• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Table of Contents






Title: Program for the restoration and rehabilitation of Peabody Hall
CITATION DOWNLOADS THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102019/00001
 Material Information
Title: Program for the restoration and rehabilitation of Peabody Hall
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Knott, A. Dean
Publisher: College of Architecture, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1976
Copyright Date: 1976
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00102019
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

UF00102019_00001 ( XML )


Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Title page
    Table of Contents
        Table of contents
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
Full Text
PROGRAM FOR THE RESTORATION
AND REHABILITATION OF
PEABODY HALL


A.. Dean Knoth.,
AE 6 814.
Fall 1976





TABLE OF CONTENTS




Historic Significance............................1-

Site.............................................5-10

Architectural Analysis...........................11-16

Proposals........................................16-22

Space Requirements...............................23- O

Code Deficiencies and Requirements............... 1- 2

Restoration Requirements.........................43-49

New Construction.................................50-53

Economic Feasibility.............................54-57

Appendix A.......................................58-60

Appendix B




HISTORIC SIGNIFICANCE

In 1905, with the establishment and locating of the University

of Florida in Gainesville, an elaborate campus plan was laid out

by the first official architect, William Edwards, and P.K.

Young. Included in this plan, to the east of the proposed
administration building, was to be the "Normal School" (fig. 1).

For the next decade this original plan was followed and even-

tually the normal school building was erected as the George

Peabody Hall for the College of Education (to be called Peabody

henceforth). Though the planned administration building never

materialized, several other buildings were built in accordance

with the early plan: Floyd Hall, Flint Hall, and Anderson Hall,

which, along with the Memorial Auditorium, effectively outlined

one of the major open spaces of the University of Florida's

campus, the Plaza of the knerices (fig. 2). These buildings
formed, and still do form, the central core of classrooms on campus.

Peabody was built with a $40,000 donation from the Peabody

Foundation, which covered all costs of construction. At this time

a gift to a state school was rare, for most philanthropists
feared the states would relax efforts to support their schools

in lieu of private aid. Originally the school had tried to obtain

$50,000 for the building, and the loss of the extra $10,000
in the gift would account for the simplicity of architectural
ornament and spartan interior finishes.







. PLAN III:


General Plan (1905)
UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
Edwards and Walter, ArTchitects


LEGEND


In Infirmary
La Language
L~aw Lawr
Li Library
MD Men's Dormitories.
MA Mechanic Arts
Mi ines
MP Medicine and Pharmacy
Mu Museum
NS Normal School
Ph Philosophy
PP Power Plant
So Science
Y Y. Md. C. A.


Ad
Ag
Bi
Ch
CP
DH
EA

EE
Ex

Fr
Glm

Ho


Administration
Agriculture
Biology
Chapel
Chemistry and Physics
Dining Hall
Engineering and
Architecture
Electrical Engineering
Experiment Station
Faculty Houses
Fraternity Houses
Gymnasium
HistpSry and Economics
Hortfoulture





t~t
r


IM


as
3


a


'ti
" I





.~. -;-";'~~ ~'rgt;r~)~~i~TiTr:~~7,;~ ~. __
1 ~j~!~.nRP~;D~F~;.:ik~:~:~:ti;~-~,..- ! sJ: :~~~; :~.' P
~ 1. 1~ ,r
.t r
.~
nr;t~lC~LL~rl i4.~(~I; ~lil
~Y:-.;
I.?~E~ii*".- 1 ; _~I
.I. .-r-
Irl I~r -ni 't
**::`. hL; .. ~;;
~'~" _L~dC~~~
J .,
~ .141rg1

1. 47 ~Jr
r .:- I .:~1. .1I~i .61
I'!YL~'I I.I. i ;-@r.~ .i,; _~~~ 1 I~ :x r
r '' '' .~
J:i 7' ;-- ., :%
;r r . ~ .~ ~
~' ~ 1 ;~ :.~. :~~: ~~ si : b i ''
P, ~ ..;.;
~fddi~:~is~7i~v;;6~~~tr~d~..... ~- j~...~n-r, -. ..,,,,.;:...,...~ ,r. 1 ~ui.' '. I
~~.F:!G
:c*1 I~

c;;l nw ill tf rr~dl~~c~
rl' .'..' ?w - ''' '"'~"-~~4
yt~jr~, '-r
.-~i.uv~ T~'~L~Jj~ ~r zi ~~~l-r~r
i cr$
~Thj ~il_r 1 I";i ..' .~2;, .r.T~Y"~u~~lt~i
.". ~~~~r 'II
h I
*
'
s ~t~J~i~ ~p
Pa ...
.. :'t~sln~, )E~
~L
:I '
.o~s, - - sr~;;;~.~B~h~E$eZ~'~';~.('~'~'
I,


~ ~Sp;L"
~itL~ ~rt~1-- ,c~'-
u ,. :rL.IIM
ih;i ~cV1-uL~T~9i~5C~
;~? C:i r ~g~sr~;----
,, rr
c, r

;S
?1:I(+5:I h~h~ lilull .I,i
- II
oil ... Ell
'"il ,5
.*

I h,(
L, gL~*BP~~%dBR~'~IR#WII&P11%16il~r~BI~BBBP
ir


.~ -t~""l .~nd
! ' ..Y:P~IIIAPB:~ LR~iPWlrY~
~-1~~ lil ~PX'B~I~~ i~~ ~o19,"dl B Isb~'~,




The request for the funds was sponsored by Dr. Murphree,

the president of UF, in 1911, and the money was obtained by late

in that year. On December 12, 1911, the architect, William

Edwards of Atlanta, wrote a letter to Murphree asking him to

forward information on the proposed building and to place it

on the campus plan, which he (edwards) had designed when the

school was started. By the 13th Edwards had received sketches

(mail service being better then than today) from Murphree of

his ideas for the building. These were based heavily on the

Peabody Hall at the University of Georgia in Athens, Ga., sketches

of which are in the University Archives with the rest of

Murphree's papers (figs. 3&$C). From these sketches, Edwards

derived his floor plan and designed a building very similar to

the University of Georgia's Peabody Hall. The major difference

between the two buildings was architectural style, Georgia's

was Greek Revival and UF's is Collegiate Gothic.

By the 27th of December, 1911, the floor plans and front

elevation.were sent to Murphree for approval. Edwards notes that

the central section of the rear of the building was not as wide

as proposed (like the Georgia Peabody Hall), but it would be

expanded if possible, however, this .was never done. Al so,

Edwards states that it would be difficult to stay within the

$40,000 budget, and to do so he reecomended the omission of a

separate heating system for the building in favor of a central,

campus system for Peabody, Floyd, and Benton E~ngineering Building

(to be located in Benton). It is irioni~e to note thsei the




G


4 '
4;kl'll i


s,
'~;~'~ *
.~:i Y


~ /r
P:
Ji "
1( y


Leefsr~ ~S
3.e46a


;arYCI
),Co 2 c


.26 LA 3


L,


~ I'L


:" r La

OEL

Was a7L~5d tl
jEtCtL;;rD f~at
Scoo tvrea.L~
ii(wYa}~S


2&A37


ur & &
Ag
s t


~----- ~


7t I -


~il r ~3 _


,_~, ~ be --J )t I~ -- ?


0--




~-,~C~,, C" -~6
;-~---i--~--- - ~:t? -


Stn PCP-~. 3`!
s ;; -


kso o~i 2D~~~ rs


.~~~- A-





















Typical Campus Scenes




university is now investing in this type of system for all the

buildings on campus. Despite the budget limitations, Peabody

was well built (fig. 5) and the architectural ornaments, finials,

and water tables were carved out of stone, not the specified

terracotta, though the interiors were extremely plain and the

additional width to the east of the building was not achieved.

Peabody was dedicated in 1912 and opened for use in the

fall term of 1913,an event remarked upon by the "Florida Alligator"

(fig. 6). At this time Peabody housed the teacher's college,

the university library, and the only psychological laboratory

in the South"', a dubious claim in that the University of Georgia's

Peabody preceded UF's and also had a psychology laboratory. L?

Later the administration for the university's summer school was

added to the building's functions. In 1925, with the removal

of the library to its own building to the north of Peabody, the

School of Architecture, which had just been founded, was put

on the second and third floors. Classes in architecture were

still held in Peabody until early in this decade.

