Group Title: Circular ;
Title: Vegetable gardening guide /
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102085/00001
 Material Information
Title: Vegetable gardening guide /
Series Title: Circular ;
Physical Description: 1 folded sheet : ; 46 x 31 cm. folded to 23 x 10 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Stephens, James M
Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla
Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date: 1972
Copyright Date: 1972
 Subjects
Subject: Vegetable gardening -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Vegetables -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: prepared by J.M. Stephens.
General Note: Panel title.
General Note: "June, 1972."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102085
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 232154582

Full Text
rcuar 104 H
ircular 104 H
1 -
I\ 4f-


SBID


FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE


HM

""^**






INTRODUCTION
Successful vegetable gardens are not accidental
They are the results of planning. constant care.
and the will to make things grow.
There are many factors which dete mine
whether or not a garden will or will not he suc-
cessful. The recommendations contained here are
for home gardens; they may o, nmiy not be suit-
able for commercial use.
There are many things a vegetable garden mray'
offer toward a satisfying experience: fieT;h air.
exercise, sunshine, food rich in vitamins and
minerals, income and 1. n, leldgv.

SOME EARLY PLANS
Consider the size of your family and the am'cunt
of produce to be canned, fi...:'n, stored or ;id, :I-
well as that used fresh. Don't underestimate thie
work and personal attention involved.
Choosing a Location.- Select a plot of -.:odl.
well-drained soil near a water supply. It should
be close to the home for convenience but ishiuli
not be shaded by tall liiuildlinui o tie_-. Ent I,-n.r
the garden spot with a feince is oil.uill. l ',il..ll le.
The Garden Design.--Many gardeners find it
hielful to draw out on p.iper the lohatin of each
row and the crop or -ULe.-.-iln of Lrop.s to be
planted.
CROP REQUIREMENTS
Vegetables ullted i, Flriil.i gacilenri le.tdinl
varieties, seed or plants lneulel. planting distances
and depths. best time for plantin L 1hv lrean.
haidineie ,, days to harvest and ex\iected yieldl
are shown in the Pl.lntinL Guide on the inside of
this leaflet.
SOIL PREPARATION
Spade well or plow the land at least 3 weeks
before plnltinv Rework the soil to secure a fine
firm seedbed for ill.nting.

LIIMING
Lime to sweeten the soil should be applied only
when the needs have been established by a re-
2






able soil test. The best range for garden i on
indy soil is between pH 5.5 and 6.0. Applications
f 2 to 3 pounds of finely ground dolomitic lime-
,one per 100 square feet usually will be icelit on extremely acid soils.
Line needs should be met well in advance of the
wanting date, piefe rialy 2 to 3 months before
ie giidcii is to be planted. However, hydrated
,ne may be applied two weeks or more before
antin where a lui k-:tLlin- material is neces-
try. Use at three-fourths the rate of dolomite.
.oisten the Lcaiden soil, and make sure the lime
thoroughly mixed into the soil.

ORGANIC MATTER
The m. iii it', of Fl' iIl.i soils are low in organic
latter or humus. Orginiic matter is valuable in
hat it increases the water hllllije capacity of a
ioil, supplies nutrients and improves the ease of
,ikhing soils. The 'i;gmlni,- matter content of a
;oil m.iy be increased by .,iil'. iij.k animal manure,
'otted leaves or any partly decomposed plant
:efuse. Cover crops add organic matter when
)lowed or spaded into a soil.
Animal manure is not a balanced fertilizer.
Apirlxin.itelh 21./I pounds of superphosphate
should be added to 25 pounds of manure and
: e. Il over 100 square feet of garden.

FERTILIZING
When uiiintv commercial fertilizers the follow-
ng amounts and un,lr.es are usually satisfactory
for the initial application.

Soil Grade Amount Amount
10 ft. Row 100 sq. ft.
Sand, marl, rock, 6-8-6 or
or clay 6-8-8 lb. 2-5 lbs.
Organic soils (muck
or peat) 0-12-20 lb. 1-2 lbs.

During the gi '.'.ing season it may be desirable
to sidedress 2 or 3 times with the appropriate
mixed fertilizer, at 1 to 2 lbs. per 100 ft. of row.
On minel.il soils, 10-0-10, 15-0-14 or similar mix-
ture. at I to 1'_ lb. per 100 ft. of row may be
suibI.tit ut eL for the complete fertilizer.
3






One-half of the first and main application of
fti tili-ile would best be broadcast over the entire
garden plot one to two weeks before planting. The
other half should be banded at planting. time in
1 or 2 bands each 2 to 3 inches to the side of and
1 to 2 inches below the level of the seed or
i,1 ,irtrti row.

