Pools and a Clubhouse
* 3,4 and 5 Bedrooms, 1 and 2 Garages
* Popular Ruskin Location
* USDA Self-Help Housing program -- help
build your home in exchange for a down
payment
* No money down, easy to qualify
* Non-profit agency works for you
-Hablamos Espaiol ~




BAYOUPASS
i'q .. .r.. i, r.. re hmebuyrs under 80% of median ncome. Call fr details.


A community of affordable homes
exclusively for first-time homebuyers!

FLORIDA HOME PATNERSM H
(813)672- 7889 www.flhome.org


ow Taking Application

for Packing House

I hiX
Behind 5th 3rd Bank

645-6431







June 10, 2010
CPF STATEWIDE
*DIVORCE* BANKRUPTCY Starting
at $65 *1 Signature Divorce *Missing
Spouse Divorce "We Come to you!"
1-888-705-7221 Since1992

ROOF REPAIRS CALL 24/7 Flat Roof&
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Inspections. Lic/Ins CCC1327406. All
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1-877-572-1019

WANTED 20 Homes To showcase our
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CCC058227 1-877-292-3120

$99.95 FLORIDA CORP. $154.95
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Free information packet: www.ame-
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630-9800 Tampa ... (813) 871-5400
St. Pete... (727) 442-5300 Orlando
... (407) 898-5500 Toll Free... (800)
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only need apply.

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C MOUNTAIN HOMESITE BEST
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com


THE SHOPPER 29


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more.

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com ;

Need Sod? St. Augustine $100 Bahia
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ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed
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$300 per day depending on job require-
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1-800-349-2060 A102 for casting times/
locations.

** BODYGUARDS WANTED ** FREE
Training for members. No Experience
OK. Excellent $$$. Full & Part Time.
Sign On Bonus. 1-615-228-1701. www.
psubodyguards.com


CPF STATEWIDE
$$ EARN EXTRA INCOME $$ Working
from home. $5.00 for every envelope
Processed with our sales brochures.
Guaranteed!! Free Information. 1-800-
210-2686 or visit: www.funsimplework.
com

Earn up to $150 per day. Under cover
Shoppers needed to judge retail and
dining establishments Exp Not Re. Call
1-888-601-4861

CENTRAL GEORGIA 280 ACRES -
$1375/AC. Auchumpkee Creek, rocky
shoals, several pond sites, hardwoods
& planted pine. Pictures on website!
478-987-9700 www.stregispaper.com
; St. Regis Paper Co.

GEORGIA LAND & HOMESITES -
Beautiful country subd. just off US1.
Great investment! Half acre tracts $75/
month & up. MH's welcome. Others
available; www.HickoryHammockProp-
erties.com ; Owner Financing 912-585-
2174; 912-526-9964

GEORGIA LAND & HOMESITES -
Washington County near Augusta.
acre 20acres starting @ $3750/acre.
County approved, incredible investment,
Beautiful weather. Low taxes. Owner
financing from $199/mo. Hablo Espanol,
706-364-4200

GEORGIA Quiet, Country Living in
Central GA. 4acre-5acre Private lots.
Only 20mins. to Walmart Owner financ-
ing $110/mo. Call 678-644-0547 for
pictures or www.CountryLots.net

IRS PUBLIC AUCTION LONGWOOD,
FL 4br/2ba/2cg w/pool on a corner lot.
109 E Cumberland Circle. Open House
6/15, Sale 6/16, 10am. Registration
9am. Sharon Sullivan 954-654-9899
www.irssales.gov ;

IRS PUBLIC AUCTION WEST PALM
BEACH, FL 4br/2ba screened lanai.
217 Bilbao Street. Open House 6/28,
Sale 6/29, 10am. Registration 9am.
Sharon Sullivan 954-654-9899 www.
irssales.gov

STOP RENTING!! GOVT & BANK
FORECLOSURES! From $500 Down,
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rebuildUS.com ;


CPF STATEWIDE
NNC MOUNTAINS Brand new! Moun-
tain Top tract reduced to $19,500! Pri-
vate, near Boone area, bank financing,
owner must sale, 866-789-8535

NC MOUNTAINS Price Slashed from
$89,900 to $69,900 New 1232 sf log
cabin on 1.5 private acres. Large deck,
covered porch, paved access, EZto fin-
ish. Additional acreage available. Call
828-286-1666 today

NORTH CAROLINA Be cool in the
Mountains. Efficiency to 5-br houses &
condos. Fully equipped. Views, pools,
golf, tennis & more. Sugar Mountain
Accommodations & Realty staysugar.
com 1-800-545-9475