It is interesting to note that in all of the campus plans,

developed at different times, Peabody has never been deleted,

but,by the same token, has never had an addition proposed,

though may other buildings on campus were supposed to be added

to in a quadrangular fashion (fig. 7). Obviously the building

was always considered architecturally complete. However, it was

not always considered safe. As early as the 1930's, complaints

were.made by students and faculty and a photo report was made




1. II UCniversity of ~Florida, Gainesville, Ilorida, Thursday, October 2, 1913


I


ANNUAL O


~;*lac~rsarx~---^l--~---- I~--- --~---- ------ ~-_1_11-1~-~---- 1--11~--~----- ---L.---
ry; Ip


'nives Opened. With_ Impr~es~sie Cerem~onies. r st Enroll ,
e com- bus it, was productive ot hee essary. to lay usiae al exor~b'TtliiE~
on of this fine building was best results, for it tended to pro- Jconceit, and to appreciate the
exceptionally important event duce men and leaders. main business of the place. It
Iso, because it provided for Altho this comparative free- was necessary to cultivate regu-
riiga class of men of which dom was granted, the University liar habits, to engage in sane rec-
lorida was in great need, per- was not indifferent to the devel- reaction, to enjoy proper com-
tasin greater need than of any opment of student character. panionship, to study, to avoid
thrclass of graduates, men Nray, it was the never-ending en- mental dissipation, and thus to
>rprdto build up the sec- deavor of all connected with the Ihave the finest social experience
ndary education of the state. University to turn out men of the and develop a capacity for lead-
Mention was then made of highest principles. In this con- ershcip. .
Language Hall, and of the many nection he spoke of the teinpta- Dr. Murphree then spoke of
bther additions and improve- tions which the student was sure rthe proper sphere of the various
pets that were to .be seen~. to meet, and most forcibly told student activities -and the good
president then told of the odf the evil effects of smoking, that could be derived from them,
geat increase in student attend- drinking, gambling and licen- after which he raised the ques
~nee, not from a spirit of boast-) tiousness, and besought the stu-) tion--"Who have the right to be
fulness, but because of the desire dents to overcome the tempta- here?" A right to be at the
of the University to extend its tion. Again he emphasized that University lies in your capacity
usefulness and to be of great character and self-control are for exercising.college freedom
service to the state and nation. necessary. in a sane manner. If you can-
This increase in attendance was Dr. Murphree then made men- Inot say "No" you should have
largelyy due to the best adver- tion of several college problems. been kept in the nursery and
isers a school can have--a man- Too much money was perhaps looked after at home. Those
set of students to proclaim worse for the students than too (Continued on page 2.)


~


ni


at
al




e:c


OPENINGG EXERCISES

OF UNIVERSITY OF FLbRIDA


THE ALLIGATOI

Football Field Scene of Much Actil
Championship Year in Every
The season is now far enough IverL.
Tenney is thei same old reliable Iomto
and several new men are fight- giving
ing it out for Taylor's old place. Iment
In the kicking, only the punting by joir
can as yet be sized up, but the tion,
way Tubby is sending them work
down in practice shows that in may cc
this department of the game, Lool
Taylor's absence will not be felt Ifor the
badly. Tubby has been averag- a most
ing between fifty-five and sixty Manag
yards to the punt, and is getting cations
them high and perfect spirals. from i
When the goal posts get up, we ISouth
can see better how he will do and th~
on the drop kicking, sind if he this re
shows the form he did last year, selected
that department of the game will quired.
be~well taken care of. until tl
The scrubs have been work- not lec
ing hard as well, and have al. season,
ready given the varsity several With
hard scrimmages. Although the looked
scrub does not get the praise that varsity
the varsity man gets, he is a




























GEORGE PE ODY HALL


This handsome new building,' which is the home of the Teachers' College and Normal School, marks a
new epoch for the University of Florida, and indeed for the entire educational system of the State. It was made
possible by' a gift of $4&0,000 from the Peabody Fund Trustees, and represents the first gift of any size to the Uni-
versity. In this building is to be found the only Psychological Laboratory in the. South. Temporary quarters
for the University Library is provided therein and a permanent home for the Teachers' College and allied activ-
ities. The conditions upon which the $40,000 was given called for an annual expenditure of $g10,000.~ This gives
the Teachers' College a strong faculty, and wide range of usefulness in training teachers for the State of Florida.


STHE ALLIGATOR


Football Field Scene of Much Acti
Championship Year in Every


OF UNIVERSITY OF FL$RIDA


blnth Session of the University Opened With Impressiv Ceremonies. 3rgest Enroll
ment in the History of the Institution. '


. The season is now far enough
advanced to allow the team to
be sized up pretty well, and the
outlook for a most successful
team is promising. All the old
men are showing up in fine
shape, and the return of Coarsey
and Buie to the line up have
rounded them out to almost per~-
fection. In spite of the loss of
Big Bake and Wilson, the line
shows up even better this year
than last, the addition of Hand-
cock and Price more than filling
the-holes left over. In the back


very
success!
out hir
imposs
team te
The n
workit
and a
been
more
pected
near ft
For
subscri
below.


/ The formal opening of the
Snt session of the University
Sa place last Wednesday morn-
Sin the auditorium of the Col-
j of Agriculture. Tuesday
Been devoted to the register-
of students, which work was
inued Wednesday after the
e of Chapel exercises. Ow-
to the new system now in
~gue, according to which the
db~ans of the various colleges
5ster all former stu-
isand the committee
entrance examirla- *
and classifications
eto deal only with
agy men, the registra-
i~in" consumed but little
ligne, and the faculty
whre able to commence
tite regular schedule of
classes Thursday morn-
$i.Indeed the instruc-
tion in the College of
law began Wednesday.
The opening exercises 7:
were simple, but unusual-
ly impressive. After the
Whiging of "America," Dr.
-e~ Anderson read the
-fiP~ ~rst Pisakr. Tfili'~ s >
Wils followed by an earn-
est prayer .by Rev. Mr.
Cloar. "Love Divine, All
Lo eve Excelling" was
then sung. The presi-
dent, Dr. A. A. Murphree,
made the annual address
beore the students and


its merits throughout the land.
Then more earnestly he spoke
of the great ideals of the Univer-
sity and the rules it had been
found necessary to adopt for
carrying out these ideals. It
was a critical time in the life of
a student. He was leaving home
and getting free of home con-
trol. This new independence
required on the part of the stu-
dent balance, poise, self-control.


little money. Tlip students here,
as well as the Placulty, have a
genuine respect for those who
work hard to j~rn their way
through college. lA; man's stand
depends solely u ln his personal
worth and ende ior. .
Then he denote need the moral
poison hidden ;~nthe words
quoted from PIfiident Hyde's
great book, wot@ that give the
point of view of shs~me students-


field Swanson, at quarter, is are out
showing the best form, especial- thepr
ly on the offensive, that has been Iboys in
shown for some years. Hesteit Univr
is in better shape than last year, year.
Tenney is the same old reliable, join to
and several new men are fight- giving
ing it out for Taylor's old place. ment t
In the kicking, only the punting by join
can as yet be sized up, but the tion, a
way Tubby is sending them work
down in practice shows that in maycl
this department of the game, Looi
Taylor's absence will not be felt for the
badly. Tubby has been averag- a most
ing between fifty-five and sixty Mng
yards to the punt, and is getting cations 1
them high and perfect spirals. from pi
When the goal posts get up, w~e ISouth P
can see better how he will do and the
on the drop kicking, and if he this res]
shows the form he did last year, selected,
that department of the game will quired t<
be~well taken care of. until the
The scrubs have been work- not leavi
ing hard as well, and have al. season, a
ready given the varsity several With tl
hard scrimmages. Although the looked :
scrub does not get the praise that varsity
the varsity man gets, he is a (Ce


here were few written; rules at
heUniversity. The thinking
fthe students was not done
them in advance. An~d this
eeoaltho a few might
abuse it, was productive of the
best results, for it tended to pro-
duce men and leaders.
Altho this comparative free-
dom was granted, the University
was not indifferent to the devel-
opment of student character.
;Nay, it was the never-ending en.
deavor of all connected with the
University to turn out men of the
highest principles. In this con-
nection he spoke of the teinpta-
tions which the student was sure
to meet, and most forcibly told
of the evil effects of smoking,
drinking,' gambling and licen-
tiousness, and besought the stu-
dents to overcome the tempta-
tion. Again he emphasized that
character and self-control are
necessary.
Dr. Murphree then made men-
tion of several college problems.
Too much money was perhaps
worse for the students than too


"C is the getitlenian's grade."
This showed the new form of
wasting time and was the mark
of a coward.
To stand well here it was nec-
essary tolay aside all exorbitant
conceit, and to appreciate the
main business of the place. It
was necessary to cultivate regu-
lar habits, to engage in sane rec-
reation, to enjoy proper com-
panionship, to study, to avoid
mental dissipation, and thus to
have the finest social experience
and develop a capacity for lead-
ership. .
Dr. Murphree then spoke of
the proper sphere of the various
student activities and the good
that could be derived from them,
after which he raised the ques-
tion-"Who have the right to be
here?" A right to be at: the
University lies in your capacity
for exercising. college freedom
in a sane manner. If you can-
not say "No" you should have
been kept in the nursery and
looked after at home. Those
(Continued on page 2.) .


ne com-
eonof this fine building was
exceptionally important event
because it provided for
aiiga class of men of which
loiawas in great need, per-
psin greater need than of any
thrclass of graduates, men
rprdto build up the sec-
ndary education of the state.
Mention. was then made of
Language Hall, and of the many
theirr additions and improve-
nents that were to be seen
['he president then told of- the
rreat increase in student attend-
Ince, not from a spirit of boast-
ulness, but because of the desire
,f the University to extend its
Usefulness and to be of great
service to the state and nation.
This increase in attendance was
largely due to the best adver-
isers a school can have-a man-
Y set of students to proclaim


1IZU LcmUN EXERCISES

















































I
MD





figs. 8,9,&10O) on the dangerous conditions in the building.

'hese early complaints did not suggest the removal of the building,

ut only its renovation to comply with fire safety codes, specifically

0 replace the single wood stair with fire stairs. This was done,

ut not until 1953. At that time a new staircase was placed

n the south wall and the north stair from the basement to the

irst floor was extended to the attic,and the central stair was

losed above the first floor.

This did not ease matters for long, because in 1959 the

chairman of the Political Science department complained of the

excessive overcrowding of the halls and suggested an additional

taircase on the east center wall of the building. This was

.ot done, but exterior fire escapes were added (fig. 11).

