• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Main
 Back Cover






Title: Memoranda book
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102094/00001
Finding Guide: A Guide to the William Sherman Jennings Papers
 Material Information
Title: Memoranda book
Series Title: Miscellaneous Papers
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Publication Date: 1901
Physical Location:
Box: 29
Folder: Memoranda book
 Subjects
Subject: Jennings, William Sherman, 1863-1920.
 Notes
General Note: 'The Standard Diary'
General Note: 'Trademark 1901'
General Note: 'Published for the trade'
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102094
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Main
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
    Back Cover
        Page 285
        Page 286
Full Text















~u,~7tA Mt~-3~X

-P c-LJ )~hEyL


I







\) /










se e*




TRADE



MARK









PUBlISHED
YFOR
THER TRIDE

0- syna

.ae il





June.


May.


April. March. Feb. J


Io - o t t o t.
6 0 (. 10 0(0 to O 5 414
J 0 C : *^ 0 <. \ w \ M C LI U Q 00 0a 0 *


u CO 0 .0 O C C \\o
t t (0 o.
* 0.o 5. 0(.0 05


*0 L 0\W.0 a o 0\N tG CUl : 0\
""- 4- C.0 .05 '0
tP t0"t0t o


1't0 1z 4. 1 -0 wCoO 0 toUt O 0 'O7,.C t
0 t C7.-. t Ct C, : Lo0 w Z 0'0 to1


an.


*4
'P


Dec. Nov. Oct. Sept. Aug. July.
o t S t t~ 8o P 0 t a : - t o I I j Sunday.
Wo ,o O "< o VI __ i : Mo o o j ::_ & \ o N a : u: 1,,, 03 : Monday,
SM i i M I W S N i J i 3 Il iu Oc w >-: 1 r,-Tuesday.
o--: two a o I , 4 -0 Cto- c W ednes.

: or101% : 0 0 zP C- s M i l: & M M M n Thursday.
S 80_o4 : o C O o1 o E! -o 4 o 0 :5 c o 0 o w: 2; C3 Friday.
S'0O 0 : '0t: W" oo 0 : t O O o t O o\ oSaturday.


S 8 t- o I Sunday.
Co : .i : Monday.
So cn Tuesday.
0 c L Ol t o 1 Wednes.
20 0 5 ~ Thursday.
t ,3 C o : t 0 I2 Friday..
0 0o : t: L, Saturday.


0






17j


_ _I_


- -----~- ---




















FOR IDENTIFICATION.
My Name is..... .................................

My Address is.....................................



In case of accident or serious illness please notify








THINGS TO BE REMEMBERED.
The make of my Bicycle is.............................


Its number is.......................................

rhe number on the case of my Watch is...............
The numberof tile works is.........................

The number of my Bank Book is.......................
My Weight was ...................................
O n ............ .... ... .................. ...
and my Height............... feet....... .......inches

Size of my Hat................Glows.................
Hosiery............Collar...............

Cuffs...............Shoes ..................
Shirt...............Drawers...............










SUMMARY OF STAMP TAXES.

In Effect July 1, 1898.



Stocks, Bonds, Debentures, Certificates of
Indebtedness, issued after July r, 1893, per
$1oo face value ..$ .05
Transfers of Stock, per $0oo face value .02
Sales of Merchandise, for present or future
delivery on exchanges, per $oo .01
Bank Check or Sight Draft, .02
Promissory Note and Time Draft, Bills of
Exchange, (inland), Money Orders, for
each $oo .... .02
Bills of Exchange (foreign), Letter of Credit,
drawn singly per $1oo .04
In sets of two or more, for each bill .02
Bill of Lading or Receipt for any goods to be
exported ..10
Bill of Lading to be issued by express and
transportation companies, per package .01
Telephone messagess, charged at z5 cts. or over .01
Surety Bonds .50
Certificates of Profit, memo. showing interest
in corporation, or transfers of same, per $1oo
face value ... . 02
Certificate of Damage, and certificates of port
wardens or marine surveyors .25
Other certificates not specified .10
Charter Party, per vessel of 300 tons 3.00
Between 300 and 600 tons 5.00
Exceeding 600 tons . 10.00
Contract, brokers' notes of sale or exchange of
goods, stocks, bonds, notes, real estate, &c. .10
Conveyances, value between $oo and $500 .50
For each additional $5oo0 .50
Telegraph flessages .01
Custom House Entry, not over $xoo .25
Between $0oo and $500 .50
Over $500 1.00
Custom House Entry, for withdrawal .50
Insurance (life), for each $Too of policy .08
Insurance (marine, inland, fire, casualty, fidel-
ity, guarantee), on each dollar of premium
charged .. .. .005
Leases, For one year .25
Between one and three years .50
Over three years 1.00
Ilanifest for custom house entry, or Clearance
for foreign port, per ship of 300 tons 1.00
Between 300 and 6oo tons 3.00
Exceeding 60o tons 5.00
mortgagee, between $r,ooo and $,,500 .25
For each $5oo additional .25
Passage ticket to foreign port, costing not
over $30 . 1.00
Between $3o and $6o, $3.00. Over $6o 5.00
Power of attorney, to vote .10
To sell, rent or collect, to transfer stock
or bonds . .......25
Protests of notes and drafts .2
Warehqusq receipts .










WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.



MEASURE OF LENGTH.
4 In. make i Hand. 3 Ft. make i Yard.
7.92 In. Link. 5j Yds. i Rod or Pole
18 In. Cubit. 40 Poles" i Furlong.
12 In. Foot. 8 Fur. i Mile.
6 Ft. Fathom. 69 i-6 Miles make i Degree.
60 Geographical Miles make i Degree.
176 Yards Mile.
5z8o Feet l Mile.

MEASURE OF SURFACE,
144 Square Inches make a Square Foot.
9 Square Feet x Square Yard.
30 Square Yards Rod, Perch or Pole.
40 Square Rods "' Square Rood.
4 Square Roods Square Acre.
ro Square Chains Square Acre.
640 Square Acres i Square Mile.
Gunter's Chain equal to 22 Yards or 0oo Links
2721 Square Feet make i Square Rod.
43,560 Square Feet x Acre.

MEASURE OF SOLIDITY.
1728 Cubic Inches make I Cubic Foot.
27 Cubic Feet i Cubic Yard.

AVOIRDUPOIS WEIGHT,
271" Grains make Drachm (dr. or 271 Grains
16 Drachms Ounce oz.) or 437
i6 Ounces Poud lb.) or 7000 "
28 Pounds i Quarterqr.
4 Quarters Hundred-Weight (cwt.)
26 Cwts. Ton.
2240 Pbunds Ton.

TROY WEIGHT.
24 Grains make i Pennyweight, or 24 Grains.
20 Pennywts. i Ounce, or 480
12 Ounces Pound, or 5760

APOTHECARIES' WEIGHT.
so Grains make i Scruple. 8 Drachms make x Ounce.
3 Scruples i Drachm. 12 Ounces x Pound.

DIAMOND WEIGHT,
16 Parts make x Grain (4-5ths Grain Troy.)
4 Grains I Carat (3 i-5th Grains Troy.)

LIQUID MEASURE,
4 Gills make I Pint, 3 1t Gallons make r Barrel.
2 Pints i Quart. 54 Gallons i Hhd.
4 Quarts" i Gallon. 252 Gallons x Tun.

DRY MEASURE,
8 Quarts make a Peck. 1 8 Bushels make i Quarter.
4 Pecks I Bushel.I 36 Bushels i Chaldron.
i Bushel equal to o215.42 Cubic Inches.











WEIGHT PER BUSHEL OF GRAIN, ETO.



The following Table shows the number of

pounds per bushel required, by law or custom,

in the sale of articles specified, in the several

States of the Union.


STATES.




Maine ........
N. Hampshire.
Vermont......
Massachusetts.
Connecticut...
New York....
New Jersey...
Pennsylvania..
Delaware.....
Maryland.....
D ist. (. ...',
Virginia ......
West Virginia.
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia .......
Louisiana ....
Arkansas .....
Tennessee ....
Kentucky.....
Ohio .........
Michigan .....
Indiana.......
Illinois .......
Wisconsin ....
Minnesota ....
Iowa .........
Missouri......
Kansas.......
Nebraska.....
California- ...
Oregon .......


~

i


L ,. I_ ~


56 50 52 30 6o
56 50. 30 6o


56 o50 52 32 6o
56.... 3260
58. .3260
56.. .. 30 60
5'6 30 56
56
56 .. 57 32 6o


56 50. 32 6
56 48.. 32 6
54 6 .. 30 ..
56 50 57 33 60
56 48 57 35 56







56. 4326o
56 50 48 32 60
56 48 57 32 6
56.. 3260
56 ... 326o
56 5733 6o
56 57 32 60
56 50 57 32 60
56 50 57 34 60
52 32
56 .. .. 36 60
56. .3 o
56* 7 o36
56. 7 o26











INTEREST TABLE.

UOUR PER CENT.


TIME.

I Dy.
3


10
12

i MO.

3


6 Ii

8 "


TIME.


3
5
10
to ,






6
x Mo.


4 "

6 (


9 l(
10 Yr.

i Yr.


TIME. $2

SD 0 o
3 o
5 0
0 0
12
25
x Mo. 1
2 r
3
4 2
5 2j
7 3k

8 4
9 4


i Yr. 6


$7 $8
o 0
o o
o
0 &
I I
1 I
2 2
21 21
41 54
7 8


14 16
1i8 2i8
181 212



28 32


FIVE PER CENT.


$5 $6 $7
0 0 0
o o o
S 0 0o
0 0 0
o oo
I I I

1, 2 2
2 3 3
4 56
6 89
8 10 12
io 13 15
13 .5 '8

17 20 23
19 23 26
21 25 29
23 28 32
25 30 35


SIX PER CENT.


$6 $7 $8
0 0 0
0 0 0

I I
I I 2
33 3
34 4
67 8
9 11 12
12 14 26
15 i8 20
i8 21 24
21 25 28
24 28 32
27 32 36
30 35 40
33 39
36 42 148


$2 $3 $4
0 0 0
o o
0 0 0
I I i
O i 2
1 1 2
S 212
2 34
3 5 6
4 6 8
5 8 io
6 9 i2
7 '1 14
8 2 16
9 14 18
10 15 20
II ,7 22
12 /8 2^


' '


lr----


FVE PER CENT


. . 1~


I I '. .


li9


1$5









RATE OF INCOME ON STOCKS.
Purchased at the following prices, (par value
being $1oo), and bearing interest at
the following rates.


Paid. 3% 4%,

$506 oo 8 oo
55 5 45 7 27
6o 5 00 6 67
65 4 62 6 15
70 4 28 5 71
75 4 o00 5 33
80 3 75 5 00
85 3 53 4 70
90 3 33 4 44
91 3 30 4 40
92 3 26 4 34
93 3 23 4 30
94 3 '9 4 26
95 3 '5 4 2
96 3 131 4 17
97 3 09 4 12
98 3 o6 4 08
99 3 03 4 04
101 2 971 3 96
102 2 941 3 92
103 2 91 388
104 2 88 3 85
o10 2 86 3 8
o10 2 83 3 77
107 2 80 3 74
lo8 2 78 3 70
109 2 75 3 67
110 2 72 3 63
115 2 60 3 48
120 2 50 3 33
130 2 30 3 07
140 2 14 2 86
150 2 00 2 67
163 I 88 2 50
170 . .
18 .
190 .
200 .


