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EDL NHPRC UFPKY



Biographical materials
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102095/00001
Finding Guide: A Guide to the William Sherman Jennings Papers
 Material Information
Title: Biographical materials
Series Title: Miscellaneous Papers
Physical Description: Archival
Publication Date: 1901
Physical Location:
Box: 29
Folder: Biographical materials
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Jennings, William Sherman, 1863-1920.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00102095:00001

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: ~E ION OTE- 1
JALLN HSrHEE 19.0
JANu 8rn 9Oi7


















IN HONOR OF ......

Gov. W. S. JENNINGS
...AND CABINET...


O.Y.... f, ....







DANCES.

I GRAND MARCH


2 WALTZ


3 TWO STEP


4 WALTZ


5 TWO STEP


6 WALTZ


7 TWO STEP


8 WALTZ


9 TWO STEP


10 WALTZ







DANCES.

11 TWO STEP


12 WALTZ


13 TWO STEP


14 WALTZ


15 TWO STEP


16 WALTZ


17 TWO STEP


18 WALTZ


19 TWO STEP


20 'AALTZ








COMMITTEES.

ABRANGE HNTi.
W M MCINTUsB, JR., Chairman
W C. Lewis. T. B. Byrd.
T t. Handolph. J R. Cohen.
FINANCE.
J. BALL, Chairman.
H. V R Schrader. W. A. Denmllly.
C. B. GwynD. A. Ball.
TRANSPORTATION..
S.D. CHITTiEDEN. Cbatrman.
J. C. Trice. A. Levy.
D. B. MeFimnnss, Jr. W L. Moor.

MILITARY.
P. HorsrrouL, Coairman.
R. Cay. E. E. Phlibrlck.
n. j. Phillllp. A. C. Sptller.
BALL.
L. M. LrVELY, Chairman.
J. W Henaerson. 0. B. Perkins.
J. A. idmonason. P W. Wilsou.
HB CEPTION.
F.T. MYER9g, Chairman.
Geo. P Raney. R. W. Williams
J. A. Henderson J. Diamond.
Gen. Lewis. G. W Walker.
E M. Hopkins. L. C. Yareer,
J. 8. Wlntnrop. W. R. Wilson.
J. T. Bernard. Robert Gamble,
R. B. Uorman. J. Hlrschberg.
G. W. Saxon. G. H. G. non.
W. A. Rawls. F W. Armstrong.
0. I. Davls.








-tCli


Hon. William S. Jennings, of Brooksville, Governor of Florida,

and now a candidate before the white Democratic voters of the State for the
office of United States Senator, is, in the truest and highest sense of
the phrase, a Democrat of the old school. Although a compaRatively young

4 man, being only forty-one years of age, t he Governor's experience in pub-
lic affairs has been wide and, and his close study and extensive observa-

ion of public questions and practical administration have constantly serv-
d to strengthen his conviction that the only true end of government is
found in the time-honored maxim, which has for over a century constituted
e bed-rock of Democratic faith, "equal and exact justice to all men, and

ecial privileges to none". He believes this rule furnishes the

irest and yet the profoundest test of all legislation; that it supplies
guide for deciding all questions touching the liberty of the people-

s the best safe-guard of the people's opportunities, and were it fully
observed there could be no class legislation nor privileged few.
Like all old-school Democrats, Governor Jennings is a man of

positive and profound convictions upon public questions. Since his b-y-
hood days he has been a deep and discriminating student of economic and
governmental affairs, and his studies have strengthened and confirmed his

inherited devotion to the principles of the Democratic party. These
principles, crystallized and enunciated in party platforms, he regards as

commands ofhthe party, directed to the officials elected upon such plat-
forms, requiring them to aid in carrying out its provisions -- and he holds

that the value the services of an official so elected should be tested and

measured by their compliance with the demands of the platform. Holding to

this view of party allegiance, Xr. Jennings has, as Governor of Florida

an.fSt R past three years, carefully observed in spirit and in fact every
,plank and principle of the State Democratic platform upon which he...was

nominated and elected, so far as it relates to State affairs, by reccomend-
ing the enactment of laws and the adoption of constitutional amendments
to carry into effect the policies demanded by the platforms
4 Among other measures recommended to the two legislatures which

have convened during his term, the Governor's messages advocated the

following, which embrace every demand of the platform upon which he was

elected, and constituted the i emplte discharge of his constitutional









(2)

function and duties in this mLati connection. The laws recommended by

Governor Jennings were:
Relief of the Supreme Court, as comtemplated by the platform; the

creation of a Supreme Court Commission, and the adoption of the constitu-

tional amendment demanded; taxation of bank stock; improvements of the

State's tax sale certificate service; liberal aid to the State Board of
health; the remodeling and erection of suitable additions to the State
Capitol; the creation of the office of Traveling State Auditor; liberality

for the development of the public school system; the purchase and mainten-

ance by the State of the South Florida Military Institute; the examination

and perfecting of titles to State property; the establishment of a hospi-

tal for certain of the State prisoners; redistricting of the State creat-
three Congressional Districts and an additional Circuit Court; a consti-

onal amendment authorizing a tax on all corporate franchises; tax on

ritance, gifts and devises; stringent laws prohibiting the carrying

concealed weapons; liberal appropriations for the State troops; a law
authorizing publication of a roster of the soldiers of Florida in the Con-
federate service; liberal appropriations for the Confederate Home; liberal

pensions to Confederate soldiers; reduction of interest on Florida's bonded

debt; uniform system of insurance of State properties; application of the
net proceeds from the settlement of Florida's Indian War Claims to the pay-
ment of the bonded debt of the State; the establishment of a High School

in each County, prescribing a uniform course of study; maS and liberal

appropriations fof State Institutions. With a few exceptions these rec-

ommendations were all embodied in laws.
Striking evidence of Governor Jennings' fidelity and obe-

dience to party law is found in the fact that every person who has been
recommended for appointment to office by white Democratic primary election
- n ..-, without exception, been appointed. Furthermore, under the platform
provision pledging the Governor not to appoint to any office"any person

not nominated by primary election, or by convention, whose appointment will

be objectionable to the Democratic Executive Committee of the County in

which he resides", convincing testimony of the excellence of Governor

SJennings appointments in such cases is furnished by the fact that not one

objection has been filed in his office by any Democratic County Executive

Committee to any appointment made.













The remarkable success of Governor Jennings' administration of
State affairs is recognized by all. The rate of taxation levied for
the general expenses of the State government has been reduced one and
one-half mills on the dollar below the rate authorized by the legislat-

ure. Notwithstanding this reduction in the tax levy the unusually
large appropriations made by the legislature in 1901 and 1903 have

I been promptly met and the balances in the general revenue fund are
ample to meet all just demands on the treasury. Upon therrecommen-

dation of Governor Jennings a large part of the m:ney received from
the settlement og the State's Indian War Claims was paid on the bond-

debt of the State which was thereby reduced nearly one half. Tie

funding of the remaining bonds of the State which were bearing six
a nd seven per cent.interest in bonds bearing only three per cent. re-
lieves the tax payeEs of interest payments amounting to many thousands

of dollars annually The appropriations made for schools under the
Governor's recommendation have been many times larger than at any time
in the past.
Nearly all the public buildings in the State have been improved

and new buildings erected. It was largely through the firm stand tak-

en by Governor Jennings that the Supreme Court has at last caught up
with its docket Governor Zennings insisted in his message to the

Legislature in 19 01 on the employment of Supreme Court Commissioners
and on the adAption of a constitutional amendment forrthe increase in

the number of judges This was dahe and the result is well known

and eatisfaotpry. Now every suiter can get his case disposed of in

a reasonable time,and,expensive and sometimes disastrous delays are

avoided. These and many other reforms are due to the positive ao-
.-;" '^"Fe e-~errt of *ti present chief executive .
The position of Governor Jennings with reference to national

affairs is well known and easily understood. He stands squarely on
the party platform and does not hesitate to advocate its prinoiptaw
plea.
He is emphatic in demanding that the trusts be controlled and

kept within proper legal bounds. He opposes all measures that give
special privileges to a few at the expense of the whole people. He
firmly demands that larger powers be given the interstate commerce











commission to the end that the people be protected against the exor-

bitant charges and unjust discrimination imposed by powerful corpor-

ations doing an interstate business. The utter disregard these imM

mense corporate aggregations show for the rights of the people, is

one of the growing evils of the day.

Mr. Jennings insists that Florida is not receiving her just share

S of the appropriations for the improvement of rivers and harbors when
the length of her sea coast and the importance of the seaport cities

of the State are considered.

If elected to the Senate, Mr. Jennings will use his best endea-

vors to get larger river and harbor appropriations and to secure a

proper recognition of the commercial importance of the State.

The Governor 's experience in the Executive Office h;js enabled

him to see and to be able to present in an effective manner the injust-

ice done the State under the present laws and regulations by which

lands granted to the State are withheld to the great injury of the

people for whose benefit the grant was made to the State.

It is also his purpose to secure if possible an additional grant

of lands for the benefit of the schools in the various counties .
The Governor favors positive steps to secure the election of

United States Senators by the people and the nomination of senators

by primary election along with all other officers. He favors and

will earnestly advocate the adjustment of all disoutes between employ-

ers and employees by arbitration, the adoption of a graduated income

tax and the immediate construction of the Isthman canal.

There can be no misunderatnding of the attitude of Mr. Jennings

on all public matters and it is well known that he does not hesitate

to use all means in his power to put into execution :.he principles for

which he stands. He has plainly stated what he will work for if
elected to the United States Senatel -no one aoubtos hb. ability,

his experience, his earnestness and his remarkable energy and persever-

ance in carrying into effect the prinioples he adopts and advocates.
The old soldiers and their widows are among the best friends of

Governor Jennings, as he has added largely to their comforts by securing

to them the substantial recognition they are entitled to grom the State

The number of pensions has increased in three years from about seven

hundred to more than twenty five hundred. There are still many others

whose services entitle them to recognition and they will have the same












careful attention according to all. A caoplete history of the old sol-

diers of the State is being prepared under the direction of the Govern o

This will prove useful and gratifying to the friends of those who risked
"their lives for the cause of the State. To Governor Jennings is due th

credit of an increase in the receipts for the hire of State prisoners

*from $2 twenty one thousand dollars per annum to about one hundred and
4-
gixty thousand dollars per aninm, all of which gpes to the counties.

While this great increase in receipts has been secured there has been a

marked improvement in the case and attention paid these unfortunates.

Betterzaccamodations and more comforts have been secured to them, and the

have careful medical attention at all times.

It is but reasonable to suppose that since Mr. Jennings has done so

much for the people of the State as Governor he will be able to do more

frn thdm as United States Senator. He has promised to secure many

advantages for the people if elected and every one knows he stands by

his promises and in tireless in his efforts to accomplish results. He

is not a theorizer but a practical worker who knows how to do things for

*he people he represents.





















V




SIn the Supreme Court of Florida,

J january Term, A. D.- 1920.

Saturday, February 28th, 1920.

The Court met pursuant to ado.qrnment_. ,

Present: Hon. Jefferson B. BroApe, Chief Justice,- .""1:-

Hon. R. F. Tay ior, Yustice, .

Hon.' J. B. Whitfield, Justice,

Hon. W. H. Ellis, Justice,

V Hon. T. F. West, Justice,

Hon. J. T. Wills, Circuit Judge.


It is Ordered that the following Memorial be spread upon a

separate page of the Minutes of the Court:


The Court has learned with deep sorrow of the death yesterday

at St. Augustine of Honorable William S. Jennings, a former Governor

of Florida and a distinguished member of the bar of this Court. The

business of the Court will be suspended while a suitable tribute is

paid to the memory of a most highly esteemed citizen of the State.

'When quite a young; man Honorable William S. Jennings removed

from Illinois, his native State, to Florida; and by reason of his

unusual ability, his high character, his remarkable energy and his

patriotic devotion to duty and loyalty to his associates, he soon

attained and has ever since held a foremost position of honor and

usefulness among the prominent men of the State.

As Co-mity Judge of Hernando County, as a member and Speaker of

the House of Representatives, as Governor of the State, as on honored

and eminently useful member of the legal profession, and as a potent

factor in the development of the resources of the State, he has ren-

"atriot ic servioqs to the State of Florida,

'.-ef left: y regard




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): -A GREAT DAY FOR PLO'RIDA-

13 GOVERNOR JENNINGS' WONDERFUL ACHIEVYMEMTl

SSTAT BOARD OF EDUCATION REJOICING

TRUSTEES INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT PUND 0

j Wi4s great -Victory
GOVIEINOR B6ROWAR HAPPT-

SRailroad Suits against farsto. elaiming is,B00,000 acres.
*a4 fihal.decree ditr #75,000. settled. '

yr nearly seven years Ex-Geverner .Jenning has devoted himself

to StaBe Affairs and with inparalelled success. During the early

days ot his splendid administration, he decided that the Railroad


V.
land grLnts agregating pwarde. of Ten Millieo acres were inoperative


against the Trustees of the In*ernal Imprevpment Fund of Florida to


whom all Swamp and oevr-flewed lands had been granted primarily for


Drkinage and Reclamation purposes and he and his associate trustees


declined to issue any deeds under said grants to railroad Gompanies,


which policy haa been continued through the Administration of


Governor Breward. In the meantime many suits were intlituted in the


State and the United States Courts by Railroad Gempanioe claiming


upwards* f..o5,0000 000 acres; None if whic- have succeeded except in


.taa a f lands certified or dfentrasct by trustees themselves pirier


to Jennings' administration.

At the close of Ex-Governer's term he .wai employed by the
:. .t 0 a .. .. ", '
S'L: si aeeo as general G:eaeu l and has'been untiring in his masterly


:.to :,;ri the F ~.elios that he secured the patent for nearly

.S.j,@:.. a. .. te. i ai..aJAI'U a..owt d .. ..

H has u noedede, far beyond the most sanguine hPoes. He how


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To the Trustees $165,000. in cash payment of large indebtedness

to State Beard ef Education and settlement of suits claiming 2,271,335 acres

and $275,000,00 cash For which the Trustees deed about 400,900 acres

certified or contracted lands and pay $110,000.

Governor Breward, General Ellis, Comptroller Creem,Treasurer Knett

and Cmmnissioner of Agriculture McLin may be justly proud of the course


they have so persistently and consistently followed that saved to the Fund

intrusted to their Keeping and to the State Board of Education this


magnificent domain.


The State Beard of Education is rejoicing that its demand for an

accounting for proceeds of ia sales of public lands has been recognized

and that a Million Acres has been added to its fund.

Governor Broward is perhaps the happiest man in Florida.

Impressed with Governer Jennings' views on land grant questions when few

others were, accepting this radical "doctrine that reversed the policy
6
followed by Jennings' predecessors for 25 years, he became a candidate for

Governor to save the public lands. He made a great plea to the voters en

this issue illustrated by his memorable map and was elected. His election

however was only the beginning of the battle. Suit after suit has followed

Adverse orders granted by the Csurts. Finally Judge Swayne denied an

Injunction to step the dredges working in the Everglades and then new hopes
were entertained. New he sees the Fund saved the great work of Drainage

and Reclamation inaugurated.by himself and present trustees and shares

with the trustees and State Beard of Education the signal success et

Ex-Governer Jennings in his far seeing and excellent legal judgement- and

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.o.n.r an o. c JNIOS, CGIJXS.L for OVE '
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of Dnrinnjg Coramissian rm is'being warmly DoQngratula iedver the sgri%

victory that h9 nftb won in the litigation involving the validity eT the.

Drainarg law sstablishing a araina-e cdintriot in thV Emvargle"dea and
levying a drainage tax of fivR cantn, vr tare to be us9d in the drainage

eperatians of reclair ing thei Everglades.

AUTHOR POF THE LAW

'OOVFWOR JPPTINTUGS raq tbhe author of tha original draiinrgu law' aIrd its
plan and soopl' and p.urpo' wa0 s -6 0lon Cive' by him.



During thae close of' JOvrnror Jonjiiing8' terim in office he procured the
patent p tMi Yvergaf;ladss ; aide a fRpn0clal study of tha statue of the land

grant and of' the public lhind -rtuestion Hi': :a iniLt.ntiAon h:-id nmde a

complete chanWt. in the policy o+, th '. .timpoAition of the Trplic lanD1s

Governor reward was Rmuclh UirpeNFissed vit'i the rcoan!cidfnt ions made in

GoverMner Jnnti m' Massage on the land qu,,stiofn i-id ixmdei his teaairable

Map Cammpain an the question of saving anid realniniing thi public lands

and was flocted on that ionie.

JIENNiNw R}TAINMD AS (IOUHSBEL

At the beginning of Governor Breward's administration, rermer Govenme

Jenninjgs wia reftained as Counsel in charge of the litigation involving

.Oarly six mil.lioe aores of lfnd grant olamsa ambracd in f de6en or

aore suits rep asented by ten or twelve of the ablest !.-yoers in Plorida

with. 0bed asaistanr e frea naw York.
"T,,i .OF TR lLADS

: h iar :ii34ad land grant a ela~ti ts insisted in thler suits that tte
1,i18taa tut tf P lrida had granted .he lends in question to the varilsta

USm *A Sl and flb the Attle to the lannds vested in th railroads by -
a-.' "at ve a.t ts .
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WWINS Administration acntenda d thot thq tIt3' tb# te las dm
.vaste absolutely in 0te Trusteea of thea nternal Inprovesant -Ma tl.
their RuOeonaera -in fficela undifr Act of JAgistlaturn pfansd in x185 few
'the epresaB parpeans a XRaianagoland recla3lmtioln ek.tE swampD lanigas aM
until that purpose had been accomplished th8 legisintux e had no further r
central ever the flid r lands and that only a resiatfury interest fl
0

lative riiqpojition.

SLOW PROORJe 3S LITiOATIOI

The maP.ny suitt Involving sao many legislative land grants, constitnt -*
tiEnal, l al and histortical uestionan covering a period. ef' fifty years
made the litigation exceedingly volujminouas nri thea piroesse in the suItS
necessarily eala. Th us a laigs. t'n j ontit oattel i siispns.e .ithwut funad
b proceed teo drain with, or financial Aility to intautrRtet or insure
th, conrtinuiane orf iranaga ep3ertions,

JSFLTIfWIGS AVlYISS TH3 T3UgOTIOhS



ard reqolaimsnatien neuht tht tvic o tnre oarinffel on tr qiusti n or tthe
pewrs of trusPtees to s'l l minds of thi fuindl an use tha proatd' d for the
atpae o0f purchasing dredges, hpllO!nPli of Inabor fnd the expelnditureS
ltedtent te the Creinate operations. Governor Jennings rendered tan
*aiReon advisfing the trufleu that the absolute title t io th lands in
the fued wee arranveoFbly vested In the Trustees to be suold by thgS o nd thIe
prnendsl used fr the purpose of drainage and reolaitimation.

BRoyAn .. SHEa oSEs


tledimeSy ftalwareig tiha pnisiin the trul tees proceeded to lay
MIt a t.a o t isaMi e we i the Jverglades Governoer Browar;d and
t.L .eav.aolner M tte. me e t hi ie and ordtiie two pnwf .rt
insrs l, usea feo tf.l asoMtesi do n aofnd drir tUa enr *wwnei Brewa*a.

S e at alhwe*- ewonoutehs an luanohe In thhae rvegt s an hIn Sew "t
neeessarllyhlfewl..elu, tmzhMe ether, E tr o.vgeeese fwlthL % adt



etste, thWe Wln and .Aaneaa eae nau a tiM A di
4, i4!
ml linir ,h h ,diso ,,a Ik ;el nte no








by theM and the faithful angaorw oAnde crw in charge neer to' ra le at
they had freatheld Lake Okseehebee
The litigatiten pregresaed, several injunctlnsn wre granted the

greater part of thnir available funds worn at timan enjoined, the result.
of the lItigRtlon at tines seemed in doubt. Some ine intrl-ooutsry orders of-

the Court -.rer at tiLnsa unfavorable. But the Tnrtses reby.ing implioltly

upon th't opinion of their ounael preaseded with .grsat vigor and the
dredges %are never stayed s lay in their on-yard e'nd excellent progress.

ORiGIN OF THIN DIRAINAgf-' LAV

Tho origin of thf drnicnaeg law graw out of two sPDeci l conditions

that existed at the :oegnning ,, of Govrernor 3roiard's ad:inintration one
was the seeming doubt o-' telo result of the .itl;.ation tupn which the

ownership of the land rested. The ether vra the fact that several hundred

thousand shares of land had been deeded tee Railrond Oompanies under
legislative enaotments whieh in fairness should baar soae part of the

oeat of reclaiming and not require thfe remnant or publiM lands remaining
in the fund to pay all the expense of a common reolaimation scheme bene-

fiting the lands owned by acrporations Iqually with the lands owned by

the fund and to meat the further condition of requiring lands that the

Trustees were forced to sell in an unreolainaer condition at -. nominal f
figure of from twenty-five to thirty cents per acre to obtain funds to

carry on the drainage with, to likwilso share in thein bI'urden of reclaim-

ation which increased the value of the Innd to uipwrds of Ton dollars
per acre and to meet these conditions requiring all lands within the

drainage area to bear wane portion of.the cost oC drainage without t regard

to ownership, Whther the litigation was favorable to t he Railroads or

to the State the great drainage work inauijrated by Governor Sroward and

Uil associates should not be stayed or interfered with even the the state
did net suaeoeodin the litigation.
Pirst Drainage LAW.

THe task of drafting the Drainage LAW was delegated to foWrm

SwE~ rn.MNt WINGS0 It was an iapQrtant and difficult undertaking,
o:ltuitiollne as very different from these elsewhere that rreaedent could

4'Sn br tlflowiS, the< territory ever which the drinaige law was to operate




__ ___.:*, "_ _ : -- ;---- --.. ... ." .. .. -.
'... 4 ... ...


weea UaIsbited. The a]m w asw .ag s two or th :flatse o S-
unstaaeoyed, unvrlxpe1d inpnnetraBXe. Th9erefore the P An 9Mn04e w.t the0
bill was necafl arply of an originall chaw snater, wit'h rsome.aend tit tih
origih l-rtrnft rnhRP3 a law*

COUITITUT.orAt. AMnmilNT


A Constitutional Aioni-irL-ent :re: VuvPv r y.-l i tr' I l;'11:itr'e at the same

session ,ith Sirailni plrlevions to the statute -ni srFibmitted to the
people ~'o ratiioat.ion Thin a ienlvnt 8 's',n e")'-:"It A4E by en ovmarwhse3ling

vote, 4ML4 ai Cleailg .the Board prooacedrLd under thpi crainagea Iiw
to collect the tax provided by it and nine corpoeI tions owning Approxi-
matel"y 0 llbl4-Go lands in ithe frairnago dittrlots rlfTd nuts
in the UniJted Sttats ocarts question i, t+,h censtitutionality of the Act
which 'ran vigorously conntentsd, ArutMrments arid briefs at great length -:re
submitted vhich resulted in the Courts nelding tnant the law was uneein
stitutimonal.

Le. is Itturne Was In Sesason

The legislature mvao in imnflalon when tnq finir-wl 1"craT 'vvas nrSn1irqd, In
tho meantinc governorr J'nning, had submitted volluninous reports tr 7Tunsel
on the litirLttion r narrative oW th volur:inous t-3tiol;n1oy +.t k: i th. a
cases to t the Beard which -as trar.nsmitte.. by HpFci5l Mainntgr of %ov'rnft6r
BrOeard to the legislature.

Governor Broward Reonaiestn New Bill

.p0vernor Biroatrd ismiiataly uiol rscaiit of the final decree requested
Governor Jennizig to prepare Pn n.onrtment tto the formeI Act in line with

his reoo nnndations. In compliancel th~'rewith Governor Jennings submitted
three drafts 0o bills llu1itrated by rispa, voluminous explanatoer noteo
and brief o Dalians of th uts en the rt n e Conesttttional end legal
Sants inv olved overnfer B1owar and hbin conferees selected rNem the
:thras bills the present bill whioh bedtam a law.
SAain litigation bsllewtd t ~ Beard preoraedi to put hO* new law

OiRO 6et m 0Saa-nMd fasolnt il)e dminage Sx sit saluits wore filed by

trparrie ;orlra ampnx1matnly 46#"0@ a *asor of lanM .ormprssented

:4*0 J4.df3* 4 .4.Lta' gwl aMd BVef SBt (lair AbnM .# The WUeg-
'. -ithe -44.4 Apti two -B t ph.s wOD Ba ,Mnt r u
--:i.. .- :; .--* -




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ed during the argument ':rhich consumer d several daay, extensnivep briefs
were fll&l the laet having been submitted on the fiftseentli instant,

A SIGNAL VICTORY

Tih li.v having, b: -i l.9trainead. bvyJucivJi Locke in th-i United :.:ates
Circuit courtt in oonsiderd P signal victory for irovarner iBrewafrd nd

thn Poonard of 1rntinerpF Comriqnionqrs pnr ithlT' Goun9il vho hnas exhibited

marked Pbillty in hrndlling the g'rat pro&-.l -!i.-:.'-'e re ontnnt and

untiring. rfernprch heq -Proug;t u.acLcen.












































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FLORIDA HlISrTO'ICAL ASSOCIATO'rIo SAY CGO:TIfT


gWILLIAM SI^S^TH JNNINGS*




















Compiloi by: 4 itt
11A
AnMrew Jackson High School
Jacksonville, Florida

















The infooration found in this essay was compiled from the
following bookat personal interview of widow of W, S. Jennings:


1. FLOPRID'S COLI SAAD3S Pages 319-320
Author A* J. Hanna and K. A. Hanna.

2. FLORIDA LAND Or CANCGE Pages 333-334, 337 and 366


3. FLOSTIA I14 THE MAKTOIG Page 226
Author: F, P# Stockbridge and J. !. Perrj y


4. THE FLO! RT HANDBOOK (4th Edition) Page 262
Author: Allen Morris copyright 1953


5. Personal interview with 11a. W. S. Jennings. wife
of the late Willia Sherman Jennings, on february 11, 1957,


SOU10S QF zIR-TMA ,TI2














WILLIAM SHEMPJ JUIE GS


Wlllaa Shernan Jennings sm born near Walnut Hill, Illinois,
on srroh 24, 1863, eon of Josoph 1. and Amarda (Couch) Jennings and
first cousin of William Jernnngs Bryan. He came to Florida in 185
to complete his lagal studies anU began practice at Brookaville. ie
am appointed Cirmult Court comaassioner in 187 ami became county
Juide of Hernamo county the next year. He resig n asa Jud e in 1393
to serve in the House of R11'epresent ves where he was speaker. He
served as a Presidential Eleettr i 1896 and for ten years was presi-
dent of the Brooksville Tcwn Council.
Out of the desperate poverty caused by the panic of 1873,
arose the Populist Party of the 1890r* When tho party was definitely
organized the FPanaero Alliance joined, but their membership had
shrunk to three-fourth. This dseline in adherents wa largely due
to the developing of a liberal wing of the Democratic Party containing
such men a Stephen R Ma llory, J. V. Z. Stockton, William Sherman
Jenniqn and others. Thus moderate Populists were able to find an
expression for their am ideals without severing old political ties.
The Daeocrat vat the election of 1896. Thus endd Populima in
Florida*. Pr then on its influence became part of a new liberal
democracy led by such me as 3roird, Jennings, Stockton and others.
Liberal democracy entered the executive chair at Tallahassee
in the person of William 8S Jnnin who took t the oath of office in
1901. He was the 18th governor of :'lorida and was also nominated at
1







the last convention held in florida. Public opinion at large as
movingg sharply tawards the regulations of economic amnopoly.
The new Governor fired hie opening gun against Public land
,ranted by legislative act to railroads but not yet deeded to them
by the Trustees of the Internal Improveznt Pund ralindg the
State that most of the Public land received from the Pederal Gover mwent
had been samp and overflowed areas earmarked to support reclamation
projects. "ost of this land was the vcerglades.
The Everglades cam into possession of the ftate of Florida in
1850, by cession fra the Federal Govurment at Ta hington. It was
not until 1903, however, that ay systemftic effort as made to
reclaim it. In that year tho Honorable Wi. 8 Jenings, then
Governor of Plorida, set on foot the project of bringing this vast
area under control. Plans adopted and developed in the beginning
have proven their value although the work has not yet been ecapleted.
Previous to this tae, Governor VW S. Jennings in 1901, trade a
three months trip to Aurope, His ain objective as to make a study
of the European drsaitnage system. Ih of his time ma spent in
:Hlland, although the Jenninrgs also viated Italy. Mrs. W. S.
Jennings stated that they visited every dam and dike in Hollan.i
They were acccaapanied by their son, S. Bryan Jennings and Mr. W. S.
Jenningt niece, Basel Jennings.
The engineers in charge of the Holland dike and dam costructon
presented Governor Jeminge with copies of their miute*s and data
on the rcn~truation which he found moat beneficial in his work in
the Dverglades. eP. JenninWe brought these minutes aMid data hbane
and had thea translated into Dnglish. For the most part the data
frao Hollanid wr of the greatest help to him although he did receive
data from Italy. The drainage wmrk in the Everg3ades that has been


* *








donor bears the imprint of the ingenuity of the Dutch people.
r.S. William STruInM Jemning~ thile still !Governor of Florida,
roccmended a bill for ?orost '..ecornearation. Tids bill, however,
was not passed unt1 after the Joath o.f '4 Jennings. After a
period of twenty-four ,:ers, S. Jryan JoYrnnin, son of W. S.
Jenniins ar, ?Mrs, ;i.' S. Jorm i -ts, iz'all:,- maraed to get tihe bill
passed. S. .S Jesnings orVgiiox.. thio project and for seven :.-ars
waa .Iresidset of the croup bohind t;is project. He received no
pay for hisa services. The foreat reconoervation and the drainagLa
of the erlad as te second most outstanding thing V. 3.
Jennings id while he was governor. Unrier his administration a
:iv wing was added to the ol.h capitol BuildiLga and an extensive
road work program was usdertak-On. ?he Legislature was so pleased
with the work done on the Capitol that thoy presented W. S. Jennlngs
whun he lett office with tb; de-I heo ha d uised while Governor of
Florida9 This desk row occupies a placo in tho Jennings' home in
Jacksonville.
The Internal ImprovenQr ."'un 3arid employed W. 8. Jennia-o; to
take over the diras'.a oS th- oerglades. He directed fitv 'rure
miles of canal drainasie. He alled It-. W. S. Jenni.zcis in acquiring
ou.r hundred acre below Hceasmtead. Bro. -11 L, taa ;oille d"orated,
nino hundred si.t-,' acres anSk the Lieislature conceded tine hubIred
sixty acre also. The State eventually aided enough to make the
total amount of land four thousand acres. Tils land is noted for
Its beautiful royal Palms. The Legislature gave them a commission
and assisted with finances which ieaulted .n the creation of the
c'rMal Palml State Park, which is a part o the Ever-glade State Park.
Tho loyal Palm State Park, owine by the American lamoerna Federation,








aas the mncleus of the rvergladee State Park.
SThe Jennings at one tim took up residence in ?iami. Their
hoae was facing BiSeaca Bay and they war next door neighbors to
wi S. Jenningas first cousin, ?r. William Jennings Bryan. Both
sold their hbase at the san timo. The Jenninge moved to Jacksonville.
In 1907, they began building a hame in Jacksonville which wae
completed in 1908. When r-. 3. Jennings moved to Jacksonville
he opened his law office here. He was also vade a Vice-President
of the Florida rational Bank.
r. V. S. Jnninga enCineered the sale of a large tract of
laan located in the Eveirlades to r'. r* J Bolas whch helped to
rinanco the drainage system. This sale ran into millions of dollars.
his laMn that was rainedi hasa been re"errei to b as rich as the
Valley of the Mlle. The land, beirn so fabulously rich, is a vegetable
,ara- 'se. rom lakeo Okoechobee three thousan1.i dollars worth of
catilsh are sent up To-:th ever ;oau.r.
Tt has betn the popular belief that Mri'. VU I. Jenningas ied in
Jacklsonville. flwvers, this s not true according to the statoaent
za.c- by M r. i7J Z, Jennincna. "ho state that her husbanJ died t;
.. gturs ie Ino the "oncee de leon Hotel onr "ebruart 240 192I Thus
e.:Jlo the lif? c'i a creat man who di h to aidc t a he betterment
of our sovore.~tit state of lTorida.








OuW erV W.8.Janmlag
of Pe wit 1o 01-19s.

WiliJm emrna Ja iagl a native of nLuls erase to iFlnort
io 1Z896. Is be am a *itae t BimoandSe @eoaty aan patetso to all
of the Seass it the B taejtoa 185 he was a poeted t o aty JUe ort
lereande by SevMrmor Ir Perry sa SL in a s ma ta 194 he was el*et-
oe a mater at the State Liogislture triag Speaker oS ~the a-
ReprcsMtatives SJa lPS2Ioa I ho lead the PIWj~Reariatt a l n
tkrets the fta votes of the State beiag eait for W111i2a Jmlaa
Bryan fr Prestident
In 1900 Seau s years of as kh was eleeted grroaesr oft ler t
reoitlan the hleost votte ever east tI Lthse attoe was imaugmSutod
Jmknar 191 *t somnetd Gov ar r W.D.Sas mr se baa served tis tera.
t wasm h the reaemaiat nf of G overmr W.S.Jemntng that the
JusteUes o* the Saprnm CGouwt were inmrased. to saf lasted of tree,
s that the grIeatlyr greased bsaes oft t he Gueot sOult be dtspeoed
Of prumpZy.
Daritg the atdiaistatlem tof W9.Soniag as e Severeor oft fori
10-w190l8Itats taoes were erotse to thb f lowest pola ver attaind,.
The Statl* lost tutions were Iaprmved tnA expanse systemtisedstwo
extenoiAMs au a deme wre adLoa to the 8tate Coapetol ftkAag -Mr
them a mtlUes &*er ofe ledA In the ZvorLsdes were redeemed tra
tilrnoae leA grnatlr ts a umh redeme lands are still beita used
for AaminJ an rewlaUIstla purpesoas.ariaa the administratMn of
Governr Napoleoe B.IBwamrd 30 smeuoe4et Governor nningS s atte his
torn *f U vrbergoveraer Jamingp was lep advisr in EvrgLarOMe
drtl ~tage for the luter al improvement Trustees aA rl the the Tnfles
the benefit of his well Wtint ed study of the donluagS prejorts
GovernMr JIaing sosamed the pubicatlia f the velume *Solters
of Print" eovoerang trr the per e e ti olvil A other wars aa he
also bad thue tInute of the Xtona laprovemeut Trstoes staee 14
public tl tas beE tolm fe t made a a th lep to e peple at the State.
e L tituted the system of oeeittemal pa rf e and parole san greatly
ltedsed the expanse *f ulmntasuiag State priLeaerslo prepared the
trosrter of aI tax sale sertM lesw fram the State t rf TPes r's
Offiae at Tallahaseeo to the iospeo+r ve e mties asa to make re-
dompt i a of tax eertltiftteBs ore oeBvnett and less espease to
land mewre
The Ihdian War Claim of f ieda was colleetat during OGveror
Jamlag6 adiatimt tnl sand vuse tIs ayif all the otstbandgAt
besas ot the aSato ,tisam ina 1071 faM 187. Tshe bal"a of the lBatia
War Claims as e oleetedwas used far sehaols sad other purposes as
rmQndlr by logislatti es etmmat M nl 190 .
Govermer IJanings first to advocate state Forestry proteettie
tad oseursrvatt hnd was an heored l eader antimlpatlag the States
Welftrefhe state prospered dortag the term of Gveraer nmaluan eTa h
eemiess mat foreltil ofet temr Goevnerso were masbedt a ead xteded
by Govermer JeOtaLgs as the pressures of the State were developed and
st iliAed and the soesease asd adtavusenats ad te rby Plo a youmet
elected Goveorar has beoe sentiaued. 4arig the present entry gi
to FPloida pemin ao samng the great sad g rowin states of the Wt8a.
DIe.8l1-145. 8i-BJ.B.Witttle l(RetirL edl Mhte Jastiee Iforid
Sqprime Omurt)







Governor W.S.JeoantiaR
of PFlrida 1901-190 .
FPeet-aetes to feteh of December 1943 by Jlitcr J..thitef4t~id.
Governor W.8.JsJmngsa Floridt wvt resomantaed and adveeated the
dralnAge and reel4attSen of the Everglades in his message to the 19N8
Legislatures itch aesiage set forth detailed af otenrmti~ napa of
oovatis s' and hisn hauative study of the area in full. This rese.-
NOedatten restated l the aProziately fivo-Pdatred miles of draiatng
saal8 and other extensive rbip em tv e ad dvtolspmuDtgsatttiaed up
to tho present timeo
fullowipn his admnlistnttle a Governor ,as legal adviser for the
Internal Iaprevement Trusteessbktlh Bwarn is oempoeed et the (Gvemor
aad ether State offieallehe had ftll charge of directing the work nt
the Evargladas weirking with the Trastotaeo sletodte [ utetatandiag
fins ef natinally resegpisd aglaeers, ate o lde tw and oaiplete
sarvey of the drasiage and reolaeItten poslbfliti os an submitted
their findntag with reoesmesattios for an aall ever plan of preeoedure..
twhih ware adopted by the Trmstees as a fixed pell~ for tRho g ngatle
eonnarvation project,
Governor Jenningsa sont4toea sale atf the State'* 1ivergladea land
of afrioiate arevege to finish fumts with ~ himh to start the drain-
age work with present day results. In following years a Ptate Bond issue
ao thy area fiasneed the oeutiLn tion of the dredgin ,.
In I1U Ploanr Oevemnor ennulngvlritted Samfpe with his chief
objective the asudy if the dra Znge nd reelamtxten in RellrandezN
iaspected every main proj et in that seuntry anter the gttarnes of
the shief magneer in shargsoae seaourd copies of the engineers reports
romth the begnLag f tho wl B ellamd and tbrmgbt tbems back to
PeridaF and had them taRnela *teM in to english ,so that he mtict mske a
thoroeug~ study ef the tollanud pln and preseedure n the hope *t
matk-g a nBoe m.-o d t podiaer plesa rr the development or the
Zvurgladma emitltltiw '
The St. La s flnt ft" M Afleotie oeeet thir Lae Okeeohobeo
and the aleosahateoha River to t"t Otalmt f Vfexs!e ,wn his ldeW.
Governor Jennings visualized the o-ams possibllities of the
future. f the Everglades as the' greMtet uapir prdctring -rem in the
vr'ldv Thne augr 13ow of the World~ Ia the asking rs it were.
The United States agar Corpen tto e in rec spnition of Governor %rnni nga
outstanding service to Florida sad humanity,thru their Presideat
Ciarense Rittlaggtvos a #1000.00 seholariuip eaeh year to the
Flnrida State Univerlity at Gaiaesvlle1 hmoeriag severmaer Jennitngs


'*t above was furanldhed by Governer Jenings widow(Mrs. R S ,)
a1fy inn Jmnutingsi61 KMein St., Jaksoaearll e,6-la.,









H^ otlu hus-

oc r ffr e F 3 .'3'iDorivacn,
acnd unacintnxcud.fc^C cli oplcd Gv tRc




18apti t nrc


'ciaffc ct Lorta.

T3r yarcer- 3, 1-


1z3unvlant Skpf1s,).SlD. TaI-tor.









is ,hascim> to Our Kccaz.cn-
^y LHl[- .rE&%.4
_+J+ @g
) +,t +,- ;.--;m4+.+..+ -+...+Y~~-V~'


fc


lBUtlitm l3nning$


of 1t& State : from 1901 to 1905
to Rio I-cwfrb;

Eo 'ccc>eC bu6rinj p>i au i-ii R, -Cn tarcl-
lion CL t CfRiecf Exective of fZ State-
wor^ipp2i wic R Rti ?RLurcR CLa a-
facidRful anrC active menXxer; caxtiZ


-Ne
^*













wc, adi cLvc aclb conpilrct k c:, CI
nxcamger of our 6benoinxira.iorx,-
Kvintl < c,.r 3 2)ice 7 rci !cit of k'f







91,1C intlirdte erb gsv tRc
becas'ds witR fzRe U nw i er- of of is
ft?.rci.R brirg Rieo rnari c(, Dc rnor
rentber it proper ,Rak. we ?.o1
pfclaca u.tpoi racorb our capprcciactiot
of iC ct co-wor-zar, Ca puL-
Atc -r.axn acns RCiout nmriths>. ac imaxm
i .crefore ge i t








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is~tSolti

t.c S'ir-A Iaptiol CRurcr oF-
f-iFal. ar c c^ Cori.a, tfRcit we be-
pforc frc bfo_ of

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con~iih~it: hopi


tak fi? > piril-htR t8 ocVe wdo,
Bavin9 fougR plos f192* Rev
'L V .t",L: -.'.5-. i
are cinooime pcrgpi~l Kc .ppiimen" iu-
ca gkctr worf;-
aCL. 62 iU furRcr


I.











cil w tudno toI Ri afflicle
rea f.ivc o crc conboofnexce
ai6b our carnc ri tia n .'npatlt,
ir tLeir ecreaCvcii-it


rommen miin them

to !Rc 90o of Geouii rla cir- t e faticr
of aff nmerci.c; i it firtpidr


cidat ac copy of lRc foregoirnit r.co-
CdiLoi~ 13 trac k unitl eo to tRe fcaxidit
of te. b6c2cease c, a. a cop? Ipr l eb
upon tte xminivautcS.



































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',!
For THE NAtd AL CYCLOPEDIA OF AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY-James T. White & Co., Publishers, New York










Rev. by H. w. W. i O H. W. W.










Jhlyt1I1GS, William Shermnan;,, governor of Y.Loriaa- (1O190b)4


was born near Walaut hi1, I..L t, Mari. 24, bU63, nor. of josepr Irf.


anad ;vmanda O)uca), Jmkiminel, ana a co'aaln or Wiii.i Ji-ennings


13ryen (1,. v.) Htw is tker was a successful fruit-.growe?, *tooax


raiser, and truin-producer of IllinoisB, the son of Charles Wo


owa Maria ....................Jennings, a'u Fitoasor. of Ilhoraes


and Lrene ....Ji................. J'enrWnaEs.ii Tam Shermun Jen-


nings received kiis early education in the public schools of Miarion


coun-ty, ena was griauvateo at the Normal. Vniveraity, Corbonw-dAe, in


I883.. he Thei. s9tuaied at tUe tVon o1 #o.LLeEe of Law in Chicago


((lbb4-65)*, completing his .legal. studies uncter the direcitok of his


brother, Charles Eugur J-n0sings,. wno was then etoze attorney for






For THE NATIONAL CYCLOPEDIA OF AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY-James T. White & Co., Publishers, New York







JENI.IGS, Wilizam Sherman




Marion county. Removing to ElrtWi:a in November, libb5, he secured


his admiseson to the bar in .186, and entered upon the practice


of his profession at Brooksville. The following year he was


appointed commissioner of the circuit court, resigning a year


later to become juage or Hernando county, orticiating from May,


1888, to lenuary, lbaI. when he resigned to accept an eleeiioa


to the state legislature. He was reelecteo in 1694, serve as ,


speaker of the house,ias chairman of the committee on rules and


regulations, and as member of the public health committee and of


several other important couirLtteLes.. IAn lbe he was appointed colonel


of the 3th. i'lorida regiment of tne state militia by Govi. Jlem-


ming, and in 1 96 presidential .elector on tne Democratic ticKet..


For ten years he was president of the Broocsvilie T'own Council, and


in 1868 was chairman of the Lemocratic convention.. All these


offices of public trust he fiilei with such auoiltyr that in lj 1 he was


elected governor f F'lorida, being the youngest man ever chosen






For THE NATIONAL CYCLOPEDIA OF AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY-James T. White & Co., Publishers, New York







JEUl1II,-C6, William Sherman 3



chief executive of the state. Following his term of office as


governor, he removed to Jacksonville where for a number of


years he was the attorney for the nterna.l mprovementurnd


ana HoarQ of rani.iage Qlomnueissioners, handling tre EverFlaues
-/^, -!< ,:.- ..- i:^ L i7 '" <--
drainuage work, in which he was deeply interested. He was author


of the Ylorida dreinaee law iani plan for orjining the Evere.inehs.


.he was ales a member of the advisory ooard, feaerAl rain age amn


reclamation commisseae, and chairman of the committee named by -


Secretary oir ~*e Lane- to prepare wiendriern s to the crbirage bill,


as well as counsel in drafting anu settling the contract for


comprehensive investigation and survey of the hverElaces oy a
,,, , ." - / .. ., .. rr .' ^ -, .-. .

, ;. "- "anm sson nof expert eagmeeres. >. e o O seah ,ei r-


general counsel for tre Ever.lacies Sugar L ana ,o., a .onseA s L


for the Purst-.lart Construction Ut.o, Everglaues Contractors,


Powers Soutziern Dreuging Co..., president of the ennir.Es Artesiun


Farm ILand CGo., the Daoe Muck Land Co*., the Leesburg State bank,






For THE NATIONAL CYCL EDIA OF AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY-James T. White & Co., Publishers, New York






J'lANING William Sherrman 4




Depositors" Trust Co., vice-preslient arid general counsel for the


'lorida State Drainage Land Co., ctrrmian of the ways and means


committee of the ?!aval Stores Association of Florida, and director


of Barnes & Jessup Co. I.e was chairman of tie Floriaa tax, commission


in 1911 ano 19 and in 19J.. rneiifr the American peace com-


6 4I 4 i aMMMM"a"raguaye Amarmby. Aue, industrious, sancere,


S nd democratic, Mr. Jennlngs hei a foremost position or honor and


usefulness among prominent men of the state. Possessing dynamic


energy, patriotic devotion to duty anc loyalty to his associates,


kh was a potent factor in tUe development oi the resources or the


state, as well as a leader in all movements for the morbl ana civae


/ bettermient of his fellow men.. For many years he was a aeacon in tne '


Baptist church, and was at one tame vice-presiaent or tte Floriua
;+,+*,+ .,. ... u ^ ,' &. +
Baptest convention. The uegree or LL. D. was conierred upon him
A
oy the John B. Stetson university ot which ne was a trustee.-






OF AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY--James T. White & Co., Publishers, New York


He wae a member of the following o dtl s::. ..# .











Be was twice married:: (4). VrNW, Ib i to Corinne, daughter 0!


0 rk .an o f V. 4 who died


a few months Iater,; anct ((P2)) J1 Tallahassee, ia.,.~ J.W, 18ft,


to May, daizhter- ot ien.. Auslin S. Mann ot Foitcliau. lie kaci one


son, Skherman Bryan Jenrurigs. Jeh cied in St. Auguatine, i'La., Feo,


2?, 195zO.


For THE NATIONAL















it. by t. v. W. 18/R/8o 1. 1. 1.


JflWljw '"I LAP Shnwas Gven o ri4ClaM (190-1*OS)

wt t)) ?o, r ikifskgt kfl, 1tis watr. 2Lf tE$ s uon i Jotett V*
wd ASar4a (Oe-vah) JsM. ti :a ud at :uit oif STlU'ia JAtJ)aG3S
Sryan (V# T7)*? t, Sts *hslr sa a 4 wea tihfu Lt g&i X troratft8 sk-*
traiaef, rJd Crain -ptndotuarl : of IlUmlinoS tho stfL as MAw4leBa W,
--toa &-*rl iet< L., *..-.< -<...J na age *and aSafvipco^ of law.:-l

a& Itrienr- & ... n,.*%...s.....tA -al.r&a .il.la.sej S lrm^ *a.*s
entire rtecastiv We Parly efduatSitn Xn tre mtil-Ui taoecri *sf slar i-os
4ouinty, a4 A g1a,.tt1Td ait Ulm NR n aa tUnivsaTnSyg 'e.rardjej tI
1883. He then atndied at tWi Union 0?itr6 ef L0 Se.a &laL.a
(1684-88) gMpAetiOi his 1 -il atittes uwidws t A,dii c.Z he L
bnrtSer, ha BiS E;a t itc JteBs, who aVS ethe ha a4 aEe.' y fow

Marion oottgs* Bftfsmvia to loridan ir P.otmbr-, 2 X iS s sR-naar
his aaut*Ltint to te*.-bar? it JM9, aM entdsfnd uIponb tUh pr3Atie
of his sawfeEnsta at Brokafle.1 The t.flori-r reara )M *stA
aipIfltae4d atvISa*toflEr of the *Ori t .e.sfrt, %saA 9.
Latr toU become juw-e of BEranfrdo atty, ofsatf stit frEon Rfay
1888, to Jamriy X193J, -tln he rho iMaln to aeeeopt X1 al otIaon
to th statt leg1tlt4rrs. Yb wasm fsele9tel in &194v, *wad a*
h-Ar4mrn at te Gomittee an taules ad rwaI nations, aurt a5
member of te wabIa hetath soearittoe and of sever oticr Lta-

portant sentItesa s atnd as speaker of the houe at ftl6oW101
rweedon. In 1889s hte wa appointed oo3bnel of the 356h Florida













JPrmtrC0 1 -.:.i1ai wh'-Pvi


r ,:r-t.A ovf *e ustt.Tv nfllUa by Cot?* FIerMAi ., ;nd in TIKg6

p**savle,"ial e.icor'Z Ocr ^t lAoeL?s)ia tiet. For ee? Vs I Vjfl

ips ws-Q ftre0i-l-At C-f ti hx-na t 'le TovIn CInrAoiAs, -n in S 4

^'O^ A C ewa" of te ta'ot--.io oonrentioi. ALL tas c'^too

of tW 1f-l3 tni.St t i;AeD slth M*iA .ltty V -I 1 19& I e

Ce.iot' .r-ir %Of P'lcr ., !t;ii-. tjq yu dol.:i wr osewn

o'tle *x-iutiO8 of Vth 3*t,'e. TelA-t ,t hi te i-i i- .fiase

cV; ne hAe :r.e to J 3:zk-nal'd aJs ares fr- a rniar ref

yeO-tas ha Was the a terdey ftor th*tan.rnL I.mpr.VOr43t Paa

a* B4&avi ut% DCc. t a. Crnri4'sion re o afViim, ter EW toiutvr3e

At ine r ?kr in .e*i- t* .i -- t 0tan W- -4* A- Cownw:'Nar

b piaocured the United 9last patt-e-.t s th- Euvert.' ..As. a^
:mtr wf tnw Floa at AiOn- Im; lni- Apn r for rtkiIre i -?

it2 la*de. an atsen a *Orlir et ti*W xZi-4o7 1riiaC tfeIral

dr4itae rMtad 2r. l-vstten oor A-fcintIn, '1 othveTrv o--f n Ue ro' itIrt

fclud 1y4 tv Udited tett ltst&r8iy o.',I I.t-r41 V d01 .cY tot. rCP.aLtc

,srte.u.enrtsL t t' to it Aince billt,& a i.L ,i As counoe i(n a:u-ftin- aA

.t-iA ;h lOntr-Act for ooNpW. rrn lv4 invest, ttfo V' E ur-svey

ft tbe ntwghalws '; f cor i4V'a-CIon of eapoirt snin0&*e;t. V! &' -

&aste- fl'te In-il-.n t sa OL.ir" due t14 "ta -tE the AdoS&1 4c v(ayn

a;it 4i'ungfi, Ma Covs rnorMhi.* Wsw ieledii tiY :4i.al 'buui to a

n d7 t.tSrefu.d st..4aba Oiias 't .' L ty tS'ir ft T:'or' *i :: f\c ( 1

fl*c:ai r i ati aoJtift, e.('2Vfi Ct to the ate.to -.1n' it-s pec;le. At

t's tiet o. .Jia d












JinWMINS Wi-A iaLsa gBem


I3ie anta Land Cgauany, counsel for the Furst-U1Sak Ceo-
atwtUeion b&-, vae -gldwea Ganto$a tersr, Do.wrn oeuthe'rn aYfsL

ing Do., pasindent of thYS Jeamnig Arteanm PFarm Lad Co.,* the
Damde ak Land Oe6, the LsAoebrg State Bianke mepoiItQre'I Trntt
cb**, Vie-preaident Wt terradl sounwel foar tie Floria State
Vfr'lnae Land y*., Qhordarmn ef the ".yWs an4 means oetitte
of the Paw-l 3tates AssiootAtea of Flror A., aw director of
Bargne & J6eaep C?*., afterw'rdae Sothern r.Wal Btt'ree Oesopsanr .
ge was Qteinan of the Florid- tax oomlsmoin .X 1911 ani 1213,
ai4 1in3S5 as appRintad by PnesiAent WuodwC Wilr on thon
Imtrnsational odntsa.alon for the kWmacnosnt of PFn4i in 1 t e
tiAti b6etsw. the Unite d State' -ad P.arwufl AbIb induntrlious,
forcefrula Otsie, d deeogertaie, Mr. JantnaSea thol a tfoemoat

taVetion of honor and uefulnetas ss an pmoaientS en of Vt
state&t. ?Se.stag dynsaM s ,aiwrgy, patrotti devotion to Auty
a;nd loyalty to his aseoites*, hbe was a potent faStor in thtn de
n1lopmes of the eOSoVAseS of the atate, at well a& a eitader in
&41 mowavent-i for the an i an5d aitvi betttenrt of hita tellw mRn.
fs was on of the beft Gove run florid? ever hitad. Hi wa-

MAtstaltoUn shso4n marfld executtive ability e*t .xistt% a
pradeful record of aebltevsemnto. tr smay are tie was a dac -ion
in the BptUat church, and waS ans om te1S nea-preani. t Got
Sit florida Baptist aonmfWion, jand President of the St-te
S*naAy 9ohool OonLention, Thep duex of LL*D. wap oonfTrOa uipOn













X1?ES. tWlimtam shatman 4


bin by the John D. Steosa Univneralty, of whtoh bt asa a


i was a mAt rt of follow ruaisatio ************




. ............


8 was trios IaXrIOR (1L) iS0, to Osti,m dim.hter

of Jorte4as of Brnokavll., fa., who e a tff ,anths
later iAn (a) in Tallahaam PVia., 1M1, to Yitr

DAhter of ti, Afttin 8s. lam of fliod'. Re ha, on1 eon,
bheaSan Bryan JhnaiFAu. Be &ted In s t. ugsVt^ine, Fla* 7ab.
27, IsaQ.















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/






first 6aptist Cburcb
BU'NYAN STEPHENS, D.D., Pastor '
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.






RESOLUTIONS REGARDING THE DEATH OF

HON. WILLIAM S. JENNINGS


Whereas, It has .seemed good to our Heavenly Father to call Hon. W.S%
-' innings of Jacksonville, Governor of .the State of Florida from 1901
to 1905, to his reward; and

Whereas, The deceased during his administration as Chief Executive of
this state worshipped with this church as a faithful and active member;

And Whereas, He was active and consistent as a member of our denomina-
tion, having served as vice-president of the Florida Bartist Convention;

And Whereas, The intimate relations held by the deceased with the memn
bers of this church during his term as Governor render it proper that
we should place upon record our appreciation of his services as a co"
worker, a public servant, and his merits as a man; therefore be it

Resolved, by the First Baptist Church of Tallahassee,Fla., that we
deplore the lose of W.S.Jennings with deep feelings of regret, softened
by the confident hope that his spirit is with those who, having fought
the good fight here, are enjoying perfect happiness in a better world.

Resolved, that we tender to his afflicted relatives our sincere condol-
ence and our earnest Christian sympathy in their affliction, commending
them to the God of comfort and the Father of all mercies.
Resolved, that a copy of, the foregoing resolute ns be transmitted to
the family of the deceased, and a copy spread -on the mhiutes;,




oderator.
Offered by JF.Dorman, .-
and unanimously adopted
by the Church; in conference, urch C
February 3,190. uh Clr.














The Administration of Gov.rnor Jannings from January

1901 to January, L0, wa- one of toe mo3t progressive anj fruitful

of gooi rasuils to tae people in tne nistory of tne staue. Hia &

loyal devorion to tne staLe ol nis adop-ion, his vision ana fore-

eignt, nii business juagemenT, his iniation ana his forceful ability

to accomplish matt-rs of magnitude ana general good, "here dis-

played on many ways to tn e listing benefit ot the people of Elorida.

During. nis .Af.minisr~tion the Capital bu-1ling at Taliahas ee was

so enlarged and improved as to double its size ana to greatly

ennance its appearance; tne tax levy for general state .r.cosea

was by his direction unaer legislative autnority reduced to tne

lowest pointt in tne n4story ci tne at::te; tn t1i 3 to all state

property, buillin.:,s anJa -ro,:n.t -vre taoroe. _ily examined ana dupiy

perfebcda; tne properties rit'e jLiJ retli improve ania -1irged;

a complete volun" 'i.as colloeua mco cuuoli iied giviyA a1,1a as to

Florirns sulai.-ra ania sailu-rsa in e Tia xiou,, War and in the War

between toe uates; tne aprropriations for common aonoois ani ior

pensions were greatly increased; tne mari.rierint of ana carin:t; p'v

the St..-e Prisoners was amaue more systematic, humane anfl lesa

expensive; he inaugurated tne eystem.af oonaitional paraons whioh

Was sust-int1id by tne aup:reme oourt ana nha~ proven so useful ana

elevating in tne mani.r;e-ment of State business; he secure.a tne

enactment of a statuoueunder nhicn tne hun.iresd of thousands of

tax sale ortiiioa.es tnnat had Deen kept in tne oDsement of the

Gaptitol were sent to tne ocuntiee where tne lands are, in order

that tney may oF more coavenuently examine ana redeemed; he

appointed more state ofiloials than any other Governor einoe 1887








-2-


when t' rreen% constitution oecamr3 o)iravl3; all of his

af'Q:'oif:l~ to oiificr ~ncorsaCi by tnh po2 Of t1C, '3L L

In SU -aI-Iu' --I ITlections, many az ,,tilw lsre still in pffioe

at tne Ccv-rnor'9 Ir-th; he ecareji without ccr.It to the st'f-Ae-
1ttu 31 CkL;~
tne i7>Lr;-.-nt from *i th- Uniteid I-`rate u~ 1rnore thani tnrccce million

acres of 14-r:r0 3a61; cvQ1r flO.-e-et lands in tne JL: incit

Florii.- #' he rroc. ritc n enetrnent of statute

wNhicn the State Com trollur apyoint,:i b' him, ai:ci b7 tie county

t ax a3i; ,sorT:C, aL n e-tilizaztiofl cl' Vaeq that r in a

great r.- iuCtion c.I bot-i. atite &na county taexs; he seaouri t.'l

anistrypent ot laws to incr 9.3i tre numofDr ana to facilitie is

buainesq oi th he Su-reme Co-,;,rt as well 5 c,: t_. tcz7] c2clrts, he

firet a-l- :rt nd. r -' ; 2 -rained bOy tne courta in 'A3

interlpr.- 7oion of tr-. lw,, he 2nf0 *.~ x tne ri,'rIt .int diuty ao t:,e

Truatl*-- o1 tie Ilt.. rJ Itprcv; Fci~ii oat' tne State,.corislating

of thle ana 'toit:i~~rO tOr oz. tile C.6bincstUiG~t tc lrir tjo-

Flori- Ev.- r .I.-Iie 3; lei comrproi~li edc and .:ectled tftl c1dx1;! of

ajL3.3-amneoom' aniae to m=ny millions of aore,3 ot State lanla under

legislative ,aLa grants. tn-.''eby savin".: -vC~ milliorvi of aor_-a

whion sine-, theii anr nowi are bejin, usea in tn-- P:!-eat dnt,-rpriae

to drain the Evervlades crhion have so limoon.Ai-irfully davelor'-eA tke

southern 1-ortione ot th,. SLZ.e, L~n-t have multiplied tPn t_4.Lo1e

values ana uaeful rescuccez 01 tr;6 Stite, bringing tncuaaii... o01

p~rsons i mriiiena, vealfl to Fiori-a; as an ofitoiaa. aWna a ILVvte

oisizdn, he inuuoti maznxrugeful citizens to aettle in the Stai6e;

he Ixrfeobe.ai the ti`!es to all the state linia xxta that have

since then been used in San devalopiagttne 8ate and he first

conceived aac fo ujmalaeci the plans for drainage and improvement












of the great Everglades in South Florida that have broul.t suoh

:.o'rld famed results and permmament goodI to tre siate; in aho.rt

he w:.Y Florid.'a developer whose u.e-.ol service .ill ivr be

a bright oh-iter in the. history .of tne State. In doi:i: all t!i.is

and v ry muon more for the Sr c.;c : lCVii s sincerely, he o-.as

at all uimea a mro-,t moidet, affable, ccneidc:rte anld '-nt.rous

Cnristian gcntlenn. As a lawyer i~e saoc ~orrin he forxmost;

as an E~:cl.rtive he h-i.: no superior; ;.3 I "- *i-.'--tvere he eured

the pasea&e of -irny 'useful statutes; as a bu-,iicess .an of lar.e

affairs he vas li..-rl, bro-.uminnd, unselfish, carc-fuli -.-.'

remarkrealy suLco!.-: ful; aa a fried ; ne w.. loyal, true and

magnairncus, as a citizen he w ..3 distirn .clhedi, beloved and

honoreaL. He, t. rih., .,, -cr.. tha any otihr man in the State, h:.i

an intir,-l.te no;;ei.er. of the 1.;;, and r : .r. e of the State

and cf th,- laws .anil official acts that -.ffect.'i them. His

collection of useful data a ujn matt-ra .onc-rnin the State nai

its resources is tne :'ct cmplte and u--ul in .iateInce. Those

iv,_ l.uored nitn him in tnis life *-ork fCr tne -ooC of Florida

will tr uasure hiM me-'ory s a great and o:,i .Ln whose chief Ail;

waa u-:.eti.i -3--,'ic. to his ..J,-pt.a St'ate. And this servioa with

its beneficial re.-ilta to tne r-ople of Florida Aill be an

inspiration to Othe.,-? who may emul._.t, his exTrrrle.














Governor Jenninis possessed the capacity and

discriminating judgement .to learn accurately the

political and economic need. of Florida. The greatt

ambitionn of his life was to serve Florida faithfully,

whether as public officer or citizen, and he fave un-

sparinLly of .his time and talents to the :tcorn.plishnent

of work helpful to the State. He ,V.~ not a dreamrier nor:

an ideali-st. Rather vws- he a man of the rost practical

type, a man of achievement. His mind w:.e constiuctive,

his rtotires -:.ere h'nelrc'lnt, he thc.u.,y rir'epsared him-

.elf by study nd plqpct-:rtion to effpatively prosecute

the development -.,crk so o1o.-e. to his heart. By patient

investiLaticn he kne'a the cc.ndit lcns exiatirt.in the

State res'Pectine a vide rane of activities -a d p7,Sai-

bilitiea. By critical reflection and thrc.th extended

oonaultationa with men of affairs, his forward-locking

mind worked out the solution, helpful to Florida, of r.any

piobloem affeoting the public welfare. A treat factor

in his success gad his oapAcity and his .ill -for irc.k --

unremittirn labof to improve the condition of the people

to whose service he devoted his ai1fe.







I\v




IS MEMORIAL"


At a meeting of the Brooksville Bar Association, helad
at the Qourt Maroh' 1920, t take suitable aotien upon tk
unexpected death of the Honorable W. S, Jennings, Upon motion,
Judge G. V. Ramsey, was elected Chairman, and Hugh Hale,
Secretary.
Upon motion, Col. G. C. Martin, Col. Fred L. Stringer and
Col. F. B. Googler, were appointed by the Chairman a committee
to draft resolutions, and the following were drawn by them,
and adopted, and which it was resolved should be presented to
the family of the deceased, and the Oircuit Court at its next
meeting.--
WHERSAS, Honorable W. S. Jennings died in the City of
St, Augustine, Florida, February 27th, 1920, it is fitting
that the members of the Brooksville Bar Association, of which th4
deceased was an honored and able member, should express their
deep regret at his untimely death in the prime of life, and their
respect and loving regard for his memory.
Willian Sherman Jennings was born talented and gifted with
remarkable industry, perseverance and determination, and blessed
with an even temper, end an iapertarable equipoepe. His mind wau
clear and logical, with wonderful grasp of detail, and powerful
analysis. He was an eminent and successful lawyer. He led
a strenuous life. And held many offices, judicial, legislative
and executive. He has left the impress of his talent, industry
and skill upon the business policies, laws end institutions of
his rdaqted state.
S1 IWlliam Sherman Jennings, governor of Florida from 1901 to
I :
i '"
*





-2-


1905, wasborn in Marion county, Ill., larch 24, 180l, son of

Judge Joseph W. and Amanda (Oruah) Jennings. His father was
a member of an old eel.onal family. Yeang Willia. reaeiveft
his early education in the public schools and later was

graduated from the Union Law School of Chicago, and also read

law in the office of his brother, Charles E Jennings at Salem,

Ill., who fbr a time was law partner of the father of William

Jennings Bryan. Mr. Jennings was admitted to the Florida Bar

at Brooksville, Hernando county, in May, 1886, to which town

he had removed from Illinois in 1885. He made a fine record as

a brilliant young lawyer and in 188T was appointed circuit court

eommissloner for the Sixtt Jaudicial Ctircult. Ma, S Ma, Mko#M

appointed county Fudge of Hernando county, and in November of that

year was elected to the office for a four-year term. In 1892

he was elected to the lower house of the state legislature from

Hernando. Elected again in 1895, he was made speaker of the house.
In 1896 he was a presidential elector and had the satisfaction of

casting a ballot for nomination of his first cousin, William

Jennings Bryan, the Demoeratic candidate for president in the

famous and memorable Chicago s convention at which "the coamoner"
sprang into national fame awih his "orewn eut..-ore an arose of

gold" ration, and Mr. Jennings later east the state's electoral
vote at Washington for Mr. Bryan. In 1898 he was elected chairman
of the state Demeeratie convention, held that year at Orlando.
Two years ster, he was nominated by the demeeratie convention,

at Jaokaonvillo for the governorship, and he ran well ahead of the

state ticket, thus attesting his personal popularity.

Mr. Jennings was a Baptist by faith and membership, He was


















married twice, first to Miss Corinne Jordan of Brooksville,
and the second time at Tallahassee to Miss May Mann, a daughte*:
of Senator A. S. Mann. He is survived by his widow and their

son, Bryan Jennings.

While a resident of Brooksville, Mr. Jennings filled a number

of losal offices, serving as a member of the city councilfor

ten years, and of that period he was president of the body for

eight years, and was also president of the board of trustees for
/
the Brookaville High School.

Mr. Jennings acquired large land interests in the Everglades

section olf the state, and was perhaps one of the wealthiest men

in Florida. He was one of the state's best known men.


RESOLVED, by the Bar Association of Brookaville, Florida,

that in the death of Honorable W. S. Jenninga, we lament the death

of a distinguished and honorable member, a learned lawyer,

diligent and capable in the discharge of his duties to his clients;
kindly and courteous with his colleagues, to the court and to

the members of the Bar.
RESOLVED, That in his death the Bar, the Church, and the

Democratic party, have lost an able, jealous and usetfl member,
and the State of Florida one of its meot distinguishBe oLtisens.
That we mourn his loan as one of our brotherhood, and point with

pride to his esueesaful career.
RESOLVSD JURTEIR, That the Chairman of this oeamittee is

requested to present these resolutions to his bereaved family,




,-4-










anL to the Oiroult Court at its aet tarm, with the request that
the anae be spread pon the minutes of the 1irouit Court.

Chairman OmaMitaee on Rasoluti oa.

Oha aiAn, Bar Assoeiation ef Brooks-
ville, Flor ida.
..-<^ ^











Tallahassee, Fla., Feb. 28, 1920,


At a meeting of the Governor and Executive Officers
of the Administrative Departments held in the Capitol on Saturday,

the 28th day of February, A. D. 1920, the following resolution was

unanimously adopted and ordered to be spread upon the records of

the Executive Department:


It is with deep sorrow that we learn of the death of
Honorable William S. Jennings, a former Governcr of this Sta~~t

and we take this means of paying a tribute to the memory of one of

Florida's leading citizens.

Honorable William Sherman Jennings, a native of the

State of Illinois, removed to Florida when a young man, and his

life has been one of devotion and loyalty to his adopted State.

His ability, steadfastness of purpose and inherent strength of

character soon placed him in positions of trust and honor, he

having served the State as County Judge of Hernando County, member

and Speaker of the House of Representatives, Presidential Elector

and as Governor, being the youngest man ever chosen Chief Executive

of this State. As a distinguished member of the legal profession

and a leader in the development of the resources of the State, he

has rendered services that will ever hold for him a place in the

grateful memory of the people of Florida. In private life he

was a leader in his church and in all movements for the moral

and civic betterment of his fellow men,

It has been ordered, as a mark of our respect and esteem,

that the flag on the capitol building be placed at half mast and

that the capitol building be closed until after the funeral.of our

honored fellow citizen and that a copy of this memorial be forwarded

to the family of the deceased.


Governor

e retry of State,


z Genera -

Com troll.e. -


'Treasurer.


Superintendent r PubI Instruction,


Commissioner of A iculture,




V .r

LETTERS TESTAMENTARY Drew's Form P. C. 408 Printed and for sale by The H. & W. B. Drew Compnity
Jacksonville, Florida

31 -n Court of the Countr 3Iu~ge,

Duval
S......................... ....................... ... .... ................. C oun tp,
%tate of Ijrotrita
3n re the estate of

WILLIAM S. JENNINGS,
Deceased.
Cto 311 to aolom Cbcsc presents @ball Come, Orcetinig:
Mlbreags, William S. Jennings
late of the County aforesaid, died on tit, 27th do,, of. Februariereto
A. D. 19. 2Q leaving b ...............L... ........Last Will and TtItai,,ent and Codioi;,,hi.h, having been
satisfactorily proven, wa n the.................................... a............ay of...................1 ... ............................ D. 19 ... 09 dulLy
7!dtitffhd to probate and record in this Court. And as by said Last Will an. Testame.. d ...........
Codicil thereto the son of the testator, the wife of the testator
it appears ihat .. .B. Jenningsi/and May M. Jenninge/waee named as
SExecutors thereof, to act in suoh oapaoity without any bond /hha.tso-
ever, or other security, being required of them, or either of them,
and the said S. B. Jennings and lay M. Jennings




................................ .............. ....... having prayed the Court to grant Letters Testamentary thereon to
them a. such execut.....9 .

and having, in due form of law, taken the prescribed oath, and performed all other acts necessary
S.to.o.................. ..... .............. e al qualification as such .ec. ut.. OQ

J0to, C bereore, Unoto ye, That I,. .........................................
County Judge in and for the County aforesaid by virtue of the power and authority by lawu in me
vested, do hereby de e he S. B, Jennings and May U# Jen:ings
vested, do hereby declare the s ......... .......................................................... ..... ........................
............................................................................................................................................... ................................................... ........ ... ....... du qu alified
by .e laws of said State to act as e.xect Ora of said Last Will and Testament C..od.. icil
thereto
with full power, by the provisions of law and by virtue of these presents, to administer all and
singular the goods, chattels, rights and credits of saidi......l........ S .....nngs deeaed
and to ask, demand, sue for, recover and receive the same; to pay the debts in which the said
William S. Jernnings, deceased,
S stood bound, so far as the assets shall extend and the law direct, and duly entitled to have and
hold, for the putrpoe.e directed in and by the said Last Will and Testae............. ..... ........... 1...
all the estate of said... William S. Jertnings, deceased, and without bond,
during the legal cotimuaance of... ... i(dr inistration. until te sarnie shall expire by
Shereto
virtue of the provisions of said Last Will and Testament .....ad Co icil or until the power of
authority hlereby, granted shall be duly revoked according to law..

In Ceatimotny Wbere0t, I hereunto set my
the seal of the Coiuntly iud~ e's Court of the C
Jacksonvill.e, thi. day

A. D. 19.....
............ .......................... ...........................
r/- 7


-Vt'




~~--Y e.~~m--" C


Drew's Form P. C. 408


in County Suboe's Court,


I-
0

tt
0t


. county, Jfloriia.


last lWill anb testament
OF


letters Testantentarv
TO


. 19


County Judge.


Recorded in Book.


. Page


County Judge.

The H. & W. B. Drew Company, Jacksonville, Fla. 4.5-16


/


Filed....


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PERSONAL AND STATISTICAL. PARTICULIABS


3 SEX 4 COLORS OR RACE 5 SINGLE
MARRIED.
Male White O DoRDcMarr. eg.di
5a If married, widowed, or divorced
HUSBAND of
(or) WIPE of


6 DATE OF BIRTH ----.2- _, _.--------------.--- g6-
IMonth) IDay, 'lYear)
7 AGE IP LESS than
1 day,.----. hrs.
... ..6...yr.. ....mos.... ....a. or------ =in.
8 OCCUPATION OP DECEASED
ia) Trade, profession, or T.L r'
particular kind of work .__ -. -------.--..._.
(b) General nature of In-
dustry, business, or estab-
lishment in which em-
ployed (or employer)---------------------------------
(c) Name of employer

9 BIRETPLACE (city or town) -2AlI1Ut Hi ll-.....1 -
(State or country) Marion County, Ill.

10 NAME OP FATHER JOSeqTh Jennings
City or
11 BIETHPLACE OP FATHER Tow-ni -................-..-..-
(State or country) Ill.

12 MAIDEN NAME OP MOTHER, Amianda COl c h
tClty or
13 BIRBTBP.ACE OF MOTWER Townj ,,--....----..----..-----...
i.State or country) ,11.
14
n4 dormant Bs.ynJ n;lls._ _____________
(Address) .Tr_ n rninn tr _I.


15
Piled -----------, 191----..---------------------------
Form V. S. No. 4 20 M-S-9-19. egistrar.


STATE OF FLORIDA

BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS
1 PLACE OP DEATH STATE BOARD OF HEALTH
.------ Pile No.
County ---St_ sT_, _J__h ______ __ CERTIPICATE OP DEATH

Precinct --------------------------- Registration District No. ------------ Register
(Write name, nnt number)
or
Inc Town -----------------------__ Primary Registration Dist. No. ---..---
or 4 .
City, -- -t,-A-u -u --(0o. Ponce D eq ]i._. .St.; ------.-----Ward)

2 PULL -NAM-E Wl-1TL-lei efl i2g.a.----------

(a) Residence. No.1f- -- Main ........ St., -----...Ward. .Ja.9 O]._i
(Usual place of abode) (If nonresident giv-t


)ry mo0 4 d Hor lio in IU. S, if of foieiga Irib? ns. moL. i.


MEDICAL CERTIFICATE OF DEATH
16 DATE OP DEATH (Month, day
and year) Februnarv 27119'2


I HEREBB CERTIPY, That I attended deceased from
------------------- 19-- to.--------------------... 19----
that I last saw h-..... alive on--- ----.------------... 19 ---
and that death occurred, on the date stated above, at----------m.
The CAUSE OP DEATE* was as follows:


In-t. Pneujiioni a


_---------------(duration))---... yrs.----... mos.------.......
COTIBTOY------------------------- -
(Secondary)
-------------------(duration)-- .yr........-- mos.....- da.
18 Where was disease contracted
If not at place of death?.- --------
Did an operation precede death?-.~ O--- Date of-----------
Was there an autopsy? ----------- 0----------------
What test confirmed diagnosis?------......------ ----------.
(Signed) -.-JLQIy... ---............------- --- LD.
19 (Address) NOW York City N.Y. -
*State the Disease Causing Death, or in deaths from Violent
Causes, state (1) Means and Nature of Injury, and (2) whether
Accidental, Suicidal, or Homloidal. (See reverse side for addl-
tlonal space).
19 Place of Burial, Cremation, or Removal Date of Burial
or Removal
E:vnrgrern Pglet ery IFebru3aryr.l 2
20 UNDERTAERon ADDRBESSZ
Moulton & KylIe City. .


.1*


Leanth of Iisidutce in dir or loan where death occaned


--.......... -........


ed No. -----
[If death occurred
in a hospital or in-
stitution, give its
NAME instead of
street and number]


a y r town and State)
e city or town and State)


~


II


11-


,











REVISED UNITED STATES STANDARD CERTIFICATE OF DEATH
[Approved by U. S. Census and American Public Health
Association]

Statement of occupation.-Precise statement of occu-
pation is very important, so that the relative healthful-
ness of various pursuits can be known. The question
applies to each and every person, irrespective of age.
For many occupations a single word or term on the
first line will be sufficient, e. g., Farmer or Planter, Phy-
sician, Compositor, Architect, Locomotive engineer,
Civil engineer, Stationary fireman, etc. But in many
cases, especially in industrial employment, it is neces-
,sary to know (a) the kind of work and also (b) the
nature of the business or industry, and therefore an
additional line is provided for the latter statement; it
-. should he.used.only..when nceded._ Asexamlew a (a)
Spinner, (b) Cotton mill; (a) Salesman, (b) Grocery;
(a) Foreman, (b) Automobile factory. The material
worked on may form part of the second statement.
Never return "Laborer." "Foreman," "Manager,"
"Dealer," etc., without more precise specification,
as. Day laborer, Farm laborer, Laborer-Coal mine,
etc. Women at home, who are engaged in the
duties of the household only (notpaid Housekeep-
ers who receive a definite salary), may be entered
as Housewife, Housework, or At home, and children,
not gainfully employed, as At school or Al home,
Care should be taken to report specifically the occupa-
tions of persons engaged in domestic service for wages,
as Servant, Cook, Housemaid, etc. If the occupation
has been changed or given up on account of the DISEASE
CAUSING DEATH, state occupation at beginning of illness.
If retired from business, that fact may be indicated
thus: Farmer (retired, 6 yrs.). For persons who have
no occupation whatever, write None.
Statement of cause of death.-Name, first the DISEASE
CAUSING DEATH (the primary affection with respect to
time and causation), using always the same accepted
term for the same disease. Examples: Cerebrospinal
fever (the only definite synonym is "Epidemic cerebro-
spinal meningitis") ; Diphtheria (avoid use of "croup");
Typhoid fever (never report "Typhoid pneumonia")
Lobar pneumonia: Bronchiepneumonia ("Pneumonia,"
- --unqualified, is-indefinite)-; Tabercelosis of-lungs;-menA
inges, peritoneum, etc.. Carcinoma, Sarcoma, etc., of
---------- (name origin; "Cancer" is less definite;
avoid use of "Tumor" for malignant neoplasms);
Measles; l'hooping cough: Chronic valr'ular heart
disease: Chronic interstitial nephritis, etc. The con-
tributory (secondary or intercurrent) affection need not
be stated unless important. Example: Measles (dis-
ease causing death), 29 ds.; Pronchopneumonia (sec-
onaary), To ds. Never report mere symptoms or ter-
minal conditions, such as "Asthonia," "Anemia" (merely
symptomatic, "Atrophy," "Collapse," "Coma," "Convul-
sions," "Debility" ("Congenital," "Senile," etc.), "Drop-


i | '


sy," "Exhaustion," "Heart failure," "Hemorrhage," "In-
anition," "Marasmus," "Old age," "Shock," "Uremia,"
"Weakness," etc., when a definite disease can be ascer-
tained as the cause. Always qualify all diseases result-
ing from childbirth or miscarriage, as "PUERPERAL sep-
licemia," "PUERPERAL peritonitis," etc. State cause for
which surgical operation was undertaken. For VIOLENT
DEATHS state MEANS OF INJURn and qualify as ACCI-
DENTAL, SUICIDAL, or HOMICIDAL, or as probably such, if
impossible to determine definitely. Epcamples: Acci-
dental drowning; Struck by railway train---accident;
Revolver wound of head--omicide: Poisoned by car-
- -bolic-acid-probably suicide. The nature of the injury,
as fracture of skull, and consequences (e. g., sepsis,
tetanus) may be stated under the head of "Contribu-
tory." (Recommendations on statement of cause of
death approved by Committee on Nomenclature of 'the
American Medical Association.)

ALL CERTIFICATES MUST BE WRITTEN
PLAINLY, WITH UNFADING BLACK INK.
lProRnANTr's SzIOGNATV

SItems I to 13 inclusive must be made over the signa-
nature of the informant.
MEDICAL CRTfl'ZIOAT OF DELATB:

Items 16 and 17 to be made over the signature of the
physician or other person responsible for making this
portion of the certificate.
UNDRAEBA B's SIGNAUTVBE

All death certificates must be made over the signa-
ture of the Undertaker or person acting as such.
B3BBEB STAMP SIGNATURES NOT PEBIUTTED

-- Informants,- Physicians, Coroners, Undertakers and
Registrars must not use rubber stamp signatures-death
certificates will be permanently preserved, and to be of
value for legal purposes--ll signatures must be written
with unfqding black ink.


rr
- .. EsbP ?~~) a~~~ I~















SHeon. William S. Jennings, of Brooksville, Governor of Florida,

and now a candidate before the white Democratic voters of tkh State for the

office of United States Senator, is, in the truest and highest sense of

the phrase, a Democrat of the old school. Although a comparatively young

man, being only forty-one years of age,t he Governor's experience in pub-

lic affairs has been wide and, mar his close study and extensive observa-

tion of public questions and practical administration have constantly serv-

ed to strengthen his conviction that the only true end of government is

found in the time-honored maxim, which has for over a century constituted

the bed-rock of Democratic faith, "equal and exact justice to all men, and

special privileges to none". He believes this rule furnishes the

fairest and yut the profoundest test of all legislation; that it supplies

a guide for deciding all questions touching the liberty of the people--

is the best safe-guard of the people's opportunities, and were it fully

observed there could be no class legislation nor privileged few.

Liko all old-school Democrats, Governor Jennings is a man of

positive and profound convictions upon public questions. sincee his boy-

hood days he has been a deep and discriminating student of economic and

governmental affairs, and his studios have strengthened and confirmed his

inherited devotion to the principles of the Democratic party. These

principles, crystallized and enunciated in party platforms, he regards as

commands oflthe party, directed to the officials elected upon such plat-

forms, requiring them to aid in carrying out its provisions -- and he holds

that the value the services of an official so elected should be tested and

measured by their compliance with the demands of the platform. Holding to

this view of party allegiance, Mr. Jennings has, as Governor of Florida

for the past three years, carefully observed in spirit and in fact every

plank and principle of the State Democratic platform upon which he was

nominated and elected, so far as it relates to State affairs, by reccomend-

ing the enactment of laws and the adoption of constitutional amendments

to carry into effect the policies demanded by the platform.

Among other measures recommended to the two legislatures which

have convened during his term, the Governor's messages advocated the

following, which embrace every deand of the platform upon which he was

elected, and constituted the complete discharge of his constitutional


~--4 5









(2)
functions and duties in this saafa connection. The laws recommended by

Governor Jennings were:

SRelief of the Supreme Court, as contemplated by the platform; the

creation of a Supreme Court Commission, and the adoption of the constitu-

tional amendment demanded; taxation of bank stock; improvements of the

State's tax sale certificate service; liberal aid to the State Board of
Health;. the remodeling and erection of suitable additions to the State
Capitol; the creation of the office of Traveling State Auditor; liberality

for the development of the public school system; the purchase and mainten-

ance by the State of the South Florida Military Institute; the examination

and perfecting of titles to State property; the establishment of a hospi-

tal for certain of the State prisoners; redistricting of the State creat-

ing three Congressional Districts and an additional Circuit Court; a consti-

tutional amendment authorizing a tax on all corporate franchises; tax on

inheritance, gifts and devises; stringent laws prohibiting the carrying

of concealed weapons; liberal appropriations for the State troops; a law

authorizing publication of a roster of the soldiers of Florida in the Con-

federate service; liberal appropriations for the Confederate Home; liberal

pensions to Confederate soldiers; reduction of interest on Florida's bonded

debt; uniform system of insurance of State properties; application of the

net proceeds from the settlement of Florida's Indian War Claims to the pay-

ment of the bonded debt of the State; the establishment of a High School

in each County, prescribing a uniform course of study; xea and liberal
u'g
appropriations fot State Institutions. With a few exceptions these rec-

ommendations were all embodied in laws.
Striking evidence of Governor Jennings' fidelity and obe-

dience to party law is found in the fact that every person who has been

recommended for appointment to office by white Democratic primary election

has, without exception, been appointed. Furthermore, under the platform

provision pledging the Governor not to appoint to any office"any person

not nominated by primary election, or by convention, whose appointment will

be objectionable to the Democratic Executive Committee of the County in

which he resides", convincing testimony of the excellence of Governor

Jennings appointments in such cases is furnished by the fact that not one

objection has been filed in his office by any Democratic County Executive

Committee to any appointment made.














The remarkable success of Governor Jennings' administration of

State affairs is recognized by all. The rate of taxation levied for

the general expenses of the State government has been reduced one and

one-half mills on the dollar below the rate authorized by the legislat-

ure. Notwithstanding this reduction in the tax levy the unpaually
large appropriations made by the legislature in 1901 and 1903 have

been promptly met and the balances in the general revenue fund are

ample to meet all just demands on the treasury. Upon therrecommen-

dation of Governor Jennings a large part of the money received from

the settlement og the State's Inian War Claims was paid on the bond-

ed debt of the State.wM, k was thereby reduced nearly one half. The

refunding of the remaining bonds of the State which were bearing six

and seven per cent.interestin bonds bearing only three per cent., re-

lieves the tax payers of interest payments amounting to many thousands

of dollars annually The appropriations made for schools under the

Governor's recommendation have been many times larger than at any tma

in the past.

Nearly all the public buildings in the State have been improved

and new buildings erected. It was largely through the firm stand tak-

en by Governor Jennings that the Supreme Court has at last sought up

with its docket Governor Sennings insisted in his message to the

Legislature in 19 01 on the employment of Supreme Court Commissioners

and on the adaption of a constitutional amendment for the increase in

the number og judges This was dnhe and the result is well known

and satisfaotpry. Now every suiter can get his-case disposed of in

a reasonable time,and.expensive and sometimes disastrous delays are

avoided. These and many other reforms are due to the positive ao-
tive effort of the present chief executive.

The position of Governor Jennings with reference to national

affairs is well known and easily understood. He stands squarely on

the party platform and does not hesitate t9 advocate its principatx

plea/ 6db ^a- &/,47 414St CL -


pal*wbhjta.w "1f.. MWg wm6e&. He opposes all measures that give

special privileges to a few at the expense of the wuele people. He

firmly demand that larger powers be given the interstate commerce











commission to the end that the people be protected against the exor-

bitant charges and unjust discrimination imposed by powerful corpor-

ations doing an interstate b business. The utter disregard these imm
mense corporate aggregations show for the rights of the people, is

one of the growing evils of the day.,
-Mr. Jennings insists that Florida is not receiving her just share
of the appropriations for the improvement of rivers and harbors when

the length of her sea coast and the importance of the seaport cities

of the State are considered.

(If elected to the Senate, Mr. Jennings will use his best endea-

vors to get larger river and harbor appropriations and to secure a

proper recognition of the commercial importance of the State.

The Governor 's experience in the Executive Office has enabled

him to seeand to be able to present in an effective manner, the injust-

ice done the State under the present laws and regulations by which

lands granted to the State are withheld to the great injury of the

people for whose benefit the grant was made to the State, .
It is also his purpose torn-eoure if possible an additional grant

of lands for the benefit of tl-e schools in the various counties .
The Governor Saer positive steps to secure the election of

United States Senators by the people and the nomination of senators

by primary election along with all other officers. He favors and

wi-1l earnestly, advocate the adjustment of all dis utes between employ-\\'
t^t Z^W?/1 '4 Ar ..4A.Y-r 4 ^.*4 L 'ki t t
ers and employees by arbitrationA, the adoption of a graduated income

tax and the immediate construction of the Isthman canal.

There can be no misunderatnding of the attitude of Mr. Jennings

on all public matters and it is well known that he does not hesitate

to use all means in his p9wer to put into execution ihe principles Ame
w---'ch- tanAds. He has plainly stated what he will work for if

elected to the United States Senate and no one doubts his ability,

his experience, his earnestness and his remarkable energy and persever-

ance in carrying into effect the prinicples he adopts and advocates.

The old soldiers and their widows are among the best friends of

Governor Jennings, as he has added largely to their comforts by securing

to them the substantial recognition they are entitled to grom the State

The number of pensions has increased in three years from about seven

hundred to more than twenty=five hundred. There--are still .many--otherf-

-whf.hse services entitle them to recognition and they-will-har Ettacne




* 3.

U


r


o6ifi rtt -ftntion, a fbrdi-g toall A complete history of the old sol-

diers of the State is being prepared under the direction of the Governr

This will prove useful and gratifying to the friends of those who ri ad

their lives for the cause of the State. To Governor Jennings is due th

credit of an increase in the receipT for the hire of State prisoners

from $2 twenty one thousand dollars per a nu, to about one hu4r(.and 4 ...

sixty thousand dollars per annum, all of which goes to the counties.

While this great increase in receipts has been secured there has been a

marked improvement in the case and attention paid these unfortunates.

Bettf ,apo/modations and more comforts have been secured to them, and the S

have e medical attention at all times.

It is but reasonable to suppose that since Mr. Jennings has done so

much for the people of the State as Governor he will be able to do more

for thdm as United States Senator. He has promised to secure many

advantages for the people if elected and every one knows he stands by

his promises and is tireless in his efforts to accomplish results. He

is not a theorizer but a practice worker who knows how to do things far

the people he represents.


* 1 a.











IN TEE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA: IN
AND FOR DUVAL COUNTY.

Friday, March 5th, A. D., 1920.


Court met this day as ordered, at 10:00 o clock A.M.,

Honorable Daniel A. Simmons, Judge, presiding.


In Re: the death of WILLIAM SHERMAN JENNINGS.

Suggestion and Motion.


Comes now E. J. L'Engle, a member of the Bar of this

Honorable Court, and, craving the indulgence of the Court,

suggests the death of the

Honorable William Sherman Jennings,

late of the City of Jacksonville, of the State of Florida,

and a -nember of the Bar of this Honorable Court: and

Thereupon, moves the Court to appoint a committee

herein to draft suitable resolutions and to suggest

appropriate action by the Court and Bar in respect to his

memory.


Order


The foregoing suggestion and motion coming on this

day to be heard and considered: thereupon,

It Is Ordered, That the said motion be, and the same

is hereby granted; and that E. J. L'Engle, as Chairman

and J. C. Cooper Jr., W. H. Baker, Esquires, severally

Ir I; : I




2





members of the Bar of this Court, be, and they are hereby

appointed a committee herein to prepare and present

suitable resolutions and to suggest appropriate action by

the Court and Bar, in recognition of the death of our late

Brother, the Honorable William Sherman Jennings.


It is now considered, that Court take a recess until

Saturday, March 6th, A. D., 1920, at 10:00 o'clock A.M.



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA: IN
AND FOR DUVAL COUNTY.

Saturday, March 6th, A. D., 1920.


Court met this day as ordered, at 10:00 o'clock A.M.,

Honorable George Couper Gibbs, Judge, presiding.


In Re: the death of Honorable William Sherman Jennings,

a member of this Bar.


The Honorable E. J. L'Engle, Chairman of the committee

heretofore appointed by the Court, announced that they were

ready to report, and under leave of Court, presents unto

the Court the following resolutions, to-wit:




William S. Jennings, a member of this Bar, died in

St. Augustine, Florida, February 27th, 1920. In his death

the Bar of this County and of the entire State has lost one



DOWLING, HUTCHINSON & PAITISON
O WFICtAL AND C NERAL SHORTHAND REFORIERS
JACKSONVtL E, FL O IDA










of its most distinguished members. Although not a native

of Florida, he had at the time of his death, been a

resident of this State for thirty-five years, and had been

engaged in the active practice of law in this State for

thirty-four years, with the exception of such time as he

was occupying the distinguished position of Governor of

the State. The career of Governor Jennings as a lawyer

commenced with his admission to the Bar at Brooksville

in 1886. In May, 1888, he was appointed County Judge of

Hernando County, and was later in the same year elected

to succeed himself.

He took a prominent part in the political life of the

State, which culminated in his nomination in 1900 as

candidate of the Democratic party for Governor of Florida,

to which high office he was in the same year elected. At

the end of his term of office, he took up his residence in

the City of Jacksonville, where he continued to live until

his death.

His career as an attorney and counsellor was not less

successful than his public and political career. After

the end of his term as Governor, he became the Attorney for

the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund and the Board

of Drainage Commissioners of the State, and in that

position he had much to do with, and deserves very great

credit for the constructive work which has culminated in

the development of the great Everglades District of


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OFfiCIAL AN~ GENERAL SHORTHAND REPORTERS
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA











Florida. As an advocate in the Court room he was forceful

and dignified, and as a counsellor his judgment was clear

and sound. As an officer of the Court his integrity, and

his fairness to his brother attorneys, was unquestioned.

Therefore, Be It Resolved, by the Bar of this Court,

that in the death of Governor Jennings, this Bar has

suffered an irreparable loss, and wishes to express the

esteem in which he was held and the sympathy which it

feels to his family in his death.

And the Court is hereby requested to have these

Resolutions spread upon the Minutes of the Court, and that

a copy of the same be furnished to Governor Jennings'

family.

E. J. L'ENGLE

Wm. H. BAKER

JOHN C. COOPER Jr.

Committee.




E. J. L'Engle, Esquire, then made the following

remarks:


Not only the Bar of this Court, but people of Florida

have suffered a distinct loss in the death of ex-Governor

W. S. Jennings. Few men in Florida possessed his

constructive ability, his broad and far-reaching vision,

his knowledge of the people, resources and possibilities


DOWLING, HUTCHINSON & PATTISON
OrFICIAL ANO GENERAL SHORTHAND REPORTERS
JACKSONVILLE, F Ot DA




5






of Florida, and his interests in the welfare and

up-building of this State. During the past twenty years

no man in Florida has done more to promote its development,

and few, if any, have equalled his grasp of the possibilities

of development in this State. As Governor of Florida he

devoted no inconsiderable part of his time to the study of

the Internal Improvement Fund, the drainage of the

Everglades, and the up-building of the agricultural and

commercial possibilities of the State. His extensive and

accurate knowledge of the legal and practical aspects of

the drainage of the Everglades, as well as his close study

of the history of the Internal Improvement Fund, put him

in a position to make suggestions to Governor Broward which

resulted in the latter's campaign for Everglades drainage.

For more than fifteen years after that time, Governor

Jennings followed this great State work with close

interest, and at all times exercised a sound influence on

the course of this development. There was no problem which

has come up in connection with Everglades work since its

initiation that has not been benefited by his thought and

suggestion.

Questions of taxation and State finance received

Governor Jennings' earnest and continued stufy for many

years. In fact, he was as thoroughly informed on these

matters as any man in Florida, and he devoted a large

amount of his time to efforts to simplify and render more
DOWLING, HUTCHINSON & PATTISON
OFFICIAL ANf GENERAL SHORTHAND REPORTERS
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA










efficient, our taxation system. As a member of a

legislative commission, he proposed and earnestly advocated

changes in our tax laws which would have been of great

benefit to the State. In matters connected with

legislation of all kinds, Governor Jennings was always

found ready to give his time and service. He exercised a

potent influence in constructive legislation of all kinds.

As a lawyer, Governor Jennings devoted a large part

of his practice to questions of taxation, State finance and

constitutional law. He became a recognized authority in

this State on the constitutional aspects of revenue and

drainage legislation, and his views were often sustained in

the Courts of last resort. Probably no lawyer in Florida

had wider experience or greater success in dealing with

legal questions in connection with taxation and drainage.

It was a marked characteristic of Governor Jennings'

career as a lawyer, that he was always found on the

constructive side of every problem. He could see more

clearly than most lawyers, the existence of undeveloped

resources and the necessity of building rather than tearing

down. This was therefore the keynote of his attitude

towards legislation and litigation. Coupled with these

characteristics, Governor Jennings possessed an indomitable

will and persistent and unflagging energy. With these

traits it is not remarkable that he has left a permanent

impress on the legislative and judicial records of this


DOWLING. HUTCHINSON & PATTISON
CFTI iAL AND GENERAL SHORTHAND REPORTERS
JACKSONVILLE. FLOPIDA




7





State; but more than this, his breadth of view and sound

judgment have moulded the growth and development of this

State.

Governor Jennings was one of the few men who may be

classed as the builders of Florida during the past twenty-

five years.

The Bar of Florida has indeed suffered an irreparable

loss in Governor Jennings' death, and it is fitting that

we should here pay our small tribute to a man who has

devoted his life to the betterment of his adopted State.




B. F. Brass, Esquire, then made the following

remarks:


Your Honor, and at the request of the Committee, it

is with pleasure that I make a few remarks concerning my

personal relationships with Governor Jennings. I must say

that it makes my heart unusually glad and I greatly rejoice

at being present on an occasion when his brethren in the

profession and the leading citizenship of the City assemble

to pay homage, tribute and respect and esteem to his

memory. It can not but be a pleasure for me to make these

remarks, but at the same time, it is with the deepest

sense of consecration to the memory of this distinguished

man.

My personal relationships with Governer Jennings first

SDOWLING, HUTCHINSON & PATTISON
crFiCIAL ANo GENERAL SHORTHAND REPORTERS
JACKSONVILLE FLOm DA





8




commenced at his home, where I first knew him. I was

impressed there with his home relationships. As a husband,

a true, considerate, thoughtful, devoted husband. As a

father, as being the firm, exemplifying, true and devoted

father. And as to that great relationship of father and

son, I have never yet seen a more beautiful relationship

than existed in that instance. My next impressions of

Governor Jennings were emulations to his entire qualities:

his keen mind, his ability, which he used so constructively;

his pleasing personality, attracting all that came in

contact with him; his keen judgment, his broad views and

ability to grasp questions. I have often times been

surprised at Governor Jennings' power to do things.

During my close and intimate association with him for the

past four years, some perplexing questions have come in

the office for attention. It has been surprising to me,

and very surprising at times, the ease with which Governor

Jennings grasped the situations and with his power to deal

with them; and, not only.in his vision of what was to be

done, but in his power to do it. I have known him to go

to New York City on very important business matters and

litigation, and return almost immediately, where it seemed

it would require weeks. The same is true of other matters.

I feel I should make a few remarks as to Governor

Jennings' pleasing personality and his affability. Within

the last few days, I have seen quite a number of people

~~~~~~~ 7 1 ,, ,- -











who only slightly knew Governor Jennings, and they have

expressed to me their great and deep friendship for the

Governor, although they knew him so slightly. Not only the

people within the State of Florida, but of people from

other states distantly removed from here. I have noticed

further his retiring disposition, his custom of laying

credit for what was done, at the feet of others. I have

heard remarks recently by those who were associated with

him closely as Governor; remarks that while he was

Governor, if perplexing questions came before the cabinets,

or some of the Boards of which he was a member, and the

matter was handled satisfactorily to the person applying

for action, and they wished to express themselves to

any one, Governor Jennings always referred them to the

other members of the cabinet or board; and that, if the

matter was not handled satisfactorily to the applicant,

he always asked them to place the blame upon himself.

Governor Jennings was a man who placed the utmost

confidence in his fellow men, and I can truthfully say

from my associations with Him, that it was equally true

of his closest associates. It has been surprising to me

that in matters involving important litigation, Governor

Jennings had such confidence in those in whom he placed

the handling of the matter, not seeming to have the least

doubt as to the outcome; and as to his confidence in the

ability of those to whom it was given. During my

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OFItIAL ANO GENERAL SHORTHAND REPORTERS
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA











association with Governor Jennings, I have never yet, nor

did I ever, have him to make one'unkind remark to me, and

apparently no unkind thought was in his mind; and it is

with pleasure in my memory to think that, after four years

of close and intimate association, on the part of either of

us there was never the unkind word or even the unkind

thought.




A. W. Cockrell, Esquire, then made the following

remarks:


If Your Honor please, it has been my privilege to know

Governor Jennings upon his first coming to Florida, but I

came to know him well only after he became Governor. The

first real insight into his remarkable character and his

high standing was due to the fact that at that time, when

he first became Governor, I happened to be President of the

local Bar Association. As such, and being, as he assumed,

the representative of the Bar of the largest town of the

State, he said he desired to consult with me with reference

to a matter peculiarly personal to himself, the solution of

which he desired to make in behalf of the Bar rather than

along lines of his own personal obligation with reference

to the appointment to the supreme bench of the State. He

had been asked by friends of a certain lawyer, to appoint

that lawyer to the supreme bench. He had known him for

DOWLING. HUTCHINSON & PATTISON
F'ICIAL AND GENERAL SHORT HANDO REPORTERS
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA





11





years, been associated with him, been under obligation to

him as one lawyer is to another under such circumstances,

and he was confident in his own mind that such a man on the

Supreme Court bench would be of aid to the State; and yet,

in his opinion, unless the Bar of the State had confidence

in such a man, he would not be of advantage to the State.

So that he asked me primarily as to what the Bar of

Jacksonville thought of this particular man, and also stated

that he would be glad to have it ascertained how the members

of other bars in the State thought of this particular man:

showing, as I am putting it to you, that he would not

appoint a man, though he considered him fit, for a high

place in this State, unless he felt sure that that man

would have the confidence of those who had the right, to

some extent if not to a large extent, to feel as he did

toward that member of the Supreme Court.

There are other incidents which impressed me with the

high character of our deceased brother, that I might

relate. One, probably a personal matter, but it also

Concerns the history of this State to some extent, that I

may point to. While he was Governor, he was bitterly

assailed by those who didn't know him as we did, assailed

upon grounds which were absolutely without any basis in

fact; and in one instance to such an extent as that he

consulted some of his friends as to what he should do. It

reflected very greatly upon his integrity. I was called

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OFFICIAL ANn GENERAL SHORTHAND REPORTERS
JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA











into consultation. Statements were made publicly against

him, statements made by men who thought they had

substantial evidence sufficient to.justify them in making

the statements. At this consultation, when Governor

Jennings was present, the problem uppermost in the minds of

the typical lawyer, was that in the event that we should

undertake to institute a push through proceedings proper

in the premises, we should do so with the primary intent to

win. That technical problem I felt on the part of those

concerned, and I admit it may be that I made the

suggestion, was too narrow for the Governor. Without in

the slightest degree saying anything which would make it

unpleasant to me or make it appear that I was too narrow,

he repudiated the idea. He said, "My character has been

assailed; there is no truth in it: and if we are to carry

through this litigation which may be necessary, and which

seems necessary, I intend to bare my whole life so that all

may see what I am. If I am not worthy, I shall go down."

It has been my privilege, further, to come in contact

with the Governor during each administration since he was

the chief executive of our State; and, notwithstanding

Governor Jennings' position on all public questions and

with reference to all candidates for high office was well

known; notwithstanding he was no compromiser, and when he

was for one man he was for that candidate and not for the

other; notwithstanding he did not support the successful

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OFFICIAL AND GENERAL SHORTHAND REPORTERS
JACKSONV(.LE FLORIDA










candidates at all times: but who ever was Governor, that

Governor desired and relied upon the views and the help of

Governor Jennings in his administration of the State

affairs. It seems to me that high tribute should be known

to all, because, so far as Governor Jennings was concerned,

he himself did not make such matters public, nor did he

comment upon it to his own friends. His modesty in that

regard was equal to his vast ability and the vast confidence

which the public men of this State had in him.



I. L. Farris, Esquire, then made the following

remarks:


May it please the Court, it is hard for me to find

words to express the great admiration that I had and held

for the late Governor Jennings. I have known him ever

since I was a bare-foot boy; when he was living in Hernando

County and I in the county just above, Marion. He was a

great man, an able lawyer, a worthy public servant. The

people of this State scarcely realize the great service

that he has rendered them in his capacity as a member of

the Legislature and as Governor of this State, and even

since that time. No man in Florida wielded any greater

influence with the legislative department of the

government of the State during the past twelve or fifteen

years, which was the time of my service in that branch of

the government, than Governor Jennings. Strong men and


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JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA










able men anr- good mein were always ready to rally to JiTfs

standard, to seek his advice, and to follow his judgment on

great questions affecting the welfare of the people of

this State. He was a true leader; he was an unselfish man;

he was a good friend of the .young men of this State, not

only the younger members of the Bar, but all the young men

generally. He had a helpful disposition. His heart went

out to those whose circumstances were not, perhaps, so

good as others. He was always ready to extend the helping

hand, and he was always so genial and found so much

apparent pleasure in being able to help some one. I feel a

distinct personal loss in his passing, but I am glad of

this opportunity to pay this humble tribute to his memory.

He was a great man, his was a great soul, a great

intellect, and the people of this State have suffered a real

loss in the passing of Governor Jennings.



Judge George Couper Gibbs then made the following

remarks and Order of Court:


The Court and Bar both deeply feel the loss which we

have sustained in the departure from our midst of Governor

Jennings. He had the confidence of the Court, and, so far

as we are informed, of all the courts of this State. His

practice was not confined to the courts of this judicial

circuit, but it extended into many other circuits of the

State. It always brings great sadness when such a man

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passes from our midst.

It is ordered by the Court, that the resolutions of

the Committee be spread upon a page of the Minutes of this

Court set apart especially for the purpose; that a copy

of these resolutions be filed with the family of the

deceased, one of these copies going to Mrs. Jennings,

another of these copies to Mr. and Mrs. Bryan Jennings;

and that, out of respect for the memory of Governor

Jennings, this Court will now take a recess until Monday

morning, at ten o'clock A. M.


. :* 7 ri A 7 T i N. f







SRSOLUTION.

WHEREAS death has removed from our midst our former Governor,

william Shermin Joenings, and

'HIEREAS Governor Jennings was largely interested in the

affairs of Clay County, and gave of his time and means for the

development and betterment of this County, therefore

Be It Resolved that in his death, the State of Florida, and par-

ticularly Clay County, has lost one of its foremost citizens and

friends; that his removal in the prime of life leaves a vacancy

that cannot be filled. Night has indeed fallen upon Noon. In his

departure from us as a citizen and neighbor we have all suffered

an tnreparable loss.

That his stalwart Americanism and loyalty to high ideals are

most worthy to be followed by all;

That we bow with sorrowful hearts in this hour of our loss,

with the knowledge that the Supreme Governor yet lies and that

His ways are higher than our ways, and that He doeth all things well.

Be It Further Resolved that this resolution be spread upon

the minutes of this Board and published in The Clay County Times,

and a copy furnished the family of the deceased.

By order of the Board of Couinty Commisioners of Clay County,
Florida, this firs; day of March, 1920.

J. E. Taylor,

Chairman.









IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,FOURTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR DUVAL COUNTY.

Saturday,March 6th, A. D. 1920.

George Couper Gibbs,Juddge,Presiding.



RESOLUTIONS ON THE DEATH OF GOVERNOR JENNINGS.



WILLIAM S. JENNINGS, a member of this Bar,died in St. Augustine,

Florida,February 27,1920. In his death the Bar of this County and of the

entire State has lost one of its most distinguished members. Although not

a native of Florida,he had at the time of his death,been a resident of

this State for thirty-five years and had been engaged in the active practice

of law in this State for thirty-four years,with the exception of such time

as he was occupying the distinguished position of Governor of the State. the

career of Governor Jennings as a lawyer commenced with his admission to the

Bar at Brooksville in 1886. InMa ,,1888, he was appointed County Judge of

Hernando County and was later in the same year elected to succeed himself.

He took a prominent part in the political life of the State which

culminated in his nomination in 1900 as candidate of the Democratic party

for Governor of Florida,to which high office he was in the same year elected.

At the end of his term of office,he took up his residence in the City of

Jacksonville,where he continued to live until his death.

His career as an attorney and counsellor was no less successful than

his public and political career. After the end of his term as Governor, he

became the attorney for the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund and

the Board of Drainage Commissioners of the State, and in that position had

much to do with and deserves very great credit for the constructive work

which has culminated in the development of the great Everglades District of

Florida. As an advocate in the Court room he was forceful and dignified,and

as a counsellor his judgment was clear and sound. As an officer of the Court

his integrity,and his fairness to his brother attorneys was unquestioned.
















TBE~FORE BE IT RESOLVED By the Bar of this Court,that in the death

of Governor Jennings,this Bar has suffered an irreparable loss,and wishes

to express the esteem in which he was held and the sympathy which it feels

to his family in his death;

And the Court is hereby requested to have these Resolutions spread

upon the minutes of the Court,and that a copy of the same be furnished to

Governor Jennings' family.



E. J. L'Engle,

Wn. H. Baker,

John C. Cooper, Jr.

Committee.




State of Florida,)
: sS.
County of Duval )


I,Frank Brown, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Fourth Judicial

Circuit of Florida, in and for Duval County, do hereby certify that the

foregoing is a true and correct copy of the resolutions on the death of

Governor Jennings as adopted by the Court and as recorded in Circuit

Court Minute Book No. 27, at page 795.

IN WITNESS WHERBEF I have hereunto set my hand and

affixed the. seal of said Court at Jacksonville, Florida, this 8th day

of March A. D. 1920.



.Clerk of the Circuit Court
,Clerk of the Circuit Court