Peabody presently houses the political science department's

lasses and some of its offices. Because of the construction

f a new building, General Purposes Building A (GPA), the space

n Peabody will be excessive under the State University System's

SUS) space formula allowance for UF. Thus Peabody is slated

or destruction to keep within bounds of this allowance.




















































*;boy Ha;l 1::::tiu exer

dated and hasardous.


r; ~'ir "--
'r .E .r
'' ;-t
. ~- -.
"~"~-.


'' '; ~, ;----
-- -- ---.-
--


-e
L^'L
is~a~c r~r
-: .~t~Fi~













































Peabody Hall- rThe only stairwary, wrorn and win~ding, a
serious fire trap.

















































































































'r,~4'i~iB~"~=fL:~rd~:i~mT~I~~~Q~l~f~~, -~O~-

'~t'~' '~''~-~ ~' "


"''~--.---yurrqg*?pr


g;



:,p


i~i:
r,2~. ~
:.I
'.i:)"'I :' .*. ~
-,

P-
:" ,it~: -:~':
:,t L I -1~-
99~1~ li!PS
.1


The only staiwaay, wAorn and

rot~ted- Peabody Hfall.


C
..
.p



i;Fc~

s_





ITE: General Description

Peabody Hall is located on an east-west axis with the main

entrance to the west, facing the Plaza of the Americas. Between

he east side of the Plaza and the west elevation of Peabody

uns Murphree Way, a service drive that deadends to the north of

he building at the Library East-West collonade. Library East is

approximately 100' due north of Peabody across a small formal

arterre. To the south of Peabody is Union Road, and at the

ear of the building, to the east, is a large lawn about 175'

quare. Just beyond the lawn is the administration parking lot

nd the main entrance to the UF campus from S.W. 13th St., US 441.

their significant buildings around Peabody are Floyd Hall, which

s on axis directly across the Plaza from Peabody, andtValker

nd Grinter Halls to the south..

historic Planning

As stated earlier, the site of Peabody was designated from

he earliest campus plan for the nNormal School" or teachers'

college. Even afts the first plan was abandoned, the concept

f keeping the campus unified and the departments near each

their was a major force in all new plans. Peabody always contained

several departments which were important to a majority of

students, thus retaining its position as a campus focal point,

long with the Plaza of tha:Americas itself, through all the





changes in campus planning. By 1920 the first plan, proving

oo cumbersom, was replaced by a more coordinated plan which

ntroduced limited quadrangular expansion of the existing facilities

fig. 11), and gave definite form to the Plaza, increasing the

importance of the buildings on its perimeter. These buildings,

eabody, Floyd, Flint, and Anderson, defined the preimeter and

he Auditorium provided a focal point to the vista (fig. 12).

he Plaza scheme was to be retained, though later other proposed

structures were added and deleted, and other quads and courts

ere never realized.

sthetic Value to the Plan and Convinience of Location

Several other plans based on quadrangular and beaux arts

eyouts were proposed (fig. 13). The most elaborate of these

as that of William Arnett in his master's thesis of 1932

figs. 7&14). All of these plans retained the Plaza as an

important visual element and Peabody and the other buildings as

oundries for the Plaza.

However, in the last three decades there has been a shift

way from this area, and the far perimeters of campus have been

developed to accommodate the expansion of the university.

previous to this recent development, the concept in campus

planning was to compact the students in an area and bring the

natructors to them, thus reducing the area to be transversed

y the students between classes and reducing the amount of traffic

round campus (one instructor vs. 30-50 students).

The most recent idea in campus planning at Uf is to return




PLANJ IV


General Plan (1920)


AA Administration and
Auditorium
Ag Agriculture
Bi Biology
Bu Buckman Hall (Dormitory)
Ch Chapel
Co Commons
CP Chemistry and Physics
EA Engineering and
Architecture
ES Engineering Shops
Ez Experiment Station
FH Faculty Housea
Gym Gymnasium


Horticulture
Language Hall
Law
Library
Men's Dormitories
Medicine and Pharmicy
Museum
Peabody Hall
Power Plant
Science
Temporary Shoes
Thomas Hall (Dormitory)
Y. M. C. A.


Ho
La
Law
Li
MD
MP
Mu
Pe
PP
Sc
TS
TH
Y


Buildings erected 1905-1925 are shown in~ solid black.





Amafs


e~~ 3** que 800 FE




PLAN VI


General Plan Showing Existing Conditions (1931)


An
Ag
BS
Bu
Co
CP
DP
En
Ex
FG
Gym
Ho
In
La'


Auditorium
Agriculture
Broadcasting Station
Buckman Hall (Dormitory)
Commons
Chemistry-Pharmacy
Sewerage Disposal Plant
Benton Engineering Hall
Experiment Station
Farm Group
Gymnasium
Horticulture
Infirmary
Language Hall


Law
Li
ME
ND
NG
Pe
PO
PP
Sc
SP
St
Th
Y


Law
Library
Mechanical Engineering.
New Dormitory
New Gymnasium
Pea.bod.y Hall
Post Office
Power Plant
Science Hall
Swimming Pool
Football Stadium
Thomas Hall (Dormitory)
Y. M. 0. A.


Bufldin~gs 'to be retained in future developments are shown


in solid black.
















































F. It





PLAN V
General Plan (1930)
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
.Rudolph Weaver, Architect

LEGEND
Au Auditorium La Language Hall
Ag Agriculture Law Law
Bu Buckman Hall (Dormitory) Li Library
Co Commons ME Mechanical Engineeri
CP Chemistry-Pharmacy ND New Dormitory
En Benton Engineering Hall Pe Peabody Hall
Ex Experiment Station PP Power Plant
Gym Cymnasium Sc Science Hall
Ho Horticulture ,St Football Stadium
In Infirmary Th Thomas Hall (Dormito

Major buildings erected 1905-1931 are shown in solid 'ol






























o p """"1
-L
Ni nn

F \4 I 5




Second Stage of Expa~nsion


A
Ag
AS
BS
Ch
Co
OJ
Ed
En
ES
Ex
FA
FG
Gym


Administration
Agriculture
Artillery Stables
Broadcasting Station
Chapel
Commons
Commerce and Journalism
Education -
Engineering
Engineering.Shops
Experiment Station
Fine Arts
Farm Group
074nasium *


In
LA
Law
Li
Me
MD
Mu
PP
Pr
So
St
T
U
WD


Infirmary
Liberal Arta
Law
Library
Medical School
Men's Dosmitories
Ilorida State Museum
Power Plant
President's House
Science
Football Stadium
Theater
Student' Union
Women's Dormitories


Exr~tetng buildings anld first stage of expansion arte


























AMTrott


THE UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
THE DEVELOPED .PLAN -
RAST HALP
3 EXPEA
MAllillM EitSTING auILDINGS
5KPANSION, FIRST STAGE (AO


Rt,1'ro


. v nu


I 11




this concept for the reason that the transportation around

mpus has become time consuming and roads choked by the amount

people moving around. Also, it has become increasingly
difficult for students to get to classes on time because of the

stance to be covered between the classrooms is excessive

many cases. To relieve this situation, campus planners are

acing a new emphasis on the Plaza of the Americas and the
grounding buildings. This is exemplified by the placement

f the university's newest and largest classroom structure,

A, to the southwest of the Plaza (fig. 15). This building
nd its open areas will provide a connecting link between the

laza and the long greensward, which terminates at the Reitz

nion. Also, it will give renewed visual importance to Peabody

nd the other buildings around the Plaza, which are required

bo help the Plaza retain its own identity as the older, historic

section of campus.

This new plan and building will concentrate a greater

amount of students in close proximity of Peabody in addition

to the students in the nearby business school, one of the

University's largest departments, and the main libraries.. The

Auditorium, presently being restored, will also draw additional

students and area locals to this section of campus for special

events. All these factors combine to create a new importance

in the visual impact of the area. The buildings already around

the Plaza; Peabody, Flint, Floyd, Library East, and the Auditorium,





_~II


Nii~


8.


- v.


-i-




ive the area its appeal and identity. They unify the whole

architecturally, Peabody being one of the most important in

retaining this unity. Without Peabody the Plaza is unelclosed

usually and physically in a section about 37$' wide. Since

here is nothing behind Peabody, except a lawn and surface

parking lot (fig. 16), the eye would be carried on and the sense

f an enclosed unified whole is destroyed. Prom this standpoint

lone, it is necessary to retain Peabody Hall permanently.
reffic Flow

The traffic flow patterns of UP are the result of several

uccessive plans overlaid, the best aspects of each being retained.

n each one Peabody has always been near one or more of the major

arteries, pedestrian and vehicular. As stated in the General "

description of the site, Peabody has to the east one of the major

terminals for vehicular traffic, the administration and visitors

asking lot, which places Peabody in a prime area which would

e convenient to all who would be using this lot, especially

isators on business.(fig. 17). Also, the read just to the

outh of Peabody, Union Road, is a two lane street with parking

n both sides and a large amount of the east-west cross-campus,

ehicular, pedestrian, and bike traffic. The vehicular traffic

includes an inter-campus bus stop in front of Peabody's south

entrance (fig. 18). This increases accessibility to the building

rom all around campus, especially for students who are unable

o drive on campus during the day and others who cannot park






















































f14 \c,


,i


, e.


. r. ".at


--L~CI-


''


I '











111 '
:.~. ""
r
si


~3


1. ----~ - -r -


d.



































