Citation
CreekLine

Material Information

Title:
CreekLine
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Publisher:
RT Publishing, Inc., Rebecca Taus - Publisher
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- NW St. Johns County coverage
Coordinates:
30.03556 x -81.353054 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Creekline. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

page 24Puzzles page 19Get to Know . Jim Snellen page 5Take 5 Fourth annual Pet Supply Drive held this monthBy Martie Thompson editor@floridanewsline.com Pet Supply Drive cont. on pg. 19A Florida NewsLine Publication page 6Inquiring Minds want to know! July 2018 Volume 18 Issue 7Photo courtesy Martie ThompsonAll ages can donate supplies for pets in need during Florida NewsLines annual Pet Supply Drive, now through July 17. Its summer so that means its time for the fourth annual Florida NewsLine Pet Supply Drive, which will run until July 17. Once again this year, all items collected will be donated to First Coast No More Homeless Pets for its Pet Food Bank, which is staed completely by volunteers and operates out of the First Coast No More Homeless Pets Cassat Hospi-tal. Many local businesses in the St. Johns, Ponte Vedra, Nocatee and Mandarin areas have generously agreed to be collection sites for the Pet Supply Drive. Be sure to see the ad detailing the locations in this issue. ere is sure to be a location St. Johns County School Directory rfrntbrfntbn St. Johns County School District r f Advertise in our 2018-19Ad deadline July 9thDONT MISS IT! Advancing the Art & Science of 12525 Philips Hwy, Ste. 101, Jacksonville 7855 Argyle Forest Blvd, Ste. 701, Jacksonville 1541 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville 9191 R G Skinner Parkway, Ste. 202, Jacksonville 100 SR 13, Suite A, Saint Johns 1495 Kingsley Ave., Orange Park 200 Southpark Blvd., Ste. 207, St. Augustine 520 A1A North, Ste. 203, Ponte Vedra Beach The Nations Largest Dermatology Practice Beautiful Skin 866-400-DERM (3376) | AdvancedDerm.com ADCS-7.5x2-banner-ad-2017-R2.indd 1 12/6/17 1:00 PM Student homelessness has doubled in the past 10 years and former teacher Jennifer Smith is helping many students feel more loved and comfortable in the classroom. A major problem reported by Northeast Florida schools is a dysfunctional or forgotten lost and found system to serve its students. Personal belongings are lost daily and the majority of schools do not have the capacity to face the growing piles of clothing and supplies. Smith felt that these lost items could be utilized to meet the needs of students living in situ-ational pov-erty. e Giving Closet Project was de-veloped out of the desire to help schools revitalize their lost and found areas into successful donation centers for students in need throughout the community. I came up with the idea of laun-dering the lost and found clothes and then putting them neatly on hangers on a rack, so disadvantaged kids could select clothes for them-selves, Smith said. As a teacher for 15 years, Smith saw rst-hand the negative eect situational poverty can have on a childs success in school. Budget cuts and lack of resources food, school supplies, hygiene products or clothing have a detrimental impact on not only a students academic suc-cess, but also their social, emotional and behavioral growth at schools all across the area. e Giving Closet Project was born in April 2016 and is now a thriv-ing success for children in the community. Many schools in Duval and St. Johns County have requested e Giving Closet be avail-able at their school, but focus is cur-rently on the two schools already open along with gaining additional support. Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary in Jacksonville and e Webster School in St. Augustine are schools that oer a lo-Photos courtesy Jennifer SmithJennifer Smith with the board she created for One Spark. At The Webster School, lost and found items are first laundered and then put on hangers on a rack. The Giving Closet Project at The Webster School. repurposes unclaimed lost and found itemsBy Angela Higginbotham angela@floridanewsline.comcation for children to gather items they need. Lost and found items are picked up from many schools in the area to service these two locations. We feel really great about what we are doing and we are lling orders for thousands of students now, Smith said. During the next school year, we really want to spread more awareness in St. Johns County. An eort is being made to form a business model and develop as much awareness as possible. Events such as One Spark in Jacksonville have helped open doors and bring in new help and sponsors. I cant thank our sponsors like the Junior Service League and the Com-munity First Cares Founda-tion enough. We have a great board and great support so far, but to make the biggest impact, we need more help. We need more volunteers and space for storage and washing machines, Smith said. With an ever growing amount of inventory and children who need help, volunteers are critical and sponsors are vital to the success in reaching and helping as many children as possible. Visit www.givingclosetproject. org for more information and to learn how you can help.

PAGE 2

Page 2 | The CreekLine July 2018 rfPain, aching, numbness or heaviness in your legs could be symptoms of peripheral artery disease (PAD). The condition is caused by a lack of blood ow due to narrowed or blocked blood vessels. The good news is you dont have to live with leg pain. If you notice these symptoms, our physicians at Baptist Heart Specialists can help:1. Leg pain when walking2. Sores or wounds on the toes, feet or legs that heal slowly or not at all3. A pale or bluish color to the skin4. A lower temperature in one leg compared to the other5. Poor toenail growth and decreased hair growth on the legs Why live with pain? Call us today for an assessment at Baptist South. rfntbfnftrr (904) 810-1051 r f ntbnr rfn rfn tttbbtFighting Chance BJJ Cardio Kickboxing and Summer BootCamps r br

PAGE 3

The CreekLine July 2018 | Page 3 See pg. 16 for drop o locations & details! Drop offNOW! Pet Food & Supply Drive answers to puzzles on page 24 MYSTERY PHOTO Florida NewsLine 12443 San Jose Blvd., STE. 403 Jacksonville, FL 32223 (904) 886-4919 www.FloridaNewsLine.comThe CreekLine Community Newspaper is a free monthly publication distributed via bulk mail to all addresses in Zip Codes 32259 and selected routes in 32092 and 32095. Submission of articles and photographs are received by mail or email, although email to editor@FloridaNewsLine.com is preferred. The writers opinions do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Florida NewsLine. Advertising Rates are available by request. Florida NewsLine is not responsible for advertisement content or accuracy of information provided by its advertisers Nor does Florida NewsLine endorse any of the products or services included in this publication. Florida NewsLine reserves the right to refuse advertisement or copy from any advertiser. All rights are reserved and no portion of this publication may be copied without the express written consent of the publisher. 2018.Editor Martie Thompson Editor@FloridaNewsLine.comCreative Director Julie Gerona Graphics@FloridaNewsLine.comReporter Angela Higginbotham Angela@FloridaNewsLine.comBookkeeper Emily Whitehead Accounting@FloridaNewsLine.comSocial Media SocialMedia@FloridaNewsLine.com ? ? ? ?Can you guess where this is? Submit your answer to mail@FloridaNewsLine.com.Last months Mystery Photo was of Picolata Crossing Elementary School. Our winner was Laurie Misch.Advertising Sales Linda Gay Linda@FloridaNewsLine.comHeather Seay Heather@FloridaNewsLine.comAnswersPuzzles to our Table of Contents Call (904) 886-4919 for rates and information. Call Linda at (904) 607-5062 for rates and information. Dont Miss it! ITS COMING!St. Johns County School DirectoryYour ad seen by 50,000+ potential customers! rfrntbrfntbn St. Johns County School District r f Ask about advertising in our 2018-19Ad deadline July 9th You will be responsible for selling display advertising space in our print publications.Responsibilities: Grow advertising revenue with new and existing clients Create and deliver sales presentations to clients Be a farmer: discover new opportunities and provide solutions to new clients Answer customer inquiries in a timely and professional manner Organize client correspondence and paperwork Qualifications: Previous experience in sales, advertising, or other related field Strong negotiation skills Ability to build rapport with clients Eective verbal and written communication skills Ability to thrive in fast-paced environmentEMAIL RESUME TO: PUBLISHER@FLORIDANEWSLINE.COM Ponte Vedra NewsLineis looking for an Advertising Sales Representative! Come visit us today at the Pet Center! 130 N. Stratton Rd. St. Augustine, FL 32095 (904) 209-6190Ryan is a two-year-old male cat who was brought to the Pet Center as a stray. As this animal was a stray there may be some traits that are unknown at this time. Ryans adoption is sponsored by the Friends of the Pet Center. Sally loves to play ball! Shes a sweet eight-year-old German shepherd mix who was found stray. Shes heartworm positive, so the adoption fee is waived and the Friends of the Pet Center are willing to sponsor up to $250 towards the treatment of the heartworms. Meet Ryan! Meet Sally!4 Around Town 5 Take 5 6 Inquiring Minds 7 Your Vote Counts 9 St. Johns Business Monthly 10 Briefs 17 St. Johns County School District Monthly Calendar 22 Fishing 23 Gardening 23 Pantry Raiders 25 Community Marketplace 26 Travel

PAGE 4

Page 4 | The CreekLine July 2018 around town 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 celebrate the 4th!World Golf Village: Tuesday, July 3. Fireworks over the lake in the heart of World Golf Village begin at 9:15 p.m. Parking is $10 per vehicle. www.worldgolfimax.com Fireworks over the Matanzas: Wednesday, July 4. Festivities begin at 6 p.m. Fireworks over the bayfront between the Castillo de San Mar cos and the Bridge of Lions begin at 9:30 p.m. www.visitstaugustine.com American Pride 4th of July: Wednesday, July 4. Festivities begin at Moosehaven at 5 p.m. Fireworks over the St. Johns River begin at 9:20 p.m. www.moosehaven.org Downtown Jacksonville: Wednesday, July 4. Fireworks over the downtown riverfront will begin at 9:45 p.m. www.jaxhappenings.com Jacksonville Beach: Wednesday, July 4. Fireworks from the Jacksonville Beach Pier begin at 9 p.m. www.jacksonvillebeach.orgJulyS S M T W T F Marinela M. Nemetz, D.D.S.Robert J. Nemetz, D.D.S., M.S.| | Marinela M. Nemetz, D.D.S. www.nemetzdental.comWe are in-network providers with Metlife, Delta, Cigna, United Healthcare and most other PPO Plans.Mandarin South Business Center July 2Praying the Patriotic Rosary 7 p.m. San Juan del Rio Catholic Church, 1718 State Road 13 N All are welcome to join in prayers for our countryJuly 5U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-7 6:30 p.m. 8 p.m. St. Augustine Yacht Club near the St. Augustine Lighthouse pa@mysafeboating.comJuly 5Rotary Club of Bartram Trail 7:30 a.m. 8:30 a.m. (repeating event on Thursdays) Westminster Woods, 25 State Road lancedmalcolm@gmail.comJuly 6Rotary Club of St. Johns meeting 7:30 a.m. (repeating event on Fridays) St. Johns Golf and Country Club Clubhouse www.rotarystjohns.orgJuly 10 Aug. 14Free Quit Smoking Now Class Tuesdays, 6 p.m. 7 p.m. Flagler Hospital Wellness Center Call Florida AHEC to register (904) 482-0189July 10Friends of the Library meeting 6 p.m. 7 p.m. Bartram Trail Branch Library New members welcome; (904) 827-6960July 12Shorebird Walk at Matanzas Inlet with St. Johns County Audubon Society 9 a.m. 11 a.m. Matanzas Inlet West Parking Lot, 8655 A1A S., St Augustine www.stjohnsaudubon.comJuly 12Palencia Bridge Club plays Party Bridge 11 a.m. 3 p.m. (repeating event on Thursdays) Donovans Irish Pub, 7440 US Highway 1 Diane Tamplin, (904) 808-7326July 14Friends of the Library Book Sale 9:30 a.m. 12 p.m. Bartram Trail Branch Library (904) 827-6960July 14Teen Craft Hour: Peppermint bath salts 3 p.m. 4 p.m. Bartram Trail Branch Library RSVP: (904) 827-6960July 14St. Johns Chapter of the Catholic Writers Guild 10 a.m. 12 p.m. St. Pauls Catholic Church school auditorium, 2609 Park St. www.dosafl.com/outreach/catholic-writersguild/ or writerrod@comcast.net July 16Summer Movie for Kids: Leap! 3 p.m. Bartram Trail Branch Library (904) 827-6960July 16All Star Quilt Guild 9:45 a.m. First Christian Church, 11924 San Jose Blvd. www.orgsites.com/fl/allstarquiltguild or (904) 502-5254July 17St. Johns Federated Republican Women meeting Forum featuring candidates for County Commissioner and School Board 6:30 p.m. social/7 p.m. forum 100 E. Town Place, World Golf Village sjfedrepublicanwomen@gmail.comJuly 17North Business Council of the St. Johns County Chamber of Commerce 8 a.m. 9 a.m. Westminster Woods on Julington Creek, 25 State Road 13 Register at www.sjcchamber.com or call (904) 829-5681July 17St. Johns CARES meeting 7 p.m. Bartram Academy, 164 Everest Lane, Ste. 1 www.stjohnscares.orgJuly 17World Golf Village Toastmasters 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. First Florida Credit Union, 1950 County Road 210W Worldgolfvillage.toastmastersclubs.orgJuly 17Happy Hookers crochet group 6 p.m. 8 p.m. Bartram Trail Branch Library (904) 827-6960July 18LEGO Club for Kids 3 p.m. 4 p.m. Bartram Trail Branch Library (904) 827-6960July 19Adult Coloring Club 10:30 a.m. 12 p.m. Bartram Trail Branch Library (904) 827-6960July 20First Coast Newcomers Club board games and lunch 1 p.m. Coee Cafe, St. Augustine Limited to 10; RSVP (904) 829-0643 July 21Fruit Cove Cruise In sponsored by Sunshine State Chevelles 4 p.m. 8 p.m. PDQ parking lot, 194 State Road 13 Repeating event on third Saturday of each month (904) 827-6960 July 27Helping Hands of St. Johns County 10 a.m. First Florida Credit Union, 1950 County Road 210W jacqphil@aol.comJuly 30Primary Election Voter Registration or Party Change deadline for voters www.sjcvotes.us

PAGE 5

The CreekLine July 2018 | Page 5 take Photo by MetroCreative 904-825-0540 www .oastaug .com 3055 CR -210 W est, Suite 110 St. Johns, FL 32259 o CONVENIENTL Y LOCA TED ON CR -210 o SAME & NEXT D A Y APPOINTMENTS o CHILDREN & ADUL TS WELCOME QUALITY ORTHOP AEDIC CARE FOR THE WHOLE F AMIL Y Vilano boat ramp undergoes improvementParking at the Vilano boat ramp will be intermittently impacted through August due to projects that will con-struct a marine rescue docking facility and repair two oating docks damaged in Hurricane Irma. While a portion of the parking lot will be utilized as a staging area, a majority of the parking will remain open to public use. e boat ramp will also remain open and accessible to the public throughout the project. Boaters and visitors are encour-aged to exercise caution while utilizing the facility during this time. Visit www. sjc.us for periodic updates and call (904) 209-0382 or email tmeyer@sjc. us for additional information.Summer movie announced for kids at Bartram Trail Branch Librarye Bartram Trail Branch Library will show the movie, Leap! (2017, rated PG) in its Summer Movies for Kids series on Monday, July 16 beginning at 3 p.m. e movie is about an orphan girl who dreams of becoming a ballerina and ees her rural Brittany for Paris, where she passes for someone else and accedes to the position of pupil at the Grand Opera house. Kids are welcome to bring in favorite pillows, blankets, quilts, and beach towels to get comfy on the oor; covered drinks and their own favorite foods are also welcome. Light snacks will be provided thanks to the Friends of the Library.Crafters needede Mandarin United Methodist Womens 29th annual Fall Craft Festival will be held on Saturday, Oct. 6, 2018 at the church. located at 11270 San Jose Blvd. More than 100 crafters typically participate; interested crafters should contact Darlene at dhc1015@bellsouth. net for additional information. Helping Hands to meet on July 27School supplies will be collected at the July 27 monthly meeting of Helping Hands of St. Johns County. e group will meet from 10 a.m. 12 p.m. at Faith Community Church, 3450 CR 210 W. Helping Hands of St. Johns County is a volunteer organization started in 2006 that meets the last Friday of each month. ere are no dues, ocers or stress. Members come when they can and do what they can with what is donated. Helping Hands is fortunate to have many community partners and could not exist without their help through donations of goods and services. Email jacqphil@aol.com for more information. Jacksonville Area Afternoon Golf Tour accepting new memberse Jacksonville Area After-noon Golf Tour is seeking local ama-teur golfers who would like to play one to two days per week (weekdays and weekends) around 1 p.m. at the following courses: Amelia River Golf Club, Bent Creek Golf Club, Blue Sky Golf Club, Cimarrone Golf Club, Eagle Harbor Golf Club, Eagle Landing Golf Club, Fernandina Beach Golf Club, Ju-lington Creek Golf Club, King & Bear at WGV, Magnolia Point Golf Club, North Hampton Golf Club, Royal St. Augustine, Saint Augustine Shores, St. Johns Golf & Country Club, Saint Johns Golf Club, Slammer & Squire at WGV, South Hampton Golf Club, and Windsor Parke Golf Club. e tour goes on continuously and year-round, so golfers can join for free anytime. No handicap is necessary and all skill levels are welcome. Play as little or as much as you want; you pay only when you play. Email JaxGolfTour@gmail.com for more information.

