Group Title: 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow - ICMF 2010 Proceedings
Title: 16.1.1 - Characterization of droplet dynamics in a bifurcating channel
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Title: 16.1.1 - Characterization of droplet dynamics in a bifurcating channel Droplet Flows
Series Title: 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow - ICMF 2010 Proceedings
Physical Description: Conference Papers
Creator: Carlson, A.
Do-Quang, M.
Amberg, G.
Publisher: International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF)
Publication Date: June 4, 2010
 Subjects
Subject: droplets
two-phase flow
unstable flow
phase field
three dimensional simulations
 Notes
Abstract: We present here a phenomenological description of droplet dynamics in bifurcating channels that is based on three-dimensional numerical experiments. Droplet dynamics is investigated in a bifurcating channel, which has symmetric outflow conditions in its daughter branches. For the parameter spaces explored here, we find two distinct flow characteristics as the droplet interacts with the junction; splitting or non-splitting. A flow map based on the initial droplet size and the Capillary number characterizes the two flow regimes of splitting and non-splitting droplets. Close to the threshold between these regimes, the Rayleigh-Plateau instability is identified as a driving mechanism for the droplet break-up.
General Note: The International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF) first was held in Tsukuba, Japan in 1991 and the second ICMF took place in Kyoto, Japan in 1995. During this conference, it was decided to establish an International Governing Board which oversees the major aspects of the conference and makes decisions about future conference locations. Due to the great importance of the field, it was furthermore decided to hold the conference every three years successively in Asia including Australia, Europe including Africa, Russia and the Near East and America. Hence, ICMF 1998 was held in Lyon, France, ICMF 2001 in New Orleans, USA, ICMF 2004 in Yokohama, Japan, and ICMF 2007 in Leipzig, Germany. ICMF-2010 is devoted to all aspects of Multiphase Flow. Researchers from all over the world gathered in order to introduce their recent advances in the field and thereby promote the exchange of new ideas, results and techniques. The conference is a key event in Multiphase Flow and supports the advancement of science in this very important field. The major research topics relevant for the conference are as follows: Bio-Fluid Dynamics; Boiling; Bubbly Flows; Cavitation; Colloidal and Suspension Dynamics; Collision, Agglomeration and Breakup; Computational Techniques for Multiphase Flows; Droplet Flows; Environmental and Geophysical Flows; Experimental Methods for Multiphase Flows; Fluidized and Circulating Fluidized Beds; Fluid Structure Interactions; Granular Media; Industrial Applications; Instabilities; Interfacial Flows; Micro and Nano-Scale Multiphase Flows; Microgravity in Two-Phase Flow; Multiphase Flows with Heat and Mass Transfer; Non-Newtonian Multiphase Flows; Particle-Laden Flows; Particle, Bubble and Drop Dynamics; Reactive Multiphase Flows
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Volume ID: VID00391
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: 1611-Carlson-ICMF2010.pdf

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7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


Characterization of droplet dynamics in a bifurcation channel


A. Carlson*, M. Do-Quang* and G. Amberg*

Department of Mechanicics, Linne Flow center, The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
andreaca@mech.kth.se, minh@mech.kth.se and gustava@mech.kth.se.
Keywords: Droplets, two-phase flow, unstable flow, Phase Field, three dimensional simulations

March 24, 2010



Abstract

We present here a phenomenological description of droplet dynamics in bifurcating channels that is based on
three-dimensional numerical experiments. Droplet dynamics is investigated in a bifurcating channel, which has
symmetric outflow conditions in its daughter branches. For the parameter spaces explored here, we find two distinct
flow characteristics as the droplet interacts with the junction; splitting or non-splitting. A flow map based on the
initial droplet size and the Capillary number characterizes the two flow regimes of splitting and non-splitting droplets.
Close to the threshold between these regimes, the Rayleigh-Plateau instability is identified as a driving mechanism for
the droplet break-up.


embolotherphy treatment.


Flow in bifurcating channels takes place in many
phenomena in Nature, as the transport of nutrition in
plant leaves (Katifori et al. (2010)) and blood flow
in veins and capillaries (Bull (2005)). Bifurcating
channels are also an unavoidable part in applications
in the medical technology, microsystem technology as
well as for transport of large-scale quantities as oil and
gas from refineries and human waste in sanitary sewer
systems. A bifurcating channel consists of a primary
or parent channel that separates into two or more
secondary channels, also named daughter channels.
The flow as it meets the point of bifurcation, needs to
divide its mass flow into the daughter branches. The
present paper is devoted to the study of an unstable
flow phenomena at small scales as a droplet meets
the junction in a bifurcating channel, where special
emphasis is placed on understanding what governs the
splitting or non-splitting behavior of the droplet in the
junction.