IRRI.G ACTION
In ir i-it;in' the g ii-len it is advisable to
itllI.r..L-hl"'1 wet the soil once a week unless -i.li-
cient rain falls, rather than to ilII,' several light
pl inklirng-. A r,.-'. ini -. il_-n will require 1 inch
of water per week and when the plants are l. 1 i:i
as much as 2 inches may be leumi led. PlaZi
shallow cans in your garden to ile',rninll. ii''.
much water is being applied.

\\ EI: :) CONTROL
The primary purpose of cultivation is to i n l i .I
weeds. Weeds are easy to control when tli- .wre
small. Shallow cultivation and h'.inL is .I-' I-eil
in order to reduce damage to the crop root -. -tern.
N,, one chemical weed killer (herbicide) can ',e
n.-ca-, -f t1 for a growing garden.
INSECT AND DISEASE CONTROL
A utI'g'- .-:ni1.* .l-I pose l-.ii' for insects
of vegetables is one containing malathion or diazi-
non plus Sevin or methoxychlor. A ,.ie- tel
.et.iic. ,l-purpose spray for diseases of vegetables
would contain one or more of the fil1],winL, t LInli-
cides: zineb, maneb, 'aptl.in. or copper. For
powdery mihlt.i' on cucumbers, -iiua-;h, and
melons, use Karathane. .M:iai. ready prepared
general-purpose cially available. Apply ,LA.i.ding to recommen-
dations and precautions on the label.
You can exlpet I best results if you begin con-
trol tlb.'rt., early. Api''. funicjide-i at weekly in-
tervals as a preventive measure. For in-.-'t-. dust
or spray at the first signs and repeat treatments
as needed. The materials shown below are effec-
tive against the insects as indicated and are safe
if properly used.







5% 4% or 5% 1.5% 1%
Sevin Malathion Lindane Rotenone
Aphids X X
Army.'.c'o rmI'S X X
: u.J'.w,.X mi X
_ubIage Worms X X X
i-.,l. potato beetle X
Cucumber beetle X X
Earworms X
Fleabeetle X X
'1 ru1 t, horn,
pinworms X X
T.ilf.hrlli. ,-r X X X X
L..n t'- (I.-r X X X
Melon pickle
worms X X X
Mexican bean
beetle X X X
Pameras X X
Pea weevils X X X
Red spiders X
Stink bugs X X X
Thrip- X X X Diazinrn 2'-
I I:.. II'h X Ljiazin.,n 2',

Special Insects. Chlordane may be applied to
the soil surface as a 5: dlust or a II11 t,, 2c7L
bait for control of ant.-. :utvwoiims, grasshoppers,
and mole-crickets. Do nt apply this material to
the leaves of plants. ChliIdane is sometimes in-
cluded in general garden fertilizers and may offer
s.nite control of these insects and wireworms.
Sanitation.--Many insects and diseases may
e reduced by rotating garden locations, cleaning
up crop refuse and early soil preparation.
Sterilizing Seedhed Soil.- Soil foi stating
transplants may be sterilized I.y placing a 2-inch
layer in a pan and baking at 160 degrees F. for
S1 hour.
Seed Treatment.-Buy treated seed or apply
50% thiram (Alasan) to untreated seed.
)amping-off.- Wet the base of the plhnt and
the soil surface to a depth i:f I._ to 1 inch with
1 ounce of 76% wettable ferl.am to 3 gallons of
water or dust 15', ferbam on the soil surface
and water in.

NEMATODES
Mnst Florida soils contain parasitic plant nema-
todes. For most vegetables these soils should be
fumigated. "In-the-row" fumigation is cheap and
practical. This involves placing the fumigant in
a band in a trench six inches deep where the crop







5% 4% or 5% 1.5% 1%
Sevin Malalhion Lindane Rotenone
A Ilh ids X X
Armyworms X X
Budworms X
Cabbage Worms X X X
Col. potato beetle X
Cucumber beetle X X
Earworms X
Fleabeetle X X
Fruit, horn,
piii. ,orrini X X
Leaf-hopper X X X X
Leaf-roller X X X
Melon pickle
worms X X X
Mexican bean
beetle X X X
Iamreras X X
Pea weevils X X X
Red spiders X
Stink bugs X X X
Thrips X X X Diazinrn 2',
Ieafminers X [iazinrin 2 .

