Group Title: 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow - ICMF 2010 Proceedings
Title: 6.4.4 - Eulerian models and three-dimensional numerical simulation of polydisperse evaporating sprays
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 Material Information
Title: 6.4.4 - Eulerian models and three-dimensional numerical simulation of polydisperse evaporating sprays Computational Techniques for Multiphase Flows
Series Title: 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow - ICMF 2010 Proceedings
Physical Description: Conference Papers
Creator: Freret, L.
de Chaisemartin, S.
Reveillon, J.
Laurent, F.
Massot, M.
Publisher: International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF)
Publication Date: June 4, 2010
 Subjects
Subject: liquid sprays
multi-fluid models
numerical analysis
scientific and parallel computing
Euler-Euler/Euler-Lagrange comparisons
 Notes
Abstract: Providing accurate simulations of polydisperse evaporating sprays dynamics in unsteady gaseous flows with large scale vortical structures is both a crucial issue for industrial applications and a challenge for modeling and scientific computing. The usual Lagrangian approaches developed in polydisperse unsteady configurations require tremendous computational costs and may lead to a low level of resolution if not enough numerical parcels are used. Besides, they induce coupling issues due to the different kind of description of the two phases that are involved. A large range of Eulerian models have been recently developed to describe the dispersed liquid phase with a lower cost and an easier coupling with a carrier gaseous phase. Among these models, the multi-fluid model allows a detailed description of polydispersity and size/velocity correlations of droplets of various sizes. It has been studied in depth from a mathematical and numerical point of view (see Laurent & al (2004); Laurent (2006); Massot & al (2009)) and validated through comparisons versus Lagrangian simulations in de Chaisemartin (2009) and experimental measurements in Fréret & al (2008) in 2D and 2D-axisymmetrical configurations. However, the validation in three-dimensional unsteady configurations still remains to be done. In this work, we study the non-evaporating droplet segregation in three-dimensional Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence (HIT) using a reference Lagrangian spray model versus the Eulerian multi-fluid model. A spectral Direct Numerical Simulation solver is used to describe the evolution of the turbulent carrier phase, whose characteristic properties remain statistically stationary due to a semi-deterministic forcing scheme. We focus on the optimization via a parallel implementation of the multi-fluid model and dedicated numerical methods which demonstrates the ability of the Eulerian DNS model to be used in high performance computing for academic three-dimensional configurations. We provide qualitative comparisons between the Euler-Lagrange and the Euler-Euler descriptions for two different values of the Stokes number based on the initial fluid Kolmogorov time scale, St = 0:17 and 1:05. A very good agreement is found between the mesoscopic Eulerian and Lagrangian predictions. We go further with first quantitative comparisons of the segregation effect of the vortices on the spray mass density distribution showing the accuracy and ability of the multi-fluid model to be used in 3D configurations from the tracer limit (St ! 0) to unity.
General Note: The International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF) first was held in Tsukuba, Japan in 1991 and the second ICMF took place in Kyoto, Japan in 1995. During this conference, it was decided to establish an International Governing Board which oversees the major aspects of the conference and makes decisions about future conference locations. Due to the great importance of the field, it was furthermore decided to hold the conference every three years successively in Asia including Australia, Europe including Africa, Russia and the Near East and America. Hence, ICMF 1998 was held in Lyon, France, ICMF 2001 in New Orleans, USA, ICMF 2004 in Yokohama, Japan, and ICMF 2007 in Leipzig, Germany. ICMF-2010 is devoted to all aspects of Multiphase Flow. Researchers from all over the world gathered in order to introduce their recent advances in the field and thereby promote the exchange of new ideas, results and techniques. The conference is a key event in Multiphase Flow and supports the advancement of science in this very important field. The major research topics relevant for the conference are as follows: Bio-Fluid Dynamics; Boiling; Bubbly Flows; Cavitation; Colloidal and Suspension Dynamics; Collision, Agglomeration and Breakup; Computational Techniques for Multiphase Flows; Droplet Flows; Environmental and Geophysical Flows; Experimental Methods for Multiphase Flows; Fluidized and Circulating Fluidized Beds; Fluid Structure Interactions; Granular Media; Industrial Applications; Instabilities; Interfacial Flows; Micro and Nano-Scale Multiphase Flows; Microgravity in Two-Phase Flow; Multiphase Flows with Heat and Mass Transfer; Non-Newtonian Multiphase Flows; Particle-Laden Flows; Particle, Bubble and Drop Dynamics; Reactive Multiphase Flows
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Bibliographic ID: UF00102023
Volume ID: VID00157
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: 644-Freret-ICMF2010.pdf

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7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


Eulerian models and three-dimensional numerical simulation of polydisperse
sprays


L. Fr6ret*, S. de Chaisemartint, J. Reveillont, F. Laurent and M. MassotO

Laboratoire d'Imagerie Parametrique, Universit6 Paris VI, France
t IFP, Reuil Malmaison, France
CORIA, Saint Etienne du Rouvray, France
SLaboratoire EM2C, Ecole Centrale Paris, Chatenay-Malabry, France
lucie.freret@upmc.fr, stephane.de-chaisemartin@ifp.fr, julien.reveillon@coria.fr, frederique.laurent@em2c.ecp.fr,
marc.massot@em2c.ecp.fr
Keywords: Liquid Sprays, multi-fluid models, numerical analysis, scientific and parallel computing,
Euler-Euler/Euler-Lagrange comparisons.