YA NlM s Ur I


I


~-


L 7




































I\


C-


I: I


PEnouESsesbh


1




r the building. This south entrance, added in 1953, is the

us of a great amount of northbound student pedestrian traffic,

ch is funneled fam the small spaces around Walker and Grinter

ls, and Carleton Auditorium (fig. 19). From the north, the
varies and school of business contribute a large amount of

bound pedestrian traffic, which goes past the east or west

ades of Peabody, the parterre to the north being a terminus

ch gives added visual impact to the north entranceand creates
eating place for visitors and students (fig. 20),

Service to Peabody is convenient, because of Murphree Way,

ch runs north-south along the west facade. This road connects

h Union Road for easy vehicular access. Also, because of the

ad sidewalk intersecting Union Rd. due south of Murphree Way

running north-south from Union to Stadium Rd., service vehicles

e access to Stadium Rd, which is the main east-west bike,

estrianand service read across campus. This road also

nects to S.W. Ilth St so large vehicles can get on and off

pus easily from Peabody by using the above route. All these
tors combined show Peabody and the adjacent area to be very

essible and prominent on the UP campus for"the staff,

inistration, visitors, andmost importantly, the students.

ure Proposals

One o'f the current construction projects at UP is the

section of all facilities on a central HY/AC system supplies

m three locations. One of these is the cooling tower at




1 N




c w--r r- e ,


1 1









N


P\L -




888 0 til outsC










III




LAKE ALICE O



o a ...
on





FIGURE 7.1

o A LT. A

O
O SURFACE PARKING

-- 6 LANE RD.
- - 4 LANE RD.
se. ------- -- 2 LANE RD.
************ 2 LANE SERV. RD.
BIVENS ARM
emassue Teamewcavanam evuev save




-- --{L J

ames
10000
1 000
o 0 -- untrrn-







On


LAKE \ ALICE












on
I .......... .---




-- -
--
as. -.- .. ..------ -- -
*********
BlVENS ARM
aamous Venampouravion evuev @eT*


"ne


r-----


FIGURE


7.8


A LT. B


O
- *
--
-


PARKING STRUCTURE
SURFACE PARKING
6 1.. ANE RD .
4 LANE RD.
2 LANE R D.
2 LANE SERV. RD.




ti= 0 .. -- -- L100 L
llllD
n 10000 4

po o
o
a a












-- LAKE ALICE






Ill []

co






:eunOE 7,3


o SURFACE PARKING

PARKING STRUCTURE

e sus swoPs
- 6 LANE RD.
- 4 1.. ANE R D.

-'/ es. 2 LANE RD.
********** 2 LANE SERV. RD.

BIVEN5 AAM BUS ROUTE
WAMPUS TRANapeMTATSDN BTUWY 9STS




ARCHITECTURAL ANALYSIS
The architectural style of Peabody, and indeed of the entire

ampus, is Collegiate Gothic, which was at the peak of its

popularity at the turn of the century and hung on until the

arly '$o's. The reasons for its widespread use were that

hough an informal style, it was imposing and could be adapted
oa formal campus plan, allowing deviations from the plan

without ruining it, it could be easily expanded without ruining

he lines of the original design, and, because of its medieval

oots, it gave an impression of permenance and antiquity to
ven the newest of campuses.

Peabody Hall is less flamboyant in design than other gothic

buildings of the period and on the university campus, due to

he shortage of construction funds, but it is, nevertheless,

very good example of its style and type. The gothic ornament
n the exterior was originally to have been executed in terra-

otta, but was rendered in stone, which is odd in that there
as a funding shortage as mentioned previously and stone was

.ore expensive. These ornaments are most unusual in that they

re obviously inspired by githic models, but they are more classic

n treatment than other ornaments elsewhere on campus. (pic. 1)

overall the lines of the facade are simple and unobscured by the

mall amount of ornament at the entrances, and the building is




lanced and reasonably symmetric along its main facade, unusual

this style and showing the influence of the classic Beaux Arts

chool (pic; 2). Another interesting feature is that there is

o parapet at the top, being replaced by a system of french
utters behind a classical cornice (pic. 3). The lines of the

of itself are also unusual for a gothic building in that though

here are gables over the entrances and at the ends the main

cof is derived from the french mansard and interpreted in spanish

ile. Finally, the light rose color of the brick, in contrast

o Library East's dark red brick, and gray stone trim, in com-
instion with the other unusual elements already mentioned,

ive Peabody more of a French Rennissance look, of the period

hen France was undergoing the transition from medieval gothic

o classic motifs in their architecture, than the more traditional'

english or Tudor Gothic style that was the most popular model
or American college buildings.

The doors in the central entrance are original and still

eve the original hardware (pic. LE). These lead to an entry

all with a tudor arch connecting it and the circulation hall

inning the length of the building. This entry hall had,

ntil 1953, a monumental stair leading to the third floor. This

as removed when the new staircases were added to the north and

outh, and its space given over to new classrooms and offices.
The building consist of a basement with load bearing masonry

alls, two floors and an attic, which is now the third floor.





Frd ;Z











slRB


71 C.
11


/


'Plc.. s




The floor plan now consists of a main hall running north-south

with enclosedfireproof staircases at either end. On each floor

4 all halls and anterooms lead off the main hall to offices and
lessrooms, or very narrow and long rooms connect directly to

the main hall. None of the subsidiary halls are long enough;

however, to constitute a danger in the event of an emergency,

hough they do disrupt the air circulation and increase the need
for artificial light.

These interior spaces of Peabody are not as good as the

exterior architecturally. The construction and design of the build-

ng being typical of the period, and of the present, in that
ore care and attention was lavished on the exterior while the

interior was made purbly functional and rather drab. Also,

because of the aforementioned shortage of funds, cutbacks in

architectural ornament was required somewhere and the interior

eing the least visible was the most obvious place (pic. 5).
he interior of Peabody is characterized by cluttered walls in

2alls, which do not get natural light and are not tell-lit because

bf the recent energy crunch. Also, the building tends to be very

noisy in its circulation areas due to the wood floors and the
hardness of the wall and ceiling materials.

The classrooms and offices are rather pleasant because they

receive a lot of light from the numerous windows which also give

good air circulation, making air conditioning unnecessary except
in the hottest of weather. The quality of light and air circulation

is not so good on the third floor, originally the attic, because




the windows, though of good size, are dormers which are placed

too high from the floor to give direct light and the amount of

small halls and anterooms mentioned earlier is greatest in this

area making the central hall dark and stuffy.

As stated earlier several of the large rooms in the original

design were divided (see plan progression figs. 25-36), however,
the lecture hall on the second floor is still much as it was when

the building was built. The floor is still sloped, though this

has been recent the original s1ppe being removed then replaced,

for large groups of seated people, but the stage and the Gothic

proscenium arch have been removed.
The exterior has had little alteration in the past. The major

changes #as the addition and subtraction of the end and central
staircases in 1953. The stair at the south end completely altered

the south elevation. Previously this elevation had been a solid

wall with only windows (pic 6) where there is now a simplified

gothic entrance and window bay. The north entrance had the
windows replaced with metal ones which would comply with the

codes requirements for fireproof staircases. The window bay

was expanded vertically as to light the upper sections of the

stair and this incurred the loss of a finial over the lintel

(pics. 7&8). On the west front (main entrance) the windows
were also replaced to light what are now two separate floors

instead of the original stair well. This involved the changing

of the position of the windows and reducing them from three bay




wood casements (pic. 9) to two bay double hung. Also, the






--rrfa

















)1








r -r n-1

I




























r-







FTA ACMsCrr IA (2
































---- 29'-O"


a


O


r \


O


O


rli-~~


O


O


2o


,9


.i


~ ~;;;;


BASEMENT- \9'\ST




6
1


VM EV4.MT 014-














P-------~---------~--f


:r


_i


71K9T TTF YST 11 12





c -24 -01


.241_O 1


7 6


i~i\ll


24'-O1


1


T-C"


FIRST


FLOOR \s1 I


~~S~aeh ~F


--- 24








I


t


~it


Li---l


TE9 TlrDR- nS(,





-"


cZED DR. 1112.











4, I

e 9
LADIES
.r ROOM
2 -O" a it -0" -- a 58'-[" 24 -0
1



11

17 6






I


o 11


O
24 -0 1 / I DOWN 30 8 2 4LO"
i N DOWN


18'- 2 12 -0 20

{\l





- 4 "


58'-1"


24'-O"


SECOND FLO -1 \




EX EEC


I.~I


f~-~oD p -r. WI (,










-qMg? JLCOP 1 is m2.


: i





THIRD FLO \A





11. Co





-jt~


rl


--


~9


*t

/--~~


"Plc, o





pygOSALS FOR ADAPTIVE USE:
With the completion of GPA, the educational departments

that are presently located in Peabody will be removed and the
building will be vacant. Several proposals have been made .1 1
concerning what to do with the building. One is to tear is down,

another to rehabilitate it into usable research laboratory or

U.brary space, and a third would be to use the building for

student oriented functions and agencies. The first proposal

should be abandoned completely, considering the previously demon-
strated signifigence of the structure historically, architect-

wally, and in relation to the rest of the campus plan. The second
idea would be impractical, because the building is too prominent

for such a restricted amount of people to control its valuable

floor space and this function would be contrary to the general

philosophy of having theatre around Peabody strictly for the
students' use, andthough it is close to the other main libraries,

Peabody is too small to be effectively used as a library without

immediate major additions. Also, this last ideswould tend to

decentralize an already scattered library collection.

