Title: Observer news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102144/00014
 Material Information
Title: Observer news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: M&M Printing Co., Inc
Place of Publication: Ruskin, FL
Publication Date: April 22, 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102144
Volume ID: VID00014
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Pocket the savings when buying pizza, window tinting, auto repairs, .
beauty treatments, hearing aids, carpeting, furniture,
sundaes, auto wax, appetizers, golf, AC maintenance
or dental care, by clipping coupons throughout this issue.
- - - - -


April 22, 2010
Volume 54
Number 13


P.R.S.T. STD
PAID
RUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570
PERMIT NO. 8


THE OBSERVER NEWS


I www~~.Obererew.ne


SCC Dues

debtors may

face foreclosure
* By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
SUN CITY CENTER -
Cracking down on its ex-
cessively delinquent dues
evaders, the Community
Association here is turn-
ing to extreme measures:
foreclosure actions on their
homes to settle the debts.
Among approximately
11,000 members of the SCC
CA owners of thousands
of homes in various neigh-
borhoods across the 50-year-
old retirement community
straddling both sides of S.R.
674 137 currently are de-
linquent in paying their
$256.00 per person annual
membership dues. Among
these non-payers are a half
dozen who owe more than
$2,000 and another 31 who
are behind between $1,000
and $2,000, CA President Ed
Barnes said this week.
Together, their unpaid debt
to the association totals more
than $100,000, Barnes said.
Such high dollar delinquen-
See DUES DEBTORS, page 8


HCSO goes after criminal bad habits


* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net
RUSKIN The Hillsbor-
ough County Sheriff's Of-
fice has long held a philoso-
phy of community policing.
The principle is the very
essence of law enforcement
with deputies integrated
into the communities they
serve. With that integration
comes knowledge they
know better what has or
perhaps will happen that
requires attention.
Community policing
is, however, expensive. It
requires a significant in-
vestment of time and man-
power. Traditionally the
time investment has been
shouldered by the officers,
both on and off duty. Like
most everyone during this
time of economic recession
the HCSO has had to do
more with less. They have
been successful. Despite
budget cuts, the HCSO has
achieved more which for
the public means less crime.
According to the Florida
Department of Law En-
forcement, the crime rate


in Hillsborough County
has fallen every year since
2002. In 2007, Hillsborough
County fell below the seven
county Tampa Bay metro
area average in crime rates



i IU


per 100,000 people. While
some forms of crime have
increased recently, the num-
bers are far below those of
the 1990s. And even those
increases have only rarely


been felt by the public at
large. Considering the popu-
lation influx of the past de-
cade, coupled with the more
recent wide-scale economic
See HCSO, page 16


Mitch Traphagen photo
Sgt. Susan Bradford with Detective Jason Roberts. "Since we've gone to intelligence
policing, we've seen arrests go up. It's working," Sgt. Bradford said.


Ruskin expert recycles pipes from retired organs


Penny Fletcher Photo
Wayne Warren, music director at St. Anne Catholic Church
in Ruskin and organist for Calvary Evangelical Lutheran
Church in Apollo Beach, is also a master organ builder
and tuner. Here he adjusts pipes for maximum sound at St.
John the Divine Episcopal Church in Sun City Center. The
pipes came from three churches, some as far away as Mich-
igan, made before World War I. All the scaffolding and other
woodwork had to be built from scratch and almost 4,000
wiring connections made to put the organ together.


* By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews. net
SOUTH COUNTY- The part of the or-
gan visible to people watching it played is
but a tiny portion of what makes the sound.
Behind huge walls of specially-made swell
shades that open and close like shutters
as the keys are played and foot pedals are
pumped, are two whole rooms filled with
pipes brought from three separate churches,
some made before World War I.
Parts of the organ, some of which came
from as far away as Michigan, were tracked
down and brought to St. John the Divine in
Sun City Center by trucks and vans and put
together under the direction of two musi-
cians, who have been friends for 30 years:
Chuck Wirick and Wayne Warren.
As many readers will recognize, Chuck is
the president of the South Shore Arts Coun-
cil Board of Directors, the music director
at both the Ruskin and Sun City Center
locales for St. John the Divine Episcopal
Church, and holds office in many perform-
ing and musical arts groups, while Wayne
is currently the music director for St. Anne
Catholic Church in Ruskin and organist for
Apollo Beach's Calvary Evangelical Lu-
theran congregation as well. He is also very
active behind the scenes of many musical
programs around the world, because of his
expertise in building, repairing and tuning


of some of the finest pipe organs ever built
including overseeing all of that for the Or-
gan Historical Society's National Conven-
tion held in Detroit.
Chuck and Wayne met when Chuck was
director of music at Brookside United
Methodist Church in Detroit and Wayne
was building and repairing organs there; a
business he still operates from his Apollo
Beach home via his Web site, www.warren-
pipeorgans.com.
When St. John the Divine planned to build
a second campus in Sun City Center (while
retaining its 45-year-old Ruskin-based site)
members wanted to have a spectacular or-
gan but it just wasn't in the budget.
Organs like the one now in St. John's Sun
City Center location would cost more than
$100,000 if ordered new, and could be on a
waiting list long enough to have held up the
building of the sanctuary. Knowing there
had to be a way to obtain the same qual-
ity at half the cost, Chuck contacted his old
friend who had moved to Florida in 1990
- and they came up with a mind-boggling
plan to build one organ from parts of three
organs that were in different parts of the
country.
Wayne had been the organist for the sec-
ond-oldest Catholic Church in the United
See PIPE ORGAN, page 14


Whatever

Happened

About...
* By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
Operation Last Dose
In a companion program to
the annual Operation Medi-
cine Cabinet collection of
outdated or no longer needed
prescription drugs conducted
by the Hillsborough County
Sheriff's Office, the law
enforcement agency and
Sweetbay Supermarkets
teamed up this month to
stage Operation Last Dose at
various stores in the county.
The next collection date
in the South County is
scheduled for 9:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. on Saturday, May
1, at the Ruskin Sweetbay,
1023 North U.S. 41. Expired
or unwanted prescrip-
tion medicines along with
controlled substances and
over-the-counter drugs all
can be surrendered at that
time, according to Deputy
Rob Thornton.
The chemicals and
compounds collected are
disposed of safely by HCSO
personnel, keeping them out
of the water and wastewater
systems.
Open SCC CA Seat
Six residents have applied
for appointment to a vacant
seat on the nine-member
Community Association
board of directors.
Meeting the April 16 dead-
line for candidacy to com-
plete the term of resigned
director John "Woody"
Nelson were Ronald Cress,
David Floyd, Jane Keegan,
Uta Kuhn, Sam Sudman and
Mary Thompson, according
to Ed Barnes, current board
president.
The sitting set of directors
are to make the appoint-
ment from the six during
their regular board meeting
Wednesday, May 12. That
individual will complete
Nelson's term through 2010
and may stand for election in
December when three more
board seats will be up for
See WIr-ITFVFR ..nnn,


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Look familiar? Check out 'Postcards' on page
16 for a chance to share the nostalgia of old
Florida postcards that identify our unique
state with its unusual clestinations.


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2 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


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Dimes ..................... .............. 1.00 & up
1965 1969:
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WE BUY ALL FORMS
School Rings
Jewelry
Broken Jewelry
Chains n
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APRIL 22, 2010


South Bay Hospital Designated as a
Blue Distinction Center


Blue Cross and Blue Shield of
Florida, Inc. (BCBSF) has des-
ignated South Bay Hospital as a
Blue Distinction Center for Knee
and Hip Replacement. "We are
proud to achieve this distinction
from Blue Cross and Blue Shield
for our Knee and Hip Replacement
Program," says Sharon Roush,
CEO of South Bay Hospital. "This
recognition of our quality care is
representative of the hard work
and dedication of our entire medi-
cal team."
South Bay Hospital offers com-
prehensive knee and hip replace-
ment services, including:
Joint Replacement Surgery
Joint Resurfacing Surgery
Repair of Fractures
Arthroscopic Surgery
Small Bone and Joint Repairs
Repairs of Tendons and Nerves
Repair of Carpal Tunnel Syn-
drome
"Blue Distinction puts a high
value on research and evidence-
based health and medical informa-
tion," said Allan Korn, M.D. Blue
Cross and Blue Shield Association
Chief Medical Officer. "Blue Dis-
tinction Centers show our commit-


ment to working with doctors and
hospitals in communities across
the country to identify leading in-
stitutions that meet clinically vali-
dated quality standards and deliver
better overall outcomes in patient
care."
To be designated as a Blue Dis-
tinction Center for Knee and Hip
Replacement, the following types
of criteria were evaluated.
Established acute care inpa-
tient facility, including intensive
care, emergency care, and a full
range of patient support services
with full accreditation by a CMS-
deemed national accreditation or-
ganization
Experience and training of
program surgeons, including case
volume
Quality management programs,
including surgical checklists as
well as tracking and evaluation of
clinical outcomes and process of
care
Multi-disciplinary clinical path-
ways and teams to coordinate and
streamline care, including transi-
tions of care
Shared decision making and
preoperative patient education


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FAMILY DENTISTRY


Kirk D. Parrott, D.D.S

Carl E. Friedman, D.D.S.

902 N. Tamiami Trail, Ruskin, FL 33570
(Across from Sweetbay Supermarket)
NEW PATIENTS WELCOME
(813) 645-6491
Members Amencan Dental Associaion, Fonda State Dental Associaton, Flonda West Coast Dental
Association, Manatee County Dental Association and Hillsborough County Dental Association


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 3
New associate joins Putnam expresses concern over rising
SCC Prudential debt and taxes


-lioraa Realty
A new sales associate has joined
the Sun City Center office of Pru-
dential Florida Realty.
Cindy Arnold is a newly-licensed
sales associate. She is a native of
the Pacific Northwest and attended
the University of Colorado in Den-
ver, Colorado. She will become
part of a team with Trudy Prov-
ince, who is also an associate with
the Sun City Center office.
Cindy will be responsible for
residential real estate sales. Prior
to joining Prudential Florida Re-
alty, she was the General Manager
for Chipman Enterprises, Inc. for
12 years.


Support the troops
Calvary Lutheran Evangelical
Church Youth Group and Angel At-
tic are working together with Sup-
port the Troops, Inc. to send much
needed support to the military over-
seas. For every $ 1 donated you will
receive one piece of clothing for free
from selected merchandise at Angel
Attic.
The Calvary Lutheran Evangelical
Church Youth Group will be taking
these donations to buy items or do-
nate the money. The money would
go to pay for various items such
as postage needed by Support the
Troops, Inc. They send out almost
300 boxes each week to military
units in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait,
Qatar, and Kyrgyzstan. The post-
age alone can run over $48,000 each
month.
Angel Attic will be running this
special for two days, on Friday,
April 23 and Saturday, April 24
from 9:00am to 12:00pm. Angel At-
tic is located at 1424 College Ave E
in Ruskin, FL.

The SCC WGA 9 hole
league played Thursday
March 25 Game -
Mystery Hole.
Winners --
First -- Connie Ream
Second Christel Fraebel
Third 3 way tie Sandra Hur-
witz, Beth Johnson, Betty Klitzke.


Congressman Adam Putnam today expressed concern for the grow-
ing debt burden America has taken on, and the fact that taxes have
risen because of misguided policies recently passed by Congress.
"As millions of Americans file their tax returns, the $3.8 trillion
budget that President Barack Obama has sent to Congress for the next
fiscal year raises taxes by $2 trillion and still saddles the nation with
$8.5 trillion in additional debt over the next decade.
"At a time of double digit unemployment in Florida and around
the nation, I am very concerned about the direction in which the
president and Congress are leading us. In past periods of economic
downturn, there has been bipartisan support for reducing the tax bur-
den on Americans. These policies have prompted economic rebound
and brought Americans back to work. But now, faced with the worst
economy since the Great Depression, Washington is on a narrow, par-
tisan course that places an enormous debt burden on Americans for
generations to come, while simultaneously raising the tax burden on
families, small businesses and seniors."
Since 2001, Putnam has represented Florida's 12th Congressional
District, which includes most of Polk County and portions of Hillsbor-
ough and Osceola counties.

Volunteers needed at LifePath Hospice
Are you looking for a meaningful experience that makes a difference
in someone's life? Do you have two-to-four hours to share each week?
Then consider volunteering with LifePath Hospice.
Volunteers bring compassion and companionship to patients with ad-
vanced illnesses. They perform any number of activities, such as reading
to patients, helping at mealtime, providing a much-needed break for a
caregiver, creating a legacy project or just sitting quietly offering sup-
port. Volunteers receive free training and do not need any previous type
of experience.
LifePath Hospice will offer volunteer training in April at the Bridges
Clubhouse, 11350 Bloomingdale Avenue in Riverview. The training runs
on the following dates and times: Friday, April 30 at 1:30 p.m. for a 90
minute orientation and Friday, May 7 and Friday, May 14 from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. for training. Volunteers must pre-register and attend all orienta-
tion and training meetings.
Contact Judie Bortness at 813-984-2299 or bortnessj@lifepath-hos-
pice.org to register or for more information.

Kings Point Ladies 9 Hole League 2010
Championship March 22 .w
Championship Winner -
Sue Watkins
Flight A Winners
1st Sally Repetti
2nd Betty Irwin .

Flight B Winners
1st Judy Trombley
2nd Janet Balonick
3rd Nita Schmierer

Flight C Winners
1st Joan Abrams
2nd Liz Lister
2nd Liz Lister Championship Winner -
3rd Bev Buteau Sue Watkins






4 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Positive Talk The future is


by William Hodges
Children are the only true asset
that a country has. It really doesn't
matter how wealthy we are if we
have no one to leave it to. How
we treat our children and the envi-
ronment we create for them deter-
mines if they will be able to pick
up the torch and light the way into
the future. Being a parent can be a
very frustrating experience, almost
as bad as having to live through
childhood. Many of us have un-
real expectations of what we can
reasonably expect of ourselves as
parents. I like the words of Kahlil
Gibran on this subject:
"You may give them your love
but not your thoughts,
For they have their own
thoughts.
You may house their bodies but
not their souls,
For their souls dwell in the house
of tomorrow, which you cannot
visit, not even in your dreams.
You may strive to be like them,
but seek not to make them like
you,
For life goes not backward nor
tarries with yesterday.
You are the bows from which
your children as living arrows are
sent forth."
The most important thing you
can give your children is love.
Probably the next most important
Falcon Watch Ladies 9-hc
Flt. A
1st Marion Crowe 46
2nd Judy Boyer 51
Yuko Vetsch 51
3rd Janine Johnson 52
Flt. B
1st Rosa Gerry 47
2nd Elle Warming 49


with our children
gift you can give to them is the
ability to trust their own judgment
and think on their own. We do not
encourage self development by de-
manding that they believe as we
do, simply because we say we are
right. Lay the facts before them and
help them discover for themselves
what is right.
Maybe it is because men and
women see their children as a
chance for immortality that they
try to live again through their chil-
dren. Only this time they are deter-
mined to correct all of the mistakes
of their childhood. They strive to
make the child into the person they
would like to have been. The truth
is we give our children life, and in
doing so, give them the opportunity
to grow into unique human beings.
Whether we like it or not, that is
what they will do.
As I think back across my life,
some of the happiest days were
those when my children allowed
me to share in their activities. I was
young again when I walked onto a
football field with my son, not to
relive old days of youthful glory
but to learn a new skill from him-
the art of officiating. And through
the years, my daughter has brought
me continual joy by sharing her
exuberance for her job and consid-
ering me her friend and mentor.
When they leave home, all chil-
dren are at the mercy of natural
forces just as the arrow is when it
leaves the bow. We can only hope
we have launched them with suf-
ficient power.
Hodges is a nationally recog-
nized speaker, trainer, and syn-
dicated columnist. Hodges may
be reached at Hodges Seminars
International, PO. Box 89033,
Tampa, FL 33689-0400. Phone
813-641-0816. Web site: http://
www.BillHodges.com.


Discovering Poetry
In celebration of National Poetry Month (April), the Brandon Regional
Library has invited John Foster, poet and resident of Sun City Center, to
give a reading/seminar entitled "Discovering
Poetry." The presentation, open to the public, ..
is scheduled for Saturday, April 24 at 2 pm at
the library. Admission is free. Using examples
from his book, "Discovery! A Wordcrafter's
Journey," the poet will discuss a variety of po-
etry forms and poetic devices. Having given
readings and seminars in Sarasota, Bradenton
and Sun City Center, John Foster is known for
his instructive and entertaining lectures.
Foster's work, much of it humorous, has ap-
peared in the 2009 Anthology of the Florida
State Poets Association and in the 2010 An- JOHN FOSTER
thology of Yale Poets. Additionally, his poems
have been featured in a number of professional journals. He is currently
conducting a series of poetry workshops for the spring semester of the
Graduate School for Seniors at Freedom Plaza in Sun City Center. Fos-
ter was recently named "Poet of the Month" on an international poetry
web site.


Caloosa prepares for Triangular Tournament
Caloosa Triangular Tournament Committee preparing the agenda
for the tournament to be hosted April 14, at the Caloosa C.C. L R:
Kris Wells Falcon Watch, Jane Broccieri Falcon Watch, Joann Bren-
nan Sandpiper, Sue Daveler Caloosa C.C. (CWGA 18) President and
Jeanne Kolls Tournament Coordinator and Vice President (CWGA
18). Thirty six couples per club will participate in a best ball of two
18 hole tournament. A luncheon and prizes will be awarded follow-
ing the tournament. Sandpiper has reigned in the first two encoun-
ters which began in 2008.


ole League Winners March 19 Game Low Gross


Mary McClafferty
3rdJennie Ryan
Flt. C
1st Ruth Johnson
Colleen Savas
2nd Katherine Marcario
Rosa Ricciardi


46 3rd Darlene Gray
50 Flt. D
1st Nancy Stevens
48 2nd Connie Kehl
48 Nancy Scott
49 3rd Kathy Boccieri
49 Mimi Meszaros


APRIL 22, 2010

THE OBSERVER NEWS
THE SCC OBSERVER
THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT

210 Woodland Estates S. W.
Ruskin,FL 33570
813-645-3111
FAX 813-645-4118
www.observernews.net
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Penny@observernews.net
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Melody@observernews.net
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articles should be emailed to
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^o ..rf.- .r


Golf Scores Hogans Golf Club Tuesday, March
23 Course: Apollo Beach, Play: K-skins
1st : Fred Mayes, 6 skins
2nd : five-way tie at 3 skins each Frank Carlin, Jim Sari, Fred Zizel-
man, Jenice Taylor and John Kazlauskas

Low-net: two-way tie at 70's Jenice Taylor and Rich Lucidi
Low-gross: Chip Wood, 88
Also playing: Dave Grenke, Ron Kingston, Sharlene Peter and Don
Koester


SUNSET LOUNGE


at PAAI[A BPEACP


1/2 Pound

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starting at


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choice of one side
Live Entertainment
Wednesday thru Sunday

611 DetinyDrive
S Rusin, FL A
s613-645-32qI "


AMERICA'S


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DOVE INTERIORS
CARPET ONE'M o
2305 College Ave. E. Ruskin, FL
1 mile west of 1-75 Exit 240-B 813-645-8660
HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. 2 p.m.
Closed Sunday Evenings by Appointment W


IFT Faturing:


LT- - 1- - L-JF- - I


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APRIL22, 2010 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT* 5


The Ruskin Moose Lodge #813 is located at
1212 E. Shell Point Road, Ruskin (813) 645-5919


Friday, April 23
Saturday, April 24



Friday, April 30
Every Wednesday


Every Thursday
Every Friday



Every Saturday night
Every Sunday Noon


7-11 p.m. Karaoke by Kim
5-7 p.m. Chicken Marsala Dinner
7-11 p.m. Prom with music by
Nickel and Dime
7-11 p.m. Charlie Burns
5-7 p.m. Spaghetti Dinners, followed by
Wii Bowling

5-7 p.m. Wings (the best I've every had)
5-7 p.m. Fish Fry
(beer batter, fried or baked)
Live music
Karaoke by Kim


to 3 p.m.