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1-7 bedroom chalets, condos & cabins.
Some pet friendly! Daily, weekly,
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beechmountain.com ; 1-800-368-7404

BEAUTIFUL TENNESSEE Mountain
lots, breathtaking views. River ac-
cess. Ideal for fishing, hunting, ATV
/ horseback riding. Near Dale Hollow
Lake. Utilities. Owner financing. From
$15,900 888-939-2968

TENNESSEE MTNS 435ac w/timber,
creek, river, natural gas well, springs,
city water, utilities. Eight miles of trails
$1800/ac. Will divide into 2 tracts. www.
tnwithaview.com ; 1-888-836-8439

SOUTH CAROLINA Santee Cooper
Lake Area. 2 acres, near 1-95. Beautiful
building tract $19,900. Owner financing
803-473-7125


CPF STATEWIDE
Donate Vehicle Receive $1000 Grocery
Coupon Noah's Arc Support No Kill
Shelters, Research to Advance Vet-
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Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted
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Donate your Car Truck or Boat to
HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND Free 3
Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free
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RUN FIREWORKS TENT $$ MAKE
THOUSANDS $$ Call 813-234-2264
/ 800-334-BANG Citrus, Hernando,
Hillsborough, Lake, Lee, Orange, Pasco,
Pinellas, Seminole & Sumter Counties
only need apply.

ADOPTION 866-633-0397 Unplanned-
Pregnancy? Provide your baby with
a loving, financially secure family.
Living/Medical/Counseling expenses
paid. Social worker on staff. Call
compassionate attorney Lauren Fein-
gold (FL Bar#0958107) 24/7

OWNER SAYS SELL! Deep Dock-
able COASTAL WATERFRONT only
$79,900. Direct Ocean Access. Adjoin-
ing lot sold for $309,900! All amenities
complete! Paved roads, underground
utilities, club house, pool. Excellent
financing. Call now 877-888-1406,
x2580

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Call M & M Printing For All Your Printing Needs
Mickey 813-645-4048 ext. 204 or email: mickey@mmprintinc.com
David 813-645-4048 ext. 207 or email: dpayne@mmprintinc.com


Competitively Priced Printing Including:
Letterhead Business Cards


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Invoices

Statements

Proposals
Books

Booklets

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We Also Print:

The Observer News

The SCC Observer


Brochures

Pamphlets

Newsletters

Receipts
Flyers
Postcards

Folding Cards
Call For A Quote


Newspapers

Tabloids


The Riverview Current Magazines
Call For A Quote

We Offer the Following Services:

Design Layout Folding


Cutting


Hole Punching Copies
Call For A Quote


Serving the South Shore Communities Since 1968
210 Woodland Estates Avenue S.W., Ruskin, FL 33570
Phone: (813) 645-4048 Fax: (813) 645-1792


Kirao D.s., P.
J^Cari E. Friedmaii D.D.S., Pa.A


Thomas & Paulk PA


U


Greater Riverview
SChamber of Commerce, Inc.


h1= HARBOR MF3'- )77,FAS1,

L= HARBOR MARINAS


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Letterhead: 8.5 x 11 Std.
Many paper stocks and types available.
Matching envelopes in #10 Std. Envelopes available in
many other sizes including "A", Baronial, Remittance,
Business Reply; with or without window and security.


Black and 1 to 4 color printing

Our Location:
Hwy 41 S., one block south of College
Ave. (SR 674). Over the bridge and turn
right on 1st St. SW. Go around curve and
we are the second driveway on the left.


Community Papers of

Florida reach over 125

publications about 9,000,000

Readers in Florida.

Call Beverly

813-645-3111 ext. 201


m
& Printing Company, Inc.
Established in 1968 .H"W "ILI
Publisher ofThe Observer News,The SCC Observer News
and The Riverview Current


College Blvd.

Woodland
Estates Ave.






30 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


THE OBSERVER NEWS THE SCC OBSERVER THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT


ENT., INC.
Lic..#CMC056816
AIR-CONDITIONING,
HEATING & REFRIGERATION
Complete Sales, Service,
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Amana and Senior
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John R. Bowman, Jr., Owner
(813) 633-2703




Let someone
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heavy work.

