Title: Observer news
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102144/00009
 Material Information
Title: Observer news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: M&M Printing Co., Inc
Place of Publication: Ruskin, FL
Publication Date: March 18, 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102144
Volume ID: VID00009
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text



Sat Sun City Center FunFest
r Sat., March 20 9 AM to 3 PM

N. Pebble Beach Blvd. PR..STD


PAID
RUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570
PERMIT NO. 8


The Navy Band Pr Lyke's Gaslight Par.
The Navy Band.rie~ o


U.S. Navy rocks out for Tampa
SBy MITCH TRAPHAGEN At noon, "Pride" will give a free
mitch@observernews.net concert at Channelside, along with
AMPA The city of Tampa free tours of a U.S. Coast Guard
has declared March 15-21 Tam- vessel. At 5 p.m., Vice Admiral
pa Navy Week in a ceremony on Samuel Locklear will moderate a
Monday that included a live out- forum at the University of South
door concert from the Navy band Florida on how the U.S. Navy has
"Pride." evolved since World War II. Also
Tampa is one of 20 cities across at 5 p.m., "Bowling for Sailors"
the nation chosen to host Navy
Week this year. The event began
on March 12 with tours of the SS
American Victory and the swear-
ing in of new recruits.
"This is a way for people to learn
how the Navy works and to see
where their tax dollars are going,"
said Lt. Dave Hecht, field officer
for the Navy Office of Community ; .
Outreach.
Navy Week is a community out-
reach effort by the U.S. Navy in-
volving a wide variety of activities
throughout the area. Crew from
the USS Florida, a guided mis- l
sile submarine, some of whom are
Tampa Bay natives, were on hand
throughout the week in schools The Navy Band "Pride" rocks out
and other venues for everything Tampa's Lyke's Gaslight Park. Pi
from cooking to parachute demon- Brooke Knight on vocals and gui
stations and activities with Navy and Ben Stewert on percussion.
Seals and divers. The week ends
with aerial performances from the Trips Worth Taking:
Blue Angels during the MacDill
Airfest on Saturday and Sunday. T ffany o in
The events are designed to pro- Tiffany oriE ina
vide an opportunity for the public
to meet and get acquainted with By WARREN RESEN
Navy service members. w630@aol.com
Public events on Thursday in- Member of Florida Outdoor Writers Assn.
clude sailors volunteering at a WIJINTER PARK The name
Habitat for Humanity home in W is magical. Who wouldn't be
Tampa and a parachute demonstra- pleased to have a Tiffany lamp
tion into Steinbrenner Field by the prominently displayed in one's
Leap Frogs during a spring train- home? Or perhaps one of his mag-
ing game. nificent leaded glass windows
On Friday, crew members from with the sun streaming through it
the USS Florida will be on hand during the day? Of course it would
during the Tampa Downtown also have to be suitably lit at night
Market from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for a passersby to appreciate.


Navy Week
will take place at Splitsville Lanes
at Channelside.
Admission is free for the Mac-
Dill Airfest, gates open at 8 a.m.


Tribute to an era

is subject of variance hearing

E Bv/PMELODi -Lt 1ES.ON
niih'.'-:.l:'.: .r err, .*i c l. e -ln! I .
G I lBS()NTI N -i I ,,IF F. : i ii i !i Ii l!!i. 1' !!C-ii~ii I ic II C ,iC 'CliC i,_' C






Ccl I.iiG e.1ill s dkIn r 'I fIid.' I rom n- The Gnt's







so r structures succoh as the lcomemoria complex A ton" d dent
signage, say spokespersons for both groups. Plus,

CCG currently is seeking a variance from coun- The_ !ant's m p ,
ty authorities that would reduce the setback to 25 s at s
feet from the 50 feet normally required for acces- h greeted visi-




sory structures such as the memorial complex. A tars and residents
hearing on the petition, originally scheduled for enter Gibsonton
March 26, has been reset for April 23, accord- for many years.


oom Saturday ana Sunaay.
For more information and a See TRIBUTE TO AN ERA, pag
complete schedule of Navy Week
events, visit www.navyweek.org/ left-brain?
tampa2010. Right-brain, left-brain?
STalented couple mixes arts and administration


during a free concert in downtown
ctured are Sean Meyer on vocals,
tar, Gene Register on Keyboards,


* By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews. net
OUTH COUNTY Actors
from all over the area come
together in plays, musicals, dinner
theaters and more both for the love
of the performing arts and to en-
tertain (and often raise money for)
friends, neighbors, charities and
families down on their luck.
Many a good cause in South
County has been funded by tickets
to see stage productions and eat
great food.
Bill Turcotte, the newly-elected
president of the Pelican Players,
and his wife Diane who recently
wrote her first play, want to bring
the various theatrical groups in the


re 13


area closer together (which makes
perfect sense) since they belong to
several of them.
They also want the Pelican Play-
ers to become more involved with
the South Shore Arts Council, Bill
said.
This pleases the Council's board
president, Chuck Wirick, who is
also interested in bringing South
County's arts community together.
"During the recent past, the South
Shore Arts Council has had an em-
phasis on the visual arts (painters,
sculptors, photographers, etc.) and
now we're trying to broaden our
appeal to go back to the way it was
See THE ARTS, page 18


ils displayed within a short drive


While this is only a dream for
most of us, the works of Louis
Comfort Tiffany can be appreci-
ated by all in nearby Winter Park,
Florida, at The Charles Hosmer
Morse Museum of American Art.
The museum houses the most
comprehensive collection of Louis
Comfort Tiffany in the world and
it is less than a day's drive for most
Floridians.
The vast collection includes Tif-
fany jewelry, pottery, paintings,


art glass, leaded-glass windows,
lamps and the magnificent interior
chapel he designed for the 1893
World's Columbian Exposition in
Chicago. It's worth the trip just to
view this chapel which was even-
tually installed in his Long Island,
NY, mansion before finding its
way to Winter Park. The story of
its tortuous journey to Florida is
truly fascinating.
Public perception of Tiffany and
See TIFFANY, page 16


"Tulip Table Lamp"
by Louis Comfort
Tiffany.
The Morse Museum
houses many of
Tiffany's creations
and is only a short
drive from South
County.


::.,:-:i ,: red by Ruskin-SouthShore
-'!- :,I r- I:>er of Commerce
Thurs., March 18 4 to 8 p.m.
at MiraBay Villages
U.S. Hwy. 41 Apollo Beach


March 18, 2010
Volume 54
Number 8


THE OBSERVER NEWS


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2 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

-'b]
, r. ;
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r _____________________


MARCH 18, 2010


Feeling Sticky, stuffy,

or cold and clammy

in your own home?


UI


Attend Our Seminar In The Banquet Room
At The Sun City Center Chamber of Commerce
(1651 Sun City Center Plaza, Sun City Center, FL 33573)


Save Energy Don't Over-Cool Your Home Eliminate Dust Mites
Learn How To Protect Your Home!


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MARCH 18, 2010
Dr. Robert Valins can help


Why do people suffer for
months or years from heel pain
when they don't have to?
It's a question we've asked our-
selves many many times. At Total
Foot and Ankle of Tampa Bay we
see people every day who come
to us because they just woke up
one morning with a sharp stabbing
pain in their heels that lessened or
increased as the day wore on. Their
continuing pain is often not quite
as severe as that first morning, but
they now know that something
just isn't right with their feet. They
continue to live with it (and the
occasional flare-ups) hoping that it
will go away in time and yet it just
doesn't. Why would they live with
this kind of pain and limitation?
We have a confession to make
After all these years we still don't
know why people continue to live
with Heel Pain and the limitations
on their lifestyle that it imposes.
Heel pain can be cured.
That's right. Ninety-five percent
of people who experience heel
pain can be cured with simple con-
servative treatments.
We believe there are three big
reasons why people try to live with
pain in their feet.
*They don't know that it can be
cured. Eliminated. Ended. People
think that since they use their feet
so much, that they must have to
hurt at least a little bit. But this
is just plain wrong because the
natural lifetime state of your feet
should be pain-free.
They hope it will go away
naturally. It won't. The underlying
cause of heel pain must be treated
and resolved. All that will hap-


pen is that the pain will continue
to grow until it is so bad that the
person finally seeks treatment.
You just can't put this one off and
delaying it only makes treating it
more difficult.
They are worried about sur-
gery, time off work, cost. Here's
the great news. Ninety-five per-
cent of all heel pain cases can be
treated without surgery, using sim-
ple treatments and therapies and
no time off from work.
One out of every four Ameri-
cans will experience heel pain in
their lifetime!
That's right, heel pain is very,
very common. We see it every day.
Nothing is more precious than
having healthy happy feet that can
carry you everywhere you wish to
go. There are many reasons why
the number of heel pain cases is
increasing so dramatically. Here
are two:
Our active healthy lifestyles
We hate to be the ones to break
the news to you, but your active
lifestyle may be one of the reasons
you're experiencing this pain.
When we walk, run, play golf or
participate in other sports we re-
ally use our feet and legs. We par-
ticipate in some of these activities
on hard unnatural surfaces like
concrete or asphalt. As we actively
move we can cause damage to our
feet and ankles. This damage can
often be prevented with the right
kind of stretching and warm up
activities, but quite often we don't
take the time and we begin to ex-
perience pain. In some cases sharp
stabbing pain. The good news is
that the damage can be repaired


and full activity can resume and
we can teach you how to prepare
for physical activity and minimize
any further damage.
Our work requires us to use
our feet extensively
Many of us have jobs that require
us to be on our feet and work-
ing. Nurses, waiters, construction
workers, delivery workers, teach-
ers, just about all working persons
spend a lot of time on their feet.
Often the motions that we employ
to complete our work can put un-
due stress on our feet and we soon
find ourselves struggling with pain
in our heels and arches. And just
as in sports we are usually work-
ing on hard unnatural surfaces.
End heal pain suffering
No one has to suffer from heel
pain. Armed with important facts
you can easily make the choice
to end your suffering quickly and
return to your active, healthy life-
style. With the treatment options
we now have, you can expect in
ninety-five percent of the cases to
miss no work at all as we solve this
problem together.
For more information about heel
pain or other foot and ankle prob-
lems visit our website at Total-
FootAndAnkle-TampaBay.com or
call the Sun City Center office of
Dr. Robert Valins and Dr. Nathan
Penney at 813- 633-5900.


YOew Reeaeealie: husdy PM
*eUi tRJ~~~ 56 WE LY CMMUI T i lbA IrYkNES SOUR:t


We


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 3
Financial advisor expands practice
Diana Miller, a local Financial
Advisor practicing for 30 years, has
a lot of experience and expertise to
offer, and is presently pursuing a cli-
ent base in Florida.
Until her move to Sun City Cen-
ter, Miller had been working on the
West Coast, and has hundreds of cli-
ents there that she still does planning
for. Observing that in this difficult
economy perhaps she can provide
assistance here as well, Miller states
that her decision to expand her prac-
tice, at this time, is based on her per-
ception that people are searching for DIANA MILLER,
a plan that can work for them now.
Miller can be reached at (813) 956-8500. Email her at grtplnner@
hotmail.com

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month
According to the American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer is the
second leading cause of cancer death. Fortunately, colorectal cancer is
also preventable and highly treatable. That is why it is so important to be
tested for colorectal cancer.
If you are 50 years old or older, you should be tested, especially if you
are at high risk. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include age, family
history and race. Other risk factors include smoking, alcohol consump-
tion, obesity, physical inactivity and diet.
To learn more about colorectal cancer, how to lower your risk and
screening recommendations, you can attend a free seminar hosted by
South Bay Hospital called "No One Should Die from Colon Cancer".
This seminar presented by Colorectal Surgeon, Craig Amshel, MD will
be held on Friday, March 19, from 12:30pm to 1:30pm. For more infor-
mation, or to make a reservation for the free seminar, call 1-877-442-
2362.

Research military records
The next meeting of the Manasota Genealogical Society will be
held on Tuesday, April 6, from 9:30 am-noon at the Central Public
Library. The guest speaker will be Bryan Mulcahy, Reference Li-
brarian, Fort Myers-Lee County Library. His talk is entitled: "Re-
searching Military Records: the French & Indian War (1754-1763)
through World War II."
Following the guest speaker, the Computer Special Interest Group
will meet and is open to all who are interested in learning what's new
in genealogy on the Internet.
For more information, call Jean Morris at (941) 722-5156 or visit
us on the web at: http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/-flmgs/


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4 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Positive Talk But he's always the customer


by William Hodges


Because of the current econo-
my, it's an extremely competi-
tive retail market. In many cases,
major retailers are reducing their
prices and cars are being offered
with no interest financing. The
war to gain new customers is on,
and is being waged in earnest.
Some companies, however, have
recognized it is easier to keep
a customer than it is to get new
ones; they have policies in place
that recognize the customer might
not always be right-but he is al-
ways the customer.
While standing at the return
desk of a major retailer waiting to
be served, I had the opportunity
to watch the customer service
representative handle a number of
transactions. She remained cheer-
ful, courteous and made refunds
with little or no question as to why
the products were being returned.
In two instances, in particular, I
was amazed that the store would
give money back on the items
presented. In the first instance, it
was a pair of shoes which had ob-
viously been worn for some time.
The customer, claimed that they
had been worn for only two weeks
and had deteriorated prematurely.
Even from where I stood, I could


see the fallacy in that. The clerk
just smiled, said, "Yes Ma'am,"
and made the refund. In the sec-
ond instance, it was a hunting
rifle being returned two days after
the close of hunting season. The
customer said that the rifle didn't
shoot straight. It was a little hard
for me to determine whether or
not he was telling the truth, but it
was not hard to see why he didn't
need the rifle until next hunting
season. I have a feeling that the
rifle was not the only thing that
wasn't a straight shooter. Again,
the clerk smiled and refunded
the money. In both instances, she
apologized to the customers for
any inconvenience the product
had caused and thanked them for
their business.
To my mind, both of these cus-
tomers abused a very good retailer.
I asked the customer service rep-
resentative why she allowed them
to get away with such fabrications.
She said it was her company's pol-
icy to ensure that every customer
be treated with courtesy, and that
complete satisfaction was their
goal. If this meant certain custom-
ers would abuse the system, so be
it. I guess she was right, because
I now have complete confidence
that if I buy something from this
retailer, it will do what they say
it will do. If it doesn't, or I per-
ceive that it doesn't, I also know
that I, being the customer, will al-
ways be right. This retailer could
not have run any kind of ad that
would convince me any more of
the company's integrity than the
few dollars they spent in taking
the products back from those less-
than-honorable patrons. Maybe
more businesses should follow
their lead and realize that the cus-
tomer is their lifeblood. Though


he may not always be right, he is
always the customer.
Hodges is a nationally recog-
nized speaker, trainer, and syn-
dicated columnist. Hodges may


be reached at Hodges Seminars
International, PO. Box 89033,
Tampa, FL 33689-0400. Phone
813-641-0816. Web site: http://
www.BillHodges.com.


Knowledge is power
Credit cards all too often dig consumers even deeper into debt. But
sweeping changes to the credit card laws went into effect Feb. 22 that
will benefit credit card users.
Among the adopted practices that will benefit credit card uses are:
Monthly credit bills must include information on how long it will take
to pay off the balance if card holders only make minimum payments;
Credit card companies must give a 45-day written notice before in-
creasing interest rates, annual fees, or making other changes to the card
agreement; and
If card holders make more than the minimum monthly payment, the
excess amount must be applied to the balance with the highest interest
rate.
Log onto Hillsborough County's Consumer Protection Agency Web
site at www.hillsboroughcounty.org/consumerprotection to find out
more about the new credit card laws and how they affect card holders.
Take advantage of the wide range of tools to help everyone become an
educated consumer.
Calling all for teenage bands
The search is beginning for talented teen musicians to compete in the 13th
Annual Teenage Battle of the Bands hosted by the Hillsborough County
Parks, Recreation and Conservation Department (PRC). The event is usually
held in early November at the Hillsborough County Fair.
A list of bands interested in competing in the 2010 event is being estab-
lished now. A limited number of bands will be accepted and members must
be between 13 and 20 years of age.The bands are judged on guitars, drums,
vocals, showmanship, originality and preparation.
Last year's winner Rising Down utilized the first place prize of studio time
to cut a three-song demo CD at Morristown Studios.
The Fair is located at 4810 E. State Road 60 in Dover, five miles east of
Brandon at the intersection of Sidney-Washer Road and Highway 60.
Contact Joe Soletti, Parks, Recreation and Conservation Department, at
(813) 376-5778 to sign up.

DAMON C. GLISSON, ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Probate and Estate Planning Home Visits
Wills Medicaid Planning Divorce
SPersonalInjury WrongfulDeath


5908 FORTUNE PLACE
APOLLO BEACH, FL 33572
www.Glissonl.com

(813) 645-6796


The hiring of alawyeris an important decision that
Should not be based solely on advertisement. Beforeyou
decide, ask us to send you FREE written information
about our qualifications and experience.


MARCH 18, 2010


THE OBSERVER NEWS
THE SCC OBSERVER
THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT

210 Woodland Estates S.W.
Ruskin, FL 33570
813-645-3111
FAX 813-6454118
www.observernews.net
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
BY M & M PRINTING CO. INC.
EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT
Brenda Knowles Publisher/Editor
Brenda@observernews.net
Penny Fletcher Contributing Writer
Penny@observernews.net
Melody Jameson Contributing Writer
Melody@observernews.net
Mitch Traphagen Online Editor
Traphagen@obseerenews.net
Julie Ball Contributing Writer
SALES DEPARTMENT
Vilma Stillwell DisplyAdvertisingMgr.
Vilma@observernews.net
Nan Kirk DisplayAdvertisingRep.
Nan@observerews.net
CLASSIFIED/CIRCULATION DEPT.
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Beverly@observernews.net
PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT
Betty Morrow Prod Mgr/LyoutArtis
News@observernews.net
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Chere@observernews.net
Sue Sloan Composition/Layout
Sue@observernews.net
NOTE: All press releases or news
articles should be emailed to
news@observemews.net or faxed to
813-645-4118 or mailed to
210 Woodland Estates Ave.
M &M PRINTING CO. INC. 2010
siidiisi


Calling all seniors
Seniors are invited to a free pre-
sentation on the "Common Myths
of Identity Theft" March 22 from
11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the meeting
room at Denny's Restaurant, 3747
Sun City Center Blvd.
A guest speaker from Pre-Paid
Legal Services, Inc., will follow.
Arrive on time if you plan to buy
lunch. Call Sunnie Planthold at
(813) 600-3360 to reserve your
seat.


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Have something you would like
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210 Woodland Estates S.W., Ruskin 33570
FAX 645-4118
News@ObserverNews.net






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 5


rmm.w uy t mmmmmn umas
Rear Row, L-R: Grace Bibisi-Leading Knight, Carol De Costa, PER ENF Chairman and Mrs. Weer-
Teacher. Front Row, L-R: Cole Barrentine, Ashley Kelley, Bryce Vinh, Edward Tarrant, Mackenzie Tichy,
Shannon Cox, Noah Statham, and Amanda Frye.
South Hillsborough Elk's Lodge #2672 donates dictionaries
The South Hillsborough Elk's Lodge #2672 presented 50 dictionaries to the Ruskin Christian School on
Monday, March 1. Grace Bibisi and Carol DeCosta co-chairmen of the project were pleased to represent the
Elks and their mission statement, Elks Care Elks Share.


C-BUG receives $4,450 grant
The Cockroach Bay Users Group contact C-BUG. This project has
(C-BUG) has received a $4045 the potential to provide education-
grant for its unique "Keep the Wa- al outreach to more than 92,000
ters Clean" project. This grant was annual visitors.
awarded by the Alafia River and C-BUG is a nationally recog-
Hillsborough River Basin Boards nized nonprofit all-volunteer or-
of the Southwest Florida Water ganization serving the needs of
Management District. The project the greater southeastern shore of
will discourage the public from Tampa Bay since 1995. It focuses
discarding fishing materials into on increasing boat ramp locations
the surrounding waters, provide and protecting seagrass and graz-
the public with an easily under- ing manatees from unnecessary
stood and remembered method boat travel. It advocates and prac-
for collecting such material and tices responsible "Environmental
develop partnerships with com- CPR" (Conservation, Preservation
mercial organizations to focus on and Restoration).
recycling their empty containers. Large or small donations to cov-
Educational posters will be dis- er printing of a new South Shore
played at various boat launch Nature Boating Guide may be sent
ramps in conjunction with the to P. O. Box 5991, Sun City Cen-
Hillsborough County Parks and ter, FL 33573, or directly to RBC
Recreation Department. A me- Bank 112 S. Pebble Beach Blvd,
dia campaign will focus on using Sun City Center, FL 33573. In
recycled containers (potato chip either case, be sure to make your
tubes, butter tubs, etc.) for col- check payable to C-BUG to ensure
election of used monofilament and a tax deduction. Do not send cash.
similar discarded materials used For more details contact Charlie
in boats, on piers and shore areas. Feldsehau at 813-785-5086 (cell)
School students who would like or cfcldschau(4)tampabay.rr.com.
to help should have their teachers


Hillsborough County Budget Blog asks Question of the Week FWC is looking for lady anglers


Hillsborough County has added
a new blog question to spark dis-
cussion on developing the Fiscal
Year 2011 Budget:
If you were selected as a special
budgetary advisor to County Ad-
ministrator, what would be your
most important budgetary recom-
mendation?
County residents can join the
discussion at http://hillsboroughfl.
blogspot.com/
During the budget public hear-
ings last year, County residents
showed up in mass to voice their
opinions. This year, County resi-
dents are just one click away from
letting their voices be heard.
To find out details on the FY 11
budget, go to the County's Web
page (www.hillsboroughcounty.


org) and click the megaphone
graphic to go straight to all things
budget. Residents will even be
able to watch the budget hearings
and workshops live or prior meet-
ings on demand.
All public comments, no mat-
ter through which form, will be
sent to County management and
budget staff and County Commis-
sioners for consideration in devel-
oping the recommended budget.
This recommended budget will be
delivered to the County Commis-
sioners from the County Adminis-
trator on June 3.
After that time, County Com-
missioners will discuss efficien-
cies and possible reductions until
the September 23 Budget Public
Hearing when the final FY 11


Budget will be adopted.
Hillsborough County is offering
multiple social media opportuni-
ties for residents to be more en-
gaged in the discussions concern-
ing their county government:
become a Fan of Hillsborough
County on Facebook (www.face-
book.com/HillsboroughFL/);
become a Follower on Twitter
(http ://twitter. com/Hillsborough-
FL);
join the discussion on Blog
posts (http://hillsboroughfl.blog-
spot.com/);
email (hcbudget@hillsbor-
oughcounty.org); and
voicemail or text message bud-
get concerns to 813-704-0181.


