Group Title: 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow - ICMF 2010 Proceedings
Title: 16.1.3 - Numerical analysis of high speed droplet impact
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 Material Information
Title: 16.1.3 - Numerical analysis of high speed droplet impact Droplet Flows
Series Title: 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow - ICMF 2010 Proceedings
Physical Description: Conference Papers
Creator: Sanada, T.
Ando, K.
Colonius, T.
Publisher: International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF)
Publication Date: June 4, 2010
 Subjects
Subject: numerical simulation
high-speed
droplet
side jet
target compliance
 Notes
Abstract: When a droplet impacts a solid surface at high speed, the contact periphery expands very quickly and liquid compressibility plays an important role in the initial dynamics and the formation of lateral jets. The high speed impact results in high pressures that can account for the surface erosion. In this study, we numerically investigated a high speed droplet impacts on a solid wall. The multicomponent Euler equations with the stiffened equation of state are computed using a FV-WENO scheme with an HLLC Riemann solver (Johnsen & Colonius 2006) that accurately captures shocks and interfaces. In order to compare the available theories and experiments, 1D, 2D and axisymmetric solutions are obtained. The generated pressures, shock speeds, and the lateral jetting generation are investigated. In addition, the effect of target compliance is evaluated.
General Note: The International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF) first was held in Tsukuba, Japan in 1991 and the second ICMF took place in Kyoto, Japan in 1995. During this conference, it was decided to establish an International Governing Board which oversees the major aspects of the conference and makes decisions about future conference locations. Due to the great importance of the field, it was furthermore decided to hold the conference every three years successively in Asia including Australia, Europe including Africa, Russia and the Near East and America. Hence, ICMF 1998 was held in Lyon, France, ICMF 2001 in New Orleans, USA, ICMF 2004 in Yokohama, Japan, and ICMF 2007 in Leipzig, Germany. ICMF-2010 is devoted to all aspects of Multiphase Flow. Researchers from all over the world gathered in order to introduce their recent advances in the field and thereby promote the exchange of new ideas, results and techniques. The conference is a key event in Multiphase Flow and supports the advancement of science in this very important field. The major research topics relevant for the conference are as follows: Bio-Fluid Dynamics; Boiling; Bubbly Flows; Cavitation; Colloidal and Suspension Dynamics; Collision, Agglomeration and Breakup; Computational Techniques for Multiphase Flows; Droplet Flows; Environmental and Geophysical Flows; Experimental Methods for Multiphase Flows; Fluidized and Circulating Fluidized Beds; Fluid Structure Interactions; Granular Media; Industrial Applications; Instabilities; Interfacial Flows; Micro and Nano-Scale Multiphase Flows; Microgravity in Two-Phase Flow; Multiphase Flows with Heat and Mass Transfer; Non-Newtonian Multiphase Flows; Particle-Laden Flows; Particle, Bubble and Drop Dynamics; Reactive Multiphase Flows
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Volume ID: VID00393
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Resource Identifier: 1613-Sanada-ICMF2010.pdf

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Paper No 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010


Numerical Analysis of High Speed Droplet Impact


Toshiyuki Sanada*, Keita Andot and Tim Coloniust

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu, 432-8561, Japan
tDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91106, USA
ttsanad @ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp, kando @caltech.edu and colonius@caltech.edu

Keywords: numerical simulation, high-speed, droplet, side jet, target compliance

Abstract

When a droplet impacts a solid surface at high speed, the contact periphery expands very quickly and liquid compressibility
plays an important role in the initial dynamics and the formation of lateral jets. The high speed impact results in high pressures
that can account for the surface erosion. In this study, we numerically investigated a high speed droplet impacts on a solid wall.
The multicomponent Euler equations with the stiffened equation of state are computed using a FV-WENO scheme with an
HLLC Riemann solver (Johnsen & Colonius 2006) that accurately captures shocks and interfaces. In order to compare the
available theories and experiments, ID, 2D and axisymmetric solutions are obtained. The generated pressures, shock speeds,
and the lateral jetting generation are investigated. In addition, the effect of target compliance is evaluated.


Introduction

When a high speed droplet impacts on a solid wall, there is
an important initial stage (Lesser & Field 1983) during
which the curved liquid surface is compressed and non
uniform pressure distribution is generated. This initial stage
creates high pressure which is greater than the well-known
water hammer pressure,


p = pCV,


than the water hammer pressure. They also argued that the
pressure inside the cylindrical droplet is higher than in the
spherical case, but edge pressure is identical for both cases
(Lesser 1981, Field et al. 1985). The experiment of
Rochester & Brunton (1979) agrees with their argument, but
some experiments show discrepancy. For example, Engel
(1955, see Brunton 1966) proposed modified water hammer
pressure as,