Tacos


All events are open to qualified
Moose members and guest.


Celebrating 36 Years in Business
CALL FOR FREE
INSPECTION o
TERMITES?
ASK ABOUT TERMIDOR
SBRANDON
PEST CONTROL
Phone: (813) 685-7711
Fax: (813) 685-3607
WaWMI 1011M IN O 0 1 0- -. 1 -.-. .


East Sagy Watch
By Michael Cooper
Season Update: Girls' Flag Football
QB Stephanie Williams threw two TDs to Nicole Lock in a 14-7 vic-
tory over district rival Bloomingdale. The following game Newsome
clipped the Indians in OT 14-13. A two point conversion failed giving
the Wolves an important district win. Williams threw two TDs to lock
in the loss. East Bay closed out the week with a close 21-16 win over
Armwood. Williams threw TDs to Andrea Owens and Janielle Rodri-
guez. Lock threw for a three point conversion to Delaney Poli and Es-
sence Crum ran for a TD. Varsity is 8-2 overall. Defense has been key
this year for East Bay. Leading the defense in flag pulls is Akeila Brown
with 54 and Poli leads in INTs with 5.
Monday the Indians host the District 9 tournament and will face
Bloomingdale. Newsome will play Spoto. The winners of each game
will face off for the championship on Wednesday.
Junior varsity closed its season with two more wins and one loss. The
team lost to Bloomingdale, 12-7, but rebounded with a 7-2 win over
Newsome and a 19-0 victory over Armwood. Overall JVfinished at 6-1,
the best record in its 5 year history under Coach Greg Taplin.
For team info go to http://ebhsgirlsflagfootball.com/

-L^ ^


I


Registration begins
Ruskin Area Youth Sports junior
league baseball will have registra-
tion April 24 from 9 to 11am and
May 8 from 9 to 11am and will be
held in the First Baptist Church of
Ruskin gym. The season runs from
May 10 to July 3.
Just $55 to play! Ages include
4-12 years.


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Steve Crotwell has a fish tale to tell
This 31b 4oz Spanish Mackeral was caught by Steve Crotwell at Sky-
way Bridge on April 19.


The men in the photo are (left to right), TA Martinez, Aaron Schmidt
and Bill Van Deman. Jim Brennan not pictured.
2010 TBSC Winter Spearfishing
Invitational was held
The 2010 TBSC Winter Spearfishing Invitational Weigh-in was held
Sunday, April 11 at the Pinellas Park Winghouse. This event, benefitting
Diveheart Charity for Disabled Veterans and the Fishing Rights Alliance,
was the first spearfishing tournament of the Florida Skin Diving Asso-
ciation calendar for 2010 and had just under 100 divers enter in scuba,
freedive and overall spearfishing categories.
The Apollo Beach Spearfishing team, sponsored by Schmidt Broth-
ers Homes/Bimini Bay took First and Second Place Freediver Trophy,
First Place Amberjack Trophy, and Apollo Beach finished with 3 Top
Ten Overall divers out of 100 entrants. Bill Van Deman was Third Place
Overall, followed closely by Jim Brennnan at 6th Place and Aaron
Schmidt at 8th overall.


Riverview Memorial
VFW Post #8108
Riverview Memorial VFW Post
#8108, 7504 Riverview Dr. sched-
ule is as follows:
Meetings: Men's Auxiliary --
1st Thursday at 7 p.m.
Ladies' Auxiliary --
2nd Tuesday at 7 p.m.
VFW Post --
2nd Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday:
Breakfast, 9 a.m. to noon, $6
Monday: Bar Bingo at 6:30
a.m.
Wednesday:
Spaghetti from 5 to 7 p.m. $6
Friday:
Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.;
Fish, $6; Combo, $7
Karaoke from 8 to ?
Saturday: Karaoke from 8 to ?
2nd Tuesday: Ladies' Auxiliary
Meeting at 7 p.m.
3rd Tuesday: VA Hospital Bingo
-- Leave Post at 6 p.m.
Every Wednesday:
$6 All-U-Can-Eat Spaghetti Dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m.
Carry-out orders available.
Call ahead -- 671-9845
1st Thursday:
Men's Auxiliary Meeting at 7 p.m.
2nd Thursday:
Post Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Every Friday:
Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.
(all you can eat fish -- $6)
Carry-out orders available.
Call ahead -- 671-9845
They also serve Chicken Ten-
ders, Shrimp or combos for $7.
Each dinner comes with fries,
coleslaw, and a hush puppy.
Every Saturday:
Karaoke by Jeff at 8 p.m.

Cyberspace Safety
The generation of children grow-
ing up is becoming more and more
"plugged in." Teens love the In-
ternet, but it can be a dangerous
place. Make sure your children
have the proper guidance and su-
pervision to keep their cyberspace
safe.
Kids Clicking On
Danger
54% of online teens frequently
have private conversations with
someone they've never met.'
2 in 5 online teens have posted
personal information on the inter-
net.
30% of teens online have talked
with a cyber-stranger about meet-
ing in person.
1 in 4 teens online have talked
about sex with an online stranger.'
70% of teens say they've acci-
dentally come across pornography
on the internet.
1 in 5 children are sexually so-
licited online.
70% of children have acciden-
tally encountered pornography on
the Internet.
63% of teens say they know
how to hide what they do online
from their parents.
Nearly 3 out of 10 (28%) par-
ents don't know or are not sure if
their teens talk to strangers online.
Is Your Child Is In
Danger?
Signs that your child could have
a problem:
Spends large amounts of time
online, especially at night.
Hides computer disks and flash
drives.
Turns off the monitor or quickly
changes the window when parents
enter the room.
Neglects school assignments,
avoids normal social activities or
withdraws from the family. (This
could indicate they've been in con-
tact with an online predator.)


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT -


APRIL22, 2010






6 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Judy Stimson Photo
Oscar
Oscar is no grouch! He is a
sweet black and white male do-
mestic short hair. Now that he is
old enough, he is anxiously wait-
ing to go to his forever home.
Oscar quietly looks at you with
his big eyes. We wonder what he
is thinking. If you speak "Oscar,"
please come to the shelter and
be his translator. Although, he is
probably saying, "Pick me! Pick
me!" Oscar will be neutered, mi-
crochipped, and brought current
on his shots as part of his adop-
tion. C.A.R.E. is open 10 am to
3 pm on Tues. Sat. For direc-
tions visit www.CareShelter.org
or call 813-645-2273.


Marlene Greenberg Photo
CoCo
CoCo has the poise and grace
of a true lady. This pretty Lab mix
had a home with a loving owner.
Unfortunately, he was forced
to give her up when his hous-
ing situation changed. CoCo
is housebroken, knows basic
commands, and walks great on
a leash. Her owner also told us
that she is ok with children, cats,
and most dogs. CoCo thinks she
is at doggy camp right now. She
is busy playing with her new
furry friends and charming all
of her human caretakers. We
would love to find her a forever
home and that news would make
her week. CoCo is spayed, mi-
crochipped, and current on her
shots. C.A.R.E. is open 10 am to
3 pm on Tues. Sat. For direc-
tions visit www.CareShelter.org
or call 813-645-2273


Have something you would like
to send us?
210 Woodland Estates S.W., Ruskin 33570
FAX 645-4118
News@ObserverNews.net



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EMPLOYERS...
Do you have a
position available?
Run your "Help Wanted"
tad FREE in The Shopper
to find just the right fit for
your business.
Place your 20-word ad weekly until
the position is filled or this promotion
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must be resubmitted each week by the Monday, 4:00
p.m. deadline and are subject to review and space
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APRIL 22, 2010


* Bold and fanciful new art show
Opening in Ruskin
What is "Outsider Art"? The works can be *
,,a charming, colorful paintings and construc- *
/ o -tions that are innovative and unusual. Some- 0
[i times they are referred to as Folk Art. They
6\ 1 // are created by artists who are self-taught,
"\ -who've had no formal training yet who
captivate the viewer's imagination. Think
Grandma Moses, the most famous self-
* taught American painter of the last century *
* who began to paint for the first time when *
* she was well into her old age. *
* Curious? Come see and celebrate the first ever Opening Recep- *
* tion for "Outsider Art," works by Pam Tipton of Sun City Center and
Michael Manghise of Kings Point. See their work, meet the artists
and hear live jazz by Gary Tatlock's group, "Cloud Seven". It's all
* happening on Thursday May 6 at the SouthShore Regional Library,
* 15816 Beth Shields Way in Ruskin and it's FREE. Be there by 6:30 *
* pm for light refreshments in the Community Room. 0
* For information call 273-3652; ask for the SouthShore Library *
* Reference Desk. *
* This program is co-sponsored by the South Shore Art Council and
* the Friends of the SouthShore Regional Library.
* 0


Visit several Navy warships during
'Fleet Week'
The Tampa Bay council of the United States Navy League is spon-
soring a one day trip to Fort Lauderdale on Tuesday, April 27, to visit
several Navy warships during "Fleet Week."
A chartered bus will leave Tampa at 6 am. Tuesday morning and
return that evening. Cost is $35 members and $50 non-members.
Non-members may join the Navy League that day and receive a $15
rebate. Some of the ships to be visited are the USS Iwo Jima LHD
7, USS Porter DDG 78, USS Independence LCS 2 and the Canadian
destroyer escort RCN Montreal.
This is a once in a lifetime opportunity to visit some of the finest
ships in the world. Certain restrictions apply and pre-registering is
required for security reasons. If enough people from the Sun City
Center area sign up the bus will pick them up in SCC. For detailed
information contact: Skip Witunski, Navy League Area President
813-629-7000 skip@witunski.com.


Presenting the flag for the Sun
City Center Club were left Bob
Lohr and right Dieter Quitsch.

German Heritage
Day celebrated
The United German American
Society of Florida held their fes-
tive annual German Heritage Day
recently at the historic St. Peters-
burg Coliseum. Over 1,000 at-
tended representing 31 clubs in
the State of Florida. The Sun City
Center German American Chorus
was part of the combined choruses
that sang, as well as folk dancers
from around the region.


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 7


-
- a Q -


- Copyrighted Material

m a Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers
.W .


L R: Jeanne Kolls Caloosa C.C.Vice President/Tournament Coor-
dinator, Kris Wells President Falcon Watch Women's18 hole golf
league, Joanne Brennan Trophy recipient SCCWGA President and
Sue Daveler President Caloosa C.C.(CWGA18) Women's 18 hole
golf league and hostess.
Triangular Golf Tournament held
In the Triangular Tournament at the Caloosa Country Club April 14,
Sandpiper with the net score of 1169 won the Trophy for the third year in
a row. Caloosa Country Club ranked 2nd with a net score of 1185. Falcon
Watch third with a net score of 1220. Eighteen twosomes participated
from each club. At the luncheon immediately following the tournament
the trophy and prizes were presented.


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Golf Scores Hogans
Golf Club Tuesday,
March 23 Course:
Apollo Beach, Play:
K-skins
st : Fred Mayes, 6 skins
2nd :five-way tie at 3 skins each
- Frank Carlin, Jim Sari, Fred Zi-
zelman, Jenice Taylor and John
Kazlauskas

Low-net: two-way tie at 70's -
Jenice Taylor and Rich Lucidi
Low-gross: Chip Wood, 88
Also playing: Dave Grenke, Ron
Kingston, Sharlene Peter and Don
Koester


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36" WIDE X 36" HIGH $144.00 Installed
36" WIDE X 50" HIGH $207.00 Installed
48" WIDE X 48" HIGH $255.00 Installed
48" WIDE X 60" HIGH $319.00 Installed


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36" WIDE X 48" HIGH $39.00 Installed 36" WIDE X 48" HIGH $39.00 Installed
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Summerfield Crossings
Ladies Golf Association
Low Gross March 16
1st Flight
1st Place Linda Smith 90
2nd Place Karen Jones 94*
3rd Place ane Lange 94*
2nd Flight
1st Roseanne Dougherty 95
2nd Mary Ann Speich 103
3rd Diana Linkous 104
3rd Flight
1st Eleanor Presunka 105
2nd Lynn Patron 115
3rd Nancy Rademaker 116
4th Flight
1st Linda Sands 109
2nd Genette Scalpone 114
3rd Jan Norton 115
*Tie broken on 2nd handicap
hole
KP Ladies 9 Hole Golf
League Game Gross
Score Played on March
22
Flight A Winners
Betty Irwin 50
Marilyn Vahovich 51

Flight B Winners
Louise Maheral 42
Judy Trombley 45

Flight C Winners
(2 Tie)
Joan Abrams 49
Bev Buteau 49
Liz Lister 51


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APRIL 22, 2010


"M Iscma bd mftqbd"P






8 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Dues debtors Continued from page 1


cies reflect years of skipping out
on a membership obligation codi-
fied as a covenant in most property
deeds and accepted by new own-
ers, usually immediately following
completion of their home purchases
at the transaction closings, Barnes
noted. It is these three dozen most
severely past due debtors who now
top the pending foreclosure list, he
added.
While CA dues, which entitle ev-
ery member to full use of the wide
range of recreational and club fa-
cilities on three major campuses,
have been creeping up year by year,
Sun City Center's membership rate
still remains far below the fees ex-
pected from residents in similar
communities, Barnes pointed out.
In other communities, he noted, the
monthly or quarterly recreational
or homeowner association fees for
access to fewer features and activi-
ties can range from $300 to $500 -
annually many times the SCC dues
rate.
Those SCC dues support the many
facilities and activities available to
its residents, the president empha-
sized. "The CA is responsible for
maintaining the campuses and we
need to collect the dues owed, in-
cluding the backlog, to meet the
standard expected."
For years, the CA has dealt with
accruing overdue membership
balances by placing liens against
members' residential properties
in the community for the amount

Whatever

happened?
* Continued from page 1
grabs, Barnes added.
"I'm very, very pleased that six
citizens have expressed an interest
in serving on the board," Barnes
said, adding that he hoped that
interest would be evident again in
December in connection with the
annual election.
SouthShore Round Table
Edith Stewart, Hillsborough's
lobbyist in Tallahassee and county
public affairs administrator, along
with Stewart Rogel of the Tampa
Bay Partnership, a regional
economic development group,
will highlight a public meeting of
the SouthShore Round Table on
Friday, April 23.
The meeting is scheduled for
9:30 a.m. to noon in the conference
room at the University of Florida's
Gulf Coast Research Center at
Balm, according to Don Schings,
SSRT chairman. The multi-faceted
agricultural experiment complex is
located at 14625 C.R. 672, east of
the Balm community.
SCC Sewer Project
Upcoming construction of the
30-inch wastewater pipeline along
S.R. 674 through Sun City Center
will be the subject of a community
meeting set for Wednesday, April
28. The 10 a.m. session to be con-
ducted by Hillsborough County's
Water Resource Services will be
held in the Florida Room of the
Atrium, Central Campus.
The $4.8 million project consists
of building 11,000 feet of force
main line on the south side of the
roadway from U.S. 301 to Cortaro
Drive, according to Steve Valdez,
spokesman for Hillsborough's
Public Works Department. County
commissioners are expected to
award the construction contract this
week and work is to commence
shortly, continuing for approxi-
mately 10 months, Valdez said.
The community meeting is
designed to give area residents a
chance to get answers to any ques-
tions about the project.
C 2010 Melody Jameson


due, Barnes explained. "If the liens
were not discharged at some point
by homeowners catching up the
back due balances, then they (the
liens) would have to be paid as part
of the final settlements whenever
the properties changed hands in re-
sales," he said.
However, several circumstances
including a downturn in the real
estate resale market have combined
to reduce the effectiveness of liens
alone in collecting overdue mem-
bership fee debt, Barnes indicated.
"We're now forced to take a more








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radical approach to collections," he
added.
Consequently, the CA board has
developed a specific foreclosure
policy and process which is ef-
fective immediately, Barnes said.
Because the three dozen property
owners with the most egregious
long term balances outstanding all
are CA members and liens filed
with Hillsborough County already
have attached to their property re-
cords, they soon will be receiving
formal notices of the potential fore-
closure actions, he added.





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"We will give them 30 days to pay
the back dues amount and only that
amount," the president said. But,
he added, if the debt is not settled
within the one-month period and
the CA must proceed with the fore-
closure to collect the debt $1,800
in legal fees is added to the back
dues amount, creating a new and
higher balance owing in each case.
Balances paid after the foreclosure
action is filed but before the matter
actually is heard in court probably
can be settled for a lesser amount in
legal fees, Barnes indicated.


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The CA already has proceeded
with one such legal filing and it has
been settled satisfactorily, prior to a
court hearing, the president added.
"I regret that we have to be so
hardnosed about this in order to
collect the fees owed," Barnes
summed up, "but we cannot allow
members to blow off their dues ob-
ligations for years. That is not fair
to the members who meet their ob-
ligations, even when it may be dif-
ficult to do so. Our new policy is
fair and equitable for everyone."
Copyright 2010 Melody Jameson





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APRIL 22, 2010






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 9


Sun Coast WAVES Unit 15 hosts luncheon-


Four members of Tampa Bay
WAVES Unit #55, a local group
of women veterans of the Sea
Services, attended a luncheon at
Kally K's Restaurant in Dunedin,
on March 27, hosted by the mem-
bers of Sun Coast WAVES Unit
15. Speaker Rear Admiral LeRoy
Collins, Jr. USNR (Ret), who is
Executive Director of the Florida
Department of Veterans' Affairs,
explained that the FDVA is a cabi-
net agency headquartered at Talla-
hassee created to help Florida vet-
erans, their families and survivors
to improve their health and eco-
nomic well-being through qual-
ity benefit information, advocacy,
education, and long-term health
services. Some of their many
functions are to assist veterans and
their dependents and survivors in
obtaining pensions, hospitaliza-
tion, vocational training, employ-
ment assistance and other benefits
or privileges to which they may be
entitled. All services rendered by
FDVA, he said, are without charge
to the claimant. The agency also
operates five state veterans' nurs-
ing homes and one Domiciliary
Home (Assisted Living Facility).


RADM LeRoy Collins poses with presidents of four Florida Units of
WAVES National: left to right: June Wilbur, SunCoast Waves Unit
15; Barbara McCarthy, Gulf Coast WAVES Unit 27; Admiral LeRoy
Collins; Barbara J. McGuire, Tampa Bay WAVES Unit 15; Lelia Tay-
lor, Sarasota Navy Women Unit #123.


These homes are non-profit, both
state and federally funded, and are
monitored by Florida's Agency for
Health Care Administration and
the U.S. Department of Veterans
Affairs.
Tampa Bay WAVES Unit #55
meets monthly in the Community
Room at St. Matthew's Anglican
Church, 10701 Bloomingdale Av-
enue, in Riverview. The next meet-


SCC Woman's Golf Association (WGA) March 18, Course
holes" 50% handicap
Low Gross Winners: 2nd Marcia Karp 43
Flight A Jan Huber-38 Flight D Claire Mielak 44
Flight B 1 st Laura Hammaker 40 Low Net Winners:
2nd Kiyoko Ashendorf 42 Flight A Jeanie Shively 30.5
Flight C 1st Patricia Jones 40 Flight B 1st Syl Olivera 30


ing will be on Saturday, May 1 at
11 am. All women who served
honorably (including those cur-
rently serving) in the U. S. Navy,
Navy Nurse Corps, Coast Guard,
Marine Corps, or Maritime Ser-
vice, or related reserve compo-
nents, are eligible for membership.
For further information call Jean-
nette Green, 813-657-9164.