Abstract

Providing accurate simulations of polydisperse evaporating sprays dynamics in unsteady gaseous flows with large
scale vortical structures is both a crucial issue for industrial applications and a challenge for modeling and scientific
computing. The usual Lagrangian approaches developed in polydisperse unsteady configurations require tremendous
computational costs and may lead to a low level of resolution if not enough numerical parcels are used. Besides,
they induce coupling issues due to the different kind of description of the two phases that are involved. A large
range of Eulerian models have been recently developed to describe the dispersed liquid phase with a lower cost
and an easier coupling with a carrier gaseous phase. Among these models, the multi-fluid model allows a detailed
description of polydispersity and size/velocity correlations of droplets of various sizes. It has been studied in depth
from a mathematical and numerical point of view (see Laurent & al (2004); Laurent (2006); Massot & al (2009))
and validated through comparisons versus Lagrangian simulations in de Chaisemartin (2009) and experimental
measurements in Fr6ret & al (2008) in 2D and 2D-axisymmetrical configurations. However, the validation in
three-dimensional unsteady configurations still remains to be done. In this work, we study the non-evaporating
droplet segregation in three-dimensional Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence (HIT) using a reference Lagrangian
spray model versus the Eulerian multi-fluid model. A spectral Direct Numerical Simulation solver is used to describe
the evolution of the turbulent carrier phase, whose characteristic properties remain statistically stationary due to a
semi-deterministic forcing scheme. We focus on the optimization via a parallel implementation of the multi-fluid
model and dedicated numerical methods which demonstrates the ability of the Eulerian DNS model to be used in high
performance computing for academic three-dimensional configurations. We provide qualitative comparisons between
the Euler-Lagrange and the Euler-Euler descriptions for two different values of the Stokes number based on the initial
fluid Kolmogorov time scale, St = 0.17 and 1.05. A very good agreement is found between the mesoscopic Eulerian
and Lagrangian predictions. We go further with first quantitative comparisons of the segregation effect of the vortices
on the spray mass density distribution showing the accuracy and ability of the multi-fluid model to be used in 3D
configurations from the tracer limit (St 0) to unity.


Introduction character of the droplet size distribution can signifi-
cantly affect flame structures. Size distribution effects
In many industrial combustion applications such as are also encountered in a crucial way in solid propel-
Diesel engines, fuel is stocked in condensed form and lant rocket boosters, where the cloud of alumina parti-
burnt as a dispersed liquid phase carried by a gaseous cles experiences coalescence and becomes polydisperse
flow. Two phase effects as well as the polydisperse in size, thus determining their global dynamical behav-











ior, see Doisneau & al (2010). Consequently, it is of
interest to have reliable models and numerical methods
able to describe precisely the two-phase flows physics
where the dispersed phase is constituted of a cloud of
particles of various sizes that can evaporate, coalesce
or aggregate, break-up and also have their own inertia
and size-conditioned dynamics. In a "mesoscopic" de-
scription of the liquid phase, droplets are considered as
a cloud of point particles for which the exchanges of
mass, momentum and heat are described using a statis-
tical point of view, with eventual correlations, and the
details of the interface behavior, angular momentum of
droplets, detailed internal temperature distribution in-
side the droplet, etc., are not predicted. Instead, a finite
set of global properties such as size of spherical droplets,
velocity of the center of mass, temperature are modeled.
Since it is the only one which provides numerical simu-
lations at the scale of a combustion chamber or in a free
jet, this mesoscopic point of view will be adopted in the
present paper.
The main physical processes that must be accounted
for are (1) transport in real space, (2) acceleration of
droplets due to drag, (3) droplet heating and evaporation,
and (4) coalescence and break-up of droplets leading to
polydispersivity. Spray models have a common basis at
the mesoscopic level under the form of a number den-
sity function (NDF) satisfying a Boltzmann type equa-
tion, the so-called Williams equation (Williams (1958)).
The internal variables characterizing one droplet are the
size, the velocity and the temperature, so that the to-
tal phase space is usually high-dimensional. Such a
transport equation describes the evolution of the NDF
of the spray due to evaporation, to the drag force of the
gaseous phase, to the heating of the droplets by the gas
and finally to the droplet-droplet interactions, such as
coalescence and break-up phenomena. There are sev-
eral strategies in order to solve the liquid phase and the
major challenge in numerical simulations is to account
for the strong coupling between all the involved pro-
cesses. A first choice is to approximate the NDF by a
sample of discrete numerical parcels of particles of var-
ious sizes through a Lagrangian-Monte-Carlo approach
(see O'Rourke (1981)). It is called Direct Simulation
Monte-Carlo method (DSMC) by Bird (1994) and gen-
erally considered to be the most accurate for solving
Williams equation; it is especially suited for DNS since
it does not introduce any numerical diffusion, the par-
ticle trajectories being exactly solved. This approach
has been widely used and has been shown to be effi-
cient in numerous cases. Its main drawback is the cou-
pling of an Eulerian description for the gaseous phase
to a Lagrangian description of the dispersed phase, thus
encountering difficulties of vectorization/parallelization
and implicitation. Besides, it brings another issue asso-