PAGE 6

Page 6 | The CreekLine July 2018 Inquiring Mindswant to know!By Martie Thompson editor@floridanewsline.com ??Are you puzzled about something going on in NW St. Johns County or won-dering about whatever happened on a topic from a previous issue? Email your question to us at editor@oridanewsline.com by the fth of the month and we will do our best to track down the information for you. While we will do our best to answer all the questions we receive, we may not be able to answer all questions received each month. Also, due to publication scheduling, the time it takes to research answers may vary. Here are answers to questions we received this month:Q: Do you know any update on the Project Family indoor sports facility that is supposed to be built on Race Track Road near the new Durbin Park development?A: We reached out to Della Wolfe, director of marketing for this project, which is set to include two indoor turf elds suitable for football, lacrosse and soccer as well as another eld for baseball and softball. Wolfe told us that they have been diligently working with the Army Corps of Engineers to develop a site plan that will have the least amount of impact on the wetlands located on the property and that as soon as this is resolved, they will be moving forward with the project. Wolfe also said, In the meantime, we have opened a 75,000 sq. ft. sports fa-cility o Baymeadows Road that currently houses 12 volleyball courts (home to JJVA), one basketball court and indoor turf and batting cages. is smaller version of the new project ignites much excitement about moving forward with Project Family in St. Johns County. According to Suzanne Konchan, AICP, Growth Management Director for St. Johns County, Project Family received its concurrency approval by St. Johns County last October. with St. Johns County Commissioner Jimmy Johns, (District 1) Q A Q: What is the latest news from the County Commission?A: Right now, it is raining requests for money everything from beach renourishment to the School Board to people requesting their drainage issues be xed. We are in budget season and our Oce of Management and Budget is saying we should not spend all of our cash reserves. For instance, we have only received one-third of the reim-bursement amount we expect to receive from FEMA from the hurricanes. is reimbursement process is working, but it is working slowly so we have a cash ow issue. So we are looking at the budget for next year and asking, where is the money going to come from?Q: What do you consider to be a big budget challenge?A: One challenge is we have a lot of deferred maintenance, such as for roads and storm drainage. People are legiti-mately concerned about these items, but there is no easy x. With drainage, for example, there are more than 30 issues that have been problems for years. ese will take months if not years to nd im-provements and some will never really have a solution, since the issues are the result of topography, for example. One thing we have done with new roadways associated with new development con-struction is to reduce the percentage of homes needed to be built and put in a time limit so that roads will be built sooner rather than later in the develop-ment timeline.Q: Today is June 18, the day before the County Commission meeting at which commissioners will consider the request of the St. Johns County School Board to bear some of the expense of complying with the school safety act. Can you give us some insights on your thoughts on this as of today?A: At the joint meeting we had with the School Board earlier this month, we heard from the sheri that he cannot hire enough ocers in time to comply with the law. Additionally, we have heard that there is a signicant dier-ence of opinion between the school board and the state as to whether there is sucient funding. I felt we needed a clear understanding as to what direction we are running before we run. I think the issue is a complex mental health issue and not a gun issue, as some of the schools that were targeted had armed ocers on site. Unfortunately, people who are intent on harming other people will do so. We need to address this problem where it initiates; how do we stop the violence?Q: But the school board is required by law to have an armed oicer at each school by the beginning of next school year. A: As far as what the nancial respon-sibility of the County Commission is, I would say that we have a limited amount of money to spend. If we have $1 million that we can share with the school board, why are we not spending it on the deferred maintenance or drain-age issues as I mentioned earlier? Its not a matter of not wanting to partner with the school board. Let me be clear that I am not putting a dollar value on lives. But I believe we are limited by human and nancial resources and the county commission has to try to meet all of our communitys needs. is is why it is so important for us to hear from the citizens. What is important to you for us to spend money on and how should we get the money to pay for it?Q: What is the best way for our readers to contact you?A: Readers can email me at bcc1jjohns@ sjc.us or call me at (904) 615-7437. Health Wellness Check Caregivers You Can TrustWe specialize in non-medical care and daily living assistanceWeekly, bi-weekly, monthly Custom plans for you or an elderly parent www.healthwellnesscheck.comrrfrnrrtbtrtrrr t Wellness check Home safety check Personal care/Assist with ADL Medications/Meal Assistance Light housework/Laundry Errands/Shopping Pet assistance Summer Spectacular Sale Sugar Bear Antiques MallrfrntbrtrrJuly 13th-15thRefreshments Served www.sugarbearmall.com rrfntb rfntbrfnbbtt Come experience the LARGEST cast ever! 35 singers, dancers, actors! Private Lessons on ALL Instruments for ALL Ages Community Band | Orchestra | Jazz Band 8 performances/two weekends. 2 Friday, 2 Saturday nights 8pm and 2 Saturday, 2 Sunday matinees 2pm H e ll o D o ll y !P e r f o r m anc e s : A p r i l 1 4 2 3Join the NFC as we proudly present Client: NE Florida Conservatory Contact: Richard A Dickson Ad Rep: Heather Ph: E-mail: richardadickson@comcast.net Ad Size: 1/4TODAYS DATESpelling of Company Name Phone number Address Coupon Expiration date (if applicable) Ad CopyPlease verify and initial:SIGNATURE REQUIREDCHECK ONE PLEASEApproved AS IS Approved WITH CHANGESPlease Approve Ad or send changes by 1/24/17I have seen and checked the attached proof.By signing/emailing approval you accept responsibility of ANY error that may occur on your ad. It is your opportunity to catch any error made during the production of your ad. Local Community News, Inc. IS NOT responsible for any error not marked after approval. No adjustments will be made to invoice amount. PLEASE REVIEW CAREFULLYMandarin NewsLineMARCH 2017 H e ll o D o ll y !P e r f o r m an c e s : A p r i l 1 4 2 3Join the NFC as we proudly present July 20-29Reserved Seating/tickets: Showtixnow.com All tickets $20!Sponsored by HASKELLLIVE 15-piece orchestra. Join the NFC as we proudly present

PAGE 7

The CreekLine July 2018 | Page 7 with Beverly Slough, St. Johns County School Board Member, District 1 Q A FYI Contact Numbers St. Johns County Local Government (www.sjcfl.us) Sheris Oice: (904) 824-8304 Sheri David B. Shoar, dshoar@sjso.org Julington Creek Field Oice: (904) 209-2150 Property Appraiser: (904) 827-5500 Eddie Creamer, sjcpa@sjcpa.us Supervisor of Elections: (904) 823-2238 Vicky Oakes, voakes@votesjc.com Tax Collector: (904) 209-2250 Dennis Hollingworth, taxcollector@sjctax.us Clerk of Court: (904) 819-3600 Hunter S. Conrad St. Johns County Board of County Commissioners District 1: (904) 209-0301 Jimmy Johns, bcc1jjohns@sjcfl.us District 2: (904) 209-0302 Jeb Smith, bcc2jsmith@sjcfl.us District 3: (904) 209-0303 Paul Waldron, bccd3pwaldron@sjcfl.us District 4: (904) 209-0304 Jay Morris, bccd4@sjcfl.us District 5: (904) 209-0305 Henry Dean, bccd5hdean@sjcfl.us St. Johns County School Board (www.stjohns.k12.fl.us) District 1: (904) 547-7510 Beverly Slough, beverly.slough@stjohns.k12.fl.us District 2: (904) 547-7510 Tommy Allen, tommy.allen@stjohns.k12.fl.us State of Florida Elected Oicials State House District 17: (904) 823-2300 Representative Cyndi Stevenson, Cyndi.Stevenson@myfloridahouse.gov, State Senate District 7: (386) 446-7610 Senator Travis Hutson Federal Elected Oicials U.S. Congress District 4: Representative John Rutherford, (202) 225-2501 U..S. Senate: Senator Bill Nelson, (202) 224-5274 Senator Marco Rubio, (202) 224-3041 @ Estate Planning Wills Trusts Probate Guardianship Over 20 Years Legal Experience 904-665-0005 www.preddylaw.com12627 San Jose Blvd. Ste. 102 (Just north of the Julington Creek Bridge) Blondes have more fun! 12627 San Jose Blvd., Suite 602 Jacksonville, FL 32223904-800-2459 www.strandz-hair.comWe proudly carry: Q: Can you give us an update as of today (June 15) about what the St. Johns County School District is doing to comply with the school safety act?A: We just had a joint meeting with the Board of County Commissioners where we presented our plan and asked for their help. Currently we have 15 Youth Resource Ocers that the school dis-trict and the sheris oce jointly pay for. is leaves us a gap of 28 ocers in order to have one on each school campus. Q: What is the plan that you presented?A: We asked the Board of County Commissioners to provide funds for the capital outlay (cars, guns) for these 28 ocers and we oered to pay all of the salaries. ey would be St. Johns County Sheris Oce employees and the sheri oered to provide training. ese ocers would work for the school district for 180 days plus summer school each year and then for SJSO for the remainder. e Board of County Commissioners has a meeting on June 19 at which they will vote on this pro-posal. I am hopeful that it will pass.Q: Would all these oicers be hired by the beginning of the school year as required by the law?A: No. So, as a stopgap measure, the school board has authorized the super-intendent to negotiate a contract with a security company to provide armed guards in the interim, possibly up to a year. ere are security companies with guards who are specially trained to work on school campuses and these are the companies we will be negotiating with. We are taking great care to ensure that the guards we hire will be best suited to protect our children.Q: What would you say to parents who might be nervous about having armed guards who are not sheris deputies on campuses?A: We are required by law to have an armed guard or ocer on every campus beginning the rst day of school. e law also requires the guards to have spe-cic training and psychological screen-ings and these are the types of guards we would hire. is is the closest thing to a deputy we will be able to have in this interim period. Im well pleased that we have a plan to get one guard on each campus for safety of our students.Q: What do you know so far about this years standardized test results?A: Im very pleased. We have prelimi-nary numbers and St. Johns County is rst in the state in all measures of reading and most measures of math. We are also No. 1 in EOC (End of Course) exams. e hard work of our students and teachers has yielded great results.Q: Any other updates?A: e new schools are very close to completion. All of our principals are working on hiring additional sta as the school district continues to grow. We had 5 percent growth last year and we anticipate about the same this year about 1,000 more students.Q: How can our readers contact you?A: ey can email me at beverly. slough@stjohns.k12..us or call me at (904) 547-7510.Your Vote CountsElections ahead By St. Johns County Supervisor of Elections Vicky OakesCandidate qualifying ended June 22 at noon and the races for the upcoming Aug. 28 Primary Election are set. Visit votesjc.com for a complete listing of the candidates. e candidate list will include all federal, state and local races that will appear on the ballot. As a reminder, Florida is a closed Pri-mary State. is means that only voters who are registered members of a politi-cal party which has candidates on the primary ballot may vote for that partys candidates in a primary election. Voters with no party aliation (NPA) are not eligible to vote for party candidates in a primary election;however, all qualied voters regardless of party aliation or no party aliation can vote on Nonpar-tisan judicial and school board oces. Know your party aliation. It aects the ballot you receive in the Primary and the races in which you are eligible to vote. July 30 is the last day to register to vote or make party changes for the Primary Election. Its now easier than ever to register to vote or update your registra-tion. Online voter registration is now available on our website. You can also verify your voter registration, make changes to your party aliation, check and update your address, request a vote by mail ballot, locate your polling place, and view your sample ballot by selecting My Voter Status. You can also register to vote or submit voter registration applications in person at any public library or the Tax Col-lectors Oce located at the annexes. Address changes can be made any time. Simply call the oce at (904) 823-2238 to update your address or use the online form on our website. It is very important to keep your in-formation updated with the Elections Oce in order to receive your sample ballots. ey will be mailed approxi-mately three weeks prior to the election to every registered voter, and are also Your Vote Counts cont. on pg. 15 Donald J. Levine, MD, Jaime Kibler, DO, and Katherine Wilson, PA-C, rfnt bttttttttf tttttt tttrtrf trttftfttfttf t Baptist Health tt r rtr tt ttttr t tFinding the right doctor just got easier.BAPTIST PRIMARY CARE WELCOMES NICOLE FIFER, PA-C, TO ITS JULINGTON CREEK LOCATION.bbttttf rttfttfft btbtbtbttb rtrtbttttf ftttttttf ttbtbtbt tttfrfnntbtNow accepting new patients. Same day appointments available.Baptist Primary Care Julington Creek 1400 Bishop Estates Road St. Johns, FL 32259904.287.2794baptistprimarycare.net Baptist Health Baptist Health

PAGE 8

Page 8 | The CreekLine July 2018 Home-field advantage.1706752State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company, State Farm Fire and Casualty Company, Bloomington, ILI understand you work really hard for your home and car, and Im here to help protect them. Stop in or call me today. Don Haneline, Agent 196 Everest Lane Suite 3 Saint Johns, FL 32259 Bus: 904-615-1415 InsureWithDon.com Mon Fri: 9 AM 5 PM Sat: 9 AM 12 PM After Hours by AppointmentLocated in the Promenade at Bartram Springs, Race Track Rd. & Bartram Springs Pkwy. The Sheri ReportsBy St. Johns County Sheri David B. ShoarHurricane awareness Hurricane season began at the beginning of last month and lasts until the end of November and meteorologists are call-ing for a near or above normal amount of storms this year. ey predict a total of 10 to 16 named tropical storms, of which ve to nine will be hurricanes with winds greater than 74 mph, and one to four major hurricanes with winds greater than 115 mph. You should be familiar with the terms Hurricane Watch and Hurricane Warn-ing. A Watch is issued when conditions are favorable that a hurricane could strike in 36 hours. A Warning is issued when hurricane force winds are expected to strike in 24 hours. By this time you should already have an emergency plan for yourself and family and begin implementation of that plan. Some things to consider in your prelimi-nary plans are: Take photos of your property from all angles; it may not look the same once the storm passes. Plan for elderly/handicapped/invalid care at a shelter or at home. Learn which routes will be safe during a storm. Learn where ocial shelters are located. Trim any dead wood from trees prior to the storm. Check for, x or take note of loose items on your structures (shutters, screens, eaves, gutters, antennas, satellites). Plan what you and your family will do if you have to evacuate. Get necessary supplies and secure them in safe area. Plan for pet care. Review your insurance coverage and protect important documents. Show others in the family how to turn o/on gas, electricity, and water. Make outside repairs. When a Hurricane Watch for your area is issued you should do the following: Listen to ocial bulletins on radio, TV, or NOAA Weather Radio, and internet for updates. Check all supplies you already have to see if they are in satisfactory condition, including batteries. Fill gas tank of vehicles, check oil and tire pressure. Inspect mobile home tie-downs. Board, tape, and cover windows and doors or skylights. Secure boat. Secure any objects and furniture that are outside. Check on all medical supplies, special needs for elderly, handicapped, etc. Plan to evacuate if necessary. When a Hurricane Warning is issued here are some suggestions: Stay tuned to TV, radio, internet or NOAA Weather Radio. Move valuables to higher location Move furniture away from windows and cover. Fill containers (bathtub, plastic jugs) with drinking water. Use phones only in an emergency. Bring in/secure pets (food & water). Shut o water and electricity at main breaker switch. Leave mobile homes. Leave low areas. If evacuating, leave early. Sometimes a hurricane path may not be predictable and evacuation orders could come at any time. If you are asked to evacuate, please do so early and know the route you will be taking. Remember there will be many folks taking the same route from a very large area so be sure to give yourself plenty of time to leave safely. Finally, if you refuse to leave following an evacuation order, here are some safety tips for riding out the storm: Turn the refrigerator to maximum cold. Freeze water in plastic containers; if the electricity goes o you can use the ice to keep food cold in the refrigerator. Turn o utilities if told to do so by the authorities. Unplug small appliances. Fill bathtub and containers with water. Stay indoors in a small interior room, hallway, or closet. Prepare for storm surge and possible ooding. Plan what to do if the winds become too strong. Stay away from windows and doors, even if covered. Close all inside doors, brace exterior doors. If you have a two-story house, stay on the rst oor. Lie on the oor or under a table or other sturdy object. Now is the time to go over your hurricane preparedness. If you have not made any emergency plans, you should do them The Sheri Reports cont. on pg. 14 1030 N. Ponce de Leon Blvd. St. Augustine, FL 32084 904.824.9402 Our attorneys are here to help you right whats wrong. At Canan Law, our mission is to provide intelligent, creative and successful legal services. We are serious trial lawyers, and we will go to court to litigate legal issues that can affect your future. Accidents Collisions