5%

I0 00
9 09
8 33
7 69
7 14
6 66
6 25
5 88
5 55
5 49
5 43
5 38
5 32
5 26
5 21
5 15
5 10
5 05
4 95
4 90
4 85
4 81
4 76
4 72
4 C7
4 63
4- 59
4 54
4 34
4 i6
3 84
3 57
3 33
3 12


6%,

12 00
10 90
10 00
9 23
8 57
8 oo
7 5
7 05
6 66
6 59
6 52
6 45
6 38
6 31
6 25
6 18
6 12
6 o6
5 94
5 88
5 83
5 77
5 71
5 66
5 61
5 56
5 50
5 45
5 21
5 00
4 61
4 28
4 00
3 75
3 53
3 33
3 i6
3 00


7% 8% 9%

14 ooi 6 oo t8 oo
12 72 14 55 16 36
ii 66 13 33 15 00
to 76 12 30 13 85
o oo00 II 42 12 85
9 33 Io 66 12 oo
8 75 10 00 I 25
8 23 9 41 10 58
7 77 8 88 io 00
7 69 8 79 9 89
7 6o 8 70 9 78
7 53 8 6o 9 68
7 45 8 51 9 57
7 36 8 42 9 47
7 29 8 33 9 38
7 22 8 25 9 28
7 14 8 i6 9 18
7 07 78 o8 9 9
6 93 7 92 8 91
6 86 7 84 8 82
6 80 7 77 8 74
6 73 7 69 8 65
6 66 7 61 8 57
6 60 7 55 8 49
6 54 7 48 8 41
6 48 7 41 8 33
6 42 7 34 8 26
6 36 7 27 8 18
6 o8 6 95 7 83
5 83 6 66 7 50
5 38 6 15 6 92
5 oo00 5 7 6 43
4 66 5 33 6 co
4 38 5 o0 5 62
4 12 4 701 5 29
3 88 4 44 5 00
3 68 4 21 4 74
3 50 4 oo 4 50


TO FIND LENGTH OF DAY OR NIGHT.
At any time of the year add 12 hours to the time of the
sun's setting, and from the sum subtract the time of rising
for the length of the day. Subtract the time of setting
from 12 hours, and to the remainder add the time of rising
next morning for the length of the night. These rules are
equally true for apparent time.










RATES OF POSTAGE.


POSTAL CARDS, 1 cent each, go without further
charge to all parts of the United States, Canada and Mexico.
"Reply Postal Cards," with card attached for paid reply,
2 cents each. Cards for foreign countries (within the
Postal Union) 2 cents each.
LETTERS, to all parts of the United States, Canada
and Mexico, 2 cents for each ounce or fraction thereof.
LOCAL, OR "DROP" LETTERS, that is, for the city or
town where deposited, 2 cents where the carrier system is
adopted, and 1 cent where there is no carrier system.
FIRST CLASS.-Letters and all other written matter,
whether sealed or unsealed, and all other matter sealed,
nailed, sewed, tied, or fastened in any manner so that it
cannot be -easily examined, 2 cents for each ounce or
fraction thereof.
SECOND CLASS.-Only for publishers and news-
agents, 1 cent per pound.
NEWSPAPERS and PERIODICALS (regular publications)
can be mailed by the public at the rate of 1 cent for each 4
ounces or fraction thereof.
THIRD CLASS.-Printed matter, in unsealed wrap-
pers only (all matter inclosed in notched envelopes must
pay letter rates), 1 cent for each 2 ounces or fraction there-
of, which must be fully prepaid. This includes books, cir-
culars, chromos, engravings, handbills, lithographs, music,
pamphlets, proof-sheets and manuscript accompanying the
same, reproductions by the electric pen, hektograph, me-
tallograph, papyrograph, and, in short, any reproduction
upon paper by any process except handwriting and the
copying-press. Limit of weight 4 lbs., except for a single
book, which may weigh more.
FOURTH CLASS.-All mailable matter not included
in the above, which is so prepared for mailing as to be easily
withdrawn from the wrapper and examined, 1 cent per
ounce or fraction thereof. Limit of weight 4 lbs. Full
prepayment compulsory.
REFORWARDING.-Letters will be forwarded from
one post office to another upon the written request of the
person addressed, without additional charge; but un-
claimed packages cannot be returned to the sender until
stamps are furnished to pay the return postage.
PERMISSIBLE WRITING.-No writing is permit-
ted on third or fourth class matter except as follows: The
name and address of sender on the outside or inside of
package, preceded by the word "from." On the wrapper
may also be written the names and number of articles in-
closed. The sender is further allowed to mark a word or
passage in a book or paper to which he desires to call
special attention. He may also write a simple inscription
or dedication upon the cover or blank leaves of a book or
pamphlet. There may be attached to articles of merchan-
dise, by tag or label, a mark, number, name, or letter for
purpose of identification. Printed circulars may contain the
L , ,+ .. ......I ..~.~. ......... .... Jr . .. ....... .










RATES OF POSTAGE.


written name of the sender, or of the addressee, and the
date. Any other writing on third or fourth class matter
will subject the package to letter rates of postage, and
render the sender liable to a fine of ten dollars for each
offence. Printed matter may be enclosed with fourth class
matter, but the whole package is subject to the rate of I
cent per ounce or fraction thereof.

REGISTRATION.-Letters or packages can be regis-
tered by adding stamps to the amount of 8 cents to the
regular rate.

SPECIAL DELIVERY STAMPS, at 10 cents each,
used in addition to regular rates, insures delivery immedi-
ately on arrival at office of destination. These stamps can
be usedfor no other furfose.



MONEY ORDERS.

For Orders not exceeding $2.50, three cents; over
$2.50 and not exceeding $5, five cents; over $5 and not
exceeding $10, eight cents; over $10 and not exceeding
$20, ten cents; over $20 and not exceeding $30, twelve
cents; over $30 and not exceeding $40, fifteen cents;
over $40 and not exceeding $50, eighteen cents; over
$50 and not exceeding $60, twenty cents; over $60 and
not exceeding $75, twenty-five cents; over $75 and not
exceeding $100, thirty cents.

-:0:-

FOREIGN POSTAGE.

The rates for LETTRRS are for tlie half ounce or frac-
tion thereof, and those for NEWSPAPERS for 2 ounces or
fraction thereof.
To Great Britain and Ireland, France, Spain, all parts
of Germany, including Austria, Denmark, Switzerland,
Italy, Russia, Norway, Sweden, Turkey (European and
Asiatic), Egypt, letters 5 cents, newspapers 1 cent for each
2 ounces or fraction thereof.
To Australia, letters via San Francisco, 5 cents; via
Brindisi, 5 cents; newspapers, via San Francisco, 1 cent
for 2 ounces; via Brindisi, 1 cent for 2 ounces. China,
letters, via San Francisco, 5 cents; via Brindisi, 10 cents;
newspapers, 2 cents for each 2 ounces. British India,
Italian mail, letters 5 cents; newspapers, 1 cent for 2
ounces. Japan, letters, via San Francisco, 5 cents; news-
papers, 1 cent for 2 ounces,










HELP! In case of Accidents.

Drowning. 1. Loosen clothing, if any. 2. Empty
lungs of water by laying body on its stomach and lifting it
by the middle so that the head hangs down. Jerk the
body a few times. 3. Pull tongue forward, using hand-
kerchief, or pin with string, it necessary. 4. Imitate
motion of respiration by alternately compressing and ex-
panding the lower ribs, about twenty times a minute.
Alternately raising and lowering the arms from the sides up
above the head will stimulate tie action of the lungs. Let
it be done gently but persistently. 5. Apply warmth and
friction to extremities. 6. By holding tongue forward,
closing the nostrils and pressing the "Adam's apple" back,
(so as to close entrance to stomach) direct inflation may
be tried. Take a deep breath and breathe it forcibly into
the mouth of patient, compress the chest to expel the air,
and repeat the operation. 7. DON'T GIVE UP I Peo-
ple have been saved after HOURS of patient, vigorous effort.
8. When breathing begins, get patient into a warm bed,
give WAViM drinks, or spirits in teaspoonfuls, fresh air and
quiet.
Burns and Scalds. Cover with cooking soda and
lay wet cloths over it. Whites of eggs and olive oil.
Olive or linseed oil, plain or mixed with chalk or whiting.

Lightning. Dash cold water over a person struck.
Sunstroke. Loosen clothing. Get patient into shade
and apply ice-cold water to head.
Mad Dog or Snake Bite. Tie cord tight above
wound. Suck the wound and cauterize with caustic or
white-hot iron at once, or cut out adjoining parts with a
sharp knife.
Venomous Insects' Stings, &c. Apply weak am-
monia, oil, salt water or iodine.
Fainting. Place flat on back; allow fresh air and
sprinkle with water.
Tests of Death. Hold mirror to mouth. If living,
moisti...: ii cL....-I Fsh pin into flesh. If dead the
hole ....:.. .. .1 .I' i, will close up.
Cinders in the Eye. Roll soft paper up like a lamp
lighter and wet the tip to remove, or- use a medicine
dropper to draw it out. Rub the otier eye.
Fire in One's Clothing. Don't run-especially
not down stairs or out of doors. Roll on carpet or wrap
in woolen rug or blanket. Keep the head down, so as not
to inhale flame.

Fire in a Building. Crawl on the floor. The clear-
est air is the lowest in the room. Cover head with a
woolen wrap, wet if possible. Cut holes for the eyes.
Don't get excited.
Fire in Kerosene. Don't use water, it will spread
the flames. Dirt, sand or flour -is the best extinguisher;
or smother with woolen rug, table-cloth or carpet.
Suffocation from Inhaling Burning-Gas. Get
into the fresh air as soon as possible and lie down. Keep
warm. Take ammonia,-twenty drops to a tumbler of
water, at frequent intervals.









ANTIDOTES FOR POISONS.


First. Send for a Physician.
Second. INDUCE VOMITING, by tickling throat with
feather or finger, drinking hot water or strong Mustard
and water. Swallow Sweet Oil or whites of Eggs.
Acids are antidotes for ALKALIES, and vice versa.

SPECIAL POISONS AND ANTIDOTES.
Acids. MURIATIC. OXALIC.
S U ... Soap-suds, Magnesia,
ACETIC. SULPHURIC(Oilof Vit- L neSo agnia
riol). NITRIC (Aqua Fortis).
Prussic Acid. Ammonia in water. Dash water
S -. in face.
Carbolic Acid. Flour and water, mucilaginous drinks.
Alkalies. POTASH. LYE. Vinegar or Lemon juice
HARTSHORN. AMMONIA. in water.
Arsenic. Milk, Raw Eggs, Sweet Oil, Lime-
Rat Poison. water, Flour and water.
Paris Green.
Bug Poison.
Lead.
Saltpetre. Whites of Eggs or Milk
Corrosive Sublimate, in large doses.
Sugar of Lead.
Blue Vitriol.
Chloroform. Dash cold water on head and chest.
Chloral. Artificial Respiration. Piece of ice
Ether. in rectum.
Carbonate of Soda. Soap-suds and mucilaginous
Copperas. drinks.
Cobalt.
Iodineo. Starch and water. Astringent info-
Antimonyet. ) sions. Strong tea.
Tartar Emetic, s
Mercury AND ITS SALTS. Whits of Es. Milk.
Nitrate of Silver. ) saltandwater.
Lunar Caustic.
Opium.
Morphine.
Laudanum. Strongcoffee, hotbath. Keep
awake and moving at any
Paregoric, cost.
Soothing Powders
or Syrups.
Strychnine. i Mustard and water, Sul-
T n ux Vomica phate of Zinc. Absolute
Tinct. of Nux Vomica. quiet. Plug the ears.

AVOID DANGER OF POISONING.
By always keeping every bottle or box well labelled. If
an old bottle is used do not fail to wash off all old labels.
Have place for poisonous medicines, etc., and keep them
on the high shelves. Promptly destroy all packages
which have contained them.










WEATHER SIGNALS.


[Adopted for general use by the United States Signal Service
on and after March 1, 1887.]



INTERPRETATION OF SIGNALS.

No. 1. No. 2. No. 3. No. 4.
White Flag. Blue Flag. Black Trian- White Flag.
gular Flag. Black Center.




Clear or Rain or Temperature. Cold Wave.
Fair. Snow.
No. 1, white flag, clear or fair weather, no rain. No.
2, blue flag, rain or snow. No. 3, black triangular flag,
refers to temperature, and above Nos. 1 or 2, indicates
warmer weather; below Nos. 1 or 2, colder weather, and
when not displayed, stationary weather. No. 4, white
flag with black center (cold wave flag), sudden fall in
temperature; this signal is usually ordered at least twenty-
four hours in advance of the cold wave. It is not dis-
played unless a temperature of forty-five degrees, or less,
is expected, nor is flag No. 3 ever displayed with it.
A red flag with a black center indicates that a storm of
marked violence is expected.

DISPLAY EXAMPLES.











When No. 3 is placed above Nos. 1 or 2 it indicates
warmer; when below, colder; when not displayed, the
temperature is expected to remain about stationary.
When displayed on poles, the signals should be ar-
ranged to read downward; when displayed from horizon-
tal supports, a small streamer should be attached to

indicate the point from which the signals are to be read.