Sandpiper "Select Best 9

2nd Connie Toussaint 30.5
Flight C 1st Suzanne White 31.5
2nd Helen Joseph 32
Flight D 1st Ann Dean 27
2nd Mary Sacchetti 30.5


ephenson and Aleta Jonie MascheK


Dr. Gwendolyn Stephenson retires
Hillsborough Community College Presidential Showcase honoring
Dr. Gwendolyn Stephenson on the occasion of her retirement took place
at the Westin Hotel, Harbour Island in Tampa. Dr. Stephenson received
citations from Florida Governor Charlie Crist; Mayor of Tampa, Pam
Iorio; and the County Commissioners. Dr. Stephenson's awards are both
local, and national.
Attending from Ruskin was Glenn and Danita Dickman, Ross and
Vicki Ellsberry, Jim Anderson, Dr. and Mrs. Allen Witt, who is President
of Ruskin Community College and Aleta Jonie Maschek, President of
the Friends group at Ruskin College.
Danita Dickman was on the hon-
orary committee of the President's
Showcase. Ross Ellsberry was on the
committee to elect a new president. At
this writing a new president has not
been chosen from the ten outsiders
picked to be interviewed for the posi-
tion. None of the four locals made the
top ten list.
Glenn and Danita Dickman


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APRIL 22, 2010






10 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT


Take a walk on the wild side


If you've ever wanted to explore
the woods, your golden opportu-
nity is coming Saturday, May 1, at
the 13th annual "Welcome to the
Woods" event at Seminole For-
est Wildlife Management Area in
Lake County.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
and the Florida Division of Forest-
ry started Welcome to the Woods
as a way to introduce people to all
the things they can do on a wildlife
management area. The one-day
program, now in its 13th year, is a
great opportunity for people of all
ages to get out into the woods and
enjoy a guided tour of what nature
has to offer. Participants can learn
to fish at Bear Pond, hike along the
Florida Scenic Trail, enjoy a hay-
ride to Blackwater Creek, learn
safe boating practices and then
take a short canoe trip along the
creek.
In addition, there will be wild-
life educational exhibits, includ-
ing live snakes; a program on how
prescribed burs benefit the state's
ecosystem, featuring a state heli-
copter used in the controlled-burn
process; and an opportunity to


FWC biologist Jean Marie Conner (right) introduces Jimmy Conner
(left) and a couple of young participants to a common king snake
at a previous Welcome to the Woods event. FWC biologist Kristin
Wood (center) looks on.
(FWC photo)


shoot a bow and arrow.
Space is limited, so partici-
pants should register in advance
by calling 352-732-1225 week-
days between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Participants should wear clothing
suitable for light hiking, and bring


bug spray, sun protection, snacks
and water.
The Seminole Forest Wildlife
Management Area is on State Road
46 just west of the Wekiva River in
Lake County.


Riverview Chamber of Commerce hosts 'hog roast'


April 22,2010

Conservation and you in daily living


What can you do to conserve
and protect wildlife and their habi-
tats? Habitat is a combination of
food, water, shelter and space in a
suitable arrangement to meet the
needs of wildlife. If you plant na-
tive trees and shrubs that provide
natural shelter and food for birds
and butterflies, you are practic-
ing conservation where you live.
You can manage ponds for high
fish production while also provid-
ing habitat for wading birds, wa-
terfowl, otters and other wildlife.
Identify and remove invasive non-
native plants before they crowd
out the natives. And think twice
about buying exotic snakes, liz-
ards and other nonnative pets that
have the potential to escape then
reproduce and spread in precious,
natural Florida.


Landscaping
Do your part to conserve wildlife
without ever leaving your home.
Bring birds, butterflies and wild-
life to your backyard with a few
simple steps. Find out more about
landscaping with native plants and
providing water, shelter and food
for wildlife.

At Home
There's a lot you can do around
your house for conservation. Learn
how to incorporate recycled mate-
rials, use materials with few toxic
elements and install energy-saving
designs into new home construc-
tion. Start a compost pile. Find
out more about the effect of using
chemicals in your homes' septic
tank. Find other ways to deter pests
without chemicals or bug zappers.


On April 10 the Greater Riv-
erview Chamber of Commerce
held their 10th Annual Hog
Roast and Silent Auction at the
International Showman's Asso-
ciation, 6915 Riverview Drive,
Riverview.
The Alafia River provided a
beautiful backdrop for the eve-
ning's activities which began
with Lupton's famous BBQ, with
sweet buttery corn-on-the cob by
Kazbors Sports Grille, and a de-
licious assortment of desserts by
Chik-Fil-A.
At the Gazebo, Zebron and
James, local musicians, enter-
tained the crowd during the eve-
ning with a nice blend of country
and southern rock music.
Riverview's Honorary May-
or, Jeanne Bush, won over the
audience with her delightful
rendition of "Crazy" and mem-
bers from the Riverview VFW,
Dave Schenck, Buck Coplan,
Cody Palmer and Jess Olson,
performed their musical selec-
tions for an enthusiastic crowd
as well.
While moms and dads strolled
the grounds, seeing old friends,
or making new ones, the chil-
dren were entertained with ma-
gicians, balloon artists, arts and
crafts, games and bounce hous-
es. The YMCA Camp Christina
generously donated their time
to supervise and assist with all
the children's activities during
the evening. The Silent Auction
was once again enjoyed by the
crowd and smiles were plenti-
ful when the winners of each
auction were announced. Many


thanks to event chairman, Jim
Johnson, the 2010 Hog Roast
Committee, the numerous busi-
nesses who donated silent auc-
tion items, the volunteers, and
all who attended the 10thAnnual
Hog Roast and Silent Auction.


Photos courtesy
of
Huth & Booth
Photography


F( I 'have: to share
d'IUMe3 Dgd?"
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MN cr-on-VA


Right the Fat Cats of
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East Bay High School drama students present musical drama


"All I Really Need To Know I
Learned in Kindergarten: The Mu-
sical" is based on Robert Fulghum's
best selling book, conceived and
adapted by Ernest Zulia with mu-
sic and lyrics by David Caldwell.
Robert Fulham's best selling
book, All I Really Need To Know I
Learned in Kindergarten sold over
15 million copies in 96 countries.
The heartwarming book was first
translated to the stage in 1992 and
has had a wonderful production
history. The stage adaptation is
a brilliant piece of theatrical sto-
rytelling, woven with song. The
stories and songs are about all of


us and celebrate human existence
from childhood to the wisdom of
old age.
Presented by a cast of 18 East
Bay theatre students, the play will
be presented in the East Bay High
School Auditorium on May 6, 7,
and 8. Tickets are $6 for adults and
$4 for students and include dessert
and coffee at intermission. Doors
open at 6:45pm. Pre-show begins
at 7pm with the show starting at
7:30pm.
The 2009-2010 East Bay Theatre
season started off strong with their
production of Steel Magnolias in
November 2009. East Bay's Mov-


ing Minds Theatre Co., comprised
of advanced drama students, toured
local elementary schools and per-
formed Charlie and the Chocolate
Factory to over 400 kindergarten,
1st, and 2nd graders in November
2009 as well. In December 2009,
the East Bay HS Thespian Troupe
performed at the District 9 Thes-
pian Festival and took home 8 su-
perior ratings, including Critic's
Choice in Playwrighting, Critic's
Choice-Alternate in Monologues,
and Critic's Choice-Alternate in
Student Directed Scenes. East Bay
Theatre recently performed John
Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men in


February. All I Really Need To
Know I Learned in Kindergarten
is the last show of the season.
Seats can be reserved over the
phone by calling 813-671-5134
ext. 271. You can make a reserva-
tion and pay for the tickets at the
door. Groups of 10 or more that
make a reservation in advance will
receive the student price for the
entire group. You may also pur-
chase tickets at the door without a
reservation.


APRIL 22, 2010






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 11


Making Suet


The SCC Member Spotlight is on ......
Sun City Center Coins and Collectibles
John R. Rose known locally as JR is the owner of Sun City Center
Coins & Collectibles. He opened the first coin shop in Sun City Center
in the 90s.
After retiring from the Army Medical Corps in 1967 he became a certi-
fied dealer and in 1969 became a member of the American Numismatic
Association. This designation encouraged him to open 3 coins shops in
South Baltimore, Pasadena, and Ft. Meade. After a few years he closed
the 3 shops, moved to Colorado Springs and then to Kansas where he
became a wholesale dealer.
In 1990 he decided to retire and move to Sun City Center to be closer
to his youngest daughter, Lark.
For the last several years JR has been buying, selling and trading
coins and collectibles in his own backyard, Sun City Center. During his
lengthy carrier, he has purchased entire estates, conducted appraisals,
sold coin accessories, and traded gold and silver coins in both the USA
and internationally.
For coin supplies, information, or appraisals, call the expert, JR of Sun
City Center Coins & Collectibles at 813-634-3816.
- Elaine Brad is President of the Sun City Center Area Chamber of Com-
merce. She can be reached at (813) 634-5111 extension 101 or via direct e-mail
ebradl@(aoL conm


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Last week I had the opportuni-
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educator and her class of future
birders; kids in the third through
fifth grade. They were all going
nuts over the idea of making their
own suet feeders to bring home
and hang on a tree in their yard.
Their first question was what ex-
actly is suet? Suet is a fat based
food source for wild birds that
is hung on trees in small square
cages like feeders or smeared on
pinecones. Woodpeckers and
chickadee's are common visitors
to suet feeders.
For our suet recipe, we used 3
bricks of lard, which were added
to a pot by our young volunteers
who began to melt them down
into a liquid. When the lard
finally melted, 6 cups of warm
water was added to the mix. All
the kids took turns watching the
concoction bubble and change
Kings Point Ladies
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2nd Place: Jackie McDow
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AFlt. 1st
2nd
3rd
4th
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slowly. Four cups of flour were
added to thicken up the mixture,
followed by 6 cups of oats. Af-
ter stirring, 6 cups of birdseed
was added, and it actually started
to smell like something I would
want to eat. To top it off, the
kids added raisins as a special
treat for the birds.
Once all the ingredients were
stirred together, each young
birder chose a pinecone and
tied some natural string around
the top quarter so that it could
be hung from a branch. The
warm suet mixture was poured
into small aluminum containers
so each child could spoon the
mixture onto the pinecone. Us-
ing a spoon the kids carefully
spooned the thick mixture into

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the crevices of the cone, making
sure to cover the entire pinecone
with the mixture. Once this was
completed, we placed the suet
feeders into large plastic bags
and placed them in the freezer to
solidify the mixture a little more
so the kids could bring their
feeder's home.
I also participated and made
my own feeder and it has hung
on my shady tree for 3 days with
not one visitor. I am hopeful that
a bird will at least stop by my
feeder; after all I put such hard
work into creating a fatty meal
for my feathered friends.



Caloosa Country Club
Women's 18 hole league
golf tournament. March
22 and 24. Low net.
Vera Thompson 1st 135 "Presi-
dent's Cup Winner 2010!"
Jerry Ramsey 2nd 136
Jackie Wrigley 3rd 137
Timi Pratt's tie 3rd 137.
JoanMacholl 4th 139
Hazel Winklemann 5th 140


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APRIL 22, 2010






12 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Health and beauty consultant

uses her talent to help charities


APRIL 22, 2010


Gladys Yonker took time out
from RVing around the country
finding places to hike, bike and do
health and beauty presentations-
often free for a good cause- to send
me an email requesting we have
coffee at Popi's Place in Ruskin.


When we met, she brought with
her magazine stories written in her
home state of Michigan about how
she helped a local charity called
Manna's Market where women
can buy good used clothing suit-
able for interviews and business-
type jobs.
"I'd certainly like to give pre-
sentations and events here and
help some of the organizations
that give back to the community,"
Gladys said. "After all, once we
have enough ourselves, it's impor-
tant we help others. And it makes
us feel so good too."
The Copenhagen-born 74-year-
old came to the States as a baby
with her Swedish parents and lived
in Flatbush, N.Y until she was 9,
when the family moved to Detroit
where she spent most of her adult
life.
Her first husband died in 1992,
and in 1998 she married John
Henry Yonker, who was then also
a widower. Since then, they have
bought an RV and traveled the
country, but return to Hawaiian
Isles in Ruskin enough to call it
their second home.
"We still have 25 acres in Michi-
gan, but I love it here," she said.
"I love to go hiking, and ride a
bicycle, and all the things you can
do here you can't always do up
north."
But Gladys isn't exactly a snow-
bird. She comes and goes when-
ever the notion hits her.


"If I feel like getting on a plane
and coming to give a presentation,
I can do that any time," she said.
"We stay as long as we like. My
husband loves all the free time he
gets when I work or give presenta-
tions," she told me. John Henry is
an old car buff, who has recently
bought another vehicle he is anx-
ious to restore.
"We're both very independent
people," she told me. "He loves
driving around while I do my
thing."
Theformerdoggroomerswitched
to grooming people in 1980 when
she first became a training man-
ager for Nutrimetics, a division of
Avalla health and beauty products,
which she still sells.
But she takes her presentations
much farther than sales.
"People may look up the products
on the Web site (www.myavalla.
com/us/pwp/gyonker) but they can
contact me to give a presentation
to their civic or church group too.
I'm always up for that."
She especially enjoys working
with teenage girls.
"I'm often distressed at the im-
ages they imitate that they've seen
on TV and in the movies," she
said. "I ask them, 'How do you
want people to see you? Cheap or
moral?' I'd like to give a finishing
school class to show young girls
how they can best present them-
selves like they did 100 years ago
when they went to finishing school
and then had a coming out party.
Last year I taught my first course
with 13-year olds. It was the per-
fect age. I taught them skin care,
using natural things that make skin
healthier. Then in the next class I
taught them about color and how
to choose clothes that went with
their undertones rather than wast-
ing money on clothing that doesn't
make them look good."
She has theories that each indi-
vidual (adult) can have any one
of four types of look at any given
time they choose: high glamour,
earthy, business or romantic.
"I'd be glad to give a talk to a
group for charity, or teach people
how to give seminars on this to
others to earn money. Once I get
people trained, they can go any di-
rection they choose."
Then she told me something I had


always suspected but never had the
data to prove: 55 percent of a first
impression is based on your image
when you enter the room before a
word is ever spoken. Thirty-three
percent of that is based on body
language. "Our company has done
studies that prove this. Only 7 per-
cent of the first impression you
make is based on what you know
and say," she said.
Gladys said it was all right to
publish her telephone number as
well as her Web site, in case any-
one wanted to know more about
the presentations she is willing to
make or who might want to work
with her on classes for area teen-
age girls or ask her to contribute


some time to speak for charity.
Those interested may contact her
at (269) 367-4266.
*Perhaps you have something
you'dliketo share. Ormaybeyou'd
rather tell the community about
your favorite charity or cause: or
sound off about something you
think needs change. That's what
"Over Coffee" is about. It really
doesn't matter whether we actually
drink any coffee or not (although I
probably will). It's what you have
to say that's important. E-mail me
any time at penny observernews.
net and suggest a meeting place.
No matter what's going on, I'm
usually available to share just one
more cup.


Penny Fletcher Photo
Gladys Yonker is a part-time
resident of Hawaiian Isles Mobile
Home Park in Ruskin and part-time
resident of Michigan. A health and
beauty specialist with Avalla for 30
years, she says she enjoys giving
presentations for charity without
charge and also working with
teenage girls to help them create a
good wholesome image.


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 13


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14 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Pipe organ
* Continued from page 1
States St. Anne in Detroit (the
oldest is in St. Augustine) prior to
moving to Florida in 1995 and still
had many connections due to his
positions there and through the Or-
gan Historical Society.
After much searching he located
an organ in storage at the former
Westminster Presbyterian Church
in Toledo, Ohio. The building was
an historic site but a new congrega-
tion had moved into it and wanted
to use the space the organ had taken
up for a Baptistery.
The organ itself was in good
shape although more than half a
century old, but many of the pipes
were not.
Some of the pipes that were still
useable were made before World
War I, and together with pipes from
the Seventh Day Adventist Church
in Brandon and others from a pri-
vate residence in Femdale, Mich.,
made a full set of wind pipes ca-
pable of creating the old-fashioned
pipe organ sound.
"An organ like this new would
cost more than $100,000," said
Chuck. "The new electronic organs
don't have the same sound. A lot
of churches have an organ facade,
which really, is the illusion of pipes,
but they aren't real pipes."
This organ has 11 ranks (rows of


pipes) which would have cost more
than $20,000 each if purchased in-
dividually, he said.
While most people think of an
organ as a percussion instrument
similar to a piano, it is really a
wind-driven instrument, Chuck
explained. "The special sound of
wind going through the pipes is
very different from the new elec-
tronic sound if you listen closely,"
he explained, showing me how
playing the keys and pumping
the pedals made its swell shades
(which are shaped like vertical
blinds) open and close, allowing
different amounts of wind to pass
through much of what looked to me
like pipes from old-fashioned wood
and coal heating stoves.
Chuck and Wayne worked with
church building committee chair-
man Jack Edison to supervise the
arrival of trucks and vans that
brought the organ, often one tier of
pipes at a time, to its new home.
Bill Longmore of Lakeland Or-
gan Builders was called on to help.
Earlier this month, after about
4,000 electrical connections had
been made, wooden scaffolding
made, and the pipes placed in prop-
er ranks, the project, which was
started in 2008, was completed.
"The wind going through the
pipes makes this a living, breathing


instrument," Chuck announced af-
ter playing it for the first time.
The family of Wendy Smith, a
member of the congregation, do-
nated a Steinway concert piano to
the church as well, he added.
A dedication concert open to the
community will be held April 25
at 4 p.m. at St. John the Divine
Episcopal Church, 1015 Del Webb
Blvd., E, Sun City Center, with
many people from area churches
performing, including the chil-
dren's' choir, Les Petits Chanteurs
de St. Anne, from St. Anne Catho-
lic Church in Ruskin.
After the concert there will be a
reception. The event is open to the
community at no charge. An offer-
ing will be taken to go toward the
organ fund.


Penny Fletcher photo
Looking at this organ, people usually don't suspect there are two
whole rooms filled with pipes and equipment behind the scenes that
make its sound.


CAR

ON
FLOR -. ME


Penny Fletcher Photo
This organ, which is now at St. John the Divine Episcopal Church,
1015 Del Webb Blvd. E., Sun City Center, was once part of a huge
pipe organ ensemble at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Toledo,
Ohio, which has since been marked as an historic site.