PAGE 9

St. Johns Business Monthly | Page 9 M onthl y ST JOHNS rf By Scott Grant ScottGrant@StJohnsBusinessMonthly.comMarket Insight A peculiar theory M onthl y ST JOHNS r rfrntfbfbfffntbf ffntbf ffntbf Chance OwenFinancial Advisor.605 Sr 13n Ste 101 Fruit Cove, FL 32259 904-230-3385 Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 05/09/2018. CDs offered by Edward Jones are bank-issued and FDIC-insured up to $250,000 (principal and interest accrued but not yet paid) per depositor, per insured depository institution, for each account ownership category. Please visit www.fdic.gov or contact your financial advisor for additional information. Subject to availability and price change. CD values are subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of CDs can decrease. If CDs are sold prior to maturity, the investor can lose principal value. FDIC insurance does not cover losses in market value. Early withdrawal may not be permitted. Yields quoted are net of all commissions. CDs require the distribution of interest and do not allow interest to compound. CDs offered through Edward Jones are issued by banks and thrifts nationwide. All CDs sold by Edward Jones are registered with the Depository Trust Corp. (DTC). 1.95 2.20 2.75 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 6-month 1-year 2-year Annual Percentage Yield (APY) eective 06/14/2018. CDs oered by Edward Jones are bank-issued and FDIC-insured up to $250,000 (principal and interest accrued but not yet paid) per depositor, per insured depository institution, for each account ownership category. Please visit www.fdic. gov or contact your nancial advisor for additional information. Subject to availability and price change. CD values are subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of CDs can decrease. If CDs are sold prior to maturity, the investor can lose principal value. FDIC insurance does not cover losses in market value. Early withdrawal may not be permitted. Yields quoted are net of all commissions. CDs require the distribution of interest and do not allow interest to compound. CDs oered through Edward Jones are issued by banks and thrifts nationwide. All CDs sold by Edward Jones are registered with the Depository Trust Corp. (DTC). r rfrntfbfbfffntbf ffntbf ffntbf Chance OwenFinancial Advisor.605 Sr 13n Ste 101 Fruit Cove, FL 32259 904-230-3385 Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 05/09/2018. CDs offered by Edward Jones are bank-issued and FDIC-insured up to $250,000 (principal and interest accrued but not yet paid) per depositor, per insured depository institution, for each account ownership category. Please visit www.fdic.gov or contact your financial advisor for additional information. Subject to availability and price change. CD values are subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of CDs can decrease. If CDs are sold prior to maturity, the investor can lose principal value. FDIC insurance does not cover losses in market value. Early withdrawal may not be permitted. Yields quoted are net of all commissions. CDs require the distribution of interest and do not allow interest to compound. CDs offered through Edward Jones are issued by banks and thrifts nationwide. All CDs sold by Edward Jones are registered with the Depository Trust Corp. (DTC). 1.95 2.20 2.75 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 6-month 1-year 2-year r rfr ntfbfbfffntbf ffntbf ffntbf Chance OwenFinancial Advisor.605 Sr 13n Ste 101 Fruit Cove, FL 32259 904-230-3385 Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 05/09/2018. CDs offered by Edward Jones are bank-issued and FDIC-insured up to $250,000 (principal and interest accrued but not yet paid) per depositor, per insured depository institution, for each account ownership category. Please visit www.fdic.gov or contact your financial advisor for additional information. Subject to availability and price change. CD values are subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of CDs can decrease. If CDs are sold prior to maturity, the investor can lose principal value. FDIC insurance does not cover losses in market value. Early withdrawal may not be permitted. Yields quoted are net of all commissions. CDs require the distribution of interest and do not allow interest to compound. CDs offered through Edward Jones are issued by banks and thrifts nationwide. All CDs sold by Edward Jones are registered with the Depository Trust Corp. (DTC). 1.95 2.20 2.75 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 6-month 1-year 2-year r rfrntfbfbfffntbf ffntbf ffntbf Chance OwenFinancial Advisor.605 Sr 13n Ste 101 Fruit Cove, FL 32259 904-230-3385 Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 05/09/2018. CDs offered by Edward Jones are bank-issued and FDIC-insured up to $250,000 (principal and interest accrued but not yet paid) per depositor, per insured depository institution, for each account ownership category. Please visit www.fdic.gov or contact your financial advisor for additional information. Subject to availability and price change. CD values are subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of CDs can decrease. If CDs are sold prior to maturity, the investor can lose principal value. FDIC insurance does not cover losses in market value. Early withdrawal may not be permitted. Yields quoted are net of all commissions. CDs require the distribution of interest and do not allow interest to compound. CDs offered through Edward Jones are issued by banks and thrifts nationwide. All CDs sold by Edward Jones are registered with the Depository Trust Corp. (DTC). 1.95 2.20 2.75 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 6-month 1-year 2-year r rfr ntfbfbfffntbf ffntbf ffntbf Chance OwenFinancial Advisor.605 Sr 13n Ste 101 Fruit Cove, FL 32259 904-230-3385 Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 06/14/2018. CDs offered by Edward Jones are bank-issued and FDIC-insured up to $250,000 (principal and interest accrued but not yet paid) per depositor, per insured depository institution, for each account ownership category. Please visit www.fdic.gov or contact your financial advisor for additional information. Subject to availability and price change. CD values are subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of CDs can decrease. If CDs are sold prior to maturity, the investor can lose principal value. FDIC insurance does not cover losses in market value. Early withdrawal may not be permitted. Yields quoted are net of all commissions. CDs require the distribution of interest and do not allow interest to compound. CDs offered through Edward Jones are issued by banks and thrifts nationwide. All CDs sold by Edward Jones are registered with the Depository Trust Corp. (DTC). 1.95 2.30 2.80$1,000 $1000 $1000 3-month 1-year 2-year Wells Fargo Advisors is a trade name used by Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC, Member SIPC, a registered broker-dealers and Investment and Insurance Products: NOT FDIC Insured NO Bank Guarantee MAY Lose Value Beth Shealy Financial Advisor 13750 Old St. Augustine Road, Jacksonville, FL 32258 (904)367-4677 | beth.shealy@wellsfargo.com | www.wfadvisors.com/beth.shealy >](\003\034v\003^P] \003 \021]v\003 r \003 \034]\003^] \003 toZ\003W]}v\003^P] \003 \003 Beth Shealy Financial Advisor 13750 Old St. Augustine Road, Jacksonville, FL 32258 | (904) 367 4677 | beth.shealy@wellsfargo.com | ww.wfadvisors.com/beth.shealy Investment and Insurance Products: NOT FDIC Insured NO Bank Guarantee MAY Lose Value Wells Fargo Advisors is a trade name used by Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC, Member SIPC, a registered broker dealers and non bank affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company. 6 Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC. All rights reserved. CAR 0418 03698 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 Z]uv\003Wovv]vP \003 \034\003Wovv]vP\003^P] \003 >](\003\034v\003^P] \003 \021]v\003 r \003 \034]\003^] \003 Beth Shealy Financial Advisor 13750 Old St. Augustine Road, Jacksonville, FL 32258 | (904) 367 4677 | beth.shealy@wellsfargo.com | ww.wfadvisors.com/beth.shealy Investment and Insurance Products: NOT FDIC Insured NO Bank Guarantee MAY Lose Value Wells Fargo Advisors is a trade name used by Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC, Member SIPC, a registered broker dealers and non bank affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company. 6 Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC. All rights reserved. CAR 0418 03698 Beth Shealy Financial Advisor 13750 Old St. Augustine Road, Jacksonville, FL 32258 | (904) 367 4677 | beth.shealy@wellsfargo.com | ww.wfadvisors.com/beth.shealy Investment and Insurance Products: NOT FDIC Insured NO Bank Guarantee MAY Lose Value Wells Fargo Advisors is a trade name used by Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC, Member SIPC, a registered broker dealers and non bank affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company. 6 Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC. All rights reserved. CAR 0418 03698 toZ\003W]}v\003^P] \003 \003 Beth Shealy Financial Advisor 13750 Old St. Augustine Road, Jacksonville, FL 32258 | (904) 367 4677 | beth.shealy@wellsfargo.com | ww.wfadvisors.com/beth.shealy Investment and Insurance Products: NOT FDIC Insured NO Bank Guarantee MAY Lose Value Wells Fargo Advisors is a trade name used by Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC, Member SIPC, a registered broker dealers and non bank affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company. 6 Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC. All rights reserved. CAR 0418 03698 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 Z]uv\003Wovv]vP \003 \034\003Wovv]vP\003^P] \003 >](\003\034v\003^P] \003 \021]v\003 r \003 \034]\003^] \003 toZ\003W]}v\003^P] \003 \003 Beth Shealy Financial Advisor 13750 Old St. Augustine Road, Jacksonville, FL 32258 | (904) 367 4677 | beth.shealy@wellsfargo.com | ww.wfadvisors.com/beth.shealy Investment and Insurance Products: NOT FDIC Insured NO Bank Guarantee MAY Lose Value Wells Fargo Advisors is a trade name used by Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC, Member SIPC, a registered broker dealers and non bank affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company. 6 Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC. All rights reserved. CAR 0418 03698 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 \003 Making Mortgages Easier Every DayIan B. MacDonald | Construction Perm Loan Specialist | NMLS ID: 546443 904.626.0353 (C) | ian.macdonald@regions.com 130 St. Johns Commons | St. Johns, FL 32259 Specializing in: Construction/Renovation Perm Financing Doctor/ Dentist/ Medical Professional Home Loans VA Home Loans Prudential Financial Planning Services Andrew Laino, CLU, CFP, CLTC Financial Planner CA Insurance License Number 0E93910 701 San Marco Blvd, Jacksonville, FL, 32207 904-313-4553 Comprehensive Financial Planning O ering nancial planning and investment advisory services through Pruco Securities, LLC (Pruco), doing business as Prudential Financial Planning Services (PFPS), pursuant to separate client agreement. O ering insurance and securities products and services as a registered representative of Pruco, and an agent of issuing insurance companies. 0223493-00005-00 Hurricane preparedness tipsBy Marge Cirillo mail@floridanewsline.comIn 1854, a cholera epidemic threatened the residents of the west-end London suburb of Soho. Soho was not the swanky shopping and dining district it is today. It was a slum. Hundreds would die of the disease. Medical experts believed that the disease was transmitted by miasma, or bad air. Public health ocials urged the public to avoid sleeping in cold air, to be temperate in eating and drinking, to avoid raw vegetables and fruit, and the consumption of cold water when overheated. None of these things cause the transmittal of cholera. One man set out to nd the real cause of the dreaded disease. His name was John Snow and he was the son of a common laborer. At an early age, Snow had demonstrated an aptitude for mathematics. As a result, he found himself apprenticed to a doctor at the age of 14. Eleven years later he became a surgeon. Snow rejected the common belief that diseases such as cholera were transmitted by pollution or diseased air. He believed the disease was trans-mitted by water tainted by sewage. Snow began to laboriously map every cholera death in London that year, all 616 of them. Snows hand drawn map demonstrated that all the deaths had occurred within a short distance of a single well, the Broad Street well in Soho. Snow theorized, correctly, that it was water from the well that was causing the epidemic. e chief physi-cian for the city of London called the new theory peculiar. Nonetheless, the Broad Street well was closed, and the cholera outbreak ended. Later it was shown that sewage was leaking into the well. In one long summer of research, Snow had discovered the cause of cholera, saved hundreds of innocent lives, and invented the science of epidemiology. Epidemiology is the study of the dis-tribution and determinants of disease. Snows methodology is still used by or-ganizations like the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organi-zation to this day. e medical com-munity was reluctant to accept Snows ndings. He would be vindicated, but only in death. Human beings are often resistant to change. Innovators are often stone-walled by the establishment. People laughed at the light bulb, the airplane, and the personal computer. e British Parliament declared of Edisons light bulb that it might be good enough for our Transatlantic friends... but unwor-thy of the attention of practical or sci-entic men. As investors, we need to embrace change in order to prot from changes in the way we live. Change is going to happen whether we like it or not. So, stay open to innovative ideas, even the peculiar ones. Scott A. Grant is President of Standfast Asset Management in Ponte Vedra Beach. He welcomes your comments or questions at scottg@standfastic.com. e Florida Small Business Develop-ment Council (FSBDC) exists to provide assistance with marketing and business plans for small businesses. Here are some hurricane preparedness tips for businesses: Develop a Comprehensive Plan. An eective hurricane survival plan should be written down and reviewed annually. is plan should address policies and procedures for employee safety regard-ing hurricanes, business continuity and contingency plans in the face of damage to the businesss facilities and policies for dealing with employees, customers and vendors. Some of the key elements of an eective plan are: Conditions that will activate the plan Chain of command Emergency functions and who will perform them Specic evacuation procedures, including routes and exits Procedures for accounting for per-sonnel, customers and visitors Equipment for personnel Determine procedures and individual crisis management responsibilities. Iden-tify which personnel are required to be on-site in the days surrounding a hurri-cane, as well as who is essential to busi-ness function, whether required on-site or not. Be sure to communicate areas of accountability and responsibility for key personnel and how to perform their emergency-response duties eectively. Coordinate with others. Understand the hurricane response plans of other busi-nesses in your area as well as police, re department, hospitals, and utility com-panies. It is also helpful to communicate with suppliers, shippers, and others with whom you regularly do business. Prepare employees. Communicate your hurricane plan with all your sta; obtain all emergency contact numbers for employees and ensure understanding of roles, responsibilities and expectations for every employee. Review emergency plans annually. Assess changes in your business or to the community that may aect your hurricane response plan and make the necessary changes each year. Marge Cirillo is the Florida Small Busi-ness Development Council consultant for St. Johns County. She can be reached at m.cirillo@unf.edu or (904) 209-1295.

PAGE 10

Page 10 | The CreekLine July 2018 Briefs 108 Bartram Oaks Walk Drive Suite 201 St. Johns, FL 32259rfntbbn Introducing Venus Versa Treatments! Imagine reversing the signs of sun damage and tightening your skin with a non-invasive aesthetic procedure. do to not only improve the appearance of your skin, but also reverse the effects of aging, sun damage and that stubborn cellulite!The SPA at Bartram Walk bbbf ttfff fb tb rtbf bwww.bartramwalkspa.com904-899-1234fbf rfntbr rffn t nfbnfbf n tft n bb n n Linda Ventura 904-797-26602491 US 1 South lindaventura@allstate.com S A V I N G M O N E Y I S J U S T T H E S T A R TSure, rewards for safe driving are a big deal. But thats just the start. Lets chat today and Ill tell you all the reasons why switching to Allstate is worth it. St. Johns County Parks and Recreation announces Master Plan update meetingsSt. Johns County is hosting Parks and Recreation Master Plan update commu-nity meetings from 6 p.m. 8 p.m. on Tuesday, July 17 at the Players Com-munity Center, 175 Landrum Lane, and from 6 p.m. 8 p.m. on Wednesday, July 18 at the City of St. Augustine Beach City Hall, 2200 A1A Beach Blvd. e meetings are a component of a multi-phase Parks and Recreation Mas-ter Plan update process that will create a more dynamic and diverse parks and recreation system to generate numerous economic, social, and environmental benets. Residents are invited to the meetings and oer feedback regarding St. Johns County Parks and Recreation facilities and services. For more informa-tion, call (904) 209-0344.4-H Youth Development Program seeks volunteers e St. Johns County 4-H Youth Devel-opment Program is seeking caring adult volunteers to work with 4-H youth aged ve 18 in St. Johns County. As a 4-H club or project leader, 4-H volunteers have an opportunity to share their interests with youth. e 4-H project areas include animal and plant science, healthy living, citizenship, envi-ronmental education, technology, food preparation, photography and more. e reward of sharing your interest with a young person is priceless. rough a learn by doing experience, 4-H volun-teers help youth learn leadership, com-munication, citizenship and a variety of life skills that enable them to become capable and caring citizens. 4-H Volunteers have the exibility to determine the amount of time, location and subject area they prefer. Volunteers receive full assistance of the 4-H Oce, including training, oce support, and a variety of resource materials and project curriculum. An orientation for new Club and Project Volunteers will take place on ursday, July 26 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the St. Johns County Extension Oce located at 3125 Ag-ricultural Center Drive, St. Augustine, FL 32092. Call the 4-H Oce at (904) 209-0430 by July 23 if you would like to attend the 4-H volunteer orientation on ursday, July 26. United Way of St. Johns County announces Emergency Food and Shelter National Board Program fundsUnited Way of St. Johns County is pleased to announce that $18,640.00 in federal funds has been awarded to St. Johns County through the Emer-gency Food and Shelter National Board Program. A local board made up of county, city, and human services agencies along with United Way of St. Johns County will determine how funds are to be distrib-uted among emergency food and shelter programs in the local service area. e board is responsible for recommending agencies to receive funds in this cycle and, as well as, funds awarded in future cycles. Under the terms of the grant from the National Board, local organizations, whether nonprot or governmental, may apply. To receive funds, the orga-nization must conduct an annual audit, practice non-discrimination, and have demonstrated the capability to deliver emergency food and shelter programs. Examples of how program funds can be used include the following: food (served meals or groceries), lodging in a mass shelter or hotel, one months rent or mortgage payment, one months utility bill and/or equipment necessary to feed or shelter people. Qualifying programs are urged to apply or gather additional information by contacting United Way of St. Johns County, jenny.harvey@unitedway-sjc. org or 904-829-9721. To learn more about United Way of St. Johns County, visit www. unitedway-sjc.org.Orthodontists oice welcomes new doctorDr. Jimmy Glenos and the team at Smiles by Glenos are proud to announce the addition of a second Board Certied orthodontist, Dr. Craig Hadgis. Dr. Hadgis and his wife, Anne, have recently moved back to the north Florida area, where Dr. Hadgis earned his orth-odontic specialty certica-tion at the School of Orthodontics at Jacksonville University. Prior to specializing in the eld of orthodontics and then going on to become Board Certied by the Ameri-can Board of Orthodontics, Dr. Hadgis received a masters degree in biomedi-cal engineering from the University of Michigan and his DDS degree as well as a degree in Advanced Education in General Dentistry from the University of Detroit Mercy. He has eight years of experience practicing the latest tech-niques in providing customized, digi-tally planned orthodontic services and is experienced in the Damon and Insignia appliance systems. e Hadgis family has enjoyed a longstanding connection to St. Augustine area. Dr. Hadgis great uncle was the rst physician to practice in nearby Bunnell. is area has been the fam-ilys go to vacation destination since Dr. Hadgis was a child growing up in Grosse Pointe, Mich. As the son of a family dentist, it is not surprising that Dr. Hadgis ended up favoring a career of creating beautiful smiles. Dr. Glenos and Dr. Hadgis became very well acquainted over the past several years through their attendance at the Florida Association of Orthodontists annual meetings. After much discussion regarding various orthodontic treatment philosophies, dental and facial growth and development, treatment timing, personal values and professional ethics, it became obvious that combining their skill sets could only prove benecial towards achieving their mutually shared goal: to provide the highest possible level of gentle, ecient and personal-ized orthodontic care to St. Augustine, St. Johns and the surrounding areas for many years to come. Visit smilesbyglenos.com for more information.Statewide soaking brings double the rain during MayMays wet weather pushed rainfall totals across the St. Johns River Water Man-agement District to double the average. For the month of May, the district-wide Photo courtesy Smiles by GlenosDoctors Glenos and Hadgis at the desk. Briefs cont. on pg. 11

PAGE 11

The CreekLine July 2018 | Page 11 DISCOVER THE NA T URAL C HOICE I N SE N IOR LIVI N GFall in love with a stunning natural setting, nestled on the waterfront of beautiful Julington C reek. E njoy a variety of spacious choices in residences, from beautiful villa homes to waterfront and garden apartments. A nd let us make life easier with services and amenities to enhance your lifestyle, from maintenance-free living to dining, housekeeping and 24-hour security plus the assurance of a full complement of supportive services. WES T MIN S T ER WOO D S O N JULIN G T O N C REEKCall (877) 280-3594 today to learn more www.WestminsterWoodsFL.org 25 S tate R oad 13, Jacksonville, FL rfntfbbfrrfrffrrrbnrfrnnnrtrf bnrfrnrr nrnfnfbNow accepting patients at our location at rf ntttnbfb tbfftnt r f ntb 425 STATE ROAD 207, SAINT AUGUSTINE, FL 32084 OPEN MONDAY FRIDAY 8-5(904) 770-7149 WWW.SMITHKITCHENS.COM Smith Kitchens FREE ESTIMATES BL-5625 rainfall total was 8.8 inches, compared to the average of 3.5 inches. is is a departure from last years data when rainfall was trending signicantly below average. While Mays rainfall has been reported as record setting, it wasnt record setting in all areas of the district, with weather stations in Jacksonville, Orlando, Daytona Beach and Vero Beach having recorded more rain in prior years. Indian River County had the high-est monthly rainfall, with 11.6 inches, followed by Seminole and Volusia, with just over 10 inches. Twelve-month rainfall totals are above average, with a zone of unusually high rainfall running through northern Alachua, Putnam, southwest St. Johns and northwest Flagler counties. Districtwide, the annual total is 16.5 inches above average.Northeast Floridas May real estate report The market is hotNortheast Floridas 2,748 home sales in May were a 6.1 percent drop from last May, yet the largest number of sales for any month since August 2017. Pending sales those on which a contract has been written but have not yet closed hit 2,996, for a 10.8 percent increase over a year ago. Sales are occurring quickly, with 60 days being the average number of days on market until sale. A year ago, the aver-age was 73 days. A median sales price of $225,000 was a 5.8 percent year-over-year increase. e average sales price was signicantly higher, coming in at $273,448 for an 8.1 percent increase since a year ago. Despite 3,797 new listings hitting the market in May, months supply of homes for sale is at 3.4, well below the veto six-months considered a market that is balanced between buyers and sellers. Final home inventory for May was 8,398; down 9.1 percent from 9,239 homes for sale in May 2017. Increasing prices are especially aecting availability of homes in the lower price ranges. Heres the breakdown of Mays homes for sale by price range: 1,324 are listed for $149,999 or less; 795 are in the $150,000 to $199,999 range; 2,114 fall in the $200,000 to $299,999 category; 2,452 are within the $300,000 to $499,999 slot; 1,259 are listed for $500,000 to $999,999, and 454 homes are on the market for a million dollars or more. Visit www.NEFAR.com for more infor-mation.Briefs. cont. from pg. 10 Military Veteran Family Man Trusted Businessmanwww.JeremiahBlocker.com Championing Economic Growth Keeping Taxes Low Protecting Our Citizens Paid by Jeremiah Blocker, Republican, for St. Johns County Commission District 4. Use of military rank, job titles, and photographs in uniform does not imply endorsement by the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense. THE CONSERVATIVE LEADER JEREMIAH IS DEDICATED TO:

PAGE 12

Page 12 | The CreekLine July 2018 TWOCONVENIENT LOCATIONS! JULINGTON CREEK OFFICE 112-203 BARTRAM OAKS WALK ST JOHNS, FL 32259ORANGE PARK OFFICE -1 KINGSLEY AVENUE ORANGE PARK, FL 32073 TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT CALL OR VISIT US ONLINE:904.264.KIDS | 264KIDS.COMfacebook.com/264KIDS Exams, Balloons, Fun! We are in-network providers for Metlife, Delta, AETNA, Cigna, United Healthcare, and most other PPO insurance plans. PEDIATRIC DENTIST PEDIATRIC DENTIST Local gymnast Emerson Hurst has had a big year she graduated from St. Johns Virtual School and she attended the U.S. Olympic National Championships in Cincinnati for the second year in a row. Her goal this year was to medal in at least one event and she said she is pleased that she achieved that. Hurst earned silver on the balance beam as well as bronze on the oor exercise; she nished in the top 10 on vault, but some shoulder issues that necessitated a lower degree of diculty in her bar routine kept her from a high nish on that apparatus. On competition day at nationals, she said her favorite part was sticking the land-ing on her vault. I knew that I had done my best on oor and beam and so it was excit-ing for me to stick my vault landing also. It was the cherry on top, Hurst said. Since it was my last national championship, I really wanted to leave everything out there, and I did. Hurst said she began gymnastics at age four, in a manner familiar to most gym-nasts: her mother, Diane Hurst, noticed that she was extremely active. Since I was climbing on couches, my mom said if I was going to do that, I needed to do it correctly, Emerson Hurst said. She started taking recreational classes at Starlight Gymnastics and the coaches there saw something special in her as well. ey encouraged her to continue with the more competitive levels and by the age of nine, Hurst had advanced through levels 2 5 to the optional levels beginning at level 6. is year at nationals she competed as a level 10, the highest level in the Junior Olympic Program. Hurst said that the balance beam is her favorite apparatus. I feel comfortable on the beam, which seems odd since it is only four inches wide, Hurst said. I can walk better on the beam than on the oor! Hurst was adopted as an infant from Russia by her mother, Diane Hurst, and lives with her mother and grandpar-ents, Gerry and Rosalie Hurst, in St. Johns. She credits her grand-parents for helping to pitch in with rides to the many practices she put in at the gym up to six or seven hours per day, most days of the week. She said she is a typi-cal teenage girl who enjoys crafting, shopping, playing with her dogs and hanging out with her friends in her spare time. Hurst trains at Starlight Gymnastics in Mandarin and is coached by Cheri Gil-likin and Vessy Ivanov. In the fall, Hurst will attend Towson (Md.) University on a full athletic scholarship as a member of the schools Division 1 gymnastics team. She said it all came down to the coaches when she decided to become a Towson Tiger. Additionally, she felt really comfortable there and liked the campus. She intends to major in sports management. She said she will continue working out here at Starlight through the summer before joining her new team in August. Im excited to get up there and help the team out, she said. Gymnast surpasses personal goal at NationalsBy Martie Thompson editor@floridanewsline.comPhotos courtesy Istvan Pono, EBS Productions. 904-287-3383 www.bellalavitasalon.comrfnrtbbnrbnrbrnrfnr rrtbrbb r ffn tbb r frfn rfnt Bella La Vita Salon ( Salon Suites) b bt btOer Valid with select designers onlyt n At the May 25 monthly meeting of Helping Hands of St. Johns County, volunteers put together Splash Pacs for children at the Homeless Coalition. Community members donated bathing suits, beach towels, ip ops, and visors, while community partner Publix on CR 210W donated sunscreen and bags. Pictured are volunteers Sheilah and Sally lling the bags, which were given to the children at a cookout hosted by Helping Hands of St. Johns County on June 2. Helping Hands of Saint Johns County is a volunteer organization that meets from 10 a.m. 23 p.m. on the last Friday of each month at Faith Community Church, 3450 CR 210W. Email jacqphil@aol.com for more information.Helping Hands group assembles Splash Pacs for children in need Photo courtesy Mary Safin May all your wishes come true this wondrous season. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there .CALL ME TODAY. Joyous holiday wishes to you and your familyfrom your good neighbor.1101450.1 State Farm, Home Oce, Bloomington, IL Jim Register, Agent 12058 San Jose Blvd, Suite 302 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Bus: 904-268-5522 jim.register.g2k4@statefarm.com State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Fire and Casualty Company Bloomington, IL 1706815 They matter to me.I get it. Your home and car are more than just things. Theyre where you make your memories and they deserve the right protection. Its why Im here. LETS TALK TODAY. Jim Register, Agent 12058 San Jose Blvd, Suite 302 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Bus: 904-268-5522 jim@jimregister.com State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Fire and Casualty Company Bloomington, IL 1706815 They matter to me.I get it. Your home and car are more than just things. Theyre where you make your memories and they deserve the right protection. Its why Im here. LETS TALK TODAY. Jim Register, Agent 12058 San Jose Blvd, Suite 302 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Bus: 904-268-5522 jim@jimregister.com Hurricane season is upon us. State Farm can help before as well as after it strikes. Contact me today to learn how to prepare or visit statefarm.com. May all your wishes come true this wondrous season. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there .CALL ME TODAY. Joyous holiday wishes to you and your familyfrom your good neighbor.1101450.1 State Farm, Home Oce, Bloomington, IL Jim Register, Agent 12058 San Jose Blvd, Suite 302 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Bus: 904-268-5522 jim.register.g2k4@statefarm.com

PAGE 13

The CreekLine July 2018 | Page 13 The Wait is Finally Over! A Special Open House Event at HarborChase of MandarinSaturday, July 14 | 12-3 pm 12350 San Jose Blvd. | Jacksonville, FL 32223 www.HarborChaseMandarin.come rst 10 visitors will receive a gift certicate for a chef-prepared meal in our beautiful Pomelo Restaurant! (904) 584-9817 Jacksonvilles Premier Retirement Living ALF #13126 Mandarin Inde pe nden t & As sisted Living Memo ry Ca reHarborChase of Mandarin features: Exciting Life Enrichment program Seasonal menus created by award-winning Chefs Stimulating experiences and social events daily Join us at HarborChase of Mandarin for an exclusive tour and look at Jacksonvilles newest and most innovative retirement community. e third annual Family Fun Fest was held on April 28 at Francis Field. Ap-proximately 4000 people attended the all-day festival, which raised more than $27,000 to benet AlphaOmega Miracle Home, a faith-based non-prot 501(c)(3) oering a sup-portive housing program to single mothers, their chil-dren, and senior women. e Alpha-Omega Miracle Home also broadly serves St. Johns County through various outreach initiatives. e family-friendly event was hosted by Orthopaedic Associates of St. Augustine with Dr. James Grimes serving as the emcee for the Team Obstacle Course Challenge. A team competi-tion was chosen as the signature event, as it relates to life and the mission of Alpha-Omega Miracle Home, where young women and their babies are partnered with senior women to create a nurturing team. Additional activities included face painting, crafts, bounce houses, live entertainment, food and vendors. e US Marines won the team competition with a time of 10:02. Grimes, a founding partner of Ortho-paedic Associates of St. Augustine, said, My wife and I have visited Alpha-Ome-ga Miracle Home and the work being done is nothing short of outstanding. Lisa and her team are truly making a dif-ference in our community. Lisa Franklin, founder and executive di-rector of Alpha-Omega Miracle Home, expressed her gratitude for Grace Grimes, event director, It has been remarkable to see how Grace has turned a small event into an annual Family Fun Fest that benets St. Augustine families as it builds nances each year for AlphaOmega. Top sponsors included e Original Gran-ite Bracket, Jumperama, Flagler Hospital, Jack Wilson Chevrolet, Burkhardt Sales and Service, Alexander Law Firm, e Bailey Group, WW Gay Mechanical Contractor, Dr. DePasqual, Lowes, St. Johns County Sheris Oce, Land Title, Shugart Fence, Benjamin Moore, and TBL Construction. e Team Obstacle Course Challenge was built by local companies who donated both time and materials.Family Fun Fest benefits Alpha-Omega Miracle HomeBy NewsLine Sta mail@floridanewsline.comPhoto courtesy Orthopaedic Associates of St. Augustine Team Anastasia Stay Fit at the final obstacle, the warped wall, with emcee James Grimes, MD (right).

PAGE 14

Page 14 | The CreekLine July 2018 Richard M. Oglesby, D.V.M Constanze Goricki, Dr. med.vet Tara Hogan, D.V.M Tom Fish D.V.M.1004 State Road 13 ( 0.2 mi South JCP entrance )PROTECT your pet now! NexGard-Flea and Tick KillerDogs Beg For It! Fleas And Ticks Hate It! Veterinarians Recommend It!(904) 287-5570 Estate Living Now From the High $400s Oversized water view and preserve lots Extraordinary amenities with guarded gateNew home designs available... Customize our plans to create the home of your dreams! *Showcase homes only, terms and conditions apply. See sales associate for details. Promotion ends September 3, 2018. Prices and offerings subject to change. Intervest Construction of Jax, Inc. 14785-3 Old St. Augustine Road, Jacksonville, FL CBC #057851; CBC #125726904.513.0894 / www.ICIHomes.com Julington Creek Plantation prides itself on its 1,200 acres of natural areas which include over 100 acres of ponds. Locally known as The Plantation or just JCP, neighborhood schools, nearby medical facilities, golf course, recreational offerings, and convenient shopping centers have made Julington Creek one of the most sought-after communities in the area. And we pay off the CDD Bond! THE SIENA823 E Dorchester Drive, St. Johns, FL 32259 4 Bedrooms / 3 Bath / 3 Car Garage / 3,054 ft Lot #041 NOW ONLY $591,545 SHOWCASE HOMESTHE EGRET V1000 West Dorchester Drive, St. Johns, FL 32259 4 Bedrooms / 3 Bath / 3 Car Garage / 3,067 ft Lot #030 NOW ONLY $690,900 JULINGTON CREEKS BEST KEPT SECRET with Showcase Home Purchase* Consider the sum of $92,000 as the goal for the 2018 rendition of Relay for Life of North St. Johns County and one can be astounded by the fact that it was surpassed. But passing it by a signicant amount came as a pleasant surprise to everyone in the circles of the American Cancer Society. Relay for Life of North St. Johns County, held on April 14, actually raised a bit more than 16 percent above its goal a little over $107,000. e events mission statement comes together in the amount of money raised with the concept of hope, as most of this money goes towards nd-ing a cure for cancer. To generate this amount of money, Relay for Life of North St. Johns had many hardworking members behind it. As always, there was the dedicated leadership team, working diligently to make sure the right touches were made and that the event would be a complete success from the minute details to the biggest tasks. Corporate sponsors were a prominent reason that the fundraising goal was surpassed. Ranging from large companies like CITI Bank and Tata Consultancy Services, to local companies such as All-state (John Crowell), Pilot, e UPS store (State Road 13), Medcruiters, Weaver & Stratton, Village Key & Alarm, Legacy Trust, State Farm, Bonnie Marshal, and Tims Floor Covering, all contributions were appreciated. is year, the top team was the River of Life UMC, which raised more than $12,000. On this team was also the top contributor and one of the team leads, Becky Kimball who raised more than $6,000 on her own. For all of their hard work, the follow-ing recognitions were awarded: Rookie Team of the Year was Nease High School Panthers and Rookie of the Year was Anne Cullum. On the day of the event, Best emed Campsite was Team Supreme; Most Spirited Team was Gen Z & Tatas Consultancy Services; and Best Spirit Stick was Mustangs Making a Dierence. e consensus was that all teams deserved recognition; yet these particular teams and individuals stood out for what they did to make Relay for Life successful. Relay for Life of North St. Johns will return in 2019. To become a part of this event, email the committee at r.north-saintjohnscounty@gmail.com. Relay for Life of North St. Johns County surpasses goalBy Atharva Palande mail@floridanewsline.comnow. Here are a couple of links you might be interested in: the National Hurricane Center at https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/ and the St. Johns County Oce of Emergency Management at http://www.sjcemergen-cymanagement.org/. Feel free to drop me a line at dshoar@sjso. org. It is our hope at the St. Johns County Sheris Oce that you have a safe and happy summer.The Sheri Reports cont. from pg. 8 12412 San Jose Blvd., Suite 203 | Jacksonville, FL 32223 Phone: 904-432-3321 | Fax: 904-432-3324 www.nautilusbehavioralhealth.com Let us help you and your family be at your best!rfnt fbbbn fnnn rffntb n fnf n

PAGE 15

The CreekLine July 2018 | Page 15 Hula hoop. Love. Live. Great heart care starts with caring. We have the technology and team to help you do the things you love to do, with the people who love you. Go to MemorialJaxHealthy.com/HeartCare to take a heart quiz, nd a doctor or connect to a nurse 24/7. Following a well-attended Town Hall Meeting on April 11 on the Opioid Crisis here in St. Johns County, citizens are ready to take action locally. Our rst ocial meeting of a newly formed Anti-Drug Task Force was held on May 16 with almost 30 people in attendance. is included professionals who work in related elds of interest as well as a number of concerned community resi-dents. e focus for the task force for the foreseeable future will be the Opioid Crisis and planning local strategies and interventions. Many pressing perspectives were raised at the rst meeting. One mother shared the heartache of having lost her son to an opioid overdose. Other parents expressed their growing concerns on safeguarding their middle school and high school students who might access pills from peers. Medical and treatment challenges were raised with not enough resources to meet current needs. Law enforcement stated that while they do their part through arrests of drug dealers and users, this does not get at the root of the problems. What is clear is that local citizens are concerned enough that we collectively have made a commit-ment to strategize from a multidisci-plinary perspective on how to address the current crisis. e Task Force is in the process of forming working groups and would welcome more participation from the community. Work groups will focus on the following issues: law enforcement, treatment, medical concerns, preven-tion, analytics and legal issues. Task Force meetings are being held at 9 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Health and Human Services Building, Kingsher Room. Contact Bridget Heenan, executive director of PACT Prevention Coalition at BridgetPACT@yahoo.com for more information or to express an interest in getting involved. Everyones input is welcomed to help turn the tide of this signicant crisis that directly or indirectly aects all of us in St. Johns County. Lynnette Horwath is Program Coordina-tor for PACT Prevention Coalition.Addressing our drug issues head onBy Lynnette Horwath mail@floridanewsline.comavailable online. Many important races will appear on the ballot in the Primary this year: US Senate, Congress, Governor and Cabinet members plus local races for County Commissioner and School Board Members. We are your One Source for voting Information: www.votesjc.com. Our website is updated regularly with candidates, ballot information, early voting dates, times and locations. Visit us regularly to see Whats New. Your Vote Counts cont. from pg. 7 Call Linda at (904) 607-5062 for rates and information. St. Johns County School Directory rfrntbrfntbn St. Johns County School District r f Ask about advertising in our 2018-19Ad deadline July 9th

PAGE 16

Page 16 | The CreekLine July 2018 Pet Food & Supply Drive Benefiting: DROP-OFF LOCATIONS Some items needed:Pet Food Treats Ziploc Bags Cat Litter Leashes Collars Paper Plates Chew Toys Towels Blankets Laundry SoapFor a complete list go to: www.fcnmhp.org or call 904-886-4919 Drop offNOW! ere is no end to the companionship, love and joy a pet can bring to ones life. at is perhaps one reason why the num-ber of pets surrendered to shelters each year so greatly upsets animal lovers. But the same places that house animals that were lost or aban-doned can be the very loca-tions where families nd new pets to love. e ASPCA estimates that 6.5 million companion animals enter animal shelters in the United States each year. Animal shelters, rescue groups, pounds, and humane societies are great places to begin searching for new companion animals. e organization DoSomething. org states that, each year, approximately 2.7 million dogs and cats are euthanized because shelters are too full and there arent enough adoptive homes. Homeless animals outnumber homeless people ve to one. While private breeders and reputable pet stores may have purebred animals that make great pets, to relieve the problems of relinquished or homeless pets resid-ing in crowded shelters, prospective pet parents are urged to rst consider adopt-ing shelter pets. e following are reasons why adopting shelter dogs or cats is such a great idea.Great reasons to adopt your next petBy NewsLine Sta mail@floridanewsline.com Well-behaved animals: e Humane Society of America says most shelter pets end up in facilities not because of behav-ioral issues or something they did wrong, but due to circum-stances aecting their own-ers, such as moving or divorce. at means there are thousands of house-broken, behaviortrained pets just waiting for a new family. Lower costs: When a person adopts a pet, microchipping, rst immunization costs, neutering/spaying, and some vet costs may be covered by the adoption fee. Plus, that adoption fee can be hundreds of dollars less than purchasing a pet from elsewhere. Longer life expectancy: e Canine Journal says mutts, or animals whose genetic makeup are a combination of at least two breeds, tend to have fewer health problems and live longer than their purebreed counterparts. But shelters also house many purebreds for those who prefer to go that route. Room for others: For every adopted cat or dog, room is freed up to take in more pets that need assistance. Hurt puppy mills: Puppy mills produce pets in factory-style facilities that seldom take the welfare of animals into consid-eration. Adoption hurts puppy mills bottom lines and helps ght against their inhumane breeding techniques.Photos courtesy MetroCreative Consider adopting a pet from a shelter.Shearwater 100 Kayak Way Native Sun Grocery SanJose 10000 San Jose Blvd. Native Sun Grocery Baymeadows 11030 Baymeadows Rd. Cosmic Comics 11018 Old St. Augustine Rd. Pro-Tech Automotive 5027-1 Sunbeam Rd. The UPS Store 6113 52 Tuscan Way Ste 202 Champion Cycling 11447 San Jose Blvd. Amaretti Desserts 14965 Old St. Augustine Rd. Amaretti Desserts 1992 San Marco Blvd. Sunland Acres 1376 Fruit Cove Rd. S. Ponte Vedra Eye Associates 150 Professional Dr. Baptist Primary Care 11261 San Jose Blvd. Forever Vets 2758 Racetrack Rd., Unit 208 Sellstate Realty 12276 San Jose Blvd., Ste 206 Lemongrass Salon & Spa 12627 San Jose Blvd., # 101 Twisted Compass 585 State Road 13, Suite 101 The Windsor @ San Pablo 4000 San Pablo Pkwy. Crossfit Ferrum 618 State Rd 13 #3, St Johns Sugar Bear Antiques 3047 Julington Creek Road Florida NewsLine 12443 San Jose Blvd., Suite 403 BEING ALONE CHEWING SHOES BARKING AT BIRDS BELLY RUBSDOGTOPIA DAY r rfn ttrb 4th Annual See pg. 3

PAGE 17

The CreekLine July 2018 | Page 17 100 Julington Plaza Driverrfrntbn POWERED BY FUELED BY trrfrntbbffr fff nrnnn nnntbffr ftfntbntbrrbf rftrnffrf fbfbbrfThe Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. Goddard Systems, Inc. program is AdvancED accredited. License #C07SJ0053 Goddard Systems, Inc. 2017 2018 2019 St. Johns County School Calendar 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 12 13 6 7 8 9 10 10 11 12 13 14 16 17 18 19 20 13 14 15 16 17 17 18 19 20 21 23 24 25 26 27 20 21 22 23 24 24 25 26 27 28 30 31 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30 31 Quarter 1 45 Quarter 2 45 1 2 3 4 1 1 7 8 9 10 11 4 5 6 7 8 4 5 6 7 8 14 15 16 17 18 11 12 13 14 15 11 12 13 14 15 21 22 23 24 25 18 19 20 21 22 18 19 20 21 22 28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 25 26 27 28 29 Quarter 3 46 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 6 7 8 9 10 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 13 14 15 16 17 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 20 21 22 23 24 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 27 28 29 30 31 Quarter 4 44 Teacher Optional Planning Teacher Planning (non-student day) Teacher Inservice (non-student day) Classes Resume Student/Teacher Holiday End of Quarter Underline = testing dates ST. JOHNS COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT MASTER CALENDAR July 2018 August 2018 December 2018 November 2018 Board Approved November 8, 2016 2018-2019 School Year September 2018 Easter April 21 Survey 3 Feb. 4-8, 2019 FTE Dates February 2019 March 2019 April 2019 Survey 2Oct. 8-12, 2018 May 2019 October 2018 JULY 2018 Lowest Cost Braces in 1/3 the Time! Appointments 6:30ampm & on Saturdays! New Patients Always Welcome! As Low as$99/mo.12058 San Jose Boulevard Suite 102 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Call 904-880-3131 or Text Us at 904-584-3777KrantzDentalCare.com 2018 chrisad, inc.*The statement /3 the cost...1/3 the time is typical Fastbraces patient experience relative to traditional braces. Your Fastbraces case may take a longer or shorter time, & may be less or more costly. Beauty & Song! Enjoy Wonderful Backyard Birds! rrf nntb ftt ft bb rfntbffb nt e Julington Creek Titans won the JCB Invitational baseball tournament on June 4, beating the Normandy Bandits team 9 4 to take the crown. e Titans won ve games over the course of the week, capping o the week by crushing the Villages Bombers, 9 0 in the semi-nal game before beating Normandy for the championship. e Titans were led by masterful pitching performances by Dylan McLeod, Bryce Boccio, Ronan McDonald and Matthew Mitchell as well as the team playing error free baseball over the ve game span. e Titans has been selected to attend the Cooperstown Hall of Fame tournament in Cooperstown, NY and will be traveling there July 27 Aug. 3. Teams from across the United States travel to Cooperstown for this prestigious tournament. e Titans are coached by Brandon Bascelli, David Vaughn, Ryan Mcdonald, Rick Kane and Bob Mitchell and the team consists of Richie Berrios, Ben Studer, Dawson Vaughn, Ronan McDonald, Jackson Kane, Brady Patterson, Tommy Jordan, Dylan McLeod, Bryce Boccio, Adam Harvey and Matthew Mitchell.Titans win invitational tournament Photo courtesy Bob Mitchell After eight years dedicated to scouting, more than 50 merit badges and a culminating community service project beneting St. Augustine Youth Services Boys Home (SAYS), Joey Higley, 13, earned the rank of Eagle Scout, the highest achievement and rank in the Boy Scouts of America. Higleys Outdoor Game Center Boys Being Boys consists of chess, checkers, cornhole, Jenga, Yahtzee and tic-tac-toe. His vision was to provide the boys with a place to make new friends, experience joy and bond through fun and competitive games. SAYS shapes the future of Floridas at risk youth through coaching, counseling and care. eir residential group homes provide therapeutic and pre-independent living programs for youth ages 6-17 who have suered trauma due to abuse and/or neglect. Builders First Source, Lowes, Ace, Sherwin Williams, Crown Trophy, Troops 225 and 180, and family and friends were instrumental in the success of the project.Another Eagle joins the nest Photo courtesy Carol Higley Shearwater 100 Kayak Way Native Sun Grocery SanJose 10000 San Jose Blvd. Native Sun Grocery Baymeadows 11030 Baymeadows Rd. Cosmic Comics 11018 Old St. Augustine Rd. Pro-Tech Automotive 5027-1 Sunbeam Rd. The UPS Store 6113 52 Tuscan Way Ste 202 Champion Cycling 11447 San Jose Blvd. Amaretti Desserts 14965 Old St. Augustine Rd. Amaretti Desserts 1992 San Marco Blvd. Sunland Acres 1376 Fruit Cove Rd. S. Ponte Vedra Eye Associates 150 Professional Dr. Baptist Primary Care 11261 San Jose Blvd. Forever Vets 2758 Racetrack Rd., Unit 208 Sellstate Realty 12276 San Jose Blvd., Ste 206 Lemongrass Salon & Spa 12627 San Jose Blvd., # 101 Twisted Compass 585 State Road 13, Suite 101 The Windsor @ San Pablo 4000 San Pablo Pkwy. Crossfit Ferrum 618 State Rd 13 #3, St Johns Sugar Bear Antiques 3047 Julington Creek Road Florida NewsLine 12443 San Jose Blvd., Suite 403

PAGE 18

Page 18 | The CreekLine July 2018 Dr. Tom Lahmann, Dr. Blake Moser and sta Julington Creek Chiropractic & Wellness Center P.A.Serving St. Johns County for nearly 21 years! rfrrntb rfntfntfbfbf frAlso o ering Massage and Acupuncture Treatment Treating Pediatrics through Geriatric Serving St. Johns County for nearly 21 years! 904-230-0080 www.julingtoncreekchiro.com 485 State Road 13 Suite 3 (Next to Burger King) We make your search for quality PreK and childcare simple and easy Infant through 4 years old-VPK Before and after school for ages 6 to 12NAC Accredited After School Care Transportation before and after school to Durbin Creek, Julington Creek and Patriot Oaks AcademyThe scores are in and our VPK program has achieved a 100% readiness rate for kindergarten* 990 Flora Branch Blvd. | St. Johns, FL (904) 230-8200 www.theajc.net *As measured and posted by the Florida Department of Education at https://vpk. doe.org Infant through 4 years old-VPK Infant through 4 years old-VPK Infant through 4 years old-VPK Infant through 4 years old-VPK Infant through 4 years old-VPK Infant through 4 years old-VPK The scores are in and our VPK The scores are in and our VPK The scores are in and our VPK The scores are in and our VPK program has achieved a 100% program has achieved a 100% program has achieved a 100% readiness rate for kindergarten* readiness rate for kindergarten* readiness rate for kindergarten* Now Enrolling for Summer Camp & 2018 VPKC07SJ0083 Proceeds have been tallied from the Firehouse Subs Mens Double Tennis Tournament, held May 18 20 at Jacksonville Golf and Country Club, and despite inclement weather, more than $134,000 was raised for the Foundation a 3 percent jump from last year. Hosted by Firehouse Subs for the last 19 years, it continuously ranks as the largest local fundraiser for the brands nonprot, Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation. Funds raised at the event over the years have helped award 216 grants valued at $2,388,000 to Northeast Florida rst responders. Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation was founded in 2005 in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, by Firehouse Subs founders, Chris Sorensen and Robin Sorensen. Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation has the mission of providing funding, life-saving equipment and educational opportunities to rst responders and public safety organizations. Since its inception, the nonprot organization has granted more than $33 million to hometown heroes in 46 states, Puerto Rico and Canada, including more than $5.3 million in Florida, of which more than $2.3 million has been awarded in northeast Florida.Firehouse Subs serves an ace with mens doubles tennis tournament for charity Photo courtesy Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation Amanda Keller of St. Johns successfully completed four years of challenging academic, physical and professional military training, graduating from the U.S. Naval Academy, Aug. 18, with a Bachelor of Science degree in information technology and a commission as a second lieutenant. Keller is a graduate of Creekside High School. At the academy, she was a member of the womens tennis team, including captain in her senior year. Keller ended her tennis career with the most wins in Navy history. Founded in 1845, the U.S. Naval Academy today is a prestigious four-year service academy that prepares midshipmen morally, mentally and physically to be professional ocers in the naval service. More than 4,400 men and women representing every state in the U.S. and several foreign countries make up the student body, known as the Brigade of Midshipmen. Midshipmen learn from military and civilian instructors and participate in intercollegiate varsity sports and extracurricular activities. Upon graduation, midshipmen earn a Bachelor of Science degree in a choice of 25 dierent subject majors and go on to serve at least ve years as commissioned ocers in the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps. Julington Creek native graduates from U.S. Naval Academy Photo courtesy Legacy Studiose beaches of St. Johns County are home to several species of endangered or threatened sea turtles. Residents and visitors have a special opportunity and responsibility to protect these magni-cent creatures and their vulnerable nest-ing sites as they return each season to nest along the beaches. Sea turtle nest-ing season began May 1, and St. Johns County ocials are asking residents, visitors, and businesses to help protect natural habitat by observing all nesting season laws and regulations. Between May 1 and October 31, vehicular trac on the beach is allowed between the hours of 8 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. In addition, all beachfront proper-ties are required to reduce their impact by eliminating interior and exterior lights which may disrupt nesting sea turtles. Volleyball court lights at St. Johns County Pier Park will turn on at sunset and turn o at 9 p.m. during this time. Beach visitors can also have a positive impact on nesting sea turtles by taking the following actions while enjoying the beach: Refrain from using reworks and open res. Remove ruts and ll in holes left by vehicles and sand castle building. Remove all chairs, umbrellas, or canopies from the beach before dark. ese items are subject to removal by county sta. Avoid entering sand dunes and con-servation zones (15 feet seaward of thedune line). Refrain from using balloons, as they can fall into the ocean and harm marine life. Never approach sea turtles emerging from or returning to the sea. Nesting sea turtles are vulnerable, timid, and can be easily frightened away. Never push an injured animal back into the ocean. If an injured, sick, or deceased sea turtle is encountered, call the St. Johns County Sheris Oce non-emergency dispatch line at (904) 824-8304. Leave only your footprints, providing the turtles with a safe and clean habitat in which to nest and hatch. For more information, visit www.sjc. us/hcp or contact St. Johns County Habitat Conservation and Beach Man-agement at (904) 209-3740. Its sea turtle nesting season By NewsLine Sta mail@floridanewsline.com Now Enrolling! Pre-K3 through 6th grade7423 San Jose Blvd. 904-733-0352 www.sjeds.orgSJEDS welcomes qualied applicants in grades Pre-K3 through 6 without regard to race, sex, creed, religion or national origin. Accredited by FCIS, FKC, SACS and the Episcopal Diocese of Florida. San Jose Episcopal Day School provides an intimate learning environment where teachers help each individual identify their own unique talents and strengths. With a balanced approach that is nurturing yet challenging, each child can reach their fullest potential, however high that may be. Come see for yourself why an education at SJEDS is an investment in a brighter future.

PAGE 19

The CreekLine July 2018 | Page 19 Get to Know . travel pantry raiders gardening LifeJim SnellenBy Angela Higginbotham angela@floridanewsline.com Get to Know . .Interested in being featured? Email Martie Thompson at editor@FloridaNewsLine.com Photo by Angela HigginbothamJim Snellen 141 Hilden Road, #202, Ponte Vedra, FL 32081 904.810.2027 Retail Showroom Cabinetry Flooring Furnishings Remodels Design Consultation Window Treatments Project Management Artwork Lighting Accessories Fabrics r fntb b rn b A Craft Coee House rfnttb fffr r Now Open fff convenient for you! Or, readers may drop items o at the Florida NewsLine oce, 12443 San Jose Blvd., Suite 403, anytime prior to July 17. Items requested by First Coast No More Homeless Pets include dog and cat food, treats, cat litter, blankets, ziplock bags, towels, leashes and chew toys. Florida NewsLine is pleased to sponsor this drive and partner once again with First Coast No More Homeless Pets. We hope you consider donating to help animals who cannot help them-selves. First Coast No More Homeless Pets mis-sion is to end the killing of dogs and cats in shelters in northeast Florida, southeast Georgia and across the nation. ey provide a multifaceted approach to pet overpopulation by combining free and low-cost spay/neuter, adoption initiatives and innovative pet retention services. ey work with local animal welfare groups and the community to reach those who need help keeping and caring for their pet. Visit www.fcnmhp.org/ for more information.Pet Supply Drive cont. from pg. 1Born in 1926 on Weavers Run Creek in Bullitt County, Ky., Jim Snellen has and continues to live a beautiful life of bravery and love. Snellen grew up working on the family farm and enjoyed helping his family. Our major farm product was corn. Our farm produced some of the longest ears of corn of all the farms in that area, Snellen said. At 17 years old, Snellen enlisted in the Navy in 1944 after convincing his par-ents to sign his papers. Snellen was anx-ious to see some action and be on his own. Enlisting in the middle of World War II, Snellen was stationed aboard the ship USS Cofer in the South Pacic and he served for 26 months. On July 4, 1947, Snellen met Dorothy on a blind date. She was engaged to another sailor at the time, but eventu-ally warmed to the charm of Snellen. inking he wasnt well suited for Dorothy and in an eort to get away, Snellen decided to quit his job in the hardware store and re-enlist in the United States Air Force. He requested foreign service duty and the Air Force immediately put him to work. e problem was that he was stationed in Fort Knox, Ky., which was actually closer to Dorothy than he was before in Louisville. Snellen made the decision to leave the Air Force and start a new life. He was granted a discharge and mar-ried Dorothy in 1949. e two have one daughter, three grandchildren and four great grandchildren. After leaving the service, Snellen worked for a variety of manufacturing companies, mostly in the heat-ing and air conditioning eld. Later, he moved into marketing for General Motors and American Stan-dard. Snellen has worked in every state in the continental U. S. and Hawaii, except two. In 1998, Snellen retired to Fruit Cove, within 15 miles of where his former ship, the USS Cofer, had been decom-missioned. Every time I cross the bridge over the St. Johns River, I can picture myself be-ing aboard the Cofer, Snellen said. Snellen enjoys speaking with people around the community, including at several high schools in the area and he hopes to continue sharing his thoughts and experiences with others. 1. Coming from Dallas,Tex., what did you like most about the Fruit Cove area that made you want to stay during your retirement?When we moved here it was very laid back and a lot less busy than it is now. We have always enjoyed the area. 2. What activities do you enjoy doing to keep yourself active?Well, up until about a year ago, I golfed. I enjoy doing yard work and other things around the house. For the past 16 years, Ive worked part-time at Pinch A Penny. ey tell me they want me to work until Im 100. I get bored if Im not doing something. 3. Tell me about your book and what it means to you to have it written out in that format?My book is called South Pacic at Seventeen. When I started the book I was about 80 years old and my family and friends never gave up on me. ey pushed me to completion. I cant thank them all enough for believing that it could be done. Its a lot of informa-tion and photos from my time in the military and I was trying to remember events from so long ago. In order to tell what life was like before and during World War II, I found myself including many memories of my childhood in the book. It means a lot to me to have it and I even still get a small royalty check a few times a year from book sales. 4. What do you consider as your greatest accomplishment?Being a husband and father. I have a special wife and a wonderful family. I convinced my wife to marry me on her 20th birthday and tried to convince her that I was the real gift. 5. You were awarded two bronze stars for your service. How does that make you feel?I never considered myself a hero and I never will. e things I did were the same things being done by countless others.

PAGE 20

Page 20 | The CreekLine July 2018 Emerald Homes From The High $300s* D.R. Horton Homes From The Mid $200s* (904) 217-4826 (904) 770-2348 Located on Longleaf Pine Pkwy just South of Racetrack Road in St. Johns county Established community nestled in a v ast conservation area minutes from shopping & dining in Julington Creek & Mandarin, convenient to Racetrack Rd, CR-210 & I-95 Resort style amenities featuring tw o pools, playgrounds, basketball Community sports comple x including wooded walking & biking trails, 25 acre park Three Model Homes Open Daily!*Home and community information, including pricing, included features, terms, availability and amenities are subject to change and prior sale at any time without notice or obligation. See your new home consultant for details. Pictures, elevations, features, sizes and colors are approximate for illustration purposes only and will vary from the homes as built. CBC058997 D.R. Horton, Inc. All rights reserved. New Freedom Crossing Academy K-8 school within the community opening this year! Pre-Planning advisors are available to assist you.www.CraigFuneralHome.com (904) 824-1672Call for a no cost consultation Funeral Crematory Memorial Park rfntbffft rrfnt HEARING CENTERS Dr. Leslie A. Staverman Audiologist/OwnerSchedule an appointment today!StavermanHearingCenters.com(904) Hear and be heard. Improving your ability to communicate through better hearing makes each day brighter, strengthens your relationships and makes life more fulfilling. No matter how mild or significant your hearing loss, it interferes with your ability to fully enjoy sounds and interactions with loved ones. Through technology and expertise, well bring back the sounds you miss most. At Staverman Hearing Centers, you will always be heard. We believe great hearing care begins with listening to you and developing a hearing health care plan that solves your hearing loss while meeting the needs of your lifestyle and budget. Your Community Resource For Better Hearing trf Local teen Kay Gianna Putzke has been passionate about music since she began learning piano from her mother at the young age of ve. e St. Augustine na-tive was just 12 years old in 2014 when she performed at Nocatees Roscolusa for the rst time. Although nervous, it was in that moment that she knew she wanted to perform for the rest of her life. Now, the 16-year-old is a rising junior at Christs Church Academy and simply goes by Kay Gianna when performing. She and her parents, Brian and Karen, along with her brothers and sisters, live in World Golf Village. Giannas rst EP titled Oxygen ief has approximately 40,000 views on YouTube, building momentum and excitement for the future of her music career. She composed the single alongside Nashville-based producer Patrick Davis, whose resume includes col-laborative work with Darius Rucker. I just want to keep writing and getting more gigs. I write my own songs every day, so I really want to get that music out as soon as I can, Gianna said. Gianna enjoys performing at events around the First Coast area. Her voice has recently taken her to Nashville, where she performed with the band Sixwire, known as the band of the hit television show Nashville. Gianna has opportunities to open shows for many well known artists and hopes to continue reaching people through her music. She has an impres-sive knowledge of musical instruments and has been acknowledged as an accom-plished saxophone player. She is also in the worship band at Christs Church. Giannas music teacher, Chrys Rowe, has been teaching the gifted musician music and voice for the past four years. Ive taken her as my own daughter and enjoy being there with her and her family during her events. Kay Gianna is extreme-ly talented. She has a gift for songwriting and a unique voice. ose are things you cant teach. Shes a storyteller who is wise beyond her years, Rowe said. Gianna has colleges such as Juilliard and Stetson on her radar but for now, she is focused on getting her music heard. She would like to continue working on her solo career and possibly further her educa-tion in music therapy after high school. My grandmother had Alzheimers and I enjoy playing bingo and music at St. Au-gustine Landing. I like hanging out with older people and I think music therapy is very important, Gianna said. Visit www.kaygiannamusic.com for more information.Photo courtesy Eternal Crown Photography. Kay Gianna Talented teen releases rst EP recordBy Angela Higginbotham angela@floridanewsline.com rrfn

PAGE 21

The CreekLine July 2018 | Page 21 Service is not a slogan, it's a promise Service is not a slogan, it's a promise Martha J. Marti Kendall Licensed Agent/Owner 12058 San Jose Blvd.# 204 Jacksonville, Florida 32223 904.230.1063 Service is not a slogan, it's a promise r fntbnn rrrnnr fnrrn rr nnrnrtt tnnrtnr nrnntn nrrnrn rnnnnn rnnrnfn rnt nrfnrf ttnn Martha J. Marti Kendall Licensed Agent/Owner 12058 San Jose Blvd.# 204 Jacksonville, Florida 32223 904.230.1063 Service is not a slogan, it's a promise Dawn DuBoseWatson Realty Corp fully executed contract to when one of my listings goes under contract! I do so because I have worked with her from day one, and she is one of the most conscientious people I have ever worked with. My sellers are in the best possible hands with Marti and her competent staff. Closings are smooth, with no surprises, and Marti explains the process completely to both buyers and sellers in a professional but easy to understand way. As soon all questions sometimes years after the closing! Her closings are always timely. Something we as agents, as well as our customers, can certainly appreciate. Marti is smart, articulate, and knows this is one of the most important days most of our customers will experience. Kendall Title utilizes a portal, in which all documents are kept and easily homestead exemption immediately). Marti has on several occasions accompanied me to hospitals (even to the delivery room where we closed with one lucky family gaining a new home and a new baby all in the same day), to assisted living facilities, to places of work. You name it, Marti is always prepared to accommodate, and always with a smile on her face. If you are looking for a stress-free closing, I highly recommend Marti Kendall and her staff. This will be one of the best things you can do for your buyers, sellers and your business. Since 1988 Dawn DuBose has practiced Real Estate in Jacksonvillewhich allows her to offer a wealth of experience to each of her clients. When you hire Dawn judgment gathered over more than 30 years in the real estate industry! 24/7are the hours that Dawn works for you! Whatever it takes to get your home SOLD or to FIND that perfect homeyou can rest assured you will be the recipient of all her experience, skills, knowledge and integrity! Martha J. Marti Kendall Licensed Agent/Owner 12058 San Jose Blvd.# 204 Jacksonville, Florida 32223 904.230.1063 Service is not a slogan, it's a promise rf ntrbb trtnrrtt rnrnnffr tnrnrnfrt nrntrfnnnnr nrftnfnrf fnnnrtf nntntnnr nnrfftnttn nnnr nnrn nnffnn nnntnrnrn fnntnnf tnnfnrrtn fntnrnf nfntrnrttn nrrntfntn nrftn rfnnnrtrt nrrt nrtnntnn fnnfftn tntnrr nrr tnttrnr nrnnrtt nnbnf Martha J. Marti Kendall Licensed Agent/Owner 12058 San Jose Blvd.# 204 Jacksonville, Florida 32223 904.230.1063 Service is not a slogan, it's a promise rfntb tnbbn ST. JOHNS Race Track Rd. next to Memorial Emergency Center 111 Doctors Village Dr. Ste. 400 St. Johns, FL 32259ST. AUGUSTINE22 St. Johns Medical Park Dr. St. Augustine, FL 32086 rfnrtbrrfffnrtb rrf ntbr Creating Beautiful Smiles for Over 25 Years! Water Problems? rf n tbbbb bbr REMOVE 3760 Kori Road 904-262-0197 www.affordablewaterjax.com rfrrfrfnftb FREE WATER TESTINGnrr rrfrfnftb Our #1 Priority: Your Children!Classes are exciting and motivating! Fun Additional Programs! (904) 260 4866www.starlightjax.com Now Registering for Fall ClassesSummer Camp May 29-Aug.11Classes starting Aug. 6th Alhambras Chitty Chitty Bang Bang sure to delight audiences of all agesBy Martie Thompson editor@floridanewsline.comChitty Chitty Bang Bang is a fantasmagorically fun family musical now being performed at Alhambra eatre and Dining and the star of the show is a car. Not an ordinary car, but a car that oats and ies and feeds the imagination of young siblings Jeremy and Jemima Potts, ably portrayed by child actors Trey Murphy and Tatum Matthews. For those familiar with the 1968 lm by the same name, an understandable question would be, how does the Alhambra stage a play with a magical car? And the answer is, quite well. Design and construction of Chitty was the work of Ian Black and it must be seen to be believed. Performers Shain Stro, as single father Caractacus Potts, and Jennifer Medure, as Truly Scrumptious, provide the glue which holds the story together: the eccentric and loving three-person Potts family teams up with the beautiful daughter of candy maker Lord Scrumptious. Adventure follows when the Potts children become enamored of an old car that won multiple Gran Prix races in its heyday. ey urge their father to buy the car for them, which he does by selling one of his many crazy inventions. ey name the car Chitty Chitty Bang Bang for the odd noises made by the engine and discover it can oat like a boat and sprout wings to y like a plane. Trouble and hilarity ensues when the evil Baron Bomburst (amusingly portrayed by Kurt McCall) and Baroness Bomburst (uproariously portrayed by the extremely talented Lisa Valdini) desire the magic car for themselves. e second act of the play takes place in the Baron and Baroness ctional kingdom of Vulgaria. e Potts family, along with nutty Grandpa Potts (Kenneth Uible) and Truly Scrumptious have to outwit the dastardly Baron and Baroness and their evil henchman, the Child Catcher, creepily portrayed by Pierre Tannous. Stealing each scene in which he appeared, Tannous embodied his menacing role to the point of even sning for children to kidnap in the audience. With a score by the Sherman Brothers that conjures summer fun and entertaining choreography by frequent Alhambra choreographer James Kinney, the show is enjoyable for the whole family. In particular, the number Toot Sweets, when Caractacus Potts is trying to convince Lord Scrumptious to buy his musical candy, is a delightful candy confection come to life with pastel ladies dresses and graceful, swirling dancing. e title song is an endearing and familiar earworm that audience members will be humming for days after the show. Chef DeJuan has crafted a special menu for this family friendly show, to include starters of house salad or a smokehouse sausage with potato salad and entrees of trigger sh and chips, spaghetti and meatballs, roasted pork loin with baked mac and cheese or roasted summer vegetables with baked beans. Save room for a delightful berry trie or strawberry rhubarb buttermilk pie for dessert. Chitty Chitty Bang Bang will be on stage at Alhambra eatre and Dining through July 29. Visit www.alhambrajax. com to buy tickets.Photo courtesy Alhambra Theatre & DiningThe Potts family and Truly Scrumptious with Chitty Chitty Bang Bang