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
is looking for a few good ladies
- lady anglers, that is. The FWC
invites all women who want to
learn more about saltwater fishing
to register for the "Ladies, Let's
Go Fishing!" event in Naples on
March 19-21.
The "Ladies, Let's Go Fishing!"
program is fondly referred to as
the "No-Yelling School of Fish-
ing" and offers a full weekend of
educational fishing activities for
women to acquire or fine-tune their
fishing skills, learn about habitat
conservation and enjoy meeting
other female anglers.
The FWC will help educate par-


ticipants on the importance of ma-
rine conservation by showing hab-
its that can be developed to help
you make a difference, no matter
where you fish. Women will learn
safe hook-removal, release tech-
niques and much more.
The program will begin Friday,
March 19, at 6 p.m. with a social
get-together at the Naples Harbour
Yacht Club. Saturday's events be-
gin at 8 a.m. with classroom pre-
sentations followed by lunch and
hands-on fishing skills. An option-
al Sunday fishing adventure is also
part of the plan.
Visit www.ladiesletsgofishing.
com for registration and rate infor-
mation.


How exercise can help

more than just your figure-,
EDUCATIONAL SEMINAR
Tuesday, March 23 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Marsha Bell, Physical Therapist, will provide a hands-on
demonstration of exercises.
Connie Felton, LCSW, will be discussing the mental
health benefits of regular exercise.
Everyone Welcome! FREE admission and door prize!
Wine and cheese will be served!
Sun City Center Community Association
The Florida Room in the Atrium Building
1009 N. Pebble Beach Blvd. Sun City Center, FL
Sponsored by: The Coalition for Mental Health & Aging



The Golf Club at Cypress Creek
1011 Cypress Village Blvd. Ruskin
FULL SERVICE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
"Don'tjust go out to eat..come and dine at Cypress Creek"
CRAZY *8 SPECIALS T-. 4 pm.


Nol' Taiking

Reseralion s.
Call "* '


Happy Hour 3-7 Every Day
Check our Lounge Menu
Serving Tuesday Sunday 11 a.m. to close


MARCH
DINNER SPECIALS
Tues.-Sun. 4-8p.m.
Tues: Liver & Onions...........999
Wed: Homestyle Night ..... $999
Thur: Chicken Marsala... 109
Fri: Linguine w/Clam Sauce... 12"
Sat: Steak Night............... s139
Sun: Prime Rib................ $129
Restaurant Closed Mondays


GOLF $10 O ff Call for your tee time right now.
sp- 711 813-634-8888
I Good for each player, Coupon good for regular priced rounds of golf, before 1:00 p.m.
I up to 4 players. Offer expires 3/31/10. Not valid with any other offers.
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Book by Thurman L Faison
for more information go to
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MARCH 18, 2010






6 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT


Learn about sailing at open house
Families are introduced to sailboats, youth sailing classes and S
Scouts at 1 p.m. on Saturday, April 3 at the Sailing Squadron in Apo
Beach. Free open house features sailboat demonstrations and rides
dinner of spaghetti and meatballs, sausage and peppers and other fav
ites will be served at 5:30 p.m. for a fee of $6 for adults and $3 for ki
TSS Youth Sailing classes for kids and teens runs weekly from Ju
14 through August 19. Sea Scout Ship 185 is a year 'round program
ages 14 20, with a focus on sailing and boating. The Sailing Squ;
ron welcomes anyone with an interest in sailing. Boat ownership is i
required. The Sailing Squadron is located at 1250 Apollo Beach Blv
Apollo Beach. (813) 645-2774. www.tssyouthsailing.org and ww
tampasailing.org.



\.


Pirate invades historic Ruskin Woman's Club


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At the general meeting of the
Ruskin Woman's Club on Feb. 3,
the women of the club could not
believe that they had a real pirate
in their midst. At first they were
a little wary, but then realized he
was a "good" pirate. He was very
friendly and handed each of the
ladies traditional pirate beads.
Soon members of the Ruskin
Woman's Club recognized him.
He was none other than Ruskin's
own Ross Elsberry.
At this meeting President
Wilma Wood introduced the guest
speaker, DeDe Grundell, Grun-
dell is the Executive Director for
Kids Charity of Tampa Bay, the
planning and fundraising agency
for A Kid's Place, located at 1715
Lithia Pinecrest Road in Brandon.
This state-of-the-art facility is a
temporary shelter for abused and
neglected children from birth to
17 years old.
Grundell described how this
private facility evaluates the
children medically and psycho-
logically. She said that on this
five-acre reserve there will be
five twelve-bed homes. This will
ensure siblings will be able to stay
together. This facility is first of its
kind.
President Wilma Wood has des-
ignated A Kid's Place her project
during her term of office. Ruskin
Woman's Club members are plan-
ning to visit this facility in the
future. This is just one of the many
charitable projects that the Ruskin
Woman's Club supports.


New arrival
from Brandon
Regional
Hospital
Ainsley Elizabeth Young was
born March 4, 2010. Carla Saltz-
man-Young and Robert Young of
Riverview are the proud parents.


The Ruskin Woman's Club is a member of the Florida Federation of
Women's Clubs. It is located at 503 S. Tamiami Trail in Ruskin. Meet-
ings are at 2 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more infor-
mation about the club, call Sonja Council at 634-1656 or Judy Dufault
at 641-0152


Left to right:
Club hostesses Faye Fike-
Richardson, Vicki Elsberry
(Pirate's wife and Past
President of the club),
and Iris Young.


Left to right:
Ruskin Woman's Club
member Carol Fagot,
Pirate Ross Elsberry,
and club member Bonnie
Cumbey.


Left to right:
Club member Iris Young,
Guest Speaker DeDe
Grundell, from A Kid's
Place, and President
Wilma Wood.


Congratulations!!


Riverview Moose
Lodge hosted
charity golf
tournament
On March 6, the Riverview
Moose Lodge 2158 hosted a char-
ity event with proceeds going to
the children's endowment fund.
Taking place at the Apollo Beach
Golf Club, the four person scram-
ble was won by Ray and Ann
Parisen of Kings Point, joined by
Dennis Fioramonti and Jack Jack-
son, shooting 10 under par for the
final score.


Teenage Republican Club holds first
meeting
The South Shore Teenage Republican Club will be holding its first
meeting Tuesday, March 30. It is open to teens with an interest in the
U.S.A. and the Republican Party.
They will meet at 5:30 p.m. at
SEast Coast Pizza, 13340 Lincoln
Road, Riverview and the meeting
is expected to last until 7 p.m.
For more information, search
"South Shore Teenage Repub-
licans" on Facebook or contact
Nicole at (813) 601-4190, lilesln@
gmail.com.


Just in time for the Chinese New Year
The third grade students at Sessums Elementary in Riverview spent the day celebrating Asian culture.Thanks
to several Asian students and their families, the classes were able to enjoy food native to Japan, Vietnam, Phil-
ippines and Laos in the tasting room.
Teachers Linda Charbeneau, Tara Ezell, and Ronica McLean furthered the experience by providing Asian
chips, candies and treats. The activity room allowed students to create Japanese fish prints called Gyotakus and
paint Chinese alphabet letters.
"We planned this day to make
their students more aware of the
variety of Asian cultures and to
teach them appreciation, under-
standing and tolerance of others
cultures," said Linda Charbeneau.
She also explains the physical
property of rice paper and how
A7 water changes the texture and
taste.
The classes made their own fresh
rolls with lunch meat, noodles and
vegetables like lettuce, mung bean
sprouts, and mint.
Sean Bonafe, Paige Gran, Syd-
ney Christenson, and Blaise Gales
with parent volunteer Teresa
Rowe-Wilson enjoyed the very
fresh Japanese sushi rolls and
Sessums Elementary third grade class learn about Asian foods. Vietnamese egg rolls.


MARCH 18, 2010






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 7

Food-Borne Illness


CHAMBER NEWS AND NOTES
Lexus of Tampa Bay is in Sun City Center! Stop in today or tomor-
row, Friday, March 19 and visit with Lexus sales consultant Joe Cava-
liere at the Sun City Center Chamber of Commerce parking lot. He will
be pleased to show you his fine display of new and certified pre-owned
automobiles. For more information, call him at 813.598.2098.

Mark 10 A.M., Tuesday, March 23 on your calendar. Wilhelm Heating
& Air Conditioning will present a seminar on how to protect your home
by saving energy, eliminating dust mites and much more. Come and
enter to win a free central dehumidifier! Refreshments will be served.
For more information and to RSVP, call 813.641.1811.

The Spring Trade Fair is coming up from 8 AM to 2 PM on Tuesday,
April 6 at the Community Hall, 1910 South Pebble Beach Blvd. in Sun
City Center. This is always a relaxed and informative event; free to the
public. Outside refreshments provided by Kiwanis of Sun City Center,
inside Bingo will be presented by Pat Zaidel and I guarantee you that you
will meet some of the nicest, most professional business people around.
All of our exhibitors are members of the Sun City Center Chamber of
Commerce so if you are a member, don't miss out and reserve your booth
TODAY- spaces are going fast! And if you have been considering join-
ing our busy Chamber, now is the time. Join up and join in the profes-
sional growth of your business!


ElaineBrad is President o the
Sun City CenterArea Chamber of
Commerce. She can be reached
at (813) 634-5111 extension 101
or via direct email ebradl@aoL
com.


hours later, he had a mild diges-
tion situation and mine was a se-
vere situation. I was bowing to the
porcelain god, if you will. I lost
six pounds in two days, which may
not seem like a lot, but for some-
one just over 100 lbs that signifi-
cant weight-loss can be life threat-
ening. Especially when you can't
replenish what you've lost because
your body is forcing it back out


If I have ever gotten food poi-
soning in the past, it was so minor
that I didn't even realize that my
discomfort had come from ingest-
ing a bad item. I remember talking
to one of my fellow grad students
who happened to be a food inspec-
tor about getting food poisoning.
She informed me that anytime you
feel any type of digestion problem,
whether it is a touchy stomach or
loose stool, it could be mild food
poisoning. And she told me in not
so many words to stay away from
shellfish; parasites ya know.
I never dreamed that a yummy
food like hot, fresh pizza would be
my demise. I know my downfall
came from the sausage pizza pie
because my dad and I shared it for
a meal one evening. Not even 24


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each year reportedly are diagnosed
with salmonella poisoning, but so
many more cases, such as mine do
not get reported. The main issue
with this type of illness is dehydra-
tion! If someone suffering from
this ailment does not get properly
rehydrated, it could lead to hospi-
talization or even death.
To prevent this type of illness
from infecting you, make sure all


any which way it can. of your meats and eggs are c
It seemed so fitting that after thoroughly and when eating o
three days of being bed ridden, not hesitate to send under
when I finally could stand up for food back. Make sure that
more than 5 minutes at a time, a you are cooking at home
local newspaper had written an wash your hands well and
article about how to protect your- work spaces and utensils
self against food-borne illness. If I oughly when working witl
had only read it a few days earlier, meats; this means using an
maybe I could have avoided this amount of soap and warm
horrible situation. Do not eat or drink anything
From the descriptions of the most raw or undercooked eggs si
common ailments, I determined homemadeeggnog orunderc
that I either contracted E.coli or French toast.
Salmonella. Because there was Recently some dried spices
sausage on the pizza, I could only various companies have bee
surmise that the meat may have called because they could po
been bad, undercooked, sitting be contaminated with salmc
too long or contaminated. I have Take it from me, check you
never been so ill in my life and ac- try and make sure you are c
cording to about-salmanella.com about what you put in your
it is the most commonly reported it could be the difference be
food-borne illness in the United getting sick and being health
States. Thirty thousand people
Check your irrigation system as you


'spring forward'
The Southwest Florida Water
Management District reminds res-
idents to check the timers on their
irrigation system since Daylight
Savings Time began last weekend.
The time change is also a good
time to make sure your irrigation
system timer is set correctly to
ensure that your system operates
consistently with current water re-
strictions.
Unless your city or county al-
ready has stricter hours in effect,
residents may only water before
8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. Properties
more than two acres in size may
only water before 10 a.m. or after
4 p.m. Under the current Modi-
fied Phase II restrictions, lawn and
landscape watering remains lim-
ited to a one-day-per-week sched-
ule. Please check with your local


ooked
out do
ooked
when
, you
clean
thor-
h raw
ample
water.
g with
uch as
ooked

s from
en re-
ssibly
)nella.
r pan-
areful
belly;
tween
hy.


government or utility for your wa-
tering day.
In addition to following restric-
tions, residents are also urged to
continue conserving water in other
ways indoors and outdoors at their
homes and businesses. Residents
should consider turning off their
irrigation systems if it rains before
their next watering day. With out-
door irrigation accounting for as
much as 50 percent of residential
water usage, turning off your irri-
gation system can result in a sig-
nificant water savings.
For additional information about
water restrictions, water conserva-
tion and the drought, please con-
tact your local utility or visit the
District's web site at www.Water-
Matters.org/drought/.


IN UNIFORM

John R. Heine
In" Army National Guard Pvt. John R. Heine has
graduated from Basic Combat Training at Fort Sill,
Lawton, Okla.
During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the Army mis-
sion and received instruction and training exercises in drill and ceremo-
nies, Army history, core values and traditions, military courtesy, military
justice, physical fitness, first aid, rifle marksmanship, weapons use, map
reading and land navigation, foot marches, armed and unarmed combat,
and field maneuvers and tactics.
He is the son of Lela Cherry of Riverview, and Robert Heine Jr. of,
Hartsvllle, Tenn.
Christopher A. Martinez
Air Force Airman Christopher A. Martinez graduated from basic mili-
tary training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas.
The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included
training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physi-
cal fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an as-
sociate in applied science degree through the Community College of the
Air Force.
He is the son of Elva Babyak of Riverview. Martinez is a 2006 gradu-
ate of Riverview High School.

DAV Chapter #110 has meeting change
DAV Chapter #110 will hold its regular monthly meeting on Thursday,
March 25 at Ozzie's Buffet & Grill at Sun Point Plaza, 3074 E. College
Ave., Ruskin, with lunch at 12:30 p.m. and the meeting at 1:30 p.m.
All attendees will individually pay for their own lunch. Those need-
ing a ride from SCC will gather in front of the Atrium, Main Campus at
12:15 p.m.
All three Chapter Service Officers and a DAV National Service Officer
will be in attendance to assist any veteran. Each member, please try to
bring a non-member guest!


MARCH 18, 2010


AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE






8 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


po P' m -Um


Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


-
* ab


Available from Commercial News Providers


Learn more about
Florida Frontier
You are invited to a lecture/slide
presentation by Carlton Ward,
March 25 at 5 pm in the Dickman
Community Room at the HCC
South Shore Campus.
Carlton Ward is a respected pho-
to journalist who will lecture on
the Florida Frontier. He has done
work for National Geographic and
published books on Africa as well
as the Florida Cowboy.
This is free to the public made
possible by a grant from Hillsbor-
ough Community College.


Love to sing?
The South Shore Sound Chorus,
a chapter of Sweet Adelines Inter-
national Chorus, invites all ladies
who love to sing to join their cho-
rus. The meeting time is 7pm each
Monday at Bell Shoals Church of
Christ, 2908 Bell Shoals Rd. Bran-
don. Join in the fun, music and
friendship.
For further information call
1-866-730-7464 or go to www.
southshosound.org.


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MARCH 18, 2010






MARCH 18, 2010
Letter to the Editor
Thank you
Dear Editor,
For the past several months I have been actively pursuing election to
the District 1 seat for the Hillsborough County Board of County Com-
missioners. I have not met the fund raising goals I set for this effort. No
matter how good the message, it takes money to get it out there. After
much prayer and reflection I have decided to withdraw from the race.
The issues remain. We must have a County Commission that recog-
nizes the needs of the business community. We need jobs and adequate
basic infrastructure. You have told me every day of instances when local
government has interfered with your ability to responsibly conduct your
business. There must be a better way forward than to continue to punish
citizens who try to be responsible and follow the rules.
At this point in our economic lives we need elected representatives
who make rules based on science and not on fear. We need individuals
who will take responsibility for the effects their decisions have on the
citizens. We need to elect people who pour themselves into doing the job
they are elected to do. I am tired of electing people who spend their time
running for the next election instead of doing their job.
We need to spend more time discussing exactly what we want our
government to do, what exactly that costs, and the least onerous, most
equitable way to pay for it.
So, again, thank you for your support, your kindness and your good
wishes.
Sincerely,
Anne Madden


SCC Men's Golf
Association 2 Man
Teams 1 Best Ball
Feb. 25
White Tees:
1st Place Teams (Tie 64) Chul
Kim, Kevin O'Keefe and Tom
Edge, Frank Martinelli;
3rd Place Team (65) Bill Pachler,
Ken Defreeuw;
Green Tees: 1st Place Team (60)
Harold Hodge, Butch Fletcher;
2nd Place Team (63) Bill Klitzke,
Bob Keyes.


Dr. Robert A. Norman
Board Certified Dermatologist


Kings Point Ladies
9-Hole Golf League
Gross Score March 1
Flight A Winners
Sue Watson 38
Sally Repetti 42
Flight B Winners
Marsha Marshall 37
Janet Balonick 39
Flight C Winners
Susie Potratz 41
Joan Leombruno 45


Dr. A. Theodosatos
Brandi Broughton, PA-C


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 9


Camp-Out in the
Hood a success
The Board of Directors and staff
at the Mary and Martha House
would like to thank the Whitmyer
family and friends and everyone
who joined in the food fun and live
music at "Camp-out in the Hood"
on Feb.20 in Apollo Beach.
The Whitmyers have been host-
ing this annual event for the past
4 years. This year 3 bands playing
on stage on a picture perfect after-
noon had all the campers up and
dancing. The aroma of barbequed
chicken and ribs filled the air and
a good time was had by all.
This year Jodi Whitmyer offered
to collect donations for the Mary
and Martha House in Ruskin. A
special thanks to John Haskins for
his generous donation.
The Mary and Martha House in
Ruskin is a shelter for homeless
and abused women and children.

Dance to Dixie
Rose
The Manatee RV Park will host a
social dance Sat. March 20, from 7
- 10 p.m. at Manatee RVPark Hall,
603 U.S. 41 South. Music will be
presented by "Dixie Rose."
Bring your own refreshments,
ice provided. They are asking for a
$4 per person donation. The public
is invited. For more information
contact J. Sullivan, 813-649-9150.
Directions: 4 miles north of
1-275 or 7 miles south on US 41,
Ruskin.


Jim Butner, Nondenominational Christian Worship Services worship
leader, presents a $1,110 donation to Monica Carter, CHLN, LifePath
Hospice nurse.
LifePath Hospice receives love offerings
Nondenominational Christian Worship Services has been offering worship
services in the community for approximately three years. In that time, the
group has donated all of its love offerings more than $25,000 to eight area
charities and not-for-profit organizations.
LifePath Hospice was the recent recipient of a $1,110 donation, the total of
the love offerings collected at February worship services. On March 2, wor-
ship leader Jim Butner presented LifePath Hospice nurse Monica Carter the
donation at the Sun City Center Hospice House. The funds will go to support
LifePath Hospice programs and services in the Sun City Center community.
"Our group is proud to include LifePath Hospice among the local causes
we support every year in this way," said Burner. "Their caregivers perform
a wonderful service for their patients and families and are a blessing to our
community."
In 2007, two volunteers founded Nondenominational Christian Worship
Services. That year they performed one weekly worship service. The group
has grown to 20 volunteers offering 10 weekly worship services. Nondenom-
inational Christian Worship Services also holds the annual "Jim Burner Walk
4 Chnritv" event neah (Vltnher in Sun City Center


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?0..,,,,n 2003 U.S. Hwy. 41 S Ruskin, FL
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10 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Boston
Boston is a white male domes-
tic short hair mix with salt and
pepper swirls in his coat. He and
his two siblings were brought
to CARE as tiny bundles of fur.
Boston has come a long 'way
since his first days at the shelter
as a scared kitten that was re-
luctant to be touched. Although
he often can be found hanging
out in the cat tower with at least
one of his sisters, he is happy
to get personal attention from
the volunteers. He has a sooth-
ing purr and a luscious coat. As
part of his adoption, Boston will
be neutered, brought current on
his shots, and microchipped.
C.A.R.E. is open 10 am to 3 pm
on Tuesday Saturday. For di-
rections visit www.CareShelter.
org or call 813-645-2273.


Laney
Laney is a gorgeous Vizsla mix.
She was found wandering along
a busy street, on a very cold day,
with one little baby girl trotting
behind her. When Laney is not
busy watching and loving on her
puppy (Meg), she is giving hugs
out to her visitors. This is the
kind of dog that melts your heart
with her soulful eyes, and is for-
ever loyal. As part of Laney's
adoption, she will be spayed,
brought current on her shots,
and microchipped. C.A.R.E. is
open 10 AM to 3 PM on Tues. -
Sat. For directions visit www.
CareShelter.org or call 813-645-
2273


Golf Scores Hogans Golf Club Wednesday,
March 3 Course: Summerfield, Play: Classic Skins
1st: Charlie Srimpell, 9 skins
2nd : Bill Baldwin (guest), 4 skins
3rd : Art Swallow, 3 skins
4th: Larry Clark, 1 skin
Low-net: Charlie Strimpell, 68
Low-gross: Charlie Strimpell, 94
Also playing Paul Maki, John Schachte, Dave Grenke, Wayne Velten,
Don Leath and Bill Shaver


MARCH 18, 2010


Letter to the Editor
- Historic Ruskin
Dear Editor,
I read the article about designat-
ing certain sections of Ruskin as
Historic Districts. I am very inter-
ested in history, and I like nothing
better than learning about what
has gone on before us. However,
I hope the move to preserve our
past does not come at too high a
price to the future progress of our
community. Excessive and costly
restrictions which often come with
historic designations could unfair-
ly over-burden home and property
owners and discourage the growth
of business. Quite frankly, most
of Highway 41 is an eyesore, the
character of which needs anything
but preservation. I hope a wise
compromise can be reached which
will result in saving some of the
past for posterity while maintain-
ing a healthy vision for the bal-
anced growth and revitalization of
our community.
Vince Murphy
Ruskin, Fl
March 3 Team Low
Gross Caloosa
Greens Men's Golf
Association
1st Jim Fischer, Gene Mueller
,Brad Wells, Bill Panzner 298
2nd Bill Waters, Jack Duncan,
Jim Konschak, John Mooney
300
March 10 Caloosa
Greens Men's Golf
Association
1st Bill Schofield 48
2nd Don Marlborough 52
3rd Bill Weis 53
4th Fran Hendrickson tie 54
4th (tie)Bill Panzner 54
6th (tie) Bucky Devling 55
6th (tie) Jim Sherburne 55
6th Tod McGinley 56


Free


tes for


Kite -est planned tor Ivarcn z2
Apollo Beach Beautification is sponsoring a "Kite Fest" on Saturday,
March 27 from 11 am to 1 pm at the Apollo Beach Nature Park in Apollo
Beach. There will be free kites for kids, hot dogs, cookies and drinks.
SCC Mens Golf
KP Ladies 9-Hole Golf SCC Mens Golf
LeaguePlayed on March 8 Association 2 Man
Flight A Winners Teams Total Net
Cathy Marquis 42 March 11
Sue Watkins 43 White Tees:
1st Place Team (-8) Les Eas-
Flight B Winners ton, Don Marlbouough;
Judy Trombley 43 2nd Place Team (-2) Butch
Janet Balonick 45 Fletcher, Bob Keyes;
Green Tees:
Flight C Winners 1st Place Team (8) David
Susie Protratz 48 Ransbury, Michael Sharpe;
Peggy Flippen 50 2nd Place Team (11) William
Pachler, Jim Cosgrove.