APRIL 22, 2010




OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 15


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APRIL 22, 2010






16 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


HCSO


* Continued from page 1
recession, law enforcement could
reasonably be given credit for
keeping the lid on crime in Hills-
borough County.
If the current year numbers con-
tinue that general trend, a good
part of the thanks can go to a subtle
change in philosophy that is yield-
ing good results. The HCSO is go-
ing after criminal bad habits.
"We're not looking at the people
that commit a single crime and
that's it," HCSO Lt. Frank Greco
said. "We're going after the ha-
bitual offenders the ones that
produce the most results."
In other words, the HCSO is
keeping an eye on the relatively
small number of people that com-
mit most of the crimes.
"We're hoping that it just won't
be comfortable for them to stay
here," Greco continued.
Community policing is still a pri-
ority for the HCSO as evidenced
by the uniformed deputies and
brass volunteering off-duty hours
to schools, organizations and at
local events. The new components
are a subtle but important addi-
tion. One of those components is
headed up by a man well-known
in South County, but particularly
in Sun City Center.
Sgt. Joe Burt, former Sun City
Center resource deputy, is in
charge of Street Crime Unit-A.
"The squad works on on-going
street crime, criminal activity such
as drugs, residential and vehicle
burglaries and robberies and what-
ever else the Major (Ron Hartley)
needs us to look at," Sgt. Burt
said. "We utilize everything from
uniform presence to undercover
surveillance."
The details of the squad and the
workings of the program itself are,
by necessity, kept under wraps. The
hope is, however, that deputies and
detectives will arrive at the scene
in time to catch criminals rather
than responding after the fact. A
good part of the investigation work
is upfront rather than after a crime
has already been committed.
Officers are not targeting or pro-


filing, nor is it some fictionalized,
futuristic system in which inno-
cent citizens might accidentally
become ensnared. The HCSO is
simply using the information, and
more specifically the data, they
already have in an effort to fight
crime at the source. They are hop-
ing a more proactive approach to
fighting the roots of crime will
provide a safer environment for
the general public and for those
who would otherwise become vic-
tims of crime.
"On a small scale, if you see a
bunch of crimes then put a guy in
jail and the crimes stop you know
you've got your guy," Sgt. Burt
said. "If those crimes start again
once he's out of jail, we'll know
where to look."
The sheriff's office can only
catch the bad guys they can't
keep them in jail. It is up to the ju-
dicial system to determine if and
for how long they will remain im-
prisoned. In the 1990s new efforts
were made to curb the effect of
habitual offenders and today vir-
tually every state has laws on the
books, frequently known as "three
strikes laws", to deal with them.
According to the National Crime
Prevention Council, an estimated
six to eight percent of juveniles
are responsible for 80 percent of
all juvenile crime. In Florida, the
State Attorney's Office mentions
one study that indicated 70 per-
cent of all crime in the state was
committed by 30 percent of the of-
fenders. For law enforcement, that
small number represents the very
root of crime. The HCSO program
is designed to join information and
human resources to fight it.
"We are all working as a team,"
said Sgt. Susan Bradford. "Since
we've gone to intelligence polic-
ing, we've seen arrests go up. It's
working, but it's really going back
to good old-fashioned police work.
It is a total team effort."
The program ties together all
facets of law enforcement in the
District IV office in Ruskin, from
information technology to detec-


-- I -






Postcards
Mitch Traphagen Photo
Over the course of the past four years I've more than once regretted
taking this photo. For the first two years, I was relentlessly stalked
by a pre-teen girl from Texas. She loved mermaids and figured I
clearly knew a bunch of them. I responded to her first e-mail but
then let the next hundred or so just fade into the ether. She got a
bit angry. Now it has been nearly two years since I've heard from
her, I'm guessing she has a life. But that, of course, hasn't stopped
literally hundreds of other pre-teen girls from writing in. I get letters
at least once or twice a week even today. Parents, if you want to
be cool with your pre-teen daughter, just come home dressed as a
mermaid. On the whole, however, I'm glad I was able to see and pho-
tograph these mermaids. It is something that is seriously cool and
unique to the Florida that I have always loved. Any idea where this
is? Have you seen the mermaids for yourself? If so, let me know by
e-mailing me at where@observernews.net. Oh, if you tried to email
us last week about Dinosaur World near Plant City, sorry! I jumped
the gun and neglected to activate the e-mail account. Its there now
so dive in and tell us all you know about mermaids! Perhaps you
could get a pre-teen stalker of your very own.


tives to uniformed deputies on the
street. Sgt. Bradford's detectives
work with the Street Crimes Unit
which works with the uniformed
deputies. The never-ending goal
is simply to protect and serve the
public.
"We just want to get the bad
guys," Sgt. Bradford continued.
"We work hard every day for that.
We all have families at home,
too."

Coming up, The Observer
News rides along for an
undercover stake-out with
the Street Crimes
Unit in South
Hillsborough.


Mitch Traphagen Photo
HCSO Detectives in District IV. Above, Sgt. Susan Bradford (second
from right) with Deputy Belinda Denbeigh, Detective Gary Gordon,
Detective Tom Ellison and Detective Jason Roberts.


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APRIL 22, 2010

Observations: The cell phone cell


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 17


Let's see a show of
hands. Who here has
a cell phone? Yeah,
that's right, raise
your hand if you
have a cell phone.
Hmmm...everyone?
No, wait the little
toddler in the back
doesn't have one.


By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net


Oh, I guess she is
raising her hand. A short, stubby
little hand holding a Blackberry.
There is no headline in saying that
cell phones have completely infil-
trated everyday life. A few years ago
while on the road for a travel series,
my Blackberry died. It refused to
do anll ilin; Suddenly I was cut off
from the world. I was supposed to
be working (of sorts) and it wasn't
comfortable. How would anyone
get a hold of me? How would I get
my email the instant it came in? All
of my questions were largely rhe-
torical as the solution to my woes
was 30 minutes away at the nearest
AT&T store. But it did reveal how
dependent I am on them.
Clearly, I am living my life in a
cell phone cell. As cells go, I've
seen worse but still is the cell
phone freeing me or enslaving me?
I'm ashamed to admit that I carry
two phones on my belt. Yes, I look
like an idiot. I have an iPhone for
personal use and a Blackberry for
an outside job responsibility. That
job requires a Blackberry and only
a Blackberry. So I carry them both
and have them set to vibrate and
never know which one is actually
going off when my belt starts to
buzz. Worse, I am now so accus-


tomed to it that I swear
I experience phantom
belt buzzing if neither
phone goes off for a
while. I feel the phan-
tom buzz, look at one
phone, then the other
and see nothing.
How pathetic is that?
When I was growing


up in the 1970s, my
best friend's dad worked for Centel
Telephone Company and he had a
phone in his car. It wasn't really a
phone as we know it today, it was
basically a huge radio with an old-
fashioned telephone handset wired
to it. There were no push buttons -
you had to first call a radio opera-
tor who would then patch your call
through to a landline. As kids, we
thought it was so cool when Jon's
dad would pull into the driveway of
a friend and let us call him. Added
to the cool factor was Rock Hud-
son. About that same time, Rock
frequently used the same kind of car
phone in his television series "Mac-
Millan & Wife" (if you remember
that, say "hi" to your grandchildren
for me).
I got my first cell phone in 1992
at the age of 29. I'm sure I told my-
self that I was involved in enough
important things in life to justify
purchasing it but the reality was
I thought it was cool to be able to
stand on a street corner (with no
pay phone in sight!) to make a call.
And it only made calls; I couldn't
surf the web on it (there was no
web) or check Facebook (ditto) or
even play a simple game. For that
matter, I couldn't clip it to my belt


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or stuff it into my pocket because it
was the size and weight of a brick.
When I wasn't using it, which was
most of the time due to how expen-
sive it was to use, I kept it in my
briefcase.
Hardly anyone I knew had a cell
phone back then. Somehow, as a
society, we managed to survive
without having instantaneous and
continuous access to our friends,
spouses, children and email.
Over the next few years, cell
phones became smaller and cooler.
And, you could actually leave the
city limits (for the most part) and
still make a call. The flood gates
had opened and even people who
didn't carry briefcases started to
use them. For that matter, it seemed
as though fewer people even carried
briefcases apparently they didn't
need them once the gigantic brick-
sized cell phones turned into some-
thing they could clip to a belt.
It was then that I stopped using a
cell phone and it was the happi-
est time of my adult life. My wife
and I set sail for the Bahamas and
beyond and managed to survive
without once using a cell phone. We
had a marine band radio capable of
reaching friends in Florida and there
were pay phones on every Bahami-
an island we visited. A few months
after we left, we added the ability
to send and receive emails through
our radio. We could only send very
short emails and we could only
check it once or twice a day but
to me it was even more cool than
aniiiinii; Rock Hudson had done.
We could send emails while under
sail in the Atlantic Ocean. That was
enough for us. In the months we
were gone, I don't remember wish-
ing we had a cell phone. We didn't
even consider it.
But then we returned to Florida
and suddenly, we had to be connect-


Mitch Traphagen photo


ed to everyone and i.'ciiliiii In
all likelihood, except for the short
time my Blackberry up and died,
I have never since been without a
cell phone. And now I carry two of
them.
I wonder if our time sailing was
the last time I will be without one.
During my sailing trip last year
from Cape Cod to the Chesapeake
Bay, I used my phone even well
offshore. Not to make calls so much
but I could use the phone to connect
to the web through my navigation
computer and pull satellite images
of precisely where I was at the mo-
ment from Google Earth. I could
then fire off an email (again through
the phone) to my wife that would
show her exactly where I was. Rock
could not have envisioned some-
thing that cool. But still, it was only
just cool. People have been plying
those waters for centuries with-
out using cell phones and Google
Earth.
I am not that important. I don't
hold the keys to the mysteries of
the universe nor am I so critical to
the operation of the Observer News
that I must maintain 24/7 accessi-


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ability. Also, children have grown up
for millennia without the ability to
call or text their friends or their par-
ents. We all managed to survive the
ordeal of not being able to instantly
update our friends about what we
had for lunch via Facebook Mo-
bile.
So why do we do it?
Now I know there are a few hold-
outs who will scoff at this column,
but the truth is just about everyone
on this planet carries a cell phone.
According to the International Tele-
communication Union, cell phone
subscriptions reached 4.6 billion
by the end of last year. In one sense
that is an amazing technological and
human achievement. Never before
in human history could someone
in Riverview, Florida pick up their
phone and dial the number for the
one cell phone shared among the in-
habitants of the Ouargaye, Burkina
Faso in West Africa. But you could
today.
On the other side of that coin,
however, have cell phones become
so ingrained into our lives that they
are now nearly as indispensable as
oxygen to us? Would you feel off-
kilter or somehow less than whole
should the battery of your phone
die or if it should just stop work-
ing somewhere in the middle of
nowhere? Have we imprisoned our-
selves into a cell phone cell?
Could you turn your cell phone off
for a week? If so, email me I want
to hear about it. In fact, I'd prob-
ably write a story about it because
today, that could very well make
for a headline. My email is mitch@
observernews.net and yes, I'll get
your message on my iPhone.
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18 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Observing the

* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net
Every once in a while something
emerges from the web that is cool
well beyond the latest viral You-
Tube video. The National Archives
Experience Digital Vaults is one of
those things. This web site is one
of the great reasons to have com-
puters in society.
A mere 41 years after the sign-
ing of the Declaration of Indepen-
dence, the original document was
already beginning to fade. In 1820,
Secretary of State John Quincy
Adams commissioned a printer to
make a copper engraving of the
document, reproducing the exact
text, text size and signatures. It was
no small feat as it had to be done as
a mirror image. It took the printer,
William J. Stone, three years to
complete it but from his work, the
government printed 200 copies for
Federal, state and local officials. In
1976, Stone's work was again put
to use to print an additional seven
copies as part of the bicentennial
celebration.
Access to this important docu-
ment may well have been lost
without Stone's work. And now,
thanks to the Digital Vaults, ev-
eryone in the nation and around
the world can see his engraving of
our nation's most precious docu-
ment. What Stone had done for the
Declaration of Independence, the
National Archives Experience has
done for all of American history in
making it accessible to the public.
The National Archives has more
than 10 billion records in what are
known as stacks. The Digital Vault
has selected more than a thousand
records of interest and importance
and had them digitized for sharing
with the world. From the Digi-
tal Vault you can see Mr. Stone's
work and in such detail that you
can see for yourself just how dif-
ficult his job really was. You can
also see notes written by President
Lincoln in his own hand to
General Grant, a photo of some of
the handful of Titanic survivors in
a lifeboat before they were rescued
by the Carpathia, an aerial photo
near Orlando before Disney World
came to town and a photo of troops
marching into Tampa during the
Spanish-American War (no, they
didn't have problems with rush
hour or a muck fire on 1-4).
Most images are extremely high
resolution and the details, upon
zooming in, are fascinating. By
clicking on one link, other related
links are also provided, thus offer-
ing an immersion in which hours
can be lost on almost any subject.
A "shuffle records" option allows
you to choose from hundreds of
photos and documents all avail-
able without having to travel to
Washington, D.C. to dig through
the stacks.
The Vaults also contain resources
for teachers, students and research-
ers with options to print photo-


Web: History in the making


graphs and other records.
Get lost in the past both the
important and the whimsical at the
National Archives Experience Dig-
ital Vaults at www.digitalvaults.
org.
And speaking of the National Ar-
chives, you may well be a part of
it all one day. If you've ever sent a
tweet through your Twitter account,
you will join the same historical
club through which we know of the
great presidents. Your words will
be archived alongside those of the
founders of our nation. What you
had for breakfast (and told others
about via Twitter) will be archived
by the same organization charged
with archiving the Gettysburg Ad-
dress. You, my friends, are history
in the making.
On April 14, the Library of Con-
gress announced that Twitter will
donate its digital archives of public
tweets to the library. With currently
more than 35 million tweets sent
per day, roughly 600 every single
second, that is no small bit of data.
The project is not quite as frivo-
lous as it may seem. Tweets can be
thought of as a literal second-by-
second transcript of human his-
tory as it happens. In the past, his-
tory was largely the domain of the
wealthy and famous. The average
Joe Blows of the world tended not
to rate much in the hallowed halls
of the nation's newspapers and ar-
chives. As a result, we know a lot
about George Washington but not a
heck of a lot about the people on his
periphery, the workers at Mt. Ver-
non or the guy he secretly bought
knitting needles from (yes, it has to
be true, I read it on the Web). To-
day, those people could be sending
tweets left and right but back then,
not so much.
Now everyone has the oppor-
tunity to be a part of history. The
bigger question, of course, is: Will
anyone really care? I think they
will. I think future generations will
get a kick out of our insanity and
they'll wonder how we managed
to survive despite ourselves. And
since every generation believes that
later generations are lazy, good-for-
nothings, they'll finally learn the
truth and take some comfort in the
fact that some things never change.
For more information, visit www.
digitalpreservation. gov.
And finally, speaking of George
Washington, computers are not
working in his favor. The Guard-
ian newspaper from the United
Kingdom has uncovered a bit of
a scandal. It seems while our first
president was well known for tell-
ing the truth, he wasn't so hot on
returning library books. The New
York Society Library records have
revealed that President Washing-
ton checked out an essay entitled
the "Law of Nations" along with
the twelfth volume of a collection
of debates from the English House
of Commons on October 5, 1789.
The ledger shows the borrower as


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"President" but there is no return
date noted. The books were due on
Nov. 2, 1789.
According to the Guardian,
his late fees, adjusted for infla-
tion, would currently be around
$300,000. Coincidentally, presi-
dential pals Thomas Jefferson and
Alexander Hamilton had no such


Talon Adventure

Race is May 1st
ALAFIA- The Talon Adven-
ture Race is a 10 hour challenge
to be held at Alafia River State
Park Saturday, May 1. Chal-
lenges will include mountain
biking, trail running, paddling,
navigation, and a few surprise
challenges.
Contact TampaRaces.com for
fee information. Regular park
admission fees apply.
Alafia River State Park is lo-
cated 10 miles southeast of Tam-
pa on County Road 39.
From 1-75 South take exit 240
and go east on State Road 674.
Continue on State Road 674 for
approximately 15 miles and turn
left at the flashing light onto
County Road 39. Continue for
approximately five miles, the
main park entrance will be on
the right.


l11111


problems returning books they bor-
rowed. Today, of course, people
would be filling up the National
Archives with tweets should such
news break about either President
Obama or Bush; but I think we
could cut Washington some slack
- and apparently the library al-
ready has. According to the article,


they have no plans to pursue the
late fees but would be very happy
to get the books back. Yeah, with
that kind of history the $300,000 in
late fees would be small potatoes.
Read the entire article at: http://
www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/
apr/18/george-washington-library-
new-york


The Frog Listening Network


set for May 15
The Frog Listening Network will
be conducting a 90 minute workshop
in the recreation hall at Hillsbor-
ough River State Park on Saturday,
May 15, that teaches the importance
of frogs as biological indicators of
the health of ecosystems, which
frog species inhabit the region, and
methods to identify them.
There will be a presentation by
Lance Arvidson, coordinator of the
Frog Listening Network to teach
identification techniques, followed
by an open session where partici-
pants can view live specimens, hear
sample calls, and ask questions.
All participants can purchase (for
a small donation) an audio CD, a
frog poster, an audio CD-ROM, or
a book of ID cards of the calls. All
are focused on the identification and
biology of frog species inhabiting
this region. Following the onen ses-


111i


aLM MI-


sion, Lance will lead a walk along
some trails in the area in order to
listen and identify species that may
be calling.
Park entrance is $6 per vehicle
with up to eight people. There is no
fee for the program.
Contact the park at (813) 987-
6870 or larvidson@wildlandscon-
servation.org for more details
Hillsborough River State Park is
located nine miles north of Tampa
and six miles south of Zephyrhills
on US Highway 301.


ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS
(Ages 5 and up)
* Minor Surgery Lab EKG
Immunizations
* Preventative / Routine Care
Office of:
Samuel C. Martino, D.O.
Jacqui M. Dawson, D.O.
Frank A. Sirchia, M.D.
George R. Cheesman III, M.D.
Nektarios S. Demetriou, D.O.


APRIL 22, 2010


XI






APRIL 22, 2010

Backyard Safari -
People love to see ladybugs.
They are pretty and shiny with
tiny, black dots on their little, red


bodies. Ladybugs are also orange,
yellow and pink. A ladybug, how-
ever, is not a true bug but a mem-
ber of the beetle family.
Many cultures think ladybugs
bring good luck. Long ago, tiny
aphids (plant-eating bugs) attacked
farmers' crops. The farmers prayed
to the Virgin Mary for help. Lady-
bugs, they said, arrived and ate up
the aphids, saving the crops. So
farmers called them "Our Lady's
Beetles," and they became known
as "lady beetles." Now we call
them ladybugs, even though some
of them are boys. There are more
than 400 species of ladybugs in
the United States and nearly 5,000
worldwide.
A ladybug's color helps protect


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 19


it from predators. Red, yellow, or-
ange and black are all colors that
warn enemies they are about to
eat something that will make them
sick or tastes yucky.
A ladybug also protects itself
by playing dead. If grabbed or
touched, the ladybug will squirt
out a small amount of blood from
its leg joints. This blood smells re-
ally bad. Because the beetle looks
and smells dead, a hungry bird will
skip this snack. When the danger
has passed, the ladybug may fly
away.
Its little body is really a hard
shell that covers its wings. When
it wants to fly, it lifts up the two
sides of its shell and beats its
wings. It can beat its wings up to
85 times per second.
Ladybugs and their larvae
(young ladybugs) love to munch
on aphids. Ladybug larvae look
like tiny alligators and are black
and orange or black and pink.
Ladybugs can eat up to 50 aphids
a day. Eating so many not only fills
them up but protects farm crops
and gardens from aphids and other
bugs. Aphids suck the juice out of
leaves and cause them to curl up
and die.
When you go searching for a la-
dybug, look in places where aphids


might hang out, such as milkweed
plants, rose bushes, farm fields and
orchards. Go outside and look on
the top and bottom of leaves. Are
some leaves curled up and dead-
looking, or covered with a black-
ish mold? Look closely; you may
see aphids, which means a ladybug
might be nearby.
Be part of the healthy Get Out-
doors Florida! movement by get-
ting outdoors and helping scien-
tists find ladybugs. All you need is
a camera. In an effort to study and
track ladybugs, Cornell Univer-
sity's Lost Ladybug Project wants
to know where ladybugs live. If
you see a ladybug, take its pic-
ture, showing its top. If you can,
get it to crawl on a piece of white
paper, so its spots and colors show
up better in the photo. Then write
down where and when you saw the
ladybug. Next, you or your parents
can visit www.lostladybug.org to
fill out more information and e-
mail the picture to the Lost Lady-
bug Project.
Taken from: myfwc.com/NEWS-
ROOM/Backyard/1 0/News_
Backyard 10 04.htm


How You Can Help- - --


The Tampa Bay Estuary is home
to some 2,000,000 people. Our
efforts to save the bay depend
on each and every resident. Even
those of us who live miles away
from the bay have an effect on its
health. Please do your part to help
by educating yourself and inform-
ing others.