Droplets are an important part in microsystem tech-
nology and medical technology. They have been used
in a wide range of application as both a passive and
active parameter. How these droplets behave in such
complex networks of channels can be crucial in order
to promote desired processes. Two important examples
of such processes is the mixing at microscale and


One avenue of droplet microfluidics is the use of
droplets as compartments for a desired physical phe-
nomenon such as mixing, as shown by Garstecki,
Fischbach, and Whitesides (2005). Mixing in micro
scale is a well-known obstacle, since it is merely
driven by molecular diffusion. One direction to follow
in order to foster mixing is emulsion, which can be
realized by design of droplet-droplet interaction. The
potential use of an emulsion technique is often limited
by the possibility to precisely control the droplets size
distribution.
Embolotheraphy is a medical treatment strategy that
exploits bubbles or droplets and their free surfaces (Bull
(2005)), where a bubble is introduced in order to occlude
the blood flow to certain parts of the tissue. This method
is primarily applied as a last treatment resort for cancer,
when all other conventional clinical methods have failed
to eradicate the tumor. It relies on a precise control
of the two-phase flow in the bifurcating capillaries, as
one seek to occlude the flow by lodging the bubble in
one of the junctions daughter branches. This leads to
a starvation of the tumor by excluding its oxygen supply.

In the present paper we will present three dimen-
sional simulation results of droplet dynamics in a
bifurcation channel, based on the Phase Field theory.
We show that two different flow regimes can be ob-


Introduction







7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


served as the droplet interacts with the junction; splitting
or non-splitting. A distinct criterion is found to define
the threshold between the two possible outcomes. Close
to the threshold that determines splitting or non-splitting
droplets, the Rayleigh-Plateau instability is found to be
a driving parameter for droplet splitting.

1 Mathematical formulation

1.1 Phase Field theory

The phase field theory is based on the thermodynamical
consideration of the free energy of a binary system. The
two components are here assumed to be immiscible
and separated by a narrow diffuse interfacial region.
By considering that two immiscible components ac-
tually mix over an interfacial region van der Waals
(1893) proposed the idea of a diffuse interface. The
composition profile of the interface can be seen as the
competition between the random molecular motion and
the molecular attraction.

Cahn and Hilliard (1958) derived the free energy
by making a multivariable Taylor expansion about the
free energy per molecule,

f = 3W'(C) + I VC12 (1)
2
following here the phase field derivation and notation
by Jacqmin (1999) where C is an order parameter. The
creation of an interface is established by the competi-
tion between the bulk free energy /3((C), and the in-
terfacial energy QIVC]2 due to composition variations.
a and 3 are constants that comes out directly from the
Taylor expansion, see Cahn and Hilliard (1958), and
are proportional to the surface tension coefficient a and
the interface width c, 3 ~ and a ~ ac. The free
energy functional and the phase field parameters a,
,3 and the mobility M control the interfacial dynam-
ics and width. is taken as a double-well function,
p(C) I((C + 1)2(C 1)2, which will give the two
equilibrium states at C=+l. Integration over the vol-
ume of the systems gives the total free energy defined
by F J= fdV. The functional derivative of F with
respect to the order parameter C gives rise to the chemi-
cal potential,


6F
C -
6C


Bt'(C) aV2C.


By minimizing the chemical potential with respect to C
we obtain the equilibrium profile to the interface, here
given in one dimension as Co(x) = tanh( ). c =
/is the mean field thickness and the surface tension


is defined by the integral,


f dj (d)2 d
J-oo \ dx )


2 32
3


By taking into account the effects of the fluids motion a
convection-diffusion equation is obtained, also referred
to as the Cahn-Hilliard equation


+ u vc = v (MVy),


where the mobility M is considered as a constant. We
require that there is no flux of the chemical potential
through the boundaries of the domain, which is fulfilled
by the Neumann boundary condition

i9d
-O 0, (5)
On
where n is the normal vector to the boundary. The sur-
face free energy contribution is postulated as (Carlson,
Do-Quang, and Amberg (2009))

Fwaii = [IsL + (asv TSL)g(C)] dA, (6)

where T( ) is the surface energy between the three dif-
ferent phases; liquid (L), gas (V) and solid (S). g(C)
0.5+0.75C-0.25C3 is a smooth function between zero
and one, and its derivative g'(C) will be non-zero only
at the diffuse contact line. In eq.(6) it is assumed that the
interface is at or close to equilibrium as it wets the solid
surface. 00 is the equilibrium contact angle, formed be-
tween the tangent of the interface and the solid surface,
given by Young's Law; cos(0o) sv L. Through
the variational derivative of the total free energy of the
system, with respect to C, and integration by parts, the
natural boundary condition for the concentration at the
wall is obtained,


On
a^ n + a cos(Oo)g'(C) =0 (7)

governing the diffusively controlled wetting at local
equilibrium (Carlson et al. (2009)).

1.2 Governing equations


In addition to the formulation of the free energy, the
(2) continuity and Navier Stokes equations are defined, here
given in non-dimensional form,


V-u 0,


S9


S+u VC
at







7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


p + (u V) u -VP

+ V- (/t(Vu+(Vu)T))
Re (


CVo (10)
Cn Ca) (


These equations have been made dimensionless with,


L ,
x =Lx*, t = t*, P pU2P*,
U
S= U*, 40= 3 *T
a Ua 72=p


where Lc is a characteristic length scale and U is the
reference velocity. This results in four non-dimensional
numbers appearing in eq.(9, 10),


2v2UeL 6
Pe=-3 Cn=-
3Mcr Lc
pUL 2JpU
Re pUL Ca = 2-U
P 3ua


The Peclet (Pe) number expresses the ratio between
advection and diffusion. The Cahn (Cn) number ex-
presses the ratio between the interface width and the
characteristic length scale. The Reynolds (Re) number
expresses the ratio between the inertia and the viscous
force. The Capillary (Ca) number expresses the ratio
between the viscous and the surface tension force.

1.3 Computational methodology
The governing equations have been solved numerically
with the finite element toolbox FemLego (Amberg
et al. (1999)). FemLego is an open source symbolic
tool for solving partial differential equations. Within
one single Maple worksheet the partial differential
equations, boundary conditions and numerical solvers
are all defined. It inherits parallel computational and
adaptive mesh refinement capabilities see Do-Quang
et al. (2007) for details.

The Cahn-Hilliard equation has been solved with a
type of precondition Conjugate Gradient (CG) solver,
described by Villanueva and Amberg (2006). The
multifluid Navier-Stokes equations have been solved
with a projection scheme, that was proposed by Guer-
mond and Quartapelle (2000). The linear system for
the velocities and pressure have been, respectively,
solved with the General Minimum Residual method
and a CG solver. All variables are approximated with
linear base-functions and the mesh consist of triangular
elements.


Figure 1: Illustration of the Couette flow and a descrip-
tion of the minor (B) and major (L) axis of a
droplet at steady-state.


1.3.1 Numerical validation

The dynamic behavior of the surface tension force has
been verified by validating the numerical solution of the
deformation of a three-dimensional droplet in a Couette
flow. Taylor (1934) derived analytically the deformation
(D) of a droplet in a shear flow in the limit of low Re
numbers (Re < 1), which he also verified in experi-
ments,


19A + 16
D 6 6a
16A + 16


L-B
L+B'


Here the viscosity ratio of the two liquids is A, L and
B are the major and minor axes, respectively. The
Ca number Ca = is defined by the shear rate
/, t the viscosity of the continuous liquid and d the
droplet diameter. The deformation parameter D can be
extracted from experiments and numerical simulations
by measuring the major and minor axis when the droplet
has reached steady-state. A two-dimensional sketch of
the domain and a schematic description of the droplets
minor (B) and major (L) axis is given in fig.(1). Initially
the droplet is spherical in the simulations and it deforms
into an elliptic shape.

Table(l) gives the relative difference between the
analytical and numerical results for a droplet in a
Couette flow for various Ca numbers. All results are
found to be in good agreement with the analytical
prediction from Taylor given in eq.(13).

1.3.2 Geometrical description of the domain

Droplet dynamics is investigated in a three-dimensional
Y-junction described by the two-dimensional sketch
given in fig.(2), where the z-direction goes into the
plane of the figure. A velocity profile with a shape of
a paraboloid, with a non-dimensional mean velocity
u = 1, has been prescribed at the inlet of the parent
channel, and a Neumann boundary condition is defined
for the pressure. A symmetric outlet condition is
given for the pressure (P = 0) at the upper and lower
daughter branch. The parent channel has a quadratic
cross section L2, L being the width of the channel,


(a)

























Figure 2: Geometrical description of the numerical do-
main.


and the daughter branches have a rectangular cross
section L LB where L is in the z-direction. The
daughter to parent channel area is LL = 0.75 and
0 is the bifurcation angle. The droplet has initially a
volume Vi and the non-dimensional volume is defined
as V = The walls are hydrophobic, having an
affinity of the continuous phase, with an equilibrium
contact angle of 0= 180 degrees. This prevents wetting
of the dispersed phase on the channel surfaces. The
non-dimensional numbers given in eq.(12) are defined
with the characteristic length scale chosen as the width
of the parent channel Lc = L and the reference velocity
has been chosen as the mean velocity at the inlet.

The channel has an extension in the x-direction of
about 10L. A nearly equidistant mesh has been em-
ployed between the inlet and the straight section (in
x-direction) of the branches, with few skewed cells near
the point of the bifurcation. 50 node points discretize L.
In the straight section of the branches where they are
aligned with the x-direction, has a coarse mesh with
L~ 10 node points in order to reduce the computational
time. The extension of the branches ensures that the
droplet behavior is not influenced by the outlet bound-
ary condition in the simulations. The mesh consists
of nearly 7.5 million tetrahedron elements and the
computational time on 1024 processors for a single case
was about 24 hours.


