Group Title: 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow - ICMF 2010 Proceedings
Title: 3.4.1 - Simulating multiphase flows with multi-length scales using moving mesh interface tracking with adaptive meshes
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 Material Information
Title: 3.4.1 - Simulating multiphase flows with multi-length scales using moving mesh interface tracking with adaptive meshes Computational Techniques for Multiphase Flows
Series Title: 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow - ICMF 2010 Proceedings
Physical Description: Conference Papers
Creator: Quan, S.
Publisher: International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF)
Publication Date: June 4, 2010
 Subjects
Subject: moving mesh interface tracking
mesh adaptation
mesh combination
mesh separation
droplets
Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian method (ALE)
boundary fitted mesh
 Notes
Abstract: Droplet-droplet interaction and droplet creation are two of the most important phenomena in multiphase flows. The length scales in the systems are usually much different, for example, when two drops are touching or a drop is about to pinch off, the length scale of the thin film or the thin thread could be hundreds or thousands times smaller than the drop radius. It is a challenge to numerically solve these problems with high fidelity, especially for the numerical methods in which the fluids’ properties are smoothed in a finite thickness interfacial region. In this paper, the moving mesh interface tracking method (MMIT) with mesh adaptation by Quan and Schmidt (2007) is employed to address this challenge. The interface is represented as surface triangle meshes and thus is zero thickness, therefore the jump conditions across the interface are directly implemented without smoothing of fluids’ properties. The interface moves with fluid velocity in a Lagrangian fashion. To maintain good mesh quality and to resolve the different length scales as well as to achieve computing efficiency, local and dynamics mesh adaptations, such as edge contraction, edge bisection and edge swapping, are applied. To allow topological transitions, mesh combination and mesh separation (Quan et al. 2009a) are employed. The interaction between a droplet and a substrate is simulated, and the thin film thickness is around 1.5% of the diameter of the spherical droplet. To investigate the detailed physics of droplet necking and pinch-off, especially near the moment just before the breakup, simulations on the relaxation and pinch-off of an elongated droplet are performed with the smallest radius of the thin thread around 2% of the initial radius. The numerical scheme well predicts the evolution pattern of the thin thread radius, and the results agree well with recent works by Burton et al. (2005) and Thoroddsen et al. (2007).
General Note: The International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF) first was held in Tsukuba, Japan in 1991 and the second ICMF took place in Kyoto, Japan in 1995. During this conference, it was decided to establish an International Governing Board which oversees the major aspects of the conference and makes decisions about future conference locations. Due to the great importance of the field, it was furthermore decided to hold the conference every three years successively in Asia including Australia, Europe including Africa, Russia and the Near East and America. Hence, ICMF 1998 was held in Lyon, France, ICMF 2001 in New Orleans, USA, ICMF 2004 in Yokohama, Japan, and ICMF 2007 in Leipzig, Germany. ICMF-2010 is devoted to all aspects of Multiphase Flow. Researchers from all over the world gathered in order to introduce their recent advances in the field and thereby promote the exchange of new ideas, results and techniques. The conference is a key event in Multiphase Flow and supports the advancement of science in this very important field. The major research topics relevant for the conference are as follows: Bio-Fluid Dynamics; Boiling; Bubbly Flows; Cavitation; Colloidal and Suspension Dynamics; Collision, Agglomeration and Breakup; Computational Techniques for Multiphase Flows; Droplet Flows; Environmental and Geophysical Flows; Experimental Methods for Multiphase Flows; Fluidized and Circulating Fluidized Beds; Fluid Structure Interactions; Granular Media; Industrial Applications; Instabilities; Interfacial Flows; Micro and Nano-Scale Multiphase Flows; Microgravity in Two-Phase Flow; Multiphase Flows with Heat and Mass Transfer; Non-Newtonian Multiphase Flows; Particle-Laden Flows; Particle, Bubble and Drop Dynamics; Reactive Multiphase Flows
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Volume ID: VID00083
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: 341-Quan-ICMF2010.pdf