Eleven Ways to Save
Tampa Bay
1. Plant a Florida-friendly yard
that features low-maintenance,
drought-tolerant plants adapted
to Florida's climate. These land-
scapes will require less water,
fertilizer and pesticides, reducing
harmful runoff to the bay while at-
tracting birds, butterflies and other
wildlife.
2 Reduce or stop using toxic
products. Even common house-
hold cleaners contain hazardous
chemicals that can pollute the bay
and taint our groundwater sup-
plies. Instead, use environmentally
friendly substitutes when possible.
For example, a natural cleaning
solution can be made by mixing
a cup of vinegar in a pail of wa-
ter. An effective natural pesticide
spray can be made by mixing 2.5
tablespoons of liquid dish soap
and 2 tablespoons of cooking oil
in a gallon of water. Please see our
Household Chemicals Alternatives
page for more nontoxic recipes.
3. When you can't avoid using
hazardous materials, make sure
you dispose of them properly.


Calling all students


DL-ML.r oA riviivcll
Don't dump motor oil, paints, or
cleaners down storm drains or gut-
ters, where they will eventually
find their way to the bay. Instead,
recycle used oil and take chemical
products to one of the household
chemical collection centers lo-
cated in each of the three counties
bordering the bay.
4.If you use a septic tank for
waste disposal, have the system
pumped out every three to five
years to avoid sludge buildups that
could cause the system to malfunc-
tion and pollute the bay. Do not
flush paper, plastics, diapers and
cigarette filters as they can clog
septic systems. Kitchen scraps
also can clog septic tanks, so start
a compost pile and your garden (as
well as the bay) will thank you.
5. When boating in the bay, use
marked channels whenever pos-


Summer is right around the comer. Looking for a place to do your
community service hours for school? Help out right here in Ruskin at
the Mary and Martha House. Sales and support positions are available
in The Thrift Store, at the new boutique, Second Hand Rose, and at the
administrative office.
They need help sorting donations, cleaning and stocking shelves, yard
work or let them know your particular talent and they'll put you to work.
The Thrift Store and Administrative Office are located at 1009 1st Street
SW in Ruskin. Second Hand Rose is located at 100 East Shell Point Road
and features new and name brand women's clothing and accessories.
The Mary & Martha House Inc. is a shelter for women and children in
crisis, and supports 2 emergency shelters as well as transitional housing
in South Hillsborough County. For more information on volunteering
645-7874.


FLORIDA DEER


------------


sible to avoid running aground in
shallow seagrass beds that can be
easily damaged by boat propellers.
When in shallow waters, tilt your
boat motor up and pole through
the area.
6. Ifyou live on the water, avoid
pruning mangroves -- which pro-
vide critical habitat for fish and
wildlife and filter pollutants from
the water. If you have a seawall,
consider replacing it when repairs
are needed with a more natural
shoreline or installing artificial
s.a\Ill reefs" to provide habitat
for marine life.
7. Make a commitment to drive
less and walk, carpool or bicycle
more. Automobiles contribute to
air pollution that is a source of
nearly one-third of the bay's nitro-
gen burden. This nitrogen causes
algae blooms that cloud the water



See Your

Press Releases
www.observernews.net
r OBSEvERNE
Click...
IIfSC ***OBSiai


5.
(*BnrnZ Bh ^,
,s-sy _*s _,,^ ;.^\


and deplete it of oxygen.
8. Properly dispose of or recy-
cle unwanted monofilament fish-
ing line that can entangle and kill
birds and other wildlife. Remove
snagged line you come upon while
fishing.
9. Conserve water. Take shorter
showers, use the dishwasher less
often, and obey lawn-watering
restrictions. Remember that our
drinking water comes from un-
derground supplies connected to
the bay or area rivers that have
been dammed. The more we use,
the more we reduce the freshwater
flows that are the lifeblood of the
bay.
10. Be a giver, not a taker. Use
less of everything -- water, energy,
chemicals -- and use it more wise-
ly. Give back to the bay by par-
ticipating in a shoreline cleanup or
habitat restoration project.
11 Care and Share! Let others
know how much you value Tampa
Bay and share your knowledge
about keeping it healthy with
friends and neighbors. In this way,
each of us can help build a com-
munity partnership for preserving
our beautiful bay.


Forty years after the first Earth
Day, the world is in greater peril
than ever. While climate change is
the greatest challenge of our time,
it also presents the greatest oppor-
tunity an unprecedented oppor-
tunity to build a healthy, prosper-
ous, clean energy economy now
and for the future.

Earth Day 2010 can be a turning
point to advance climate policy,
energy efficiency, renewable en-
ergy and green jobs. Earth Day
Network is galvanizing millions
who make personal commitments
to sustainability. Earth Day 2010 is
a pivotal opportunity for individu-
als, corporations and governments
to join together and create a global
green economy. Join the more than
one billion people in 190 countries
that are taking action for Earth
Day.
www.earthday.org/earthday2010


EARTH DAY


Meetings set to receive input from
Florida hunters
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) will
hold public meetings throughout the state to receive input from Florida
hunters on proposals affecting deer hunting.
Nine of the meetings will be about potential changes to hunting season
dates on wildlife management areas (WMAs) to align them with recent
changes to the state's hunting zones. The remaining five will cover the
possible implementation of a deer-harvest reporting system as a tool to
further develop future harvest management goals.
The FWC wants to collect as much public input as possible to see if
changes are needed before formally presenting the rule proposals to the
Commission. If approved by the Commission, the changes could take
effect as early as the 2011-2012 hunting season.
A meeting to discuss possible changes to WMA hunting season dates
will be at Wednesday, April 28 Plant City, Plant City High School Au-
ditorium., One Raider Place, Plant City and a meeting regarding the pro-
posed deer harvest reporting system will also be on Wednesday, June
2 at Plant City, Plant City High SchoolAuditorium.






20 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Pipe organ is completed
The pipe organ at the Sun City
Center campus of St. John the Di-
vine Episcopal Church is complet-
ed! A program of music will be
presented by members of the mu-
sic departments of local churches
on Sunday, April 25 at 4:00 p.m.
to dedicate the piano and organ at
the East Campus located at 1015
Del Webb Blvd., SCC. The pro-
ceeds of this program will benefit
the Organ Fund. A reception will
be held in the parish pall following
the event.
CHUCK WIRICK,
DIRECTOR OF MUSIC.


Honoring mother
earth
Elaine Silver is a seasoned per-
former, touring musician, and re-
cording artist who has performed
in concert at colleges, festivals,
churches, clubs and children's
events throughout North America
and Europe. She is coming to Sun
City Center to celebrate Mother
Earth (her true name is Gaia) to
help us understand how much Gaia
needs our support.
Though April22 is the 40th An-
niversary of "Earth Day," many
supporters of this beloved planet
celebrate "Earth Month." These
dedicated supporters of Gaia
schedule events throughout the
month of April. Plan to visit the
Heritage Room in the Sun City
Center's Complex, 1009 North
Pebble Beach Blvd, at 10:00 am,
on Wednesday, April 28 to honor
and support Gaia who has given so
much over the many millenniums.
For information, call Ed Leary,
383-7594.


Closing luncheon
planned
Beth Israel Sisterhood will hold
a closing luncheon on Tuesday,
May 4, at 11:15 am in the King's
Point Clubhouse Banquet Room.
Elections and installation of new
officers will be held before the
luncheon catered by Ric Shuler.
Entertainment provided by the
multi-talented 'Mid-Life Crisis'
will follow.
Reservations at $12 may be made
by check sent to Shelly Grossman,
2210 Sifield Greens Way, SCC, FL
33573. Indicate choice of chicken
breast or tuna salad with check
made out to Beth Israel Sister-
hood.
For more information about Sis-
terhood contact Sisterhood Mem-
bership Chair Marsha Marshall at
633-3338.
April pick-up for
SHARE
The April pick-up date for
SHARE is Saturday, April 24 from
8:30-9:30 am at Ruskin United
Methodist Church.
Orders for May can be placed at
that time. The church is located at
105 4th Ave NW in Ruskin.
SHARE is open to all. Great
prices on meats, veggies and
fruits. The basic package is avail-
able for $18 and there are lots of
selections. See what is available at
half the grocery store costs.


Christian Women's
Connection

meets May 10
South Shore Christian Women's
Connection presents Solo Line
Dancers with Loretta Lucek, leader
and instructor. Inspirational speak-
er is Sharon Sabo, "Life felt like a
comic strip that wasn't funny."
The presentation and luncheon
will be held at Club Renaissance,
2121 South Pebble Beach Blvd.
on Thursday May 13. The pianist
is Barbara Green. Doors open at
11:00 am, luncheon and program
is from ll:30am-1:30pm.
Reservations or cancellations
before noon Monday, May 10. The
cost is $17 inclusive.
All ladies welcome, no member-
ship required. Call 938-4320 or
383-7541 iki u '-'i0 iil coll for in-
formation.


APRIL 22, 2010


Celebrate with the
Keenagers
It's Arbor Day! Tax Returns
have been filed! Warmer weather
is here after a very cold winter.
It's also the day that the Keenag-
ers will have their last dinner of
the season.
The community is invited to
come "Celebrate with the Keen-
agers" on Friday, April 30, at the
United Community Church, 1501
La Jolla Avenue, Sun City Center.
Doors open at 5:15 pm, dinner is
served at 6 pm and the show be-
gins at 7:15 pm.
Dinner will be baked ham or
baked tilapia fillet with all the
trimmings. The show will fea-
ture Charlie Stanford on a Lowrey
Royale Organ. The community is
invited.
Tickets for the dinner and show
are $14 per person and may be
purchased after the 10 am Sunday
worship service.

CCW hosts dessert
card party
The Council of Catholic Women
(CCW) of Prince of Peace Catho-
lic Church invites anyone who
likes to play cards or any board
game to make up a table in ad-
vance and come to the monthly
Dessert Card Party on Wednesday,
May 12, from noon until 3:30 pm
in Conesa Center.
They furnish cards, pencils and
tallies. They have an assortment
of desserts, table and door prizes.
For more information call 633-
2460.


NEWS RELEASE DEADLINE: THURSDAY P.M.
YOUR WEEKLY COMMUNITY NEWS SOURCE


,- CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH
".i",lj) SundayWorship: Blended 8:00 a.m.
Contemporary 9:40 a.m.
Traditional 11:15 a.m. Big Bend d.
Nursery Provided CrossRoads: Bible Study, Worship: Wed. 7 p.m.
Pastor Jack R. Palzer
5309 U.S. Highway 41 North Apollo Beach
(acrossfrom MiraBay) www.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1305 N

St. John the Divine Episcopal Church
Growing by Faith from Generation to Generation
Rev. Tracy H. Wider Church Office 813-645-1521
SUNDAY SERVICES: 9 am Contemporary Service and Sunday School
at West Campus, S.R. 674 and 9th Street SE, Ruskin
8 am Traditional Service and 11 am Holy Communion with Choir at East Campus
at 1015 Del Webb Blvd., SCC
All Worship Services with Holy Communion and Healing Holy Oil


Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (Behind Suntrust Bank)
ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: (Nov.-April ............................. 8:30a.m. Day Care Available
Mon. Fri.
Rev. John M. Bartha and all year)......................... 10:45 a.m. 6 am.- 6 p.m.
SPhone: 645-1241 Sunday School....................... 9:30 a.m. call 645-6198

REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH-ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center, FL 33573-5354
Rev. Dr. Peter Stiller, Pastor 634-1292
Saturday Worship: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion....First & Third Sunday Bible Class...Thursday 10 am, Guests Welcome

First Church of Christ, Scientist
Ruskin Sun City Center (813) 645-6102
204 Second St. N.W, Ruskin, Florida 33570
Sunday Service Sunday School .................................. 10 AM
Wednesday Testimony Meeting ......................................... 5 PM
Reading Room Tuesday & Thursday....................................1-4 PM
ALL ARE WELCOME www.spirituality.com

F"RST BAPTIST CHURCH

L- 820 COLLEGE AVE. W.
RUSKIN, FL 33570
645-6439
S*lr A r www.fbcruskin.org
A Resource for Families
Sunday School ............................9:45 a.m .
Morning Worship............8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Dr. Barry Rumsey
Evening Service...........................6:00 p.m. CHRISTIANSCHOOL
Wednesday Night Service................7:00 p.m. THROUGH 12TH
Awana.............................................7:00 p.m. GRADE


Prince of Peace holds fashion show
On Thursday, April 8, the Council of Catholic Women (CCW) of
Prince of Peace Catholic Church held their annual spring fashion show.
The show, April Showers, was held at Community Hall.
CCW President, Louise Huberty, presented a check for $1,000 to Sis-
ter Maureen Smith to benefit Redlands Christian Migrant Association
(RCMA/Wimauma Academy).The show featured a buffet lunch catered
by Carrabba's Italian Grill. Al Frenzel provided luncheon music.
After lunch a style show with fashions from Patchingtons of St. Ar-
mands was presented. Pauline Pignataro, Deanna Montes de Oca, Pru
Minton, Fran Fallon, Sharon Nathan, Pat Wolfert, Sharon Widdon and
Pat Bennis modeled the fashions.
Karen Sochon and Aine Paik were co-chairpersons of the event.


Our Covenant with Gaia
On April 22, Rev. Dr. Bonnie Devlin presents "Our Covenant with
Gaia." As we celebrate Earth Day, we will reflect on UUA's 7th prin-
ciple, and the words of Chief Seattle that, "All things are connected."
Exploring a deeper sense of our Covenant with Gaia (Mother Earth) will
energize all to cherish and protect our living, sustaining home. We also
affirm our commitment to the UUA 'Green Sanctuary Program.'
On April 29 Bill Danek and Congregation celebrate the Annual Flower
Communion. Fellowship members will bring a flower. The program will
be followed by new officer induction ceremony.
Coffee and conversation starts at 7:00pm, Thursday, April 22, in the
Social Hall at 1115 Del Webb, East, Sun City Center. The program be-
gins at 7:30 pm. Visitors are welcome. For information, call 813-633-
2349.


f riendship $Bptist Chwrch
Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist)
1511 El Rancho Dr.
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Phone/Fax:
I _i 813-633-5950


WEEKLY SERVICES:


Bible Study
Bible Study
....Worship


Sunday
9 a .m ................
a.m ............
10 a.m. & 6 p.m.


Wednesday
6 p.m.... Prayer Meeting/Bible Study


Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC
Meets in the Social Hall of the Beth Israel Synagogue
1115 E. Del Webb Blvd.
Thursday, 7:00 PM Call 633-0396
If we cannot agree, let us at any rate agree to differ,
but let us part as friends.
Mohammad Ali Jinnah


NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where God's Love is Shared"
U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL 645.1121 www.nbcor.org
Sunday School for all ages 9:30 AM SBC
Morning Worship 10:45 AM Wanted: People Who Want to Grow
Evening Worship 6:00 PM and Live for Jesus!
Full Wednesday Schedule for all ages

North River Church of Christ i
Non-Instrumental -
13885 U.S. Hwy 301 South
(Just South of the Manatee County Line)
Minister: Howard Johnson Offce 941-776-1134
Services: Sunday 10:00am, 11:00am & 6:00pm ce 41-6- 4
Wednesday7:00pm Home 813-754-1776

SFirst Baptist Church of Gibsonton
"We love because He first loved us." 1 John 4:19
Traditional Worship Service *Sunday School 9:30 A.M.
Old-Time Gospel Hymns *Morning Worship 10:30 AM.
Nursery Available Sunday Evening 6:00 P.M. :
Interpreter for the Deaf : d--Week (Wed.) 7:00 P.M.
9912 Indiana St. Hwy 41 & Estelle Atu I 'Malcolm S. Clements, Pastor
_Gibsonton, FL 33534 --813-67-1301

Welcome ta EVERETT TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ .
1611 First St. SW Ruskin, FL 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL--
SERVICES: Sunday... .......................9:30 & 10:30 a.m .: 6:00 p.m. A '"
Wednesday................7:00 p.m -- -

PRINCE OF PEACE CATHOLIC CHURCH
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573
SPhone: 634-2328 Fax: 633-6670
M asses: Sunday.............................................................8:00, 10:00 AM Noon
Saturday Vigil..................................................4:00 PM and 6:00 PM
Daily................................ ... ............. 8:00 AM
www.popcc.org Confessions: Monday Friday 7:30am, Saturday 8:30am and 3:00pm


I


--- --- ----
I'mm






APRIL 22, 2010


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 21
1II am ..


SCC Methodist Church to host second
annual Biker Blessing and Breakfast
The United Methodist Church of Sun City Center, 1210 Del Webb
Blvd. West, is proud to host the second annual Biker Blessing and Break-
fast on Saturday April 24 from 9-11am. Motorcycles will be blessed at
10am and 1lam, and a breakfast of pancakes, sausage and beverages
will be served from 9 to 11am for just $5. Proceeds from the breakfast
will go to the church's Uganda Mission Team. A memorial table will
be available for bikers no longer with us, and bikers are encouraged to
bring names and photos and to light a candle in their honor. A moment
of silence and prayer will be offered during the blessing of the bikes. A
Pastor's Choice Award will also be awarded before the final blessing.
The Pages of Life Bookstore, our only local Christian bookstore, will be
open for the morning. You don't need a bike to attend biker friends
are more than welcome. Call 813-298-7209 to let the church know that
you are coming.
For additional information about this and other events at the United
Methodist Church of Sun City Center, call Jeff Jordan, Director of Music
and the Arts, at 813-634-2539.

