Group Title: 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow - ICMF 2010 Proceedings
Title: 2.5.1 - A Web-Based Course for Particle Transport, Deposition and Removal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102023/00057
 Material Information
Title: 2.5.1 - A Web-Based Course for Particle Transport, Deposition and Removal Particle-Laden Flows
Series Title: 7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow - ICMF 2010 Proceedings
Physical Description: Conference Papers
Creator: Ahmadi, G.
Cetinkaya, C.
Dhaniyala, S.
McLaughlin, J.B.
Doheny-Farina, S.
Fan, F-G.
Publisher: International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF)
Publication Date: June 4, 2010
 Subjects
Subject: aerosol transport
aerosol deposition
turbulent flows
environmental applications
 Notes
Abstract: A sequence of courses on particle transport, deposition and removal was developed. In these courses, the fundamentals of particle transport, deposition and removal and re-entrainment were described. An extensive web for the course materials was developed and the courses materials were made available on the web. The course sequence was also taught simultaneously at Clarkson University and Syracuse University couple of years ago. These combined research and curriculum development (CRCD) courses are composed of four modules. The models are: • Fundamental of particle transport, dispersion, deposition and removal. • Computational modeling of particle transport, deposition and removal. • Experimental study of particle transport, deposition and removal. • Industrial applications of particle transport, deposition and removal.
General Note: The International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF) first was held in Tsukuba, Japan in 1991 and the second ICMF took place in Kyoto, Japan in 1995. During this conference, it was decided to establish an International Governing Board which oversees the major aspects of the conference and makes decisions about future conference locations. Due to the great importance of the field, it was furthermore decided to hold the conference every three years successively in Asia including Australia, Europe including Africa, Russia and the Near East and America. Hence, ICMF 1998 was held in Lyon, France, ICMF 2001 in New Orleans, USA, ICMF 2004 in Yokohama, Japan, and ICMF 2007 in Leipzig, Germany. ICMF-2010 is devoted to all aspects of Multiphase Flow. Researchers from all over the world gathered in order to introduce their recent advances in the field and thereby promote the exchange of new ideas, results and techniques. The conference is a key event in Multiphase Flow and supports the advancement of science in this very important field. The major research topics relevant for the conference are as follows: Bio-Fluid Dynamics; Boiling; Bubbly Flows; Cavitation; Colloidal and Suspension Dynamics; Collision, Agglomeration and Breakup; Computational Techniques for Multiphase Flows; Droplet Flows; Environmental and Geophysical Flows; Experimental Methods for Multiphase Flows; Fluidized and Circulating Fluidized Beds; Fluid Structure Interactions; Granular Media; Industrial Applications; Instabilities; Interfacial Flows; Micro and Nano-Scale Multiphase Flows; Microgravity in Two-Phase Flow; Multiphase Flows with Heat and Mass Transfer; Non-Newtonian Multiphase Flows; Particle-Laden Flows; Particle, Bubble and Drop Dynamics; Reactive Multiphase Flows
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102023
Volume ID: VID00057
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: 251-Ahmadi-ICFM-10.pdf

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7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010



A Web-Based Course for Particle Transport, Deposition and Removal

G. Ahmadi,1 C. Cetinkaya,1 S. Dhaniyala,1 J.B. McLaughlin,2 S. Doheny-Farina3
and F-G. Fan4

1 Department of Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautical, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699, USA

2Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699, USA
3Department of Technical Communication, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699, USA
4 J.C. Wilson Center for Research and Technology, Xerox Corporation, Webster, NY 14580, USA
ahmadi@tclarkson.edu
Keywords: Aerosol Transport, Aerosol Deposition, Turbulent Flows, Environmental Applications


Abstract

A sequence of courses on particle transport, deposition and removal was developed. In these courses, the fundamentals of
particle transport, deposition and removal and re-entrainment were described. An extensive web for the course materials
was developed and the courses materials were made available on the web. The course sequence was also taught
simultaneously at Clarkson University and Syracuse University couple of years ago.
These combined research and curriculum development (CRCD) courses are composed of four modules. The models are:
Fundamental of particle transport, dispersion, deposition and removal.
Computational modeling of particle transport, deposition and removal.
Experimental study of particle transport, deposition and removal.
Industrial applications of particle transport, deposition and removal.


Introduction

Understanding particle transport, deposition and
removal is of crucial importance to many technologies that
are critical for the competitiveness of the US
microelectronic, imaging and pharmaceutical industries.
In addition, solving a number of environmental problems
requires a detail understanding of particle transport
processes. In the last decade, significant research
progress in the areas of particle transport, deposition and
removal has been made. The primary objective of this
combined research and curriculum development project is
to make the fruits of these new important research findings
available to seniors and first year graduate students in
engineering through developing and offering of sequence
of specialized courses. In these courses the process of
particle transport, deposition and removal and
re-entrainment was described. An extensive web for the
course materials was developed and the courses were
taught simultaneously at Clarkson University and Syracuse
University.

Course Modules

These combined research and curriculum
development (CRCD) courses are composed of four
modules. The models are:
Fundamental of particle transport, dispersion,
deposition and removal.


Computational modeling of particle transport,
deposition and removal.
Experimental study of particle transport,
deposition and removal.
Industrial applications of particle transport,
deposition and removal.
The front page of the course web is shown in Figure 1.
The lecture notes and the calculations models are uploaded
into the course web and are available in both pdf form as
well as html form.
..... ..... IT IT rl~- lml' I


-a1 .W. 1 W ow n o
ii ~ktr~ l~)~/rr "m"i""" r4 m


. u n.I Wir-rir

Figure 1. Front webpage of CRCD and the related
courses.


- Q"











Module I, Fundamental

In Module I the descriptions of fundamentals of
aerosols including hydrodynamic forces (drag, lift), and
adhesion forces were described. The nature of particle
adhesion and removal was also discussed. This module
also contains the description of particle interaction with
laminar flow, Brownian motion process, and particle
deposition by diffusion, interception and impaction.
The sections on interaction of particles with
turbulence and turbulent deposition that are normally
taught in the second course. Computational modeling of
turbulent flows was discussed, and classical models of
turbulent deposition were described. In addition the
process of aerosol charging and transport under the action
of electrical forces and turbulence were discussed.
We have added a number of computational
modules to make the course presentations of the materials
more interactive. The plan is to have sufficient number of
calculation modules for the student to experiment with.
As a result the student will develop a physical
understanding of some of the more complex concepts.

Module II, Computer Simulations

We refined and developed several computer
modules that were incorporated into the course sequence.
One class of examples was concerned with exploring the
flow and particle transport in a variety obstructed ducts.
Fortran simulation programs that were developed in earlier
were converted to JAVA. These programs were
incorporated in the modules dealing with the motion of
aerosol particles in the obstructed duct flows. The students
will be able to interactively use the programs to explore the
effects of various forces (6ui.\ ib, drag, lift, Brownian),
materials properties (particle density), and the flow
geometry on the motion and deposition of particles. A
module was developed for illustrating Brownian particle
motion in cross flows. The flow field in this module is a
parabolic velocity profile between two parallel plates. The
particle equation of motion includes Brownian motion,
drag, lift, and gravity. Figure 2 shows the user interface for
this module. Here, particles are injected from a nozzle in the
middle of the channel. Here the dispersion of the
Brownian particles can be seen. The module can also be
used to illustrate the effects of the lift force on larger
particles. Student can select values of the particle
diameter and density, the number of particles, and the
centerline fluid velocity.

Module III, Experimental

The course sequence includes several
experimental modules. One main experiment is the
measurement in the aerosol wind tunnel with the use of
Particle Image Velocimeter (PIV). The aerosol wind
tunnel is located in the Turbulence and Multiphase Flow
Laboratory at Clarkson University. The laser used was a
120mJ Nd:YaG laser with a 200 adjustable width sheet
generator. In this experiment, the sheet width was 0.5 mm.
The digital camera that was used was a Kodak ES1.0


7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010

MegaPlus camera. The camera had a pixel range of
1008x1008. The pixel size was 25 micrometers and the
interframe delay between pictures was 12 microseconds.
A picture of the experimental setup is show in Figure 3. A
sample PIV measurement of the velocity field behind a step
is shown in Figure 4.








L- =-. -- : 1 9
ml -...--- ..---I,--__-n. a-
















Figure 2. User interface for the module for Brownian
particle motions in cross flows.


e 3. A picture ot the aerosol wind tunnel.


Mum vectomrs(N3e' 1006(olnx.1
Mean vector (U,V) -0 0734, 0 377 1l
Corr. coefficent. -0.404
a'td de'lation 09g10,C759 -----


Figure 4. Sample PIV measurement behind a step in the
aerosol wind tunnel.






7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010


Usability Tests


The applications module concerns with a number
of examples from air pollutions to xerography. Figure 5
shows the photo of the Peace Bridge area in the south west
Buffalo, NY. Figure 6 shows a sample computational
result for the dispersion of particulate emission form the
traffic on the Peace Bridge.


Figure 5. A picture of Peace Bridge area and city of
Buffalo.


Course Web Effectiveness

The effectiveness of the course website was
assessed in two ways:

1. Usability tests were conducted on an early version of the
site and conducted again on a revised version of the site.
In both tests, participants were given tasks to find course
material and use the calculation model available on the site.
The purpose of these tests was to determine how efficiently
the participants could complete each task.

2. A survey questionnaire was administered to students
enrolled in the courses designed to assess the students'
satisfaction with the website.


Figure 6. Sample computational result for pollutant
dispersion form Peace Bridge traffics.


The Usability Testing Lab in the Eastman Kodak
Center for Excellence in Communication at Clarkson
University was set up to record users testing out the
website.
Participating in the first test on the early version of the
website were twelve student volunteers: six Mechanical
Engineering majors and six Information Technology
majors. Information from these tests were communicated
to the website designers. A year later after the website had
been redesigned a second usability test was conducted with
two Mechanical Engineering majors and three Information
Technology majors

For both test sessions a list of twelve tasks was devised
that would cover a variety of possible uses of the website.
All tasks required the students to search the site for
course-related information. One task asked the students to
do a calculation using the calculation model currently
embedded into the site.

The results indicate that the participants using the revised
site completed the tasks more efficiently.

Original Site
Average number of clicks, searches, scrolls to
complete each task per user: 3.70
Revised Site
Average number of clicks, searches, scrolls to
complete each task per user: 2.56


Original Site
Average number of failed or
completions of the task per user: 1.41
Revised Site
Average number of failed or
completions of the task per user: 0.60


incomplete


incomplete


Survey Questionnaire

Twenty-two students completed a questionnaire upon
completing the course in which the students could use the
website to assist their learning. Overall, these students
found the website useful for their needs:

1. The website was used to access information and
employ calculation models:
77% used the website to read the course
syllabus
86% used the website to read homework
assignments
77% used the website to download course
notes
54% used one or more of the calculation
models

2. Students found the availability of course notes to
be useful:


Module IV, Applications






7th International Conference on Multiphase Flow
ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL USA, May 30-June 4, 2010

86% found the course notes to be easy to
moderately easy to find.
96% found the course notes helpful to
moderately helpful to their coursework.
86% found the course notes to be easy to
moderately easy to understand.

3. Students found the calculation models to be
useful:
81% found the calculation models to be helpful
to moderately helpful.
81% found the calculation models to be easy to
moderately easy to use.

4. Overall, 86% found the website to be very to
moderately helpful to their coursework.


Conclusions

The development of a sequence of web-based
courses on particle transport, deposition and removal was
described. Different modules of the course are outline.
Availability of the course material and computational
module on the web was very helpful to student learning,
and students at multiple campuses could take the course
simultaneously.


Acknowledgments

The support of the National Science Foundation is
gratefully acknowledged.

References

httD://www.clarkson.edu/oroiects/crcd/




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