PAGE 22

Page 22 | The CreekLine July 2018 FishingCapt. Davids Fishing ReportBy Captain David Lifka mail@floridanewsline.com Call Linda at (904) 607-5062 for rates and information.St. Johns County School DirectoryYour ad seen by 50,000+ potential customers! rfrntbrfntbn St. Johns County School District r f Ask about advertising in our 2018-19Ad deadline July 9th (904) 679-5697 778 SR 13, #4 Saint Johns, FL., 32259Located one mile south from Julington Creek Bridge Youth and Adult Ballroom Dance Classes Book our space for your private event! Usually the month of July is when shrimp will begin to show in the St. Johns, with their numbers and sizes growing as summer continues to advance. Weather, as always, will play a role that often determines the quality and length of our shrimping season. Too much rain is often the culprit that puts a premature slow down or end to the season. As the shrimp make their way southward down the St. Johns River, shing will steadily improve from good, to better, to great. With shrimp in the river we can expect many species of saltwater sh to invade our area waters to feed on these tasty crustaceans. Reds, trout, ounder, croaker, weaksh and more should all be biting. Even late season tarpon will not be out of the question. Every summer many folks from around the state look forward to a weekend or even a vacation to the Gulf Coast of Florida to take part in Bay Scallop season. is years season opened for parts of Taylor County (Steinhatchee) and all of Dixie County (Horseshoe Beach) on June 16 and runs through Sept. 10. Other Gulf counties in the Big Bend area of the state will open later in July and August for their scallop season. Snorkeling in waist deep water, to depths of no more than 10 feet, scallops can be found and gathered in seagrass beds. With a two gallon per person limit or 10-gallon limit per vessel, a fun day on the water can be continued with an evening of some pretty good dining. Other than the risk of a sunburn, scalloping makes for a wonderful outdoor activity that can be enjoyed by everyone in the family. e traditional Florida Lobster two-day mini season will happen July 25 and 26, with an eight-month long regular season beginning Aug. 6. Lobstering requires greater swimming and snorkeling skills than scalloping, but is still a great opportunity to get out and enjoy the water with family and friends, and may just happen to pay delicious dividends at the end of day. Florida lobsters can be caught most anywhere in the states ocean waters, but usually the farther south you travel the easier they are to catch. Fishing Report: Freshwater catsh should be easy to nd at creek mouths. Croaker getting bigger and more plentiful. Whether you catch one, some, or none, the family time spent shing will last a lifetime. We now include a Catch of the Month photo with Capt. Davids Fishing Report each month. Please email a photo of yourself or your child with the sh caught to catchofthemonthpictures@gmail.com. Be sure to include the name of the person(s) in the photo, the name of the person who took the photo, the type of sh and date and location of the catch. We will select a photo each month for publication. Photo courtesy Nicholas CarterThis months Catch of the Month photo is of three-year-old Ezra Carter, who caught his first fish, a bream, at his neighborhood pond in Yulee. According to his father, Nicholas Carter, Ezra hooked and reeled in the fish, caught on Wonder bread, all by himself. Travel Leaders of Jacksonville 2 Fairfield Blvd, Suite 3 Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082 (Next to Starbucks in Ponte Vedra) Do you love travel so much you want to sell it? Become an IC with Travel Leaders 904 642 6909 | TLJAX.COM Personal PhilosophyI believe in practicing compassionate, comprehensive, and concise medical care by treating the whole patient, and not just the problem. Specialized services we offer include the treatment of pelvic pain, endometriosis, laparoscopic surgery, Da Vinci robotic surgical procedures, routine/high risk obstetrical care, and 3D mammography. such as same day and evening appointments, in house ultrasounds, and gender reveals. B. Veeren Chithriki, MD 13241 Bartram Park Blvd. Suite 1509-1513 Jacksonville, FL 32258904-680-0055 | www.baptistsouthobgyn.com Monday-Thursday 8am-6pm Same day appointment availability www.facebook.com/vchithrikiAccepting New Patients

PAGE 23

The CreekLine July 2018 | Page 23 GardeningHere we go again By Master Gardener Lesley Arrandale mail@floridanewsline.comSummer rains arrived early this year, in the form of Subtropical Storm Alberto. It is now ocially the hurricane season, and as always, we need to be as prepared as possible, with supplies in hand and an evacuation plan in the event of a potential major impact. Rain in general, both the lack of it and an overabundance, is at the forefront of many a gardeners mind. It governs how we deal with our gardens from day to day, and season to season. If we are in drought, drip irrigation can help save our plants and theres the added bonus that it can reduce water use, saving us from large water bills. If you can install a water barrel which lls from a drainpipe or receives runo from a valley in the roof, the rain collected is ideal for ornamentals; however, shingle roofs can potentially pollute rainwater if new or very old, and perhaps should not be used on vegetables under those circum-stances. Low areas of the yard that regularly be-come saturated with rain can be planted with water-tolerant plants a rain garden. Choose plants which can take dry periods as well as periods of inunda-tion. is website will help guide your choices: https://tinyurl.com/y7srcqxr. Master Gardeners have a variety of tasks we can take on, depending on our interests. But all of us, I think I can safely say, are basically fascinated with plants. So when a group of us recently took a trip to the Florida Panhandle to visit nurseries, research establishments, and the stunningly beautiful St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, a good time was guaranteed! For me, one of the highlights was a visit to the nursery of e MonarchMilkweed Initiative, based at the headquarters of the St. Marks Na-tional Wildlife Refuge, established in 2014 after President Obama signed a Presidential memorandum creating a federal strategy to promote the health of honey bees and other pollinators. e response by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was to ask refuges nationwide to 11401 Old St. Augustine Rd. (at I-295 South) | Jacksonville, FL 32258 | 904-260-1818 |www.rivergarden.org | River Garden Senior Services HAS RECOGNIZED RIVER GARDEN AS THE NURSING HOME IN FLORIDA Rehabilitation | Adult Day Care | Home Health Care | Long-Term Care | Memory Care | Independent Living increase milkweed populations, conserve habitats, and inform the public about the importance of pollinators. rough careful research and experi-mentation St. Marks Ranger Scott Da-vis has established germination methods for the 21 milkweeds native to Florida. To obtain the often rare plants and seeds, he relies on help from volunteers and members of the public reporting on the whereabouts of populations of the plants, as well as undertaking his own reconnaissance (https://tinyurl. com/yb4aq2bj). By judiciously gather-ing plant material, the group propagates thousands of milkweeds every year which are given to groups which establish them in natural areas, use them in the restora-tion of degraded habitats, or plant them in both public and private gardens, all of which help to support the monarch butteries and other pollinators which grace our state. Sadly native milkweeds are still not widely available in local nurseries. But-tery weed, Asclepias tuberosa, is the one most likely to be found, and will take full sun and sandy well drained soil. As with most plants, it needs careful watering until established, but should then be able to survive on rainfall alone. We learnt at the milkweed nursery that milkweeds dont usually set seed by themselves; two or more plants are needed for cross pollination. And if a productive buttery garden is your ambition, plant a number of A. tuberosa to support feeding caterpillars: those monarch babies are voracious eaters! If buttery weed just cant be found, the internet is a good resource, but if youd rather visit your local nursery you are more likely to nd the Mexican milk-weed (A. curassavica). Some caveats: A. curassavica can carry a disease which is harmful to monarch butteries, and it should be cut down in November, both to reduce the impact of the disease and to mimic the native milkweeds dying back for the winter. Enjoy our beautiful butteries and have a safe summer. The Pantry RaidersServe steak alongside a backyard barbecue staple By NewsLine Sta mail@floridanewsline.comPhoto courtesy MetroCreativeMelt 1 tablespoon of the butter in a medium skillet over medium-low heat. Add the shallot and cook until golden and slightly crispy, 7 to 8 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the shallot to a clean plate. In the same skillet, melt 2 tablespoons of butter, then add the mushrooms, garlic, thyme, salt, and pepper. Stir and cook until the mushrooms are softened, about 5 minutes. Transfer to the plate with the shallot and let cool. In a small bowl, use a rubber spatula to blend the remaining 8 tablespoons of butter with the cooled mushroom mixture until combined. Place the butter in the center of a piece of parchment paper. Bring the edges together and press with your fingers to form the butter into a log. Roll and twist the ends before popping the butter into the refrigerator for at least 20 to 30 minutes. Set the steaks on the counter for 30 minutes to bring them up to room temperature. Mean while, preheat a grill or grill pan to medium-high or about 400 F. Season both sides of the steaks with two pinches of salt and a pinch of pepper. Grill each steak for 6 to 8 minutes per side, depending on the thickness and the desired doneness. Tent with aluminum foil and let rest for 5 minutes. Slice the mushroom butter into coins and top each of the steaks with two coins before serving.Grilled Rib-Eye Steaks with Mushroom-Shallot ButterServes 4 to 6A night of al fresco dining next to a grill in the backyard can be a great way to spend an evening. Nearly any type of food can be grilled, and steaks tend to be especially good when cooked over an open flame. The following recipe for Grilled Rib-Eye Steaks with Mushroom-Shallot Butter from Laurie McNamaras Simple Scratch (Avery) is sure to please, especially when coupled with McNamaras recipe for Baked Beans, a must-have staple for any backyard barbecue.8 tbsp. (1 stick) plus 3 tbsp. unsalted butter, at room temperature cup sliced shallot 1 heaping cup sliced cremini mushrooms 2 large cloves garlic, minced 1 tsp. coarsely chopped fresh thyme leaves tsp. kosher salt tsp. coarsely ground black pepper 4 to 6 steaks (such as rib-eye, New York strip or porterhouse) Baked BeansServes 10 2 15-ounce cans navy beans, drained and rinsed 4 slices applewood or pecan wood-smoked bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces 1 cup diced yellow onion 1 cups ketchup cup plus 2 tbsp. unsulphured molasses cup packed dark brown sugar 1 tsp. ground mustard 1 tsp. ground cloves 1 tsp. kosher salt Preheat oven to 350 F. Combine the bacon and onion in a medium Dutch oven. Slowly cook over medium heat until the onion is tender and the bacon is cooked, 8 to 10 minutes. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, whisk together the ketchup, molasses, sugar, ground mustard, ground cloves, and 1 cup water to combine. Add the cooked beans and pour the mixture into the pot with the bacon and onion. Stir, cover and bake for 1 hour, stirring every 20 minutes. Add the salt and stir. Uncover and let sit for 15 to 20 minutes before serving.

PAGE 24

Page 24 | The CreekLine July 2018 PuzzlesAnswers on page 2 Provided by MetroCreative CLUES ACROSS 1. Guinean seaport 5. ey __ 8. Electromotive force 11. McVicar director 13. Monetary unit 14. Mother of Hermes 15. Broadway actress Daisy 16. Tobacco mosaic virus 17. Expression of surprise 18. African nancial intermediaries 20. Fully ripe egg 21. Soothes the skin 22. Editors write them 25. Nashville-based rockers 30. Surgical tube 31. Lasting records 32. Member of Ghanese tribe 33. Being in a vertical position 38. Spasmodic contraction 41. Cartilage disks 43. Domestic help 7. Surround completely 8. A Philly footballer 9. Dinosaur shuang_____aurus 10. Slowly disappear 12. Large antelope 14. Not nice 19. Piece of footwear 23. Newt 24. Seriously mentally ill 25. Kilogram force (abbr.) 26. Terrorist group 27. Negative 28. Time zone 29. A blacksmiths workshop 34. Baked dessert 35. A way to perceive uniquely 36. Breeze through 37. Dry white wine drink 39. Treated with iodine 40. Not thorough 41. Famous museum 45. A way of drying out 48. Small sponge cake 49. Distinctive practice or philosophy 50. Sword 55. Type of missile (abbr.) 56. Home to various animals 57. American comedian Tim 59. Scores perfectly 60. A major division of geological time 61. Spiritual leader 62. Unhappy 63. Unit of force (abbr.) 64. Door part CLUES DOWN 1. Academic degree 2. Expression of sorrow or pity 3. Large, stocky lizard 4. Romanian river 5. Stellar 6. A way to change 42. Supplements with diculty 44. Polynesian language 45. Bangladesh capital (var. sp.) 46. __ and owed 47. Excessively theatrical actors 48. Prejudice 51. Swiss river 52. Nonsense (slang) 53. Luther actor 54. Resist authority (slang) 58. Pinch rfntbfbfbfrfbf fbbfbf bfbfffr rf rnrft rfb ntbbbn ntbtb