VALUES OF FOREIGN COINS.


The following estimate, by the Director of the
Mint, of the values of Foreign Coins, is pro-
claimed by the Secretary of the Treasury, in
pursuance of the provisions of section 25 of the
Act of August 28, 1894, to be the values of such
coins in terms of the money of account of the
United States, to be followed in estimating the
value of all foreign merchandise exported to the
United States on or after Jan. I, 1900, expressed
in any of such metallic currencies:


CouNTRY.


Argentine Rep.,
Austria-Hungary
Belgium ........
Bolivia... ..
Brazil..........
British America..
Costa Rica......
Chili...........

China ...........

Colombia .......
Cuba ...........
D)enmark .......
Ecuador ........
Egypt ..........
Finland .........
France ..........
(Genran Empire
Great Britain....
Greece..........
H ayti...........
India ..........
Italy............
Japaln ..........
Liberia .........
Mexico .........
Netherlands. ....
Newfoundland ..
Norway.........
Persia...........
Peru............
Portugal ........
Russia ........
Spain ..........
Sweden ........

Turkey .........
Uruguay ........
Venezuela.......


STANDARD. MONETARY UNIT VIVALU.

D. C M
Gold & silv. Peso ............. 96 5
Gold...... Crown........... 20 3
Gold & silv. Franc ........... o 9 3
Silver ..... Boliviano .... o 42 7
Gold ...... Mieis ... .....o 54 6
Gold ..... Dollar .......... o
Gold ..... Colon............. o 46 5
Gold ...... Peso..... ..... 36 5
( Shanghai.. o 63 i
Silver .... Tael.. Saikwan.. o 70 3
(Customs).
Silver..... Peso ............. 42 7
Gold & silv. Peso ........... o 92 6
Gold ...... Crown.......... 26 8
Silver .... Sucre............. 42 7
Gold ...... Pound (oopistres 4 94 3
Gold ...... Mark............. o 9 3
Gold &silv. Franc ...........o 9 3
Gold ...... Mark........... 23 8
Gold ...... Pound sterling .... 4 86 6
Gold & silv. Drachma ......... o 9 3
Gold & silv. Gourde ........... o 96 5
Silver ..... Rupee............. 20 3
Gold& silv. Lira.............. o 9 3
Gold ...... Yen ............ 49 8
Gold...... Dollar........... o
Silver ..... Dollar.... ...... 46 4
Gold & silv. Florin ........... 40 2
Gold ...... Dollar............ 4
Gold ...... Crown............ o 6 8
Silver.... Kran............. 7 9
Silver .... S ......... ... 42 7
Gold ...... Milreis ........... 8 o
Gold ..... Ruble............. 51 5
Gold & silv. Peseta........... 1o 9 3
Gold ...... Crown............o 26 8
Gold &silv. Franc ........... o 9 3
Gold ...... Piaster ...........o 44
Gold ...... Peso.............. 3 4
Gold & silv. Bolivar ......... o t9 3


STANDARD BULLION.
Standard bullion contains r90 parts of pure gold or pure sil-
ver and 103 parts of copper alloy. The coining value of an oz.
of pure gold is *20.67. and of ai oz. of standard gold is $18.60.
The coining value in standard silver dollars of an oz. of pure
silver is al.290, and of an oz. of standard silver is $8.16.











INTEREST LAWS OF ALL THE STATES,

AND DAYS OF GRACE.


STATES AND
TERRITORIES.


Alabama .......
Arizona........
Arkansas.......
California.....
Colorado.......
Connecticut....
Delaware.......
District of Col..
Florida.........
Georgia ........
Idaho...........
Illinois .........
Indiana ........
Iowa............
Kansas .........
Kentucky ......
Louisiana ......
Maine ..........
Maryland ......
Massachusetts .
Michigan .......
Minnesota......
Mississippi .....
Missouri .......
Montana .......
Nebraska.......
Nevada.........
New Hampshire
New Jersey ....
New Mexico....
New York......
North Carolina.
North Dakota..
Ohio............
Oklahoma ......
Oregon .........
Pennsylvania ..
Rhode Island ..
South Carolina.
South Dakota .
Tennessee......
Texas ..........
Utah ...........
Vermont .......
Virginia........
Washington....
West Virginia..
Wisconsin......
Wyoming ......


DAYS OF
GRACE.




Yes Yes
Ye: Yes
Yes Yes
No No
Yea No
No No
Yes No
No I No
Yes No
Yes No
No No
No No
Yes Yes
Yes Yes
Yes No
Yes Yes
Yes No
Yes Yes
No No
No Yes
Yes Yes
Yes Yes
Yes Yes
Yes No
No No
Yes Yes
Yes No
No No
No No
Yes Yes
No No
Yes Yes
Yes Yes
No No
Yes No
No No
No No
Yes Yes
Yes Yes
Yes Yes
Yes No
Yes Yes
No No
No No
Yes No
Yes Yes
Yes No
No i No
Yes Yes


RATES OF
INTEREST.


3 ConTRaCT.

8 per et.
7 No limit.
6 10 per ct.
7 No limit.
8 No limit.
6 No limit.
6 6 per ct.
6 10 per et.
8 10 per et.
7 8 per ct.
812 per ct.
; 7 per ct.
68 per ct.
6 8 per ct.
6 10 per ct.
6 6per ct.
5 8 per ct.
6 No limit.
6 6 per ct.
6 No limit.
5 7 per ct.
6 10 per ct.
S10 per ct.
68 per ct.
8 No limit
710 per ct.
7 No limit.
6 per ct.
6 6 per ct.
6 12 per ct.
6 per ct.
6 6 per ct.
712 per ct.
68 per ct
7 12 per ct.
S10 per et.
S6 per ct.
6 No limit.
7 8per et.
7 12 per ct.
6 No limit.
610 per t.
8 No limit.
6 ( per ct.
6 6 per et.
7 12 per ct.
66 per ct.
6 10 per t.
8 12 per ct.


PENALTY OF
USURY.


Forft. of all int ......
None................
Forft. principal &int.
None.................
None.................
None.................
Forft. of principal...
Forft. of entire int...
None.................
Forft. of excess of int.
Fft. 0p.ct. prin. an'ly
Forft. of entire int...
Forft. int. over p.t.
Fit. int., costs, etc.
FfttwiceexoverlOpet
Forft. excess of int..
Forft. of interest.....
None.................
Forft. excess of int..
None(6p.c.onj'gmte)
Forft. of interest.....
Forft. of principal...
Forft. of interest.....
Exe. applic'le on prin
None.................
Forft. of int.-costs..
None.................
Fit. treble exc. of int
Forft. int. & costs....
Forft. dbl. amt. of int
Fft. contr't,fine,imp't
Fft. dbl.amt. of int..
Finenotexc.$210,imp
Forfeiture of excess.

Fft. prin.&int-costs
Forft. excess of int..
None...........
Forfeit of interest...
Forft. int., fine, imp't
Forft. excess of int..
Forft. entire interest.
None................
Forft. of excess .....
Forft.exc's over 6 p.C.
Dbl. amt. int. & costs
Forfeit. of interest ..
Forft. entire interest.
None.............


A note dated Sunday is void.
Altering a note in any manner by the holder makes it void.
A note given by a minor is void.
The maker of a lost or stolen note is not released from
payment if the amount and consideration can be proven.
A note obtained by fraud, or given by an intoxicated
person, cannot be collected.









3
4
5

3
6
7

9
IO







20
o12








22
23
'4
'5
i6
'7
18
'9
20
21
22
23
14
25


S NAMES. Born.
GEORGE WASHINGTON Feb. 22, 1732
JOHN ADAMS........ Oct. 31,1735
THOMAS JEFFERSON. April 2, 1743
JAMES MADISON ..... Mar. 16, 1751
JAMES MONROE....... April 28,1758
JOHN QUINCY ADAMS. July I, 1767
ANDREW JACKSON .... Mar. 15, 1767
MARTIN VAN BUREN. Dec. 5, 1782
WM. H. HARRISON ... Feb. 9, 1773
JOHN TYLER.......... Mar. 29, 1790
JAMES K. POLK ...... Nov. 2, 1795
ZACHARY TAYLOR..... Sept. 24,1784
MILLARD FILLMORE .. Feb. 7, o800
FRANKLIN PIERCE.... NOV. 23, 1804
JAMES BUCHANAN.... April23, 1791
ABRAHAM LINCOLN... Feb. 12, 109
ANDREW JOHNSON .... Dec. 29, 1808
ULYSSES S. GRANT ... April27, 1822
RUTHERF'D B. HAYES Oct. 4,1822
JAMES A. GARFIELD.. NOV. 19,1831
CHESTER A. ARTHUR. Oct. 5,1830
GROVER CLEVELAWN.. Mar. 18, 1837
BENJAMIN HARRISON. Aug. 20, 1833
GROVER CLEVELAND.. Mar. 18, 1837
WILLIAM McKINLEY. Jan. 29, 2843


Inaugurited. Term o Offi.
April 30, 1789 8 years.......
Mar. 4,1797 4 ......
4, 1801 8
4, 1809 8 "
4,1817 8 ......
4, 1825 4 ......
4, 1829 8 ......
4, 1837 4 ......
S 4, 1841 month .....
April 6,1841 3 yrs. x mos.
Mar. 4, 1845 4 years.......
4, 1849 1 year 4 mos..
July 9, 1850 2 years 8 mos.
Mar. 4, 1853 4 years.......
4,1857 4 ....
S4, 1861 4 yrs. 40 days.
April 5, 1865 3 yrs. ,iomos.
Mar. 4, 869 8 years.......
S5, 1877 4 .......
4, 881 6j months....
Sept. 20, 188i 3 yrs. 51 mos.
Mar. 4, 1885 4 years.......
4, r889 4 .. ......
4, 1889 4
4, 1893 4 ......
.4, 1897 .............


Died.
Dec. 14, 1799
July 4, x826
4, 1826
June 28, 1836
uly 4,1831
Feb. 23, I848
June 8, 1845
July 24, 1862
April 4, 1841
Jan. 18, 1862
June 15, 1849
July 9, 1850
Mar. 7, 1874
Oct. 8, 1869
June i, 1868
April 15, 1865
July 31, 1875
uly 23,1885
Jan. 17, 1893
Sept. 19, 1881
Nov. 18, 1886


Native o
Virginia.
Mass.
Virginia.


Mass.
S. Carolina.
New York.
Virginia.

N. Carolina.
Virginia.
New York.
N. Hamp.
Penn.
Kentucky.
N. Carolina.
Ohio.


Vermont.
New Jersey.
Ohio.
New Jersey.
Ohio.


ResideD ne


Residence
when elected.
Virginia.
Mass.
Virginia.


Mass.
Tennessee.
New York.
Ohio.
Virginia.
Tennessee.
Louisiana.
New York.
N. Hamp.
Penn.
Illinois.
Tennessee.
Illinois.
Ohio.

New York.

Indiana.
New York.
Ohio.


Political Paty.
Federal.

Republican.


Coalition.
Democrat.

Whig.

Democrat.
Whig.

Democrat.

Republican.

Democrat.
Republican.



Democrat.
Republican.
Democrat.
Republican.










LEGAL HOLIDAYS.



In most of the States when the holi-
day falls on Sunday the Monday following
is the holiday.