S= apCV,
2


where p is the generated pressure, p is the liquid density, C
is the sonic speed of the liquid. The high speed impact can
generate high pressure of order GPa, so that the target
material is often damaged because the pressure is large
enough compared to the yield stress. However, the several
models for predicting this pressure have been proposed
from theoretical, experimental and numerical studies.
The generalized form of the water hammer relation (1) that
accounts for the target compressibility can be written as


pC- p, C,V, C,V, (2)
pC, + P,C, 1+Y

where the subscripts s and 1 denote solid and water,
respectively, Y is the target compliance defined as the ratio
of acoustic impedance between solid and water (liquid
droplets). Small values of Y correspond to stiff material.
These 1-dimensional linear theories (1) and (2) may be
extended to large Mach number cases using relationship
between shock wave velocity and liquid particle velocity
(Heymann 1968, Haung et al. 1973).
During the impact of cylindrical or spherical droplets, the
dimensionality plays a role to generate complex pressure
distributions. Heymann (1969), Lesser (1981) and Field et
al. (1985) theoretically estimated that the droplet center
pressure can be predicted by the water hammer pressure Eq.
(1) but the deformed edge pressure can reach 3 times higher


where a approaches unity for high impact velocities and the
factor of 1/2 is a consequence of the spherical shape of
droplet.
In this study, we simulate a high speed droplet impact on a
solid wall and focus on the generated pressure. Although
Haller et al. (2002) have numerically investigated a droplet
impact in detail but they especially focused on jetting time.
In addition they have only solved the one case V, =500 m/s
into idealized rigid surface. We change the parameters of
the stiffened equation of state and examine the effect of
target compliance on this generated pressure due to the
droplet impact.


Nomenclature


Speed of sound (ms-1)
Total energy
Identity tensor
Parameter
Mach number
Pressure (Nm 2)
Stiffness constant (Nm 2)
Time (s)
Velocity vector (ms-1)
Impact speed (ms-1)
Target compliance





Paper No


Greek letters
a Coefficient
p Density (kg m 2)
Y Ratio of specific heats (gas)

Subsripts
cen center
i impact
1 liquid
max maximum
s solid


Numerical Method

With neglect of surface tension and any diffusions, the
flow is govern by the Euler equations (conservation form):

q + V f(q)= 0
at

P (4)
q(x,t)= (4)
E

Pu
f(q)= pu+ pI
(E + p)

where u is the velocity vector, E is the total energy and I is
the identity tensor. Flows in one and two dimensions (with
and without azimuthal symmetry) are considered. In order to
close the Euler equations, we employed the stiffened
equation of state (Harlow & Amsden 1971),


P 7P0
+ P= =E-pu.u
y-1 y-1


where P. is the stiffness constant and P. = 0 for gases. In this
study we simulate a high pressure due to high speed droplet
impact. Such high pressure condition, more specifically at
pressure which are large compare to the yield stress, solid
substance behave essentially as compressible fluids
(Tompson 1988); hence even the solid dynamics may be
described by the constitutive equation for the fluids. y and
P. were chosen from the literature. In the preliminary
calculation test problem, we used those from Chen & Liang
(2008). For the droplet impact problem we took those from
Saurel et al. (1999) and Haller et al. (2002). The parameters
used are summarized in Tables 1 and 2.
A third-order WENO scheme with an HLLC Riemann
solver (Johnsen & Colonius 2006) that accurately captures
shocks and interfaces was used to solve the system. A
third-order TVD Runge-Kutta scheme (Shu & Osher 1988;
Gottlieb & Shu 1998) was employed to march the equations
forward in time. Note that this method has been shown to
accurately resolve shock-bubble interaction problems
(Johnsen & Colonius 2009).


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010

Table 1: Stiffened EOS parameters* for preliminary test.


p [kg/m3] 1Pa] Y P. [109 Pa]

air (at rest) 1.2 1 1.4 0

air (behind 2.212 2.354 1.4 0
shock wave)
water 1000 1 1.932 1.1645

* Chen & Liang (2008)


Table 2: Stiffened EOS and target compliance parameters
for droplet impact problems.

p P. C
[kg/m] [ 109 Pal [m/s] Y
Uranium/
17204 3.53 36.6 2740 0.04
Rhodium*
Epoxy/ 2171 3.47 5.98 3090 0.26
Spinel*
WaterT 1000 4.4 0.613 1750 1.00

* Saurel et al. (1999), f Haller et al. (2002)


I I I I I
-20 -10 0 10 20
x[mm]

(a) preliminary test (droplet shock interaction)


Calculation
Domain



Reflective (2D) or
axi-symmetric condition


Shock front
"\___


air (y= 1.4, p=0)


(b) droplet impact problem
Figure 1: Schematic of calculation domain.