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7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 June 4, 2010


Simulating multiphase flows with multi-length scales using moving mesh interface
tracking with adaptive meshes


Shaoping Quan

Large Scale Complex Systems, Institute of High Performance Computing, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632
Email: quansp@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg


Keywords: Moving mesh interface tracking, mesh adaptation, mesh combination, mesh separation, droplets,
Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian method (ALE), boundary fitted mesh




Abstract

Droplet-droplet interaction and droplet creation are two of the most important phenomena in multiphase flows. The
length scales in the systems are usually much different, for example, when two drops are touching or a drop is about
to pinch off, the length scale of the thin film or the thin thread could be hundreds or thousands times smaller than
the drop radius. It is a challenge to numerically solve these problems with high fidelity, especially for the numerical
methods in which the fluids' properties are smoothed in a finite thickness interfacial region. In this paper, the moving
mesh interface tracking method (MMIT) with mesh adaptation by Quan and Schmidt (2007) is employed to address
this challenge. The interface is represented as surface triangle meshes and thus is zero thickness, therefore the jump
conditions across the interface are directly implemented without smoothing of fluids' properties. The interface moves
with fluid velocity in a Lagrangian fashion. To maintain good mesh quality and to resolve the different length scales as
well as to achieve computing efficiency, local and dynamics mesh adaptations, such as edge contraction, edge bisection
and edge swapping, are applied. To allow topological transitions, mesh combination and mesh separation (Quan et al.
2009a) are employed.
The interaction between a droplet and a substrate is simulated, and the thin film thickness is around 1.5% of the
diameter of the spherical droplet. To investigate the detailed physics of droplet necking and pinch-off, especially near
the moment just before the breakup, simulations on the relaxation and pinch-off of an elongated droplet are performed
with the smallest radius of the thin thread around 2% of the initial radius. The numerical scheme well predicts the
evolution pattern of the thin thread radius, and the results agree well with recent works by Burton et al. (2005) and
Thoroddsen et al. (2007).


Nomenclature

(You can add a nomenclature section with the tabbing
environment should you wish to do so.)
Roman symbols
CV control volume
CS control surfaces
p pressure
u fluid velocity
v moving mesh velocity
n unit normal vector of a control surface


Greek symbols
p density
p viscosity
a surface tension coefficient


K effective curvature
7 unit tangential vector of a surface
Subscripts
d droplet phase
s surrounding phase
Superscipts
T transpose
Others
I II difference across the interface


Introduction

Numerical simulation of multiphase flows is very chal-
lenging not only because of the singularity of great fluid-











property difference across a zero-thickness interface but
also because of the different length scales involved in
the multiphase flow systems. The smallest length scales
could be thousands times smaller than the characteris-
tic length scale for the overall systems, such as the ra-
dius of a bubble or drop. These small length scales usu-
ally appear in the droplet (bubble) breakup as the forma-
tion of a neck region before the actual pinch-off and also
the coalescence of drops (bubbles) as a thin film formed
when the drops are so near to each other but before colli-
sion. However, it is a challenge for numerical methods,
such as front tracking (Tryggvason et al. 2001), level set,
and volume of fluid (Scardovelli and Zaleski 1999), etc.
where the fluids' properties are usually smoothed in a in-
terfacial region with a thickness of several cell sizes, to
compute these flows with high fidelity to investigate the
underlying physics in these small length-scale regions.
However, the moving mesh interface tracking
(MMIT) method which is developed very recently by
Quan and Schmidt (2007) could be capable to deal with
this multi-length scale problem in high fidelity within
the continuum assumption. In MMIT, the interface is
represented by cell edges (in 2D) or faces (in 3D), and
thus exact zero-thickness. The interior meshes for the
two phases are connected by these interface elements
and formed to a single set of mesh to solve the governing
Navier-Stokes equations. As time progresses the inter-
face elements move in a Lagrangian mode to naturally
conserve the volume (the mass) of each phase. This
kind of mesh configuration is also called boundary fit-
ting mesh (Xu and Basaran 2007; Tsamopoulos et al.
2008), and the way of the motion of the mesh is also
named arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method (ALE) in
fluid-solid interactions (Feng et al. 1994). On the other
hand, mesh motion on the interface deteriorate the mesh
quality, and if no measures were taken, the simulation
will have great errors, or even worse, the simulation dis-
continues. In order to maintain good mesh quality, a
number of mesh adaptation schemes, including 3-2 and
2-3 flips, edge bisection, and edge contraction, etc. are
implemented in MMIT and applied locally. These adap-
tive mesh methods also help to achieve computing effi-
ciency by distributing fine mesh in the region of inter-
est and coarse mesh elsewhere. Actual breakup and the
coalescence of interface(s) are mimicked by the mesh
separation and mesh combination schemes (Quan et al.
2009a), respectively.