2 Yard Sale Signs FREE with AD

20 Words $15.50


A spiritual home where you can come as you
are, be yourself, and find God in your own
way. We are a fellowship that encourages
spirituality rather than "religion."
Affiliated with Assoc of Unity Churches, Lee's Summit
MO, and Unity, publishers of the Daily Word


I Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
Beth Israel's Social Hall
1115 Del Webb E. Sun City Center, FL
www.unitycommunityofjoy.com Tel. 813-298-7745


STHE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO THE SERVICES NOW WORSHIPPING IN THE "CHAPEL"
AT SUN CITY CENTER FUNERAL HOME 10:30 AM ON SUNDAYS
NO CREED...BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE
1851 RICKENBACKER DRIVE 813-938-4955
Minister DR. DAVID CAMPBELL

QZai/edAe/oo~J G0WCaurcof 3un Gity Genler
The Church of Open Hearts... Open Minds... Open Doors
1210 W. Del Webb Blvd. 634-2539
Worship Services:
S\ Saturday.................. 4:00 p.m. Creason Hall (Traditional Service)
Sunday....................8:15 a.m. in Sanctuary (Traditional Service)
9:30 a.m. Creason Hall (The Oasis)
F10:55 a.m. Sanctuary (Traditional with Chancel Choir)
i Fellowship tim I1 T... ..i. I,, I- r .. 10:15a.m. and 11 am. in Creason Hall
G^odtisL ove '("t.SCCi1M.omC .
PASTORS: DR. WARRENLANGER, REV GARYBULLOCK
Communion First Sunday ofEach Month


St. Andrew Presbyterian Church

d Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.
Prayers with anointing for healing and
J& wholeness during worship the second Sunday
of every month.
A Stephen Pastor: Dr. Gerald Iwerks
Ministry Church
Meet friends in Fellowship Hall after the Service
Refreshments served


1239 Del Webb Blvd. West
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Church is Handicap accessible


Phone: 813-634-1252
For Information visit:
www.standrewatscc.org


Mary Ellen Thomas and unidentified parishoner
Prince of Peace hosts art show
On Sunday, May 2, Prince of Peace Catholic Church will sponsor an
Arts Show from 1 to 3 pm in Conesa Center located
opposite the Church, across the parking area.
All the artworks on display will be the creations of
Church members and will include paintings, draw- -
ings, Bunka, and sculptures, as well as greeting cards. -
Many of the works have been donated and will be for y f -
sale, with all sales proceeds benefitting the Bishops' i'"
Relief Fund. /
Activities planned for inclusion in the show are art ^
demonstrations as well as raffles, with some of the
donated items, or art lessons, as prizes. All are invited
to attend and admission is free.
Prince of Peace Church is located at 702 Valley
Forge Blvd., Sun City Center. The Art Show offers
the opportunity to view some unique art pieces while
supporting the Bishops' Relief Fund, and perhaps do some early Moth-
er's Day or Christmas shopping.


Center for Restoration Ministries
"Restoring the broken through the Word of God"
SERVICES: Worship Service..................Sundays 11 a.m. i U /
Bible Study.................... Wednesday 7 p.m.
301 1st Street NE Ruskin, FL 33570 813-645-7779 l
..it. i, f .. t, i , ii '. n.il.. *in Pastors Teresa & Freddie Roberts, Sr Sr ~

Ruskin Church of Christ
Don White, Minister 813-361-1415
Sunday Bible Enrichment...................... ......... .............10:00 a.m.
W worship ........................................ ...................................................... 11:00 a.m .
Iglesia De Dios Puerta Abierta
Open Door Church of God
Pastor Jose C. Pifia 813-645-3813 813-285-8245
Domingo (Sunday) Estudio Biblico (Bible Study) ............................. 6:00 p.m.
Servicio De Adoracion (Worship/Praise Service).............................. 7:00 p.m.
Miercoles (Wed.) Servicio De Oracion (Prayer Service) ................. 7:00 p.m.
Both Churches at this Location: 611 2nd Ave. NW, Ruskin, FL 33570


SSOUTHSIDE
Preaching the Word APTIST HURCH
LvingPLeop BAPTIST CHURCH
4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 South
(4 miles south of Ruskin)
DAN COLLINS, PASTOR JIM KRAUSE, MUSIC DIRECTOR
COLnMUINITY INVITEDv
BIBLE STUDY 9:30 AM
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE 10:55 AM
SUNDAY EVENING SERVICE 6:00 PM
WEDNESDAY PRAYER SERVICE 7:00 PM
ADULTS, YOUTH, CHILDREN
For information, call 645-4085 Monday-Thursday



Saint nne Catholic Chutch

M Fr. John McEvoy
Pastor
813-645-1714
SaintAnneRuskin.org

U.S. Hwy. 41 106 11th Ave. NE Ruskin
SouthShore: r- .I I. Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton
M ASSES
Saturday Vigil M ass.................................................................... 5:00 p.m.
Sunday M ass............................................ 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., 5:00 p.m.
Holy Days....................................... Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Daily ......................................................... M onday thru Friday 8:00 a.m.
Espatol................................Domingo 12:00 p.m.; Miercoles 7:00 p.m.
Confession.............................Wednesday 6:15 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.
S


In Loving v'Memory of
'Daniefl"'iq D" Strunk
8/14/88 4/22/08
We want to always remember
The beautiful life you lived
And keep alive the memories
we have
Through remembering what
you did
For you 're so special to all of us
A wonderfulperson indeed
Your love, laughter and
warm smile
Reflected a heart that believed
Just in the everyday :h,ig, we do
We remember yourfaith and love
In the words you spoke to
help us :In. -l,,h
Is a continued reminder for us
S iihi. ,rlI, we miss you
so very much
We know we '11 see you once more
For this is the hope we have
in God
Being re-united in the Lord
And as we gather we 'll continue
to share
Special times we went :I. rhli
For these are memories that
warm our hearts
As we honor the memory ofyou
Forever in out hearts,

Mom, Dad, Family and Friends


In 'Memoriam
'aniel"Big D" Strunk
I Miss You My Brother,
My Friend
I recall when you and I
Would fight each other to no end,
When I couldn't stand to treat youAs a
brother or a friend.

As we grew we changed so much,
Freedom was just around the bend,
You were turning into a fine young
man, And you had become my friend.

And when I possessed an anger, That
only you could mend,
Even if it was directed at you, You'd
help me, as a friend.

But now those times are over, Like a
fleeting fashion trend, Now I am here
without you, And I must find a new
friend.

The road ahead goes on forever,
Against new obstacles I must 'tend,
But I know you'll be there to help, As
my brother, and my friend.
Love,
Cari, Timmy, Matt, Levi and
Porkchop


wul


r "Oil
ji






22 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
I


J> 4(~y


Friday, April 23
Pass a Grille Beach presents
Beach Goes Pops, a free family
friendly music and art festival. Two
days of free music feature Next Exit,
The Venturas and Suzette Jennings
and the Moodswingz (April 23); and
Hip Abduction, saxophonist Jeff Za-
vrac and the Beach Goes Pops Or-
chestra (April 24). There will also
be Art in the Park with artwork and
crafts, food and beverage vendors.
Pass A Grille Beach is located at
Ninth Avenue and Gulf Way St. in
St. Pete. For more information visit
beachgoespops.com.

International Plaza hosts a free
concert for their Art in Fashion-
Concert series playing throughout
the summer. A fashion caricature
artist will be on hand to draw free
caricatures to live island music by
the Sunsetters at this outdoor concert
near Bay Street from 6pm-9pm. In-
ternational Plaza is located at 2223 N
West Shore Blvd in Tampa. For more
information call (813) 342-3790.


BEACH

GOES POPS
-- .


Pas-A-Grill Bc h, Florida
20TH ANNIVERSARY
April 23-24, 2010


Saturday, April 24

U The City of Dunedin will be
holding the Ninth Annual Touch-
A-Truck on Saturday, April 24,
2010 from 10 AM-2 PM at Dunedin
Community Center. This is a free
event for all ages that has attracted
over 7,500 visitors each year with
activities such as: petting zoo, pony
rides, moonwalks, face painting and
demonstrations on site. This event
showcases all types of vehicles in-


eluding monster trucks, fire engines,
cars, truck, heavy-duty construction
equipment, military vehicles, heli-
copters, motorcycles, emergency
vehicles, buses, entertainment and
more. For more information call
(727) 812-4530.

U Smooth Jazz Fest will be host-
ed at Coachman Park located at 301
Drew St. in Clearwater from noon-
11:30pm. The event is free with re-
served seating starting at $20 through
ticketmaster. Bring your lawn chair
or a blanket for a day of great mu-
sic featuring Oleta Adams, Spencer
Day, Jessy J and BK Jackson For
more information visit www.wsjt.
com or call (813) 562-4700.


Tour the Nature's Classroom
facility which is normally reserved
for sixth grade Hillsborough
County students for their Earth Day
celebration open house this weekend,
with nature art displays and sales,
live music, children's activities, live
animal handling, food for sale and
environmentally focused exhibits.
Admission is $5 per vehicle and


the facility will remain open from
10am-5pm. Nature's Classroom
is located at 13100 Verges Road in
Thonotosassa. For more information
call (813) 987-6969.

Islands Fest at the Davis
Island (Sea Plane Basin) located
adjacent to Peter O. Knight Airport,
825 Severn Ave. in Tampa, will have
something for everyone in the family
including a British exotic car show,
airplane display, art show, youth sail-
ing demo, live music, magicians,
kids pet show, pet parade, face paint-
ing, children's fashion show, balloon
bounce houses and much more. This
event is free. For more information
call (813) 205-0141.


Sunday, April 25

The Sun N Fun Country
Concert is a free concert hosted at
Coachman Park in Clearwater fea-
turing Travis Tritt, Daryl Worley,
Blackberry Smoke, Burns and Poe,
the Harters and Josh Thompson.
There will also be food concessions,
mixed vendors and a children's play
area. The event is free with reserved
seating for $20. Coachman Park is
located at 301 Drew St. in Clear-
water. The concert is from noon-
9:30pm. For more information visit
www.wqyk.com.
a Thousands of pie lovers, tast-
ers and bakers gather together for
the GreatAmerican Pie Festival.
The highlight, as always, will be the


APRIL 22, 2010
Never-Ending Pie Buffet, featuring
award-winning pie, ice cream, top-
pings and beverages. Thousands of
children will make their own pies
at the Crisco Kids Creation Station.
There will be pie decorating, pie
escaping, pie tin art and many more
pie activities to enjoy. The Pietopia
Demonstration Stage sponsored by
Village Inn and Bakers Square Res-
taurants features entertainment and
baking demonstrations by chefs from
across the country. Of course, no pie
festival would be complete without a
Pie Eating Contest. The festival will
take place at Lakeside Park in Cele-
bration, FL. From Tampa, take 1-4 to
Florida Toll 417 (Celebration signs).
Get off at exit 2 onto CelebrationAve
and turn right at Golfpark Dr, then
take the second left on Sycamore.
Lakeside Park is located at 631 Syc-
amore St. For more information visit
piecouncil.org.


The fish have arrived !


Fishing is now in full swing. The
weather has wanted the waters and
the fish have arrived.
Cobia are swimming our water-
ways along with giant stingrays. The
cobia are looking for an easy meal, as
the stingrays stir the water with their
giant size, the cobia following behind
eating the small bait fish swimming
under them.
I received phone calls and a few an-
glers have stopped by my boutique to
ask fishing questions. The big ques-
tion this week was the wind. I found
that it is best not to cast into the wind,
but the opposite direction. Some have
used heavy floats on their lines to
control them. Others are not casting
but trolling. Some anglers fish only
for trout, when the wind is blowing
out of the South. The white caps on
the water attract the trout in schools.
Each angler has his own way of han-
dling weather conditions. I did talk to
anglers who will not go fishing on a
windy day, but those who do, reveal
their best fishing days.
Warmer weather has brought many
birds south and if you watch the birds
flying across the bay, you will find
fish. The birds are following schools
of fish and eating the small bait
fish left behind the fast swimming
schools.
Trout are everywhere feeding in the
flats, in deep holes, and some out in 6
foot or deeper waters. They have in-
vaded the waterways. Many anglers
return to shore out of bait as they have
fed the trout all day. Live shrimp is
good trout bait, but many are using
jigs bouncing them on the bottom of
grassy flats. If you are lucky enough
to find a school of glass minnows,
they are great trout bait. Trout is an
excellent tablefare, most often fried,
but it is great broiled, or baked until
flakey with a butter lemon sauce on
top. Legal is not less than 15 inches


or more than 20 inches except one
over 20 inches per person per day.
Four per harvest per person per day.
Spanish mackerel is a fun fish to
catch as well as a great tablefare. The
average weight is 28 ounces. Legal is
12 in. with 15 per day. They will give
you some action before yielding to
your hook.
Redfish are coming back stronger.
During the cold weather they seemed
to have gone to deep holes or to a
warmer area. One per person per day
not less than 18 inches or more than
27 inches. A good fish to bake, with
a pan of Ruskin vegetables, or if you
prefer filled with your favorite stuff-
ing.
Black drum are in schools and are
all hefty fish. They are fun to catch
and will give you a work-out. Most
are catching and releasing, as large
black drum are known to be full of
worms. Some eat the smaller ones.
The favorite spot to catch drum this
week, was the mouth of Tampa Bay.
I have reports that they have been
schooling under private docks, too.
Snook have not left our waterways
and are enjoying our warm weather
and have joined the spring bite which
is in full swing across the bay. Re-
member, you can only catch and re-
lease a snook. They are not in season
due to the cold kill and you cannot le-
gally have one in your bait well until
the Florida Fish and Wildlife tell you
that they have reopened the season. It
may be in September, that is the last
information I received.
Mullet have been enjoying the
warm water and have been spotted
jumping and soaring in the air. They
have been traveling in the Little Man-
atee River going east toward the U.S.
41 bridge. Some living around Shell
Point have used their cast nets over
schools, gracing their dinner tables
with fried mullet and hush puppies.
Flounder has been a great catch
with some larger than usual being
boated. I saw boats coming in with
seatrout and a flounder or two. The
flounder and the trout seem to be
swimming around the bay together.
I overheard at the bait shop this
week some boats are not respecting
others who have a fishing spot, by
flying by cutting their lines. Please
watch out for others, as you are not


the only one fishing.
Reports from our fresh water an-
glers say that large mouth bass are
having a ball swimming around our
lakes and the upper waters of our
rivers enjoying the warm weather. If
you drop a line with live shrimp, you
will hook one every time. Tony Pe-
tree caught two large mouth bass this
week at Lake Manatee with Jason as
his guide.
Fresh water catfish are a great
tablefare and you can have one for
dinner if you fish the upper waters of
the Alafia or the Little Manatee Riv-
ers. Some people eat the saltwater
cats by skinning them while others
choose not to eat them.
Whatever your choice, fresh or


saltwater, fish are now in the swim
and waiting for you to feed them.
Be nice, courteous, and watchout
for your fellow angler.


Florida Outdoor Sports Writers and
can be reached at aleta maschek at
yahoo.com.


Jonie Maschek is a member of

** Podiatric Medicine and Surgery


Sean D. Shanahan,

D.P.M., M.P.H.

3909 Galen Court, Suite B-1
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Phone: (813) 634-0664
__ Fax: (813) 634-0668







APRIL 22, 2010 THE SHOPPER 23


To place an ad call
813-645-3111 ext. 201
Fax. 813-645-1792
$15.50
up to 20 words
300 each addl. word
Deadline is Monday
at 4pm


105 PERSONAL
Weddings, Funerals or Healing ser-
vice (Silence or spoken prayers) Jack
Spencer Harrison, D. Min, B. Ph. D &
Nipa Grant. Anywhere. $49 & up. See: 1
Corinthians 12: 7-11. 813-642-0189

Prayer to the Blessed Mother. Oh most
beautiful flower of Mount Carmel's fruit-
ful vine, splendor of Heaven. Blessed
Mother of God, Immaculate Virgin, as-
sist me in my necessity. Oh star of the
sea, help me & show me here, in you
are my Mother. Oh Holy Mary Mother
of God, queen of heaven & earth, I
humbly beseech you from the bottom
of my heart to secure me in my neces-
sity (make request) There are none that
can withstand your power. Oh Mary
conceived without sin pray for us who
have recourse to thee (say 3 times).
Holy Mary, I place this prayer in your
hands (3 times). Say this prayer for 3
consecutive days, then you must publish
it and it will be granted to you. Grateful
thanks. JS

120 ENTERTAINMENT
Join now & save. The new Anqi Zhangs
angles & fine dining. Offering VIP annual
membership at a low rate of $100 for the
preopening of our new night club. Grand
opening July 4 weekend. This offer is
good through the end of this month. For
details call 813-447-6123






260 FRUITS/ VEG.


HOME-GROWN PRODUCE
FRESH SEAFOOD
Homemade Milk Shakes & Shortcakes
THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL:
Jumbo Gulf Shrimp $79 per lb.
16/20 ct.
This Thursday thru Sunday Only
Party Pak Oysters $1800
Hwy. 41
1 mile south of Little Manatee River
RUSKIN 813-645-5208
Credit Cards Accepted

280 PETS

Oliver & Company
Pet Sitting
& all your in home pet care needs.
813-767-7225. Licensed, bonded,
insured. Member of Pet Sitters Interna-
tional. References available

Mini Schnauzer 7 mo old, female.
Register AKC, all shots w/ chip. Very
sweet, friendly, good with kids. Call
813-703-7293






310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Sale Friday, 23 & Saturday 24, 8am-
1pm. 628 Ft. Duquesna Dr., SCC.
Collectibles, vintage items, 6ft blowup
Frankenstein, misc.


THE SHOPPER




M & M Printing Co., Inc
weekly publisher of the


The Observer News,


310 GARAGE/YARD SALES
Huge sale. Friday /Saturday, 8am-3pm.
1608 Wagon Wheel Rd., Sundance.
Great clothes. Stuff a bag for $2. House-
hold, toys, misc..
303 Sedgewick Ct.., SCC. 8am-noon.
Thursday, Friday & Saturday. We saved
the best till last. Lots of everything.




New Summer Hours:
T-F 9 to 4:30 Sat 9 to 3:30

SENIOR

TUESDAYS

Most items discounted
including Clothing,
Accessories, Collectibles, Art,
Books, and some Furniture.
Donations Needed
Please call (813) 645-5255
1311 3rd St. NE Ruskin
(Behind St.Anne Church
& Next to Kennco Mfg.)

Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana
St., Gibsonton (1 block off US 41,1 block
north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday thru
Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture,
lots misc. Ministry First Baptist Gibson-
ton. 813-671-0036 to donate
Multi family yard sale. Saturday, April
24, 7am-? 604 6th Ave., SW, Ruskin.
Furniture, household items & more.

Don't Miss This One
Elite estate sale. Artwork by famous
artists, bronze Bose radio, queen
adjustable bed, like new stackable
washer/ dryer, wicker furniture, marble
top tables, Moe Bridges lamp, Water-
front, Limoges, Lladros, Roy Crost
stand, Japanese obie & screen, tools,
yard pots, much more. Thursday thru
Saturday, 8am-1 pm. 12507 Shadow
Run Dr. off Mc Mullen & Boyette Riv-
erview. Follow signs.
Yard /garage sale. SCC. April 23 & 24,
379 & 382 Club Manor Dr. Kitchen,
pictures, books, clothing, glass, more.
8am-1 pm.
Yard sale. Lovers Dream @ Century 21
Beggins, 6542 N US 41, Apollo Beach.
Saturday 10am-2pm.
Yard sale. Saturday, April 24 8am-3pm.
Something for everyone. Too much
to list. 11955 Lark Song Loop, Sum-
merfield.

Estate Sale. Closed gift shop, selling
house. EZ Go golf cart, golf clubs, chan-
delier's, lamps, furniture, Hummel's,
Royal Doulton china, Swarovski ear-
rings, tools, clothes, over 1,500 items.
1943 Sterling Glen Court, SCC. April 23
& 24, 8am-1pm.