The third concept is the most practical. The building is
centrally located with easy access to students and visitors

alike, as discussed in the site analysis. Also, it is large

enough to contain several offices and agencies without requiring





gajor additions. Finally, the interior of the building could
be adapted so a uniform and economic office plan could be developed

within it.
In trying to organize efficient office space within an

architecturally significant structure, one must develop an app-

ropriate preservation philosophy about what must be retained
and what, if anything should be discarded. In the case of

Peabody Hall there are several strong factors which deliniate
thettype of design approach which should be taken. These are as

follows:

1. The exterior, being the only part of the building which

is.ardhitecturally significant, both in itself and in relation

to the campus plan and other buildings nearby, should

be retufneds as much as possible, to its original state,

ie restoration.

2. The interior, lacking any architectural significance

and being of poor quality in plan, should be swept away

as to promote the development of a modern, efficient office

plan, which would expand and contract with departmental
needs. This would apply only to the first through second

stories, the basement being divided by load bearing masonry

walls, which should be retained.

3. The structure of the building above the basement is wood
and in relatively sound condition, but, because of code

requirements and future loading being greater than it was

designed for, should be replaced with steel construction.




. The two stairs, being of fireproof construction, could

be retained, because they fill the code requirements for the

; emergency exits to the building. However, they should be

upgraded archite cturalIly*
These four factors indicate a total restoration of the exterior

up to and including the restoration of the south front. However,

the interior should be completely gutted to facilitate a new open

office plan designed to meet the needs to the offices to be moved

into Peabody. The new plan should facilitate easy traffic flow,

air circulation, and light penetration from the exterior. Also,

consideration for future additions to contain the expansion

of these agencies beyond the present floor area of Peabody and

the addition of new agencies and programs should be made in the

planning of new stairs and/or elevators, and utility services

should be placed in a new central core to maximize efficiency

and economy and increase ease of ex-pansion through additions.

Several agencies were considered to be located in Peabody.

All are student oriented, and, with the exception of one, the

Institute of Black Culture (IBC), would function to serve a large

majority of the student population. Among the agencies: considered

were the office of the Vice-President for Student Affairs, the

International Student Centler, Placement and Vocational Counseling,

the office of the Dean of Student Services, Student Financial

Affairs, Student Accounts, and the Registrar.

For years all of these services, vitally important to many





students during the year, have been scattered across campus,

making registration, fee paying, and other tasksrequired by the

school lenghty and excessivly time codsuming, and annoying.

Most of these offices are very crowdiid in their present locations

requiring two to three times their present space inventory to

operate efficiently and process the amount of students required :

in the minimal periods for registration, etc. It has been felt

by many in the administration that a none-stop shopping center",

coordinating all the activities mentioned above and others,

should be built to ease the aforementioned conditions.

This type of facility has failed to materialize, though

several architectural thesis have worked out a program for one,

because other facilities wer and are considered more necessary.

Peabody could become this type of facility for reasons

stated earlier, easy access, prominence to students, and adapt-

ability of the interior. However, all the student oriented offices

mentioned above would not fit into the existing structure. There-

fcee some of the more important offices should be located in

Peabody, and, as the need arises and the funds allow, expansion

could be made to the east of the building to accommodate the rest,

without interrupting the functions of the agencies already there.

To be located in Peabody itself, after rehabilitation, would

be the Office of the Vice-President of Student Affairs, Student

Financial Affairs (financial aid), and the Dean of Student Services.

The vice-president's and dean's offices are the most important




to be located in any facility that is to serve the student in

an overall capacity, because almost all the other programs and

agencies which would go into Peabody or in later additions are
under these two offices. In th at they share mahly of the same

space requirements, it would be preferable that they be placed

in a position to share these spaces, and that they be in a prominent

location to be able to direct students to the other agencies.

The next office is Financial Affairs. This should also

go into peabody as soon as possible. Presently the financial

affairs offices are located on two floors and eight rooms of

Tigert Hall and in Temporary Building E (the work/study office).

No office can function efficiently under such conditions, esp-

ecially considering the crowded condition of the offices. Currnnit

square footage for these offices is 3,067, and estimates of

retired square footage are up to 8,515.

Finally this department is one of the university's most

rapidly expanding, because of the economic crunch and more people

retiring economic assistance to go to school. Last year $$fo

of the student body had their education financed through this

office (18,000), either by loan, work/study/ or scholarship.

This number is expected to be increased by ten to fifteen per cent

by next year. About 6,000 of these students are employed by UF.

This lack of centralization coupled with the increase of work

load makes the already complex process of applying and getting

financial aid almost impossible for both students and the ad-




ministrators, involving more time to straighten out problems
than actually required, and creating problems because of the

lack of communication and confusion on the part of the student

about where to go and what to do. This is in addition to the

fact that to receive or pay out any of the financial aid monies

one must go the the HUB halfway across campus.

The last program too be located in Peabody is the Institute

of Black Cultute (IBC). This program is dedicated to raising

the awareness of the black students on campus and providing

educational and cultural experiences for these students not

found elsewhere on campus. Also, the programseeks to cealete"

a higher profile for the blacks on campus to promote the milling
with the rest of the student body. Located in an old house on

hast University Ave. (across from Anderson Hall), the IBC was

to be moved to the new General Purposes Building A. This was

felt to be inappropriate by the Institute and the administration,

fee that building was to be mainly for classrooms and offices and

not for extracurricular programs which would involve heavy usage

after the school day. Therefore, the IBC withdrew from its

proposed new quarters in favor of a position in another building

on campus like Peabody. Thus, a commitment was made on the part

of the administration to place the IBC in Peabody.~

Although the functions of the IBC do not correspond with

the general office use proposed for the rest of the building,





they can function together without interfering with each others'

operations. Indeed, the IBC is under the Dean of Student Services
office and would be conviniently located if it were in the same

building with the dean's office. Also, at a later date the IBC

could be moved to the new wing,proposed by this program, which

would contain other similar student services, and their space

would be filled by other administrative offices or the expansion

of the offices already located in the building.

Therefore, the four agencies mentioned above; the office

of the Vice-President of Student Affairs, office of the Dean

of Student Services, Student Financial Affairs, and the IBC s

will be placed in Peabody. They are all similar in their office

requirements and several share special needs for meeting rooms,
etc. Also, their spaces can be planned to allow for reorganization

and expansion, and the addition of a future wing which would

house all other student oriented services operated either under

or in conjunction with the offices in Peabody.





SPACE REQUIREMENTS:
In 1974 a proposed student service facility was the arch-

itectural master's thesis for Rex Doughtery. In this thetias,

he outlines the space requirements for all the agencies proposed

for Peabody in the previous section, with the exception of the

IBC. In March of 1975, the Vice-President of student Arrairs

ani the Dean of Student Services revised their space requirements

along the original format. These requirements are shown here

ami will be used as a basis for the redesign of the interior

of Peabody. The space requirements for the Ibc were obtained

by consulting with the director of the institute to discern what

thyp~es of space would be required and how many people these

spaces would serve. The space requirements for the Office of
Student Financial Affairs has not changed drasitcally, thus an

update was not prepared by the director.

Peabody has approximately 9,100 square feet per floor.

Including the attic this totals to about 36,000 square feet.

This amount is reduced when allowing for stairs, elevators,

utility facilities, and halls to about 30,000 square feet.





,,


St. Serv. 2850 150 60Lso 2115

Int'1 St. 0 150 .50 7oo 7oo

Placement 16 10,520 900 12,580 1697


Financial
SAff'airs 6380 1685 4C50 8515 3067
Student
Accounts 3770 3025 35o 7145 36
Counsel 'g
Center 3370 1775 150 5295 5514

Speech &~
Hearing
clinic 4575 Lc337 5oo 9412 3958
Reading &c
Study Skills 4045 6505 350 10,900 3594

Registr~ar
Admissions 16,655 2500 1000 20,155 10,369

Total NASF 45,105 35,467 4350 84,922 34,856

Gross Sq.Ft.90,210 70,934 8700 169,844L ......

Cost/sq.ft.S44~.OO $44.00 544.00


$6,615,725.36
5448,588.16
657,565.68
$373,656.80

47,473,156.00


Gen.


Special


Records


Total Cuen


Vice-~Pres


1110


2220


4c50


21276


Denof


040I


Construction
A/E Fees (6%)
DGSFees (%%)
Contingency (5%)

Estimated Cost


*Special needs includes reception areas, interview rooms,




INSTITUTE OF BLACK CULTURE
Office Complex GEgy)naaf
The office is made up of the Director and one secretary,

with as many as eight graduate students and student assistants.
The program is designed to inform black students and others on
the UF campus about black cultural heritage and history. The

program also provides a listening room for black music and
requires space for lectures anifilms. This program is one of
the newest under the Office of Student Affairs.


1. Receptionist/Secretary (400 nasf). This area is to be
central to the entire institute. It should provide waiting and

loggefacilities for the institute offices and abrve as entrance
to the Art Gallery, and anteroom to the multipurpose room thus
containingg overflow crowds on occasion. This area would be
the office for the secretary/receptionist for the director.


2. Office of the Director (250 nasf). This room should have
a desk and estra seating with a small area for informal conference
ith workers and administrators. There should be adequate

stage and closet space. The office must also be closely
located to the conference room and general office space.


$* Graduate and Student Assistants (520 nasf). There should
be four work areas to be divided among the student assistants
(two grad assistants and 6 undergrads) in a large open plan




room, which would promote interaction among the different staff
members studentand professional, and administrative. Since
not all the student assistants will be using the office all together,
there will not be any need for each of them to have his/her own
desk.

4. Storage (140 nasf). This should provide storage for filing
and records and the extra seating for the multipurpose room
when not in use. Also, a small copying machine could be kept
here for security and reduction of operational noise. This
area would be completely enclosed.