7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010


The computational domain is shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 1 (a)
shows the preliminary test case. In this calculation, the
condition was set to be same as that of Chen & Liang (2008).
This condition is corresponding to the experiment of Igra &
Takayama (1999, 2001). The Mach number for the incident
planar shock wave was 1.47. A uniform grid with 800 x 800
points was used.
Figure 1 (b) shows the schematic of droplet impact
problems. In this simulation, we consider a moving solid
material that impacts a stationary droplet. This replicates the
experiment of Camus (1971). Hence in the computational
domain, there are a droplet, a shock front in air and a solid
component, and the solid impact to the droplet with the
particle (piston) velocity of the shock wave. Uniform grids
of 1000 points, 1500 x 750 points were used for 1D, 2D and
axisymmetric cases, respectively. Non-reflecting boundary
conditions are implemented at boundaries.
Key calculation parameters are impact Mach number M,
and Target compliance Y. M, is defined as the ratio of the
impact velocity to the sonic speed of the liquid


Ci.

A, varies from 0.05 to 1.0. y changes 0.04, 0.26 and 1.0.
Note that y of 0.04 can be regarded as an effectively rigid
target (Field et al. 1988).


tail
Incident shock












(d)
LHP





4:


RW

`Y


Results and Discussion


First we solve the shock droplet interaction problem as a
preliminary test. Figure 2 shows the sequence of the
shock/droplet interaction. First (Fig. 2(b)), the incident
shock wave hits the water column and the reflected shock
wave (RW) generates. The transmitted wave (TW) appears
inside the water column. As pointed out by Chen & Liang
(2008) only a few percent of the energy is transmitted as a
compression wave due to the acoustic impedance difference.
The transmitted wave propagates faster than the incident
shock wave, because the sonic speed of water is greater than
that of air.
The compression wave inside the water column reflects at
the interface as an expansion wave and focuses due to the
curved surface. This creates a local low-pressure (LLP)
region as shown in Fig. 2(c). The focused expansion wave
propagates upstream and reflects as a compression wave at
the interface. Then a local high-pressure (LHP) region
appears (Fig.2 (d)). Inside the liquid column, these wave
reflections are repeated.
After the incident shock wave passes the water column,
diffracted shock waves (DW) are observed (Fig.2 (d)) and a
vortex pair (VP) is generated (Fig.2 (e)). This is similar to
the case of shock wave passing through a convex corer.
These results quantitatively agree with the numerical
analysis by Chen & Liang (2008) and the experiment by
Igra & Takayama (1999, 2001).


1















pressure p [kPa]

-37 440


Figure 2: The pressure contours for shock interaction with water column at (a) t = 0 ts, (b) t = 4.7 ts, (c) t = 6.7 ts, (d) t
= 13.5 ts, (e) t = 40.5 uts. The Mach number for the incident planar shock wave is M = 1.47, the diameter of the water
column is 4.8 mm. This computation condition is same as Igra & Takayama (1999, 2001) and Chen & Liang (2008).


Paper No





Paper No 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010


SY 0.04 Next, we discuss the problem of droplet impact on a solid
5 Y 0.26 wall. One-dimensional Riemann problem that may replicate
2.5 0 y 1.00
Heymann(1968) the initial stage of a droplet impact on a solid wall is first
Eq(2) considered. Initially both liquid and solid phases are
2 0 assumed to be in contact, but at the calculation start, the
S* solid wall is set in motion toward the stationary liquid. The
& 1.5 x generated pressure and shock speed in water are plotted Figs
Sx x 3 and 4, respectively. We have changed the impact Mach
1 -_ x x ___ number A, from 0.05 to 1. Target compliance Y takes
.x -x - -a o o 0.04, 0.26 and 1. The case of Y= 1 corresponds to the
0.5 e -0 0 0 same acoustic impedance, i.e. the case of high speed water
impacts water. The pressure is normalized by water hammer
pressure Eq. (1). The figure also plots the theoretical
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 estimation by Heymann (1968)
M
i V
Figure3: Generated pressure inside water in the 1D p = pC.V 1 + k (7)
problem as a function of and Y C,

Here, Vis the particle velocity; k is the parameter that takes
3.5 0 around 2 for water. This theory assumes that a droplet
SV 0.06 impacts a rigid target and contains the first-order correction
3 Y =1.00 of the shock wave velocity (Haung et al. 1973). The dashed
mann(968) lines show the estimation from Eq. (2).
2.5 It follows from Fig. 3 that the generated pressure increases
S with impact Mach number M. For the case of Y= 0.04, the
S2 generated pressure is larger than the water hammer pressure
S x o with rigid targets over a wide range of M,. The difference in
S x o 0 the generated pressure caused by the target compliance
1.5 0 o increases illi 1I For the case of = 1.0, the pressure has
0H only water hammer pressure of rigid target around M, = 1.
1 At the low A,, the pressure approaches to the Eq. (2). Figure
4 suggest that the linear theory which assumes the
0.5 2 0.4 6 propagation speed of linear waves is invalid in this range of
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1
M ,.
i
Figure 4: Generated shock speed inside water in the 1D
problem.

