Group Title: 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow - ICMF 2010 Proceedings
Title: P3.25 - Image Texture Features of Gas/liquid Two-phase Flow in Horizontal Pipes
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102023/00520
 Material Information
Title: P3.25 - Image Texture Features of Gas/liquid Two-phase Flow in Horizontal Pipes Experimental Methods for Multiphase Flows
Series Title: 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow - ICMF 2010 Proceedings
Physical Description: Conference Papers
Creator: Wang, H.
Dong, F.
Publisher: International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF)
Publication Date: June 4, 2010
 Subjects
Subject: gas-liquid two-phase flow
high-speed image
texture feature
Lempel-Ziv complexity
flow regime
 Notes
Abstract: The gas-liquid two-phase flow in horizontal pipeline was studied by high-speed image texture analysis. A method for flow regime recognition based on texture feature and how to choose an effective feature were introduced in this paper. Gas/liquid two-phase flow experiments were practiced and high-speed images were captured. A set of textural features were extracted based on GLGCM. Examples of experimental results confirm the effectiveness of several features among them by Lempel-Ziv complexity calculation and flow regime recognition. Gray Asymmetry, Energy, Correlation, Gray Entropy, Entropy, and Inertia most effective in gas/liquid two-phase flow regime recognition. The experimental results have shown that the feature which is effective in flow regime recognition is of low Lempel-Ziv complexity, but not all of the texture features with low Lempel-Ziv complexity are effective in classifying gas/liquid flow regime.
General Note: The International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF) first was held in Tsukuba, Japan in 1991 and the second ICMF took place in Kyoto, Japan in 1995. During this conference, it was decided to establish an International Governing Board which oversees the major aspects of the conference and makes decisions about future conference locations. Due to the great importance of the field, it was furthermore decided to hold the conference every three years successively in Asia including Australia, Europe including Africa, Russia and the Near East and America. Hence, ICMF 1998 was held in Lyon, France, ICMF 2001 in New Orleans, USA, ICMF 2004 in Yokohama, Japan, and ICMF 2007 in Leipzig, Germany. ICMF-2010 is devoted to all aspects of Multiphase Flow. Researchers from all over the world gathered in order to introduce their recent advances in the field and thereby promote the exchange of new ideas, results and techniques. The conference is a key event in Multiphase Flow and supports the advancement of science in this very important field. The major research topics relevant for the conference are as follows: Bio-Fluid Dynamics; Boiling; Bubbly Flows; Cavitation; Colloidal and Suspension Dynamics; Collision, Agglomeration and Breakup; Computational Techniques for Multiphase Flows; Droplet Flows; Environmental and Geophysical Flows; Experimental Methods for Multiphase Flows; Fluidized and Circulating Fluidized Beds; Fluid Structure Interactions; Granular Media; Industrial Applications; Instabilities; Interfacial Flows; Micro and Nano-Scale Multiphase Flows; Microgravity in Two-Phase Flow; Multiphase Flows with Heat and Mass Transfer; Non-Newtonian Multiphase Flows; Particle-Laden Flows; Particle, Bubble and Drop Dynamics; Reactive Multiphase Flows
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102023
Volume ID: VID00520
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: P325-Wang-ICMF2010.pdf

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7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010



Image Texture Features of Gas/Iiquid Two-phase Flow in Horizontal Pipes


Hongyi Wang, Feng Dong

Tianjin Key Laboratory of Process Measurement and Control, School of Electrical Engineering and Automation
Tianjin University. Tianjin 300072, China



Keywords: gas/1iquid two-phase flow, high-speed image, texture feature, Lempel-Ziv complexity, flow regime



Abstract

The gas-liquid two-phase flow in horizontal pipeline was studied by high-speed image texture analysis. A method for flow
regime recognition based on texture feature and how to choose an effective feature were introduced in this paper. Gas/liquid
two-phase flow experiments were practiced and high-speed images were captured. A set of textural features were extracted
based on GLGCM. Examples of experimental results confirm the effectiveness of several features among them by Lempel-Ziv
complexity calculation and flow regime recognition. Gray Asymmetry, Energy, Correlation, Gray Entropy, Entropy, and Inertia
most effective in gas/1iquid two-phase flow regime recognition. The experimental results have shown that the feature which is
effective in flow regime recognition is of low Lempel-Ziv complexity, but not all of the texture features with low Lempel-Ziv
complexity are effective in classifying gas/liquid flow regime.