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in connection with sales practice violations regarding reverse convertible notes. In addition, a Tampa-based
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have reason to believe that this was not an isolated incident.


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investors, in particular senior citizens. These investments may have been described to you as corporate bonds
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qualifications and experience.






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 11


Riverview Memorial Golfers supported Riverview Chamber of Commerce tournament


VFW Post #8108

Riverview Memorial VFW Post
#8108, 7504 Riverview Dr. sched-
ule is as follows:

Meetings: Men's Auxiliary --
1st Thursday at 7 p.m.

Ladies' Auxiliary --
2nd Tuesday at 7 p.m.

VFW Post --
2nd Thursday at 7:30 p.m.

Sunday:
Breakfast, 9 a.m. to noon, $6

Monday: Bar Bingo at 6:30 a.m.

Wednesday:
Spaghetti from 5 to 7 p.m. $6

Friday:
Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.;
Fish, $6; Combo, $7
Karaoke from 8 to ?

Saturday: Karaoke from 8 to ?

2nd Tuesday: Ladies' Auxiliary
Meeting at 7 p.m.

3rd Tuesday: VA Hospital Bingo
-- Leave Post at 6 p.m.

Every Wednesday:
$6 All-U-Can-Eat Spaghetti Dinner
from 5 to 7 p.m.

Carry-out orders available.

Call ahead -- 671-9845

1st Thursday:
Men's Auxiliary Meeting at 7 p.m.
2nd Thursday:
Post Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Every Friday:
Fish Fry from 5 to 7 p.m.
(all you can eat fish -- $6)

Carry-out orders available.
Call ahead -- 671-9845

They also serve Chicken Tenders,
Shrimp or combos for $7.

Each dinner comes with fries,
coleslaw, and a hush puppy.

Every Saturday:
Karaoke by Jeff at 8 p.m.

Celebrating 36 Years in Business

CALL FOR FREE
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The Greater Riverview Chamber
of Commerce held its 16th An-
nual Golf Tournament on March
6 at Summerfield Crossings Golf
Club located at 13050 Summer-
field Boulevard in Riverview.
Along with gorgeous Riverview,
Florida weather, fun, competition
and good friends, a great time was
had by all!
This event was made possible by
Superior Residences of Brandon
Memory Care, Commercial Tech-
nology Group, Mosaic Fertilizer,
My Family Chiropractic, Pioneer
Tire and Auto, and Tampa Electric
Company.
Congratulations to the Wee Care
for Kids Team, including Gene
Daugherty, Chris Coates, Tracy
Crumb and Tony Fiamingo who
came in first place. The second


The CoPart team looked very prol
their matching shirts.
place winners were Summerfield
Crossings Golf Club Members
Team: Lee Vernon, Rick Remil-
lard, John Remillard and Jerry
Scalpone.


Wee Care for Kids team took first place.


Congratulations to Kim Weise
and Russell Johnson who each
won "Closest to The Pin" awards.
Kim Weise also won the Wom-
en's Longest Drive award and
Jay Dabney won
the Men's Longest
Drive award. J.
McKenzie garnered
the "Closest To The
Line" award.
Tracy Jefferson
was the first com-
petitor in the Put-
ting Contest and
started out the day
right with a hole-in-
fessional in one. Later that day,
Elton Brewer also
scored a hole-in-one. Tracy and
Elton split the pot and won $130
each.
Local businesses showcased
their business by being hole spon-


Scholarships available for
children of military heroes
Those who defend our freedom know all too well the costs and sacri-
fices associated with serving in the United States Armed Forces. Many
service members leave behind families who must continue their lives
with a heavy heart. Other service members sustain wounds and injuries
that prevent them from leading a normal life. To show gratitude on be-
half of the American people, Freedom Alliance is proud to offer aid to
the children of these heroes in the form of college scholarships.
If you or someone you know is the son or daughter of a service member
who has sacrificed life or limb, then the Freedom Alliance Scholarship
Fund is available to help alleviate the costs of college. Over $3 million
has been awarded to hundreds of Freedom Alliance Scholarship recipi-
ents since 2002.
"Families of killed or permanently disabled service members face
hardships that most Americans can not imagine," Freedom Alliance
President Tom Kilgannon said. "To honor the men and women of our
Armed Forces by providing scholarships to their children is a privilege.
Paying for a college education is one hardship that these students should
not have to endure."
An eligible applicant must be the dependent son or daughter of a
U.S. soldier, sailor, airman, Marine or Guardsman who has been killed
or permanently disabled (100% VA disability rating) in an operational
mission or training accident, or who is currently classified as a Prisoner
of War (POW) or Missing in Action (MIA). They must also be a high
school senior or registered as a full time undergraduate student and un-
der the age of 26.
To learn more about the Freedom Alliance Scholarship Fund and/or to
apply, visit www.fascholarship.com or call 800-475-6620. The applica-
tion deadline is July 31, 2010.


My Family Chiropractic team had a great time.


*e Company team was all smiles at the tournament.


sors. My Family Chiropractic's
sponsored hole offered the oppor-
tunity to win cash for the longest
drive while standing on a wobble
cushion.
Congratulations to the winner,
Kyle Roschfska from the Bloom-
ingdale Winn-Dixie. Valrico State


Bank provided cold water and
snacks to golfers on their spon-
sored hole.
For more information, contact
the Greater Riverview Cham-
ber of Commerce at 234-5944 or
visit them online www.Riverview-
Chamber.com.


Chronically III May Breathe Easier
(NAPSA) -- There could be good threatening situation and
news for millions of chronic dis- to do everything I could
ease patients who are concerned stand what I was dealing
about getting the medicines they how to manage and mo
need. There's a group that has self to make sure I was ii
helped more than 6 million unin- condition to stay healthy
sured and financially struggling "As someone who has
patients with patient-assistance from asthma for years, I
programs that provide medicines important for patients to
free or nearly free. the resources available so
Former National Football manage their conditions
League running back Jerome "The healthy," Bettis added.
Bus" Bettis understands firsthand To help, the Partne
how important it is for patients Prescription Assistanci
struggling with a chronic disease provides access to hui
to take the medicines their doc- patient-assistance progr
tors prescribe. Bettis suffers from viding free and nearly f
asthma but learned how to control cines to qualifying union
his disease and refused to let it get financially struggling
in the way of his success. Nearly 200 of these pro,
"Up until I had an asthma attack directly sponsored by ph
during a nationally televised foot- tical research companies
ball game, I always felt that asth- Eligible patients have
ma was a situation that I would more than 2,500 brand-
deal with as needed," said Bettis. generic prescription mec
No\\ I realize that I was in a life- addition, there's inform


1I needed
to under-
; with and
nitor my-
n the right

s suffered
think it's
know all
o they can
and stay

rship for
e (PPA)
ndreds of
ams, pro-
ree medi-
sured and
patients.
grams are
harmaceu-

access to
name and
licines. In
nation on


more than 10,000 free health care
clinics in America and the partner-
ship has connected hundreds of
thousands of patients with clinics
and health care providers in their
communities.
Uninsured and financially strug-
gling patients seeking help can
call (888) 4-PPA-NOW to talk to a
trained operator or access the easy-
to-use Web site, www.pparx.org.
For more information on what
America's pharmaceutical research
companies are doing to help make
medicines available to all patients,
visit www.PhRMA.org. To learn
more about how Jerome "The
Bus" Bettis lives with his asthma
and helps millions to better under-
stand how they can live and suc-
ceed, visit www.sharingmiracles.
com.
America's pharmaceutical com-
panies are giving their medicines
away free to thousands of people
who need them.


Ruskin VFW Post #6287
Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120 U.S. 41 N. has listed the following
weekly activities. Meetings are: American Legion on 1st Wednesday
each month; VFW and LAVFW on the 2nd Wednesday each month;
and MAVFW on the 3rd Thursday
each month.

Thursday, March 18 Kitchen
open from 5 to 8 p.m. Bar Bingo
at 6 p.m.

Friday, larch 19 Fish Fry
from 4:30 to 7 p.m. For to-go orders,
Scall 645-2935. Karaoke Contest
from 7 to 10 p.m.

Saturday, March 20 -Turkey Shoot at 1:30 p.m. Music by Gene
Cannon from 7 to 10 p.m.

Sunday, March 21- Texas Hold 'em at 1 p.m. LAVFW Fashion
Show at 4 p.m. $5. Fire in the Hole at 5:30 p.m.

Monday, March 22- Cribbage at 1 p.m. Wii Games at 7 p.m.

Tuesday, March 23- Euchre at 1 p.m. Games in lounge from 2 to
5 p.m. Kitchen open. Bingo at 6 p.m.

Wednesday, March 24- Wii Games at 6 p.m.


WE atR, CAlv
I R,-- 111, ' "-


MARCH 18, 2010






12 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
Attention all military veterans


Several events will occur on
three upcoming dates, that may be
extremely helpful to many of the
veterans in the area:
1. On every 1st, 3rd and 5th
Tuesday of each month following
Chapter # 110 DAV, will have a
trained and certified chapter ser-
vice officer available from 1 to 3
pm, at the Pelican Room, Atrium
Building, North Course Lane of
the Central Campus, SCC. Chapter
#110, currently has three trained
service officers, who completed
training in Jan. 2010, to assist vet-
erans with any type health or dis-
ability matter or claim. There will
be a session on March 30.
2. On Saturday, March 20, at the
Sun City Center Annual Fun Fest
at the Central Campus of SCC,
off Pebble Beach N., The Military
Officers Association of America
and the Sun City Center Mens'
Club are sponsoring the use of the
James A. Haley Veterans Hospital
Outreach Clinic.
The clinic will be open at no
cost, to military Veterans residing
in the South Hillsborough County
area. Additionally, Chapter #110
DAV will have their van on display
and their three services officers to
assist veterans. Also, two national
service officers from the Disabled
American Veterans Office at Bay
Pines VA Medical Hospital at St.
Petersburg will be in attendance


with their van to assist all veter-
ans.
3. On Thursday, March 25, Chap-
ter #110 DAV will hold its regular
monthly meeting at Ozzie's Buffet
& Grill, at Sun Point Plaza, 3074
E. College Ave, Ruskin, with lunch
at 12:30, and meeting at 1:15. All
attendees will individually pay for
their own lunch. Those needing a
ride from SCC, will gather in front
of the Atrium at 12:15. All three of
the chapter service officers and a
DAV national service officer will
be in attendance to assist any vet-
eran. Come let us help.


MARCH 18, 2010


State and federal agencies work together to prevent
introduction of destructive snail


The Florida Department of Ag-
riculture and Consumer Services,
the United States Department of
Agriculture (USDA), and the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service have
joined together in a cooperative ef-
fort to prevent giant African snails
(GAS) from making their way into
Florida and are asking the public
for help.
Giant African snails are con-
sidered a serious plant pest and
potential threat to public health
because of their ability to destroy
plants, damage ornamental plants
and spread disease. Giant African
snails are illegal to import into
the United States without a per-
mit, and currently no permits have
been issued.
Because of vigilant federal and
state inspections and public edu-
cation efforts, Florida has been
successful in keeping these dan-
gerous mollusks from becoming
established again in Florida. Once
established, this pest can create a
giant swath of destruction and an
alert public can prevent that from
happening.
For the last several decades,
there was no known giant Afri-
can snail in Florida. However, the
state is no stranger to this massive
mollusk. In 1966, a boy smuggled
three snails into Miami as pets and


his grandmother subsequently re-
leased them into her garden. Sev-
en years later, more than 18,000
snails were found. It took almost
10 years and more than $1 million
to eradicate this pest from Florida.
This is the only known success-
ful giant African snail eradication
program on record.
Scientists consider the GAS
to be one of the most damaging
snails in the world because it is
known to consume at least 500 dif-
ferent types of plants. The snails
can also cause structural damage
to buildings; they consume plaster,
stucco and other calcareous mate-
rials needed to grow their shells.
In large numbers, GAS can cause
extensive damage.
Public health concerns also sur-
round this and other types of snails
because they can carry parasites.
Because of these health concerns,
it is recommended to use gloves
when handling snails and to wash
hands thoroughly afterward.
The giant African snail, Achatina
fulica, is one of the largest land
snails in the world growing up to
8 inches in length and 4.5 inches
in diameter. When full grown,
the shell consists of seven to nine
whorls (spirals), with a long and
greatly swollen body whorl. The
brownish shell covers at least half


the length of the snail. Each snail
can live as long as nine years and
contains both female and male re-
productive organs. After a single
mating session, each snail can pro-
duce 100 to 400 eggs. In a typical
year, every mated adult lays about
1,200 eggs.
Achatina fulica is originally from
East Africa and has established it-
self throughout the Indo-Pacific
Basin, including the Hawaiian
Islands. This pest has also been
introduced into the Caribbean
islands of Martinique and Gua-
deloupe with recent detections in
Saint Lucia and Barbados.
The Cooperative Agriculture Pest
Survey (CAPS), a USDA grant-
funded program which is managed
by the Florida Department of Ag-
riculture and Consumer Services,
has stepped up inspections follow-
ing a recent GAS interception but
no additional giant African snails
were found.
Anyone who thinks they have
seen a giant African snail, or may
have information on illegal snail
smuggling or import activity, is
asked to call the Department's toll-
free helpline at 1-888-397-1517.
Do not release them or give them
away. For information on invasive
snail species, visit http://www.fl-
dpi.com.


Columbus replica ships Pinta and Nina to land in St. Petersburg
On Friday, March 25, the 'Pinta' lica ever built." The craftsmanship tours and has a 900 sq. ft. main While in port, the general pub- com. Mininum of 15. $4 per per-
and the 'Nina,' replicas of Colum- of construction and the details in salon down below to view slide lic is invited to visit the ships for son. Visit their website at www.
bus' ships will open in St. Peters- the rigging make it a truly fas- shows of the ships' construction, walk-aboard self-guided tours. thenina.com for additional infor-
burg. The ships will be docked at cinating visit back to the Age of The 'Pinta' is available for private The prices are $7 for adults, $6 for mation. The ships arrive Thurs-
Gators Cafe, 12754 Kingfish Dr., Discovery. The 'Nina' was used in parties while in port. seniors and $5 for children. Chil- day, March 25 and there will be a
Treasure Island, until their depar- the production of the film '1492' Both ships will be touring to- dren 4 and under are free. The ship private viewing for the media after
ture early Monday morning, April starring Gerard Depardieu and di- gether as a new and enhanced is open every day from 9 a.m. to docking.
5. erected by Ripley Scott. 'sailing museum' for the purpose 5 p.m. No reservations are neces-
The 'Nina' was built completely The 'Pinta' was built in Brazil to of educating the public and school sary. Teachers or groups wishing
by hand and without the use of accompany the 'Nina' on all of her children on the 'Caravel,' a Portu- to schedule a 30-minute guided
power tools, and was called by travels. She is a larger version of guese ship used by Columbus and tour with a crew member should
Archaeology magazine "The most the archetypal caravel and offers many early explorers to discover call the ship directly at (787) 672-
historically correct Columbus rep- larger deck space for walk-aboard the world. 2152, or email columfnd@surfbvi.


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MARCH 18, 2010

Tribute to an era


* Continued from page 1
ing to Dennis Kline, principal plan-
ner in Hillsborough's Planning and
Growth Management Department.
In addition, Mosaic is planning
for safety reasons to seek perma-
nent closure of Lula Street which
stretches for a short distance be-
hind or west of the historic monu-
ment site. There are no houses on
Lula and residents in the area have
full access from Alice Street south
of the site, Russell Schweiss, Mo-
saic spokesman, noted this week.
The road closure application is be-
ing drafted for submission to the
county, Schweiss added.
Major point of concern has been
the driveway at the southern foot of
the Alafia River bridge which gave
access to the Giant's Camp restau-
rant when it was operating before
the building's razing, Schweiss
said. The driveway also leads to
Lula Street. Vehicles attempting to
exit the driveway onto southbound
U.S. 41 often are not seen by driv-
ers coming south over the bridge
and the situation has posed danger
for both, the spokesman added.
The driveway also has provided
access to Mosaic's Fiddler's Cove,
a nature preserve and ecological
education center at the mouth of
the Alafia River which is opened
periodically to fourth graders from
area schools. It is planned that visit-
ing school busses in the future will
reach the preserve via Alice Street
and a gate on Lula, Schweiss said.
As for access to the historic me-


morial itself, the site is not intended
to function as a park, but is more
like a historic marker even though
none of the customary road signs
are planned, Schwieiss added. The
closest parking area is in the East
Bay Shopping Plaza lot about a
tenth of a mile south of the site, he
added, and, with sidewalk along
the eastern edge of the property,
visitors will be able to walk to the
site to read the explanatory sig-
nage, view the cabin from the ex-
terior, marvel at the size of the boot
and perhaps reminisce about an era
that now is part of the community's
legendary lore.
There could be much to reminisce
over. About 60 years ago, the Gi-
ant's Camp, from various accounts,
was in the vanguard of a new and
increasingly popular destination
for traveling Americans. Following
World War II and its years of na-
tional sacrifice, rationing and con-
finement, Americans took to the
highways in new automobiles roll-
ing off assembly lines freed of the
war effort. To accommodate them,
the hospitality industry was ener-
gized in the form of tourist courts
and camps offering clean, comfort-
able lodgings, tasty home cooked
food plus roadside attractions to
both lure and entertain.
Al and Jeanie Tomaini apparently
saw them coming and prepared to
welcome them. The couple, who
made the carnival show circuit after
their marriage in 1936 billed as "the
Strangest Married Couple" because


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of his great height and her legless
two-and-half- foot stature, first vis-
ited Florida in the 1940s. Pleasure
fishermen, they were introduced to
Gibsonton's good fishing holes by
show circuit friends and ultimately
purchased the little acreage on the
south side of the river. It contained
a small tavern and an old frame
house.
On the land bordering a then-two
lane Highway 41, they fashioned
their personal home, a first rate
fishing camp with bait house, a
fleet of rental boats, a tavern with
food service, as well as a tourist
and trailer court with more than 20
white cabins along with parking
spaces for those who pulled their
homes behind their vehicles. To
this, they added a pole barn picnic
area and barbeque pits. And then,
to underscore the water related ap-
peal of the place, there were the
tanks of turtles and other native
marine life to draw drivers in from
the road. Reported to be one of a
kind in the region, the complex was
touted as "Giant's Fi'lh,,i Camp-
Gibsonton, Florida, The Town You
read about in Sat. Eve. Post. And
many millions of Americans regu-
larly relished the Saturday Evening
Post magazine famed for its Nor-
man Rockwell cover illustrations.
The industrious Tomainis also
were active in community life.
L-.,... ._ ---.-- :


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 13


I -..-....4 1 _. Timillm2eil
Once the temporary home-away-from-home for thousands of trav-
elers along U.S. Hwy. 41 for decades a primary route connect-
ing north and south Florida the last of the Giant's Camp cabins
has been positioned behind wrought iron fencing at the site of the
famed tourist court in Gibsonton. The site is being shaped into a
historic memorial honoring Al and Jeanie Tomaini for their roles in
the community's lore through a cooperative effort by Mosaic and lo-
cal citizens. A dedication of the site is expected later in the year.
Photo courtesy Russell Schweiss/Mosaic
Al, for instance, helped found the replaced first with one-story motels
first volunteer fire department in built in strips and then with high-
Gibsonton, serving as its chief, rise hotels. The tiny cabins became
And their eldest daughter, Judy termite ridden, the little marina
Tomaini Rock, has related that the hosted only rotting, half-sunken
first display boot at Giant's Camp boats. The restaurant survived for
- a rubberized version produced by a number of years under different
a tire company would be filled management but finally was closed
with candy at Halloween for area in 2006. And, Jeanie joined her gi-
youngsters to plunder. All in all, the ant in 1999, at the age of 82.
camp became a fixture for travel- The property went on the market
ers and locals alike, some of them in early 2007 with a $2.5 million
connected to the carnival show price tag. Mosaic purchased the site
world, some working in area indus- in 2008, paying approximately a
try such as the phosphate plant then quarter of the original asking price.
known as U. S. Phosphoric Products The purchase served to ensure
(USPP), some still making a living that a piece of Americana can be
in commercial fishing. memorialized, preserved as an ex-
Time, however, took its toll. Death ample of an era now past and as a
took Al at the age of 50 in 1962. tribute to an unusual couple who,
Jeanie carried on, with the help of born with physical handicaps,
others, but the Giant's Camp gradu- made the most of their energies and
ally was broken down. The era of ingenuity.
the roadside tourist court was being Copyright 2010 Melody Jameson


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14 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Observations:


Frank Kruse died
last week. No, you
don't know him.
For that matter, I
didn't really know
him, either, and it
has been nearly 30
years since I even
thought about him. I By MITCH
graduated from high mitch@obs
school with Frank in
1981. We didn't hang out but when
I heard his name, his face imme-
diately flashed into my mind. He
was smiling. That is how I remem-
ber him. I also remember a person
who appeared to me as being com-
fortable in his own skin. That is a
fairly unique trait for anyone par-
ticularly a teenager. He was a hell
of a good baseball player, too.
I don't know how he died, just
that he passed away in his home
in Lexington, Kentucky. Over the
years I have passed through Lex-
ington a few times it seems like
a nice city. I didn't know he lived
there and it probably wouldn't
have mattered if I had known.
As the years pass there are more
reminders of my mortality. There
is the muscle pain that doesn't go
away as quickly as it once did.
There is the ever-present tinge of
knee pain when standing up and
a few other less-than-pleasant re-
minders that, despite all youthful
ideas to the contrary, we all get
old.
But few reminders ii .is \ i\ id
as when people your
age begin to pass
away.
I've been shifting
gears too much. All
attempts to slow
life down notwith-
standing, the days
and years keep
going by faster.
One day I'm tak-
ing pictures at the
opening ceremony
for the golf cart
crossing on U.S.
Highway 301 in
Sun City Center,
a few days later
I'm in Des Moines In the end, w
at a conference journey, it's


I
TI
er


wit
Le
Iov
Gr
tor
Ho
of
Vil
RAPHAGEN 70,
rvernews.net pie
dri
and ceaseless ra
car making the
back home to F1
While the loi
north has long s
it did provide ar
away from it all
some time to th
a few deep my
verse.
For instance,
ferent controls t
on an old Pors
them actually c
air-cooled with
back so the onl
is to turn on a b
gine, flip a swi
valves beneath t
low the hot engi
through enigma
the dash that me
have spent dec;
find. The prob
German engine
too well. Flip oi
and 30 seconds
of'1\\ J


Shifting gears
th Congressman air makes the trip from the back
onard Boswell of before the cabin pressurizes, stop-
wa, Senator Chuck ping the flow of precious warmth.
assley, U.S. At- The only way to actually get warm
ney General Eric air is to release the pressure by
ilder and Secretary opening a window. Which, of
Agriculture Tom course, lets in cold air. Fortunately,
sack; along with opening a window also serves as
0 or so other peo- an effective means to defrost the
. The next day I'm windshield despite the three con-
ving through cold trols.
in in an old sports By modem standards, there is
1,350 mile drive virtually nothing comfortable
lorida. about a 1983 Porsche 911. The air
ng drive from the conditioning is marginal, at best.
since lost its allure, As mentioned, the heat is depen-
a opportunity to get dent upon letting cold air in and
for two days. I had some might say it smells funny
ink and to ponder thanks to the engine directly be-
steries of the uni- hind the backseat. So why drive
it? Why are male mid-life crises
there are three dif- defined by them? Because on even
hat indicate defrost the shortest entrance ramp to a
che 911. None of freeway, it can easily be beyond
lefrost. The car is the legal speed limit before the
the engine in the end. It turns and tracks like it's on
ly way to get heat rails with a mysterious force that
lower over the en- can only be from God holding it to
itch to open some the ground. It has brakes that seem
the car and then al- almost powerful enough to stop
ine air to dribble in the earth's rotation. And because it
tic openings under smells funny.
chanical engineers It's not just a mid-life crisis car.
ades attempting to It can't be because I'm well past
lem is, the crafty mid-life. I have no expectation of
ers sealed the car living to the age of 94. But it is
pen the heat valves something that allows an escape
from deadlines and expecta-
lioins and cidit i aid
.bills kIts not


hat stuff you have accumulated in life doesn't much matter. But on the
nice to have a little fun occasionally.