(a) (b) (c) 1.150

1.100

1.050

1.000

0.9500
(d) (e) (f)










Figure 5: The density contours for droplet impact with a solid wall. The impact Mach number is 0.2, the target
compliance is 0.04. The labels indicate S: Shock Wave, R: Reflected, F: Focus and J: Jetting.






7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010


Next we discuss two-dimensional and axisymmetric
solutions. Figure 5 shows the density counters of time
evolution of two-dimensional droplet impact. The impact
Mach number M, is 0.2, the target compliance is 0.04.
After the droplet impact, the droplet is deformed and a
shock wave (S) is generated (Fig. 5 (b)). The shock wave
propagates upward and is followed by a expansion wave
that appears along with the free surface (Fig. 5 (c) (d)). This
low pressure region appears due to the reflection (R) of the
shock wave. This is because the mismatch in acoustic
impedance between air and water, and horizontal velocity
components of shock wave (Haller et al. 2003). Finally the
expansion wave focuses (F) at the top of droplet (Fig. 5 (e)).
Also at the bottom of the droplet, side jet formation is
observed (Fig. 5 (f)). The results are in qualitative
agreement with the experiments (Camus 1971) and
numerical analysis (Haller et al. 2002).
As mentioned before, in the initial stage of a droplet
impact the non uniform pressure distribution which is
greater than the water hammer pressure is generated. The
generated pressures of two-dimensional and axisymmetric
cases are plotted in Fig. 6 together with one-dimensional
results. In the Fig. 6 the droplet center and maximum
pressure which occurs at the edge are shown. The detail of
the pressure difference at low A, cases are shown in Fig. 7.
From Figs. 6 and 7, it is found that the generated pressure
depends on the droplet impact Mach number A,. For the
high A, case, the center pressure is almost same as 1D
pressure and the edge pressure is about 3 times greater than
the center pressure. This tendency reasonably agree with
theories of Heymann (1969) and Lesser (1981). They also
described that the edge pressure is identical for 2D and 3D,
but our results show that the 2D pressure is greater than the
3D pressure.
From Fig. 7 as A, decreases the edge pressure approaches
the center pressure. These pressure are almost identical at
the l = 0.1. It is also found that the center pressure
decreases as the dimension increases and the center pressure
of axi-symmetric case is almost half of the 1D pressure in a
range of low M,. This agrees with Engel's result Eq. (3).
Finally the effect of target compliance on the generated
pressure is discussed. Figure 8 shows the time history of the
surface pressure with Y= 0.04 and = 0.26. The impact
Mach number A, is 0.5. This figure clearly shows that the
generated pressure decreases as the target becomes more
compressible or deformable. Especially the edge pressure is
dramatically decreased. Figure 9 shows differences in the
target deformation between Y= 0.04 and Y= 0.26. This
indicates that the wall deformation strongly depends on the
target compliance, and the droplet dynamics and the
generated pressure can change accordingly as observed in
the present computations.


7
ID
2D center
S 2D max (edge)
Saxi center
5 axi max (edge)


2

1

0
0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1
M


Figure 6: Comparison of generated pressure due to droplet
impact.


-- ID
-- 2D center
2.5 2D max (edge)
-- axi center
axi max (edge)


0.1 0.2 0.3
M
I


0.4 0.5


Figure 7: Close up figure for Fig.6.


Center, Y 0.04
--Pmax, Y 0.04
5 Center, Y 0.26
Pmax, Y 0.26
2

1.5


0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7


Figure 8: Time evolution of generated pressure (M, = 0.5).


Paper No


--
a-





Paper No


Y = 0.26 Y = 0.04


Sh ckfront


V6


Figure 9: Target deformation due to the droplet impact ( I
= 0.5). Left and right show the case of of 0.04 and yof
0.26, respectively.


Conclusions

We numerically investigate a high speed droplet impact on
a solid wall. The multicomponent Euler equations with the
stiffened equation of state are computed by a FV-WENO
scheme with an HLLC Riemann solver that accurately
captures shocks and interfaces. In order to compare the
available theory and experiments, ID, 2D and
axi-symmetric solutions are obtained. It is found that the
generated pressure depends on the droplet impact Mach
number M,. For the low M, case the pressure differences at
the center and the edge are minimized and the pressure is
almost half of the 1D case. On the other hand, for the high
M, case the edge pressure is almost 3 times greater than the
center pressure. However, increasing the target compliance
the edge pressure dramatically decreased.

Acknowledgements

This work was conducted during one of the author T.
Sanada stayed at California Institute of Technology. T. S.
appreciates the support by Murakawa Niro Foundation and
Faculty of Engineering, Shizuoka University.

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7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010


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