Special Insects. -Chlordane may be applied to
the soil surface as a 5'. lust or a 1 .. to 2'
bait for control of ant.. cutworms, grassh-oppers.
and mole-crickets. Do not apply this material to
the leaves of plants. Chlordane is sometime in-
cluded in general garden fertilizers and may offer
|some control of these insects .ian wire:worms.
SSanitation.- Many insects and disesees may
be reduced by rotating garden locations. cleaning
uip (ci'p refuse and early soil preparation.
Sterilizing Seedbed Soil. Soil foi starting
transplants may be ste ilized by placing a 2-inch
layer in a pan and baking at 160 degrees F. for
1 hour.
Seed Treatment. Buy t heated seed 1: apply
50% thiram (Arasar) ti. untreated seed.
Damping-off.-Wet the h;ise ,of the plant and
the soil surface to a depth of 1 to 1 inch with
1 ounce of 76% wettal.e terlam to 3 gallons of
water or dust 15% ferbam on the soil surface
and water in.

NEMATODES
NMost Florida soils contain parasitic plant nema-
todes. For most vegetables these soils should be
fumigated. "In-the-row" fumigation is cheap and
practical. This involves placing the fumigant in
a band in a trench six inches deep where the crop










Crop Varieties

Beans, Snap Extendei. Contender, Harve
Wade, I'helrkr-e (wax)


WANTING GUIDE FOR VEGETABLE GARDENS

Spacing in Inches Seed Planting Dates in Florida (inclusive) Plant Pounds Days
Seed/Plants Depth Hardi- Yield to
100' of Row Rows Plants Inches North Central South nesst 100' Harvest
1 lb. 18-30 2-3 11'-2 Mar.-Apr. Feb.-Mar. Sept.-Apr. T 45 50-60


Aug.-Sept.


Sept.


Dade, McCaslan, Kentucky
P'Blue Lake


Beans, Lima F2ull....k 242, C-oinentrte,i
person, Jackson Wonder, I
Buttrtpea, Florida Butter
Beet- Early Wonder, Detroit Dar
Broccoli Early Green S ~iouting. W',
Atlantic
Cabbage Copenhagen Market, Mariri
Badger Market. Glory of I
Red Acrf. Chieftan Savoy
Carrots Imperator, Gold Spike, Chal
N:ntes
I.'.uli ti-v r S n.w i, Ill Strain,

CO-l-I. ta'tlh 52-71l. Florida Pascal

Chine e,. C'.il.l'age M liil I!i. \\V'ir 1 kl

Collard& Georgia, Vates

Corn, Sweet Silver Queen.r (white) C;(o,
Golden Security, Seznic: (
many others


Cantaloupes


Cucumbers

Eggplant

Endive-Escarole

Kohlrabi

Lettuce (Crisp)
(Butterhead)
(Leaf)
(Romaine)
Mustard

Ukra

SIU ion- i I;'.l],in s i


Parsley
Peas

Peas, Sou

P.ppir'


Smith's Perfect, Sh-minil,
E1, ,ti- 47, Gulfstream
Poinsett, Ashley (slicers)
SMR 18, Pixie picklerss)
Florida A;\l ket

Deep Heart Fringed, Full
Batavian
Early White Vienna

Premier, Great Lakes typ
Bibb, ?M.it.-l I-- s, Sweethe
Prize Head, Ruby, Salad I
Parris Island Cos, Dark
Southern Giant Curled.
L, i>ji1 U -
Clemson spineless i''rki
Gieen
Excil,. Tox,- (Gran,-, Grat


C ,iii-x. Tr,,pican,d Rel
(Green) White I'P.rtuv'al r WVhit
Shallots (Multiplier.-
Ml.--. C I .l-I. P,.t 'ectlnrt
Little 31. '.el. Dii k Skir
Perfection. l..,\tc.n'., I'i ,,
thernm ri kep,. Ii.'.'n '1`.ile.
Conch, Prcoducer. -Floricre


(S


Sweet) Calif. Wonder. Yolo Wi',n,
Beater
(Hot) TIInln i.i, \\':x, An.theii


Potatoes Sebago, Red Pontiac. Ker
Red LaSoda
Potatoes, Sweet U. S. No. 1. Porto Rico, G
Goldrush. Nugget. Center
Radish Cherry Belle, Comet. Ea
Globe, \White lidle. Sparl
tipped)
Spinach Vilginia S.'.\uv. Dixie ,MI
Hybrid 7
Spinach, Summer New Zealand
Squash, (Summer) Early Prolitic Straightne,
Summer Crookntnck. Ccc,
Zucchini. Paitty Pan
(Winter) Aligold, T:ihle Quetn. Bi
Strawberry Florida 90, Tioga. Sequoia
Tomatoes Manialucie,.T Homestead-24
(Large Fruited) River, Floradel,t Tropired
(Small Fruited) Walter, Large Cherry, RoR

Turnips Japanese F'Iliave (Shogoil
Purpl.- Tn'p \V'hite Globe
Water- (Large) .'hariurton Gray.. 1'ongo.
melon Jubilee, Crimson Sweet
(Seedless) Tri-X 317
(Small) New Hampshire 1Midlgit,


Other Vegetables for the Garden.-Jerusalh
leek, lurfa gourd, honeydew melons, and rutab


191i 1 lb. 40-48

1 lb. 26-48


1 oz. 14-24


60 pits.
(14 oz.)