Introduction

Gas/1iquid two-phase flow research has received great
attention in the research field of multi-phase flow for its
conmen appearance in many industry processes and
fundamental role to multi-phase flow (Hewitt 1978). The
widespread presence of these multi-fluid systems suggests
the utility of a general technique of description to
understand their behavior.
There are already some detecting methods for two phase
flow measurement. Such as, microwave, radiation, process
tomography, correlation technology, and so on (Yang 1997,
Cilliers 2001). However, all these methods have their
application limits. In the present study we focus on studying
gas-liquid two-phase flow characters by image texture
analysis method.
Texture is an important property for the classification of
images and can be regarded as the pattern of gray level
tones present in an image. Image analysis has been used
extensively to detect texture features in biomedical
applications (Dutta 1995, Zhu 2004, Zhu 2006, Honeycutt
2008) and terrain classification applications (Kanda 2004,
L~tal 2003, Xia 1999). Texture feature features have been
evaluated by several methods with statistical method,
structure method and frequency spectrum method in general.
In two-phase flow filed, Zhou (2007) and Wang (2008) have
already successfully used the gray level co-occurrence
matrix in image features extraction for flow regime
recognition.
In this paper, gray level-gradient co-occurrence matrix
(GLGCM) was applied to analyze the flow texture of the
gas/liquid two-phase flow. Experiments were carried out
with high-speed camera recording system. Gas/1iquid
two-phase flow images were processed by digital image
processing method. Texture features of the experimental


images were extracted and analyzed GLGCM. The features
which could reflect gas-liquid flow characters clearly were
shown in the paper. All the texture features were estimated
by Lempel-Ziv complexity. And flow regime recognition
was realized with these features by SVM.

Nomenclature


Normalized gray matrix
Normalized gradient image
Normalized GLGCM matrix
Normalized maximum value
string
string
Texture feature
Limit complexity
complexity
Gray matrix
Gradient matrix
GLGCM matrix
coordinate
coordinate
Superficial gas velocity (m/s)
Superficial liquid velocity (m/s)


Greek letters
r Normalized value

Subsripts
g gray
max Maximum
n number
r number
s gradient
v number






7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010

which at different superficial gas velocity, but with the same
superficial liquid velocity about 1.26 m/s, were shown in
Figure 2.

ww~ugg 19 aguages ~ K~Ci ~ *CYT~



(1) Bubble flow


-~ -,


(2) Short slug flow


Experiment

(A) Experimental facility
The gas-water two-phase flow experiments were conducted
at the Multi-phase Flow Laboratory of Tianjin University in

Che sorzoa 11pe s matanufactured of Plexiglas, so that the
flow regime and flow process could be observed more
clearly in the experiment. The pipe is about 20m long and
the inner diameter is 50mm. The total length of this pipeline
between entrance nozzle and the outlet is approximately
16.56m, consists of two horizontal legs with the length of
7.22 and 7.30m respectively, connected by a horizontal
U-bend with the length of 2.04m.
The volume flow rate of water is about 0.1-16.0 m /h and
gas is 0.06-82.0 in3/h The average temperature was
15.7 C" Different flow regime could be formed by
controlling the valve of water and gas pipe, such as bubble
flow, plug flow, slug flow, wavy flow, annular flow and so
on.
The multi-sensor system is installed at the downstream of
the pipe where the flow regime is well developed and flow
state is more stable.
A MiniVis ECO-2 high-speed video camera with frame rates
up to 32000 fps was used to record the ascent bubbles in
two phase flow. The biggest resolution of the camera is
1280x1024. However, higher spatial resolutions result in
longer recording times and fewer video frames per unit time.
A compromise between recording speed and image
resolution has to be found. Experimentally, special
resolution of 640 x480 and frame frequency of 500 fps could
satisfy the measurements and was adopted in all
experiments reported in this study. Auxiliary backlighting
with 5400K color temperature was also used as back light in
the experiment. The camera is about 0.72m far from the
front wall of pipeline. The effective shooting coverage is
50mm in vertical and 95mm in horizontal. The whole
experiment system of gas-liquid two phase flow was shown
as Figure 1.


; ~- -~ -_


Figure 2: Gas/1iquid two-phase flow images

100 images of each case were transformed into gray value
image. They were denoised by both shadow subtraction
method and wavelet filter.