5. Gallery (700 naaf). Approximately 400 af would be allocated
to actual display of the permanent collection and temporary
exhibits. This room should be adjacent to the reception area
and near the lecture area. Lighting should be moveable. The plan
would be open to allow for maximum use and rearrangement of
the exhibits. In addition 300 sf of the space would be sued
for storage and workrooms to allow for the expansion of the
collection and the preparation of new exhibits by three research
assistants. They should have a small office located in this

space and it should be spearated from the gallery and other offices.


6. Research Library (400 nasf). This will provide shelf space
and reading room for material on black culture in America,
which is not generally available in the main libraries or texts.


7. Music Room (200 nasf). This space will provide a lonage




type atmosphere where students and staff can relax and listen to
maic through stereo headsets. Also, it can be used as a
conversation area or study area by the people not using the
haul sets. Space for storage of the records and master control
of one or more stereosystems would be provided. This could be
in conjunction with the projection and storage room for the
multipurpose roog.

~70
8. Multipurpose Room # g@nasf). This should be a large multi-
level room capable of holding up to 166 people. The level

changes should be small enough to still use the room for
receptions, with a kitchenette (50 sqft) to aid catering,
but large enough to help the veiwing of people seated for
lectures and films. A projection booth should be provided to
reduce niose of operation and lessen the distraction of changing
reels and setting up.




11t o ', 1 7


411 ion

,\re : acken

ina.: Ronuin new or the Off an of .ice President for
Student AT1n


. E the De Prr>E nt or Student Afin is

n1e'x :2600 :A

? oi a of *.; r the V ia Fresident for tndent 41 Fu irs
or 1 FASE to: DEffees -nd so.apoir areas rouped :senan.;
A:::r ey'r* otion 9 offir-- see s a basle Eunctices. < a
c., a ini.s tive cud**nt Br:r 10 the via ion of .*0-
yne tz Un r or Planning on ['[To::: at C--at-n, no-! ti:'
Stun !: Pn r -ar th? r son the Office E Mn
Pr iden. or Stud r: shool ha-.- lived l ine8 of commun n-a--
a La has fions. in hom are to be innated within th alow i.1 1. y
abo .1 b rectiv 01 this off:Inc.

One ask onet.i~n th 3 off.ion I to roFTrain and improve- :.cod < ark-
st ionsh ...9 amor .atus n Facul ty, and < droinistr at ion. ale:111y,
: r on star:116 be *-=os ble both a student--= and to other attain.iotra-
es. wever, I wou: : orwa rn e En. t his ime Ear the V ien Pres iden t for
186 :faire' offix to o<- tooated .11 th<:nontral Pacility itr-If for
we'.vtaffairn. Howarr, E tolleve it should he the lowest priority
m:: th re:Telor st Hunt n i. Fu to 9' off Lees for that general. fao11 I ty. For
e kind of emmus, it could entity remain :0 the central administration
dir g .

1000 of the Vice Pres.;rient. (Wil N':SF)

ints. office house: he V.ian -'resident for Stwicat AEfaits. .1(: shoutJ
be ?<.uipped with a desk with a chair, buil.t-an book shelves, and four
'xtra chairs for sm: 11 concurances. A built-1.a work space for working:;
withstaff and stuments viou.d also be provided.

Sea. ral Ti v. outlets and :.1 intercom should be arov.ided. A small. eloset
for coats and storage should bb also provided.

RIC office should to dir-e::1.y neco:-Tible to a scoretarial office and
:Mu' have easy access to a conferea m sroo.:1. It should be located




,Rion Page 2


March 20, 1975


close by to the other staff office for the Office .0f the Vice Presid-
ent. A private entrance should be provided to the large conference room.

Assistant Vice President Office (1 @ 145 sq. ft.)

This office will house the assistant to the Vice President for Student
Affairs. It needs to supply work space, storage space, and conference
space. It should be equipped with a desk and a chair, built-in book
shelves, a built-in work space for working with other staff and students,
and three extra chairs for visitors. The office should have several 110v.
outlets and an intercom station. A small closet for coat and storage
Oxould be provided for-the office. The office should be directly accessible
to a secretarial office.

Secretarial Offices (2 9 195 sq. ft., 290 NASF)

These offices are to house the Staff Assistant and the Secretary for
the Vice President and the Assistant to the Vice President. They
need to be supplied with work space, storage space, and a small waiting
space.

Each office should have a desk with a chair and a typing extension, a
Ceiling cabinet, and two extra chairs for visitors. S veral 110v. Outlets
and an intercom station should also be provided. One of these offices
should be directly accessible to the Vice President's office. It also
should be closely related to the office storage space.

Receptionist Area (300 NASF)

This space would comprise the main reception-waiting area. There should
be a desk with a chair and a typdig extension. There should be seating
for approximately eight students and a low table for reading material.
There should be display boards for program material and pamphlets.

This space should be directly accessible to the secretarial office.

Office Service and Storage (450 NASF)

This space will house the office file cabinets and the Xerox and mimeograph
copying machines. It should be supplied with a table for the mimeograph
machine and be closed off from the rest of the office to out down on noise.
This office should be directly accessible to the secretarial 'receptionist
areas.

Conference Room (300 NASF)

This room should be large enough for 20-25 people. It should be equipped
with a conference table (rectangle table for 20-22 size 5'O"x21'O"; boat
shaped table for 20-24, size center 6'O", end 9'O" x 20'O") with 25 chairs.
There should be several 110v. outlets and an intercom station.

This room should be directly accessible to the Vice President's office.




3, .Page 3


March 20, 17


f Lounge (250 NASF)

space should be in a private location for the use of the staff
visitors. Kitchen facilities for preparation of coffee and other
rages should be supplied as well as storage for other items.

e should be a small table for four, and seating around the room
the staff to relax and carry on conversations.

uate Assistants and Intern Work Space (625 NASF)

space will house graduate assistants, student interns, and other
ent assistants. It should contain work space and storage areas
flexible system that responds to changing demands. Floor outlets
a combined lighting-environmental system is the best solution for
ibility.

space should be directly related to the secretarial/reception
. It should be closely related to the staff offices and the
erence room.

- Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs


NASF


on

for the Vice President'
nto to the Vice President Offices
arial Offices (2 9 195 sq.ft.) -
ionist Area
Service and Storage
ence Room
ounge
DAssistant & Intern Work S.ace
.


200
145
290
300
450
300
250
625
2600
(Total NASF)




Office frSuetSrie


Office Complex (6040 NASF)

The function of the Office for Student Services as set forth in the
Directory of the Division of Student Affairs is as follows:

"The Office for Student Services provides general assistance
and counseling of a short term nature and attempts to meet
the needs of students through individual and group contacts.
In cooperation with faculty, this office also plans and
implements co-curricular activities and programs. In
addition, the office serves as ombudsman for student concerns."

To carry out its function the office has the following programs and
activities:

Individual advising
Student group advising
New Student programs
Fraternity and sorority coordination
Minority student affairs
Veteran student affairs
Institute of Black Culture
International student advising and programming
Committee responsibility for petitions and admissions
Student withdrawals
Supervision of practicum and intern students
Married student programs
Commuter student services and programs
Student Judicial Affairs
Off-campus student coordination and services

The complex should be arranged so that the work space, reading room,
and the staff offices are readily accessible .from and cluster around
the reception area. The entire office complex should have an open
feeling and inviting atmosphere. The office needs a sense of privacy,
access, ease of communication, comfort, efficiency, and integration.
The offices should move off from the reception area without opening
directly onto it.. The various spaces should interlock so that one moves
from one space directly into the next without the use of corridors.
Using partitions that do not reach the ceiling will give a sense of
openness to the office.

The Institute of Black Culture and the International Student Services
Center are both operational units of Student Services.




Ofiefor Student Services


1. Administrative & Professional Staff Offices
(9 9 145 sq. ft.; 1305 NASF)

These offices will house the Dean for Student Services, two
associate deans,.four assistant deans, a director, and a
coordinator.

Each unit should be equipped with work space and appropriate
storage. A desk, with an accompanying credenza, and built-in
bookshelves should be provided, along with other appropriate office
equipment.

2. Reception Area, Career Service Space (1250 NASF)

A rotunda-receptionist unit should be constructed to allow one
person to provide information and direction. This should be an
open area, with the ability, by use of sliding glass doors, to close
it off after office hours. The reception area should convey an
atmosphere of warmth and invitation.

Immediately behind the rotunda should be the space for career service
staff. Modules of two should be constructed so as to provide
efficiency and freedom. Sound resilient materials should be used
in the walls of the modules to lessen typewriter and other noise
pollution. Six career service staff will be housed in these
modules.

A machine work room, to provide office service with mimeographing,
copy, and magoard equipment as well as limited filing capacity
should be adjacent, though separate from the career service module
area. Care must be given to keeping noise from -this unit, to a
minimum.

There should be only minimal seating provided in the general
reception area. By the use of movable partitions, mini-reception
areas should be designed to accommodate three to five persons near
professional staff offices. A low table for reading material should
be available. .The use of colors and plants in office decor will be
important in these areas.

3. GraduateAssistants Offices (4 9 145 sq. ft.; 580 NASF)

Four work stations for one-half and one-third time graduate
assistants should be available. The stations should supply the
needs of writing and storage in a flexible manner. Movable parti-
tions are adequate and advisable. This space should be accessible
to both administrative and professional, and career service staff.