Look in the
Business & Trade
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THE LAWN BARBERS
(813) 938-3649 1
Pocketbook Friendly
*FREE Estimates
AllYour Lawn Care Needs
Palm Tree Trimming
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SERVING SOUTH HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY



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Commercial
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'- = -S


SELF ARREST BONDS
COURT DATES 664-0056
WARRANT CHECKS
BIG JOHN'S
BAIL BONDS
641-8400
FAMILY BONDSMAN
STATE FEDERAL
24 HOUR SERVICE
JOHN L. VATH
2100 Orient Road Tampa, FL. 33619
Fax: (813) 628-8739






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" ea k & '- 2o. 0 _ea li -_


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Proudly Serving: Sun City Center
Ruskin Apollo Beach Riverview
and surrounding areas
Member SCC Chamber of Commerce







CELL 813-777-9808
Frank Shaft
FL Certified Roofing Contractor
CCC# 1327713
www.ApolloBeachRoofing.com
PalmTreeRoofing@gmail.com


WLVIN#'SA/l 9 A IN
SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS
Residential and Light Commercial
Family Owned & Operated
No Revolving Technicians
Quality Service,* Sales,
Installation
Most Replacement
Parts on Hand
(813) 263-6503
< CAC 1814336 Ruskin




SAPOLLO
CONSTRUCTION
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OA Lie. #EC 0002376
* Serving the Southshore
since 1987
* No job is too small
* For all your electrical and low
voltage needs
* Licensed, Bonded & Insured
813-645-4926



Need Work Done
Around the House?

Turn to PHIL
Your Handy Person!
RIVERSIDE GOLF & BOATING CLUB RESIDENT
www.mrhandyperson.com
Serving
APOLLO BEACH
RUSKIN
SUN CITY
CENTER
KINGS POINT





25+ Years Experience
Licensed & Insured
813-649-1418


All Types of Roofing
New Roofs & Repairs
Shingle Tile Metal Hot Tar
No job too big or too small!
SERVING SINCE 1973
Ruskin Sun City Center Kings
Point Apollo Beach Riverview
"ALL MY CUSTOMERS ARE DRY
FRIENDS WHEN QUALITY COUNTY"


Ruskin &
Sun CiG Center
ChamberMember
P.O. Box 551 Ruskin, FL 33570
www.customroofing.us
Bonded & Insured Lic. #CCC1326907





*No project over $1000.
No electrical, gas, or
plumbing, and nothing
structural.


Mary Ann Wilhelm
Owner/Director
#CAC 1814397

Wilhelm rvice

641-1811
FACTORY
SA LOER 802 4th St. S.W.
S (Off College Ave. West)
Ruskin, Florida
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Ruskin, FL 33570
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813-645-7000
Listed with Sterling Management and
Sun City Center Community Association
Lic. #EC13002936







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AES. Plumbing



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JUNE 10, 2010





OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 31


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All New & Redesigned!
Stylish & Spacious
Unsurpassed amount of standard safety features


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Come See Why
Thousands of Local Drivers
Are Switching To Hyundai


All N
Redesi


Rugged Capablility,
Comfort & Style




fgined! 2010 SANTA FE

2 N

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#62423


2010 ELANTRA


Best Value
In Its Class


2010 ELANTRA Touring 2010 GENESIS Coupe




Most Interior Room In Its Class Revolution In Design, Performance & Value
LEASE239 LE 259
FOR 9 24 FOR $9 36
MONTH MONTH
$ LEASE' $ LEASEt


Fleowi!?e Guag~ptee


We will beat any
other Hyundai
dealer or pay you


2010 GENESIS
^r-7"^77^^^


Performance, Technology, Safety & Quality
FOR3 9 36
39 ^l LEASE'


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All prices are plus tax, tag and $599 dealer fee and are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. O SpecialAPR offers on select models, sei ., [ ,, i I I .. 99,
Genesis Coupe $2199, '11 Sonata $3500, '10 Tucson $2499, '10 Genesis Sedan $3799. All offers are with approved credit and some cannot be combined. *Expected range for most drivers, .. . , ..
Accent. As listed on Monroney sticker. A For model year 2008. Based on volume manufacturers as included in the EPATM Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Fu. II i. *a a. 1 &
Honda listing. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Advertised vehicles subject to prior sale. Programs subject to change without notice. tt Must present signed buyers order from accredited Hyundai Dealer on same model & equipment.


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Manatee Ave. WISR64 Exit 220 West I

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rTCorlez Road


itate Road 70


*1


2010 TUCSON


On Select Models'


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2010 ACCENT
C441 rPP


Affordable & Fuel Efficient
SALE $9,987


LEASEbio~LMI


JUNE 10,.2010


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$19.95 18-Point Check-Up


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$25 OFF Any Repair


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CAC1813763 Offer expires6/30/2010 Rebate offer is valid only with the purchase of qualifying Lennox products. See dealer for details and visit www.energystar.gov for more information on the credit guidelines and list of qualifying heating and cooling equipment.
**See dealer for details, 2010 Lennox Industries Inc. See your participating Lennox dealer for details. Lennox dealers include independently owned and operated businesses.


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