Image Texture Feature Extraction

There are mainly two types of texture features: the statistical
method and structural analysis method. The statistical
character analysis of texture is a widely used technique for
image texture analysis. Both GLCM and GLGCM, which
are statistical method, capture the second order statistics of
local image features. The difference is that GLCM captures
the second order statistics of gray level values while
GLGCM captures that of gray level gradients. The GLCM
method is commonly used example of this type of 2-D
histogram. But the gray level-gradient co-occurrence matrix
(GLGCM) takes into account the information of both gray
level and gradient among each pixel in an image. Wang and
Dong [16] have already verified that the texture feature of
GLGCM is better than that of GLCM in gas/1iquid
two-phase flow. So the texture features based on GLGCM
were described in the following section for experimental
image analysis.

(A) Gray level-gradient co-occurrence matrix
The element h(i, j) of GLGCM is defined ad the
probability of the pixel number which has gray value I in
the normalized gray image F(m,n) and gradient value j
in the normalized gradient image G(m,n). Therefore, the
gray level-gradient co-occurrence matrix provides the space
relationship between each pixel and its adjacent pixel.
In the gas-liquid two phase flow image, Sobel operator with
window-size of 3*3 was adopted to get the gradient image.
Hence, the gradient normalized is shown as:


1 Water tank; 2 Gas tank; 3 Temperature; 4 Pressure gauge:
5 Flow meter; 6 Valve; 7 IVixing ejector; 8 Stainless
horizontal pipe; 9 Perspex horizontal pipe; 10 High-speed
camera; 11Light; 12 Separation tank

Figure 1: Schematic view for the experimental system

(B) High-speed image of gas-liquid two phase flow
Examples of gas/1iquid two-phase flow experiment images,


G(m,n) =INT[g(m,n) xNs /gmax]+1


Where, g(m,n) is the gradient image, gmax is the


(3) Long slug flow






7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010





10 ICorrelation T i-T (j-LH


11 Gray Entropy T, = CH, logH


12 Grads ~ Entop T Hlog Hi~

13 EntropyT=- H T


14 Inertia T= 0-j


15 IHomogeneity T=H
=1 =11 (i j

(B) Texture features of gas-liquid two phase flow image

The high-speed images recorded in the experiment were
pre-processed by digital image processed method. Then
texture features of flow images will be extracted by GLCM
and GLGCM separately. 6 cases were shown to explain the
method. The examples of gas/1iquid two-phase flow
experiment images, which at different superficial gas
velocity (sg) in the range from 0.025m/s to 4.317m/s, but
with the same superficial liquid velocity (sl) about 1.26 m/s,
were shown in table 2.

Table 2: flow parameters of 6 cases

number S 1(m s) S (m s)

Bubble fow 1 1.263 0.048

Bubble lw 2 1.276 0.047

Short slug 1 1.269 0.051

Short slug 2 1.275 0.050

Long slug 1 1.261 0.086

Long slug 2 1.270 0.089

Textural features were extracted to measure useful
information form gas-liquid flow images. All features which
introduced in Table 2 were calculated in this research. The
results of were shown in figure 3. The same texture feature
of 6 cases was plotted in one figure for comparing.
Not all the texture features could reflect the flow character
of gas/1iquid two-phase flow as shown in figure 3.
Intuitively, several texture features are changing regularly,
such as: Gray Asymmetry, Energy, Gray Mean, Correlation,
Gray Entropy, Entropy, and Inertia. The other features seem
more disorderly and unsystematic. However, it is not
enough comment on these features subjectively. An
evaluation method is necessary to estimate the effectiveness
of these features, which is Lempel-Zir complexity analyse
method.


Where, f (m, n) is the gray value image, fmax is the
maximum gray value of matrix f And Ng is the
maximum gray value after normalization, set Ny = 16 .
Then, count the number of pixels which satisfy
F(m,n)=i and G;(m,n)= j, take it as H~. The total
amount of H, were calculated by (3):



H = ffHl (3)
I=1 ]=1

Then the normalized GLGCM IT can be calculated by
formula (4):


H,, =H,, (N, N,)(4)

where, i = 1 2,---Ng, j=l 12,---Ns.
Fifteen texture features can be proposed by Haralick (1973).
Such as small-grads advantage, big-grads advantage, gray
asymmetry, and so on. The feature computing formula is
described in table 1. The representative meaning for each
parameter was not too much to explain here.

Table 1: Texture features by GLGCM
Serial
Texture Features C J.i, ,llr ; formula
No.
Small Grads ;[s"H
Dominance ]

2 Big Grads ,2, H


3 Gray Asymmetry T3 = H ,/H



4 Asymmetny~i~ T =ij H, /iH

SEnergy T5 = CE ,


6 Gray Mean T6= H


7 Grads Mean J = j He n


8 Gray Variance T i-T) ,J2


maximum gradient value in matrix g Ns is normalized
maximum gradient value, for the presented study, we set
Ns = 16 .
Similarly, the gray levels normalize transformation is
following formula (2):


F(m, n)= INT[J(m, n)x Ng / fnax]+1







7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010


r n~~2b~ an oo


t 1-bubble i
r ---bubble 2

-D --elong slug 1
I ~longselug2
200 400 no0 800 190 1200
t(ms)
(1) Small Grads Dominance


c8o -1- bubble 1
o o -bbubble2
-*-shortslug1
coo -e-shorts~ug 2
-n- long slug 1
Sln l 2


t(ms)
(2) Big Grads Dominance


t(ms)
(3) Gray Asymmetry


110 -tbubble21

x *shortslug1
qg.-e--shon slug2 xa


oooo
oo -*-hotMu1


-longslug1



2U3 4U3 600 800 1000 1200
t(ms)
(5) Energy











29 49PP 600 100 120




-sububble 2
-*-shon slug 1
oo o-e-shonslug2
%ega o oo -*long slug 1
o~~~~ *** o ong slug 2


20 400~~~~. 60 0 00 10
t pms)~
(11)Gra Enrop


t(ms)
(6) Gray Mean


1200


t(ms)
(4) Grads Asymmetry


(7) Grads Mean


(9) Grads Variance


S200 400 600
t(ms)


800 1000 1200 I


(10) Correlation


18~ Boo -l-bubbilog1
-e-- short slug 2





(14 Inerti su


opoo, '



200 40 BU 80 100 1200



(13) Entropy


t(ms)
(15) Homogeneity


Figure 3: Texture features contrast of 6 flow situation


xx xxxx +bubl 1 200

-*- short slug 1 60
--C lng .lg 1 1






7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010


completely covered. Then, the resulting cM(n) is the
complexity of a given string.
The complexity obtained above is equal to the number of
nullifications of Q. This is, to a certain extent, affected by
the length of the string, or the number of data samples n .
To find a robust complexity measure, Lempel and Ziv
suggested a normalized Lempel-Ziv complexity measure
after their names, c, (n) defined by


Flow Regime Recognition Based on Texture
Features

(A) The Lempel-Ziv complexity of texture features
Lempel and Ziv introduced an easily calculable measure of
complexity of finite sequences, which adopted two basic
processes: copy and insert (Lempel 1976, Liu 2007, Hong
2009). Consider a string S = {s,, s2, *, Sn } ,. Assume that a
string up to Sr = {s,, s2, **, Sr )(1 cn (r) can be reconstructed by simply copying an inserting
some of the existing vocabulary of
S ~-={s1~s2,***,S,} (v Si? = {sr,l~,,,sr+,**,Sn}) can be re-produced by the same
approach, Lempel and Ziv introduced the following steps:
Step 1: Take Q, = {sr, and ask if this term belongs to
the vocabularyr of S,, = {Sy,,_zs, } If so, string
r+1, = (Sr+1 iS a Simple repetition of an existing substring
of SY,,(i~e., a simple 'copy' of existing vocabulary can
restore it), and hence the complexity remains unchanged or
cn (r + 1)= cn (r).
Step 2: Read the next string and take Qr+2 = (Sr+1Sr+2 '
Check if Qr+2 = Sr+1Sr+2 } belongs to
S ~, = {S~,,_z.ss,,s,, (obtained by augmentling S, with
S, I ).
Step 3: If the term Qr+2 does not belong to S,,,,
increase the complexity by one, i.e.,
ci? (r + 2)= ci? (r + 1)+ 1, nullify Qr+2 =( { read the next
string and take Qr+3 = Sr+3 '
Repeats the above procedure until Si? = {s,, s2, ***,Sn) iS


c, (n) = ci? (n) /bi (n)


Where


b, (n) = him c, (n) = n / log 2M


If n is large enough, the complexity of all finite sequences
will verge on a certain value bi (n) .
The Lempel-Ziv complexity of the 15 texture features for
the six kind of flow situation is shown in figure 4.
As shown in figure 4, for the 6 flow situation referred in this
paper, different texture feature represent different
Lempel-Ziv complexity. The Lempel-Ziv complexity of
Gray Asymmetry, Energy, Gray Mean, Correlation, Gray
Entropy, Entropy, and Inertia are smaller than the others,
which shown better orderliness. The results shown in figure
4, is good agreement with figure 3. Therefore, this 5 texture
features could be viewed as effective parameter for the
character study of gas/1iquid two phase flow. Flow regime
recognition is a basic useful aspect of texture feature, which
will describe in the following section.


bubble 1
H bubble 2
short slug1
O short slug2
O long slug 1
H long slug 2


p 0.8
8
.1 0.6
~-0.4

0.2

0


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Texture features


Figure 4: Lempel-Ziv complexity for texture features


As shown in figure 4, for the 6 flow situation referred in this
paper, different texture feature represent different
Lempel-Ziv complexity. The Lempel-Ziv complexity of
Gray Asymmetry, Energy, Gray Mean, Correlation, Gray
Entropy, Entropy, and Inertia are smaller than the others,
which shown better orderliness. The results shown in figure
4, is good agreement with figure 3. Therefore, this 5 texture
features could be viewed as effective parameter for the
character study of gas/1iquid two phase flow. Flow regime
recognition is a basic useful aspect of texture feature, which


will describe in the following section.

(B) Flow regime recognition by SVM
Based on the texture feature extracted above, the support
vector machine (SVM) was adopted to classify the
gas/1iquid two-phase flow regime. The theory of SVM was
introduced by Peng (2002), and will not repeat in this paper.
The recognition rates based on every texture feature by
SVM are calculated, as shown in table 3.









Ta ale 3: Recognition rate base texture features by SVM

Textural feature F...;tr. ae

1 Small Grads Dominance 0.8967

2 Big Grads Dominance 0.6033

3 IGra Asynunetry 0.9667

4 Grads Asynunetry 0.8833

5 IEnergy 0.9733

6 Grave Mean 0.8967

7 Grads Mean 0.7567

8 Gray Variance 0.8533

9 Grads Variance 0.5167

10 Correlation 0.9733

11 Grav Entropy 0.9700

12 Grads Entropy 0.8100

13 Entropy 0.9633

14 Inertia 0.9700

15 Homogeneity 0.8467

As shown in table 3, Gray Asymmetry, Energy, Correlation'
Gray Entropy, Entropy, and Inertia most effective in
gas/1iquid two-phase flow regime recognition. The result of
SVM is a little different from that of the estimation method
of Lempel-Zir complexity. The Gray Mean, which presents
small complexity in figure 4, is not working well in
gas/1iquid two-phase flow regime recognition by SVM.
On conclusion, the Lempel-Zir method is not a prefect
method to determine the effective of texture features. Not all
of the texture features with low Lempel-Zir complexity is
effective in studying gas/1iquid flow character. But all
texture features which are effective in flow regime
recognition are of low Lempel-Zir complexity. Therefore'
Lempel-Zir complexity can be viewed as a useful
pre-processing method in texture feature selection.

Conclusions

The high-speed image could represent gas/1iquid two-phase
flow process. Texture features of high-speed image were
used to analysis gas/1iquid two-phase flow character.
Gas/1iquid two-phase flow experiments were carried out at
Multi-phase Flow Laboratory of Tianjin University.
Experimental example with 6 cases at the same superficial
liquid velocity but different superficial gas velocity was
presented to illuminate the relationship between the flow
states and texture features.15 texture features were extracted
based on GLGCM and the Lempel-Zir complexity of all
texture features were calculated for estimating their
effectiveness. The texture feature with low Lempel-Zir
complexity is more orderliness, which could used for
gas/1iquid flow character analysis. The Lempel-Zir method
is not a prefect method to determine the effective of texture
features. Lempel-Zir complexity can only be viewed as a


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010

useful pre-processing method in texture feature selection.
Finally, the texture features of high-speed images were used
in flow regime recognition by SVM. The results show that
some texture features are successfully in flow regime
recognition. And, it verified that the feature which is
effective in flow regime recognition is of low Lempel-Zir
complexity, but not all of the texture features with low
Lempel-Zir complexity are effective in classifying
gas/1iquid flow regime.

Acknowledgements

The author appreciates the support from National Natural
Science Foundation of China (No. 50776063) and Program
for New Century Excellent Talents in University of China
(No. NCET-06-0230)


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