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


ciated with the repartition of the evaporated mass at the
droplet location onto the Eulerian grid for the gas de-
scription. Moreover for unsteady computations of poly-
disperse sprays, a large number of parcels in each cell
of the computational domain is generally needed, thus
yielding large memory requirement and CPU cost. This
drawback makes attractive the use of a Eulerian formu-
lation for the description of the disperse phase, at least
as a complementary tool for Lagrangian solvers.
The Eulerian Multi-Fluid model, extended by Laurent &
Massot (2001) from the ideas of Greenberg & al (1993),
allows to describe polydispersivity of a spray in size
and the associated size-conditioned dynamics. This ap-
proach relies on the derivation of a semi-kinetic model
from the Williams equation using a moment method for
velocity conditioned by droplet size while keeping the
continuous size distribution function. This distribution
function is then discretized using a finite volume ap-
proach in the size phase space that yields conservation
equations for mass, momentum (and eventually other
properties such as temperature) of droplets in fixed size
intervals. This Multi-Fluid model is developed in the
framework of a DNS for laminar flows. However, it
is specific of the difficulties one will encounter in the
development of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) tools for
turbulent flows (see Boileau & al (2010)).

In the present work, we consider monodisperse non-
evaporating sprays in large scale vortical structures of an
unsteady forced HIT gaseous field. As we do not want
to cope with the difficulties of the two-way coupling but
solely compare two descriptions of the dispersed liquid
phase, we restrict the simulation to one-way coupling
and thus isolate the behavior of each method. The ex-
tension to polydisperse evaporating droplets has already
been discussed in Laurent & al (2004); de Chaisemartin
& al (2008); Reveillon & Demoulin (2007), crossing
phenomena in Kah & al (2010) and was not taken into
account here since we tend to validate the multi-fluid
model in 3D unsteady flows. Simulations were car-
ried out thanks to the coupling of a solver dedicated to
the Eulerian spray description (Muses3D) with an other
one which solves the Lagrangian liquid phase and the
gas phase on a Eulerian grid (Asphodele). Muses3D
solver has been developed by S. de Chaisemartin dur-
ing his thesis ( de Chaisemartin (2009)) and L. Fr6ret
at EM2C laboratory and Asphodele by J. R6veillon and
co-workers at CORIA laboratory. The coupling of these
two solvers allows the simultaneous numerical simula-
tion with the use of two models Eulerian and Lagrangian
for the liquid phase coupled to an unique gas carrier-
phase.

The paper is organized as follows. We first recall briefly
the modelling of the liquid phase, both from a La-











grangian and Eulerian descriptions, as detailed in de
(I miisc'.iiiiii (2009). We also discuss the numerical
methods for the two different descriptions as well as for
the gaseous phase. Next, we detail the optimization via
MPI parallel implementation done in Muses3D connect-
ing with numerical methods and the way we achieved
the coupling between parallel Muses3D and sequential
Asphodele. This allows to carry out simultaneous sim-
ulations of two descriptions of a spray dispersion in an
unsteady three-dimensional HIT configuration with two
different Stokes, from the tracer limit St 0.17 to
St 1.05 which leads to maximal segregation effects.
Qualitative comparisons are performed considering the
Eulerian liquid density, the Lagrangian droplet positions
and particle number density. Moreover, statistical prop-
erties of the dispersed phase such as particle-fluid ve-
locity correlation and Eulerian droplet segregation are
computed from both Lagrangian and Eulerian simula-
tions. Presented results account for our first quantitative
outcome on droplet segregation in an unsteady 3D con-
figuration.

Governing equations and modelling

In this study, we restrict ourselves to physical processes
such as (1) transport in real space and (2) acceleration of
droplets due to drag.
In order to introduce the non-dimensional equations, we
define the reference velocity Uo and length xo based on
the macroscopic characteristics of the computational do-
main allowing to define a reference time scale for the
gaz: T7 xo /Uo. These quantities, along with the phys-
ical constants for a reference physical mixture, po Poo
are taken to define the dimensionless system. To derive
the dimensionless equations, we define a normalization
Reynolds number based on the reference quantities

Re0 = p-X (1)

The Stokes number is given by St = Tp/r where the
drag relaxation time is defined by Tp piS/(187p,),
the liquid density is pi and p, is the gas viscosity and T,
is the Kolmogorov time scale.
Dimensionless variables are given such as:

u* u/Uo, x* = x/xo, t* = t/9g, S* = S/So.

A number density function (NDF) of the spray f' is
introduced, the quantity f(t, x, S, u)dtdxdSdu be-
ing the probable number of droplets with a position
in [x, x + dx], a surface in [S, S + dS], a velocity
in [u, u + du] and at time t. The NDF satisfies a simpli-
fied Williams-Boltzmann equation:


otf + x, (uf) + (Ff) 0,


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


where F is the dimensionless Stokes law drag force
given by F = (ug u)/St with u, the gas velocity.

Lagrangian liquid phase. To solve the kinetic equa-
tion (2) of the spray, we can use Lagrangian Monte-
Carlo methods. This leads to Euler-Lagrange numerical
methods, commonly used for the calculation of poly-
disperse sprays in various application fields (generally,
the gas phase is computed using a deterministic Eule-
rian solver, while the disperse phase is treated in a La-
grangian way). In our study, the Lagrangian reference
is not taken as a converged DSMC method, in order to
be closer to industrial concern. For the given gas DNS
configuration, we perform a Discrete Particle Simulation
(DPS). Indeed there is no need to use Stochastic Parcel
method, since all the droplets contained in the computa-
tional domain can be tracked. One can note that in the
infinite Knudsen limit meaning that there is no droplet
interaction, the DSMC computation is equivalent to an
ensemble of DPS, each numerical particle representing
one droplet with a weight equal to one.
The physical processes are then described by the classi-
cal following non-dimensional equations:


dvk
dt
dxk
dt


1
St(S (x, t) Vk) ,
St(Sk)


where vk and xk denote the dimensionless velocity and
position vectors of each droplet k. The vector ug rep-
resents the gas velocity at the droplet position xk. The
right hand-side term of the first equation in (3) stands for
a drag force applied to the droplet of size Sk.
The Lagrangian numerical particles ODE systems (3)
are solved with an explicit third order Runge Kutta
solver.

Eulerian liquid phase. The alternative to Lagrangian
particle tracking is the resolution of spray Eulerian
global quantities, as number or mass density and mo-
mentum. These Eulerian methods can be seen as mo-
ment methods derived from the kinetic equation (2).
The formalism and the associated assumptions needed
to derive the Eulerian multi-fluid model are introduced
in Laurent & Massot (2001). Two steps are to be real-
ized in order to obtain the Eulerian multi-fluid model's
equations. In a first step, the size of the phase space is re-
duced by considering zero and one order moments with
respect to the velocity variable at a given time t, position
x and droplet size S : n = fdu and u = ufdu/n
which depend on (t, x, S). The closure of the system is
obtained through the following assumptions:
[H1] For a given droplet size, at a given point (t, x),
there is only one characteristic averaged velocity
u(t, x, S).











[H2] The velocity dispersion around the averaged veloc-
ity u(t, x, S) is zero in each direction, whatever the
point (t, x, S) is.

It is equivalent to presume the following NDF condi-
tioned by droplet size:

f(t, x, S, u) = n(t, x, S)6(u u(t, x, S)), (4)

that is to reduce the support of the NDF to a one dimen-
sional submanifold parametrized by droplet size.
Such an assumption leads to a closed system of con-
servation equations called the semi-kinetic model on
the moments of order zero and one in velocity. It is
given by two partial differential equations in the vari-
ables n(t, x, S) and u(t, x, S) which express the con-
servation of the number density of droplets and their
momentum, respectively, at a given location x and for
a given size S:

0 9in + 9x (nu) 0,
(5)
t dt(nu) +x (nu iu) nF 0,

where F(t, x, S) is the Stokes's drag force taken at
u u.

The second step consists in choosing a discretization
0 = S(1) < S(2) < ... < S(p) < ... < S(Ns + 1) for
the droplet size phase space and to average the obtained
system of conservation laws over each fixed size inter-
vals [Sp, S+1 [, called section. The set of droplets in
one section can be seen as a "fluid" for which conserva-
tion equations are written. The sections exchange mass
and momentum. To close the system, the following as-
sumptions are introduced:

[H3] In one section, the characteristic averaged velocity
does not depend on the size of the droplets.

[H4] The form of n as a function of S is supposed to
be independent of t and x in a given section, thus
decoupling the evolution of the mass concentration
of droplets in a section from the repartition in terms
of sizes.

The conservation equations for the kth section then read,
in our simplified case:

,1 ,,.' + 9x. (mfu ) = 0,
S- (6)
St(,,' i') + dOx (mkuk i uk) = mkFk,

where m is the mass concentration of droplets in the
kth section.


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


Eulerian multi-fluid numerical methods

Phenomena involved in our problem are of two differ-
ent types: transport induces an evolution in the physical
space without any interaction between the sections, and
by contrast, the transport in internal coordinate space
(velocity) are encountered through drag. This induces
an evolution without any coupling with the spatial co-
ordinates. It is then interesting to separate these two
transport types using an operator-splitting method and
to treat efficiently the different difficulties of the multi-
fluid system: a complex transport term (for the physi-
cal space) and stiff source terms (for the phase space).
The multi-fluid system (6) is then split into two systems
that we solve alternatively. We choose a Strang splitting
which is second order in time provided that all the steps
are second order in time, see (Descombes and Massot
2004). The scheme then takes the form:

HAt o GAto GAt o Ht Ht o At o H at, (7)

where G' (respectively Hs) denotes the physical trans-
port (respectively the phase space transport) during time
a. This Strang splitting is composed of two Lie split-
ting step (H' o G0) of length a At and it alternates
the order in which they are performed (left part of equa-
tion (7)). It is equivalent to one Strang splitting step of
length 2At (right part of equation (7)). The splitting
approach has the great advantage to preserve the proper-
ties of the schemes we use for the different contributions
such as maximum principle on the velocity or positivity
of density.
In physical space, the system that we get from the
operator splitting is weakly hyperbolic and can gen-
erate 6-shock and vacuum zones. As precised in de
Chaisemartin (2009), we use second order kinetic
schemes which are finite volume schemes based on the
equivalence between a macroscopic and a microscopic
level of description for the pressureless gas equations
(see Bouchut & al (2003)). These schemes preserve the
positivity of mass density and reproduce a discrete max-
imum principle on the velocity. In addition, we use a
dimensional Strang type splitting. This allows to use
schemes in 1D configuration and it preserves the sec-
ond order of the method (see LeVeque (2002)). In the
3D case, the scheme then takes the form:


GAt At o o At o GAt o GAt o At
Soy z z oy x


where G' denotes the physical transport in the direction
d (which can be x, y, or z) during time a. This form of
splitting does not lead to CFL reduction in a direction
as a classical Strang splitting algorithm would. Indeed
all the transport sub-steps are computed for a timestep
At. This splitting allows the same numerical diffusion











in each direction. The global scheme we solve is then
obtained by replacing G At by the expression (8) in (7).
The system obtained in the phase space from the
splitting of system (6) is solved using an efficient ODE
solver based on an implicit Runge-Kutta 5th order
method RadauIIA (see Hairer & Wanner (1996)).

Eulerian multi-fluid optimization. As for standard
Eulerian computational fluid dynamics, domain decom-
position appears, for multi-fluid computation, as a very
interesting way to achieve parallel computation. Indeed
it offers the ability to use an arbitrary high number
of points, the number of processes used allowing to
have a sub-domain on each process with a reasonable
number of points, leading to reasonable computational
time and memory requirement. The difficulty of such
parallelization lies in the data communications due both
to multi-fluid peculiarities and dedicated numerical
methods.
The main issue of the multi-fluid, when dealing with
domain decomposition, is the size discretization lead-
ing to an extra dimension of the problem. As this
dimension typically contains five to twenty sections
for "classical" multi-fluid model, a 3-D computational
domain leads to a 4-D computation. Furthermore, the
operator splitting used for the numerical scheme makes
two blocks appear with different properties, as far as
domain decomposition is concerned. On the one hand
the physical space transport is local in size and would
naturally lead to a domain decomposition in size, each
process realizing the transport for one size section. In
this case no communication would be necessary in the
physical space. On the other hand, the phase space
transport is local in physical space and would then lead
to a decomposition in space, a process treating a space
sub-domain with all the size sections on it. Here, no
communication needs to take place on the phase space.
The different decomposition strategies available in
this context have been evaluated (see de ( I.ic'iii.iiiiii
(2009)). The first strategy is limited by the number
of sections used and will have to be coupled with
a partially spatial decomposition, in order to use an
important number of parallel processes (- 100). An
hybrid method, with size decomposition in the physical
transport, and space decomposition in the size phase
space transport lead to an array reorganization and
consequently to a high amount of communications.
Finally, the domain decomposition in space is a good
compromise between data calculations and MPI com-
munications. For this strategy, an efficacity close to one
has been obtained up to 128 cores that was the limit
of our cluster. The extensibility to a thousand core is
eventually foreseen and is the subject of our current
investigations.


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010



Gas solver and turbulence forcing. The gaseous
carrier-phase is solved using a solver for Low Mach or
incompressible flows. This solver is based on finite-
difference (FD) prediction correction method for the ve-
locity evolution, as introduced in Chorin (1968). As far
as numerical methods are concerned, the time resolu-
tion is provided by a third order explicit Runge Kutta
scheme. Spatial evolution is done with a FD scheme,
the derivatives being computed with a Pade 6th order
scheme (see Lele (1992)).
At each time step, we perform a turbulence forcing
method to generate an isotropic homogeneous turbu-
lence. To maintain the major properties (energy, dis-
sipation rate, integral scale) of the spectral turbulence
close to constant values, a controlled amount of en-
ergy must be transferred into the spectral simulation
through a forcing procedure. There are various ways to
achieve the forcing of isotropic homogeneous turbulence
in a spectral DNS. In this work, we use the fully con-
trolled deterministic forcing scheme (FC-DFS) devel-
opped by Guichard & al (2004). Inspired from Overholt
& Pope (1998)'s deterministic scheme, FC-DFS scheme
has an efficient convergence rate and reduces drastically
the fluctuations of the prescribed properties. Turbulence
is forced by adding a linear source term to the balance
equation for the velocity field a in wavenumber space:

ia =+ -u,
at Tf
where a represents the classical Navier-Stokes contribu-
tions for an incompressible flow. The forcing function
fk is real and depends on both time t and wavenum-
ber magnitude K. The value Tf is the characteristic re-
laxation delay of the simulated spectrum E, towards a
model spectrum Em. The principle of FC-DFS model
is to relax the simulated spectrum E, towards a model
one Em only for a given range of low wavenumbers
(K < KF). The interested reader is referred to Guichard
& al (2004) for further information. The vorticity of the
field extracted at dimensionless time t = 20 from this
computation is plotted in Fig 1(a).

3D DNS configuration

A uniformly monodispersed non-evaporating spray
with a zero initial velocity is distributed initially in the
gaseous field in order to study droplet ejection from
the core of the vortices. The drag force sets particles
in motion. Owing to the multi-fluid size distribution
description, the evaporating case is easy to carry out and
will be addressed in a near future, the non-evaporating
case was a necessary first step.
Droplet dispersion and preferential segregation have








7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


25 )4C

3
2 2








x 1

(a) Gas vorticity norm, obtained with
t = 20


x 1 1


spectral resolution at time


N 2

1.5

1
3


(a) Normalized particle number density (/o measured from the La-
grangian simulation for St = 0.17 at time t 20


(b) Eulerian spray number density for St


0.17 at time = 20


x 1 1 y
Y


(c) Eulerian spray number density for St = 1.05 at time t = 20


Figure 1: (a) Gas vorticity norm, obtained on a 1293
grid with spectral resolution at time t = 20, slice planes
inside the domain (x = 2, y = 2, z = 1).
Eulerian spray number density obtained with the multi-
fluid method on a 1293 Cartesian grid at time t 20.
Slice planes at x = 2, y = 2, z = 1, for two Stokes
number: (a) St = 0.17, (b) St = 1.05.


1 1
Y


(b) Normalized particle number density (/o measured from the La-
grangian simulation for St = 1.05 at time t 20


Figure 2: Eulerian spray number density /to obtained
from a Lagrangian simulation of 1283 particles by con-
sidering the droplets accumulated around each numeri-
cal grid node, at time t = 20. Slice planes at x = 2,
y = 2, z 1 for two Stokes number: (a) St = 0.17, (b)
St 1.05.











been analyzed from a Eulerian point of view. Instanta-
neous fields of density are plotted for St = 0.17 in
Fig l(b) and for St = 1.05 in Fig l(c). This latter
case is a case of a Stokes number close to unity leading
to maximal segregation effects. The corresponding
vorticity field is presented in Fig l(a). These three fields
have been captured at exactly the same dimensionless
time t = 20. Even without any quantitative analysis, it
is possible to see the dramatic impact on the particles'
inertia on their dispersion properties. Particles tend to
leave the vortex cores and segregate in weak vorticity
areas. For St = 1.05, the normalized liquid density
varies between 0 (no droplets) and 4 (four times the
mean density).

Numerical setup. We use a cubic computational
domain with periodic boundary conditions. As far as
spatial discretization is concerned, the same grid of
1293 points is used for the gas solver and the Eulerian
spray solver. One has to note that the space domain
decomposition for the multi-fluid method, implemented
using the MPI library, allows to use for the spray com-
putation a refined Eulerian grid at a low computational
time cost. This refinement is already available through
a trilinear interpolation procedure but was not used in
this study since our objectives were the validation of the
Eulerian model in a 3D unsteady and realistic context.
As the gas field is solved sequentially, it is globally
known on each processor and this allows to distribute
uniformly Lagrangian particles on each core. This
reduces significantly the number N1 of Lagrangian
particles on each core keeping the total particles number
N very high. We have N1 N/ni where np is the
core number. As the evaporation phenomena is not
taken into account and there is no interaction between
Lagrangian droplets, numerical particles are indepen-
dent from one to each other and no information goes
from droplets to the gas. Hence, there is no need to
consider MPI communications between nodes. No
particles have to be moved from one core to another
as it has to be done when the gas field is divided into
distinct sub-domains, see Garcia (2009). An other
point of view is to consider that we are doing np DPS
simulations with few numerical particles. The parallel
efficiency of such method is thus optimal and equal to
one. The simulations corresponding to the results that
are presented were performed on a cluster made of 8
nodes with 2 processors AMD Opteron 64 bits dual core
with speed 2.4 GHz, the 32 cores being connected by
an infinyband gigabit network. A computational time of
twenty hours was necessary to obtain the Eulerian and
the Lagrangian simulation up to a dimensionless time
t 20.
In our simulations, N = 1283 mono-dispersed


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


non-evaporating particles are randomly embedded
throughout the computational domain with a zero
initial velocity. Hence, thanks to the use of 32 cores,
N1 65530 droplets are tracked through the unsteady
gas field on each core. Droplet dispersion is usually
characterized by the Stokes number St = Tp/Tk, Tk
being the Kolmogorov length scale, which indicates
the ability of droplets to capture local variations of
the carrier-phase velocity. Turbulence properties being
fixed, simulations were carried out by varying the Tp
parameter. Two Stokes numbers have been considered,
0.17 and 1.05, corresponding to droplet diameters of
15 and 45 /m. The Reynolds number defined in (1)
is equal to 1000. We eventually provide dimensional
quantities for illustration purposes, based on an esti-
mated velocity of Uo 1.5m/s and xo 0.01m, as
well as a typical value of 1.5 x 10- m 2 / s for /po.
In addition, we will let do 0.001 (for St 0.17)
and do = 1i iI.:,, (for St 1.05), where do is the
diameter corresponding to the droplet surface area So.
The computational domain has a size L3 with L = 2,
which corresponds to 8 cm3 in dimensional values.
We take as a reference solution for the liquid phase
the Lagrangian Discrete Particle Simulation with N
particles in the computational domain. We provide
comparisons between this Lagrangian reference and
the Eulerian multi-fluid monokinetic computations
by plotting the Lagrangian particle positions and the
particle number density measured from the Lagrangian
simulation versus the Eulerian number density.




Eulerian-Lagrangian comparisons

Qualitative liquid dispersion comparisons. The Eu-
lerian multi-fluid description of the spray dynamics are
presented in this section for two Stokes number, based
on the Kolmogorov length scale:
* St = 0.17, corresponding to droplet with diameter
d = 15/m, see Fig l(b).
* St = 1.05, corresponding to droplet with diameter
d = 45/m, see Fig l(c).
These two different inertia allow to study a spray ejected
from the center core and segregated in weak vorticity
areas. They are thus well suited for robustness eval-
uation of the multi-fluid method. Indeed high den-
sity regions, as well as vacuum, are created, that rep-
resent a challenging issue for a Eulerian method. Higher
Stokes number are not tackled here since it was shown
in Reveillon & Demoulin (2007) that, for Stokes num-
ber greater than unity, effects of maximal segregation in
turbulent flow occur. The droplets are inertial enough
to be ejected from a vortex and not follow the fluid











particle like a tracer. Their velocities become decorre-
lated from the gaseous carrier phase velocity. In this
case droplet trajectory crossings have a strong impact on
the spray repartition and the mono-kinetic assumption
of the multi-fluid method might not allow to describe
it. Recently, Kah & al (2010) extended the multi-fluid
method to higher order moment method to take into ac-
count these droplet crossings and it would be interesting
to enrich the presented comparisons with Eulerian re-
sults provided by the extended multi-fluid multi-velocity
model.
To assess the multi-fluid description of the size-
conditioned dynamics, Eulerian density fields are com-
pared to Lagrangian droplet positions computed for the
same Stokes numbers at the same time t = 20, see
Fig 2(a) and Fig 2(b). Qualitative comparisons are ap-
plied in the planes x = 2 and y = 2. In the chosen iner-
tial range, the spray is ejected from the vortex cores and
accumulated in low vorticity areas. In order to link the
spray dispersion given by both methods to the gas vortic-
ity structure, the square norm of the gas vorticity is given
in Fig 3(d) and Fig 4(d), for the planes x = 2 and y 2,
respectively. Qualitative comparisons between both ap-
proach can be done focusing on the vacuum zones de-
scription. These zones correspond to the gas vortex
cores, that can be identified from the vorticity represen-
tation. The repartition of these vacuum zones obtained
by the classical Lagrangian method is very precisely re-
produced by the multi-fluid on the different planes (see
Fig 3(a) and Fig 3(e) for the plane x = 2 and Fig 4(a)
and Fig 4(e) for the plane y = 2). Furthermore, the
evolution of droplet repartition with inertia is very well
captured by the multi-fluid. Indeed, the Eulerian density
fields for higher Stokes number still a present very good
agreement with the Lagrangian droplet repartitions, see
Fig 3(b), Fig 3(c) and Fig 3(f) for the plane = 2 and
Fig 4(b), Fig 4(c) and Fig 4(f) for the plane y =2.