Governing equations, numerical methods

The fluids of multiphase flows are assumed incompress-
ible and immiscible. The unsteady motion of the mul-
tiphase flows is governed by the continuity and the
Navier-Stokes equations, here written in integral form


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 June 4, 2010


and in a moving control volume scenario,


S I
cv

CV
cv

cv

C

cv


dv = jv nds,
cs

pdv + JJ p (u v) -nds =
cs





cs
pudv + 1 pu (u v) -nds
CS

pfdv pnds
Cs


+ ff(Vu+ Vu) nds.
cs


(1)


0, (2)


(3)





(4)


Equation (1) is a consistency requirement for the volume
of a moving and deforming control volume. In MMIT,
the interface moves with the fluid, i.e. u v, so the
jump in the fluid's densities across the interface presents
no numerical difficulties for computing the convection
terms in (2) and (4), as these terms identically equal zero
on the interfacial surfaces.
The jump condition for the normal stresses and the
continuity of shear stress across the interface read


[pH --K + [2/ (Vu n) n.,
S((Vu + VU) n). = 0.


In the numerical method, the curvature of a surface is
calculated by a least-squares parabola fitting in a lo-
cal coordinate system; the jump in the normal viscous
stresses is implemented directly using a Taylor series ex-
pansion for multi-variable functions; the continuity con-
dition of the stresses is satisfied by using a geometric
harmonic mean method, and this method is second-order
accurate, because it calculates the exact shear stresses
for linear velocity distributions. The details and some
validations can be found in Dai and Schmidt (2005);
Quan and Schmidt (2007, 2006).

Mesh adaptation for small length scales

To obtain good mesh quality, a number of mesh adap-
tation schemes are implemented and these shemes are
mainly based on the mesh quality metric (Knupp 2003),
local interface curvature, edge angles, dihedral angles,
averaged length of the initial configuration. However,
for cases where two flat interfaces, or an interface and
a solid wall are very near to each other forming a very
thin neck or a very thin film, the above mentioned mesh
adaptation criteria are not efficient for mesh refinement
in these small-length-scale regions. Fig. 1 shows meshes
of a case where a droplet is approaching a substrate,







7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 June 4, 2010


Figure 1: Interior mesh of the droplet and the surround-
ing phases for a droplet approaching a substrate. Blue:
droplet; black: the surrounding fluid. (a) overall view
and (b) enlarged view of the region between the droplet
and the substrate



where the mesh of the droplet phase is. For this simula-
tion, all the mesh adaptation schemes based on the above
mesh criteria are employed. From Fig. 1 (a), it can be
seen that the mesh adaptation works well, as the mesh
near and inside the droplets is very fine and the mesh
far away from the droplet is coarse. However, from the
enlarged view of the region between the droplet and the
substrate, it is concluded that the mesh in this region is
too coarse to obtain reliable information for examine the
underlying detailed physics, as there are only two cells
in between the interface and the substrate for most of the
region. Apparently, to address this issue, extra length
criteria are needed.
From Fig. 1 (b), it is clearly that the curvature of the
interface cannot be used for the length scale to refine
the mesh, as the mesh on the interface is already fine
enough to capture the curvature changing. The averaged
length of the interior mesh in the suspending fluid can
neither be a good criteria, as the mesh in this region is
already much finer than other region. However, it is ob-
served that unit normal of the interface and the substrate


