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CreekLine ( June 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101421/00033

Material Information

Title: CreekLine
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: RT Publishinig, Inc.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date: June 2013
Publication Date: 07-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101421:00040

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101421/00033

Material Information

Title: CreekLine
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: RT Publishinig, Inc.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date: June 2013
Publication Date: 07-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101421:00040


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THE CREEKLINESM SERVING THE NORTHWEST ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMMUNITY SINCE 2001 Visit our online edition at www.thecreekline.com MEMBER OF THE RT PUBLISHING GROUP OF COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS Volume 13, Issue 7 July 2013The CreekLine12443 San Jose Boulevard, Ste. 403 Jacksonville,FL 32223Presorted Standard US Postage Paid Callahan, FL 32011 Permit No.4 What’s InsidePage 3 Whats New Page 4 From the CommissionerPage 5 School District Journal Page 6 The Sheriff Reports Page 8 EPIC detox center Page 9 Real estate in St. JohnsPage 12 Geneva grads Page 13 Civics 101 Page 14 Mosquito control tips Page 16 Marine Corps League Page 19 JCE art show Page 20 Mr. IrreplaceableŽ Page 22 4-H volunteers needed Page 23 Swim safely! Page 24 Purposeful Parenting Page 25 Nease Sparklers Page 26 Ancient City Pirates Page 29 Fishing Report Page 30 Loggerheads Page 33 Garden Club award Page 34 Troop 718 VPK SpotsStill Available Enroll Now and Infant through 4 years old VPK Top notch educators Back to School Special Ask your rep how you can save 5%!! For St. Johns neighbor Michelle Knowles, her trip to the Pan-Massachusetts Challenge (PMC) annual bike-a-thon is not just an opportunity to raise money for charity. It is a passion to honor the memory of a young friend who made a special home in Knowles memory and heart. The 201213 school-year welcomed 150 Switzerland Point Middle School (SPMS) beginning band students which doubled the size of the existing band program. The 310 SPMS middle school band musicians are led by Laurie Zentz, a 28-year veteran in music education, recognized in December 2012 by School Band and Orchestra magazine as one of the 50 Directors Who Make A Di erence.Ž The band busy seasonŽ lasts all year for the Raider bands. The initial fall concert consisted of three class periods of Beginning Band gathered for the “ rst time together to perform to a jam-packed gymnasi-The volunteers are busy collecting donations, booking artists to perform and doing all the other numerous tasks involved in making the second annual Clean Water Music Fest happen. The event is booked at the Ponte Vedra Concert Hall on Saturday, August 10. The “ rst Clean Water Music Fest, held last summer, was the idea of Shawn Fisher and Jordyn Jackson, who are both graduates of Bartram Trail High School. They perform together under the band name, Flagship Romance.Ž Fisher and Jackson started dating several years ago while he was running his band, Son of a Bad Man.Ž Jackson asked Fisher to help her write some new songs for her jazz career and it wasnt long until they were performing together. They describe their style at folk-pop.Ž The two wanted their music to be used for a higher purSwitzerland Point Raiders rockBy Contributing Writer Carol Higleyum with additional performances in the winter and spring. The Concert Band, Symphonic Band and Jazz Ensemble not only performed fall and spring concerts at SPMS and BTHS but took the show on the road for the St. Augustine Christmas Parade, the Music Performance Assessments and the Music USA Festival Awards competition at Universal Studios. Not only were a trifecta of Superior rankings proudly earned, but our brand new Jazz Ensemble stole the show with a “ rst place win and “ ve individual performer awards. The Jazz Ensemble could also be heard at the inaugural Night of the ArtsŽ event, at parent information evenings and during school lunch periods. During the winter season many band students voluntarily committed to perform in the FBA Solo and Ensemble Music Performance Assessment event hosted at Creekside High Second annual event Clean Water Music Fest is coming soon!By Donna KeathleyLargest single athletic fundraising event in the country to end cancerLocal woman rides for Maddie By Karl KennellShe “ rst met Maddie Savoie when she started babysitting Savoie and her brothers; Savoie was four years old and her family lived two miles up the road in the Boston, Massachusetts area. Knowles quickly formed a bond of friendship with Savoie, just as if they were soul sisters. Savoie had three brothers, so Knowles would take v for some girl timeŽ to get her nails done and braid her hair. It became a tradition for the two and continued for years. It was in 2006 after Knowles had moved to Florida and was attending the University of North Florida when the call came that changed her life„ Savoie had cancer. Knowles immediately booked a ” ight back to Boston and visited her soul sisterŽ in the hospital. Savoie was already on her “ rst round of chemo and was starting to lose her hair by the time Knowles got there. Although it was such a super“ cial thing to be upset about, I used to always braid her hair; although I was told over the phone she had cancer, when I saw her in that room in a bandana is when it struck me,Ž Knowles related. I obviously was visibly upset; however, Maddie told me not to be upset because God only picks the strongest. Here I was, supposed to be comforting her. She was the child and she was there to comfort me.Ž One story that Knowles likes to tell is the story of sneaking in Savoies ChristmasŽ Labradoodle puppy HopeŽ into her hospital room. Luckily the doctors and nurses were so caring they turned a blind eye,Ž Knowles shared. I ride my bike in the PMC because the race gives me an avenue to remember, grieve and celebrate Maddie.Ž Photo by Joshua Phillips pose, thus they organized the inaugural Clean Water Music Fest. The “ rst Fest was held in August of 2012 and was a huge success. With the help of their corporate sponsor, Venus Swimwear and the many local businesses who donated to the Local woman rides cont. on pg. 30Clean Water Music Fest cont. on pg. 4 SPMS Raiders cont. on pg. 23

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Page 2, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com Save All Summer onNew or Used Auto Loans Jax Federal Credit Union 200CASH BACK*$ 295 Mandarin Rd. Mandarin Rd.Loretto Rd. Loretto Rd.San Jose Blvd. Ricky Dr. Ricky Dr.San Jose Blvd.

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Whats NewCommunity HappeningsDo you have community or club news you would like included in The CreeekLine? Then contact Martie Thompson at: editor@thecreekline.com or 886-4919. At RT Publishing we welcome Letters to the Editor. We request they be no more than 250 words. All letters must include writers name, address, and telephone number. Only the name will be published. E-mail to editor@ rtpublishinginc.com. Anonymously sent letters will not be published.Letters to the Editor policy The CreekLine The Ocean Breeze Mandarin NewsLine Southside NewsLine Players JournalPublisher Rebecca Taus publisher@rtpublishinginc.comEditor Martie Thompson editor @mandarinnewsline.comAdvertising Sales, Linda Gay LG@rtpublishinginc.comAdvertising Sales, Heather SeayHS@rtpublishinginc.comGraphic Design, Lisa Felegygraphics@rtpublishinginc.comRT Publishing, Inc. 12443 San Jose Boulevard Suite 403 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Ph: 904-886-4919 The CreekLine Community Newspaper is a free monthly publication distributed via bulk mail to all addresses in Zip Codes 32259 and selected routes in 32092 and 32095. Submission of articles and photographs are received by mail or email, although email to editor@rtpublishinginc.com is preferred. The writers opinions do not necessarily reect the opinion of RT Publishing, Inc. Advertising Rates are available by request. RT Publishing, Inc. is not responsible for advertisement content or accuracy of information provided by its advertisers. Nor does RT Publishing, Inc. endorse any of the products or services included in this publication. RT Publishing, Inc. reserves the right to refuse advertisement or copy from any advertiser. All rights are reserved and no portion of this publication may be copied without the express written consent of the publisher. 2013. Mandarin NewsLine+)Southside NewsLine+The CreekLine+ Save 5% on Septembers ad when you book both months! *Oer good for this special section only! No other oers apply. Cannot be combined with agency discounts!Call today to reserve your ad space!904-886-4919 Time for Our Annual Back to School GuideNow is the time to advertise your . .Enrollment for the 2013-2014 school year, Dance, Gymnastics, Karate, Day Care, Schools, and more!The St. Johns County Sheri s O ce announces the next Operation Medicine Cabinet, a pharmaceutical take back program, will be held on Saturday, July 27, 2013 from 9:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. at the parking lot of Julington Creek Elementary School, located at 2316 Racetrack Road. Bring unused or expired medications to this location for proper disposal. (No sharps or nuclear medications.) St. Gerard Campus High School presents a Remember When Super Cool s Sock Hop on Saturday, July 20 from 7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. at Bishop Baker Hall, located at 267 St. George Street in St. Augustine. Get out your saddle shoes, poodle skirts, and black leather jackets! Greasers are welcome! The Sock Hop will feature DJ Tony of Ava/Cameron Audio and Video Productions spinning the greatest blasts from the past. There will be awards for Best Dressed and Best Dancers as well as an Oldies Karaoke contest, hula hoops, food, drink and lots of fun. All proceeds will help the students of St. Gerard Campus, a 501(c)(3) charity. The purchase of tickets is tax deductible to the extent the law allows. Tickets are on sale for $25; pleas call 829-5516 to purchase your tickets! Mark your calendars for this years Tools 4 Schools supply drive! New and gently used school supplies can be dropped o at a number of locations throughout the county from July 22 to August 2. These supplies will be distributed to teachers for students to use in their classrooms year round. Remember to save any unused school supplies for donation when cleaning out backpacks and lockers. For more information, please call 547-7120. Combine art and science to create functional, attractive and ecologically sound surroundings that complement your home on July 18 at the St. Johns County Windstorm Training Center, located at 3111 Agricultural Center Drive from 2:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. Tips on cost-saving, e cient landscapes will help you reduce water, fertilizer and pesticide use. Join Keith Fuller, St. Johns County Extension horticulture agent; Beverly Fleming, master gardener; and Renee Stambaugh, native plant consultant. The program is free, open to the public and hosted by the St. Johns County Extension Service. Florida native plants are available for purchase. For more information, please call 2090430. Residents interested in providing input on the St. Johns County library systems long range planning, including desirable future services and programs, are encouraged to complete a brief survey available through September 30 at www. sjcpls.org or in person at any library branch or bookmobile location. Participant feedback on such topics as facilities, outreach, technology and service will help sta maximize the library systems resources for Whats New cont. on pg. 5 Copies of this Online Coupon is not accepted.

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Page 4, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com e best and most affordable pest and termite service in Jacksonville! Protect your home year-round with theAllgood Advantage Plan ONE simple and affordable payment plan.$250 initial service, $45/month thereaer Convenient all-in-one pest and termite control Full warranty against new termite damage The most thorough pest defense in the industry Follow us on for tips, fun facts and giveaways. www.facebook.com/AllgoodJacksonville Ask us about our lawn care service and receive one FREE treatment when you sign up for the Allgood Advantage Plan!Join the Allgood family.904.323.3609To learn more visit us jacksonville.allgoodpestsolutions.com The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Over 15 Years Legal Experience904-665-0005www.preddylaw.com Construction on the new county Health and Human Services Center has begun and should be completed a little ahead of the deadline for us to be out of the old location. A few people thought this to be a terrible idea; it passed our board 4-1. You decide! The old location on U.S. Highway 1 South purchased by the county in 1999 needed repairs in excess of $4.5 million and was considered functionally obsolete per a recent appraisal report. This would be to a building 40 years old so you still have an old building. The board agreed on a sale to Lowes for $8.0 million. Keep in mind that this would return a property to the tax base that had been tax exempt since the county took ownership in the 90s. This would be an increase to the commercial tax base, the countys number one priority. They would have around 140 employees that would increase jobs and more tax money to the county. The store would also pay sales tax to the county. All of this commercial tax money would be new to the county, helping to reduce the tax burden on residential properties. Lowes did not request incentives, another plus for the people of our county because From the Commissioner’s DeskBy Contributing Writer Ron Sanchez, County Commissioner, District 2 the dollars would start coming in earlier. They will pay impact fees as required. Tax money in the amount of $3.5 million would be joined with the $8.0 to build the new building on property we already own. No reduction in taxes because it is already o the tax rolls. The location is just south of our county administration building and more centrally located in our county. Bus service is available from Sunshine Bus to that location. This would place most county services in a general location. In case you are wondering, we do have an obligation to furnish this service and the housing of this service. We will spend $1.0 million less in your money to build a new building that will be paid for in 15 years (The $3.5 million would be a loan). Lease space was not available to satisfy our needs unless we separated all of the departments all over the county. This would be a real bad and expensive decision for you, the taxpayer. Does it make sense to pay a lease with your money so we can increase your revenue from the person that owns the property? In 15 years we have nothing but a higher lease. Ill let you think about that one! We have a large number of people that use this service from all over the county. The location we decided on is great for the people that use this service. The building now houses the following state agencies: Department of Health and Childrens Legal Services. County agencies: Family Integrity Program (CBC), Social Services, Veterans Services and Sheri s Sub-Station. Federal agencies: Veterans Administration Clinic, Stewart-Marchman-Act Behavioral and Rural Healthcare (Azalea FQHC). We receive lease dollars from some of these agencies at the current market price. The Veterans Administration Clinic is of course a federal service and we are negotiating with them to house their o ce in a separate building from the Health and Human Service Complex. We would construct that next to the HHS Building. The lease dollars would o set the cost, not you the taxpayer. Health and Human Services Center The CreekLine YOURCommunity Newspapereditor@thecreekline.comra e and silent auction, the event was a huge success. They raised close to $12,000. The pro“ t from the event was donated to the charity: waterŽ organization, which is based out of New York City. Charity: waterŽ goes into countries and communities who have no access to safe, clean water and basic sanitation by providing these areas wells and other methods of water access. The monies from the “ rst Clean Water Music Fest provided two entire communities totaling 585 people in Malawi with clean water for the next 20 years. Hopefully the 2013 event will be bigger and better. Some of the bands performing include Flagship Romance,Ž of course, as well as Sunbears!, The Dog Apollo, The Chico Lobos Band, The Rubies, Dudes on a Rug and more are being booked daily. Fisher and Jackson are still looking for businesses to donate items for the ra e and silent auction. If you can help, please contact them at CleanWaterMusicFest@gmail.com. Clean Water Music Fest cont. from pg. 1

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www.thecreekline.com • July 2013 • The CreekLine, Page 5 School District Journal By Contributing Writer Beverly Slough, St. Johns County School Board 287.2794Baptist Primary Care Julington Creek1400 Bishop Estates Road, St. Johns, FL 32259 Celebrating 15 Years in Practice! Dr. Levine is dedicated to your familys health through every stage of life. He has served Julington Creek for more than 15 years and is ready to provide you with a medical home. Services Include: www.baptistprimarycare.net/levine-md Convenient Appointments Before & After Work or School! Call today for your FREE consultation! the bene“ t of residents county wide. To learn more about the many services currently o ered at your local library branch visit www.sjcpls.org/content/ branches. The Bartram Trail Branch of the St. Johns County Public Library will host a childrens FLYP event entitled Meet Your Local Super HeroesŽ and ice cream party on Wednesday, July 31 at 10:00 a.m. You can explore the “ re truck and meet real “ re“ ghters then celebrate your summer reading with ice cream. Thank you to the Friends of the Bartram Trail Branch Library for making our summer reading program possible. This program will be held indoors in case of rain. Please contact the library at 827-6960 for additional information. Julington Creek Plantation CDD will be hosting Crafts on the Creek,Ž a free outdoor craft and gift fair for the public on Labor Day weekend. This event will take place on Saturday, August 31 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at JCP Plantation Park (directly across from The Champions Club golf course at 875 Davis Pond Boulevard). This is an opportunity for vendors to exhibit and sell their work. If interested in participating as an artist, crafter, direct sale business or food vendor, please see www.jcpcdd.org. Flotilla 14-7 of the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary will be presenting About Boating Safely,Ž a course for both beginners and experienced boaters that will give the participant the knowledge to obtain the Florida Boating Safety Education Identi“ cation Card. The course is o ered on Saturday, August 3 at the St. Augustine Campus of St. Johns River State College, located at 2900 College Drive (o State Road 16) in St. Augustine, starting at 7:45 a.m. and lasting until 5:00 p.m. Please note that Florida law requires that all persons born on or after January 1, 1988, when operating a vessel powered by 10 horsepower or more, must have in their possession a Florida Boating Safety Education Identi“ cation Card. Students must register prior to the class by contacting Vic Aquino at 460-0243. The Marine Corps League, Ancient City Detachment 383, meets on the “ rst Tuesday of each month at 1900 hours at the St. Augustine Elks Lodge 829, located at 1420 State Road A1A South in St. Augustine. For additional information, please visit mcl” 383.org. Adults and teens age 14 and older are invited to attend the Project Lap Blanket crochet group at the Bartram Trail Branch Library on Tuesday, July 16, Monday, July 22 and Tuesday, July 30 from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The group will crochet or knit blankets for cancer patients at area hospitals. All skill levels are welcome. Cant come to any of the meetings? Pick up the crochet pattern at the Reference Desk in the library and crochet the blanket in your spare time. Drop o completed blankets and any yarn youd like to donate during regular library hours. For additional information, please call the Reference Desk at 827-6960. The St. Johns Federated Republican Women invite you to join them the third Monday of every month at 6:30 p.m. at Davidson Realty in World Golf Village. Men are always welcome. There will be no scheduled meetings for June, July and Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) and end of course examination (EOC) results are in for the 2012-13 school year. St. Johns County continues to excel in all areas. Our students scored “ rst in the state for every area of reading that is measured (grades three through 10), “ rst in every subject measured by end of course exam (Algebra I, Geometry, United States History, Biology I), “ rst in science in both “ fth and eighth grades (only grades tested) and in the top three in every grade level in math, with the exception of eighth grade. St. Johns County students were ranked 16th in the state for eighth grade math due to the fact that we chose not to double test our students. Districts were given the option of either giving FCAT math to students in that grade who took End of Course exams in Algebra I or Geometry or allowing those students scores on the EOC to measure their performance. We elected to only test our students once, exempting them from FCAT math. Other districts tested them with both FCAT and EOCs, counting their scores in both areas. Since we chose not to double test, our highest performing students were not included in the FCAT calculation, lowering our state ranking. On balance, with advanced students performance on EOCs and the strong results of the remainder of the students, we are very happy with math results in eighth grade. School grades have not been released yet. Even with the very strong showing of our students on the tests, there is a strong possibility that we will see a drop in school grades due to the formula that is used to calculate them. This year, writing standards for pro“ ciency moved from 3.0 to 3.5. In addition, scores for exceptional education students are being factored into the school grade. Perhaps the most impactful element, however, is the rule that requires an automatic drop of one letter grade if the students in the lowest 25 percent do not show adequate learning gains. In addition to impacting the student achievement scores, if fewer than 50 percent of these students score below the cut score, a school automatically receives a reduction of one letter grade. This reduction is in addition to any other reduction it may have received. For example, if a school scores enough points in the formula to earn a B but has fewer than 50 percent of its lowest 25 percent of students make adequate learning gains, the school grade drops to a C. The State Board of Education is looking at the impact of several elements, including this one, that have the potential to drop school grades dramatically all over the state. They have established a task force to study the elements and report back recommendations for any changes to the school grade formula. It remains to be seen how St. Johns County will fare, but there is the possibility that we may see some school grades drop despite our very strong showing on the testing. Regardless of the outcome of the school grades, I am very proud of our students and their teachers and parents for a job very well done. We continue to lead the state in student achievement as measured by FCAT and EOCs. Our students and teachers are the best! All our schools have consolidated to high school campuses for the summer. If you or someone you know needs to register a student or otherwise contact his/her school, the regular school numbers ring to the high school location. All school business will be conducted at the high school sites, which are open Monday through Thursday, from 7:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. July 1 through 7 will be a district-wide shutdown week, so no personnel will be available during that week. Both the consolidation and shutdown week, as well as our practice of a four day work week, are continuing e orts to conserve on utilities during the summer and result in a savings of over $1 million annually. It is really important that we have each student registered prior to the start of school so that we may be sure to have adequate numbers of teachers at each school. Please encourage anyone you know who has not already registered to contact their school right away. Our district website (www. stjohns.k12.” .us) contains a wealth of information about our schools as well as resources for students and parents. I encourage you to visit the website to learn more about our programs and to “ nd the answers to questions. Suggested reading lists will also be found on the website. I highly encourage all our students to continue reading throughout the summer. As always, thank you for your commitment to public education. If I may serve you in any way, please contact me at sloughb@stjohns.k12.” .us.Whats New cont. from pg. 3 Whats New cont. on pg. 10 Dispose of unwanted or outdated prescription medication (excluding sharps, medical wastes, nuclear medications or thermometers)Saturday, July 27 9:00 a.m. „ 1:00 p.m. Julington Creek Elementary School parking lot

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Page 6, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com Gari Dental provides a family friendly atmosphere with a skilled and qualied team, that is knowledgeable in all your dental needs. Our valuable team has over 100 years of collective experience. Call today to schedule your appointment and experience the difference. 287-0033 www.garidental.com Starting from left to right: Pam Parker (O. Coordinator), Cindy Johnston (Dental Asst.), Dr. Gus Gari, Joy Major (Dental Hygienist), Caroline (O. Manager) Buy A Business John SerbCerti“ed Business Intermediary www.FirstCoastBizBuySell.com Call 904-613-2658 for a Con“dential No-Cost Valuation & Consultation Your best investments are the ones we manage. Call: 904-230-1020Tenant screening & placement, Lease preparation, Property Repair and Maintenance — We take your headaches away!Single Family Homes Townhomes Condos Vacation Rentalswww.ImprintProperties.com Imprint Properties, LLC. Real Estate and Property Management The Sheriff ReportsBy Contributing Writer David B. Shoar, St. Johns County Sheriff It has been nearly 49 years since a hurricane struck the First Coast directly from the east and that hurricane, Hurricane Dora has been the only one to strike from the east since records have been kept dating back to 1851. There are only a very small percentage of folks who remember the destruction that Hurricane Dora caused in the early morning hours of September 10, 1964. The storm made a direct hit at then sparsely populated Vilano Beach with its 120 mph winds and a storm surge of 12 feet. Dora continued east to Lake City and then made a right turn and traveled north through Georgia and the Carolinas before going out to sea. The storm caused one death directly and $280 million damage. Although we have been spared from devastating storms we should not let down our guard and be prepared if a hurricane is headed our way, remember it was not too long ago, we had the outer e ects of three storms coming from the west coast that caused substantial damage. I would like to once again devote this months column on Hurricane awareness or safety. Hurricane season began at the beginning of last month and lasts until the end of November and meteorologists are predicting an above normal season in the Atlantic basin with a possibility that the season could be very active. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), predicts that there will be 13 to 20 named storms. Of those they say between seven and 11 could reach hurricane strength and of those, three to six could become a major hurricane. You should be familiar with the terms Hurricane Watch and Hurricane Warning. A Watch is issued when conditions are favorable that a hurricane could strike in 36 hours. A Warning is issued when hurricane force winds are expected to strike in 24 hours. By this time you should already have an emergency plan for yourself and family and begin implementation of that plan. Some things to consider in your preliminary plans are: € Take photos of your property from all angles, it may not look the same once the storm passes. € Plan for elderly/handicapped/invalid care at a shelter or at home. € Learn which routes will be safe during a storm. € Learn where o cial shelters are located. € Trim any dead wood from trees prior to the storm. € Check for, “ x or take note of loose items on your structures (shutters, screens, eaves, gutters, antennas, satellites). € Get and use a hurricane tracking chart € Plan what you and your family will do if you have to evacuate. € Get necessary supplies and secure them in safe area. € Plan for pet care. € Review your insurance coverage. € Protect your important documents. € Show others in the family how to turn o /on gas, electricity and water. € Make outside repairs. When a Hurricane Watch for your area is issued you should do the following: € Listen to o cial bulletins on radio, TV or NOAA Weather Radio and Internet for updates. € Check all supplies you already have to see if they are in satisfactory condition include batteries. € Fill gas tank of vehicles, check oil and tire pressure. € Inspect mobile home tiedowns. € Board, tape, cover windows and doors or skylights. € Secure boat. € Secure any objects and furniture that are outside. € Check on all medical supplies, special needs for elderly, handicapped, etc. € Plan to evacuate if necessary. When a Hurricane Warning is issued here are some suggestions: € Stay tuned to TV, radio, internet or NOAA Weather Radio. € Move valuables to higher location € Move furniture away from windows and cover. € Fill containers (bathtub, plastic jugs) with drinking water. € Use phones only in an emergency. € Bring in/secure pets (food and water). € Shut o water and electricity at main breaker switch. € Leave mobile homes. € Leave low areas. If evacuating--leave early. Sometimes a hurricane path may not be predictable and evacuation orders could come at any time. If you are asked to evacuate, please do so early and know the route you will be taking. Remember there will be many folks taking the same route from a very large area so be sure to give yourself plenty of time to leave safely. Finally, if you refuse to leave following an evacuation order, here are some safety tips for riding out the storm: € Make sure your building is well-constructed. € Turn the refrigerator to maximum cold. € Freeze water in plastic containers, if the electricity goes o you can use the ice to keep food cold in the refrigerator. € Turn o utilities if told to do so by the authorities. € Unplug small appliances. € Fill bathtub and containers with water. € Stay indoors. € Prepare for storm surge and possible ” ooding. € Plan what to do if the winds become too strong. € Stay away from windows and doors, even if covered. € Stay in a small interior room, hallway, or closet. € Close all inside doors, brace exterior doors. € If you have a two-story house, stay on the “ rst ” oor. € Lie on the ” oor or under a table or other sturdy object. Now is the time to go over your hurricane preparedness. If you have not made any emergency plans, you should do them now. Planning ahead will save you unnecessary stress from not knowing what to do or not having the supplies you will need to get you through the hurricane watch, warning, storm, and aftermath. Print and post this list on the refrigerator or somewhere it will be easily seen. Please visit our website, www.sjso.org for additional information concerning Hurricane Preparedness and of course feel free to drop me a line at dshoar@sjso. org. It is our hope at the St. Johns County Sheri s O ce that you have a safe and happy summer.Dear Editor, Conservatives feel that CDD Supervisors should be handling homeowners taxes wisely, conservatively and ethically. Programs that are not well attended should be canceled, not subsidized. So you and I are paying for someones hot dog, child care or activities. We were told we would only pay for infrastructure and activities would pay for themselves through fees, but that is not happening. Thank goodness Supervisors Lansdale and Page are there to slow down these expenditures. A salary survey was done and they compared us to Sawgrass, Timuquana and Queens Harbor. Our general manager was given an excessive raise even though he doesnt have the same education or licenses as those sta We are a government facility and should be using government salaries as comparisons. The head of Duval County Parks and Recreation makes less than $86,000, so why does our GM who only runs one facility make more than he does? The CDD is selling alcohol from 7:00 a.m. until 1:00 a.m. to try and make more money. Fees are not always equitable. Master swimmers get to swim for free three days a week with the head coach while Aqua Fitness has to pay $40 a month. It troubles me when non-residents speak at the CDD meetings, controlling the voting issues when they dont pay our taxes, but get bene“ ts of subsidized programs. The tennis pro makes 50 percent more then the national average and our supervisors give him a raise to $160,000. That is an insane amount of money to pay when we dont see that much pro“ t coming back to us. People are losing their homes so we should be very conservative with our tax situation. Leslie MiedemaHurricane awarenessLetter to the Editor W W W WWWwww.TheCreekLine.comVisit our website:

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www.thecreekline.com • July 2013 • The CreekLine, Page 7 Kids Are Not Little AdultsWe understand that kids are not little adults. They have special needs and an emergency room can be an anxious place for a child. Our physicians are board certi“ed in emergency medicine and our registered nurses are certi“ed in pediatric advanced life support and trained in pediatric medication administration. The Memorial Emergency Care Center Julington Creek oers rapid response for pediatric patients children will be seen quickly in one of our two pediatric rooms. Memorial Emergency Care Center Julington Creek Because kids are not little adults. www.memorialhospitaljax.com With competitive rates and personal service, it’s no wonder more drivers trust State Farm. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Ride with the #1 car insurer in 1001142.1State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, IL Jim Register Jr, Agent 12058 San Jose Blvd, Suite 302 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Bus: 904-268-5522 www.jimregister.comFLORIDA. State Representative Ronald DocŽ Renuart (R … Ponte Vedra Beach) was presented with the 2013 Florida Dental Association Legislator of the Year Award in mid-June at the Florida National Dental Convention at the Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, Florida. Renuart was recognized for his outstanding e orts during the 2013 legislative session where he sponsored House Bill 581. The bill which passed favorably through the House Health Innovation Subcommittee with a unanimous vote, relates to dentist and insurance contracting. We are honored and privileged to present this award to Representative Renuart. He has always been an outstanding advocate on healthcare issues,Ž said FDA President, Dr. Kim Jernigan. Renuart practices internal medicine in Ponte Vedra Beach and is a leader in health policy in the Florida House of Representatives. During the 2013 legislative session, Renuart successfully passed “ ve bills through the House of Representatives, all of which have already been signed into law by Governor Rick Scott. He is the chairman of the Veterans and Military A airs Subcommittee, vice-chairman of the K-12 Education Subcommittee and serves on the Health and Human Services Committee, Health Innovation Subcommittee and Government Operations Appropriations Subcommittee. He is also the vice-chairman The Guild of the Jacksonville Symphony celebrated the installation of of cers and their board at the 2013 annual luncheon held on June 4 at San Jose Country Club. At that time they presented a check for $40,000 to the president of JSA, David Pierson and two scholarships were presented to Andrew Callahan and Michael Kuhn, members of the Youth Orchestra.Renuart named Florida Dental Association Legislator of the Year Rep Renuart receives the 2013 Florida Dental Association Legislator of the Year Award from Dr. Kim Jernigan, president of the Florida Dental Association and Dr. Gerald Bird, chair of the Florida Dental Association Political Action Committee. of the First Coast Legislative Delegation. Renuart lives in Ponte Vedra Beach with his wife, Tamara. The CreekLine For advertising call: (904) 866-4919

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Page 8, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com 700 3rd St | Neptune Beach | FL www.garciainstitute.com 904-567-3841 108 Bartram Oaks Walk Dr, Suite 201 St Johns FL 32259 Come Visit us at our NEWEST Location! BEFORE AFTER Complimentary Consultations for the Latest Advances in: , Juvederm, and SculptraTM and Contoura PlusTM~CALL NOW: 904-567-3841~ Dr. Phillip Garcia is a double board certi“ed Facial Plastic Surgeon. Explore for T reasures! Experience Fun Foods! GREAT Old-Fashioned Market! Don’t Miss Out! Join Us This Weekend! (904) 824-4210 www.StAugustineFleaMarket.com 2495 State Rd. 207, St. Augustine, FL 32086 Only minutes away on I95 @ Exit 311 (5 miles South of the Outlet Malls) The St. Johns County Sheri s O ce announced that $1.3 million was appropriated in the state budget to operate a detox center in St. Johns County. As the largest county in Florida without a detox center and with 80 percent of our residents that needed detox assistance not receiving it in 2012, it was critical that an e ort be made to bring a detox facility to our county for the safety and well-being of our residents,Ž stated Sheri David B. Shoar. We are very appreciative to the State Legislature for recognizing this need.Ž In partnership with the Sheri s O ce, EPIC Behavioral Healthcare will be taking the lead in the e ort to bring a detox center to St. Johns County. According to research, detox services are a proper “ rst step in a persons recovery journey from drug and alcohol addiction. The mental clarity, emotional stability and improved physical condition provided by a drug and alcohol detox will allow for more active participation in the daily requirements of a treatment program. The proposed detox center has earned the endorsements of the Sheri s O ce, St. Johns County Board of County Commission, Flagler Hospital, the St. Johns County School District, the City of St. Augustine, the State Attorneys O ce, United Way of St. Johns County, and Home Again St. Johns. All cite the need and importance of a detox center for St. Johns County residents. On June 1, EPIC kicked o a campaign to purchase and renovate an existing building. According to Patti Greenough, CEO of EPIC, We have a wonderful opportunity to secure a building that will be perfect for the detox center but we must close on this building by August 1 so time is of the essence. This presents a signi“ cant cost savings as a building doesnt have to be constructed.Ž Greenough noted that treatment of addiction is as successful as treatment of other chronic diseases and that addiction treatment yields lower crime and medical costs. Most people are touched by substance abuse in some way … a detox center will allow for the evaluation, stabilization and the fostering of a persons readiness for entry into substance abuse treatment,Ž stated Greenough. The planned detox facility will have 16 beds and be led by a team of physicians, nurses, and trained substance abuse professionals. To learn more about the detox center and investment opportunities to assist in obtaining the building, please call EPIC at 829-2273 or to visit www. epicbh.org. Like many children his age, the week of summer camp is a time that 12-year-old Justin Bele looks forward to every year. But, unlike other camps, the one at Nemours Childrens Clinic is attended only by children like Bele … children who have cochlear implants, a surgically implanted electronic device to improve listening and spoken language skills. Four years ago Catherine Swanson, CCC-SLP/CCC-A, Beles speech language pathologist and audiologist at Nemours Childrens Clinic, recommended that, in addition to his regular schedule of speech therapy, he receive additional, intensive auditory, speech and language therapy during the summer when he was out of school and his familys schedule was more ” exible. Recognizing that there were other children like Bele, the cochlear implant summer camp was born. For one week each summer these 10 children get together at Nemours and spend the week doing science experiments, playing games and making crafts while working one-onone with speech pathologists. For example, an activity with sidewalk chalk can also turn into a lesson on vocabulary and following multi-step directions. Beles mother, Estella Bele, travels from Daytona each year so that Justin Bele can attend the camp and they stay together at the Ronald McDonald House. Once camp starts, it doesnt take long for her to notice positive changes in her son. I notice the di erence right away,Ž she said. It gives him a good feeling being around other kids like him. Theyre able to support each other. Hell tell another boy, You did really well with your Rs and they do the same with him,Ž Estella Bele said. The campers develop their vocabulary, listening skills, language skills, social skills and engage with other children who also have experienced hearing loss. For many, this is the only opportunity they have to spend time with other children who have gone through similar experiences. Nell Rosenberg, a speechlanguage pathologist with Duval County Public Schools, runs the day-to-day activities during the week and works with Swanson to develop activities and lessons to implement. Current and former student clinicians also volunteer their time to spend with the campers. The camp is free to families and is funded by donations to the Nemours Fund for Childrens Health. The group enjoys reuniting each year and also getting to know new campers. For more information, visit www. Nemours.org. E ort to bring detox center to county beginsSummer camp for children with cochlear implants held Advertise inThe CreekLineIt’s good for business!607-5062LG@rtpublishinginc.comA message from the St. Johns River Water Management District...During Eastern Daylight Time, residential lawn watering is limited to two days per week: • Homes with odd number addresses: Wed./Sat. • Homes with even number addresses: Thurs./Sun. • Nonresidential properties: Tues./Fri. Restrictions apply to water from private wells and pumps as well as public and private utilities. Water for no more than one hour per zone Water only when needed and not between 10 AM and 4 PMwater less Visit www. oridaswater.com

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www.thecreekline.com • July 2013 • The CreekLine, Page 9 Call 288-9211 z ay hm Real “NY Style hand tossed pizza at affordable prices. (Next to Publix)Visit: brooklynpizzajax.com Prices, percentages, inventories, agents, appraisals, contracts. When all these things are swirling around your head and combined with historically low interest rates, its no wonder the business of entering real estate can be confusing. According to The Wall Street Journal, mortgage costs rose to more than 4 percent recently for the “ rst time in over a year, as the average interest rate on a 30-year “ xed mortgage climbed from below 3.6 percent to 4.07 percent in a month and the re“ nancing index sank 15 percent, the lowest since November of 2011. According to the Northeast Florida Association of Realtors (NEFAR), Mays $158,500 median sales price for the region as a whole was a 20.1 percent increase over last Mays $132,000. The May median price was also up 16 percent year to date. The supply of homes for sale plunged 43.6 percent since last May, with 4.4 months currently on hand. Despite the bleak history of the real estate market over the past few years, most sources say the industry is steadily returning to its former glory. A brief Associated Press article published just a few days ago asserted that real estate is looking better than it has for seven years. It said, Most US homebuilders are optimistic about home sales, a sign that construction could help drive stronger economic growth in coming months. The National Association of Home Builders/ Wells Fargo builder sentiment leaped to 52 this month from 44 in May.Ž It hasnt been that high since 2006. The National Association of Realtors chief economist also adds, The housing numbers are overwhelmingly positive.Ž So what does this mean for St. Johns County buyers, renters and sellers?Mark Rosener, vice president and managing broker of Watson Realty Corp. says, Our market in Northern St. Johns County is de“ nitely in recovery modeƒit is a tremendously better market in which to sell than it has been in several years. It is also a great time to buy„interest rates being low and pricing still well below the peak levels is the perfect scenario in which to buy.Ž Prudential Network Realty broker/associate Charlie Hillyer agrees. He states that especially homes under the $250,000 price point have stabilized or even increased somewhat in value due to the shrinkage of inventory which provides less competition for sellers. When these homes hit the market, he is often “ elding multiple o ers from buyers. I believe that buyers con“ dence has come back somewhat,Ž Hillyer shares. They believe we are on the rise from the bottom of the market and are interested to get back in the market to own a home.Ž Hillyer also points to the banks that are no longer ” ooding the market with foreclosures and short sales, but rather letting these houses trickleŽ back into the market as another reason that home prices are stabilizing. When asked what advice she would give to someone looking to enter the market now, real estate agent Sherry Davidson says, A buyer should work with a lender and be ready to buy. If they “ nd a home they like, there will likely be other o ers and they have to be ready to make an o er on the property quickly.Ž For sellers, she says, [A seller] should look at their home through the eyes of a potential buyer. They should get rid of the clutter and make any repairs. If a buyer sees that the house is not maintained well, they will wonder what else has not been taken care of.Ž St. Johns County is especially valued for its top-notch schools, making summer the most popular time for families to move. Rosener adds, There are diverse community options from townhomes to single family, active adult communities, golf course communities and the abundance of new home communities. Most new home builders that are active in the greater Jacksonville area are building here in Northern St. Johns. New homes are being built in all price ranges, sizes and styles.Ž The St. Johns County School District will implement operational strategies to save money during the upcoming summer months. These strategies helped produce an energy savings of more than $1,000,000 during the summer of 2012. By restricting building operations in all district facilities during the summer, energy consumption at each site can be reduced. This will require centralization of summer activities in buildings where the lowest energy consumption will occur. Beginning on Monday, June 10, the district will operate on a four-day workweek, from 7:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and be closed on Fridays. All facilities will function in an energy conservation mode Friday through Sunday. Summer activities will be designed within the Monday through Thursday workweek and will be completed by August 1. The district will return to the normal “ ve-day workweek beginning on Monday, August 5. Beginning on Monday, June 17, the district will operate from six high schools and one middle school serving as regional centers. St. Johns Technical High School will remain in its permanent location due to scheduled summer programs. All other facilities will function in an energy conservation mode. Maintenance managers and custodial sta will work at the schools in their region on a rotating basis. Each regional high school will serve as the operations center for the schools that have been assigned to that site. School administrative teams will work in designated areas of each high school. Summer academic programs, camps and extended school year services will be planned, developed and communicated by each school and will operate at the regional high school sites. Sta will return to their regular sites on Monday, July 30. Following are the assignments for each NW St. Johns County school: Bartram Trail: Switzerland Point, Liberty Pines, Timberlin Creek and Hickory Creek. Creekside: Fruit Cove, Durbin Creek, Julington Creek and Cunningham Creek Nease: Pacetti Bay, Wards Creek, Mill Creek and PalenciaReal estate market in NW St. Johns County nally improvingBy Devyn FussmanSchool district announces summer consolidations Tech Tip Tuesday Tues, July 23 € 12 PM Bartram Trail Branch LibraryPlease join us for any of these free sessions: 12pm … 1pm: iPad User Group: Smart phone and tablet users. Come to the fun discussion group to learn about tips, tricks, and awesome apps.4:30pm Picasa: Are you taking a lot of vacation pictures this summer? Come learn about this free editing and organization tool from Google. You must bring your Google username and password with you to the class.6pm … Introduction to Powerpoint 2010: Whether youre new to Publisher or converting from an older version, this is the class to come to if you cant nd that button Microsoft hid this time.For additional information, please call 827-6960.