65 pits.
I oz.)

I oz.


30-36


24-36


16-24


55 pits. 24-30
l0 oz.)
150 pits. 24-36
( 4. oz.)


125 pits.
(I' oz.)


75 pits.
I oz.)
Slb.


1 oz.


in 1 oz.

30 pits.
(1/4 oz.)
1 oz.

/ oz.


12 oz.


24-36


24-30

34-42


70-80


48-60

36-42


15-18 11'--2 Mar.-June Feb.-Apr. Jan.-Feb.


12-15 11.-2 Mar.-June Feb.-Apr.


16-22


14-24


1I-1 Sept.-Mar. Oct.-Mar.
l -1 Aug.-Feh Aug.-Jan.


Sept.-Apr.


Oct.-Feb.
Sept.-Jan.


I.: Sept.-Feb. Sept.-Jan. Sept.-Jan. H


I., Sept.-Mar. Oct.-Mar. Oct.-Feb. H


20-24 12 Jan.-Fpb.
Aug.-nlct
6-10 i .1. Jan.-Mir


Oct.-Jan.


Oct.-Jan. H


T 80 60-65

T 50 65-75


H 75 60-70
H 50 60-70


70-75


80 55-60


Aug.-Feb. Oct.-Jan. H 150


8-12 14-., Oct.-J.n. Oct.-Jan.


14-18

12-18


48-60


1.- Feb.-Mar. Jan.-Apr.
Sept.-Nov.
'., Mar.-Apr. Feb.-Mar.


115-125


Nov.-Jan. H 100 75-85


Sppt.-Jan.
Aug.-Nov.
Jan.-Feb.


i. Mar.-Apr. Feb.-Apr. Feb.-Mar.


15-24 1/-% Feb.-Apr. Feb.-Mar.
Sept.
36-48 1/2 Feb.-Mar. Jan.-Feb.
July Aug.-Sept.


18-24 8-12 3V Feb.-N r.
Sept.


24-30

12-18


1 oz. 14-24


2 oz.


3-5

12-18



4-8


24-40 18-24


400 plt:. or zets 12-24
1 oz. seed
800 pits. or sets 12-24
1'., lb. seed 18-24


1 oz.


12-20


3-4

11 -2
6-8
8-12
2-3)


1 I lbs. 24-3


1i._ Ilbs.
a. Zipper Cream
60 pits.
(14 oz.)


/z Mar.-Apr.
Oct.-Nov.
% Feb.-lnMr.
Sept.


1 Jan.-Mar.
Sept.-May
1-2 Manr.-May
Aug
3, Jan.-Mar.
Aug.-No'v.
Aug.-Mar.
iA Aug.-Jan.
1-" JF.- Mar.
1-2 Jan.-Feb.


Jan.-Feb.
Sept.
Feb.-Mar.
Oct.-Nov.
Jan.-Feb.
Sept.


Jan.-Mar.
S -,pt.-NNv.


150 50-55

15 80-85


T 150


Jan.-Feb. T 100


Dec.-Feb.


Sept.-Jan. H

Nov.-Feb. H

Sept.-Jan. H



Sept.-Mar. H


Mar.-May Feb.-Mar.
Aug. Aug.-Sept.
n.-MarJana Jan.-Mar.
Aug.-Nov. Sept.-Nov.
Aug.-Mar. Sept. Mar.
Aug.-Jan. Sept -Dec.


Dec.-Jan. Sept.-Jan.
Sept.-Mar. S.rit.-Feb.


1-2 Mar.-May M.r.-May


20-36


15 lbs. 36-42

80 pits. 48-54


oz.
OZ.
2 oz.

2 oz.


2 oz.
101 pits.
35 pits.
(1/4 oz.)
70 plts.
(1%/ oz.)
1 oz.


12-18


18-24


12-15

18-24

1-2


14-18 3-5


30-36
42-4q


90-120
36-40
40-60

36-48

12-20


18-24
42-48


48-72
10-14
36-40

18-24


12 Feb.-Apr.


4-8 Jan.-Feb.