ALABAMA-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, Mardi-Gras, Good Friday,
April 20, July 4, 1st Monday in Sept., Dec. 25.
ARIZONA-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30, July 4, Dec. 25,
any day of Thanksgiving orgen. election, Arbor Day.
CALIFORNIA-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30, July 4, Sept.
9, 1st Mon. in Oct., Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, general
election.
COLORADO-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30, July 4, 1st
Monday in Sept., Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, Arbor
Day, general election.
CONNECTICUT-Jan. 1, Feb. 12, Feb. 22, Fast
day, May 30,July 4, Ist Monday in Sept., Thanks-
giving, Dec. 2o.
DELAWARE-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30, July 4, 1st
Monday in Sept., Thanksgiving, Dec. 25.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, Mar.
4, May 30, July 4, 1st Mon. in Sept., Thanksgiving,
Dec. 26.
FLORIDA-Jan. 1 and 19, Arbor Day, Feb. 22, April
26, June 3, July 4, 1st Mon. in Sept., Thanks-
giving, Dec. 25, ':. ..- 1 election.
GEORGIA-Jan. 1 ....11 I, Feb. 22, April 26, June 3,
July 4, 1st Monday in Sept., any Thanksgiving, 1st
Friday in Dec., Dec. 25.
IDAHO-Same as Arizona. Also Friday after May 1.
Omitting May 30.
ILLINOIS-Jan. 1, Feb. 12 and 22, May 3(0, July 4,
1st Monday in Sept., Election Day, Thanksgiving,
Dec. 25.
INDIANA-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, public fast, May 30, July
4, 1st Monday in Sept., Thanksgiving, Dec. 25,
general election.
IOWA-Jan. 1, May 30, July 4, 1st Monday in Sept.,
Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, general election.
KANSAS-Jan. 1, May 3" i.,.11;.: ,. 1.ly 4, 1st
Monday in Sept., Arbor I*. i r.-..I ::. ...,,, Dec. 25,
-onernl election.
1:; [ i.i K, -Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30, July 4, public
fast, 1st Monday in Sept., Thanksgiving, Dec. 25,
general election.
LOUISIANA-Jan. 1 and 8, Feb. 22, Mardi-Gras in
New Orleans, Good Friday, April 6, July 4, Dec.
25, All Saints Day, general election.
MAINE-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30, public fast, July
4, 1st.Monday in Sept., Thanksgiving, Dec. 25.
MARYLAND-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, Good Friday, May 30,
July 4, 1st Monday in Sept., Thanksgiving, Dec.
25, general election, every Saturday P. aM.
MASSACHUSETTS-Feb. 22, April 10, May 30, July
4, 1st Monday in Sept., Thanksgiving, Dec. 25.
MICHIGAN-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30, July 4, 1st
Monday in Sept., Dec. 25, Fasting and Thanksgiving
day.
MINNESOTA-Jan. 1, Feb. 12 and 22, Good Friday,
May 30, July 4, 1st Monday in Sept., Thanksgiving,
Dec. 25, Arbor Day, general election.
MISSISSIPPI-July 4, Dec. 25.
MISSOURI-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30, July4, 1st Mon-
day in September, Dec. 25, Thanksgiving, general
election.














i i.4 j. 1.. I *. 1 -- -. I I \.i .

1st ul1. Il OUp l, pu t lo titi akoaivtlg, Li .
NEVADA-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30, July 4, Oct. 31,
Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, general election.
NEW HAMPSHIRE-Feb. 22, Fast day, May 30,
July 4 1st Monday in Sept., Thanksgiving, Dec. 25,
general election.
NEW JERSEY-Jan. 1, Feb. 12 and 22, May 30,
July 4, 1st Monday in Sept., Thanksgiving and Fast
day, Dec. 25, every Saturday P.M., general election.
Notes and drafts payable on secular or business day
next succeeding each holiday.
NEW MEXICO-Jan. 1, July 4, Dec. 25, and all days
for Fasting and Thanksgiving. Notes due on holi-
days are payable on the next business day thereafter.
NEW YORK-Jan, 1, Feb. 12 and 22, May 30, July
4, 1st Monday in Sept., Dec. 25, general election,
every Saturday P. M., Thanksgiving, Fast day.
NORTH CAROLINA-Jan. 1 and 19, Feb. 22, May
10 and 20, July 4, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, Dec.
25, general election. Notes and drafts payable on
secular or business day next succeeding each holiday.
NORTH DAKOTA-Jan. 1, Feb. 12, Feb. 22, May
30, July 4, Arbor Day, Thanksgiving, public fast,
Dec. 25, general election.
OHIO-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30, July 4, 1st Monday
in Sept., Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, general election.
OREGON-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 3Q, 1st Sat. in June,
July 4, 1st Monday in Sept., public fast, Thanks-
giving, Dec. 25.
PENNSYLVANIA-Jan. 1, Feb. 12, Feb. 22, Good
Friday, May 30, July 4, Ist Mon. In Sept., Thanks-
,; .. Dec. 25, general election, every Saturday iP.M.
I.H-l.i'. .. i -- .., Feb. 22, Arbor Day, May
30, J.,i. 4. ".i I ..1., ... September, Thanksgiving,
Decel.,'. i ., ,, l...1,on, general election.
SOUTH CAROLINA-Jan. 1, Jan. 19, Feb. 22, May
10t July 4, Ist Monday in Sept., National Thanks-
giving, Dec. 25, general election.
SOUTH DAKOTA-Same as North Dakota.
TENNESSEE-Jan. 1, Good Friday, 2d Friday in May,
May 30, July 4, ist Mon. in Sept., Thanksgiving,
Dec. 25, general election.
TEXAS-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, March 2, April 21, July 4,
1st Monday in Sept., Dec. 25, days of Fasting and
Thanksgiving, election day.
UTAH-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, April 15, May 30, July 4,
July 24, 1st Monday in Sept., Thanksgiving, Fast
days, Dec. 25.
VERMONT-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30, July 4, Aug,
16, Thanksgiving, Dec. 23.
VIRGINIA-Jan. 1 and 19, Feb. 22, Fast day, July 4,
1st Monday in Sept., T].... -.' :. Dec. 25, June 3.
WASHINGTON-Jan. 1, i .1 -. .1 22, Decoration
day, July 4, 1st Monday in September, Thanksgiving,
December 25, general election.
WEST VIRGINIA-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, July 4, Dec. 25,
any day of National Thanksgiving, general election.
WISCONSIN-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30, Arbor Day,
July 4, 1st Monday in Sept., Thanksgiving, Dec. 25,
general election.
WYOMING-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30, July 4, Arbor
Day, Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, general election.


L.[ ,-. i it -i i' "'










STANDARD TIME.

IN this Almanac the risings and settings of the Sun and
Moon are given in local mean time, as heretofore. The
Tides are given in STANDARD TIME.
To change to STANDARD TIME add or subtract the
minutes as given below, according as they are marked jlus
or minus.

Standard Time Divisions as adopted by the Railroads.
EASTERN STANDARD-75th Meridian. Canada, be-
tween Quebec and Detroit,-U. S. east of Buffalo, N. Y.;
Pittsburg, Pa.; Wheeling and Huntington, W. Va.;
Bristol, Tenn.; Charlotte, N. C., and Augusta, Ga.
CENTRAL STANDARD-9oth Meridian. West from
"Eastern" limits, as above, to Broadview, Canada; to the
Missouri River in Dakota; North Platte and McCook,
Nebraska; Wallace and Dodge City, Kansas; Toyah and
Sanderson, Texas.
MOUNTAIN STANDARD-Io5th Meridian. West from
"Central" limits to Heron, Montana; Ogden, Utah;
Needles and Yuma, Arizona.
PACIFIC STANDARD--2oth Meridian. West from
"Mountain" limits to coast.

Correction for the following Cities.


Eastern Standard,
750 Longitude.
,uteas.
Bangor, Me ........ 25
Augusta, Me........ 21
Portland, Me........ 19
Boston, Mass........ x6
Newport, R. I....... 15
Providence, R. I..... 14
Concord, N. H ...... 14
New London, Conn. 11
Springfield, Mass... 10
Montpelier Vt....... 0o
Haford, Cnn...... 9
Montreal, Que....... 6
Albany, N. Y........ 5
New York, N. Y ... 4
Utica, N. Y ......... --
Philadelphia, P4..... i
Syracuse, N. Y.... --
Baltimore, Md....... -- 6
Washington, D. C... 8
Rochester, N. Y..... II
Buffalo, N. Y.........- 6
Pittsburg, Pa. ........ 2

Mountain Standard.
1050 Longitude.
Denver, Col.........
Salt Lake City, Utah, + 28


Central Standard.
90o Longitude.
Minutes.
Cleveland, Ohio..... 33
Columbus, Ohio..... 28
Detroit, Mich ...... 28
Toledo, Ohio........ 26
Dayton, Ohio ....... 23
Cincinnati, Ohio..... 22
Louisville, Ky....... 18
Indianapolis, Ind..... 6
"hicago, Ill.......... 10
Milwaukee, Wi..... 8
Springfield, Ill....... 2
Memphis, Tenn...... o
New Orleans, La. .. o
St. Louis, Mo.......
Rock Island, Ill..... 3
Dubuque, Iowa ..... 3
Burlington, Iowa.... 5
St. Paul, Minn. ..... 2
Des Mones, Iowa... 4
Kansas City, Mo..... 8
Galveston, Texas.... 9-
Omaha, Neb. ....... 24

Pacifco Standard.
1200 Longitude.
Sacramento, Cal. .... 6
San Francisco, Cal... + to


-- ---------- --










TIDE TABLE

(The following values are derived from late determine.
tions of the UNITED STATES COAST SURVEY.)


To find the time (Standard Time) of High Water at any
of the following places, add or subtract the hours and
minutes opposite the name of place in the following
Table, to or from the hours and minutes of High Water
at NEW YORK for the required day, as found in the
Calendar Page.

Mean
EASTERN STANDARD. it. eet.
Eastport, Me. ...................... add 2 33 18.2
Bar Harbor, Me ..................... 2 24 o0.4
Rockland, Me, ......................" 2 42 9.6
Thomaston, Me...................... 2 55 9.4
Portland, Me. ......................... 2 55 9.
Bath, M e.............. .............. 3 49 6.,
Portsmouth, N. H. .................. 3 3 8.6
Isle of Shoals, N. H................. 2 57 8.7
Newburyport, Mass................... 3 3 7.5
Gloucester, Mass.............. ... 2 42 8.9
Salem, M ass......................... 2 57 9.2
Nahant, Mass................... .. 2 50 9.4
Plymouth, Mass...................... 2 59 Io.2
Provincetown, Mass................... 3 7 9.2
Edgartown, Mass. ................... 3 55 2.0
Nantucket, Mass .................... 4 6 3.0
Vineyard Haven, Mass..............." 3 22 1.6
Wood's Hole, North Side, Mass. ... sub. o 21 4.0
Wood's Hole, South Side, Mass...... add o 14 1.6
New Bedford Entrance
(Dumpling Rock), Mass. ......... sub. o 20 3.7
Newport, R. I....................... o 33 3.9
Bristol, R. I......................... o 25 4.7
Point Judith, R. I ................... 0 45 3.1
Sandy Hook, N. J.................. o 32 4.7
Watch Hill, R. I .................. add o 33 2.7
Stonnington, Conn .................. o 54 2.7
New London, Conn.................. 1 4 2.6
New Haven, Conn................... 2 57 6.o
Tr:i.: ., C...n. ................... 2 59 6.5
M'. .s.,Il. 0!.,.r, L. I................. o 4 1.9
Throg's Neck, N. Y................. 3 13 7.3
Cape May Landing, N. J........... 0 14 4.8
Newcastle, Del. ........ .......... 3 52 6.5
Philadelphia, Penn................... 5 46 6.o
Annapolis, Md....................... sub. 3 18 0.9
Baltimore, Md. ....................... 23 1.3
Richmond, Va. ..................... 3 24 3.6
Hatteras Inlet, N. C. ................. o 56 2.0
Beaufort, N. C. ..................... 0 35 2.8
Charleston (C. H. Wharf), S. C...... 19 5.1
CENTRAL STANDARD.
Fort Pulaski (Savannah Ent.), Ga.... sub. 1 21 6.9
Savannah (Dry Dock Wharf), Ga..... o 26 6.5
St. Augustine, Fla. ..................." o 17 4.2
Key West, Fla. .................... add o 54 1.2
Tampa Bay (Egmont Key), Fla ..... 3 o 1.4
Cedar Keys (Depot Key), Fla........ 4 52 2.6









I IicaI- TI D T
(STANDARD TIME.)

JANUARY. FEBRUARY, MARCH,
Nosr. N. Y. BOsT. N. Y. BOST. N. Y.
0 TIDl. TIDE. TIDE. TIDit. TDw. TIDE.
S Morning. MIornig. Morning. Touring. morning. 3 boring.
S 7 52 4.i 9 39 6 37 8 24 5 21
2 8 56 5 029 7 25 915 6 13
3 9 54 6 II 12 8 6 TO 3 7 I
4 o 47 7 4 1I 5 48 10 45 7 40
5 11 34 8 o o1 9 28 21 8 15
6 ..... 9 o 48 10 4 II 57 8 55
7 P 39 9 I 26 to 39 0o 9 31
8 I 21 Io 36 2 3 II 16 0 51 ro 8
9 2 I II 4 2 42 II 59 I 29 10 44
S1 2 39 11 5 3 23 0 21 2 9 1 24
II 3 19 0 4 9 I 9 2 51. .
12 4 3 I 2 5 3 2 I 337 036
13 4 51 149 6 2 3 0 4 29 1 28
14 5 43 240 7 4 4 0 5 29 2 26
15 6 39 3 37 8 6 5 3 6 33 3 30
16 7 38 4 35 9 5 6 3 7 35 4 31
17 8 35 5 33 9 58 6 56 8 34 5 31
18 9 30 6 28 1o 47 7 42 9 29 6 27
19 10 22 7 19 I 33 8 27 10 21 7 17
20 1 II 8 5 ..... 9 16 I1 9 8 3
21 II 55 8 52 0 41 10 I Ir 54 8 51
22 0 17 9 39 1 26 1o 46 0 18 9 41
23 I 3 10 22 2 16 II 37 1 8 10 29
2.) 1 48 11 6 3 7 o 5 2 0 11 21
25 2 35 I 56 4 4 I 3 2 53 ...
26 3 24 0 22 5 9 2 7 3 5 0 49
27 4 20 19 6 17 3 15 453 52
28 5 23 2 21 7 23 4 20 5 57 2 55
29 6 31 3 29.... 6 59 3 56
30 7 38 4 35 ..... ..... 7 56 4 5
31 8 42 5 40 .. ..... 8 45 5 43

THE SIZE OF THE SEAS.
Mills long.
M editerranean ................................ 2,000
Caribbean ....................................... 1,800
Red .. .... ........ ........ ..... ... 1,400
Black ....................... ................... 032
Baltic ........................ .......... ..... . 600









I-IIGI-I TID E.
(STANDARD TIME.)


S APRIL,
BOOST. N. Y.
0 IDE, TIDE.
Morning. M .orning.

I 9 31 6 29
2 10 12 7 9
3 10 51 7 45
4 1I 26 8 20
5 ..... 9 0
6 o 21 9 39
7 I 0 To 17
8 I 4r1 1 57
9 2 25 II 44
10 3 11i 9
II 4 2 I 2
12 4 59 I 58
13 6 o 2 58
14 7 2 3 59
15 8 3 4 59
16 9 0 5 57
17 9 53 6 51


o1 45
II 35

o 51
I 44
2 38
3 33
4 30
5 28
6 24
7 17
8 7
8 53


7 40
8 29
9 23
10 14
It 6

o 31
I 29
2 26
3 21
4 14
5 4
5 50


MAY,

BosT. N. Y.
TIDH. TIDN.
Morning. morning.

9 36 6 34
10 17 7 14
1o 58 7 52
11 35 8 31
. 9 14
o 37 9 56
1 19 10 36
2 4 II 21
2 50 .. ..
3 38 0 36
4 3 1 29
5 29 2 27
6 29 3 27
7 31 4 27
8 31 5 28
9 29 6 27


10 25
IT it

0 36
I 28
2 19
3 8
3 58
4 49
5 41
6 33
7 24
8 13
9 0
9 46


7 21
8 13
9 7
9 59
10 48
II 39
o 6
0 57
I 47
2 39
3 30
4 21
5 9
5 58
6 44


JUNE,
Bos r, N. Y.
jU'lU. j l1DE.
Mlorn.i Mi ornin. .

10 31 7 27
ii 13 8 7
It 54 8 52
0 15 9 35
0 59 10 18
I 43 Ii o
2 28 I1 47
313 o 12
4 4 3
5 o 58
5 59 2 58
7 34
8 8 5 5
9 ri 6 9
10 Io 7 7
11 5 8 o
1i 55 8 52
o o2 9 43
i 8 10 28
I 54 11 Ii
2 37 I 56
3 21 0 19
4 7 6
4 55 '53
5 46 2 44
6 39 3 36
7 33 4 29
8 26 5 22
9 15 6 13
10 5 7 3


AREA OF OCEANS IN SQUARE MILES.
Pacific ....................................80,000,000
Atlantic..................................40,000,000
Indian .................................. 20,000,000
Southern...............................10,000,000
Arctic..................................... 5,000,000









II -H: TIDE
(STANDARD TIME.)


JULY,
BosT. N. Y.
TIDE. TIDE.
Morning. Morning.

10 52 7 46
11 34 8 30
..... 9 16
o 38 9 58
I 22 10 39
2 6 II 23
2 51 ....*
3 41 0 39
4 35 I 34
5 37 2 34
6 44 3 41
7 52 4 49
8 58 5 55
9 57 6 55
10 51 7 46
11 37 8 33
..... 20
o 43 io I
1 24 10 39
2 5 II 20
2 45 ....
3 26 0 24
4 I I io
5 I I 59
5 56 2 54
6 53 3 50
7 51 4 48
8 47 5 44
9 39 6 37
10 29 7 25
II'13 8 7


AUGUST.

BosT. N. Y.
TIDE. TIDE.
ornin.g. Morning.

ii 55 8 53
o 16 9 36
i 0 to 19
I 45 Ii 2
2 31 II 52
3 20 0 19
4 16 I 15
5 21 2 19
6 31 3 29
7 41 4 37
8 44 5 42
9 41 6 38
10 31 7 27
11 14 8 9
II 54 8 52
o 14 9 32
o 52 10 8
I 30 o1 45
2 io If 25
2 49 .....
3 33 0 31
4 22 I 21
5 i6 2 14
6 16 3 14
7 17 4 14
8 16 5 13
9 to 6 8
10 2 7 0
10 49 7 44
11 33 8 28
****. 9 15





SIZE OF THE GREAT LAKES.
Mliles long. Miles wide,
Superior ............................... 380 120
Michigan.................................330 60
Ontario ..................................170 40
Champlain ..................... ... 123 I1


SEPTEMBER.

Bos'r. N. Y.
TIDEI. TIDE.
Alorning. Morning.

0 38 9 59
I 25 TO 45
2 15 Ii 36
3 7 4
4 5 1 4
5 o1 2 8
6 19 3 17
7 26 4 22
8 26 5 22
9 18 616
Io 6 7 4
o1 48 7 43
I1 26 8 20
. 8 59
o 20 9 37
o 58 to 14
I 37 10 52
2 I8 II 34
3 I .*
3 48 o 47
4 42 I 41
5 40 2 38
6 42 3 39
7 42 4 38
8 39 5 37
9 32 6 30
10 22 7 19
II 9 8 3
II 54 8 52
o IS 9 41
.. .










IEITG-II TID E-
(STANDARD TIME.)


OCTOBER,
Hirosr. N. Y.

S Morning. MOorriBIg.
Si 8 o 30
2 2 r II 23
3 2 56 .....
4 3 54 o 53
5 4 56 1 55
6 6 o 258
7 7 2 3 59
8 7 59 4 55
9 8 48 5 46
10 9 33 6 31
11 Io 16 7 13
12 o1 55 7 50
13 11 32 8 28
14 ..... 9 7
15 o 28 9 47
16 1 9 to 26
17 1 51 ri 6
18 2 34 11 53
19 3 2 0 18
20 4 Io 1 9
21 5 5 2 3
22 6 4 3 2
23 7 5 4 2
24 8 4 5 o
25 9 0 558
26 9 53 6 5r
27 1o 46 7 41
28 II 36 8 32
29 o I 9 26
30 o 54 1o IS
31 i 48 ir 10


NOVEMBER.

Ilo.T. N. Y.
T) II II )Iw,.


2 43 .....
3 37 0 35
4 34 i 33
5 31 2 29
6 28 3 25
7 22 4 19
8 12 5 9
8 39 5 57
9 43 6 41
10 25 7 22
Ir 5 8 0
11 44 8 40
o 4 9 23
0o 45 3
1 26 10 43
2 ro r1 27
2 53 .---.
3 40 0 39
4 32 1 31
5 28 2 26
6 28 3 25
7 29 4 26
8 30 5 27
9 29 6 27
1027 7 23
11 20 8 14
..... 9 12
0 40 10 4
1 33 Io 52
2 23 1i 44


DECEMBER.

llor. N. Y.



3 12 0 10
4 2 1 1
4 54 i 52
5 47 2 45
6 39 3 37
7 32 4 28
8 21 5 18
9 9 6 7
9 55 6 53
10 39 7 34
11 21 8 i6
...-- 9 o
0 23 9 42
i 4 10 21
1 46 1I 2
2 29 11 47
3 i3 0 11
4 1 1 0
4 55 1 53
5 56 2 54
7 0 3 57
8 6 5 3
9 9 6 7
To it 7 S
11 7 3 o
1" 57 3 55
0o 22 9 45
1 1t 10 30
1 57 11 13
2 42 .---.
3 26 0o 24


SIZE OF THE GREAT LAKES.
M1iles lo~g. lead le
Erie....................................270 50
Huron.................................. 250 90
Winnipeg ...............................240 40
Athabaska ........................... 200 20











SHORT METHOD

FOR CALCULATING INTEREST.

Multiply the principal by as many hundreds as there
are days, and
For 4 per cent........................... Divide by go
.5 .. ........................... 72
6 .... .... ................. " 6o
7 .. .. ........................... . 52
8 ........................... " 45
9 ". .......................... . 40
i .o ....................... .... " 36
12 ................ .. ...... 30
EXAMPLE- INTEREST on $50 for 30 '1T"" t 4 %.
50 x.30 = 15.oo, which divided by go = :, ... -the
required result.
----o~o : ----

FESTIVALS AND FASTS.
Epiphany . . . . . .. Jan. 6
Septuagesima Sunday . . . . Feb. 3
Quinquagesima -Shrove Sunday . . Feb. 7
Ash Wednesday . . . . . Feb. 20
First Sunday in Lent . . . . Feb. 24
St. Patrick ... .. .. .... . Mar. 17
Palm Sunday . . . . .. . Mar. 31
Good Friday . . . . ... .April 5
Easter Sunday .. . . ...... April 7
Low Sunday .. . . ..... .April 14
Rogation Sunday .. . . ..... May 12
Ascension Day-Holy Thursday . .. .May 16
Pntecost-Whit Sunday . . .. May 26
Trinity Sunday . . ..... .June 2
Corpus Christi . . . . . . June 6
St. John Baptist . . . . .. June 24
Michaelmas Day . . . . . Sept. 29
St. Andrew . . . . . . Nov. 30
First Sunday in Advent . .. . . Dec. i
Christmas Day . . . . Dec. 25



THE SEASONS.
Eastern Standard. Central Standard.
Vernal Equinox.....M ar. 21, 2h. r.. Mar. 21, ih. M.
Summer Solstice.... June 21, roh. A. June 21, 9h. A.
Autumnal Equinox..Sept. 23, lh. A. Sept. 23, oh. A.
Winter Solstice.....Dec. 22, 711. I. Dec. 22, (h. AM.
Mnimt.in Standard. Pacific Stalndrd.
Vernal Equinox.....a. a2, oh. . Mar. 20, 1ih. A.
Summer Solstice.... June 21, Sh. A. June 21, 7h. A.
Autuminal FTPint,- Crpt 23, 1ih. M. Sept. 23, toh. M.
Winter -..i -..: L'-.. 22, 5h. S. Dec. 22, 4h. M.



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES.
Dominical Letter . . . . . . F
Epact . . . . . . . . o
Lunar Cycle, or Golden Number . . .. 2
Solar Cycle . . . . . 6
Roman Indiction .... . . . . 14
Julian Period .. . . . . 6614











ECLIPSES FOR THE YEAR.



In the year 190o there will be two Eclipses of the
SUN, one of the MooN, and a LUNAR APPULSE.
I. A LUNAR APPULSE, May 3-4. Invisible to N6rth
America. Visible more or less to Europe, Asia, Africa,
Australia, the extreme eastern tip of South America, and
the Indian Ocean.
II. A TOTAL ECLIPSE OF THE SUN, May 18. In-
visible to North America. Visible to Australia, southern
Asia, the eastern part of Africa, and to the Indian Ocean,
the p'blh of totality passing through the islands of Mauri-
tils, Sumatra, Borneo and New Guinea.
III. A PARTIAL ECLIPSE OF THE MOON, October
27. Visible in part to the western coast of North America,
Europe, Africa, and to Asia, Australia and the north Pacific
and Indian Oceans. Occurring as follows:


PACIFIC STANDARD.