C CaCvary's
y ^AnaeC7ttic
Thrift Store
NOW OPEN Wednesday,
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. Noon
SUPPORT OUR TROOPS!
For every $1 donated,
receive a FREE clothing item
(from selected merchandise)
1424 E. College Ave. Ruskin
813-641-7790
Ministry ofCaivary Lutheran church


The SCC Observer and
210 Woodland Estates Ave SW
Ruskin, Florida 33570


310 GARAGE/YARD SALES
SCC Friday & Saturday, April 23 & 24,
8am-3pm. 2316 W. Del Webb Blvd.
Household, clothes, lamps, electronics,
collectible, sports, military, more. Many
foreign items.
Garage sale. Finally all moved in!
Jewelry, movies, clothes, toys, etc.
1501 North Lake Dr., SCC. Friday &
Saturday, 8am-?
Ruskin 3 family garage sale. Men shoes
size 9, household goods, dishes, stain-
less Macaw cage, kids toys, clothes,
crib, carseat. Saturday, 4/24. 301 5th
St., SW, North off College Ave., west
of US 41. 8am-3pm.
2 family yard sale. Saturday only 4/24,
8am-2pm. 1709 Meridian St., Ruskin.
813-645-0354
Friday, April 23, 8:30am-2pm. Saturday,
April 24, 8:30am-noon. 308 Manatee
Dr., SW, Ruskin. Playhouse, pad locks,
tools, lots of misc.
Estate garage sale. April 22, 23 & 24.
8am-3pm. 618 Oakmont Ave., Sun
City Center.
Fundraiser yard sale. Saturday only.
4/24, 7:30-1pm. Furniture, children
clothing, yard tools, Christmas deco-
ration, women's large size clothing &
much more. Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 11421 Big Bend Rd., Rlverview
(east of US 301)


Dealer in Gold & Silver Coins
Domestic & Foreign
11% or more and over
on SILVER COINS
Call for private consultaWon or appointment
Alltransactions are strictly confidential
(813) 634-3816. cell (813) 503-4189
"Your local dealer for over 20 years"


312 ESTATE SALES

K&M ESTATE SALES
1810 N. Pebble Bch Blvd, SCC
Outdoor furn, leather sectional, lamps,
linens, dining room set and more. Fri
& Sat 7:30am-1:30pm. 813-495-5718
Preview online: www.kandmestate-
sales.com

WE BUY ESTATES
in the Sun City area or
take consignments on
your ENTIRE HOUSE
We also come and pick it upl!


Classified Is Convenient


The Riverview Current


312 ESTATE SALES


ATTENTION! Please note
date and times of sale!
Contents include: Gorgeous
cherry office/computer desk and
chair; beautiful Italian-inspired
lamps, art and furniture; China;
variety of end, coffee and lamp
tables; kitchen and dining room
tables with chairs; twin and full
size bedroom sets; big screen TV;
reclining sofa; wing-back chairs;
wine cooler; 2 patio sets;
Aquarius water system; lawn
ornaments; household and misc.
items.
PLEASE PARK ON
SAME SIDE OF SALE DUE TO
EMERGENCY VEHICLES.
Look forward to seeing you there!




Your home will be staged for
best results. Working in
Sun City Center for 23 years.
Please feel free to call about
the sale or its contents.
Bonded Licensed
Cell: 508-0307
or Eve:633-1173


NETTIE'S ESTATE SALES
Home: 741-0225 Cell: 382-7536
2205 New Bedford Dr.
Sun City Center
Thur. & Fri., April 22 & 23
7 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Contents include: Antique Swedish
coffee grinder; Heywood Wakefield
kitchen table w/chairs; Broyhill floral
sofa; pink swivel rockers; Singer
sewing machine; Simmons
BeautyRest sleeper sofa; Provincial
style end and coffee tables; glass
top rattan patio table w/chairs;
rocking chair; collectibles; China;
sterling silver; Italian king/queen
size BR furniture; queen size bed;
household and misc. items.
PLEASE PARK ON SAME SIDE OF
SALE DUE TO EMERGENCY
VEHICLES. See you there!


100 Announcements
200 Farmer's Mkt
300 Merchandise
400 Marine
450 Transportation
500 Real Estate
550 Manuf. Housing
600 Rentals
650 Prof. Services
700 Services
800 Employment


312 ESTATE SALES


6819 U.S. 301 S., Riverview
(813) 677-8180

330 FURNITURE


E (1)4-2
W'.' wW betgini nm~~L~' i ture~II~I~com


360 GOLF CARTS


Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade. Char-
gers, parts all related. Ronny's Carts &
Parts. 813-645-4515 or 813-484-9855

We buy golf carts, any condition. We pay
top dollar for used carts, running or not.
Same day pickup. 813-300-0114


- W.umaCar of Sun City Center


1 6 olt 8 Volt
Complete Set Complete Set I
$479" $529"
*Plustaxand applicable *Plustaxand applicable
fees Installed with core fees Installed with core
exchange Exp 4/29/10 1 exchange Exp 4/29/10

139 S. Pebble Beach Blvd.
Suite 102 (behind CVS Pharmacy)
Sun City Center, FL






425 SLIPS OR STORAGE
Little Manatee Outdoor Storage. RV's,
boat's, trailer's. All sizes. 2903 39th
Ave., SE. Ruskin. 813-787-8531. www.
littlemanateeoutdoorstorage.com


"- THRIFT STORE '
OPEN: Wed., Thurs. & Fri, 8 aom. 3 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. 12 p.m.


N w
U.
S.R.
w 4
1st St SW.


TSIFTOR


1009 Ist_


R


Street S.W.
Zuskin


674E We Have
Furniture, Too!
DONATION DROP OFFS
TUES. THRU FRL ONLY PLEASE,
ALL DONATIONS MUST BE IN CLEAN
USEABLE CONDITION.


U U


AAA Furniture
New & Gently Used Furniture

BUY & SELL
Daily Trips to SCC


Mon.-Sat.
9 a.m.-5 p.m.


www.ButterfleldsAuctions.com
Butterfield Auctions AB2706/AU3549


I


erviem(s
SecretBest Kept
I


THE SHOPPER 23


APRIL 22, 2010


8(813)
78'3-27001







24 THE SHOPPER
425 SLIPS & STORAGE
South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special-
izing in outside storage for RVs, boats &
trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay-
Storage.com






455 AUTOMOBILES

$Fast Cash$
Cars, trucks & Vans. Dead or alive.
813-626-5733, 813-924-6255 Free
Hauling. God Bless

456 TRUCKS AND VANS

2005 Dodge Caravan,
44,000 miles, 4cyl. like new. $6,500
SCC. 414-418-8936 ask for Ted, 414-
801-1972

459 MOTORCYCLES

Feel the freedom
& save on gas 2009 Harley David-
son, Street Bob DYNA. Reduced to
$9,000. No reasonable offer refused.
Call Stephen 813-833-7148 or Carolyn
813-645-7802 for appointment to see
the bike.






510 WATERFRONT FOR SALE
Apollo Beach. For rent or sale, by
owner. 2br/2ba, very clean, newly reno-
vated condo. SS appliances, partially
furnished. View, boat slip, must see!
941-445-5732

511 HOUSES FOR SALE
Home for sale by owner. 601 4th Ave.,
Ruskin. 4br/2ba, ready to move in.
Newly remodeled kitchen w/ maple
cabinets, all new appliances including
washer /dryer, beds, linens, dishes.
Large lot with fruit trees. Carport, porch,
fireplace. Nice neighborhood. Priced for
quick sell. $135,000. Call for appoint-
ment. 813-645-5381


CYPRESS CREEK
Ventana 3/2 plus den,
open plan on golf course;
large lanai w/self-
cleaning heated pool,
spa; 3-car; lots of storage.
2004 model, 1950 sq. ft.
Reduced to $269,900

(813)355-1512



VACANT LOTS IN RUSKIN
OWNER FINANCING:
SCleared residential lot with shed,
great area, good size, no HOA, no
CDD. $29,900.
* 2.46 acres, corner lot, cleared, few
large oaks, well and electric, for
home/mobile home. $70,000.
* 1.17 acre cleared, secluded, across
from nature preserve, well, electric.
Mobile home OK. $59,900.
* Fabulous riverfront lot, deep water,
huge dock, great fishing. Utilities
onsite, PD-MU zoning. $249,000.
COMMERCIAL RENTAL
7,200 s.f. warehouse, office space,
2BA, insulated roof, loading dock,
roll-up doors, over 1 acre lot.
$2,200/mo. + deposit.


512 CONDOS FOR SALE

Mini Mansion!
Must see! Sun City's Kings Point.
2br/2ba condo. 1209 sf. New 2009.
Terms available. $64,900. 727-776-
2799






555 M.H. FOR SALE
55+ Mobile home for sale. Riverfront
park with dock & boat slip. One bed-
room, carport. $5,000. 813-645-2446

560 M.H. ON LOTS
Mobile home for sale Eastwood Mobile
Home Park, Gibsonton. Call Heather
813-677-5726

565 M.H. IN PARKS
$3,500 for mobile home on river in 55+
park. Good fishing, Activites, remod-
eled, TV, AC, low lot rent. No interest
financing. Double your money on this
investment. Phone 813-240-9405






610 WATERFRONT RENTALS
Apollo Beach 3br/2ba on canal. New
pool, lanai, dock, lease. 2,000 sf. Fios
ready, pet ok. $1,695. Hall 813- 645-
6985

The Dolphin House, Apollo Beach,
efficiency apartments on water. Boat
docking /fishing. Pool, laundry. $185
weekly, $185 deposit. No pets. 813-
850-5217

611 HOUSES FOR RENT
SCC house for rent. 2br/1.5ba, com-
pletely renovated from inside to outside.
Monthly rent $795 plus security deposit
with yearly lease. Association fees &
lawn maintenance extra. Please call
813-649-1599 for details

Ruskin 3br/1ba house, screened porch
on quiet street. Waterfront. Fish off the
dock. No smoking, no pets. References
please. $450 biweekly $450 security de-
posit. 813-363-6001 or 813-649-1599

Ruskin, quaint 3/2 home for rent on
large lot, front covered porch. Couple
or small family. Monthly rent is $950
with signed lease. Security deposit and
references required. No smoking, no
pets. Please call 813-649-1599.

612 APTS. FOR RENT
For rent: Efficiency apartments. Weekly
rates, utilities furnished 813-677-8789,
813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896






AVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE
OCCUPANCY
RIVERWOOD APARTMENTS

1 Bedroom Apartments

Handicap Unit Available

Rental Rates Beginning at
$520 + Utilities

For Rental Information
call: (8131 645-7320
(TDD 800-955-87711

709 Oceanside Circle,
& Ruskin 1

Mon-Fri 8:00 AM- 4:00 PM
Equal Opportunity Provider & Employer


613 CONDOS FOR RENT
Kings Point, 2br/2ba, 55+. Unfurnished/
furnished. Lanai, appliances. $750
monthly, annual lease includes water,
cable, recreational/ fitness facility. 813-
634-5332, 646-915-2747


613 CONDS FOR RENT
Kings Point gated adult community $725
includes water, sewage, 3 cable TVs.
pool, health club, workshops. Fully fur-
nished. 813-928-1971, 813-633-4007

630 M.H. RENTALS

For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With
A/C. 813-677-1086

2br/1 ba mobile home for rent. R & M
Mobile Home Park, Gibsonton $175
weekly, $500 deposit, electric not in-
cluded. 813-677-7509.

2br/2ba private lot. South of Gibsonton,
US 41. Call 813-927-2065

For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home near
shopping center in Gibsonton. 813-677-
8789, 813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

Mobile home for rent. 2br/1.5ba, large
lot, Ruskin area. $650 monthly, $400
deposit. 813-389-2071

645 OFFICE SPACE








We will not be underpriced!

Prices starting at
$250 per month




646 WAREHOUSE SPACE
Garage & mini storage rooms for rent.
Pirates Treasure Cove, Gibsonton.
813-677-1137






680 ADULT/CHILD CARE
In home nursing care. AM or PM, can
live-in. Salary negotiable. Kings Point
resident. 813-226-7217






705 CLEANING

Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integrity.
Call for free estimate. 7days a week.
Move-in, move-out, rentals. Insured,
bonded, licensed. Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean

Green Team
Home /office cleaning. Windows
cleaned. Pressure washing, yard
maintenance. Call Dee 813-777-1221.
Visa, MasterCard accepted.

710 LAWN CARE
Bill's Lawn Service Residential & com-
mercial. Cut, edge, trim, Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Riverview, Gibsonton. Licensed./
insured. 813-293-6840 New accounts
welcomed.

Terry's Lawn Service
Free estimates. Mowing, trimming,
edging. Home 813-634-2856, cell 813-
317-7679


S wn Care, Inc.
Professional Lawn Care Service
Residential & Commercial
Total Lawn Maintenance
Landscaping/Sod/Mulch
Landscape Maintenance
Irrigation Monitoring & Repair
FREE EST1MATES/REASONABLE RATES
813-645-7266
www.bandslawncare.com
"Your Local Lawn Care Professionals I"


710 LAWN CARE

M & C Mower Repair.
Parts & service. Authorized warranty
center. Commercial & residential. 725
14th St., Wimauma. 813-938-3226

FloraScapes
Professional maintenance company
serving all your landscaping needs.
Residential & commercial. Ruskin,
Apollo Beach, SCC, Riverview. Li-
censed/insured. 813-333-3688

714 TREE REMOVAL

Professional Tree &
Landscaping. Sales: trimming, remov-
als, popcorn curbing, stump grinding,
clearing, hauling. Fill dirt/ top soil/
rock/ mulch. We barter for items of
value. Free estimate. Call Paul 813-
634-6041 or 813-751-9691

715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service. Cul-
vert sets, driveways, shell, crushed
asphalt, concrete, fill dirt, excavating,
mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963
Free estimates.

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill dirt,
topsoil, sand, crushed rock & asphalt,
driveway culverts. Loader, backhoe,
grading, bushhog, discing. Install Sep-
tic System & drain fills. CFC#1427021.
813-645-1883

Fill-Land Clearing
Dozer & loader work, driveway & sep-
tic fill, & shell hauled. Robert Carver,
813-634-4962. Beeper 813-267-6217


APRIL 22 2010
720 HOME MAINT.
Wall & ceiling repairs.
Jones Drywall Service
Licensed & insured. Free estimates
813-645-1718 or 813-220-1008. Lic
#SCC131149657. Notary service

723 PAINTING

Quality Inside Painting
40yrs experience. Resident of SCC.
No job too small. Lowest estimate,
very dependable. Call Jim 813-642-
0466

740 MISC. SERVICES

Exum's Well Drilling
Pump sales/ repair all makes/ models.
Wells 4" & larger. Affordable prices
24hrs service. 813-645-6696 or 813-
220-4572

740 MISC. SERVICES

Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks, boat
lifts & seawalls. Free inspection. Heck-
er Construction Co. 813-236-9306

Free removal of appliances, old grills,
all metals. Daily in Sun City Center,
Ruskin, Apollo Beach. You call we haul.
813-765-1119

S&L Lawn Mower Repair
SamCook Industrial Park, 1601 US
41, Ruskin. Suite 4. Weed eaters,
pressure washers, chain saws, riding
or push mowers, go carts, mini bikes,
4 w heelers also commercial. Free
pickup & delivery. Se Habla Espanol.
813-305-6666 or Llama a memo 813-
846-1305


CALL
1 B. (813) 645-3211

DICKMAN Serving South Hillsborough
INC. County since 1924.
R E A L T www.dickmanrealty.com
Celebrating 86 Years dickman@tampabay.rr.com
1924 2010
SOUND LIKE A BROKEN RECORD?? REDUCED AGAIN, and now a recordbreaking LOW
asking price for outstanding bayfront condo at Bahia Beach. And the owner is still look-
ing for offers. 2BR 2BA with view of Tampa Bay, St Pete, sailboats, pool, dolphins, and
sunsets. Hidden but convenient retreat. $189,000. Judy Erickson 468-0288
NEW LISTING!! Well maintained 2BR/1.5BA waterfront condo with a 30' Dock will ac-
commodate sail boats and larger boats. $129,900. Call Roxanne Westbrook 748-2201 or
Kay Pye 361-3672
GREAT OPPORTUNITY!! Hwy 41 commercial industrial property. 1.43 acres with metal
building ready for your business. 2530 sq ft of work area with 3 phase power, dust col-
lection unit, 5 roll up doors, also included 3 buildings with office space, great buy priced
below appraised value. $629,900 call Kay Pye or Roxanne Westbrook.
WATERFRONT LOT! 78x100 with dock, only minutes to the bay! Great spot for your dream
home! REDUCED to $119,000. Kay Pye 361-3672 or Roxanne Westbrook 748-2201
A LITTLE SLICE OF HEAVEN! 2.21 Acre Lakefront parcel on a cul-de-sac and surrounded
by breathtaking views! Just the place for your dream home! Some restrictions apply.
$129,900. Kay Pye 361-3672 or Roxanne Westbrook 748-2201
OLDER FLORIDA CRACKER HOUSE, OWNER FINANCING! 2BR/1.5BA, enclosed Fla-Rm,
inside utility room, 2-car-carport, CHA, 4 years-new roof, new sewer! Beautiful corner lot
with oaks & fruit trees: $58,000. Call Claire Tort 363-7250
BACK ON THE MARKET Cute 2BR/1BA CB house, bright open living area, utility-rm, car-
port, newer roof, shed in backyard. Great first home or investment. A block from river.
$65,000. Call Claire Tort 363-7250
SPACIOUS 3BR/2BA CANALFRONT PROPERTY: This Triplewide Palm Harbor has high
ceilings, bright living/dining area, bay windows on waterside, and a fabulous large mod-
ern kitchen. Outside, screen porch, workshop and canal front with seawall and davits.
$150,000. Call Claire Tort 363-7250.
BEAUTIFUL PROPERTY SUN CITY CENTER. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage home
built in 1994 has been meticulously maintained with new a/c in 2006, a new roof in 2007
and much, much more. Call today to see this beautiful property which is priced to sell at
$139,500. Call Cathy Griggs 391-8653.
LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION! Oversized corner building lot within walking distance
to recreation, churches, schools and the like but on a quiet lane. Just under 3 acre and
partially cleared. Zoned Residential Single Family. Asking $67,000. Jo Ellen Mobley 645-
1540.
ALMOST ONE & ONE HALF ACRES to build that dream home and have room to spare.
Partially cleared and level with county water and sewer available. Dead-end street with
little traffic. Much potential. Asking $133,000. Jo Ellen Mobley 645-1540.
LAND 3.5 ACRES More or less on Hwy 674 or College Ave zoned AR that could possibly
be rezoned for your business. Property has two septic tanks, water and electric. NOW
REDUCED to $175,000. Call Kathy Jacobson 624-2225

CALL US FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS........645-3211
Donate your old functioning cell phones and drop off at our
office for use by the "Victims Assistance Program."