PAGE 25

The CreekLine July 2018 | Page 25 Reader Advisory: The National Trade Association we belong to has purchased the above classifieds. Determining the value of their service or product is advised by this publication. In order to avoid misunder standings, some advertisers do not offer employment but rather supply the readers with manuals, directories and other materials designed to help their clients establish mail order selling and other businesses at home. Under NO circumstance should you send any money in advance or give the client your checking, license ID, or credit card numbers. Also beware of ads that claim to guarantee loans regardless of credit and note that if a credit repair com pany does business only over the phone it is illegal to request any money before delivering its service. All funds are based in US dollars. Toll free numbers may or may not reach Canada. ADVERTISE to 10 Million Homes across the USA! Place your ad in over 140 community newspapers, with circulation totaling over 10 million homes. Contact Independent Free Papers of America IFPA at danielleburnett-ifpa@live.com or visit our website cadne tads.com for more information Job Finder is complimentary for our advertisers. Community Marketplace Call (904) 886-4919 for advertising rates W/ 24-mo. agreement. Redemption required. IV SUPPORT HOLDINGS LLC Ask me how to Bundle and s ave. CA LL TODAY! 877-666-2821 Get a $100 AT&T Visa Reward Card when you sign up for DIRECTV SELECT Package or above.OUT WITH CABLE. IN WITH SAVINGS.$100 Reward Card for purchase of qualifying DIRECTV SELECT and above; Oer not available in select locations. For new residential customers in the U.S. (excludes Puerto Rico and U.S.V.I.). Residents of select multi-dwelling units are not eligible for this oer. Reward Card: Will be sent letter with redemption requirements. Redemption reqd w/in 75 days from reward notication mail date. Reward Card delivered within 3-4 weeks after redemption to customers who maintain qualifying service from installation date and through reward fulllment. Card expires at month-end, 6 mos. after issuance. No cash access. For cardholder agreement, go to rewardcenter.att.com/myrewardcard/agreement_FSV.pdf. AT&T Reward Card issued by U.S. Bank National Association, pursuant to license from Visa. U.S.A Inc. May not be combined with other promotional oers on same services. Oer ends 6/30/18. DIRECTV SVC TERMS: Subject to Equipment Lease & Customer Agreements. Must maintain a min. base TV pkg of $29.99/mo. Programming, pricing, terms and conditions subject to change at any time. Visit directv.com/legal or call for details. AT&T Intellectual Property. All Rights Reserved. AT&T, Globe logo, DIRECTV, and all other DIRECTV marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T aliated companies. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. EARLY TERMINATION FEE OF $20/MO. FOR EACH MONTH REMAINING ON AGMT., $35 ACTIVATION, EQUIP. NON-RETURN & ADDL FEES APPLY. New approved residential customers only (equipment lease reqd). Credit card reqd (except MA & PA). Get FAA approved maintenance training at campuses coast to coast. Job placement assistance. Financial Aid for qualifying students. Military friendly. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance800-481-7894 AIRLINE CAREERS Lowest Rx Prices, Every DayStart saving at BlinkHealth.com*Restrictions apply. Visit BlinkHealth.com for more details. ANNOUNCEMENTSBeware of loan fraud. Please check with the Better Business Bureau or Con sumer Protection Agency before sending any money to any loan company. SAPAAUTOS WANTEDCARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!! All Makes/Models 2002-2018! Any Condition. Running or Not. Top $$$ Paid! Free Tow ing! Were Nationwide! Call Now: 1-888-985-1806BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES$100s earned weekly selling sneakers. Text 770-9106872 or PnnyAKickz.comEDUCATION/INSTRUCTIONAIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINING Get FAA Technician certification. Approved for military benefits. Financial Aid if qualified. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)724-5403 AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINING Get FAA Technician certification. Approved for military benefits. Financial Aid if qualified. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-453-6204EMPLOYMENT25 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED! Earn $1000 per week! Paid CDL Training! Stevens Transport covers all costs! 1-877209-1309 drive4stevens.comFINANCIALIRS TAX DEBTS?$10k+? Tired of the calls? We can Help! $500 free consultation! We can STOP the garnish ments! FREE Consultation Call Today 1-855-823-4189FOR SALE LungCancer? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call866-5903140for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. VIAGRA & CIALIS! 60 pills for $99, 100 pills for $150. FREE shipping. Money back guaran teed! Call Today 1-866-339-0930. Attention Viagra users: Ge neric 100 mg blue pills or Generic 20 mg yellow pills. Get 45 plus 5 free $99 + S/H. Guaranteed, no prescription necessary. Call844-493-5940 MALE ENHANCEMENT PUMP: Get Stronger & Harder Immediately. Gain 1-3 Inches Permanently & Safely. Guaranteed Results. Free Brochure. 1-800-3543944 www.DrJoelKaplan.com Lowest Rx Prices, Every Day! Go to BlinkHealth.com to get the guaranteed lowest price on nearly all generic medica tions at a nearby pharmacy. DIATOMACEOUS EARTH-FOOD GRADE 100% OMRI Listed-Meets Organic Use Standards. BUY ONLINE ONLY: homedepot.com KILL BED BUGS! Harris Bed Bug Killers/KIT. Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.comINTERNET SERVICESHughesNet Satellite Internet 25mbps starting at $49.99/ mo! Get More Data FREE OPeak Data. FAST download speeds. WiFi built in! FREE Standard Installation for lease customers! Limited Time, Call 1-800-916-7609MISCELLANEOUSSAVE YOUR HOME! Are you behind paying your MORTGAGE? Denied a Loan Modification? Is the bankthreatening fore closure? CALL Homeowners Relief Line now! FREE CON SULTATION 844-359-4330 A PLACE FOR MOM. The na tions largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted, local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1-855-401-6444. A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted lo cal advisors help solutions to your unique needs at NO COST TO YOU! Call 844-432-3281 NEW AUTHORS WANTED! Page Publishing will help you self-publish your own book. FREE author submission kit! Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: 844-660-6943 Have an idea for an invention/ new product? We help every day inventors try to patent and submit their ideas to compa nies! Call InventHelp, FREE INFORMATION! 866-783-0557 BATHROOM RENOVATIONS. EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Grab bars, no slip flooring & seated showers. Call for a free in-home consultation: 877-661-6587 DRINKING PROBLEM? DRUG ABUSE? Take control of your life today. Find out the Addiction Treatment option thats right for you. Take the first step toward recovery & call now 1-866-943-7748. Were you an INDUSTRIAL TRADESMAN (machinist/ boilermaker/pipefitter etc) and recently diagnosed with LUNG CANCER? You may be entitled to a SIGNIFICANT CASH AWARD. Risk free con sultation! 855-677-0507 Fed Up With CREDIT CARD DEBT? CONSOLIDATED CRED IT Can Help Reduce Inter est Rates & Get you out of DEBT FAST FREE Consultation. 24/7 Call Now: 855-977-7398 Call Empire Today to schedule a FREE in-home estimate on Carpeting & Flooring. Call Today! 1-855-929-7756 FREE AUTO INSURANCE QUOTES. See how much you can save! High risk SR22 driver policies available! Call 855-970-1224 Guaranteed Life Insurance! (Ages 50 to 80). No medical exam. Affordable premiums never increase. Benefits never decrease. Policy will only be cancelled for nonpayment.855-569-0658 MEDICAL BILLING & CODING TRAINING! Train at home to process Medical billing & Insurance! CTI can get you job ready! 1-833-766-4511 AskCTI. com HS Diploma/GED needed. Lung Cancer? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 866-4281639 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. Were you an INDUSTRIAL TRADESMAN (machinist/ boilermaker/pipefitter etc) and recently diagnosed with LUNG CANCER? You may be entitled to a SIGNIFICANT CASH AWARD. Risk free consultation! 877-781-1769 GENERIC VIAGRA and CIALIS! 100 Pills $99.00 FREE Ship ping! 100% guaranteed. 24/7 CALL NOW! 888-889-5515 Cross Country Moving, Long distance Moving Company, out of state move $799 Long Distance Movers. Get Free quote on your Long distance move 1-800-511-2181 Call Empire Today to schedule a FREE in-home estimate on Carpeting & Flooring. Call Today! 1-800-508-2824 HughesNet Satellite Internet 25mbps starting at $49.99/mo! FAST download speeds. WiFi built in! FREE Standard Installation for lease customers! Lim ited Time, Call 1-800-610-4790 Spectrum Triple Play! TV, Inter net & Voice for $29.99 ea. 60 MB per second speed No contract or commitment. More Chan nels. Faster Internet. Unlimited Voice. Call 1-855-652-9304 A PLACE FOR MOM. The na tions largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted, local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1-844-722-7993 Earthlink High Speed Inter net. As Low As $14.95/month (for the first 3 months.) Reliable High Speed Fiber Optic Technology. Stream Videos, Music and More! Call Earth link Today 1-855-520-7938 Stay in your home longer with an American Standard Walk-In Bathtub. Receive up to $1,500 o, including a free toilet, and a lifetime warranty on the tub and installation! Call us at 1-844-374-0013 DIRECTV SELECT PACKAGE! Over 150 Channels, ONLY $35/ month (for 12 mos.) Order Now! Get a $100 AT&T Visa Rewards Gift Card (some restrictions apply) CALL 1855-781-1565 DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Chan nels $14.95 High Speed In ternet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Call 1-855-837-9146SATELLITE TVDISH TV $59.99 For 190 Chan nels $14.95 High Speed In ternet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Call 1-855-419-7188 DIRECTV SELECT PACKAGE! Over 150 Channels, ONLY $35/ month (for 12 mos.) Order Now! Get a $100 AT&T Visa Rewards Gift Card (some restrictions apply) CALL 1877-666-2821WANTED TO BUYWants to purchase miner als and other oil and gas in terests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201 THE FOLLOWING ADS HAVE NOT BEEN SCREENED BY THE SOUTHEASTERN ADVERTIS ING PUBLISHERS ASSOCIA TION (SAPA); Therefore, any discrepancies thereof shall not be the responsibility of the aforementioned association. Your publisher has agreed to participate in this program and run these ads as a service to the Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association. Garage SalesPLACE YOUR GARAGE SALE AD HERE FOR FREE!Email to:classifieds@ floridanewsline.com Massage Therapy Alicia Nordman LMTOnly $50 an hour #MM12329/MA53865 ( 904 ) 514 5788www.hunterlmt.comA New U Massage located in San Jose Office Center, Next to Sonnys and Ace Hardware$5 OFF with this ad. Aqua Pro Specialties LLCPRESSURE WASHING 904-704-1388Licensed & Insured Cold Steel Barber Shop904-527-8444r ffntb Driveways Concrete Removal Patios Driveway Extension Walkways PaversCall Today for Free Decorative Trim with Driveway Job! Catering to the needs of the Homeowner FREE ESTIMATES838-1836 Fresh Look Lawn Maintenance 904-729-1478Affordable Monthly Rates Shawn Wienecke Owner I.T. Promise Inc. Computer Services( 904 ) 287-2254Professional Computer ServicesBusiness & Residential ~ ~ ~ ~www.itpromise.com rrf r frntbf tttr rfnt b fnt n rfffntbrfntb br rfnf fftf Tear Out and Replace *\003:DONZD\\000V\003*\003DWLRV Free Estimate904-651-5593Licensed, insured, bondedPAVERS CONCRETE & MORE St. Johns County Concrete Services, LLCrfntbf FREEestimatesrfn (904) 534-5011 Professional painter needed. Minimum 5 years expe rience must have transportation own drivers license and tools. Drywall repairs and carpentry A+. Pay based on experience and production. No major druggies or drinkers will be allowed. (904)654-4934 Ponte Vedra NewsLine is looking for an Advertising Sales Representative! You will be responsible for selling display advertising space in our print publications. See page 3 for details! EMAIL RESUME TO: PUBLISHER@ FLORIDANEWSLINE.COM

PAGE 26

Page 26 | The CreekLine July 2018 TravelThe new U.S. Civil Rights Trail and Mississippi Museum By Debi Lander mail@floridanewsline.com Call today! 904-217-6916Awbree O'Quinn, DMD Courtney Sargent, DMDGeneral Dentists2233 County Road 210 West St. Johns, FL 32259www.SouthlakeDentalCareFL.com*Offers not to be applied toward account balances or dental services already delivered and not in conjunction with any other offers, discounts or reduced-fee plans. D0150, D0330, D0272, D0210, D1110, D8660, D8030, D8040, D8080, D8090 D0330, D0272, D0210, D0140, D0220, D0230 IT IS OUR OFFICE POLICY THAT THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS THE RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT WHICH IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED-FEE OR REDUCED-FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMEN T. DN20135 | DN21195We accept most insurance plans! Financing options available!New Patients Always Welcome! Emergency Care Cleanings Comprehensive Exams Gum Disease Treatment Root Canal Therapy Mouth / Night Guards Natural Tooth Colored Fillings Crowns, Dentures ZOOM Teeth Whitening Dental Bridges Invisalign Invisible Braces ns! W e l c o m e OR ORCleaning,Exam & X-rays$59(Reg. $295) Offer expires 3/31/18. Includes exam, cleaning & x-rays. New Patients Only.In-OfceWhitening$99(Reg. up to $199) Offer expires 3/31/18. With completed new patient exam, cleaning & x-rays. New Patients Only.Includes emergency exam, necessary x-rays & consultation for new patients. Offer expires 3/31/18. (Reg. $70) EmergencyExam$1 Now Offering Evening Appointments! Ask us about Teeth Whitening DRM26170-7VB Awbree O'Quinn, DMD Courtney Sargent, DMD Comprehensive lifetime dental care in a caring & friendly environment! rfn rfntbrrb rfbfbtntbrrbfbrr frrrr rrrfrfrfrf rbrrbntb r fntbr r fntbb bt bbf btb nb tbb nb tbn rnrfrffnrttbrrbbbbb bbbbbbbbbbb bb bb rfn b brfnbb bb bbbbnb I want cremation. Call for pricingFlagler Memorial Cremation Society rfnt b r A CONNECTING CHURCHOur Worship Services r fnft br rn r Switzerland Animal Hospital rfrrrn tfbtrr fnrtbb rrb r f Companion Animal and Laser Surgery Center www.switzerlandanimalhospital.com rfr(904) 287 2527 On July 4, Americans celebrate our coun-trys independence. While the 13 colonies broke free in 1776, individual freedoms have come more slowly, with the struggle for Civil Rights continuing to this day. To commemorate and explain the journey, the National Park Service and tourism ocials have combined to cre-ate a U.S. Civil Rights Trail: a national listing of locations where important civil rights events took place. ey chose only ones that oer visitors a stop well worth the time. e new Civil Rights Trails col-lection of churches, courthouses, schools, museums and other landmarks let travel-ers see and learn about the activists and the events that challenged segregation and changed the nation. e presence of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the most visible leader of the move-ment, emerges at locations in several states. His birthplace and gravesite sit just steps apart in downtown Atlanta. He led the successful bus boycott after the arrest of Rosa Parks from his rst church, in Montgomery, Ala. e Memphis church where he gave his Ive Been to the Mountaintop speech the night before his assassination at the Lorraine Motel is a popular destination. e motel, expanded into the National Civil Rights Museum, is the most visited restored civil rights landmark in America. e museum highlights the 50th anniversary of the death of Dr. King this year. A stop in Greensboro, N.C. or Nashville, Tenn. reveals the F.W. Wool-worth lunch counters where sit-ins by black college students in 1960 inspired a wave of similar nonviolent demonstrations. e trails stops include four major muse-ums including the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. opened in 2016. Still drawing immense crowds, the museums popularity requires reservations well in advance for its timed passes. e Birmingham Civil Rights Institute, now the centerpiece of a new national monument, faces the park where police re hoses and dogs terrorized demonstra-tors in 1963 across the street sits the 16th Street Baptist Church, site of the Sunday morning bombing that killed four young girls, injured many others, and brought national attention to the campaign for civil rights. e Center for Civil and Human Rights is a major attraction in downtown Atlanta. e newest of the trails museums, the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum, opened in Jackson on Dec. 9, 2017. I recently had the oppor-tunity to tour the Jackson site, the only state-sponsored civil rights museum and one focusing on Mississippi events. Eight interactive galleries grip visitors with strik-ing images and stories. Seven of the gal-leries encircle a central space, highlighted by a sculpture called is Little Light of Mine. You move from the darkened galleries into the light as you work your way around the building. e sculpture becomes brightest when the music of the Movement swells, about every 15 minutes. I found myself pulled in by the clapping, swaying and singing of others who gathered in the space. Warning: is is not a museum you can whisk through; theres no sugarcoat-ing here. e brutal stories make this a poignant place. e Emmett Till case, for example, reveals the riveting tale of a 14year old boy beaten, shot and then thrown in a river for whistling at a white woman shop owner. A lynching tree inscribed with names bears witness to the 600 Mississip-pians hung in the state. e displays include Ku Klux Klan robes and the rie that killed Medgar Evans. e cutting-edge museum includes a number of informative videos set within small spaces like the back of a police wagon or a jail cell. Sometimes you have to wait your turn to get in, but do take the time. Civil and human rights remain at the cen-ter of political and social discourse today. e trail and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum highlight stories that Americans cant and shouldnt forget. I highly recom-mend a visit and suggest you plan to spend a minimum of a half-day. Visit www.bylandersea.com to read more of local travel writer Debi Landers stories and travel tips.Photos courtesy Debi LanderThe Woolworth Counter in Nashville, Tenn. Displays within the Jackson, Mississippi Museum. This Little Light of Mine, a light sculpture, glows and changes color.

PAGE 27

The CreekLine July 2018 | Page 27 Comprehensive Care Is Now More Convenient. North Jacksonville is home to the regions newest medical complex, oering a wide range of leading-edge services, including: UF Health North brings high-quality care to more residents of Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia. A new 92-bed hospital with all-private rooms An adult and pediatric emergency room open 24/7 An outpatient surgery center More than 20 UF Health specialty practices Outpatient imaging, lab and other diagnostic services A midwife-led birth center THE NEWSLINES COMP CARE AD.indd 1 6/13/18 3:05 PM

PAGE 28

Page 28 | The CreekLine July 2018 TakeTHATchest pain.We offer the fastest ER wait times in the area. We're ready to treat you or a loved one during an emergency. Check out our website to see our average ER wait times: MemorialHospitalJax.com/TakeThat. JULINGTON CREEK memorial emergency 42 Doctors Village Dr.(Located off Race Track Road)(904) 230-5000 PREVENTATIVE CARE SURGICAL SERVICES EMERGENCY SERVICES DIAGNOSTIC SERVICES FREE EXAMComplete Physical Exam Included $20 OFFDENTAL CLEANINGMust present coupon. Offers cannot be combined. Expires 7/13/18.$10 OFF New Clients Only WELLNESS MEMBERSHIPMust present coupon. Offers cannot be combined. Expires 7/13/18. OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK EXTENDED HOURS WALK-INS WELCOME CONVENIENT DROP OFF FOREVERVETS.COM FRUIT COVE, RACE TRACK, ST. JOHNS 904-287-5625 2758 Race Track Rd., Ste. 409, Fruit Cove TINSELTOWN 904-619-9733 4372 Southside Blvd. Ste. 309, Jacksonville BAYMEADOWS 904-733-5100 8505 Baymeadows Rd. Jacksonville MURABELLA ST AUGUSTINE WORLD GOLF904-686-9352 74 Capulet Dr. Unit 204, St. Augustine