Quantitative spray equilibrium comparisons. As
studied in Reveillon & Demoulin (2007), the equilib-
rium of the spray with its carrier phase is detected
through the statistics of the slip velocity

WE(X, ) (U U)(X,t),

where u. and u are the Eulerian gas velocity field and
the liquid velocity field both taken at the numerical grid
point x. From a Lagrangian point of view, the slip ve-
locity of a droplet k is given by

wL(k,t)(= (u,(x) V)(t),

where vk is its velocity and u,(xk) is the gas ve-
locity taken at the droplet position Xk. The mean
value of the Lagrangian slip velocity is defined by


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


w(t) = 1/N E L(k, t) with N the to-
tal particle number while its Eulerian equivalent is
w(t) L3 f wE(x(, t)dx. In the following, an over-
bar stands for a Eulerian quantity whereas a tilde denotes
a Lagrangian one. Because of the homogeneous nature
of the turbulence and the dispersion, the mean value
of the slip velocity remains equal to zero. However,
the slip velocity root mean square respectively defined
I ( 2 1/2
by c (t) l/N ( (WL(k,t) ())) and

'(t) L-3 (fWE(X t) -(t))2 dx) 12 evolves
towards a stationary value co which corresponds to the
equilibrium of the spray with the carrier gas phase. At
initial time t = 0, the liquid spray is initially distributed
in the computational domain with a zero velocity, so
wu (0)/Ti = '(O)/u = 1 with ug the initial
gas velocity r.m.s. As prescribed previously, the drag
force set the liquid spray in motion and, depending on
the Stokes number, the mean value of the slip velocity
reaches a steady state at t = 0.2 for a small Stokes
number (St 0.17) whereas a longer time is needed
for the largest value of the Stokes number (St 1.05).
The final mean stationary value of the slip velocity stan-
dard deviation wc is close to zero when the droplets are
small enough to follow all the velocity fluctuations of
the flow (St = 0.17) and it increases to reach 0.21 cor-
responding to droplets of St 1.05. This result accords
with those presented in Reveillon & Demoulin (2007)
and are plotted in Fig 5. Values of wZ and W'o show
a very good agreement for St 0.17, whereas wZU is
smaller than c', and equal to 0.16 for St 1.05.









7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


25 3


15 2
Y


(a) Eulerian multi-fluid number density
for low inertia droplets St 0.17


(b) Lagrangian droplet positions
for low inertia droplets St 0.17


(c) Normalized particle number density
(/o measured from the Lagrangian
simulation for low inertia droplets St


(d) Instantaneous Vorticity field


16~


15 2 25 3


(e) Eulerian multi-fluid number density
for higher inertia droplets St 1.05


(f) Lagrangian droplet positions
for higher inertia droplets St 1.05


(g) Normalized particle number density
(/o measured from the Lagrangian
simulation for low inertia droplets St =


Figure 3: Eulerian Lagrangian comparisons of the liquid phase for two different Stokes St = 0.17 and St = 1.05, in
the (y z) plane at x = 2 at time t = 20.


15 2


Y


15 2
Y


0.17


15 2
Y


- i"-









7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010








2


25 15






05



15 2 25 3 1 15 2 25
Y x


(a) Eulerian multi-fluid number density
for low inertia droplets St 0.17


(b) Lagrangian droplet positions
for low inertia droplets St 0.17


(c) Normalized particle number density
(/(o measured from the Lagrangian
simulation for low inertia droplets St


(d) Instantaneous Vorticity field


1 15


25 3


(e) Eulerian multi-fluid number density
for higher inertia droplets St 1.05


(f) Lagrangian droplet positions
for higher inertia droplets St 1.05


(g) Normalized particle number density
(/(o measured from the Lagrangian
simulation for higher inertia droplets St


Figure 4: Eulerian Lagrangian comparisons of the liquid phase for two different Stokes St = 0.17 and St = 1.05, in
the (x: z) plane at y = 2 at time t = 20.


0.17













Eulerian rms. St=0.17
Lagrangian rms. St=i 17
Euleran rlls. SL=1.05
Lagranmoan rms. St=l )5


0 02 0 04 U 06 018
time (en ms)


0.1 0 12


Figure 5: Time evolution of the Eulerian (w (u)/u )
and Lagrangian (_' (t)/ug) slip velocity r.m.s. for
St 0.17 and St 1.05.


Conclusions and perspectives

We have presented comparisons between Lagrangian
and Eulerian liquid spray computations in a context
of three-dimensional unsteady forced HIT carrier-phase
gas. Results were presented for two different Stokes
values showing the impact of inertia on droplet seg-
regation as well as the robustness of the multi-fluid
model since Stokes values from tracer limit to unity were
used. Qualitative comparisons were conducted consid-
ering two slice planes and a very good agreement has
been obtained up a Eulerian density prediction quanti-
tatively close to DPS results. Preferential concentration
was quantitatively studied through the comparison of the
slip velocity r.m.s. These results are a first step in spray
equilibrium comparisons between the Eulerian and La-
grangian approach and will be completed in a near fu-
ture in both improved quantitative comparisons and an
extension to evaporating case.


Acknowledgements

This research was supported by an ANR-05-JCJC-0013
Young Investigator Award (PI : M. Massot, 2005-2009)
which provided a post-doctoral grant for L. Freret
at EM2C Laboratory (2007-2008) and a DGA/CNRS
Ph.D. grant for S. de ( Ii.iinc'sii.llii (Mathematics and
Engineering Departments of CNRS 2005-2009). The
authors also acknowledge the support from IDRIS
CNRS (Institut de Developpement et de Ressources
en Informatique Scientifique, Centre National de la
Recherche Scientifique) where some of the computa-
tions were performed.


S05V


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


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