2 Results

Fig.(3, 4) displays the three-dimensional droplet
iso-surface for C=0 and the velocity field in the cross
section, taken at the centre line in the channel, with a
normal [0 ex, 0 ec, 1 ec] at three snapshots in time. In
these three simulations the droplets have the same initial
shape, as a liquid slug, with the aspect ratio L- 2, a
volume V 0.67 and Cn = 0.06.


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


Ca 0.15 0.1 0.08 0.06
Deo,,,, 2.8% 1.1% 0.8% 1.0%

Table 1: The relative deviation between the analytical
and computed deformation parameter is given
for different Ca numbers. All other parameters
have been kept constant Re=0.01, Pe 103,
Ca=0.06 and A = 1 and the mesh is equidistant
with a spacing Ax = 0.02.





Fig.(3a) shows the droplet as it has deformed at
the tip of the junction, forming two symmetric liquid
fingers in the upper and lower branch of the channel.
The flow from the parent channel continues to deform
the droplet, and a liquid thread is formed at the bi-
furcation. This thread is thinning in time, as the two
liquid fingers propagate into the daughter branches.
Finally it becomes so small that surface tension starts to
contract the thread radially, an instability resembling the
Rayleigh-Plateau instability. After breakup two equally
sized droplets are formed in each branch, that rapidly
obtains their energy minimizing shape.

By just changing the magnitude of the surface ten-
sion coefficient a very different flow behavior than
observed in fig.(3a) is obtained, see fig.(4). In fig.(4a)
the droplet has just deformed at the junction. Work
from the continuous phase is transferred into surface
energy through droplet deformation, making the droplet
decelerate at the bifurcation. Finally it obtains a quasi
steady-state condition as it sticks at the bifurcation. The
incipience of a numerical disturbance initiates droplet
migration into the lower branch, see fig.(4c). Finally
the droplet solely occupies the lower branch, leaving an
asymmetric distribution of both the continuous as well
as the disperse phase in the junction branches.

The droplet splitting or non-splitting phenomenon
depends mainly on the relative dominance of the surface
tension force, represented in the Ca number. The
resulting droplet dynamics seem to also highly depend
on its initial configuration, identifying the droplet size
and the Ca number as two of the key parameters for
the definition of the multiphase flow characteristics
in the junction. Similar experimental observations
have been made in both T- (Link et al. (2004)) and
A-junctions (Menetrier-Deremble and Tabeling (2006);
Eshpuniyani et al. (2005)). These parameters form a
non-dimensional space, which is explored in numerical
experiments, describing the relationship between the
splitting and non-splitting flow regimes as shown in








7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


----~--------~


-------------














------------- -


(c)


Figure 3: Droplet shape with V=0.67 and Ca=3.0 10 3
at three snapshots in time; (a)=2.5, (b)=2.7,
(c)=3.0. Figure 4: Droplet shape with V=0.67 and Ca=1.8 10-3
at three snapshots in time; (a)=2.0, (b)=3.5,
5 (c)=4.0.


(c)


(b)


-----------
-----------


111*""
-------~
----2~
x~o*-~""" I:~rc=
--


-17

- - - - - - -


























10
log(Ca)

Figure 5: Flow map of splitting (filled markers) and
non-splitting (hollow markers), where the full
line represents the threshold between split-
ting and non-splitting found as V -0.8 -
0.5log(Ca).


fig.(5).

A distinct and well-defined criterion defines
here the splitting or non-splitting characteristics
V -0.8 0.5log(Ca), indicated by the full line in
fig.(5). These findings identify that large droplets favor
splitting and that such a process is hard to obtain with
small droplets.

3 Conclusion

We have reported here three-dimensional numerical
experiments based on phase field theory of droplet
dynamics in a bifurcating channel with symmetric
outflow conditions. Two distinct flow regimes are
identified as the droplets interact with the junction,
splitting and non-splitting. In particular we show the
effects of the initial droplet size and Ca number on the
resulting two-phase flow characteristics.

Droplets that split equally, produce a symmetric
distribution of both phases in the channel daughter
branches. Near the threshold between the two regimes,
we observe that the Rayleigh-Plateau instability can be
a driving parameter for droplet division.

In the non-splitting regime the droplet migrates
into one of the channel branches, leading to a strong
temporal asymmetric flow in the junction. These results
are illustrating that a symmetric placement of the droplet
in the parent channel is highly unstable. A more detailed
description of droplet dynamics in a bifurcating channel


K* t


Splitting

*


N^4


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


by the respective authors can be found in Carlson et al.
(2010).

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