Title: Observer news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102144/00007
 Material Information
Title: Observer news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: M&M Printing Co., Inc
Place of Publication: Ruskin, FL
Publication Date: February 25, 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102144
Volume ID: VID00007
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text





February 25, 2010
Volume 54
Number 5


THE


OBSERVER N


P.R.S.T. STD
PAID
RUSKIN, FLORIDA 33570
PERMIT NO. 8



tWS


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This is Biscuit, a shep-
herd sharpei mix that
is looking for a good
home. Volunteers at
C.A.R.E. would love to set
up a visit or maybe take
in some squirrel chasing,
if you're up to it.
See more on page 9


Angelina Padua of Sun
City Center, celebrated
her 107th birthday this
week at the Senior Cen-
ter in Ruskin. The gala
event drew many visitors
to her court, as she was
crowned "Queen for a
Day"
See more on page 32

w_ i_-


Looking for a place of
worship in our beautiful
communities? You'll find
plenty to choose from in
the church directory
listed on pages 24 & 25


Looking for a
professional or just a
little help around the
house? The Business
and Trade Directory
has everything from
AC repair to Window
washing.
seepage 30


'Sunrise on

Ruskin's second

century slated
U By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
RUSKIN In a few days this community
will embrace yet another centennial bench-
mark in its passage from tiny settlement
carved out of a wilderness to a town trea-
sured by many for myriad reasons.
Tuesday, March 9, marks the 100th an-
niversary of that
customary recog-
nition given any
new community:
formal filing of its
platted area. On
that date in 1910
the plat of "Ruskin
City" defining its .
streets, park and
residential prop-
erty was presented
and accepted in
the Hillsborough Ray Daniels carries a
basket of cucumbers in
County court- a Ruskin field in 1947.
house. With that Photo courtesy of State Library
filing, Ruskin, a and Archives of Florida
settlement on the pristine eastern shore of
Tampa Bay dedicated to the principles of
its namesake English social critic and phi-
losopher, officially was born.
The occasion will be marked locally with
a sunrise gathering in that platted park on
See RUSKIN TURNS 100, page 26

TRIPS WORTH TAKING

Casa Marina:

A jewel in

Jacksonville
By WARREN RESEN
w630@aol.com
Member of the Florida Outdoor Writers Association
The Grand Old Lady of Jacksonville Beach
sits on a dune overlooking the Atlantic Ocean.
She has been there since early in the last cen-
tury silently watching the ebb and flow of
world events.
Casa Marina has had many lives since its
opening in 1925 as the newest, most innova-
tive hotel of its time. The hotel's fortunes rose
and fell with the tide of events until now it is
the Grand Dame of Jacksonville Beach, a bea-
con for guests wanting a touch of old world
elegance and for brides wanting a unique
wedding experience.


Winning

World Series

pitcher makes

Riverview

his home
U By PENNY FLETCHER
penny@observernews.net
RIVERVIEW When five-
year-old Dave LaPoint got pulled
out of bed to play baseball, he
never dreamed it would be the
start of a lifelong career.
"When I was five, my eight-
year-old brother would pull me
awake by the hair because they
were one person short to play
ball," Dave told me recently dur-
ing an interview in his new Riv-
erview home. "Because the other
boys were so much older and
bigger than me I had to get better
fast- or else. So I was always
throwing something, whether it
was a baseball, a snowball or a
rock. My dad had been a good
baseball player- he'd made it to
the semi-pro level- and always
brought us kids to the games and
we'd listen to them on radio too."
The first time Dave ever
watched a game though was on a
See PITCHER, page 16


* By MELODY JAMESON
mi@observernews.net
RUSKIN Recession reluc-
tant, major league developers may
be sitting on their hands and Ty
Pennington's televised Extreme
Makeover team may be scaling
back the give-away homes, but
here affordable housing develop-
ment is going strong.
Three more phases of built-out
Bayou Pass I and II, which strad-
dles 14th Avenue between 24th and
21st Streets, now are taking shape,
according to Earl Pfeiffer, execu-
tive director of Florida Home Part-
nership, a non-profit developer as-
sisting first-time home buyers.
Basic infrastructure for Bayou
Pass III, located on the north side
of 14th Avenue between 18th and
21st Streets is 99 percent complet-
ed, Pfeiffer said this week. And
prospective homeowners inter-
ested in their first home purchase
there will begin the application
process next week, Pfeiffer noted.
BP III is eventually to encompass
166 dwellings.
Then, on March 23, representa-
tives of Florida Home Partner-
ship and its development partner,
Hillsborough County's affordable
housing office, will ask county
commissioners to approve minor
changes to a 2005 rezoning ap-
proved for about 90 acres on the
south side of 14th Avenue between
6th and 12th Streets. The changes
will reduce the density on the acre-
age and allow for relocation of an
internal park, said Isabelle Albert,
a senior planner in the county's
Planning and Growth Manage-
ment Department. Given BOCC
approval of the adjustments, the


site is to become Bayou Pass IV
and V.
The 90 acres initially were ap-
proved for residential development
about five years ago when KB
Homes was interested in building
356 single family dwellings on the


"-40' A
.. ,


/ / .


Penny Fletcher Photo
Professional pitcher, major league baseball player, club manager
and agent Dave LaPoint has started teaching pitching to South
County youth during the months he is not managing an Independent
League team up North for players getting back into the pros after
injury or other reasons for being off the field. Dave says he plans to
spend September through April in his new home in Riverview and
then return to Long Island for a five-month season working with the
pros.


couple of two-story designs avail-
able," he noted.
But, new sections will feature
some differences, Pfeiffer said. BP
III, for instance, will have a larger
pool with cabana and a retention
pond in BP IV and V is slated to


property, Pfeiffer noted. However, get some islands for landscape
the builder, stung by a buyer-shy interest. Then, we're thinking
recession following the sub-prime about adding weight lifting to the
housing market collapse, drew clubhouse activities menu which
back from the project as many could involve an on-site activities
other builders did from their once- director," he added. New club-
planned developments. houses will duplicate the "Old
Florida Home Partnership, on Florida look" incorporated in the
the other hand, faced increased first such Bayou Pass facility, Pfe-
demand for its type of self-help iffer noted, bui c %'re going to the
housing in 2009, up by 20 percent, next level."
Pfeiffer said. Consequently, the The Florida Home Partnership af-
acreage a few blocks west of the fordable housing program for first-
first Bayou Pass with residential re- time buyers is underwritten by the
zoning approval in place appealed U.S. Department of Agriculture
to the developer as it continues to- through its housing assistance di-
ward build out of its Hidden Creek vision. Approved buyers dedicate
community in the Wimauma some of their own labor to
area and with work in building their homes
similar community in \ and can obtain a 30-
Pasco County. year fixedrate mort-
Initial con- a gage. Homes
cepts for Bayou in the new
Pass IV and V B AV PA S sections will
call for a total of 1l J LJ rangebetween
303 single fam- $129,000 and
ily homes on more equally sized $139,000, Pfeiffer said. Each de-
lots, two parks, a large clubhouse velopment has its own homeown-
with meetings rooms and pool. ers' association.


plus four entrances/exits, Pfeiffer
said.
The new sections will share sev-
eral characteristics with the origi-
nal Bayou Pass in terms of appear-
ances, he added. BP III, IV and V
will be predominately one-story
homes with varied front elevations
and painted in soft tropical or earth
tones, although "we still have a


The customary Homebuyers
Forum for those who may be in-
terested in making their first home
purchase in Bayou Pass III is
scheduled for 5:30 p.m., Thurs-
day, March 4. Applications will be
available at that time and reserva-
tions to attend may be made by
calling 813-672-7889.
2010 Melody Jameson


No depression in the local

affordable housing market





2 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


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FEBRUARY 25, 2010
Are you ready to become your own boss?
Explore a career in real estate the dream of homeownership is
What if a career afforded you not only emotionally fulfilling, it
flexible hours, ensured your in- also offers many personal and fi-
come would reflect your effort nancial incentives."
and exercised your entrepreneurial While beginning a new career in
spirit? If this sounds enticing, per- other industries often requires sev-
haps you should explore a career eral years and tens of thousands of
in real estate. dollars in education costs, it only
Real estate can be an exciting takes a few weeks and several
profession in which no two days hundred dollars to get started in
are alike. One day you could be real estate. The low cost of entry
driving around town to familiarize makes real estate a particularly at-
yourself with the current homes on tractive option for the unemployed
the market. The next, you might be or individuals who can't afford an
showing a buyer several properties expensive two or four year educa-
for sale or sitting at the kitchen ta- tion. The quick start-up time also
ble with a homeowner to illustrate is a perk for those who don't have
how you can help get their home the leisure of waiting several years
sold. to get their new career off the
"A career in real estate can be ground.
an enjoyable and gratifying expe- Most often though what attracts
rience," said James M. Weichert, people to real estate is the poten-
president and founder of Weichert, tial for uncapped earnings it pro-
Realtors. "Helping others achieve vides. Those with an entrepreneur-
\N. ial spirit like the fact that the only

tl 'I '\ effort they put into their job and
: -. their ability to get results.
Perhaps the greatest benefit a ca-
: reer in real estate provides is flex-
ibility. Many agents find it easier
: ,- n to strike a healthy work-life bal-
ance because they can make their
own hours something that can
be a real benefit to a stay-at-home
parent. The flexibility also makes
real estate a great choice for those
who have another career or are
pursuing other interests but would
like to supplement their income.
Even those who may not see them-

Cell phones for soldiers
Dove Interiors Carpet One hopes to turn old cell phones into prepaid
calling cards for U.S. troops stationed overseas.
The phones are sent to ReCellular, which pays Cell Phones for Soldiers
for each donated phone enough to provide an hour of talk time to sol-
diers abroad.
"Americans will replace an estimated 130 million cell phones this year"
says Mike Newman vice president of ReCellular, "with the majority of
phones either discarded or stuffed in a drawer. Most people don't realize
that the small sacrifice of donating their unwanted phones can have a
tremendous benefit for a worthy cause like Cell Phones for Soldiers.
Donations can be made at Dove Interiors Carpet One located at 2305
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For further information call 813-645-8660.


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selves as a real estate agent can
earn some extra cash by becom-
ing a referral associate, a type of
licensed practitioner that receives
compensation simply for referring
someone who eventually buys or
sells a home.
"With many experts forecast-
ing a real estate market poised for
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ichert.
There are a number of resourc-
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course is designed to help new
sales associates start selling quick-
ly. Weichert also provides a host
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develop an expertise in a number
of specialized areas to meet the
specific needs of consumers.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 3
All Bay Insurance adds two new team


members
In an economy that has had its
share of struggles the past few
years, All Bay Insurance Group
has continued to thrive and grow,
recently adding two new team
members. At the end of 2009,
David McLauchlin joined All Bay

as the pri-
mary Ac-
count Ex-
ecutive for
the agen-
cy. David
started his
S"" insurance
i career in
% 2001, and
DAVID MCLAUCHLIN has worked
with two
independent agencies in the area
over the past 8 years. "Although
David has extensive insurance
knowledge and experience, it's
his sincere passion for people that
sets him apart from most others,"
says Joel Meek, owner of All Bay
Insurance Group. "We are truly
blessed to have great people like
David who are intensely focused
on the customer-service aspect of
insurance."
Shortly thereafter, at the begin-
ning of this year, Samantha Sidoti
was added to the team to serve as
the Customer Service Representa-
tive. Samantha recently moved to
the SouthShore area, with a back-
ground in retail customer service.
"Samantha has already contacted


A great time for the family
Now every Tuesday a balloon artist is coming from 6 pm to 8 pm at
S & S Tacos/Pizzas & Stuff in Riverview. Bring the family to eat at the
2009 Business of the Year, and leave full, kids happy and knowing you
got the biggest bang for your buck.
Invite your friends and extended friends, your children friends anyone
who is looking to just have an en-
joyable evening. Any questions call
813-677-8226. The Golf Club a

1011 Cypress Vill;
FULL SERVICE REST
"Don'tjust go out to eat...con


several hun- -
dred of our
customers
just in the first
few weeks
with updates
regarding
their policies
and the insur-
ance industry
in general.
We're very Samantha Sidoti
happy to have
her on our team, and we've already
had wonderful feedback from
customers
about her
great at-
titude and
helpful
spirit," says ay
Joel.
All Bay
Insurance
Group
opened its
first of- JOEL MEEK
fice in Riv-
erview in 2006 and its second of-
fice in Apollo Beach earlier this
year. They now provide insurance
protection to over 900 families in
the South Shore area, specializ-
ing in Personal Insurance such as
Auto, Home, and Life. They can
be reached by phone (813-677-
1121) or by stopping by either of
their offices: 11345 Big Bend Rd,
Riverview FL or 101 Flamingo Dr,
Apollo Beach FL.


t Cypress Creek
age Blvd. Ruskin
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4 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Positive Talk
by William Hodges From lions to pussycats


As a professional speaker, I cre-
ated a program entitled "Tip Toe
Thru the Alligators" that I present
at conferences, conventions and
management meetings. The title
comes from the old saying: "When
you're up to your fanny in alliga-
tors, it's hard to remember your
original mission was to drain the
swamp." In today's world of cor-
porate downsizing (excuse me,
the current politically correct term
is "rightsizing"), there are a lot
of people doing more with less.
Many of them are just trying to
hold on to theirjobs. It is essential,
especially in this type of climate,
that we understand when some-
one bites and snaps at us, it is not
personal but rather a stress effect
of this do-more-with-less philoso-
phy. The objective of my "Tip Toe
Thru the Alligators" program is to
show ways to work around obsta-
cles (usually other people) to get a
job done.
Speaking of animals, I remem-
ber hearing a story about a man
named Joe who had been laid off
from his job and decided to take
a new path in life. He had always
wanted to be in show business, but
was continually turned down until
he finally ended up at the zoo. Be-
ing desperate, Joe told the person-
nel officer at the zoo that he would
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The Office Coffee
Maker
I've asked my coworkers to
save our used coffee grounds in
the empty plastic coffee contain-
ers the coffee comes in. Then I
take the used grounds home in the
plastic coffee "cans" and dump the
grounds in my compost pile, rinse
the grounds out, and pour that wa-
ter on my hydrangeas.
Janice C.
Want to live better on the money
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or we're both going to lose our
jobs."
The next time you are busy try-
ing to drain the swamp, and you
run into some animals who snap
and bite at you, keep our friend Joe
in mind. Those alligators may be
no more real than Joe's lion. They
may be people trying to keep their
jobs just like you and me. Treat


them kindly and they just might
turn out to be pussycats.
Hodges is a nationally recog-
nized speaker, trainer, and syn-
dicated columnist. Hodges may
be reached at Hodges Seminars
International, PO. Box 89033,
Tampa, FL 33689-0400. Phone
813-641-0816. Web site: http://
www.BillHodges.com.


take any position-even cleaning
cages. As chance would have it,
Joe made a comment on his desire
to be in show business. The per-
sonnel officer's face brightened.
He explained to Joe that he had a
bad situation and maybe Joe could
help him. The zoo had advertised a
new gorilla exhibit. However, the
gorilla had died in transit and all of
the people coming to see the goril-
la were going to be disappointed.
Could Joe put on a gorilla costume
and act the part of a gorilla? It
was the answer to Joe's dream, a
chance to get into show business,
so he accepted.
Once in the cage, wearing the
costume, Joe beat his chest and
made snarling noises at the crowd
of onlookers. The onlookers ap-
plauded and threw peanuts. This
encouraged Joe to even more
spectacular activity. He beat his
chest harder, bellowed louder, and
began to swing higher and higher
on the trapeze in the cage. He ex-
pended even greater effort until
he lost his grip at the top of one
swing, flew over the wall, and
landed in the next cage. To Joe's
horror, he found he had fallen into
a cage with what appeared to be a
very hungry lion. Joe thought, "If
I yell out, people will find out I
am not really a gorilla and I will
lose my job. However, if I don't
do something, I will become lion
food. Maybe I can scare the lion."
So he beat on his chest and bel-
lowed loudly, but the lion just kept
coming toward him. Joe beat and
bellowed some more, but the lion
just kept coming. Finally, Joe qui-
etly said to himself, "I don't care
if I lose my job, I'm going to yell
for help." The lion heard him and
quickly replied, "Shut up, buddy,


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FEBRUARY 25, 2010

THE OBSERVER NEWS
THE SCC OBSERVER
THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT

210 Woodland Estates S. W
Ruskin,FL33570
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* Urgent and important notice
* There is a nationwide blood shortage. Please donate blood at *
* BloodNet, 3822 State Road 674, located in the Home Depot/!
* Beall's shopping center. *
* Important notice: After 12 years, the Sun City Center location *
* is closing. The last day to give at Sun City Center is Friday, Feb *
* 26. Otherwise it's a trip to Brandon. Friday hours are 9 to 3pm *
and you should try to arrive early by at least 1 pm. Call Tami at
S(813) 642-0201 for hours and details.
SAll lifesaving donors will receive a free "Love What You
* Give" t-shirt, a wellness checkup including a cholesterol screen-
* ing and a chance to save three lives!
* Thank you local gallon donors and Tami for her service.
* You may wish to designate your donation for use at the local *
* Southbay Hospital or Brandon Regional Hospital.

Bill McBride to speak to Democratic Club
The East Hillsborough County Democratic Club is pleased to an-
nounce that Bill McBride will be the guest speaker at their upcoming
meeting on Tuesday, March 9, from 6:30 p.m. 9:00 p.m. at Gior-
dano's Restaurant, 11310 Causeway Blvd. (a.k.a. Lumsden Blvd.)in
Brandon.
McBride is a father of two children and his wife, Alex Sink is run-
ning for Governor of Florida.
McBride will be discussing the 'state of Florida' and the 'state of
Alex Sink's campaign.' There will be an opportunity for questions, so
anticipate a great interactive evening. Plan to attend.

SHARE February pick-up
This coming Saturday, Feb. 27 is pick-up day for SHARE orders and
the day to place your order for March pick-up. SHARE is a low-cost
food program open to all who like a good bargain. Great prices on meats,
veggies and fruits. There are many items to choose from.
Pick-up for SHARE is at Ruskin United Methodist Church located at
105 4th Ave. NW in Ruskin. Pick-up hours are from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.
Come check out SHARE. For more information, call 645-1241.


"I






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 5


Fishing has become automated


Fishing in 2010 has taken a
w twist, for some anglers.
any are sailing along with new
radios, new radar with the auto-
ilot options and digital sonar
ith new live-cam video moni-
toring and electronic maps in
vivid color. This is an eye-open-
ing innovation and can change
your way of navigation.
Software power is now part
of our fishing gear. Looking for
fish and using your brain to find
them is no longer the tactic of
a great angler. Most are sailing
along looking at their automatic
fish finder.
Software power has invaded
boats with chart plotters, digi-
tal sonar, new high tech radios,
maps in vivid color, traffic mon-
itors, and all types of radar.
What is wrong with looking for
your own school of fish, taking
a pole and measuring your own
water depth, looking at your
rolled up waterproof map, driv-
ing your own boat and know-


ing the waterways without some
electronic monitor telling you
where to go?
Remember your favorite fish-
ing spot and know where they
feed and watch the tides. This is
real fishing.
King of the waterways this
week is the amberjack. This fish
has invaded our waterways in
schools. Anyone using a jig or
live bait probably caught one of
these fish this week. They were
being chased by hungry birds for
several days. The birds were in
hope they left some baitfish be-
hind. Food value for this fish is
listed as fair. Most people that
do eat this fish, smoke it. It is a
fun fish to catch.
I received a report about a per-
mit being caught in St. Petesburg
that weighed in at 40 lbs. The
largest that I could find on re-
cord was a 20-pounder. Average
weight of this fish is 3 lbs.
If you have been fishing only
in your favorite spots, make
a change and you might catch
more fish.
This is a good time to use
large bait in our fresh waters of
the upper rivers, both the Little
Manatee and the Alafia, for lar-
gemouth bass that have been eat-
ing in this cold weather and are
reportedly huge.
Trout fishing has been good in
grassy flats. Anglers are using
shiners, and are moving them


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slowly along the grassy bottoms
to make their catch.
Sheepshead are under a lot of
private docks along the water's
edge and have graced many din-
ner tables this week. Redfish
have moved out of their holes
and are showing up on dinner
tables, too.
Many people don't include fish
in their diets, but it is recom-
mended you eat fish three times
a week.
Don't get caught with a snook
in your bait well, as they still are
out of season. The season did not
open because of the cold weather
fish kill.
Low tides have also made for
better fishing this week.
My telephone complaints this
week were about the buoys not
being replaced in the Bay, and
the individuals visiting at the
boat launches while others were
patiently waiting to launch.
Of course I heard plenty about
our Florida weather being too
cold.
Fish long, fish late, watch the
weather, and always fish togeth-
er.

-- Aleta Jonie Maschek is a
member of Florida Outdoor
Press.


Board meets to discuss plans
The Board of Directors of TSS Youth Sailing met on Feb. 8 to discuss
plans for their upcoming April 3 Open House and summer youth sailing
classes at the Tampa Sailing Squadron, 1250 Apollo Beach Blvd., Apollo
Beach. For more information on youth sailing classes, call 645-2262.
Members of the board are: Ellie Sherwood, Kathryn Shea, Kelli Kerns;
back row: Mel Twes, Pat Austin, and Mike O'Hern.
Wimauma Post Office offers
passport application service
The Wimauma Post Office, 5608 State Road 674, Wimauma, offers conve-
nient passport application service. They are holding a passport fair from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 27 and Saturday, March 6. Call for an appointment
at (813) 634-4772.
For those planning a trip out of the country soon, the Post Office can assist in
accepting passport applications. Customers can also call 800-ASK-USPS to get
the location of nearby passport Post Offices and their passport customer hours,
or they can visit the Department of State's website at www.travel.state.gov.
The Post Office recommends coming in as early as possible to apply for a
passort and keep in mind the following to help the passport application process
go smoothly and efficiently.
Bring in proper proof of American citizenship. This must be either: a certi-
fied birth certificate issued by the city, county or state; a previous U.S. passport;
a certificate of citizenship; or a naturalization certificate. Note: a hospital-issued
birth certificate alone is not acceptable.
Bring in proof of identity. This must be either: a previous U.S. passport; a
naturalization certificate; a certificate of citizenship; or a current valid driver's
license, government ID or military photo ID.
The passport application requires two recent identical photographs. Wimau-
ma Post Office also does passport photos.
To save time, you can download a passport application at www.usps.com/
passport to complete your application beforehand.
For more information, contact Wimauma Post Office at (813) 634-4772 or


visit their website at wwwusps.com.

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Framed painting by Artist Bob-
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Framed commerative stamp
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semi postal fund raising stamp for
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Washington D.C. donated by Pat
Hersey: Winner Dottie Morgan
50/50 raffle: Ist:Joyce Stafford
2nd: Karla Pia
3rd :Marion McCoy


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6- OBSERVER- NEWS - RI--ER--EW CURRENT-- FEBRUARY-- 25, 2010


Josette Urso admires a plaque listing all the painters' names
that is now affixed to the doorway of the Mary & Martha House
'Second Hand Rose' Boutique in Ruskin.


Josette Urso, Artist/Director of the Ruskin Community
Mural 2009, addresses the crowd in front of the mural.


!?:;.- I;
^il


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.i~


Ruskin community mural is formally dedicated


The sky was clear and blue; the
air was calm and almost balmy. It
was a perfect day for the almost
175 people who witnessed the
dedication ceremonies of the new
mural that adorns the exterior of
the unusual building on the corer
of U.S. 41 and Shell Point Road in
Ruskin.
The work has been a collabora-
tion of many who arrived in the
torrid heat of mid-August to expe-
rience workshops under the guid-
ance of noted painter Josette Urso.
Urso, who grew up in Tampa and


graduated from USF's School of
Art, now lives and works in NYC.
She responded to a "Call to Art-
ists" that appeared on the Internet
in the early summer. The South
Shore Arts Council, the sponsor-
ing group, selected Urso from
many applicants not only for her
impressive background and body
of work, but because she displayed
an eagerness to tackle what was to
be a challenging project.
The unusual site at 100 E. Shell
Point Road has had several inter-
esting owners, including the early


offices of The Observer News. It
now houses the boutique called
"Second Hand Rose," and is a
fundraising project of the Mary &
Martha House, a social services
agency for abused women and
children, in another location.
From the very start of the mural
painting program, co-directors
Jan Falcione and Laurie Keppler
and their Board of Directors were
solidly behind the project. Equally
supportive as the funding source
was the Community Foundation of
Greater Sun City Center.


People of all ages from all over
the South Shore, some of whom
had never painted anything before,
came to the early workshops to
discuss, sort out and display many
visual ideas that evolved under
Urso's direction. It was never a
grand design that would simply be
applied to the building's exterior.
With paper, scissors and paint,
they collaborated on collages
that grew out of the forms found
in nature that surrounds the area.
Then they transferred their ideas
onto the exterior. Titled "Seed to


Bloom" the result is an innovative,
organic flow of abstract designs
that circles the entire building in
delicate pastel colors.
This is the second community
mural sponsored by the South
Shore Arts Council in connection
with the annual art event called
The Big Draw. Last year's mural,
directed by Michael Parker and
created by many hands, commem-
orated Ruskin's first 100 years
and can be seen on the 100' by 20'
exterior of the old Clark Furniture
building nearby.


New arrivals
from Brandon
Regional
Hospital


Giovanni E. Alvarado was born
Feb. 13, 2010. Crystal and Sergio
Alvarado of Riverview are the
proud parents.
Ava Marie Lynn Davis was born
Feb. 12, 2010. The proud parents
are Barbara Marie Johnson and
Terrell R. Davis of Gibsonton.
MaKaylah Joy-Nicole DeBolt
was born Feb. 10, 2010. Shari and
Charles DeBolt of Riverview are
the proud parents.
Audrey Elizabeth Vasiliki Gallos
was born Feb. 9, 2010. The proud
parents are Julie Oliver and Spiros
Gallos of Riverview.


Excelsior College announces recent
graduate Karl N. Scully
Karl N. Scully, a resident of Riverview, has earned a(n) Bachelor of
Science from Excelsior College.
Excelsior College (www.excelsior.edu) is an accredited, private, non-
profit institution that focuses on the needs of working adults. Its primary
mission is to increase access to a college degree for adult learners by
removing obstacles to their educational goals. Excelsior's unique
strengths lie in its acknowledged leadership in the assessment of student
knowledge. It does so by providing working adults multiple avenues to
degree completion that include its own online courses and college-level
proficiency examinations, and the acceptance of credit in transfer from


other colleges and universities.


Preschool
enrollment opens
St. Andrew's United Methodist
Preschool, located at 3315 Bryan
Road, begins its enrollment of 3-
and 4-year-olds for the 2010-2011
school year March 9.
St. Andrew's Preschool provides
a half-day program which includes
a full curriculum with emphasis on
readiness skills to prepare children
both academically and socially for
kindergarten.
The school takes pride in its Gold
Seal Accreditation. Call Gwen
Taylor at (813) 689-1207 to regis-
ter or for additional information or
visit www.standrewsbrandon.org.


Buzbee-McGriff
Reunion
The Buzbee-McGriff Reunion
will be held from 3 to 7 p.m. on
Saturday, Feb. 27 at Ruskin Rec
Center, 901 6th Ave. SE.
Family and friends are invited to
come and share good times, good
food, fun and fellowship. You are
asked to bring your favorite cov-
ered dishes along with family reci-
pes and memorabilia to share.
Playground and gameroom will
be open for recreation. Young and
old or in-between, they look for-
ward to seeing you there.
For more information, call
Tracey Buzbee at 645-0354.


A day in another culture

~ Tampa Prep students to sample the work,
schooling and music of migrant farm workers ~
WIMAUMA -- Approximately 40 students from Tampa Prepa-
ratory School in Tampa made RCMA Charter School in Wimau-
ma a part of their annual "Terrapin Day" on Feb. 24.
Terrapin Day promotes Tampa Prep's mission statement, 'a
higher purpose than self,' and their theme this year is 'Together
is Better.' Tampa Prep students dedicate this day to serving their
community.
Tampa Prep students learned about the largely migrant popu-
lation that Redlands Christian Migrant Association serves. They
spent time in the fields at Wishnatzki Farms and met some of the
parents that are served by RCMA.
Late morning, they arrived at the RCMA charter school, Wimau-
ma Academy, to learn about the school and spend time with the
children, reading and assisting with their 'Majors.' Majors give
RCMA students an opportunity to explore subjects such as art,
science, sports and music.
From noon to 2 p.m., a guest from Tampa's Latin Dance Moves
& Fitness joined the students for the major 'Moving with Music.'
Students were exposed to rhythm, dance and the origins of Latin
music.
This day personifies the theme of Tampa Prep's Terrapin Day,
'Together is Better,' as students take time to learn about one
another.For more information, see www.rcma.org and www.
tampaprep.org.


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT


FEBRUARY 25, 2010


-- l





OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 7


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


41b b
* ab


Available from Commercial News Providers


CLASSIFIED ADS
20 WORDS $15.50
645-3111


County Public Works Launches Online
Construction Project Status Feature


-


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Our countertops were old and stained, but we could not spend the mon-
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painted them with American Accents Stone Creations paint, although
any similar paint would work. You can see what the colors will look like
on the lid. I used about 2 1/2 cans and then protected the countertops
with several thin layers of polyurethane. Everyone thinks that we have
installed new countertops! This was a quick fix without much expense.
Carolyn H.
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0 Podiatric Medicine and Surgery

Sean D. Shanahan,
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3909 Galen Court, Suite B-1
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Phone: (813) 634-0664
Fax: (813) 634-0668

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813-645-6411
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Have you ever wanted to find out
the latest about major construc-
4 W 4 tion projects in your community?
Now you can! The Hillsborough
County Public Works Department
has started a new community proj-
ect information Web page that will
give citizens the opportunity to
view the status of major depart-
ment projects under construction
in the unincorporated county.
The first two projects to be list-
ed on the Web site are the Bruce
B. Downs Boulevard project from
Palm Springs Boulevard to Pebble
Creek Drive, and the Racetrack
Road project from Douglas Road
to Hillsborough Avenue.
This Web site will provide an
overview of projects, allow citi-
zens to check on the current status


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and view the construction sched-
ule, and check on traffic shifts and
possible delays. It also gives the
public an opportunity to view an
informational video on the project
and submit any comments or con-
cerns they may have.
This Web site will include infor-
mation for all future major Public
Works Department projects, such
as stormwater projects, intersec-
tion improvements and roadway
widening.
To access the project informa-
tion page, go to the Public Works
Department homepage at www.
hillsboroughcounty.org/public-
works/ and click on "Major Com-
munity Projects" or simply type
in www.hillsboroughcounty.org/
pwprojects/.

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Gibsonton
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for your Dog or Cat!

February 27 9am-1 pm

Wimauma Civic Center

5705 Hillsborough Street

Wimauma, FL 33598
Dogs/Cats must be 8 weeks or older to receive their
DA2PP/FVRCP vaccine and 3 months or older to receive their
rabies vaccination. Licenses will be available.
Cats must be in a carrier; dogs must be on a leash.

Sponsored by: 4
THEHI HUMANESOCIETY COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
OF TAMPA* BAY OF GREATER SUN CITY CENTER ,--.
For more information call: 813-367-2078 Amaervices
or visit www.humanesocietytampa.org
v J


FEBRUARY 26, 2010






8 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER
Library to hold Opening Gallery Reception I1 U U I r n I


FEBRUARY 25, 2010


Join the Southshore Regional
Library for an Opening Gallery
Reception celebrating the artwork
of Nancy Cooper and Gunni Nils-
son Price on March 4 from 6:30-
8:00 pm. Refreshments will be
served. This evening has been co-
sponsored by the Friends of South-
shore Regional Library.
Gunni Nilsson Price is a self-
taught artist. She had a one person
show at Teco Plaza, nine years ex-
hibiting at Gasprilla, twelve years
at Winter Park, a one person show
at the Kotler Gallery in Tampa's


Poet Peter Meinke to give reading
Distinguished poet Peter Meinke will be reading from his works at the
South Shore Library at 15816 Beth Shields Way on March 4 at 7:15 pm
in conjunction with the library's opening and reception for artists Gunnie
Nilsson Price and Nancy Cooper from 6:30 to 8 p.m
Peter Meinke has published 15 books of poems, 7 in the prestigious
Pitt Poetry Series, the most recent being The Contracted World (2006).
His poetry has received two NEA Fellowships and three prizes from the
Poetry Society of America. His book of short stories, The Piano Tuner,
won the 1986 Flannery O'Connor Award. He directed the Writing Work-
shop at Eckerd College for many years. The University of Tampa Press
has just re-published Lines from Neuchitel with original illustrations by
his wife, Jeanne.
For information, call 813-672-1155.

Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
This letter is in response to the front page article "Troops receive items
government lacks money to buy." Wow, what does that say about our
government? They spent billions bailing out car companies, banks, etc.
but don't have enough money to spend on our servicemen/women??
How outrageous. Where are their priorities?? Obviously misguided, to
say the least. What a shame. Does our government not value these brave
men/women, who volunteer, to fight for this country's freedoms?
Having said that, I am glad to hear that there are groups of citizens
that are willing and able to help. But there is something very wrong with
this picture. This is a truly disgusting situation. Shame on our govern-
ment for not taking proper care of our troops, and giving them absolutely
everything they need.!
Sincerely,
Uta H. Kuhn, Sun City Center


Bring 'em Back to Life
The March 16 meeting of the
South Bay Genealogical Society
will feature George C. Morgan ex-
plaining how to "Bring 'em Back
to Life: Developing an Ancestor
Profile."
In the course of genealogical re-
search, one often loses sight of the
fact that the people being traced
participated in historical times, led
complex lives, and interacted with
one another.
This talk presents a methodolo-
gy and a structured model for tak-
ing the details collected about an
ancestor and creating a biographi-
cal profile.
The luncheon meeting will be
held at noon at the SouthShore
Regional Library. Reservations re-
quired by March 10. Cost is $13.
Contact Sally Wepfer for reserva-
tions and membership information
at 634-7539.
The Society provides "Ask a
Genealogist" assistance at South-
Shore Regional Library on a
scheduled basis, holds monthly
program meetings, as well as
workshops and Seminars, to assist
those tracing their family history.
Membership is open to all South
County residents.


Have something
you would like
to send us?
210 Woodland
Estates S.W.
Ruskin 33570
FAX 645-4118
E-mail: News
@ObserverNews.net


Cypress Creek Terrific Kids Sponsored by SCC Kiwanis Club
Cypress Creek Elementary proudly announces the February Terrific Kids. They are: James Miril, Emily
Rios, Monica Rodriguez, Tomas Torres, Kyedis Cooper, Rodrigo Garcia, Colin Lambert, Alexa Linares,
Almadelia Garcia, Isabel Sanchez, Abigail Potter, Brizeyda Rodriguez, Jose Cigarroa, Jessica Raygoza,
Sawyer Swick, Rylee Sopka, Seleanna Velasquez, Kara Robinson, Lexi Balderas, Jaden Wayne Chris-
tensen, Jesus Casas, Claudia Vasquez, Jose Hernandez Mendez, Felicia Garcia, Christopher Chibatto,
Martha De Los Santos, Lanette Mercado, Anthony Martinez, Ryan Beller, Jonathan Gallardo, Jaquelyn
Manzanares, Mandy Bienaime, Nichole Smith, Yamiled Ramirez, Olivia Speed, Dillion Juarez, Jezel Fi-
erro, Hayley Cardoza, Rachel Gonzales, Enrique Porras, Anthony Martinez, Marley Simon, Omar Mal-
donado, Emma Paskert, Natalie Garcia, Angel Suastegui, Brian Juarez, Cristopher Meza, Jermeisha
Burton, Brando Ramirez, Eddie Diaz, Samantha Barone, Christopher Garcia, and Erin Hanson.


We're on
the web!
Check us out


Mar.13-14
10-5 pm


Pets Reign
5th Annual Ruskin PetFest will
be held Saturday, Feb. 27, from 9
am to 2 pm at the Ott Off-Leash
Dog Sanctuary in Ruskin. The
sanctuary is easily accessible off
S.R. 674, 21st St. S.E. and 3rd
Ave. S.E.
It is a free family event. There
will be : pet fashion contest, sil-
ly pet tricks contest, dog owner
lookalike contest, music, food and
vendors and CARE Silent Auc-
tion.


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examination or treatment. Senior citizen discount does not apply.
727 Cortaro Dr. (SweetBay Plaza)
Open Mon-Fri 8:30-5:00 813-633-2636


www.observernews.net
645-3111


--SS


Free Skin Cancer


Screening Clinic

If you are concerned about a skin
growth, we would be happy to evaluate

Howard A. Oriba, M.D. Michael G. Caruso, M.D.
Dermatologists

4002 Sun City Center Blvd. e Suite B, Sun City Center FL 33573
(Corner of Upper Creek and Sun Cit Center Blvd.)(Pink building with green roof)





CAILII VV


n ~r ~ur t


Germain Library, a six month
exhibit at Tampa International
Airport and many other shows
throughout Tampa. She paints
with oil on canvas.
Nancy Cooper learned the ba-
sics of art from her mother an artist
and High School art teacher. She
also studied at FSU. She received
numerous awards in watercolor.
She painted a mural at SCC indoor
lap pool and created a large paint-
ing for the South Sports Complex.
Basically she is a realist and works
in various mediums.






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 9


Auditions now open for Boychoir
The Florida Boychoir is adding two new Boychoirs the St. Petersburg
Boychoir and the Tampa Boychoir. Music teachers from the Tampa Bay
area are currently nominating boys to audition.
The St. Petersburg Boychoir, where the Choirmaster, Brian Collar,
sang as a child, is being re-founded. The Tampa Boychoir is all new.
These Boychoirs will perform a treble repertoire and most new boys
will be placed in one of these choirs. Some very talented new boys may
be placed directly in this top choir and could join the tour this summer
to Europe.
The Florida Boychoir is dedicated to the preservation and promotion
of the classical Boychoir tradition and to the quality training of your
Choirboys. By expanding the program, over 100 boys in the Tampa Bay
area will now be able to participate in this unique experience.
There is no tuition for membership in the Boychoirs. Families are
asked to become sponsors through a membership pledge which they
determine.
For more information, visit web site FloridaBoychoir.com and watch
the Music and More video. Auditions may be scheduled by mailing Ad-
missions@FloridaBoychoir.com or by calling (877) 671-7464.


Take a trip back in time
The United Daughters of the Confederacy, JudahP. Benjamin Chapter,
the Gamble Plantation Preservation Alliance and the Florida Park Ser-
vice are hosting the 50th Annual Spring Open House.
Once again you can travel back to the Old South during the day through
the many lifestyle demonstrations of that time period. The ladies of the
United Daughters of the Confederacy will be wearing costumes reminis-
cent of the era of the lx Is'- through 1870s while providing a narrative of
the Gamble Mansion's history. Additionally, the 4th Florida Volunteer
Infantry will be dressed in military uniforms re-enacting a Confederate
encampment. Music, crafts and more await attendees.
For additional information, contact the park office at (941)723-4536.
For ADA assistance, please contact the park office.

Gamble Plantation Historic State Park
50th Annual Spring Open House
FREE!
Sunday March 7, 2010
10:00a.m. 4:00 p.m.
U.S. Highway 301
one mile west of 1-75 off exit #224


Save taxpayers money and save a pet
What costs hundreds of tax dollars each and can be solved for a fraction of that cost? The answer may
surprise you but it involves spaying and neutering animals to prevent unwanted births! Consider that the
average cost to the county to respond to a resident complaint, pick up a homeless dog that was the subject
of the complaint, and then feeding/sheltering or euthanizing it costs hundreds of dollars for that single ani-
mal. That's a lot of tax money for the tens of thousands of animals handled by the county each year. It's
much cheaper and far more humane to have an animal spayed or neutered!
Many years ago the Doris Day Animal League started Spay Day, which is celebrated each year with
events during the month of February to draw attention to the need to have companion, stray and feral ani-
mals spayed or neutered in an effort to better their health and to prevent the unwanted births and deaths of
more homeless animals. These events draw communities together to recognize this crisis and to take action
to stop the vicious cycle of unwanted animal births and their unintended consequences.
It has been repeatedly proven that a spayed or neutered companion animal is often healthier, less ag-
gressive and more content (in many ways) than an animal that has not been "fixed." It is also an amaz-
ing fact that "unfixed" stray or
feral animals can reproduce at M
an alarming rate. For example,
unsprayed (female) dogs and
cats can have more than 15 off-
spring each year. Multiplied by
the thousands of homeless ani-
mals in Hillsborough County
alone one can understand the e
local crisis!
Everyone canhelp. Haveyour
own pet fixed. Participate in lo- x
cal cat rescue group efforts and
have feral cats fixed. Donate
to local shelters to provide as-
sistance to those lower income
residents to help have their h
animals fixed. There are sev-
eral low cost spay-neuter clin- Marlene Greenberg Photos
ics within Hillsborough County Leia Biscuit
that provide affordable services Leia is a female domestic short Biscuit is a Shepherd Sharpei
and many local vets participate hair with Bengal markings. This mixture. This great looking guy
in the County voucher program lovely lady is a couch potato was found as a stray along a lo-
in the County voucher program who is looking for a new couch. cal road. A very friendly male to
for low income residents. The Her favorite spot is in the center the volunteers Biscuit was look-
local CARE Animal Shelterhas of the cat tower, where she can ing to go squirrel hunting when
information about most of these people watch. She likes to be we visited. Only his cage kept
held and be brushed. Leia is cur- him back. Was he ever happy to
programs and volunteers there rent on her shots, microchipped, hear all the compliments sent
urge you to visit CARE or call and spayed. C.A.R.E. is open 10 his way. As part of his adoption,
645-2273 for more informa- AM to 3 PM on Tues. Sat. For Biscuit will be spayed, micro-
tion. directions visit www.CareShelter. chipped, and brought current on


org or call 813-645-2273.


his shots. C.A.R.E. is open 10AM
to 3 PM on Tues. Sat. For direc-
tions visit www.CareShelter.org
or call 813-645-2273


KELLER B WILLIAMS


I Ir D r ra~ ,,
-~~~ -. lI Il I ~I


164


Address
201 Bedford St #D82...........
205 Kings Blvd #49.............
102 Cambridge Trl #230.....
201 Bedford Trl #F121.........
1902 Dandridge St#2.........
1811 Bedford Ln #G 165.....
201 Bedford Trl #124...........
1902 Dandridge St#6.........
2243 Grenadier Dr #157.....
304 Friar Ct #A ....................
441 Gloucester Blvd #83.....
1901 Canterbury Ln #A23..
1905 E Canterbury Ln #1....
2228 GreenhavenDr #384.
1905 Hanson Ct #305.........
202 Bedford Tr1104 #104....
2247 Grenadier Dr #155.....
2222 Greenwich Dr #51......
210 IslipW ay #17................
504 Fallow Ct #196.............
2104 Hailstone Cr #394......
2110 Harleston PI #216......
2116 Harleston PI #213......


KELLER
WILLIAMS


35 Agents


in Sun City
- Center to
Serve You


i9-C Sun City Center Plaza(Just before the Post Office) 813-633-4200


KINGS PNN IN U IYCNE TIESNCTCNE


List Home
Price Open Address
.27,500 2323 Glenmore Cir #313..........
.30,900 ....** 407 Gladstone PI #99...............
.34,900 2628 Lancaster Dr ....................
.41,500 2613 Lancaster Dr#32..............
.42,000 1533 Ingram Dr#1533.............
.42,500 2522 New Haven Cr #119.........
.43,500 1335 Idlewood Dr #34..............
.44,900....** 2191 Acadia Greens Dr#2........
.45,900 1153 Jameson Greens Dr #07...
.48,000 ....* 2527 Lynx Rd #00015...............
.48,000 2340 Nantucket Dr #61.............
.48,500 1010 Radison Ave #13 ..............
.49,000 927 Mcdaniel St #35.................
.49,500 1105 Harefield Circle #57.........
.54,900 ....* 735 Mccallister Ave #264.........
.55,000 2413 Sifield Greens Way ..........
.59,900 1142 McDaniel St#47..............
.67,000 1220 Corinth Greens Dr#9.....
.68,900 1124 New Winsor Lp #11 .........
.69,900 2031 Grantham Greens Dr #54
.80,000 702 McDaniel St#91 ................
.80,900 1134 New Winsor Loop #6.......
.82,000 2274 Sifield Greens Way #50....


List Home
Price Open Address
82,900 1305 Burbank Ct...............
,89,000 216 S Pebble Beach Blvd..
89,000.....* 314 S, Pebble Beach Blvd
.89,900....** 822 La Jolla Ave #07.........
94,900....* 708 Brockton E PI..............
,95,900 303 Linger Lane................
107,000...* 1803 Allegheny Dr............
,112,999 1705 New Bedford Dr.......
114,900..* 1304 Bluewater Dr............
114,900.. 1514W Del WebbW Blvd.
119,000 ... 1212 SimmonsWay..........
119,900...* 811 Oakmont Ave.............
119,900...* 1707 Orchid Ct..................
128,900...* 1219 Hacienda Dr.............
129,900..* 633 Oakmont Ave.............
142,500...* 644 Allegheny Dr..............
,145,000 1726 Coco Palm Cir #32....
148,800 640 Allegheny Dr..............
S156,900...* 1850 Wolf Laurel Dr..........
167,900..* 2359 Emerald Lake Dr......
169,900 616 Oakmont Ave.............
175,000.. 703 BaltusrolWy...............
235,000 1966 Wolf Laurel Dr..........


List Home
Price Open Address
...66,000 216 Stoneham Dr...................
...69,000 1527 Fort Duquesna Dr.........
...95,500 1848Wolf Laurel Dr...............
...99,500.....* 1207 Emerald Dunes Dr.........
...99,900 1606 Brookton Green Dr........
.104,900 704 Camellia Green Dr...........
.108,900 1842Wolf Laurel Dr...............
.109,800 703 Medina Way....................
.110,000 322 Caloosa Palms Ct.............
.112,000 1830 Wolf Laurel Dr...............
.112,500 813 El Rancho Dr....................
.114,000 1114 Emerald Dunes Dr.........
.124,900 1113 Villeroy Dr #260............
.125,000 1121 Jasmine Creek Ct...........
.129,000 2017 New Bedford Dr............
.129,450 1049 Emerald Dunes Dr.........
.135,000 1058 Emerald Dunes Dr.........
.139,347......* 1103 Jasmine Creek Ct...........
.139,900 1215 Jasmine Creek Ct...........
.140,000 1007 Emerald Dunes Dr.........
.141,758 429 Noble Faire Dr .................
.141,900 1729 S Pebble Beach Blvd.....
.149,000 1371 Emerald Dunes Dr #16.


THIS AD COMPLIMENTS OF Judie McFarland *Tom McFarland *Vickie Bruni Larry Bruni Sam Provan Pam Reno Jud
*Al Martinsky Gary Kaukonen Nicki Kaukonen Bob Totero. Debi Tourangeau Mardell Williamson Laverne Calhoun *
* Nora Nelson Angie Cole Kathy McGarland Marianne Crowe Sharon Mooring Karen Castillo Colleen Schemiser JR
Mike Hurley Neil Shaffer Rene Morin Roger Humbers Carol Wettach
IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO PREVIEW A HOME IN KINGS POINT...please come by the Keller Williams office and an agent will escort


List Home RESIDENTIAL
Price Open Address List Price City
118 W St. Johns Way........................69900................Apollo Beach
.152,900 13804 Hillcrest Dr ............................ 95,000................ Riverview
.159,900 539 Red Mangrove Ln ..................... 96,900................ Apollo Beach
12615 Ocelot PI ............................... 110,000.............. Riverview
.169,900 418 Stephens Rd.............................. 114,900.............. Ruskin
.170,000 517 9th St NE ..... .............................. 119,900......... Ruskin
.175,000 5549 Bishop Rd..................... 120,000 ..............Wimauma
911 Go vie Woods Dr. #911 ............. 127,500 .............. Ruskin
.179,000 3110 Apricot St................................ 129,000......... .....Seffner
.179,900 11402 Raulerson Rd ........................ 155,900.............. Riverview
1608 24th SE St ............................... 158,300 .............. Ruskin
.179,900 5575 State Rd 674........................... 169,000 ..............Wimauma
.185,000 308 2nd Street NW.......................... 169,900.............. Ruskin
.189,000 1604O racle Dr............................... 179,900 ..............Ruskin
12956Tribute Dr ............................. 179,900.............. Riverview
.199,900 11412 Donneymoor Dr.................... 199,900.............. Riverview
205,000 302West Lake Dr............................. 219,000 ..............Wimauma
1617 race Dr................................. 229,000 .............. Ruskin
.211,000 2208 Misty Ridge Ln........................ 232,500 .............. Valrico
.224,900 15201 Balm Wimauma Rd .............. 279,000 ..............Wimauma
224,900 2615 Manatee Harbor Dr................. 285,000.............. Ruskin
717 Apollo Beach Blvd ....................349,900.............. Apollo Beach
.234,000 210 4th SW St.................................. 399,000..............Ruskin
254,900 3131 Long Rifle Dr........................... 399,000 ..............Wimauma
608 SW Dickman Drive.................... 459,000.............. Ruskin
.255,000 936 Preservation St.......................... 316,830.............. Bradenton
.257,450 3720 Moccasin Wallow .................. 500,000 ..............Palmetto
S269,90VACANT LAND
269,810 Golf Island................................. 375,000..............Apollo Beach
.269,900 9002 Symmes Rd............................ 55,000................ Gibsonton
.289,900 OakSt SW ........................................ 35,000................ Ruskin
5204E SR 674 Ave........................... 190,000 ..............Wimauma
290,000 17091 st St SW ................................90,000.........000 ....... Ruskin
COMMERCIAL
i Brogden Boyette Rd........................................ 199,000 ..............Riverview
Gail Green 5204E State Road 674 Ave.............. 190,000..............Wimauma
DelCastillo OPEN HOUSE KEY
*.............. Open for viewing 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.
you there. ** ............ Open for viewing 2:00 to 4:00 p.m.


II


I I


FEBRUARY 26, 2010


I






10 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


I participated in the Great Back-
yard Bird Count this past week-
end and urge everyone to take part
in this special event. By taking
just 15 minutes out of your day,
you can add to the data being col-
lected online. The deadline to en-
ter your data isn't until March 1
so you would have plenty of time
to look out your window from the
comfort of your house, or take a
stroll around your neighborhood
and count birds.
By visiting www.birdsource.
org/gbbc you can print out a bird
sheet for your specific area and it
gives you step by step directions
on how to add your data once you
have gathered it. You may want to
bring your camera because there is
a photo contest, so take your best
shot of whatever it is you see while
counting birds.
On my first time out, I heard a
lot of birds but had a hard time
finding them in the branches. The
little Warblers are hard to pinpoint
because they bounce from branch
to branch and flitter and flutter
through the air. I did see a beau-


It' not too late to
start counting

tiful Robin with a bright orange
breast, an osprey, black vultures
and turkey vultures, and I saw
a gorgeous male cardinal eating
seeds in my backyard.
There are several tricks to iden-
tifying birds because so many of
them are similar but have mark-
ings that differentiate them from
other species. However, the tough
part is getting a close enough look
to distinguish them; birds move
fast! Take for instance the Chicka-
dee family; in particular the black-
capped Chickadee and the Caro-
lina Chickadee. They are the same
color and similar in size. Howev-
er, the coloration differences are so
minute that you need to see both of
them side by side to determine the
specific intricacies of their color-
ation. That is why I always bring
my camera; I take photos while I
am out in the field and then ana-
lyze them back at home to identify
the un familiar species.
Another neat feature of this
website details birds in need. The
Audubon society has put together
a list of birds that are the most
threatened throughout specific ar-
eas. This is a great tool to help us
as citizens determine what birds
need the most help in our area. By
providing the information from
the bird count, scientists can track
migration routes, numbers of spe-
cies in a certain area and number
of declining species in an area.
This can lead to habitat protection
or public education about bird spe-
cies that need our help. So get out
there and count!


MOAAIMen's Club sponsor VA mobile


outreach clinic
The Military Officers Associa-
tion of America (MOAA), along
with the Sun City Center Men's
Club, are sponsoring the use of the
James A. Haley Veterans' Hospi-
tal Mobile Outreach Clinic at this
year's SCC Fun Fest, which will
take place at the SCC Atrium on
Saturday, March 20. The clinic
will be open, at no cost, to all area
veterans residing in SCC and the
surrounding area. The clinic has
three private exam rooms, a bath-
room, two wheelchair lifts and
many other "extras." The van will
be available from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Required documentation for
enrollment will be a DD214 or
current VA card. Medication lists
should be available for review by
doctor or pharmacists. Also, past
medical documents related to cur-
rent complaint/illness should be
available if not already in the elec-
tronic medical file.
A general health screening,
which will include information
relative to the importance of early
recognition and treatment (diet vs.
medication) of Type II diabetes,
will be provided. Enrollment for
veterans (including new Category
8 patients), may be requested. The
clinic will then have the capability
to document any pertinent find-


ings or recommendations in the
VA electronic medical record.
If there are any questions re-
garding utilizing the mobile clinic
contact: Frank Kepley (813 ) 642-
0801 (MOAA); or Jerry Mahoney
(813) 633-2879 (Men's Club).


The Sun City Center Area Cham-
ber of Commerce has a 3,800 square
foot Banquet Room the ideal size
for your one-day seminar, presen-
tation, business reception, etc. Ca-
pacity for this room is 210 persons
and includes a permanent 13' x 25'
dance floor. It is also available for
after hours and weekend use.
Kitchen facilities are optional;
though there is no cooking allowed
in the kitchen, it is designed for
your caterer with a warming oven,
microwave oven, double-door re-
frigerator and several large coffee
urns. We do the set up and take
down according to your specifica-
tions. We offer half and full date
rates with discounts to our Cham-
ber members.
For a board room environment,
your Chamber also offers a 7' x 12'
meeting space furnished with con-
ference table and chairs. Capacity
is approximately 20 persons. Day
rental only eight hour maximum.
This is closed door rental; no over-
flow into the adjoining Chamber
offices or Chamber lobby.
Looking for a spot to stop in,
make appointments, meet with


clients, use the internet and/or re-
group your hectic day? Check out
our SATELLITE OFFICE, a 7' x 6'
private working space with desk,
chairs, and wireless internet. Day
rental only one hour minimum -
and unlike the Banquet Room or
Board Room, our Satellite Office
is available to Chamber Members
only.
Call us for more information.
813.634.5111
CHAMBERLAND NEWS IS
GROWING
The Chamberland News is a
monthly email designed for resi-
dents of Sun City Center and/or the
surrounding area. It specifically
spotlights only those events that
are hosted by a Sun City Center
Chamber member or events that are
presented by the Chamber itself.
Events are listed in order, by date
and sent out via email the 1 st of ev-
ery month. Printed copies are also
available in the Chamber lobby.
Chamberland News is free to the
public, so if you are interested in
receiving this email, send your re-
quest to ebradl@aol.com or come
to the Chamber lobby on March 1


to pick up your copy.
21st ANNUAL SPRING
TRADE SHOW
Mark your calendars! The 21st
Annual Spring Trade Show will be
held on April 6, 2010 from 8 AM to
2 PM at the Community Hall, 1910
South Pebble Beach Blvd. in Sun
City Center. Our gold sponsor this
year is the St. Petersburg Times.
We expect another fantastic turn-
out at this event, so if you are a Sun
City Center Chamber member, re-
serve your booth NOW. Many of
our fine Chamber members have
already chosen their booths for this
event. So don't hesitate select
your first choice booth now.
You can get your membership
and/or registration paperwork by
mailing sccchamber@aol.com or
call us at 813.634.5111 ext 101 or
ext 102. We look forward to talk-
ing to you.

ElaineBrad is President ofthe
Sun City CenterArea Chamber of
Commerce. She can be reached
at (813) 634-5111 extension 101
or via direct email ebradl@aol
com.


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FEBRUARY 25, 2010






LOOKING FOR SEMINAR


SEyecare, Cosmetic, Optical & Hearing Services
at Sun City Eye Associates, 779 Cortaro Drive, Sun City Center

OurAward-Winning Physicians
Richard Hector, MD
SFellowship Trained Cornea/External
Disease & Dry Eye Specialist
Michael Manning, MD
/i > Cataract & LASIK Surgeon
Comprehensive Ophthalmologist
Prabin Mishra, MD, PhD
Dr. Pravak Dr. Carter Dr. Mishra Dr. Detweiler Dr. Manning Dr. Hector Fellowship Trained Cosmetic Surgeon
Board Certified in Anti-Aging Medicine
SComprehensive Eye Examinations Cataract Evaluations/Surgery Julie Carter, MD
* Dry Eyes, Glaucoma, Diabetic Conditions, and Macular Degeneration Fellowship Trained Glaucoma Specialist
* Functional / Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Brow Lifts & Cataract Surgeon
0 Eyeglasses and Sunglasses Contact Lenses Roman pravak, MD
Fellowship Trained Retina Specialist
* Hearing Evaluations *Second Opinions Hearing Aids & Batteries O
Edwin Detweiler, OD
Call 634-2020 to schedule an appointment Board Certified Optometrist
Medicare and most insurances accepted. (Most eye exams are a Medicare covered benefit.)
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kl, (A






OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT 11


Ruskin Moose Lodge Calendar
The Ruskin Moose Lodge #813 is located at
212 E. Shell Point Road, Ruskin (813) 645-5919


Friday, February 26
Saturday, February 27
Friday, March 5
Saturday, March 6
Friday, March 12
Saturday, March 13


Wednesday, March 17

Friday, March 19
Saturday, March 20

Friday, March 26
Saturday, March 27
Every Wednesday

Every Thursday
Every Friday


7-11 p.m. Live music by Gene Cannor
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins
7-11 p.m. Live Music with The Smoke
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim Mullins
7-11 p.m. Live Music with Calvin O
7-11 p.m. Support your State Party
Wear a shirt to represent your home s
Cake Walk, Prizes, Games
5-7 p.m. St. Patrick's Corn Beef Dim
7-11 p.m. Music, Games, Prizes
7-11 p.m. Live Music with Charlie Bu
Noon -2 p.m. Moose Legion Picnic
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim
7-11 p.m. Live Music with Double Sh
7-11 p.m. Karaoke with Kim
5-7 p.m. Spaghetti Dinners
(half orders available)
5-7 p.m. Wings (the best I've every h
5-7 p.m. Fish Fry
(beer batter, fried or baked)


Live music every Friday night
Karaoke by Kim every Saturday night

All events are open to
qualified members and guest.


N


Marine Corps
League meets to
nominate officer
The next meeting of the R
view Detachment of the Ma
Corps League will be hel
7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March
American Legion Post 148,
U.S. Hwy. 301 S., Riverview.
It is important that all men
attend this meeting as the non
tion of officers for the next
will take place at this meeting
The Detachment would also
to invite all area Marines and
Corpsmen to attend this mec
and learn what they are all al
For more information, call
Skelding at (813) 672-1778 or
their website at www.mclr
view.org.


Florida State
tate Fair releases
attendance figures
ner for the 2010 year
The 2010 Florida State Fair, held
ms from February 4-15, has released
preliminary attendance figures that
indicate 354,390 people visited the
fair during its 12-day run.
ot This is approximately a 24 per-
cent decrease from the prior year
when the final audited attendance
was 466,733 people.
The weather is normally the
ad) number one reason that impacts
people's decision to attend an
outdoor event. During the twelve
days of the 2010 Florida State Fair,
three of those days were rainy and
only three days were sunny and
clear skies.
S Two out of the twelve days
reached temperatures higher than
68 F degrees; the highest tempera-
ture was 760 F on opening day and
the lowest was 370 F on Feb. 14.
Fair officials believe that
economic conditions and the 2010
Super Bowl, which took place
during the first Sunday of the fair
's this year, may have also influ-
enced people's decision to attend
iver- fair.
the fair.


anne
d at
2 at
7240

nbers
nina-
year

like
FMF
eting
bout.
Jack
visit
river-


LADIES FINE APPAREL CONSIGNMENT SHOP

S last Call Room 30-50% F
1311 Apollo Beach Blvd., S. f ,..
Apollo Beach, FL 33572 ,
(Behind Alpha Pizza)


\WV e pay top $S for o as l ^ I
. A orgOod, used fuW'O /
941-746--0093o J
J/4O6.093 or -.oo 0-oo
1-800-738009'3
1001 9th St. W. (Downtown Bradenton)
IO *.-, -


Florida State Fair
announces Best
in Show, Rides
and Food Stand
awards
The Florida State Fair has an-
nounced the 2010 winners for
overall best in show for rides, best
food stand, first place adult and
children's ride, and the people's
choice for best ride or attraction.
1st place -- Food Stand: Polar
Bear Ice Cream (new food vendor
at the 2010 Florida State Fair)
2nd place -- Food Stand: Carou-
sel Foods (sold the Krispy Kreme
doughnut burger among other food
items)
Best in Show for Ride: Gentle
Giant Wheel from Reithoffer
1st place -- Adult Ride: Fighter
Mondial from Wade Shows
1st place -- Children's Ride:
Western Mouse roller coaster from
Reithoffer
People's Choice for Best Ride or
Attraction: The Original Batcopter
Judging criteria for food stands
included overall appearance of
staff and food stand, customer
service, cleanliness of staff, qual-
ity of the food and taste, unique-
ness of food and menu selection.
Judging criteria for rides included
performance of the ride and audi-
ence enjoyment, ride operator's
appearance, customer service, and
appearance surrounding the ride
including paint, lights, landscap-
ing and cleanliness. The people's
choice for best ride or attrac-
tion was influenced by people's
comments posted on the Fair's
Facebook page and visitors who
attended the fair.


Charity begins at home
The Ruskin Eagles Auxiliary says 'charity begins at home.' On Feb. 3,
the Ruskin Eagles Auxiliary President, Mary Payne and Vice President
Diane St. Jacques presented Dr. Hal Ott with two checks.
The first check presented was for Dr. Ott's off-leash dog park in Ruskin
in the amount of $100. Dr. Ott owns and maintains the dog park at his
own expense, and the Auxiliary wanted to express a sincere thank you to
him for his unselfish service to the community.
The second check presented was in the amount of $500 for Dr. Ott's
medical clinic in Haiti. The clinic in Haiti works completely on dona-
tions from the public, and never has there been a better time to donate to
such a worthwhile and needed cause!
The motto of the Eagles is 'people helping people' and they are very
proud and honored to be part of this wonderful community. For member-
ship information or questions about the Eagles, call 645-2922.





Left to right: Vice President Diane St. Jacques, Dr. Hal Ott, and
President Mary Payne.

Local Republican elected Vice-Chairman
of the Republican Party of Florida
Hillsborough County Chairwoman Deborah Cox-Roush has been
elected Vice-Chairman of the Republican Party of Florida. Cox-Roush
was elected by her peers; the members of the State Republican Executive
Committee.
"I am honored and deeply humbled by the confidence and dedication
of those who have supported me throughout this campaign and by the
vote from my fellow committee members." said Cox-Roush. Cox-Roush
continued saying, "I believe in our party and our common-sense values
and will work tirelessly to build and renew our party for a stronger better
Florida and America."
Deborah Cox-Roush became Chair of the Hillsborough County
Republican Party in December of 2008. She has been working non-stop
to build the local Republican Party and has made as one her signature
initiatives a program known as Republican's Care, encouraging local
Republicans to be engaged with charity in addition to their political
activities.
Senator John Thrasher was elected to replace Jim Greer as Chairman
of the Republican Party.

District extends water restrictions
The Southwest Florida Water Management District's Governing Board
voted to extend modified Phase II water shortage restrictions through
June 30, 2010, while lifting restrictions on pressure washing for 15 of
its 16 counties.
The Governing Board voted to maintain most of the Phase II water
shortage restrictions as the District's water resources continue to recover
from the four-year drought. The District is still suffering from a 28-inch
rainfall deficit for the past 48 months.
The Board decided to lift the pressure washing restrictions in response
to significant improvements in aquifer and river levels as a result of
several months of above-average rainfall. Moreover, the region's major
public water suppliers have been able to capture and store enough water
to meet the needs of residents. However, the Board urged residents to
continue the water conservation practices they've learned over the past
three years.
Under the modified Phase II restrictions, pressure washing is allowed
for necessary purposes such as prior to painting or sealing, or to address
a health or safety hazard. Pressure washing will now be allowed once a
year for any reason.
The District declared a water shortage in January 2007. Seven coun-
ties were subject to additional Phase III restrictions in 2008 and 2009.
Hillsborough, Pasco and Pinellas counties were briefly subject to the
most aggressive Phase IV restrictions when public water supplies were
critically low last spring.
For more information about watering restrictions in your area, contact
your local utility, or visit the District's website at www.WaterMatters.



Ruskin VFW Post #6287
Ruskin VFW Post #6287, 5120 U.S. 41 N. has listed the following
Weekly activities. Meetings are: American
X Legion on 1st Wednesday each month; VFW
and LAVFW on the 2nd Wednesday each
month; and MAVFW on the 3rd Thursday
each month.
Thursday, February 25 Bar Bingo at
6 p.m.
Friday, February 26 Fish Fry from 4:30
to 7 p.m. Music by George Raab at 7 p.m.
Saturday, February 27-Turkey Shoot at 1:30 p.m. MAVFW Steak
Dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, February 28- Texas Hold 'em at 1 p.m. Fire in the Hole
at 5:30 p.m.


Celebrating 36 Years in Business

CALL FOR FREE
INSPECTION
TERMITES?
ASK ABOUT TERMIDOR
SBRANDON
PEST CONTROL
Phone: (813) 685-7711
Fax: (813) 685-3607
II fe g I.o Rl -


FEBRUARY 25, 2010






12 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Request a Speaker
Camp Bayou has recently en-
hanced their Speaker's Bureau
offerings, thanks to the efforts of
Dr. Diane Alvarez, Camp Bayou
Speakers Coordinator. In addition
to their basic program which pro-
vides information about amenities
and activities at the Camp Bayou
Outdoor Learning Center, there
are a number of new programs on
a variety of topics available for a
nominal donation to Camp Bayou.
A sampling of the programs in-
clude:

"Native Plants in Our Area"
"Introducing the Florida
Master Naturalist Program"
"Citizen Science at Camp
Bayou"
"Plants for the Butterfly
Garden"
"Ruskin History"
"John Ruskin and Sustain-
ability"
"The Nature Writers"
"Folk Tales from Camp
Bayou"
"Ucita: History of Florida
Native People"
"The Paleo Fossil Museum"
"PleinAire painting (with or
without demo)
To learn more or find out how to

Caloosa Greens Ladies
Golf Association Feb. 4
game Best nine front or
back
A Flight
1st Mary Miller 22.5
2nd Eleanor Shreiber 24.5
(match of cards)
B Flight
1st Mary Houston 24 (match
2nd Pat Sulliven 24 of Cards)
3rd Peg Nolan 25
C Flight
1st Anna Dean 19.5
D Flight
1st Jo Smalley 23
2nd Yvonne Rocheleau 25


schedule a speaker for your orga-
nization's meeting, contact Diane
at 813-634-7969 or email camp-
bayou@yahoo.com.
Camp Bayou is neither a camp-
ground nor a summer camp. It was
an RV park before the County's
ELAP program purchased the land
but it is now open for day use only
to the general public. Through vol-
unteers, donations, membership
and grants, the RCDF offers pre-
scheduled programs to schools,
youth groups, adult groups and
families plus it's open from Thurs-
day- Saturday from 9am-2pm for
passive recreational pursuits such
as wildlife watching, nature pho-
tography and trail walks. General
admission is still FREE.
The Camp Bayou Outdoor
Learning Center is a public- pri-
vate partnership between the non-
profit Ruskin Community Devel-
opment Foundation, Inc. (RCDF)
and Hillsborough County Parks,
Recreation and Conservation.
Camp Bayou is located 3 miles
south of SR674 at the end of 24th
St SE in Ruskin. More information
is on the web at http://www.camp-
bayou.org.


Golf Scores Hogan's
Golf Club Feb. 11
Course: Riverside,
Play: K-Skins

1st : two-way tie at 8 skins each
- Dave Grenke & John Schachte
2nd : Wayne Velten, 4 skins

Low-net: Wayne Velten, 71
Low-gross: Chip Wood, 85

Also playing: Bill Shaver, Anna
Kuhnley, Tony Hoying (guest) and
Barry Lolin


Dalia Meza Photo
RCMA Wimauma Academy announces February Terrific Kids
RCMA Wimauma Academy recognizes the following students as their Terrific Kids for February 2010: Front
row: Melissa Moran, Mariflor Antonio, Hanna Antonio, Alexis Estrada, Christopher Perez, Carlos Reyes
Second row: Helen Halm (Kiwanis), Nancy Alguire (Kiwanis), Isabel Valdez, Josue Peraza, Carlos Santiago,
Fernando Guzman, Sala Halm (Kiwanis), and Mark Haggett (Principal). Missing from photo: Jesus Galarza


Kings Point Ladies
9-Hole Golf League Feb
8 Points Game
Flight A Winners (2) Tie for 1st
Mary Reter 28
Betty Irwin 28
Karen Bergmoser 25
Flight B Winners (3) Tie for 1st
Janet Balonick 27
Nita Schmierier 27
Shirley Brei 27
(2) Tie for 2nd
Liz Lister 25
Lorraine Rings 25
Flight C Winners (2) Tie for 1st
Bev Elliot 26
Karole Reiss 26
Joan Leombruno 21


The Perfect Piece
Used Quality Furniture & Accessories


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813-645-1800 I
Stop by...you'll be pleasantly surprised! I
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The SCC WGA 9 Hole
League played Feb. 18
at Sandpiper Course
Game Throw Out
Worst Hole
Winners
First Place Sandra Hurwitz 25
Second Place Mary Klopp 26
Third Place Tie -- Aileen Engel
and Shirley McCarty 32


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FEBRUARY 26,2010






FEBRUARY 25, 2010 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 13
A FREE REPORT for readers of this paper...


"New Medicine Based On An 88-Year Old


Theory By Albert Einstein Can Help Almost


Everyone Who Is Sick Or Injured"

rT-----------------------------------------------------------------------
FDA Over-the-Counter Approved
for Treating Pain from Osteoarthritis of the Hand!
L- ----------------------------------------------------------------------- J


What you are about
to read may be the
most important infor-
mation you've ever
read. Here is why.
Albert Einstein was, quite
possibly, the most intelligent
person who ever lived. His
theories and ideas were so
far ahead of his time, that
even now, the smartest sci-
entists alive are still discov-
ering his value.
One of his theories pub-
lished in 1917, worked out
the theory of how lasers
function. However, it was
not until May 16, 1960 (43
years later) that the first
actual laser was developed
by an American scientist.
Since then, scientists and
inventors have developed
many types of lasers and all
kinds of uses for them. They
can be used as a scalpel
that is so delicate, it can be
used on the eyes of human
beings. Lasers are used to
read price codes at your
local supermarkets. And
they're used to play music
and video on your CD's and
DVD's.
But now, there is a new
type of laser so effective
against human disease and
injury that it is rapidly chang-
ing the practice of medicine.
This is a new type of low-
level laser which produces
an unfocused light that has
been...
Registered With
The FDA
To Be 100% Safe!
Low-level lasers use less
than one watt of power and
they produce what can best
be described as a "Healing
Light".
Here is a somewhat un-
scientific description of how
this "Healing Light" can cure
the damage done by human
sickness and disease.
As you probably know, our
entire bodies are made up of
human cells. The health of
all human cells is based on
energy. If your cells don't
receive enough energy, they
will weaken and the body
will become sick.
For you to be healthy,


what your cells need is
exactly the right kind and the
right amount of energy.
Every time you get injured or
become sick, the energy
flow to your cells is disrupt-
ed. Until the proper type and
amount of energy is
restored, you will remain
sick or injured.
That's what a low-level
laser device does. It re-
energizes the cells in your
body with the right kind and
proper amount of healing
energy.
It may surprise you to
learn that low level lasers
are ...
Used By A
Growing Number Of
DoctorsTo Heal
Their Patients In
The Fastest Way
Possible!
Could you guess what
kind of doctors use the high-
est percent of low-level
lasers on their patients?
It's doctors involved in
sports medicine. Why? The
answer is simple. You see,
doctors involved in sports
medicine often have to get
their patients better in the
fastest way humanly possi-
ble because every day he
remains "unhealthy" can
cost the sports organization
millions of dollars.
But here's something
exciting! You don't actually
need to go to a doctor to
get laser therapy. If you
want to you can buy one of
these devices and use it on
yourself. The best ones
come with simple, easy-to-
follow instructions and can
be used by almost any per-
son with average intelli-
gence.
Perhaps the best low-level
lasers in the world have
been invented by a doctor
named Larry Lytle. He has
studied lasers and human
health for years, and Dr.
Lytle is, without question,
one of the most knowledge-
able people in the world
about low-level lasers...
and... how they can be
used...


To Help Almost
Every Health
Problem Ever
Experienced By A
Human Being!
Dr. Lytle believes (as do
many other people) low-
level laser therapy will
become the medicine of the
future.
If you hold a low-level
laser device against the skin
of your body and turn it on,
you will be able to see the
laser light... but... you will
not be able to feel it. There
probably won't even be a
sensation of warmth. Laser
light is as gentle as the kiss
of a butterfly. But, from a
healing point of view, it is
quite possible it is more
effective than drugs or
surgery.
Low-level laser therapy is
not just the medicine of the
future. For many people
who know about it, it is the
"medicine" they use now.
The problem of trying to
explain the healing powers
of low-level laser therapy
is...
It Works So Well On
So Many Different
Problems, It Seems
Like It Couldn't
Possibly Be True!
But it is true! As men-
tioned earlier, all injury and
illness creates an interrup-
tion of energy to the cells of
the human body. The body
will never recover until the
proper amount and type of
energy is restored to these
cells. But once that energy
is restored...
The Body Can
Recover From
Almost Everything!
With the correct equip-
ment, properly used, low-
level lasers have been
clinically shown to reduce
pain, reduce inflammation,
increase cellular energy,
increase cell permeability
(so that the nutrients the
cell needs to heal can get
into the cell) and even help
correct faulty DNA!*
What you have just read is


No medical treatment claims made or implied. Statements based on general clinical research results. Your results will vary.


Professional Kesults in a small, easy to use PacKage!
To receive your FREE information packet call 1-800-597-9231, Code 5465


a very simplistic (almost
childish) explanation of low-
level laser therapy, of how it
works, and what it can do for
you. But this is something
that needs to be explained
to you much more accurate-
ly by a real expert.
This is information which
just might help relieve you of
any disease and might pos-
sibly save your life and the
life of your loved ones. And
best of all, you can ...
Get This
Information
Absolutely FREE!
Dr. Larry Lytle himself
has written and compiled a
FREE REPORT in which he
explains to you exactly how
and why low-level laser ther-
apy works. Dr. Lytle will
show you some unbeliev-
able "before" and "after" pic-
tures of people who have
benefitted by this amazing
new therapy.
For some people, a free
report and information like
this can mark the beginning
of an entirely new life... pain-
free and full of energy.
For others, it can make the
difference of living a healthy
life compared to a low-ener-
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ease.
And, for those who live
with enormous pain every
day ... this free report could
truly guide them to a mira-
cle!
But even if you are not
sick, not injured, or not in
pain, you should still order
this report. After all, it is
100% free. And almost
nobody lives out their life
without having at least some


kind of sickness or injury.
Wouldn't it be nice to know
that, if you do become sick
or injured, you will at least
know where to go to find
some sort of answer to your
problems that don't involve
dangerous drugs!
Dr. Lytle is a remarkably
young man in his 70's. His
life's missions is "To Make A
Difference In Humankind",
and he has devoted his life
to the accomplishment of
that goal.
He is not doing this for
profit. He passionately
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apy is an important health
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To receive your free infor-
mation pack, call 1-800-597-
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then leave your name and
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Get the free report. You
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everything to gain. The
report and your gift are both
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Get This Valuable
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14 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Florida must take advantage of bio
By Charles H. Bronson, Flor- in the state. This foresight has al-
ida Agriculture and Consumer lowed Florida to capitalize on the
Services Commissioner renewable energy movement that
has rapidly emerged across the na-


As Florida's Agriculture and
Consumer Services Commission-
er, one of my proudest achieve-
ments is Florida's status as a lead-
er in the biofuel industry. We have
long believed that Florida should
be and can be a leader in produc-
ing energy from crops. One of the
most exciting components of this
industry is biomass energy, which
recognizes the value of Florida's
vast farmland and forest lands and
mild climate, as it allows "crops"
to be grown almost year round.
Recently, some have suggested
that facilities which convert clean
biomass into electricity should not
be a part of Florida's energy future.
I respectfully disagree. The U.S.
Environmental Protection Admin-
istration, the U.S. Department of
Energy, and most authoritative
environmental organizations have
recognized biomass as a source of
energy that is cleaner than tradi-
tional carbon-based fossil fuels.
The Florida Department of Ag-
riculture and Consumer Services
(FDACS) has sponsored the an-
nual Farm to Fuel Summit since
2006, which aims to promote the
production, distribution, and use
of renewable fuels. The Florida
Legislature created the initiative in
state statute to enhance the market
for and promote the production and
distribution of renewable energy
from Florida-grown crops. Ad-
ditionally, Florida seeks to utilize
forest logging residues to enhance
the value of agriculture products

Kings Point Ladies 18
Hole League Feb.15
Game: Back 9 minus
1/2 handicap
A Flt.
1st (tie) Mary McClafferty, Lee
Leverett 26
2nd Joan Sword 28
3rd Marissa Cacciotti 29
4th (tie) Joan Contois, Esther
Plusse 32
B Flt.
1st Mary Etzler 25
2nd Jackie McDow 26
3rd Rosa Gerry 29
4th Marilyn McCormick 31
C Flt.
1st Mary Arpaia 26
2nd Terri Ferrara 29
3rd Dot Mulford 30
4th Gladys Lowry 31
D Flt.
1st Diane King 28
2nd Marge Miller 32
3rd Barbara Warner 32

Golf Scores Hogans
Golf Club
Monday, Feb. 15
Course: Diamond Hill,
Play: Skins
1st : Two-way tie at 4 skins each
- Chip Wood and Ed Weber
2nd : six-way tie at 2 skins each
- Dave Bublitz, Jim Sari, Ernie
Urmas, Bill Hagen, John Schachte
and Dave Grenke

Low-net: Chip Wood, 67
Low-gross: Chip Wood, 79 (new
course record)
Also playing: Liana Bublitz, Joe
Hoffman, Art Swallow & John Ka-
zlauskas
E.EEMENE.E.ENE.E.E
S Send Us Your News
SThe Observer News
210 Woodland Estates SW, Ruskin=
FAX 645-4118 or E-mail: News@m
S ObserverNews.net
lllllllllll


tion.
The Obama Administration just
announced a comprehensive strat-
egy to enhance American energy
independence, launch a new clean
energy economy that includes re-
newable energy forms such as bio-
mass, and create millions of jobs.
Here in Florida, biopower compa-
nies are already proposing projects
to create energy from materials
that would otherwise be landfilled
or burned openly in slash piles. In
rural areas in particular, providing
opportunities for municipalities
and counties to create their own
energy with area-grown resources,
including short-rotation woody
crops, is exciting from both a re-
newable energy and an economic
development standpoint. Rural
areas such as Gadsden County en-
joy enormous forestry resources;
encouraging biomass production
in these communities also benefits
forestry producers by providing
economic incentives for them to
maintain healthy, sustainable for-
ests that generate clean energy and
reduce carbon pollution.
The Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services' Division
of Forestry is currently working
cooperatively with the University
of Florida and the Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection
to complete a forest sustainability
study, requested by the Legisla-
ture, that will look at new energy
markets and their impacts on forest
supply and forest products pricing


FEBRUARY 25, 2010


U
-power
into the future in Florida. The ide-
al world is one in which our cur-
rent forest products industry can
co-exist with the new bio-energy
markets and keep our forests sus-
tainable while producing valuable
forest products and clean renew-
able energy.

Economic Downturn Creates
Entrepreneurs
Perhaps no one else understands
the economic downturn better than
the people of Florida. In a state
that depends on tourism and the
service industry almost as much as
it depends on agriculture, demand
for such services has fallen and
businesses are hurting like never
before.
While nothing will replace
Florida's one-of-a-kind tourism
industry, the state CAN embrace
new, sustainable industries that
will have a long-term impact on
job creation and economic devel-
opment. As Florida continues to
position itself in the forefront of
the renewable energy industry, we
will benefit from an industry that
is growing rapidly as the public
demands cleaner, greener energy.

Trees = Jobs
While Florida is known for its
sandy beaches and palm trees, our
state is also home to vast amounts
of forest resources: nearly 16 mil-
lion acres of timberland. Florida's
$16.57 billion forestry industry,
the state's number one agricul-
tural commodity, has long repre-
sented sustainable jobs for Flo-
ridians. Yet the forest industry is
struggling, with paper sales down


and an alarming downturn in new
home construction, leaving timber
products piling up with few cus-
tomers to purchase them. We have
an opportunity now, however, to
take advantage of our forestry in-
dustry by promoting bio-power.
Utilizing clean wood and wood
waste to create energy requires
employees in the forest to gather
the material, employees on the
roads to transport material to bio-
power facilities, and employees in
the facilities to operate and main-
tain them. As USDA Agriculture
Secretary Vilsack said in August
of last year, "by using a collabora-
tive management approach with a
heavy focus on restoring these nat-
ural resources, we can make our
forests more resilient to climate
change, protect water resources,


Couples winners
Cheryl and Jerry Karpinski, recently
Country Club Couple's Championship.


and improve forest health while
creating jobs and opportunities."
Simply put, bio-power will put
a lot of Floridians back to work.
Florida can lead the nation in bio-
power technology and the new
jobs it can create. Both state and
federal policymakers agree that
biopower is critically important
in reducing greenhouse gas emis-
sions, increasing our energy secu-
rity and creating jobs, particularly
in rural communities. Partnering
with bio-power companies, com-
panies that are committed to bring-
ing this technology to Florida in a
way that is environmentally sensi-
tive and respectful of health im-
pacts, can put the Sunshine State
in the forefront of the new energy
economy.


won the Caloosa Golf and


Just My Size
I had been doing this trick for about two years. Now is the time of year
the clothing sales are huge! Most of what is left is small sizes or big sizes
or something marked with the wrong size. I size up and then take it home
to alter it myself.
I bought a lovely elastic waist skirt this season in a much larger size.
I came home and shortened the elastic and removed a little fabric at the
seam. Not only did I find a "designer" item on sale, but also it is now
"tailored" to be the proper fit for me.
Cindy in South Carolina
Want to live better on the money you already make? Visit stretcher.com/r/99.htm> to find hundreds of articles to help you stretch
your day and your dollar! Copyright 2010 Dollar Stretcher, Inc.


Kitty Litter Bags
Instead of using the kitty bags in the litter box that are about $4 for six
bags, I get a box of 13-gallon garbage bags that has 20 bags for the same
cost as the kitty bags. They work great!
FB.

Whipped Cream Cheese
My son loves whipped cream cheese, but since it is often more expen-
sive than the bar style, I have now started whipping my own. I add a little
bit of milk and whip it with the mixer to get it soft and fluffy. He thinks
it's great, and I save a little bit of money for just a few minutes of time
on my part.
Rebecca G.
Want to live better on the money you already make? Visit stretcher.com/r/99.htm> to find hundreds of articles to help you stretch
your day and your dollar! Copyright 2010 Dollar Stretcher, Inc.


!J




FEBRUAR




-

t





., ;:i
... ._


DI -
A.b] ~a -a

I~I.I'vI'L


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 15


Y 25, 2010







'i ; ... ;.


'" '.;"'^


$ 9 clean & Tune Speciall
Our technicians will thoroughly inspect, clean and tune your Air
Conditioning System, which is recommended by all manufacturers.
S- This service will include:


+ 3 Canned Goods which go to
Feed The Hungry
Good till the end of March.
New Customers only!
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16 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


Photo courtesy of Dave LaPoint
Dave at the mound for the St. Louis Cardinals during the 1982 World
Series against his former teammates from the Milwaukee Brewers.
Dave said it was fun playing against his former team and that they
stayed friends even though his new team (the Cardinals) won.


Pitcher
* Continued from page 1


tiny black-and-white television at
his grandparents' house.
"I'll never forget it. It was the
World Series between the Dodg-
ers and the Twins in 1965 or 66,"
he said. He really felt the weight
of how much his life had changed
since that day, when he finally
stood in the stadium he had seen on
that small television so long ago.
"I was 6 when I watched Jim Kaat
pitch for the Minnesota Twins, and
then in 1982, we were teammates
when we won the World Series. It
was my rookie year in the majors
and it was a real blessing because
I felt this was how the game was
played," he said.
Having been drafted right out of
high school in 1977 into the Mil-
waukee Brewers he went through
the various classifications in the
minors starting at Newark, N.Y at
17.
His first disappointment was that
he had signed the contract at 17
and got yanked out of the bullpen
(without getting to play) because
he hadn't actually graduated yet
even though he had finished his
exams.
Rules were rules, he said. And he
found out quickly that they were
strictly enforced.
"I'd traveled 240 miles on a Fri-
day night, went home and gradu-
ated the next day, then went back
- another 240 miles- and finally
got to play," he said, now able to
laugh about it.
Dave said it took him three years
in the minor leagues before mak-
ing it into the majors at 21.
After a brief time with the Brew-
ers he was traded to the St. Louis
Cardinals and became the young-
est person of all time to have a win
in both leagues.
"I was always a pitcher," he told
me. "When I was traded to the
Cardinals, we played the Brewers
in the Series and I pitched against
my old teammates. Having Moose
Haas (the opposing team's pitcher)
pitch against me was a real experi-
ence. We were still friends, in the
bullpens there was wire between
us but we talked through it. And
we were warming up side-by-side.
He'd taken me under his wing
years before and at the series, I re-
alized that even though he was a
real veteran, he was still nervous,
just like me."
Dave played pro ball until 1993
when he became an agent, and then
in 1994 had the opportunity to start
a new team- the Adirondack Lum-
berjacks in the Northeast League.
"I became their GM (general man-


ager) and managing and pitching
coach. I quickly learned that all
the things you take for granted-
who sings the Star Spangled Ban-
ner; who puts the bases out; who
cleans and mows the field- these
things don't just happen- I had to
make them happen."
He had to put everything and
everyone together, including a
grounds crew, clubhouse person-
nel, banquet teams, advertising
sponsorships and then get players
on the field.
He was with this team from 1995
to 1996 and they won the first year
they were in the league. "We were
the inaugural champions," he said
proudly. "And I'd really been on a
tight budget because I was prom-
ised $300,000 to do everything
and actually got about $40,000 up
front, so I really had to do some
fundraising."
He said he wore so many hats it
was hard to remember "who and
where" he was. From suit and tie in
the morning to the practice pitch-
ing cage in the afternoon, some-
times well into the night coach-
ing players, he worked to get- and
keep- his winning team in shape.
"I sure had to learn about PR
(public relations)," he said. "And
I had to learn it fast."
Now he manages the Long Is-
land Ducks during season in New
York. Until then, he will live in
Riverview and will return again
when season is over. "I'll spend
about 5 months in the North and 7
here," he said. He plans to leave in
April to begin training.
The Ducks is a team made up of
former pro players who have been
out of the game awhile, perhaps
from injury or other emergency,
and want to get back into the ma-
jors, he said.
"These are highly skilled guys
who have had contracts for $20
and $40 million that have been out
for awhile," he said.
While in Riverview however,
he'll be teaching boys and girls the
art of pitching on an individual or
group basis, although he prefers
one-on-one lessons.
"When you want to walk on the
moon, you need to learn from a
guy who has walked on the moon,
not simply one who has read about
it," he said.
Anyone interested in learning
(about baseball or strictly pitching
skills) from a man of Dave's vast
experience is asked to call (813)
442-6163 to schedule an appoint-
ment or email him at dlapointl@
tampabay.rr.com.


Penny Fletcher photo
Dave is on 62 baseball cards that range from the beginning of his career at 17
to the present day.


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FEBRUARY 26,2010






FEBRUARY 25, 2010

Frances Frick
It took 95 years to slow Frances
Frick down but she's finally re-
tired.
Again.
The New York City-born former
accountant for the North American
Newspaper Alliance who worked
in the New York Times Building
for more than 35 years spent her
niur .rr rn


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 17

honored by Homeland Security, Coast Guard Auxiliary
childhood surrounded by aunts and he was in charge of a narcotics di-
uncles in a neighborhood where vision for the police department." | I
everybody knew everybody else. Several of her other uncles were "
"I had an interesting family life inspectors for various departments
as a child," she told me. "There in the city and state including the
were so many of us. My grand- New York Transportation Depart- I
mother was the driving force be- ment, and one niece was put in
hind our education. She had 18 charge of both JFK and LaGuardia
children. Ten of them lived to airports after the Sept. 11 tragedy.
adulthood. We moved from where Fortunately, her niece wasn't in -,
I was born in Queens to Long Is- the wrong place at the time of the . J
land City and there was always bombings like all her superiors
someone from the family around, were, Frances told me.
One of my uncles was a Monsignor "They were all killed, leaving
in charge of the (Catholic) schools her in charge. She was next in line.
in New York City. Grandma also What a terrible, terrible way to get
raised a judge who worked in the a promotion but she had to take
Children's Court for the State and over immediately."
(another uncle who was) a Colonel All the children growing up in
in the Army. And then there was her extended family were expected Oscar Kramer presents Frances with a letter and certificate of rec-
my Uncle Freddy "Freddy the to make something useful of them- ognition from the Department of Homeland Security on behalf of
Narc' they called him because selves, and still are, she said. the U.S. Coast Guard. Oscar and Judy Kramer took over the Frick's
duties with the Coast Guard.


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"My grandmother educated me
through college," Frances said. "I
don't know how she did it."
While still living in New York,
she met and married her "lifetime"
husband Walter, who died of dia-
betic complications in 1999.
During World War II Walter
worked at Ranger Aircraft and
after that became a mechanic for
General Motors.
"He was so good he made man-
agement at GM in no time. He
could tell someone what was
wrong with their car simply by lis-
tening to the noise it made. He was
like a human computer," she said
proudly during our interview Feb.
16 at her new home at the Cypress


Creek Assisted Living Residence.
Because Walter worked his way
up so quickly in management, he
was able to buy a new Cadillac at a
reduced price every year between
1947 and 1972, she said.
"Once he retired, we only bought
one every two years," Frances
quipped. "I'll bet you don't know
anyone else who's had 35 brand
new Cadillacs!"
By a strange coincidence, both
their companies were bought out
and they were both offered early
retirement with full benefits at
around the same time.
"It wouldn't happen that way
See OVER COFFEE, page 19


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18 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


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FEBRUARY 25, 2010

Over Coffee


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 19


* Continued from page 17
anymore," she said. "Things have
really changed. But we were all
right. We decided to move to
Florida because Walter wanted a
boat. He didn't even know how to
operate one, so when he did get it,
he had to hire someone to bring it
to us from Tampa." This memory
made her laugh aloud.
"So here it is, 1972, and we're
driving around Florida looking


for a place we'd like to live and
we had to get off I-4 because it
had gotten really dark. We saw a
sign for Bahia Beach Hotel and
fell in love with the place. We met
the Dickmans there. They were
all such nice people. We bought a
home in Ruskin and started going
to all the events at the yacht clubs
and hotel. Both of us learned all
about safety and boating. It was a
wonderful life."


LETTER TO THE EDITOR
New study demonstrates need for
Right to Repair legislation


Consumers save $26 billion
annually in vehicle repairs at
neighborhood repair shops
versus dealerships

Dear Editor:
New data reveals that consum-
ers save an estimated $26 billion a
year or $360 per family for vehicle
service and repair at neighborhood
independent repair shops com-
pared to more costly new car deal-
erships. This demonstrates why
Congress needs to swiftly pass the
Motor Vehicle Owners' Right to
Repair Act (HR 2057). This leg-
islation will prevent car manufac-
turers from denying access to re-
pair information, computer codes,
tools and software needed by car
owners and their neighborhood
repair shops to repair late model
vehicles.
Historically, car owners have
had the ability to repair their ve-
hicles themselves or take them to
the service facility of their choice.


The car companies now seek to
force consumers to return to the
dealership for service and repair
and are lobbying heavily against
the Right to Repair Act. It is ap-
palling that some manufacturers
can take federal bailout money and
then turn around and oppose a bill
that would protect every American
motorist from a vehicle repair mo-
nopoly.
The MotorVehicle Owners'Right
to Repair Act (HR 2057) currently
has the support of 53 members of
Congress. Every consumer who
owns or operates a vehicle in the
U.S. stands to suffer economically
if this bill is not passed. Please
send a letter urging your members
of Congress to support the Right to
Repair Act by visiting www.right-
torepair.org.
Sincerely,
Kathleen Schmatz,
President and CEO, Automotive
Aftermarket Industry Association
(AAIA)


The couple bought a
26-foot cabin cruiser and
they joined Flotilla 75 in
Ruskin where they had
taken their boating training.
"There were only about six peo-
ple in it then, and when we joined,
we tried really hard and built it up
to about 35. I wasn't a member a
day before they started handing
me coffeepots and otherjobs," she
laughed.
Both she and Walter became
board members, and then got on
the Division Board, which super-
vised nine Flotillas in the area be-
tween Ruskin, Lakeland and Ma-
deira Beach.
She did public relations and
finance and he went on SAR
(Search and Rescue) missions, she
said. But mostly, they gave safety
courses.
Along with this, she and Mabel
Godfrey held monthly blood pres-
sure clinics at the Ruskin Method-
ist Church and in Apollo Beach at
Caribbean Isles.
But after breaking her leg four
times, and later her hip, finally
Frances found herself confined to
a wheelchair.
"It's so much easier since I
moved here," she said, showing
me around her living quarters and
the big, airy common areas filled
with plants, caged birds and foun-
tains.
Judy and Oscar Kramer of Sun
City Center took over the duties


M*tI

iti-11KIII,


Penny
tRAN(, S 1-5 Fletcher Photo
Frances
I 1, .. n ..... ." Frick
,oN ".^' .An?-"'"' showed
Stride
-f 7 in her
---- recog-
""" nition
from the
Coast Guard as she
showed me this certificate but said
she enjoyed every day she spent volunteering.


she and Walter used to perform,
she said, and last week, two days
before our interview, Oscar pre-
sented Frances with a letter and
certificate of recognition from
the Department of Homeland Se-
curity on behalf of the U.S. Coast
Guard.
Frances couldn't speak highly
enough of the people who work
at the assisted living residence or
of the nurses and therapists who
worked hard to get her to walk
while she was at Palm Garden.
"When I was in the nursing
home, they tried so hard to help
me walk again but I'd just had too
many breaks, and falls, and then I
had a seizure. But it isn't so bad,"
she said from her wheelchair.
"Here there are always people
around me. "
Frances also has very low vision


which is no longer helped by the
big "reading machine" (desktop
print magnifier) she has that she
says she will give away to anyone
who needs it.
"Just let them call me at (813)
645-2460 and I can tell them about
it," she said.
*Perhaps you have something
you'd like to share. Or maybe you'd
rather tell the community about
your favorite charity or cause: or
sound off about something you think
needs change. That's what "Over
Coffee" is about. It really doesn't
matter whether we actually drink
any coffee or not (although I prob-
ably 1v i!l, It's what you have to say
that's important. E-mail me at pen-
ny@observemews.net any time and
suggest a meeting place. No matter
what's going on, I'm usually avail-
able to share just one more cup.


Trust'L1!I your Eyecae to Spec~1iait


Walter Robert
Moscoso, M.D. Edelman, M.D.

Retina Specialist, Cataract & Laser
Macular Surgeon,
Degeneration Glaucoma Specialist


MANATEE
J EYE CLINIC
EI1 i;. J i' i


Eric
Berman, M.D.

Eyelid Plastic
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Neuro-Specialist


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To "tn






20 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Getting out "Events in and out of the area"


FEBRUARY 25, 2010


Compiled by Julie Ball
Friday February 26
The Cuban Club at 2010 Ave.
Republica De Cuba N in Ybor
City is hosting The
Cigar City Tat- -, -e
too Convention all ,
weekend. The cost .
is $15 per day or $40 "I -
for the whole week-
end. This convention is more than
needles and tattoos. it combines
art, music and film into a weekend
long event. Visit http://cigarcityt-
attooconvention.com or call (813)
910-7777 for more information.

The Seratoma Youth Ranchjust
off 1-75 in Brookesville (85 Myers
Rd) is hosting Youth Fest. With
a wide variety of family friendly
music on multiple stages, and the
opportunity to be in the outdoors,
come out and enjoy the full array
of food, entertainment, merchan-
dise and craft exhibits. The festival
kicks off Friday evening and goes
through the weekend with some of
the best Southern rock and coun-
try music acts today. The festival
will close on Sunday with a per-
formance by Charlie Daniels. Ad-
mission prices are as follows: $10
(Fri.), $15 advance/$20 door (Sat.),
$20 advance/$25 door (Sun.), $40
ad\ ,iiicc $45 door (weekend pass),
camping $50 (includes weekend
pass). For more information or to
purchase tickets visit journeyfest.
org or call (877) 733-3139.


Saturday February 27
More than 200 local middle and
high school students will test and
show off their custom built robots
in the Inspiration and Recogni-
tion in Science and Technology
Tech Challenge open competition
at the Recreation Center at Uni-
versity of South Florida located at

Hometown news
from the Virginia
Military Institute
The following Virginia Military
Institute cadets are among the 449
cadets who were recently named
to the Deans' List for the first se-
mester of academic year 2009-10.
To be eligible for the Dean's List, a
cadet must have a term grade point
average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale and
no grade below C.
Nathan C. Gibbs A freshman
from Riverview, FL is majoring
in Chemistry. Cadet Gibbs's par-
ents are Mr. and Mrs. Stephen C.
Gibbs.
Justin E. Hickman A junior
from Brandon, FL is majoring in
Psychology. Cadet Hickman's
parents are Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy E.
Hickman.
VMI, with an enrollment of
1,500 cadets, is the nation's oldest
state-supported military col-
lege. U.S. News and World Re-
port has ranked it among the top
three public-supported liberal arts
colleges in the nation for the last
seven years.
Golf Scores Hogans
Golf Club Feb. 17
Course: SandPiper,
Palms to Oaks, Play:
Classic Skins
1st: two-way tie at 5 skins each
Fred Mayes & Ernie Urmas
2nd : two-way tie at 3 skins each
Art Swallow & Frank Carlin
3rd : two-way tie at 1 skin each
Anna Kuhnley and Tom Kirchen
OLo[]=w-net: Fred Mayes, 70
Low-gross: Chip Wood, 87
Also playing Robert Layer, Don
Mowry, Wayne Velten & John
Schachte


4202 E Fowler Ave., adjacent to
the Sun Dome. Winners advance
to the FIRST Championship in At-
lanta, GA. Matches
begin at 10:30 a.m.
Admission is free. \ "
For more informa- =i -
tion call (617) 939-
8316.

Join the annual celebration of
Ybor City's ethnic heritage and
culture at Fiesta Day, with an
arts marketplace, ethnic foods,
multicultural exhibits and enter-
tainment, International Parade
of Flags and more from 10am to
6pm. Also Flan Fest (11 a.m.-4
p.m.) with sampling and contests
at Ybor City Saturday Market in
Centennial Park. In conjunction
with Fiesta Day celebration, enter
your best flan recipe for a chance
to win cash prizes; plus flan-eating
contest, flan sampling, and ethnic
foods for sale. Admission to all
events is free with the exception
of charges for food. For more in-
formation visit ybormarket.com or
call (813) 248-3712.

See Gasparilla's Outbound
Voyage as the "Jose Gasparilla"
sailing vessel docks at the Tampa
Convention Center, located at
333 S Franklin St., for a last hur-
rah with live bands in the court-
yard, free beads, balloon makers
and face painters starting at 2pm.
Mayor Pam Iorio gets the key to
the city back just before the final
cannon blast as the ship shoves
off at 6:30 p.m. For more informa-
tion visit http://gasparillapiratef-
est.com/outward-bound-voyage.
shtml or call (813) 251-3378.

The Tampa Bay History Center
will feature a special kid friendly
before hours tour with hands-on


games and activities in the galler-
ies.
This event features "Take Me
Out to the Ballgame." Keep the
fun going with a light breakfast
of tasty guava pastries and other
treats provided by the Colum-
bia Cafe. Led by educators, kid-
friendly activities are reserved for
children ages 5-12 with an adult
companion. Space is limited, pre-
registration is required. Admission
is $8 per child + $12 per adult for
TBHC members and $10 per child
+ $14 per adult for non members.
For more information or to register
call (813) 228-0097 or visit tam-
pabayhistorycenter.org.


Sunday February 28
Looking to add another member
to your family? The USF Sundome
located at 4202 E Fowler Ave.
will host a Pet-adopt-athon from
10am to 3pm by rescue groups
from across Florida to raise aware-
ness of the pet situation, educate
pet owners and promote animal
food donations to Animal Based
Charities. For more information
call (877) 799-7387.

The Marie Selby Botantical
Gardens located at 811 S Palm
Ave. in Sarasota will host an
Asian Cultural Festival from 10
am to 5 pm with ex-
otic sights, sounds ,
and smells of the
Orient including
performances by
the Matsuriza Taiko
drummers, Ikebana flower ar-
rangements, bonsai displays, su-
mi-e ink paintings, origami paper
folding and more.
Admission is $17, $6 ages 6-11,
under age 5, free. For more infor-
mation call (941) 366-5731.


The Gasparilla Marathon and
Half Marathon will take place in
downtown Tampa beginning at 6
am. Both events begin at Platt and
Parker streets (adjacent to Publix).
The flat, fast and mostly water-
front course showcases many of
Tampa's beautiful and historic


neighborhoods including Davis
Islands, Downtown Tampa, River-
front Park, Ballast Point and Bay-
shore Boulevard. Runners must
maintain a 16-minute mile. Entry
fees: Marathon: $85-$110; Half
Marathon: $50-$75. Visit tam-
pabayrun.com to signup.


,aloosa members I to r uenny ranson ana UICK Lanese present
their Italian and Irish jokes and sing-a-long numbers.
Good Time Nite was a success
Caloosa Golf and Country Club enjoyed a "Good Time Nite" recently
with 200 in attendance. The evening began with a catered Italian meal
served by Danny Boys. A talent show followed with 8 creative acts rang-
ing from a 23 piece band to a skit entitled "Second Week of Deer Camp."
The fun evening ended with a Men's Bake Off where 30 male members
made delicious desserts enjoyed by the audience. The 1st prize winner
was Bill Winklemann's gourmet trifle. Caloosa has many social events
throughout the year with the St. Patrick's Day Party coming up soon.
For more information about the Club contact the Pro Shop at 634-
2870.


WHOLESALE TIRES;1 ~








Get answers to your questions about Medicare.



You're invited to join your neighbors for a Medicare informational meeting near you. This is your chance
to ask questions and learn about the Medicare options available in your area. A local SecureHorizons
representative will be available to talk with you about your choices.


You can still switch plans through March 31.-

Telesales

800-237-3037, TTY 711
Visit our Web Site at www.SecureHorizons.com


Now's the perfect time to ask
about your Medicare Advantage,
Part D and Medicare
Supplement options. Call now to
reserve your seat at a Medicare
informational meeting near you.


March 8, 29, 2010
10:00 a.m.
Panera Bread
3490 Lithia Pinecrest Rd
Valrico, FL 33594


March 2, 16, 2010
12:00 p.m.
Buca di Beppo
11105 Causeway Blvd
Brandon, FL 33511


March 4, 9, 18, 25, 2010
10:00 a.m. & 1:30 p.m.
Cypress Creek Golf & Country Club
1011 Cypress Village Drive
Ruskin, FL 33573


March 22, 2010
6:30 p.m.
Buca di Beppo
11105 Causeway Blvd
Brandon, FL 33511


March 9, 23, 2010
10:00 a.m. & 2:00 p.m.
La Quinta Inn & Suites
310 Grand Regency Blvd
Brandon, FL 33511


March 2, 10, 22, 2010
10:00 a.m.
Best Western Hotel
9331 Adamo Drive
Brandon, FL 33619
March 16, 26, 30, 2010
2:00 p.m.
Denny's
3747 Sun City Center
Sun City Center, FL 33573


A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with
special needs at sales meetings, call 800-237-3037, TTY 711.
A UnitedHealthcare" Medicare Solution
"You can switch to another Medicare Advantage plan until March 31, but during this time you can't join or drop your
Part D coverage.
SecureHorizons Medicare Advantage plans are offered by UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company and its affiliated
companies, Medicare Advantage Organizations with a Medicare contract.
C0009M0011 090925 172215 OVEX3191975 000


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 21


FEBRUARY 26, 2010






22 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT


-E


A few simple
ingredients


As you may recall I recently con-
fessed to my slaw-dog addiction. You
may be relieved to know that I have
joined Slaw-Dog Anonymous. I go to
meetings three times a week and have
learned to avoid evil places of temp-
tation such as: sporting events, county
fairs, food courts and my kitchen. In
place of this dependency, I have eased
my cravings with something allegedly
less addictive.
Ever since I was a kid, I have loved
fried pies. I was waddling through the
local supermarket the other day and
found a display stuffed silly with them
at four-bits apiece. You would be sur-
prised about how many you can cram
into a shopping buggy.
When I got home, I got a case of
the munchies and after enjoying two
or three dozen of the delicacies I hap-
pened to glance at the back of the box
of one where the ingredients were
listed.
Imagine my surprise when I saw sev-
en lines of ingredients in some of the
smallest type I have ever tried to read.
I counted them and found that there are
39 separate items required to make one
chocolate pie.
My knowledge of chemistry is very
limited. When I was in school, I took
a basic class in chemistry, twice. It
was listed in the course handbook as
"Chemistry 100: Poet's Chemistry."
That is no joke. You could fill libraries
with what I don't know about chem-
istry.
However, some of the things listed
on the back of the box seemed to be
better suited for the 'Al-Qaida Do-It-
Yourself Terrorist Kit.' (Now avail-
able both on-line and in your local Bin
Laden-Mart.)
Let's face it; these pies don't have a
shelf life.'They have a 'half life' simi-
lar to plutonium. According to reliable
reports, recent excavations in Qin
Tomb in China dating back to 210 BC,
archeologists have uncovered kumquat
fried pies that were in excellent shape,
ready to go back on the shelves.
Please don't take me for a health
food nut. The slaw-dog gag isn't far
from the truth. However, do you really
need 39 ingredients? What happens
to your body after you swallow this
chemical warehouse? Your guts have
to be asking, "What, in the name
of DuPont, is this jerk trying to get
me to digest?"
I've got a stomach like a leather
bag, but things not found on the
Periodic Chart of Elements can't
be all that beneficial.
So here are a few questions for
commercial bakers. Do we really
need an across-the-board sample
of the chemical industry swirling
around in our bellies? Why not save
yourself a couple of bucks and cut
back the ingredients to around 20?
Wouldn't it be nicer not having to
put a 'Hazardous Material' warn-
ing sign on your trucks? Would not
your delivery guys present a better
image if they weren't wearing de-
contamination suits?
And could I be so bold as to sug-
gest the word, "fresh"?
2010, Jim McGowan.


United States-


Census


2010


Sewing Guild to
meet
The Brandon/East Bay Chapter
of The American Sewing Guild
will hold its monthly meeting on
Wednesday, March 3 at the Bran-
don Recreation Center located at
502 East Sadie Street in Brandon.
Coffee will be served at 9:30
a.m. and business meeting will be
at 10 a.m.
For more information, call Claire
Smith at 633-2397.


* DAILY SPECIALS
* Fresh Picked Strawberries
* Hand Dipped Strawberry or .
Banana Milkshakes
* Strawberry Shortcake &
Sundaes
* Baked Goods: Cupcakes,
Cookies, Strawberry Tarts
* Fresh Produce
* Freshly-made Cubans,
Smoked Pork Sandwiches,
Chicken Salad Croissants
* Local Honey


OPEN:
Mon. -Sat.10 a.m to 5 p.m.
ltLkT Sun. Noon to 5 p.m.

5574 S.R. 674 Wimauma
1.7 miles east of Hwy. 301
(813) 642-8747
Dine-In Take-Out


Dr. Robert A. Norman
Board Certified Dermatologist

Offering Botox, Restyl
products
Same Day Appointments FREE
6322 U.S. Highway 301
813-880-7541
Insurance accepted: Medicare, Medicaic
Cigna, Aetna, Amerigroup, and


Dr. A. Theodosatos
Brandi Broughton, PA-C


ane and various cosmetic
and services
SSkin Screening
Riverview
6
d, BCBS, Humana,
many more


How to Identify Census 2010 Workers

By being counted in the 2010 Census you are standing up for what
your community's needs are. That's why census takers are so
important. A census taker is a person from your community who is
hired by the Census Bureau to make sure that your neighborhood
gets represented as accurately as possible. The census taker's
primary responsibility is to collect census information from
residences that have not sent back their 2010 Census form.

The Census Bureau provides the census taker with a binder
containing all of the addresses that didn't send back a filled
out census form
The census taker then visits all of those addresses and
records the answers to the questions on the form
If no one answers at a particular residence, a census taker
will visit that home up to three times, each time leaving a
door hanger featuring a phone number; residents can call the
number on the hanger to schedule the visit

The census taker will ONLY ask the questions that appear on the
census form. They will NEVER ask for your Social Security Number or
personal banking information (such as account numbers or
passwords).

Your privacy and confidentiality is our priority!

The census taker who collects your information is sworn for life to protect
your data under Federal Law Title 13. Those who violate the oath face
criminal penalties: Under federal law, the penalty for unlawful disclosure is
a fine of up to $250,000 or imprisonment for up to 5 years, or both.



S2010 CENSUS: IT'S IN OUR HANDS


Census 2010 workers wear an
official identification badge.


Census 2010 workers carry
U.S. Census Bureau bags,
making them easier to identify.


For more information
about the 2010 Census
visit
www.2010census.gov.


Riverside Golf
S33.00 .......... before noon
$28.00 ............... after noon :
: 18 ...o............. after 3 pm
Includes 18 holes & cart
Tax Included
Valid only with this coupon. Exp. 3/31/10

*50O OFF any round
Valid only with this coupon. Exp. 3/31/10 .
- ----------------Golf Lessons ---
Golf Lessons $20
d P4.ITAwI


&A Iu ll


Pw MUUM: YUU MR Lilit; L1dy. P 0 %. % V %P.AL %PP %


FEBRUARY 26,2010


*44V


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60


I






FEBRUARY 25, 2010
Mortgage Prepayments


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 23


The Dollar Stretcher Blog
by Gary Foreman
I am trying to find the best way
to really take advantage in reduc-
ing our mortgage to save on inter-
est paid. We are in our home for 5
years with a 30 yr fixed @ 6.1%
rate. Payment is $1500 mo. We are
now sending in our regular pay-
ment weekly by dividing 1500 by
4. On top of that we are sending in
$400 to $500 weekly to add to prin-
cipal. We did not know if dividing
the original payment by 4 would
make a big difference since it is get-
ting there early in weekly amounts.
We would sure appreciate advice
and help.
TR

Wow! TR is to be congratulated
on her dedication to paying off the
mortgage quickly. But, let's see if
all those extra payments are reduc-
ing the length of her mortgage.
Hopefully, TR has already taken
the first step. That's to make sure
that her mortgage allows for pre-
payments without penalty. Most
mortgages do allow it, but it's good
to be certain. If not, they'll take all
her payments and just apply them
to the next regular due date. Ef-
fectively making all her early pay-
ments an interest free loan to her
mortgage company!
Let's talk about what TR is trying
to do. By sending one quarter of her
monthly payment in each week she
could be reducing the amount of
interest owed and that would mean
that more of her payment goes to
reducing principal.
Basically it's a math problem.
We'll break it down into easy to un-
derstand pieces. Beginning with the
interest rate.
Typically we talk about interest
rates on an annual basis. In this
case 6.1% per year. But in reality
it's a daily rate. In this case 6.1%
divided by 365 days or 0.0167% or

Golf Scores Hogan's
Golf Club Friday, Feb.
5 Course: Imperial
Lakewoods, Play:
9-Hole Match
1st : two-way tie at 37's Fred
Mayes and John Schachte
2nd : Chip Wood, 40
3rd : Mac McKay, 42
4th: Bob Freiboth, 48
Saturday,Feb. 6 Course:
SandPiper, Lakes/
Palms,Play: Classic
Skins
1st : Woody Nelson, 9 skins
2nd : Fred Mayes, 4 skins
3rd : two-way tie at 2 skins each
J. Kirkland and John Schachte
4th: Frank Carlin, 1 skin
Low-net: two-way tie at 68's -
Dave Diehl and J. Kirkland
Low-gross: Chip Wood, 84
Also playing on this cold windy
day: Don Mowry, Jay Sparkman,
Bill Shaver, Glenn Sterling (guest(,
Bill Hagen, Bob Harris, Fred Zi-
zelman & Doug Seipelt.
SCC Men's Golf
Association 2 Man
Scramble Feb. 11
Flight A:
1st Place Teams (Tie 58) Chul
Kim, Jim Rottman and Tom Conv-
ery, Bert Poulin;
3rd Place Team (59) Joe Pliska,
William Pachler;
Flight B:
1st Place Team (51) Tom Edge,
Ron Chaban;
2nd Place Team (59) Kirby
Hawkes, Mike Zwissler; Green
Tees:
1st Place Team (51) Butch
Fletcher, Bill Klitzke;
2nd Place Team (54) Bud Fol-
ley, Walter Wight.


0.000167 per day.
So the mortgage company multi-
plies the principal (i.e. the amount
that TR still owes on the mortgage)
by 0.000167 each day. That amount
is added to the amount owed.
Suppose that TR's mortgage is
$100,000 (probably not a realistic
number, but a nice round one to
work with). For each day TR will
owe an additional $16.71 in inter-
est. So for a 30 day month she'd
owe $501.37 in interest on the
$100,000 mortgage amount.
If her payment were $1500 rough-
ly one third would go to paying the
interest owed ($501.37) and two
thirds ($1500 $501.37 = $998.63)
would go to reducing the principal.
What happens when TR sends in
one quarter of her payment 3 weeks
early? The amount she's send-
ing in is $375 ($1500 / 4 = $375).
The amount of interest to borrow
$375 for 21 days is $1.32 ($375 *
.000167 21 days = $1.32). That's
true no matter how big or small the
mortgage principal is.
The second weekly payment
would save $0.88 ($375 .000167
* 14 days = $0.88). The third week-
ly payment would save $0.44 ($375
* .000167 7 days = $0.44).
What about the extra princi-
pal that TR is sending in weekly?
Let's say that she sends in $500 per
week. That $500 is worth $0.58 per
week.
So sending in all those weekly
payments really isn't saving TR
much money. In fact, if she's mail-
ing them the cost of the envelope
and postage is consuming much of
the savings. That, and her time has
some value, too.
Now some of you will have no-
ticed that by paying weekly TR
has added the equivalent of a full
monthly payment each year. But
she doesn't need to make weekly
payments to get that effect. All she
has to do is to keep adding extra to


each payment for principal reduc-
tion.
And, in that area TR does have
the right idea. By adding $400 or
$500 a week to reducing the prin-
cipal, she's making a major dent in
the length of her mortgage.
Calculating the effects of addi-
tional principal prepayments is a lit-
tle more difficult. The reason is that
they reduce the amount of interest
owed next month. So the amount
of next month's payment that goes
to pay interest is reduced and the
amount that goes to pay principal is
increased. And, that effects the next
month's payment even more. And,
that the month after, etc.
Suppose that TR combines her
extra principal into one $2,000 pay-
ment per month. She'll reduce the
amount of interest owed by $10.16
($2000 .061 / 12 = $10.16). So
her next monthly payment will in
effect be prepaying an additional
$10.16 of principal. And, that will
make the payment after that even
more effective. Just that one $2,000
prepayment would shorten the life
of the mortgage by one and a half
years.
Unless you're a math fiend, it's
eaiser to use a prepayment calcula-
tor you find on the net. One that I
like is found here
< http://www.decisionaide.com/
mpcalculators/ExtraPaymentsCal-
culator/ExtraPayments1.asp >.
So what should TR do? Probably
skip the weekly payments. They're
having a very minimal effect and
increase the chances for a clerical
foul-up at the mortgage company.
But, TR should continue to make
monthly principal prepayments.
They'll make a major difference in
the length of her mortgage.
Keep on Stretchin' those Dollars!
Gary


Top row: Gary Adcock, Stu Offenbach, Anne Skinner, Barb Struble,
Russ Stutz; Seated, Board Officers: Mike Almaguer, Kay Dudek,
Nancy Cleary and Loren Hofer.
Caloosa Golf and Country Club elects
new board
The Caloosa Golf and Country Club 2010 nine-member board was re-
cently elected. Like many volunteers in Sun City Center, this group
dedicates their expertise and time, making Caloosa a wonderful place to
play golf, and enjoy a variety of social events.
In a time when golf courses are struggling or closing, Caloosa, the only
member-owned private golf club in Sun City Center, is operating in the
black, and able to reduce membership fees due to the work of the 2009
board. Six members are pictured above from the 2009 board remain on
the 2010 board.
Summerfield Crossings Summerfield Crossings
Ladies Golf Association Ladies Golf Association
Feb. 9 Feb.16
1st Flight 1st Flight
Tie broken on holes #3 and #17 1st PlaceBess Hosford 67
1st Place Linda Smith 35 2nd Place Linda Smith 69
2nd Place Bess Hosford 35 3rd Place Young Yoo 70
3rd Place Roseanne Dougherty 35 2nd Flight
2nd Flight 1st Place Diana Linkous 69
1st Place Diana Linkous 33.5 2nd Place Nancy Rademaker 70
2nd Place Linda Slater 43 3rd Place Honey Jenks 71
3rd Place Molly Walker 45 3rd Flight
3rd Flight 1st Place Lynn Patron 70
1st Place Linda Sands 35 2nd Place Pat Colton 76
2nd Place Gene Szczepaniak 42 3rd Place Genette Scalpone 77
3rd Place Ann Schrepple 43 Birdies Mary Ann Speich, hole
Birdie: Linda Smith, Hole #2 #8; Jane Lange, hole #6


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24 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


FEBRUARY 25, 2010



KI cf
Jk. ^ *^**


Funds earmarked for Haiti
Judy Hasch, treasurer of the church, is shown presenting a check
for $6,415 to Pastor Dr. Gerald Iwerks of St. Andrew Presbyterian
Church of Sun City Center for funds collected from parishioners for
Haiti relief.
VOTF to meet
The Tampa Bay Affiliate of Voice of the Faithful (VOTF) will meet
at 1:30-3:30 p.m. on Monday, March 8, at Our Lady of Guadalupe Mis-
sion, 16550 South Hwy 301, Wimauma across Hwy 301 from Copper
Penny Restaurant. Meeting will include a video of Fr. Thomas Reese,
S.J., noted author and former editor of "America" magazine, addressing
the Voice of The Faithful national conference. Also there may be an up-
date on Florida Limitations Statute law. Come, bring a friend. Free. For
information, Larry, 634-9904 or larryvaughan@comcast.net

'Unsung African Americans' is topic for
discussion
Howard Reeves will present "Unsung African Americans: Honoring
their contribution to the development of the United States." Reeves has
experienced America's integration first-hand. He was the first non-com-
missioned officer to be promoted to staff sergeant at his air force base,
and the first African-American consultant for the Traveler's Insurance
Company in the southeast. Schools in his town became integrated just in
time for him and his wife to enroll their son in the first grade of a newly
integrated school.
Reeves is a resident of Sun City Center. Before Hillsborough Correc-
tional Institution became a women's prison, he tutored the male inmates.
He is a former member of the Tampa UU church.
On March 4 Dr. Rev. Robert Tucker will present "Remembering Henry
Bergh" who, among many other
great achievements, founded the
ASPCA.
This is the monthly food dona-


Hazel Martin Pnoto
Couples L to R: Jim and Marge Lawyer, Roger and Muriel Rackliff, Bill and Doris Palmer, Howard and
Joyce Roeding, and Harry and Babs Es
Happy Anniversary- couples celebrate 50+ years of marriage
It was a joyous day as the United Community Church, 1501 La Jolla Avenue, Sun City Center, celebrated
"Happy Anniversary Sunday." Forty-one couples married 50 or 60 years and 60+ years in 2010, were hon-
ored. There was cake, corsages and congratulations as the congregation greeted everyone after the morning
service.

Florida Orchestra Brass Quintet in
Concert at St. Andrew
The Florida Orchestra Brass Quintet will be in concert at St.
Andrew Presbyterian Church, 1239 Del Webb Blvd., West, Sun
City Center on Sunday, March 7 at 3 pm. Concert tickets are $9
at the door or church office.
This performance is part of the church's Fine Arts Series
which showcases many talented artists of versatility and musi-
cal skill.
For information call Judy Voohees at 642-8125.


tion week.
Coffee and conversation 7:00PM,
in the Social Hall at 1115 Del Webb
Blvd. East, Sun City Center. The
program begins at 7:30. Visitors
are welcome. For information call
813-633-2349


iront (L-K) betty ooDlas, Lousie
Mathews Back row (L-R) D'Etta
Jones, Barbara Reese
Homegrown
Mission Workers
Barbara Reese, D'Etta Jones,
Betty Dobias, Louise Mathews re-
ported about their various mission
trips to witness to help people with
medical, dental, surgical and eye
needs during the February Trinity
Women's Fellowship luncheon. If
you would like to attend the March
luncheon please contact the Trinity
Baptist Church at (813) 634-4228.


CCW to hold Card Party
The Council of Catholic Women
of Prince of Peace Catholic Church
invites anyone who likes to play
cards or any board game to make
up your table in advance and come
to the monthly Dessert Card Party
on Wednesday, March 10, from
noon until 3:30 pm in Conesa Cen-
ter. They furnish cards, pencils
and tallies. They have an assort-
ment of desserts, table and door
prizes. For more information call
633-2460.


CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH
SundayWorship: Blended 8:00 a.m.
/'" Contemporary 9:40 a.m.
Traditional 1115 a.m. Ig BendRd.
Nursery Provided CrossRoads: Bible Study, Worship: Wed. 7 p.m. MP :
Pastor Jack R. Palzer
5309 U.S. Highway 41 North Apollo Beach
(acos room MiraBay) www.calvarylutheranchurch.net 645-1305 l N S

St. John the Divine Episcopal Church
Growing by Faith from Generation to Generation
Rev. Tracy H. Wider Church Office 813-645-1521
SUNDAY SERVICES: 9 am Contemporary Service and Sunday School
at West Campus, S.R. 674 and 9th Street SE, Ruskin
8 am Traditional Service and 11 am Holy Communion with Choir at East Campus
at 1015 Del Webb Blvd., SCC
All Worship Services with Holy Communion and Healing Holy Oil


Ruskin United Methodist Church
First Street & 4th Ave. NW, Ruskin (Behind Suntrust Bank)
ALL ARE WELCOME TO COME AND WORSHIP WITH US:
SUNDAY MORNINGS: (Nov.-April ............................. 8:30 a.m. Day Care Available
Mon. Fri.
Rev. John M. Bartha and all year)......................... 10:45 a.m. 6 a.m. 6 p.m.
SPhone: 645-1241 Sunday School....................... 9:30 a.m. call 645-6198

REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH-ELCA
701 Valley Forge Blvd., Sun City Center, FL 33573-5354
Rev. Dr. Peter Stiller, Pastor 634-1292
Saturday Worship: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion....First & Third Sunday Bible Class...Thursday 10 am, Guests Welcome

First Church of Christ, Scientist
Ruskin Sun City Center (813) 645-6102
204 Second St. N.W, Ruskin, Florida 33570
Sunday Service Sunday School ........................................... 10AM
Wednesday Testimony Meeting .... ............................. ...... 5PM
Reading Room Tuesday & Thursday.....................1- 4 PM
ALL ARE WELCOME www.spirituality.com

F"RST BAPTIST' CHURCH

2' C820 COLLEGE AVE. W.
SRUSKIN, FL 33570
645-6439
www.fbcruskin.org
L i[ i-A Resource for Families
Sunday School..........................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship............8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Dr. Barry Rumsey
Evening Service...........................6:00 p.m. CHRISTIANSCHOOL
K-2
Wednesday Night Service................7:00 p.m. THROUGH 12TH
Awana............................................7:00 p.m GRADE


WEEKLY SERVICES:
riend ship BI ptist Church SundayWEEKLY SERVICES
i Rance Goad, Pastor (Southern Baptist) 9 am ......................Bible Study
1511 El Rancho Dr. 11 a.m ....................Bible Study
_1511 El Rancho Dr. 10 a.m. & 6 p.m............Worship
Sun City Center, FL 33573 l a
Phone/Fax: Wednesday
813-633-5950 6 p.m.... Prayer Meeting/Bible Study

SUnitarian Universalist Fellowship of SCC
Meets in the Social Hall of the Beth Israel Synagogue
1115 E. Del Webb Blvd.
Thursday, 7:00 PM Call 633-0396
No man really becomes a fool until he stops
asking questions.
Charles Steinmetz

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Where God's Love is Shared"
U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Ruskin, FL 645.1121 www.nbcor.org S
Sunday School for all ages 9:30 AM SBC
Morning Worship 10:45 AM Wanted: People Who Want to Grow
Evening Worship 6:00 PM and Live for Jesus!
Full Wednesday Schedule for all ages

North River Church of Christ
-Non-Instrumental-
13885 U.S. Hwy 301 South
(Just South of the Manatee County Line)
Minister: Howard Johnson Offie 941776-1134
Services: Sunday 10:00am, ll:00am & 6:00pm Office 941-776-1134
Wednesday7:00pm Home 813-754-1776

SFirst Baptist Church of Gibsonton
"We lovtbecause He first loved us." 1 John 4:19
Traditional Worship Service *Sunday School 9:30 A.M.
Old-Time Gospel Hymns *MVorningWorship 10:30A.M. l
Nursery Available Sunday Evening 6:00 P.M.
Interpreter for the Deaf id-Week (Wed.) 7:00 P.M.
9912 Indiana St. Hwy 41 & Estelle Atj 'Malcolm S. Clements, Pastor
\Gibsonton, FL 33534 813-677-1301 .

W1co4 e a EVERET TATE, MINISTER
South Hillsborough Church of Christ
1611 First St. SW Ruskin, FL 645-7607
-NON-INSTRUMENTAL-
SERVICES: Sunday........................9:30 & 10:30 a.m.: 6:00 p.m .
Wednesday................7:00 p.m.

PRINCE OF PEACE CATHOLIC CHURCH
702 Valley Forge Blvd., SCC, FL 33573
Phone: 634-2328 Fax: 633-6670
Masses: Sunday.............................................................8:00, 10:00 AM, Noon
Saturday Vigil.................................................. 4:00 PM and 6:00 PM
Daily............. ............ ........................... 8:00 AM
www.popcc.org Confessions: Monday Friday 7:30am, Saturday 8:30am and 3:00pm






FEBRUARY 25, 2010
Services and Offerings
The United Community Church at 1501 La Jolla Avenue, Sun City
Center, welcomes everyone to:
Sunday Worship Service is at 10:00 am Men's Fellowship, Tuesdays
at 8:00 AM. Breakfast is at Danny Boys.
Grief Support Group meets on Tuesdays at 2:00 pm
Intercessory Prayer Group meets on Wednesdays at 9:00 am
The Emmaus Road Study Group meets on Thursdays from 9:00-
10:30 am. Join them for the study of the book, "Jesus: Understanding
the Life, Teachings, and Relevance of a Religious Revolutionary," by
Marcus Borg. Anyone interested in a nontraditional group discussion of
religious issues is welcome to attend and participate. For additional in-
formation call the group facilitator, Dr. Wiley Mangum at 813-634-6904
or you can email him at magnum@cas.usf.edu
Upcoming Events:
Friday, Feb. 26, the Keenagers will present Mystery Dinner Theater.
The Keenagers will provide the dinner and the Pelican Players of Sun
City Center will help you solve the mystery. Tickets are $14 per person
and are available after the 10:00 Sunday service through Feb. 21. You
can also mail your check to Dan Patch, 1808 Adrean Place, Sun City
Center, 33573 on or before Feb. 22. For event information call Dan
Patch at 813-634-3043.
New Member Orientation is on Tuesday, March 9 and 16. Are you in-
terested or do you know someone who is interested injoining the church
family? For more information call the Church Office at 813-634-1304.
For daily Meditations of Inspiration and Faith, 24 hours a day, call
Faith Lift at 813-633-6265.
For information about church activities call the church office at 813-
634-1304.
WELCA is .. .


sponsoring a
rummage sale
WELCA, the women's orga-
nization of Redeemer Lutheran
Church, Valley Forge and Hwy
674 in Sun City Center, is spon-
soring a Rummage Sale on Fri-
day, Feb. 26, from 8 am to 1 pm
and Saturday, Feb. 27 from 8 am
to 11:30 am. A large number of
items have been donated for the
sale. Crafts and baked goods will
also be available.


it's time to eat
The Trinity Baptist Church
hospitality committee pre-
pares for a church dinner.
The committee organizes the
monthly covered dish dinners,
the Thanksgiving and Christ-
mas dinners, and other special
events. For information on
the church, call 634-4228.


A spiritual home where you can come as you are, be
yourself, and find God in your own way. We are a fellow-
ship that encourages spirituality rather than "religion."
Affiliated with Assoc of Unity Churches, Lee's Summit
MO, and Unity, publishers of the Daly Word
Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
Beth Israel's Social Hall
1115 Del Webb E.
Sun City Center, FL

Unity Community of Joy
www.unitycommunityofjoy.com Tel. 813-298-7745



THE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
INVITES YOU TO THE SERVICES NOW WORSHIPPING IN THE "CHAPEL"
AT SUN CITY CENTER FUNERAL HOME 10:30 AM ON SUNDAYS
NO CREED...BUT CHRIST
NO BOOK...BUT THE BIBLE
1851 RICKENBACKER DRIVE 813-938-4955
Minister DR. DAVID CAMPBELL


QjiedJlreodis G Curcqof/cun CGizy Genler
The Church of Open Hearts... Open Minds... Open Doors
1210 W. Del Webb Blvd. 634-2539
SWorship Services:
SSaturday.................. 4:00 p.m. Creason Hall (Traditional Service)
l k. Sunday....................8:15 a.m. in Sanctuary (Traditional Service)
9:30 a.m. Creason Hall (The Oasis)
F h 10:55 a.m. Sanctuary (Traditional with Chancel Choir)
Fellowship tim H .... T, i, 1,,, 1..; I .. Ir .... 10:15a.m. and 11a.m. in Creason Hall
a-6d ovse n %(L.ICCiMC.com
PASTORS: DR. WARRENLANGER, REV GARY BULLOCK
Communion First Sunday ofEach Month


St. Andrew Presbyterian Church

| Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.
Prayers with anointing for healing and
J& wholeness during worship the second Sunday
of every month.
A Stephen Pastor: Dr. Gerald Iwerks
Ministry Church
Meet friends in Fellowship Hall after the Service
Refreshments served


1239 Del Webb Blvd. West
Sun City Center, FL 33573
Church is Handicap accessible


Phone: 813-634-1252
For Information visit:
www.standrewatscc.org


OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 25


It's no blarney!
Saint Anne Catholic Church is planning its highly popular annual Saint
Patrick Celebration to be held on Thursday, March 11, at 6:30 pm in the
parish hall. The evening will begin with a cabaret style Corned beef
and cabbage dinner, beverages and dessert. Dinner will be followed by
an Irish Variety Show on tour direct from the Emerald Isle featuring
Barry Collins, Irish Comic from Cork; Cathleen Doherty, Irish Dancer
from the UK; Michael Funge, Singer/Musician from Wexford; Bernard
McHugh, Singer/Musician from Cavan; and Harriet Earis, Celtic Harp-
ist from Donegal. Everyone is welcome to join in for the food, fun and
festivities. Tickets are $30 each and are now on sale.
For more information, call the parish office at 813-645-1714.


m,-' -,
Irish night planning committee: Henry Juda, Veronica Mosher, Deb-
bie Wenz, Bobby Shea (standing), Frank Sullivan, and Fr. John
McEvoy


Marian Hilton, Clay Stromberg,
Ivan Lucas, Jane Elarth, Mary
Appleby, Nancy Lucas, and Do-
ris Stromberg.


Center for Restoration Ministries
"Restoring the broken through the Word of God"
ERVICES: Worship Service.................. Sunday 11 a.m.
Bible Study.................... Wednesday 7 p.m.
301 1st Street NE Ruskin, FL 33570 813-645-7779
, i t, tf t., t i. t.t i.i,. **.',,n.il ...n' Pastors Teresa & Freddie Roberts, Sr


Ruskin Church of Christ
Don White, Minister 813-361-1415
Sunday Bible Enrichment.............................. ..............10:00 a.m.
W orsh ip ........................................ ...................................................... 11:00 a.m .
Iglesia De Dios Puerta Abierta
Open Door Church of God
Pastor Jose C. Pifia 813-645-3813 813-285-8245
Domingo (Sunday) Estudio Biblico (Bible Study) ............................. 6:00 p.m.
Servicio De Adoracion (Worship/ Praise Service).............................. 7:00 p.m.
Miercoles (Wed.) Servicio De Oracion (Prayer Service) ................. 7:00 p.m.
Both Churches at this Location: 611 2nd Ave. NW, Ruskin, FL 33570


SOUTHSIDE
LovingPeopk OUTSIDE
Preaing Pto BAPTIST CHURCH
4208 U.S. Hwy. 41 South
(4 miles south of Ruskin)
DAN COLLINS, PASTOR JIM KRAUSE, MUSIC DIRECTOR
C OMlINiUrITY INVITEDv
BIBLE STUDY 9:30 AM
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE 10:55 AM
SUNDAY EVENING SERVICE 6:00 PM
WEDNESDAY PRAYER SERVICE 7:00 PM
ADULTS, YOUTH, CHILDREN
For information, call 645-4085 Monday-Thursday



Saint Anne Catholic CIutch


Pastor
813-645-1714
SaintAnneRuskin.org

U.S. Hwy. 41 106 11th Ave. NE Ruskin
SouthShore: r- .II. Beach, Ruskin, Sun City and S. Gibsonton
M ASSES
Saturday Vigil M ass.............................................................. 5:00 p.m .
Sunday M ass............................................8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., 5:00 p.m.
Holy Days ....................................... Contact Parish Office for Schedule
Daily ......................................................... M onday thru Friday 8:00 a.m.
Espatol................................ Domingo 12:00 p.m.; Miercoles 7:00 p.m.
Confession.............................Wednesday 6:15 p.m.; Saturday 3:45 p.m.
24 L -/


OBITUARIES


Pete Dail Jr.
Pete Dail Jr., 73, of Ruskin, Fla.,
went into the arms of angels February
6, 2010, at the James A. Haley VA
Hospital in Tampa. Born in Snow Hill,
N.C., he lived 46 years in Ruskin. He
was owner of Dail's Texaco and later
Dail Farms. Pete served in the Air Force
Air Police during the Korean War as a
top secret courier, traveling all over the
world.
Survivors include his wife of 53
years, Pastor Shirley Dail; sons,
Pete Dail III (Beverly) and Randall
Dail (Michele); grandchildren, Dustin
(Desira), Matthew, Sarah, Koby and
Logan Dail; great-grandson, Cooper
Blue Dail; siblings, Earlene Sugg,
Grace Murphrey, Bobby Dail, Delna
Dail and Ralph Dail, all of North
Carolina; sister-in-law, Betty Tarwater;
many loved nieces, nephews, cousins
and friends; and a loving church family.
He was preceded in death by his father,
Pete Dail Sr.; mother, Rosa Mae Rouse
Dail; and brother, William Dail of North
Carolina.
Pete served faithfully on the board of
his church for 10 years. He is already
greatly missed. Memorial gifts may be
sent to Church Along the Way Mission,
1116 4th St. N.W., Ruskin, FL 33570.
See the guest book at tbo.com (search
Pete Dail)

Anna Marie Potter
Anna Marie Potter born in Tampa
March 4, 1979 passed away February
13, 2010 in Ruskin. She leaves behind
four children and a loving family.
Memorial service was held Feb. 17,
2010 at New Beginnings Fellowship.


Blackwood
Brothers Quartet
to perform
The legendary Blackwood Broth-
ers Quartet will be performing at
the First Baptist Church of Gillette
on Sunday, March 7, during the 11
am worship. The public is wel-
come to attend. A dinner on the
grounds will be held immediately
afterwards. For those that cannot
make the service it will be broad-
cast live on the church's website :
http://www.gillettefbc.org.
The Blackwood Brothers Quar-
tet was formed in 1934 with
brother Roy, Doyle, James, and
Roy's son R.W. That heritage of
Gospel music is carried on today
by James' oldest son Jimmy who
joins tenor great Wayne Little, the
smooth bass of Randy Byrd, and
the singing and piano artistry of
Brad White to present a modern-
day version of that great quartet.
"We are excited to have the Quar-
tet coming to Gillette," said Pastor
Tim Durden. "We are honored to
have them and looking forward to
a great time."
First Baptist Church of Gillette is
located at 3301 Mocassin Wallow
Road (97th St E) in North Manatee
County. For more information call
the church at (941) 722-1937 or
visit their website at http://www.
gillettefbc.org.






26 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Ruskin turns 100 years old


FEBRUARY 25, 2010


* Continued from page 1
the Ruskin inlet, at the comer of
1st Avenue and 2nd Street N.W.
"It will be quite informal; coffee
and donuts shared by interested
citizens under the shelter in Com-
mongood Park," said Fred Jacobs-
en, immediate past president of the
Ruskin Community Development
Foundation (RCDF). "We'll prob-
ably reminisce a bit about what
we know of the first one hundred
years as we look ahead to Ruskin's
second century," he added.
Jacobsen said no formal invita-
tion list has been made" but it is
expected community leaders and
citizens with specific interest in
Ruskin history will join the gath-
ering on the inlet shore. For exam-
ple, he added, Alan Witt, current
RCDF president as well as Hills-
borough Community College pres-
ident at its South Shore campus,
can draw connections between the
new 21st century campus and the
first Ruskin College around which
the community was designed in
the early 20th century, while Jim
Hosler, community planning and
demographics expert now leading
the South Hillsborough Economic
Development (SHED) Council,
projects future economic possibili-
ties for the community.
In addition, such local residents
as Conrad Peterson, owner of the
restored home on 4th Avenue that
once served as the art, music and
drama center for the first college,
said this week he plans to attend
the early morning gathering with
his copy of the original plat found
in the arts center during its recent
remodeling. The Peterson home
now has received county approval
as a bed and breakfast site and is
a candidate for designation by the
county as a historic structure. The
former choreographer for interna-
tional music personalities also said
he's beginning to accept reserva-
tions for dates later in the year as
he's putting the finishing touches
on the home displaying his life-
time collection of authentic an-
tiques from decades past.
Although no evidence has sur-
faced that the local Ruskin ever
was incorporated as a municipal-
ity under Florida's laws after its
founding, the community from its
earliest days was envisioned as a
growth center, according to writ-
ten records. Residential lots by
the multiple dozens were planned
around the first college campus
and on both sides of the inlet lead-
ing to Tampa Bay. The first post
office was established in 1908.
Taking a page from the social
philosophies of John Ruskin,
members of the first settling Mill-
er and Dickman families antici-
pated bountiful crops during three
sub-tropical growing seasons and
eager participants coming to the
agricultural cooperative where
higher education was among the
rewards of labor.
In what may have been a full-
page advertisement, George McA.
Miller, president of the first col-
lege, colorfully described the fore-
seen community in an undated
early 1900s Illinois publication,
The Arena Advertiser. Miller first
referred to the "Grecian myth"
about a golden garden held as "the
exclusive property of the greedy
daughters of Hesperus" and guard-
ed by a dragon until he was slain
by Hercules. Miller applied the
myth to the modem America of his
day, suggesting that contemporary
golden gardens were being claimed
by "The greedy sisters, Rent, In-
terest and Profit" and guarded by
"the cruel dragon, Monopoly"
so that "the common people, to
whom they (the gardens) belong,


have been but little better off for
the discoveries."
As a countering measure, Mill-
er's advertisement promised abol-
ishing rent, interest and profit, of-
fering 10-acre Florida plots suited
as homesites and for farming,
providing "a good living for the
average family" in exchange for
$2 down and $1 per month for no
more than three years. Under the
plan, the monies were credited to
participants over time, pooled and
loaned when needed. Moreover,
those taking part in the coopera-
tive and making the requisite in-
vestment were given tuition-free
admission to the college.
That initial Ruskin community
took root, growing with popula-
tion and blooming with crops for
nearly a decade until World War
I scattered many of the newcom-
ers. The primary college building
burned to the ground in 1918 and
Dr. Miller, its driving force, died
in 1919.
Ruskin as an agricultural settle-
ment, however, survived to be-
come by mid-century a tomato
and truck crop center sometimes
promoted as "America's salad
bowl." The community's farmers
also pioneered in the packaging
of fresh fruits and vegetables for
long distance shipping. And, that
originally platted area around the


While it no longer is possible to know with certainty if Ruskin's settlers actually intended their commu-
nity become a municipality, they certainly envisioned the settlement as a growing enterprise. This plat
map of "Ruskin City" is one of several drawn of the area a century ago. It organized the agricultural
cooperative community around the first Ruskin College campus on the shore of the Ruskin Inlet and
anticipated dozens upon dozens of newcomers settling onto farming plots and homesites lining both
sides of the waterway leading to Tampa Bay. An informal recognition of the 100-year-old filing that gave
official "birth" to the community is being planned for March 9.
(Illustration from Jonie Maschek collection, courtesy of RuskinHistory.org.)

inlet attracted many new residents
along with the descendants of set-
tiers.
The sunrise commemoration of
Ruskin's organization on paper
and commencement of its second
century is set for 7:30 a.m.
C 2010 Melody Jameson


"Miss Buckeye" on the Little Manatee River, Ruskin, circa 1950.
Photo courtesy of State Library and Archives of Florida



Cremation .