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an expensive car, despite what the
name would imply, but it is needy.
It needs me just as much as I need
it.
Somewhere, approaching a large
southern city, I tapped the accel-
erator lightly, the engine growled
behind me and the speedometer
instantly shot up to 80. I thought
about Frank. According to his obit-
uary he worked as a plumber and a
landscaper in Arizona. Then eight
years ago he moved to Lexington to
train horses. I have a feeling he was
good at it. It seems he was where he
wanted to be; doing what he wanted
to do. A man comfortable in his
own skin. Just as I was while driv-
ing that old car.
The bravado of my youth has
long since worn off. I have driven
from the north and back more than
a dozen times without a major inci-
dent and I wondered how long my
luck could hold out. I've always
believed we have been blessed with
life to live life; and, as such, I al-
ways planned to leave a battered
and possibly bloodied corpse be-
hind. Of course I have no intention
of taking anyone with me. Driving
at 80 mph was merely an attempt to
keep up with traffic. I worry that as
I get older I am becoming more pro-
tective. Life isn't meant to be lived
sheltered away behind an artificial
feeling of safety. Tomorrow is not
guaranteed, regardless of whether


you hit the accelerator a bit or lock
yourself in a closet. Hitting the ac-
celerator is, to me, a lot more fun.
Driving from the Cedar Rapids,
Iowa, airport to a small town no
one has ever heard of, I remem-
bered why we moved there. Parts
of Iowa are beautiful and it was a
beautiful day. I also remembered
why we left.
The woman working behind the
counter at the Casey's convenience
store in Marengo, Iowa, had big
news: "I'm moving to Florida,
too!" she said. I didn't bother to
wonder how she knew we had al-
ready moved; that's just how things
work in a small town. Ironically,
she was the first person we encoun-
tered when we stopped in to check
the place out a few years ago. Next
week, she will be off to live her
life.
I realized that freedom to live
your life is a gift we have been
given, particularly as Americans -
and that is just what I was doing
driving that sports car across the
country. I settled back into the seat;
the engine providing the sympho-
ny for my thoughts. Before long,
the lights of Tampa illuminated the
darkness and I was home. Home to
a place where I now realize I can
be comfortable in my own skin.
Thanks Frank, for the memory of
your smile and for the lesson you
gave me. Godspeed.


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 15


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16 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
Tiffany
0 Continued from page 1
his works is that he specialized in leaded
glass windows and lamps. However his
talents were far greater than that cover-
S ing many different areas and techniques
of design and fabrication all of which
are on display.
The 30,000 square foot museum's
holdings also include a major collec-
tion of American art pottery and rep-
resentative collections of late 19th and
early 20th century American paintings,
graphics and decorative arts. A 12,000
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MARCH 18, 2010

'Easier to fit a wall than a body'


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 17


Until I met Nina Tatlock the
only experience I'd had with any
kind of thread painting was with
"bunka," an ancient Japanese form
of embroidery practiced by several
groups in Sun City Center.
But looking at Nina's various fi-
ber art pieces in her home and on
her Web site, I realized there are
countless possibilities for making
pictures and designs with fabric
and thread.
The newly-elected vice president
of the South Shore Arts Council
has only lived in South County for
four years. She and her husband
Gary and their (now) 17-year-old
daughter Jeanine moved from
Indianapolis, Ind., after visiting
friends in Apollo Beach many
times over a period of years.
The strange thing, however, was
that shortly after their move, their
friends moved away leaving the
newly-relocated family members


to find their own way in their new
environment.
Nina quickly gravitated to the
arts community. While in Indiana,
she had helped found and exhib-
ited her fiber arts and mixed media
collages at the Art in Hand Gallery
in Zionsville and had worked on
its board; taught classes; and held
shows where models displayed her
one-of-a-kind wearable art.
"I've been around fabrics all my
life," she explained. "My mother
and grandmother were both sew-
ers. I started sewing at age 12, and
dropped hints that I wanted my
own sewing machine for Christ-
mas."
Her mother picked up on it and
Nina ended up making herself a
pair of pants on Christmas day.
"My mother always had patterns
and material around, so I got start-
ed right away," she said.
Her mother and grandmother
helped her when she got in a bind
and didn't know what to do, but
mostly, she says she is self-taught.
"I've done a lot more ripping out
than putting things together," she
joked.
Besides designing everything
from clothing to wall art, while
in Indiana Nina also worked for
Husqvarna Viking, teaching new
sewers how to use the machines
they bought from the exclusive
hundred-and-fifty year-old Swed-
ish company.


All the while, she experimented
with various projects, having tak-
en classes while at Purdue in dye-
ing, weaving and printing as well
as her basic textile courses.
"When I'm making a piece, its
title comes to me because of a feel-
ing or emotion I get from it," she
told me, pointing out the tryptic on
one wall that she named "Learn-
ing."
Learning was made years ago
while she was preparing her
daughter to go to school, teaching
her shapes, colors, numbers and
letters. "I would see her struggling
with something and think 'that's
so easy' but at the same time I was
learning computers and my hus-
band (whose career included com-
puter programming) would say
'that's so easy'to me and I realized
everything is easy once you know
all about it and nothing is easy un-
til you learn."
Although her love of fabric
and design started with clothing,
somewhere along the way Nina
decided it would be "easier to fit a
wall than a body" and began mak-
ing wall art and home d6cor rather
than clothes.
At this point in her life Nina says
she enjoys teaching even more
than working on her own pieces.
Sharing knowledge gives her a
special kind of joy, she said.
She's also making her position
with the South Shore Arts Council


1 .-



This tryptic is called "Learning," and contains sequences of num-
bers, letters and shapes. The pieces were designed during the time
Nina was teaching her daughter, now 17, these basics before she


started school.

a priority and wants to reach out
to get more varied types of mem-
bers.
"We want all kinds of art repre-
sented, not just the visual arts," she
explained. "We want to promote
music and literature and dance
and theater as well as painting and
sculpture or the type of work that
I do."
Her vice presidency has fallen on
the last year of her three-year term,
and the Council's rules say she
must leave the board next year.
"I don't plan to abandon them
though," she said. "I'll just serve


in a different way."
Nina's first year on the Council's
board was also the first year it held
Ruskin's "Big Draw," which has
now become an annual event.
"We just had our first planning
meeting for the next Big Draw,"
she told me. "We don't have any-
thing formulated yet so I hope a
lot of artists come out and get in-
volved."
For those who don't know, the
Big Draw is responsible for the two
large murals in downtown Ruskin;
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18 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

The arts


MARCH 18, 2010


* Continued from page 1

originally founded," Chuck said.
It will help that Bill is also on the
Arts Council's board.
At this point in his life, Bill is
once again using both sides of his
brain. The former teacher, prin-
cipal and now retired associate
superintendent of schools used
his business skills for 31 years to
negotiate contracts, hire, fire and
decide curriculum for a school dis-
trict in Maine.
During those years, he had put
aside the love of theater that had
him acting in high school and di-
recting while a student at the Uni-
versity of Maine.
The artsy side of his brain may
have been influenced by genes
from his grandfather, who was in
minstrels in the 1920s and '30s,
and a father and mother who were
actors in Community Theater the
whole time he was growing up.
When he thought back, he real-
ized he spent his entire childhood
surrounded by acting and the arts.
The first role he remembers play-
ing was the teenage suitor (Dexter)
in Meet Corliss Archer, a play and
weekly television comedy (from
the 1950s) about a high school girl
and her family.
From there, his high school act-
ing career took him to playing the
inspector in Dial M for Murder.
"I was about 15 then," he said,
laughing. "But after college I put
all that away until I moved to
Natchez, Miss. (many years lat-
er) where I joined a little theater
group."
It seems Bill had retired in his
forties after a heart attack but Di-
ane was still plugging away as a
supervisor with the Social Security
Administration.
When she was transferred to
Mississippi neither of them knew
they would pick up their long-for-
gotten love of theater there.
Diane had grown up in Jame-
stown, N.Y., where Lucille Ball
had spent her childhood, and when
Lucy and Dezi Arnaz debuted their
first movie, the now legendary
comedy The Long, Long Trailer,
the famous couple had their pre-
miere in Jamestown. "It was a
really, really big deal back then,"
Diane said.
But watching the theater crews
get out their gear for the famous
couple wasn't Diane's first experi-
ence with theater. At around 10 she
began attending Children's Little
Theater to gain some acting skills,
and ended her high school years
by being voted both Best Actress
and Best Debater in her yearbook.
But she put her acting away when
she "grew up," got a job and had
three children.
Fortunately for South County,
both Bill and Diane started acting


again later in life; after Bill had
retired and Diane was transferred
to her last assignment for Social
Security in Natchez.
"The Community Theater group
there was just wonderful," Diane
said.
When they moved to Northport
after she retired they threw them-
selves into a theater company in
Port Charlotte. Bill was even ac-
tive on its board.
But when one of their three
daughters moved to Tampa, the
prospect of interacting regularly
with children and grandchildren
brought them to Valrico, and af-
ter three years there, to Sun City
Center.
That was about five years ago.
Since moving to South County,
both Bill and Diane have become
involved with several theater
groups. Both have acted in plays
and done dinner theater.
"We did 28 performances of The
Odd Couple from Nov. 20 to Dec.
17 at the Palace Dinner Theater in
Sun City Center," Bill said. "And
we do mystery dinner theaters year
round."
Mystery dinner theaters are dif-
ferent because they're not usually
scripted, he explained. Many are
not open to the public because
they're done for specific groups,
clubs and organizations.
Diane recently wrote her first
mystery for dinner theater combin-
ing the characters from the board
game Clue and the elements from
Dial M for Murder. She calls it
Dial C for Clue.
Meanwhile, Bill is back to using
his organizational and business
skills as newly-elected president
of the board of the Pelican Play-
ers and as a board member of the
South Shore Arts Council.
"Our goals are to bring the arts
community together in new ways,"
he said of both organizations. "A
reorganization of the board to meet
the theater environment of 2010 is
our top priority. Things are chang-
ing. There's a real emerging inter-
est in dinner theaters and one-act
plays. The board was not consti-
tuted in the same environment we
have now and we realize it's time
to bring things up to date."
As of March 11 when they were
interviewed, both Diane and Bill
were working on the play, Love,
Sex, and the IRS, which will be
shown in the Borini Theater in the
main Kings Point clubhouse in
Sun City Center April 6 at 7 p.m.
and April 7 at both 1:30 and 7 p.m.
Tickets for those performances
may be bought by the public in
advance for $10 by calling Mary
McClafferty at (813) 634-4430.
I guess the only proper way to
end this story is by saying I hope
Diane and Bill both continue to
"break a leg."
Bill and his
scene part-
ner, Jen6
Evans from
Apollo Beach,
a teacher at
Ruskin's Earl
J. Lennard
.11F High School,
wait back-
stage for their
next scene in
Dearly De-
parted.


H i- \,


Bill Turcotte, newly-elected president of the Pelican Players community theater group, recently sang his
heart out while playing King Arthur in Camelot. Here, surrounded by actors from all over South County,
he takes a brief break after a show held in Sun City Center.


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 19


Spring Training and Navy
Week will collide at 7pm as the
Philadelphia Phillies take on the
Baltimore Orioles at the Bright
9 House Networks
Field located
at 601 N Old
Coachman Road
in C kiwll\ici As
the teams take the
field, the Navy Parachute Team, the
Leap Frogs,
take to the sky
over the field
and entertain
baseball fans.
Tickets range
from $12-$33.

The St. Pete Times Forum
located at 401 Channelside Dr.
in Tampa will host the Xtreme
Fighting Championships Mixed
Martial Arts where competitors
use integrated forms of fighting
including Jiu-jitsu, judo, karate,
boxing, Taekwon-Do, wrestling
and more. Tickets range from $15-
$70. For more information or to
purchase tickets call (813) 301-
2500.


^Th Ity of
Miami Gardens is
pleased to announce
the star-studded
lineup for the 5th
Annual "Jazz in the
Gardens" hosted by
#1 rated, nationally
syndicated radio
personality Tom
1 Joyner, taking
place on Saturday,
March 20 and Sunday, March 21
at Dolphin Stadium, 2269 Dan
Marino Blvd, Miami Gardens.
Confirmed artists include the queen
of R&B, Mary J. Blige; R&B
crooner, Robin Thicke; Grammy
award-winning singer/songwriter,
John Legend; Rick James prot6g6
and funk/R&B performer, Teena
Marie; R&B vocalist, Melanie
Fiona; jazz chanteuse, Cassandra
Wilson; saxophone king and
Eric Clapton collaborator, David
Sanborn; R&B newcomer, K'Jon;
and famed pianist, keyboarder
and founding member of the Jazz
Crusaders, Joe Sample. Concert
hours are 4pm to Midnight both
days.Ticket prices begin at $45 per
person per day. Weekend passes
are the best value. Visit www.
jazzinthegardens.com for more
information.

The Chasco Fiesta festival of-
fers eleven days of family fun and
entertainment, along the banks of
the beautiful Pithlachascotee Riv-
er in downtown New Port Richey.
This time-honored tradition allows
visitors to witness a traditional Na-
tive American festival, float deco-
rated watercraft in the boat parade,


or attend one of the areas largest
street parades. Other activities in-
clude live entertainment with a
concert featuring popular country
music stars and Christian rock art-
ists, a world record beef barbecue,
a street carnival, Native Ameri-
can arts and crafts show, golf and
softball tournaments, flea market
and antique show, Native Ameri-
can Pow Wow, Children's Village,
kayak race, as well as the 5K &
10K races. For more information
visit chascofiesta.com.


MacDill Air Force Base opens
its gates to the public for two
days of high-flying fun (Saturday/
Sunday). Watch fly-bys of all types
of aircraft and a performance by the
Blue Angels. You can get up close
and even tour some aircraft as well.
SinceAirFest coincides with"Navy
Week Tampa," catch a special
performance by the Leapfrogs,
the Navy's elite parachute team.
Gates open at 8 a.m. daily.


Event is free. For
more information
visit http://www.
macdill-airfest.
Y com.


Tampa Bay
Fossil Club show
will take place in the Special
Events Center at the Florida State
Fairgrounds (Interstate 4 at U.S.
301 N in Tampa) this Saturday and
Sunday with displays of fossils
and other artifacts from Florida's
prehistoric people, gems, minerals
and more.
Also related programs on hunting
for fossils and preservation
techniques, fossil vendors and
kids "fossil pit" activity. Children
dig in a sand pit for fossils, learn
about what they've found, how
the animal fossil lived and when
it died. Admission is $5 with
ages 12 and under free. For more
information call (813) 909-9358.


The Street Dreams Car Show
with more than $10 million in high
end vehicles and cars owned by
area sport stars will be displayed at
the St. Pete Times Forum located
at 401 Channelside Dr. In Tampa.
The show is from llam-6pm and
admission is $15.


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MARCH 18, 2010


Sunken Gardens will host
an Orchid Festival this Sunday
from 10am to 4pm. Find your
favorites from among the variety
of orchids for sale, enjoy talks on
orchid culture and care. Admission
is included in Sunken Garden's
admission: $8 adults, $6 seniors,
$4 kids ages 2-11; members are
free. Sunken Gardens is located at
1825 Fourth St. N in St. Pete. For
more information call (727) 551-
3100.

Scenic Fort DeSoto will host
the Florida Beach Halfathon
Marathon with races in lengths
of 13.1-miles and 5K on Fort
Desoto's flat trails and access
roads. Registrationbegins at 6 am,
wheelchair athletes race begins at
7 am, Halfathon and 5K begin at
7:05am. All 13.1-mile halfathon
finishers receive a Starfish gold
medal. Age group awards for 5K.
Price for registration is $70 day of
halfathon, $35 day of 5K (discounts
available for early registration).
Fort DeSotot is located at 3500
Pinellas Bayway S in Tierra Verde.
For more information or to pre
register call (727) 347-4440.






20 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


There is a coalition of agitated
anglers from charter captains
down to the small angler in his row
boat. The one point they all seem
to agree on is: the current regulato-
ry process relies upon government
sponsored research but doesn't put
much stock in the thoughts and ob-
servations of the everyday fisher-
man.
One angler put in his two cents
by saying these rules may look
good on paper until you get out
and try them in the real fishing
world.
A group of anglers went to Wash-
ington D.C. to voice their objec-
tions. They referred to the fishing
industry as a horrible train wreck.
First there was the netters who
suffered, now who wants to go
fishing for grouper or snook, when
you can't catch them.
Then there are those who wel-
come all of the closures and regu-
lations insuring that our grand-
children will have fish out there to
catch.
Remember when the ban was
on redfish? We had a time period
where we could not catch a red-
fish. They put millions of baby
reds in our waterways and they
grew larger. Now we have redfish
everywhere, but there still is a reg-
ulation on only one per person per
day of legal size.


Fishing is

good
If you were fishing for your din-
ner table this past week, I'm sure
all of you ate good because many
anglers reported to me there was
plenty of sheepshead caught. Av-
erage weight of the sheepshead
is 2 pounds. Its lean, white and
firm meat has an excellent food
value and can be broiled, fried, or
baked.
Numerous snook have been
caught and released. One group
told me they caught more than ten
in one afternoon.
Flounder, also a great tablefare
and included on most all restau-
rant menus, was plentiful this past
week.
A great trout run was enjoyed by
all who fished the flats. Schools of
them have been feeding at Cock-
roach Bay.
Those staying home and fishing
from their private piers have had
fun catching a small game fish
called ladyfish. To my knowledge
they are not edible and are full of
bones.
Our fresh waters in both the
upper parts of the Alafia and the
Little Manatee Rivers are yield-
ing great catches of large mouth
bass and fresh water catfish. Hush
uppies and catfish have been the
nain dish on many dinner tables
hs past week.
Even though mother nature has
handed us hurricanes, red tide,
old weather coupled with fish
kill, strong winds and rain, we still
have one of the best fishing spots
in the world.
I hope that as you spring ahead
with daylight savings time, you
will enjoy the warm weather, find
plenty of fish and enjoy one of the
most ancient sports in the world,
fishing.


MARCH 18, 2010
Bronson warns homeowners that termites are swarming


Termite swarming season gets
under way in late February and
early March as temperatures begin
to warm. Swarming means the ter-
mites are leaving their colonies to
search for new nesting sites. Florida
Agriculture and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H. Bronson
is again warning Floridians to take
steps to protect their home. Termites
cause about $750 million in property
damage in the United States annu-
ally.
Termites are most abundant in the
southwestern and southernU.S., with
the Gulf Coast commonly known as
"the termite belt." Since termites try
to avoid light and open air spaces,
the insects do their damage behind
walls. Many homeowners don't
realize they have a termite problem
until swarming season when they see
them flying around their homes. The
swarmers are winged, black insects
about one-quarter-inch long and look
a lot like flying ants.
Termites can be categorized into
two groups by their nesting sites.
The earth-dwelling termites that
make tunnels in the ground or build
tubes above the earth are called
subterranean termites. The second
group, the wood-dwelling termites
that have no contact with the earth,
are called drywood termites. Flor-
ida's climate makes it especially
vulnerable to termites and they are
found throughout the state. Despite
this, many homes in this state have
no termite protection.


"Prevention is critical in avoiding
termite destruction," Bronson said.
"The insects can go undetected for
long periods of time while they feed
on the wood in a home."
The Florida Department of Ag-
riculture and Consumer Services
regulates and licenses pest control
companies and conducts regular in-
spections to ensure the businesses
are adhering to the rules and regula-
tions governing pesticides and pest
control. Consumers can contact
the department to find out whether
a pest control company is properly
licensed, to find out how many con-
sumer complaints have been filed
against a particular business and to
learn about the various types of ter-
mite control contracts.
Licensed pest management profes-
sionals have the expertise to inspect
buildings and treat them to prevent
an infestation or provide treatment
when the insects are found. Termite
companies are now required to clear-
ly tell customers if their contract cov-
ers both subterranean and drywood
termites. Most pest control opera-
tions in Florida are licensed and have
the proper training. But there are
unlicensed companies in operation,
and it is important to check out any
businesses before signing a contract.
Steps that consumers can take to pro-
tect their homes from this destructive
pest are:
-- Remove wood piles and other
cellulose sources from under and
next to homes.