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Page 10, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com Julington Creek Plantation 1637 Racetrack Road #206 St. Johns, Florida 32259904-880-8796 Celebrating 25 years! MAY Management Services, Inc.Licensed Property ManagerMAY Realty & Resort RentalsLicensed Real Estate Brokerage www.maymgt.com Tim HutchisonRegional ManagerLaura QualantoneCo-Regional Manager 475 West Town Place St. Augustine, FL 32092904-940-1002The Neighborhoods of World Golf VillageDeborah AlleyLicensed Property ManagerKathy May“eldLicensed Property ManagerRich Curran-Kelley, CAMRegional ManagerDottie KrinerLicensed Property ManagerPam Horan Licensed Property Manager Make an appointment today and Save 20% OFF Facial! ~ or ~ Free Blowdry with Facial New Clients OnlyExpires 7/31/13 Calypsosalonand spa VARSITY INSURANCE, INC. 268-6365www.varsityinsuranceagency.com Email: varsity@fdn.com For coverage, service and rate second opinions . Children ages six through 12 can become nature detectives and learn how lizards help gardeners because they are pollinators during several hands-on workshops o ered this summer by the St. Johns County Public Library System branches. Every child attending will receive free gardening goodies, including Nature Detective notebooks and have fun learning all about fantastic Florida lizards and how to spot them with members of the Garden Club of St. Augustine. Registration is required and space is limited. To sign up, please call or stop by your local branch. Ponte Vedra Beach, 827-6950: 1:00 p.m. or 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, July 13 Bartram Trail, 827-6960: 2:00 p.m. or 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, July 17 Main Library, 827-6940: 1:00 p.m. on Friday, July 19 Hastings, 827-6970: 1:00 p.m. on Thursday, July 25 Southeast, 827-6900: 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, August 14 These workshops are designed by the Sisterhood of the Traveling Plants, presented by the Garden Circles and sponsored by the Garden Club of St. Augustine and each librarys Friends of the Library organization.August, but we will resume our monthly schedule on September 16. For more information, please contact sjfedrepublicanwomen@gmail.com. The St. Johns County Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer your lawn and garden questions at the Bartram Trail Library, located at 60 Davis Pond Road at the entrance to Julington Creek Plantation. The clinics are scheduled for Thursday, July 18 and Saturday, July 27 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. You can bring in a soil sample for free pH testing. Instructions on taking a soil sample can be found on the internet. The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-7 meets the “ rst Thursday of every month at 7:30 p.m. at the St. Augustine Yacht Club near the St. Augustine Lighthouse. The ” otilla is always looking for new members, particularly those who own aircraft, boats and have radio equipment and skills. If you are interested, please contact Vic Aquino at 460-0243. The Creekside High Dance Teams coach Krystina Nelson and the Knights Dancers will present the 2013 Knights Dance Camp from July 29 through August 1, from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon at CHS. Campers ages “ ve through 12 and all levels of experience are welcome. Registration forms may be found at www-chs.stjohns. k12.” .us/athletics/sports/winter/ dance. For more information you may also contact Coach Nelson at Krystina.nelson@ stjohns.k12.” .us. The next meeting of the Ancient City Chapter of the Florida Writers Association will be Saturday, July 20 at the Main Library in St. Augustine. Marketing and public relations specialist Holly Feist will discuss the seven deadly sins any author should avoid when marketing their book. Library doors open at 10:00 a.m., the meeting begins at 10:15 a.m. and all are welcome to attend. Programs are presented in partnership with the Ancient City Chapter of the Florida Writers Association and the Friends of the Main Library. All book sales bene“ t the FOL. The Main Library is located at 1960 US Highway 1 in St. Augustine. The NASJAX Skin and Scuba Diving Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the “ rst Wednesday of each month at the Golden Corral Bu et and Grill, located on San Jose Boulevard. The club is open to all divers and those who are interested in diving (military a liation is not required). For more information, please see the website nasjaxscubadivers.org or contact the club president, Dave Martin at 413-8773. World Golf Village Toastmasters meets the “ rst and third Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at First Florida Credit Union (entrance in back), located at 1950 County Road 210 West. You are invited to visit the World Golf Village Toastmasters Club. Our members include experienced Toastmasters and those just starting. Together we share the Toastmasters experiJCP CDD facts: 1. JCP CDD is subject to Florida Sunshine standards for governments. Information requested from us and our databases are public information. Our meetings are open to the public. 2. User fee revenue is collected when we charge a fee for something speci“ c. The 2013 recreation budget projected $1,477,327 in user fees (38 percent of total revenue) and $2,377,983 from annual assessments (62 percent of total revenue). A recent $22,500 donation by the Loggerhead swim team for pool heating equipment is additional revenue. Tennis and Loggerhead swim team programs are the largest contributors to user fee revenue. All departments charge user fees except for administration, housekeeping and property. 3. The most recent recreation fund “ nancial statement (April 2013, seven month actual results) shows $41,521 more revenue and $148,984 less expense than the prorated budget. Signi“ cant changes can occur during our busiest season from May through September. Our budget is organized by operating department to show user fee revenue, direct expense and how much of the annual assessment is needed to cover those direct expenses. Our budgets are available on our website, www. jcpcdd.org. 4. We currently follow the “ scal 2013 budget and have a proposed “ scal 2014 budget. The current annual assessment for single family homes is $760 and the proposed budget doesnt increase that amount. It could reduce the annual assessment if adopted as currently written. 5. Our annual budget and fee schedule must be adopted at a public meeting. In July and August we should review, discuss and vote on both. Participate in this process by attending evening meetings on July 9, July 17 and August 20. CDD supervisors can be reached anytime by email addresses listed at our website; we all read your emails (thats a fact!) My opinions: 1. Annual assessments are paid by every CDD property owner regardless of whether they use the amenities. Additional user fee revenue is collected from residents who do use the amenities. I assume not everyone will use our programs and facilities. That does not make our amenities controversial or less valuable. 2. Our amenity program is “ nancially strong and very successful as a result of diligent work by our dedicated general manager and sta the volume of residents who use our facilities, reasonable annual assessments and user fees. 3. Your “ ve supervisors may not agree on all important issues; that is both expected and desirable for balanced decisionmaking. Respectful disagreement is good; personal attacks are unnecessary. 4. JCP CDD residents also disagree on important issues and want supervisors to vote their conscience based on their thorough understanding and facts. Respectful disagreement is good; personal attacks are unnecessary. This article is my opinion and in no way constitutes nor implies District opinion, endorsement, sponsorship or viewpoint. The views expressed may or may not be shared by the other JCP CDD Supervisors.Nature detective workshops o ered at librariesWhats New cont. from pg. 5Julington Creek Plantation CDD reportBy Contributing Writer Cathy Klein, Supervisor, Julington Creek Plantation Community Development District kfyogabar@gmail.com Whats New cont. on pg. 12 Businessnot as bigas it used to be?Call for a free consultation & we’ll work at increasing your business!The CreekLineLinda Gay 607-5062

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www.thecreekline.com • July 2013 • The CreekLine, Page 11 In the hallways and classrooms of Bartram Trail High School, students are continuously “ nding ways to get involved with the community and make a di erence in peoples lives. There are all sorts of clubs ranging from the Beta to the National Honor Society that students can join to ful“ ll their interests and passions. One particular club, the Dreams Come True Club, that was new to the school this past year, made a special impact on a young boys life. Beginning in 1984, the Dreams Come True organization made its goal to “ ll an unfortunate child with joyous memories. They ensure this by granting dreams to children battling life-threatening illnesses in Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia. More than 3,000 dreams have been granted, from Hawaii trips to shopping sprees. The Dreams Come True Club at Bartram Trail got the chance to participate in this rewarding experience. Started up by Brianna Warwick, upcoming senior at Bartram Trail, the Dreams Come True Club opened its doors for students to join. The aim of the club was to use fundraisers and donations to raise enough money so that the organization could pair them with a child to present a dream to. With the help of club o cers, club members and the club sponsor, Ginger Baker, along with other donations from students around the school, the club was able to reach its goal. The main fundraiser that the club created was the “ rst annual Snow” ake Charity Ball held this past January. They sold tickets, crafted decorations Dreams Come True Club makes a di erenceBy Contributing Writer Megan Grantand threw on a spectacular dance for the students to attend and enjoy, while also knowing they donated to a deserving cause. The Dreams Come True members also made donation jars that they took around to their classes, asking for left over change and generous donations from their fellow classmates. At the end of the year, the Dreams Come True Club successfully raised over $2,800, with 100 percent of their money donated to their Dreamer. On May 8, 2013, 10-year-old Carter Richards was presented with a trip to Disney World and the magical village, Give Kids the World.Ž For a week, he and his family will get to relax and take a break from the stressful world around them, while having fun at the parks and various rides. Warwick, the Dreams Come True Club president, exclaimed, Meeting and presenting Carter, our Dreamer, with the dream of a lifetime was one of the most incredible and unforgettable moments. I dont think any of us expected that Carter would impact our lives as much as we expected to impact his. It makes everything weve faced and accomplished well worth it.Ž Looking on to the next school year ahead, the Dreams Come True Club is already thinking up new ideas and improvements that can grow the club and its impact on the community. They hope to have even more members and people aware of their purpose next year and look forward to granting another childs life-long dream. The CreekLineAdvertise in YOUR Community Newspaper!607-5062

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Page 12, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com Join medical professionals throughout the year to learn about the latest health information. 2009 Baptist H ea lt h 2013 CALENDARAugust 15 How to Recognize Stroke Symptoms Barbara Klus, RN and What to do About it September 19 Treatment and Prevention of the Jason Meir, MD Aging Face October 17 Breast Health November 21Your Annual Primary Lara Church, MD Care Visit RSVP to 904.202.CARE(2273). Seating is limited!Reservations will be accepted beginning 30 days prior to the scheduled event date.BAPTIST SOUTHlearnlunch Call 904-322-0383E-mail: jodell3@ymail.com John O’Dell & Associates On Sunday, June 2, Geneva Presbyterian Church was in an unusually celebratory mode. Honored on that day were 13 students who just graduated from “ ve di erent high schools and they will attend 11 di erent colleges this fall„but thats not all of the story. This particular group of youth from the church had been lucky enough to have been raised by the entire villageŽ of the church along with a lot of input from some fabulous, dedicated leaders since 2006. Four leaders of the church came together in 2006 to speci“ cally create a youth group for sixth through 12th grade students. The focus of that organization was to address four things equally … worship, fellowship, mission outreach and study. As time went by, the leaders “ gured out just how to put this group together for the best development of the kids. The group started meeting on Wednesday nights in the corner of the Geneva fellowship hall. Tucked in their little space, the children played games, read the Bible, planned fundraisers and worked on mission activities. In 2007, 12 of the group went on their “ rst mission trip to Tennessee. That started a run of seven years of sending the group of anywhere from 16 to 25 children and adults to mission work in places like St. Petersburg, Florida and Big Creek, Kentucky. During these trips the youth were able to build wheelchair ramps and clear ground to pour concrete for decking; they painted more fences and walls than that they could believe. They sat with senior citizens and war veterans and ran Vacation Bible School studies; in their down time they enjoyed music and “ reworks. The trips required funds which needed to be raised by the team members. The most unique fund raiser was a Flock the CongregationŽ event in 2008. The kids took donations to put a ” ockŽ of ” amingo in the yards of friends and neighbors. People could even pay for insurance against ” ocking. This was a great church bonding event for the young and the old, netting $1000 to the Mission bank account. Of course there were many car washes, spaghetti dinners, garage sales and chili cook-o events. There was never a short-Mary Polidan traveled to Carnegie Hall in New York City on May 31, 2013 where she received a National Gold Medal at the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards for her Digital Art, Widowed.Ž Polidan was an American Vision Nominee at the North East Florida Scholastic Art Awards (NEFSAA) for this piece and earned a regional Silver Key for her photography. Polidan commented that she is thankful that her ight from New York City ran on schedule as she graduated from Creekside High School the following afternoon. Polidan wishes to thank her Creekside photography teacher Miriam Provisero for her encouragement and the NEFSAA, the Duval Art Teachers Association and the Haskell Corporation for providing the opportunity. Polidan adds, Im honored to receive this award and I know that Creekside will be represented at the Scholastic Awards for years to come with its creative, talented student body.Ž Growing up at Geneva Presbyterian: Congratulations, grads!By Donna Keathleyage of fun, work or learning for the youth of Geneva. This year is the largest graduating class coming from that original youth group of 2006. Over the last seven years we have been able to accomplish our goal of setting these young adults on the right path through worship, mission, fellowship and study. Congratulations to Jordan Alexander, Ryan Cloherty, Jake Bliven, Jonathan Dobbs, Drew Toelle, Brandi Rivers, Kevan Wright, Samantha Fillipo, Reid Arnold, Lauren Cowart, Gavin Loftus and Samantha Clarke. ence in ...a mutually supportive and positive learning environment, where every individual member has the opportunity to develop oral communication and leadership skillsƒand have fun doing it.Ž For more information, please visit www.worldgolfvillage.toastmastersclubs.org. The Northeast Florida Quit Smoking Now (QSN) Program o ers free tobacco cessation classes! The classes meet once a week for six consecutive weeks and provide a free workbook as well as free nicotine replacement therapies (patch, lozenge and gum) to assist tobacco users in their quit attempt. Please call us today at 482-0189 to register for one of our upcoming Quit Smoking NowŽ classes in St. Johns County. You will be glad you did! The MOMS Club St. Augustine-North is a wonderful way to meet other stay-at-home and part-time working mothers and is a fun way for your children to socialize with other children. Mothers with children of all ages are welcome. Members for this chapter must live in the 32092 or 32095 zip codes, including all neighborhoods along the 210 corridor. We meet once a month to plan our activities for the month ahead. These business meetings are held at 10:00 a.m. on the fourth Thursday of every month at Faith Community Church on County Road 210. Of course, children are welcome at all of our meetings and activities. If you have any questions or would like to get more information to join, please email sanmoms@gmail. com, check out our website at www.sanmomsclub.weebly.com or drop into our business meeting.Whats New cont. from pg. 10

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www.thecreekline.com • July 2013 • The CreekLine, Page 13 Fields Cadillac Call me for all of your automotive needs! Jim Seery WGV Resident Sales/Leasing Consultant New and Preowned375 Outlet Mall Blvd. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 904-823-3000 ext. 1030 781-206-7315 jim.seery@eldsauto.com www.eldscadillac.comAsk about our Fields Matters Amenities In 2002, I was taking a Saturday course for history teachers at the University of Florida. One Saturday is particularly memorable not for the class itself, but for what happened at lunch afterward. I was at a pizza place and was seated by the window looking out on University Drive just east of 13th Street. It was an unusually quiet Saturday until a large number of people began gathering on opposite corners of that intersection. On one corner was a large group of whites standing around their cars in a parking lot. A second group of mostly AfricanAmericans gathered on the opposite corner around the large brick University of Florida sign. Then, a third group began to appear. Gainesville police began to park several cruisers on the street between the other groups. Not until the group of whites took from their cars and donned Ku Klux Klan robes and hoods did I know what was happening. For the next 45 minutes, the whites chanted and waved their picket signs with messages of white supremacy while the predominantly African-American group responded with anti-Klan messages. Fortunately, on that day, nothing more happened. Each group, including the police, would pack their things and leave peacefully. So, what? Other than a lot of noise, some slightly interrupted tra c and more than a few tax dollars spent on the police protection, nothing really happened. Or did it? What actually occurred was democracy. Citizens with opposing views peacefully gathered to voice their opinions with publicly funded security protecting the rights of each group to do so. With varying degrees of disruption, such incidents are historically common: the Boston Tea Party, Su ragettes, anti-Vietnam War and the Occupy Wall Street protests are just a few. I occasionally referenced the Klan/anti-Klan rally in my class discussions as an example of several fundamental principles of democracy. It serves equally well here. Weve been examining the 12 principles o ered by R. Freeman Butts as the most fundamental to civics education. The Gainesville event is an excellent example of the next two of these principles, participation and due process. The First Amendment guarantees “ ve freedoms including assembly and speech. Both are activities crucial to free and open democratic participation. We have available to us numerous prudent methods of democratic participation, public demonstrations being but one. However, Butts warned, healthy participation has a corrupted form called majoritarianism; the practice of making decisions by majority rule. In its worst extreme, majority rule can deprive a minority group of its rights, e.g. Jim Crow, womens su rage, cultural assimilation of Native Americans. How, then, can majoritarianism be avoided? Due process is the judicial requirement that all laws be written and applied to all citizens equally. Therefore, regardless of how extreme or controversial it may be, any person or group has the right to be heard, to assemble and to be treated equally under the law. As is often said, I may disagree unto death with what you say, but I will defend to death your right to say it.ŽThe Bartram Trail Branch Friends of the Library is happy to announce a special Civil War themed book sale to be held the second week of July. This will commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. The Friends have been collecting donated Civil War books for the past year in anticipation of this event and have accumulated some 200 titles so far. If you have any that you would like to donate to the sale, they will be gratefully accepted. Proceeds of all book sales go to support the Bartram Trail Branch Library. Funds may be used to buy supplies for childrens programming, for new book purchases or to replace technol-As we enter the summer months and the traditional curtailment of many arts events, it is exciting to hear of a program which is currently expanding both in available space and in activities. The Florida Ballet, which has been in the community for more than 30 years under the direction of Laurie Picinich Byrd, is doing just that. It recently added over 3800 square feet from the building adjacent to its existing studios in downtown Jacksonville. In addition to current activities, this will provide an informal performance venue with tiered seating to accommodate approximately 100 people. It will also make it possible to present such unique o erings as lunchtime programs for seniors and weekend young peoples concerts as well as early evening after workŽ performances and will enable expansion of current collaborations of the Florida Ballet with other art forms such as the annual Ballet de Marais with Walter Parks and his Jazz Trio and Philip Pan, Concertmaster of the Jacksonville Symphony. Additionally, it will provide needed extra studio space to accommodate the recently established Florida Ballet Conservatory. In this program, middle and high school students attend daily ballet and related dance classes and work on academic education in one location. Similar to existing Conservatory programs in other major cities, it provides the opportunity for talented young students preparing for careers in dance performance and related areas such as teaching, choreography and dance therapy, to have the advantage of a thorough training program while providing designated time for academic studies. The discipline of dance training has long been recognized for encouraging good work habits and time management, but if not having to balance academics and dance studies with extended commuting between school and studio can relieve some of the pressure, it can be very bene“ cial. The Florida Ballet training program follows the American Ballet Theatre National curriculum. This can only be taught by certi“ ed faculty and provides National standards of excellence as proven by student examinations held annually. It is a unique method of maintaining standards. One of the special annual summer programs o ered by the Florida Ballet is the Orlando Ballet/Florida Ballet Summer Mini…Intensive. This gives the students an opportunity to work together for two weeks with faculty from both organizations. This is in addition to the regular Summer Intensive and Workshop programs. A performance by students of the summer programs will be held at the Bolles Middle School Auditorium on Saturday July 28. It will feature excerpts from Swan LakeŽ and additional ballet and contemporary works and is open to the public. In addition to many other events, the Florida Ballet will of course present its annual NutcrackerŽ in December at the Lazzara Theater at UNF. It will feature prominent guest artists and will also o er several performances for school children. For additional information on the above and other upcoming events, you can check the web at www.” oridaballet.org or call 353-7518.E Pluribus Unum: Civics for one and allBy James A. Lee, M.Ed., Ed.D. ABD, Peer Teacher Evaluator, St. Johns County School DistrictLibrary to host Civil War-themed book saleogy. The Friends of the Library recently purchased eight new adult public computers and the improvement has been greatly appreciated by both sta and patrons. The sale will o cially begin on Monday, July 8. A special table will be set up in the lobby of the Bartram Trail Branch Library. The books will be available for browsing and purchase during normal library hours for the entire week. For more information, please call 827-6960.Encore!An exciting new arts projectBy Betty Swenson Bergmark, Professor Emeritus, Jacksonville University The CreekLineis YOUR Community Newspaper! Send us your community news!editor@thecreekline.comCreativity requires the courage to let go of certainties.~Erich Fromm

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Page 14, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com ACCREDITEDACCREDITATION ASSOCIATION for AMBULATORYHEALTH CARE EYE CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE & WORLD GOLF VILLAGETHE EYE SURGERY CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE AAAHC 940-9200 T T Network RealtyCharlie HillyerREALTORCell: 904-509-3130Business: 904-260-4300www.StJohnsHomesandLand.comCharlie.Hillyer@Prunet.com For Real Estate Service in St. Johns County, trust 20 years of local experience. I know the territory! Julington Creek Plantation Re creation Center presentsƒJulington Creek Plantation CDD will be hosting a free outdoor Craft & Gift FairŽ for the public on Labor Day weekend at JCP Plantation Park. We are looking for artists, crafters, direct sale businesses and food vendors to exhibit and sell their work. EARLY BIRD VENDOR DISCOUNT by July 21st For more info see www.jcpcdd.org CRAFT VENDORS WANTED! The Florida Department of Health in St. Johns County and the Anastasia Mosquito Control District remind residents and visitors to take proper precautions to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes. We can all take some simple steps to help protect ourselves, our families and our community against mosquitoborne illness,Ž said Dr. Dawn Allicock, DOH-St. Johns director and health o cer. Personal protective measures and the communitys participation in the prevention and control of mosquitoes and mosquito-borne illnesses play an important role in integrated mosquito management,Ž said Dr. Rui-De Xue, director of the Anastasia Mosquito Control District of St. Johns County. DOH-St. Johns and the Anastasia Mosquito Control District encourage everyone to take basic precautions to protect yourself from mosquito bites and the diseases they carry, by following the Department of Healths recommendations to Drain and Cover.Ž DrainŽ standing water to stop mosquitoes from multiplying: € Drain water from garbage cans, house gutters, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, ” ower pots or any other containers where sprinkler or rain water has collected. € Discard old tires, drums, bottles, cans, pots and pans, broken appliances and other items that arent being used. € Empty and clean birdbaths and pets water bowls at least once or twice a week. € Protect boats and vehicles from rain with tarps that dont accumulate water. € Maintain swimming pools in good condition and appropriately chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use. CoverŽ skin with clothing or repellent: € Clothing: Wear shoes, socks and long pants and longsleeves. This type of protection may be necessary for people who must work in areas where mosquitoes are present. € Repellent: Apply mosquito repellent to bare skin and clothing. Always use repellents according to the label. Repellents with DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus and IR3535 are e ective. Use mosquito netting to protect children younger than two months old. Cover doors and windows with screens to keep mosquitoes out of your house. Repair broken screening on windows, doors, porches and patios. The Florida Department of Health works with partner agencies, including the Anastasia Mosquito Control District, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and state universities throughout the year, to monitor for the presence of illnesses carried by mosquitoes, such as West Nile virus, Eastern equine encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, malaria and dengue. For more information about mosquito-borne diseases in Florida, please visit DOHs website at http://www.doh.state. ” .us/Environment/medicine/arboviral/index.html. Baptist Health Foundation is pleased to announce four additions to its board of directors. The Baptist Health Foundation supports and enhances essential programs and services of the Northeast Florida-based, not-for-pro“ t Baptist Health system. Baptist Health Foundation raised almost $12 million during “ scal year 2012, thanks to the generosity of many caring individuals and organizations throughout the region. The new directors are: € Dan Edelman, CPA, managing partner of the Florida practice of Dixon Hughes PLLC. A certi“ ed public account with 30 years of experience, Edelman concentrates on general business consulting. He also serves as chairman of the Jacksonville Public Library Foundation Board and on Kipp Jacksonville Schools Board of Directors. € William Mason, Ed.D, FACHE, president emeritus of Baptist Health. Mason recently retired from the Baptist Health and Wolfson Childrens Hospital boards of directors, on which he served for 15 years after retiring as president and CEO of Baptist Health. Mason was recently named an emeritus member of both boards and he has also previously served as president of the Baptist Health Foundation. € Jane Rollinson, president and CEO of Criterion Consulting Solutions where she heads the healthcare division. She has held top executive roles at several medical and insurance companies over her 28-year business career, moving to consulting in 2007. She serves on the associate board of governors for the Boys and Girls Clubs of Northeast Florida and on the Presidents Council of the Cancer Support Community, an international nonpro“ t that provides support, education and hope to people a ected by cancer. Terry West, president and CEO of VyStar Credit Union, a Jacksonville-based credit union with more than 400,000 members and assets of more than $4.7 million. A former middle school mathematics teacher, he chaired the 2011 United Way campaign for United Way of Northeast Florida, helping raise more than $25.5 million for the community. Each of these new members brings an exemplary professional and philanthropic background to the Baptist Health Foundation,Ž said Pierre Allaire, Ph.D., Baptist Health vice president and chief development o cer who oversees the Baptist Health Foundation. I look forward to working all four of these community leaders who are generously sharing their time and expertise with the Baptist Health Foundation.Ž Oops Unisex Salon is now open at the new shopping center on Race Track Road near the entrance to Bartram Springs. Owner Andraea Green has over 20 years experience in the industry and is an accomplished unisex stylist who has previously owned a successful salon in Boston, Massachusetts. A graduate of the University of Massachusetts Amherst with a degree in economics, she was drawn to barber styling to express creativity and a desire to be an entrepreneur. At Oops Unisex Salon, a Paul Mitchell Focus Salon, their mission is to provide the best quality hair care service especially in the areas of damaged hair, home-maintenance recommendations and creative cuts. The salons philosophy is simple: Customer Service.Ž Green states, We truly believe that the main focus of any organization should be the customer. Without the customer, we have no business. More importantly, we need to understand our customers total needs and make recommendations for their desired results. Our goal is to build long-term relationships with our guests by providing consistent, exceptional and personalized services. Our team has great passion for creativity and professionalism.Ž Be sure to stop in and meet Andraea and her team, Billie, Daniel, Amanda, Crisalida, Jamila and Rickeal soon! Look for their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!New salon opens near Bartram Springs subdivisionPrevent mosquito-borne illness by following these precautionary measuresFoundation adds four new members to its board of directors Tell our advertisers you saw them inThe CreekLine Support our fine Advertisers!NW St. Johns County’s Original Community Newspaper Lunar PhasesNew: July 8First Quarter: July 16Full: July 22 Last Quarter: July 29

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www.thecreekline.com • July 2013 • The CreekLine, Page 15 11945 San Jose Blvd, Bldg. 400, Jacksonville, FL 32223 14540 Old St. Augustine Rd, Bdlg. 2, Jacksonville, FL 32258 Gynecological Care New age bio identical hormone replacement therapy Sekine, Rasner & Brock of Jacksonville oers Womens Health Care for all ages !Everything a woman needs in one visit including examination, mammography and lab assement.In-Oce Procedures (Permanent Birth Control) (Treatment for Heavy Periods) Obstetrical Care Ultrasound Call TODAY for an appointment! BIOFEEDBACK ASSOCIATESof Northeast FloridaChange your Brain. Change your Life.904.646.0054www.biofeedbackassociates.com The American Academy of Pediatricians has given neurofeedback the highest grading of effectiveness for ADD/ADHD. Provides a non-drug approach for diagnosing and treating ADD/ADHD and is based on research that has been widely replicated all over the world. ADD/ADHD without MEDICATIONS Other bene“ts include: completed This months movie review belongs to the “ lm Star Trek Into Darkness an actionpacked, science “ ction adventure “ lm for adults and teens to enjoy. Sometime in the distant future, a crew of voyagers is sent to observe a faraway planet. Captained by James T. Kirk, portrayed by Chris Pine, the planet is a danger zone and breaking the prime directive is just another day in the life of this leader. Though he does save the life of his “ rst o cer, Spock, played by Zachary Quinto, he ends up demoted; however, this also lands him and the rest of his friends in the middle of the destruction of many of Star Fleets highest ranking o cers, by a one man terror, Khan, performed by Benedict Cumberbatch. While he is no longer demoted, Kirk and his crew head into a war zone near Klingon territory to hunt down Khan. Khan is a genetically altered superman who has been in cryo-sleep for a few centuries. The Enterprise has been out“ tted with new weaponry in the form of proton torpedoes and there is an additional factor to these missiles. Many other genetically altered beings remain locked in sleep inside the tubes. Peter Weller portrays Admiral Marcus, who authorizes this journey, though there seems to be ulterior motives in his actions and Kirk will just have to decipher who to believe while trying to save Earth. J.J. Abrams has directed a “ lm that plays with a lot of the classic history that may dismay many Trekkies. Tribbles and Khan are just a portion of the changes. Uhura is well-played again by Zoe Saldana and her relationship with Spock remains an intrigue for the future. A redeeming quality of the movie is the camaraderie and attitudes of the original crew. Bones remains irascible and sarcastic in the face of the stoically logical Spock and forever thrill-seeking Kirk. While Scotty, Sulu and Chekov are all enjoyable in their expanding roles, they remain signi“ cant to Kirks future and future “ lms. Changes aside, though the cameo by Leonard Nimoy does tie in the story of Khan, the story is cohesive and interesting and action is often riveting and de“ nitely entertaining. I will watch the next installment and see where these new actors take me.Locally owned homebuilder Dennis Homes has opened a new model home and is o ering new home designs in the Main Street neighborhood at the RiverTown community, St. Johns Countys only riverfront master-planned community. Homebuyers may select from a wide variety of home designs at the RiverTown community,Ž said RiverTown director of development Christian Kuhn. The new model by Dennis Homes exempli“ es the style and design of a Traditional Neighborhood Development (TND) with inviting front porches and alleys leading to garages.Ž Many of the Main Street neighborhood home sites overlook the community parks and green spaces. The new Charleston model and Main Street neighborhood ” oor plans o er the best in modern living while retaining the charm and vintage feel that is quintessentially RiverTown,Ž said Dennis Homes President and CEO Scott Dennis. The Main Street neighborhood o ers convenient access to the RiverTown Amenity Center and the communitys Riverfront Park. We encourage everyone to visit our new model and beautiful home sites at the RiverTown community.Ž Dennis Homes is o ering a variety of new ” oor plans in its Main Street collection ranging in size from approximately 1,400 square feet to more than 2,400 square feet of living space and priced from the $180s. The Charleston has an open, spacious ” oor plan with three bedrooms and two baths. The gourmet kitchen with granite countertops, oversized island and 42-inch cabinetry opens up to a large dining area and gathering room. Covered front and rear porches, including a summer kitchen with sink and gas stubout for grill, extend the living areas to the outdoors. Dennis Homes also includes energy ef“ cient tankless water heaters, R-13 wall insulation, R-38 ceiling insulation, and radiant barrier roof decking as standards. The model is open daily. The RiverTown communitys design has been in” uenced by Southern neighborhoods of years past, where sidewalks and front porches encourage residents to become neighbors. A pedestrian-friendly community that embraces the outdoors and Movie ReviewStar Trek Into DarknessDirected by: J.J. Abrams. Starring: Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Zoe Saldana, Benedict Cumberbatch and Peter Weller. Review by T.G. Stanton.Rating: Good Movie, Glad to Have Seen It (4 out of 5) New model opens in Main Street neighborhood at RiverTown Dennis Homes has opened a new model and is offering traditional-style designs in the Main Street neighborhood of the RiverTown community. its most valuable asset, the St. Johns River, the RiverTown communitys walking trails meander through the community. Homebuyers are drawn to the communitys numerous amenities, welcoming family-oriented atmosphere and convenient access to top-rated schools. On Friday, May 3, a stormy night couldnt keep away the friends and family of the 12 contestants vying for the Miss Nease crown! After the Top Six was called, one girl emerged the winner contestant #1 Juliana Barranco! In addition to winning the title, Barranco won Best Interview and Best Evening Gown. Other winners include Miss Congeniality Chloe Cegelski and Best Talent Savannah Raney. For her year of reign, Barranco has chosen to bring awareness about bullying/cyber-bullying to her platform. In addition to speaking engagements, Barranco will be making public appearances throughout the community and at school. She will represent Nease in the Miss Senior High/Northeast Florida pageant this fall which is the preliminary pageant to Miss Florida America. Congratulations Juliana! Photo courtesy of Graham Martin Ancient City Photography Congratulations to Miss Nease 2013! The CreekLine YOURCommunity Newspapereditor@thecreekline.comneed customers?lg@rtpublishing.com

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Page 16, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com Mallena UrbanRealtor 11226 San Jose Blvd. Jacksonville, FL 32223C: (321) 543-9008O: (904) 421-7930 murban.watsonrealtycorp.com Follow me on Facebook: www.facebook.com/murban00 ...Serving my neighborhood of North St Johns with Integrity... The Bartram Park Farmers Market Village Lake Circle, Jacksonville, FLnear the north entrance to Bartram Park on Old St. Augustine Road Jacksonville, FL 32258Every Thursday ~ RAIN or SHINE 2 pm to 6 pm facebook.com/TheBartramParkFarmersMarket Grand Opening July 18 Live music, local produce, baked goods, delicacies, arts & crafts, free drawing for gift baskets. Vendor info: nfva.org@gmail.com Christmas in July? Clement Moores famous poem describes St. Nick as having a droll little mouth drawn up like a bow and a beard as white as snow. The piece continues, He had a broad face and a little round belly, that shook when he laughed, like a bowlful of jelly!Ž Moores poetry inadvertently describes the requirements for contestants in the PapaŽ Hemingway Look-Alike Contest. The competition highlights the annual Hemingway Days festival in Key West, Florida, along with a marlin tournament boasting a $250,000 purse and literary short story competition drawing On Friday morning, May 24, under the bluest of skies that matched the blueness of their trousers and as the baking sun sent torrents of perspiration ” owing, the Oldest City Detachment #383 had the distinct honor of being a part of the Liberty Pines Academys Liberty Parade and Celebration Day.Ž Was it worth it? As the Oldest City Detachment #383 Color Guard stood at parade rest listening to the voices of innocents “ ll the air with patriotic songs and as each grade of Americas future paraded by in a sea of waving miniature American ” ags with their eyes wide open inspecting those matureŽ Marines in their uniforms, one could only be reassured that the passing of the torch of liberty to the next generation will glow as bright as each face and yes, it was worth it!Ž Our sincere gratitude goes out to Liberty Pines Academy for the invitation to participate in its ever growing program that showcases its support of our veterans. A special thank you to the faculty and parents: Well done!ŽYou wont want to miss the annual Earnest Hemingway Look-Alike contest in Key WestBy Contributing Travel Writer Debi Lander, www.bylandersea.com Dispose of unwanted or outdated prescription medication (excluding sharps, medical wastes, nuclear medications or thermometers)Saturday, July 27 9:00 a.m. „ 1:00 p.m. Julington Creek Elementary School parking lot over 1300 entries. From July 16 through 21, 2013, stocky middleaged men with whiskers will ” ock to the isle to compete in a pageant akin to Miss America. Some return on an annual pilgrimage with the understanding that newbies score little chance of securing the coveted title. They line up on stage for preliminary rounds showing o their beards and bellies. Hopefuls also receive a generous minute to display a personal talent„frequently a song, poem, literary reading or comic routine. Last summer I watched as many paraded in khaki sportswear, but at least two men wore “ sherman knit sweaters resembling a famous portrait of Ernest. Thats diehard dedication in 90 degree heat and humidity„or is it the importance of being Ernest? Semi-“ nalists go on to compete in the “ nals held Saturday night before a beerdrinking crowd over” owing Sloppy Joes Bar. The Key West watering hole ranks a favorite haunt of Old Hem himself and owner Joe Russell became one of his closest friends. The judges panel of past winners also scrutinizes the contestants congeniality during activities like the whimsical Running of the Bulls.Ž This quirky event satirizes Ernest Hemingways love of Spain and the bull“ ght. Look-alikes pull wooden hobbyhorse bulls through the streets of downtown Key West instead of Pamplona. No one mentions the fact that the Nobel Prize winning writer was actually a young man when he lived in Key West during the 1930s. Seems that older contestants fare better than those in their 50s and no aspiring youths enter. This contest indulges big boys and the Hemingway manly-man lifestyle of hunting, “ shing and love of cocktails. During the festival, participants, known as Papas, meld into a fraternity of sorts; likewise for their wives called Mamas. The 2012 semi-“ nalists included Michael Groover of Savannah, Georgia, who was cheered by his wife, Food Network personality Paula Deen. Deen praised her husbands Hemingway looks, but said he had other equally important qualities in common with the author. Hes all man, hes truthful and honest and (has) really got the spirit,Ž Deen said. The 2012 winner, Greg Fawcett, a 64-year-old North Carolina investment banker, won after his 10th attempt besting the 139 other Hemingway lookalikes. He credited his victory to establishing camaraderie with the judges, timing his haircuts carefully and paying attention to the length of his beard. Upon hearing the announcement, Fawcett looked to the heavens mouthing a thank you. Like a pageant crowning, he was met with rousing cheers and hugs from fellow contestant. Why, I might have even seen a few tears. Additional information visit: www.” a-keys.com. Businessnot as bigas it used to be?Call for a free consultation & well work at increasing your business!The CreekLineLinda Gay 607-5062

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www.thecreekline.com • July 2013 • The CreekLine, Page 17 Same day appointments available. 904-449-2055 ParadisePoolService.net Licensed and Insured State Certied Pool Contractor Lic. # CPC1456905 & CPC1458125 Paradise Pool Service ~ Your Pool Specialist Get ready for swim season! Call us today for these pre-season services: What a wonderful summer this is turning out to be for me; I hope you are enjoying yours. I am making the transition from a city girl back to a country girl and absolutely love it. We made the move into our new home up in Eagle Rock, Virginia just after school ended. We left Florida in the middle of a heat wave and arrived at our home in the hollowŽ and needed a blanket! We have a view of the mountains from our porch swing. It is the perfect place to sit and read. I can hear the creek and the cows in the pasture across the road. We added chickens to our homestead our “ rst Saturday. What an adventure that was. We bought three month old hens and put them in our sons dog kennel to take them home. As we cleaned out the newŽ chicken coop we left them in the truck bed. Next thing we knew two had gotten out and were perched on top of the kennel. Keep in mind, I have never held a chicken before! My husband quickly caught one and tried to pass it o to me. I just expected him to carry them both but that didnt work. As we walked up the hill to the new coop he warned me I might end up with chicken poop on me, not to be surprised. Well, I was ready to let her down on the spot. Fortunately she was good for me. We decided to let all “ ve of them out to catch bugs in the yard while we “ nished “ xing up the coop and boy, oh boy, was that a mistake! They quickly ran for the woods. Our woods has not been cleared in years so just picture “ ve chickens going every which way. We took turns trying to chase them out with one of us to catch them at the edge of the woods and after 45 minutes of chase we just gave up. We were hoping they would still be somewhere around when we returned from our errands. Luck was on our side. We captured two and put them in the kennel by the entrance to the coop. Two more showed up early in the evening and walked on their own into the coop so we captured them and added them to the kennel. Last but not least the most troublesome one made it into the coop as we ate dinner. What a relief; I hated the thought that the raccoons might get them. The best part of our move is that we are less than 10 miles from a brand new library, Eagle Rock Public Library and they have the best collection. I walked in and right in the front with the new books was a copy of And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini. This is de“ nitely his best book ever! I highly recommend it for students and adults both. It is told in di erent voices and through di erent generations. My other adult book The Fifth Assassin by Brad Meltzer is another one I would recommend for students as well as adults. This is a perfect read The SPMS Dreams Come True Kids Helping Kids ClubŽ presented a Disney Dream to a threeyear-old girl with a life-threatening illness at their annual Dream Party on May 14. The over 100 club members are sixth through eighth grade students who raised funds by selling coupon books, organizing a loose change collection, sponsoring a student talent show and selling Dreamsicles to send their dreamer and her family on this special Dream! Making a Dream Come True is only one way in which the students of SPMS help make a difference for someone in our community. Notes from the Pacetti Bay Media CenterBy Contributing Writer Lynn Johnson, NBCT, Library Media Specialist, Pacetti Bay Middle School, IBMYPfor United States history because it taps on all the presidents that have been assassinated and is “ lled with history and intrigue. The next two I read ended up with a common thread, T4 by Anne Clare LeZotte and Blue by Joyce Moyer Hostetter. T4 is told in verse through the eyes of a deaf German girl during the Holocaust. It is a quick read and very powerful. The author lives in Gainesville. I am hoping to see if we can get her to come for a visit. Blue is told by a 13-year-old girl from Hickory, North Carolina during World War II. It is an amazing story of resilience in a very challenging time. All four books are de“ nitely worth taking the time to read.Switzerland Point Middle School sponsors a Disney Dream The CreekLine For advertising call: (904) 866-4919

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Page 18, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com WeRentSunshine.comWalter Williams Property Management, Inc. Cheryl Karl Oce is located in Jacksonville, FL Jamey Johnston, executive o cer for the United States Navy, visited Julington Creek Elementary after his return back to the States from El Salvador after 72 days of deployment. Second grade teacher Susan Baker and “ rst grade teacher Amy Grimm encouraged their students to write letters to some sailors returning from their sixmonth deployment in Japan, El Salvador and South Korea. Some of the singleŽ sailors did not have family here to greet them, so the children had letters waiting for them in their rooms upon their arrival. It warms my heart to know that the sailors felt loved by our letters,Ž said Lauren Cas-The North Florida Vendors Association (NFVA) announced the opening of its second As temperatures rise so can your utility bill. Energy bills are dependent on weather because cooling systems run longer during hotter times of the year, even if the thermostat is set at a “ xed temperature. In fact, cooling your house in the summer makes up almost 50 percent of the electric portion of your utility bill. JEA recommends that you follow these tips to save on your utility bill: € Set the thermostat at 78 to 80 degrees in the summer, higher when you are not home. A “ ve degree shift can save you 6 to 8 percent per degree in the summer. € Use insulated drapes, blinds or shades on your windows. E cient use of window shading can save you up to 12 percent on the cooling portion of your utility bill in the summer. € Use the thermostats autoŽ setting instead of the onŽ setting for your air handler.Grand opening of Bartram Park Farmers Market on July 18weekly farmers market on Jacksonvilles south side. The grand opening of the Bartram Park Farmers Market is slated for July 18 from 2:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m.; the market is set to continue on Thursdays from 2:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m. year-round The market will be located on Village Lake Circle at the north entrance to Bartram Park Boulevard on Old St. Augustine Road. The grand opening will feature live music by Beach Street Boogie and Fermins Spanish Guitar, market gift basket drawing, cooking demonstrations, kids activity, fresh organic produce, baked goods, organic meats, art, crafts, jams and sauces, fresh pasta and prepared Greek, Caribbean and homestyle foods. We are actively seeking out the best vendors from Florida and Georgia for our market. The business community and residents of Bartram Park have welcomed us and we intend to provide them the highest quality farmers market experience,Ž commented NFVA president, Arthur Glaser. Market updates are posted daily at www.facebook. com/TheBartramParkFarmersMarket. Interested vendors are asked to email NFVA.org@gmail.com.JEA o ers tips for keeping your cool € Use ceiling or box fans in occupied rooms in the summer to make it feel 3 to 5 degrees cooler. Because this will make you feel cooler, you can raise your air conditioning thermostat setting, which saves you more money than the cost of running fans. Remember fans cool people not rooms. € Change or clean air “ lters monthly. € Seal leaks in the cooling ducts. Dont forget the leaks around the air handler unit. Sealing leaks in ductwork can save you 1 to 30 percent on the cooling portion of your utility bill, based upon the size of the leak. € Weather strip doors and windows. Repair or replace broken or cracked windows. Weather stripping windows and doors can save you up to 8 percent on the cooling portion of your utility bill. € Install a programmable thermostat. Using a programmable thermostat can save 5 to 15 percent on the cooling portion of your utility bill. € Take advantage of JEAs rebate program, ShopSmart with JEA. ShopSmart o ers a wide range of rebate programs to save you money on those home energy upgrades. € Sign up for JEAs MyBudget program, which evens out your energy costs so you pay about the same amount each month, making it easier to manage your monthly expenses. Learn more about JEAs MyBudget program. € Go to jea.com for more energy-saving tips.Navy o cer visits Julington Creek Elementary studentsContributed by Ingrid Jones, Julington Creek Elementary The CreekLineAdvertise in YOUR Community Newspaper!607-5062tillo, a second grade student. I think its nice the single sailors get letters because it will help them not feel alone,Ž said Andy Stickney. Chloe Dresback stated, I feel happy because even though these sailors didnt have family, they had their shipmates with them to be their family. When they are away, they take care of each other like their family does.Ž Baker and Grimm believe it is important to teach children to care for others more than themselves. They do many community service activities throughout the year that allow for their students to learn this important lesson.Executive Of cer for the Navy, Patrol Squadron 10, Jamey Johnston W W W WWWwww.TheCreekLine.comVisit our website:

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www.thecreekline.com • July 2013 • The CreekLine, Page 19 THE ONLY PLACE MORE LOVING IS IN YOUR ARMS. Tour your local Goddard School and experience why its the best preparation for social and academic success. Goddard Systems, Inc.s program is AdvancED accredited. SAINT JOHNS 100 Julington Plaza Drive 904-230-2002 GoddardSchool.comLEARNING FOR FUN. LEARNING FOR LIFE.SMCALL TODAY!> The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. License #C07SJ0053 Goddard Systems, Inc. 2013 TCLMANDARIN San Jose Blvd. WE’VE LOWERED THE COST OF RAISING KIDS We sell gently used Children’s clothing (sizes newborn to 16) Shoes, Equipment (Pack n’ Plays, Swings, High Chairs and Toys). Come to see, come to buy! With a concept that is this simple saving money is child’s play!Selected Spring/Summer clothing 50% OFF until July 31! 11112-25 San Jose Boulevard, Mandarin, FL 32223 904-886-7071 Bring ad for 10% Off. One per Customer. Exp 7/31/13 May 21 at Julington Creek Elementary was certainly an amazing evening! We would like to thank all of the volunteers for making this years annual art show possible. Our PTO, teachers and sta helped make JCEs Art Show and Ice Cream Social the most successful yet. Countless volunteers helped to make this possible by organizing and displaying student art work throughout the school. I would like to speci“ cally thank Mrs. Strahm, Mrs. Kessler, Mrs. Graves, Mrs. Limoges, Mrs. Bryce, Mrs. Dutrieux, Mrs. Durant, Mrs. Hendrickson, Mrs. Jamsheedy and son Dean and many others for their unending talents and assistance. In addition to art work being placed throughout the school, many of the tables in the cafetorium were colorfully decorated with our students creations. Perhaps the happiest dilemma was the long lines of families waiting for ice cream, our fantastic Book Fair and the butter” y fund raiser!Swiss Point Middle School students shake hands with their opponents before commencing play and deliberate strategy in the SPMS Chess Tournament held on May 18. William Bowman, president of the Jacksonville Chess Club, supervised the tournament. The tournament was organized by the SPMS Chess Club coordinator, Douglas Hayes. The Julington Creek Sharks 6U B team won the state tournament this past weekend in mid-June in Chie and, Florida. This is the Babe Ruth Baseball League. The team is coached by Kevin Huber, Neil Gornto and Rick Sargent. The players names are Jake Brooks, Nicholas Romano, Caden Baldwin, Neil Gornto, Luke Spencer, Josh Huber, John Bay, Jonas Wells, Andrew Sargent, Colyn Muhler, Trent Radford, Aiden Beneciuk and Brett Smithley.JCEs Art Show and Ice Cream Social: Thank you to all!By Contributing Writer Linda McAnarney, Art Educator, Julington Creek Elementary SchoolSPMS plays chess! There were several special features at this years art show. Thank you to Mrs. Nason and Delany McClure for emceeing. Thanks to Sarah and her sta and KidzArt for providing a fun art craft for students to make. Thank you, Mrs. Motley and Mrs. Ellis for all of your assistance as well. Thanks to our generous PTO for the free ice cream enjoyed by all and to the many volunteers (parents, teachers and sta ), who helped scoop and serve the ice cream. Mrs. Piscatella, Andi Piscatella, Mr. McAnarney, Mrs. Woodard, Mrs. Baker and were also generous with their time to helping with this event. I would also like to recognize the additional support of the art program by the Parent Teacher Organization. The “ nancial assistance they provided Erin Durant with her wearable art: sneakers decorated with fabric markers. Liam Conion with his ceramic pizza.throughout the year enabled me to attend this years Florida Art Education Association Conference and helped with the purchase of numerous art supplies. If you have a chance, you are welcome to come and see some of the art enrichment books outlining the life and works of contemporary artists. Finally, thanks to all of the students for their incredible talent as artists and to their parents for their support in attending this years event. This was our best attended art show ever at JCE. The hallways and cafetorium were full of art enthusiasts everywhere.Congratulations, Sharks! Why wait for the mailman? View our digital edition online at www.thecreekline.com

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Page 20, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com Yoga Den Studio6 NEW weekly classes! Group & Private Lessons Teacher Training ~~Ever thought about being a yoga teacher? Well Check this out!! Yoga Den has been certifying teachers at the 200 hr. level since 2004. ~ Proven program at the most affordable price! ~ July has a 3 week intensive that is closed In August we begin the 1 weekend per month for 9 months. In January a 6 month program begins that meets 3 days per month. Expect the unexpected!! ~~ 2929 Plummer Cove Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32223 Located in Mandarin, j ust south of I-295 across from WalmartLive longer! Grow Stronger! www.yoga-den.com 904-268-8330 Workshops ~~ July 13-14th Exploring the Chakras Workshop! Leave feeling relaxed and refreshed! ~ July 19th Yoga Basics workshop: Good for beginners or refine your practice! ~ July 20th Arm Balance workshop Learn to fly! ~ August 3-4th Restorative Yoga Workshop! Restoring connections between mind and Bodies! Congratulations to the Fruit Cove Middle School Navy tennis team, who are the St. Johns County champions! Pictured are Logan Michaelski, Andrew Wolter, Emily Kastleman, Tessa Adylette, Lexi Witwer, Sami Resh, Samatha Shaner, Julia Tyminski and Jenna Barnett.The members of the club Arts in Motion gather once a month to go to Ponte Vedra Library and assist children in arts and crafts. Arts in Motion is a club at Nease High School which meets every Thursday to discuss their next outing. Their outings occur every month and consist of meeting with young kids at the Ponte Vedra Library and collaborating with them in arts and crafts projects. The projects are coordinated with Each school day, as we drove through the student drop-o loop, there was Wynton Hardy with a smile and a kind word. He never failed to lift our mood and change our attitude from rushed to grateful! Our younger son was so excited to see Mr. HardyŽ and wave back to him from the backseat. He would then talk about Hardy all the way from LPA to his Pre-K school. Liberty Pines Academy is blessed to have so many great and wonderful teachers and sta One just seems to stand out among the crowd, Wynton Hardy, who is a custodian at LPA and has been described as Mr. IrreplaceableŽ by some of the LPA sta Many parents of students who attend LPA feel the same way! Here are few of the comments left on the LPA PTO Facebook page recently describing Hardy: You know there are a lot of great people that work at LPA to make the best of everyday, but there is one person that sticks out and goes above and beyond. I never leave that parent pick up line without a smile on my face thanks to Mr. Hardy! He has a great smile and such enthusiasm for life!Ž He is truly an amazing gentleman, and he adds a tremendous amount to the spirit at LPA, as well as to each of our crazy, busy lives as he greets us each morning.Ž I love Mr. Hardy!!! This world needs millions more just like him!!!Ž He made dropping o my sweet boy all through kindergarten a little bit easier.Ž Not only is it great to know he will be smiling and waving to everyone every morning but he also dedicates so much of his spare time to the LPA Cross Country team!Ž Arts in Motion Club encourages student interactivity and creativityBy Contributing Writer Jennifer Lee, Nease High School StudentLPAs Mr. IrreplaceableŽ is honored with giftBy Contributing Writer Stephanie BradfordWe were new here (LPA) this year and he made our transition so much easier just seeing his smiling face each morning.ŽThese comments were left in response to an LPA family looking for a way to recognize Hardy for the di erence he makes on a daily basis at LPA. Families quickly joined together with monetary donations and heart-felt Thank YouŽ notes for Hardy. Tricia Burford, local artist and LPA parent, collected the donations and notes and put together a basket for him. Several families were able to meet by the ” ag pole at LPA and present Hardy with his gift. Just to see his appreciation was overwhelming! With tears he accepted his gift and quickly, in Mr. Hardy fashion, headed back to work. He feels blessed to work at LPA and with such wonderful people. There were just too many wonderful comments to list them all! Hardy is a special person with the amazing ability to make each person he comes in contact with feel special, whether it is a student, a parent or another sta member! Liberty Pines Academy is a better place because of Wynton Hardy and his infectious smile and enthusiastic personality!the holidays, such as Valentines Day, Christmas and Easter crafts. The club is made up about 25 members led by their president, Sarah Davenport. According to Davenport, the club was founded when budget cuts eliminated many school art classes and her hope is that they can expose kids to the arts and encourage kids who may be aspiring artists in the future.Ž Interestingly, members have somewhat similar views on participation in Arts in Motion. When asked what her principal reasons were for joining this club, Claire Lee, a member of Arts in Motion, replied, Because my friend who goes to that club is my ride home and I decided to check it out and I went to one of the meetings and it sounded really interesting.Ž She and Davenport both agree that their favorite part of the club is being able to interact with the children. I love kids, so my favorite part is de“ nitely getting to know the kids while helping them with their crafts,Ž Davenport stated. A lot of the kids that come are regulars so its fun to see them regularly.Ž In addition, they both agree that a bene“ t from being in this club is the service hours for volunteering, which are necessary to graduate from their schools International Baccalaureate (IB) program. Some ideas for the future and the impact of the club have been proposed. We provide fun and free activities for the kids to do with their parents and our team members to promote creativity and better kid-parent relationships in the community,Ž reported Davenport, when asked about the impact of the club on the community. One idea for the future of Arts in Motion is to visit other libraries other than the Ponte Vedra branch in order to reach di erent children. Alluding to the future of the club, she hopes to just stay strong in what were doing and make sure that this club lasts for many more years so that we can continue to provide this opportunity for the kids.Ž Mr. Hardy appreciates his gift. Timothy Colbert, a grade 5 Palencia Elementary student, has won a national re and electrical safety essay contest. The contest was sponsored by The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI.org), which is an organization dedicated to promoting electrical safety in the home, school, and workplace. Tim's essay outlined a plan to promote electrical safety through the use of electronic media. He said, "We should tell people about safety in a way they would pay attention. I pay more attention to important things when they are shown electronically. I think other kids would do the same." His ideas include creating safety lyrics and setting them to popular song tunes. He hopes to show these educational videos in schools, TV and on uTube. His award prize includes a three-day trip this summer to Washington DC where he will visit museums, monuments and the Capitol. Congratulations Tim!Palencia student wins essay contest Everybody reads The CreekLine Shouldn’t your ad be included?287-4913

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www.thecreekline.com • July 2013 • The CreekLine, Page 21 2013 To register for any summer camp, please visit:www. Bricks 4 Kidz .com/saintjohnscountyAny questions, Please call:904-230-0543Or e-mail:Michelle@ Bricks 4 Kidz .comCamps held at Bricks 4 Kidz Creativity Center 530 SR13 N, Suite 5 St. Johns, FL 32259 1 mile south of Julington Creek Bridge Behind Regions Bank WE OFFER EXCITING LEGO BIRTHDAY PARTIES LEGO IS A TRADEMARK OF THE LEGO CO. WHICH IS NOT AFFILIATED WITH BRICKS 4 KIDZ Best : SALON Best : SPA Best : STYLISTS Best : NAIL SALON Best : MASSAGE THERAPISTS Vote with Panache! THE BEST OFŽ St. Augustine, 2013! WE CONTINUALLY STRIVE FOR... € knowledge, creativity and inspiration € keeping active in our community € client respect € giving you extra : PI S T S VOTE AT STAUGUSTINE.COM JULY 12 ~ 31st y The Rotary Club of Bartram Trails fourth Teacher of the Quarter recognition award was recently presented by Rotarians Michael Andreoni and Randy Johnson. The Rotary Club of Bartram Trail works with school principals on a quarterly basis for nominations of teachers that exemplify excellence in education. This quarter the award was presented to Linda McAnarney, art educator at Julington Creek Elementary School (JCE). McAnarney leads annual school wide art activities such as Celebrating our Cultural Diversity, MLK, Jr. Poster and Essay Contest, the Art Club and an Evening of the Fine Arts. In alignment with the big vision goals at JCE, partnerships with Flagler College, Mayo Clinic and Scout Troop 110 enabled a 75 foot mural, Smithsonian Docent Program on American Indian tribes and a 27 foot by 18 foot United States map, respectively. Community art events included Images inspired by Picasso and St. Augustines Mosaic Project for the 450 celebration and student art was displayed at the annual Mandarin Art Show. From a global perspective McAnarney instituted a quarterly book discussion to increase understanding Ingrid Jones annual Papa Johns Beat Mrs. JonesŽ Typing Contest was held at Julington Creek Elementary on Thursday, May 30 and the results are in! Twenty-seven students quali“ ed for the typing “ nals by typing 35 wpm or higher with at least 80 percent accuracy. The top six “ nalists won a Papa Johns pizza and seven students beat Jones, winning a T-shirt too! Thank you to Papa Johns and TCBY on Race Track JCE hosts annual Beat Mrs. JonesŽ Typing Challenge Road for their support with the contest. The top “ nalists were: Liam King 65wpm/92 percent accuracy; Lauren Philip 57wpm/91 percent accuracy; Jonathan Fitzgerald 56wpm/96 percent accuracy; Ava Johnson 54wpm/91 percent accuracy; Josh Jacobs 51wpm/98 percent accuracy; Analia Romney 51wpm/98 percent accuracy; and Jacob McLeod … 51wpm/94 percent accuracy.Liam King, Ava Johnson, Mrs. Jones, Analia Romney, and Lauren Philip, Jonathan Fitzgerald, Josh Jacobs and Jacob McLeod. When the town of Moore, Oklahoma was devastated by tornadoes, Nease High School students and faculty knew they wanted to help out the people who had lost so much. With only 10 days of school left and seniors already checked out for the year, they knew it would be a challenge. The idea came from a faculty member to collect ip ops, an item that all students could relate to and easily purchase, to send to residents of Moore. A Nease teacher from Oklahoma expressed her gratitude to the school for wanting to help out her state and thought the idea was great. So, students started collecting the ip ops along with monetary donations. They also asked the community to contribute by placing ip ops in Nease collecting bins located in the Publix stores at Nocatee, Murabella and Race Track Road. The Nocatee Publix even sold ip ops to customers who wanted to donate. The excitement grew at school and the community embraced the idea. So how many ip ops did Nease HS end up collecting? A total of 780 pairs. Students worked hard boxing up the shoes by size and gender to be sent on a truck to Moore. One student was overheard saying, It feels good to help those in need and work together as a school and community.Ž The schools motto is We Are Nease.Ž Nease students help tornado victimsRotary Club of Bartram Trail recognizes Teacher of QuarterBy Contributing Writer Carol A. Higleyof diverse cultures and partnered with the World Relief Organization serving refugee families living in our community. McAnarney, joined by her family, was recognized at the June 6 Rotary Club meeting. Michael Story, JCE principal, expressed, Mrs. McAnarney is an excellent example of the amazing teachers in St. Johns County. We are very proud of her contributions to the students and sta of JCE.Ž McAnarney joins third quarter honoree Alexandra Martin from Liberty Pines Academy, second quarter honoree Suzanne Mecke from Hickory Creek Elementary School and “ rst quarter honoree Ashley West from Creekside High School as Rotary Club of Bartram Trail Teachers of the Quarter for 2012-13. A special thanks to our business partner sponsors, Bozard Ford and Bartram Park Zaxbys for their support. We are proud to jointly recognize model educators in our local community. Congratulations! The club typically meets at 7:30 a.m. on Thursdays at Westminster Woods in Julington Creek. For more information, please contact club president Thomas Carroll at tfcarrollusmc@gmail.com. The CreekLineis YOUR Community Newspaper!Send us your community news!editor@thecreekline.comAdvertise your local business!lg@rtpublishinginc.com

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Page 22, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com Kill the Keg Kill the Keg *All rates are per golfer and are subject to 6% sales tax *Coupon must be present to receive the special rate for golf / no photo copies *Tee Times may be made up to 7 days in advance Nease NJROTC has so much pride for “ ve former cadets from the class of 2009. Three Present Colors!Ž echoed throughout the St. Augustine National Cemetery at 1000 this Memorial Day 2013 with the reply of numerous Color Guards snapping to attention and the Oldest City Detachment #383, Marine Corps League was proud to participate. This tribute, as all Memorial Days are, is to those comrades who are forever suspended in time, in our memories and in our hearts for paying the ultimate price. It is said that it is our duty to remember the fallen, but we do not remember because we have never forgot. Remembrance is not only shown during special occasions such as Memorial Day by veteran organizations, but every day, everywhere and every place. Just look around and you will see military baseball caps or tee shirts being worn as a badge of remembrance.St. Johns County 4-H Youth Development Program is seeking caring adult volunteers to work with 4-H youth ages “ ve through 18 in St. Johns County. As a 4-H club or project leader, 4-H volunteers have an opportunity to make a positive impact local youth by sharing interests, knowledge and skills. Whether it is robotics, gardening, animal science, rocketry, environmental education, photography … 4-H needs you! Through a learn by doingŽ experience, 4-H volunteers help youth learn leadership, citizenship and a variety of life skills that enable them to become capable and caring The team girls of WGV Gymnastics in World Golf Village participated for the rst time in the AAU National Championships at the ESPN Wide World of Sports in Orlando, Florida. Great success was had by all and the girls brought home lots of bling. Ten out of 12 girls placed elite. Some of the girls took rst on an event bringing home a gold medal! The all-around results were as follows: In level 4: Jolie Baker 36.025, Lily Gendreau 35.85, Isabelle Iannone 36.375, Amelia McKendrick 37.7, Ashley Robertson 36.475, Isabella Storey 36.7, Olivia Vanbennekon 35.5, Danielle Villarreal 33.275, and Gracie Weithman 34.65. In level 5: Chalsea Vickery 35.975 and Kirsten Villarreal 35.85. In level modi ed-optional: Brooke Landess 36.275. Great job girls! A big thanks to coaches Kalofer Hristozov, Paul Lietz, Sheree Wilson and Ashlyn Jockell.Five former Nease NJROTC cadets graduate from military academiesBy Contributing Writer Carol Blair David Towle and Kameron Wrightcadets graduated from the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland on May 24, 2013. Captain Robert Young, senior naval science instructor at Nease and his wife attended the ceremony in which President Barack Obama delivered the commencement address to 1047 new Navy and Marine o cers, calling on all the graduates to utilize the values they have learned at the Naval Academy in their future roles as leaders in the military and our communities. The new ensigns from Nease were David Towle, who graduated with distinction, William Zapala and Kameron Wright. Towle will complete his masters at University of Maryland before reporting for duty as a nuclear engineer onboard a navy submarine. Zapala will remain at the academy to teach sailing to the new plebes this summer before reporting to Pensacola as a student for ” ight training this fall. Wright will be reporting to San Diego, California to serve as a surface warfare o cer aboard a Navy frigate. A fourth Nease NJROTC cadet, Alex Alpert, graduated from United States Military Academy (USMA) West Point, In New York, on May 25, 2013. Alpert will be reporting to Fort Benning for armored training. Additionally, Dimitri Paspalaris, also a 2009 Nease NJROTC graduate, completed his degree at The Citadel. He ranked fourth in his graduating class. He will be reporting for duty as a surface warfare o cer in Hawaii. It is an extremely rare opportunity for this many students from one school to receive appointments to any academy at one time. This is a testament to the education they received at Nease High School and the Navy JROTC program. 4-H Youth Program seeks volunteersBy Contributing Writer Geralyn Sachs, SJC 4-H Extension Agentcitizens. 4-H volunteers have the ” exibility to determine the amount of time, location and subject area they prefer. Volunteers receive full assistance of the 4-H o ce, including training, o ce support, and a variety of resource materials and project curriculum. If you are interested in learning more about becoming a 4-H volunteer, please drop by the 4-H o ce at the St. Johns County Agricultural Center, located at 3125 Agricultural Center Drive in St. Augustine or call Geralyn Sachs, 4-H Extension Agent at 209-0430. New 4-H volunteer leader trainings will take place at the Extension O ce on Monday, July 22 and Thursday, July 25 from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the 4-H O ce if you plan to attend. Help the youth of St. Johns County to be the best that they can be by becoming a 4-H volunteer. 4-H is a community of young people across America learning leadership, citizenship and life skills. As one of our nations oldest, yet most current organizations, 4-H is reaching millions of young people with positive youth development opportunities. Victorious weekend for WGV Gymnastics team

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www.thecreekline.com • July 2013 • The CreekLine, Page 23 Open Mondays through Fridays 8:30am – 5pm 1631 Race Track Road Suite 101230-7977Most Insurances AcceptedPediatric Associates of Julington Creek, PAOffering care for Infants, Children & Adolescents Mary Ann Garcia, M.D., FAAP Victor Luz, M.D., FAAP Tami Newbern, ARNP FLAG FOOTBALL & CHEERLEADINGGRADES 1 … 8 (FOOTBALL) GRADES K-5 (CHEERLEADING) CO-ED LEAGUES Evaluation/Orientation Dates: Aug 8, 10, or 12 (attend one) Fruit Cove Baptist Church Online registrations will begin July 1st. Register and pay securely online at www.fruitcove.com/sports.php FALL REGISTRATION! July 25 ~ 4-6:30 ~ Julington Creek & Mandarin July 31 & August 1 ~ 4-6:30 ~ All Locations Mark SpivaksInstitute & Dance ExtensionJulington Creek230-7778106 Julington PlazaCorner Race Track Road & Flora BranchMandarin 268-3583 3740 San Jose PlaceOne block N. of Crown PointFruit Cove 287-4619774 N SR 13One mile South Julington Creek Bridge Oering Outstanding Dance Instruction For All Ages For 3 Decades! Visit our Website for Schedules & Forms www.markspivak.com $10.00OFFNew Students Only bring in this ad The Seventh Coast Guard District has received reports of missing swimmers already this summer and urges everyone to take necessary safety precautions before and while swimming. Drowning is the “ fth leading cause of accidental death in the United States. On average, 10 people die from unintentional drowning every day. Of these, two are children aged 14 or younger. In an e ort to save lives, the Coast Guard recommends the following for all swimmers: Swim near a lifeguard. United States Lifesaving Association statistics, during a 10-year period, show that the chance of drowning at a beach without lifeguard protection is almost “ ve times greater than drowning at a beach with lifeguards. Never swim alone. Many drownings involve single swimmers. Learn water rescue techniques you can use if someone you are swimming with is in danger. Dont “ ght the current. If caught in a rip current, dont “ ght it by trying to swim directly to shore. Instead, swim parallel to shore until you feel the current relax, then swim to shore. Most rip currents are narrow and a short swim parallel to shore will bring a swimmer to safety.Village Academy North recently hosted a butter” y release event to celebrate the life of Zacharie VanEkeris, who died in February after an accident on his motorcycle at age 23. Mr. ZakŽ was beloved by his family and friends and he also made a signi“ cant impact on the students in his class. VanEkeris worked with the extended day program at Palencia Elementary School in the mornings before school started and then he would travel to Village Academy North where he worked as an aide in a VPK classroom. In the afternoon he would return to Palencia Elementary School to work with students in the extended day program after dismissal. After 32 years in the childcare business, I have only met two people who have had an instant rapport with children,Ž explained Babette Weaver, co-owner and operator of The Village Academy and Village Academy North. Zak was certainly one of them. The children knew, instinctively, that he cared about them, and they loved him right back.Ž Because of his devotion to helping children, VanEkeriss co-workers, family and friends have worked to create a fund in his memory. The Mr. Zak Fund will help provide summer camp scholarships to children who might otherwise be unable to attend. The fund works directly with area summer camps to pay for one week of camp in exchange for a second week being donated by the camp provider, giving each scholarship recipient two weeks at camp. Zak was a wonderful child,Ž said his father Andre, who attended the butter” y release in his sons name. He Coast Guard urges swimmers to remain vigilant and safeSwim sober. Alcohol is a major factor in drowning. Alcohol can reduce body temperature and impair swimming ability. Both alcohol and drugs impair good judgment, which may cause people to take risks they would not otherwise take. Dont ” oat where you cant swim. Non-swimmers and weak swimmers often use ” otation devices, such as in” atable rafts, to go o shore. If they fall o they can quickly drown. No one should use a ” otation device unless they are able to swim. Weak swimmers should also consider wearing an inherently buoyant Coast Guard-approved Type I, II or III life jacket. Prepare for the unexpected. Wear a life jacket while participating in any activity during which you would unexpectedly enter the water, such as “ shing from breakwalls or piers. Avoid unnecessary risks. Walking along breakwalls is risky because it only takes a momentary loss of footing to invite tragedy. Jumping from breakwalls, waterside structures or into unfamiliar water is extremely dangerous since unseen underwater hazards may exist. Additional water safety tips are available on the United States Lifesaving Association website, www.usla.org.Mr. Zak Fund established to help kids go to campespecially liked promoting physical education for children, and I know that this fund is something he would be very proud of. After such a tragedy, I am grateful that we have a chance to keep his memory alive.Ž Curt Weaver, co-owner and operator, said that Zak was a positive in” uence on everyone he worked with at the school. I have never met a more relentlessly happy person in my life,Ž Weaver said. It didnt matter if it was 6:30 in the morning or 6:00 at nightƒZak had a smile and a kind word for everyone he met.Ž Paperwork has been submitted to the IRS to establish the fund as a non-pro“ t entity. Donations are greatly appreciated and can be accepted at any Prosperity Bank Branch with a deposit to the Mr. Zak Fund. Do you enjoy receiving The CreekLine each month?Then our Advertisers!As a non-subscription publication we rely on our fine advertisers to finance the production of your community newspaper! Be sure to patronize our advertisers and tell them you saw them in The CreekLineThank SPMS Raiders cont. from pg. 1School. Thanks to practices with and direction from SPMS band leadership, guest clinicians and Bartram Trail High School band students, our Raiders rocked with 44 Superior and 25 Excellent ratings out of 69 total performances. Students eighth grade year is special in many ways and band participation is no exception. The eighth graders joined Bartram Trails Spirit of BartramŽ band for the football game against Wolfson High School and select students had the opportunity to participate in the All County Middle School Honors Band with peers from all seven St. Johns County middle schools. One talented bassoonist, Erin Kirsche, was also selected for Floridas All State Honor Band and performed in Tampa representing SPMS! The arts are a vital component to the holistic development of our youth, cultivating creativity, expression, problemsolving and innovation. This years band students soared academically in SPMS and district level competitions throughout the year. The SPMS spelling bee winner, six out of 10 science fair winners, eight out of 11 history fair winners, three out of “ ve math counts winners and “ ve out of “ ve battle of the books winners were band students. Thanks to SPMS administrations support for the arts, the Raiders band program continues to expand as Zentz will be directing three Beginning Bands, Concert Band, Symphonic Band, Wind Symphony and Jazz Ensemble this upcoming year with a total of 385 students.

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Page 24, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com A CONNECTING CHURCH Our Sunday Services Traditional Worship 8:30am Sunday School 9:45am Contemporary Worship 11:00amwww.switzerlandcommunitychurch.org likeŽ us on Facebook “I want cremation.”$650 Flagler Memorial Cremation Society669-1809 A friend gave me two bags over” owing with paperback books. I devoured them. I forgot how much I love a good, suspenseful read! I allowed myself to get lost in the twisting plot, urging victims not to answer the door, risk that meeting or sleuth in the dark. They should know better!Ž I routinely exclaimed. I related to the characters and wanted to help them. I liked them. Meanwhile, I was not relating to my children„or liking them when they interrupted me! I would promise to come play at the end of this sectionŽ knowing full well I just started a new chapter. I was an accomplice to summertime murder! Free time with my children was the victim. Oh, mamma, will you ever learn?! Summertime spreads before us with months of unplanned days waiting to be “ lled. Instead of escaping to something, escape with your children! Of course reading is a fantastic pastime. But if your littles want a story or the big kids need to chat, remind yourself whats most important... the relationship with your kiddos. One way our family has cultivated a love of reading and developed our own family culture is through reading aloud. This isnt only good for pre-readers. Our teen is regularly the one to start the chant, read more! read more! read more!Ž when I try to set a book down. Through reading aloud, weve learned of new places, shared inside jokes and laughed together a lot. If reading aloud is new in your family, you may like the antics of Cheaper by the Dozen. The school year is so busy Helping Hands of St. Johns County will be meeting on Friday, July 26 at 11:00 a.m. at Faith Community Church Community Center, located on County Road 210 next to Cimarrone. This months project will be the out“ tting of 25 students from Crookshank Elementary School in St. Augustine. The children will be provided a new out“ t and sneakers for their “ rst day of school. This is the third year the group has helped the school. In June, Helping Hands collected new underwear for St. Francis House and Home Again St. Johns, which both help the homeless population in St. Augustine. They also helped coordinate the annual Fathers Day barbeque at Trout Creek for our senior citizens. Members served food, visited with COA members, played games and brought gifts for both the fathers and all COA attendees. Helping Hands is a volunteer organization that meets once a month, on the last Friday, at Faith Community to do a small project to bene“ t others. There are no dues, o cers or stress. Members come when they can and do what they can with what is donated. If you Faith NewsDo you have church or synagogue news you would like included in The CreekLine? Then contact Martie Thompson at: editor@thecreekline.com or 886-4919. Invitethe community to your House of Worshipeditor@thecreekline.comHelping Hands updateBy Contributing Writer Jackie Valyouhave a donation (not monetary) of anything you might think someone can use, you may contact jacqphil@aol.com. If we cant use it for a project we will in turn pass it to an organization that can. Thank you for all the community support; we rely solely on donations of goods and services. Purposeful ParentingSummertime murderBy Allie Olsenfor most families. Our “ vegrade home school next year will involve three co-ops in addition to family learning here at home, visits with out-of-town family, time with friends and fellowship with our church family. My heart is beating fast just thinking about it! For me, the temptation to unplug from everything and everyone during summer can be great. But God has placed these precious children in my care„not just to feed, clothe and protect, but to nurture, educate and shape into respectful, caring and godly men and women. So Ill set my book down mid-sentence. Ill go outside in the sweltering heat to see my marksman take aim with his bow. Ill read A Mother for Choco and Click, Clack, Moo Cows That Type to my twoyear old again and again. Ill listen to tales of Clash of Clans even though I couldnt care less about elixir drills or healers. I dont listen because I care about iPad games, but because Im communicating to my children that I care about them. I wont kill our summer for my own desires. And when they happen to be engrossed with a game or a book and I can sneak in an extra chapter of my book, Ill enjoy a bit of summertime murder alongside them. Dignity U Wears Undie Campaign experienced another record setting year, generating over 170,000 undergarments, an increase of 50,000 pieces over the 2012 campaign. Collected garments include underwear, bras, socks and undershirts. Additionally, Dignity U Wear received $25,000 in monetary donations as a result of the campaign. Donations came from apparel companies, businesses, faith groups, schools, civic associations and profes-Dignity U Wears Campaign breaks recordssional groups. We have been very touched by the national support we received this year,Ž said executive director, Barbara Truncellito. The message of the Undie Campaign resonated with Americans wanting to help individuals who are struggling.Ž The success of the campaign is in large part due to the sponsors, Tommy Hil“ ger, Delta Galil, CATO, Maidenform, Fishman and Tobin, Thorlo and Caring for Others. Since the campaign was introduced nine years ago, it has collected more than 800,000 undergarments. The clothing is donated to school children, homeless and wounded veterans and women in crisis through a network of over 300 social service agencies throughout the United States. Underwear is the most requested item of clothing and the Undie Campaign helps stock the organizations inventory needs for the entire year. Early to bed.....and ADVERTISE!The CreekLine 607-5062LG@RTPublishing.comWork real hard..... Early to rise....

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www.thecreekline.com • July 2013 • The CreekLine, Page 25 Get Fuel Efficient with the O’Steen Volkswagen 40+ mpg VW Club Volkswagen has seven models in its lineup capable of achieving more than 40 highway miles per gallon (mpg).* That’s more than any other manufacturer in the United States. *EPA estimates. Your mileage will vary. VW TDI Clean Diesel and VW Hybrid vehicles are built for the eco-conscious and the high-performance conscious. Have a great time in a VW fuel-efficient vehicle, passing all the other fuel-efficient vehicles out there! Starting at $25,945 Starting at $26,706 1 1401 Philips Hwy Jacksonville, FL 32256 904-322-5100 OSteenVW.comfacebook.com/OSteenVW We now offer digital X-Rays on site! Sambursky Chiropractic, LLCDr. Bruce Sambursky, Chiropractic Physician683-437612421 San Jose Blvd. #300 (just South of Care Spot-formerly Solantic ) Serving the Mandarin and Julington Creek area. www.backbonejax.comTHE PATIENT OR PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE S, EXAMINATIONS OR TREATMENT. Chiropractor ) Dr. Sambursky has 25 Years ExperienceDo you take my insurance?: Yes Blue Cross, Aetna, Cigna, Medicare, United Health care, All Automobile insurances. Call our office if your insurance is not listed. Cash programs also available. What conditions do you Treat?: What are your hours? Where are you located? Immediate/Same day appointments The Summer FunŽ Backpack Program bene“ ting homeless youth from the St. Johns County School District ASSIST (Aid and Support for Students in Sudden Transition) donated not only 522 backpacks full of summer activities but, each child received a brand new pair of Reebok shoes from the Maurice Jones-Drew Foundation. The backpacks were “ lled from a list provided by the school district indicating grades the youth were in, gender and shoe size. The Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind homeless students also received backpacks and shoes. Local nonpro“ t JCP CARES assembled the backpacks and on May 24, the St. Johns County School District picked up the backpacks and delivered them to the countys schools. The Maurice Jones-Drew Foundation is a non-pro“ t organization, whose mission is to assist the underprivileged in our society. I have seen Mr. JonesDrews generosity and caring on many di erent levels and in In its sophomore year, the Nease Sparklers certainly have had quite a great season! The program has grown to include more community outreach opportunities as well as a basketball game half-time performance. Since founder Adriana Barranco brought the Sparkle E ect cheer organization to Florida and Nease High School, many schools throughout Florida have formed Sparkler teams, including two in Northeast Florida. These neighboring schools (including Creekside High School) contributed to the Sparklers being honored as the National Spotlight Team of the MonthŽ by the Sparkle E ect organization in October. In addition, the Sparklers were The Nease Sparklers take a look backBy Contributing Writer Diana Barrancoincluded in a NBC Nightly News Making A Di erence segment, featured in American Cheerleader Magazine and most recently, in a Varsity.com article. The Sparklers stay committed to their Nease Sparklers CareŽ program and held a school-wide event for donations to their charity of choice, the Ronald McDonald House of Jacksonville. Every year, the Sparklers bring needed items to the House for the families in Jacksonville and perform cheers and sign autograph cards. In October, the Sparklers participated in Walk In Their ShoesŽ a 5k run for the Ronald McDonald House o ering participants cheers of support. The Sparklers are currently looking for new members to join the squad for this coming season! If you have a daughter or a son who is going to be in “ fth grade through high school, please contact Diana Barranco at www.neasedancemom14@aim.com. Leave your name, phone number, your students name, age and grade. You will be contacted about an upcoming informational meeting in August. Dont miss out on being a part of the 2013 2014 team!Nease Sparklers before a performance.522 Summer FunŽ backpacks given to St. Johns County homeless studentsmany di erent facets through out community over the years and we value him as a true role model for our kids,Ž stated Chris Stone, homeless student liaison with the school district. This gift will surely make a di erence in the lives of the students and families that receive the shoes.Ž The annual Summer FunŽ Backpack Program has gained great community support over the years including local Girl Scout Troop 504, youth group members from River of Life United Methodist Church and the local MOMS group. To learn more about the ASSIST program, please visit www.stjohns.k12.” .us/ depts/student/homeless. JCP CARES is a grassroots non-pro“ t organization founded in Julington Creek Plantation. If you would like Primrose School donated items for the backpacksmore information about events or to become involved, please go to www.jcpcares.org for contact information.

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Page 26, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com Julington Creek Animal Walk is a state-of-the-art pet boarding facility for dogs, cats, and exotics providing: Your pet will “ nd a welcoming retreat at our 9-acre, fenced, off-leash dog park featuring a bone-shaped swimming pool and our NE Floridas Premier Luxury Pet Resort, Dog Park and SpaConveniently located next to Julington Creek Animal Hospital Stop by for a tour and receive a coupon for a free daily park pass Aordable small dog luxury oasis. Please call for details. Veterinarian Owned and Operated “Concerns about your drinking water?”Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 Years. Straight answers No high pressure. 262 0197 3760 KORI RD. Lic. #W-32 yo u C all th e W ate r T reatmen t Compan y J acksonville h as trusted f or ove r 2 2 0 Years S Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 years. Ancient City Pirates 9U baseball team goes 5-0 to win the FLGA Summer Slam tournament! Pictured are Trey Fiacco, Steven Klinger, Colton Powers, Morgan Hovis, John Ford, Hayden Steiger, Dillon Haines, Luke Hayes, Dallin Beggs, David Brothers and Andrew Johnson. Congratulations! The Swiss Point Raiders defeated Fruit Cove Flyers with a score of 6-3 to earn the 2013 Middle School District championship title. With a scoreless game heading into the bottom of the fourth inning, strong defense led by shortstop Reedy Davenport, second baseman Nelia Marichal and center“ elder Blaire Register was key for the Raiders. Sixth grader and starting pitcher, Olivia Creamer got the o ense started for the Raiders in the bottom of the fourth with a single to left center, followed by a bunt from eighth grader, Blaire Register. The Raiders momentum was strong with runners on “ rst and second in a scoreless game against the Flyers. Savannah Parker drew a walk, loading up the bases. Sixth grader Emily Sikes sealed the lead with a single that drove in the “ rst two runs of the game. With two outs, sixth grader Breanna Yost reached “ rst on another walk by Fruit Cove pitcher, Lexie Schively, which moved runners to second and third. Sixth grader Faith Keller, Nease High School International Baccalaureate juniors recently provided support for the Betty Gri n House, a local abuse shelter touching thousands of families in St. Johns County. Over 90 students participated in the service project. On a Saturday afternoon in May, students volunteered their time and energy spreading Ancient City Pirates 9U Win! SPMS Lady Raiders softball team wins county championshipBy Contributing Writer Tracy Caincame up with a big hit to score fellow teammate, Savannah Parker. Swiss Point pitcher Creamer, not only supplying a great outing on the mound, came out in the top of the “ fth with another single to center; Register followed, singling to right. Seventh grade power-hitter Parker could not have ended her season on a higher note when she blasted a three-run home-run over center “ eld to secure a 6-0 lead over the Fruit Cove Flyers. After a threat to their lead in the bottom of the seventh, with one out and three runs scored, Coach Tracy Cain called time to visit with the in“ eld. Creamer remained strong and gained the win for the Lady Raiders in a 6-3 e ort over Fruit Cove. This gives the Lady Raiders their “ rst softball championship win in school history. Fruit Cove has won the title the last three years and pitcher Schively has been named pitcher of the year for SJMSAA softball for two consecutive years. Other notable players for the county include County MVP, Ali Smith-FCMS; Rookie Pitcher of the Year, Anna CowlingLPA; North Division Player of the Year, Blaire Register-SPMS; South Player of the Year, Holly Lands-GRMS; and County Rookie of the Year, Olivia CreamerSPMS. Bailee Dixon, Emily Fricke, Sam Binard, Olivia Creamer, Haley Sandiford, Nelia Marichal, Raeffaella Funnell, Head Coach Tracy Cain, Breanna Yost, Bailey Vaeughn (Manager), Alyssa Girard, Emily Sikes, Faith Keller, Chloe Andrews, Savannah Parker, Reedy Davenport, Coach Kerry Creamer, Blaire Register and Coach Todd Sandiford. Not pictured: Nicole MasankoNease IB students support the Betty Gri n HouseBy Contributing Writer Karen Blackwell Aparna Sethumadhaven, Christina Catania, Ashley, Simone Frauenfelder, Abby Sanders, Danielle Sevilla, Lexi Tomkunas, Elena Gouzoa, Devon LaBat, Devin Crawford, Nicole Thatcher, Jesse Chen, Tristan Memory, Harrison Ballard, Jane Viviano, Paige Fiore, Lauren Hsu, Haley Thurston, A.J. Hlavac, Josh Brand, Shivam Khosla mulch, cleaning the facility and delivering donated items to the shelter. Through fund raising efforts they were also able to purchase a new freezer which was needed. In total more than $2000 was given to the Betty Gri n House and over 300 service hours were earned by the IB juniors.In preparation for QuiltFest 2013, the Seven Sister Guilds of Northeast Florida (All Star Quilters Guild, Coastal Quilters of NE Florida, First Coast Quilters Guild, Friendship Quilters Guild, Honeybee Quilters Guild, River City Piecemakers and St. Augustine Piecemakers) invite you to attend the show on September 26, 27 and 28 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. in the Prime Osborn Convention Center, located at 1000 Water Street in downtown Jacksonville. This show is the largest all-volunteer show in the Southeast and All Star Quilters Guild welcomes QuiltFest 2013By Contributing Writer Dot Butler Stars All Around will feature over 400 quilts, a silent auction, quilters walk, quilt sale booth, kids corner, free demos, charity corner, a quilt appraiser and vendors.QuiltFest cont. on pg. 27