Jan.-Mar.


Jan.


- Mar.-June Feb.-June


3, Oct -Mar.


Feb.-Apr.


J;Jn -Feb.
Aug -Oct.


Sept.-Jan. S

Feb.-J une


Oct.-Mar. Oct -Mar.


4 Oct.-Nov. Oct.-Nov.


3. Mar.-Apr.
1. Mar.-Apr.
Aug

2 Mar.


Mar.-Apr.
Feb.-Mar.
Aug.


Feb.-Mar.


- Sept.-Oct. Sept.-Oct.
1/2 Feb.-Apr. Feb.-Mar.
Aug. Sept.
2 Feb.-Apr. Feb.-Mar.
Aug. Sept.


Oc t.-Jan.

Jan.-Apr.
Jan.-Mar.
Sept.-Oct.


Jan.-Feb.
Oct -Nov.
Aug.-Mar.

Aug.- Mar.


4-6 12-3/4 Jan.-Apr. Jan.-Mar. Oct.-Feb.
Aug.-Oct. Sept.-Nov.


T 200


753-90

50-55

80-85


75 90-95

100 50-55

75 50-80



100 40-45

70 50-55


H 10on


H 100 50-75
H 110 75-105
H 40 90-95
11 40 50-55

T 80 70-80

T 50 70-80


H 150 80-95

T 75 120-140

H 40 20-25


H 40 40-45

T 40 55-65
T 150 45-60


T 3(0 95-105
H 50 90-110
T 125 75-85

T 200 75-85

H 150 40-50


2 oz. 90-120 60-84 2 Mar.-Apr. Jan.-Apr. Feb.-Mar. T 400 80-100


by


ce, Brussels sprouts, cassava, chayote, chives, dandelion, dasheen, dill, fennel, garbanzo bean, garlic, herbs, kale,
- globe artichokes, asparagus, and rhubarb not well adapted to Florida.


t H-Hardy, can stand frost and usually s
SH-Slightly hardy, will not be injured b
T-Tender, will be injured by light frost
T Tomato varieties best adapted to staking


ng (32*F) without injury.
)sts.


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)
Coolprative Extension Service, University of Florida,
Florida State University and
United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
Joe N. Busby, Dean


Beans, Pole


100-130


~--------







is to be grown. After the fumigant is applied t0
trench should be tilled and the soil surfa.
sprinkled with walei to seal the tfumicant in t'
soil. Fumigants should n,,t ie tpl)llieii tol s. il th
is too wet I:ir cold.


Nematicide
D-D, Vidden D
Telone


EFDB


Ne-nago'n
Fumazone




\',iirl x


Rate/i00 Ft.
- uLi 1i o



Scup or
S2' oz.

I oz. liquid
1: cup clan
i ';'i. 1
1': cup gran
ul-s i 10"L

2 cupn ,


2 rupl


RI'marks
z. Mix with fu,-l oil,
keiosnne. c-ir mini-ra
spirits. Wait 14-21
da:;. I hforr i pilant.ing
.tnie az for D-D.
,..xc[pt di not apply
for onions..
.M ix ,.vih .'.ater. \I
ul-es 7 dia', I,.'i-cre. pIlanti
DO NOT usa for
- onions, garlic, beet:
; potatoes, s%%eetpotal
and peppers.
Same as for D-D.
Co'.ering row with
plastic for 7 days al
treatment helps. Al
controls weeds. soil
fungi, bacteria, and
insects.
Same as for Vorlex
except can be mixe
with water.


PESTICIDE PRECAUTIONS

Consider all pesticides as potential poiso
They should be applied strictly nacol ding to mma
facturers' precautions and recommendations.
ways wash vegetables from the garden thorc'oug
before using. Use pesticides only as necessary
control insects and diseases andt stop applicati.
during the harvesting season. Store pesticides
theii originall labeled tontalners Keep them <
nf the reach of children and other irtespqonsil
persons.


The listing of spef'ic.: tri.d.- ramn -- her- 'I' n..t c..n
tute vnd,''rs,.i-r-nt "f th,. Iir.".liu t in pr. It' i nr r- toT oth.
containing the nnamie na tv i he.micnial iner,-.ir-nt'.
Prepared by.
J. M. Stephens in coe-ation .vith \wor.r uf th
Institute of Food and Apticultural Science,.


COOPFRATl\E EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
IActs of May 8 and June So. 1911)
CO ri rl t. I t.,r. i ** ...c I ,, r: iti .1 I .,r.jj.
Florida State University and
United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
Joe N. Busby, Dean




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