Moon enters Penumbra 5h. 4m. St.
Moon enters Shadow 6h. 25m. Mt.


First contact of shadow, 137 degrees from the north
point of the Moon's limb toward the east.
Magnitude of Eclipse = 0.227 (Moon's diameter = i).
IV. AN ANNULAR ECLIPSE 01' THE SUN, November
it. Invisible to North America. Visible to the greater
part of Europe, Asia, northern Africa, the extreme north-
ern edge of Australia, and to the Indian Ocean. The path
of annulus passes through Arabia, the Island of Ceylon,
the Malay Peninsula, to the Island of Luzon.

.----o~o@oo---


MORNING AND EVENING STARS.
MERCURY will be Evening Star about February 19,
June s1 and October 12; and Morning Star about April
4, August 2 and November 20.
VENUS will be Morning Star till April 30; and then
Evening Star the rest of the year.
JUPITER will be Morning Star till June 30; and then
Evening Star the rest of the year.










The Calendars for the Latitude of
Boston and Chicago

May be used filr Central and Southern New England,
Central New York, Southern Michigan, Southern
Wisconsin, Northern Iowa, Northern Nebraska, South
Dakota, and Wyoming.

The Calendars for the Latitude of
New York and Philadelphia

May be used for Southern New York, New Jersey, Penn-
sylvania, Northern Ohio, Northern Indiana, Northern
Illinois, Southern Iowa, and Southern Nebraska.

The Calendars for the Latitude of
Washington, Cincinnati, etc.

May be used for Delaware, Maryland, the Virginias,
Southern Ohio, Southern Indiana, Southern Illinois,
Kentucky, Missouri, Kansas, and Colorado.


FACTS WORTH KNOWING.
There are 2,754 languages.
America was discovered in 1492.
A square mile contains 040 acres.
Envelopes were first used in 1839.
Telescopes were invented in 1590.
The first steel pen was made in 1830
A span is ten and seven-eighth inches.
A hand (horse measure) is four inches.
Watches were first constructed in 1476.
The first iron steamship was built in 1830.
The first lucifer match was made in 1829.
Gold was discovered in California in 1848.
The first horse railroad was built in 1826-7.
The average human life is 31 years.
Coaches were first used in England in 1569.
Modern needles first came into use in 1545.
Kerosene was first used for lighting purposes in 1826.
The first newspaper was published in England in 1588.
The first newspaper advertisement appeared in 1652.
Until 1776 cotton-spinning was performed by the hand-
spinning wheel.
Measure 200 feet on each side and you will have a
square acre within an inch.
The first sewing machine was patented by Elias Howe,
Jr., in 1846.
The first steam engine on this continent was brought
from England in 1753.
One horse power is the strength necessary to lift 33,000
pounds one foot per minute.
The first knives were used in England, and the first
wheeled carriages in France in 1559.
'The national colors of the United States were adopted
by Congress in 1777,













v l --_, t ,;_^ ','\. _ ,: o. ,

MOON'S PHASES. EAST'N DIVISION. CENT. DIVISION.

FULI. MooN ...... 4d 71 3m A 4d. 6h. 13111. A.
LAST QUARTER.. I2d. 3.38ml A. 2d. 2h. 38I11. A.
NEW MOON ...... 2od. 9h11. 36m. MT. 2od. 8h. 36mn. T.
FIRST QUARTER.. 27d. 411. 521m. 27d. 311 52111. A.
LATI l I--- - I -lI '1 .1 .



IlTu. r7 30 3 57 r7 24 3 53 r7 19 3 48
2\ WE. s4 39 5 2 4 44 4 57 s4 49 4 52
3jTH. r7 30 6 2 r7 25 5 57 P-7 19 5 52
4,FR. s4 41 rises s4 46 rises. 34 51 rises.
5:SA. r7 30 5 48 r7 25 5 52 r7 r9 5 56
6 5 s4 43 6 53 s4 48 6 56 s4 53 7 o
7|Mo. r-7 30 7 56 '7 25 7 58 I-7 19 8 I
8'lu. s4 45 8 5 s o 8 59 s4 55 9 I
9.WE. r7 29 9 58 17 24 9 58 Y7 19 9 59
IoTH. s4 47 Lo 57 s4 52 1o 56 s4 57 Io 56
II F. r7 29 [I 56 r'7 24 11 54 -7 19 IT 53
2, SA. s4 49 'morn s4 5-1 morn s4 59 morn
131 r7 28 o 54 r7 23 0 51 77 18 o 49
I4 Mo. s4 51 I 52 s4 56 I 48 I5 I 45
IS Tu. r7 27 2 51 /7 23 2 47 17 IS 2 42
1i6WE. s4 54 3 49 -s4 5S 3 44 s5 3 3 39
17 Ti. r7 26 4 43 r7 22 4 38 r7 I7 4 33
I8 FR. s4 56 5 34 5 5 29 s5 5 5 24
I SA. r7 25 6 22 r7 20 6 I8 I7 16 6 13
20 s4 59 sets. x5 3 sets- s5 8 sets.
2I Mo. r7 24 6 40 r7 i9 6 42 17 13 6 46
22' TU. s5 i 7 50 -.F5 5 7 51 s5 IO 7 53
23iWE. ;7 22 9 2 r7 I8 9 2 17 14 9 3
24 Tll. sr5 4 10 1 s'5 8 io 14 15 12 ro 14
25IFR. r7 21 11 27 r7 17 II 25 17 12 r1 23
26 SA. s5 6 morn s15 io morn s5 14 morn
27 r7 20 o 38 1-7 15 o 35 r7 I o 32
28 Alo. s5 9 1 47 s5 13 1 43 s5 17 I 39
29 Tur. r7 17 2 53 r'7 3 2 48 -7 Io 2 43
30 WE. s5 II1 3 54 s5 15 3 49 s5 19 3 44
31 T. 7 5 4 48 124 r 4 43 r 8 4 38









..- t '
I ' I. ''' --- r '**
':i ,l ." r ' r-


. _'-- ,I '". ,= :, or... -


MOON'S PHASES. EAST'N DIVISION. CENT. DIVISION.

FULL MOON...... 3d. ml. 30111. M.l 3d. 9. 30111. IA.
I.AST QUARTER... II(. 111. 12111. A. JI d, o1 12111. A.
NEw MOON ....... Sd. 911. 45111. A. 18. 81h. 45111. A.
FIRST QUARTER.. 25d. ih. 38m. 25d. oh. 38m. A.
LATITUDE OF BOSTON UT i ..1 1 "*
AND CHICo GO. 1 : '. .i ,.III:,
Day ] .. S ]Moon
1 orF SUN IMooN SUN MOON SUN MOON
l W'k. R.&S. R.&S. R.&S. R.&S. I R.&S. I R.&S.


r7 14 5 34
s5 i5 6 13
77 12 rises.
s5 18 6 431
'7 10 7 45
S5 20 8 45
7'7 8 9 44!
r7 "1
.5 2 'i . ..
s5 2( ,
r7
s5 2' i
r7 c, : -, ',
s5 3
'r6 5 .
>5 3 4 .:

s5 3'- 4
r6 5' I
'5 34''
r6 54 '-

)6

S5 4 I'

r65 4
S5 4 '4
Y-6 .
s3 4


r7 II
s5 '9
7'7 9

r7 7
s, 24
1'7 5
S5 26
177 2
s15 2S
27 0
s5 31
r6 57
s5 33
r6 55
s5 36
r6 52
s5 38
-6 49
s5 41
r6 46
s3 43
r6 441
s5 45
r6 41
s5 48
:r6 38
s 5 50


r7 7 5 26
s5 22 6 6
77 5 rises.
s5 25 6 47
'7 3 7 47
s5 27 8 45
7-7 I 9 42
s5 29 10 38
r6 59 rI 34
s5 32 morn
r6 57 o 30
s5 34 I 26
r6 55 2 20
s5 36 3 12
r6 52 4 2
s15 38 4 47
r6 50 5 29
s5 41 sets.
r6 47 6 43
s5 43 7 57
r6 44 9 9
s5 45 10 20
r6 42 II 30
s5 47 morn
r6 39 o 37
s5 49 I 38
r6 36 2 34
s5 51 3 23

.... ..


I FR.
2 SA.
3 S
4 Mo.
5 Tu.
6 WE.
7 TI .
8 FR.
9 SA.
10 .S
II Mo.
12 TU.
13 WE.
14 TH.
15 FR.
16 SA.
17
18 Mo.
19 Tu.
20 W\IE.
21 Til.
22 FR.
23 SA.
24 4
1,.,
26 Tu.
27 WE.
28 TH.


"i: :.. :. .. .. ...: I















MOON'S PHASES. EAST'N DIVISION. CENT. DIVISION.
(In standard Time.)__
FULL MOON-...... 5d. 31). 41. M- 5(1. 11. 411. .I.
LAST QUARTER... 13d. 81. 6111. M. 3d. 7h. h6m. L.
NELw MooN....... 2od, 711. 53111. t. 20d. 6)1. 5311i. M.
FIRST QUAR'TER..1 26d 301. A. 26d. h.d. 39m. A.
LATITUCI 'oi ,ii" .'1 rL"f J 'a I .i nU .*T 'ff

S of , I| SUN MOON
S W'Vk.i .. i .'. I R.&S.IR.&S.
I FR. r6 36 4 13 r6 35 4 9 r6 33 4 5
2 SA. s5 51 4 48 15 52 4 45 $5 53 4 43
3 ;S 16 33 5 21 6 32 5 19 '6 30 5 I8
4 Mo. s5 53 rises. s5 54 rises.l s5 56 rises.
5 Tu. r6 3o 6 34 r6 29 6 -1 ,-6 28 6 35
6 \WE. 5 56 7 33 sS 57 7,- 5 53 7 32
7 TI. Pr6 27 8 32 '6 26 8 .:. 25 8 29
8 FR. sc 5S 9 30 s5 59 9 -" 'j 0 9 25
9 SA. r6 23 to 27 r'6 22 10 : '. 22 o 20
1o S .s6 0 I 24 s6 I ir :.I 1 2 I 15
iI Mo. r6 20 morn r6 19 morh -6 19 morn
12 Tu. s6 3 o 19 s6 3 o 14 S6 4 o io
13 Wi-. r6 16 r ii ;6 16 i 1 15 i
14 Ti., s6 5 2 o s6 5 i 'i' 6 i 51
13 FIR. vr6 13 2 45 ,-6 13 2 4' 12 2 36
16 SA. s6 7 3 6 8 3 -I 8 3 19
17 r6 9 4 3 6 9 4 9 3 59
18 Mo. s6 Tl 4 38 s6 10 4 ro 4 36
19 Tu. r6 6 5 2 r6 6 5 ' 5" 2
20 WioI. s6 12 sets. s 6 12 set 12 sets.
21 TI. -6 3 8 3 r6 3 8 ':* 3 7 59
22 FR. s6 14 9 I s6 14 9 4 9 12
23 SA. r-5 59 o0 31 r5 59 ro o io 22
24 S s6 6 1rr 38 6 16 fr I S 15 1i 29
25 Mo. r5 56 morn r5 56 mo.,,, 57 mom
26 Tu. 6 18 o 38 s6 S o '17 o 28
27 WE. r-5 52 I 30 ?-5 53 53 I 2f
28 TI. s6 21 2 1 s6 20 2 19 2 5
29 FI-. >-5 49 2 2 r 5 49 2 50 2 44
30 SA. s6 23 3 s6 22 3 21 3 18
3r a -5 545 3 r5 46 3 -1 47 3 49









, ," ,' . '- . -u -- '