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-- Have an annual inspection by
a licensed professional pest control
company.
-- Direct water sources, such as
air conditioner drip lines and roof
downspouts, away from the structure
foundation.
-- When purchasing a home, care-
fully check its termite protection his-
tory.
-- Obtain a termite protection con-
tract and renew it annually.
Bronson said consumers should
read a termite protection contract be-
fore signing it. Some contracts only
require that the company re-treat a
home if termites are found. Bron-
son says it is better to have a re-treat
and repair contract which requires
the pest control business to repair
any damage caused by termites af-
ter a home has been inspected and
treated.
For information visit the depart-
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FloridaTermiteHelp.org or call
1-800-HELPFLA (1-800-435-
7352).


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News@ObserverNews.net





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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 21


MARCH 18, 2010

Over Coffee


* Continued from page 17
one in Thriftway Plaza (just east
of the Ruskin Post Office) and the
other on the building that houses
Second Hand Rose, a shop on
Shell Point Road near U.S. 41 that
sells "gently used" women's cloth-
ing suitable for office wear to ben-
efit the Mary and Martha House
shelter for homeless and abused
women and their children.
Besides her work on the Coun-
cil's board and planning for the
next Big Draw, Nina continues
iI


to teach free-motion design using
sewing machines; embroidery;
how to draw and color using sew-
ing machines with a darning foot;
thread painting, quilting, appliques
and wearable clothing design, and
making wall art and home d6cor.
She may be contacted about any
of these things through her Web
site, www.ninatatlock.com, by
email at info@ninatatlock.com, or
telephone, (813) 649-1371.
When I got up to leave Nina
made the remark that she always


Penny Fletcher Photos
Nina Tatlock of Apollo Beach, a lifelong fiber artist, has recently
taken over as vice president of the South Shore Arts Council. After
obtaining degrees in clothing and textiles from Purdue University
in Indiana she began designing clothing and holding "wearable
art shows." Now she enjoys teaching others how to make not only
clothing, but framed wall art from fabric.


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learns something from the people
she teaches.
I agreed because I always learn
something from the people I inter-
view.
A "tryptic" I've learned, is a se-
ries of three arrangements (usually
on a wall) that together make a
complete picture or design.


Now I wonder what Nina learned
from me!
*Perhaps you have something
you'dliketo share. Ormaybeyou'd
rather tell the community about
your favorite charity or cause: or
sound off about something you
think needs change. That's what
"Over Coffee" is about. It really


doesn't matter whether we actually
drink any coffee or not (although I
probably will). It's what you have
to say that's important. E-mail me
any time at penny @observemews.
net and suggest a meeting place.
No matter what's going on, I'm
usually available to share just one
more cup.


137 years of Popular Science


* By MITCH TRAPHAGEN
mitch@observernews.net
In the "This is One of the Cool
Things about the Web" depart-
ment, Popular Science magazine
has partnered with Google to of-
fer their entire 137-year magazine
archive free for browsing. Accord-
ing to Popular Science, each issue
appears as it did in its original time
of publication, including the front
page and advertisements.
Searching the 1962 editions near
my birth date, I discovered that
guys wearing suits or sport coats
and ties really liked to pose near
power tools in advertisements in
those days.
And speaking of guys, appar-
ently getting ajob operating heavy
equipment was restricted to them
based on an advertisement that
began, "Men...Get that Job!" For-
tunately, if lighter equipment was
your thing, tools were cheap. You
could earn $7,108.50 a year ser-
vicing radiators or acquire an engi-
neering degree in just 27 months.
Oh yeah, and an authentic replica
of a German Luger pistol was just
$3.95. That's right, three dollars
and ninety-five cents. There was
no confirmation as to whether the
thing actually shot bullets, but the
ad reminded me a bit of the x-ray
glasses advertised in my youth.
Just as there were a lot of disap-
pointed male adolescents wearing
silly looking glasses, there may
well have been a few disappointed
lunatics holding a fake non-shoot-
ing Luger.
There were also a number of let-
ters to the editor with suggestions
about how space missions in the
future could carry enough water
for astronauts, along with testi-


u~: z:~-r--r-z -im


monials from people who claim
their automobiles have honestly
and truly passed the 100,000 mile
mark so that it is indeed possible to
drive a car that far.
The archive currently allows
searches through keywords. The


magazine plans to provide more
advanced search technology in the
future. Perhaps someday that will
include mind control; and your
grandchildren will read all about
how we had to use "keywords"
and our fingers to type on key-
boards. Hey! It's not impossible.
We figured out the astronaut / wa-
ter problem, didn't we?
The archive is available at www.
popsci.com/archives


Each issue in the Popular Science archive appears just
as it did at its original time of publication, complete with
period advertisements.


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22 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT


Mary & Martha House launches
Operation Prom Gown
Second Hand Rose Boutique, operated by The Mary & Martha House
Inc. announces the launch of Operation Prom Gown. From now through
the end of May, any high school student donating their prom gown from
a previous event, in good saleable
condition, will receive a $5 vouch-
er towards a gown at Second Hand
Rose for this year's prom.
The boutique located at 100 East
Shell Point Road in Ruskin has re-
cently received a large shipment
of gowns from Trendy Teens con-
signment in Riverview. All prom

and alterations are available for a
small fee. The boutique sells new
and name brand women's cloth-
ing, jewelry and accessories.
The store in open from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. on Wednesday, Thursday,
and Friday; and from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday. The Mary & Martha
House Inc. is a shelter for women and children in crisis, and supports two
emergency shelters as well as transitional housing in South Hillsborough
County. For more information, call the boutique at 645-7628 or the office
at 645-7874.

Addict learns to repair relationship
with son
One of the most important things for the future of our society is the
positive upbringing of children. Children need the love and help of par-
ents and family to really make it. And those children who have parents
or family members who are struggling with a drug or alcohol addiction
can have an especially difficult time.
Bobby N. is one person who has had personal experience with addic-
tion and its effects on the family. He was addicted to drugs for more than
20 years before going into treatment. "[When I was using drugs] I would
not see my son for months and when I did I was always using, although
he did not know it at the time. Sometimes I would fall asleep after being
up for days and he could not wake me up and would get scared, eventu-
ally he got to where he did want to come over," he explains in a recent
interview.
With the help of his family, Bobby enrolled in the Narconon program
where he was finally able to handle his drug addiction for good. During
his treatment he was able to do many courses that helped him to regain
control of his life but there was one course in particular that really helped
him to get back onto the road to survival.
This course was called 'The Way To Happiness' and in it he found
some key information that aided him in repairing his relationship with
his own child. This was one precept in the book called, "Love and Help
Children." From the information in this book along with the rest of the
Narconon program Bobby was able to mend his relationship with his son
and even became a drug prevention lecturer to help other children. "The
precept, "Love and Help Children" is one of the biggest reasons I do
what I do now, because I wanted to make the world as safe as possible
for my son," he says.
The Way To Happiness is a common sense guide to moral living that
has been used as a key part of Narconon drug treatment for decades. Nar-
conon is a long-term residential drug and alcohol rehabilitation program
that has been helping to rehabilitate addicts and rebuild families since
1966. The organization currently operates more than 150 centers in 50
different countries and achieves a more than 70 per cent success rate for
permanent recovery from substance abuse.
Today Bobby's relationship with his son is stronger than ever. "Today
my son and I get along well and I can honestly say we are very, very
close almost like friends but at the same time it is my responsibility to
set an example for him and be there for him as a guiding light," says
Bobby.
"When I went through the Narconon program the precepts on the way
to happiness literally drove in the responsibilities I have to my son and
family and I cannot imagine living the life of insanity I once lived," he
adds.
If you or someone you love is struggling with a drug or alcohol addic-
tion contact Narconon today at 877-237-3307.

Before you replace the water heater...
Just today I saved $650 on a got as much water out as we could,
new hot water heater! My hot wa- we unscrewed the heating ele-
ter heater gave out last week so ments, and they were fried!
I thought I was going to have to What caused the problem was a
spring for a new one. However, build up of scale in the base of the
a quick trip to my local hardware heater. We then hooked up a tube


store proved otherwise.
I explained that my hot water
heater wasn't making the water hot
any more. The fellow at the store
explained how hot water heaters
are nothing more than a thermostat
and two heating coils in a tank. I
asked him if he sold the heater ele-
ments and he said, "Sure do." We
proceeded to the plumbing aisle
where there was an array of hot
water heater coils. I went home,
turned the breaker off (VERY im-
portant) to the hot water heater and
went to work. With the help of my
neighbor, we drained the tank, us-
ing the faucet at the bottom of the
heater. It had a hose fitting on it so
we just drained it using a garden
hose into a kitchen pot. After we


to a shop vacuum hose (using duct
tape around the seal) and removed
almost all of the scale at the base
of the hot water heater through
the heating element hole. After a
quick trip back to the hardware
store for the right heating elements
(Total cost: $26!), we were on our
way. We put in the new heater ele-
ments and turned the breaker back
on. We got the most wonderful hot
water for $26!
Terri B.
Want to live better on the money
you already make? Visit stretcher.com/r/99.htm> to find
hundreds of articles to help you
stretch your day and your dollar!
Copyright 2010 Dollar Stretcher,
Inc.


The Ruskin Moose L
1212 E. Shell Point Road


Friday, March 19
Saturday, March 20


Friday, March 26
Saturday, March 27
Every Wednesday


Every Thursday
Every Friday



Every Saturday night
Every Sunday Noon


7-11 p.m


.odge #813 is located at Moose Lodge
, Ruskin *(813) 645-5919 plans St. Patrick's
i. Live Music with Charlie Bums Day dinner


11 a.m. -? p.m. Moose Legion Picnic
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim
7-11 p.m. Live Music with Double Shot
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim
5-7 p.m. Spaghetti Dinners, followed by
Wii Bowling

5-7 p.m. Wings (the best I've every had)
5-7 p.m. Fish Fry
(beer batter, fried or baked)
Live music
Karaoke by Kim


to 3 p.m.


Tacos


All events are open to qualified
Moose members and guest.


Dinner is being served from 4
to 7 p.m. and there is a choice of
corned beef or ham and cabbage
dinner. There will be games,
prizes, and music from 7 p.m. to
10 p.m.
So put on your green and have
some fun at the Ruskin Moose
Lodge #813, 1212 E. Shell Point
Road, Ruskin. This is open to
qualified members and guest.


UF researchers find cancer-fighting properties in papaya


The humble papaya is gaining
credibility in Western medicine
for anticancer powers that folk
cultures have recognized for gen-
erations.
University of Florida researcher
Nam Dang, M.D., Ph.D., and col-
leagues in Japan have documented
papaya's dramatic anticancer effect
against abroad range of lab-grown
tumors, including cancers of the
cervix, breast, liver, lung and pan-
creas. The researchers used an
extract made from dried papaya
leaves, and the anticancer effects
were stronger when cells received
larger doses of the tea.
In a paper published in the Feb.
17 issue of the Journal of Ethnop-
harmacology, Dang and his col-
leagues also documented for the
first time that papaya leaf extract
boosts the production of key sig-
naling molecules called Thl-type
cytokines.
This regulation of the immune
system, in addition to papaya's
direct antitumor effect on various
cancers, suggests possible thera-
peutic strategies that use the im-
mune system to fight cancers.
The papaya extract did not have
any toxic effects on normal cells,
avoiding a common and devastat-
ing consequence of many cancer
therapy regimens. The success of
the papaya extract in acting on
cancer without toxicity is consis-
tent with reports from indigenous
populations in Australia and his
native Vietnam, said Dang, a pro-
fessor of medicine and medical
director of the UF Shands Cancer
Center Clinical Trials Office.
"Based on what I have seen and
heard in a clinical setting, nobody
who takes this extract experiences
demonstrable toxicity; it seems
like you could take it for a long
time as long as it is effective,"


he said.
Researchers exposed 10 differ-
ent types of cancer cell cultures
to four strengths of papaya leaf
extract and measured the effect
after 24 hours. Papaya slowed the
growth of tumors in all the cul-
tures.
To identify the mechanism by
which papaya checked the growth
of the cultures, the team focused
on a cell line for T lymphoma.
Their results suggested that at least
one of the mechanisms employed
by the papaya extract is inducing
cell death.


NAM DANG, M.D., PH.D.
In a similar analysis, the team
also looked at the effect of pa-
paya extract on the production of
antitumor molecules known as
cytokines. Papaya was shown to
promote the production of Thl-
type cytokines, important in the
regulation of the immune system.
For that reason, the study findings
raise the possibility of future use
of papaya extract components in
immune-related conditions such
as inflammation, autoimmune dis-
ease and some cancers.
Bharat B. Aggarwal, Ph.D., a


researcher at the University of
Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer
Center in Houston, already is so
convinced of papaya's restorative
powers that he has a serving of the
fruit every day.
"We have always known that
papaya has a lot of interesting
things in there," said Aggarwal, a
professor in the center's depart-
ment of experimental therapeu-
tics who was not involved in the
UF research. Foremost among
papaya's health-promoting agents
is papain, papaya's signature
enzyme, which is found in both the
fruit and the leaves.
"This paper has not gone too
much into identifying the compo-
nents responsible for the activity,
which is just fine. I think that is a
good beginning," Aggarwal said.
Aggarwal also noted that papaya
extract's success in reducing can-
cer in laboratory cell cultures must
next be replicated in animal and
human studies.
"I hope Dr. Dang takes it further,
because I think we need enthusi-
astic people like him to move it
forward," Aggarwal said.
Dang and a colleague have
applied to patent the process to
distill the papaya extract through
the University of Tokyo; the next
step in the research is to identify
the specific compounds in the pa-
paya extract active against the can-
cer cell lines.
For this stage, Dang has part-
nered with Hendrick Luesch,
Ph.D., a fellow UF Shands Cancer
Center member and a professor
of medicinal chemistry. Luesch is
an expert in the identification and
synthesis of natural products for
medicinal purposes, and recently
discovered a coral reef compound
that inhibits cancer cell growth in
cell lines.


Newly formed Ladies' Auxiliary


The American Legion Ruskin Ladies' Auxiliary Unit 389 was formed
on March 1. The new officers are as follows:
President Lois McBride
First Vice President Kelly Speight
Secretary/Treasurer Shirley Sheehy
Chaplain Gwen McCallister
Sergeant-at-Arms Martha Wierman
Membership Sue McBaine
At this time they are meeting at Ruskin VFW Post 6287, 5120 U.S. 41
N., Ruskin. Anyone who would like to join, call 634-2315 and they will
get back with you. They are holding their meetings at 7 p.m. on the 3rd
Wednesday of the month.


MARCH 18, 2010


~gs~"~Z~J


;LZ-






MARCH 18, 2010


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 23
I know my
redeemer lives
The Trinity Baptist Church choir
will present an Easter Cantata, "I
Know My Redeemer Lives!" dur-
ing the evening worship service at
6:00 p.m. on Palm Sunday, March
28 at 702 Del Webb Blvd West,
Sun City Center.
Admission is free. For more in-
formation, call the church at 634-
4228.


New members welcomed
Trinity Baptist Church Senior Pastor Dr. Ron Churchill, on the left,
welcomes new members Patti Hillman and Karen and Larry Howard.
For information on the church, call 634-4228.

Carl Franklin to discusses pre-birth
agreements
Carl Franklin is a Metaphysical Researcher. He holds a Masters degree
in Theology and Psychology and is a Minister of Coptic Fellowship In-
ternational (a spiritual/metaphysical organization embracing all Faiths,
beliefs and philosophies). Practicing self hypnosis and meditation has
allowed him to go beyond the 5 senses. He is a dowser and channeler.
He has the ability to communicate with the Higher Realm. Listen to him
at the Heritage Room in the Sun City Center's Complex, 1009 North
Pebble Beach Blvd, at 10:00 am, on Wednesday, March 31 to learn about
the pre-birth agreements we all make prior to entering this life. For infor-
mation, contact Ed Leary, 383-7594.
Plan ahead!
Friendship Baptist Church on 1511 El Rancho Dr. in Sun City Cen-
ter has orchestrated a March Revival beginning Saturday, March 19 and
concluding on Monday, March 21. In addition to testimonies and music
from the church's own praise team, the male quartet "Peace River" will
perform along with the Echoes of Inspiration.
Speakers include Tom Biles, former Director of Southern Baptist Con-
vention; Jeff Holly, education director and Othoniel Valdes, church plan-
ner.
An upcoming event for Friendship Baptist is the Sun City Center Fun
Fest on March 20. They will be giving away a free bottle of water to
soothe your thirst and feed your soul. At the end of the month, on March
27 the church's free monthly film with traditional movie refreshments
will start at 5p.m.
For information on the revival, church events or the Fun Fest call 813-
633-5950.






Zipperer's Funeral Home

Only onsite Crematory in S. Hillsborough County
Family owned and operated since 1979


Z 813-645-6130


1520 33rd St. S.E., Ruskin, FL 33570
www.zipperersfuneralhome.com Exp.3/31/o


"fW -'- 2010 Jlenten & /oly 'Week Schedule
EVERY WEDNESDAY
8:00 a.m. ........................................Mass followed by Adoration until noon
12:00 p.m ........................................................... .... ......................... M ass
7:00 p.m......................................... M isa y Via crucis
EVERY THURSDAY
6:00 7:15 p.m......................................... Reconciliation
EVERY FRIDAY
8:00 a.m........................................... ass followed by Adoration until noon
12:00 p.m ......................................... Mass followed by Stations of the Cross
THURSDAY, MARCH 25TH
7:00 p.m .....................................Taize Mass with Prayer Around the Cross
PALM SUNDAY MARCH 28TH
8 :00 a.m ................................................................................................. M ass
11:00 a.m ........................... Multicultural Mass followed by parish picnic
5:00 p.m ........................ ........................... ................................. M ass
106 11th Ave. NE Ruskin* 645-1714 'www.SaintAnneRuskin.org


Trinity Baptist Church celebrates birthdays
Trinity Baptist Church members Marian Hilton, left, and Nita
Schmierer, are celebrating their 90th birthdays during March. For
more information about the church, call 634.4228.

St. John the Divine is hosts 4th annual
golf outing
St. John the Divine is hosting its
4th Annual Golf Outing on Satur-
day, March 27. They will play the
Club Renaissance in Sun City Cen-
ter, 1.5 miles east of 1-75. The pub-
lic is invited to put their 4 person
team together: They may have 4
men, 4 women, or 2 couples. The
day will start at 7:30 a.m. with a
continental breakfast and registra-
tion. Tee off time is at 8:30 a.m.
They will have lunch and prizes for
gross and net winners, Men's clos-
est to the pin and women's closest
to the pin, and a putting contest. A
raffle will be held with some great
prizes, including rounds of golf for
4 at several beautiful golf courses. Carol Slaughter getting ready
The cost is $65 which covers the for the golf tournament.
breakfast, lunch, greens fees and
cart fees. Entry fee is $65 payable to St. John the Divine. Entries close
March 22. Call Ilene at 633-6564 for information.



Cremation?.

1 "Yes. I am interested in more information.
Name
Address

City State Zip
I PhoneI
SMail to:
National Cremation I
I & BURIAL SOCIETY I
I308 East College Ruskin, FL 33570 I
813.645.3231
TH N I 'L G T
SOCIETY F ITS*KID


We Mal
COMPLETE ASSI!


Make Your Life Easier with
Hanson Services, Inc.
In-Home Assistance
ke It Possible For Your Loved One
To Remain in Their Home.
STANCE WITH ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING


" Meal planning & preparation
" Bathing & personal hygiene
assistance
" Medication organization
V After hospital care
f Escort to appointments
" Bill Paying & Check Writing
through a Certified CPA
< Shopping & errands .. .. i
SShopping & errands 2009 Best of Sun City Center
V Light housework Award in Home Health Service
V Private duty Category by the U.S. Commerce
i Nursing home companionship Association
Assist with discharge from hospital or facility
30 Years of experience providing care with respect &
understanding to older adults. WE ARE LOCAL!
b, CALL 634-6617 FOR YOUR
FREE NEEDS ASSESSMENT
Bonded Licensed Insured Lic #30211040
-0,


Gospel Echoes
to sing
The Gospel Echoes will
be singing in the Wimauma/
Sun City Center Wal Mart
parking lot, Saturday March
20 at 6:30 pm. Everyone is
welcome.




Create a Life of
Joy
Create a Life of Joy will be cov-
ered from a Christian\ Spiritual
point of view at a women's retreat
Saturday, March 27, at Day Spring
Episcopal Conference Center in
Ellenton, from 9 am to 5 pm. Car
pools will be arranged from Sun
City Center.
Participants will discuss the pow-
er of their God-given potential and
spiritual gifts, discover more of
their purpose on this earth, learn to
align themselves with the rhythm
of the universe, set intentions for
the best year of their life, and sim-
ply enjoy the peace and healing of
the beautiful environment.
The day is sponsored by Unity
Community of Joy and is open to
all women interested. Registra-
tion is required. The cost, which
includes lunch, is $30 for mem-
bers of the congregation and $40
for community friends. This is the
second annual women's retreat and
promises to be fulfilling in several
ways. Feel renewed, refreshed
and purposeful. For more infor-
mation call Betty Martin-Lewis at
813-298-7745.

Catholic Women to
meet
The Council of Catholic Women
of Prince of Peace Catholic Church
will hold their final meeting for the
year 2009-2010. They will meet
following the 8:00 am Mass and
Devotion on Wednesday, April 7.
The meeting will be held in
Conesa Center and feature the Liv-
ing Rosary. They will also discuss
in summary what transpired this
past year and goals for next year
will be explored. All women of
Prince of Peace Catholic Church
are invited to attend.

Premiere of
Requiem Mass to
be presented
Prince of Peace Catholic Church
in Sun City Center is presenting
the premiere choral performance
of a beautiful Requiem Mass writ-
ten by Mark Winchester March 21


I at 4 p.m.
This ancient and liturgical Latin
text has been set to music by many
composers from the Middle Ages
to the present time. Its text is from
the Mass of the Dead. This opus is
written, directed and accompanied
by Winchester, who is the music
director at Prince of Peace.
Reserve Sunday, March 21 at 4
p.m. for an inspiring musical ex-
perience.






24 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
The Doerfels return to United Methodist Church of SCC


MARCH 18, 2010


The United Methodist Church of
Sun City Center, 1210 Del Webb
Blvd. West, is proud to welcome
back The Doerfels, a Branson-
based bluegrass group, on Friday
evening March 19 at 6:30PM.
This veteran bluegrass ensem-
ble has won numerous awards up
and down the East coast for their
lively and highly original shows.
Originally farmers from upstate
New York, this family travels and
performs together for most of the
year. The average age of the band
is 16 years. The core band consists
of the oldest son and leader TJ, 19,
on banjo; Kim, 17, on the fiddle;
Eddy, 15, on mandolin; Joey, 14,
on bass and cello; and Ben, 12, on
guitar. The whole family joins in
on certain songs and adds humor
to the act, making it an entertain-
ing show for all ages. It's not un-
usual for one of the younger kids
to wander on stage and steal the
show!
If you like country, gospel, and
bluegrass, interspersed with a
touch of blues, jazz, swing, and
classical, you'll want to catch this
outstanding, young talented band!
The Doerfels' concert is sure to


The Doerfels


be a sell-out, so concert-goers are
encouraged to arrive early for a
good seat. A donation of just $5
is requested at the door. For ad-
ditional information about this
and other concerts and recitals at
the United Methodist Church of
Sun City Center, contact Jeff Jor-


Veeda Javaid to be guest speaker at St.
Andrew Presbyterian Church
On Sunday, March 21 at 9:30 teachers. The hope is that the new
a.m., Veeda Javaid, Executive Di- ly trained teachers would go out to
rector of the Presbyterian Educa- the surrounding communities an
tion Board (PEB), Lahore, Paki- open their own desperately needed
stan will be the guest preacher at schools.
St. Andrew Presbyterian Church, Veeda travels to the U.S. an
1239 Del Webb Blvd., West, Sun to European countries to educat
City Center. others about the PEB and to raise
With the help of her staff and money for her schools and proj
the board of directors of the PEB, ects. Her goal is to establish
Veeda is responsible for 13 former thousand schools to compete wit
mission schools and two addi- the madrasas that instruct accord
tional programs, the Girls at Risk ing to Taliban principles.
Project and the Rainbow School.
In 1972 the Pakistan government
nationalized all the schools in
that country, including the long
established Presbyterian mission
schools. After nationalization CALVARY LU
the quality of education and the S ontem
physical structures of the schools Traditi
greatly deteriorated. Since then PsorkR Palzer CrossRoads: Bible
several schools have been returned 5309 u.s. Highway 41 North Apollo Beach
to the PEB. Since 1998, Veeda (acrossfrom MiraBay www.calvarylutheranc
and the PEB personnel saw the op-
pression of girls and women, es- St. John the I
specially those who lacked a male Growing by Faith
Rev. Tracy H. Wider -
in the family. To help with this SUNDAYSERVICES: 9 am Co
problem they established shelters at West Campus, S.R.
for Girls at Risk. These shelters 8 am Traditional Service and 11 am
at 1015 De
are in smaller villages within the All Worship Services with H
area around Lahore. The purpose
of these schools is to provide im- kin United
mediate shelter/lodging/counsel- Ruskin United
ing/guidance to the women/girls First Street & 4th Ave
at risk. ALL ARE WELCOME
Another pressing problem is be- SUNDAY MORNINGS: (Nov.-Ap
Rev. John M. Bartha and ally
ing met by the Rainbow School in Phone: 645-1241 Sunday
Lahore. This school began as a
way to provide training for teach-
ers in special education. The initial REDEEMER LUTH


school was established to educate
students with learning disabilities
and to be the center for training
St. John the Divine
Episcopal Church
presents Eleonora
Lvov
Russian born piano virtuoso Ele-
onora Lvov will appear at St. John
the Divine Episcopal Church, Sun
City Center on Sunday, March 21
at 3:30 p.m. A resident of Sarasota,
Lvov is an internationally acclaimed
artist. Tickets are $10 and are for
sale after each of the Sunday services
or by calling Barbara Capron 634-
9771 or will be sold at the SCC CA
Kiosk 9 am-noon March 8-19.
The proceeds of these programs
will benefit the Pipe Organ Fund of
St. John the Divine. There will be a
reception held in the Parish Hall fol-
lowing the event and CDs of Lvov
will also be on sale.


V-
o
d
d

d
e
e
i-
a
h
d-


dan, Director of Music and the
Arts, at 813-634-2539. To learn
more about the United Methodist
Church of Sun City center, please
visit their website at www.sccumc.
com.

CCW dessert card
party
The Council of Catholic Women
(CCW) of Prince of Peace Catho-
lic Church invites anyone who
likes to play cards or any board
game to make up your table in
advance and come to the monthly
Dessert Card Party on Wednesday,
April 14 from noon until 3:30 pm
in Conesa Center.
They furnish cards, pencils and
tallies. They have an assortment
of desserts, table and door prizes.
For more information call 633-
2460.


THERAN CHURCH
ship: Blended 8:00 a.m.
=porary9:40 a.m.
onal 1:15a.m. Bendd. I .
Study, Worship: Wed. 7 p.m.
B A I
hurch.net 645-1305 I N i

)ivine Episcopal Church
from Generation to Generation
Church Office 813-645-1521
temporary Service and Sunday School
674 and 9th Street SE, Ruskin
Holy Communion with Choir at East Campus
el Webb Blvd., SCC
oly Communion and Healing Holy Oil


Methodist Church
i. NW, Ruskin (Behind Suntrust Bank)
TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
il ....... .............8:30a.m. Day Care Available
Mon. Fri.
'ear)..................... 10:45 a.m. 6 a.m.- 6 p.m.
School....................... 9:30 a.m. call 645-6198

ERAN CHURCH-ELCA


/UI Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center, FL33153-3/j 4
Rev. Dr. Peter Stiller, Pastor 634-1292
Saturday Worship: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion....First & Third Sunday Bible Class...Thursday 10 am, Guests Welcome

First Church of Christ, Scientist
Ruskin Sun City Center (813) 645-6102
204 Second St. N.W, Ruskin, Florida 33570
Sunday Service Sunday School ........................................... 10AM
Wednesday Testimony Meeting ......................................... 5PM
Reading Room Tuesday & Thursday...................................... 1-4 PM
ALL ARE WELCOME www.spirituality.com

FARST BAPTIST CHURCH
-<----6--of 0} K.cS a FL 0%
L \ 820 COLLEGE AVE. W.
RUSKIN, FL 33570
645-6439
Sscwww.fbcruskin.org
A Resource for Families -


Sunday School............................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship............8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m.
Evening Service...........................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night Service..............7:00 p.m.
Aw ana ............................................7:00 p.m .


GRADE


High Seas Spring Break Camp
The United Methodist Church of Sun City Center is happy to offer its first
Spring Break camp. At High Seas Expedition, kids explore the mighty love
of God on a journey that will change them forever! High Seas Expedition
is filled with incredible Bible-learning kids see, hear, touch, and even taste!
Bible Point crafts, teambuilding games, cool Bible songs, and tasty treats are
just a few of the High Seas Expedition activities that help faith flow into real
life. (Since everything is hands-on, kids might get a little messy. Be sure to
send them in play clothes and safe shoes.) Plus, we'll help kids discover how
to see evidence of God in everyday life-something we call God Sightings.
Get ready to hear that phrase a lot!
Your kids will also participate in a hands-on mission project called Opera-
tion Kid-to-KidTM that will let the kids in our community blanket the world
with God's love.You can sign up by going online at www.sccumc.com or call
634-2539 to register by phone. High Seas Spring Break Camp is free.
What happens when science talks to religion
On March 18 Aileen Vincent-Barwood, presents "What Happens When
Science Talks To Religion"? Aileen was born in Toronto Canada and is
a WWII Canadian Air Force veteran. Since 1976 she has been an Ameri-
can citizen and now spends 7 months a year in Sun City Center. She is a
longtime reporter, former overseas journalist for the Canadian Broadcast
Corporation in the Middle East and Africa and the former editor and col-
umnist for The St. Lawrence Plain Dealer in Canton, NY. Her fiction and
non-fiction has appeared in many magazines and international publica-
tions. She has authored three books and most recently a murder mystery
and an award winning short story.
Coffee and conversation is at 7:00 pm in the Beth Israel Social Hall at
1115 Del Webb Blvd. East, Sun City Center. The program begins at 7:30.
Visitors are welcome. For information call 813-633-2349.
Annual meeting and election of officers for the Unitarian Universalist
Fellowship will begin promptly at 5:00 pm on March 25, in the Social
Hall at 1115 Del Webb Blvd. East, Sun City Center.


; Friendship Baptist Chwrch
I Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist)
1511 El Rancho Dr.
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Phone/Fax:
813-633-5950


C4


WEEKLY SERVICES:


.Bible Study
.Bible Study
.....Worship


Sunday
9 a .m ..............
1 1 a .m ..............
10 a.m. & 6 p.m.


Wednesday
6 p.m.... Prayer Meeting/Bible Study


Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC
Meets in the Social Hall of the Beth Israel Synagogue
1115 E. Del Webb Blvd.
Thursday, 7:00 PM Call 633-0396
Drawing boundaries is the preoccupation of minds
incapable of building bridges.


Brian Hocking


NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where God's Love is Shared"
U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL 645.1121 www.nbcor.org
Sunday School for all ages 9:30 AM SBC
Morning Worship 10:45 AM Wanted: People Who Want to Grow
Evening Worship 6:00 PM and Live for Jesus!
Full Wednesday Schedule for all ages

North River Church of Christ
Non-Instrumental-
13885 U.S. Hwy 301 South
(Just South of the Manatee County Line)
Minister: Howard Johnson Office 941-776-1134
Services: Sunday 10:00am, 11:00am & 6:00pm ce 41-6-1 4
Wednesday7:00pm Home 813-754-1776

SFirst Baptist Church of Gibsonton
"We love because He first loved us." 1 John 4:19
Traditional Worship Service *Sunday School 9:30 A.M.
Old-Time Gospel Hymns *Morning Worship 10:30A.M. 3
Nursery Available Sunday Evening 6:00 P.M.
*Interpreter for the Deaf Mid-Week (Wed.) 7:00 P.M.
9912 Indiana St. Hwy 41 & EstelleAin 8 Malcolm S. Clements, Pastor
\Gibsonton, FL 33534 813-67-1301

Welcome Ae. EVERETT TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ
1611 First St. SW Ruskin, FL 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL-
SERVICES: Sunday........................9:30 & 10:30 a.m.; 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday................7:00 p.m.

PRINCE OF PEACE CATHOLIC CHURCH
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573
Phone: 634-2328 Fax: 633-6670
Masses: Sunday............................................................ 8:00, 10:00 AM, Noon
Saturday Vigil.................................................. 4:00 PM and 6:00 PM
Daily............................. .. ...... ....................... 8:00 AM
www.popcc.org Confessions: Monday Friday 7:30am, Saturday 8:30am and 3:00pm


I


I ... .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....







MARCH 18, 2010
OBITUARIES
Isabel A. Harley
After 101 years, Isabel A. Harley
of Sun City Center, FI rejoined her
husband Jim in heaven on September
4, 2009. Isabel was raised in Beaver
Dam, WI along with her 10 brothers
and sisters and parents Nick and
Teresa Kummer. She married Jim in
1930 and moved many times with
Jim's work, finally settling in East Troy,
WI in 1947. Isabel was an avid bowler
and competitive golfer, winning many
awards and championships through the
years.
In 1967 Jim retired and they moved to
Sun City Center where Isabel continued
to enjoy golf through 94 years. She was
a member of Prince of Peace Catholic
Church and served as a Eucharistic
minister for many years and on the
rosary guild.
Isabel is survived by daughter Patricia
Totten and husband David of Burlington,
WI; two grandsons Robert of Burlington,
and Scott, wife Gina of San Antonio,
TX; two great grandchildren, Dustin
of USN and Chiree of San Antonio,
TX; great great grandson Mark of San
Antonio, TX; special niece Shirley and
many other nieces and nephews. Rest
in peace Mom.
Mass of Christian Burial was held
at 10 a.m. Tuesday September 8, 2009
at Prince of Peace Catholic Church in
Sun City Center, FL. Entombment was
at Mansion Memorial Park and Funeral
Home, Ellenton, FL.
Francis (Frank) Meek
Francis (Frank) Meek passed away
in Sun City Center Florida on March 7,
2010.
He is survived by his loving wife Jane
Snyders Meek. He previously served on
the Sun City Center Emergency Squad
and was an active member of the SCC
United Methodist Church.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 25


A Memorial Service were held at Sun
City Center United Methodist Church
on March 11, 2010. Donations may be
made to the SCC Emergency Squad.
Arrangements handled by Sun City
Center Funeral Home.
John R. Phelps
John R. Phelps, May 2, 1909 -
March 4, 2010. Phelps, a teacher
of instrumental music in Detroit MI,
served as organist at the Sun City
Center United Methodist Church and
as Director of Johnny's Angels choral
group and held membership in many
Sun City Center clubs.
He is predeceased by his wife of
56 years, Dorothy, and his daughter
Janis. He is survived by his daughter
Nancy, 4 grandchildren and 6 great
grandchildren.
Memorial gifts may be sent to the
Emergency Squad or United Methodist
Church Music Dept, both of Sun City
Center.












L '



Ray Jones Stanclift, Jr.
Ray Jones Stanclift, Jr., 90, of SCC,
died at home on March 9, 2010 as he
lived, with courage and dignity.
Ray was born January 24, 1920
in Washington DC, the only child of
Colonel Ray Jones Stanclift and Lucy


Jane Watson Stanclift. Most of his
early years were spent on the army
post at Fort Sam Houston where his
dad served as the Chief of the US Army
Veterinary Corps. He was 9 when his
dad retired after 30 years of service to
our country and moved to the family
farm in Kansas. These were great
years working the land, caring for the
animals, and doing a lot of hunting,
fishing and hiking with his cousin and
best friend, Bruce Watson. He was
baptized at Overland Park Presbyterian
Church and attended the church
sponsored Scout Troop #94 where he
earned his Eagle, the highest ranking
honor in Boy Scouts.
Ray was the First Graduate in
Chemical Engineering from Kansas
University in 1941. As Army Reserve,
he was called to active duty a few
months later for 'a year and a day'. He
often joked 'that was a long day' as he
proudly served as a chemical officer,
advancing to the rank of Major, in the
Pacific arena until after WW2 came
to an end in 1945. By 1951 he had
earned his PhD in Chem Eng from K.U.
and embarked on a 31 year career with
Exxon culminating with responsibilities
for marine transportation of chemicals
worldwide.
While in the South Pacific he met his
bride to be, Dorothy Jane Lewis, who
was serving our country as a Navy
Nurse during WW2. They married Dec
6,1945 and began a long and wonderful
life together. Their favorite passions
were family and traveling throughout the
world (to 140 countries!), making friends
with people everywhere they went and
exploring the many cultures, artwork,
music and lands of other places. His
other passion through the decades
was following the stock market with his
broker and friend Bruce Burrows. He
was honored to be a lifelong member
of the Presbyterian Church where he


worshipped his living Lord.
Ray was preceded in death by
his parents and his beloved wife
Dotty (1993). He is survived by his
children, John Ray (Kathy) Stanclift of
Torrance, CA; Mary Stanclift Hirsch of
Sun City Center, Fl. and Jill Stanclift
of Vancouver, WA, as well as his
grandchildren Brianne, Kyle, Anna
Brodea and Richard Zachary.
Donations may be made in honor
of Ray Jones Stanclift, Jr. to Kansas
University Endowment, Attn: Judy
Wright, P O Box 928, Lawrence, KS,


Richard W. (Dick), Taylor
Richard W. (Dick) Taylor, 87, of Sun
City Center passed away on March 9,
2010. He was the loving husband of
the late Jacqueline F. Taylor; and is
survived by his sister Helen Oliver of
Hillsboro, NH; son Bruce Taylor and
wife Christine of Sterling, Va.; son Barry
Taylor and wife Brenda of Westminster,
Md.; and daughter Cheryl Openshaw
and husband Jay of Norfolk, Va. He
is also survived by 7 grandchildren:
Christopher Taylor, Tracy Taylor, Tracy
Rouchard, Jamie Kendellen, Brian
Chapline, Nicholas Taylor, Richard


Chapline; and 6 great grandchildren.
He also leaves behind his loving
companion Yoshie Witty.
In lieu of flowers, donations in
Richard Taylor's memory can be made
to the Sun City Hospice House, 3723
Upper Creek Dr. Ruskin, FL 33573.

In h honor of

ipi1ip j j(Pj) Coms5




tm\


3/2-4 1t 6/12/04
We all would like to say Happy
24th Birthday to P. J.
You are loved and missed more
than words can say.

Love 4-Ever,
Mom, Dad, Travis, Family
& Friends


A spiritual home where you can come as you are, be
yourself, and find God in your own way. We are a fellow-
ship that encourages spirituality rather than "religion."
Affiliated with Assoc of Unity Churches, Lee's Summit
MO, and Unity publishers of the Daly Word
Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
Beth Israel's Social Hall
1115 Del Webb E.
Sun City Center, FL

Unity Community of Joy
www.unitycommunityofjoy.com Tel. 813-298-7745



V THE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO THE SERVICES NOW WORSHIPPING IN THE "CHAPEL"
AT SUN CITY CENTER FUNERAL HOME 10:30 AM ON SUNDAYS
NO CREED...BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE
1851 RICKENBACKER DRIVE 813-938-4955
Minister DR. DAVID CAMPBELL


QjnieoJeodos(is GCurcof cun CG/iy Genler
The Church of Open Hearts... Open Minds... Open Doors
1210 W. Del Webb Blvd. 634-2539
S Worship Services:
Saturday................. 4:00 p.m. Creason Hall (Traditional Service)
II l, Sunday.....................8:15 a.m. in Sanctuary (Traditional Service)
9:30 a.m. Creason Hall (The Oasis)
F h 10:55 a.m. Sanctuary (Traditional with Chancel Choir)
Fellowship tim T..... i 1, .' ... I r .... 10:15a.m. and 11 a.m. in Creason Hall
'-'fotisYLove n (.SLCC(IiC.comh
PASTORS: DR. WARRENLANGER, REV GARY BULLOCK
Communion First Sunday ofEach Month



St. Andrew Presbyterian Church

| Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.
Prayers with anointing for healing and
I L wholeness during worship the second Sunday
of every month.
A Stephen Pastor: Dr. Gerald Iwerks
Ministry Church
Meet fiends in Fellowship Hall after the Service
Refreshments served


1239 Del Webb Blvd. West
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Church is Handicap accessible


Phone: 813-634-1252
For Information visit:
www.standrewatscc.org


Center for Restoration Ministries
"Restoring the broken through the Word of God"
ERVICES: Worship Service.................. Sunday 11 a.m.
Bible Study .................... Wednesday 7 p.m.
301 1st Street NE Ruskin, FL 33570 813-645-7779
t, if t. ,t. i. i *i ','.2 ..il.., *'n Pastors Teresa & Freddie Roberts, Sr "


Ruskin Church of Christ
Don White, Minister 813-361-1415
Sunday Bible Enrichment.............................. ..............10:00 a.m.
W orsh ip ........................................ ...................................................... 11:00 a.m .

Iglesia De Dios Puerta Abierta
Open Door Church of God
Pastor Jose C. Pifia 813-645-3813 813-285-8245
Domingo (Sunday) Estudio Biblico (Bible Study) ............................. 6:00 p.m.
Servicio De Adoracion (Worship/Praise Service).............................. 7:00 p.m.
Miercoles (Wed.) Servicio De Oracion (Prayer Service) ................. 7:00 p.m.
Both Churches at this Location: 611 2nd Ave. NW, Ruskin, FL 33570



SOUTHSIDE
Loving Peopk
Preaing Pto BAPTIST CHURCH
4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 South
(4 miles south of Ruskin)
DAN COLLINS, PASTOR JIM KRAUSE, MUSIC DIRECTOR
COLnMUINITY INVITED
BIBLE STUDY 9:30 AM
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE 10:55 AM
SUNDAY EVENING SERVICE 6:00 PM
WEDNESDAY PRAYER SERVICE 7:00 PM
ADULTS, YOUTH, CHILDREN
For information, call 645-4085 Monday-Thursday



Saint Anne Catholic Chutch


Pastor
813-645-1714
SaintAnneRuskin.org

U.S. Hwy. 41 106 11th Ave. NE Ruskin
SouthShore: r- : .I I. Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton
M ASSES
Saturday Vigil M ass.................................................................... 5:00 p.m .
Sunday M ass............................................8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., 5:00 p.m.
Holy Days....................................... Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Daily ......................................................... M onday thru Friday 8:00 a.m.
Espatol................................ Domingo 12:00 p.m.; Miercoles 7:00 p.m.
Confession.............................Wednesday 6:15 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.
24 -/


RENEE WATTERS
Girl Friday
honored
Recently Friendship Baptist
Church's "Girl Friday," (plus Sat-
urday and Sunday, etc) was hon-
ored at a retirement party. Renee
Watters is a hard working ex-ev-
erything, who has chosen a new /
old occupation her family.
The church shall surely miss her
and wishes her well in visiting her
children, and family.
One performance
only
Riverview United Methodist
Church is pleased to present a Pas-
sion Play on Good (Holy) Friday,
April 2, at 7:00 p.m. in the church
sanctuary located at 8002 US Hwy
301 South, Riverview.
The final few days of Jesus' life
is the centerpiece of the Christian
faith. The events of the Passion
answer the question, "To what
lengths would God go to make real
his love and forgiveness to all his
children?"
One performance only! Every-
one is welcome. There is no charge
to attend this event. Arrive by 7:00
p.m.






26 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
UF researcher:

Florida agriculture took economic hit, but remains strong


MARCH 18, 2010


Florida agriculture survived the
first part of the economic downturn
fairly well but decreased demand
for exports has been a concern, a
University of Florida expert says
in an annual report.
In the report that looks at 2008
economic data, agriculture and re-
lated industries contributed $76.5
billion to the state's economy, said
Alan Hodges, an extension scien-
tist with UF's Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.
"Every single sector of the econ-
omy has been affected in the reces-
sion, there's just no getting away

Sun City
Christian Center
announces their

Sun City Christian Center, lo-
cated at 17566 U.S. Hwy. 301
South, Wimauma, will hold its an-
nual chicken dinner this Saturday,
March 20.
For a $6 donation diners will get
a half chicken (barbecued fresh
Saturday morning), potato salad,
baked beans, a roll and brownie.
Dinners are carry-out only and
available from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. at the church. Tickets have
been on sale for several weeks,


from that. And agriculture is no ex-
ception," Hodges said. "However,
it looks like agriculture has taken
less of a hit than some other seg-
ments."
Hodges has been involved in the
annual report's production since
2000.
Economic data compiled by the
federal government lags about
two years behind, and 2008 is the
most recent year for which data is
available, he said. Economists peg
December 2007 as the start of the
country's recession.
The report tracks more than 90


however organizers are planning to
have extra meals on hand for those
who would like to stop in and pick
up one (or several) during the car-
ry out times listed earlier. Enjoy a
great meal at a great price.
The church is conveniently lo-
cated two miles south of S.R. 674
on U.S. 301, minutes from Sun
City Center and Wimauma.
For church service times and
more information visit www.Sun-
CityChristian.com.


SUNROOMS SCREEN ROOMS


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march of dimes
march for babies"


industry sectors such as farming,
ranching, pest control, fertilizer
manufacturing, mining, food and
beverage manufacturing, paper and
lumber production, golf courses,
recreational fishing and commer-
cial hunting and trapping.
Agriculture's $76.5 billion value-
added impact from the 2008 report
is down from the 2007 figure of
$93 billion but that's similar to
the economic hit suffered by other
industries during the same time pe-
riod, he said.
The value-added impact includes
what economists call multiplier ef-
fects, which Hodges explains like
this: A farmer buys things like
seeds, fertilizer, machinery and
equipment from suppliers. That
spending creates revenue for sup-
pliers and their employees, who
spend their wages on things like
food, housing and transportation.
The researchers rely on a model
called IMPLAN that tracks a vast
array of economic transactions be-
tween business sectors.
Agriculture's value-added impact
is down, and Hodges said he be-
lieves lower demand for the state's
agricultural exports is to blame.
For example, citrus fruit is ex-
ported from Florida to Europe and
Asia, and those exports were down
by nearly 20 percent in 2008.
Still, agriculture and natural re-
source industries accounted in
2008 for about 8 percent of Flori-


da's gross state product.
Accounting for nearly 1.3 mil-
lion full- and part-time jobs, or 14
percent of the state's total employ-
ment in 2008, agriculture ranks
second in jobs among the state's
economic sectors, though Hodges
notes that UF's report reclassified
some jobs from the North Ameri-
can Industry Classification Sys-
tem's designations.
Among industry groups, average


a


Trs your Eyecare1!to LI Splecialists


Walter
Moscoso, M.D.
Retina Specialist,
Macular
Degeneration


Robert Eric
Edelman, M.D. Berman, M.D.


Cataract & Laser
Surgeon,
Glaucoma Specialist


MANATEE
* EEYE CLINIC
E-Nrri.^j ^.

Eyelid Plastic
Surgeon,
Neuro-Specialist


Robert
Sambursky, M.D.
Cornea Specialist,
Cataract Surgery,
General Eye Care


annual growth in value-added im-
pacts from 2001 through 2007 was
highest for mining (19 percent)
and crop, livestock, forestry and
fishery production (10 percent),
followed by food and kindred
products distribution (5 percent)
and forest product manufacturing
(3 percent).
For more data, please see the
full report: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/
fe829


ANY FLUID Mc
ANY FLUD FULL ENGINE A/C SERVICE
EXCHANGE DIAGNOSTIC SPECIAL
OF95 $997
steering S I Value 91
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ANY FLUSH Includes:Inspect belts compressor & hoses,
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Brake,Transiss anowerSteer Check Engine Light On? leak est entire system. (Freon is exta). Most crs
S Most vehicles. No other d counts apple
Additional charesfor shop s uppes may added Mostvehicles. No other discounts apply and light trucks. Valid only with coupon.
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Environmental disposal fee may apply in some are See store for details. Exp. 442210 Exp. 4/2210
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aplicabeO, add brake fluid, inspect hydraulic system suspention, air & breather finger motor oil. Purlatoroil filter. Most cars and light
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H.. 60 AAA Autorized
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Goodson

reduce

Market

Strawberry Shortcake
Milk Shakes
Sandwiches
S* Fresh Vegetables

634-7790
Mon. Sat. 8:30 a.m. 5 p.m.
CLOSED SUNDAY


(813) 633-3065
1515 Sun City Center Plaza


Y1


m


F,






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 27


East Saey Wtatch

By Michael Cooper


EAST BAY HIGH SCHOOL

GIRLS' FLAG FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
JV/ARSITY


Photo by Visual Sports/Furman Whitaker
East Bay High School Girls' Flag Football Team
1st Row: Ayrianna Woody, Megan Loomis, Dashline Nemorin, Kaylii Bolin, Princess Davis, Edleen
Diaz, Alexis Hardy, Janielle Rodriguez, Nereida Diaz, and Akeila Brown.
2nd Row: Priscilla Aviles, lesha Martinez, Stephanie Williams, Amber Jacobus, Jonilda Francois,
Brian Lidey, Michael Cooper, Tim Smith, Greg Taplin, Nicole Lock, Melissa Lopez, Kayla Cyrus, and
Andrea Benedetto.
3rd Row: Bryanna Poli, Taja Hammond, Kayla Lassalle, Andrea Owens, Catherine Donley, Kayla
Mayfield, Kaitlyn Magolon, Raven Rennolds, Keyah Richardson, Tiana Hill, Essence Crum, Delaney
Poli, Sasha Martinez, and Bithia Desvarieux.


SAT 3/20 at MATANZAS (Tournament)

MON 3/22 SPOTO HOME

THU 3/25 RIVERVIEW HOME

WED 3/31 LENNARD HOME

THU 4/01 at BLOOMINGDALE AWAY

MON 4/05 at NEWSOME AWAY

WED 4/07 at ARMWOOD AWAY

MON 4/19 BRANDON HOME

THU 4/22 FREEDOM HOME

MON 4/26 Districts @ EBHS HOME

WED 4/28 Districts @ EBHS HOME


EAST ]
High


8 a.m.

E 6:15/7:30 p.m.

E 6:15/7:30 p.m.

E 6:15/7:30 p.m.


6:15/7:30 p.m.


S 6:15/7:30 p.m.

S 6:15/7:30 p.m.

E 7 p.m.

E 7 p.m.

E TBD

E TBD




BAY
School


What To Plant in March


FLOWERS: Annuals: Ageratum,
Alyssum, Amaranthus, Arctotis,
Asters, Baby's Breath, Balsam,
Bracteantha, Browallia, Calen-
dula, Calliopsis, Celosia, Cleome,
Coleus, Cosmos, Dahlberg Daisy,
Delphinium, Dianthus, Diascia,
Dusty Miller, Foxglove, Gaillar-
dia, Gazania, Geranium, Impatiens,
Kalanchoe, Lobelia, Marigold,
Melampodium, Marguerite Daisy,
Mexican Sunflower, Nasturium,
Nemesia, Nicotiana, Nierembergia,
Ornamental Pepper, Osteosper-
mum, Periwinkle/Vinca, Petunia,
Annual Salvias, Snapdragon, Stock,
Strawflower, Sunflower, Torenia,
Verbena, Viola, Wax Begonia,
Zinnia

VEGETABLES: Beans, Beets,
Cantaloupes, Carrots, Corn,
Cucumbers, Green Onions, Egg-
plant, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Mustard,
Okra, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin,
Radish, Squash, Sweet Potatoes,
Tomatoes, Turnips, Watermelon

HERBS and SPICES: Anise,
Basil, Bay Laurel, Borage, Cara-
way, Cardamon, Chervil, Chives,
Cilantro/Coriander, Cumin, Dill,
Fennel, Ginger, Horehound,
Lemon Balm, Lovage, Marjoram,
Mexican Tarragon, Mint, Oregano,
Rosemary, Sage, Savory, Thyme,
Watercress.

BULBS: Achimenes, African
Lily, Alstroemeria, Amaryllis,
Amazon Lily, Aztec Lily, Black-
berry Lily, Blood Lily, Caladium,
Calla, Canna, Crinum, Crocosmia,
Dahlia, Elephant Ears, Gladiolus,
Gloriosa Lily, Kaffir Lily, Lilies,
Louisiana Iris, Moraea, Rain Lil-
ies, Shell Gingers, Society Garlic,
Spider Lily, Tiger Lily, Tritonia,
Tuberose, Voodoo Lily, Watsonia,
Walking Iris.


WHAT TO DO IN MARCH
For more details on the follow-
ing, call your local Extension office
or visit the University of Florida's
publication website: http://edis.
ifas.ufl.edu
Plant and fertilize annuals.
Control scab disease on citrus.
Fertilize lawn, trees and shrubs
(if not done in February).
Plant and fertilize vegetables.
Check the planting guide to see
what vegetables should be planted
this month. Select varieties that are
recommended for Florida's condi-
tions. Unless large quantities of or-
ganic fertilizer material are applied,
commercial fertilizer is usually
needed for Florida gardens. 2 to 4
pounds of 8-8-8 or 1 to 2 pounds of
15-15-15 fertilizers recommended.
Broadcast this amount a week or
two before planting.
Additionally vegetable crops may
need to be sidedressed 2 or 3 times
during the growing season with
half the above rates. Slow release
fertilizers are very good and only
one application per growing season
may be necessary.
Fertilize perennials. Perennials
should be fertilized lightly 3 to 4
times during the growing season.
Use a slow release fertilizer for best
results.
Fertilize palms. Choose a 10-5-
15, 12-6-18 fertilizer labeled as
a "Palm Special" or proportion-
ally similar fertilizer containing 1%
magnesium, 1 to 2 % iron and man-
ganese, sulfur and trace amounts of
zinc, copper and boron. Fertilizers
that provide slow release of their
nitrogen, potassium and magne-
sium are best. Applications of these
fertilizers should be made 4 times
per year at the rate of 1.5 pounds
per 100 square feet (10 foot by 10
foot) or 1 pound to 5 pounds per
established tree. Recommended
months to fertilize are March, June,
August and October. If fertilizers
containing only quick release (wa-
ter-soluble nutrients) are used, they
should be applied monthly at a low-
er rate of /4 pound per 100 square
feet. Fertilizer should be applied to
the entire ornamental planting area
or at least the entire palm canopy
area and watered in lightly.
Fertilize muscadine grapes.


Mature, producing vine
receive 4 to 6 pounds pe
6-6-6 or 8-8-8 with 250/
of the nitrogen from sloi
sources. Split applications
efficient than a single ai
so use 11/4 to 2 pounds p
cation and apply three t
year. Recommended time
March, May and just after
(in August).

V ..
-~hL w*

cf t


Remove any cold damaged
growth from plants. Frost or freeze-
damaged growth on plants should
be removed now. To determine how
much of the plant you need to cut
back, gently scrape the plant's bark
to see if the cambium layer is green
(living) or brown (dead). Prune all
dead material.
Watch for lacebug infestations.
Examine plants weekly. These
sucking insects attack azalea, pyra-
cantha, and sycamore producing
whitish speckling on the upper leaf
surface. Shiny black spots of excre-
ment can be found on the under-
side. Treat when necessary with an
insecticide or horticultural oil.
Prune landscape plants that
require shaping and size reduction.
Cut each branch separately with
hand shears to maintain a neat, nat-
urally shaped shrub. Note: Azaleas
and gardenias should not be pruned
until afterthey bloom. Remove dead
foliage from ornamental grasses
and cut stems to 4-12 inches above
the ground, depending on the size
of the clump.
Plant annuals and vegetables.
Check the planting guide to see
what annuals and vegetables should
be planted this month.
Spray roses to prevent black
spot and powdery mildew disease.
Symptoms of black spot are dark,
round spots with yellow halos


s should followed by dropping leaves.
:r year of Purchase a fungicide labeled for the
o to 30% control of these diseases and follow
w release label directions.
are more Watch for pests. Lubber grass-
pplication hoppers hatch. They are black with
per appli- a yellow to orange line down their
imes per sides. Young lubbers should be
s are late hand-picked or treated with a pesti-
;r harvest cide. Aphids feed on the underside
of new growth and cause cupped
distorted leaves. Mites thrive in dry
weather, sucking plant juices from
the underside of leaves. Forceful
sprays of water will dislodge both
insects. Lady Beetles and several
( otherbeneficial insects are effective
predators and will suppress aphids.
I't Insecticide soap sprays and other
pesticides will also control these
critters if their natural enemies do
not.


Use oak leaves as mulch or in a
compost pile. A mulch of oak leaves
around ornamental plants will sup-
press weeds, conserve soil mois-
ture and add organic matter to the
soil. The yearly addition of leaves
may gradually acidify soils. Have
your soil pH tested to see if lime is
needed. If you choose to compost
leaves, be sure to thinly layer them
with manure or grass clippings
to accelerate the decay process.
Moisten, but don't saturate each
layer. Turning the pile occasionally
will also speed up decomposition.
Air layer to propagate plants.
Select pencil-thick branches and
remove a ring of bark about 12 to 2
inches wide, about 12 to 18 inches
from branch tip. Gently scrape the
girdled area to remove green tissue
and dust it with a rooting hormone.
Cover the area with a handful of
moist sphagnum moss and enclose
with a small sheet of plastic tied at
both ends. Then cover with tin foil.
Peel back the foil and check for
roots in 4 to 6 weeks. When suffi-
cient roots have been formed in the
moss, cut the branch below the root-
ed area and plant in a container.
Pinch out growing tips and old
blooms of annuals. To increase
branching and flowering, remove
2 to 1 inch of tip growth from each
stem. Flowering annuals produce
blooms on the new growth. The
more branching that you encourage
the lovelier the flowering display.


Buy Now,
Drink Later
Everyone knows that it is cheap-
er to brew your own coffee than
go to the big chain. But if you like
fun, seasonal flavors, it is certain-
ly easier to throw down a couple
dollars at the store. Did you know
that the flavored creamers at the
grocery store have special sea-
sonal flavors that only come out
this time of year? I read the expi-
ration dates on them, and they vary
widely.
Just this morning, I purchased,
on sale, some creamers that don't
expire until next April or May! So
you can throw them in the back of
the fridge and enjoy 'mocha fudge'
or 'pumpkin spice' well into the
spring! Just don't forget to check
the dates!
Kimberly M.
Want to live better on the money
you already make? Visit stretcher.com/r/99.htm> to find
hundreds of articles to help you
stretch your day and your dollar!
' 2010 Dollar Stretcher, Inc.


Sliced and Diced
Don't waste food, and save time
to boot! I keep a half-dozen or so
quart-sized freezer bags of various
items at hand in the freezer at all
times. For example, any time I cut
the tops or bottoms off bell pep-
pers, I dice them and place them
in a pan or plate in the freezer.
Ten minutes later, they've 'set'
enough not to stick together when
fully frozen, and I drop them in the
appropriate freezer bag.
Then, whenever I need them,
such as when making an egg
scramble before going to work in
the morning, all I need to do is
'grab and cook.' The tedious slic-
ing and dicing prep work has long
since been done, and I haven't
wasted perfectly good food! I do
this with peppers, onions, sausage,
hamburger meat, and other items
as well. Use your imagination!
Rick in Virginia
Want to live better on the money
you already make? Visit stretcher.com/r/99.htm> to find
hundreds of articles to help you
stretch your day and your dollar!
' 2010 Dollar Stretcher, Inc.


MARCH 18, 2010


(


^








28 THE SHOPPER MARCH 18, 2010


To place an ad call
813-645-3111 ext. 201
Fax. 813-645-1792
$15.50
up to 20 words
300 each addl. word
Deadline is Monday
at 4pm


105 PERSONAL

Alone? Seniors Dating Bureau
Safest Since 1977! Ages (45-
90) 1-800-922-4477 (24Hrs) Or log
onto: Respected Dating.com

Gold Party
Cash Paid No Checks
Buying all gold items, broken or not.
Armed Security present for your
protection & ours. Provided by AAA
Security & Protection of Ruskin. Safe
location, Morgans Red Barn, 2112
US 41, south corner of US 41 & 8th
St., SW, Ruskin. Everything weighed
in front of you no games played here.
You see the weight. Any amount ok,
small or large. 2 day event. Saturday
9am-4pm. Sunday 10am-4pm.






310 GARAGE/YARD SALE
Elmira's Community Flea Market. Satur-
day, March 20, 8am-2pm. Copper Penny
parking lot, corner of SR 674 & US 301.
Vender space available $15 for 10x10
space & 1 table. Call 941-776-8975
or info@elmiraswildlife.org to reserve
space. Set-up starts at 7am

Paradise Mobile Home Court. Rummage
& bake sale. Lunch available. Saturday
March 20, 8am-1 pm. Parking up front.

Rummage sale. Beth Israel., 1115 Del
Webb E, SCC. Tuesday 3/23, 8am-4-
pm. Clothing, knickknacks, household
goods, linens & more.

Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana
St., Gibsonton (1 block off US 41,1 block
north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednesday thru
Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing, furniture,
lots misc. Ministry First Baptist Gibson-
ton. 813-671-0036 to donate






CARPORT SALE
SATURDAY, MARCH 20
9 a.m. to I p.m.
1 Lunch Served
at Clubhouse
'" 11 a.m.to Ip.m.


THE SHOPPER




M & M Printing Co., Inc
weekly publisher of the


The Observer News,


310 GARAGE/YARD SALES
Apollo Beach. Caribbean Isles. 20+ park
wide sale. 3/20, 9am-1 pm. Big Bend Rd.
south on US 41/ First right on Elsberry
Rd., Follow signs

303 Sedgewick Court, St Andrews Est.
Friday & Saturday, 8am. Lots of books,
kitchen items, records & more.
Riverbreeze Estate
Craft & Bake Sale
9am-1 pm. Thursday, March 18. Cof-
fee & tea 9am-? Lunch served 11 am-
1pm. 1710 7th St., SW, Ruskin.

Garage sale. 608 Ojai Ave., SCC. Friday
only March 19. Bargains galore.

Moving sale. March 19 & 20. 1830
Wolf Laurel Dr., SCC. Furniture & misc.
8am-2pm.

j CaCvary's
ny e^ngeittic
Thrift Store
NOW OPEN Wednesday,
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. Noon
Children's Clothing
50% OFF
Books Buy 1, get
1 FREE
1424 E. College Ave. Ruskin
813-641-7790
Ministry oFCalvar Lutheran Church


SCC Tops annual garage sale. Friday
& Saturday, March 19 & 20, 8am-2-
pm. 1502 North Pebble Beach Blvd.,
SCC. Household items, books, clothes,
etc. Treasures for everyone. Great
bargains.

Don't Miss This One
US 41 S. to Universal to Stephens
Rd. to River Bend Rd., Ruskin. Boats,
motorcycle, inclosed trailer, tilt trailer,
corner computer desk, entertainment
center, lots of cheap books of all kinds
& much, much, more. Friday 3/19 &
Saturday 3/20, 8am-3pm.

3 family sale. Thursday thru Saturday,
8am-2pm. 734 Tam O Shanter Ave.,
SCC. Furniture, bedding, clothing, tools,
grill, household items.

3/18 to 3/20, Thursday, Friday & Sat-
urday. Simmons Way, SCC. Clothes,
furniture, household goods, electronics
& much more, Great bargains.

Community Garage Sale
Mira Lago. 604 Yorkdale Dr, (club-
house) Ruskin. 8am-noon. March 20 &
21. Something for everyone.


The SCC Observer and
210 Woodland Estates Ave SW
Ruskin, Florida 33570


310 GARAGE/YARD SALES

Big Yearly Spring Sale
In Sundance
Is extended one more weekend, 4
more families added. All name brand
clothes, baby, kids, women, men's
all sizes Tommy, Levi, Hollister,
South Pole, Aeropostale & many
more brands. Great kids & ladies $ 1
tables & men's $2 table. VHS Disney
& kids movies. New CDs.& DVDs.
Lots of linens, Yankee candles, lots
of household misc. Lots & lots of guy
stuff. Something for everyone. Friday,
8am-5pm & Saturday & Sunday 8am-
4pm. 1106 Oxbow Rd (4.5 miles south
of SR 674 on US 301 to Lightfoot
Rd). Follow signs & balloons. See you
there.

Yard sale. 3/19, 8am-1pm. Friday. 1204
Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center.

Apollo Beach. Jewelry, old watches,
dolls, home decor items, bar stools, slid-
ing glass doors, pictures, dehumidifier,
gun rack, fishing tackle, tools, Fortress
37X anchor & boating accessories,
sinks, bike, books, golf items, clothes
& misc. 6443 Lake Sunrise Dr. Friday &
Saturday, 8am-?

First Apostolic Church rummage sale.
Friday & Saturday, 8am-2pm. Furniture,
clotting, baby items & more. 1820 30th
St., SE, Ruskin.

Boy Scounts Troop 601
Giant Yard Sale & Auction
Something for everyone. Plenty of
food. Pancake breakfast, lunch and
spaghetti dinner, starting at 6am- 2pm.
Come to the WCI building next to Bob
Evans off 1-75 exit 240 on SR 674.
Please come and support us. Dona-
tions are accepted.

685 Allegheny Dr., SCC. 8am-2pm
March 19 & 20. 2 families. Price nego-
tiable on some items. Macrame, also
golf clubs.

Garage sale. 1346 Bluewater, SCC.
Friday & Saturday, 3/19 & 3/20. 8am-
2pm. Household, clothing, walker's,
knickknacks, many misc. items.

Saturday, 8am-noon. Twin bed, fur-
nished, lots of misc. 6328 Florida Circle
W, Apollo Beach

Huge multi family garage sale.
Please do not arrive early
Saturday only 10am-? West on Apollo
Beach Blvd., left at Gulf & Sea, left on
Lookout Dr., to 229

312 ESTATE SALES


Anne's Estate Sales Y




EZ-GO Golf Cart, Full Bed, King Headboard
w/Mirrors, Leather Chairs w/Ottomans,
Craftmatic Twin Beds, Recliners, Dinette Table
w/Chairs, Baker's Rack, Computer Desk,
Armoire, Sofa Tables, TVs, File Cabinet,
Bookcases, Crafts, Jewelry (Large Collection).
Collectables: Lenox, Vintage Postcards, Old
Paper Money, Antique Collectables, Penn Reel.
lots of Tools: Electric & Manual, Air
Compressor, Tool Cabinet, Household,
Kitchen & Misc. Items.
wwwAnnesEstateSales.blogspot.com


Going Home ?
Take the Observer
with you!!
Call 813-645-3111
ext. 201
$18 for 6 mo


The Riverview Current


312 ESTATE SALES


316 CALOOSA PALMS CT.
(OffDelWebbE.)
MARCH 18&19-8am-1pm
Golf Cart, Sleep Sofa, 2 Plaid Chairs &
Ottoman, 6-Piece Rattan Set
(Brown), King Suite, Lamps,
Stereo, TV, Pictures, Kitchen
Items (Fiesta Ware), Linens,
Rugs, Silk Pants, Clothes,
Shoes, and Misc. Items.
633-1173 or 508-0307


WE BUY ESTATES
in the Sun City area or
take consignments on
your ENTIRE HOUSE
We also come and pick it up!!


www.ButterfieldsAuctions.com
Butterfield Auctions AB2706/AU3549


AAA Furniture
New & Gently Used Furniture

BUY & SELL
Daily Trips to SCC


6819 U.S. 301 S., Riverview
(813) 677-8180

330 FURNITURE


100 Announcements
200 Farmer's Mkt
300 Merchandise
400 Marine
450 Transportation
500 Real Estate


550 Manuf. H
600 Rentals
650 Prof. Ser
700 Services
800 Employr


housing

vices


lent


Dealer in Gold & Silver Coins
Domestic & Foreign
10% or more and over
on SILVER COINS
Call for private consultation or appointment
All transactions are strictly confidential
(813) 634-3816. Cell (813) 503-4189
S "Yourlocaldealerforover 18years"


To Place a Classified Ad
Call 813-645-3111 ext 201
or e-mail:
Beverly@observernews.net.
20 words for $15.50 and 300 for
each additional word. Bold line
$3. All classified ads are paid in
advance. We take Visa, Master-
Card or Discover over the phone.
Deadline is Mondays at 4 pm for
Thursday paper.