Q. Sudet Asistnt Sace (2 @3 145 sq. ft.; 290 NASF)


This area supplies work space for four student assistants. Each
station should provide the opportunity for interaction and
collaboration of two student assistants in each unit. Each station
should supply the needs of writing and storage in a flexible manner.
movable partitions are adequate and advisable. The number-of student
assistants varies and the ppace should be responsive to this..
Integration with the location of professional and career service
staff would be helpful.

5. Practioum & Intern Space (4 9 145 sq. ft.; 580 NASF)

The Office for Student Services carries a major instructional
responsibility through providing "field experience" in practicums
and internships for graduate and professional students in an
interdisciplinary format.

The area is to supply work space for four to six students. This
space may be used for individual work with students and should
have extra seating for that purpose.

The space should be generally accessible to the professional staff
offices to insure the probability of close supervision, wheh
necessary.

6. Conference Room (300 sq. ft. 300 NASF)

It should accommodate up to 20 people (rectangular table, 5' x 30").
A facility for audio-visual presentations should allow the
accommodation of rear-screen projection equipment. Acoustical
treatment is important. An intercom station should be supplied.

7. Seminar Rooms (2 0 000 sq. ft. 800 NASF)

As already pointed out, the staff of this office is also responsible
for instructional functions. Space for seminars to accommodate up
to 20 students -is desirable. As in all seminar space, this should
be informal and conducive to comfortable communication and discussion.
Even lighting, soft surfaces and good acoustical treatment are
desirable.

The seminar rooms should be closely related to professional staff
offices, the student work space, andtthe reception area.

8. Professional Library and Reading Room (400 NASF)

This facility will house reading material of a professional nature.
for practicum and intern students as well as informational material
for students coming to the office. Shelf space for storage and use
of materials will be needed.




The library should be closely related to the reception area,
student work space and offices.

9. Lounge (150 NASF)

This space should be in a private location for the use of the staff
and student assistants. Kitchen facilities for the preparation of
refreshments should be supplied as well as storage for other items.

There should be a table for four and seating around the room for
the staff to relax and carry on conversation during their breaks.

The lounge should be closely related to the career service area
and staff offices.

[a) 1. Staff Offices

a) 00698, Tom Goodale, Dean 6f Student Affairs; Dean for
Student Services.
b) 00702, Phyllis Meek, Associate Dean of Student Affairs;
Associate .Dean for Student Services.
0) 00700, Robert J. Denson, Student Affairs Coordinator,
Director of Student Judicial Affairs & New Student
Programs.
d) 00703, Robe'rt L. Burrell, Assistant Dean of Student
Affairs; Assistant Dean for Student Services.
e.) 00701, Loype Sparkman, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs;
Assistant Dean for Student Services.
f) 00302, Joyer Taylor, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs;;
Assistant Dean for Student Services.

2. Career Service

a) 00712, Betty Anderson, Staff Assistant I.
b) 00715, Barbara Jones, Secretary III.
c) 00720, Carolyn Dennison, Secretary II.
d) 02962, Pam Tiefenbach, Secretary II.
e) 00683,.Bbnnie Whiting, _Secretary II.
f) 00721, Lena Hobdy, Secretary II.
g) 50011, Fran Halslander, Clerk I.
h) 50011, Harolyn Gillespie, Clerk I.

[b) Associate Dean for Student Services, Classification 5.

[o) Graduate Assistant positions

1. Administrative assistant one-third time (13 hours per week),
reporting to the Dean for Student Services.
2. Coordinator, Women's Programs, one-half time (20 hours per week),
reporting to the Associate Dean for Student Services.
3. Practioum & Interns r The numberrvaries each quarter, generally
4 to 6. No in-house titles given. Time in the
office ranges from 13 to 40 hours per week. The




Demand Associate Deans sprieteepros


4. Student Assistants Eleven '(11) college work study positions;
15 hours per week; the professional staff
supervises these persons.

(a) #6 Conference Room
a) 12 hours per week
b) Counseling Center

#7 Seminar Rooms
a) 20 hours per wekk
b) Counseling, Career Planning & Placement




Studnt financial Af is


Office Complex

In order to handle the increasing number of students using
the office, it has been split int.o three basic sections.
One section handles personnel and employment, one handles
College Awarded Scholarships, Federal and etate Insured Loans
Programs, and the Department student records-and files, and
the third section handles .University General Scholarship
Awards, Federal and State Loan and Grant Programs, Univer-
sity of Florida Loan Programs, and the data processing sec-
tion. Each of these sections should be connected by a com-
mon lobby area.

In addition, there is the Director's office suite and the
general office areas. These are common areas and should be
central to the rest of the office complex.

This office is closely related to the Office of Student Ac-
counts. These two offices generate a great deal of Student
traffic and should be located at one end of the facility
opposite to that of the Registrar's Office, which also gen-
erates a good deal of student traffic.

At certain high activity periods the mall space of this
facility should be capable of connecting with the major
lobby area of this office to handle the load of student
traffic. This can be achieved by the use of temporary par-
titions to act as traffic control and extend the space,










t




Student Finacial affairs (81 s)


1. Director's Suite (590NASF)

1. Director's Office (145 NAsF)

This office is to house the Director of Student Fi-
nancial Affairs. It should be equipped for small
conferences, storage of books and other materials,
and should contain work space. Ther should be a desk
and chair, a built-in bookshelf, and two extra chairs
for visitors. There should also be a work counter,
several 110 V. outlets, and an intercom station.

This office should be directly accessible from the
Director's secretary's office, as well as having its
own private entrance. It should have direct access
to the conference room.

2. Director's Secretary/Reception Room (145 NAsF)

This office will.house the Director's personal sec-
retary as well as serving as the reception/waiting
area for the Director's office. It should contain
a secretarial desk and chair and two extra chairs
for visitors. The room should have several 110 V.
outlets and an.intercom station.

This room should have direct access to the Director's
office. It should be closely related to the general
reception area.

5. Conference Room (500 NASF)
This conference room should be large enough for twenty
people (table size-4'X 20'). It should contain a
conference table and twenty chairs. It should con-
tain several 110 V. outlets and an intercom station.

The conference room should have direct access from
the Director's office as well as a general entrance.

II. Student Personnel and Employment Section (2185 NASF)

1. Student Personnel-Employment Manager's Office (145NAsF)

This office is used for counseling as well as mana-
gerial functions. It should contain a desk and chair,
a built-in bookshelf, and two extra coirs for visit-
ors. It should have several 110 V. outlets and an
intercom station.

The Employment Manager's office should be directly
accessible from the waiting area and closely related
to the clerical offices and other counseling offices.




2. Counselors' Offices (2 @ 145 sq. ft.-290 NASP)
These offices will house the employment counselors.
They should each contain a desk and chair, a built-
in bookshelf with a work counter, and two extra chairs
for visitors. Each room should have several 110 V.
outlets and an intercom station.

These offices should be directly accessible from the
waiting area. They should be closely related to the
Manager's office and the clerical office.
3. Clerical Office (1015 NASF)
This office will house seven clerks and three student
assistant stations, Each station should have a sec-
retarial desk and chair. The room should have-sev-
eral 110 V. outlets for typewriters and other equip-
ment. The head clerk should have an intercom station.

This office should have direct access to the office
storage area and the waiting area. It should be
closely related to the counselors' offices.

4. Office Storage (150 NABF)

This room will contain all of the record files for
the Student-Personnel-Employment Office. It will
contain 15-20 filing cabinets and a number of smaller
storage units. It should be designed for maximum
wall area.

The office storage should be directly accessible from
the clerical office.

5. Waiting Area (150 NAs?)
This is the waiting area for the.Student Personnel-
Employment Office. It should contain seating for
15-20 people and a bulletin board for posting employ-
ment notices.

This waiting area should be directly accessible from
the general waiting area and the counselors' offices.
III.Office for College Awarded Scholarships, Custodial Schol-
arships, Federal and State Insured Loans Programs, and
Department Student.Records.anti Files section. (5545 NASF)
1. Assistant Director's Office (145 NAs?)

The Assistant Director's office should contain a desk
and chair, a built-in bookshelf with a work counter,
and two extra chairs for visitors. It should have
several 110 7. outlets and an intercom station.

.This office should be directly accessible from the
Assistant Director's secretary's office.




2. Assistant Director's Secretary's Office (145 Ms?)

This secretary serves as the Assistant Director's
secretary/receptionist. It should contain a sec-
retarial desk and chair and two extra chairs for
visitors. It should have several 110 V. outlets
and an intercom station.

This office should be directly accessible from.the
general reception area and the Assistant Director's
office. It should be closely related to the Program
Supervisor's office, the Counselors' offices, and the
clerical area.

Programs Section

3. Special Programs Superintendant (145 NASF)
The Superintendant's office should contain a secre-
tarial desk and chair, a built-in bookshelf, and two
extra chairs for visitors. It should have several
110 V. outlets and an intercom station.

This office should be accessible from the reception/
waiting area. It should be closely related to the
Assistant Director's office, the counselors' offices,
and the clerical area.

4. Clerical Area (1015 NAs?)

This area will house five clerks and two student
assistant stations. Each station should have a sec-
retarial desk and chair. The room should have ade-
quate 110 V. outlets for typewriters and ocher equip-
ment. The head clerk should have an intercom station.

This area should be directly accessible from the Pro-
gram Supervisor's office and the reception/waiting
area. It should be closely-related to the counselors'
offices.

5. Counselors' Offices (3 @ 145 sq. ft.-435 NASP)
Each office should contain a desk and chair, a built-
in bookshelf, and two extra chairs for students. The
rooms should contain several 110 V. outlets and an
-intercom station.
These offices should be directly accessible from the
reception/waiting area. They should be closely re-
lated to the clerical area, the Program Supervisor's
office, and the Assistant Director's office.

