Group Title: 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow - ICMF 2010 Proceedings
Title: 11.2.2 - Study of the catalyst distribution in a new designed downer distributor using ECT and CFD-DEM method
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 Material Information
Title: 11.2.2 - Study of the catalyst distribution in a new designed downer distributor using ECT and CFD-DEM method Fluidized and Circulating Fluidized Beds
Series Title: 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow - ICMF 2010 Proceedings
Physical Description: Conference Papers
Creator: Zhao, T.
Takei, M.
Publisher: International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF)
Publication Date: June 4, 2010
 Subjects
Subject: electrical capacitance tomography
discrete element model
CFD
downer
 Notes
Abstract: An Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) system has been developed to non-invasively measure the particle distributions in the down-flow circulating fluidized bed (downer) with a new designed distributor. The particle concentration distribution images are obtained under certain parameter combinations. The influence factor of particle distribution and the fluctuation profiles of particle volume fraction are discussed in details. The increase of particle flow rate played a negative part in the uniformity of particle concentration. Based on the reconstructed image obtained at different position, the axial and radial profiles of particle volume fraction and its fluctuation were put forward. The effect of the air-particle mixer in the particle uniformity was clarified by comparison to the former researcher’s working results. As results, the new designed air-particle mixer was proved to lead to a more uniform particle distribution in downer. Moreover, a numerical model of this down-flow fluidized bed was developed by means of the combined two- dimensional model of computational fluid dynamics and discrete element method (CFD-DEM). This CFD-DEM model provides the information regarding the particle movement and distribution, gas velocity, gas holdup, and conversion profiles in the bed under different air-particle mix condition. Specifically, the particle volume fraction is proportional to air flow rate ratio and decreases as the measurement position moves downstream. The simulation results show very good agreement with the experiment. Introduction In the
General Note: The International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF) first was held in Tsukuba, Japan in 1991 and the second ICMF took place in Kyoto, Japan in 1995. During this conference, it was decided to establish an International Governing Board which oversees the major aspects of the conference and makes decisions about future conference locations. Due to the great importance of the field, it was furthermore decided to hold the conference every three years successively in Asia including Australia, Europe including Africa, Russia and the Near East and America. Hence, ICMF 1998 was held in Lyon, France, ICMF 2001 in New Orleans, USA, ICMF 2004 in Yokohama, Japan, and ICMF 2007 in Leipzig, Germany. ICMF-2010 is devoted to all aspects of Multiphase Flow. Researchers from all over the world gathered in order to introduce their recent advances in the field and thereby promote the exchange of new ideas, results and techniques. The conference is a key event in Multiphase Flow and supports the advancement of science in this very important field. The major research topics relevant for the conference are as follows: Bio-Fluid Dynamics; Boiling; Bubbly Flows; Cavitation; Colloidal and Suspension Dynamics; Collision, Agglomeration and Breakup; Computational Techniques for Multiphase Flows; Droplet Flows; Environmental and Geophysical Flows; Experimental Methods for Multiphase Flows; Fluidized and Circulating Fluidized Beds; Fluid Structure Interactions; Granular Media; Industrial Applications; Instabilities; Interfacial Flows; Micro and Nano-Scale Multiphase Flows; Microgravity in Two-Phase Flow; Multiphase Flows with Heat and Mass Transfer; Non-Newtonian Multiphase Flows; Particle-Laden Flows; Particle, Bubble and Drop Dynamics; Reactive Multiphase Flows
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Volume ID: VID00278
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Resource Identifier: 1122-Zhao-ICMF2010.pdf

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Paper No 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010


Study of the catalyst distribution in a new designed downer distributor using ECT and
CFD-DEM method


Tong ZHAO, Masahiro TAKEI

Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University,
1-8-14, Kanda Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308, Japan
polomarslee @hotmail.com

Keywords: Electrical capacitance tomography; Discrete element method; Computational fluid dynamics; Downer


Abstract

An Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) system has been developed to non-invasively measure the particle distributions
in the down-flow circulating fluidized bed (downer) with a new designed distributor. The particle concentration distribution
images are obtained under certain parameter combinations. The influence factor of particle distribution and the fluctuation
profiles of particle volume fraction are discussed in details. The increase of particle flow rate played a negative part in the
uniformity of particle concentration. Based on the reconstructed image obtained at different position, the axial and radial
profiles of particle volume fraction and its fluctuation were put forward. The effect of the air-particle mixer in the particle
uniformity was clarified by comparison to the former researcher's working results. As results, the new designed air-particle
mixer was proved to lead to a more uniform particle distribution in downer. Moreover, a numerical model of this down-flow
fluidized bed was developed by means of the combined two- dimensional model of computational fluid dynamics and discrete
element method (CFD-DEM). This CFD-DEM model provides the information regarding the particle movement and
distribution, gas velocity, gas holdup, and conversion profiles in the bed under different air-particle mix condition. Specifically,
the particle volume fraction is proportional to air flow rate ratio and decreases as the measurement position moves downstream.
The simulation results show very good agreement with the experiment.


Introduction

In the past decades, due to the significant advantages of the
down-flow fluidized bed (downer) such as uniform particle
distribution and short contact time between gas and particles,
downer has been proposed for some processes such as fluid
catalytic cracking process, where extremely short but
uniform contact between gas and solids are required to
prevent overreacting. Various researches have been carried
out in the past to study the flow behaviors in the down-flow
fluidized bed (downer) such as gas and solid velocity
distribution (Wang et al., 1992), solids aggregation (Zhang
et al., 2008) and solid concentration distribution (Zhang et
al., 2003; Wu et al., 2007). However, most of these studies
have focused on the fully developed region (the constant
velocity region), the gas and solids flow patterns in the
entrance region of the downer (less than 2m from the
downer inlet), which is very important to the particle
distribution uniformity, have been ignored. Therefore, in
order to fully understand the mechanisms of flow
development, it is important to clarify the particle
distribution behaviors within the entrance region of the
downer.
Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) which has
become increasingly popular for multiphase flow
measurement should be a proper solution to visualize the
particle distribution (Zhao et al., 2007; Tortora et al., 2006).
Recently, the ECT technique has been successfully applied
to many industry processes, such as fluidized bed
coalescence (Wang et al., 1995), pneumatic conveyance
(Dyakowski et al., 1999) and particle coating process (Takei


and Zhao, 2009). Moreover, the numerical simulation of
the gas-solid distribution is very necessary, in order to
confirm the accuracy of the experiment results. The discrete
element method (DEM), which has been proved to be an
effective simulation technique to study the particle-fluid
flow systems under different conditions, as briefly reviewed
by various investigators (Yu and Wu, 2003; Deen et al.,
2007), is widely used. In the DEM model, the motion of
particles is modelled as a discrete phase, described by the
Newton's laws of motion on an individual particle scale,
while the flow of fluid (gas or liquid) is treated as a
continuum phase, described by the Navier-Stokes
equations.
In this work, an ECT system, which consists of three
270mm CT sensors, is designed for particle distribution
visualization in a downer with a new designed distributor.
The distribution images of particle volume fraction were
obtained at a 10 milliseconds intervals for different
parameter combinations. After that, the axial and radial
profiles of particle volume fraction information were
extracted from the images. A numerical simulation of the
particle behaviour in the downer was undertaken using
DEM. The simulation data were then compared with the
experiment results.

Mathematical Modelling

In order to confirm the experiment result, a
mathematical model was presented. In this mathematical
model, the solid phase is treated as a discrete phase that is
described by a conventional DEM. Movement of






Paper No


individual particles is evaluated by the Newton's equation
of motion which includes the effects of gravitational force,
contact force, and fluid force. The translational and
rotational motions of a particle at any time, t, in the reactor
are determined by momentum balance, given by
dv
m- = Fa + F+G (1)
dt
do)
I =T (2)
dt
where m is the mass of the particle; v and o is the
translational and rotational velocity; I is the moment of
inertia; F, is the force acting on particle that exerted by
surrounding fluid; Fc is the contact force; G is the
gravitational force; T is the torque caused by the contact
force and the moment of inertia of particle. The contact
force between two spherical particles can be modelled by
the simple concept of spring, dash-pot and friction slider.
Thus the model depends on the parameters of stiffness,
dissipation, and friction coefficients which can be obtained
from the physical properties of the particles. The details of
the applications of this model in gas-solid systems were
illustrated in previous work (Tsuji et al., 1992; 1993).

The gas phase is treated as a continuous phase and
modelled in a way similar to the one used in the
conventional TFM. The governing equations are the
conservation of mass and momentum in terms of the local
mean variables over a computational cell, given by
(3)
-+V.(at)=0 (3)


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010

width. In the downer, gas and particles flow downward,
same as the gravity. A no-slip condition is used for the air
phase at the walls and particles are allowed for frontal
collisions with the wall. The simulation is started with the
random generation of particles without overlaps in the
rectangular bed, followed by a gravitational settling process
to form a packing. Then, gas is injected into the bed
uniformly to fluidize the particles. After a short time,
macroscopically steady flow can be established. The results
presented in this paper are all obtained in such a state.


-VP + F


where e is the volume fraction; u is the velocity vector of
fluid; P is the pressure of fluid; Fa is the fluid drag force
exerted on the particles, and 6V is the volume of a
computational cell.
The fluid drag force acting on each particle inside the
computational cell can be calculated by

f,, = (vP,, u) V (5)

The coefficient ( can be determined by the Ergun's equation
( < 0.8 )or Wen and Yu's equation ( > 0.8 ). In the
present simulation, 3 was deduced based on the summarized
equations in previous works as follow (Tsuji et al., 1993;).

Simulation Conditions

The parameter settings of the simulation are summarized in
Table 1. The simulated fluidized bed consists of a special
designed distributor and a rectangular container. Figure 1
shows the calculation domain and the grid arrangements. In
this simulation, the particle distribution behavior in downer
is numerically simulated under the same conditions as those
for the experiment. The parameter settings of the simulation
are summarized in Table 1. Because of the huge particle
number and limited computation speed, the particle
diameter is set as 3 mm, which is around 50 times to the real
particle diameter. The flow of gas and particles is assumed
to be two-dimensional since the thickness of the bed is equal
to the particle diameter, which is much less than the bed


(a) Front view


212 mm

S122 mm


Particle inlet


(b) New designed distributor
Figure 1: Calculation domain and grid arrangement


.........
.........
.........
.........
.........
oil 11111111111111111
EM iii i






Paper No


Table 1: Simulation conditions


Gas phase Particle phase
Fluid type Air Particle shape spherical
Density(kg/m3) 1.205 Density(kg/m3) 1200
Bed 0.27 Particle 3 10-3
geometry(m) (diameter) diameter(m)
2 (length) Number of 107
particles
Air flow rate at
each nozzle 0.118 Spngconstant 80
(m3/s) (N/m)
Viscosity(kg/ms) 2.0x10 Particle flow ra 175
[kg/m2s]
Friction coefficient 0.3
Time step (s) 5 x105

Experiments Using ECT

The experimental equipment consisted of a hopper tank, a
sender, an air-particle distributor, a circulating pipe, a
cyclone separator, and a receiver tank, as shown in Figure 2.
The downer which connected to the bottom of the distributor
had a diameter of 270 mm and a length of 5.3 m. Particle
was supplied from the hopper tank to the distributor inlet.
The distributor consists of one annular particle inlet and five
air nozzles, which include a centre nozzle and four


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010

well-distributed side nozzles. The annular solid inlet has an
inside diameter of 122 mm and an outside diameter of 212
mm. The air nozzles are 24 mm in diameter. The angle
between the centre line of the centre nozzle and the side
nozzle is 45 degrees. Three capacitance tomography sensors
were wrapped around the circumference of the downer at
different vertical positions. The length of each sensor is 0.66
m. Figure 2 shows the schematic diagram of the ECT sensor.
The details of the ECT sensor have been reported in the
authors' former research paper (Zhao et al., 2007). The
particulate solids used for this study were fluid catalytic
cracking (FCC) catalyst particle that has a particle density of
1,200 kg/m3, a mean diameter of 69.6 pm and a relative
permittivity of 2.7.
In the experiment, the hopper was adjusted to provide a
particle flow rates as 175 kg/m2s. The air flow rate at each
air nozzle was set as 0.118m3/s. After a few seconds delay,
in order to allow the particle to flow in a stable manner, the
capacitances measurement started at bases time using a
combined system consist of a capacitance acquisition device
and a high-speed multiplexer. The time interval to acquire
the capacitances measured by 66 pairs of electrodes in a
cross-section was At = 10.0 ms. The total measurement time
is 5s, and the total frame number of the reconstructed image
Nt is 500. The Generalized Vector Sampled Pattern
Matching (GVSPM) method was used for image
reconstruction (Takei et al., 2006).


Figure 2: Experimental apparatus


Air nozzle 1 106
(Side) x4



Air nozzle
(Center)
270
(Dimensions: mm)
Configuration of the specially
designed distributor






Paper No


Results and Discussion

Figure 3 shows the three dimensional particle distribution
image of case 1 at t-0.2s as an example. The dash lines in
figure 3 indicate the positions of ECT sensor in the
experiment. Then, the distribution images of particle volume
fraction at the cross-section of these positions were extracted
and compared with the experimental images obtained by
ECT sensors.
Table 2 shows the distribution image of particle volume
fraction obtained by the ECT system and DEM simulation.
In these images, the red pixels indicate the high particle
volume fraction, 0.2, while the blue one indicates air as
shown by the colour bar. As shown in Table 2, both the
simulation and experiment result presents that near the
entrance of the downer, the high particle concentration part,
which probably represents the solid aggregation (cluster),
always exists in the near wall region and the centre of the
downer. Hence, an annular region of low particle volume
fraction can be observed between the centre area and the
wall. And it seems that the low particle volume fraction
region located at the same place as particle inlet. Then, as the
position moves downstream, due to the force affect by air,
the clusters become smaller or even disappear. In other
words, the particle distribution becomes uniform. The above
radial profiles of particle volume fraction are very
reasonable. By means of the new designed distributor, the air
velocity was inclined with respect to the gravity direction
because of the side nozzle. After dropping from the inlet,
particles are accelerated in not only the axial direction, but
also in the radial direction. Under the affect of this radial
force, particles move away from the annular region to the
center or the wall. As a result of these trends, an annular
region of low particle volume fraction and two regions of
relatively high particle volume fraction in the center and near
the wall are formed.
Figure 4 reveals the experiment and simulation results of the
axial particle volume fraction profile. In figure 4, the
simulation result of particle volume fraction decrease with
the increase of the axial distance from distributor. The
reason of this phenomenon could be lies on the slip velocity
between particle and air phase. Wang et al. put forward that
there are three sections of particle velocity in solid- air two
phase down flow, which is the first acceleration section, the
second acceleration section and the constant velocity section
(Wang et al., 1992). Following this theory, along with the
particle drops down, the particle velocity will increase first.
Then, when the air upward drag becomes equal to the
particle gravity, particle velocity will level off. However,
during this process, the air velocity nearly keeps on constant.
Therefore, the slip velocity between particle and air phase
increases as particle drops downstream, and then cause the


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010

decrease of particle volume fraction. As shown in Figure 4,
the experiment results also show the same tendency as the
simulation result. However, the experiment result is
obviously large than the simulation one. This phenomenon
might be due to the magnification of the particle size. The
magnification of particle size will influence the drug force
acting on particle exerted by surrounding fluid and the
contact force exerted by other particles, and then cause the
increase of particle velocity. Hence, the particle velocity in
the simulation is faster than that in the experiment at the
same axial position. It means that the slip velocity in the
simulation is bigger than that in the experiment at the same
axial position, and causes the smaller particle volume
fraction.









h=0.33m
--------.p-l-

- - - - - -t






h=0.99m










h=1.65m








Figure 3: Three dimensional particle distribution (t=-0.2s)





Paper No


- Simulation U Experiment


0.3 0.5 0.7 0.9 1.1


1.3 1.5 1.7 1.9


Distance from the distributor h [m]
Figure 4: Axial solid fraction profile from simulation and experiment


Conclusions
A three-sensor ECT system was applied to visualize the
particle distribution during the particle-air mixing process in
the downer. Based on the reconstructed image, both the axial
and radial profiles of particle volume fraction are analyzed in
detail and clarified. Then, in order to confirm the experiment
results, a numerical simulation of the gas-solid distribution
in the downer is presented using discrete element method
(DEM). The comparison results of the simulation and the
experiment are summarized as follow. The distribution
images of particle volume fraction from simulation agree
well with the experiment ones. The highest particle volume
fractions could be observed near the wall. And an annular
region of relative low particle volume fraction, which


coincides with the particle inlet area, can be observed near
the entrance of the downer. The reason could be lies on the
radial drag force imposed by the air phase. And as particles
descend, the particle volume fraction decreases but become
well- distributed.

Acknowledgements
The authors wish to acknowledge the financial support
provided by the Information Center of Powder Technology
Japan, and the Grant-in-aid for scientific research (C) from
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. The authors
wish to acknowledge the support provided by the Rflow Co.
Ltd in the DEM simulation.


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010

Table 2 Distribution images of particle volume fraction
0.0 0 .20
Relative solid concentration


I--~-





Paper No 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010

Y. TSUJI, T. KAWAGUCHI, T. TANAKA, Discrete
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