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www.thecreekline.com • July 2013 • The CreekLine, Page 27 TREE FARM & NURSERY And in Switzerland! FREE LANDSCAPE ESTIMATES or visit us at www.sjtreefarm.com HUGE Crape Myrtle Sale! Thousands to Choose From! 25% O our already low prices!!! 3 gallons regularly $12.99 less 25 % = only $ 9.74 7 gallons regularly $29.00 less 25% = only $21.75 15 Gallons regularly $69.00 less 25% = only $51.75 30 Gallons regularly $139.00 less 25% = only $104.25 45 Gallons regularly $ 249.00 less 25% = only $186.75Sale Ends July 31, 2013 For Appointment Call904-230-0080 NEW LOCATION! 485 State Road 13Suite 3 (Next to Burger King) Dr. Thomas Lahmannwww.julingtoncreekchiro.com Is Back or Neck Pain Impacting Your Life? Dr. Thomas Lahmann Chiropractic PhysicianHumana Beech Street A Proud Participating Provider for Aetna and Blue Cross / Blue Shield United Insurance Plans Accepts All Auto Insurance Julington Creek Chiropractic & Wellness Center P.A.SpineMedTM Spinal Disc DecompressionA Safe and Pain-Free Procedure Designed for Back & Neck pain Non-Surgical, Drug Free Procedures for: 450-106 State Road 13 N Publix Center in Fruit Cove www.theupsstorelocal.com/3927 The UPS StoreYour one stop for: Packing Shipping Print Materials Mailbox Services Moving Supplies Business Cards Small Business SolutionsDoug NunneryConveniently located in your neighborhood; Doug and his team are here to serve you! The Jacksonville Jaguars and the Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve (GTMNERR) were recognized as the 2012-2013 St. Johns County School District (SJCSD) Outstanding Business Partners of the Year at the 26th annual Commissioners Business Recognition Awards (CBRA) held on Thursday, June 13 in Tampa. The event was produced by the Florida Department of Education in association with the Florida Education Foundation and highlighted the contributions of honorees chosen from each school district throughout the state. The Jacksonville Jaguars are strongly committed to the SJCSD through various activities and “ nancial support. Earlier this year, the Jaguars provided on-“ eld game day recognition to more than 70 Pursuing Victory Scores for the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) were received in early June and St. Johns County students continue to excel. On the Sunshine State Standards (SSS), which are required skills for graduation, St. Johns County students scored extremely well in reading, math, science and End-of-Course (EOC) assessments among all 67 Florida school districts. FCAT Science was given to students in “ fth and eighth grades. St. Johns County “ fth graders and eighth graders ranked “ rst in the state. The FCAT, which assesses reading (third through 10th grades), math (third through eighth grades) and science (“ fth and eighth grades) skills, was given in April to students throughout the state. Achievement levels range from one to “ ve, with Level 3 being considered pro“ cient. The test is part of a statewide e ort to increase School District recognizes outstanding business partnerswith Honor (PVWH) high school athletes and featured the Creekside High School marching band during halftime. As a presenting sponsor of the American Youth Character Awards, the Jaguars participated in the banquet and presented the PVWH “ nalists and winner with scholarships as part of their $25,000 donation to the district. Additionally, they have supported the districts career academies through internships, teacher externships, sponsorships and scholarships. The Jaguars have implemented honor roll programs, NFL Play 60 grants, discount tickets and ticket donations as well as player and cheerleader appearances throughout the SJCSD. The SJCSD and the GTMNERR partnership was created through the Academy of Coastal and Water Resources at St. Johns Technical High School (SJTHS). Hands-on “ eld trips allow academy students to study the estuary and learn the value of protecting and conserving natural resources. Students have also participated in an oyster reef restoration and three schools are collecting Spartina Grass seeds and cultivating the seedlings into plugs to restore vegetation. This summer, students will participate in a sea level rise activity to create awareness of the e ects of climate change and planning for sea level rise. Additionally, SJTHS carpentry students constructed an overlook at GTMNERR for use in the city of St. Augustines 450th Celebration. GTMNERR sta also provided students with certi“ cation training in the Green Industries Best Management Practices (GIBMP) for the protection of water, as well as for the proper use of fertilizers and pesticides as landscape professionals. CBRA celebrates innovative partnerships between the business community and local school districts for the bene“ t of students. Businesses were recognized with a reception at the Grand Hyatt Hotel where they were photographed with the Commissioner of Education and received an engraved trophy. The Jacksonville Jaguars and GTMNERR will be recognized at the School Board Meeting on July 11.SJC students continue to excel on FCATsstudent performance and school accountability. I am extremely proud of the e orts of our teachers, students and curriculum sta ,Ž said Superintendent Dr. Joseph Joyner. Once again our students scored well above the state average in every assessment.Ž St. Johns County students ranked “ rst in EOC assessments for Algebra 1, Geometry and Biology 1. Students also ranked “ rst in the baseline year for the United States History EOC assessment. School grades for elementary and middle schools are expected to be released this summer. High school grades will not be announced until later this year because the high school grading system incorporates data not yet available such as graduation rates and results of advanced academic testing. Additional information can be found at http://fcat.” doe.org/. PIANO & GUITAR CAMPS St. Augustine Community School of Performing Arts824-0664 In addition, the Seven Sister Guilds will each have a ra e quilt on display. The entry for The All Star Quilters Guild is Stars All Around,Ž a stunning blue and white quilt designed by guild member Sunnie Malesky and made by the guilds members. A portion of the proceeds from this quilt will donated by the All Star Quilters Guild to Camp Amigo, Childrens Burn Camp of North Florida. Begun in 2001, the Childrens Burn Camp of North Florida, Inc. is a non-pro“ t, 501c3 corporation, wholly supported by public donations. Camp Amigo exists to provide kids who have physical and emotional scars a place to be themselves and build a network of support that will last throughout their lives. For more information, please visit www. campamigo.com. The beauty and level of work in the quilts on display is brought to you each year by many volunteers. For more information on QuiltFest 2013, please contact Gay Montgomery at 742-1372 or visit www. quiltfestjax.com, For more information on the All star Quilters Guild, please contact Dot Butler at 642-6574 or visit www.orgsites.com/” /allstarquiltguild.QuiltFest cont. from pg. 26 The CreekLineYOUR Community NewspaperFor more information on advertising, call Linda Gay 904-287-4913 lg@rtpublishinginc.com

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Page 28, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com SLICKS1984 VISIT YOUR LOCAL SHOWROOMOffers end 9/18/13. Restrictions apply. Ask for details. After 12-month promotional period, then-current regular monthly price applies and is subject to change.ACT NOW AND ALSO GET:Offer subject to change based on premium channel availability.All offers require 24-month commitment and credit quali“cation. FREE PREMIUM CHANNELSfor 3 months GET MORE FOR LESS RONALD PERRY ELECTRONICS 904-268-0560 AstroTV@Bellsouth.net Dog Obedience Training 287-3934 www.marienhofkennels.comGerman Shepherd Puppies Call for Availability Marienhof Kennels 1004 State Road 13( 0.2 mi South JCP entrance ) Richard M. Oglesby, D.V.M.Constanze Goricki, Dr.med.vet287-5570M-F – 8 AM 6 PM Sat 8 AM Noon Greenbriar Animal Hospital We Celebrate The HumanPet Bond ITS HERE!Frontline TritakFast Acting! Long Lasting! Triple Action! Flea Control! Tree WorkbyMitch Drake & Sons (904) 703-5040 (904) 287-3819Licensed, Insured & Workmans Comp Over 35 Years Experience Check out our reviews and 5 Star rating at Yellowbook.com! St. Johns County homeowners can choose to have the Florida Yards and Neighborhoods program evaluate their yards based on Florida-Friendly Landscaping principles. By meeting minimum requirements and collecting at least 50 points, a homeowner will be recognized as having a Florida-Friendly Yard. Owners of FloridaFriendly Yards receive a sign to display in the yard along with a certi“ cate. Those going beyond 50 points can achieve a goldlevel status. To participate in the program, the St. Johns County Agricultural Center encourages homeowners to refrain from applying fertilizer within 24 hours of a tropical storm or depression, and to not fertilize within The Arbor Day Foundation has a booklet that helps people identify trees in a simple, stepby-step process. The booklet, What Tree Is That? is available for a $5 donation to the nonpro“ t tree-planting organization. What Tree Is That? is a fun, easy-to-use tree identi“ cation guide that features hand-drawn botanical illustrations highlighting the distinctive characteristics of many tree species. Nature lovers and professional arborists alike have called this pocket “ eld guide one of the most user-friendly resources to have. Its beautiful, full-color illustrations are in precise detail to depict natural colors, shapes and textures, so users can make a positive species identi“ cation in just a few easy steps. The Arbor Day Foundation o ers this booklet to help people identify trees in Florida and throughout the Eastern and Central regions of the United States. What Tree Is That? uses a unique step-by-step approach for identifying the species of each tree, explaining what to look for in the shape of the leaves, di erences in the leaf stems and twig structures and speci“ c characteristics of fruits, ” owers, buds and bark. Our What Tree Is That? pocket brochure is an ideal resource for developing a greater appreciation for trees,Ž said (BPT) Al fresco dining is one of the great pleasures of warm weather. Whether youre hosting a neighborhood barbecue or an intimate dinner party on your deck, outdoor dining is a great way to savor good food, company and the great outdoors. To ensure your meals are safe and enjoyable, its important to know how to prepare, transport and store food for outdoor eating. The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) o ers some advice for safely handling food when youre dining outdoors this summer: Purchasing. Warm weather brings a bounty of fresh produce and a trip to the local farmers market can make a nice addition to your outdoor meal. Food safety starts in the “ eld. Its important to get to know the growers selling produce at your local farm stand, and ask about their farming practices. How do St. Johns County encourages FloridaFriendly landscaping principals10 feet of any water body. This will reduce chemicals from entering the runo since fertilizer runo occurs when more water reaches fertilized soil than the ground than can absorb. The fertilizer or pesticides not taken up by root systems or absorbed into the soil can run o into storm drains or nearby bodies of water and detrimentally a ect water quality and the fragile ecosystems our water resources support. Additionally, any chemicals that have leached into the eroded soil that is washed away, along with landscape debris, can also cause adverse e ects on plants, “ sh, animals and people. Using fertilizer properly and reducing stormwater runo are two of the nine Florida-Friendly Landscaping principles used to evaluate yards. Additionally, homeowners are encouraged to plant the right plant in the right place, water e ciently, use mulch, attract bene“ cial wildlife, manage yard pests responsibly, recycle yard waste and protect the waterfront. Other considerations include using a slow-release nitrogen fertilizer, using iron instead of nitrogen, timing the applications, and only hiring legally certi“ ed professionals. St. Johns County requires businesses who commercially apply fertilizer to be licensed by the State of Florida, and commercial application has to follow the Green Industries Best Management Practices (GI-BMPs). More information about the FloridaFriendly Landscaping and GI-BMP programs can be found at http://fyn.ifas.u” .edu/index. html, or calling the St. Johns County Agricultural Center at 209-0430. Tree identi cation booklet helps people identify tree species in FloridaJohn Rosenow, founder and chief executive of the Arbor Day Foundation. The Arbor Day Foundation strives to help people enjoy and appreciate trees, and we feel our pocket “ eld guide will do just that.Ž What Tree is That? is also available as an online interac-Dining outdoors? Keep food safe and deliciousthey keep their products free from bacterial pathogens and other contaminants? Farmers may also have great tips for storing produce, testing for ripeness and even ways to prepare the fruits and veggies they sell. IFT spokesperson and food safety expert, Don Scha ner, PhD, says that when youre purchasing produce, make sure its free of mold, bruises or blemishes where bacterial pathogens can grow. Many grocery stores o er freshly cut, packaged produce for customers seeking nutritious convenience foods. Freshly cut vegetables and fruit need proper temperature control to prevent the growth of bacteria that cause foodborne illness. Prepping. Before preparing food, wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds. Make sure all prep utensils such as cutting boards, dishes and countertops are clean before preparing each food item. Dirt, dust and pathogenic microbes can linger on produce. Its important to wash fresh produce before consuming it. The only exception is are prebagged salads and leafy greens, as experts advise that additional washing of ready-to-eat green salads is not likely to enhance safety. Thoroughly washing in cold water will su ce for most fruits and vegetables, but some types of produce require special handling. Wash spinach or salad greens in a bowl of water and Reduced $26,000!.+/A O ,Whitelock Farms Stunning Equestrian Estate430 Triple Crown Lane ginabetbeze@yahoo.com Call Gina For More Information Or A Private Showing. tive version at arborday.org. To obtain a tree identi“ cation guide in full color, send your name and address and $5 for each guide to What Tree Is That? Arbor Day Foundation, Nebraska City, NE 68410. You can also order the book online at arborday.org. rinse them gently to remove dirt and other contaminants. Give extra attention to fruits with stems, such as apples, pears and peaches. You may be tempted to forego washing fruit with a rind, since you wont be eating the rind. But, its still important to wash oranges, avocados, melons, cantaloupe, etc.„pathogens can linger in unwashed crevices and transfer to your hands or the knife you use to cut the fruit. In addition, wash items youll peel„such as carrots and cucumbers„for the same reason. Grilling. If youll be grilling at home, remember to always marinate meat in the refrigera-Dining outdoors cont. on pg. 31

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www.thecreekline.com • July 2013 • The CreekLine, Page 29 UNISEX SALON IS NOW OPEN! 132 Everest Ln Suite 4 On Race Track Rd near Bartram Springs St Johns, Fl 32259 www.oopsunisexsalon.com 904-217-0821 Come in to receive a complimentary haircut with any chemical serviceEXPIRES 7/31/13 Oops Unisex Salon is a Paul Mitchell Focus Salon and the team-members are all Paul Mitchell trained! www.msmulligans.com Store Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-6pm 11531-4 San Jose Blvd. Mandarin, FL 32223904-262-7231$5 off $25 Name Brand and designer fashions at a fraction of retail prices. Your Second Shot at a Fabulous New Wardrobe. Regardless of the season, the greatest determining factor to the quality of our area “ shing is our local weather. Wind, rain and temperature all have di erent causes and e ects for any “ shing trip on any given day. Most of the time the cause and e ect of the weather are short term, but certain weather conditions can a have much longer e ect on our “ shing, sometimes even wiping out an entire season. Already this year we have seen changes in our “ shing patterns due to excessively heavy rains earlier this spring. Due to the large amounts of freshwater being added to the St. Johns River from these rains the salinity levels of the river dropped greatly. This has slowed the bite of several types of “ sh and moved the bite further north towards town or beyond. Allowing a few weeks to pass without too much more rainfall Excitement ” owed throughout the middle schools of St. Johns County in late February when applications were able to be taken home to parents. Each student bearing an application was de“ nitely on their best behavior. For the prize of getting ones parents to approve the application was one of the greatest adventures a child would experience over the summer. The applications were for the summer Marine Science Program o ered by the St. Johns County School District. This summer program is available each summer to all students rising in grades six through eight and has been sponsored by the school district since 1982. Three eight-day sessions are held at Menendez High School with bus transportation provided. This summers three sessions run from June 10 through July 25. Students are assigned to small classes of approximately 14 students by grade level. Each class rotates to another instructor every two days. To accommodate the large number of students applying to the program and still keep class sizes small, each grade group divided into two separate groups, A and B. Each group does identical activities but on di erent days with di erent instructors. Similarities between curriculums are shared among the Marine Science Camp o ers a blast of learning experiencesBy Karl Kennellof this summer program John Gordon says of the program, We have 24 “ eld trips going out daily with over 300 students each session.Ž Learning is hands-on, with students kayaking, canoeing, boating, hiking, snorkeling, sailing, windsur“ ng and sur“ ng. You can just imagine how these kids would be excited when the applications came out in February! For additional information, please visit www-grms.stjohns. k12.” .us/teams/marinescience/Captain Davids Fishing ReportBy Captain David Lifkagrade groups. Each group participates in salt marsh ecology and kayaking skills and safety in the “ rst rotation. The sixth and eighth grade groups also study fresh water springs and snorkeling skills and safety while the seventh grade group studies CPR certi“ cation. In the second rotation the sixth grade group continues with salt marsh ecology and adds canoeing skills and safety plus coastal dune ecology. The seventh grade group covers “ sh biology, salt water “ sh management, sailing and windsur“ ng skills and safety along with coastal dune communities. The eighth grade second rotation includes physical dynamics of wave energy, sur“ ng skills and safety along with windsur“ ng and sailing. The third and fourth rotations for all grades, expands on the skills learned during the “ rst and second rotations. Throughout all of the activities, in addition to the fun and games activities, the students learn to develop skills for using various marine ecology instruments and tools such as hydrometer, secchi disk, Kemmerer water sampling bottle, water quality test kits, dissolved oxygen kits, Ponar grab sampler, marine worm suctions, YSI ” ow meter, plankton nets, pH meters, cast and seine nets, plant presses, handheld GPS units and quadrate sampling equipment. All instructors in the program are St. Johns County School District teachers. The Marine Science Program is a carefully designed experience for responsible students who are interested in learning about our local marine environments. Marine Science instructor and leader to interfere can easily allow the salinity levels to increase and put us right back on track for a sensational summer of “ shing. July is time of year to look for shrimp to start making their way down the river to us for their annual migration. Typically smaller shrimp (great for bait) will start to show in your cast nets in the latter part of this month. Then usually as the summer progresses the shrimp become more abundant and much larger in size. In recent years we have experienced some of the best shrimping seasons that anyone could remember. With shrimp coming all the way in to Julington Creek, many shrimpers became spoiled with the size and ease to locate and catch their “ ve gallon limit. Last year the shrimp were practically a no-show making it di cult to even catch enough to use for bait. The di erence in last years shrimping and the previous few years can be contributed to rainfall. Last years heavy rains of close to a foot or more twice in the month of June put the dampers on the soon to follow shrimp run. Again this year we have already experienced similar rains this spring in May. Not quite as much and a little earlier in the year hopefully means that the balance of salt and freshwater will be just right in the coming weeks for the shrimp to show and provide us with another banner year of shrimping. Fishing Report: Croaker bite is on in the Doctors Lake area of the river. Marker 10 to Buckman Bridge are areas to try. Reds on eastside docks in Buckman area and north. Yellowmouth have slowed but should return. Whether you catch one, some or none, the family time spent “ shing will last a lifetime. The CreekLine YOURCommunity Newspapereditor@thecreekline.com The CreekLine For advertising call: (904) 866-4919

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Page 30, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com Oil Change & Rotation $19.99 $20 Off All AlignmentsIncrease Fuel EconomyFill Your Tires With $39.99 and Free Reflls08-10-13Nitrogen The Julington Creek Loggerhead Aquatics (JCLA) swim team traveled to Gainesville on June 7 to compete in the Florida Sunshine State Games. After three days of intense competition, it was time for some welldeserved fun out of the poolƒ but not out of the water! The morning after the meet, Loggerheads departed Gainesville bright and early en route to Ichetucknee Springs State Park. Most visitors to Ichetucknee are content to ” oat lazily down the crystal clear river on a comfy inner tube, but not the Loggerheads! Always ready for a challenge, JCLA swimmers decided to swim upstream against the formidable current, from the Ichetucknees south point all the way up to the midpoint dock. Even the chilly 72 degree water couldnt deter the Loggerheads from reaching their goal. Awesome! Also in June, the Loggerheads hosted their JCLA Invita-Loggerheads swim upstream!By Contributing Writer Lorraine Herreros Loggerheads complete Ichetucknee swim. Photo by John Hulvey.tional swim meet at the Julington Creek Recreation Center pool. Swimmers ranging in age from “ ve to 19 competed at the event. Visiting teams represented were the St. Augustine Swim Team, Spartan Aquatic Club and North Florida Swimming. In addition to the expert planning and preparations of the Loggerhead coaches, JCLA parents pitched in to “ ll over 75 volunteer positions ensuring that the meet would be a great success. Currently, JCLA swimmers are training to compete in their long course championship meets in July. Look for more Loggerhead achievements in the weeks to come! Congratulations to the Ponte Vedra Soccer Club Storm U-15 and U-13 girls State Cup Champions! The U-15 team has traveled the country this year playing in the USYS National League U-15 Team: Rachel Dias, Callie Delaney, Angeline Daly, Abigail Miller, Claire McAuliffe, Abigail Logue, Haley Patton, Kaitlyn Paul, Taylor Hallmon, Lindsey Patton, Danielle VanLiere, Coach Garret De Boer, Coach Daniel Villarreal, Katherine Loferski, Lianne Mananquil, Sydney Crowley, Morgan Patton, Brianna Loube and Rebecca Anderson.and Region 3 Premier League. The U-13 team had 23 goals and did not give up a single goal, out of the 32 teams in their State Cup age group. As winners of Florida State Cup, both teams will have the honor of representing Florida at Southern Regionals this June in Oklahoma. It was quite an accomplishment for three Storm girls teams, U-13, U-15 and U-18, to make it to the “ nals played in Auburndale on May 18-19. These girls have accomplished many new goals this year and are a great example of hard work pays o Job well done, ladies and Go Storm! U-13 Team: Emma Voigt, Payton Crews, Claire Amici, Bella Dawson, Piper Dotsikas, Bailee Williams, Katelyn Tauzel, Shelby Weiss, Abbey Newton, Coach Scot Shewey, Madi Sagas, Alisa Detlefsen, Noelle Rolfsen, Dani Anderson, Molly Miller, Jade Sparks, Sierra Maingot and Maya Semel. Local woman rides cont. from pg. 1Alongside thousands riders who have gone through the similar situations, for those two days, they are not strangers; they are all one family, a family that wishes cancer did not exist. It is very simple why I ride: I ride because I can,Ž Knowles explained. The Pan-Massachusetts Challenge is an annual bikea-thon that today raises more money for charity than any other single athletic fundraising event in the country. Last year the PMC raised $37 million with a 100 percent pass-through rate, a formal way of saying every single pennyŽ goes to the Dana Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and the Jimmy Fund in Boston. After seeing the care and compassion Maddie received from both of these institutions, I am more pleased than ever that this is where my money is going. Dana-Farber gives a level of care that is unsurpassed,Ž Knowles shared. Even in these challenging economic times, cancer takes no rest, no vacation and is not slowed by the economy. Any contribution you can make toward Michelle Knowles riding to help end cancer will be gratefully appreciated. You can learn more and make a donation on-line at www.pmc.org/ mk0178. Maddie and I were close until the end,Ž Knowles said. The PMC is a way for our neighbor Michelle Knowles to honor Maddie who met her battle with high hopes, unshakeable faith and a buoyant spirit of determination. Cancer does not rest. And we all should never rest until cancer is a thing of the past. Your ad could be in the next issue! Call Linda Gay today! 607-5062LG@RTPublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com • July 2013 • The CreekLine, Page 31 The CreekLine Marketplace ads!886-4919 Community MarketplaceAttention Small Businesses!!!For just $39 per issue you can reach 25,000+ addresses (min. of 6 issues) Call 886-4919 today! Help WantedLooking for experienced dance teachers in ballet, jazz, tap and hip hop classes starting from August 2013. Please call 904-333-2845 www.markspivak. com Indulge www.areyoureadytoindule.com has new owners! We are looking for experienced hair stylists with a following to join us. Commission and/or booth rentals. If interested, contact Nina Stelfox @ 904-657-9190 Jacksonville Ice and Sportsplex is looking for Happy, Energetic Part Time help to enhance our Public Sessions and Birthday Party experiences. Skate Guards start at $8.00 an hour and you must be a strong ice skater. Birthday Hostesses start at $8.00 per hour plus TIPS. No Experience necessary, we will train you. Both must work well with children and adults. Also hiring D.J.’s. Contact Wendy at 399-3223 or wwilliams@ jaxiceandsportsplex.com Jacksonville Ice and Sportsplex is looking for positive and enthusiast employees who are comfortable working with children. Now hiring Birthday Party Hostesses, Skate Guards and DJ’s. Skate guards must be strong ice skaters. $8.00 plus tips. Contact Wendy Williams @ 399-3223. Pool cleaner to maintain residential customer accounts. 1 year experience required. Pool service and repair technician. 2 years experience in all aspects of pool repair cleaning, and renovation. Must have valid clean driving record and pass background test.Please respond to r.schmitz@ comcast.net with applicable work history or a resume. Swimming Safari Swim School is looking to hire part time instructors to teach swim lessons over the summer at locations through out Jacksonville. Our program teaches students of all ages, from infants to adults, how to become Safe, Con dent, and Comfortable in the water. We are looking for applicants that enjoy working with kids, responsible, reliable, and out going. No previous swim lesson instructor experience is required. Our training for the summer season will start in April and last for about a month. All instructors are required to have C.P.R. and First Aid training through the American Red Cross by the time they nish training. If you are interested in becoming a Swimming Safari Instructor please submit your resume via email to swim @swimmingsafari.com Full time directors -Part time teachers-HUNTINGTON LEARNING CENTER seeks multi-task individuals who are con dent, high energy, possess excellent communication skills and a passion to make a difference. BA and teaching certi cation required. Come join our team! Fax resume 543-0227. The St. Johns River Farmers Market in Alpine Groves Park, 2060 SR 13, Switzerland, seeks assistance on Fridays and Saturdays with market set-up and sign placement and removal; physical strength required. Email: nfva.org@gmail.com. Phone: 904-347-8900. Water Treatment Installer (plumbing skills required) needed for 23 year old water treatment company. Must have clean drivers record and clean background. Bene ts. Immediate opening. Please call: 262-0197 or e-mail: Terri@affordablewaterjax.com Cavalari Corporation -Alfredo CavalariCall or Text: Home: (904)287-4468 Cell: (904)753-2089 alari t: 7 -446 8 2 08 9 www.allearspetsitting.com(904) 687-9610 American Classic Lawns“Quality Lawn Maintenance”Mandarin N. St. Johns County707 4468Residential from $30.Commercial Residential Aqua Pro Specialties LLCPRESSURE WASHING 904-704-1388Licensed & Insured SPRINKLER SYSTEM SERVICE AND REPAIR LIC. #1-212Summer Special $55 Driveways Concrete Removal Patios Driveway Extension Walkways PaversCall Today for Free Decorative Trim with Driveway Job! Catering to the needs of the Homeowner FREE ESTIMATES838-1836 Mention this ad $20 O Service Call E R Over 30 Years Experience EMERGENCY REPAIR PLUMBING, INC.230-9976CFC 57311 “Our Customers Are Our BEST Advertisement” A+ Rating Breakthrough Age-Defying Treatmenthseay.nerium.com I.T. Promise Inc. Computer Services( 904 ) 287-2254Professional Computer ServicesBusiness & Residential ~ ~ ~ ~www.itpromise.com JAX Chamber Mandarin Councils 2013 Small Business of the Year! SHOE REPAIR& ALTERATIONS S. San Jose Blvd. Mandarin Landing Shopping Plaza 904-292-0246Mandarin Landing Shoe Repair 10601 San Jose Blvd. 32257, Ste. #103 Spring into cleaning with Suncoast Services of St. Augustine, LLC Best Prices Starting at $50.00 Call Team Suncoast Services for appointment Licensed & Insured631 2731www.kleanspray.com 10% OFF1st time customers Michelle’s House Cleaning & MORE 351-9624 In business since 1997 Professional Swim Lessons Year Round Indoor Pool Locations Throughout Jax Sign-up by calling 260-1836 or @ www.swimmingsafari.com Join the Baptist South circle of care. Visit e-baptisthealth.com for the most up to date list of job openings. Listings are updated daily and change often. If you have any questions, please call Human Resources at 271.6078. Seeking Licensed Massage Therapist @ A New U Massage(MM12329) Mandarin furnished massage room available NOW. Room rent is $375+ 7% tax ($401.25) a month. Rent can split w/other LMT. Phone: 904-288-0064. Hood Cleaning Technician This is a part-time position starting at $10.75/Hour. Work hours during the night or early morning hours when restaurants are closed. Power washing of kitchen exhaust systems including hoods, duct work, lters and exhaust fans. Please respond to this ad with cover letter and resume to jeff.sowell@ hoodz.us.com Panache in Julington Creek is interviewing experienced & talented Stylists to join our team. Do you enjoy working in a professional, clean & successful environment? Apply at www.getpanache. com or stop in 2758 Racetrack Road #403. HELP WANTED! If you like music (and other arts) and would like to volunteer to support a non-pro t organization bringing music to the community, please call 374 8639 Full Time Dental Assistant with High Tech Dental of ce Looking for an experienced dental assistant dedicated to exceptional patient care with advanced skills in crown & bridge. Duties include but are not limited to Temporary Fabrication, Digital X-rays, Digital Charting, Experience is a must. Please fax resumes to : 904-287-4073. 32 hours per week, Monday -Thursday, 8-12 and 2-6. WANTED MANAGER of ROOF REPAIR DIVISION. Experience in roof repairs and sales required. Position entails selling and doing repairs. Drug Free Work Place. OSHA Compliant. Must have own tools. Call (904) 465-2183 Champions Gymnastics Club is looking for enthusiastic, energetic and reliable gymnastics instructors for a growing program. Please call Maggie Butler at 904-732-6040 or email information at ChampionsGymnasticsClub@yahoo.com Part Time – Flexible hours. Applicants must live in the 32259 and 32092 area. Adult applicants only. Call Robin at 687-9610 HELP WANTED POOL MECHANICS WITH 2 years experience in diagnosing, replacement or repair of pool equipment. Some experience in renovations, leak detection and pool maintenance / water balance necessary .Must have valid clean drivers license and be able to pass a background check Contact 449-2055 for details Seeking experienced Pet Stylist in local grooming shop. Must pass drug test. Contact Sharon Lucas 904-813-0918 Bookeeper/Admin Assistant Knowledgeable with EXCEL, WORD and Outlook. A/R work. Flexible schedule. 15-20 hours per week. Email resume to publisher@rtpublishinginc.com F/T assistant needed for doctors of ce. M, T, W, F & Saturday morning. Please fax resume to 904-683-4378. P/T massage therapist needed for M,W,F afternoons from 1-6pm. Please send resume to 904-683-4378. JOB Finder Looking for a job in NW St.Johns County? Heres where you can nd one close to home. CLASSIFIED ADS! NOW ONLINE AT www.thecreekline.comFREE Shaggy Chic National Dog Groomers Assn member award winning pet/show styling all breed/mixed breeds grooming walk-in nail trims/dremel g g m el 904-230-2827 free Blueberry facial We stock your fridge with delicious home-cooked meals10% off new clients 1 0% o ff new clients newclien ts facebook.com/WFDJaxPersonalChef Massage Therapy Alicia Hunter LMTOnly $50 an hour #MM12329/MA53865 Neuromuscular Therapy ( 904 ) 514 5788www.hunter l mt. c omA New U Massage located in San Jose Office Center, Next to Sonny’s and Ace Hardware $5 OFF with this ad. at Fruit Cove287-0601 Housecleaning 207-5674 Jen Kim Professional Groomer I My Dog Grooming(904) 710-1045 Dining outdoors cont. from pg. 28 tor, never on the kitchen counter or outdoors. Discard any extra marinade thats touched raw meat. Grill food thoroughly, using a thermometer to ensure the proper internal temperature: 145 degrees F for steaks and “ sh, 160 degrees F for pork, hot dogs and hamburgers and 165 degrees F for poultry. Keep “ nished meats hot until you serve by moving them to the side of the grill rack, away from the coals or highest ” ame on your gas grill. Avoid cross contamination by using separate serving plates and utensils for di erent meats and vegetables. If youll be grilling away from home„in a park, tailgating at a sporting event or on a camping trip„consider purchasing pre-formed patties for burgers and pre-cut poultry. This minimizes the amount of handling meat requires and can help minimize the risk of bacteria and cross contamination. Transporting. A picnic in the park can be great fun for everyone, but its important to assure your food arrives safely along with your family and guests. Follow smart food packing guidelines. Keep meats, including lunch meats and raw meats, cheeses and condiments cold in insulated, soft-sided bags or coolers with freezer gel packs. Food needs to be stored at 40 degrees F or colder to reduce the risk of pathogen growth, so limit the number of times you open the cooler. Never allow food to sit for more than two hours at temperatures below 90 degrees F and no more than an hour when temperatures exceed 90 degrees F. Throw away food thats been sitting out too long.

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Page 32, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com Jacksonville 10130 Philips Highway (904) 262-8113 Across from Avenues Mall, exit 339 Open 7 Days A Week AveLighting.com *Marked down fans excluded. Second fan or lesser value. In stock items only. com Hot Fans at Cool Savings!50%* OFFShop Jacksonvilles largest selection of fans during our incredible Fan Sale … Hurry sale ends soon!Buy One Fan, Get Second Fan Don’t forget.... It’s not too late for Summer Program Session B MON. 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TestStripSearch.com Espanol 1-888-440-4001 SAPA CASH PAIDup to $28/Box for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS. 1-DAY PAYMENT. 1-800-371-1136 Wants to purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201 Reader Advisory: The National Trade Association we belong to has purchased the above classi eds. Determining the value of their service or product is advised by this publication. In order to avoid misunderstandings, some advertisers do not offer employment but rather supply the readers with manuals, directories and other materials designed to help their clients establish mail order selling and other businesses at home. Under NO circumstance should you send any money in advance or give the client your checking, license ID, or credit card numbers. Also beware of ads that claim to guarantee loans regardless of credit and note that if a credit repair company does business only over the phone it is illegal to request any money before delivering its service. All funds are based in US dollars. Toll free numbers may or may not reach Canada. Free PapersWorking For You is free community paper is a vital force in our community. We live here, we work here, our kids attend school here, we shop here, and we love it here. Because we feel so connected, we want er the best our er each issue. We invite you to strengthen our community by shopping locally, being involved, and supporting each other. We do. The CreekLine Your free press streng thens our community. Not by being separate from it, but by being part of it. NW St. Johns Countys Community Newspaper (BPT) Good things really do come in small packages. And when it comes to your health, pistachios pack a powerful punch: They help you manage your weight, may help reduce blood pressure and a study published in the International Journal of Impotence ResearchŽ shows they may even help with erectile function. Here are three big reasons why you should unshell and celebrate your health with a handful. Pistachios are a great snack chock-full of vitamins and nutrients including antioxidants, beta carotene, “ ber, glutamine, potassium, phytosterols, zeaxanthin and B6. You really cant go wrong with pistachios,Ž says director of sports nutrition at the Uni-Go nuts; celebrate your health with a handfulversity of Southern California, Becci Twombley. With six grams of protein in every 160-calorie serving, pistachios are a protein front-runner compared to 160 calories of other common snacks.Ž In addition, pistachios have more nuts per serving (49) than any other tree nut. Whether youre an elite athlete in training or a casual “ tness bu what you eat will a ect your performance. As an athlete, your body needs the right carbohydrates, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals and ” uids,Ž says Twombley. Pistachios are a great preand post-workout snack because they contain a good source of lean protein, the right type of fat and electrolytes such as potassium. Their taste is unbeatable. They can be enjoyed right out of the bag or to jazz them up, you can season them right in the shell, like these Sa ron and Vanilla Pistachios by Chef Grant MacPherson. Sa ron and Vanilla Pistachios 1 pound American pistachios, in-shell 1.5 ounces Spanish sa ron, steeped in cold water 2 vanilla beans, scraped 2 tablespoons canola oil Sea salt to taste Warm canola oil in roasting pan or wok on your stove top, add pistachios and lightly toast. Add sa ron, with some liquid to coat the pistachios. Add the vanilla bean scrapings and stir to incorporate; season with sea salt to taste. Remove from heat and serve warm in the dish of your choice. The CreekLineYOUR Community NewspaperFor more information:Linda Gay904-287-4913 € lg@rtpublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com • July 2013 • The CreekLine, Page 33 731-55805521 Chronicle Court, 32256 LifetimeEnclosures.com 5 5 FREE In-Home Design ServicesMilitary & Senior Discounts! W.A.C. See website for complete “nancing Ready for Summer Si zz le? a $850 valueWhen you order your Outdoor Kitchen!See designer for details with this coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Expires on 08-31-13VISIT OUR DESIGN CENTER TODAY AND SAVE UP TOAN ADDITIONAL $150! #1 ROOFING CONTRACTOR C. Sterling Quality Roofing, Inc. $500 OFF for a complete reroof Call Now for FREE ESTIMATES 904-908-4996 www.roofjacksonville.com CCC057991 Specializing in Customer Satisfaction Since 1983 Integrity, professionalism, Security . Not Just a Roof! f f f f f f or a f f f f f o f o fo r a $ $ $ $ Celebrating our 30th year in business! Enviro Tech Lawn Care Call Today!866-2969 including adjusting sprinklers 14 Years Experience! In June, members of the Creeks Clash U-17 girls soccer team visited the site of Plaza Towers Elementary School in Moore, Oklahoma, where seven children lost their lives in the recent tornadoes. The school and surrounding neighborhood were completely destroyed. Girls made donations and visited with children and families who lived in the surrounding neighborhood and The e orts of the members of the Garden Club of Switzerland keep paying o Last month at the National Garden Club Convention in Seattle, Washington, it was announced that they were the winners of the National Garden Clubs #71A Division. This division is called Operation Wild” ower RoadsideŽ and it requires the competing Garden Clubs use of native plants in a community project. This is exactly what the members of the Garden Club of Switzerland did when they donated all the earnings of their 2011 ra e to the William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway. The $1000 was speci“ ed to purchase and plant native trees in the scenic trail area. These said trees are now planted in the front of Alpine Park. The idea was born when club member Doris Dowling o ered a full sized quilt she had made who have lost their homes and all belongings. The team was competing in nearby Edmond, Oklahoma in the Region III Championships where they advanced to the quarter nals and nished in the top eight teams from 11 states. They are currently the #1 ranked U -17 girls team in the state of Florida. We are proud of their hard work and compassion!Local garden club wins national awardBy Donna Keathley Garden Club of Switzerland president Mickey Fraser, who received a check and honors from the Florida Federations of Garden Clubs, Inc., with Claire Fioriti.to the club to help raise some extra money. Then Beverly Fleming joined in and donated an original seaside scene painting she had done; Carolyn Mullinax added a porcelain tray by designer Lynn Chase and they were o and running. At their November 1, 2010 meeting they made a motion to conduct a sale of ra e tickets and all monies earned were to be used to plant native trees on William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway. Sue Angle, president of the Florida Federated Garden Club, said they were so proud when the National Garden Club announced that the Garden Club of Switzerland received the honor for their very worthwhile project. She thanked the club for their dedication to Garden Club and is proud to have them as a part of the FFGC organization.#1 Ranked Creeks Clash U-17 visit Moore, Oklahoma The Cosmos 3vs3 soccer team enjoyed an excellent tournament at the Ponte Vedra 3v3 Challenge. This was one of the best 3vs3 experiences ever, with great competition and two playoff games going into overtime and Golden Goal. Overall, the team nished 5-2 after a great weekend of soccer, sun and fun! The Cosmos team includes Gavin Skipper, Bence Kosik, Kyle Corbett, Coach Kevin Corbett, Cesar Troncoso and Nickita Shvetz. Congrats, Cosmos! Congratulations to the 8A Julington Creek Slammers for winning the 2013 district championships in Ocala the weekend of June 22-23. They nished 3-0, outscoring opponents 49-7. They earned the right to play in the Florida State Championships in West Palm Beach during the July 4th weekend. Pictured are Eric Marichal, Ty Gebauer, Nathan Morgan, Brody Stevenson, Cole Capitano, Kolt Myers, Boston Torres, James Thompson, Hayden Gicalone, Devin Kirk, Jacob Carter, JD Hay, Chris Morgan, John Hay, Steve Carter and Chris Thompson. Congratulations, Slammers!