(Evening phone numbers)
Judy Erickson .................. 468-0288 Jim Grannon.......................
Claire Tort........................... 363-7250 KennAntonelli .....................
Kay Pye .............................. 361-3672 Kathy Jacobson .....................
Cathy Griggs ..................... 391-8653 Jo Ellen Mobley.....................
Christine Nethers ............ 260-6335 LaRae Regis..........................
Roxanne Westbrook............748-2201


610-3485
786-3124
624-2225
645-1540
633-8318







APRIL 22, 2010






810 MEDICAL

Dental Assistant: Good pay & excellent
benefits for expanded duties assistant
with excellent chair side skills available
in our restorative & prosthodontic prac-
tice. Duties will include chair side as-
sisting, knowledge of temporary crown
fabrication, restorative procedures &
ability to take radiographs. This position
is available in our Sun City location.
Please call Katie, Drs. Zamikoff, Kle-
ment, Jungman & Varga 813-634-33

870 GENERAL

AC installer. Great position for flexible
person who wants to learn installation &
service end of business. Some experi-
ence & good attitude necessary. Unlim-
ited growth potential for right person.
Apollo Beach Air 813-645-0381

CNAs/HHAs/Companions Sun City /
Riverview /Brandon area. Flexible, de-
pendable, with clean background. TB /
physical/ CPR, reliable transportation a
must. Comfort Keepers 813-298-0325

Rev. Harrison needs model airplane
builder to construct kit. Luftwaffe Fie-
seler Fi 156c Storech (stork) Pay $65.
813-642-0189

Local marine supply company is seeking
an energetic, detail-oriented, punctual,
and dependable Shipper to ship and
receive orders and help organize our
warehouse. 813.677.4000 or www.
DockBuilders.com/employment

Bilingual office assistant. Must have
computer knowledge & phone skills,
Part-time to full-time. Call 813-785-5359
or fax resume to 813-935-1138

HVAC Technician 2 yrs. experience
required. Clean driving record. Send
resume to 813-641-2144. Apply in
person at 608 21st. Ave., SE. Ruskin.
7am-3pm. M-F

Wanted caregiver to stay nights with
older man. SCC. Free room & food.
Can have other job. Call 813-633-6069
/765-366-3330

Now hiring. Companies desperately
need employees to assemble products
at home. No selling, any hours. $500
weekly potential. Info. 1-985-646-1700
Dept. FL-8089

How hiring HVAC Installers. Experi-
ence required, Clean driving record.
Send resume to 813-641-2144. Apply
in person at 608 21st Ave., SE, Ruskin.
7am-3pm. M-F






o KINN

ow Taking Application

for Packing House

'*hi
Behind 5th 3rd Bank

645-6431


870 GENERAL


Attention hair stylist, looking for a new
work home. Shelly's Styling Salon has a
booth for you. 813-633-3755 daytime,
813-741-3930 evenings.

Graphic Artist
Experienced in Photoshop, InDesign.
Must have layout experience, be a
team player and possess a positive
attitude. 40 hr. week. Benefits. Apply
to Brenda@observernews.net with
resume and samples of work before
April 30.

COMMUNITY PAPERS
OF FLORIDA
(CPF STATEWIDE)
CASH PAID foryour unused, unexpired
& sealed Diabetic Test Strips. Most
brands considered. Call Linda 888-973-
3729 for details! Or www.cash4diabet-
icsupplies.com ;

DIRECTV FREE Standard Installa-
tion! FREE SHOWTIME+STARZ (3
mo)! FREE HD/DVR upgrade! Ends
7/14/10. New Customers Only, Qual.
Pkgs. From $29.99/mo. DirectStarTV
1-877-217-4264

DirecTV Satellite Television Program-
ming starting at $29.99 per/mo. Free HD
and/or DVR receivers for new customers
Call Now 1-866-745-2846 Se.Habla.
Espanol

DISH Network. $19.99/mo, Why Pay
More For TV? 100+ Channels. FREE
4-Room Install. FREE HD-DVR. Plus
$650 Sign-up BONUS. Call Now! 1-866-
573-3640

Every baby deserves a healthy start.
Join more than a million people walk-
ing and raising money to support the
March of Dimes. The walk starts at
marchforbabies.org.

FREE GPS! FREE Printer! FREE MP3!
With Purchase of New computer. Pay-
ments Starting at Only $29.99/week.
No Credit Check! Call GCF Today.
1-877-212-9978

LOCALLY SERVING 40 STATES Di-
vorce $50 $300* Money Back Guar-
antee! Covers children, etc. *excludes
gov't fees 1-800-522-6000 ext. 700
Baylor & Associates, Est. 1973

PROFLOWERS Christmas Decor and
Holiday Flowers & Other Gifts starting
at $19.99. Go To www.proflowers.com/
Elf to get an EXTRA 15% OFF Or Call
1-877-697-7697!

SWIM SPA 5 models to choose from,
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closeout over 30 Vita Spas from $1395
Call 727-851-3217

VONAGE Unlimited Calls Around The
World! Call the U.S. AND 60+ Countries
for ONLY $24.99/Month 30-Day Money
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1-877-872-0079

NOW HIRING: Companies desperately
need employees to assemble products
at home. No selling, any hours. $500
weekly potential, Info. 1-985-646-1700
Dept. FL-820

NC MOUNTAIN LAND Mountain top
tract, 2.6acres, private, large public
lake 5min away, owner must sell. Only
$25,500 Call 866-275-0442


CPF STATEWIDE
Abortion Not an Option? Consider
Adoption. It's a Wonderful Choice for
an Unplanned Pregnancy. Living/Medi-
cal Expenses Paid. Loving, Financially
Secure Families Await. 1-877-341-1309
Atty Ellen Kaplan (#0875228)

ADOPTION Give Your Baby The Best
In Life! Living Expenses Paid. Many
Loving, Financially Secure Couples
Waiting. Call Jodi Rutstein, an Attorney/
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1-800-852-0041 #133050

ADOPTION 866-633-0397 Unplanned
Pregnancy? Provide your baby with
a loving, financially secure family.
Living/Medical/Counseling expenses
paid. Social worker on staff. Call
compassionate attorney Lauren Fein-
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ADOPTION 888-812-3678 All Expens-
es Paid. Choose a Loving, Financially
Secure family for your child 24 Hrs 7
Days Caring & Confidential. Attor-
ney Amy Hickman. (Lic. #832340)

AUTO ACCIDENT? INJURED / Many
Lawyers, Billboards, Websites, Solici-
tations An accident takes a minute
An injury can last a lifetime. AAA
Attorney Referral Service 1-800-733-
5342 Honest Ethical Help Florida Bar
Compliant Since 1996

*DIVORCE* BANKRUPTCY Starting
at $65 *1 Signature Divorce *Missing
Spouse Divorce "We Come to you!"
1-888-705-7221 Since1992

DUI DEFENSE CRIMINAL Many
lawyers, websites, billboards. When
your freedom & job is at stake. How
to choose DUI Defense A-A-A Attor-
ney Referral Service 1-800-733-5342
Since 1996

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOP-
TION? Talk with caring adoption expert.
You choose from families nationwide.
Living Expenses Paid. Call 24/7 Abby's
One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-
6298.

WANTED 20 Homes To showcase our
Solar Products and Lifetime Exterior
Paint. Call to see if your home qualifies.
CCC058227 1-877-292-3120

$99.95 FLORIDA CORP. $154.95
FLORIDA LLC Complete & Includes
State Fees, Company Book & Seal.
Free information packet: www.ame-
rilawyer.com or call Miami-Dade .
. (305) 854-6000 Broward .. (954)
630-9800 Tampa ... (813) 871-5400
St. Pete... (727) 442-5300 Orlando
... (407) 898-5500 Toll Free... (800)
603-3900. Spiegel & Utrera. PA. L.
Spiegel, Esq., Miami.

ALL CASH VENDING!! Do You Earn
$800 in a Day? 25 Local Machines
and Candy All For $9,995. Call 1-888-
753-3430 AIN#BO2000033 Call Us:
We Will Not Be Undersold!

AIRLINE MECHANIC Train for high
paying Aviation Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if qualified Job
placement assistance. Call Aviation In-
stitute of Maintenance 866-314-6283.

AVIATION MAINTENANCE/AVIONICS
Graduate in 14 Months. FAAApproved;
financial aid if qualified. Job placement
assistance. Call National Aviation
Academy Today! 1-800-659-2080 or
NAA.edu


HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate
in just 4 weeks!!!! Free Brochure. Call
Now! 1-800-532-6546 ext. 16 www.
Scontinentalacademy.com ;


BURIED IN CREDIT CARD DEBT Over
$10,000. We can save you thousands of
dollars. Call Credit Card Relief for your
Free Consultation: 1-866-640-3315

Commercial Bridge Loans! $200,000
- $10,000,000. Direct Lenders. "Low-
est rates/Best terms." Brokers fully
Protected and respected. "Since 1985"
call 917-733-3877

Pharm/Med/B2B Sales Reps! Earn up
to $60k/yr + bonus! No Exp OK! Paid
Training! FT/PT Benefits avail! Hiring/
Placing Now! 866-807-5191 ext. 106

TOO MANY BILLS!!!! "Too Many Credit
Cards" Are you in financial distress??
Call A.D.S. we can help Immediately!!!
No need for bankruptcy. Call: 1-888-
790-4660 www.mydebtfree.com;
Member BBB.

We buy structured settlements, insur-
ance annuities and lawsuit settlement
payments. Why wait? Call 123 Lump-
sum Today!!! 1-877-966-8669


CPF STATEWIDE
Ashley Furniture up to 70% Off. No
Credit Check. $10,000 Credit Line.
Huge Showroom Delivery Every-
where Tampa Discount Furniture And
Mattress Outlet.com 813-978-3900

Boats; 1000's of boats for sale www.
floridamariner.com ; reaching 6 million
homesweekly throughout Florida. 800-
388-9307, tide charts, broker profiles,
fishing captains, dockside dining and
more.

Need Sod? St. Augustine $100 Bahia
$69 per pallet. Delivery and Installation
Available. Free Estimates 1-888-99-OB-
Sod or place your order online at www.
OBGarden.com ;

ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed Im-
mediately for upcoming roles $150-$300
per day depending on job requirements.
No experience, All looks needed. 1-800-
349-2060 for casting/locations

ASSEMBLE MAGNETS & CRAFTS from
Home! Year-round Work! Excellent Pay!
No Experience! Top US Company! Glue
Gun, Painting, Jewelry, More! Toll Free
1-866-844-5091

ATTENTION!! Home Computer Work.
Flexible hours, great pay, will train.
Apply on-line www.ktpglobal.com ; 800-
330-8446

Bartenders in Demand. No Experience
Necessary. Meet New People, Take
Home Cash Tips. Up to $200 per shift.
Training, Placement and Certification
Provided. Call 877-435-2244

$$ EARN EXTRA INCOME $$ Working
from home. $5.00 for every envelope
Processed with our sales brochures.
Guaranteed!! Free Information. 1-800-
210-2686 or visit: www.funsimplework.
com

Earn up to $150 per day. Under cover
Shoppers needed to judge retail and
dining establishments Exp Not Re. Call
1-888-601-4861

Government Jobs $12-$48/hr. Full-
Benefits/Paid Training. Work available
in areas like Homeland Security, Law
Enforcement, Wildlife & more! 1-800-
858-0701 ext. 2002

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra
Income Assembling CD cases from
home! No Experience Necessary. Call
our Live Operators for more informa-
tion! 1-800-267-3944 Ext 2536. www.
easywork-greatpay.com ;

Local Reliable Typist Needed Im-
mediately. $400+ Part-time, $800+
Full-time Weekly. Flexible schedule.
Type on your own computer, training
provided. 1-800-341-2673


THE SHOPPER 25

CPF STATEWIDE
Donate your Car Truck or Boat to
HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND Free
3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible,
Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken
Care Of. 1-866-905-3801

GEORGIA CENTRAL, 72 AC $1,075/
ACRE. Planted pine, Ulcohatchee Creek,
paved road frontage w/power. 478-987-9700
stregispaper.com St. Regis Paper Co.

GEORGIA LAND & HOMESITES Beautiful
country subd.just off US1. Great investment!
MH's welcome. Half acre tracts starting $75/
month & up. Others available. Owner Financ-
ing 912-585-2174; 912-526-9964

GEORGIA LAND & HOMESITES County
approved, incredible investment, acre to
20acres starting @ $3750/acre. Beautiful
weather. Washington County near Augusta.
Low taxes. Owner financing from $199/mo.
Hablo Espanol, 706-364-4200

GOVT & BANK FORECLOSURES! Day-
tona Beach, FL. SFR 2-Bedroom, 1-Bath.
$11,850 & Fort Lauderdale, FL. Condo
2-Bedroom, 2-Bath. $9,850 Call: 1-800-821-
3573 Visit: www.rebuildus.com ;

MIDDLE GEORGIA LAND Terrific hunting,
beautiful scenery, great bargain, smallest tract
150acres & up. Jones & Baldwin Counties.
Suitable for conservation easement, Starting
$2300/acre. Call Owner 404-580-7870

NC MOUNTAINS BEST LAND BUY! 2.5acre
homesite. Spectacular view. High altitude.
Easily accessible, secluded. Bryson City.
Owner financing. $45,000. Call owner:
1-800-810-1590. www.wildcatknob.com ;

NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS Mild 4
Seasons! E-Z to finish log cabin shell, w/ loft,
includes 1.1acres $99,900. Mountain & water-
front homesites $29,000-$99,000. E-Z Bank
Financing! 828-247-9966 (Code 41)

ST. LUCIE COUNTY Fort Pierce, 8.5 acres
or 32 lots, zoned R4, near 95/Orange Ave.
1.5 miles near Flying J. $50,000/acre, owner
financing. 772-453-8888

TENN. MOUNTAINS 5 Acres, beautiful
building site w/woods atop the Cumberland
Plateau. Hunt, fish. Only 30mins. from
Monterey. Reduced to $14,500. Owner
Financing 931-839-6141

TURN YOUR UNWANTED TIMESHARE
INTO CASH! No Commissions/Brokers
Fees. Buyer pays All closing costs.
Timeshare Clearinghouse 888-595-3547
FREETIMESHAREVALUES.COM

Increase Male Size. Gain 1-3 inches Per-
manently. FDA Medical Vacuum Pumps,
Testosterone, Viagra, Cialis. Free Brochures
619-294-7777 www.DrJoelKaplan.com

Donate Vehicle Receive $1000 Grocery
Coupon Noah's Arc Support No Kill Shelters,
Research to Advance Veterinary Treatments
Free Towing, Tax Deductible, Non-Runners
Accepted 1-866-912-GIVE


NAN

WIT NOMOEY OWN!


A community of affordable homes
exclusively for first-time homebuyers!

FLORIDA HOME PARTNERSHIP
(813) 672- 7889 www.flhome.org


* Phase III Now Available!
* 2 Swimming Pools and a Clubhouse
* 3, 4 and 5 Bedrooms, 1 and 2 Garages
* Popular Ruskin Location
* USDA Self-Help Housing program -- help
build your home in exchange for a down
payment
* No money down, easy to qualify
* Non-profit agency works for you
~Hablamos Espafiol ~




BAYOUPASS


EMPLOYERS...

Do you have a

position available?
Run your "Help Wanted"
ad FREE in The Shopper
to find just the right fit for

your business.
Place your 20-word ad weekly until
the position is filled or this promotion
ends. Reach thousands of readers in South
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must be resubmitted each week by the Monday, 4:00
p.m. deadline and are subject to review and space
available.

Call Beverly at 645-3111 x201


( -


HILLSBOROUGH
Community College Ho


Hillsborough Community College seeks qualified applicants
to apply for adjunct (part-time) Mathematics Instructor teaching
positions with the SouthShore Campus (Ruskin) of Hillsborough
Community College. The positions require at least (1) a Master's
degree in Mathematics or (2) a Master's degree with at least 18
graduate semester hours in Mathematics or Statistics.

See the College's Jobs website https://jobs.hccfl.edu/ to
complete the two-step application process: (1) complete and
save your online application and (2) submit an application (and
attached documents) to be considered. See the Supplemental
Information and Additional Documents Required information
on the HCC advertisement for the position for information
concerning (1) submission of copies of graduate transcripts and
(2) foreign transcript evaluation.

Hillsborough Community College is an Equal Opportunity Employer and
encourages diversity in all areas of the campus community.


I









BUSINESS & TRADE DIRECTORY
THE OBSERVER NEWS THE SCC OBSERVER THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT

AC REPAIR/SALES AC REPAIR/SALES AC REPAIR/SALES AC REPAIR/SALES BAIL:BONDS


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a a















-'imothy Sutton, LC
INTERIOR EXTERIOR
PAINTING
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Home/Fax: (813) 642-9040
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CBC 1252135 Insured Bonded

Your ad could be here!
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page, as well as in our
"click and flip" online
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our office today for pricing
and information
813-645-3111.


www.ObserverNews.net



s A&J
Hares
ence Plumbing
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PLUMBING ROFINSROFIN ROF INSORG


PAUL WOOD PLUMBING, INC.
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WINDOWCLEANIN


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IRos IR Ie-la o


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OFFICE 813-333-6320
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SERVING SINCE 1973
Ruskin Sun City Center Kings
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Ruskin&
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M f ChamberMember

P.O. Box 551 Ruskin, FL 33570
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Bonded & Insured Lic. #CCC1326907





*No project over $1000. No
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FOR EXTRA
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the Joy of
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Lic. #CMC056816
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~ f" ra Senior& Military
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Wilhelm Hourv

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SELF ARREST BONDS
COURT DATES 664-0056
WARRANT CHECKS
BIG JOHN'S
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1.
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No Hassle Pricing 25 Years Experience
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Need Work Done
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UI


__ ._ Save 10% on

web advertising
Call your advertising
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26 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


APRIL 22, 2010


CTHADYMA


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 27


~72kentelligent C


2011 SONATA


All New &
Redesigned!


LEASE
FOR


#27403


9


With An Unsurpassed
Amount Of Standard
Safety Features
36
MONTH
LEASEt


Come See Why
Thousands of Local
Drivers Are Switching
To Hyundai


.V


2010 SONATA


APR
for 72 Mos


2010 SANTA FE


38-.,


1 m


$14,987


S---_17.990


2010
ELANTRA
Bev I idlie
In IIl Cl(7 %


2010
TUCSON
431 -Avg


LE S11 24


All New &
Redesigned!


______- a -
"EFOR 36
MONTH
O9 LEASEt


2010 ELANTRA Touring
~-


2010 GENESIS Coupe
[=M w 1HV


Affordable & Fuel Efficient Most Interior Room In Its Class
ALE$9,987 L 23924
MONTH
$23 LEASE'


'W gwljPrulaatanrtee)
wiglugi


2010 GENESIS
r 21


Revolution In Design, Performance & Value Performance, Technology, Safety & Quality
FORLE 9 36 OR 36
LU MONTH MONTH
$25 LEASE' 399 LEASEt


We will beat any
other Hyundai
dealer or pay you


sa toJ*


All prices are plus tax, tag and $599 dealer fee and are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives.t Lease down payment requirement: '10 Elantra- $2499, Elantra Touring $1999, Genesis Coupe $2199, '11 Sonata $2399,'10 Tucson -
$2499, '10 Genesis Sedan $3499. All offers are with approved credit and some cannot be combined. O 0% apr available on 2010 Sonata. *Expected range for most drivers, your actual mileage may vary depending on how you drive and maintain your vehicle. ** On the Accent. As listed on
Monroney sticker. A Based on 10 highest volume manufacturers, EPA Light-DutyAutomotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975-2009. Photos are for illustration purposes only. tt Must present signed buyers order from accredited Hyundai Dealer on
model & eauiwment. Photos me.. for illustration wurvoses cuts, Advertised vehicles subiec.t to vrior sale. Promams subiect to chanue withot noice


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2010 ACCENT


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APRIL 22, 2010


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28 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


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$25 OFF Any Repair


and


"CAC1813763
"We don't charge to show up!"


(813) 645-0381


Lennox knows you don't compromise. And neither do we.
That's why we dedicate ourselves to product innovation
and customer service. So go ahead, get comfortable.

LENNOX)
HOME COMFORT SYSTEMS
Innovation never felt so good."


CAC1813763 Offr expires 6/3/2010 *Rebate offer is valid only with the purchase of qualifying Lennox products. *See dealer for details and visit www.energystar.gov for more information on the credit guidelines and list of qualifying heating and cooling equipment
*See dealer for details. 2010 Lennox Industries Inc. See your participating Lennox dealer for details. Lennox dealers include independently owned and operated businesses.


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$19.95 18-Point Check-Up


APRIL 22, 2010


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