Figure 2: Boundary condition for the Poisson equation


are changed dramatically over this small gap, if the nor-
mal of the interface surfaces points inward to the droplet
while the normal of the substrate surfaces points away
from the simulation domain. So, we could solve a Pois-
son equation with the surface normal of the interface and
outside boundaries as the boundary conditions (see Fig.
2, i.e.

V2yi 0 with i 1,2,3 (7)
4(interface) n(inter face)
boundaries) = n(boundaries),

where 0 is a vector and has three components in three
dimensions, and n is the unit normal vector. This equa-
tion is solved by a conjugate gradient method, and the
solution is shown in Fig. 3. It is observed that the varia-
tion of 4 away from the gap region is smooth, while the
change in 4 in the gap region is very sharp. There are
some edges on which the magnitude of the difference of
4 between two nodes is even larger than unity. There-
fore, the magnitude of the difference of 4 between the
two nodes can be served as a criteria for edge bisection.
Fig. 4 (a) shows the mesh after the mesh bisections is
applied, and it can be seen that the mesh in the gap is
much finer with at least four cells in the interface nor-
mal direction. The vectors of p are also displayed in
the figure, and the magnitudes of the difference of the
vectors between two nodes in the gap are also less than
unity. The distribution of 4 is more smooth. However,
it is noted that the quality of the meshes connected to
the interface is not good, as the edge on the interface is
at least two times longer than edges in the gap. To im-
prove the mesh quality, interface edge bisections which
is based on the averaged length of interior edges in the
gap sharing the two nodes with the interfacial edge are







7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 June 4, 2010


0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1


Figure 3: (a) Contour of the solved normal vector mag-
nitude; (b) vector distribution of the solution


applied, and the mesh is displayed in Fig. 4 (b). It is
clear that mesh uniformity is much better.

Results and discussion

To demonstrate the capability of the MMIT method in
capturing detailed physics at small length scales, two test
cases are simulated which include interaction between
droplet and the substrate and the relaxation and pinch-
off of an elongated droplet.
Fig. 5 show the initial velocity distribution of a
droplet approaching a substrate, i.e. the boundary at the
bottom, in which the velocity of the droplet centroid (in
y direction) is perpendicular to the substrate. A vortex
ring is observed near the droplet which is denoted by


Figure 4: (a) mesh and vector of 4 after edge bisections
for the gap region; (b) mesh after edge bisections for the
interfacial edges and edges connected to the interface



the circle, and the center of the vortex on each side of
the droplet is outside of the droplet. The density ratio
(r) and viscosity ratio (A) between the droplet and the
surrounding fluids are 50, respectively. The Reynolds
number (Red) based on the droplet properties, droplet
initial diameter, and the droplet centroid velocity is 50,
and the Weber number (Wed) based on droplet is 25.
As the droplet approaches the substrate, the droplet will
deform, and the Fig. 6 shows the shape evolution for
the droplet at t =0, 0.25, 0.5, 7.5, 1.0, 1.25, 1.5, and
1.56, where t is non-dimensionalized by 2ro/Uc with ro
being the radius of the initial spherical droplet and Uc
the initial centroid velocity of the drop. As time pro-
gresses, the droplet first become a tear shape, and when
the droplet become very near to the substrate, the front
of the droplet become flattened. At t = 1.56, there is a
thin film formed between the droplet front and the sub-
strate. To clearly view the thin film, an enlarged view
of the film with meshes for the droplet (blue) and the
surrounding flow (red) is plotted in Fig. 7. The small-





7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 June 4, 2010


est width of the thin film is around 1.5% of the diameter
of the spherical droplet, and there are at least three cells
in the thin film region in the width direction. This gives
confidence that reliable fluid dynamics in the film can be
obtained.

I. -_ -


Figure 5: Initial velocity field for the head-on droplet-
substrate interaction. The circle inside the domain rep-
resents the droplet and the black bold straight lines are
the walls with the one at the bottom mimicking the sub-
strate. The time series from left to right and from the top
to bottom is 0, 0.25, 0.5, 7.5, 1.0, 1.25, 1.5, and 1.56.



0000

OOO




OQOO

Figure 6: Shape evolution for the head-on droplet-
substrate interaction
Fig. 8 shows the simulated shape evolution of an ini-
tial elongated droplet in a suspending fluid with finite
viscosity. The density and viscosity ratio between the
droplet and the suspending fluids are 10 and 0.1, respec-
tively. The Ohnesorge number (Ohd = d/Jpdgro)
based on the droplet properties is 0.037, and the length
ratio between the maximum length of the ligament to
the radius of the middle cylinder is 20. Initially, the


=



\\


Figure 7: Enlarged view of the thin film at t 1.56 with
meshes





COO




Oco
C^--3




0-0

00


Figure 8: Shape evolution of the relaxation and pinch-
off of an initially elongated droplet with length ratio
of 20, density ratio of 10, and viscosity ratio of 0.1.
The time sequence is 0, 435,3, 489.6, 509.8, 511.2, and
613.7.

fluids are at rest, however, due to the unbalanced sur-
face tension forces, the ligament will contract as the sur-
face tension forces serves as a restoring force. For this
case, there are two neck region formed and finally three
droplets are created with two primary droplets at the two
ends and one satellite drop in the middle. In the figure,
the time is no-dimensionalized by t, rotd/Oa, where
ro is the radius of the initial cylinder at the middle sec-
tion, Pd stands for the droplet viscosity, and a denotes



























Figure 9: Enlarged view of mesh in the neck region of
the drop at t = 509.8


r*uI
U


tII I ..l l l .ll l l .ll II I
20 40 60


Figure 10: Neck radius evolution for the case in Fig.
8. Symobls: numerical results; line: curve fitting with a
slope of 0.89



the surface tension coefficient. However, the neck at
t 509.8 in Fig. 8 cannot be clearly observed as it
is so tiny. An enlarged view of the neck with meshes
is displayed in 9. The mesh in the neck region is fine
enough to capture reliable physics, and the mesh far
away from the neck is much coarser to achieve comput-
ing efficiency. The smallest neck radius is around 2% of
the radius of the initial cylinder, however compared to
the radius of the primary droplet created after breakup;
it is less than 1%. Stone and Leal (1989) performed sim-
ilar experimental work, and full three-dimensional sim-
ulations with parametric studied were report by Quan
et al. (2009b). The evolution of the smallest radius in
the neck region is displayed in Fig. 10. The time in the
figure is computed by t = tb t, where t, is the ac-
tual simulation time and tb is the time for the breakup


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow,
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 June 4, 2010


instance, and the time here is non-dimensionalized by
tc. Our simulation shows that the reduction of radius
follows a power law with respect to time, which agrees
with the previous published results (Burton et al. 2005;
Thoroddsen et al. 2007).


Conclusions

The capability of the moving mesh interface tracking
(MMIT) method in capturing detailed physics in tiny
length scales in the thin film region or the neck re-
gion has been demonstrated. Furthermore, by using
the mesh adaptation schemes, especially the edge bi-
section based on the distribution of the normal vectors
and the averaged length, MMIT is capable to distribute
mesh with enough resolutions in the regions with small
length scales, while much coarse mesh are in the region
away from the small-length-scale regions. In such a way,
MMIT is robust in solving multiphase flows with differ-
ent length scales (the ratio between the largest charac-
teristic length and the smallest characteristic length can
be as large as 100) and at the same time the computing
efficiency is well achieved.


References

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ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 June 4, 2010


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