6. Reception/Waiting Area (200 NASF)

This waiting area should have seating for 15 people,
a bulletin board for posting information, ana a low
table for reading material. $36




It should be directly accessible from the general
reception area.and the counselors' offices.
Records Section

7. Clerical Area (1160 NASF)
This area will house six clerks and two student
assistant stations. Each station should have a sec-
retarial desk and chair. There should be adequate
110 V. outlets for typewriters and other equipment.
The processing and records clerk should have an inter-
com station.

This office should have direct access to the record
file storage area. It should be closely related to
all of the clerical and counselor sections of the
Office for Financial Affairs.

8. Filing and Storage Area (300 NASP)
This area will contain the personal files for all
students receiving loans. These files are kept on
each student for at least 4-5 years after he is no
longer receiving financial aid before being moved
to permanent storage.
The storage area should be directly accessible from
the clerical section.

IV. Office for University General Scholarship Awards, Feder-
al and State Loan and Grant Programs, University of Flor-
ida Loan Programs, and the EDR Accounting and Statistic-
al Records Section (2050 NABF)

1. Assistant Director's Office (145 NASP)
The Assistant Director's office should contain a desk
and chair, a built-in bookshelf, and two extra chairs
for visitors. The room should have several 110 V.
outlets and an intercom station.
This office should be directly accessible from the
Assistant Director's secretary's office.

2. Assistant Director's Secretary's Office (145 NAsF)

This secretary serves as the Assistant Director's
secretary/receptionist. The room should contain a
secretarial desk and chair and two extra chairs for
visitors. :Dt should have several 110 V. outlets and
an intercom station.

This office should 'oe directly accessible from the
general reception area and the Assistant Director's
office. It abould be closely related to the counsel-
ors' offices. 37




Program ecio


3. Secretary/Reception Area (290 NABF)
This area will house two secretary/receptionists.
Each station should have a secretarial desk and
chair. There should be several 110 V. outlets
for typewriters and otaer equipment and each sec-
retary should have an intercom station.

These are the general receptionists for the Office
of Financial Affairs. They should be directly
related to the main waiting area and all of Ene
other reception/wai ing areas.

4. Counselors' Cffices (5 2 145 sq. ft.-725 NASF)

Each office should contain a desk and chair, a
built-in bookshelf, and two extra chairs for
visitors. The rooms should each contain sever-
al 110 V. outlets and an intercom station.

These offices-should be directly accessible from
the reception/waiting area. They should be closely
related to the Assistant Director's office.

Data Processing Section

27. Keypunch Office (725 MABF)
This office will house the data processing co-
ordinator, three keypunch operators, and a stud-
ent assistant. The room should contain a desk
for the data processing coordinator, four key-
punch machines,-and a-storage cabinet for comput-
er cards and other equipment.

V. General Office Space (600 NASF)

.1. Lobby/Waiting Area (250 NAs?)

This is the general lobby for the Office of
Financial Affairs. It should have seating for
20 people, a bulletin board for notices, and a
low table for reading material.

This space should be directly accessible to all
of the related reception/waiting ares of this
office.

2. Staff Lounge (250 NASP)
This space should be in a private location for
the use of the staff and student assistants.
Kitchen facilities for the preparation of coffee
and omler bever: ::as shoulti be supplied as well
as storage for outer items.




There should be a table for four and seating around the
room for the staff to relax and carry on conversation
during their breaks..

The lounge should be closely related to the secretarial
areas.

3. Office Service (100 NASF).
This area will contain a xerox and a mimeograph copying
machine. The room should have a 220 V. Outlet and sever-
al 110 V. outlets. It should be closed off to reduce
the amount of noise in the rest of the office.

The service area should be closely related to as many of
of the secretary/clerical areas as possible.




Summary- Student Financial Affairs


Function NASF
A. Director's Suite
Director's Office 145
Director's Secretary/Reception Room 145
Conference Room 500
B. Student Personnel-Employment

Manager's Office 145
Counselors' Offices 290
Clerical Office 1015
Office Storage 150
Waiting Area 150

C. Loans and Records Section
Assistant Director's Office 145
Secretary's Office 145
Special Programs Superintendant 145
Clerical Area 1015
Counselors' Offices 435
Reception/Waiting Area 200
Clerical Area (Records Section) 1160
Filing and Storage Area 300

D. Loans and Data Processing Section
Assistant Director's Office 145
Secretary's Office 145
Secretary/Reception Area 290
Counselors' Offices 725
Keypunch Office 725
E. General Office Space

Lobby/Waiting Area 250
Staff Lounge 250
Office service 100
Total NASF




00DE DEFICIENCIES AND REQUIREMENTS:

At present Peabody Hall neets code requirements. It has the

proper amount of fire exits and signs, and alarms, and smoke
detection devices; however, it is not subject to a strict following

of codes because it is:

1. State property, which doesn't have to comply strictly

with codes, and

S. it is not new construction, being built before the codes
were in effectthus they do not apply.

If the codes were to be strictly enforced on the building there is

only one defincecy, the number of stories and floor area on the
floors. Peabody is not allowed to have third story as large as

the attic, because it is type VI construction (masonry exterior

and wood interior). The attic should not have areas greater

then 3,000 square feet without intermediate firestopping. Again,

however, this would not apply is the building were completely

sprinkelered en? gutted and replaced with fireproof construction.
Since it is proposed to do the latter, the codes would reclassify

Peabody as type I constitution and should not prove to be any

problem in the design solutions.
Peabody, with its new functions will be changed from a

"C" or Educational occupancy to a nB" or Business occupancy.

Rie new construction will follow all codes applicable to such




0 classification, including capacities, firestaire, floor loading,

etc. These requirements are too lengthly and unnecessary to

be copied in this report. For details one should refer to the

Southern Standard Building Code, SectionskOS, 402.4, Chapter

II, and Section 110.2 for specifies.




gTORATION REQUIREMENTS:
In the proposed rehabilitation of Peabody, the concept is

to restore the exterior as carefully as possible to its original

condition, while allowing it to function as a modern office

building on the interior. The building, because it has been

in constant daily use, is in'relatively good condition on the

exterior. However, there have been alterations to the interior

which are reflected, unflatteringly, on the exterior and should'

be removed or altered to be more sympathetic to the original

fabric. Also, there are examples of weathering and decay which

should be tended to immediately before they do much damage as

would require major restoration. Finally, there are many archit-

ectural features which have been removed from the building or

destroyed. These will be the main focus of the exterior restoration.

The following is a list of major and minor items on the exterior

and interior which should be considered in the restoration of

Peabody Hall.

1. Site Work: The site conditions immediately around Peabody

are in severe need of restoration. The parking area in the

front of the building should be removed in favor of parking

nearby (ie across Murphree Way or in new spaces located

at the east edge of the lawn behind Peabody), and the original




landscape plan of 1927 (fig. 37) restored. This should make

access to the building easier for pedestrians and bikers

and would provide a more pleasing setting for the building.

Walks and entrances should be planned to provide ease of acces

for bikes and the handicapped students in wheel chairs.

Existing bike racks (pic. 10) should be removed and an area

for thei storage and looking of bikes should be provided in

a more unobtrusive but accessible, location. Existing

ground planting around the base of Peabody (pics. 11-13)
should be removed to provide better air circulation and drying

of the ground and wall after periods of rain. Grading of

the ground to slope away from the structure may be necessary

to provide better drainage. All vines (pic 14) on the walls
should be removed permanently to prevent damage to the brick-

work. If ground plating is to be replaced it should be away

from the building by at least 3'-k' and trimmed (pic. 15)

and the roots pruned to prevent structural damage and promote'

air circulation.

Foundations: Since there are no discernable cracks in the walls,

we can assume the foundations are adequate for the building.

However, they should be checked for deterioration and the

conditions, if they exist, corrected.

Masonry: From a general examination, the masonry walls

seem to be in excellent repair, except in small isolated

spots, where water has drained on them (pic. 16). This could



















1 FY.. \o


~\c. \Z





F1 .I IS


) m. .

-I
?\ 18


. 8





PIt'. IS


we

"F k'.. 15


FY.. Pf





-:?E.0 10K
714 SS




be due to the lack of excessive freezing and heating and the

general good upkeep of the gutters which keep the water off
the walls. At one time the building sported a heavy amount

of ivy (fig. 38), which is almost all gone, except on the

north and northeast sections (pic. 17), that did not seem

to have damaged the joints (#ic 18). All the remaining ivy

and other vines should be removed to prevent its spread and

damage to the mortar joints. The brick and stonework should
be cleaned lightly, not using any chemicals or sandblasting.

A recommended procedure would be to place a flow of warm

water over the area to be cleaned for 12-24 hours then scrubbing

with wire brushes. This should be gentle enough to prevent

any damage to the brick and provide enough loosening of the
dirt to clean the building thoroughly. Most mortar joints

apprew to be in good condition; however, spot repointing

may be necessary and should be done before cleaning. The
new work should match exactly the existing conditions for

color and joint style.

. Restoration of Stone: Most of the finials have been broken

off (pics. 19-21), but several of both sizes remain (pic. 22).
These should be removed and used as molds or models for copies

also, some of the finials existing are in bad condition (pic.

23) and should be repaired to make them stable or replaced.
Other stonework, lintels, copings, and watertables hould be

checkedfor spauling and cracking (pic. 24) and mortar deter-

ioration (pic 25) and the conditions corrected.








".R-~.


A9'k.zl


"P 11




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs