Group Title: 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow - ICMF 2010 Proceedings
Title: 5.5.4 - A Lagrangian approach for quantifying the segregation of inertial particles in incompressible turbulent flows
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Title: 5.5.4 - A Lagrangian approach for quantifying the segregation of inertial particles in incompressible turbulent flows Particle-Laden Flows
Series Title: 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow - ICMF 2010 Proceedings
Physical Description: Conference Papers
Creator: Meneguz, E.
Reeks, M.W.
Publisher: International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF)
Publication Date: June 4, 2010
 Subjects
Subject: turbulent flows
inertial particles
segregation
 Notes
Abstract: This paper is concerned with the quantification of preferential concentration of heavy particles in incompressible turbulent flow. We exploit the so called Full Lagrangian Approach (Osiptsov (2000)) based on the definition of a unit deformation tensor and we show how this can be used to evaluate the statistical properties of the compressibility of the particle velocity field and of the particle concentration. The main objective of this work is the comparison of results in a DNS of statistically stationary homogeneous isotropic turbulence with those of a three dimensional synthetic flow composed of 200 random Fourier modes. We observe qualitatively the same trend in both flow fields: in particular there exists a critical value of the Stokes number (the dimensionless particle relaxation time) below which the compressibility of the particle velocity field remains negative in the course of time, indicating that the process of segregation goes on indefinitely (until the particles collide). In addition, we calculate the probability density function of the log|J(t)| and we show that its evolution in time is close to a Gaussian distribution.
General Note: The International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF) first was held in Tsukuba, Japan in 1991 and the second ICMF took place in Kyoto, Japan in 1995. During this conference, it was decided to establish an International Governing Board which oversees the major aspects of the conference and makes decisions about future conference locations. Due to the great importance of the field, it was furthermore decided to hold the conference every three years successively in Asia including Australia, Europe including Africa, Russia and the Near East and America. Hence, ICMF 1998 was held in Lyon, France, ICMF 2001 in New Orleans, USA, ICMF 2004 in Yokohama, Japan, and ICMF 2007 in Leipzig, Germany. ICMF-2010 is devoted to all aspects of Multiphase Flow. Researchers from all over the world gathered in order to introduce their recent advances in the field and thereby promote the exchange of new ideas, results and techniques. The conference is a key event in Multiphase Flow and supports the advancement of science in this very important field. The major research topics relevant for the conference are as follows: Bio-Fluid Dynamics; Boiling; Bubbly Flows; Cavitation; Colloidal and Suspension Dynamics; Collision, Agglomeration and Breakup; Computational Techniques for Multiphase Flows; Droplet Flows; Environmental and Geophysical Flows; Experimental Methods for Multiphase Flows; Fluidized and Circulating Fluidized Beds; Fluid Structure Interactions; Granular Media; Industrial Applications; Instabilities; Interfacial Flows; Micro and Nano-Scale Multiphase Flows; Microgravity in Two-Phase Flow; Multiphase Flows with Heat and Mass Transfer; Non-Newtonian Multiphase Flows; Particle-Laden Flows; Particle, Bubble and Drop Dynamics; Reactive Multiphase Flows
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7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


A Lagrangian approach for quantifying the segregation of inertial particles in
incompressible turbulent flows


E. Meneguz* and M. W. Reeks*

Mechanical and Systems Engineering, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK
Elena.Meneguz@ncl.ac.uk and Mike.Reeks@ncl.ac.uk
Keywords: turbulent flows, inertial particles, segregation




Abstract

This paper is concerned with the quantification of preferential concentration of heavy particles in incompressible
turbulent flow. We exploit the so called Full Lagrangian Approach (Osiptsov (2000)) based on the definition of a
unit deformation tensor and we show how this can be used to evaluate the statistical properties of the compressibility
of the particle velocity field and of the particle concentration. The main objective of this work is the comparison
of results in a DNS of statistically stationary homogeneous isotropic turbulence with those of a three dimensional
\ Imlici ik flow composed of 200 random Fourier modes. We observe qualitatively the same trend in both flow fields: in
particular there exists a critical value of the Stokes number (the dimensionless particle relaxation time) below which
the compressibility of the particle velocity field remains negative in the course of time, indicating that the process of
segregation goes on indefinitely (until the particles collide). In addition, we calculate the probability density function
of the log J(t) I and we show that its evolution in time is close to a Gaussian distribution.


Introduction

There have been numerous studies devoted to the seg-
regation of particles/droplets in turbulent flows, given
the relevance of this phenomenon in many environmen-
tal and industrial activities (warm rain initiation (Shaw
(2003)) and formation and growth of PM10 particu-
lates in the atmosphere are only two of many exam-
ples). Early experiments and simulations (e.g. Crowe
et al. (1993)) have shown that not only the particles seg-
regate reaching a maximum when the particle response
time is approximately equal to the timescale of the tur-
bulent structure (i.e. the Stokes number ~ 1), but also
the suspended particles seem to cluster into regions of
high strain rate and expelled from regions of high vor-
ticity. Maxey and his co-workers (e.g. Maxey (1987))
showed that the gravitational settling of particles in ho-
mogeneous turbulence is enhanced due to preferential
sweeping in the direction of gravity. Since then there
have been many studies to understand and quantify this
segregation process, e.g. the seminal studies by Sun-
daram and Collins (1997) and Wang et al. (1998) to
quantify the influence of segregation on two-particle dis-
persion and the process of particle agglomeration.
In more recent years it seems that there has been a ten-
dency, even though from different viewpoints, in mod-
eling the turbulent flow as the sum of two contributions


that we could attempt here to generalize as follows: an
underlying velocity field that accounts for all particle-
particle and fluid-particle two point spatial correlations
and a spatially uncorrelated component that makes par-
ticles with inertia to cross their trajectory and yet having
different velocities one to another (F6vrier et al. (2005),
Reeks (2004), Falkovick and Pumir (2004) and Wilkin-
son et al. (2007)).
A different mechanism is the one proposed by Chen et
al. (2006) and Coleman and Vassilicos (2009), who have
demonstrated that there exists a strong correlation be-
tween the segregation of inertial particles and the pres-
ence of zero acceleration points in DNS of turbulent
flows. In addition, it has been hypothesized that in
Kinematic Simulations (KS) -where some features like
sweeping of small scales by the large ones are not easily
reproduced- heavy particles anti-cluster with zero veloc-
ity points (Chen et al. (2006)). In addition, the motion of
particles in terms has been studied in terms of dynami-
cal systems theory as in Bec (2005) and Wilkinson et
al. (2007) who obtained an analytical expression for the
Lyapunov exponents associated with the motion of iner-
tial particles in physical space.
In the present work we exploit the Full Lagrangian Ap-
proach (FLA) (see Osiptsov (2000), Reeks (2004) and
Healy and Young (2005)) that consists of calculating the











size of an infinitesimally small volume occupied by a
group of particles, along the trajectory of one single par-
ticle. This immediately yields the concentration of parti-
cles along the trajectory, since the inverse of the volume
occupied by a fixed number of particles corresponds to
the particle concentration by definition. It is worth not-
ing that in the previous studies mentioned, the FLA was
mainly used to calculate the particle concentration at
some point and for a given time, while we recently ex-
tended the methodology further (IJzermans et al. (2010)
and IJzermans et al. 2's i'i.. Because it was the first
time this has been done, at first we needed to test the va-
lidity of our results in rather simple flow fields, as we did
in the the work above cited. We then went on to validate
our results in a more complex three dimensional turbu-
lent velocity field where no modelling is applied but the
Navier Stokes equation are solved directly, this being the
main object of the present work.
The paper is structered as follows: in the next section
we describe the methodology used, including details of
the characteristics of the flow fields used in the simu-
lations, the governing equations of motion for particles,
the deformation tensor, its evolution equations and re-
lated statistics. The third section is devoted to the dis-
cussion of findings and open questions currently under
investigation; we summarize our work and prospects for
future studies in the fourth section.


Method

Details of the simulations are described in the following
subsection. We then discuss the governing equation
of motion for the inertial particles and we illustrate in
details the Full Lagrangian Method Osiptsov (2000).

Fluid velocity field
The three-dimensional incompressible Navier Stokes
equations are solved using a pseudo-spectral method
performed on a triply-periodic cubic domain of length
L = 27r. To remove the aliasing error so introduced, the
so called "3/2" rule is implemented, according to Peyret
(2002). In order to keep the statistically stationary
turbulence, forcing is applied in a similar way to Goto
(2008), that is by fixing the magnitude of the Fourier
components of the vorticity corresponding to the lowest
wavenumbers. Based on a 1283 grid, we achieve a
Re = 65. Other relevant parameters of the simulation
are contained in Table 1. Finally, for what concerns the
discretization in time we used a fourth order Lawson
scheme which treats the linear terms of the differential
equation with exact integration (integrating factor, see
Canuto et al. (1991)) and the non linear ones with an
explicit method (fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme).
For the details of the kinematic simulations, we refer to


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


Table 1: Numerical and flow parameters of DNS.
r (Kolmogorov length scale) 0.032840 m
L (integral length scale) 1.2 m
t, (eddy turnover time) 1.04 s
Ax (grid space) 0.049 m
v cinematicc viscosity) 0.00923 rm2/s
T, (Kolmogorov time scale) 0.116847 s 1
kmax,, 2.1


Uzermans et al. (2010). Herewith we only state that the
incompressible velocity field is obtained by imposing
a Kraichnan energy spectrum as in Kraichnan (2000)
and Spelt and Biesheuvel (1997) which provides a good
description of turbulence at low Reynolds number. As
well as in our DNS simulations, also in this case we
impose periodic boundary conditions by using a three
dimensional periodic box.

Lagrangian description of the particle phase
We consider a point-particle approach with the dispersed
phase described as a continuum. Under the assumption
that the density of the particle is much higher than the
density of the carrier flow, that is pp/p > 1, and neglect-
ing Brownian motion and any body force, the equation
of motion of heavy particles is reduced to:
dx dv 1
v, (u v), (1)
dt dt Tp
where Tp is the particle relaxation time defined as Tp -
2. ,', /9vp for a spherical particle of radius a,.
The Full Lagrangian Approach (see Osiptsov (2000),
Reeks (2004) and Healy and Young (2005)) is based
upon a second order deformation tensor Jj
d9xz(xo, t)/dxoj where by definition Jij: J det(Jij).
xo represents the position of the centre of the infinites-
imally small volume surrounding each particle at some
initial time t 0 Since we are interested in the time-
dependent behaviour of such parameter, we then calcu-
late the first and second derivatives for each component
of Jij. Rearranging, we obtain the following evolution
equations:

dt Jdti Tp Ji
(2)
We choose as initial conditions Jij(0) = ij and
ij (0) dui (xo, 0)/Oxj. That being said, the choice of
the initial conditions does not affect the long term statis-
tics. We note that by definition it holds:

IJW (t) 1(t), (3)
where c(t) is the particle number concentration normal-
ized so that at time t 0 it is equal to J -1 1 From







7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


Eq. 3 it is trivial to deduce that J'a = c a for any
a E R. We now define two different type of averages,
a particle ensemble average denoted by the brackets (K),
and a spatial average defined over a certain domain Q2,
denoted by the overbar It holds the following relation:

( 1) A ((x)c(x)dx F, (4)

By recursively substituting 4 = c and recalling Eq. 3,
one can calculate any spatially averaged moment of the
particle number concentration provided that the number
of particle trajectories is sufficiently large inside a par-
ticular volume. The latter condition is easily verified in
the cases here examinated where we are dealing with a
periodic domain. This yields to the following equation:

C -(Il1 "), V aER. (5)

The Full Lagrangian Approach can also be used to deter-
mine the compressibility of the particle phase. Starting
again from Eq. 3, we can write:

d d
d In J d In n, (6)
dt dt


Because dn/dt


nV v, Eq. 6 can be rewritten as:


dt
hInl| J V v. (7)


Results and discussion

The result of our simulations carried out in the kinematic
model are discussed in details in IJzermans et al. (2010).
The primary objective of this work is the validation of
such outcomes in a more complex flow field in which the
dynamical Navier-Stokes equations are solved explic-
itly; this means that some characteristic features of real
flows, such as the sweeping of the small scales by the
large ones, are in principle taken into account. For this
reason we focus on the three dimensional DNS of ho-
mogeneous isotropic turbulence described in the method
section. We let the flow run for a few eddy turnover
times until it reaches a steady state; the corresponding
fluid velocity on the grid nodes is then saved and used
as initial conditions for when we inject the particles. At
time t = 0, we release randomly a group of 100.000
heavy particles with a uniform distribution inside a pe-
riodic cubic domain of length L = 27r. Trajectories are
then computed in time using a fourth order Runge-Kutta
numerical scheme; the velocity of the fluid at the particle
position is obtained with a 6th order polynomial interpo-
lation routine.
To start with, we calculate the spatial average of the mo-
ments of the particle number concentration ca as a func-
tion of time. For the sake of brevity, we illustrate only


---ca=3
a=2
-- =0


10 15 20 25


Figure 1: Spatial average of the moments of the particle
number concentration in the 3D DNS, St=0.4.



the case of St = 0.4 (Fig. 1), where this latter is defined
as the ratio between the particle relaxation time and the
Kolmogorov time scale of the flow, i.e. St = Tp/T. We
compare it with for the result obtained in our KS model
in Fig. 2 where the Stokes number is defined as the ra-
tio between the particle response time and the typical
timescale of the flow. As we previously observed (IJz-
ermans et al. (2009)), the curves exhibit an exponential
trend, and the order of magnitude is proportional to the
order of the moment. What is really important here, is
to observe the intermittency of the lines which might be
explained by the occurance of "singularities", i.e. events
for which JI = 0 that happen when the particle number
concentration becomes large enough to be considered in-
finite. We have previously attributed this phenomenon to
the so called Random Uncorrelated Motion Uzermans et
al. (2010)), although the contribution that this can make
is very limited for St < 1. We are currently investigat-
ing the distribution of singularities and its evolution in
space and time.
We then calculate the compressibility of the particle
phase averaged over all the particles versus time as Fig.
3 displays. Among the St numbers considered, the peak
of the segregation seems to happen for St 0.7, this
corresponding to the minimum of d < Inl J > /dt. We
observe that the curves are highly intermittent.
In Fig. 4 we also plot the long time limit of
the compressibility, that is lirmtot1 lnl J(t)l
limnt, d(ln J(t) )/dt limrnt, V-v as a function of
three different particle response times which correspond
to St 0.7, St 1 and St 4. For comparison,
in Fig. 5 we plot the same quantity obtained in our KS







7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


1020


1015



0 1010


105


S0


. 2 8..... ...... .. ... ........ ----- -2
0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 0
t


Figure 2: Spatial average of the moments of the particle
number concentration in the 3D kinematic simulation,
St=0.4.



simulations. Clearly there is a good qualitatively agree-
ment between the two. Quantitatively, the magnitude of
the segregation seems to be higher in the case of DNS,
and this enhancement is probably due to a broader -even
though still limited- distribution of scales. On the other
hand, how do we justify the positive values of the com-
pressibility? We do not have an answer to such question
yet. The calculation of an average quantity only pro-
vides us with a picture of the net effect between com-
pression/expansion and what effect prevails in the course
of time, but it is likely that having a positive compress-
ibility -on average- does not mean that the segregation is
zero everywhere. The same concept applies to negative
compression. Given the nature of Jij(t), every time a
particle experience a positive compressibilty the elemen-
tal volume that sorrounds that particle is dilated. How-
ever, it is questionable whether Jij (t) is able to measure
a sort of "local diffusion", where by this term we intend
the displacement with respect to a fixed point. It would
be somehow intuitive to argue that the vorticity plays an
important role. Nevertheless, we recently constructed a
simple flow field model of homogeneous isotropic tur-
bulence made of pairs of counter rotating vortices (IJz-
ermans et al. (2010)) in which the linear velocity field
contains no vorticity, and yet we were able to observe
positive compressibility for approximately St > 1.5. In
addition, Chen et al. (2006) have found that in their two
dimensional flow field simulated kinematically, inertial
particles cluster regardless of the amount of vorticity and
strain in the flow, the ratio among those two quantities
remaining 1 contrary to the traditional view of particles
expelled from regions of high vorticity and segregating


SSt=O 7
St=1
3 St=O 1
# St=10


+*u *
-.. A--
4~~


A


10 20 30 40 50 60
t/eta
eta


Figure 3: Particle averaged compressibility as a function
of time for four different Stokes number in the 3D DNS.



into regions of strain. We are currently in the process of
investigating what causes the compressibility to become
positive.
Finally, we calculated the probability density function
(PDF) for the occurrence of loglJ(t)\ (see Fig. 6 for
St 1). We have found out that the more time in-
creases the more it approaches a Gaussian with negative
mean as illustrated by the standardized central moments
of the distribution for the three different timescale con-
sidered. We can then confirm what was argued by Reeks
(2004), i.e. that a Gaussian convection diffusion process
can accurately describe the dispersion of log J(t) .


Conclusions

In this paper we have studied the dispersion of inertial
particles in a three dimensional DNS of homogeneous
isotropic turbulent flow, and we have benchmarked our
results with a three dimensional model of turbulent flows
kinematically simulated. With the use of the Full La-
grangian Approach, we have been able to show that there
is not a qualitative difference in the statistics of the par-
ticle concentration and of the compressibility.
We felt the need to use DNS calculations to introduce a
few effects not included in our kinematic simulations: a
broader range of scales (we now have (L/rI 126 in com-
parison with the "nearly single scale" KS model) and
other additional features such as vortex stretching and
interaction between the modes. As we expected, a wider
distribution of scales has not significantly altered the re-
sults for J(t) essentially because this is a local param-
eter whose value only depends on the gradients of the


I U







7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


St=1
St=O 7



E


S05-



-1 5-

2
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80
t/t


Figure 4: Long-time approximation for the particle av-
eraged compressibility as a function of time for three
different Stokes number in the 3D DNS.



velocity field. In the context of our study this is not re-
garded as a limitation as many inter-particle effects such
as collisions and two-particle separation are local effects
as well. Therefore, this authorizes us to carry out further
investigations in kinematic models that have the advan-
tage of not being very heavy computationally (in con-
trast to other techniques such as DNS).
We are currently in the process of gaining a better un-
derstanding of the process of segregation especially re-
garding the nature of two effects: positive values for the
compressibility above a certain St number and the fre-
quency of singularities and their distribution in time and
space.


Acknowledgements

The present work has been carried out under EPSRC-
GB's financial support. The authors would like to ac-
knowledge Stuart Coleman and Christos Vassilicos, De-
partment of Aeronautics, Imperial College London for
providing the basic version of the DNS code described
in the paper.


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04 j

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o 02
A- 01
S,


5 10 15
time*


Figure 5: Long-time approximation for the particle av-
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7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 -June 4, 2010


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nJ




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