330 FURNITURE
Glass top rattan table $75, High top solid
pine table w/ 2 chairs, $150. obo. 813-
642-8860 or 813-482-8339

335 MUSIC
For sale. Rare antiques. Chance of
lifetime to buy Henry Ford's beautiful
organ, also Roosevelt pipe organ, both
play. $3,000 each. 813-677-0135

354 MEDICAL ITEMS
Electric Wheel chair, Pronto M-51, new
battery. Asking $300. obo. 813-642-
9434

360 GOLF CARTS
New 2010 RXV, 48v, full light package,
Sunbrella, mirror, sand bottle, factory
warranty. Free delivery $6,755. Golf Cart
Depot 813-996-5522

Golf cartswanted. Buy sell, trade. Char-
gers, parts all related. Ronny's Carts &
Parts. 813-645-4515 or 813-484-9855

We buy golf carts, any condition. We pay
top dollar for used carts, running or not.
Same day pickup. 813-300-0114


WumaCar of Sun City Center


S6 Volt 8 Volt
I Complete Set Complete Set I
i479" $529"
I I I
*Plus tax and applicable *Plus tax and applicable
fees Installed with core fees Installed with core
I exchange Exp 4/1/10 exchange Exp 4/1/10


139 S. Pebble Beach Blvd.
Suite 102 (behind CVS Pharmacy)
Sun City Center, FL

390 MISC. FOR SALE
Dehumidifier $50. Trucut lawn mower,
new $2,000 now $900. Designer queen
spread, new $150 now $40. Golf travel
bag $25. 813-633-1585






410 BOATS
10' Jon boat, electric motor, 2 bass
seats, removable wheels. Over $800
value for $450. 813-633-9529

425 SLIPS OR STORAGE
Little Manatee Outdoor Storage. RV's,
boat's, trailer's. All sizes. 2903 39th
Ave., SE. Ruskin. 813-787-8531. www.
littlemanateeoutdoorstorage.com

South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special-
izing in outside storage for RVs, boats &
trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay-
Storage.com

Ramey's Business Park
RV & boat storage & heavy equip-
ment. 1/2 mile from Williams Park.
813-410-9607 or 813-849-1469


Mon.-Sat.
9 a.m.-5 p.m.


i


-..


28 THE SHOPPER


MARCH 18, 2010


(813)
783-27001


erviem(s
SecretBest Kept
I


Model Home & Consigned Furniture
& Accessories
Apollo Beach Shopping Center
6024 U.S. Hwy. 41 N. Apollo Beach
(next to Westsbore Pizza)
W LayawayAvailable


~







March 18, 2010





459 MOTORCYCLES

Feel the freedom
& save on gas 2009 Harley David-
son, Street Bob DYNA. $12,000. No
reasonable offer refused. Call Stephen
813-833-7148 or Carolyn 813-645-
7802 for appointment to see the bike.







511 HOUSES FOR SALE
Kings Point. Yorkshire, single large fam-
ily home. 2br/2ba, den. Beautifully deco-
rated. $225,000. Call 813-633-7925


Advertise in the newspaper
that your community is
reading.


511 HOUSES FOR SALE

AFFORDABLE MOBILE-HOME ON
ITS OWN LOT: 2BR/1.5BA, enclosed
porch, double roof. Needs little TLC.
Great location close to river & town,
high and dry. $52,000.
S1 ACRE CORNER LOT. Great for
house or mobile-home, this secluded lot
is cleared with few trees, only minutes
from town & shopping. Electric & well
on site. $59,900. Easy financing.
OWNER'S FINANCING ON 2BR/2BA
DOUBLEWIDE ON OWN LOT:
great condition, newer appliances, new
CHA, bright open living area, huge MBR
& walk-in closet, inside utility, screen
porch with hot tub, carport, roof over, 2
sheds. No HOA. Reduced to $75,500.







512 CONDOS FOR SALE

Mini Mansion!
Must see in Sun City Center, Kings
Point. 2br/2ba 1209 sf. Updated to
2010 standards. $73,900. $2,900
down $489 monthly. 813-850-1173






555 M.H. FOR SALE
55+ Mobile home for sale. Riverfront
park with dock & boat slip. One bed-
room, carport. $3,500. 813-645-2446


555 M. H. FOR SALE


Manatee RV park 55+ all amenities, new
low lot rent. Great Florida room, fur-
nished, washer /dryer included $6,900
owner financing, no interest. 813-938-
1686 ,813-415-4403

560 M.H. ON LOTS
Mobile home for sale Eastwood Mobile
Home Park, Gibsonton. Call Heather
813-677-5726

For sale 2 beautiful lots on water. Mobile
home, 3br/2ba, fenced, 100ft roadway.
$65,000. 813-677-0135

For sale. 3 & 4 bedroom DWMH. Owner
financing, low down, reasonable pay-
ments, quiet neighborhood, near Wal-
Mart, Gibsonton. 813-661-1109

565 M.H. IN PARKS
Neptune Village Park, Ruskin. Mobile
home w/ Florida room. Partially fur-
nished, 2br/2ba. $15,500 813-262-
2548

For sale or rent. Asking $3,500 or rent
for $575 monthly, water & electric extra,
2br/lba. Furnished, Central air. 813-
215-9738

Ruskin. River Oaks RV Park, 32ft
Mobile home, Florida room, shed, fully
furnished, new heater, roof. $3,400 obo.
813-641-9409

Classified is Informative






610 WATERFRONT RENTALS
The Dolphin House, Apollo Beach,
efficiency apartments on water. Boat
docking /fishing. Pool, laundry. $185
weekly, $185 deposit. No pets. 813-
850-5217

Apollo Beach 3br/2ba on canal. New
pool, lanai, dock, lease. 2,000 sf. Fios
ready, pet ok. $1,695. Hall 813- 645-
6985

611 HOUSES FOR RENT
One bedroom plus loft. Cedar interior. In
country near SCC. $140 weekly plus de-
posit, included water, sewer & garbage.
813-335-2877

Ruskin, quaint 3/2 home for rent on
large lot, front covered porch. Couple
or small family. Monthly rent is $950
with signed lease. Security deposit and
references required. No smoking, no
pets. Please call 813-649-1599.

Apollo Beach. 3br/1ba, garage, Florida
room, large fenced yard. Washer/dyer
hookup. Pet ok, AC. $895 monthly. Hall
813-645-6985

S & R Properties
3, 2 & 1 bedrooms. No pets. Ruskin,
Gibsonton area. RV lots available 813-
310-1888 or 813-849-1469

612 APTS. FOR RENT
For rent: Efficiency apartments. Weekly
rates, utilities furnished 813-677-8789,
813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

Ruskin. Nice one bedroom, one bath
apartment. $400 moves you in. $135
weekly. Call 813-966-4050 for ap-
pointment

613 CONDOS FOR RENT
Kings Point SCC. 55+ 1,100 sf, 2br/2ba
on golf course. No pets, unfurnished,
W/D, cable TV. $695 monthly annual
813-385-5490

620 ROOMS FOR RENT
Wimauma, want to live in a country
setting that's clean, safe & quiet. No
alcohol or drugs. $385 per month. nicely
furnished room includes all utilities and
basic cable. 813-503-4592

630 M.H. RENTALS
For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home near
shopping center in Gibsonton. 813-677-
8789, 813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

One bedroom furnished, water & electric
included. $165 weekly. Two bedroom
(not furnished) $165 weekly, plus secu-
rity deposit. R & M Mobile Home Park
in Gibsonton. 813-677-7509


630 M. H. RENTALS

For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With
A/C. 813-677-1086

2br/2ba private lot. South of Gibsonton,
US 41. Call 813-927-2065

644 COMMERCIAL
Ruskin commercial rental: 7,200 sf
warehouse including 1,400 sf., air condi-
tion office space. 2.5ba, insulated roof,
loading dock, 2 roll up doors, security
system. Over 1 acre lot. $2,200 month
plus deposit. Call Claire Tort, Dickman
Realty 813-363-7250

645 OFFICE SPACE


We will not be underpriced!

Prices starting at
$250 per month

9 *


646 WAREHOUSE SPACE
Garage & mini storage rooms for rent.
Pirates Treasure Cove, Gibsonton.
813-677-1137

649 WANTED TO RENT
Motorcycle storage wanted: Snowbird
needs dry secure arxa, 5's10' or larger
April /December. I'm honest & mature.
941-721-8222. mrcement007@opton-
line.net

Classified Works






680 ADULT/CHILD CARE
HHA/ caregiver provider. Companion/
housekeeper seeking private duty. Well
trained & qualified. Flexible hours. Call
Jana 813-333-8405

Caregiver/Companion
Quality care for your loved one.
References upon request. Please call
813-641-9012






705 CLEANING

Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integrity.
Call for free estimate. 7days a week.
Move-in, move-out, rentals. Insured,
bonded, licensed. Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean

Green Team
Home /office cleaning. Windows
cleaned. Pressure washing, yard
maintenance. Call Dee 813-777-1221.
Visa, MasterCard accepted.

Cindy's Bucket of Bubbles
Cleaning Service. Affordable, de-
pendable, licensed & insure. Free
estimates 20% off first cleaning. 813-
817-7488 www..abucketofbubbles.
com

706 PRESSURE WASHING

Benson's Pressure Washing
Houses, mobile home, driveways,
etc. Quality workmanship, reasonable
rates. We do it all. Free estimates.
Call 941-962-3125

710 LAWN CARE
Bill's Lawn Service Residential &
commercial. Cut, edge, trim, Ruskin,
Apollo Beach, Riverview, Gibsonton.
Licensed./insured. 813-293-6840 New
account welcomed.


THE SHOPPER 29
710 LAWN CARE

M & C Mower Repair
Parts & service. Authorized warranty
center. Commercial & residential. 725
14th St., Wimauma. 813-938-3226

Don's Lawn Service. Mowing, edging,
trimming. Residential, low monthly rates.
Satisfaction guaranteed. Licensed,
22yrs experience. 813-645-4066

Narvaez Landscaping. Let us make
your yard beautiful for spring!! Free
estimates. Certified Arborist. 813-770-
6164 or 813-393-6521

Montoya's Landscaping
Trees & palm trimming. Residential
& commercial landscaping. Mulch,
clearing, fill dirt, & sod installation.
Free estimate. Best price guaranteed.
813-770-1881


FloraScapes
Professional maintenance company
serving all your landscaping needs.
Residential & commercial. Ruskin,
Apollo Beach, SCC, Riverview. Li-
censed/insured. 813-333-3688



r &Sloawn Care, Inc.
Professional Lawn CareService
Residential & Commercial
Total Lawn Maintenance
Landscaping/Sod/Mulch
Landscape Maintenance
Irrigation Monitoring & Repair
FREE ESTIMATES/REASONABLE RATES

813-645-7266
www.bandslawncare.com
"Your Local Lawn Care Professionals I"


714 TREE REMOVAL


Professional Tree &
Landscaping. Sales: trimming, remov-
als, popcorn curbing, stump grinding,
clearing, hauling. Fill dirt/ top soil/
rock/ mulch. We barter for items of
value. Free estimate. Call Paul 813-
634-6041 or 813-751-9691

715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service. Cul-
vert sets, driveways, shell, crushed
asphalt, concrete, fill dirt, excavating,
mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963
Free estimates.

Fill-Land Clearing
Dozer & loader work, driveway & sep-
tic fill, & shell hauled. Robert Carver,
813-634-4962. Beeper 813-267-6217

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill
dirt, topsoil, sand, crushed rock &
asphalt, driveway culverts. Loader,
backhoe, grading, bushhog, discing.
Install Septic System & drain fills.
CFC#1427021. 813-645-1883

720 HOME MAINT.
Wall & ceiling repairs.
Jones Drywall Service
Licensed & insured. Free estimates
813-645-1718 or 813-220-1008. Lic
#SCC131149657. Notary service

Top notch handyman Service. Get it
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Church & senior citizens discount. Virgil
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740 MISC. SERVICES
Golf clubs re-gripped. Reasonable pric-
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Exum's Well Drilling
Pump sales/ repair all makes/
models. Wells 4" & larger. Affordable
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or 813-220-4572

Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks, boat
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Hecker Construction Co. 813-236-
9306

Going Home ?
Take the Observer with
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ext. 201. $18 for 6 mo


CALL
Paul. (813) 645-3211

DICKMAN Serving South Hillsborough
AY INC. County since 1924.
SA L TY www.dickmanrealty.com
Celebrating 86 Years dickman@tampabay.rr.com
1924 2010
2BR/1BA CONDO in Kings Point, Sun City Center. Located on a quiet dead-end
street in close to state-of-the-art clubhouse. $39,900.00 CALL ROXANNE WEST-
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REDUCED!! AWESOME WATERVIEW! 3BR/2BA with 120 feet of waterfront and just
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ceramic tile & more. $350,000 KAY PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK
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ACREAGE ON THE LITTLE MANATEE RIVER! 4.91 acres (MOL) 3BR/2BA with an
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each with separate folio numbers! Great opportunity for subdividing! $374,900 KAY
PYE 361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 FOR DETAILS
PRICED TO SELLI Well maintained 3BR/2BA MH on over 1 acre fenced lot. Special
features include: open floor plan, inside utility room, wood burning fireplace, 2 car
carport & more. $69,900 ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 or KAY PYE 361-3672
PLENTY OF ROOM! 3BR/2BA home on 4.55 acres. Room to expand or enjoy the
quiet. Inground pool, green belted, zoned for horses and could be a fish farm as tanks
are set up. $250,000 CALL KATHY JACOBSON 624-2225
GREAT 3BR/2BA HOME on just under an acre, minutes from schools, restaurants,
churches, etc. Features eat-in kitchen with formal living and dining rooms, inside
utility, family room, in-ground pool, detached workshop, huge lot and so much more.
Asking $169,500. CALL TODAY! JO ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540.
AFFORDABLE MOBILE HOME/HOUSE SITE in the country but not far from the city.
Roomy corner lot with over one acre mostly cleared. Priced to please at $59,900. JO
ELLEN MOBLEY 645-1540.
WATERFRONT!!! Calling all boaters and fishermen or anyone just wanting to live in
paradise!! Enjoy the beautiful views of the Ruskin Inlet from most rooms in this nicely
maintained 3BR/2BA, 2 car garage home located on a quiet cul-de-sac this property
has an enclosed pool/spa as well as an open deck, dock, davits and much, much
more. Call today and make an appointment to see this lovely home! $260,000 CALL
CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
PRICE REDUCED!! Beautifully maintained 3BR/2BA, 2 car garage home built in
2007. This property is located in Cypress Creek and is the lowest priced home in the
area. This home has a wonderful floor plan, lovely landscaping and is convenient to
shopping, restaurants and all major highways. This property is being sold as a short
sale for only $99,000. Call today for an appointment to see this affordable property
and make it yours!! CALL CATHY GRIGGS 391-8653
SERIOUS REDUCTION!!!! Seriously motivated sellers willing to increase their loss,
your gain. Excellent 3BR/2BAon golf course with almost 2300 sq. ft., vaulted ceilings,
split plan,enclosed lanai, much more. NOW ONLY $235,000. CALL JUDY ERICK-
SON 468-0288
AND MORE GOOD NEWS FOR BUYERS!!! Bayside unit at Bahia Beach reduced
$30,000 to $199,000 and still looking for offers. Very nice 2BR/2BA overlooking
Tampa Bay, St Pete, cruise ships, sailboats, pool, dolphins, etc. Close to restaurant,
beach, fitness room, and tennis courts. JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
JUST LISTED: FABULOUS RIVERFRONT LOT, close to 1 acre, breathtaking view
of water and such peaceful setting Cleared, with over 105 ft on river, No HOA, no
CDD, perfect spot to build your dream home and bring your boat! $250,000. Possible
owner's financing. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
CHARMING OLDER HOME ON 0.61 ACRE CORNER LOT, just listed: 2BR/1BA,
den/office, inside utility, covered patio with Jacuzzi, other patio for barbecues, nice
wood floors. Several detached buildings include a 2BR/1BA M/H, 2-car-high carport,
workshop and storage space. Needs a little TLC. $89,900. CALL CLAIRE TORT
363-7250
2.46 ACRES CORNER LOT, cleared, with few mature trees, electric & well. High and
dry, country setting right in town, close to shopping, restaurants & main Hwy. Great
spot for M/Home or house. $70,000. Owner's financing w/$10,000 down. CALL
CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
CALL US FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS........645-3211
Donate your old functioning cell phones and drop off at our
office for use by the "Victims Assistance Program."
(Evening phone numbers)
Judy Erickson..................... 468-0288 Jim Grannon........................... 610-3485
Claire Tort........................... 363-7250 KennAntonelli ..................... 786-3124
Kay Pye ........................... 361-3672 Kathy Jacobson ..................... 624-2225
Cathy Griggs ..................... 391-8653 Jo Ellen Mobley..................... 645-1540
Christine Nethers ............... 786-6542 LaRae Regis........................... 633-8318
Roxanne Westbrook............ 748-2201








30 THE SHOPPER






810 MEDICAL

Wanted: experienced caregivers/CNAs.
Part-time, all shifts. Apply in person
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday only.
813-634-6617. Hanson Services, 1601
Rickenbacker Dr. Ste. 5. Background
checks will be done. Lic.# 30211040

870 GENERAL

National Cremation & Burial Society,
Ruskin is seeking a part-time individual.
For more information please contact
Anthony at 813- 645-3231

Earn while save. Unique opportunity
to work toward financial freedom with
a great company. For more info. call
813-507-8498




TOMATOES

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Now Taking Applications

for Packing House

Apply within.
Behind 5th 3rd Bank

615-6431



Turn your unwanted

items into cash. Call

the classified depart-

ment to place your ad

813-645-3111


MARCH 18.2010


COMMUNITY PAPERS
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TENN MTN PROPERTY ACRES
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CPF STATEWIDE
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LAND SALE NOTICE: VIRGINIA
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financing. 1-866-275-0442

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S.E. TENNESSEE PARADISE Cus-
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SOUTHEAST TENNESSEE Variety
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Going


Home?


Check OTHEOBSERVERNEWS $35yr
Publication OTHE SCC OBSERVER O$186mos
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* Kitchen and Bath Remodels
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A


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( WeU To S
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No Job Too Big or Too Small
Serving since 1973
SRuskin Sun City Center
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Riverview
"All my customers are dry
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P.O. Box 551 Ruskin, FL 33570
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Lic. #CMC056816
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Quality Service,* Sales,
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< CAC 1814336 Ruskin


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Wilhelm rice

641-1811
FACTORY
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Ruskin, Florida
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SELF ARREST BONDS
COURT DATES 664-0056
WARRANT CHECKS
BIG JOHN'S
BAIL BONDS
641-8400
FAMILY BONDSMAN
STATE FEDERAL
24 HOUR SERVICE
JOHN L. VATH
2100 Orient Road Tampa, FL. 33619
Fax: (813) 628-8739


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OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 31


MARCH 18, 2010


I SAFETY CHECK I




32 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Moun tcaste


Vein Cei
4040 UPPER CREEK DRIVE STE. #105 SUN

813-634-133:


7241 BRYAN DAIRY RD.
LARGO, FL.33777


727-865-6941


5!
ISLA


nters
CITY CENTER

3
901 SUN BLVD., STE. 113A
DEL SOL ST. PETERSBURG


CALL TODAY !
YOUR HEALTH COULD BE AT RISK!
Could you be suffering from vein disease without knowing it? One of three Americans over 45 years of age has some forni
of vein disease in the legs--problems in the network of veins that carry blood back to the heart. Signs and symptoms may
seem harmless at first but minor problems can develop into serious problems if left untreated.
Fortunately, early detection can prevent life threatening consequences.
How does it start and what are the symptoms?
Veins with failed valves have trouble carrying blood from the legs back to the heart. Blood pools in the veins below, and
they begin to dilate and leak. The first signs of vein disease are often tiredness and a heavy feeling in the legs. This is a
clear indication that the return flow of blood from the legs to the heart is impaired. You may find that the problem is
more pronounced after a day of prolonged sitting or standing. That's because the leg veins are under higher pressure
when you are upright, and they become enlarged by the pressure of the pooled blood. Some of these veins dilate on the
surface and become the typical varicose veins and spider veins, but most are hidden inside the leg. As the walls of the
smaller veins become weaker, they start to leak fluid, protein and blood cells into the surrounding tissues. Patients often
begin to experience ankle swelling and even night cramps Charleyey horses'). When you lie down for a while, the swelling
may go down. But, chances are, the swelling will return the next day. The skin begins to sicken and becomes discolored.
Burning, itching, and even ulcers can develop.
Are there serious consequences?
Yes. In addition to leg pain and unsightly varicose veins, untreated vein disease can lead
to blood clots, deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Thrombosis occurs when a blood clot forms
due to venous blood congestion. If the clot travels from the leg to the lungs, a life-threat-
ening pulmonary embolism (PE) can occur. Untreated vein disease can also lead to
permanent damage and discoloration of the skin on your lower legs, stasis dermatitis with
infection (cellulitis), and possible leg ulcers, which are very hard to heal.
Is there any treatment?
Yes. Early detection and consultation with a doctor specializing in vein disease are the
first steps to better leg health. Under the doctor's care, you can explore the different
methods of treatment. Saline, vein stripping and surgical procedures are all now out-
moded in vein treatment. Nowadays, the procedures used are not painful. No scalpels Daniel J.Mountcastle,M.D., FAAEiM. Burd Cerhtnd.
are used. There is no downtime. And, these simple procedures are safe and very effective. Ohio State University Collc01 if Mehin

CALL US TODAY FOR A FREE CONSULTATION.
MEDICARE, AND MOST INSURANCES PAY FOR TREATMENT.


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www.mountcastleveincenters .com


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MARCH 18, 2010




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