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Page 34, The CreekLine • July 2013 • www.thecreekline.com DURBINCROSSING.COM JACKSONVILLES #1 SELLING COMMUNITY and growing!Kids and parents alike couldnt be happier about the brand new K-8 school to be built in the heart of Durbin Crossing and scheduled to open for the 2014 school year. Durbin Crossing, the most sought after community in North Florida has everything your family could want, including top rated new schools nearby, ball “elds and parks within walking distance, two elaborate amenity centers, pools, tennis, sports courts, skateboard park, dog park, large nature preserves, a village center, and stunning model homes from our excellent builders. Join the excitement! See Durbin Crossing today.is coming toA NEW SCHOOL Like us on Facebook Dennis Homes www.dennis-homes.com Dream Finders Homes www.dreamfindershomes.com Drees Homes www.dreeshomes.com D. S. Ware Homes www.dswarehomes.com Mattamy Homes www.mattamyhomes.com Providence Homes www.myprovidencehome.com Richmond American Homes www.richmondamerican.com Riverside Homes www.myriversidehome.com Accepting and Selling furniture (living room, dining room, bedroom, etc) Home decor (lamps, rugs, artwork, tchotchke) New items arrive daily. We are ready to accept your entire house, estate, etc. We also oer inventory liquidation service for builders, home and furniture industry businesses, etc. For More Information call: 880 8448 or email us at: ENCOREDECOR@bellsouth.net10830 San Jose Boulevard ( across from Walmart)Visit us online at: www.EncoreDecorFL.comWE OFFER FREE PICKUP SERVICE FOR APPROVED ITEMSHours: Jacksonvilles Largest Upscale Consignment Store H The two teams from the St. Johns County 4-H Plant Sciences Club placed “ rst in their 4-H age categories at the Clay County Fair Horticulture ID and Judging Contest last month. Members of the Senior Team were Abby Kulpa, Cady Smith, Ellie Leach and Jonathan Kulpa. Among all seniors at the contest: Kulpa placed “ rst, Leach second and Smith third. Members of the Junior Team were Henry Keating, Caeli Benyacko and Harrison Keating. Among all juniors Henry Keating was “ rst and Harrison Keating second. The contest requires the participants to identify 40 samples from among 200 species of plants. The sample could be a leaf, a ” ower, a seed or fruit or a product made from the plant such as hummus from the garbanzo bean. A second part of the contest, called Judging, is to rank in order of quality four samples of one species of plant in each of four major categories. If you would like to test yourself on plant identi“ cation, please go to http://gardeningsolutions. ifas.u” .edu/mastergardener/outreach/plant_id/index.shtml.Club meetings are fun as well as educational. Previous meetings have included a trip to the Jacksonville Zoo to study the many Florida plants that grow there, a visit to the nursery area of the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind to see a production area which grow plants for sale and attending the Jacksonville Landscape Show. Switzerlands Boy Scouts of America Troop 718 recently took an incredible 25-mile canoe trip down the great Suwannee River over Memorial Day weekend. The amazing adventure included a large group of 14 canoes “ lled with 21 scouts, 10 leaders and adults, loads of gear and the proud troops hound, Rocky. Starting Saturday morning, May 25, at Suwannee River State Park, the pod of canoes paddled a scenic 15 miles. The long lengths of canoeing were broken by swimming and ” ying o rope swings. By the time the group reached Dowling Park River Camp later that afternoon, everyone was exhausted„but on the bright side, everyones arms were pumped! And after a long day on the water, the “ ery scouts were rewarded with a delicious meal of tacos in a bag. Sunday morning, after tasty omelets in a bag, the troop set Troop 718 canoes the Suwannee RiverBy Contributing Writer Marcus Nelson, Second Class Scoutout once more„with one goal in mind. After a day of canoeing mixed with swimming in the jokingly christened Scout Springs and a satisfying lunch, the scouts reached the cool waters of Lafayette Blue Springs State Park. After a cool swim in the springs, along with a swirling mud bath, the scouts washed o before cooking their own meals. On Monday morning, the scouts packed up and went home. In April, after three weeks of training, the scouts enjoyed a day of ri” e shooting at Camp Shands. Also in April, the scouts roughed it out on a Wilderness Survival Campout. In June, the group is heading o to a weeklong summer adventure at Camp Rainey Mt. in Northeast Georgia. In July, the agenda is snorkeling and scallop hunting in the Gulf of Mexico. All this can be found with Troop 718, proudly chartered to Switzerland Community Church on State Road 13, meeting Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m. For more information, please contact Scoutmaster John Morley at 377-6669.St. Johns County teams place rst in horticulture identi cationBy Contributing Writer Janet Koehler, St. Johns County 4-H VolunteerOther meetings have included making collections of many of the seeds on the contest and practicing identi“ cation. Club members have also competed at the Jacksonville Fair and the St. Johns County 4-H Youth Expo where they also did very well. Now the seniors will begin an intense period preparing for the state horticulture ID and judging contest in July in Gainesville. Should they win there, they would go on to the national contest which is in Williamsburg, Virginia this year. Youth ages eight to 18 interested in joining the St. Johns County 4-H Program and be interested in preparing for future horticulture ID and judging contests should contact the St. Johns County 4-H O ce at 209-0430 or visit http://stjohns. ifas.u” .edu/4-H.shtml. 4-H and all programs and related activities sponsored for, or assisted by, St. Johns County/ University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences are open to all persons with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or a liations. 4-H is a community of young people across America learning leadership, citizenship, and life skills. As one of our nations oldest, yet most current organizations, 4-H is reaching millions of young people with positive youth development opportunities.Team members holding plaques and trophies. Photo by Yvette Keating. The CreekLineYOUR Community NewspaperFor more information on advertising, call Linda Gay 904-287-4913 lg@rtpublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com • July 2013 • The CreekLine, Page 35

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THE CREEKLINESM SERVING THE NORTHWEST ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMMUNITY SINCE 2001Visit our online edition at www.thecreekline.comMEMBER OF THE RT PUBLISHING GROUP OF COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS Volume 13, Issue 7 July 2013The CreekLine12443 San Jose Boulevard, Ste. 403 Jacksonville,FL 32223Presorted Standard US Postage Paid Callahan, FL 32011 Permit No.4 Whats InsidePage 3 Whats New Page 4 From the CommissionerPage 5 School District Journal Page 6 The Sheriff Reports Page 8 EPIC detox center Page 9 Real estate in St. JohnsPage 12 Geneva grads Page 13 Civics 101 Page 14 Mosquito control tips Page 16 Marine Corps League Page 19 JCE art show Page 20 Mr. Irreplaceable Page 22 4-H volunteers needed Page 23 Swim safely! Page 24 Purposeful Parenting Page 25 Nease Sparklers Page 26 Ancient City Pirates Page 29 Fishing Report Page 30 Loggerheads Page 33 Garden Club award Page 34 Troop 718 VPK SpotsStill Available Enroll Now and Infant through 4 years old VPK Top notch educators Back to School Special Ask your rep how you can save 5%!! For St. Johns neighbor Michelle Knowles, her trip to the Pan-Massachusetts Challenge (PMC) annual bike-a-thon is not just an opportunity to raise money for charity. It is a passion to honor the memory of a young friend who made a special home in Knowles memory and heart. The 201213 school-year welcomed 150 Switzerland Point Middle School (SPMS) beginning band students which doubled the size of the existing band program. The 310 SPMS middle school band musicians are led by Laurie Zentz, a 28-year veteran in music education, recognized in December 2012 by School Band and Orchestra magazine as one of the Directors Who Make A Di erence. The band busy season lasts all year for the Raider bands. The initial fall concert consisted of three class periods of Beginning Band gathered for the rst time together to perform to a jam-packed gymnasi-The volunteers are busy collecting donations, booking artists to perform and doing all the other numerous tasks involved in making the second annual Clean Water Music Fest happen. The event is booked at the Ponte Vedra Concert Hall on Saturday, August 10. The rst Clean Water Music Fest, held last summer, was the idea of Shawn Fisher and Jordyn Jackson, who are both graduates of Bartram Trail High School. They perform together under the band name, Flagship Romance. Fisher and Jackson started dating several years ago while he was running his band, Son of a Bad Man. Jackson asked Fisher to help her write some new songs for her jazz career and it wasnt long until they were performing together. They describe their style at folk-pop. The two wanted their music to be used for a higher purSwitzerland Point Raiders rockBy Contributing Writer Carol Higleyum with additional performances in the winter and spring. The Concert Band, Symphonic Band and Jazz Ensemble not only performed fall and spring concerts at SPMS and BTHS but took the show on the road for the St. Augustine Christmas Parade, the Music Performance Assessments and the Music USA Festival Awards competition at Universal Studios. Not only were a trifecta of Superior rankings proudly earned, but our brand new Jazz Ensemble stole the show with a rst place win and ve individual performer awards. The Jazz Ensemble could also be heard at the inaugural Night of the Arts event, at parent information evenings and during school lunch periods. During the winter season many band students voluntarily committed to perform in the FBA Solo and Ensemble Music Performance Assessment event hosted at Creekside High Second annual event Clean Water Music Fest is coming soon!By Donna KeathleyLargest single athletic fundraising event in the country to end cancerLocal woman rides for Maddie By Karl KennellShe rst met Maddie Savoie when she started babysitting Savoie and her brothers; Savoie was four years old and her family lived two miles up the road in the Boston, Massachusetts area. Knowles quickly formed a bond of friendship with Savoie, just as if they were soul sisters. Savoie had three brothers, so Knowles would take v for some girl time to get her nails done and braid her hair. It became a tradition for the two and continued for years. It was in 2006 after Knowles had moved to Florida and was attending the University of North Florida when the call came that changed her life Savoie had cancer. Knowles immediately booked a ight back to Boston and visited her soul sister in the hospital. Savoie was already on her rst round of chemo and was starting to lose her hair by the time Knowles got there. Although it was such a super cial thing to be upset about, I used to always braid her hair; although I was told over the phone she had cancer, when I saw her in that room in a bandana is when it struck me, Knowles related. I obviously was visibly upset; however, Maddie told me not to be upset because God only picks the strongest. Here I was, supposed to be comforting her. She was the child and she was there to comfort me. One story that Knowles likes to tell is the story of sneaking in Savoies Christmas Labradoodle puppy Hope into her hospital room. Luckily the doctors and nurses were so caring they turned a blind eye, Knowles shared. I ride my bike in the PMC because the race gives me an avenue to remember, grieve and celebrate Maddie. Photo by Joshua Phillips pose, thus they organized the inaugural Clean Water Music Fest. The rst Fest was held in August of 2012 and was a huge success. With the help of their corporate sponsor, Venus Swimwear and the many local businesses who donated to the Local woman rides cont. on pg. 30 Clean Water Music Fest cont. on pg. 4 SPMS Raiders cont. on pg. 23

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Page 2, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com Save All Summer onNew or Used Auto Loans Jax Federal Credit Union 200CASH BACK*$ 295 Mandarin Rd. Mandarin Rd.Loretto Rd. Loretto Rd.San Jose Blvd. Ricky Dr. Ricky Dr.San Jose Blvd.

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Whats NewCommunity HappeningsDo you have community or club news you would like included in The CreeekLine? Then contact Martie Thompson at: editor@thecreekline.com or 886-4919. At RT Publishing we welcome Letters to the Editor. We request they be no more than 250 words. All letters must include writers name, address, and telephone number. Only the name will be published. E-mail to editor@ rtpublishinginc.com. Anonymously sent letters will not be published.Letters to the Editor policy The CreekLine The Ocean Breeze Mandarin NewsLine Southside NewsLine Players JournalPublisher Rebecca Taus publisher@rtpublishinginc.comEditor Martie Thompson editor @mandarinnewsline.comAdvertising Sales, Linda Gay LG@rtpublishinginc.comAdvertising Sales, Heather SeayHS@rtpublishinginc.comGraphic Design, Lisa Felegygraphics@rtpublishinginc.comRT Publishing, Inc. 12443 San Jose Boulevard Suite 403 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Ph: 904-886-4919 The CreekLine Community Newspaper is a free monthly publication distributed via bulk mail to all addresses in Zip Codes 32259 and selected routes in 32092 and 32095. Submission of articles and photographs are received by mail or email, although email to editor@rtpublishinginc.com is preferred. The writers opinions do not necessarily reect the opinion of RT Publishing, Inc. Advertising Rates are available by request. RT Publishing, Inc. is not responsible for advertisement content or accuracy of information provided by its advertisers. Nor does RT Publishing, Inc. endorse any of the products or services included in this publication. RT Publishing, Inc. reserves the right to refuse advertisement or copy from any advertiser. All rights are reserved and no portion of this publication may be copied without the express written consent of the publisher. 2013. Mandarin NewsLine+)Southside NewsLine+The CreekLine+ Save 5% on Septembers ad when you book both months! *Oer good for this special section only! No other oers apply. Cannot be combined with agency discounts!Call today to reserve your ad space!904-886-4919 Time for Our Annual Back to School GuideNow is the time to advertise your . .Enrollment for the 2013-2014 school year, Dance, Gymnastics, Karate, Day Care, Schools, and more!The St. Johns County Sheri s O ce announces the next Operation Medicine Cabinet, a pharmaceutical take back program, will be held on Saturday, July 27, 2013 from 9:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. at the parking lot of Julington Creek Elementary School, located at 2316 Racetrack Road. Bring unused or expired medications to this location for proper disposal. (No sharps or nuclear medications.) St. Gerard Campus High School presents a Remember When Super Cool s Sock Hop on Saturday, July 20 from 7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. at Bishop Baker Hall, located at 267 St. George Street in St. Augustine. Get out your saddle shoes, poodle skirts, and black leather jackets! Greasers are welcome! The Sock Hop will feature DJ Tony of Ava/Cameron Audio and Video Productions spinning the greatest blasts from the past. There will be awards for Best Dressed and Best Dancers as well as an Oldies Karaoke contest, hula hoops, food, drink and lots of fun. All proceeds will help the students of St. Gerard Campus, a 501(c)(3) charity. The purchase of tickets is tax deductible to the extent the law allows. Tickets are on sale for $25; pleas call 829-5516 to purchase your tickets! Mark your calendars for this years Tools 4 Schools supply drive! New and gently used school supplies can be dropped o at a number of locations throughout the county from July 22 to August 2. These supplies will be distributed to teachers for students to use in their classrooms year round. Remember to save any unused school supplies for donation when cleaning out backpacks and lockers. For more information, please call 547-7120. Combine art and science to create functional, attractive and ecologically sound surroundings that complement your home on July 18 at the St. Johns County Windstorm Training Center, located at 3111 Agricultural Center Drive from 2:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. Tips on cost-saving, e cient landscapes will help you reduce water, fertilizer and pesticide use. Join Keith Fuller, St. Johns County Extension horticulture agent; Beverly Fleming, master gardener; and Renee Stambaugh, native plant consultant. The program is free, open to the public and hosted by the St. Johns County Extension Service. Florida native plants are available for purchase. For more information, please call 2090430. Residents interested in providing input on the St. Johns County library systems long range planning, including desirable future services and programs, are encouraged to complete a brief survey available through September 30 at www. sjcpls.org or in person at any library branch or bookmobile location. Participant feedback on such topics as facilities, outreach, technology and service will help sta maximize the library systems resources for Whats New cont. on pg. 5 Copies of this Online Coupon is not accepted.

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Page 4, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com e best and most affordable pest and termite service in Jacksonville! Protect your home year-round with theAllgood Advantage Plan ONE simple and affordable payment plan.$250 initial service, $45/month thereaer Convenient all-in-one pest and termite control Full warranty against new termite damage The most thorough pest defense in the industry Follow us on for tips, fun facts and giveaways. www.facebook.com/AllgoodJacksonville Ask us about our lawn care service and receive one FREE treatment when you sign up for the Allgood Advantage Plan!Join the Allgood family.904.323.3609To learn more visit us jacksonville.allgoodpestsolutions.com The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Over 15 Years Legal Experience904-665-0005www.preddylaw.com Construction on the new county Health and Human Services Center has begun and should be completed a little ahead of the deadline for us to be out of the old location. A few people thought this to be a terrible idea; it passed our board 4-1. You decide! The old location on U.S. Highway 1 South purchased by the county in 1999 needed repairs in excess of $4.5 million and was considered functionally obsolete per a recent appraisal report. This would be to a building 40 years old so you still have an old building. The board agreed on a sale to Lowes for $8.0 million. Keep in mind that this would return a property to the tax base that had been tax exempt since the county took ownership in the s. This would be an increase to the commercial tax base, the countys number one priority. They would have around 140 employees that would increase jobs and more tax money to the county. The store would also pay sales tax to the county. All of this commercial tax money would be new to the county, helping to reduce the tax burden on residential properties. Lowes did not request incentives, another plus for the people of our county because From the Commissioners DeskBy Contributing Writer Ron Sanchez, County Commissioner, District 2 the dollars would start coming in earlier. They will pay impact fees as required. Tax money in the amount of $3.5 million would be joined with the $8.0 to build the new building on property we already own. No reduction in taxes because it is already o the tax rolls. The location is just south of our county administration building and more centrally located in our county. Bus service is available from Sunshine Bus to that location. This would place most county services in a general location. In case you are wondering, we do have an obligation to furnish this service and the housing of this service. We will spend $1.0 million less in your money to build a new building that will be paid for in 15 years (The $3.5 million would be a loan). Lease space was not available to satisfy our needs unless we separated all of the departments all over the county. This would be a real bad and expensive decision for you, the taxpayer. Does it make sense to pay a lease with your money so we can increase your revenue from the person that owns the property? In 15 years we have nothing but a higher lease. Ill let you think about that one! We have a large number of people that use this service from all over the county. The location we decided on is great for the people that use this service. The building now houses the following state agencies: Department of Health and Childrens Legal Services. County agencies: Family Integrity Program (CBC), Social Services, Veterans Services and Sheri s Sub-Station. Federal agencies: Veterans Administration Clinic, Stewart-Marchman-Act Behavioral and Rural Healthcare (Azalea FQHC). We receive lease dollars from some of these agencies at the current market price. The Veterans Administration Clinic is of course a federal service and we are negotiating with them to house their o ce in a separate building from the Health and Human Service Complex. We would construct that next to the HHS Building. The lease dollars would o set the cost, not you the taxpayer. Health and Human Services Center The CreekLine YOURCommunity Newspapereditor@thecreekline.comra e and silent auction, the event was a huge success. They raised close to $12,000. The pro t from the event was donated to the charity: water organization, which is based out of New York City. Charity: water goes into countries and communities who have no access to safe, clean water and basic sanitation by providing these areas wells and other methods of water access. The monies from the rst Clean Water Music Fest provided two entire communities totaling 585 people in Malawi with clean water for the next 20 years. Hopefully the 2013 event will be bigger and better. Some of the bands performing include Flagship Romance, of course, as well as Sunbears!, The Dog Apollo, The Chico Lobos Band, The Rubies, Dudes on a Rug and more are being booked daily. Fisher and Jackson are still looking for businesses to donate items for the ra e and silent auction. If you can help, please contact them at CleanWaterMusicFest@gmail.com. Clean Water Music Fest cont. from pg. 1

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www.thecreekline.com July 2013 The CreekLine, Page 5 School District Journal By Contributing Writer Beverly Slough, St. Johns County School Board 287.2794Baptist Primary Care Julington Creek1400 Bishop Estates Road, St. Johns, FL 32259 Celebrating 15 Years in Practice!Dr. Levine is dedicated to your familys health through every stage of life. He has served Julington Creek for more than 15 years and is ready to provide you with a medical home. Services Include: www.baptistprimarycare.net/levine-md Convenient Appointments Before & After Work or School! Call today for your FREE consultation! the bene t of residents county wide. To learn more about the many services currently o ered at your local library branch visit www.sjcpls.org/content/ branches. The Bartram Trail Branch of the St. Johns County Public Library will host a childrens FLYP event entitled Meet Your Local Super Heroes and ice cream party on Wednesday, July 31 at 10:00 a.m. You can explore the re truck and meet real re ghters then celebrate your summer reading with ice cream. Thank you to the Friends of the Bartram Trail Branch Library for making our summer reading program possible. This program will be held indoors in case of rain. Please contact the library at 827-6960 for additional information. Julington Creek Plantation CDD will be hosting Crafts on the Creek, a free outdoor craft and gift fair for the public on Labor Day weekend. This event will take place on Saturday, August 31 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at JCP Plantation Park (directly across from The Champions Club golf course at 875 Davis Pond Boulevard). This is an opportunity for vendors to exhibit and sell their work. If interested in participating as an artist, crafter, direct sale business or food vendor, please see www.jcpcdd.org. Flotilla 14-7 of the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary will be presenting About Boating Safely, a course for both beginners and experienced boaters that will give the participant the knowledge to obtain the Florida Boating Safety Education Identi cation Card. The course is o ered on Saturday, August 3 at the St. Augustine Campus of St. Johns River State College, located at 2900 College Drive (o State Road 16) in St. Augustine, starting at 7:45 a.m. and lasting until 5:00 p.m. Please note that Florida law requires that all persons born on or after January 1, 1988, when operating a vessel powered by 10 horsepower or more, must have in their possession a Florida Boating Safety Education Identi cation Card. Students must register prior to the class by contacting Vic Aquino at 460-0243. The Marine Corps League, Ancient City Detachment 383, meets on the rst Tuesday of each month at 1900 hours at the St. Augustine Elks Lodge 829, located at 1420 State Road A1A South in St. Augustine. For additional information, please visit mcl 383.org. Adults and teens age 14 and older are invited to attend the Project Lap Blanket crochet group at the Bartram Trail Branch Library on Tuesday, July 16, Monday, July 22 and Tuesday, July 30 from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The group will crochet or knit blankets for cancer patients at area hospitals. All skill levels are welcome. Cant come to any of the meetings? Pick up the crochet pattern at the Reference Desk in the library and crochet the blanket in your spare time. Drop o completed blankets and any yarn youd like to donate during regular library hours. For additional information, please call the Reference Desk at 827-6960. The St. Johns Federated Republican Women invite you to join them the third Monday of every month at 6:30 p.m. at Davidson Realty in World Golf Village. Men are always welcome. There will be no scheduled meetings for June, July and Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) and end of course examination (EOC) results are in for the 2012-13 school year. St. Johns County continues to excel in all areas. Our students scored rst in the state for every area of reading that is measured (grades three through 10), rst in every subject measured by end of course exam (Algebra I, Geometry, United States History, Biology I), rst in science in both fth and eighth grades (only grades tested) and in the top three in every grade level in math, with the exception of eighth grade. St. Johns County students were ranked 16th in the state for eighth grade math due to the fact that we chose not to double test our students. Districts were given the option of either giving FCAT math to students in that grade who took End of Course exams in Algebra I or Geometry or allowing those students scores on the EOC to measure their performance. We elected to only test our students once, exempting them from FCAT math. Other districts tested them with both FCAT and EOCs, counting their scores in both areas. Since we chose not to double test, our highest performing students were not included in the FCAT calculation, lowering our state ranking. On balance, with advanced students performance on EOCs and the strong results of the remainder of the students, we are very happy with math results in eighth grade. School grades have not been released yet. Even with the very strong showing of our students on the tests, there is a strong possibility that we will see a drop in school grades due to the formula that is used to calculate them. This year, writing standards for pro ciency moved from 3.0 to 3.5. In addition, scores for exceptional education students are being factored into the school grade. Perhaps the most impactful element, however, is the rule that requires an automatic drop of one letter grade if the students in the lowest 25 percent do not show adequate learning gains. In addition to impacting the student achievement scores, if fewer than 50 percent of these students score below the cut score, a school automatically receives a reduction of one letter grade. This reduction is in addition to any other reduction it may have received. For example, if a school scores enough points in the formula to earn a B but has fewer than 50 percent of its lowest 25 percent of students make adequate learning gains, the school grade drops to a C. The State Board of Education is looking at the impact of several elements, including this one, that have the potential to drop school grades dramatically all over the state. They have established a task force to study the elements and report back recommendations for any changes to the school grade formula. It remains to be seen how St. Johns County will fare, but there is the possibility that we may see some school grades drop despite our very strong showing on the testing. Regardless of the outcome of the school grades, I am very proud of our students and their teachers and parents for a job very well done. We continue to lead the state in student achievement as measured by FCAT and EOCs. Our students and teachers are the best! All our schools have consolidated to high school campuses for the summer. If you or someone you know needs to register a student or otherwise contact his/her school, the regular school numbers ring to the high school location. All school business will be conducted at the high school sites, which are open Monday through Thursday, from 7:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. July 1 through 7 will be a district-wide shutdown week, so no personnel will be available during that week. Both the consolidation and shutdown week, as well as our practice of a four day work week, are continuing e orts to conserve on utilities during the summer and result in a savings of over $1 million annually. It is really important that we have each student registered prior to the start of school so that we may be sure to have adequate numbers of teachers at each school. Please encourage anyone you know who has not already registered to contact their school right away. Our district website (www. stjohns.k12. .us) contains a wealth of information about our schools as well as resources for students and parents. I encourage you to visit the website to learn more about our programs and to nd the answers to questions. Suggested reading lists will also be found on the website. I highly encourage all our students to continue reading throughout the summer. As always, thank you for your commitment to public education. If I may serve you in any way, please contact me at sloughb@stjohns.k12. .us.Whats New cont. from pg. 3 Whats New cont. on pg. 10 Dispose of unwanted or outdated prescription medication (excluding sharps, medical wastes, nuclear medications or thermometers)Saturday, July 27 9:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Julington Creek Elementary School parking lot

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Page 6, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com Gari Dental provides a family friendly atmosphere with a skilled and qualied team, that is knowledgeable in all your dental needs. Our valuable team has over 100 years of collective experience. Call today to schedule your appointment and experience the difference. 287-0033 www.garidental.com Starting from left to right: Pam Parker (O. Coordinator), Cindy Johnston (Dental Asst.), Dr. Gus Gari, Joy Major (Dental Hygienist), Caroline (O. Manager) Buy A Business John SerbCertied Business Intermediary www.FirstCoastBizBuySell.com Call 904-613-2658 for a Condential No-Cost Valuation & Consultation Your best investments are the ones we manage. Call: 904-230-1020Tenant screening & placement, Lease preparation, Property Repair and Maintenance We take your headaches away!Single Family Homes Townhomes Condos Vacation Rentalswww.ImprintProperties.com Imprint Properties, LLC. Real Estate and Property Management The Sheriff ReportsBy Contributing Writer David B. Shoar, St. Johns County Sheriff It has been nearly 49 years since a hurricane struck the First Coast directly from the east and that hurricane, Hurricane Dora has been the only one to strike from the east since records have been kept dating back to 1851. There are only a very small percentage of folks who remember the destruction that Hurricane Dora caused in the early morning hours of September 10, 1964. The storm made a direct hit at then sparsely populated Vilano Beach with its 120 mph winds and a storm surge of 12 feet. Dora continued east to Lake City and then made a right turn and traveled north through Georgia and the Carolinas before going out to sea. The storm caused one death directly and $280 million damage. Although we have been spared from devastating storms we should not let down our guard and be prepared if a hurricane is headed our way, remember it was not too long ago, we had the outer e ects of three storms coming from the west coast that caused substantial damage. I would like to once again devote this months column on Hurricane awareness or safety. Hurricane season began at the beginning of last month and lasts until the end of November and meteorologists are predicting an above normal season in the Atlantic basin with a possibility that the season could be very active. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), predicts that there will be 13 to 20 named storms. Of those they say between seven and 11 could reach hurricane strength and of those, three to six could become a major hurricane. You should be familiar with the terms Hurricane Watch and Hurricane Warning. A Watch is issued when conditions are favorable that a hurricane could strike in 36 hours. A Warning is issued when hurricane force winds are expected to strike in 24 hours. By this time you should already have an emergency plan for yourself and family and begin implementation of that plan. Some things to consider in your preliminary plans are: Take photos of your property from all angles, it may not look the same once the storm passes. Plan for elderly/handicapped/invalid care at a shelter or at home. Learn which routes will be safe during a storm. Learn where o cial shelters are located. Trim any dead wood from trees prior to the storm. Check for, x or take note of loose items on your structures (shutters, screens, eaves, gutters, antennas, satellites). Get and use a hurricane tracking chart Plan what you and your family will do if you have to evacuate. Get necessary supplies and secure them in safe area. Plan for pet care. Review your insurance coverage. Protect your important documents. Show others in the family how to turn o /on gas, electricity and water. Make outside repairs. When a Hurricane Watch for your area is issued you should do the following: Listen to o cial bulletins on radio, TV or NOAA Weather Radio and Internet for updates. Check all supplies you already have to see if they are in satisfactory condition include batteries. Fill gas tank of vehicles, check oil and tire pressure. Inspect mobile home tiedowns. Board, tape, cover windows and doors or skylights. Secure boat. Secure any objects and furniture that are outside. Check on all medical supplies, special needs for elderly, handicapped, etc. Plan to evacuate if necessary. When a Hurricane Warning is issued here are some suggestions: Stay tuned to TV, radio, internet or NOAA Weather Radio. Move valuables to higher location Move furniture away from windows and cover. Fill containers (bathtub, plastic jugs) with drinking water. Use phones only in an emergency. Bring in/secure pets (food and water). Shut o water and electricity at main breaker switch. Leave mobile homes. Leave low areas. If evacuating--leave early. Sometimes a hurricane path may not be predictable and evacuation orders could come at any time. If you are asked to evacuate, please do so early and know the route you will be taking. Remember there will be many folks taking the same route from a very large area so be sure to give yourself plenty of time to leave safely. Finally, if you refuse to leave following an evacuation order, here are some safety tips for riding out the storm: Make sure your building is well-constructed. Turn the refrigerator to maximum cold. Freeze water in plastic containers, if the electricity goes o you can use the ice to keep food cold in the refrigerator. Turn o utilities if told to do so by the authorities. Unplug small appliances. Fill bathtub and containers with water. Stay indoors. Prepare for storm surge and possible ooding. Plan what to do if the winds become too strong. Stay away from windows and doors, even if covered. Stay in a small interior room, hallway or closet. Close all inside doors, brace exterior doors. If you have a two-story house, stay on the rst oor. Lie on the oor or under a table or other sturdy object. Now is the time to go over your hurricane preparedness. If you have not made any emergency plans, you should do them now. Planning ahead will save you unnecessary stress from not knowing what to do or not having the supplies you will need to get you through the hurricane watch, warning, storm, and aftermath. Print and post this list on the refrigerator or somewhere it will be easily seen. Please visit our website, www.sjso.org for additional information concerning Hurricane Preparedness and of course feel free to drop me a line at dshoar@sjso. org. It is our hope at the St. Johns County Sheri s O ce that you have a safe and happy summer.Dear Editor, Conservatives feel that CDD Supervisors should be handling homeowners taxes wisely, conservatively and ethically. Programs that are not well attended should be canceled, not subsidized. So you and I are paying for someones hot dog, child care or activities. We were told we would only pay for infrastructure and activities would pay for themselves through fees, but that is not happening. Thank goodness Supervisors Lansdale and Page are there to slow down these expenditures. A salary survey was done and they compared us to Sawgrass, Timuquana and Queens Harbor. Our general manager was given an excessive raise even though he doesnt have the same education or licenses as those sta We are a government facility and should be using government salaries as comparisons. The head of Duval County Parks and Recreation makes less than $86,000, so why does our GM who only runs one facility make more than he does? The CDD is selling alcohol from 7:00 a.m. until 1:00 a.m. to try and make more money. Fees are not always equitable. Master swimmers get to swim for free three days a week with the head coach while Aqua Fitness has to pay $40 a month. It troubles me when non-residents speak at the CDD meetings, controlling the voting issues when they dont pay our taxes, but get bene ts of subsidized programs. The tennis pro makes 50 percent more then the national average and our supervisors give him a raise to $160,000. That is an insane amount of money to pay when we dont see that much pro t coming back to us. People are losing their homes so we should be very conservative with our tax situation. Leslie MiedemaHurricane awarenessLetter to the Editor WWW WWWwww.TheCreekLine.comVisit our website:

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www.thecreekline.com July 2013 The CreekLine, Page 7 Kids Are Not Little AdultsWe understand that kids are not little adults. They have special needs and an emergency room can be an anxious place for a child. Our physicians are board certied in emergency medicine and our registered nurses are certied in pediatric advanced life support and trained in pediatric medication administration. The Memorial Emergency Care Center Julington Creek oers rapid response for pediatric patients children will be seen quickly in one of our two pediatric rooms. Memorial Emergency Care Center Julington Creek Because kids are not little adults. www.memorialhospitaljax.com With competitive rates and personal service, its no wonder more drivers trust State Farm. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Ride with the #1 car insurer in1001142.1State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, IL Jim Register Jr, Agent 12058 San Jose Blvd, Suite 302 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Bus: 904-268-5522 www.jimregister.comFLORIDA. State Representative Ronald Doc Renuart (R Ponte Vedra Beach) was presented with the 2013 Florida Dental Association Legislator of the Year Award in mid-June at the Florida National Dental Convention at the Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, Florida. Renuart was recognized for his outstanding e orts during the 2013 legislative session where he sponsored House Bill 581. The bill which passed favorably through the House Health Innovation Subcommittee with a unanimous vote, relates to dentist and insurance contracting. We are honored and privileged to present this award to Representative Renuart. He has always been an outstanding advocate on healthcare issues, said FDA President, Dr. Kim Jernigan. Renuart practices internal medicine in Ponte Vedra Beach and is a leader in health policy in the Florida House of Representatives. During the 2013 legislative session, Renuart successfully passed ve bills through the House of Representatives, all of which have already been signed into law by Governor Rick Scott. He is the chairman of the Veterans and Military A airs Subcommittee, vice-chairman of the K-12 Education Subcommittee and serves on the Health and Human Services Committee, Health Innovation Subcommittee and Government Operations Appropriations Subcommittee. He is also the vice-chairman The Guild of the Jacksonville Symphony celebrated the installation of of cers and their board at the 2013 annual luncheon held on June 4 at San Jose Country Club. At that time they presented a check for $40,000 to the president of JSA, David Pierson and two scholarships were presented to Andrew Callahan and Michael Kuhn, members of the Youth Orchestra.Renuart named Florida Dental Association Legislator of the Year Rep Renuart receives the 2013 Florida Dental Association Legislator of the Year Award from Dr. Kim Jernigan, president of the Florida Dental Association and Dr. Gerald Bird, chair of the Florida Dental Association Political Action Committee. of the First Coast Legislative Delegation. Renuart lives in Ponte Vedra Beach with his wife, Tamara. The CreekLine For advertising call: (904) 866-4919

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Page 8, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com 700 3rd St | Neptune Beach | FL www.garciainstitute.com 904-567-3841 108 Bartram Oaks Walk Dr, Suite 201 St Johns FL 32259 Come Visit us at our NEWEST Location! BEFORE AFTERComplimentary Consultations for the Latest Advances in: Juvederm, and SculptraTM and Contoura PlusTM~CALL NOW: 904-567-3841~ Dr. Phillip Garcia is a double board certied Facial Plastic Surgeon. Explore for T reasures! Experience Fun Foods! GREAT Old-Fashioned Market! Dont Miss Out! Join Us This Weekend! (904) 824-4210 www.StAugustineFleaMarket.com 2495 State Rd. 207, St. Augustine, FL 32086 Only minutes away on I95 @ Exit 311 (5 miles South of the Outlet Malls) The St. Johns County Sheri s O ce announced that $1.3 million was appropriated in the state budget to operate a detox center in St. Johns County. As the largest county in Florida without a detox center and with 80 percent of our residents that needed detox assistance not receiving it in 2012, it was critical that an e ort be made to bring a detox facility to our county for the safety and well-being of our residents, stated Sheri David B. Shoar. We are very appreciative to the State Legislature for recognizing this need. In partnership with the Sheri s O ce, EPIC Behavioral Healthcare will be taking the lead in the e ort to bring a detox center to St. Johns County. According to research, detox services are a proper rst step in a persons recovery journey from drug and alcohol addiction. The mental clarity, emotional stability and improved physical condition provided by a drug and alcohol detox will allow for more active participation in the daily requirements of a treatment program. The proposed detox center has earned the endorsements of the Sheri s O ce, St. Johns County Board of County Commission, Flagler Hospital, the St. Johns County School District, the City of St. Augustine, the State Attorneys O ce, United Way of St. Johns County, and Home Again St. Johns. All cite the need and importance of a detox center for St. Johns County residents. On June 1, EPIC kicked o a campaign to purchase and renovate an existing building. According to Patti Greenough, CEO of EPIC, We have a wonderful opportunity to secure a building that will be perfect for the detox center but we must close on this building by August 1 so time is of the essence. This presents a signi cant cost savings as a building doesnt have to be constructed. Greenough noted that treatment of addiction is as successful as treatment of other chronic diseases and that addiction treatment yields lower crime and medical costs. Most people are touched by substance abuse in some way a detox center will allow for the evaluation, stabilization and the fostering of a persons readiness for entry into substance abuse treatment, stated Greenough. The planned detox facility will have 16 beds and be led by a team of physicians, nurses, and trained substance abuse professionals. To learn more about the detox center and investment opportunities to assist in obtaining the building, please call EPIC at 829-2273 or to visit www. epicbh.org. Like many children his age, the week of summer camp is a time that 12-year-old Justin Bele looks forward to every year. But, unlike other camps, the one at Nemours Childrens Clinic is attended only by children like Bele children who have cochlear implants, a surgically implanted electronic device to improve listening and spoken language skills. Four years ago Catherine Swanson, CCC-SLP/CCC-A, Beles speech language pathologist and audiologist at Nemours Childrens Clinic, recommended that, in addition to his regular schedule of speech therapy, he receive additional, intensive auditory, speech and language therapy during the summer when he was out of school and his familys schedule was more exible. Recognizing that there were other children like Bele, the cochlear implant summer camp was born. For one week each summer these 10 children get together at Nemours and spend the week doing science experiments, playing games and making crafts while working one-onone with speech pathologists. For example, an activity with sidewalk chalk can also turn into a lesson on vocabulary and following multi-step directions. Beles mother, Estella Bele, travels from Daytona each year so that Justin Bele can attend the camp and they stay together at the Ronald McDonald House. Once camp starts, it doesnt take long for her to notice positive changes in her son. I notice the di erence right away, she said. It gives him a good feeling being around other kids like him. Theyre able to support each other. Hell tell another boy, You did really well with your Rs and they do the same with him, Estella Bele said. The campers develop their vocabulary, listening skills, language skills, social skills and engage with other children who also have experienced hearing loss. For many, this is the only opportunity they have to spend time with other children who have gone through similar experiences. Nell Rosenberg, a speechlanguage pathologist with Duval County Public Schools, runs the day-to-day activities during the week and works with Swanson to develop activities and lessons to implement. Current and former student clinicians also volunteer their time to spend with the campers. The camp is free to families and is funded by donations to the Nemours Fund for Childrens Health. The group enjoys reuniting each year and also getting to know new campers. For more information, visit www. Nemours.org. E ort to bring detox center to county beginsSummer camp for children with cochlear implants held Advertise inThe CreekLineIts good for business!607-5062LG@rtpublishinginc.comA message from the St. Johns River Water Management District...During Eastern Daylight Time, residential lawn watering is limited to two days per week: Homes with odd number addresses: Wed./Sat. Homes with even number addresses: Thurs./Sun. Nonresidential properties: Tues./Fri. Restrictions apply to water from private wells and pumps as well as public and private utilities. Water for no more than one hour per zone Water only when needed and not between 10 AM and 4 PMwater less Visit www. oridaswater.com

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www.thecreekline.com July 2013 The CreekLine, Page 9 Call 288-9211 zb tnay fr hfm Real NY Style hand tossed pizza at affordable prices. (Next to Publix)Visit: brooklynpizzajax.com Prices, percentages, inventories, agents, appraisals, contracts. When all these things are swirling around your head and combined with historically low interest rates, its no wonder the business of entering real estate can be confusing. According to The Wall Street Journal, mortgage costs rose to more than 4 percent recently for the rst time in over a year, as the average interest rate on a 30-year xed mortgage climbed from below 3.6 percent to 4.07 percent in a month and the re nancing index sank 15 percent, the lowest since November of 2011. According to the Northeast Florida Association of Realtors (NEFAR), Mays $158,500 median sales price for the region as a whole was a 20.1 percent increase over last Mays $132,000. The May median price was also up 16 percent year to date. The supply of homes for sale plunged 43.6 percent since last May, with 4.4 months currently on hand. Despite the bleak history of the real estate market over the past few years, most sources say the industry is steadily returning to its former glory. A brief Associated Press article published just a few days ago asserted that real estate is looking better than it has for seven years. It said, Most US homebuilders are optimistic about home sales, a sign that construction could help drive stronger economic growth in coming months. The National Association of Home Builders/ Wells Fargo builder sentiment leaped to 52 this month from 44 in May. It hasnt been that high since 2006. The National Association of Realtors chief economist also adds, The housing numbers are overwhelmingly positive. So what does this mean for St. Johns County buyers, renters and sellers?Mark Rosener, vice president and managing broker of Watson Realty Corp. says, Our market in Northern St. Johns County is de nitely in recovery modeit is a tremendously better market in which to sell than it has been in several years. It is also a great time to buyinterest rates being low and pricing still well below the peak levels is the perfect scenario in which to buy. Prudential Network Realty broker/associate Charlie Hillyer agrees. He states that especially homes under the $250,000 price point have stabilized or even increased somewhat in value due to the shrinkage of inventory which provides less competition for sellers. When these homes hit the market, he is often elding multiple o ers from buyers. I believe that buyers con dence has come back somewhat, Hillyer shares. They believe we are on the rise from the bottom of the market and are interested to get back in the market to own a home. Hillyer also points to the banks that are no longer ooding the market with foreclosures and short sales, but rather letting these houses trickle back into the market as another reason that home prices are stabilizing. When asked what advice she would give to someone looking to enter the market now, real estate agent Sherry Davidson says, A buyer should work with a lender and be ready to buy. If they nd a home they like, there will likely be other o ers and they have to be ready to make an o er on the property quickly. For sellers, she says, [A seller] should look at their home through the eyes of a potential buyer. They should get rid of the clutter and make any repairs. If a buyer sees that the house is not maintained well, they will wonder what else has not been taken care of. St. Johns County is especially valued for its top-notch schools, making summer the most popular time for families to move. Rosener adds, There are diverse community options from townhomes to single family, active adult communities, golf course communities and the abundance of new home communities. Most new home builders that are active in the greater Jacksonville area are building here in Northern St. Johns. New homes are being built in all price ranges, sizes and styles. The St. Johns County School District will implement operational strategies to save money during the upcoming summer months. These strategies helped produce an energy savings of more than $1,000,000 during the summer of 2012. By restricting building operations in all district facilities during the summer, energy consumption at each site can be reduced. This will require centralization of summer activities in buildings where the lowest energy consumption will occur. Beginning on Monday, June 10, the district will operate on a four-day workweek, from 7:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and be closed on Fridays. All facilities will function in an energy conservation mode Friday through Sunday. Summer activities will be designed within the Monday through Thursday workweek and will be completed by August 1. The district will return to the normal ve-day workweek beginning on Monday, August 5. Beginning on Monday, June 17, the district will operate from six high schools and one middle school serving as regional centers. St. Johns Technical High School will remain in its permanent location due to scheduled summer programs. All other facilities will function in an energy conservation mode. Maintenance managers and custodial sta will work at the schools in their region on a rotating basis. Each regional high school will serve as the operations center for the schools that have been assigned to that site. School administrative teams will work in designated areas of each high school. Summer academic programs, camps and extended school year services will be planned, developed and communicated by each school and will operate at the regional high school sites. Sta will return to their regular sites on Monday, July 30. Following are the assignments for each NW St. Johns County school: Bartram Trail: Switzerland Point, Liberty Pines, Timberlin Creek and Hickory Creek. Creekside: Fruit Cove, Durbin Creek, Julington Creek and Cunningham Creek Nease: Pacetti Bay, Wards Creek, Mill Creek and PalenciaReal estate market in NW St. Johns County nally improvingBy Devyn FussmanSchool district announces summer consolidations Tech Tip Tuesday Tues, July 23 12 PM Bartram Trail Branch LibraryPlease join us for any of these free sessions: 12pm 1pm: iPad User Group: Smart phone and tablet users. Come to the fun discussion group to learn about tips, tricks, and awesome apps.4:30pm Picasa: Are you taking a lot of vacation pictures this summer? Come learn about this free editing and organization tool from Google. You must bring your Google username and password with you to the class.6pm Introduction to Powerpoint 2010: Whether youre new to Publisher or converting from an older version, this is the class to come to if you cant nd that button Microsoft hid this time.For additional information, please call 827-6960.

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Page 10, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com Julington Creek Plantation 1637 Racetrack Road #206 St. Johns, Florida 32259904-880-8796 Celebrating 25 years!MAY Management Services, Inc.Licensed Property ManagerMAY Realty & Resort RentalsLicensed Real Estate Brokerage www.maymgt.comTim HutchisonRegional ManagerLaura QualantoneCo-Regional Manager 475 West Town Place St. Augustine, FL 32092904-940-1002The Neighborhoods of World Golf VillageDeborah AlleyLicensed Property ManagerKathy MayeldLicensed Property ManagerRich Curran-Kelley, CAMRegional ManagerDottie KrinerLicensed Property ManagerPam Horan Licensed Property Manager Make an appointment today and Save 20% OFF Facial! ~ or ~ Free Blowdry with Facial New Clients OnlyExpires 7/31/13 Calypsosalonand spa VARSITY INSURANCE, INC. 268-6365www.varsityinsuranceagency.com Email: varsity@fdn.com For coverage, service and rate second opinions . Children ages six through 12 can become nature detectives and learn how lizards help gardeners because they are pollinators during several hands-on workshops o ered this summer by the St. Johns County Public Library System branches. Every child attending will receive free gardening goodies, including Nature Detective notebooks and have fun learning all about fantastic Florida lizards and how to spot them with members of the Garden Club of St. Augustine. Registration is required and space is limited. To sign up, please call or stop by your local branch. Ponte Vedra Beach, 827-6950: 1:00 p.m. or 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, July 13 Bartram Trail, 827-6960: 2:00 p.m. or 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, July 17 Main Library, 827-6940: 1:00 p.m. on Friday, July 19 Hastings, 827-6970: 1:00 p.m. on Thursday, July 25 Southeast, 827-6900: 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, August 14 These workshops are designed by the Sisterhood of the Traveling Plants, presented by the Garden Circles and sponsored by the Garden Club of St. Augustine and each librarys Friends of the Library organization.August, but we will resume our monthly schedule on September 16. For more information, please contact sjfedrepublicanwomen@gmail.com. The St. Johns County Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer your lawn and garden questions at the Bartram Trail Library, located at 60 Davis Pond Road at the entrance to Julington Creek Plantation. The clinics are scheduled for Thursday, July 18 and Saturday, July 27 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. You can bring in a soil sample for free pH testing. Instructions on taking a soil sample can be found on the internet. The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-7 meets the rst Thursday of every month at 7:30 p.m. at the St. Augustine Yacht Club near the St. Augustine Lighthouse. The otilla is always looking for new members, particularly those who own aircraft, boats and have radio equipment and skills. If you are interested, please contact Vic Aquino at 460-0243. The Creekside High Dance Teams coach Krystina Nelson and the Knights Dancers will present the 2013 Knights Dance Camp from July 29 through August 1, from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon at CHS. Campers ages ve through 12 and all levels of experience are welcome. Registration forms may be found at www-chs.stjohns. k12. .us/athletics/sports/winter/ dance. For more information you may also contact Coach Nelson at Krystina.nelson@ stjohns.k12. .us. The next meeting of the Ancient City Chapter of the Florida Writers Association will be Saturday, July 20 at the Main Library in St. Augustine. Marketing and public relations specialist Holly Feist will discuss the seven deadly sins any author should avoid when marketing their book. Library doors open at 10:00 a.m., the meeting begins at 10:15 a.m. and all are welcome to attend. Programs are presented in partnership with the Ancient City Chapter of the Florida Writers Association and the Friends of the Main Library. All book sales bene t the FOL. The Main Library is located at 1960 US Highway 1 in St. Augustine. The NASJAX Skin and Scuba Diving Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the rst Wednesday of each month at the Golden Corral Bu et and Grill, located on San Jose Boulevard. The club is open to all divers and those who are interested in diving (military a liation is not required). For more information, please see the website nasjaxscubadivers.org or contact the club president, Dave Martin at 413-8773. World Golf Village Toastmasters meets the rst and third Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at First Florida Credit Union (entrance in back), located at 1950 County Road 210 West. You are invited to visit the World Golf Village Toastmasters Club. Our members include experienced Toastmasters and those just starting. Together we share the Toastmasters experiJCP CDD facts: 1. JCP CDD is subject to Florida Sunshine standards for governments. Information requested from us and our databases are public information. Our meetings are open to the public. 2. User fee revenue is collected when we charge a fee for something speci c. The 2013 recreation budget projected $1,477,327 in user fees (38 percent of total revenue) and $2,377,983 from annual assessments (62 percent of total revenue). A recent $22,500 donation by the Loggerhead swim team for pool heating equipment is additional revenue. Tennis and Loggerhead swim team programs are the largest contributors to user fee revenue. All departments charge user fees except for administration, housekeeping and property. 3. The most recent recreation fund nancial statement (April 2013, seven month actual results) shows $41,521 more revenue and $148,984 less expense than the prorated budget. Signi cant changes can occur during our busiest season from May through September. Our budget is organized by operating department to show user fee revenue, direct expense and how much of the annual assessment is needed to cover those direct expenses. Our budgets are available on our website, www. jcpcdd.org. 4. We currently follow the scal 2013 budget and have a proposed scal 2014 budget. The current annual assessment for single family homes is $760 and the proposed budget doesnt increase that amount. It could reduce the annual assessment if adopted as currently written. 5. Our annual budget and fee schedule must be adopted at a public meeting. In July and August we should review, discuss and vote on both. Participate in this process by attending evening meetings on July 9, July 17 and August 20. CDD supervisors can be reached anytime by email addresses listed at our website; we all read your emails (thats a fact!) My opinions: 1. Annual assessments are paid by every CDD property owner regardless of whether they use the amenities. Additional user fee revenue is collected from residents who do use the amenities. I assume not everyone will use our programs and facilities. That does not make our amenities controversial or less valuable. 2. Our amenity program is nancially strong and very successful as a result of diligent work by our dedicated general manager and sta the volume of residents who use our facilities, reasonable annual assessments and user fees. 3. Your ve supervisors may not agree on all important issues; that is both expected and desirable for balanced decisionmaking. Respectful disagreement is good; personal attacks are unnecessary. 4. JCP CDD residents also disagree on important issues and want supervisors to vote their conscience based on their thorough understanding and facts. Respectful disagreement is good; personal attacks are unnecessary. This article is my opinion and in no way constitutes nor implies District opinion, endorsement, sponsorship or viewpoint. The views expressed may or may not be shared by the other JCP CDD Supervisors.Nature detective workshops o ered at librariesWhats New cont. from pg. 5Julington Creek Plantation CDD reportBy Contributing Writer Cathy Klein, Supervisor, Julington Creek Plantation Community Development District kfyogabar@gmail.com Whats New cont. on pg. 12 Businessnot as bigas it used to be?Call for a free consultation & well work at increasing your business!The CreekLineLinda Gay 607-5062

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www.thecreekline.com July 2013 The CreekLine, Page 11 In the hallways and classrooms of Bartram Trail High School, students are continuously nding ways to get involved with the community and make a di erence in peoples lives. There are all sorts of clubs ranging from the Beta to the National Honor Society that students can join to ful ll their interests and passions. One particular club, the Dreams Come True Club, that was new to the school this past year, made a special impact on a young boys life. Beginning in 1984, the Dreams Come True organization made its goal to ll an unfortunate child with joyous memories. They ensure this by granting dreams to children battling life-threatening illnesses in Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia. More than 3,000 dreams have been granted, from Hawaii trips to shopping sprees. The Dreams Come True Club at Bartram Trail got the chance to participate in this rewarding experience. Started up by Brianna Warwick, upcoming senior at Bartram Trail, the Dreams Come True Club opened its doors for students to join. The aim of the club was to use fundraisers and donations to raise enough money so that the organization could pair them with a child to present a dream to. With the help of club o cers, club members and the club sponsor, Ginger Baker, along with other donations from students around the school, the club was able to reach its goal. The main fundraiser that the club created was the rst annual Snow ake Charity Ball held this past January. They sold tickets, crafted decorations Dreams Come True Club makes a di erenceBy Contributing Writer Megan Grantand threw on a spectacular dance for the students to attend and enjoy, while also knowing they donated to a deserving cause. The Dreams Come True members also made donation jars that they took around to their classes, asking for left over change and generous donations from their fellow classmates. At the end of the year, the Dreams Come True Club successfully raised over $2,800, with 100 percent of their money donated to their Dreamer. On May 8, 2013, 10-year-old Carter Richards was presented with a trip to Disney World and the magical village, Give Kids the World. For a week, he and his family will get to relax and take a break from the stressful world around them, while having fun at the parks and various rides. Warwick, the Dreams Come True Club president, exclaimed, Meeting and presenting Carter, our Dreamer, with the dream of a lifetime was one of the most incredible and unforgettable moments. I dont think any of us expected that Carter would impact our lives as much as we expected to impact his. It makes everything weve faced and accomplished well worth it. Looking on to the next school year ahead, the Dreams Come True Club is already thinking up new ideas and improvements that can grow the club and its impact on the community. They hope to have even more members and people aware of their purpose next year and look forward to granting another childs life-long dream. The CreekLineAdvertise in YOUR Community Newspaper!607-5062

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Page 12, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com Join medical professionals throughout the year to learn about the latest health information. Baptist H ea lt h 2013 CALENDARAugust 15 How to Recognize Stroke Symptoms Barbara Klus, RN and What to do About it September 19 Treatment and Prevention of the Jason Meir, MD Aging Face October 17 Breast Health November 21Your Annual Primary Lara Church, MD Care Visit RSVP to 904.202.CARE(2273). Seating is limited!Reservations will be accepted beginning 30 days prior to the scheduled event date.BAPTIST SOUTHlearnlunch Call 904-322-0383E-mail: jodell3@ymail.com John ODell & Associates On Sunday, June 2, Geneva Presbyterian Church was in an unusually celebratory mode. Honored on that day were 13 students who just graduated from ve di erent high schools and they will attend 11 di erent colleges this fallbut thats not all of the story. This particular group of youth from the church had been lucky enough to have been raised by the entire village of the church along with a lot of input from some fabulous, dedicated leaders since 2006. Four leaders of the church came together in 2006 to speci cally create a youth group for sixth through 12th grade students. The focus of that organization was to address four things equally worship, fellowship, mission outreach and study. As time went by, the leaders gured out just how to put this group together for the best development of the kids. The group started meeting on Wednesday nights in the corner of the Geneva fellowship hall. Tucked in their little space, the children played games, read the Bible, planned fundraisers and worked on mission activities. In 2007, 12 of the group went on their rst mission trip to Tennessee. That started a run of seven years of sending the group of anywhere from 16 to 25 children and adults to mission work in places like St. Petersburg, Florida and Big Creek, Kentucky. During these trips the youth were able to build wheelchair ramps and clear ground to pour concrete for decking; they painted more fences and walls than that they could believe. They sat with senior citizens and war veterans and ran Vacation Bible School studies; in their down time they enjoyed music and reworks. The trips required funds which needed to be raised by the team members. The most unique fund raiser was a Flock the Congregation event in 2008. The kids took donations to put a ock of amingo in the yards of friends and neighbors. People could even pay for insurance against ocking. This was a great church bonding event for the young and the old, netting $1000 to the Mission bank account. Of course there were many car washes, spaghetti dinners, garage sales and chili cook-o events. There was never a short-Mary Polidan traveled to Carnegie Hall in New York City on May 31, 2013 where she received a National Gold Medal at the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards for her Digital Art, Widowed. Polidan was an American Vision Nominee at the North East Florida Scholastic Art Awards (NEFSAA) for this piece and earned a regional Silver Key for her photography. Polidan commented that she is thankful that her ight from New York City ran on schedule as she graduated from Creekside High School the following afternoon. Polidan wishes to thank her Creekside photography teacher Miriam Provisero for her encouragement and the NEFSAA, the Duval Art Teachers Association and the Haskell Corporation for providing the opportunity. Polidan adds, Im honored to receive this award and I know that Creekside will be represented at the Scholastic Awards for years to come with its creative, talented student body. Growing up at Geneva Presbyterian: Congratulations, grads!By Donna Keathleyage of fun, work or learning for the youth of Geneva. This year is the largest graduating class coming from that original youth group of 2006. Over the last seven years we have been able to accomplish our goal of setting these young adults on the right path through worship, mission, fellowship and study. Congratulations to Jordan Alexander, Ryan Cloherty, Jake Bliven, Jonathan Dobbs, Drew Toelle, Brandi Rivers, Kevan Wright, Samantha Fillipo, Reid Arnold, Lauren Cowart, Gavin Loftus and Samantha Clarke. ence in ...a mutually supportive and positive learning environment, where every individual member has the opportunity to develop oral communication and leadership skillsand have fun doing it. For more information, please visit www.worldgolfvillage.toastmastersclubs.org. The Northeast Florida Quit Smoking Now (QSN) Program o ers free tobacco cessation classes! The classes meet once a week for six consecutive weeks and provide a free workbook as well as free nicotine replacement therapies (patch, lozenge and gum) to assist tobacco users in their quit attempt. Please call us today at 482-0189 to register for one of our upcoming Quit Smoking Now classes in St. Johns County. You will be glad you did! The MOMS Club St. Augustine-North is a wonderful way to meet other stay-at-home and part-time working mothers and is a fun way for your children to socialize with other children. Mothers with children of all ages are welcome. Members for this chapter must live in the 32092 or 32095 zip codes, including all neighborhoods along the 210 corridor. We meet once a month to plan our activities for the month ahead. These business meetings are held at 10:00 a.m. on the fourth Thursday of every month at Faith Community Church on County Road 210. Of course, children are welcome at all of our meetings and activities. If you have any questions or would like to get more information to join, please email sanmoms@gmail. com, check out our website at www.sanmomsclub.weebly.com or drop into our business meeting.Whats New cont. from pg. 10

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www.thecreekline.com July 2013 The CreekLine, Page 13 Fields Cadillac Call me for all of your automotive needs!Jim Seery WGV Resident Sales/Leasing Consultant New and Preowned375 Outlet Mall Blvd. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 904-823-3000 ext. 1030 781-206-7315 jim.seery@eldsauto.com www.eldscadillac.comAsk about our Fields Matters Amenities In 2002, I was taking a Saturday course for history teachers at the University of Florida. One Saturday is particularly memorable not for the class itself, but for what happened at lunch afterward. I was at a pizza place and was seated by the window looking out on University Drive just east of 13th Street. It was an unusually quiet Saturday until a large number of people began gathering on opposite corners of that intersection. On one corner was a large group of whites standing around their cars in a parking lot. A second group of mostly AfricanAmericans gathered on the opposite corner around the large brick University of Florida sign. Then, a third group began to appear. Gainesville police began to park several cruisers on the street between the other groups. Not until the group of whites took from their cars and donned Ku Klux Klan robes and hoods did I know what was happening. For the next 45 minutes, the whites chanted and waved their picket signs with messages of white supremacy while the predominantly African-American group responded with anti-Klan messages. Fortunately, on that day, nothing more happened. Each group, including the police, would pack their things and leave peacefully. So, what? Other than a lot of noise, some slightly interrupted tra c and more than a few tax dollars spent on the police protection, nothing really happened. Or did it? What actually occurred was democracy. Citizens with opposing views peacefully gathered to voice their opinions with publicly funded security protecting the rights of each group to do so. With varying degrees of disruption, such incidents are historically common: the Boston Tea Party, Su ragettes, anti-Vietnam War and the Occupy Wall Street protests are just a few. I occasionally referenced the Klan/anti-Klan rally in my class discussions as an example of several fundamental principles of democracy. It serves equally well here. Weve been examining the 12 principles o ered by R. Freeman Butts as the most fundamental to civics education. The Gainesville event is an excellent example of the next two of these principles, participation and due process. The First Amendment guarantees ve freedoms including assembly and speech. Both are activities crucial to free and open democratic participation. We have available to us numerous prudent methods of democratic participation, public demonstrations being but one. However, Butts warned, healthy participation has a corrupted form called majoritarianism; the practice of making decisions by majority rule. In its worst extreme, majority rule can deprive a minority group of its rights, e.g. Jim Crow, womens su rage, cultural assimilation of Native Americans. How, then, can majoritarianism be avoided? Due process is the judicial requirement that all laws be written and applied to all citizens equally. Therefore, regardless of how extreme or controversial it may be, any person or group has the right to be heard, to assemble and to be treated equally under the law. As is often said, I may disagree unto death with what you say, but I will defend to death your right to say it.The Bartram Trail Branch Friends of the Library is happy to announce a special Civil War themed book sale to be held the second week of July. This will commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. The Friends have been collecting donated Civil War books for the past year in anticipation of this event and have accumulated some 200 titles so far. If you have any that you would like to donate to the sale, they will be gratefully accepted. Proceeds of all book sales go to support the Bartram Trail Branch Library. Funds may be used to buy supplies for childrens programming, for new book purchases or to replace technol-As we enter the summer months and the traditional curtailment of many arts events, it is exciting to hear of a program which is currently expanding both in available space and in activities. The Florida Ballet, which has been in the community for more than 30 years under the direction of Laurie Picinich Byrd, is doing just that. It recently added over 3800 square feet from the building adjacent to its existing studios in downtown Jacksonville. In addition to current activities, this will provide an informal performance venue with tiered seating to accommodate approximately 100 people. It will also make it possible to present such unique o erings as lunchtime programs for seniors and weekend young peoples concerts as well as early evening after work performances and will enable expansion of current collaborations of the Florida Ballet with other art forms such as the annual Ballet de Marais with Walter Parks and his Jazz Trio and Philip Pan, Concertmaster of the Jacksonville Symphony. Additionally, it will provide needed extra studio space to accommodate the recently established Florida Ballet Conservatory. In this program, middle and high school students attend daily ballet and related dance classes and work on academic education in one location. Similar to existing Conservatory programs in other major cities, it provides the opportunity for talented young students preparing for careers in dance performance and related areas such as teaching, choreography and dance therapy, to have the advantage of a thorough training program while providing designated time for academic studies. The discipline of dance training has long been recognized for encouraging good work habits and time management, but if not having to balance academics and dance studies with extended commuting between school and studio can relieve some of the pressure, it can be very bene cial. The Florida Ballet training program follows the American Ballet Theatre National curriculum. This can only be taught by certi ed faculty and provides National standards of excellence as proven by student examinations held annually. It is a unique method of maintaining standards. One of the special annual summer programs o ered by the Florida Ballet is the Orlando Ballet/Florida Ballet Summer MiniIntensive. This gives the students an opportunity to work together for two weeks with faculty from both organizations. This is in addition to the regular Summer Intensive and Workshop programs. A performance by students of the summer programs will be held at the Bolles Middle School Auditorium on Saturday July 28. It will feature excerpts from Swan Lake and additional ballet and contemporary works and is open to the public. In addition to many other events, the Florida Ballet will of course present its annual Nutcracker in December at the Lazzara Theater at UNF. It will feature prominent guest artists and will also o er several performances for school children. For additional information on the above and other upcoming events, you can check the web at www. oridaballet.org or call 353-7518.E Pluribus Unum: Civics for one and allBy James A. Lee, M.Ed., Ed.D. ABD, Peer Teacher Evaluator, St. Johns County School DistrictLibrary to host Civil War-themed book saleogy. The Friends of the Library recently purchased eight new adult public computers and the improvement has been greatly appreciated by both sta and patrons. The sale will o cially begin on Monday, July 8. A special table will be set up in the lobby of the Bartram Trail Branch Library. The books will be available for browsing and purchase during normal library hours for the entire week. For more information, please call 827-6960.Encore!An exciting new arts projectBy Betty Swenson Bergmark, Professor Emeritus, Jacksonville University The CreekLineis YOUR Community Newspaper! Send us your community news!editor@thecreekline.comCreativity requires the courage to let go of certainties.~Erich Fromm

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Page 14, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com ACCREDITEDACCREDITATION ASSOCIATION for AMBULATORYHEALTH CARE EYE CENTEROF ST. AUGUSTINE & WORLD GOLF VILLAGETHE EYE SURGERY CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE AAAHC 940-9200 T T Network RealtyCharlie HillyerREALTORCell: 904-509-3130Business: 904-260-4300www.StJohnsHomesandLand.comCharlie.Hillyer@Prunet.com For Real Estate Service in St. Johns County, trust 20 years of local experience. I know the territory! Julington Creek Plantation Re creation Center presentsJulington Creek Plantation CDD will be hosting a free outdoor Craft & Gift Fair for the public on Labor Day weekend at JCP Plantation Park. We are looking for artists, crafters, direct sale businesses and food vendors to exhibit and sell their work. EARLY BIRD VENDOR DISCOUNT by July 21st For more info see www.jcpcdd.org CRAFT VENDORS WANTED! The Florida Department of Health in St. Johns County and the Anastasia Mosquito Control District remind residents and visitors to take proper precautions to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes. We can all take some simple steps to help protect ourselves, our families and our community against mosquitoborne illness, said Dr. Dawn Allicock, DOH-St. Johns director and health o cer. Personal protective measures and the communitys participation in the prevention and control of mosquitoes and mosquito-borne illnesses play an important role in integrated mosquito management, said Dr. Rui-De Xue, director of the Anastasia Mosquito Control District of St. Johns County. DOH-St. Johns and the Anastasia Mosquito Control District encourage everyone to take basic precautions to protect yourself from mosquito bites and the diseases they carry, by following the Department of Healths recommendations to Drain and Cover. Drain standing water to stop mosquitoes from multiplying: Drain water from garbage cans, house gutters, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, ower pots or any other containers where sprinkler or rain water has collected. Discard old tires, drums, bottles, cans, pots and pans, broken appliances and other items that arent being used. Empty and clean birdbaths and pets water bowls at least once or twice a week. Protect boats and vehicles from rain with tarps that dont accumulate water. Maintain swimming pools in good condition and appropriately chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use. Cover skin with clothing or repellent: Clothing: Wear shoes, socks and long pants and longsleeves. This type of protection may be necessary for people who must work in areas where mosquitoes are present. Repellent: Apply mosquito repellent to bare skin and clothing. Always use repellents according to the label. Repellents with DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus and IR3535 are e ective. Use mosquito netting to protect children younger than two months old. Cover doors and windows with screens to keep mosquitoes out of your house. Repair broken screening on windows, doors, porches and patios. The Florida Department of Health works with partner agencies, including the Anastasia Mosquito Control District, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and state universities throughout the year, to monitor for the presence of illnesses carried by mosquitoes, such as West Nile virus, Eastern equine encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, malaria and dengue. For more information about mosquito-borne diseases in Florida, please visit DOHs website at http://www.doh.state. .us/Environment/medicine/arboviral/index.html. Baptist Health Foundation is pleased to announce four additions to its board of directors. The Baptist Health Foundation supports and enhances essential programs and services of the Northeast Florida-based, not-for-pro t Baptist Health system. Baptist Health Foundation raised almost $12 million during scal year 2012, thanks to the generosity of many caring individuals and organizations throughout the region. The new directors are: Dan Edelman, CPA, managing partner of the Florida practice of Dixon Hughes PLLC. A certi ed public account with 30 years of experience, Edelman concentrates on general business consulting. He also serves as chairman of the Jacksonville Public Library Foundation Board and on Kipp Jacksonville Schools Board of Directors. William Mason, Ed.D, FACHE, president emeritus of Baptist Health. Mason recently retired from the Baptist Health and Wolfson Childrens Hospital boards of directors, on which he served for 15 years after retiring as president and CEO of Baptist Health. Mason was recently named an emeritus member of both boards and he has also previously served as president of the Baptist Health Foundation. Jane Rollinson, president and CEO of Criterion Consulting Solutions where she heads the healthcare division. She has held top executive roles at several medical and insurance companies over her 28-year business career, moving to consulting in 2007. She serves on the associate board of governors for the Boys and Girls Clubs of Northeast Florida and on the Presidents Council of the Cancer Support Community, an international nonpro t that provides support, education and hope to people a ected by cancer. Terry West, president and CEO of VyStar Credit Union, a Jacksonville-based credit union with more than 400,000 members and assets of more than $4.7 million. A former middle school mathematics teacher, he chaired the 2011 United Way campaign for United Way of Northeast Florida, helping raise more than $25.5 million for the community. Each of these new members brings an exemplary professional and philanthropic background to the Baptist Health Foundation, said Pierre Allaire, Ph.D., Baptist Health vice president and chief development o cer who oversees the Baptist Health Foundation. I look forward to working all four of these community leaders who are generously sharing their time and expertise with the Baptist Health Foundation. Oops Unisex Salon is now open at the new shopping center on Race Track Road near the entrance to Bartram Springs. Owner Andraea Green has over 20 years experience in the industry and is an accomplished unisex stylist who has previously owned a successful salon in Boston, Massachusetts. A graduate of the University of Massachusetts Amherst with a degree in economics, she was drawn to barber styling to express creativity and a desire to be an entrepreneur. At Oops Unisex Salon, a Paul Mitchell Focus Salon, their mission is to provide the best quality hair care service especially in the areas of damaged hair, home-maintenance recommendations and creative cuts. The salons philosophy is simple: Customer Service. Green states, We truly believe that the main focus of any organization should be the customer. Without the customer, we have no business. More importantly, we need to understand our customers total needs and make recommendations for their desired results. Our goal is to build long-term relationships with our guests by providing consistent, exceptional and personalized services. Our team has great passion for creativity and professionalism. Be sure to stop in and meet Andraea and her team, Billie, Daniel, Amanda, Crisalida, Jamila and Rickeal soon! Look for their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!New salon opens near Bartram Springs subdivisionPrevent mosquito-borne illness by following these precautionary measuresFoundation adds four new members to its board of directors Tell our advertisers you saw them inThe CreekLine Support our fine Advertisers!NW St. Johns Countys Original Community Newspaper Lunar PhasesNew: July 8First Quarter: July 16Full: July 22 Last Quarter: July 29

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www.thecreekline.com July 2013 The CreekLine, Page 15 11945 San Jose Blvd, Bldg. 400, Jacksonville, FL 32223 14540 Old St. Augustine Rd, Bdlg. 2, Jacksonville, FL 32258 Gynecological Care New age bio identical hor mone replacement therapy Sekine, Rasner & Brock of Jacksonville oers Womens Health Care for all ages!Everything a woman needs in one visit including examination, mammography and lab assement.In-Oce Procedures (Permanent Birth Control)(Treatment for Heavy Periods) Obstetrical Care Ultrasound Call TODAY for an appointment! BIOFEEDBACK ASSOCIATESof Northeast FloridaChange your Brain. Change your Life.904.646.0054www.biofeedbackassociates.com The American Academy of Pediatricians has given neurofeedback the highest grading of effectiveness for ADD/ADHD. Provides a non-drug approach for diagnosing and treating ADD/ADHD and is based on research that has been widely replicated all over the world.ADD/ADHD without MEDICATIONSOther benets include: completed This months movie review belongs to the lm Star Trek Into Darkness, an actionpacked, science ction adventure lm for adults and teens to enjoy. Sometime in the distant future, a crew of voyagers is sent to observe a faraway planet. Captained by James T. Kirk, portrayed by Chris Pine, the planet is a danger zone and breaking the prime directive is just another day in the life of this leader. Though he does save the life of his rst o cer, Spock, played by Zachary Quinto, he ends up demoted; however, this also lands him and the rest of his friends in the middle of the destruction of many of Star Fleets highest ranking o cers, by a one man terror, Khan, performed by Benedict Cumberbatch. While he is no longer demoted, Kirk and his crew head into a war zone near Klingon territory to hunt down Khan. Khan is a genetically altered superman who has been in cryo-sleep for a few centuries. The Enterprise has been out tted with new weaponry in the form of proton torpedoes and there is an additional factor to these missiles. Many other genetically altered beings remain locked in sleep inside the tubes. Peter Weller portrays Admiral Marcus, who authorizes this journey, though there seems to be ulterior motives in his actions and Kirk will just have to decipher who to believe while trying to save Earth. J.J. Abrams has directed a lm that plays with a lot of the classic history that may dismay many Trekkies. Tribbles and Khan are just a portion of the changes. Uhura is well-played again by Zoe Saldana and her relationship with Spock remains an intrigue for the future. A redeeming quality of the movie is the camaraderie and attitudes of the original crew. Bones remains irascible and sarcastic in the face of the stoically logical Spock and forever thrill-seeking Kirk. While Scotty, Sulu and Chekov are all enjoyable in their expanding roles, they remain signi cant to Kirks future and future lms. Changes aside, though the cameo by Leonard Nimoy does tie in the story of Khan, the story is cohesive and interesting and action is often riveting and de nitely entertaining. I will watch the next installment and see where these new actors take me.Locally owned homebuilder Dennis Homes has opened a new model home and is o ering new home designs in the Main Street neighborhood at the RiverTown community, St. Johns Countys only riverfront master-planned community. Homebuyers may select from a wide variety of home designs at the RiverTown community, said RiverTown director of development Christian Kuhn. The new model by Dennis Homes exempli es the style and design of a Traditional Neighborhood Development (TND) with inviting front porches and alleys leading to garages. Many of the Main Street neighborhood home sites overlook the community parks and green spaces. The new Charleston model and Main Street neighborhood oor plans o er the best in modern living while retaining the charm and vintage feel that is quintessentially RiverTown, said Dennis Homes President and CEO Scott Dennis. The Main Street neighborhood o ers convenient access to the RiverTown Amenity Center and the communitys Riverfront Park. We encourage everyone to visit our new model and beautiful home sites at the RiverTown community. Dennis Homes is o ering a variety of new oor plans in its Main Street collection ranging in size from approximately 1,400 square feet to more than 2,400 square feet of living space and priced from the $180s. The Charleston has an open, spacious oor plan with three bedrooms and two baths. The gourmet kitchen with granite countertops, oversized island and 42-inch cabinetry opens up to a large dining area and gathering room. Covered front and rear porches, including a summer kitchen with sink and gas stubout for grill, extend the living areas to the outdoors. Dennis Homes also includes energy ef- cient tankless water heaters, R-13 wall insulation, R-38 ceiling insulation, and radiant barrier roof decking as standards. The model is open daily. The RiverTown communitys design has been in uenced by Southern neighborhoods of years past, where sidewalks and front porches encourage residents to become neighbors. A pedestrian-friendly community that embraces the outdoors and Movie ReviewStar Trek Into DarknessDirected by: J.J. Abrams. Starring: Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Zoe Saldana, Benedict Cumberbatch and Peter Weller. Review by T.G. Stanton.Rating: Good Movie, Glad to Have Seen It (4 out of 5) New model opens in Main Street neighborhood at RiverTown Dennis Homes has opened a new model and is offering traditional-style designs in the Main Street neighborhood of the RiverTown community. its most valuable asset, the St. Johns River, the RiverTown communitys walking trails meander through the community. Homebuyers are drawn to the communitys numerous amenities, welcoming family-oriented atmosphere and convenient access to top-rated schools. On Friday, May 3, a stormy night couldnt keep away the friends and family of the 12 contestants vying for the Miss Nease crown! After the Top Six was called, one girl emerged the winner contestant #1 Juliana Barranco! In addition to winning the title, Barranco won Best Interview and Best Evening Gown. Other winners include Miss Congeniality Chloe Cegelski and Best Talent Savannah Raney. For her year of reign, Barranco has chosen to bring awareness about bullying/cyber-bullying to her platform. In addition to speaking engagements, Barranco will be making public appearances throughout the community and at school. She will represent Nease in the Miss Senior High/Northeast Florida pageant this fall which is the preliminary pageant to Miss Florida America. Congratulations Juliana! Photo courtesy of Graham Martin Ancient City Photography Congratulations to Miss Nease 2013! The CreekLine YOURCommunity Newspapereditor@thecreekline.comneed customers?lg@rtpublishing.com

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Page 16, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com Mallena UrbanRealtor 11226 San Jose Blvd. Jacksonville, FL 32223C: (321) 543-9008O: (904) 421-7930 murban.watsonrealtycorp.com Follow me on Facebook: www.facebook.com/murban00 ...Serving my neighborhood of North St Johns with Integrity... The Bartram Park Farmers MarketVillage Lake Circle, Jacksonville, FLnear the north entrance to Bartram Park on Old St. Augustine Road Jacksonville, FL 32258Every Thursday ~ RAIN or SHINE 2 pm to 6 pm facebook.com/TheBartramParkFarmersMarket Grand Opening July 18 Live music, local produce, baked goods, delicacies, arts & crafts, free drawing for gift baskets. Vendor info: nfva.org@gmail.com Christmas in July? Clement Moores famous poem describes St. Nick as having a droll little mouth drawn up like a bow and a beard as white as snow. The piece continues, He had a broad face and a little round belly, that shook when he laughed, like a bowlful of jelly! Moores poetry inadvertently describes the requirements for contestants in the Papa Hemingway Look-Alike Contest. The competition highlights the annual Hemingway Days festival in Key West, Florida, along with a marlin tournament boasting a $250,000 purse and literary short story competition drawing On Friday morning, May 24, under the bluest of skies that matched the blueness of their trousers and as the baking sun sent torrents of perspiration owing, the Oldest City Detachment #383 had the distinct honor of being a part of the Liberty Pines Academys Liberty Parade and Celebration Day. Was it worth it? As the Oldest City Detachment #383 Color Guard stood at parade rest listening to the voices of innocents ll the air with patriotic songs and as each grade of Americas future paraded by in a sea of waving miniature American ags with their eyes wide open inspecting those mature Marines in their uniforms, one could only be reassured that the passing of the torch of liberty to the next generation will glow as bright as each face and yes, it was worth it! Our sincere gratitude goes out to Liberty Pines Academy for the invitation to participate in its ever growing program that showcases its support of our veterans. A special thank you to the faculty and parents: Well done!You wont want to miss the annual Earnest Hemingway Look-Alike contest in Key WestBy Contributing Travel Writer Debi Lander, www.bylandersea.com Dispose of unwanted or outdated prescription medication (excluding sharps, medical wastes, nuclear medications or thermometers)Saturday, July 27 9:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Julington Creek Elementary School parking lot over 1300 entries. From July 16 through 21, 2013, stocky middleaged men with whiskers will ock to the isle to compete in a pageant akin to Miss America. Some return on an annual pilgrimage with the understanding that newbies score little chance of securing the coveted title. They line up on stage for preliminary rounds showing o their beards and bellies. Hopefuls also receive a generous minute to display a personal talentfrequently a song, poem, literary reading or comic routine. Last summer I watched as many paraded in khaki sportswear, but at least two men wore sherman knit sweaters resembling a famous portrait of Ernest. Thats diehard dedication in 90 degree heat and humidityor is it the importance of being Ernest? Semi- nalists go on to compete in the nals held Saturday night before a beerdrinking crowd over owing Sloppy Joes Bar. The Key West watering hole ranks a favorite haunt of Old Hem himself and owner Joe Russell became one of his closest friends. The judges panel of past winners also scrutinizes the contestants congeniality during activities like the whimsical Running of the Bulls. This quirky event satirizes Ernest Hemingways love of Spain and the bull ght. Look-alikes pull wooden hobbyhorse bulls through the streets of downtown Key West instead of Pamplona. No one mentions the fact that the Nobel Prize winning writer was actually a young man when he lived in Key West during the 1930s. Seems that older contestants fare better than those in their 50s and no aspiring youths enter. This contest indulges big boys and the Hemingway manly-man lifestyle of hunting, shing and love of cocktails. During the festival, participants, known as Papas, meld into a fraternity of sorts; likewise for their wives called Mamas. The 2012 semi- nalists included Michael Groover of Savannah, Georgia, who was cheered by his wife, Food Network personality Paula Deen. Deen praised her husbands Hemingway looks, but said he had other equally important qualities in common with the author. Hes all man, hes truthful and honest and (has) really got the spirit, Deen said. The 2012 winner, Greg Fawcett, a 64-year-old North Carolina investment banker, won after his 10th attempt besting the 139 other Hemingway lookalikes. He credited his victory to establishing camaraderie with the judges, timing his haircuts carefully and paying attention to the length of his beard. Upon hearing the announcement, Fawcett looked to the heavens mouthing a thank you. Like a pageant crowning, he was met with rousing cheers and hugs from fellow contestant. Why, I might have even seen a few tears. Additional information visit: www. a-keys.com. Businessnot as bigas it used to be?Call for a free consultation & well work at increasing your business!The CreekLineLinda Gay 607-5062

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www.thecreekline.com July 2013 The CreekLine, Page 17 Same day appointments available. 904-449-2055 ParadisePoolService.net Licensed and Insured State Certied Pool Contractor Lic. # CPC1456905 & CPC1458125 Paradise Pool Service ~ Your Pool Specialist Get ready for swim season! Call us today for these pre-season services: What a wonderful summer this is turning out to be for me; I hope you are enjoying yours. I am making the transition from a city girl back to a country girl and absolutely love it. We made the move into our new home up in Eagle Rock, Virginia just after school ended. We left Florida in the middle of a heat wave and arrived at our home in the hollow and needed a blanket! We have a view of the mountains from our porch swing. It is the perfect place to sit and read. I can hear the creek and the cows in the pasture across the road. We added chickens to our homestead our rst Saturday. What an adventure that was. We bought three month old hens and put them in our sons dog kennel to take them home. As we cleaned out the new chicken coop we left them in the truck bed. Next thing we knew two had gotten out and were perched on top of the kennel. Keep in mind, I have never held a chicken before! My husband quickly caught one and tried to pass it o to me. I just expected him to carry them both but that didnt work. As we walked up the hill to the new coop he warned me I might end up with chicken poop on me, not to be surprised. Well, I was ready to let her down on the spot. Fortunately she was good for me. We decided to let all ve of them out to catch bugs in the yard while we nished xing up the coop and boy, oh boy, was that a mistake! They quickly ran for the woods. Our woods has not been cleared in years so just picture ve chickens going every which way. We took turns trying to chase them out with one of us to catch them at the edge of the woods and after 45 minutes of chase we just gave up. We were hoping they would still be somewhere around when we returned from our errands. Luck was on our side. We captured two and put them in the kennel by the entrance to the coop. Two more showed up early in the evening and walked on their own into the coop so we captured them and added them to the kennel. Last but not least the most troublesome one made it into the coop as we ate dinner. What a relief; I hated the thought that the raccoons might get them. The best part of our move is that we are less than 10 miles from a brand new library, Eagle Rock Public Library and they have the best collection. I walked in and right in the front with the new books was a copy of And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini. This is de nitely his best book ever! I highly recommend it for students and adults both. It is told in di erent voices and through di erent generations. My other adult book The Fifth Assassin by Brad Meltzer is another one I would recommend for students as well as adults. This is a perfect read The SPMS Dreams Come True Kids Helping Kids Club presented a Disney Dream to a threeyear-old girl with a life-threatening illness at their annual Dream Party on May 14. The over 100 club members are sixth through eighth grade students who raised funds by selling coupon books, organizing a loose change collection, sponsoring a student talent show and selling Dreamsicles to send their dreamer and her family on this special Dream! Making a Dream Come True is only one way in which the students of SPMS help make a difference for someone in our community. Notes from the Pacetti Bay Media CenterBy Contributing Writer Lynn Johnson, NBCT, Library Media Specialist, Pacetti Bay Middle School, IBMYPfor United States history because it taps on all the presidents that have been assassinated and is lled with history and intrigue. The next two I read ended up with a common thread, T4 by Anne Clare LeZotte and Blue by Joyce Moyer Hostetter. T4 is told in verse through the eyes of a deaf German girl during the Holocaust. It is a quick read and very powerful. The author lives in Gainesville. I am hoping to see if we can get her to come for a visit. Blue is told by a 13-year-old girl from Hickory, North Carolina during World War II. It is an amazing story of resilience in a very challenging time. All four books are de nitely worth taking the time to read.Switzerland Point Middle School sponsors a Disney Dream The CreekLine For advertising call: (904) 866-4919

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Page 18, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com WeRentSunshine.comWalter Williams Property Management, Inc. Cheryl Karl Oce is located in Jacksonville, FL Jamey Johnston, executive o cer for the United States Navy, visited Julington Creek Elementary after his return back to the States from El Salvador after 72 days of deployment. Second grade teacher Susan Baker and rst grade teacher Amy Grimm encouraged their students to write letters to some sailors returning from their sixmonth deployment in Japan, El Salvador and South Korea. Some of the single sailors did not have family here to greet them, so the children had letters waiting for them in their rooms upon their arrival. It warms my heart to know that the sailors felt loved by our letters, said Lauren Cas-The North Florida Vendors Association (NFVA) announced the opening of its second As temperatures rise so can your utility bill. Energy bills are dependent on weather because cooling systems run longer during hotter times of the year, even if the thermostat is set at a xed temperature. In fact, cooling your house in the summer makes up almost 50 percent of the electric portion of your utility bill. JEA recommends that you follow these tips to save on your utility bill: Set the thermostat at 78 to 80 degrees in the summer, higher when you are not home. A ve degree shift can save you 6 to 8 percent per degree in the summer. Use insulated drapes, blinds or shades on your windows. E cient use of window shading can save you up to 12 percent on the cooling portion of your utility bill in the summer. Use the thermostats auto setting instead of the on setting for your air handler.Grand opening of Bartram Park Farmers Market on July 18weekly farmers market on Jacksonvilles south side. The grand opening of the Bartram Park Farmers Market is slated for July 18 from 2:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m.; the market is set to continue on Thursdays from 2:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m. year-round The market will be located on Village Lake Circle at the north entrance to Bartram Park Boulevard on Old St. Augustine Road. The grand opening will feature live music by Beach Street Boogie and Fermins Spanish Guitar, market gift basket drawing, cooking demonstrations, kids activity, fresh organic produce, baked goods, organic meats, art, crafts, jams and sauces, fresh pasta and prepared Greek, Caribbean and homestyle foods. We are actively seeking out the best vendors from Florida and Georgia for our market. The business community and residents of Bartram Park have welcomed us and we intend to provide them the highest quality farmers market experience, commented NFVA president, Arthur Glaser. Market updates are posted daily at www.facebook. com/TheBartramParkFarmersMarket. Interested vendors are asked to email NFVA.org@gmail.com.JEA o ers tips for keeping your cool Use ceiling or box fans in occupied rooms in the summer to make it feel 3 to 5 degrees cooler. Because this will make you feel cooler, you can raise your air conditioning thermostat setting, which saves you more money than the cost of running fans. Remember fans cool people not rooms. Change or clean air lters monthly. Seal leaks in the cooling ducts. Dont forget the leaks around the air handler unit. Sealing leaks in ductwork can save you 1 to 30 percent on the cooling portion of your utility bill, based upon the size of the leak. Weather strip doors and windows. Repair or replace broken or cracked windows. Weather stripping windows and doors can save you up to 8 percent on the cooling portion of your utility bill. Install a programmable thermostat. Using a programmable thermostat can save 5 to 15 percent on the cooling portion of your utility bill. Take advantage of JEAs rebate program, ShopSmart with JEA. ShopSmart o ers a wide range of rebate programs to save you money on those home energy upgrades. Sign up for JEAs MyBudget program, which evens out your energy costs so you pay about the same amount each month, making it easier to manage your monthly expenses. Learn more about JEAs MyBudget program. Go to jea.com for more energy-saving tips.Navy o cer visits Julington Creek Elementary studentsContributed by Ingrid Jones, Julington Creek Elementary The CreekLineAdvertise in YOUR Community Newspaper!607-5062tillo, a second grade student. I think its nice the single sailors get letters because it will help them not feel alone, said Andy Stickney. Chloe Dresback stated, I feel happy because even though these sailors didnt have family, they had their shipmates with them to be their family. When they are away, they take care of each other like their family does. Baker and Grimm believe it is important to teach children to care for others more than themselves. They do many community service activities throughout the year that allow for their students to learn this important lesson.Executive Of cer for the Navy, Patrol Squadron 10, Jamey Johnston WWW WWWwww.TheCreekLine.comVisit our website:

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www.thecreekline.com July 2013 The CreekLine, Page 19 THE ONLY PLACE MORE LOVING IS IN YOUR ARMS. Tour your local Goddard School and experience why its the best preparation for social and academic success. Goddard Systems, Inc.s program is AdvancED accredited. SAINT JOHNS 100 Julington Plaza Drive 904-230-2002 GoddardSchool.comLEARNING FOR FUN. LEARNING FOR LIFE.SMCALL TODAY!>The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. License #C07SJ0053 Goddard Systems, Inc. 2013 TCLMANDARIN San Jose Blvd.WEVE LOWERED THE COST OF RAISING KIDSWe sell gently used Childrens clothing (sizes newborn to 16) Shoes, Equipment (Pack n Plays, Swings, High Chairs and Toys). Come to see, come to buy! With a concept that is this simple saving money is childs play!Selected Spring/Summer clothing 50% OFF until July 31! 11112-25 San Jose Boulevard, Mandarin, FL 32223 904-886-7071 Bring ad for 10% Off. One per Customer. Exp 7/31/13 May 21 at Julington Creek Elementary was certainly an amazing evening! We would like to thank all of the volunteers for making this years annual art show possible. Our PTO, teachers and sta helped make JCEs Art Show and Ice Cream Social the most successful yet. Countless volunteers helped to make this possible by organizing and displaying student art work throughout the school. I would like to speci cally thank Mrs. Strahm, Mrs. Kessler, Mrs. Graves, Mrs. Limoges, Mrs. Bryce, Mrs. Dutrieux, Mrs. Durant, Mrs. Hendrickson, Mrs. Jamsheedy and son Dean and many others for their unending talents and assistance. In addition to art work being placed throughout the school, many of the tables in the cafetorium were colorfully decorated with our students creations. Perhaps the happiest dilemma was the long lines of families waiting for ice cream, our fantastic Book Fair and the butter y fund raiser!Swiss Point Middle School students shake hands with their opponents before commencing play and deliberate strategy in the SPMS Chess Tournament held on May 18. William Bowman, president of the Jacksonville Chess Club, supervised the tournament. The tournament was organized by the SPMS Chess Club coordinator, Douglas Hayes. The Julington Creek Sharks 6U B team won the state tournament this past weekend in mid-June in Chie and, Florida. This is the Babe Ruth Baseball League. The team is coached by Kevin Huber, Neil Gornto and Rick Sargent. The players names are Jake Brooks, Nicholas Romano, Caden Baldwin, Neil Gornto, Luke Spencer, Josh Huber, John Bay, Jonas Wells, Andrew Sargent, Colyn Muhler, Trent Radford, Aiden Beneciuk and Brett Smithley.JCEs Art Show and Ice Cream Social: Thank you to all!By Contributing Writer Linda McAnarney, Art Educator, Julington Creek Elementary SchoolSPMS plays chess! There were several special features at this years art show. Thank you to Mrs. Nason and Delany McClure for emceeing. Thanks to Sarah and her sta and KidzArt for providing a fun art craft for students to make. Thank you, Mrs. Motley and Mrs. Ellis for all of your assistance as well. Thanks to our generous PTO for the free ice cream enjoyed by all and to the many volunteers (parents, teachers and sta ), who helped scoop and serve the ice cream. Mrs. Piscatella, Andi Piscatella, Mr. McAnarney, Mrs. Woodard, Mrs. Baker and were also generous with their time to helping with this event. I would also like to recognize the additional support of the art program by the Parent Teacher Organization. The nancial assistance they provided Erin Durant with her wearable art: sneakers decorated with fabric markers. Liam Conion with his ceramic pizza.throughout the year enabled me to attend this years Florida Art Education Association Conference and helped with the purchase of numerous art supplies. If you have a chance, you are welcome to come and see some of the art enrichment books outlining the life and works of contemporary artists. Finally, thanks to all of the students for their incredible talent as artists and to their parents for their support in attending this years event. This was our best attended art show ever at JCE. The hallways and cafetorium were full of art enthusiasts everywhere.Congratulations, Sharks! Why wait for the mailman? View our digital edition online at www.thecreekline.com

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Page 20, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com Yoga Den Studio6 NEW weekly classes! Group & Private LessonsTeacher Training ~~Ever thought about being a yoga teacher? Well Check this out!! Yoga Den has been certifying teachers at the 200 hr. level since 2004. ~ Proven program at the most affordable price! ~ July has a 3 week intensive that is closed In August we begin the 1 weekend per month for 9 months. In January a 6 month program begins that meets 3 days per month. Expect the unexpected!! ~~ 2929 Plummer Cove Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32223 Located in Mandarin, j ust south of I-295 across from WalmartLive longer! Grow Stronger! www.yoga-den.com 904-268-8330 Workshops ~~ July 13-14th Exploring the Chakras Workshop! Leave feeling relaxed and refreshed! ~ July 19th Yoga Basics workshop: Good for beginners or refine your practice! ~ July 20th Arm Balance workshop Learn to fly! ~ August 3-4th Restorative Yoga Workshop! Restoring connections between mind and Bodies! Congratulations to the Fruit Cove Middle School Navy tennis team, who are the St. Johns County champions! Pictured are Logan Michaelski, Andrew Wolter, Emily Kastleman, Tessa Adylette, Lexi Witwer, Sami Resh, Samatha Shaner, Julia Tyminski and Jenna Barnett.The members of the club Arts in Motion gather once a month to go to Ponte Vedra Library and assist children in arts and crafts. Arts in Motion is a club at Nease High School which meets every Thursday to discuss their next outing. Their outings occur every month and consist of meeting with young kids at the Ponte Vedra Library and collaborating with them in arts and crafts projects. The projects are coordinated with Each school day, as we drove through the student drop-o loop, there was Wynton Hardy with a smile and a kind word. He never failed to lift our mood and change our attitude from rushed to grateful! Our younger son was so excited to see Mr. Hardy and wave back to him from the backseat. He would then talk about Hardy all the way from LPA to his Pre-K school. Liberty Pines Academy is blessed to have so many great and wonderful teachers and sta One just seems to stand out among the crowd, Wynton Hardy, who is a custodian at LPA and has been described as Mr. Irreplaceable by some of the LPA sta Many parents of students who attend LPA feel the same way! Here are few of the comments left on the LPA PTO Facebook page recently describing Hardy: You know there are a lot of great people that work at LPA to make the best of everyday, but there is one person that sticks out and goes above and beyond. I never leave that parent pick up line without a smile on my face thanks to Mr. Hardy! He has a great smile and such enthusiasm for life! He is truly an amazing gentleman, and he adds a tremendous amount to the spirit at LPA, as well as to each of our crazy, busy lives as he greets us each morning. I love Mr. Hardy!!! This world needs millions more just like him!!! He made dropping o my sweet boy all through kindergarten a little bit easier. Not only is it great to know he will be smiling and waving to everyone every morning but he also dedicates so much of his spare time to the LPA Cross Country team! Arts in Motion Club encourages student interactivity and creativityBy Contributing Writer Jennifer Lee, Nease High School StudentLPAs Mr. Irreplaceable is honored with giftBy Contributing Writer Stephanie BradfordWe were new here (LPA) this year and he made our transition so much easier just seeing his smiling face each morning.These comments were left in response to an LPA family looking for a way to recognize Hardy for the di erence he makes on a daily basis at LPA. Families quickly joined together with monetary donations and heart-felt Thank You notes for Hardy. Tricia Burford, local artist and LPA parent, collected the donations and notes and put together a basket for him. Several families were able to meet by the ag pole at LPA and present Hardy with his gift. Just to see his appreciation was overwhelming! With tears he accepted his gift and quickly, in Mr. Hardy fashion, headed back to work. He feels blessed to work at LPA and with such wonderful people. There were just too many wonderful comments to list them all! Hardy is a special person with the amazing ability to make each person he comes in contact with feel special, whether it is a student, a parent or another sta member! Liberty Pines Academy is a better place because of Wynton Hardy and his infectious smile and enthusiastic personality!the holidays, such as Valentines Day, Christmas and Easter crafts. The club is made up about 25 members led by their president, Sarah Davenport. According to Davenport, the club was founded when budget cuts eliminated many school art classes and her hope is that they can expose kids to the arts and encourage kids who may be aspiring artists in the future. Interestingly, members have somewhat similar views on participation in Arts in Motion. When asked what her principal reasons were for joining this club, Claire Lee, a member of Arts in Motion, replied, Because my friend who goes to that club is my ride home and I decided to check it out and I went to one of the meetings and it sounded really interesting. She and Davenport both agree that their favorite part of the club is being able to interact with the children. I love kids, so my favorite part is de nitely getting to know the kids while helping them with their crafts, Davenport stated. A lot of the kids that come are regulars so its fun to see them regularly. In addition, they both agree that a bene t from being in this club is the service hours for volunteering, which are necessary to graduate from their schools International Baccalaureate (IB) program. Some ideas for the future and the impact of the club have been proposed. We provide fun and free activities for the kids to do with their parents and our team members to promote creativity and better kid-parent relationships in the community, reported Davenport, when asked about the impact of the club on the community. One idea for the future of Arts in Motion is to visit other libraries other than the Ponte Vedra branch in order to reach di erent children. Alluding to the future of the club, she hopes to just stay strong in what were doing and make sure that this club lasts for many more years so that we can continue to provide this opportunity for the kids. Mr. Hardy appreciates his gift. Timothy Colbert, a grade 5 Palencia Elementary student, has won a national re and electrical safety essay contest. The contest was sponsored by The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI.org), which is an organization dedicated to promoting electrical safety in the home, school, and workplace. Tims essay outlined a plan to promote electrical safety through the use of electronic media. He said, We should tell people about safety in a way they would pay attention. I pay more attention to important things when they are shown electronically. I think other kids would do the same. His ideas include creating safety lyrics and setting them to popular song tunes. He hopes to show these educational videos in schools, TV and on uTube. His award prize includes a three-day trip this summer to Washington DC where he will visit museums, monuments and the Capitol. Congratulations Tim!Palencia student wins essay contest Everybody reads The CreekLine Shouldnt your ad be included?287-4913

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www.thecreekline.com July 2013 The CreekLine, Page 21 2013To register for any summer camp, please visit:www. Bricks 4 Kidz .com/saintjohnscountyAny questions, Please call:904-230-0543Or e-mail:Michelle@ Bricks 4 Kidz .comCamps held at Bricks 4 Kidz Creativity Center 5 30 SR13 N, Suite 5 St. Johns, FL 32259 1 mile south of Julington Creek Bridge Behind Regions BankWE OFFER EXCITING LEGO BIRTHDAY PARTIESLEGO IS A TRADEMARK OF THE LEGO CO. WHICH IS NOT AFFILIATED WITH BRICKS 4 KIDZ Best : SALON Best : SPA Best : STYLISTS Best : NAIL SALON Best : MASSAGE THERAPISTS Vote with Panache! THE BEST OF St. Augustine, 2013! WE CONTINUALLY STRIVE FOR... knowledge, creativity and inspiration keeping active in our community client respect giving you extra : PI S T S VOTE AT STAUGUSTINE.COM JULY 12~31st y The Rotary Club of Bartram Trails fourth Teacher of the Quarter recognition award was recently presented by Rotarians Michael Andreoni and Randy Johnson. The Rotary Club of Bartram Trail works with school principals on a quarterly basis for nominations of teachers that exemplify excellence in education. This quarter the award was presented to Linda McAnarney, art educator at Julington Creek Elementary School (JCE). McAnarney leads annual school wide art activities such as Celebrating our Cultural Diversity, MLK, Jr. Poster and Essay Contest, the Art Club and an Evening of the Fine Arts. In alignment with the big vision goals at JCE, partnerships with Flagler College, Mayo Clinic and Scout Troop 110 enabled a 75 foot mural, Smithsonian Docent Program on American Indian tribes and a 27 foot by 18 foot United States map, respectively. Community art events included Images inspired by Picasso and St. Augustines Mosaic Project for the 450 celebration and student art was displayed at the annual Mandarin Art Show. From a global perspective McAnarney instituted a quarterly book discussion to increase understanding Ingrid Jones annual Papa Johns Beat Mrs. Jones Typing Contest was held at Julington Creek Elementary on Thursday, May 30 and the results are in! Twenty-seven students quali ed for the typing nals by typing 35 wpm or higher with at least 80 percent accuracy. The top six nalists won a Papa Johns pizza and seven students beat Jones, winning a T-shirt too! Thank you to Papa Johns and TCBY on Race Track JCE hosts annual Beat Mrs. Jones Typing Challenge Road for their support with the contest. The top nalists were: Liam King 65wpm/92 percent accuracy; Lauren Philip 57wpm/91 percent accuracy; Jonathan Fitzgerald 56wpm/96 percent accuracy; Ava Johnson 54wpm/91 percent accuracy; Josh Jacobs 51wpm/98 percent accuracy; Analia Romney 51wpm/98 percent accuracy; and Jacob McLeod 51wpm/94 percent accuracy.Liam King, Ava Johnson, Mrs. Jones, Analia Romney, and Lauren Philip, Jonathan Fitzgerald, Josh Jacobs and Jacob McLeod. When the town of Moore, Oklahoma was devastated by tornadoes, Nease High School students and faculty knew they wanted to help out the people who had lost so much. With only 10 days of school left and seniors already checked out for the year, they knew it would be a challenge. The idea came from a faculty member to collect ip ops, an item that all students could relate to and easily purchase, to send to residents of Moore. A Nease teacher from Oklahoma expressed her gratitude to the school for wanting to help out her state and thought the idea was great. So, students started collecting the ip ops along with monetary donations. They also asked the community to contribute by placing ip ops in Nease collecting bins located in the Publix stores at Nocatee, Murabella and Race Track Road. The Nocatee Publix even sold ip ops to customers who wanted to donate. The excitement grew at school and the community embraced the idea. So how many ip ops did Nease HS end up collecting? A total of 780 pairs. Students worked hard boxing up the shoes by size and gender to be sent on a truck to Moore. One student was overheard saying, It feels good to help those in need and work together as a school and community. The schools motto is We Are Nease. Nease students help tornado victimsRotary Club of Bartram Trail recognizes Teacher of QuarterBy Contributing Writer Carol A. Higleyof diverse cultures and partnered with the World Relief Organization serving refugee families living in our community. McAnarney, joined by her family, was recognized at the June 6 Rotary Club meeting. Michael Story, JCE principal, expressed, Mrs. McAnarney is an excellent example of the amazing teachers in St. Johns County. We are very proud of her contributions to the students and sta of JCE. McAnarney joins third quarter honoree Alexandra Martin from Liberty Pines Academy, second quarter honoree Suzanne Mecke from Hickory Creek Elementary School and rst quarter honoree Ashley West from Creekside High School as Rotary Club of Bartram Trail Teachers of the Quarter for 2012-13. A special thanks to our business partner sponsors, Bozard Ford and Bartram Park Zaxbys for their support. We are proud to jointly recognize model educators in our local community. Congratulations! The club typically meets at 7:30 a.m. on Thursdays at Westminster Woods in Julington Creek. For more information, please contact club president Thomas Carroll at tfcarrollusmc@gmail.com. The CreekLineis YOUR Community Newspaper!Send us your community news!editor@thecreekline.comAdvertise your local business!lg@rtpublishinginc.com

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Page 22, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com Kill the Keg Kill the Keg *All rates are per golfer and are subject to 6% sales tax *Coupon must be present to receive the special rate for golf / no photo copies *Tee Times may be made up to 7 days in advance Nease NJROTC has so much pride for ve former cadets from the class of 2009. Three Present Colors! echoed throughout the St. Augustine National Cemetery at 1000 this Memorial Day 2013 with the reply of numerous Color Guards snapping to attention and the Oldest City Detachment #383, Marine Corps League was proud to participate. This tribute, as all Memorial Days are, is to those comrades who are forever suspended in time, in our memories and in our hearts for paying the ultimate price. It is said that it is our duty to remember the fallen, but we do not remember because we have never forgot. Remembrance is not only shown during special occasions such as Memorial Day by veteran organizations, but every day, everywhere and every place. Just look around and you will see military baseball caps or tee shirts being worn as a badge of remembrance.St. Johns County 4-H Youth Development Program is seeking caring adult volunteers to work with 4-H youth ages ve through 18 in St. Johns County. As a 4-H club or project leader, 4-H volunteers have an opportunity to make a positive impact local youth by sharing interests, knowledge and skills. Whether it is robotics, gardening, animal science, rocketry, environmental education, photography 4-H needs you! Through a learn by doing experience, 4-H volunteers help youth learn leadership, citizenship and a variety of life skills that enable them to become capable and caring The team girls of WGV Gymnastics in World Golf Village participated for the rst time in the AAU National Championships at the ESPN Wide World of Sports in Orlando, Florida. Great success was had by all and the girls brought home lots of bling. Ten out of 12 girls placed elite. Some of the girls took rst on an event bringing home a gold medal! The all-around results were as follows: In level 4: Jolie Baker 36.025, Lily Gendreau 35.85, Isabelle Iannone 36.375, Amelia McKendrick 37.7, Ashley Robertson 36.475, Isabella Storey 36.7, Olivia Vanbennekon 35.5, Danielle Villarreal 33.275, and Gracie Weithman 34.65. In level 5: Chalsea Vickery 35.975 and Kirsten Villarreal 35.85. In level modi ed-optional: Brooke Landess 36.275. Great job girls! A big thanks to coaches Kalofer Hristozov, Paul Lietz, Sheree Wilson and Ashlyn Jockell.Five former Nease NJROTC cadets graduate from military academiesBy Contributing Writer Carol Blair David Towle and Kameron Wrightcadets graduated from the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland on May 24, 2013. Captain Robert Young, senior naval science instructor at Nease and his wife attended the ceremony in which President Barack Obama delivered the commencement address to 1047 new Navy and Marine o cers, calling on all the graduates to utilize the values they have learned at the Naval Academy in their future roles as leaders in the military and our communities. The new ensigns from Nease were David Towle, who graduated with distinction, William Zapala and Kameron Wright. Towle will complete his masters at University of Maryland before reporting for duty as a nuclear engineer onboard a navy submarine. Zapala will remain at the academy to teach sailing to the new plebes this summer before reporting to Pensacola as a student for ight training this fall. Wright will be reporting to San Diego, California to serve as a surface warfare o cer aboard a Navy frigate. A fourth Nease NJROTC cadet, Alex Alpert, graduated from United States Military Academy (USMA) West Point, In New York, on May 25, 2013. Alpert will be reporting to Fort Benning for armored training. Additionally, Dimitri Paspalaris, also a 2009 Nease NJROTC graduate, completed his degree at The Citadel. He ranked fourth in his graduating class. He will be reporting for duty as a surface warfare o cer in Hawaii. It is an extremely rare opportunity for this many students from one school to receive appointments to any academy at one time. This is a testament to the education they received at Nease High School and the Navy JROTC program. 4-H Youth Program seeks volunteersBy Contributing Writer Geralyn Sachs, SJC 4-H Extension Agentcitizens. 4-H volunteers have the exibility to determine the amount of time, location and subject area they prefer. Volunteers receive full assistance of the 4-H o ce, including training, o ce support, and a variety of resource materials and project curriculum. If you are interested in learning more about becoming a 4-H volunteer, please drop by the 4-H o ce at the St. Johns County Agricultural Center, located at 3125 Agricultural Center Drive in St. Augustine or call Geralyn Sachs, 4-H Extension Agent at 209-0430. New 4-H volunteer leader trainings will take place at the Extension O ce on Monday, July 22 and Thursday, July 25 from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the 4-H O ce if you plan to attend. Help the youth of St. Johns County to be the best that they can be by becoming a 4-H volunteer. 4-H is a community of young people across America learning leadership, citizenship and life skills. As one of our nations oldest, yet most current organizations, 4-H is reaching millions of young people with positive youth development opportunities. Victorious weekend for WGV Gymnastics team

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www.thecreekline.com July 2013 The CreekLine, Page 23 Open Mondays through Fridays 8:30am 5pm 1631 Race Track Road Suite 101230-7977Most Insurances AcceptedPediatric Associates of Julington Creek, PAOffering care for Infants, Children & Adolescents Mary Ann Garcia, M.D., FAAP Victor Luz, M.D., FAAP Tami Newbern, ARNP FLAG FOOTBALL & CHEERLEADINGGRADES 1 8 (FOOTBALL) GRADES K-5 (CHEERLEADING) CO-ED LEAGUES Evaluation/Orientation Dates: Aug 8, 10, or 12 (attend one) Fruit Cove Baptist Church Online registrations will begin July 1st. Register and pay securely online at www.fruitcove.com/sports.php FALL REGISTRATION! July 25 ~ 4-6:30 ~ Julington Creek & Mandarin July 31 & August 1 ~ 4-6:30 ~ All Locations Mark SpivaksInstitute & Dance ExtensionJulington Creek230-7778106 Julington PlazaCorner Race Track Road & Flora BranchMandarin 268-3583 3740 San Jose PlaceOne block N. of Crown PointFruit Cove 287-4619774 N SR 13One mile South Julington Creek Bridge Oering Outstanding Dance Instruction For All Ages For 3 Decades! Visit our Website for Schedules & Forms www.markspivak.com $10.00OFFNew Students Only bring in this ad The Seventh Coast Guard District has received reports of missing swimmers already this summer and urges everyone to take necessary safety precautions before and while swimming. Drowning is the fth leading cause of accidental death in the United States. On average, 10 people die from unintentional drowning every day. Of these, two are children aged 14 or younger. In an e ort to save lives, the Coast Guard recommends the following for all swimmers: Swim near a lifeguard. United States Lifesaving Association statistics, during a 10-year period, show that the chance of drowning at a beach without lifeguard protection is almost ve times greater than drowning at a beach with lifeguards. Never swim alone. Many drownings involve single swimmers. Learn water rescue techniques you can use if someone you are swimming with is in danger. Dont ght the current. If caught in a rip current, dont ght it by trying to swim directly to shore. Instead, swim parallel to shore until you feel the current relax, then swim to shore. Most rip currents are narrow and a short swim parallel to shore will bring a swimmer to safety.Village Academy North recently hosted a butter y release event to celebrate the life of Zacharie VanEkeris, who died in February after an accident on his motorcycle at age 23. Mr. Zak was beloved by his family and friends and he also made a signi cant impact on the students in his class. VanEkeris worked with the extended day program at Palencia Elementary School in the mornings before school started and then he would travel to Village Academy North where he worked as an aide in a VPK classroom. In the afternoon he would return to Palencia Elementary School to work with students in the extended day program after dismissal. After 32 years in the childcare business, I have only met two people who have had an instant rapport with children, explained Babette Weaver, co-owner and operator of The Village Academy and Village Academy North. Zak was certainly one of them. The children knew, instinctively, that he cared about them, and they loved him right back. Because of his devotion to helping children, VanEkeriss co-workers, family and friends have worked to create a fund in his memory. The Mr. Zak Fund will help provide summer camp scholarships to children who might otherwise be unable to attend. The fund works directly with area summer camps to pay for one week of camp in exchange for a second week being donated by the camp provider, giving each scholarship recipient two weeks at camp. Zak was a wonderful child, said his father Andre, who attended the butter y release in his sons name. He Coast Guard urges swimmers to remain vigilant and safeSwim sober. Alcohol is a major factor in drowning. Alcohol can reduce body temperature and impair swimming ability. Both alcohol and drugs impair good judgment, which may cause people to take risks they would not otherwise take. Dont oat where you cant swim. Non-swimmers and weak swimmers often use otation devices, such as in atable rafts, to go o shore. If they fall o they can quickly drown. No one should use a otation device unless they are able to swim. Weak swimmers should also consider wearing an inherently buoyant Coast Guard-approved Type I, II or III life jacket. Prepare for the unexpected. Wear a life jacket while participating in any activity during which you would unexpectedly enter the water, such as shing from breakwalls or piers. Avoid unnecessary risks. Walking along breakwalls is risky because it only takes a momentary loss of footing to invite tragedy. Jumping from breakwalls, waterside structures or into unfamiliar water is extremely dangerous since unseen underwater hazards may exist. Additional water safety tips are available on the United States Lifesaving Association website, www.usla.org.Mr. Zak Fund established to help kids go to campespecially liked promoting physical education for children, and I know that this fund is something he would be very proud of. After such a tragedy, I am grateful that we have a chance to keep his memory alive. Curt Weaver, co-owner and operator, said that Zak was a positive in uence on everyone he worked with at the school. I have never met a more relentlessly happy person in my life, Weaver said. It didnt matter if it was 6:30 in the morning or 6:00 at nightZak had a smile and a kind word for everyone he met. Paperwork has been submitted to the IRS to establish the fund as a non-pro t entity. Donations are greatly appreciated and can be accepted at any Prosperity Bank Branch with a deposit to the Mr. Zak Fund. Do you enjoy receiving The CreekLine each month?Then our Advertisers!As a non-subscription publication we rely on our fine advertisers to finance the production of your community newspaper! Be sure to patronize our advertisers and tell them you saw them in The CreekLineThank SPMS Raiders cont. from pg. 1School. Thanks to practices with and direction from SPMS band leadership, guest clinicians and Bartram Trail High School band students, our Raiders rocked with 44 Superior and 25 Excellent ratings out of 69 total performances. Students eighth grade year is special in many ways and band participation is no exception. The eighth graders joined Bartram Trails Spirit of Bartram band for the football game against Wolfson High School and select students had the opportunity to participate in the All County Middle School Honors Band with peers from all seven St. Johns County middle schools. One talented bassoonist, Erin Kirsche, was also selected for Floridas All State Honor Band and performed in Tampa representing SPMS! The arts are a vital component to the holistic development of our youth, cultivating creativity, expression, problemsolving and innovation. This years band students soared academically in SPMS and district level competitions throughout the year. The SPMS spelling bee winner, six out of 10 science fair winners, eight out of 11 history fair winners, three out of ve math counts winners and ve out of ve battle of the books winners were band students. Thanks to SPMS administrations support for the arts, the Raiders band program continues to expand as Zentz will be directing three Beginning Bands, Concert Band, Symphonic Band, Wind Symphony and Jazz Ensemble this upcoming year with a total of 385 students.

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Page 24, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com A CONNECTING CHURCH Our Sunday Services Traditional Worship 8:30am Sunday School 9:45am Contemporary Worship 11:00amwww.switzerlandcommunitychurch.org like us on Facebook I want cremation.$650Flagler Memorial Cremation Society669-1809 A friend gave me two bags over owing with paperback books. I devoured them. I forgot how much I love a good, suspenseful read! I allowed myself to get lost in the twisting plot, urging victims not to answer the door, risk that meeting or sleuth in the dark. They should know better! I routinely exclaimed. I related to the characters and wanted to help them. I liked them. Meanwhile, I was not relating to my childrenor liking them when they interrupted me! I would promise to come play at the end of this section knowing full well I just started a new chapter. I was an accomplice to summertime murder! Free time with my children was the victim. Oh, mamma, will you ever learn?! Summertime spreads before us with months of unplanned days waiting to be lled. Instead of escaping to something, escape with your children! Of course reading is a fantastic pastime. But if your littles want a story or the big kids need to chat, remind yourself whats most important... the relationship with your kiddos. One way our family has cultivated a love of reading and developed our own family culture is through reading aloud. This isnt only good for pre-readers. Our teen is regularly the one to start the chant, read more! read more! read more! when I try to set a book down. Through reading aloud, weve learned of new places, shared inside jokes and laughed together a lot. If reading aloud is new in your family, you may like the antics of Cheaper by the Dozen. The school year is so busy Helping Hands of St. Johns County will be meeting on Friday, July 26 at 11:00 a.m. at Faith Community Church Community Center, located on County Road 210 next to Cimarrone. This months project will be the out tting of 25 students from Crookshank Elementary School in St. Augustine. The children will be provided a new out t and sneakers for their rst day of school. This is the third year the group has helped the school. In June, Helping Hands collected new underwear for St. Francis House and Home Again St. Johns, which both help the homeless population in St. Augustine. They also helped coordinate the annual Fathers Day barbeque at Trout Creek for our senior citizens. Members served food, visited with COA members, played games and brought gifts for both the fathers and all COA attendees. Helping Hands is a volunteer organization that meets once a month, on the last Friday, at Faith Community to do a small project to bene t others. There are no dues, o cers or stress. Members come when they can and do what they can with what is donated. If you Faith NewsDo you have church or synagogue news you would like included in The CreekLine? Then contact Martie Thompson at: editor@thecreekline.com or 886-4919. Invitethe community to your House of Worshipeditor@thecreekline.comHelping Hands updateBy Contributing Writer Jackie Valyouhave a donation (not monetary) of anything you might think someone can use, you may contact jacqphil@aol.com. If we cant use it for a project we will in turn pass it to an organization that can. Thank you for all the community support; we rely solely on donations of goods and services. Purposeful ParentingSummertime murderBy Allie Olsenfor most families. Our vegrade home school next year will involve three co-ops in addition to family learning here at home, visits with out-of-town family, time with friends and fellowship with our church family. My heart is beating fast just thinking about it! For me, the temptation to unplug from everything and everyone during summer can be great. But God has placed these precious children in my carenot just to feed, clothe and protect, but to nurture, educate and shape into respectful, caring and godly men and women. So Ill set my book down mid-sentence. Ill go outside in the sweltering heat to see my marksman take aim with his bow. Ill read A Mother for Choco and Click, Clack, Moo Cows That Type to my twoyear old again and again. Ill listen to tales of Clash of Clans even though I couldnt care less about elixir drills or healers. I dont listen because I care about iPad games, but because Im communicating to my children that I care about them. I wont kill our summer for my own desires. And when they happen to be engrossed with a game or a book and I can sneak in an extra chapter of my book, Ill enjoy a bit of summertime murder alongside them. Dignity U Wears Undie Campaign experienced another record setting year, generating over 170,000 undergarments, an increase of 50,000 pieces over the 2012 campaign. Collected garments include underwear, bras, socks and undershirts. Additionally, Dignity U Wear received $25,000 in monetary donations as a result of the campaign. Donations came from apparel companies, businesses, faith groups, schools, civic associations and profes-Dignity U Wears Campaign breaks recordssional groups. We have been very touched by the national support we received this year, said executive director, Barbara Truncellito. The message of the Undie Campaign resonated with Americans wanting to help individuals who are struggling. The success of the campaign is in large part due to the sponsors, Tommy Hil ger, Delta Galil, CATO, Maidenform, Fishman and Tobin, Thorlo and Caring for Others. Since the campaign was introduced nine years ago, it has collected more than 800,000 undergarments. The clothing is donated to school children, homeless and wounded veterans and women in crisis through a network of over 300 social service agencies throughout the United States. Underwear is the most requested item of clothing and the Undie Campaign helps stock the organizations inventory needs for the entire year. Early to bed.....and ADVERTISE!The CreekLine 607-5062LG@RTPublishing.comWork real hard..... Early to rise....

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www.thecreekline.com July 2013 The CreekLine, Page 25 Get Fuel Efficient with the OSteen Volkswagen 40+ mpg VW Club Volkswagen has seven models in its lineup capable of achieving more than 40 highway miles per gallon (mpg).* Thats more than any other manufacturer in the United States. *EPA estimates. Your mileage will vary. VW TDI Clean Diesel and VW Hybrid vehicles are built for the eco-conscious and the high-performance conscious. Have a great time in a VW fuel-efficient vehicle, passing all the other fuel-efficient vehicles out there! Starting at $25,945 Starting at $26,7061 1401 Philips Hwy Jacksonville, FL 32256 904-322-5100 OSteenVW.comfacebook.com/OSteenVW We now offer digital X-Rays on site! Sambursky Chiropractic, LLCDr. Bruce Sambursky, Chiropractic Physician683-437612421 San Jose Blvd. #300 (just South of Care Spot-formerly Solantic ) Serving the Mandarin and Julington Creek area. www.backbonejax.comTHE PATIENT OR PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE S, EXAMINATIONS OR TREATMENT. Chiropractor ) Dr. Sambursky has 25 Years ExperienceDo you take my insurance?: Yes Blue Cross, Aetna, Cigna, Medicare, United Health care, All Automobile insurances. Call our office if your insurance is not listed. Cash programs also available. What conditions do you Treat?: What are your hours? Where are you located? Immediate/Same day appointments The Summer Fun Backpack Program bene ting homeless youth from the St. Johns County School District ASSIST (Aid and Support for Students in Sudden Transition) donated not only 522 backpacks full of summer activities but, each child received a brand new pair of Reebok shoes from the Maurice Jones-Drew Foundation. The backpacks were lled from a list provided by the school district indicating grades the youth were in, gender and shoe size. The Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind homeless students also received backpacks and shoes. Local nonpro t JCP CARES assembled the backpacks and on May 24, the St. Johns County School District picked up the backpacks and delivered them to the countys schools. The Maurice Jones-Drew Foundation is a non-pro t organization, whose mission is to assist the underprivileged in our society. I have seen Mr. JonesDrews generosity and caring on many di erent levels and in In its sophomore year, the Nease Sparklers certainly have had quite a great season! The program has grown to include more community outreach opportunities as well as a basketball game half-time performance. Since founder Adriana Barranco brought the Sparkle E ect cheer organization to Florida and Nease High School, many schools throughout Florida have formed Sparkler teams, including two in Northeast Florida. These neighboring schools (including Creekside High School) contributed to the Sparklers being honored as the National Spotlight Team of the Month by the Sparkle E ect organization in October. In addition, the Sparklers were The Nease Sparklers take a look backBy Contributing Writer Diana Barrancoincluded in a NBC Nightly News Making A Di erence segment, featured in American Cheerleader Magazine and most recently, in a Varsity.com article. The Sparklers stay committed to their Nease Sparklers Care program and held a school-wide event for donations to their charity of choice, the Ronald McDonald House of Jacksonville. Every year, the Sparklers bring needed items to the House for the families in Jacksonville and perform cheers and sign autograph cards. In October, the Sparklers participated in Walk In Their Shoes a 5k run for the Ronald McDonald House o ering participants cheers of support. The Sparklers are currently looking for new members to join the squad for this coming season! If you have a daughter or a son who is going to be in fth grade through high school, please contact Diana Barranco at www.neasedancemom14@aim.com. Leave your name, phone number, your students name, age and grade. You will be contacted about an upcoming informational meeting in August. Dont miss out on being a part of the 2013 2014 team!Nease Sparklers before a performance.522 Summer Fun backpacks given to St. Johns County homeless studentsmany di erent facets through out community over the years and we value him as a true role model for our kids, stated Chris Stone, homeless student liaison with the school district. This gift will surely make a di erence in the lives of the students and families that receive the shoes. The annual Summer Fun Backpack Program has gained great community support over the years including local Girl Scout Troop 504, youth group members from River of Life United Methodist Church and the local MOMS group. To learn more about the ASSIST program, please visit www.stjohns.k12. .us/ depts/student/homeless. JCP CARES is a grassroots non-pro t organization founded in Julington Creek Plantation. If you would like Primrose School donated items for the backpacksmore information about events or to become involved, please go to www.jcpcares.org for contact information.

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Page 26, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com Julington Creek Animal Walk is a state-of-the-art pet boarding facility for dogs, cats, and exotics providing: Your pet will nd a welcoming retreat at our 9-acre, fenced, off-leash dog park featuring a bone-shaped swimming pool and our NE Floridas Premier Luxury Pet Resort, Dog Park and SpaConveniently located next to Julington Creek Animal Hospital Stop by for a tour and receive a coupon for a free daily park pass Aordable small dog luxury oasis. Please call for details. Veterinarian Owned and Operated Concerns about your drinking water?Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 Years. Straight answers No high pressure. 262 0197 3760 KORI RD. Lic. #W-32 yo u C all th e W ate r T reatmen t Compan y J acksonville h as trusted f or ove r 2 2 0 Years S Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 years. Ancient City Pirates 9U baseball team goes 5-0 to win the FLGA Summer Slam tournament! Pictured are Trey Fiacco, Steven Klinger, Colton Powers, Morgan Hovis, John Ford, Hayden Steiger, Dillon Haines, Luke Hayes, Dallin Beggs, David Brothers and Andrew Johnson. Congratulations! The Swiss Point Raiders defeated Fruit Cove Flyers with a score of 6-3 to earn the 2013 Middle School District championship title. With a scoreless game heading into the bottom of the fourth inning, strong defense led by shortstop Reedy Davenport, second baseman Nelia Marichal and center elder Blaire Register was key for the Raiders. Sixth grader and starting pitcher, Olivia Creamer got the o ense started for the Raiders in the bottom of the fourth with a single to left center, followed by a bunt from eighth grader, Blaire Register. The Raiders momentum was strong with runners on rst and second in a scoreless game against the Flyers. Savannah Parker drew a walk, loading up the bases. Sixth grader Emily Sikes sealed the lead with a single that drove in the rst two runs of the game. With two outs, sixth grader Breanna Yost reached rst on another walk by Fruit Cove pitcher, Lexie Schively, which moved runners to second and third. Sixth grader Faith Keller, Nease High School International Baccalaureate juniors recently provided support for the Betty Gri n House, a local abuse shelter touching thousands of families in St. Johns County. Over 90 students participated in the service project. On a Saturday afternoon in May, students volunteered their time and energy spreading Ancient City Pirates 9U Win! SPMS Lady Raiders softball team wins county championshipBy Contributing Writer Tracy Caincame up with a big hit to score fellow teammate, Savannah Parker. Swiss Point pitcher Creamer, not only supplying a great outing on the mound, came out in the top of the fth with another single to center; Register followed, singling to right. Seventh grade power-hitter Parker could not have ended her season on a higher note when she blasted a three-run home-run over center eld to secure a 6-0 lead over the Fruit Cove Flyers. After a threat to their lead in the bottom of the seventh, with one out and three runs scored, Coach Tracy Cain called time to visit with the in eld. Creamer remained strong and gained the win for the Lady Raiders in a 6-3 e ort over Fruit Cove. This gives the Lady Raiders their rst softball championship win in school history. Fruit Cove has won the title the last three years and pitcher Schively has been named pitcher of the year for SJMSAA softball for two consecutive years. Other notable players for the county include County MVP, Ali Smith-FCMS; Rookie Pitcher of the Year, Anna CowlingLPA; North Division Player of the Year, Blaire Register-SPMS; South Player of the Year, Holly Lands-GRMS; and County Rookie of the Year, Olivia CreamerSPMS. Bailee Dixon, Emily Fricke, Sam Binard, Olivia Creamer, Haley Sandiford, Nelia Marichal, Raeffaella Funnell, Head Coach Tracy Cain, Breanna Yost, Bailey Vaeughn (Manager), Alyssa Girard, Emily Sikes, Faith Keller, Chloe Andrews, Savannah Parker, Reedy Davenport, Coach Kerry Creamer, Blaire Register and Coach Todd Sandiford. Not pictured: Nicole MasankoNease IB students support the Betty Gri n HouseBy Contributing Writer Karen Blackwell Aparna Sethumadhaven, Christina Catania, Ashley, Simone Frauenfelder, Abby Sanders, Danielle Sevilla, Lexi Tomkunas, Elena Gouzoa, Devon LaBat, Devin Crawford, Nicole Thatcher, Jesse Chen, Tristan Memory, Harrison Ballard, Jane Viviano, Paige Fiore, Lauren Hsu, Haley Thurston, A.J. Hlavac, Josh Brand, Shivam Khosla mulch, cleaning the facility and delivering donated items to the shelter. Through fund raising efforts they were also able to purchase a new freezer which was needed. In total more than $2000 was given to the Betty Gri n House and over 300 service hours were earned by the IB juniors.In preparation for QuiltFest 2013, the Seven Sister Guilds of Northeast Florida (All Star Quilters Guild, Coastal Quilters of NE Florida, First Coast Quilters Guild, Friendship Quilters Guild, Honeybee Quilters Guild, River City Piecemakers and St. Augustine Piecemakers) invite you to attend the show on September 26, 27 and 28 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. in the Prime Osborn Convention Center, located at 1000 Water Street in downtown Jacksonville. This show is the largest all-volunteer show in the Southeast and All Star Quilters Guild welcomes QuiltFest 2013By Contributing Writer Dot Butler Stars All Around will feature over 400 quilts, a silent auction, quilters walk, quilt sale booth, kids corner, free demos, charity corner, a quilt appraiser and vendors.QuiltFest cont. on pg. 27

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www.thecreekline.com July 2013 The CreekLine, Page 27 TREE FARM & NURSERY And in Switzerland! FREE LANDSCAPE ESTIMATES or visit us at www.sjtreefarm.com HUGE Crape Myrtle Sale! Thousands to Choose From!25% O our already low prices!!! 3 gallons regularly $12.99 less 25 % = only $ 9.74 7 gallons regularly $29.00 less 25% = only $21.75 15 Gallons regularly $69.00 less 25% = only $51.75 30 Gallons regularly $139.00 less 25% = only $104.25 45 Gallons regularly $ 249.00 less 25% = only $186.75Sale Ends July 31, 2013 For Appointment Call904-230-0080 NEW LOCATION! 485 State Road 13Suite 3 (Next to Burger King) Dr. Thomas Lahmannwww.julingtoncreekchiro.com Is Back or Neck Pain Impacting Your Life? Dr. Thomas Lahmann Chiropractic PhysicianHumana Beech Street A Proud Participating Provider for Aetna and Blue Cross / Blue Shield United Insurance Plans Accepts All Auto Insurance Julington Creek Chiropractic & Wellness Center P.A.SpineMedTM Spinal Disc DecompressionA Safe and Pain-Free Procedure Designed for Back & Neck pain Non-Surgical, Drug Free Procedures for: 450-106 State Road 13 N Publix Center in Fruit Cove www.theupsstorelocal.com/3927 The UPS StoreYour one stop for: Packing Shipping Print Materials Mailbox Services Moving Supplies Business Cards Small Business SolutionsDoug NunneryConveniently located in your neighborhood; Doug and his team are here to serve you! The Jacksonville Jaguars and the Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve (GTMNERR) were recognized as the 2012-2013 St. Johns County School District (SJCSD) Outstanding Business Partners of the Year at the 26th annual Commissioners Business Recognition Awards (CBRA) held on Thursday, June 13 in Tampa. The event was produced by the Florida Department of Education in association with the Florida Education Foundation and highlighted the contributions of honorees chosen from each school district throughout the state. The Jacksonville Jaguars are strongly committed to the SJCSD through various activities and nancial support. Earlier this year, the Jaguars provided on- eld game day recognition to more than 70 Pursuing Victory Scores for the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) were received in early June and St. Johns County students continue to excel. On the Sunshine State Standards (SSS), which are required skills for graduation, St. Johns County students scored extremely well in reading, math, science and End-of-Course (EOC) assessments among all 67 Florida school districts. FCAT Science was given to students in fth and eighth grades. St. Johns County fth graders and eighth graders ranked rst in the state. The FCAT, which assesses reading (third through 10th grades), math (third through eighth grades) and science ( fth and eighth grades) skills, was given in April to students throughout the state. Achievement levels range from one to ve, with Level 3 being considered pro cient. The test is part of a statewide e ort to increase School District recognizes outstanding business partnerswith Honor (PVWH) high school athletes and featured the Creekside High School marching band during halftime. As a presenting sponsor of the American Youth Character Awards, the Jaguars participated in the banquet and presented the PVWH nalists and winner with scholarships as part of their $25,000 donation to the district. Additionally, they have supported the districts career academies through internships, teacher externships, sponsorships and scholarships. The Jaguars have implemented honor roll programs, NFL Play 60 grants, discount tickets and ticket donations as well as player and cheerleader appearances throughout the SJCSD. The SJCSD and the GTMNERR partnership was created through the Academy of Coastal and Water Resources at St. Johns Technical High School (SJTHS). Hands-on eld trips allow academy students to study the estuary and learn the value of protecting and conserving natural resources. Students have also participated in an oyster reef restoration and three schools are collecting Spartina Grass seeds and cultivating the seedlings into plugs to restore vegetation. This summer, students will participate in a sea level rise activity to create awareness of the e ects of climate change and planning for sea level rise. Additionally, SJTHS carpentry students constructed an overlook at GTMNERR for use in the city of St. Augustines 450th Celebration. GTMNERR sta also provided students with certi cation training in the Green Industries Best Management Practices (GIBMP) for the protection of water, as well as for the proper use of fertilizers and pesticides as landscape professionals. CBRA celebrates innovative partnerships between the business community and local school districts for the bene t of students. Businesses were recognized with a reception at the Grand Hyatt Hotel where they were photographed with the Commissioner of Education and received an engraved trophy. The Jacksonville Jaguars and GTMNERR will be recognized at the School Board Meeting on July 11.SJC students continue to excel on FCATsstudent performance and school accountability. I am extremely proud of the e orts of our teachers, students and curriculum sta said Superintendent Dr. Joseph Joyner. Once again our students scored well above the state average in every assessment. St. Johns County students ranked rst in EOC assessments for Algebra 1, Geometry and Biology 1. Students also ranked rst in the baseline year for the United States History EOC assessment. School grades for elementary and middle schools are expected to be released this summer. High school grades will not be announced until later this year because the high school grading system incorporates data not yet available such as graduation rates and results of advanced academic testing. Additional information can be found at http://fcat. doe.org/. PIANO & GUITAR CAMPS St. Augustine Community School of Performing Arts824-0664 In addition, the Seven Sister Guilds will each have a ra e quilt on display. The entry for The All Star Quilters Guild is Stars All Around, a stunning blue and white quilt designed by guild member Sunnie Malesky and made by the guilds members. A portion of the proceeds from this quilt will donated by the All Star Quilters Guild to Camp Amigo, Childrens Burn Camp of North Florida. Begun in 2001, the Childrens Burn Camp of North Florida, Inc. is a non-pro t, 501c3 corporation, wholly supported by public donations. Camp Amigo exists to provide kids who have physical and emotional scars a place to be themselves and build a network of support that will last throughout their lives. For more information, please visit www. campamigo.com. The beauty and level of work in the quilts on display is brought to you each year by many volunteers. For more information on QuiltFest 2013, please contact Gay Montgomery at 742-1372 or visit www. quiltfestjax.com, For more information on the All star Quilters Guild, please contact Dot Butler at 642-6574 or visit www.orgsites.com/ /allstarquiltguild.QuiltFest cont. from pg. 26 The CreekLineYOUR Community NewspaperFor more information on advertising, call Linda Gay 904-287-4913 lg@rtpublishinginc.com

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Page 28, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com SLICKS1984 VISIT YOUR LOCAL SHOWROOMOffers end 9/18/13. Restrictions apply. Ask for details. After 12-month promotional period, then-current regular monthly price applies and is subject to change.ACT NOW AND ALSO GET:Offer subject to change based on premium channel availability.All offers require 24-month commitment and credit qualication.FREE PREMIUM CHANNELSfor 3 months GET MORE FOR LESS RONALD PERRY ELECTRONICS 904-268-0560 AstroTV@Bellsouth.net Dog Obedience Training 287-3934 www.marienhofkennels.comGerman Shepherd Puppies Call for Availability Marienhof Kennels1004 State Road 13( 0.2 mi South JCP entrance ) Richard M. Oglesby, D.V.M.Constanze Goricki, Dr.med.vet287-5570M-F 8 AM 6 PM Sat 8 AM Noon Greenbriar Animal Hospital We Celebrate The HumanPet Bond ITS HERE!Frontline TritakFast Acting! Long Lasting! Triple Action! Flea Control! Tree WorkbyMitch Drake & Sons (904) 703-5040 (904) 287-3819Licensed, Insured & Workmans CompOver 35 Years Experience Check out our reviews and 5 Star rating at Yellowbook.com! St. Johns County homeowners can choose to have the Florida Yards and Neighborhoods program evaluate their yards based on Florida-Friendly Landscaping principles. By meeting minimum requirements and collecting at least 50 points, a homeowner will be recognized as having a Florida-Friendly Yard. Owners of FloridaFriendly Yards receive a sign to display in the yard along with a certi cate. Those going beyond 50 points can achieve a goldlevel status. To participate in the program, the St. Johns County Agricultural Center encourages homeowners to refrain from applying fertilizer within 24 hours of a tropical storm or depression, and to not fertilize within The Arbor Day Foundation has a booklet that helps people identify trees in a simple, stepby-step process. The booklet, What Tree Is That?, is available for a $5 donation to the nonpro t tree-planting organization. What Tree Is That? is a fun, easy-to-use tree identi cation guide that features hand-drawn botanical illustrations highlighting the distinctive characteristics of many tree species. Nature lovers and professional arborists alike have called this pocket eld guide one of the most user-friendly resources to have. Its beautiful, full-color illustrations are in precise detail to depict natural colors, shapes and textures, so users can make a positive species identi cation in just a few easy steps. The Arbor Day Foundation o ers this booklet to help people identify trees in Florida and throughout the Eastern and Central regions of the United States. What Tree Is That? uses a unique step-by-step approach for identifying the species of each tree, explaining what to look for in the shape of the leaves, di erences in the leaf stems and twig structures and speci c characteristics of fruits, owers, buds and bark. Our What Tree Is That? pocket brochure is an ideal resource for developing a greater appreciation for trees, said (BPT) Al fresco dining is one of the great pleasures of warm weather. Whether youre hosting a neighborhood barbecue or an intimate dinner party on your deck, outdoor dining is a great way to savor good food, company and the great outdoors. To ensure your meals are safe and enjoyable, its important to know how to prepare, transport and store food for outdoor eating. The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) o ers some advice for safely handling food when youre dining outdoors this summer: Purchasing. Warm weather brings a bounty of fresh produce and a trip to the local farmers market can make a nice addition to your outdoor meal. Food safety starts in the eld. Its important to get to know the growers selling produce at your local farm stand, and ask about their farming practices. How do St. Johns County encourages FloridaFriendly landscaping principals10 feet of any water body. This will reduce chemicals from entering the runo since fertilizer runo occurs when more water reaches fertilized soil than the ground than can absorb. The fertilizer or pesticides not taken up by root systems or absorbed into the soil can run o into storm drains or nearby bodies of water and detrimentally a ect water quality and the fragile ecosystems our water resources support. Additionally, any chemicals that have leached into the eroded soil that is washed away, along with landscape debris, can also cause adverse e ects on plants, sh, animals and people. Using fertilizer properly and reducing stormwater runo are two of the nine Florida-Friendly Landscaping principles used to evaluate yards. Additionally, homeowners are encouraged to plant the right plant in the right place, water e ciently, use mulch, attract bene cial wildlife, manage yard pests responsibly, recycle yard waste and protect the waterfront. Other considerations include using a slow-release nitrogen fertilizer, using iron instead of nitrogen, timing the applications, and only hiring legally certi ed professionals. St. Johns County requires businesses who commercially apply fertilizer to be licensed by the State of Florida, and commercial application has to follow the Green Industries Best Management Practices (GI-BMPs). More information about the FloridaFriendly Landscaping and GI-BMP programs can be found at http://fyn.ifas.u .edu/index. html, or calling the St. Johns County Agricultural Center at 209-0430. Tree identi cation booklet helps people identify tree species in FloridaJohn Rosenow, founder and chief executive of the Arbor Day Foundation. The Arbor Day Foundation strives to help people enjoy and appreciate trees, and we feel our pocket eld guide will do just that. What Tree is That? is also available as an online interac-Dining outdoors? Keep food safe and deliciousthey keep their products free from bacterial pathogens and other contaminants? Farmers may also have great tips for storing produce, testing for ripeness and even ways to prepare the fruits and veggies they sell. IFT spokesperson and food safety expert, Don Scha ner, PhD, says that when youre purchasing produce, make sure its free of mold, bruises or blemishes where bacterial pathogens can grow. Many grocery stores o er freshly cut, packaged produce for customers seeking nutritious convenience foods. Freshly cut vegetables and fruit need proper temperature control to prevent the growth of bacteria that cause foodborne illness. Prepping. Before preparing food, wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds. Make sure all prep utensils such as cutting boards, dishes and countertops are clean before preparing each food item. Dirt, dust and pathogenic microbes can linger on produce. Its important to wash fresh produce before consuming it. The only exception is are prebagged salads and leafy greens, as experts advise that additional washing of ready-to-eat green salads is not likely to enhance safety. Thoroughly washing in cold water will su ce for most fruits and vegetables, but some types of produce require special handling. Wash spinach or salad greens in a bowl of water and Reduced $26,000!.+/Ab O btn,fffWhitelock Farms Stunning Equestrian Estate430 Triple Crown Lane ginabetbeze@yahoo.com Call Gina For More Information Or A Private Showing. tive version at arborday.org. To obtain a tree identi cation guide in full color, send your name and address and $5 for each guide to What Tree Is That?, Arbor Day Foundation, Nebraska City, NE 68410. You can also order the book online at arborday.org. rinse them gently to remove dirt and other contaminants. Give extra attention to fruits with stems, such as apples, pears and peaches. You may be tempted to forego washing fruit with a rind, since you wont be eating the rind. But, its still important to wash oranges, avocados, melons, cantaloupe, etc.pathogens can linger in unwashed crevices and transfer to your hands or the knife you use to cut the fruit. In addition, wash items youll peelsuch as carrots and cucumbersfor the same reason. Grilling. If youll be grilling at home, remember to always marinate meat in the refrigera-Dining outdoors cont. on pg. 31

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www.thecreekline.com July 2013 The CreekLine, Page 29 UNISEX SALON IS NOW OPEN!132 Everest Ln Suite 4 On Race Track Rd near Bartram Springs St Johns, Fl 32259 www.oopsunisexsalon.com 904-217-0821 Come in to receive a complimentary haircut with any chemical serviceEXPIRES 7/31/13Oops Unisex Salon is a Paul Mitchell Focus Salon and the team-members are all Paul Mitchell trained! www.msmulligans.com Store Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-6pm 11531-4 San Jose Blvd. Mandarin, FL 32223904-262-7231$5 off $25 Name Brand and designer fashions at a fraction of retail prices. Your Second Shot at a Fabulous New Wardrobe. Regardless of the season, the greatest determining factor to the quality of our area shing is our local weather. Wind, rain and temperature all have di erent causes and e ects for any shing trip on any given day. Most of the time the cause and e ect of the weather are short term, but certain weather conditions can a have much longer e ect on our shing, sometimes even wiping out an entire season. Already this year we have seen changes in our shing patterns due to excessively heavy rains earlier this spring. Due to the large amounts of freshwater being added to the St. Johns River from these rains the salinity levels of the river dropped greatly. This has slowed the bite of several types of sh and moved the bite further north towards town or beyond. Allowing a few weeks to pass without too much more rainfall Excitement owed throughout the middle schools of St. Johns County in late February when applications were able to be taken home to parents. Each student bearing an application was de nitely on their best behavior. For the prize of getting ones parents to approve the application was one of the greatest adventures a child would experience over the summer. The applications were for the summer Marine Science Program o ered by the St. Johns County School District. This summer program is available each summer to all students rising in grades six through eight and has been sponsored by the school district since 1982. Three eight-day sessions are held at Menendez High School with bus transportation provided. This summers three sessions run from June 10 through July 25. Students are assigned to small classes of approximately 14 students by grade level. Each class rotates to another instructor every two days. To accommodate the large number of students applying to the program and still keep class sizes small, each grade group divided into two separate groups, A and B. Each group does identical activities but on di erent days with di erent instructors. Similarities between curriculums are shared among the Marine Science Camp o ers a blast of learning experiencesBy Karl Kennellof this summer program John Gordon says of the program, We have 24 eld trips going out daily with over 300 students each session. Learning is hands-on, with students kayaking, canoeing, boating, hiking, snorkeling, sailing, windsur ng and sur ng. You can just imagine how these kids would be excited when the applications came out in February! For additional information, please visit www-grms.stjohns. k12. .us/teams/marinescience/Captain Davids Fishing ReportBy Captain David Lifkagrade groups. Each group participates in salt marsh ecology and kayaking skills and safety in the rst rotation. The sixth and eighth grade groups also study fresh water springs and snorkeling skills and safety while the seventh grade group studies CPR certi cation. In the second rotation the sixth grade group continues with salt marsh ecology and adds canoeing skills and safety plus coastal dune ecology. The seventh grade group covers sh biology, salt water sh management, sailing and windsur ng skills and safety along with coastal dune communities. The eighth grade second rotation includes physical dynamics of wave energy, sur ng skills and safety along with windsur ng and sailing. The third and fourth rotations for all grades, expands on the skills learned during the rst and second rotations. Throughout all of the activities, in addition to the fun and games activities, the students learn to develop skills for using various marine ecology instruments and tools such as hydrometer, secchi disk, Kemmerer water sampling bottle, water quality test kits, dissolved oxygen kits, Ponar grab sampler, marine worm suctions, YSI ow meter, plankton nets, pH meters, cast and seine nets, plant presses, handheld GPS units and quadrate sampling equipment. All instructors in the program are St. Johns County School District teachers. The Marine Science Program is a carefully designed experience for responsible students who are interested in learning about our local marine environments. Marine Science instructor and leader to interfere can easily allow the salinity levels to increase and put us right back on track for a sensational summer of shing. July is time of year to look for shrimp to start making their way down the river to us for their annual migration. Typically smaller shrimp (great for bait) will start to show in your cast nets in the latter part of this month. Then usually as the summer progresses the shrimp become more abundant and much larger in size. In recent years we have experienced some of the best shrimping seasons that anyone could remember. With shrimp coming all the way in to Julington Creek, many shrimpers became spoiled with the size and ease to locate and catch their ve gallon limit. Last year the shrimp were practically a no-show making it di cult to even catch enough to use for bait. The di erence in last years shrimping and the previous few years can be contributed to rainfall. Last years heavy rains of close to a foot or more twice in the month of June put the dampers on the soon to follow shrimp run. Again this year we have already experienced similar rains this spring in May. Not quite as much and a little earlier in the year hopefully means that the balance of salt and freshwater will be just right in the coming weeks for the shrimp to show and provide us with another banner year of shrimping. Fishing Report: Croaker bite is on in the Doctors Lake area of the river. Marker 10 to Buckman Bridge are areas to try. Reds on eastside docks in Buckman area and north. Yellowmouth have slowed but should return. Whether you catch one, some or none, the family time spent shing will last a lifetime. The CreekLine YOURCommunity Newspapereditor@thecreekline.com The CreekLine For advertising call: (904) 866-4919

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Page 30, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com Oil Change & Rotation $19.99 $20 Off All AlignmentsIncrease Fuel EconomyFill Your Tires With $39.99 and Free Reflls08-10-13Nitrogen The Julington Creek Loggerhead Aquatics (JCLA) swim team traveled to Gainesville on June 7 to compete in the Florida Sunshine State Games. After three days of intense competition, it was time for some welldeserved fun out of the pool but not out of the water! The morning after the meet, Loggerheads departed Gainesville bright and early en route to Ichetucknee Springs State Park. Most visitors to Ichetucknee are content to oat lazily down the crystal clear river on a comfy inner tube, but not the Loggerheads! Always ready for a challenge, JCLA swimmers decided to swim upstream against the formidable current, from the Ichetucknees south point all the way up to the midpoint dock. Even the chilly 72 degree water couldnt deter the Loggerheads from reaching their goal. Awesome! Also in June, the Loggerheads hosted their JCLA Invita-Loggerheads swim upstream!By Contributing Writer Lorraine Herreros Loggerheads complete Ichetucknee swim. Photo by John Hulvey.tional swim meet at the Julington Creek Recreation Center pool. Swimmers ranging in age from ve to 19 competed at the event. Visiting teams represented were the St. Augustine Swim Team, Spartan Aquatic Club and North Florida Swimming. In addition to the expert planning and preparations of the Loggerhead coaches, JCLA parents pitched in to ll over 75 volunteer positions ensuring that the meet would be a great success. Currently, JCLA swimmers are training to compete in their long course championship meets in July. Look for more Loggerhead achievements in the weeks to come! Congratulations to the Ponte Vedra Soccer Club Storm U-15 and U-13 girls State Cup Champions! The U-15 team has traveled the country this year playing in the USYS National League U-15 Team: Rachel Dias, Callie Delaney, Angeline Daly, Abigail Miller, Claire McAuliffe, Abigail Logue, Haley Patton, Kaitlyn Paul, Taylor Hallmon, Lindsey Patton, Danielle VanLiere, Coach Garret De Boer, Coach Daniel Villarreal, Katherine Loferski, Lianne Mananquil, Sydney Crowley, Morgan Patton, Brianna Loube and Rebecca Anderson.and Region 3 Premier League. The U-13 team had 23 goals and did not give up a single goal, out of the 32 teams in their State Cup age group. As winners of Florida State Cup, both teams will have the honor of representing Florida at Southern Regionals this June in Oklahoma. It was quite an accomplishment for three Storm girls teams, U-13, U-15 and U-18, to make it to the nals played in Auburndale on May 18-19. These girls have accomplished many new goals this year and are a great example of hard work pays o Job well done, ladies and Go Storm! U-13 Team: Emma Voigt, Payton Crews, Claire Amici, Bella Dawson, Piper Dotsikas, Bailee Williams, Katelyn Tauzel, Shelby Weiss, Abbey Newton, Coach Scot Shewey, Madi Sagas, Alisa Detlefsen, Noelle Rolfsen, Dani Anderson, Molly Miller, Jade Sparks, Sierra Maingot and Maya Semel. Local woman rides cont. from pg. 1Alongside thousands riders who have gone through the similar situations, for those two days, they are not strangers; they are all one family, a family that wishes cancer did not exist. It is very simple why I ride: I ride because I can, Knowles explained. The Pan-Massachusetts Challenge is an annual bikea-thon that today raises more money for charity than any other single athletic fundraising event in the country. Last year the PMC raised $37 million with a 100 percent pass-through rate, a formal way of saying every single penny goes to the Dana Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and the Jimmy Fund in Boston. After seeing the care and compassion Maddie received from both of these institutions, I am more pleased than ever that this is where my money is going. Dana-Farber gives a level of care that is unsurpassed, Knowles shared. Even in these challenging economic times, cancer takes no rest, no vacation and is not slowed by the economy. Any contribution you can make toward Michelle Knowles riding to help end cancer will be gratefully appreciated. You can learn more and make a donation on-line at www.pmc.org/ mk0178. Maddie and I were close until the end, Knowles said. The PMC is a way for our neighbor Michelle Knowles to honor Maddie who met her battle with high hopes, unshakeable faith and a buoyant spirit of determination. Cancer does not rest. And we all should never rest until cancer is a thing of the past. Your ad could be in the next issue! Call Linda Gay today! 607-5062LG@RTPublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com July 2013 The CreekLine, Page 31 The CreekLine Marketplace ads!886-4919 Community MarketplaceAttention Small Businesses!!!For just $39 per issue you can reach 25,000+ addresses (min. of 6 issues) Call 886-4919 today! Help WantedLooking for experienced dance teachers in ballet, jazz, tap and hip hop classes starting from August 2013. Please call 904-333-2845 www.markspivak. com Indulge www.areyoureadytoindule.com has new owners! We are looking for experienced hair stylists with a following to join us. Commission and/or booth rentals. If interested, contact Nina Stelfox @ 904-657-9190 Jacksonville Ice and Sportsplex is looking for Happy, Energetic Part Time help to enhance our Public Sessions and Birthday Party experiences. Skate Guards start at $8.00 an hour and you must be a strong ice skater. Birthday Hostesses start at $8.00 per hour plus TIPS. No Experience necessary, we will train you. Both must work well with children and adults. Also hiring D.J.s. Contact Wendy at 399-3223 or wwilliams@ jaxiceandsportsplex.com Jacksonville Ice and Sportsplex is looking for positive and enthusiast employees who are comfortable working with children. Now hiring Birthday Party Hostesses, Skate Guards and DJs. Skate guards must be strong ice skaters. $8.00 plus tips. Contact Wendy Williams @ 399-3223. Pool cleaner to maintain residential customer accounts. 1 year experience required. Pool service and repair technician. 2 years experience in all aspects of pool repair cleaning, and renovation. Must have valid clean driving record and pass background test.Please respond to r.schmitz@ comcast.net with applicable work history or a resume. Swimming Safari Swim School is looking to hire part time instructors to teach swim lessons over the summer at locations through out Jacksonville. Our program teaches students of all ages, from infants to adults, how to become Safe, Con dent, and Comfortable in the water. We are looking for applicants that enjoy working with kids, responsible, reliable, and out going. No previous swim lesson instructor experience is required. Our training for the summer season will start in April and last for about a month. All instructors are required to have C.P.R. and First Aid training through the American Red Cross by the time they nish training. If you are interested in becoming a Swimming Safari Instructor please submit your resume via email to swim @swimmingsafari.com Full time directors -Part time teachers-HUNTINGTON LEARNING CENTER seeks multi-task individuals who are con dent, high energy, possess excellent communication skills and a passion to make a difference. BA and teaching certi cation required. Come join our team! Fax resume 543-0227. The St. Johns River Farmers Market in Alpine Groves Park, 2060 SR 13, Switzerland, seeks assistance on Fridays and Saturdays with market set-up and sign placement and removal; physical strength required. Email: nfva.org@gmail.com. Phone: 904-347-8900. Water Treatment Installer (plumbing skills required) needed for 23 year old water treatment company. Must have clean drivers record and clean background. Bene ts. Immediate opening. Please call: 262-0197 or e-mail: Terri@affordablewaterjax.com Cavalari Corporation -Alfredo CavalariCall or Text: Home: (904)287-4468 Cell: (904)753-2089 alari t: 7 -446 8 2 08 9 www.allearspetsitting.com(904) 687-9610 American Classic LawnsQuality Lawn MaintenanceMandarin N. St. Johns County707 4468Residential from $30.Commercial Residential Aqua Pro Specialties LLCPRESSURE WASHING 904-704-1388Licensed & Insured SPRINKLER SYSTEM SERVICE AND REPAIRLIC. #1-212Summer Special $55 Driveways Concrete Removal Patios Driveway Extension Walkways PaversCall Today for Free Decorative Trim with Driveway Job! Catering to the needs of the Homeowner FREE ESTIMATES838-1836 Mention this ad $20 O Service Call E R Over 30 Years ExperienceEMERGENCY REPAIR PLUMBING, INC.230-9976CFC 57311 Our Customers Are Our BEST Advertisement A+ Rating Breakthrough Age-Defying Treatmenthseay.nerium.com I.T. Promise Inc. Computer Services( 904 ) 287-2254Professional Computer ServicesBusiness & Residential ~ ~ ~ ~www.itpromise.com JAX Chamber Mandarin Councils 2013 Small Business of the Year! SHOE REPAIR& ALTERATIONS S. San Jose Blvd.Mandarin Landing Shopping Plaza 904-292-0246Mandarin Landing Shoe Repair 10601 San Jose Blvd. 32257, Ste. #103 Spring into cleaning with Suncoast Services of St. Augustine, LLC Best Prices Starting at $50.00 Call Team Suncoast Services for appointment Licensed & Insured631 2731www.kleanspray.com 10% OFF1st time customers Michelles House Cleaning & MORE 351-9624In business since 1997 Professional Swim Lessons Year Round Indoor Pool Locations Throughout Jax Sign-up by calling 260-1836 or @ www.swimmingsafari.com Join the Baptist South circle of care. Visit e-baptisthealth.com for the most up to date list of job openings. Listings are updated daily and change often. If you have any questions, please call Human Resources at 271.6078. Seeking Licensed Massage Therapist @ A New U Massage(MM12329) Mandarin furnished massage room available NOW. Room rent is $375+ 7% tax ($401.25) a month. Rent can split w/other LMT. Phone: 904-288-0064. Hood Cleaning Technician This is a part-time position starting at $10.75/Hour. Work hours during the night or early morning hours when restaurants are closed. Power washing of kitchen exhaust systems including hoods, duct work, lters and exhaust fans. Please respond to this ad with cover letter and resume to jeff.sowell@ hoodz.us.com Panache in Julington Creek is interviewing experienced & talented Stylists to join our team. Do you enjoy working in a professional, clean & successful environment? Apply at www.getpanache. com or stop in 2758 Racetrack Road #403. HELP WANTED! If you like music (and other arts) and would like to volunteer to support a non-pro t organization bringing music to the community, please call 374 8639 Full Time Dental Assistant with High Tech Dental of ce Looking for an experienced dental assistant dedicated to exceptional patient care with advanced skills in crown & bridge. Duties include but are not limited to Temporary Fabrication, Digital X-rays, Digital Charting, Experience is a must. Please fax resumes to : 904-287-4073. 32 hours per week, Monday -Thursday, 8-12 and 2-6. WANTED MANAGER of ROOF REPAIR DIVISION. Experience in roof repairs and sales required. Position entails selling and doing repairs. Drug Free Work Place. OSHA Compliant. Must have own tools. Call (904) 465-2183 Champions Gymnastics Club is looking for enthusiastic, energetic and reliable gymnastics instructors for a growing program. Please call Maggie Butler at 904-732-6040 or email information at ChampionsGymnasticsClub@yahoo.com Part Time Flexible hours. Applicants must live in the 32259 and 32092 area. Adult applicants only. Call Robin at 687-9610 HELP WANTED POOL MECHANICS WITH 2 years experience in diagnosing, replacement or repair of pool equipment. Some experience in renovations, leak detection and pool maintenance / water balance necessary .Must have valid clean drivers license and be able to pass a background check Contact 449-2055 for details Seeking experienced Pet Stylist in local grooming shop. Must pass drug test. Contact Sharon Lucas 904-813-0918 Bookeeper/Admin Assistant Knowledgeable with EXCEL, WORD and Outlook. A/R work. Flexible schedule. 15-20 hours per week. Email resume to publisher@rtpublishinginc.com F/T assistant needed for doctors of ce. M, T, W, F & Saturday morning. Please fax resume to 904-683-4378. P/T massage therapist needed for M,W,F afternoons from 1-6pm. Please send resume to 904-683-4378. JOB Finder Looking for a job in NW St.Johns County? Heres where you can nd one close to home. CLASSIFIED ADS! NOW ONLINE AT www.thecreekline.comFREE Shaggy Chic National Dog Groomers Assn member award winning pet/show styling all breed/mixed breeds grooming walk-in nail trims/dremel g g m el 904-230-2827 free Blueberry facial We stock your fridge with delicious home-cooked meals10% off new clients 1 0% o ff new clients newclien ts facebook.com/WFDJaxPersonalChef Massage TherapyAlicia Hunter LMTOnly $50 an hour #MM12329/MA53865 Neuromuscular Therapy ( 904 ) 514 5788www.hunter l mt. c omA New U Massage located in San Jose Office Center, Next to Sonnys and Ace Hardware$5 OFF with this ad. at Fruit Cove287-0601 Housecleaning 207-5674 Jen Kim Professional Groomer I My Dog Grooming(904) 710-1045 Dining outdoors cont. from pg. 28 tor, never on the kitchen counter or outdoors. Discard any extra marinade thats touched raw meat. Grill food thoroughly, using a thermometer to ensure the proper internal temperature: 145 degrees F for steaks and sh, 160 degrees F for pork, hot dogs and hamburgers and 165 degrees F for poultry. Keep nished meats hot until you serve by moving them to the side of the grill rack, away from the coals or highest ame on your gas grill. Avoid cross contamination by using separate serving plates and utensils for di erent meats and vegetables. If youll be grilling away from homein a park, tailgating at a sporting event or on a camping tripconsider purchasing pre-formed patties for burgers and pre-cut poultry. This minimizes the amount of handling meat requires and can help minimize the risk of bacteria and cross contamination. Transporting. A picnic in the park can be great fun for everyone, but its important to assure your food arrives safely along with your family and guests. Follow smart food packing guidelines. Keep meats, including lunch meats and raw meats, cheeses and condiments cold in insulated, soft-sided bags or coolers with freezer gel packs. Food needs to be stored at 40 degrees F or colder to reduce the risk of pathogen growth, so limit the number of times you open the cooler. Never allow food to sit for more than two hours at temperatures below 90 degrees F and no more than an hour when temperatures exceed 90 degrees F. Throw away food thats been sitting out too long.

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Page 32, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com Jacksonville 10130 Philips Highway (904) 262-8113 Across from Avenues Mall, exit 339 Open 7 Days A Week AveLighting.com *Marked down fans excluded. Second fan or lesser value. In stock items only. com Hot Fans at Cool Savings!50%* OFFShop Jacksonvilles largest selection of fans during our incredible Fan Sale Hurry sale ends soon!Buy One Fan, Get Second Fan Dont forget.... Its not too late for Summer Program Session B MON. 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Also beware of ads that claim to guarantee loans regardless of credit and note that if a credit repair company does business only over the phone it is illegal to request any money before delivering its service. All funds are based in US dollars. Toll free numbers may or may not reach Canada. Free PapersWorking For You is free community paper is a vital force in our community. We live here, we work here, our kids attend school here, we shop here, and we love it here. Because we feel so connected, we want er the best our er each issue. We invite you to strengthen our community by shopping locally, being involved, and supporting each other. We do. The CreekLine Your free press streng thens our community. Not by being separate from it, but by being part of it.NW St. Johns Countys Community Newspaper (BPT) Good things really do come in small packages. And when it comes to your health, pistachios pack a powerful punch: They help you manage your weight, may help reduce blood pressure and a study published in the International Journal of Impotence Research shows they may even help with erectile function. Here are three big reasons why you should unshell and celebrate your health with a handful. Pistachios are a great snack chock-full of vitamins and nutrients including antioxidants, beta carotene, ber, glutamine, potassium, phytosterols, zeaxanthin and B6. You really cant go wrong with pistachios, says director of sports nutrition at the Uni-Go nuts; celebrate your health with a handfulversity of Southern California, Becci Twombley. With six grams of protein in every 160-calorie serving, pistachios are a protein front-runner compared to 160 calories of other common snacks. In addition, pistachios have more nuts per serving (49) than any other tree nut. Whether youre an elite athlete in training or a casual tness bu what you eat will a ect your performance. As an athlete, your body needs the right carbohydrates, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals and uids, says Twombley. Pistachios are a great preand post-workout snack because they contain a good source of lean protein, the right type of fat and electrolytes such as potassium. Their taste is unbeatable. They can be enjoyed right out of the bag or to jazz them up, you can season them right in the shell, like these Sa ron and Vanilla Pistachios by Chef Grant MacPherson. Sa ron and Vanilla Pistachios 1 pound American pistachios, in-shell 1.5 ounces Spanish sa ron, steeped in cold water 2 vanilla beans, scraped 2 tablespoons canola oil Sea salt to taste Warm canola oil in roasting pan or wok on your stove top, add pistachios and lightly toast. Add sa ron, with some liquid to coat the pistachios. Add the vanilla bean scrapings and stir to incorporate; season with sea salt to taste. Remove from heat and serve warm in the dish of your choice. The CreekLineYOUR Community NewspaperFor more information:Linda Gay904-287-4913 lg@rtpublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com July 2013 The CreekLine, Page 33 731-55805521 Chronicle Court, 32256 LifetimeEnclosures.com 5 5 FREE In-Home Design ServicesMilitary & Senior Discounts! W.A.C. See website for complete nancing Ready for Summer Si zz le? a $850 valueWhen you order your Outdoor Kitchen!See designer for details with this coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Expires on 08-31-13VISIT OUR DESIGN CENTER TODAY AND SAVE UP TOAN ADDITIONAL $150! #1 ROOFING CONTRACTOR C. Sterling Quality Roofing, Inc. $500 OFF for a complete reroof Call Now for FREE ESTIMATES 904-908-4996 www.roofjacksonville.comCCC057991Specializing in Customer Satisfaction Since 1983Integrity, professionalism, Security . Not Just a Roof! f f f f f f or a f f f f f o f o fo r a $ $ $ $ Celebrating our 30th year in business! Enviro Tech Lawn Care Call Today!866-2969 including adjusting sprinklers 14 Years Experience! In June, members of the Creeks Clash U-17 girls soccer team visited the site of Plaza Towers Elementary School in Moore, Oklahoma, where seven children lost their lives in the recent tornadoes. The school and surrounding neighborhood were completely destroyed. Girls made donations and visited with children and families who lived in the surrounding neighborhood and The e orts of the members of the Garden Club of Switzerland keep paying o Last month at the National Garden Club Convention in Seattle, Washington, it was announced that they were the winners of the National Garden Clubs #71A Division. This division is called Operation Wild ower Roadside and it requires the competing Garden Clubs use of native plants in a community project. This is exactly what the members of the Garden Club of Switzerland did when they donated all the earnings of their 2011 ra e to the William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway. The $1000 was speci ed to purchase and plant native trees in the scenic trail area. These said trees are now planted in the front of Alpine Park. The idea was born when club member Doris Dowling o ered a full sized quilt she had made who have lost their homes and all belongings. The team was competing in nearby Edmond, Oklahoma in the Region III Championships where they advanced to the quarter nals and nished in the top eight teams from 11 states. They are currently the #1 ranked U -17 girls team in the state of Florida. We are proud of their hard work and compassion!Local garden club wins national awardBy Donna Keathley Garden Club of Switzerland president Mickey Fraser, who received a check and honors from the Florida Federations of Garden Clubs, Inc., with Claire Fioriti.to the club to help raise some extra money. Then Beverly Fleming joined in and donated an original seaside scene painting she had done; Carolyn Mullinax added a porcelain tray by designer Lynn Chase and they were o and running. At their November 1, 2010 meeting they made a motion to conduct a sale of ra e tickets and all monies earned were to be used to plant native trees on William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway. Sue Angle, president of the Florida Federated Garden Club, said they were so proud when the National Garden Club announced that the Garden Club of Switzerland received the honor for their very worthwhile project. She thanked the club for their dedication to Garden Club and is proud to have them as a part of the FFGC organization.#1 Ranked Creeks Clash U-17 visit Moore, Oklahoma The Cosmos 3vs3 soccer team enjoyed an excellent tournament at the Ponte Vedra 3v3 Challenge. This was one of the best 3vs3 experiences ever, with great competition and two playoff games going into overtime and Golden Goal. Overall, the team nished 5-2 after a great weekend of soccer, sun and fun! The Cosmos team includes Gavin Skipper, Bence Kosik, Kyle Corbett, Coach Kevin Corbett, Cesar Troncoso and Nickita Shvetz. Congrats, Cosmos! Congratulations to the 8A Julington Creek Slammers for winning the 2013 district championships in Ocala the weekend of June 22-23. They nished 3-0, outscoring opponents 49-7. They earned the right to play in the Florida State Championships in West Palm Beach during the July 4th weekend. Pictured are Eric Marichal, Ty Gebauer, Nathan Morgan, Brody Stevenson, Cole Capitano, Kolt Myers, Boston Torres, James Thompson, Hayden Gicalone, Devin Kirk, Jacob Carter, JD Hay, Chris Morgan, John Hay, Steve Carter and Chris Thompson. Congratulations, Slammers!

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Page 34, The CreekLine July 2013 www.thecreekline.com DURBINCROSSING.COM JACKSONVILLES #1 SELLING COMMUNITY and growing!Kids and parents alike couldnt be happier about the brand new K-8 school to be built in the heart of Durbin Crossing and scheduled to open for the 2014 school year. Durbin Crossing, the most sought after community in North Florida has everything your family could want, including top rated new schools nearby, ball elds and parks within walking distance, two elaborate amenity centers, pools, tennis, sports courts, skateboard park, dog park, large nature preserves, a village center, and stunning model homes from our excellent builders. Join the excitement! See Durbin Crossing today.is coming toA NEW SCHOOL Like us on Facebook Dennis Homes www.dennis-homes.com Dream Finders Homes www.dreamfindershomes.com Drees Homes www.dreeshomes.com D. S. Ware Homes www.dswarehomes.com Mattamy Homes www.mattamyhomes.com Providence Homes www.myprovidencehome.com Richmond American Homes www.richmondamerican.com Riverside Homes www.myriversidehome.com Accepting and Selling furniture (living room, dining room, bedroom, etc) Home decor (lamps, rugs, artwork, tchotchke) New items arrive daily. We are ready to accept your entire house, estate, etc. We also oer inventory liquidation service for builders, home and furniture industry businesses, etc. For More Information call: 880 8448or email us at: ENCOREDECOR@bellsouth.net10830 San Jose Boulevard ( across from Walmart)Visit us online at: www.EncoreDecorFL.comWE OFFER FREE PICKUP SERVICE FOR APPROVED ITEMSHours: Jacksonvilles Largest Upscale Consignment Store H The two teams from the St. Johns County 4-H Plant Sciences Club placed rst in their 4-H age categories at the Clay County Fair Horticulture ID and Judging Contest last month. Members of the Senior Team were Abby Kulpa, Cady Smith, Ellie Leach and Jonathan Kulpa. Among all seniors at the contest: Kulpa placed rst, Leach second and Smith third. Members of the Junior Team were Henry Keating, Caeli Benyacko and Harrison Keating. Among all juniors Henry Keating was rst and Harrison Keating second. The contest requires the participants to identify 40 samples from among 200 species of plants. The sample could be a leaf, a ower, a seed or fruit or a product made from the plant such as hummus from the garbanzo bean. A second part of the contest, called Judging, is to rank in order of quality four samples of one species of plant in each of four major categories. If you would like to test yourself on plant identi cation, please go to http://gardeningsolutions. ifas.u .edu/mastergardener/outreach/plant_id/index.shtml.Club meetings are fun as well as educational. Previous meetings have included a trip to the Jacksonville Zoo to study the many Florida plants that grow there, a visit to the nursery area of the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind to see a production area which grow plants for sale and attending the Jacksonville Landscape Show. Switzerlands Boy Scouts of America Troop 718 recently took an incredible 25-mile canoe trip down the great Suwannee River over Memorial Day weekend. The amazing adventure included a large group of 14 canoes lled with 21 scouts, 10 leaders and adults, loads of gear and the proud troops hound, Rocky. Starting Saturday morning, May 25, at Suwannee River State Park, the pod of canoes paddled a scenic 15 miles. The long lengths of canoeing were broken by swimming and ying o rope swings. By the time the group reached Dowling Park River Camp later that afternoon, everyone was exhaustedbut on the bright side, everyones arms were pumped! And after a long day on the water, the ery scouts were rewarded with a delicious meal of tacos in a bag. Sunday morning, after tasty omelets in a bag, the troop set Troop 718 canoes the Suwannee RiverBy Contributing Writer Marcus Nelson, Second Class Scoutout once morewith one goal in mind. After a day of canoeing mixed with swimming in the jokingly christened Scout Springs and a satisfying lunch, the scouts reached the cool waters of Lafayette Blue Springs State Park. After a cool swim in the springs, along with a swirling mud bath, the scouts washed o before cooking their own meals. On Monday morning, the scouts packed up and went home. In April, after three weeks of training, the scouts enjoyed a day of ri e shooting at Camp Shands. Also in April, the scouts roughed it out on a Wilderness Survival Campout. In June, the group is heading o to a weeklong summer adventure at Camp Rainey Mt. in Northeast Georgia. In July, the agenda is snorkeling and scallop hunting in the Gulf of Mexico. All this can be found with Troop 718, proudly chartered to Switzerland Community Church on State Road 13, meeting Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m. For more information, please contact Scoutmaster John Morley at 377-6669.St. Johns County teams place rst in horticulture identi cationBy Contributing Writer Janet Koehler, St. Johns County 4-H VolunteerOther meetings have included making collections of many of the seeds on the contest and practicing identi cation. Club members have also competed at the Jacksonville Fair and the St. Johns County 4-H Youth Expo where they also did very well. Now the seniors will begin an intense period preparing for the state horticulture ID and judging contest in July in Gainesville. Should they win there, they would go on to the national contest which is in Williamsburg, Virginia this year. Youth ages eight to 18 interested in joining the St. Johns County 4-H Program and be interested in preparing for future horticulture ID and judging contests should contact the St. Johns County 4-H O ce at 209-0430 or visit http://stjohns. ifas.u .edu/4-H.shtml. 4-H and all programs and related activities sponsored for, or assisted by, St. Johns County/ University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences are open to all persons with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or a liations. 4-H is a community of young people across America learning leadership, citizenship, and life skills. As one of our nations oldest, yet most current organizations, 4-H is reaching millions of young people with positive youth development opportunities.Team members holding plaques and trophies. Photo by Yvette Keating. The CreekLineYOUR Community NewspaperFor more information on advertising, call Linda Gay 904-287-4913 lg@rtpublishinginc.com

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