MOON'S PHASES. EAST'N DIVISION. CENT. DIVISION.
(In Standard Time.) _
Fou. MooN ...... 3d. Sh. A. 3d. 7h. 20o. A.
LAST QUARTER.. xld. lol. 57m A. lid. 9h. 571n. A.
NEW MOON ...... 18d. 411. 37M". A. i8d. 3i. 37ni. A.
Fl'IST QARTKr.. 25d. z 5. m. raS. 25d. Job r5mn. Mt.
LATITUDE OF BOSTON LAT. OF NEW YORK IAT. OF WASH.
AND CHICAGO. AND PHILA. IN. & ST. LOUIS.
)a I.ocnl- en1 Time. I.ocl 1 n, Time.- Local lean Time.
T)av ..
& of SuN T1 C. Mlu SuN MonN
SW'k. R.&S. I' r* I \- R.& S. .&S. S.
IMo. r3 43 4 18 -5 44 4 17 r5 46 4 18
TTu. s6 26 443 s6 25 4 43 *6 24 4 45
3 WE. r5 40 rises. r5 41 rises. r5 43 rises.
4TH. s6 29 7 22 s6 27 7 19 .6 26 7 18
5FR. r-5 36 8 20 r5 38 8 17 r5 39 8 14
6SA. 6 31 9 17 s6 29 9 13 s6 28 9 9
7 ; r5 33 0 I'. ". 35 10 8 r5 36 10 4
8Mo. r6 33 I "* 32 1 I s6 30 1o 56
9T'u. r5 30 55 -5 31 II 50 r5 33 11 45
o1 W\ s6 35 mornl 6 34 mor s6 32 morn
II1 Tl. r75 26 0 .4. .,28 o 36 r5 30 0 31
121 F. s6 38 -i "3 36 1 17 s6 34 I 13
13 SA. 1-5 23 1 .25 55 r5 27 i 52
14$ .- s6 40 233 6 38 2 31 s6 36 2 30
5Mo. 75 20 3 6 5 22 3 5 r5 24 3 5
16l'Tu. s6 42 3 38 6 40 338 .6 38 3 39
171WE 5 17 4 r2 r5 19 4 13 r5 21 4 15
18 I'Ir. s6 44 sets. s6 42 sets. s6 39 sets.
'9iFR. r5 14 8 7 1-5 16 8 3 r5 19 7 59
20 SA. s6 46 9 1 s6 44 9 14 s6 41 9 Io
21 r5 1o to 24 r5 13 10 19 r5 16 1I 14
22 Mo. s6 49 1 21 s6 46 1 16 s6 43 1I 2
23 Tu. r5 7 morn -5 o0 morn r5 13 morn
24WE. 6 51 o 9 6 48 o 5 s6 45 o I
25 Tn. -5 4 o 49 r5 7 o 46 1-5 10 o43
26 FR. s6 53 1 23 s6 50 1 21 s6 47 I 19
7 SA. 15 I 54 r5 4 52 r5 8 I 51
i28 s6 55 2 6 52 22 s6 49 2 21
Sr4 59 2 48 -5 2 2 48 5 2 49
3 T. 6 58 314 6 54 3 15 s6 51 3 17















MOON'S PHASES. EAST'N DIVISION. CENT DIVISION.
(Nll Sitlicld rdi Tune.)
Fut.L MOON ...... 3d. Ill. 19M A. 3d. o. 191n. A.
LAST QUARTE .. Lid. 911. 38m. n Lid. 811. 38Sn t.
NEW MOON ...... i8d. oh. 37111. M. 7d. n11l. 37111. A.
]"I ST QUANrUl.r .. 25d. o011. 39m111. ,. 24d. lib. 3911. A.
LATITUDE OF BOSTON LAT. OF "*'l fi I LAi DF WASH,
AND CHICAGO. AND HIL( ] UN A ST. LOUIS

orf SUN 3ooN Su. N MOON SUN MOON
W w'k.! R&s ..& S I. S. R.&S. R.&S.
I WE. 1-4 56 3 4< 7-4 59 3 43 r5 3 3 46
2 TH. s7 o 4 IO s6 56 4 13 s6 53 4 16
3 FR. r-4 53 rises. r-4 57 rises. r5 o rises.
4 SA. s 7 2 8 8 s6 58 8 4 j6 55 7 59
5 r-4 50 9 r4 54 8 57 :' 58 8 52
6 Mo. s7 4 9 52 s7 I 9 417 57 9 42
7 Tu. r4 48 to 38 r4 52 IO 33 I 55 To 29
8 W E s7 6 II .:' 3 : : i '3' 58 11 12
9 TH r4 46 1I 58 r4 49 1I 55 1-4 54 1 52
10 FR. s7 9 morn .s7 5 morn r- o morn
II SA. r-4 43 o 32 -r4 47 o 3.:' . 52 O 28
12 ;- s7 Ii 1 5 ,r7 7 1 1 2 1 2
13 Mo. r4 41 I 37 -4 45 4 50 I 37
14 Tlu. s7 13 2 9 s7 9 2 1'.: 4 2 I1
15 WE-. r4 39 2 43 r-4 43 2 4i 48 2 47
16 Tu. s7 15 3 20 S'7 IT 3 --. 6 3 27
17 FR. r4 37 4 3 7r4 41 4 4 46 4 1
18 SA. s7 17 sets. s7 12 sets. s7 8 sets.
19 r14 35 9 5 r'4 40 9 c0 i 44 8 55
20 Mo. s7 19 110 0 7 14 9 55 : 9 9 51
2rl Tu. r-4 33 10 45 r-4 38 10 41 43 0o 37
22 WE. s7 21 1i 23 s7 16 ii 2C0 II I1 17
23 Tll. r4 32 11 55 r'4 36 1 5 4r II 52
24 FR. s7 23 morm s7 18 morn 13 morn
25 SA. r-4 30 o 24 r4 35 o 2- 4 40 O 23
261 -z s7 25 o 51 s7 19 o 5' 1 14 0 52
27Mo. r7-4 28 I 7 r4-4 34 I 18 4 39 I 19
28 Tu. s7 26 I 44 s7 21 I 4 11'- 16 I 48
29 WE. r4 2 2 12 7-4 32 2 14 ',4 38 2 j8
30 TH. s7 28 2 42 s7 23 2 45 17 2 49
31 FR. r4 26 3 15 7-4 31 3 15 4 37 3 24












F "7
3
~~-4"!r
~~ir~.


MOON'S PHASES. EAS
(Ii, StLinm l:r, Tim-.)
FULL MOON...... 2d.
LAST QUARTER... 9d.
NEW MOON....... 16d.
FIRST QUARTER.. 23d.
LATITUDE OF BOSTON
AND CHICAGO.
D a y I -k 1k. ,- s.1
I of SUN MION
( W'k. R.&S.R.&S.


F'N DIVISION. CENT. DIVISION.

411. 53111. M. 2d. 3hl 53.111. 1.
5h. o01. A. 9d. 41. onl. A.
Sh. 33111. t. 6d. 7h. 3311. M.
3h. 59m. 23d. 2h. 59m. A.


LAT. ff.,
Alrl I,,,,,,
I.,cl
SUN MOOUIN
R.&S. I R.& S.


3 54 74 31
rises. s7 25
8 37 r4 30
9 20 s7 26
9 59 14 29
to 35 s7 28
1I 8 74 29
[1 39 s7 29
norn rI4 28
o 9 s7 30
o 41 r4 28
I I6 s7 j3
I 55 r4 28
2 39 s7 32
3 31 74 28
sets. s7 33
8 35 '4 28
9 17 s7 33
9 53 '4 28
10 24 s7 34
ro 53 r'4 29
11 20 s7 34
11 46 r4 29
morn s7 35
o 14 r4 30
o 44 s7 35
I 17 r4 30
I 53 7 35
2 34 r4 31
3 2, "7 35
. . ,t' ....'


3 58
rises.
8 32
9 16
9 55
10 32
ii 6
1r 38
morn
0 9
o 42
I IS
r 58
2 43
3 36
sets.
8 31
9 14
9 50
10 22
10 52
11 20
11 47

o 16
o 47
I 21
I 57
2 39
3 25


R'.&'S. R.&S.


4 4
rises.
8 28
9 12
9 53
10 31
II 5
11 38
morn
o Io
o 45
I 22
2 3
2 48
3 41
sets.
8 27
9 1i
9 49
10 22
10 53
1I 22
II 49
morn
o 19
o 51
I 25
2 3
2 44
3 31


I SA.
2 S
3 Mo.
4 Tu.
5 \VE.
6 TH.
7 FR.
8'iA.
9 S
10 Mo.
II Tu.
12 W\E.
13 TI'l
14 FR.
15 SA.
16 S
17 Mo.

20 9T.
20 ll.
21 FR.
22 SA.
23 S.
24 Mo.
25 Tu.
26 \\E.
27 TH.
28 FR.
29 SA.
30L 5



















MOON'S PHASES. EAST'N DIVISION. CENT. DIVISION.

FULL MOON...... d. 6h. 17111. A. id. 5h. 17m. A.
.AS'T QUARTER... Sd. loh. 20111. A. 8d. 9. 20111. A.
NEw MOON....... i5d. 511. 1om. A. I5d. 41. 10111. A.
FIRST QUARTER .. 23d. Sh. 58m. M. 23d. 7h 58m. i.

FULL MOON 'Id. 4 M. 3 34.
(1II trndrd Tln-1


1 I.



I I I .


Ii
IC.


I .
C I j



I- -



I

I I






2I .. "
I I' i .











2

I
2 I I


3 1- .
3 '.'*. L,. i


l'. -" -I 4




I 4'





. ,i 4 i 4
- il.






'. '' '4





i '. i I -

I' 4"




4 *r iI


4 ; ,:.; .





41 -


II

4 '

'4 I 4
4 4f' 4








4'_ L 4
"; :* i 4 -







4

I .





- 1 ' '







; ;. :, I! ;


4-. I. 4-


I .
4' I










4.'
1I ] 4 i






4 ' "




4 _
:" i -'- -:
















MOON'S PHASES. EAST'N DIVISION. CENT. DIVISION.
(IN s lladldr Time.)_
LAST QUARTER.. 7d. 31h. 2m. M. yd. 2h. 21n. Mr.
NEw MOON ...... 14d. 311. 2711. 1 14d. 21. 27111. M
'IRST QUARTER 22d. 211. 52111. M. 22d. ill. 52111. .
Oui. MOON ..... 311. 29 rm. A. 29d. 2hl. 211i1. A.
LATITUDE OF BOSTON LAT. OF NEW YORK LAT, OF '
AND CHICAGO. AND PHILA. CIN. & 8T. u,..,,
])av T ].-I MeIa- Time. ].o M Met, TIme. Local IleR u 'flme.
of SuNN MOON SUN MOON SUN MOON
SW'k. R.&S.IR.&S. R.&S. R.&S. R.&S. R.&S.
I TH. r4 52 7 44 '4 56 7 42 r5 o 7 42
2 FR. s7 19 8 17 S7 15 8 16 s7 II 8 17
3 SA. 4 4 8 49 r'4 58 8 50 r5 2 8 51
4 s .7 16 9 21 s7 13 9 23 '7 8 925
SMo. r4 56 9 56 '5 o 9 59 r5 4 10 2
6 Tu. .7 14 10 35 1s7 I0 o 39 s7 6 10 43
7 \\WE 4 58 I 20 '5 2 11 24 r5 5 II 30
8 Tl. s7 1I mor'n s7 8 morn s7 4 morn
9 FR. -5 o0 o 1i re5 3 0 I16 r5 7 o 21
10 SA. s7 9 I 8 s7 5 I 13 s7 2 I IS
I r-5 2 2 I0 r5 5 2 14 "5 9 2 20
12 Mo. s7 6 3 I5 s7 3 3 19 6 59 3 24
13 Tu'. r5 4 421/ 5 7 424 r5 0 4 28
14 \W.E .17 3 sets. s7 o sets. s6 56 sets.
1511 T. r5 6 7 23 r5 9 7 22 '5 13 7 23
16 FR. s7 0 7 51 .6 57 7 51 s6 54 7 53
17 SA. 7-5 8 8 8Ir1-5 1 8 19 r)5 15 8 22
18 S s6 57 8 46 s6 54 8-48 6 51 8 51
19 M0o. 5 11 9 16 15 13 9 19 15 6 9 23
20 TI. s6 54 9 49 s6 51 9 53 s6 49 9 57
21 WE. -5 13 TO 26 r5 15 o0 30 r5 8 io 35
22 TIL. s6 510 I 8 s6 48 i1 13 s6 46 0i 18
23 FR 7'5 15 11 56 '5 17 morn 15 20 morn
24 SA. s6 48 morn s6 45 o I s6 43 o 6
25 -5 17 o 49 1-5 19 0 54 r5 22 0 59
26 Mo. s6 45 I 48 s6 42 I 52 s6 40 I 57
27 Tu. r-5 19 2 51 r-5 21 2 54 r5 24 2 59
28 WE. s6 4 3 57s6 39 4 o 6 38 4 3
29 TIH. -5 21 rises. r-5 23 rises. 7-5 26 rises.
30 FR. .6 38 6 47s6 36 6 47 .6 34 6 48
31 SA. 715 23 7 2T r5 25 7 22 7'5 27 7 24