O Yes. I am interested in more information.
Name
Address
City State Zip
Phone
Phone Mail to: .
l National Cremation
I l & BURIAL SOCIETY
I i 308 East College Ruskin, FL 33570

813.645.3231
THE ATIO'S LRGES &'ODE9


EVERY WEDNESDAY
8:00 a.m. .................................. Mass followed by Adoration until noon
12:00 p.m ............................................................................... . ......M ass
7:00 p.m ....... .............. ............................................ M isa y Via crucis
EVERY THURSDAY
6:00 7:15 p.m. .................................................................... Reconciliation
EVERY FRIDAY
8:00 a.m.................................. Mass followed by Adoration until noon
12:00 p.m ....................................... Mass followed by Stations of the Cross
MARCH 1ST 3RD
7:00 p.m. .................................. ................... Lenten Parish Mission
THURSDAY, MARCH 11TH
5:00 8:00 p.m. ...................................................... The Light Is On"
Welcome Home Every parish in the diocese of
St. Petersburg will have reconciliation at the same time.
THURSDAY, MARCH 25TH
7:00 p.m ..................................... Taize Mass with Prayer Around the Cross
S10611th Ave.NE Ruskin* 645-1714 *www.SaintAnneRuskin.org g


I



Employees grade gladiolas at the Roman J. Claprood nursery in No-
vember 1959.
Photo courtesy of State Library and Archives of Florida






Zipperer's Funeral Home

Only onsite Crematory in S. Hillsborough County
Family owned and operated since 1979


Z 813-645-6130


1520 33rd St. S.E., Ruskin, FL 33570

www.zipperersfuneralhome com Exp 331/10




AflB ijfi ^ek^

-l^U||~l~^^ *|








FEBRUARY 25, 2010 THE SHOPPER 27


To place an ad call
813-645-3111 ext. 201
Fax. 813-645-1792
$15.50
up to 20 words
300 each addl. word
Deadline is Monday
at 4pm


105 PERSONAL
Bon Worth's Customer appreciation day.
Feb. 27, 9am-6pm. 1517 Sun City Cen-
ter Plaza, SCC. Refreshments, prizes
& discounts.

Alone?Seniors Dating Bureau
Safest Since 1977! Ages (45-
90)1-800-922-4477 (24Hrs) Or log
onto:RespectedDating.com

Retired man looking for man to share
expenses on a group tour of the Holy
Lands & Egypt. For details call Grady
at 813-230-0898







310 GARAGE/YARD SALE

Timely Treasure Sale
March 5, 8am-2pm.& March 6, 8am-
noon. United Methodist Church, 1210
W. Del Webb. Jewelry, antiques,
furniture, linens, household goods.
Lunch available.
DeJa Vu
clothing boutique.

Almost New Thrift Store. 10008 Indiana
St., Gibsonton (1 block off US 41, 1
block north Gibsonton Dr.,) Wednes-
day thru Saturday, 9am-3pm. Clothing,
furniture, lots misc. Ministry First Baptist
Gibsonton. 813-671-0036 to donate

Coming soon. Parkwide clubhouse &
carport sale. Neptune Village MHP,
2525 Gulf City Rd., Ruskin. Saturday,
March 6, 8am-1 pm.




Store Hours:
M-F 9 to 4:45 Sat 9 to 3:45
Monday Sr. Discount
55 yrs' 50% OFF
on most items
Large Variety of Clothing,
Furniture, Accessories,
Colectables, Art, Books
and Plenty ofBargains!

Donations Needed
Please call 813-645-5255
1311 3rd St. NE Ruskin
Behind St. Anne Church
& Next to Kennco Mfg.


THE SHOPPER




M & M Printing Co., Inc
weekly publisher of the


The Observer News,


310 GARAGE/YARD SALES



raftJ Bazaa

Sat., March 6
8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
MANATEE RV PARK
6302 U.S. Hwy. 41 S.
(between Ruskin and Palmetto)
Watch for Barn Door Entrance
on east side of U.S. 41
GREAT CRAFTS, FOOD, BAKED
GOODS, DOOR PRIZES, RAFFLE!

Look! A garage sale you can't miss.
Something for everyone. 1802 Allegh-
eny Dr., SCC. Friday 2/26, 8am-2pm

Garage sale. Golf cart/ lots of misc..
1504 Heron Dr., SCC. Thursday, Feb
25, 8am-1 pm. & Friday, Feb. 26, 8am-
11am.

Friday & Saturday, 2/26 & 2/27, 3 fami-
lies. Antiques, collectibles, household,
jewelry, furniture, all priced to sell. 1416
Seton Hall Dr., (off Del Webb W) One
mile from SR674, SCC. 8am

Parkwide yard sale. Lunch /bake sale.
Sun City MH & RV park. 5116 SR 674,
Wimauma. Friday, Feb. 26, 8am-?

Yard sale. Friday /Saturday, 9am-1pm.
1994 GMC flatbed truck, hot tub & misc.
408 Frances Circle, (off Stephens Rd)
Ruskin.


SCanary's
nael attic
s- Thrift Store
NOW OPEN Wednesday,
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. Noon

10% OFF

TOTAL PURCHASE

1424 E. College Ave. Ruskin
813-641-7790
Ministry of Calvary Lutheran church

Multi family garage sale. Lots of variety.
Something for everyone. 2105 West
View Dr., SCC. Friday 2/26 & Saturday
2/27, 8am-1pm.

2 families. 708 Ward Circle, SCC. Friday
& Saturday, 2/26 & 2/27, 8am-1pm.
Bedroom set, books, clothes, electric
cash register, jewelry.

Holiday Palm RV Park's annual yard
sale. 424 19th Ave, NE, Ruskin. Just
behind McDonalds. Feb 27, 9am-?
Lunch & baked goods.


The SCC Observer and
210 Woodland Estates Ave SW
Ruskin, Florida 33570


310 GARAGE/YARD SALES
Friday & Saturday, 2/26 & 2/27, 8am-
1pm. 1602 Ventana Dr., Ruskin (off
Cypress Village Blvd) Lots of stuff priced
to sell.

Garage sale. SCC 309 Stroll Lane.
Friday & Saturday, 2/26 & 2/27. 8am-?
Lots of misc. items.

Big garage sale. Feb. 26 & 27, 8am-
2pm. Cookbooks, household items,
books, tapes & DVDs, clothes, automo-
tive's, drill, bits, lamps, glider rocker
& much more. 414 Stoneham Dr. (St
Andrews) SCC

Yard sale. Saturday 2/27 Sunday 2/28,
8am-4pm. Fishing misc., Kayak, TVs,
entertainment center, guitars, clothes,
tapestries, household items. 810 Light-
foot Rd., Sundance, Wimauma

Yard sale. Thursday & Friday, Feb. 25
/26, 7:30am. Furniture, jewelry, cloth-
ing, fishing, nice glassware, tools, lots
of misc. knickknacks. 1207 Simmons
Way, SCC. (off Bel Air)

Move in sale. Friday & Saturday, 401
Rickenbacker Dr., SCC. 9am-? Honda
Elite moped, washer, dryer, men's bike,
household furnishings, clothes, tools,
jewelry & many misc. items.

Huge sale. 1703 Tahoe Dr., SCC. Nu-
merous power & battery tools, almost
new lawn mower /gas trimmer /edger.
VCRs, Brand new DVD players (4) many
misc. items, Electric scooter. Friday &
Saturday, 8am-noon.

Don't miss this One!
New Orleans prints, items from
around the world. Tools, Kayak, boat
mufflers, all kinds of boat accessories,
art work, home network equipment,
cake molds, clothes, much more. 6447
Lake Sunrise, Apollo Beach. Friday &
Saturday, 8am-1pm.

Yard sale. Feb. 27. Yost Park, 1112 W.
Shell Point Rd., Ruskin. 8am-? Come
one, come all.

Feb. 26 /27. Children's clothes, sizes
4-7, lots of toys (vanity, toy, kitchen,
tents, chairs, books) women's /men's
clothing, tools, skill drill press, sanders,
vise, razors, leatherwallets. 1401 Seton
Hall Dr., SCC. 7:30am.

Friday & Saturday, 2/26 & 2/27. Garage
sale. 8am-? Lots of misc. items. 134
Lookout Dr., Apollo Beach.

Neighborhood sale. Friday 2/26 & Sat-
urday 2/27, 8am-1pm. South Pebble
Beach, left on New Bedford, St. George.
Huge sales.

Rummage Sale
Redeemer Lutheran Church, Valley
Forge & SR 674, SCC. Friday, Feb.
26, 8am-1pm. Saturday, Feb. 27, 8am-
11:30am. Many donated items/ crafts

311 AUCTIONS

Auction
Stillson Auction Co. LLC. On your site.
Estate/ business liquidation / char-
ity. Call now to schedule! 30+ yrs of
experience.
813-634-4241
AU3835
312 ESTATE SALES
Fabulous estate sale. Apollo Beach Coin
& Antiques. 5916 Fortune Plaza, Apollo
Beach. Antique secretary desk, table &
chairs, china hutch, couch, entertain-
ment center, beds, clothes, household
misc. To much too list. Buying gold /an-
tiques. Saturday only 2/27, 8am-3pm.

Check out our web site
observernews.net


The Riverview Current


312 ESTATE SALES






Your home will be staged for best
results. Working in Sun City Center
for 23 years.
Please feel free to call about
the sale or its contents.
Bonded Licensed
Cell: 508-0307
Eve: 633-1173

WE BUY ESTATES
in the Sun City area or
take consignments on
your ENTIRE HOUSE
We also come and pick it up!!


www.ButterfieldsAuctions.com
Butterfleld Auctions AB2706/AU3549


AAA Furniture
New & Gently Used Furniture

BUY & SELL
Daily Trips to SCC


Mon.-Sat.
9 a.m.-5 p.m.


4.


6819 U.S. 301 S., Riverview
(813) 677-8180


Classified is Informative

330 FURNITURE
Living room furniture: Sofa, 2 chairs,
entertainment center, 2 end tables, cof-
fee table. View on Friday 10am-lpm.
1131 Villeroy Dr., SCC. or call 813-
633-0111


Model Home & Consigned Furniture
& Accessories
Apollo Beach Shopping Center
6024 U.S. Hwy. 41 N. Apollo Beach
(next to Westshore Pizza)
Ws3 LayawayAvailable




335 MUSIC
Lowrey Festival organ with bench &
books. Good condition $450. 813-
634-3228


100 Announcements
200 Farmer's Mkt
300 Merchandise
400 Marine
450 Transportation
500 Real Estate


550 Manuf. H
600 Rentals
650 Prof. Ser
700 Services
800 Employr


housing

vices


lent


360 GOLF CARTS


New 2010 RXV, 48v, full light package,
Sunbrella, mirror, sand bottle, factory
warranty. Free delivery $6,755. Golf Cart
Depot 813-996-5522

Golf carts wanted. Buy sell, trade. Char-
gers, parts all related. Ronny's Carts &
Parts. 813-645-4515 or 813-484-9855

We buy golf carts, any condition. We pay
top dollar for used carts, running or not.
Same day pickup. 813-300-0114






Bogey Bill's Gdf Cars
Street Legal Cars Utility
Carts Lifted Carts Warranty
On All Cars EZ Go Club Car
Cruise Car Yamaha
New Pre-Owned Custom
2107 College Ave. E (S.R. 674) Ruskin
GAS ELECTRIC SOLAR
813-645-1481


390 MISC. FOR SALE
Leisure Bay hot tup, portable spa. Pur-
chased from Recreational Warehouse
for $3,300. Now $500 obo. Like new,
Call 813-262-2064 for appointment
in SCC.

Electric cook stove $75, over the stove
microwave $40. Printers $25 & $35. Fax
machine $30. 813-334-0641

For sale. Red Sox spring training tickets.
4 seats behind home plate. $23/ ticket
(face value) 8 games available. 813-
633-2062

425 gal water, plastic tank, good for
agriculture or power washer, fits in body
of pickup. $175 obo. 813-677-7719 or
508-561-2428

John Deer Gator, 2002. Kawaski engine,
dump body, very good condition. $3,500.
813-677-7719 or 508-561-2428






410 BOATS
8ft row boat, with oars, excellent condi-
tion $300 obo. 813-677-7719, 508-
561-2428

425 SLIPS OR STORAGE
South Bay RV & Boat Storage. Special-
izing in outside storage for RVs, boats &
trailers. 813-677-2000 www.SouthBay-
Storage.com

Little Manatee Outdoor Storage. RV's,
boat's, trailer's. All sizes. 2903 39th
Ave., SE. Ruskin. 813-787-8531. www.
littlemanateeoutdoorstorage.com

Ramey's Business Park
RV & boat storage & heavy equip-
ment. 1/2 mile from Williams Park.
813-410-9607 or 813-849-1469






456 TRUCKS AND VANS
1996 Ford ranger, XL with topper, new
tires, alternator, battery. $2,500 obo.
813-634-7579 or 813-316-8596


L 983


[" THRIFT STORE '
OPEN: Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 8 a.m. 3 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. 12 p.m.
1009 1st. Street S.W.
u. Ruskin
s 5. 674 We Have
W 4 E
st St Furniture, Too!
DONATION DROP OFFS
TUES. THRU FRI ONLY PLEASE,
THtRIFT ALL DONATIONS MUST BE IN CLEAN
STORE S USEABLE CONDITION.


THE SHOPPER 27


FEBRUARY 25, 2010


~







28 THE SHOPPER
456 TRUCKS AND VANS
Dodge van (camper) 318, project
vehicle. See at 2813 Universal Dr.,
Ruskin. $600 obo. 956-200-9288 or
956-281-7047

1995 F-150, Mark 3, Ford pickup. V-8,
white, factory stripes on side, 4 wheel
drive, step side body, excellent condi-
tion. $5,000 obo. 813-677-7719 or
508-561-2428

1998 Chevy S-10 truck/ cap, 6 cyl, new
tires, good shape. Lot F 8/201 Riveroaks
RV Park 813-645-1511, $4,025






510 WATERFRONT FOR SALE
Last 1/2 acre on Gulf City Road, 3
sea walls, dock, private boat ramp.
$275,000. 813-690-1836

511 HOUSES FOR SALE


CYPRESS CREEK
Ventana 3/2 plus den,
open plan on golf course;
large lanai w/self-
cleaning heated pool,
spa; 3-car; lots of storage.
2004 model, 1950 sq. ft.
Reduced to $273,900

(813) 355-1512


511 HOUSES FOR SALE





MAKE OFFERS ON ALL LISTINGS
SWorthington, SCC 3BR/2BA with spa & therapy
pool (solar heated). $263,000.
* Brentwood I "Expanded." KP. 2BR/2BA
w/carport, reduced price $79,500.
* Hampton "Expanded," KP. 2BR/2BA, extra
enclosed lanai, kitchen remodeled, laminate
floors, furnished and golf cart. $69,500.
RENTALS
Stuart "Expanded," Fully furnished for
annual rental. $750 per month.

You can find your
classified ad online @
www.observernews.net

Mira Bay
Mira Bay Villa, 3br/2ba/2cg,
gated community with every
amenity for active life styles.
Villa has many upgrades plus
huge walk-in closet,glass
walk-in shower.Won't last at
$164,900
Adamsville Rd.
1500 s.f. home on large
fenced gated lot.Totally
remodeled 2br,w/20x42 pool
in screened lanai. Perfect for
entertaining. Quiet location.
$169,000
Mandra Stewart
S.L Real Estate
Services, LLC
(813) 741-3678


CALL
1 (813) 645-3211

DICKMAN Serving South Hillsborough
.. INC. County since 1924.
R E A L T Y www.dickmanrealty.com
Celebrating 86 Years dickman@tampabay.rr.com
1924- 2010
RUSKIN HOUSE ON LARGE FENCED LOT! Nice, clean 3BR/1BAwith carport
& utility-room. Newer plumbing & sewer, newer CHA, large shed in back.
Reasonable taxes, not a short sale, no HOA, no CDD. $79,900. CALL CLAIRE
TORT 363-7250
AFFORDABLE 2BR HOUSE, POSSIBLE LEASE OPTION. Newer metal roof,
carport, utility-room, shed in backyard. Great starter/retirement home or income
property. $69,000. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
GREAT SPOT FOR YOUR DREAM HOME/MANUFACTURED HOME: 1.17
acre cleared lot, secluded, only minutes from town & shopping, with electric and
well. $59,900. Owner's financing. CALL CLAIRE TORT 363-7250
WATERFRONT CONDO WITH AWESOME VIEW! 2BR/2BA located on deep
water in Bahia Del Sol subdivision. Very well maintained corner unit. This is a
short sale. $149,000 ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
OVER 1 AC. WITH 200' ON THE LITTLE MANATEE RIVER. Features include:
maple cabinets, Italian marble tile throughout, 5 sets of French doors, huge
master bedroom, plantation shutters, custom bookshelves, mother-in-law suite.
This beauty also has tons of storage, a 5-car garage, L-shaped dock with
boathouse for the fishing and boating enthusiast. $489,900. CALL KAY PYE
361-3672 or ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
WATERFRONT LOT! 78 x 100 with dock and only minutes to the bay! Great
spot for your dream home! REDUCED TO $119,000, KAY PYE 361-3672 or
ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201
OVER 8 ACRES REZONED FOR 5 HOMES. One well and septic in place.
Located at the deadend of 30th St SE on west side. 330 Ft. of road frontage.
Priced to sell at $199,900. ROXANNE WESTBROOK 748-2201 or KAY PYE
361-3672.
WATERFRONT RENTAL IN APOLLO BEACH!! 2BR/2BA condo in Anchor
Point $795 per month with 1 year lease. CALL ROXANNE WESTBROOK
748-2201
VACANT CORNER LOT ready for your house plans or zoned for mobile home
use. Totals 1.15 acres in quiet country area, culvert in place and mostly cleared.
Priced to sell at $59,900. CALL JO ELLEN MOBLEY at 645-1540.
REDUCED AGAIN!! SHORT SALE,.3BR/2BA 2 car garage with 14x21, lanai,
fireplace. Won't last long, NEEDS TLC! $100,000 CALL KATHY JACOBSON
624-2225
POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING or lease option on beautiful bayside condo at
Bahia Beach. Spectacular sunsets, sweeping view of Tampa Bay, St. Pete, and
Skyway. 2BR/2BA, fully furnished, close to pool, restaurant, beach, tennis.
Looking for offer at $229,900. JUDY ERICKSON 468-0288
UNHEARD OF PRICEll This is one of the lowest priced properties in Sun City
Center for a home of similar age and size in this and it is not a short sale or
foreclosure! This BEAUTIFUL PROPERTY has been meticulously maintained
with new a/c in 2006, a new roof in 2007 and much, much more. Sun City Center
boasts golf, tennis, softball, two indoor pools plus over 200 clubs and activities.
A golf cart friendly community to local shopping and activities and it is conve-
niently located to airports, beaches, Tampa, Sarasota & St. Petersburg. Come
and enjoy the Florida lifestyle today!! $139,500 CALL CATHY GRIGGS
391-8653
CALL US FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS........645-3211
Donate your old functioning cell phones and drop off at our
office for use by the "Victims Assistance Program."


(Evening phone numbers)
Judy Erickson ..................... 468-0288 Jim Grannon..........................
Claire Tort........................... 363-7250 KennAntonelli .....................
Kay Pye .............................. 361-3672 Kathy Jacobson .....................
Cathy Griggs ..................... 391-8653 Jo Ellen Mobley.....................
Christine Nethers ............... 786-6542 LaRae Regis...........................
Roxanne Westbrook............ 748-2201


610-3485
786-3124
624-2225
645-1540
633-8318


511 HOUSES FOR SALE

JUST LISTED! Nicely furnished 2BR/2BA
mobile home + large enclosed addition,
carport & utility shed in an age-restricted
community. Split BR plan, central air & heat,
washer & dryer in shed; it is ready for you to
move in. This community offers clubhouse,
shuffleboard, and heated pool. Fees are
only $72 per month. $49,000.
VERY AFFORDABLE 2BR/2BA DOUBLE-
WIDE, nice enclosed porch at level of living
room, carport, workshop/storage shed,
double roof. 1-year-new CHA, huge MBR,
inside utility, handicap accessible. $56,500.
OWNER FINANCING for this great
2BR/2BA Doublewide with substantial down
payment. Bright living area, newer appliances
in kitchen, large MBR & walk-in closet, inside
utility, screen porch & hot tub, carport, roof
over, new CHA, 2 sheds. $79,500.


512 CONDOS FOR SALE
Kings Point 2br/2ba, Luxury, furnished,
next to clubhouse, warranty, replumbed,
can grill on porch. Made over $12,000
in rent in '09. Photos "Buy it now" priced
$39,499 obo by 3/16/10. Tenants
available if desired in future. Possible
owner financing. Agent owned Charles
Ruterberg RE. 813-789-2022 leave
message.






555 M.H. FOR SALE
55+ Mobile home for sale. Riverfont Park
with dock & boat slip. One bedroom,
carport. $3,500. 813-645-2446

560 M.H. ON LOTS
Mobile home for sale Eastwood Mobile
Home Park, Gibsonton. Call Heather
813-677-5726

For sale 2br2ba on private property. Riv-
erview. Owner financing. $550 monthly
Se Habla Espanol. 813-325-5190


565 M.H. IN PARKS


Cute one bedroom with Florida room.
$1,000 plus first month lot rent. Back-
ground check required. Needs TLC.
Paradise MHP 813-645-3635

1br/lba, clean trailer with shed, new
roof over. Furnace, hot watertank. Quiet
adult park. $1,500 813-645-9723






610 WATERFRONT RENTALS
The Dolphin House, Apollo Beach,
efficiency apartments on water. Boat
docking /fishing. Pool, laundry. $185
weekly, $185 deposit. No pets. 813-
850-5217

New mobile homes for rent. Family
park. L & N Trailer Park, Gibsonton.
(2nd Month Free)
813-381-4830

Apollo Beach beautiful 2br/2.5ba, 1,400
sf, hard wood, granite, stainless steel,
boat slip, great sunsets. $1,200 monthly.
Plevel Realty 813-624-5481

1br/1ba trailer on Little Manatee River.
$175 weekly, utilities included. 813-
641-2532

Ruskin. Efficiency apt. on water. $150
weekly. First, last & $300 security re-
quired. 813-458-2396

611 HOUSES FOR RENT

Sun City Center 55+
Now available 2br/2ba, includes water,
sewer, yard care, fitness, recreation
card. 813-634-9695

SCC.2br/2ba/2cg. on middle lake with
dock & screened porch. Huge corner
lot, includes lawn service. $800 monthly,
annual rental 727-398-7403

612 APTS. FOR RENT
For rent: Efficiency apartments. Weekly
rates, utilities furnished 813-677-8789,
813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896


612 APTS FOR RENT
1br/1ba, unfurnished, non smoker, no
pets. 1013 Neptune Dr, Ruskin. Water,
sewer included. $385 monthly, $385
deposit. Info. 813-633-0069





AVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE
OCCUPANCY
RIVERWO0D APARTMENTS

1& 2 Bedroom Apartments

Handicap Unit Available

Rental Rates Beginning at
$520 + Utilities

For Rental information
call: (813 645-7320
(TDD 800-955-87111

709 Oceanside Circle,
Rusin 2
Mon-Fri 8:00 AM- 4:00 PM
Equal Opportunliy Provleri & Eploer


613 CONDOS FOR RENT
1br/1.5ba 55+ gated community, Kings
Point in SCC. Full use of recreational
facilities. Fully furnished. $600 monthly,
annual lease. 813-633-8083

630 M.H. RENTALS
For rent. 2 bedroom mobile home near
shopping center in Gibsonton. 813-677-
8789, 813-601-1542 or 813-516-0896

Huge 4br/3ba doublewide, private
wooded lot. All electric, big porch, CHA,
Laminate floors. Near SCC. 813-645-
4708 or 813-892-5802

For Rent: Clean
Mobile Homes With
A/C. 813-677-1086

45+ 3br/2ba mobile home, 5 miles from
SCC, on private lot, partially furnished.
Very nice. No children. short or long
term. $600 monthly 813-634-5875

645 OFFICE SPACE








We will not be underpriced!

Prices starting at
$250 per month




646 WAREHOUSE SPACE
Garage & mini storage rooms for rent.
Pirates Treasure Cove, Gibsonton.
813-677-1137







680 ADULT/CHILD CARE
RN seeking live-in companion position
to elderly female. Duties can include,
advocate with your physician & teach-
ing on health issues will also assist with
care, prepare meals, shopping & light
housekeeping. Excellent references
& security check upon request. Call
Brenda 239-362-7783

Caregiver/Companion
Qualify care for your loved one.
References upon request. Please call
813-641-9012

HHA/ caregiver provider. Companion/
housekeeper seeking private duty. Well
trained & qualified. Flexible hours. Call
Jana 813-333-8405


FEBRUARY 25, 2010

680 ADULT/ CHILD CARE
Elderly caregiver or housekeeper, excel-
lent driving record. Any hour, Monday
thru Friday. Years of experience w/
references. 813-645-2456







705 CLEANING

Green Team
Home /office cleaning. Windows
cleaned. Pressure washing, yard
maintenance. Call Debbi 813-777-
1221. Visa, MasterCard accepted.

Ron's Cleaning Service
Quality housecleaning with integrity.
Call for free estimate. 7days a week.
Move-in, move-out, rentals. Insured,
bonded, licensed. Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Sun City Center.
813-846-7629
Flat rate $75, full clean

710 LAWN CARE
Bill's Lawn Service Residential & com-
mercial. Cut, edge, trim, Ruskin, Apollo
Beach, Riverview, Gibsonton. Licensed./
insured. 813-293-6840 New account
welcomed.

February Special
St. Augustine Floratam sod, picked
up $50 a pallet. Delivery & installation
estimates available. Call Ralph's Sod
Service at 813-645-8221

FloraScapes
Professional maintenance company
serving all your landscaping needs.
Residential & commercial. Ruskin,
Apollo Beach, SCC, Riverview. Li-
censed/insured. 813-333-3688



T ,&S Lawn Care, Inc.
Professional Lawn Care Service
Residential & Commercial
Total Lawn Maintenance
Landscaping/Sod/Mulch
Landscape Maintenance
Irrigation Monitoring & Repair
FREE ESTIMATES/REASONABLE RATES
813-645-7266
www.bandslawncare.com
"Your Local Lawn Care Professionals I"


714 TREE REMOVAL

Professional Tree &
Landscaping. Sales: trimming, remov-
als, popcorn curbing, stump grinding,
clearing, hauling. Fill dirt/ top soil/
rock/ mulch. We barter for items of
value. Free estimate. Call Paul 813-
634-6041 or 813-751-9691

715 FILL DIRT/HAULING

Pittman Trucking & Tractor
Service. Bank run, wash shell, fill dirt,
topsoil, sand, crushed rock & asphalt,
driveway culverts. Loader, backhoe,
grading, bushhog, discing. Install Sep-
tic System & drain fills. CFC#1427021.
813-645-1883

Myers Trucking
Backhoe & Tractor Service. Cul-
vert sets, driveways, shell, crushed
asphalt, concrete, fill dirt, excavating,
mowing etc. Tony (813) 363-7963
Free estimates.

Fill-Land Clearing
Dozer & loader work, driveway & sep-
tic fill, & shell hauled. Robert Carver,
813-634-4962. Beeper 813-267-6217

720 HOME MAINT.
Wall & ceiling repairs.
Jones Drywall Service
Licensed & insured. Free estimates
813-645-1718 or 813-220-1008. Lic


723 PAINTING

Quality Inside Painting
40yrs experience. Resident of SCC.
No job too small. Lowest estimate,
very dependable. Call Jim 813-642-
0466








FEBRUARY 25,2010

740 MISC. SERVICES

Exum's Well Drilling
Pump sales/ repair all makes/ models.
Wells 4" & larger. Affordable prices
24hrs service. 813-645-6696 or 813-
220-4572


Seawall Repairs
also new construction of docks, boat
lifts & seawalls. Free inspection. Heck-
er Construction Co. 813-236-9306








810 MEDICAL

Receptionist Part-time. Monday -Friday
1-5pm Fax CV to 813-886-7222 or ap-
ply in person: 25 College Ave W, Suite
D, Ruskin. Call 813-886-2020 www.
mobileeyecare.com


870 GENERAL


870 GENERAL

Needed for Ruskin based business.
Experience aluminum enclosure install-
ers. Must have some tools & reliable
transportation. Dependability & good
work ethic are a must. Good commu-
nications skills a plus. Call 813-649-
1599 to apply


Busy Salon Looking for

STYLISTS
Full or Part Time
Must be Dependable
and Hard Working
Classic Cuts
3830 S.R. 674 Suite 106 SCC
Cypress Creek Shopping Center
(near Home Depot)
Call Kim 7 a.m.- 5 p.m.
B13-634-4449





SUNTOWERS
RETI RECENT CO MU N ITY

Part-Time Driver
Part-Time Servers
Dietary Aides
Sun Towers Retirement
Community has positions
available for customer service-
oriented individuals.
Interested candidates should apply at:
101 Trinity Lakes Drive
Sun City Center, FL 33573
(813) 634.3347


COMMUNITY PAPERS
OF FLORIDA


(CPF STATEWIDE)
Local marine supply company seeks a (CPF ST
Part-time 1979 SKYLANE 182 RG. Low time, always
Warehouse Person hangared. Professionally maintained. A
50K avionic Garmin upgrade in 2008. Must
Call 813-677-4000 or go to www. sell NOW. See at: http://tinyURL.com/Nic-
dockbuilders.com/employment for e182RG.; No reasonable offer refused.
more details.


Wanted caregiver to stay nights with
older man. SCC. Free room & food.
Can have other job. Call 813-633-6069
/ 765-366-3330


Abortion Not an Option? Consider Adoption.
It's a Wonderful Choice for an Unplanned
Pregnancy. Living/Medical Expenses
Paid. Loving, Financially Secure Families
Await. 1-877-341-1309 Atty Ellen Kaplan
(#0875228)


I ~ Sa~ ~I~ ~ ~

HM SBUYER FORUM 9 MARCH
S 1]--H4


A community of affordable homes
exclusively for first-time homebuyers!


FLORIDA OME PARTNERSHIP

(813) 672 7889 www.flhome.org


* Phase III Now Available!
* 2 Swimming Pools and a Clubhouse
* 3, 4 and 5 Bedrooms, 1 and 2 Garages
* Popular Ruskin Location
* USDA Self-Help Housing program --
help build your home in exchange for a
down payment
* No money down, easy to qualify
* Non-profit agency works for you
~Hablamos Espafiol ~





SBAYOUndPASS
Offer open to first-tme hof ebiers under 80% of median income Call for detae l


How can I


reach the


whole


FLOCK...


without


getting


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LOCALLY SERVING 40 STATES Divorce
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PROFLOWERS Christmas Decor and Holi-
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TURN YOUR UNWANTED TIMESHARE
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ADOPTION Give Your Baby The Best In
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ADOPTION 888-812-3678 Living Expenses
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LUMBER LIQUIDATORS Hardwood Floor-
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HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just
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BURIED IN CREDIT CARD DEBT Over
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GET OUT OF DEBT! Business, Personal Loan
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Ashley Furniture up to 70% Off. No
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Showroom Delivery Everywhere Tampa
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com 813-978-3900

Boats; 1000's of boats for sale www.floridama-
riner.com ; reaching 6 million homes weekly
throughout Florida. 800-388-9307, tide charts,
broker profiles, fishing captains, dockside
dining and more.

GET A NEW COMPUTER Brand Name
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METAL ROOFING TAX CREDIT! 40 yr War-
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AMAZING OPPORTUNITY! Looking for 10
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THE SHOPPER 29

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"AWESOME JOBS!" Now hiring 18-25 guys
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ance Since 1996 ... 1-800-733-5342 24 Hours
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Heating/Air Tech Training. 3 week acceler-
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Seeking Working Partners to expand our
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GEORGIA CENTRAL, 50 AC $1,325/AC
Fantastic hunting tract in a great hunting area.
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Affordable Health Plans Doctors/ Prescrip-
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By placing your classified ad in our network of statewide

newspapers you can reach



5.2 million homes in Florida

The Florida Community Paper Advertising Network

works with over 125 nuhlications throughout the


SV- state. Place one ad and reach millions! It's that

n ( easy. Call Beverly today for details at

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RET IREMENT CO N MUNITY

LPNs: 7-3 & 3-11
CNAs: All Shifts
We have openings for caring staff.
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Interested candidates should apply at:
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105 Trinity Lakes Drive
Sun City Center, FL 33573
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I. *


.,^'tC^
aW^P~~


^-^^


I


.1






30 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER


THE OBSERVER NEWS THE SCC OBSERVER THE RIVERVIEW CURRENT


Remica Kitchens
Free Estimates
Beautiful All Wood New Cabinets
Affordable Cabinet Refacing
Granite and Quartz Countertops
Largest Variety of Colors and Styles
Made in the U.S.A.
813-641-7711




GAL
FRIDAY
1 "A Handy Woman"
Home Repairs
Maintenance
Honey-Do Lists
Call CHRIS at
813-363-3031



~ F A&J
S Hares
35 rs. Plumbing
Experience
Service & Repairs
Repipes Water Heaters
New Construction
Remodels & Additions


HOME WATCH SERVICE
"Peace of Mind While You're Away"
Regularly Scheduled Visits
Exterior Property Review
* Check Doors,Windows, Irrigation
* Interior Plumbing,Water,A/C,etc.
Mail and Packages
Professional *Insured *Licensed *Bonded
81K3-944-8478-


ENT.. INC.
Lic. #CMC056816
AIR-CONDITIONING,
HEATING & REFRIGERATION
Complete Sales, Service,
Installation & Repair
Amana and Senior
Trane Dealer Discount
John R. Bowman, Jr., Owner
(813) 633-2703


"* '- I



Residential Commercial
New Roofs Re-Roofs Tile
Tile Repairs Hot Tar/Flat Decks
Ventilation Leaks Repaired
FREE Estimates Financing Available
24 Hr. Emergency Service
Senior Citizen Discount
, We Carry Workers'Coamp
For Your Protection BBM
A Lic CCC1325993 Bonded Insured =



DoThtHev

Work For Yo


E LVltC /c I E
SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS
Residential and Light Commercial
Family Owned & Operated
No Revolving Technicians
Quality Service,* Sales,
Installation,
Most Replacement -
Parts on Hand "-"
(813) 263-6503
< CAC 1814336 Ruskin






Ceiling Fans
Outlets
Lighting
SPanel Upgrades
FREE Estimates

813-645-7000
Listed with Sterling Management and
Sun City Center Community Association
Lic. #EC13002936






* Kitchen and Bath Remodels
* Room and Garage Additions
* Lanai Enclosures Drywall Tile
* Window and Door Replacements


Complete Sales Service
Repair Installation
SERVICING ALL MAKES AND MODELS
24 Hour Service Financing Available
Lic. #CAC1815928


S3 Senior& Military
S Discounts





Affordable P |,M is here!
SVirus & Spyware I Backup
Removal Printer Software
*Windows Reload Laptop Repairs
SSoftware Installation Hardware Installation



FREE Pickup FREE Delivery
Insured 25 Years Experience
Available 7 Days a Week



Need Work Done
Around the House?

Turn to PHIL
Your Handy Person!
RIVERSIDE GOLF & BOATING CLUB RESIDENT
www.mrhandyperson.com
Serving
i APOLLO BEACH
-- RUSKIN
SUN CITY
CENTER
KINGS POINT





25+ Years Experience
Licensed & Insured
813-649-1418


-- RANDY THOMPSON -
Home/Fax: (813) 642-9040
Cell: (813) 477-3792
CBC 1252135 Insured Bonded


No Job Too Big or Too Small
Serving since 1973
Ruskin Sun City Center
Kings Point Apollo Beach
Riverview
"All my customers are dry
friends when quality counts"

a
BM,

Sun City Center
Chamber Member
P.O. Box 551 Ruskin, FL 33570
www.customroofing.us
Bonded & Insured Lic. #CCC1326907





*No project over $1000.
No electrical, gas,
plumbing, and nothing
structural.


Mary Ann Wilhelm
Owner/Director
#CAC 1814397

Wilhelm rice

641-1811
FACTORY
DEALER 802 4th St. S.W.
A R (Off College Ave. West)
Ruskin, Florida
Turn to the Experts
www.wilhelmac.com





COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL
South Bayi -
Electric Co. -
o \ 1 SERVICE
CENSED UPGRADES
BONDED ALL TYPES
INSURED B OF WIRING
ER00126636 T RENOVATIONS
OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE
SECURITY LIGHTS CEILING FANS
SWITCHES & OUTLETS SPAS & DOCKS

105 21 ST. N.W. RUSKIN


Over 30 Years Experience *
Interior/Exterior
Residential & Commercial
For FREE
Estimate, al (813)403-8810
S B i M Bonded-Insured-Lic. #PA2848
www.onthespotpainting.com


Positive

news
for positive people.




.'


Passing on the Joy of
Clean Windows
Done with Care *
Outside/Inside, Lic. & Ins.
Residential Specialist
Pete Wincle, LLC
(813) 33-288


Tmot y Sutton, LLC
INTERIOR EXTERIOR
PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
PRESSURE WASHING
29 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN OHIO
NOW SERVING FLORIDA
LICENSED BONDED INSURED
813-727-1013
LIC. #PA2809



PAUL WOOD PLUMBING, INC.
State Certified Plumbing Contractor
#CFC1427697
Residential
Commercial
"4 {s Certified Backflows
Stoppages
Service and Repairs
FREE Estimates 24-Hour Service
Licensed Bonded Insured


NOW OPEN
_J LOOKING
FOR EXTRA
STORAGE
SPACE
FOR YOUR...
l5T e R.V.
SO BOAT
645-5222 CAMPER
cell: 240-2049 ETC.
1501 33rd St. SE ANY SIZE
Ruskin, FL 33570






Unstuff those
.,. closets! There's
,1,, somebody's
bargain in there!
Sell your
I unwanted
items in the
.^ classified!
THE OBSERVER NEWS
813-645-3111 ext. 201
Fax 813-645-1792


-5 F

-AO


SELF ARREST BONDS
COURT DATES 664-0056
WARRANT CHECKS
BIG JOHN'S
BAIL BONDS
641-8400
FAMILY BONDSMAN
STATE FEDERAL
24 HOUR SERVICE
JOHN L. VATH
2100 Orient Road Tampa, FL. 33619
Fax: (813) 628-8739


No Hassle Pricing 25 Years Experience
ALL PHASES -- From Quality
Interior Residential Painting to
Small Home Improvement Needs
10% OFF with ad
Housekeeping Services Available


A FREE Estimates
Lic. #CFC057969
A+ Rating Bonded Insured


Thomas M. Flynn, Inc.
Master Plumber
In Business since 1978 Licensed, Bonded, Insured
Lic#RF11067351
Free Estimates Emergency Services
Custom Plumbing Remodel
*Slab Leak Detection
SWater Heater Repair/Replacement
SPlumbing/WaterPurification Installation
813-777-0558


641-1387
MIS EB3


FEBRUARY 26,2010


II


15% OFF
Interior or
]Exterior
Painting
(Whole House)


I


(813)





OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER 31


Fee.


Sunday
at 6pm!


2010 SONATA


-380


Was $17,409
.., I ir Ilhrrrjld. Fvfurd Dj 2500
Jenkins DoubleDiscount $2500

-Aug
A~yJUJ9J


Was 20,409
Your CashfTrade/Tax Refund D n - 2500
A Jenkins Double Discount $2500



APR
for 6 Mos


2009 SANTA FE
;29


62:123


2010 ELANTRA


2011 SONATA


All New & Redesigned
See Them Now!


2010 TUCSON


1 $119Q 24111
11 .%*,,,


LEASE199
MONTH
LEA SE


FOR 23 36
lAsls239 ,,'o
I


2010ELANTRA Touring 2010 GENESIS Coupe
A ;j-~ca~r a~" 1


2010 GENESIS


*2^


SAffordable & Fuel Eflicient Most Interior Room In Its Class Revolution In Design, Performance & Value Pcrlri L c. T li ii .r..'iiy .d ( alii
ALE $9,987 23o 9 259 o 396.F36
$9 MONTH MONTH "" i "
$L$9LEfE$25lLEA24A39 9..'..."

______ We will beat any
w/1 r WP other Hyundai
w r e Guaradealer or pay you
S , ,,, 1 rne Ina. I er installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. Jenkins Hyundai will double your cash/trade and/or tax refund up.... ..... .
, i , . I I I I. ,. a. vehicles with already discounted price marked on the vehicle. Limit 1 trade-in per purchase. Cannot be combined with any other advertised offers.t I . I . . i 1 1 i .
r., i. * J ' .. is Sedan $3499. All offers are with approved credit and some cannot be combined. *Expected range for most drivers, your actual mileage may var) .I .
.--. I I. \ I ., 111 I, .m manufacturers, EPA Light-DutyAutomotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975-2009. O On Select Model. tt Mu. ,' I 1 I 1 .
, , advertised vehicles subject to prior sale. Programs subject to change without notice.


I11


I'I
I~


Manatee Ave. WISR64-J Exit 220 West- ILL


-rrCortez Road-


late Road 70


All Prices
Refled Double
Double Discount


-U


1-


B..ev, I li/ne


31-


I I


2010 ACCENT

E1Y


FEBRUARY 26, 2010


-I


riri


9J~ir~l~


NI!






32 OBSERVER NEWS RIVERVIEW CURRENT SCC OBSERVER

Casa M arina Continued from page 1


FEBRUARY 25, 2010


To visit Casa Marina is to return
to the privileged world of yester-
year when the hotel and Jackson-
ville Beach was a destination for
the privileged. Every tourist post-
card of the day glowingly pro-
moted Jacksonville Beach as the
"worlds finest beach."
The grand opening of Casa Ma-
rina was on June 6, 1925, the day
the town of San Pablo River was
renamed Jacksonville Beach. And


what an opening it was reported to
have been, "200 guests dined and
danced in the grand salon," while
those less fortunate celebrated in
the streets and onthe beach outside
the walls of this Spanish-Mediter-
ranean designed building.
Those were heady days. Jack-
sonville was a movie town before
Hollywood and movie stars of the
day flocked here. For the rich and
famous, this was a tropical play-


Angelina
Padua

celebrates
107 years

L Jul. B6ll photo


Sun City Center resident Angelina Padua celebrated her 107th birth-
day at the Senior Center in Ruskin among friends and family this
week. She grew up in the small town of Montemurro, Italy, until 1921
when she met and fell in love with Rocco Padua, an Italian American
barber. They moved to Albany, New York, where she lived until 1995.
She then moved to Florida to live with Lucille and Ed Rose. Angelina
says her secret to maintaining her long life is olive oil. She cur-
rently lives with her son-in-law, Ed Rose, who said "Angelina is so
happy and excited to be celebrating her birthday. She has already
had three parties and just loves all the attention." Angelina got to be
"Queen for a Day" on her 107th birthday. She was presented with a
scepter and tiara while sitting on her royal throne accompanied by
Sherri Worthington, adult aide. "The secret to her health is her daily
glass of wine and her positive attitude. She doesn't dwell on the
past, only the future. She hopes to celebrate many more birthdays,"
said Ed Rose.


ground and "the" place to be seen.
Casa Marina belongs to the age
before cookie cutter hotel/motel
guest rooms. Here, rooms and par-
lor suites are uniquely decorated.
Floors are of dark polished wood
as is the accent trim throughout
the building. Public areas feature
warm pecky cypress paneling and
the chrome accents of modern day
inns is conscious by its absence.
Since its beginnings as an elegant
hotel, Casa Marina has had many
incarnations. During World War II,
the U.S. government appropriated
Casa Marina for military housing.
A succession of owners followed
who remodeled the hotel into an
apartment building, restaurant
and assorted businesses. Then in
1991 it was lovingly restored to
its original grandeur and modern
conveniences were added. The lat-
est work was completed in 2004,


bringing it up to its present state of
elegance and comfort. As the old
Ann Murray song says, "Every-
thing old is new again."
The atmosphere of Casa Marina
is one of quiet refinement, except
during those nights when live mu-
sic is featured in the outdoor ocean
patio. Then the old gal rocks, prob-
ably keeping the resident ghosts
awake. Yes, a hotel with this much
history does have its resident ghost
stories.
Casa Marina's signature feature
today is its weddings. There are
an average of three per week and
the all inclusive packages are a
blessing for brides who come from
around the world to celebrate this
most memorable of events at a
one-of-a-kind location.
Wedding photos show the old
world charm and warmth of Casa
Marina instead of the sterile sur-


0i.

HOMEWOOD
RESIDENCE
FREEDOM PLAZA
BROOKDALE SENIOR LIVING
Personalized Assisted Living Respect for Individual PreferencessM
Alzheimer's & Dementia Care Daily Moments ofSuccesssM
3910 Galen Ct., Sun City Center, FL 33573
(813) 633-4340 www.brookdaleliving.com


Alsssted Lirg FacII 9634 Reoect for Ind dul Pe,


nd DaIly Mo


roundings so common in "regular"
hotels and banquet halls. Another
dimension making this a memo-
rable occasion are the beach wed-
dings with photos of bride and
groom on the white sand beach
with the blue Atlantic Ocean in the
background.
The Casa Marina Hotel & Res-
taurant offers 23 stunning bed-
rooms and parlor suites individu-
ally decorated to represent the
distinctive and changing eras of
its rich history. The Penthouse
Lounge enjoys its own notoriety
with stunning views of the Florida
coastline and the nearby 1,300 foot
Jacksonville Beach ocean pier.
Recognized in 2005 by the Na-
tional Trust for Historic Preserva-
tion as one of the Historic Hotels
of America, the Casa Marina is a
constant in a constantly changing
landscape.


Personalized
Assisted Living...
with an emphasis on Living.

Imagine watching your loved one regain an
enthusiasm for life with personalized support
in a friendly, encouraging environment. A little
help can make an enormous difference with
activities of daily living such as bathing and
dressing.
Call to schedule a get-acquainted visit, or
tour our website today and discover how we
provide our residents with the highest
standards of Personalized Assisted Living.





en o S. are Service Mark of Brookdale Senior In 1 Inc.Nahvlle. USA 52130-ROPO2-21


JOHN MOORE FWI



OREI QUALITY. MO ALUE.


Sun City Center Ruskin Flooring
1629 Sun City Center Plaza 912 US Highway 41 N.
(813) 633-7116 (813) 694-9434
Mon-Fri 8AM to 4PM Mon-Fri 9AM to 5PM
Sat 9AM to 1PM Sat 9AM to 1PM












Tile Flooring For Every Style.

Trusted Brands. Lifetime Guarantee.


m strongCOLORCENTE


SNAP.
CRACKLE.
POP.
Tile Floors Warning.
SUN CITY CENTER Ceramic
and porcelain tile floors in many local
homes are breaking and cracking,
sometimes only a few years after
installation. Repairs can be costly,
running well into the thousands of
dollars.
Local flooring retailer John Moore
cautioned, "If you hear popping,
snapping or hollow sounds when you
walk on your tile, it's a clear warning:
the installation is faulty and may fail."
The Tile Council of North America
(TCNA) publishes standards for tile
installation. Reputable installers abide
by TCNA guidelines.
"Properly installed tile floors should
last for decades" continued John
Moore. "In fact, we offer lifetime
warrantees on our installations because
we follow all Tile Council standards."
John Moore Flooring uses Tile
Council specified procedures and
materials to permanently bond tile to
the sub-floor. Properly installed, tile
floors are very durable but the wrong
materials or incorrect procedures will
let tiles loosen, crack or break under
normal wear and tear.
"Call me today for a free in-home in-
spection to determine the condition of
your tile floor," offered John Moore.


-1 - -1 -11 - - 111 1 -,-- 1 11 I =




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