, '- .,



S~ ,,: -.-"

MOON'S PHASES. EAST'N DIVISION. CENT. DIVISION.
(In SYil, ,d TiI..). __
LATr QuARtrmI.. 3d. 1.21. m. hl sd. 7h. 27m. il.
NE.W MOON ...... 12d. 4h,. 8m. A. ad. 311. 1811. A,
I'ISrT QUAt 1Rti .. 20d. 811. 33111. A. 2od. 711. 33111. A.
FU.L MOON ...... 28d. oh. 3bln. 7. 7d. ihi. 36111. A.
LATITUDE OF BOSTON LAT. OF NEW YORK LAT. OF WASH.
AND CHICAGO. AND PHILA. CIN. & ST. LOUIS,
31 l'.ocal e 1' Time. I loe ea TLi-- --me. lo l an Tlime.
I of SUN MOON SlN MArON SUN MOON
\ W'k. IR&S. R.&S. R.&S. R.&S. R.&S. R.&S.
S0 r5 24 7 57 r5 26 7 59 r5 2S S 3
2 Mo. s6 33 8 35 6 31 8 38 s 29 8 4
3Tu. -5 26 9 i8r5 28 9 22 5 30 9 27
4 \VE. 6 3 o0 8 s6 28 10 13 s6 26 Io I8
5 TH. r5 29 1 4 5 30 9 -5 32 r1 14
6 F. s6 26 morn s6 25 morn s6 23 mlom
7 SA.- 5 31 o 4 15 32 o 8 5 34 0 14
8 5 s6 23 I 7 rY6 22 I II s6 20 I 16
9 Mo.0'5 33 2 11 r5 34 2 14 r5 35 2 19
o Tu. A6 19 3 15 ~6 IS 3 17 s6 17 3 21
t WlVE. r5 35 4 19 r5 36 4 20 r5 37 4 23
12 Tit. .s6 j6 5 20 s6 15 5 21 s6 14 5 23
13 IF'. R15 37 sets.- '5 38 sets. 5 .39 sets.
14 SA. .6 12 6 48 s6 12 6 5o .6 I1 6 53
15 1-5 39 7 '8 /5 40 7 21 '5 41 7 24
16 Mu. 16 9 7 5 s6 8 7 53 s6 S 7 5s
17 Tu. -"5 41 8 25 1-5 42 829 rn 5 42 8 34
18 \VE. 6 5 9 4 s6 5 9 8 s6 4 9 '4
19 1T1i '5 43 9 49 '5 44 9 54 r5 44 9 59
2o FR. 6 2 10 39 s6 10 44 s6 I o 49
21 SA. I5 46 1 34 15 46 1 38 15 46 II 44
22 s 5 s5 morn sS 58 morn 5s 58 morn
'- 5 4 480 335 48 o 37 55 48 o 40
24 T. 3 55 I 36 s5 55 1 39 s5 55 I 43
25 WE. P"5 50 2 43 r5 50 2 45 r5 50 2 48
26 TH. s5 5 3 54 s5 5 3 55 y5 50 3 57
27 FR. -5 52 5 6 r5 52 5 6 '5 5: 5 7
28 SA. s5 48 rises. s5 48 rises. s5 48 rises.
29 1r5 54 6 32 r5 54 6 3 5 553 6 39
30 Mo. s-5 44 7 14 s5 45 7 18 s5 45 7 22
. . .. I .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .











1 "( --; '.: -. ', - ". "' a "" u:-t ,"



MOON'S PHASES. EAST'N DIVISION. CENT. DIVISION.
(Il 81 t;tr -]llle. ) _
IAST QUARTER... 2d. 411. 40 A. 2d. 31. 49111. A.
NEW MOON ....... od. 531m. A t h. 53111. A.
FIRST QUARTER .. Sd,, 3S. 3511 A. iSd. 2h. 311. A.
FULL. Moo...... 255d. yh. r6m. M. 25d. h. r6m. st.
0,rr.r i, '...TO0l t.A ir .. 'ri,,, T. OF WASH.
*...I____. Alu i.ll C in. St. LOUIS.
Sof SI MOON SUN MOON SUN T MOON
W V'k. R &SR.& S.I R.&S 1 R,&S. R.SS.IR.&S.
i f -7 910 56 ? 4 10 57 r6 59 II o
2 Mo. 34 28 I 59 3 4 34 11 59 S4 39 m11orn
3 Tu. r7 it orn 6 mornl 9 7 I o
4 WE4 28 I o 4 33 i 1 38 r o
5 Tu. r 13 1 59 r 8 I 3 1 57
6 FR. s4 28 58 4 33 2 5 38 2 55
7 SA. r7 15 3 t.. ; -to 3 ;' 5 3 5
8 .4 28 534 53 1s433 4 4', 438 4 47
9 Mo. r7 t7 5 :: 2 5 4 7 540
lo Tu. s4 28 6 i<. 4 33 6 ,i4 38 6 32
SII\VE r- I 11- 14 set: 8 sets.
,j TH. s4 '. 4 33 6 1 4 39 6 19
T3 FR. V7 .j- 16 7 1 I.,- 10 7 14
14 SA. s4 2 4 34 8 1 .4 39 8 13
15 S -7 -, I.17 7 9 I' ; 9 13
6 "Mo.. 4 3 1 .4 40 o1 14
.7 ;Tu ry :- 1311 i8
18 Wl\.s4 i.'. 4 1y r.I. 4 40 M1or1

o FR 4 .- 4 41 r 29
ai SA, r7 2r 2 4 '2j; 13 2 38




a6 Ti. S4 4 39 6 44 6
7 FR. 7 : 7 23 7 . 7 37
S. -4 '. 40 8 4:' 46 8 43
2 7 -l 7 4' 9 -i. Is 9 47
3 Mo. 4 1'- 42 10 4-4 47 10 48
31 Tu, y7 : 4., .- 24 zz 4- r g9I11 48




Ther. TUESDAY, JAN. I, 1901 Wea.













Their. WEDNESDAY 2 /ea.











There. WEDNESDAY 2 Wea.

^^*c^^^. cL^-^




Ther. THURSDAY, JAN. 3, 1901






























Ther. FRIDAY 4




Ther. SATURDAY, JAN. 5, 1901 Wea


T|r SN 6^v r ~ We /.



















Ther. SUNDAY 6 Wea.





Ther. ON E. M..


























Ther. TUESDAY 8 Wea.

4irL



7AA~&x 8%q4&





Ther. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 9, 1901
































Ther. THURSDAY 10

i~ /
^^^^ft^U^L


Wea.


Wea.





Ther. FRIDAY, JAN. II, 1901


Ther. SATURDAY 12
r;-7




Ther. SUNDAY, JAN. 13, 1901 Wea.























Ther. MONDAY 14 Wea.

-I a^




Ther. TUESDAY, JAN. 15, 1901


Ther. WEDNESDAY 16

^^^CL~t--^




Ther. THURSDAY, JAN. 17, 1901

^^ ;Z-yPb., -u


FRIDAY 18


Wea.


Ther.




Ther. SATURDAY, JAN. 19, 1901
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ e


T'her. SUNDAY 20

^i^Sa^^--J~


Wea.




Ther. MONDAY, JAN. 21, 1901

























Ther. TUESDAY 22

^ a^^ke"i^--




Ther. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 23, 1901 Wea.


THURSDAY 24


Wea.




Ther. FRIDAY, JAN. 25, I901 Wea.


SATURDAY 26




SUNDAY, JAN. 27, 1901


MONDAY 28


Ther.


Wea.




The. TUESDAY, JAN. 29, Igoi Wea.


WEDNESDAY 30




Ther. THURSDAY, JAN. 31, 1901 Wea.


FRIDAY, FEB. I


Wea.





Other. SATURDAY, Fu'. 2, 1901 Wea.


SUNDAY 3


Ther.


Wea.





Ther. MONDAY, FEB. 4, 1901 Wea.































Ther. TUESDAY 5 Wea.





her. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 6, 1901 Wea.


THURSDAY 7


Wea.




Ther. FRIDAY, FEB. 8, 190o Wea,


SATURDAY 9


Ther.





SUNDAY, FEB. 10, 1901


MiONDAY II


NWea.


Wea.





Ther. TUESDAY, FEB. I2, I901 Wea.


WEDNESDAY 13


Ther.


Wea.




Ther. THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 1901 Wea.


FRIDAY 15




Ther. SATURDAY, FEB. 16, 19g0 Wea.


SUNDAY 17


Ther.




Other. MONDAY, FEB. 18, 1901


TUESDAY 19


Wea.


Wea.




Ther. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 20, 1901 Wea.


THURSDAY 21


Ther.





Ther. FRIDAY, FEB. 22, IgoI Wea.


SATURDAY 23


Wea.


Ther.




Ther. SUNDAY, FEB. 24, 19OI Wea.


MONDAY 25




Ther. TUESDAY, FEB. 26, 190T WTea.


WEDNESDAY 27




Ther. THURSDAY, FEB. 28, 1901 Wea.


FRIDAY, MAR. I


Ther.




Ther. SATURDAY, MAR. 2, 1901 Wea.


SUNDAY 3


Ther.




Ther. MONDAY, MAR. 4, 1901 W


Wea.


TUESDAY 5





Other. WEDNESDAY, MAR. 6, 19io


THURSDAY 7


Wea.


Wea.




FRIDAY, MAR. 8, 1901


SATURDAY 9




Sr. SUNDAY, MAR 10, 1901 Wea.


MONDAY I I


Wea.




Ther. TUESDAY, MAR. 12, 1901 Wea.


WEDNESDAY 13


Ther.




THURSDAY, MAR. 14, 1901


FRIDAY 15


Wea.


Ther.


Wea.





Ther. SATURDAY, MAR. 16, ig90 Wea.


SUNDAY 17


Ther.




Ther. MONDAY, MAR. 18, 1901 Wea.











T1'her. TUESDAY 19 Wea.o






Ther. TUESDAY 19) Wea.
k7^~rC ~ i ^s ^fa^-
C~crh {Cfi/ /ti U-r'-^ ^




Other. WEDNESDAY, MAR. 20, 1901 Wea.















T'her. THURSDAY 21 Wea.


-^ cUah (^7fria, ^f^^ ^^.
an /^ ft, ,,tt J


)T A^ 2 / c

d" 7 ?-yO ?
'^ ^ ^ >hV^ -/i cJjt-c




Ther. FRIDAY, MAR. 22, 1901 Wea.


,7,
9/ ,x
aun^a 4 (B-tri^^i^-^-y^c


Ther. SATURDAY 23

7a'&4wl --<




Ther. SUNDAY, MAR. 24, 19o0 Wea.


MONDAY 25


Other.





STher. TUESDAY, MAR. 26, igo Wea.


WEDNESDAY 27


Ther.




Ther. THURSDAY, MAR. 28, 1901 Wea.


FRIDAY 29




Ther. SATURDAY, MAR. 30, 1901 Wea.


SUNDAY 31




Ther. MONDAY, APRIL I, 1901


Ther. TUESDAY 2 Wea.




C~yntt;4CnS r AxCo i.


J4SL I a/ W--lop #aHj^U ,


Wea.




Ther. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, I90I Wea.


THURSDAY 4


Ther.




Ther. FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1901 Wea.


SATURDAY 6




Ther. SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 1901 Wea.


MONDAY 8


Wea.




Ther. TUESDAY, APRIL 9, 1901 Wea.


WEDNESDAY 10


Ther.





Ther. THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1901 Wea.


FRIDAY 12


Wea.




Ther. SATURDAY, APRIL 13, 1901 Wea.


SUNDAY 14


Ther.


Wea.





Ther. MONDAY, APRIL 15, 1901 Wea.


TUESDAY 16




Ther. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1901 Wea.


THURSDAY 18


Ther.




Ther. FRIDAY, APRIL I9, I90I Wea.


SATURDAY 20




Ther. SUNDAY, APRIL 21, 1901


MONDAY 22


Wea.


Wea.




Ther. TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 1901 Wea.


WEDNESDAY 24


Wen.




Ther. THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 19oi Wea.


FRIDAY 26


Ther.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs