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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101421/00031
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Title: CreekLine
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: RT Publishinig, Inc.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date: March 2012
Publication Date: 10-2012
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101421:00031

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THE CREEKLINESM SERVING THE NORTHWEST ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMMUNITY SINCE 2001 Visit our online edition at www.thecreekline.com MEMBER OF THE RT PUBLISHING GROUP OF COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS What’s InsidePage 3 Whats New Page 4 From the CommissionerPage 5 School District Journal Page 6 The Sheriff Reports Page 8 Wm. Bartram Highway Page 9 Relay for Life Page 11 Girl Scouts celebration Page 13 Halloween in MicanopyPage 15 Newcomers Club Page 17 New Bishop visits BTHS remembers 9/11 Page 19 HCE Carnival Page 20 Pooch Pouches Page 21 National Merit studentsPage 22 Pacetti Bay PTSO Page 24 Community Ed classes Page 26 CAA sports news Page 24 Community Ed classes Page 26 CAA sports news Page 27 High school sports Page 32 Fishing Report Page 35 Gardening Volume 11, Issue 10October 2011The CreekLine12443 San Jose Boulevard, Ste. 403 Jacksonville,FL 32223Presorted Standard US Postage Paid Callahan, FL 32011 Permit No.4 FREE ONLINE CLASSIFIED ADS Go towww.thecreekline.comand click onFree Classi ed Ads FREE INSTALLATION ($150 Value)Present this coupon at initial consultation to receive Free Installation ($150 Value) with the purchase of a 800 series system. Other Charges may apply. Not valid on prior sales or with any other offers. Participating Dealers only. Call for Details. Hurry! Special Ends 11/10/11. Introducing the smallest, lightest, most technologically advanced computer collar available.The MicroLite’Only fromCopyright Invisible Fence of the First Coast Attention all marching band fans! Nease High School will host its “ rst ever marching band competition, the First Coast Marching Invitational (FCMI) on Saturday, October 22. Sanctioned by the Florida Marching Band Coalition (FMBC), the competition is a regional event where high school marching bands will compete with the opportunity to score points to qualify for the state competition to be held in Tampa in NovemIf you are not careful, you just might miss the entrance when driving down Race Track Road. You may recognize it by the annual Pumpkin Patch and Fall Festival. It is the little church in the modular buildings at 2600 Race Track Road. Those modular buildings have been put to good use over the last decade as a sanctuary, childrens classrooms, nursery and o ce. Recently though something special has begun to rise out of the ground at River of Life United Methodist Church. After 10 years, founding Pastor Kim Saal has departed, leaving a legacy of shepherding the church from just a misYee-Haw! On Friday, September 16, Durbin Creek Elementary kicked o their Accelerated Reader (AR) Program for the 2011-2012 school year with some old-time western fun. The stage in the Oasis was turned into a western town, the teachers and students donned cowboy hats and red bandanas and the curtain on stage opened to reveal Principal Sandra McMandon and Assistant Principal Christy Slater in western style garb. There was a new sheri and deputy in town that day and a Durbinstyle showdown was on the horizon. You could hear a pin drop as Sheri McMandon and Deputy Slater paced o drew their books and read as fast as they could to determine the Fastest Reader in the Wild West.Ž They were followed by cowboy and author Bill Mark your calendars for October 22Nease hosts First Coast Marching Invitational band competitionBy Martie Thompson Nease Panther Pride Marching Band performs their show Mad, New WorldŽber. I am so excited to be a part of the Nease Band Boosters, who are not only focused on the talent of our own band students, but seek to provide opportunities for all band students to showcase their talent as well,Ž stated Carolyn Milian, FCMI coordinator for the Nease Band Boosters, who are supplying volunteers for the event. The Nease Band Boosters have been working busily for the past six months to prepare for this competition. Our plan is to make FCMI as educationally and performance rewarding as possible. Our band parents have been working all summer to make participating bands feel welcome and comfortable. This is a great opportunity to showcase Nease and we hope it will also be a great experience for participating bands,Ž shared Nease Band Director Michael Johnson. The competition will begin with the semi“ nal round at 1:00 p.m. when each band will have the opportunity to present their show. Unlike at football games where crowd noise is inevitable, performances at marching competitions are the main event, so musical solos and nuances are more easily distinguished. Bands have a time limit to march onto the “ eld, perform and then leave the “ eld and the whole competition moves along at a brisk pace. After all bands have competed in the semi“ nal round, winners of each class (deter-Durbin Creek Reading Round-Up celebrationBy Contributing Writer Chris Cole, AR Committee Co-Chair Fourth grade teacher Matt Ostrowsky, Assistant Principal Christy Slater, Principal Sandra McMandon and real life cowboy Bill Cummins celebrating Reading Round-Up Day at Durbin Creek Cummins who did some fancy rope tricks for the bandana clad students in grades one through “ ve. At one point, Principal McMandon found herself in a real pickle when she was roped up by Cowboy Bill on stage. The Building a congregation and a new church By Karl Kennell Karen Strok and Pastor Casey Neelysion to a fully charted church in May 2011, as well as planning and starting a new church building. Planning for the building began in 2008 and led to many challenges for Pastor Saal and the congregation. Finally ground has been broken on a new multi-purpose and sanctuary building. Pastor Saal departed, pleased to be leaving the new construction in good hands. On July 1, 2011 new Pastor Casey Neely took over the task of not only seeing the new building gets built but also the task of building the congregation. He is well suited for the job. Pastor Neely became a United Methodist pastor only 10 years ago, “ rst serving a congregation in Ormond Beach for three years and then moving to Ft. Myers to take over a struggling parish which had declined to 60 mostly senior members. You de“ nitely can say he is truly a builder. For during the seven years he spent in Ft. Myers he built that modest congre-River of Life cont. on pg 7 FCMI cont. on pg 10 Durbin Creek cont. on pg 16

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Page 2, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com of St. Augustine 904.825.0540 www.oastaug.com 3055 CR210W, Suite 110, St. Johns, FL 32259 One Orthopaedic Place, St. Augustine, FL 32086 LET OUR SPORTS MEDICINE TEAM Keep you in the game!JAMES GRIMES, MD JOHN STARK, MD SPECIALIZING IN THE TREATMENT OF SPORTS RELATED INJURIES: FOOT/ANKLE SPRAINS & FRACTURES NECK & BACK INJURIES SHOULDER SEPARATIONS & DISLOCATIONS ELBOW LIGAMENT & TENDON INJURIES HIP INJURIES & GROIN PULLS KNEE CARTILAGE & LIGAMENT TEARS COLLARBONE FRACTURES BURNERS & STINGERS FOR THE TREATMENT OF: No Appointment RequiredSt. Johns Location Clinic Hours: St. Augustine Location Clinic Hours:ALBERT VOLK, MD SINA KASRAEIAN, MD KURTIS HORT, MD ANDREA TRESCOT, MD BRIAN HAYCOOK, MD BETH PEARCE, DPM 5 pm to 9 pm Monday Friday 9 am to 2 pm Saturday 5 pm to 10 pm Monday Friday 9 am to 7 pm Saturday | | American Heart Association Gold Plus certification means that Baptist Medical Center South is among the best in the nation in providing life-saving care in the event of a stroke. Learn more about our Primary Stroke Center at e-baptisthealth.com/stroke. Sudden symptoms? Call 911.Trouble seeing Numbness or weakness of face, arm or leg Confusion, trouble speaking or understanding Trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination Severe headache

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Whats NewCommunity HappeningsDo you have community or club news you would like included in The CreeekLine? Then contact Martie Thompson at: editor@rtpublishinginc.com or 886-4919. At RT Publishing we welcome Letters to the Editor. We request they be no more than 250 words. All letters must include writers name, address, and telephone number. Only the name will be published. E-mail to editor@ rtpublishinginc.com. Anonymously sent letters will not be published.Letters to the Editor policy Fall in Love with Organic Values Fill your pantry without emptying your pocketbook. With value prices every day of the year, our 365 Everyday Value organic products make it easy for you to stock up on the best products for the best price. $15 offany $50 purchase vali d a t whole f oods mar k et jacksonville onl y not vali d with a n y ot h er of f er or t m disco u nt car d n ot red e em a bl e for cash or g if t cards. l i mi t on e cou p on per custom e r. no copies d uplic a t ions o r f acs i mil e s will be acce p te d P L U 30 64 1 V A L ID 10/1/11 10/31/11 www .wholefoodsmarket.com10601 SAN JOSE BL VD JACKSONVILLE, FL 904-288-1100 I-95 I-295 San Jose Blvd. With this coupon receive RT Publishing, Inc. The CreekLine The Ocean Breeze Mandarin NewsLine Players JournalPublisher Rebecca Taus publisher@rtpublishinginc.comEditor Martie Thompson editor @rtpublishinginc.comAdvertising Sales, Linda Gay lg@rtpublishinginc.comAdvertising Sales, Josh Allen ja@rtpublishinginc.comGraphic Design, Brittany Lehmangraphics@rtpublishinginc.com RT Publishing, Inc. 12443 San Jose Boulevard Suite 403 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Ph: 904-886-4919 The CreekLine Community Newspaper is a free monthly publication distributed via bulk mail to homes and businesses in NW St. Johns County. Submission of articles and photographs are received by mail or email, although email to editor@rtpublishinginc.com is preferred. The writers opinions do not necessarily reect the opinion of RT Publishing, Inc. Advertising Rates are available by request. RT Publishing, Inc. is not responsible for advertisement content or accuracy of information provided by its advertisers. Nor does RT Publishing, Inc. endorse any of the products or services included in this publication. RT Publishing, Inc. reserves the right to refuse advertisement or copy from any advertiser. All rights are reserved and no portion of this publication may be copied without the express written consent of the publisher. 2011. Whats New Cont on pg 4Eight schools in the NW St. Johns School District are joining forces to raise money for the schools. The golf tournament will take place on November 5, 2011 at The Champions Club at Julington Creek starting at 1:30 p.m. Registration is $75 per golfer or $300 per foursome. For more information or to register please contact Debora McCarty at rdmccarty10@comcast.net or visit any of the eight schools websites that are participating in this event (Hickory Creek Elementary, Cunningham Creek Elementary, Timberlin Creek Elementary, Julington Creek Elementary, Switzerland Point Middle School, Fruit Cove Middle School, Bartram Trail High School and Creekside High School). District IV of the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs and the St. Johns County Extension Service will sponsor Gardenfest 2011 on Saturday, October 29 from 9:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. It will be held at the Extension Oce located at 3125 Agricultural Center Road in St. Augustine. The program, presented by outstanding speakers, is chock full of great information for the Florida gardener. Topics include: Alien Invaders, Creepy Crawlies, Blooming Gourds and Dead or Alive Autumn Arrangements. Plants will be available for purchase at bargain prices. The course will count as CEUs for Master Gardeners. Registration is only $10 and morning refreshments and drinks for lunch will be provided. You may bring your own lunch or we will prepare a bag lunch for you for only $5 more. Pre-registration is needed to be assured of lunch. To register or for more information, please call the registrar, Rachel Wilson, at 272-4252 or the event chairman, Art Burnett, at 282-4981. Would you be willing to spend one hour per week to make a dierence in a young persons life? The St. Johns County School District is looking for volunteers who have a little bit of time, a listening ear and an encouraging word to help a student become successful in school and in life. Mentors serve in a school setting and meet with a student once per week. If you are interested in taking part in this exciting opportunity, please call the school districts Volunteer Services Department at 547-3945. 4-H is a youth development program for youth ages 5-18 (as of September 1) that focuses on the development of life skills, citizenship and leadership. 4-H has been around for over 100 years and provides opportunities for youth to use their Head, Heart, Hands and Health to positively develop into competent, caring and contributing citizens. There are 20 dierent 4-H clubs through out St. Johns County and nearly 30 county schools that participate in 4-H in the classroom projects (public speaking and chicken embryology). Club information can be found at: http://stjohns.ifas. u.edu 4-H is a community of young people across America learning leadership, citizenship and life skills. As one of our nations oldest, yet most current organizations, 4-H is reaching millions of young people with positive youth development opportunities. The Switzerland Garden Club will have its October meeting on Thursday, October 13 at 10:00 a.m. Janet Young will speak on Switzerlands early settlers. If you are interested in attending please call 287-9772 for more information. New members are welcome! The Friends of Bartram Trail Library will present a second session of ACT and SAT preparation classes at the library. The ACT class will begin at 5:00 p.m. and the SAT class will begin at 6:30 p.m. All classes will be held on Monday. The class dates are: November 7, November 14, November 21, November 28 and December 5, 2011. Registration is required and class size is limited. Registration closes on October 23, 2011. A donation of $25 for each class series a student takes is requested. Please register via email to btbfol@yahoo.com and include the students name, grade and class selection (ACT or SAT). Plant Clinic at the Bartram Trail Library! St. Johns County Master gardeners will be on hand to answer your plant and lawn questions on Saturday, October 15 and Thursday, October 20 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon at the Bartram Trial Library located at 60 Davis Pond at the entrance to Julington Creek Plantation. We will accept small soil samples from your vegetable, lawn or shrub areas for free pH testing. Adults and teens age 14 and older are invited to attend the Project Lap Blanket crochet group at the Bartram Trail Branch Library on Tuesday, October 18, Monday, October 24 and Monday, October 31 from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The group will crochet or knit blankets for cancer patients at area hospitals. All skill levels are welcome. Cant come to any of the meetings? Pick up the crochet pattern at the Reference Copies of the online coupon ad are not accepted.

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Page 4, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com From the Commissioner’s DeskBy Contributing Writer Ron Sanchez, County Commissioner, District 2 Offering investment advisory services as a representative of 0156581-00002-00 Prudential Financial Planning Services, a division of Pruco Securities, LLC. ROBERT E. BURKE The CPA Never Underestimate the Value VARSITY INSURANCE, INC. NEED BETTER INSURANCE? 268-6365 Local Independent Agents We work for you not the insurance company.Our name celebrates our love of competition and commitment to excellence.Serving Mandarin Since 1990 Julington Creek PlantationSee what items are for sale. Browse our ads at www.julingtoncreekplantation.org The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Over 15 Years Legal Experience904-665-0005www.preddylaw.com St. Johns County is rich in history and years of economic development. I think all residents may bene“ t and be interested in knowing the history and development of our County. It can not be put in better words than the summary below, paraphrased from Sidney Johnstons Historic Properties Survey of St. Johns County, Florida, which was commissioned by the county in 2001. St. Johns County, the oldest county in the state, derives its name from Floridas longest river. Called various names since its discovery by French explorer, Jean Ribault, the name San Juan appeared on a map showing the river around 1720. This name was probably derived from the Spanish mission of San Juan del Puerto established on Fort George Island about 1590. The Spanish established St. Augustine in 1565 and their “ rst settlements in the county were Franciscan missions established to Christianize natives and provide labor and food for St. Augustine. Most of these were along waterways including the St. Johns, Matanzas, and Tolomato Rivers. One of the earliest was the mission at Tocoi, making this place name one of the oldest in Florida. In the late 1600s the Spanish Crown constructed a series of forti“ cations to increase defense for St. Augustine. Many of these were within the county, including Fort Diego, Fort Picolata, Fort Tocoi and a guardhouse at Twenty Mile (Palm Valley). Only Fort Matanzas remains, though archaeological evidence exists for others. After gaining Florida in 1763, the British Crown sparked development by awarding large land grants. The English also opened one of the nations “ rst public roads, the Kings Road, running from New Smyrna, through the county and into Georgia. Large plantations producing indigo, rice and other exports developed throughout the region. Settlement was heaviest along the St. Johns River and coastal waterways. Land grants remained a productive strategy after the Spanish resumed control of Florida in 1784. In-migration of Minorcan refugees from the failed New Smyrna colony provided a local farming class. Establishing themselves “ rst in St. Augustine, Minorcan families soon dispersed across the county, forming small farms and plantations and establishing a rich culture across the region. The United States acquired Florida in 1821 and the Territorial Legislature created St. Johns County assigning St. Augustine as the seat of government. Small settlements appeared along the St. Johns River, many focused on agriculture especially oranges and at Tocoi, the St. Johns Railway was completed into St. Augustine in 1859. During the Civil War, Union troops occupied St. Augustine, gunboats patrolled the St. Johns River and earthworks were established at Picolata which can still be found today. In the 1880s, Henry Flagler spurred St. Augustines growth and population increased in interior regions of the county as agricultural products found a larger market. New settlements with churches and schools appeared in rural areas. The introduction of railroad lines helped spur growth in the rural villages of Elkton, Hastings and Spuds. River settlements at Picolata, Racy Point, Remington Park, Riverdale and Switzerland also experienced steady growth with steamboat wharves attracting commerce. A few wealthy seasonal visitors developed river estates and resorts at Crescent Beach and Summer Haven. Many settlers cultivated citrus providing community names like Orangedale and Fruit Cove, until hard freezes in the 1890s pushed Floridas citrus belt farther south. African-American settlers formed communities at Armstrong, Elkton, Fruit Cove and Hastings, buoyed by employment in agriculture and the burgeoning turpentine industry. Designated as New Augustine, a large ethnic community emerged west of St. Augustine, becoming known as West Augustine which included the beautiful Florida Memorial College campus. Developers platted numerous subdivisions throughout the county during the 1920s land boom, but many were never developed. Ponte Vedra Beach emerged as an exclusive seaside village in the Great Depression, when most other communities continued to depend on agriculture. In cooperation with county landowners and timber companies, the Florida Forest Service installed “ re watchtowers in the 1940s. Development since World War II has increased with each passing decade into the growth patterns we see today. Though agriculture has remained a steady economic driver and dependable tradition in the middle portions of the county, the main economic activity in the northern half has turned largely to suburban development. Whats New cont from pg 3 Desk in the library and crochet the blanket in your spare time. Drop o completed blankets and any yarn youd like to donate during regular library hours. For additional information, please call the Reference Desk at 8276960. The Nease Panther Pride Band has been selected to host a Florida Marching Band Coalition (FMBC) marching band competition, the First Coast Marching Invitational, at the school on Saturday, October 22. The all day event, featuring approximately 10 bands from Florida will begin with preliminary competition at 1:00 p.m.; “ nals competition should be concluded at approximately 10:00 p.m. Local middle schools will be performing the National Anthem prior to “ nals competition and the Nease Panther Pride Band will perform an exhibition of their 2011 show, Mad New World.Ž Concessions will be available and tickets are for sale at the gate. Come out and support the arts in St. Johns County! Julington Creek Plantation Recreation Center invites you to join their Child Watch for their Little Monsters Halloween Party to be held on Saturday, October 29 from 6:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. at the Recreation Center. The cost is $15 per child and children from age three to 10 are invited to attend. Pre-registration is required by Wednesday, October 26. For additional information, please contact mgunther@jcpcdd.org. TOPS (Take O Pounds Sensibly) FL#493, St. Augustine has a weekly meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesdays at the Old Colee Cove Volunteer Fire Station, located at 9105 County Road 13 North (south of Buddy Boys Grocery Store). Weigh in starts at 8:30 a.m. We are a National Weight Loss Organization, fees are low and we have lots of fun, contests and inspiring programs. All are welcome; come and join us! For more information, please contact Sara Weaver at 940-7528 or Bobbi Culbreth at 824-2466. A class on proper tree pruning and maintenance will be hosted by the St. Johns County Extension Service on October 20 from 2:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. at the SJC Agricultural Building Auditorium, located at 3125 Agricultural Center Drive. Chuck Lippi, the City of St. Augustines arborist and one of only eight Board Certi“ ed Master Arborists in Florida, will o er instruction on keeping the trees in our landscapes beautiful and healthy for generations to come. Lippi will then join a panel discussion with Gail Compton, nature columnist; Beverly Fleming, Master Gardener; and Renee Stambaugh, native plant consultant, regarding proper selection of trees for your landscape. This class is free, open to the public and includes a native plant sale featuring trees and shrubs. For more information, please contact 209-0430 or visit www. nativeplantconsulting.com. Two high schools join their drama programs together to produce the classic musical, Les Miserables, based on the novel by Victor Hugo and with music by Claude-Michel Schonberg and lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer and Alain Boublil. The musical is produced by special arrangement with Music Theatre International and is rated PG. T he Ponte Vedra High School Theatre directed by Randall Adkison and Nease High School Drama directed by Laura Adkison, j oin a cast of 50 students. Performances will be held at Ponte Vedra High School on November 10, 11 and 12. Evening shows are at 7:00 p.m. on all three nights, and there will be a 1:00 p.m. matinee on Saturday. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased in advance from a cast member and will be sold at the door. The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-7 meets the “ rst Thursday of every month 7:30 p.m. at the St. Augustine Yacht Club near the St. Augustine Lighthouse. The ” otilla is always looking for new members, particularly those who own aircraft, boats and have radio equipment and skills. If you are interested, please contact Vic Aquino at 460-0243.

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www.thecreekline.com • October 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 5 School District Journal By Contributing Writer Beverly Slough, Member, St. Johns County School Board Unlimited t raining included. Access to a eet of boats in Jacksonville and St. Augustine as well as over 60 locations across the country. Call us about trade ins.Call today 1-888-684-2214 Aordable Boating Without the Hassle.Located at Julington Creek Marina in Jacksonville and Camachee Cove Yacht Harbour in St. Augustine No Maintenance!No Insurance!No Cleaning!No Storage!www.freedomboatclub.com Music Lessons for All Ages Bob Moore 904-333-2479www.bobmooremusic.com/music_lessons Conveniently located at St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church Nowis the timeto make your move. Conventional and Jumbo Loans USDA Rural Developement Construction to Perm FHA and VA Loans Condo Loans Fixed or Adjustable Rates First Federal offers: All loans subject to credit underwriting and approval. Please contact a mortgage originator for more details on available loan programs. Contact Scott Neeley Your school board has been extremely busy in the last few weeks. We passed our $427.7 million budget for this year, which saw a very minor decrease in ad valorem taxes. As I mentioned before, we are working with dramatically reduced funding, nearly $19 million, which we have supplemented with monies from our reserves. We have not laid o teachers or reduced programs. In fact, we have hired 239 new teachers because of the Class Size amendment requirements. In addition, we hired 100 new non-instructional personnel. We anticipate that our reserves can stand us in good stead one more year but no longer in the current economic environment. If funding does not increase after that time, we will be forced to look carefully at sta ng and programs to balance our budget. At our September board meeting, we approved two new charter schools. St. Pauls School of Excellence is an elementary school to be located in the Lincolnville area. Its focus is to meet the needs of students who come to school less than prepared to learn. The goal is to work with the students and their families to enhance the skills that they need to be successful. The school is scheduled to open in 2012. The St. Augustine Public Montessori School also plans to open in 2012. It will provide public Montessori instruction to its students. Both schools still have issues that must be resolved as the actual charter is developed. PEACE Schools application was denied due to challenges with “ nances and the academic performance of its feeder school, ABLE Academy. The board is also in the process of “ nalizing far-reaching rezoning. Elementary L, which will open in the Palencia area in 2012, will be populated with students from the current Mill Creek zone and possibly some other neighborhoods that are close to the school. In addition, plans are being developed to bring relief to Durbin Creek Elementary, Fruit Cove Middle, Ponte Vedra Palm Valley Rawlings Elementary and R. B. Hunt Elementary. The school board will approve the “ nal rezoning plans at the November meeting. On October 17, Dr. Joyner will present his annual State of the Schools address. In this report, he highlights the accomplishments for last school year and lays out the goals for the current one. The event will be held at 40 Orange Street, St. Augustine and begins with a reception at 5:30 p.m. followed by the program at 6:30 p.m. I hope many of you will be able to attend this informative meeting. Take the opportunity to remain a lifelong learner by participating in a community education class o ered by our school district. Many di erent topics are addressed from grant writing to art lessons to foreign language. There is even one class entitled The Queens Etiquette. For information on course prices, dates, times, locations and registration, visit www.stjccommunityed.com or call 547-7565 or 547-7503. The second annual Golf Fore Education will take place November 5 at The Champions Club at Julington Creek Plantation. The event bene“ ts eight of the northwest county schools and features a special prize for a hole in one: a boat donated by North Florida Yacht Sales. Cost is $75 per player or $300 per foursome, which includes greens fee, cart, range balls, meal, prizes and gift bags. To play, make your check payable to Switzerland Point Middle School PTSO or pay with a credit card via PayPal at spmsptso@hotmail.com. All proceeds are divided equally among the eight schools. As always, thank you for your commitment to public education. If I may serve you in any way, please contact me at sloughb@stjohns.k12.” .us. Please plan to join Habitat for Humanity as it is preparing for the annual Holiday Gala for Humanity, the highly anticipated event that kicks o the holiday season each year in St. Augustine. All are invited to attend the event which will be held at the River House on Thursday, December 8. Come out and enjoy the 12 Tastes of Christmas, where your favorite restaurants will be o ering food tastings and wine pairings. In its 17th year, the Gala festivities will include lively auctions, live music and dancing.Habitat for Humanity prepares for annual major fundraiserHabitat for Humanity is currently seeking sponsors for this signature event: The Hammer and Holly Sponsorship ($1,000 donation) and the Bolts and Bells Sponsorship ($500 donation). We are proud to announce that the following businesses have already committed to sponsor our annual event: CITI, Bank of America, Marsh Creek Country Club/PARC Group, Womens Council of Realtors … St. Augustine Chapter, St. Johns County Board of Realtors and the Clark Family,Ž says Diane Quick, Executive Director. If youre interested in making a donation, becoming an event sponsor, or volunteering, please call Aubrey Mulligan, special events coordinator, at 687-7694. Habitat for Humanitys Gala for Humanity will be held at the River House on Thursday, December 8 from 6:00 p.m. until 10:00 p.m. The ticket price is $55 per person or $100.00 per couple. Please call the Habitat for Humanity o ce today at 826-3252 to reserve your spot.A recent e-mail to CDD Supervisor Sam Lansdale was an appalling attempt to silence him and his right to question JCP CDD operations. Silencing Sam is an attempt to silence the majority of taxpayers. Residents dont want increased assessments caused by lax management of the facility and improper oversight by the CDD Board. Go Sam! Sam was elected with a greater margin over his opponent (60 percent to 40 percent) than the other two winners. Obviously his message resonated better with taxpayers and therefore represents the majority of voters in the 2010 election. Sam asks pertinent questions at CDD meetings and the Board and others should know hes keeping his election promises and should be applauded for his work. Without Sams efforts and tough questions about CDD management and operations we would almost certainly have had increased taxes for 2012. I was involved in the initial ad-hoc committee responsible for the original resident survey leading to the facility we now have. I also served on the CDD Board during the period of “ nancing, planning, construction and decision making so I know exactly what we have and why we have it. After the facility opened they added sta and bene“ ts that drove CDD costs higher, including doubling the salary of the General Manager and a tennis pro earning a six “ gure income. In 2010 it seemed the CDD faced another tax increase when I wrote two editorials ( The CreekLine and St. Augustine Record ) cautioning residents to wake upŽ to the possibility Letter to the Editorof another increase based on escalating operating costs. This began the wake-up call that continued through this 2011 budget cycle. This is a community recreation facility, not a Country Club. The facility is paid for by all residents including those who never use it … some are on “ xed incomes and others are unemployed. Regardless, all residents are represented by the Board who must always be careful stewards of taxpayer money. If anyone doubts that Sams views represent the majority of residents, we can conduct a professional survey to learn their views. All homeowners were surveyed before this facility was built so why not now? Lets learn the views of the majority rather than make assumptions based on who speaks the loudest at CDD meetings. Are we subsidizing activities for which rates are too low? Are we oversta ed for services o ered? Do we have too many salaried managers? Are we offering bene“ ts we cant a ord? Is the skate park meeting its budget targets? Fee for service operations should breakeven; if not, fees should rise or services should be discontinued. We have a wonderful facility that surrounding communities envy, but increased assessments will be detrimental considering other communities now advertise no CDD fee.Ž Think about it! Al Abbatiellogot news?editor@thecreekline.com

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Page 6, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com The Sheriff Reports By Contributing Writer David B. Shoar, St. Johns County Sheriff 2006 Huntington Learning Centers, Inc. Independently owned and operated.HLC-2011 MANDARIN886 9600BEACHES220 1212 Accredited CITA & SACS Trans-Regional SchoolIndependently owned & operated CL Founded in 1977, Huntington Learning Center is the oldest supplemental education provider in the nation. Our teachers help students of ages and motivation to succeed. Whether your child is struggling in school or simply searching for an enriching academic experience, our program will make a difference. Success in School Tomorrow Begins with Huntington Today. $50CALL TODAYSAVE READING, WRITING MATH, SPELLIING PHONICS, STUDY SKILLS STATE TESTING PREP CONFIDENCE, MOTIVATION, SELF-ESTEEM SAT & ACT PRIVATE TUTORING FOR SAT/PSAT/ PREP Trick or Treat 108 Bartram Oaks WalkLocated inside the Spa and Salon at Bartram Walk. 899-1234 www.hairbycarl.comCarl SlackOrganic Color is NO Trick...... It is a TREAT! Now using Organic, Ammonia Free Hair color. Keeping your Health and Condition of your hair a priority. Call Carl for your TREAT. SCRAPBOOK 12276 San Jose Blvd Suite 701 Jacksonville, FL 32223 www.enchantedscrapbook.com (904) 647-6772 Come Scrap Your Stories! We can help you preserve your memories! From the beginner to the advanced scrapbooker, we have what you need! Located in the heart of Mandarin on San Jose Blvd just north of the Julington Creek Bridge. Bring in this ad for 5% OFF your entire purchase Oswald ChiropracticAt Bartram Park www.oswaldchiropracticjax.com Exam X-Rays (If Medically Necessary) 1st TreatmentFREE Value $150.00 +* Massage (MA41847) (OUR NO RISK OFFICE POLICY) THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT WHICH IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITH IN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT. 904.268.9100 Exp. 11/15/11 October is Crime Prevention Month and crime prevention is an essential function at the St. Johns County Sheri s O ce. We have specially trained deputies, certi“ ed Crime Prevention Practitioners, dedicated to the mission of crime prevention. One of the most important components of crime prevention is you, as well as your friends and neighbors willingness to extend the eyes and ears of law enforcement to report suspicious activity. You will “ nd an entire section dedicated to helping strengthen this important partnership on our website at www. sjso.org. The mission of crime prevention is to encourage citizens to protect their homes and businesses against burglaries; to encourage citizen involvement in the reporting of crime; to develop appropriate programming for various interested groups; to Crime prevention and Halloween safetydistribute materials about crime prevention; and to serve as a liaison with community organizations and other interested community groups. Some of the programs our Crime Prevention Unit o ers include Computer and Fraud Crimes, Crimes against the Elderly, Financial Crimes, Home and Business Security Surveys, Identity Theft and establishing an e ective Neighborhood Watch Program. The Crime Prevention section of our website has the contact information you need to arrange for a program or to interact with our specialists. Burglary is likely to be the crime that a ects the most law abiding citizens. There are a few simple things you can do to assist in the event you become a victim. Write down the name brand, model and serial number of all electronic devices, appliances and tools. Take photos of every room in your home to include all furniture and appliances that could also be of use should you have an insurance claim. Be sure to photograph your valuable jewelry as well. Here is another excellent tip from the National Crime Prevention Council. If you have a printer or scanner take all of the important cards and documents you carry in your wallet or purse, such as licenses, credit cards, insurance cards and membership cards. Arrange them on the glass then scan and print both sides on a single sheet of paper. Keep these copies in a safe place such as in a zip lock bag in a secure area. Scanners and printers are available for a very nominal fee at all branches of the St. Johns County Public Library. On a lighter note, law enforcement agencies are also celebrating an important birthday of one of our best known partners in Crime Prevention. McGru the Crime Dog turns 30 years old. When McGru was created by the Ad Council in 1980, the goal was to reach children with crime prevention messages but he quickly became popular with everyone. During the “ rst two years, even though he didnt have a name, he had his famous tag line Take a bite out of crime.Ž A nationwide contest was launched to give the well-dressed bloodhound some personal identity. Among the most popular suggestions were Sherlock Bones, Sargedog, Keystone Cop Dog and J. Edgar Dog. The winning name McGru Ž was submitted by a New Orleans police o cer. McGru remains so popular he even has his own web page at www.McGru .org. I suggest you log on with your children for an excellent presentation on dealing with a current and serious topic of bullying. I would like to close this month with some Halloween safety tips: Accompany your kids if you dont think theyre old enough to trick-or-treat on their own. If they are old enough to trick-ortreat without an adult, be sure to tell your kids to stay in a group. Designate a route before your kids begin trick-or-treating and emphasize the importance that they stick to it. Have your children trickor-treat in areas where there are a lot of people around. They should also avoid taking shortcuts through alleys and parking lots. Ensure your kids only visit houses with lights on and you might also suggest that the houses they visit have some sort of Halloween decoration on the porch. Make sure your children do not go inside someones house. They can get their candy from the porch. Dress kids in a bright costume so others can see them. Also, have them wear re” ective strips or carry a glow stick or ” ashlight. Ensure your kids costumes are not so long that they can trip over them. Instead of masks, have Gerard E. Masters, III became a Marine at Parris Island, South Carolina on September 16, 2011. He was in the 2nd Battalion, Fox Company Platoon 2072. He earned the rank of Private First Class. He graduated from Bartram Trail High School in 2011 where he was involved in weight lifting and AFJROTC for four years. He is the son of Gerard Masters and Caprice Long. After his leave from boot camp, he will complete Marine Combat Training in Jacksonville, North Carolina and Military Occupational Specialty School for Amphibious Assault Vehicle training at Camp Pendleton in San Diego, California. After his training has been completed, he will attend FSCJ and join his reserve unit Company B, 4th AA Battalion The Iron Gators.Ž Congratulations PFC. Gerard Masters, we thank you for defending this great country that we live in. your children wear make-up so they can see well and, most importantly, check your kids candy before they eat it. Throw out any candy that is not in its original wrapper or looks like it has been tampered with. If you should “ nd candy that has appeared to have been tampered with, call your local law enforcement agency immediately. I hope we have another safe year for a fun celebration of Halloween in St. Johns County. As always I appreciate your input and feedback. You can contact me at dshoar@sjso.org.

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www.thecreekline.com • October 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 7 ( 904 ) 825 9960 In the Winn-Dixie Shopping Center on CR 210 W2220 CR 210 W, Suite 312, St. Johns Florida 32259 Fall Special10% OFFAny dental treatment, including crowns, bridges, partials, veneers, etc. Not valid with other oers. Oer Expires 11/17/11New Patient Special Adults $99 & Children $79Includes dental exam and x-rays, a ”uoride treatment, teeth cleaning and polishing. Not valid with other oers. Oer Expires 11/17/11 Gentle, Caring Dentistry for the Whole Family Welcome to Kids-Go-RoundSt. Johns’ Premier Children’s Seasonal Consignment Sale Visit www.kidsgoround.org for more information. SALE DATES:Friday, Oct 21 | Pre-Sale Saturday, Oct 22 | 8am 6pm Sunday, Oct 23 | 8am 1pm 1/2 Price Day SALE LOCATION: Julington Creek Publix Shopping Center. Plantation Plaza (in the old Blockbuster location) 2750 Racetrack Road Jacksonville, FL 32259Ladies......Want to earn money for the items your children no longer use?Is it time to clean out your closets? Accepting new consignors for children’s AND women’s items! Vendor spots are still open. Contact information: www.2ndgoround.orgFind us on Facebook (Kids-Go-Round) for coupons and other deals! The business of government … on the level of community development districts (CDDs) in St. Johns County … is actually big business. Of the 39 CDDs in St. Johns County, 23 of them are either managed or advised by two large commercial companies specializing in such services. Some CDDs split management chores between the companies and inhouse employees. Governmental Management Services works with 17 of the districts and Rizetta and Company, Incorporated, works with six districts. The remaining 16 districts in the county are either under direct management by the county or smaller, similar, private organizations. Information on the web site of Governmental Management Services indicates the company operates throughout Florida and in Tennessee. The company advises CDDs on bond issues, district administration and other things beyond management services. Rizetta and Company has a healthy amount of district business throughout Florida and also extends into Alabama. In addition to managing districts, Rizetta manages bond “ nancings and community associations. While the various, individual CDDs are under the control of the elected boards of the districts, some CDD day-to-day operations are handled by the private companies for a set cost. Often, these companies appear to have grown out of extraneous services o ered by certi“ ed public accounting practices, turning into far-” ung, free standing large businesses. An interesting aspect of these companies is the functions they provide under contract to CDDs. At times, these companies act as privatized government, performing various services and chores for fees to CDDs. CDDs in St. Johns County associated with Governmental Management Services are: € Aberdeen CDD € Antigua CDD € Brandy Creek CDD € Deer“ eld Preserve € Durbin Crossing CDD € Heritage Park CDD € Isles of Bartram Park CDDSecond of a SeriesCDDs in St. Johns County mean big dollars and big businessBy J. Bruce Richardson€ Julington Creek Plantation CDD € Las Calinas CDD € Main Street CDD € Moultrie Creek CDD € Rivers Edge CDD € Sampson Creek CDD € Tolomato CDD € Treaty Oaks CDD € Turnbull Creek CDD € Twin Creeks CDD CDDs in St. Johns County associated with Rizetta and Company are: € Glen St. John € Heritage landing CDD € Maderia (Outside City of St. Augustine) € Maderia (Inside City of St. Augustine) € Northridge Lake CDD € Sandy Creek CDD € World Commerce CDD Some CDDs, such as Julington Creek Plantation Community Development District, have greater self management, including directly hiring, managing and paying employees. During peak, summer season, the Julington Creek employee count can reach as high as 215 to 230 sta members, many of these being students working part time in recreation areas. During the rest of the year, the employee count averages 130 people, including “ ve supervisors. Of this smaller group, 24 are considered to be full time and eligible for bene“ ts such as health care policies and vacation time. Julington Creek Plantation CDD has 5,032 single family homes, 753 multifamily homes, 23 commercial units, two church units and one golf course unit. The original intent of CDDs was for the districts to be ongoing, formal taxing organizations which would relieve community developers the chore of building infrastructure such as roads and some utilities. Many CDDs have grown beyond this initial simple concept into full scale organizations mimicking full municipal governments, but without police, “ re and paramedic protection. And, some CDDs have created programs which overlap traditional homeowner association provided services, such as recreation features. The State of Florida taxing rules governing CDDs often create interesting … and expensive … scenarios for non-residential occupants of CDDs. Many people incorrectly believe CDD fees only apply to residential homes. Businesses located in the boundaries of CDDs must pay annual fees, too. Julington Creek Plantation CDD expects a total of $801,994.82 in fees from business this year. Just 23 businesses will split those fees, with the largest going to Publix Supermarkets. Since CDD fees are on top of county levied property taxes, these fees can become burdensome to small businesses. One local small business located inside the CDD, with an identical business at a second location in Jacksonville (Duval County) reports a total tax/CDD assessment of $60,000 in St. Johns County in the Julington Creek Plantation CDD and in Jacksonville, only $25,000. Two churches are located in the Julington Creek Plantation CDD, which, together, pay annual CDD fees of $25,900.94. These same two churches, under traditional state law, pay no property taxes to the county and are exempt from paying sales tax. The typical residential CDD fee in Julington Creek Plantation is $830 for single family homes, and $516 for multi-family homes. These fees do not include homeowner association fees.Your home can look like a model home!Chandler Designs specializes in decorating model homes for the home building industry as well as working with private individuals. I was thrilled to win eight Laurel Awards this year for Best Interior Merchandising from the Northeast Florida Builders Association,Ž says Wendy Chandler, the companys president. It is always such an honor to receive that kind of recognition for your work!Ž Chandler Designs work can be seen in model homes by Lennar Homes, Mattamy Homes and Standard Paci“ c Homes. Chandler Designs has now opened a retail store on County Road 210 called The Model Home Store. Everyone loves to look at model homes and get inspired, but “ nding the same great furniture or accessories for your own home that you see in a model can be a challenge,Ž says Chandler. So I decided to open The Model Home Store, where we can help you make your home look like a model home! Its a fabulous boutique store with everything from furniture, accessories and ” ooring to custom draperies, upholstery and even a baby boutique.Ž The store also sells unique gifts and fashion jewelry. If I dont have what you are looking for in the store, we can sit in my library and go through the dozens of catalog from my suppliers and I can help you “ nd it,Ž says Chandler. Each month we also have a warehouse sale where we will sell furnishings from model homes that have closed. These items are sold at well below cost and are practically new. Come see what were all about, you wont be disappointed!Ž Be sure to see Chandler Designs ad in this issue of The CreekLine! gation of 60 into 400 members. I owe my success not only to my faith, but to the support of my wife Jessica,Ž he said. Together we are doing Gods work.Ž His task is laid out before him with River of Life currently having a single service on Sundays at 9:30 a.m. with an attendance of 100 to 150, including 20 youth of high school and middle school age along with approximately 25 younger children. Volunteer Youth Coordinator Karen Strok sees those youth as a great foundation for the building of the congregations future. She described how they actively participate in the annual Pumpkin Patch, community Easter Egg Hunt, summer vacation bible study and visits to Westminster Woods where they annually go caroling during Christmas for the residents. Their favorite, though, has to be Move It!Ž which is the new middle school ministry. Each Wednesday they pick up kids attending Fruit Cove Middle school for a “ eld trip to a surprise destination. Each time they either do a service project or have some fun bowling or knocking a golf ball around a miniature golf course. With a congregation of young parents and their children, Pastor Neely has willing partners in not only celebrating a new building. But he also has an enthusiastic team to help build the congregation. River River of Life cont. from pg 1of Life Church de“ nitely this year opens a new chapter to the future with the new charter, new pastor and new building. The anticipated completion date for the new building is January 2012. got news?editor@thecreekline.com

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Page 8, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com 12058 San Jose Boulevard, Suite 102 J (904) 880-3131Alan M. Krantz, D.D.S.KrantzDentalCare.com $30/mo. Convenient Appointments Before & After Work or School!Trusted, Comfortable & Affordable Dental Care for the Entire Family Emergencies Welcome! Convenient Payment Options Available Ask About Our Affordable Dental Plan for Uninsured Patients! $30/mo. OCTOBER IS FIRE SAFETY MONTH PUBLIC SAFETY FIVES SAVE LIVES UPWARD BASKETBALL & CHEERLEADING $100 REGISTRATION FEE SIGN UP NOW FOR Fruit Cove Baptist Church Im back! You may recall we took some time o from our regular Scenic Highway meetings during the summer, but were now back at it. Our most recent meeting was on September 8 but not at our normal venue … seems we were accidentally locked out of the County Annex Building and had to meet in an outdoor location in Julington Creek Plantation. Despite the hardshipŽ we had a good meeting and accomplished a good deal. We discussed, in depth, the most recent FDOT/St. Johns County planning to potentially destroy a 200 plus year old oak tree at the corner of State Road 13 and State Road 16 near the Heritage Landing development. FDOT had planned a lane improvement project for northbound tra c onto State Road 13 but St. Johns County asked to include a right turn lane onto State Road 16 to accommodate tra c mostly generated by Heritage Landing. This right turn addition creates a problem … take down the tree and a cost to the county of less than $100,000. Other options are to go around the treeŽ at a cost of just under $2 million or do nothing at no cost to the county. Our request to the county is to do nothing. Spare the ancient tree and the trees on the west side of State Road 13. As I see it (backed by fact), this conundrum is the result of county oversight during the approval process of Heritage Landing. Theres more to the story and if interested send an e-mail to alabbat@bellsouth. net. We also discussed planning for the Old Settlers Reunion and Oral History gathering to be held October 16 and 17 at Alpine Groves Park. This is William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway updateBy Contributing Writer Al Abbatiello, alabbat@bellsouth.netour second annual Old Settlers Reunion and invite you attend for some old fashionedŽ fun, music and entertainment. The Oral History gathering is a celebration of participants in our Oral History project wherein these long term residents recorded some of the details of the customs, traditions and relationships in the early days of St. Johns County between the years 1920 into the 1970s. The oral history project started with funding from the grant awarded the William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway Management Council several years ago. A copy of the oral history (recorded and written) now resides at the Bartram Trail Library Branch on Davis Pond Boulevard in Julington Creek Plantation. A copy will also be presented to the St. Augustine Historical Society in St. Augustine in early October Were on target for preparing a long term Strategic Plan, including funding sources at our next meeting on October 13, 2011 at the County Annex and wed love to see you take part in this planning. We have lots to do and need volunteers to help us keep our part of the county scenic and a signi“ cant point of interest Were still conducting a ra e (courtesy of our local Garden Club); ra e proceeds will buy trees to be planted on State Road 13 when and where theyre needed. Prizes include a homemade quilt, porcelain collectable by Lynn Chase and oil on canvas Seascape by Beverly Fleming. Tickets are $3 each or four for $10. For tickets, please call Claire Fioriti (287-9772) or Al Abbatiello (287-5577). See you on October 13 at 6:30 p.m. The club has been busy as usual these past few months. We are welcoming our incoming exchange student from Poland, Przemyslaw Gorbat. He is attending Bartram Trail High School and is presently living with his “ rst host family, Bob and Donna Leonard. Our outbound students are also settling into the routines in their new host countries. The Leonards daughter, Christi, is in Brazil and Alayna Mobley is in Hungary. You can read their journal entries at www. rye” orida.org. We successfully held our third annual Poker Night last month. We would like to thank EJCON Corporation for their generous support of this event. Also thanks to all our players this year. The American ” ags at the Julington Creek Bridge on September 11 were courtesy of the Rotary Club of Bartram Trail. They are part of our ongoing ” ag project where you can get a ” ag installed in your yard six holidays a year for only $30. An order form and more information are available on our website at www.bartram-Rotary Club of Bartram Trail UpdateBy Contributing Writer Jamie Mackeytrailrotary.org. We invite you to join us on October 15 for our 2011 Fruit Cove Pub Crawl. We will be starting at 4:00 p.m. at Pizza Palace then we are going to Wakame, then across Race Track Road to Brickstone Pizza, back over to Cork and Keg and ending up at Shannons Irish Pub. Starbucks and Tropical Smoothie are there as anytime stopsŽ if you need a little help getting through. Ra e prizes will be awarded at Shannons at 8:00 p.m. so be sure to pace yourself and be at the “ nish line. This years theme is pirates and we have additional prizes for the best dressed pirates. The cost of the event is $30 which will bene“ t local and international charities of the Rotary Club of Bartram Trail. You will get a souvenir tee shirt and beer mug, as well as a fun evening. We have a maximum of 150 tickets that are available as advance purchase only. Call us at 535-8411 and well meet you to get you your tickets or drop them in the mail to you. The event is sponsored by St. Johns Boat and RV Storage, Air Doctors, D. Brad Hughes PA, Willow House/MaryBeth Murray, SunTrust/The MorleyCarnley Group, Pinch-A-Penny, Sears Carpet and Air Duct Cleaning and the generosity of the participating restaurants. We are also gearing up to participate in the Veterans Day Sunset Celebration on November 10 in Veterans Park. Look for more information as that date approaches and join us as we honor our veterans. The club meets every Thursday morning at Westminster Woods on Julington Creek. Visitors are welcome. Please visit our website or contact club President Frank Gwaltney at 803-9850 for more information about Rotary and our club.

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www.thecreekline.com • October 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 9 i pick paint color. www.pamsatherstudio.com pam sather the right color paint carpet hardwood tile 904.466-0370 watch Pams design segments on First Coast Living11:00 am Dr. Levine is dedicated to your family’s health through every stage of life. He has served Julington Creek for more than 12 years and is ready to provide you with a medical home. Services include: Sports/school physicals Immunizations Well visits for adults and children GYN care Coordination of care for chronic conditions (diabetes, hypertension, etc.) On-site lab for all blood drawsFinding the right family doctor just got easier.Same-day acute appointments 287.2794Baptist Primary Care Julington Creek1400 Bishop Estates Road, St. Johns, FL 32259 Donald J. Levine, MD Board-Certified, Family Practice, along with Carol N. Sims, PA-C 13 www.baptistprimarycare.net/levine-md Flu Vaccine Available We can handle all of the details! We know the ins and outs of the local real estate market and have the knowledge and commitment to meet your needs. If you are looking to buy a home, sell your home, invest in property, or build a new home, let us be your real estate representatives. Contact us today for all of your real estate needs. big and small 2004, An Independently Owned and Operated Member of The Prudential Real Estate Aliates, Inc. Prudential is a service mark of The Prudential Insurance Company of America. Equal Housing Opportunity. All information deemed reliable, but not guaran teed. we sell them allNeed help buying, selling or investing in real estate?Stan & Jan Timbrook REALTORS Walkers will go around the clock in the battle against cancer when the American Cancer Societys Relay For Life of Bartram Trail gets underway with teams of residents gathering at Bartram Trail High School beginning at 12:00 noon on Saturday, May 5, 2012 with a goal of raising $200,000 in the “ ght against cancer. Relay For Life events are held overnight as individuals and teams camp out at the Bartram Trail High School track with the goal of keeping at least one team member on the track or pathway at all times throughout the evening. Teams do most of their fundraising prior to the event, but some teams also hold creative fundraisers at their camp sites during Relay. Relay brings together friends, families, busi-Families and friends ght cancer through Relay For Lifenesses, hospitals, schools, faithbased groups . people from all walks of life … all aimed at furthering the American Cancer Societys e orts to save lives by helping people stay well, by helping them get well, by “ nding cures and by “ ghting back. Relay is a unique opportunity for our community to come together to celebrate people who have battled cancer, remember those weve lost, and “ ght back against the disease,Ž said Pamela Pearce, Relay For Life of Bartram Trail event chair. Many of the participants are cancer survivors, which serves as a reminder that the Bartram area communities are not immune to this disease and that by participating in Relay, we are joining with the American Cancer Societys e orts to create a world with less cancer and more birthdays.Ž For more information, please visit our website at BartramRelay.com. Funds raised at Relay For Life of Bartram Trail help the American Cancer Society to impact the lives of those touched by cancer within the community. The American Cancer Society invests more than $120 million in cancer research funding each year, and more than $15 million goes to researchers in Florida. Relay For Life still has committee positions open as well. Individuals interested in helping to plan the event in the areas of fundraising and sponsorship, marketing/PR and event activities are asked to contact Laura Petrillo, Community Representative with the American Cancer Society, at 391-3644. To locate a Relay For Life event and “ nd out how you may get involved, please call 1-800-227-2345 or visit RelayForLife.org.Your JCP CDD facilities, amenities and programs are the envy of both current and prospective Northeast Florida homeowners. The variety of recreation services and programs both appeal to and bene“ t many in the Julington Creek community. This fall the “ tness sta will be hosting new Les Mills classes and interactive seminars focusing on health and “ tness. Also, new group dog training and socialization classes begin and dont forget the Ghoulington Creek Family Halloween Dance which will include a costume contest and parade around the pool. Additional information on these and many more activities can be found at www. jcpcdd.org. I encourage you to sign up for free e-mail alerts at our website to receive e-mail reminders of upcoming events Julington Creek Plantation CDD reportBy Contributing Writer Sam Lansdale, Supervisor, Julington Creek Plantation Community Development Districtand programs. With such a great facility and so many diverse activities available, I am dedicated to ensuring we have superior facilities and services, all without raising assessments. I believe that CDD assessments paid by JCP property owners should be used to pay existing bond indebtedness and pay to keep the core facility, including the grounds, facilities and related equipment (i.e. pools, tennis courts, sportsplex, gym, etc) and basic administrative functions open, well maintained and operating e ciently. Any additional services and programs o ered by the CDD should be user-paidŽ and generate suf“ cient revenues to at least cover the extra expenses required to provide such services. Examples include restaurant sales, parties, child care, all teams, all camps, swim lessons, tennis lessons, “ tness lessons, basketball lessons, skate lessons and any other services provided to select groups. The entire tax base does not receive direct bene“ t from those extraŽ services as the users do. Due to the publics continued involvement, progress is being made with regard to reducing user-paid department losses and increasing transparency. During the recent budget process the special events department was reorganized towards becoming revenue positive and at the last CDD meeting the swim team department presented a proposal to increase membership to hopefully become revenue positive. The adjustments made in these departments increased revenue projections and/or decreased expense projections, all without a reduction in the level of service. I applaud the e orts made thus far and feel we should encourage additional user-paid departments to follow this lead towards creating a better “ nancial position, which will help reduce the pressure to raise assessments in the future. With your support, I intend to continue e orts to achieve this outcome. We work for you and I encourage you to attend the meetings and voice your concerns or opinions on how we are conducting your business. The next JCP CDD meetings will take place on October 11, 2011 and November 08, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. at the JCP Recreation Center. Feel free to contact me day or night via email or phone (SLansdale@jcpcdd.org 5094902). This article is my opinion and in no way constitutes nor implies District opinion, endorsement, sponsorship or viewpoint. The views expressed may or may not be shared by the other JCP CDD Supervisors.Editors Note: The CreekLine is appreciative that Supervisor Lansdale approached us and offered to write a column for us to share with our readers. The CreekLine is, and has always been, agreeable to publishing columns penned by our elected of cials so that they may communicate directly with our readers, their constituents. Any questions or requests for additional public servant columns may be directed to editor@ thecreekline.com. A Note from County Commissioner Cyndi Stevenson:Due to the volume of calls and inquiries regarding the county budget, please see following link that should help answer questions about the county budget and scal stewardship.www.sjc .us/District1

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Page 10, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com The foods and drinks we choose affect our overall health, including our gums and teeth. Most people know that sweetened sodas are not good for them. But did you know that non-diet soft drinks contain as much as 11 teaspoons of sugar per serving? Americans drank more than 53 gallons of sodas per person in 2000. Dentist can usually spot a soda drinker due to cavities and white spots in their teeth know as decalcications, which can Oral Health Tip Of The MonthEffect of Sodas on your Teethbe the start of cavities in the tooth. Sodas contain citric and phosphoric acids which are harmful to your teeth. Prolonged exposure to acid can erode the enamel in your teeth causing permanent damage. Other drinks such as gatorade, lemonades,crystal light, diet sodas,etc... are very acidic and can increase the risk of enamel erosion. The easiest way to prevent teeth erosion is to limit eating and drinking between meals, be mindful of the sugary foods and beverages. Dr. Gus J. Gari D.D.S. To Schedule an appointment call287-0033 If you must drink a soda or sugary beverage, drink it all in one sitting instead of sipping throughout the day. Be sure to brush your teeth two to three times a day, especially after meals and before you go to bed. Floss once a day to remove the bacteria and plaque between your teeth. Get to your dentist at least twice a year for a professional examination and cleaning. For more information please contact Dr. Gus Gari 287-0033. ACCREDITEDACCREDITATION ASSOCIATION for AMBULATORYHEALTH CARE EYE CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE & WORLD GOLF VILLAGETHE EYE SURGERY CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE AAAHC 940-9200 T T Baptist Health has announced that it made this years InformationWeek 500, an annual listing of the nations most innovative users of business technology, claiming a spot in the top half of the list this year. The 2011 list was revealed September 13 at the exclusive InformationWeek 500 Conference in Dana Point, California. Baptist Health was recognized for its ongoing project, initiated in 2010, to bring an electronic medical record (EMR) to all “ ve of its facilities. The goal is to make patient care safer and improve patient outcomes. This endeavor, which involves installing new infrastructure, implementing software and providing comprehensive training to employees, involves a team of hundreds including information services, physicians and nursing sta as well as external business partners and software providers. Going fully digital is the future of health care,Ž said Roland Garcia, senior vice president and chief information o cer of Baptist Health. Baptist Health is pleased to be recognized among the InformationWeek 500 for our initiative to create one electronic medical record throughout our system of four adult hospitals, one chilEvery once in a while, I have caught a unique “ lm presentation at the 5 Points Theatre in the Riverside area. They usually have a very limited run and are not the blockbustersŽ one expects to see in the multi screen venues across town. Rather, they are selected from what might be considered some of the best in “ lm production. The theatre itself is also unique. Built originally in 1927 and known then as the Riverside Theatre, it was constructed to be able to accommodate liveŽ theatre as well as the new “ lm genre. This was done in case no one wanted to attend the new talkies!Ž I was given to understand that it was also the “ rst building in the area to be air conditioned! Now the 5 Points Theatre is embarking on another adven-Baptist Health earns ranking in top technology listdrens hospital, a home health care agency and our network of more than 100 primary care and specialty physician o ces.Ž The federal government has mandated that all healthcare providers put electronic records in place, but Baptist Health was already at the forefront of this new age. Baptist Medical Center South was designed and opened as a fully-digital hospital in 2005. Now, all three of Baptist Healths community hospitals … Baptist South, Baptist Beaches and Baptist Nassau … are fully digital and using an electronic medical record. So are Baptist Home Health Care and many of the o ces within Baptist Primary Care. Baptist Medical Center and Wolfson Childrens Hospital have some EMR functions in place and will become fully digital in 2012, while all other locations are implementing signi“ cant enhancements. InformationWeek annually identi“ es and honors the nations most innovative users of information technology with its Top 500 listing and spotlights the power of innovation in information technology. For 23 years, the InformationWeek 500 has chronicled and honored the most innovative users of business technology,Ž said InformationWeek Editor In Chief Rob Preston. In this day and age, however, being innovative isnt enough. Companies and their IT organizations need to innovate faster than ever before to stay a step or two ahead of their customers, partners, and competitors. This years ranking placed special emphasis on those high-octane business technology innovators.Ž Additional details on the InformationWeek 500 can be found online at www.informationweek.com/iw500/.Exciting happenings at 5 Points TheatreBy Betty Swenson Bergmark, Professor Emeritus, Jacksonville Universityture. Mike and Jack Shad, the current owners of the building are leasing it to Tim Massett and his wife and partner for this venture, Shana-David Massett. They plan to return to Jacksonville to reawaken the facility with some renovations that will make this a very special place to enjoy some outstanding movies as well as live productions. The upgrades will include installing a larger screen, comfy seats and acoustic improvements. A full kitchen will also be installed to accommodate seat side service from an expanded menu of house prepared specialties. Add to this some unique brewsŽ and wines and where could you “ nd a better place to watch a movie? All this will take money! A fund drive is underway to raise a minimum of $95,000 needed to achieve these goals. It is o to a great start. Contributions on various levels are available and receive bonus tickets for upcoming events. In the meantime, presentations continue. In addition to specially selected and scheduled movies, 5 Points Theatre is one of the hosts for the Jacksonville Film Festival. Among the many other participants are the Cummer, the San Marco Theatre, MOCA, Theatre Jacksonville and Jacoby Hall. The mission of the Jacksonville Film Festival is  to provide entertainment, educational opportunities, programs and events that enrich the arts and the culture of NE Florida, while inspiring a new generation.Ž Membership is available with special bene“ ts and discounts. The next series of presentations are currently planned for October 13 to 16. The o erings at 5 Points are scheduled for October 15 and will include World ShortsŽ at 10:00 a.m., and Florida ShortsŽ at 12:00 noon, in addition to Breaking and EnteringŽ at 2:00 p.m., El TraspatioŽ at 4:00 p.m., Everyday SunshineŽ at 6:30 p.m., A NY ThingŽ at 9:00 p.m. and I am BishŽ at 11:00 p.m. All this in addition to regularly scheduled movies! For additional information on the Jacksonville Film Festival, including times, subjects and locations, you can call 8589889 or visit the web at www. jax“ lmfest.com The 5 Points box o ce can be reached at 359-0047. Advertise inThe CreekLineIt’s good for business!886-4919LG@rtpublishinginc.com mined by number of wind instruments; basically all band members except for percussion and color guard) plus a certain number of other high scorers, will advance to the “ nals competition. This is where it really gets exciting as by now it is evening and the bands are thrilled to go all out and perform under the lights. The day ends with a full retreat of “ nalist bands, similar to the parade of nations in the Olympics. It is a beautiful sight to see hundreds of musicians marching a full loop around the track in unison to a cadence as they make their way to their bands area to await the “ nal results. Bands are scored on many di erent attributes, including music performance, visual performance, general e ects, auxiliary, percussion and drum majors, with multiple trophies awarded. All bands desire the large Grand Champion award! The event will also include FCMI cont. from pg 1 a joint performance by the Pacetti Bay and Landrum Middle School Bands of the National Anthem prior to the “ nals competition. Exhibitions by a college band as well as the Nease Panther Pride Marching Band of their show Mad New WorldŽ are also scheduled. FCMI is a family friendly event and the entire community is invited. It is a great place to spend the day, especially for those families with aspiring marching band students. Delicious concessions are available from a variety of vendors; so come and spend the day enjoying the show! Tickets, which are available the day of the competition at the gate, are $10 and there is a $1 discount for students of all ages wearing their schools band shirt. Dont miss this golden opportunity to experience the thrill of a marching band show right here in northern St. Johns County!

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www.thecreekline.com • October 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 11 CRAFTERS WANTED To reserve a table, please call 904 287-7300 904-209-1320 2758 Racetrack Road Publix Plantation Plaza Tues … Fri 9-8 & Sat 9-7 Walk-In Special Never been oered before.No call-in or schedule in advance appointments ....walk in only. Cannot be combined with other oers. Both locations. Take a chance.....walk in and ask....if we have time available your in! (Oer valid October 11 November 15, 2011!) cialist is now at Panache! Now oering Goldwell Hiring talented Stylists461-9552 “Concerns about your drinking water?”Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 Years. Straight answers No high pressure. 262 0197 3760 KORI RD. Stronger...Faster...Better RACE TRACK RDFLORA BRANCH BLVD. SR 13PUBLIX Fred Baldwin, PT, DPT, SCS, ATC, PES and Tobi Baldwin, PT, DPT, MS, OCS, MTC, FAAOMPTNow oering Mat Pilates classes on Monday 6:30pm, Thursday 10am call for more information and to register. In 2012 Girl Scouts of the USA will mark 100 years of inspiring girls and young women with the ideals of courage, con“ dence and character. Millions of active Girl Scouts, volunteers and alumnae will come together to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouting. Will you be one of them? Girl Scout troops from the Creeks Cove Service Unit supporting schools like Hickory Creek Elementary, Cunningham Creek Elementary, Liberty Pines Academy and Timberlin Creek Elementary will kick o the celebrations of the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts on October 22 at Alpine Groves Park by the river from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. This event is open to the public and patches will be distributed to the “ rst 150 Girl Our Scholastic Book Fair was an incredible success. I would like to extend my heartfelt appreciation to all the volunteers who worked so hard to make it the success it was. A special thank you to Karin Gowens, our library media aide and the three-parent chairwomen, Kim Eichorn, Edith Buonacore and Anja Wells. Every day we sold out of copies of The Strange Case of Origami Yoda, the sequel Darth Paper Strikes Back, The Eleventh Plague, I Pledge Allegiance, Torn, Killer Pizza: The Slice, Alibi Junior High and the new 39 Clues book, The Medusa Plot. The runaway best seller was de“ nitely Darth Paper Strikes Back. The earlier book from the series is on the Sunshine State Young Readers list for this year. A large number of students had already read it which contributing to the huge sales of Darth Paper. Our actual sales were up $1200 from the past four years. Thank you also, to parents and students for your overwhelming support. The money will be used Retired Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Learning Martha Mickler has been named by Superintendent Joseph Joyner as the Interim Deputy Superintendent for Academic Services for the St. Johns County School District. Mickler will be stepping into this role to “ ll the opening left by Pam Stewart, who was recently named Public Schools Chancellor by the Florida Department of Education. She will assume her duties on October 17. During her tenure at the SJCSD, Mickler served as assistant principal and then principal of Julington Creek Elementary School. She opened Cunningham Creek Elementary School and served as its principal for six years. While there she received the Commissioner of Educations Outstanding Elementary Principal Achievement Award. In 2001 she was named Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Learning. Mickler most recently served as a member of the Core Planning Team for the districts 20102015 Strategic Plan.Local Girl Scouts kick o 100th anniversary celebration!By Contributing Writer Dbora McCarty, Creeks Cove Service Unit, Girl Scouts of USAScouts coming that day. Juliette DaisyŽ Gordon Low was born on October 31 and it is only be“ tting that we have a birthday party with cake and presents! We ask the community to bring nonperishable items for our Christs Cupboard food bank as part of our service project. Activities such as face painting, game booths and a not-so-haunted trail will be available for kids of all ages. This is a free event for the community and we hope many will come to share the joy of girl scouting. Girl Scouts will dress up in Halloween costumes and all are welcome to do the same. For more information, please contact Dbora McCarty at rdmccarty10@comcast.net.FCTC announces Pharmacy Technician program Pharmacy Technician, a new program being o ered at First Coast Technical College (FCTC), is designed to meet the workforce needs of area hospitals and retail settings. Curriculum includes medical terminology, pharmaceutical compounding, inventory maintenance, handling of hazardous materials, labeling/ pricing orders, patient records, customer service, IV preparation, data processing automation, sterile techniques and more. Classes are scheduled to begin on October 27 and will be held Tuesday, Wednesday and ursday evenings from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the FCTC St Augustine Campus, 2980 Collins Ave. Financial aid is available for those who qualify. Applications and information are available online at www. fctc.edu, 547-3471 or by email debra.warren@fctc.edu. Notes from Pacetti Bay Middle School Media CenterBy Contributing Writer Lynn Johnson, NBCT, Library Media Specialist, Pacetti Bay Middle Schoolto purchase Otterboxes for our class set of iPad2s and books for classroom curriculum support. In addition to the ” y o the shelvesŽ books at the Scholastic Book Fair there are some outstanding new books. The author of The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Brian Selznick, has once again created an amazing new novel. Of epic size, Wonderstruck is the story of two protagonists set in New York City. The setting of the drawings is 1927 and the story is told during the later 70s. Even though the book has over 600 pages the students are clamoring for this book. The drawings are amazing and it is a wonderful book for anyone who has visited NYC or is going to visit NYC; you will quickly recognize so much of the setting. Watch for the movie, Hugo Cabret; it is due to hit the theaters on November 23. A new branch of the 39 Clues has been released, Cahills vs. Vespers: The Medusa Plot. Book 2 will be out in December. Once again Scholastic Publishers have put together an amazing group of authors that are collaborating on these books. The webpage that ties in to the books is www.the39clues. com. Be sure to check it out. Our Story Hour at PBMS is now o cially on the calendar for the fourth Tuesday of every month! Children who live in our area are welcome to join us for an hour of reading and activities. Our “ rst book was Truckery Rhymes by Jon Scieszka. It is a fun collection of truck themed Mother GooseŽ rhymes. It doesnt take long for the children to follow the rhythm and beat. Our next Story Hour will be October 25. Please tell your friends and neighbors and join us for a special hour at PBMS. See you then!St. Johns County educator returns from retirementI cannot tell you how appreciative I am that Martha has agreed to come out of retirement to help us out,Ž said Superintendent Joseph Joyner. This gives me a tremendous amount of peace and will allow us to continue to move forward as I take the necessary time for a quality search.Ž I am looking forward to working with the team again,Ž said Martha Mickler. I am very glad to be of assistance during the transition time and support the district.Ž Mickler retired in 2009 after 38 years in education. United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, Flotilla 14-07 presents its one-day About Boating Safely program for new and experienced boaters from 7:45 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday, November 5 at the St. Johns River Community College located on SR 16 For more information call Vic Aquino at 460-0243About Boating Safely program

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Page 12, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com 165 Hampton Point Dr., Suite 3 St. Augustine, FL 32092( 904 ) 429-0290www.atlasphysicaltherapy.com12421 San Jose Blvd., Suite 100 Jacksonville, FL 32223( 904 ) 292-0195 Regain function and return to normal, active lifestyles withASTYM for Soft Tissue dysfunction and repair Diagnosis that respond well to the ASTYM treatment: Disorders locations “Without pain, to what matters.” Buy A Business John SerbCerti“ed Business Intermediary www.FirstCoastBizBuySell.com Call 904-613-2658 for a Con“dential No-Cost Valuation & Consultation Tina P. Fernandez, CPA, PLwww.tpfcpa.com 904-287-2195 Over 30 Years Experience Have Con“dence in Your Tax Preparation & Planning. Allow Me to Assist You. Visit www.tpfcpa.com for informative news and Tax Savings Tips. Serving the Accounting Needs of Individuals and Small Businesses by Providing Quality Service at Competitive Rates. 450-106 State Road 13 N Publix Center in Fruit CovePh: 230.8881 52 Tuscan Way, #202Publix Center at International Golf Dr. and SR 16 Ph: 940.0055 Additional fees may apply. Mail Boxes Etc., Inc. is a UPS company. The UPS Store locations are independently owned and operated by franchisees of Mail Boxes Etc., Inc. in the USA and by its master licensee and its franchisees in Canada. Services, pricing and hours of operation may vary by location. Copyright 2011 Mail Boxes Etc., Inc.While you manage your business, well help manage your mail.Who has time to wait for mail? Or worry about it? Not you. Get a mailbox at The UPS Store. Youll have a real street address. Well send you e-mail or text alerts when new mail arrives. And well hold it in a secure location until you pick it up*. Well help with the logistics. So its more convenient for you. Stop by today. Greenbriar Animal HospitalA Professional Veterinary Hospital Offering... We Celebrate The HumanPet Bond ( 0.2 mi South JCP entrance ) vetM-F – 8 AM 6 PM Sat 8 AM Noon The Warriors are back in full swing now and what a great year we have ahead! The PTO Family Fun Night was a great success despite a few drops of rain. We had a fantastic turn out and everyone enjoyed the bounce houses, carnival games, cake walk and delicious food. We want to thank all of the volunteers that were part of Family Fun Night; we could not have done it without you! Your help is always appreciated and needed to ensure success at our events. The PTO is currently selling Gator Bowl tickets. You can purchase them through November 11 for just $30; what a great opportunity to see your favorite SEC or Big 10 team play while helping your school raise money at the same time. Calling all business owners and sales reps! Dont miss this opportunity to promote Most parents of collegebound students have probably heard of the SAT Subject Tests (formerly known as Achievement Tests and the SAT II: Subject Tests), but how important are these exams? Do many schools require them? Most importantly, how can your student prepare for them? Here are a few facts about the SAT Subject Tests that you and your teen should know as he or she goes through the college application process: Are the SAT Subject Tests required by all colleges? No. However, many colleges use the Subject Tests for admission and course placement. Some colleges specify the Subject Tests that they require, while others allow the applicant to choose which tests to take. Which United States colleges require the SAT Subject tests? Universities and colleges change their policies on standardized tests often, so be sure to check with the undergraduate admissions o ce at the school of interest. In general, highly The CreekLineis YOUR Community Newspaper! Send us your community news!editor@thecreekline.comAll about SAT Subject TestsContributed by Edgar Gonzalez, Director, Huntington Learning Centerselective colleges tend to require or recommend that students submit scores for one or more Subject Tests. Here are a few examples of various schools policies: € Yale University and Duke University require freshmen applicants to take either the ACT (only) or the SAT Reasoning Test and two Subject Tests of their choosing. (At Duke, however, students applying to the Pratt School of Engineering must take one Subject Test in mathematics.) € New York University requires applicants to submit scores from two Subject Tests, with the exception of those applying to the Tisch School of the Arts or to music or studio art programs in the Steinhardt of Education. € Carleton College recommends, but does not require, that students submit scores from one or more Subject Tests, while Stanford University recommends, but does not require, that students submit scores from at least two Subject Tests. € Case Western Reserve University, Trinity University and Emory University do not require the SAT Subject Tests, but encourage students to send such scores if they feel they might strengthen their applications. How many SAT Subject tests are there? There are 20 tests, including: Literature United States History World History Mathematics Level 1 Mathematics Level 2 Biology-Ecological or BiologyMolecular Chemistry Physics Chinese with Listening French French with Listening German German with Listening Spanish Spanish with Listening Modern Hebrew Italian Latin Japanese with Listening Korean with Listening How can students prepare for the SAT Subject Tests? While being knowledgeable in the subject tested is obviously key to success, for some subjects, it is also important that students take the exams at opportune times. For example, students who take one or both of the biology exams should do so shortly after completing their high school biology course, while the material is still fresh in their minds. Language Subject Tests, on the other hand, are for students who have studied a language for two or more years. For more information about the SAT Subject Tests, visit www. collegeboard.com. For additional information, please contact canlearn@aol. com and see Huntington Learning Centers ad in this issue of The CreekLine!Wards Creek updateBy Contributing Writer Beth McCannyour business to Wards Creek Elementary families. The 2011 Business Expo will be held on Thursday, October 13 from 6:30 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The Business Expo will be held in conjunction with the Fall Book Fair and ever popular Spooktacular, story telling by our favorite teachers. Please contact the PTO for information on a booth for your business. Our biggest fund raiser of the year, the Fun Run, will be held Friday, November 4. Look for pledge information to come home with your children in the near future. The CreekLine YOURCommunity Newspapereditor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com • October 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 13 Lets face it, in this market it might not make sense to sell if you can rent. And right now, we have a waiting list of people who would love to rent your house. So before you consider putting your home on the market during this competitive time, give us a call to see just how much rental income you can enjoy while you wait for the market to rebound. Well pre-screen and creditapprove tenants, routinely inspect your property to make sure its cared for, schedule and oversee any needed repairs, and even direct-deposit rent into your bank account so you dont have to deal with checks. For more information on this great alternative, call Elsie Evans at 904-484-2170. 904-940-5000 | DavidsonPropertyManagement.comTRUSTED REAL ESTATE ADVISORS.Ž Property Management, Inc. RENT NOW,SELL LATER. St. Johns Eye AssociatesSharokh Kapadia, OD FAAO Diane L Kapadia, OD Pauline Thai, OD Lenka Champion, MD Frame Show & Styling Event October 27th From 2pm-7pm50% Off Frameswith purchase of prescription lensesFeaturing frames from Ray-Ban, Tory Burch & Polo by Ralph Lauren Serving Wine & Cheese/Door PrizesINSURANCE & FRAME EXCLUSIONS MAY APPLY CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER DISCOUNTS (904) 287-9137www.visionsource-stjohnseye.com We help you make your home look like a Model Home! 230-6855618 SR 13 NorthAcross From Thrift StoreFriseur Salon Visit Fruit Cove/ Julington Creeks Spacious & Relaxing Salon STATION RENTAL NOW AVAILABLE Call for Monthly Specials Micanopy, Florida is a little town that lays just a hair south of Gainesville, exactly an hour from the First Coast as the crow ” ies. Buy before I go on to tell you their tale, you have to get straight “ rst the pronunciation of this town: it is Mick-a-nopee.Ž The general population of Micanopy is approximately 700 folks. But that being said, this town has a huge history both documented and folklore. According to the truth, Micanopy was the “ rst distinct United States town in Florida. It was originally a Seminole village called Cuscowilla and was visited by the exploring naturalist William Bartram in the late 1700s. Bartram wrote so favorably about the fertile lands in the regions that settlers arrived in the region to ultimately form the town proper. In the mid-1800s, settlement began in earnest after MicanopyƒA happening place for Halloween!By Donna KeathleySpain ceded the territory with two forts located in the area, “ rst Fort De“ ance and then Fort Micanopy. Micanopy was the name of a Seminole Indian Chief and the area was home to some of the bloodiest battles of the Second Seminole Indian War. The little towns main drag called Cholokka Boulevard is home to a very cool historic district with some pretty interesting antique stores. The town has many homes that have been restored and it boasts an array of historic landmarks. The Micanopy Historical Society Museum is the place to start and then you can go antiquing or eat a bite at one of their casual eateries. If you are so inclined, you can stay at one of the two Bed and Breakfast facilities in the area. Folklore has it that in the early 1900s Micanopy was the winter home of wandering gypsies who practiced witchcraft and magical activities. This passed-down version of the towns history gives Micanopy a great background for the celebration of Halloween as we millennium folks know it. Therefore the citizens of Micanopy have perfected this Halloween celebration into a fabulous event called the Micanopy Fall Harvest Festival. Cholokka Boulevard comes alive over Halloween weekend as its the happening place for the fall festival. Its packed with over 200 local and regional artists, crafters and musicians who participate in the festival. The quality of the show and its vendors ranks very high to the buying public. The main stage located mid-way through the event plays host to a variety of good time music throughout the two days of the festival. Also, on Saturday afternoon its the home of the famous old time auction which is enjoyed by all in attendance. This year the 37th annual Micanopy Fall Harvests Festival will be held Saturday, October 29 and Sunday, October 30. Saturdays hours are 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and Sunday 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. Directions to downtown Micanopy: From Gainesville, go south onto Highway 441 to the blinking light where you turn right onto Cholokka Boulevard. Please visit www. micanopyfallfestival.org for more information. Photo courtesy of www.micanopyfallfestival.org.

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Page 14, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com If so, you may be eligible to take part in a clinical research study testing the safety and eects of an investigational drug to treat high fat levels (triglycerides in your blood.) Eligible volunteers must be: Has your doctor told you that your triglycerides are too high? MA1106824 C St. Johns Center for Clinical Research(904) 209-3173 MandarinHearing and Balance Center Mandarin Hearing and Balance Center12276 San Jose Boulevard, Ste 516 Jacksonville, FL 32223 www.doctorknox.com For more than 10 years, Mandarin Hearing and Balance Center has been serving Mandarins hearing needs. With so much amazing technology available, theres never been a better time to try a hearing aid. Isnt it time you regained the joy of hearing? Were here to help www.usa.siemens.com/aquaris YouGotDance.com Learn to Dance Like the Stars! (904)386-6549 Liberty Pines Academy has many exciting things going on and there is something for everyone! Families of LPA gathered on September 27 for Pizza with the Principal. Following the September PTO general meeting and SAC elections, Principal Randy Kelley shared his expectations for parents and sta to assist students in achieving academic excellence. He began by congratulating the students and sta on receiving the grade of AŽ for the 2010-2011 school year. Kelley reviewed the concept of the K-8 school for new families and invited them to become more involved by joining the wolf family as a volunteer and/or PTO parent. Kelley stated, LPA plans to continue developing a culture of leadership among the students which would connect with the 7 Habits of Highly Effective Students.Ž One of the goals is to have the middle grade students become mentors/student interns to model the behaviors for the elementary students. Part of this process began last school year with the implementation of student interns in the classroom, o ce and media center. Students are able to experience real-life work situations and become familiar with common business/educational practices in todays world. By aligning the sta and students through the 7 Habits, Principal Kelley helps provide a win-win atmosphere for learning. Beginning on October 25, LPA will kick-o its annual book fair. This years theme is Reading Takes You to Far Away Places.Ž Books make great gifts for the holidays and there will be lots of books to choose from including many popular titles, Sunshine State books, AR books and themed books (animals, sports, etc.) The 2010-11 school year was a banner year for Timberlin Creek Elementary (TCE). Members of the graduating class of 2011 marked the “ rst class which had completed their entire elementary education at TCE. The milestone year was made even better when Timberlin Creek achieved an AŽ school rating and was selected to receive both the Five Star Award and the Golden School Award. At the September school board meeting, Principal Catherine Hutchins accepted both awards. We are proud of the accomplishments that our school continues to achieve annually. It could not have happened without the teamwork of our entire Eagle family: students, teachers, parents, support sta and the administration. We will continue to work hard to provide the very best for our students so they continue to grow socially, emotionally and academically,Ž Principal Hutchins remarked. The Golden School Award recognizes schools which have exemplary volunteer programs. To qualify, schools must have: € A sta training program on volunteerism in which a minimum of 80 percent of the school sta have participated during the school year. € A School Volunteer Coordinator who has been designated to provide leadership for the school volunteer program through recruitment, placement, training and supervision of participants. € A total number of hours in volunteer service that equals October at Liberty Pines AcademyBy Contributing Writer Stephanie Bradford, LPA PTOStudents can visit the book fair during school hours the week of October 25. There will be special evening hours (5:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m.) on October 25 during LPAs Night of the Arts. Come and join us for a great night out as we celebrate Leaders Are Out of This WorldŽ artwork. All grade levels will have artwork on display during this event. Entertainment will be provided by LPA Or Ensemble, LPA Elementary and Middle Chorus and LPA Drama. Performances will begin at 6:00 p.m., so everyone is invited to come early and shop the book fair prior to enjoying the wonderful entertainment. Local business partners of LPAs Partners in Learning will be on hand to showcase their businesses also. Please come out and support these businesses, as they continue to support LPA. The last order for LPA Spirit wear for the 2011-2012 school year is due Friday, October 21. Please visit the Spirit wear tab on the LPA PTO main page to download an order form. Questions can be emailed to LPASpirit@earthlink.net. Remember the weather is changing and now is the time to order your long sleeved shirts and/or hoodies. Are you ready for some college football? LPA PTO is fast approaching its second fundraiser, Gator Bowl. The game will be played on January 2, 2012. Tickets can be purchased October 25 through November 4 at a cost of $30 per ticket. LPA will receive $10 for each ticket sold! If your student is an honor roll student at LPA and you purchase an adult ticket, you receive a free student ticket. Parking passes are available for $25. Come and join the LPA Tailgating fun! Anyone can purchase tickets through LPA PTO; please visit the LPA PTO website for more information. Come out and support our Liberty Pines Academy Middle School sports teams! Come cheer the kids on as they compete with other schools in our area. These kids practice hard each week and would love to have you show your support. Basketball: All games start at 5:30 p.m. October 13: Landrum at LPA October 17: First round of tournament play. Running Team: All meets start at 4:00 p.m. October 13: at Gamble Rogers Middle School October 27: at Fruit Cove Middle School November 2: at Liberty Pines Academy LPA PTO is looking forward to November, as this is the start to a busy time of year. There are holidays quickly approaching, Veterans Day and Thanksgiving break. Please check the LPA PTO website often for updates and information. (wwwlpa.stjohns.k12.” .us/pto)Awards cap banner year for Timberlin Creek ElementaryBy Contributing Writer Trish Edmondstwice the number of students enrolled in the school. These hours of volunteer service will be in the areas that support instruction. At TCE, volunteers logged 13,121 hours during the year. This is the sixth time that TCE has received this award. The second commendation, the Five Star School Award, was created by the Commissioners Community Involvement Council and is presented annually to those schools that have shown evidence of exemplary community involvement. This includes business partnerships, family involvement, volunteerism, student community services and school advisory councils. This is the “ fth year that TCE has received this award. Hutchins stated, What an honor it is to be a Five Star School again this year. This is a result of everyone in our school community working together to meet the criteria set by the state. It truly recognizes our school and the level of community involvement. Indeed we are proud of this honor and look forward to achieving the Five Star status again this year.Ž WOW!Shou l dnt YOUR ad be in T he CreekLine too?886-4919sales@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com • October 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 15 Nicole Sherman, Realtor Janelle Bales, Realtor Cindy Gavin, Realtor Debbie Espinosa, Realtor 904-553-3156 – Cell 904-655-9859 – Cell 904-465-3397 – Cell 904-318-5615 – Cell NShermanRealtor@aol.com janellebales@yahoo.com cindygavin@vanguardcb.com despinosa78@att.net nsherman.vanguardcb.com betterwithbales.com CindyGavinTeam.com debbieespinosa.vanguardcb.com Peter O’Brien, Realtor Skip Skipper, Realtor Renee Pappy, Realtor Gwen Whittington, Realtor 904-673-1441 – Cell 904-945-3724 – Cell 904-591-2166 – Cell 904-705-5848 – Cell peterobrien@comcast.net skipskipper@vanguardcb.com spappy2@comcast.net gwen@vanguardcb.com peterobrien.vanguardcb.com skipskipper.vanguardcb.com rpmovesyou.com gwen.vanguardcb.comColdwell Banker Vanguard Realty 12276 San Jose Blvd. | Jacksonville, FL 32223 All of our listings are onColdwell Banker Vanguard Leading the competition in video marketing. Get your home SOLD. NilShRlt PtO’BiRlt JllBlRlt SkiSkiRlt CidGi Rlt RPRlt Grace McCurry, Realtor Cora Hunt, Realtor Dottie Wilson, Realtor 904-910-1942 – Cell 904-262-0166 – Cell 904-699-3231 – Cell gracemccurry@vanguardcb.com coraquality@gmail.com homeagent1@aol.com gracemccurry.vanguardcb.com corahunt.com dottiewilson.vanguardcb.com G MC R lt C H t R lt Dt ti Wi l R lt DbbiEiRlt GWhittitRlt Meet the best of the best. Top Producers of a Top Producing Company Call us for all your real estate needs. Shaggy Chic Spa & Pet Supplies (Both group and private) NOW OPEN! 445 State Road 13 Suite 24 In the Food Lion Center230-2827 On Tuesday, November 15 at 11:00 a.m., the Newcomers of North St. Johns will have a special catered luncheon by A1A Ale Works banquet service in their private Sala Menendez dining room. The site for this monthly meeting/luncheon is the main ” oor of the historic Lightner Museum Building, located at 75 King Street in St. Augustine. The building, formerly the Hotel Alcazar, was built in 1888 in the Spanish Renaissance style. To the left of the front entrance, the dining room boasts 12 foot ceilings, alabaster chandeliers and views of the tropical garden courtyard with its famed stone bridge over the koi pond. The building is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. After the luncheon/meeting, we will walk a half block to the Villa Zorayda Museum, located at 83 King Street, for a one hour docent led tour. The Villa Zorayda was the winter residence of Franklin Smith who in 1883 used poured concrete and crushed coquina stone for its construction. The building is 1/10th the scale of a section of the 12th century Moorish Nease IB students continued their support of Blessings in a Backpack on September 22 by lling backpacks for use by kids in need who are now able to take home a backpack of food each weekend. Nease IB students contributed two large bins full of food as well as $100 during their most recent collection period.Newcomers Club o ers luncheon and tourBy Contributing Writer Marcia Smith, Newcomers of North St. JohnsAlhambra Palace in Granada, Spain. This building began the Moorish Spanish revival of architecture in St. Augustine. Outside, no two windows are the same size. Inside, there are intricate traceries on the walls made of alabaster and plaster that were brought from Spain, tiles over 350 years old from Egypt and Spain, Egyptian artifacts, tropical hardwood furniture, “ ne antiques and a 2,400 year old Egyptian cat rug made from hairs of ancient cats that roamed the Nile River. In 1933, this property was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Diners need to choose between a blackened Mahi Mahi topped with a Caribbean Creole sauce and served with rice pilaf and fresh vegetable or a Mojitomarinated grilled chicken breast topped with ale Gouda sauce and fried onions and served with roasted garlic mashed potatoes and fresh vegetable. Dessert is Key Lime cheesecake. There will be a cash bar, ra e and door prizes. Lunch with beverage, tax, tip and the tour are all included for $25. Please reserve by November 8, as seating is limited to the “ rst 80 people. Mail checks to NNSJ, 884 Eagle Point Dr., St. Augustine, FL 32092 and indicate at the bottom of your check your choice of entree. Email Laura at leccpremo@yahoo. com for luncheon information. All women new to the area are invited to come and join Newcomers Club. Please contact Sue at sjaird@comcast.net for membership information. These are two gems worth seeing in St. Augustine. Parking is limited, so please car pool. At the recent Newcomers of North St. Johns fashion show sponsored by Talbots Upscale Outlet are Newcomer models, going up the stairs, Teri OConnell, Donna Walker, Judy Janssen and Ana Maria Wilson. Do you enjoy receiving The CreekLine each month?Then our Advertisers!As a non-subscription publication we rely on our ne advertisers to nance the production of your community newspaper! Be sure to patronize our advertisers and tell them you saw them inThe CreekLineThank

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Page 16, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com Cash on the Spot!Bring your old silver, gold and platinum jewelry and coins to Miriams for instant cash or store credit. Schedule your own Gold Party and make money for you and your friends! On your precious metal sale, bring this ad for anExtra 5% Immediate Cash Miriams is a family owned and operated jewelry store serving Jacksonville for over 30 Years We specialize in new, antique and estate jewelry. With gold prices reaching record highs, co unt on the trusted professionals at Miriams Jewelry to deal with you fairly and honestly. Miriams is buying: Interested in hosting a Gold Party for you and your friends? Contact Miriam at the San Marco store or Benji at the Beaches store to schedule your party! San Marco Square Store: Beaches Store: TCL K EN B ERRY B.S.N., D.C.319 West Town Place, Suite 7 Located in the WGV Professional Plaza904-940-0361 Serving World Golf Village and surrounding communities for over 4 years WWW.THE VILLAGE CHIROPRACTOR.COM Neck & Back Pain Join us for Our New Oce Grand Opening Celebration November 18th Prizes and giveaways How can I help my child succeed in school? Is my child getting opportunities to explore areas of potential talent or ability? Is my child developing con“ dence? Is my child on track with social development? While we cant be sure of how our children will respond to opportunities to build knowledge and self esteem, there are certain experiences that have demonstrated a proven bene“ t to a childs development and education. Music is one of them. Consistent music education really shows its bene“ ts as children grow into teens and young adults and prepare for higher education. Standardized test scores, used by colleges to assess a students readiness for a rigorous curriculum, tend to be higher for students with exposure to music performance or music Davidson Realty continued its ongoing efforts to support the Blood Alliance with a blood drive on August 16 at its World Golf Village of ce. Bozard Ford Lincoln Mercury supported the effort by giving away free Quick Lane oil change coupons to all donors. Twenty three units of blood were donated. The Creeks Clash U13 Girls White team won the First Coast Labor Day Shootout, winning all four games played. Playing in their rst tournament together, the girls scored a total of 11 goals while allowing only one. Coach Phong Le did a fantastic job of preparing the girls for success. Great job ladies! Go Clash! Want your kid to go to college? Try music!By Contributing Writers Stacey Osborn, Lesson Coordinator with Logan Lively, Manager, Music and Artsappreciation. SAT scores, for instance, were approximately 60 points higher on verbal and more than 40 points higher on math in one analysis of data in 2001. Additionally, more years of music experience tend to correlate with better test scores. To give middle and high school students an opportunity to ” ourish when it comes to their musical talents, consider supplementing school band and orchestra rehearsals with private lessons. With oneon-one instruction, students learn new skills, advance more quickly and develop greater con“ dence in their abilities. Private lessons are most e ective when given at the onset of school to give students the best chance for success in school and out. Music education and appreciation have been shown to bolster students academic performance, con“ dence, discipline and social interaction. Its never too early to start, and schools and community organizations o er various opportunities to expose your child to music. Whether its group classes for toddlers at a community center, schoolbased band and orchestra programs, or private individual lessons, consistent music appreciation can help childrens development at all stages. Creeks Clash wins Shootout Julington Creek Plantation Recreation Center Come Join us in Child Watch for our Little Monsters Halloween Party! Saturday, October 29th *SIGN UP A WEEK IN ADVANCE & RECEIVE A $2.00 DISCOUNT! kids cheered with approval. Durbins Accelerated Reader Program consists of the students reading everyday trade books and then taking quizzes on the computer to earn points. The students work towards a class goal and a school goal and they are rewarded every nine weeks if they meet their targets. At the end of the school year, if the Durbin students earn a combined 50,000 points, then Principal McMandon announced at the assembly that she will kiss a real live pig. Stay tuned to see what happens. Durbin Creek cont. from pg 1 The CreekLineis YOUR Community Newspaper! Send us your community news!editor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com • October 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 17 Race Track Blvd.Flora Branch Blvd. 990 Flora Branch Boulevard St. Johns, Florida 32259License#C075J0083 www.theacademyatjulingtoncreek.net Please visit our center and take a personal tour. Marcia Pozin Executive Director 904-230-8200.Infant thru VPK ( 4 years old ) Before/After School Ages 6 thru 12 Celebrating our 1 st year in Julington Creek! VPK Openings for the 2011-2012 School Year More for your money.... Fall Festival Oct. 27th 6pm 8pm 268-8330www.yoga-den.com 2929 Plummer Cove Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32223Located in Mandarin, just south of I-295, across from Walmart Yoga den Yoga Den Studio First class FREE! with this ad Proudly serving NorthWest St. Johns & Mandarin for over 9 years!Get Started with Yoga Basics 9 Unlimited Classes Free Uniform No Contracts Tiger Martial Arts 904-288-9010 Bully Proof!Self-Awareness Self Defense Safety Awareness On September 20, we were honored by the opportunity to have private interview with the new bishop of the St. Augustine Diocese, the Most Rev. Bishop Filipe J. Estevez and Fr. John Tetlow, pastor of San Juan Del Rio Catholic Church. The occasion for the interview was the annual Diocesan Celebration Mass for the Feast of St. Vincent. Bishop Estevez made a very warm and comfortable impression. His enthusiasm for becoming the shepherd of the St. Augustine Diocese was only eclipsed by how his eyes lit up when the conversation turned to St. Vincent and in particular the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. He had passion in his voice as he described the life of St. Vincent and the saints life in Paris. Later during the Mass in his homily he outlined for the congregation the story. He explained just how important the Society of St. Vincent de Paul is to the metropolitan Jacksonville area. He described all of the local hospitals that the church and society support in the area, the enumerable number of charitable acts the society performs and the thrift stores for the bene“ t of the needy. The celebrant for the mass, Bishop Estevez, entered the San Del Rio Catholic Church celebrates Feast of St. Vincent By Karl Kennellchurch ” anked by an honor guard dressed in full regalia from the Knights of Columbus Ave Maria 4th Degree Assembly. Accompanying the Bishop were St. Vincents Council Spiritual Advisor Fr. Joe McDonnell; pastor of SJDR, Fr. John Tetlow; parochial vicar of SJDR, Fr. Tony Ike; Deacon Larry Geinosky, Deacon Je Silvernale, Deacon Stan Boschert and several guest priests. In addition to the large congregation gathered from around the Diocese and SJDR Parish were Ursula Shaw, president of the Jacksonville Saint Vincent de Paul Conference; John Donnelly, president of the SJDR Council; the presidents of the various St. Vincent de Paul Society councils from the Diocese; members of the Bishop Kenny High School St. Vincents Council and most honored guests were the Sisters of the Daughters of Charity. After the Mass a reception was held in the Parish Hall. There Bishop Estevez conducted an annual Commitment Ceremony. The gathered council presidents completely “ lled the stage side to side. After the ceremony a long line of admirers formed to get their picture taken with the Bishop. There again his charismatic charm glowed. He took time with each guest to exchange conversation and made sure to show a sincere beaming smile when the ” ash went o When we alone during the interview Bishop Estevez described how St. Vincent reminded him of the story of St. Augustine. He very proudly, towards the ending of the conversation said, Vincentians are special. I doubt there is any other group that does so much good with so little.Ž During the meeting Fr. Tetlow wanted to send out the reminder that the Poor BoxŽ in the church is there to help St. Vincents reach out to the poor. After spending time with the Bishop it is little wonder that the congregants of St. Augustine Diocese are excited to welcome their new shepherd, the Most Rev. Bishop Filipe J. Estevez.The skies were overcast on Friday, September 9, as leaders in the St. Johns County community joined Bartram Trail High Schools Class of 2012, AFJROTC, vocal ensemble, current military representatives and school o cials in a touching tribute to the lives lost during the September 11, 2001 attacks. County Commissioner Mark Miner, a 2002 BTHS graduate, recalled how the students at BTHS wanted to bring home the signi“ cance of the attacks, to honor the fallen and always remember the sacri“ ces made that day.Ž Along with other former BTHS students, Miner was instrumental in obtaining a piece of the World Trade Center shortly after the disaster. The piece of steel was transformed into the VŽ statue that stands at Bartram today. Miner said that America is a nation of perseverance. When we unite, we can accomplish and we can overcome anything. That is what our monument represents.ŽBarry Craig, BTHS athletic director recalled traveling to New York to retrieve the piece of steel. The portion of steel that was chosen had damage on Bartram Trail remembers historic dayContributed by Belinda Smith, BTHSone side. Construction workers assisting in the clean-up at the World Trade Center site conveyed that the piece of steels damage came from the heat of the “ re. They said you could take that same piece of steel and drop it from a 100 story building and it would not dent the beam. It gives an idea of what people were against that day.ŽBob Kirk, a former BTHS teacher and sculptor of the monument, said that he wanted to make something that would last forever and be a memory of the tragic loss of life, but that would also symbolize the strength of Americans. He took the original steel beam from the World Trade Center and carefully designed the memorial that stands in Bartrams courtyard. He intentionally did not clean the dust and ash from the steel beam because of what it represented. Nine years later, the rain has washed the World Trade Center dust and ash into Bartrams soil,Ž he shared. It will always be a part of our campus and our special connection to the lives, events and strength that came from one tragic day in our nations history.

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Page 18, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com Julington Creek Animal Walk is a state-of-the-art pet boarding facility for dogs, cats, and exotics providing: Your pet will “ nd a welcoming retreat at our 9-acre, fenced, off-leash dog park featuring a bone-shaped swimming pool and our NE Floridas Premier Luxury Pet Resort, Dog Park and SpaConveniently located next to Julington Creek Animal Hospital Stop by for a tour and receive a coupon for a free daily park pass Aordable small dog luxury oasis. Please call for details. Veterinarian Owned and Operated $10 o new students with this ad Helping Hands of St. Johns County will meet on Friday, October 28 at 11:00 a.m. at Faith Community Church Community Center. This months project is Christmas trees for Hospice. The group will be decorating small Christmas trees for patients in Hospice care. This will the third year the group has presented Community Hospice and Peds the beautiful decorated trees. Anyone wishing to donate a small tree (two to three foot) or decorations may contact jacqphil@aol.com or bring them to the meeting on October 28. The Rippers from Sew Much St. Johns County resident Mary Bell long suspected that one room in her three bedroom house was hotter than it should be. Its right next to the garage,Ž said Bell, 63. And it gets more sun.Ž So Bell checked out a JEA Home Energy Evaluation backpack from the Bartram Trail Branch of the St. Johns County Public Library to “ nd out for sure. She measured the rooms temperature with the bright, yellow thermal thermometer inside the backpack and her worst fears were con“ rmed. It was indeed “ ve to six degrees hotter in that room than in the rest of the house,Ž Bell said. Armed with that information, Bell changed the three light bulbs in the rooms ceiling fan. I put in those curly lights,Ž she said. They produce a lot less heat.Ž And she became diligent about using room darkening shades that had been installed during a prior e ort to cool down the room. Bell is one of hundreds of people who are saving money and energy with the JEA Home Energy Evaluation backpacks. The backpacks, made from recycled billboards, are available for checkout from all Jacksonville Public Library branches and from one library in St. Johns County, the Bartram Trail Branch, which services a pocket of JEA customers in Julington Creek. Inside each backpack are NORTHEAST FLORIDAConservatory  a c o mm unit y s c hoo l o f the a r ts  1st ANNUAL MUSIC FESTIVAL Oct. 14 (FRI) B a llr oo m D an c e D e m o & C onse rv ato ry J a zz B and Oct. 15 (SAT)M usi c a ll da y! ( e v e ry 3 0 m inutes ) & V endo r M a rk et OPEN HOUSE Oct. 16 (SUN)C onse rv ato ry C o mm unit y B and C on c e r t 3PM Jax, Fl 32223 www.nfconservatory.org All Souls Church/ Hartley Rd Helping Hands UpdateBy Contributing Writer Jackie ValyouComfort will meet at 10:00 a.m. on October 28. They are still retro“ tting clothes for our wounded military and are in need of new size medium t-shirts (good quality), woven boxer shorts (no knits please) and pajama bottoms. These “ ne men and women have lost limbs and enjoy being in regular clothes vs. hospital garb as they get treatment and rehabilitation. The Stocking for a Soldier project is well underway, thanks to the help of Winn Dixie on County Road 210, First Florida Credit Union, St. Michaels Soldiers and many neighborhood groups and churches. Stockings are still available at Winn Dixie on County Road 210, Our Lady of Angels Catholic bookstore in Mandarin, Cadillac/ Saab dealer in Orange Park and First Florida Credit Union on County Road 210 or by emailing jacqphil@aol.com. They may be returned to any of the above establishments by November 1 so our armed forces in Iraq and Afghanistan get them for Christmas. Members of Helping Hands purchased 250 stockings through a Wal-Mart grant and 300 more were cut and sewn by members. Helping Hands is grateful for the community support it has received from everyone. They are working on making this a happy holiday for our soldiers “ ghting to keep us safe. Stockings may be “ lled with snacks or toiletries and have a card and suggested list of items inside or you may go to the website www.stmiachaelssoldiers.com for items needed. Helping Hands is a volunteer organization that meets on the last Friday of each month (except for November and December) at 11:00 a.m. at Faith Community Church Community Center on County Road 210 next to Cimarrone. The group is nondenominational and meets in friendship to do a small project for the community. There are no dues, o cers or stress. The group relies solely on donations of goods and services from the community. Anyone is welcome to join and membership is always open. members come when they can and do what they can. Please contact jacqphil@ aol.com for more information.Helping Hands members Deb Ennis, Jeannie Sturgill, Winn Dixie 210 store manager Greg Blanford, Kathy Signorile of St. Michaels Soldiers and Maria Morrison of First Florida Credit Union kick off the Stockings for a Soldier project.Find out if your home is energy e cientBy Contributing Writer M.C. Finottithe tools homeowners need to conduct a home energy audit, including three kill-a-watt meters, which measure the energy usage of appliances like a refrigerator, a co ee pot or even a “ sh pump. My daughter measured the energy our co ee pot uses,Ž said Sarah Boren, executive director of Green Team Project, a non-profit dedicated to helping people save money on their energy bills, thereby reducing their environmental footprint. Green Team partnered with JEA to create the backpacks. And my daughter learned that it costs 16-cents a day to use our co ee pot. Thats nothing right? But if you do the math, thats $8.62 a year. Multiply that by all the other small appliances we use at home and it adds up. So by unplugging the co ee pot and other appliances after each use, the savings can be considerable.Ž As for Mary Bell, shes working her way through all the items in the backpack. She has yet to go in her attic to measure her insulation. Im saving that for the very end,Ž Bell said, laughing. I saw a garden snake go up there the other day, so Im not in any hurry.Ž There will be a free, informational meeting on November 3 at 7:00 p.m. at the Recreation Facility at Julington Creek Plantation. The meeting is open to the public and will include a demonstration of all the items inside the JEA HEE backpack. Luck is a dividend of sweat. The more you sweat, the luckier you get.~Ray Kroc

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www.thecreekline.com • October 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 19 APPOINTMENT 904.264.KIDS264KIDS.COM CALL OR VISITUS ONLINE TO ANSCHEDULE San Jose Blvd. SR 13Bartam Walk Race Track RoadLOCATED ABOVE BLACKSTONE GRILLE 112 BARTRAM OAKS WALK #203 | JACKSONVILLE, FL | 32259 Hickory Creek Elementary PTO is happy to invite all to its annual Carnival at the Creek! The Carnival will be open to the public and held on Friday, October 14 from 4:30 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. on campus at Hickory Creek Elementary, located at 235 Hickory Creek Trail o Greenbriar Road. There will be over 20 activity events that family members of all ages can enjoy. Events will include challenge course and bouncy in” atables, cake walk, hayrides, face painting and many other games of chance, challenge and luck as well as ra es and treats for all. You may pre-purchase wristbands for $15 by October 10 at the school or $20 at the event with unlimited game play and Fall has arrived at Creekside and the excitement brought with it extends beyond the re-mulching of the palm trees in the courtyard. The school is full of faces and activities, some familiar and some new. Between the homecoming commotion and the college application procrastination, theres a serious need for organization this year. Just in time, its Naviance to the rescue! Naviance is an interactive family connectionŽ website that helps guide students as they take important steps towards college and careers. The program, which up until last month was only used by Ponte Vedra High School, features four dimensionsŽ geared to the needs of every high school student: course planning, college planning, career planning and success planning. Each student receives a password and has the ability to change his/her online pro“ le by updating test scores, current courses and GPA. Within the dimension of college planning,Ž students can assemble lists of colleges in which they are interested, rate them based on preference and research important aspects of the schools, such as admissions processes and “ nancial aid guidelines. Perhaps one of the most CHS HappeningsStudents get organized with NavianceBy Rachel Buff, CHS Studentimpressive features of Naviance is the softwares ability to predictŽ the likelihood of acceptance at certain universities by utilizing information from a students pro“ le and organizing it into a scattergram graph. While these graphs are not 100 percent accurate, they serve as a great tool to those who wish to see where they stand. Whats unique about the website is that its not just designed for students who plan to attend college after high school. In the career planningŽ dimension, students can take personality tests to discover which career path will “ t them best and explore a multitude of options. Creeksides Naviance administrator Justin Vogel believes students and parents will embrace Naviance, as it will help them think critically about the future.Ž The sooner you start thinking about college, the more doors you open for yourself,Ž he shares. Naviance will no doubt give students the tools they need to be successful.Ž If you are a CHS student and wish to explore Naviance for yourself, see Justin Vogel to receive your login information and visit connection.naviance. com/creeksidehs.Community invited to Hickory Creek Carnival By Contributing Writer Lisa McGonagle, Hickory Creek Elementary PTOprizes. Children aged three and under are $3. The Carnival at the Creek is sponsored by Hickory Creek Elementarys PTO. Proceeds from this event will go towards funding the schools AR reading program, purchasing teacher supplies, funding in-school educational “ eld trips, family fun nights and helping hands for the upcoming school year. For further information, please contact Sharmain Powell at sharwane300@ bellsouth. net. Join the carnival fun where everyones a winner if you play and see why Living is good at the Creek.Ž Wish you were here!Call today to advertise in NW St. Johns County’s ORIGINAL Community Newspaper!886-4919 lg@rtpublishinginc.com

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Page 20, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com Conveniently located one block North of I-295 and San Jose Blvd. 50% OFF Your Pets First Exam with Dr. Silverness( 1st Time Clients Only )Not valid with any other oer. Expires 12/31/11 FREE BOARDING Book 2 Nights at our Resort and 3rd Night is FREE! (1st Time Boarders Only)Not valid with any other oer. Expires 12/31/11 Ann Silverness, DVM,CCRT Mandarin Landing Animal Hospital & Pet Resort3003 Hartley Road Jacksonville, FL 32257 904-268-0477 www.mandarinlandingah.comCIV no longer mandatory for pet boarding Bordatella now done annually Mandarin NewsLine sm GOLD SPONSORS BRONZE SPONSORS $500 FOR BEST IN SHOWŽ Saturday, November 12 (Rain or Shine!)11AM 2PM Riverplace Shopping CenterF or f u rther infor m ation contact R andy T ho m as at 73 5 9 088 ADMISSION 2 CANS OF FOOD FOR MANDARIN FOODBANK Auto Club South DALLAS BRENNEISE SILVER SPONSORS CPA PRESENTED BY 15t h An nual M a n d a r i n C h i l i C o o k O f f M an darin Chil i Cook-Off IBERIA BANK Axiom Wellness CenterFor the Body and the Person Inside Print, Promo & Design Julington Creek Plantation Presents: Dog Training Classes Starting October 25th at the R ecreation Center Beginner, Advanced and Socialization Classes Oered Professional Obedience Instr u ctor. Non-JCP R esidents Welco m e See www.jcpcdd.org for more info A  Ghoul-ington Creek ŽFamily Halloween Dance Saturday, October 22ndDance the Monster MashŽ with your kids! Contests, Prizes, Parade of Costumes and more... Little did the boys know how happy ThumbelinaŽ would be when she visited the residents of the Clyde E. Lassen Veterans Nursing Home. Thumbelinas joy was the result of the Pooch PouchesŽ recently made up and delivered to the individual residents of the vets nursing home. Thumbelina, if you havent guessed by now, is one of the dogs that comes to visit the residents to participate in pet therapy with the residents. The boys are members of the Robinson-Savaria Squires Council of San Juan Del Rio Catholic Church. The Pooch Pouch project was one of the planned outreach projects the boys have for the veterans home. Members Salton and DJ Doran, Ben and Josh Dvorak, Chase Eden“ eld, Cooper Huskey, Coleman Osburn, Alejandro Rodriguez and Perry Minotakis not only had fun putting the Pooch Pouches together, but had an eye opening experience when they made their delivery. As they were escorted by Tim Murphy, activity assistant at the home, from resident to resident they discovered that these veterans had remarkable histories and were just like their grandparents. One of the highlights for the boys was the individual memory cases that each resident has next to their room doors. They were entranced by the displays of photos, memorabilia and medals that each resident has displayed. Led by youth leaders Patrick Doran and Lou Bilello, the boys went from room delivering the plastic bags “ lled with Did you know that the largest urban “ re in the Southeast happened right here in Jacksonville, Florida? On May 3, 1901, a small “ re that started at noon in the LaVilla mattress factory burned for eight long hours. According to Metro Jacksonville, the “ re swept through 146 city blocks of Jacksonville, destroying over 2,000 buildings, taking seven lives and leaving almost 10,000 people homeless in the process.Ž The Great Fire of 1901 will go down in history as the third largest “ re disaster to ever take place. The “ re, which started in the kitchen during lunch, could soon be seen from Savannah, Georgia and the residents of Raleigh, North Carolina could even see the smoke clouds! October is celebrated nationwide as Fire Safety Month. As we remember The Great Fire of 1901, its important to be aware of how fast “ re can spread. Here are some key “ resafety tips for you to remember this October: SJDR Squires Circle delivers Pooch Pouches to retired veteransBy Karl Kennelldog biscuits and treats. They caught resident Jack Sorgen in the hall as he made his way back to his room from the weekly pool tournament. The surprise and joy glistened across his face as he was surrounded by the enthusiastic boys. Resident Ginny Roberts probably had the most unique reaction to the unusual gift. Well!Ž she said with determined enthusiasm, I guess Im going to have to start going to pet therapy.Ž When checking later with Leigh Devane, volunteer coordinator at the home, it became apparent that Roberts was true to her word, as Devane described how Roberts made a point to join in the recent pet therapy session speci“ cally seeking out Thumbelina. The Robinson-Savaria Squires Circle of San Juan Del Rio Catholic Church o ers Catholic boys between the ages of 10 and 17 the opportunity to develop new friendships, enjoy fun activities, serve their parish and community and grow into Catholic leaders. With the support and guidance of the Knights of Columbus Switzerland Council 12664 youth leaders, the Squires run their own organization, elect o cers and share their Catholic faith by helping people in need in their parish and community while enjoying the company of friends in social, family, athletic, cultural, civic and spiritual activities. For more details, please email youth leader Patrick Doran at pmdoran@bellsouth.net.The Great Fire of 1901By Contributing Writer Meghan Bender, Community Programs Manger, Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation€ Test all of your smoke detectors to be sure they are functioning properly. This includes installing new batteries every six months. € Use propane and charcoal grills outdoors; be sure the grill is placed a safe distance away from any building or structure. € Make sure you have a working “ re extinguisher handy in your home. € Plan an escape route in case of an emergency; be aware of emergency exit locations. € Dont run or hide extension cords underneath carpets or doors, they can overheat and catch “ re. € Dont leave burning candles unattended and always keep them away from linens, bedding, drapes and other ” ammable materials. € Be cautious when using portable heat sources, such as patio or space heaters. Keep combustible materials, including wood, plastics and plants at least three feet away. Next time you are downtown, take a moment to look at the Jacksonville Fire Memorial sculpture that can be found on the Northbank Riverwalk. The memorial was built in 2003 and according to Metro Jacksonville, it is intended to memorialize the great “ re and the citys rise from devastation.Ž These safety tips are brought to you as part of the prevention-education mission of the Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation. Look for our upcoming articles in our Safety Series.ŽMural by Joe Puskas donated by Firehouse Subs to the downtown re station. The CreekLineis YOUR Community Newspaper! Send us your community news!editor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com • October 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 21 (904)292-2210 MandarinSouthBusinessCenter12421SanJoseBlvd.€Suite310/320 Jacksonville,FL32223(BetweenSonnysBBQ&Solantic) LorettoRd. NSanJoseBoulevard RaceTrackRd. JulingtonCreek Lessthan1/2mi. fromJulingtonCreek MarinelaM.Nemetz,D.D.S.BoardCertifiedPediatricDentistRobertJ.Nemetz,D.D.S.,M.S.AdultDentistry€Periodontics€Prosthodontics Nease High School is proud to recognize its eight National Merit Semi“ nalists for 2012, all of whom are in the International Baccalaureate (IB) Program: Marissa A. Galiley, Anthony J. Janocko, Tia A. Lewis, Carson L. Ridenhour, Steven L. Schwartz, Wenli Shao, Dhiraj Sikaria and Logan H. Stern. These students scored in the top 1 percent of 1.5 million high school students in the nation who entered the National Merit Program by taking the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test in the fall of their junior year. National Merit Semi“ nalists will be considered for National Merit Scholarships upon their advancement to “ nalist Fruit Cove resident Ron Cleveland and Wounded Warriors recently completed the 9/11 American Challenge, from Liberty State Park near the World Trade Center site via Shanksville Pennsylvania and nally to Washington D.C. Participants included survivors, family members and rst responders from 9/11, wounded heroes from the con icts in Iraq and Afghanistan and the general public. According to Cleveland, It was a very great challenge but the nal numbers were 565 miles, 70 miles a day, over eight days, climbing over four mountain ranges for total of over 23,000 feet.Ž He said he will never forget meeting great people along the way, in all the small towns who came out to cheer the riders on and feed them.Nease students earn honorsContributed by Kyle Dresback, Principal, Allen D. Nease High Schoolstanding in the spring. Nease High School is also proud to announce that Katie Jackson, an IB student, has been named a semi“ nalist in the National Achievement Scholarship Program, an academic competition recognizing outstanding Black American high school students. This program is run concurrently with but operated and funded separately from the National Merit Program. Katie scored in the top 1 percent of all Black Americans participating in this program to achieve this honor. Fourteen Nease IB Program students were also recognized as National Merit Commended Students. These students scored in the top 3 percent of all students who entered the National Merit Program and will become candidates for special scholarships sponsored by corporations and businesses. The National Merit Commended Students are Nolan Alberti, Jordan Bernas, Christina Chase, Graham Hancock, Kathryn Hill, Blake Insel, Caleb Jarriel, Bryce McKenzie, Vivian Nguyen, Liam Rawson, Alex Sengstock, Aaron Skipper, Preston Sluder and Carly Young. Tia A. Lewis, Wenli Shao, Steven L Schwartz; back: Anthony J. Janocko, Logan H. Stern, Dhiraj Sikaria, Carson L. Ridenhour, Marissa A. Galiley A Note from County Commissioner Cyndi Stevenson:Due to the volume of calls and inquiries regarding the county budget, please see following link that should help answer questions about the county budget and scal stewardship.www.sjc .us/District1 Book Discussion at the Bartram Trail Branch Library!“Still Alice” Monday, October 17 7 pmJoin us for a discussion of this book by Lisa Genova. New members are always welcome!

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Page 22, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com The Shoppes of MurabellaAccepting New Patients (904) 826-346952 Tuscan Way Suite 205 St. Augustine, FL 32092 New Location! MICHAEL BOYER PAINTING, LLC287-2203 Licensed & Insured #ST-5178 LLC 20%Discount off total amount due for the month of October We Do It ALL!Take an additioinal 20% off the total amount due. For example: 1,300 sq ftregular price $1,600 20% discount you pay only $1,280! Marion’s of Mandarin904-262-99819735-2 Old St. Augustine Road(next to Hala Caf)Private setting for all customers. Wig maintenance, products, hats and accessories. Under New Ownership!New Hair Stylist available, call for appointment. Wig Boutique P ma a a a i n Pacetti Bay Middle School welcomed parents at the Open House held September 13. Parents experienced a fast-paced day in the life of their middle school student as they followed their childs schedule in one and a half hours time. Parents heard a presentation from each teacher and were able to ask questions before moving on to the next class. Informational meetings for the eighth grade “ eld trip and band were also held that evening. The Scholastic Book Fair was open at Open House giving parents the opportunity to shop with their children. The book fair is always a big hit with the students as they look for more books to add to their home libraries or donate to their teachers classrooms. PTSO volunteers were on hand during Open House to continue the PTSO membership drive and sell newly-styled spirit wear. Thanks to all the families that have joined so far. We appreciate your support. Membership is $15 per family and includes a copy of the school directory, distributed later on in the year. Meetings are held the “ rst Wednesday of each month at 3:00 p.m. in the PBMS Media Center. All are welcome. More information can be found at www-pbm.stjohns. We are not merely the writersƒWe are the magicians who can turn just 26 letters of the alphabet into something that will move you to tears. We are the magicians who can turn a simple ink blot into something that people will contemplate era after era„a timeless truth.Ž J.R. Laurent wrote this on the dedication page of Bartram Trails literary magazine, The Oracle. Its certainly something everyone should know, as writing is essential to everything we do. Most of the students at BTHS know about the clubs for sports, music, academics and theater. But The Oracle is a club that nurtures writing. And its not just a club; its PBMS PTSO October updateBy Contributing Writer Sharon Davis, Corresponding Secretary, PBMS PTSOk12.” .us/ptso/. All PBMS parents are encouraged to join and participate in the PTSO. The PBMS school directory is a useful resource for the PBMS family and is a great opportunity for area businesses to advertise to the community. We welcome local business participation to make the directory as useful and successful as possible. Businesses can contact Pam Durham at 547-8763 for more information. The PTSO-sponsored Fall Dance was held on September 30. The dance theme was sports and many students were dressed in support of their favorite sports team. The PTSO wishes to thank all those who volunteered or donated food items. Your e orts helped make it a huge success! The PTSO cookie dough fundraiser will run from October 10 through 25. Along with cookie dough, mixed bags, which are colorful reusable bags, will be sold. This joint fundraiser was a huge success last year, raising enough funds to allow the PTSO to purchase a classroom set of iPads for use by all students. We encourage community members to participate to help us surpass last years sales. The cookie dough is delicious and will be delivered November 10, just in time to have around the house for easy holiday baking.PBMS PTSO members Bev Downs and Becky Lawson selling spiritwear.BTHS HappeningsThe Write FutureBy Devyn Fussman, BTHS Studentalso a class, a school publication and a student-run business. Established in 2000, The Oracle is Bartram Trails literary school magazine that publishes submissions from students and is dedicated to supporting the creative arts. Any BTHS student can submit poetry, short “ ction, art, creative non“ ction and photography to the magazine and possibly have their work published. We work with all aspects of the arts so that no one is left out. Our creativity is endless,Ž says Elizabeth Moore, assistant head editor. Which is a good thing, as colleges are looking for students with creativity and students who have been published will have more impressive applications than those who have not. Recently they published two years worth of work: a social commentary issue, Oracle Speaks Out and they were also proud to publish their “ rst book of photography and poetry, Shadows and Light, on Amazon. Their goal for the 20112012 year is to release a book of speculative “ ction (fantasy, sci-“ horror, mystery and otherworldly themes) onto the web as well. In addition to being a literary magazine and student-run business, The Oracle is also an advanced creative writing class that counts as honors credit. Mary Mullen, who is also the clubs sponsor, often gives her students unusual assignments to challenge them to think outside the box. She says that writing is one of the most underrated and yet one of the most important arts in the world, and its especially important to incorporate it into the school curriculum. These writers not only work together to create a beautiful magazine, but they also share and critique their own writings and help each other grow as writers. Their love and dedication to writing has made them some of the best writers in the school. Most of them stay on sta for the full three years (a year of a lower-level Creative Writing class is required to join) and improve their writing skills tremendously. To me, its more about the people you get to work with every day,Ž says Jason Agatep, head editor.  The Oracle is like a home away from home; were like a family and no ones afraid to be themselves.Ž Watch for contests, “ ll out submission forms and contact the sta at the BTHS school website and at www.theoraclemagazine.blogspot.com. Businessnot as bigas it used to be?Call for a free consultation & we’ll work at increasing your business!The CreekLineLinda Gay 287-4913

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www.thecreekline.com • October 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 23 www.maymgt.com MAY Management Services, Inc.Licensed Property ManagementMAY Realty & Resort RentalsLicensed Real Estate Brokerage “Our job is to help Boards of Directors successfully manage their Associations” The Neighborhoods of World Golf Village Tim HutchisonRegional ManagerJulington Creek Plantation 1637 Racetrack Road #206 St. Johns, Florida 32259904-880-8796New Of“ce!Jean WrightLicensed Property ManagerDottie KrinerLicensed Property ManagerRich Curran-Kelley, CAMRegional ManagerDiane HartmanLicensed Property ManagerKathy May“eldLicensed Property ManagerDeborah AlleyLicensed Property ManagerLaura QualantoneLicensed Property Manager904-940-1002 US1 … 1 Mile South of Nease High School Back Pain? Neck Pain?You dont have to suffer!Call: 247-ACHE (2243) Dont let little aches be a Big Pain! A month into the new school year and the excitement has been worn o like used sand paper. The slow start of the “ rst week full of paperwork for the parents and very little for the students has given way to hills and mountains of homework that take up the entire evening. But there is at least one good thing to look forward to: homecoming. The hustle and bustle of girls dragging their dates through the mall looking for a tie to match their new dress overwhelms the cashiers and salespeople at department stores and small boutiques throughout the area. Classrooms buzz with he-said/she-saidŽ about who asked who and whos wearing what. Its the nice distraction from the boring monotony of school everyone has been waiting for. When October 1 rolled around, giddy Nease girls erupted from schools around the county as the SAT “ nally ended and they all raced home to settle the “ nal plans for dinner and after-parties. As they care-My friends always depend on me to summarize the season and melt down all the information from all the September periodicals into a so called Must HaveŽ list. This list is the Bible so to speak, if you could only buy two or three things for the upcoming fashionable events you will be attending. The last few years this list has become much more important as we are all watching our purses. I take this assignment seriously and am proud to share it with you Fashionable Florida Friends (FFFs)! So here we go for fall 11s Must HaveŽ column. Number one on the agenda is for you to get to the mall and do some serious leg-wear shopping. Yes, Kate Middleton has hit the scene and the trend of hosiery has rained down to the First Coast! Some of my friends call it sheer torture to consider wearing hose in Florida; one boasts of at least a century of naked legs, sans hose, for her. But the fact is any gals legs look better in hose. Its like cosmetics for the leg, but better. I ran into one of my trendy friends just last week and she had on a pair of drop-dead gorgeous hose. I told her, Linda, your legs look fabulous and whatever brand and color that those hose are, write it down for me.Ž She did and I drove straight to the store and bought a three-pack, sharing one pair with another friend on the way home! I swear, I didnt know Linda had such good looking legs till she had those hose on! Peanut Butter Jelly or jam Cereal/Oatmeal Canned Pasta Canned Stew/Chili Canned pasta Soup Canned fruit/veggies Toilet PaperChrist’s Cupboard Food Pantry Wish ListChrist’s Cupboard is located at Celebration Lutheran Church, 810 Roberts Road. Call 230-2496 for info! Christ’s Cupboard serves anyone in need. Hours are 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Tues. and Weds.Fashion UpdateFall 11 must haves!By Donna Keathley, dkeathley designsI am not talking about wearing fuddy duddy old lady hose, but nice, ” attering ultrasheer pantyhose, black opaque tights and patterned leg wear is inŽ for Fall 11! Todays pantyhose are miles ahead of those we wore to work in the 80s. The fabric is more comfortable, the elastic is less restricting and they o er toning and shaping bene“ ts to boot. Look at the re” ection of Miss Kate in her pretty dresses with those shiny sheer hose on in her pre-wedding photos. This is what its all about. Then, I also play Miss Manners in the hosiery wear story. There are certain occasions that covered legs are a must. The fact that you have pantyhose on for a job interview is a given; you have to do it! Then the social occasions that be“ t covered legs, like funerals, weddings, etc. show pure class. The fall opaque legs and textured legs “ nishŽ a great looking ensemble like nothing else. Nothing else said, go buy a pair of hose, its the “ rst Must Have.Ž The second best low cost update for your fall wardrobe is the woven scarf. This years version is oblong and made of very handsome fabric; chose one in your color palette and it should go with everything in your closet. Wear the scarf as a wrap or loop it in half around your neck topping o the entire look of your day, whether it be a denim skirt and ballet ” ats or a pantsuit and heels. If you still have any fashion budgetŽ left, buy a blouse or a dress with an asymmetrical neckline. My friend and I were working with her new LBD (little black dress) with the new neckline just last week. We tried many di erent pieces of her jewelry with it and nothing worked; any necklace ruins the lines of the neck. At the end of the day, just a great earring statement was all that little number took to “ nish the polished look! Now go shopping for these Must HavesŽ and have fun! Nease HappeningsBreak the monotony, please!By Brittany Dirks, Nease Studentfully applied their make-up and slipped into their short dresses, hearts were ” uttering and beating fast and when they eagerly got into their cars to take pictures at one or another lovely place with trees and interesting architecture, they were nearly shaking with anticipation. Once their parents were satis“ ed and theyd eaten dinner, hours were spent at the Moroccan Shrine Center dancing the night away. On a more stressful note, seniors anxiety levels are approaching maximum capacity as college application deadlines creep closer and closer. But the inevitable senioritis has started kicking in and there are some who are slacking. SomeŽ is a slight understatement, though. Every senior is “ ghting the slow onset of the mental disorder of extensive proportions. They are all looking towards winter break with eyes full of hope for a relaxing time to unwind. Overall, the student population has settled back into the monotonous rut of school and is desperate for relief already.More students in SJC schools than last yearThe number of students attending St. Johns County Public Schools by the 20-day enrollment count was 31,072, an increase of 909 students over the same time last year. The latest attendance “ gure represents a 3 percent increase over last years enrollment of 30,163. St. Johns County remains one of the fastest growing school districts in the state, especially during a time when most districts are experiencing declining enrollments. Considering the school district as a whole, middle schools had the largest growth this year with 4.9 percent. High school enrollment increased by 3.1 percent while elementary school enrollment increased by 2.3 percent. Schools with the largest increases for 2011-2012 are Osceola Elementary School (11.6 percent), Pacetti Bay Middle School (10.3 percent), Crookshank Elementary School (9 percent), Liberty Pines Academy and Creekside High School (8.3 percent), Mason Elementary School (7.3 percent), Sebastian and Fruit Cove Middle Schools (7 percent) and R. B. Hunt Elementary (6.6 percent). In addition there are 144 St. Johns Virtual School students, 101 enrolled in high school courses and 43 in K-8 classes. Part of the increase in the student growth rate may be attributed to available housing, the districts academic reputation and the wide variety of educational options for students in St. Johns County. St. Johns County is a desirable place to live and we o er a lot of choices for students,Ž said Tim Forson, Deputy Superintendent for Operations. Our nationally recognized high school academies are just one example of the variety of academic opportunities available to our students. We work closely with teachers and parents to provide the best educational experiences and extracurricular activities for all grade levels.Ž In an e ort to meet Class Size Amendment and growth requirements, Hickory Creek, Mill Creek and Hartley Elementary Schools were recently expanded and an expansion at Osceola Elementary School is nearing completion. Construction has begun on Elementary school LŽ in the Palencia area that will serve students in the north-central area of the county. The Northeast Florida Conservatory will celebrate their “ rst anniversary with a music festival to be held the weekend of October 14 through 16. The festival will begin with a wine and cheese reception on Friday, October 14 at 7:00 p.m. with a ballroom dance demonstration with music by the Conservatory Jazz Band. Saturday, October 15 will be “ lled with musical and theatrical performances from 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. Performances include the Jacksonville Suzuki Strings, pianists, vocalists, theatre and a drum line. This festival day will end with a performance by the Conservatory Community Orchestra. There will also be a market show with vendors selling their treasures; food and beverages will be available. Events on Friday and Saturday will be held at the Northeast Florida Conservatory Anniversary celebrated with music festivalof Music on San Jose Boulevard. Festival weekend will conclude with performance by the Conservatory Community Concert Band at 3:00 p.m. on Sunday, October 16 at the All Souls Church on Hartley Road. The Northeast Florida Conservatory is a 501(c)(3) non-pro“ t organization founded a year ago by the Executive Director Richard Dickson and serves all of Jacksonville and surrounding counties. Programs and music lessons are available for all ages on all instruments. The faculty consists of professional musicians from the Jacksonville Symphony and local colleges. Programs and classes in private lessons, theatre, ensemble/playing, performance and music theory are available. Proceeds from the anniversary music festival will go towards scholarships and “ nancial assistance.

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Page 24, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com Lindell & Farson, P.A.Attorneys At LawConveniently Located in South Mandarin 12276 San Jose Blvd., Suite 126 Jacksonville, FL 32223-8630904-880-4000 www.lindellfarson.com J. Michael Lindell, Esq.James A. Farson, Esq.Roger K. Gannam, Esq. R. Howard Walton, Esq. Automobile, Motorcycle & Trucking Accidents, Insurance Disputes, & Wrongful Death Complex Business, Real Estate, & Construction Disputes LINDELL &FARSON Lindell & Farson, P.A. 904-880-4000 WESTMINSTER WOODS ON JULINGTON CREEK 12th Annual Fall FestivalSaturday, October 22nd 12:00-4:00pm 25 State Road 13287-7300 W ESTMINSTER W OODS ON J ULINGTON C REEK W ESTMINSTER C OMMUNITIES OF F LORIDA www.WestminsterRetirement.com m m m Saturd 1 1 Jim Taylor provides TaylorMade Solutions Call me at 904-705-1692 or TaylorMade4You@bellsouth.net to discuss how I can provide Solutions tailor-made for You.Managerial Accounting ServicesOver 25 years experiencePersonal & Business Income Tax PreparationFormer Internal Revenue Agent & Lic. to practice before the IRS QuickBooks Set-Up, Training & Support Call me now to Review your QuickBooks setup and show you how it can simplify your accounting. Excel Spreadsheet Design, Training, & Support Learning is a lifelong process. The St. Johns County School District Community Education program provides evening classes for adults at select schools around the county. Classes have been o ered at R. B. Hunt, Mill Creek, Ocean Palms and Cunningham Creek Elementary Schools, Gamble Rogers Middle School, St. Johns Technical High School and the Fullerwood Center. Teachers come from all walks of life, from retired and working professionals to Wouldnt you love to have a well-behaved dog in time for the holidays? Julington Creek Plantation Recreation Center announces that it will begin o ering dog obedience training classes in the parking lot starting October 25. Classes o ered will include: Beginner, Advanced and Socialization. During each six-week session you can expect discus-If your car has been feeling a little sluggish lately, there are some things you can do to get your motor running right again. First change your oil and “ lter. Make sure to use the grade of oil that is recommended by the car. Using the wrong grade of oil can reduce the performance of your car and its gas mileage. And, do not rely on the oil light in your car. By the time that light goes on, some damage to your engine may already have been done. So, check your oil often. When you do, also check the brake ” uid and transmission ” uid levels. You should ” ush the brake ” uid, transmission ” uid Community Education courses are on-lineempty-nesters to current educators who want to expand their teaching experience. They bring their passion and expertise to the classroom in an informal but educational, and in many cases, entertaining setting. Courses are taught in many areas to meet the needs of retirees and hobbyists to people who want to increase their job skills. They include E-Commerce website design and maintenance, basic computers and Microsoft applications, art, folk guitar, bluegrass string band, karaoke tech, French, Spanish and American Sign Language, etiquette, sewing, writing, photography, landscape design, yoga, Middle Eastern dancing, meditation and more. Classes usually meet one evening per week for one to three hours, depending on the class. Prices range from $7 to $10 per class hour. For more information, log on to www.sjccommunityed. com or call 547-7565 or 547-7503. Have a dog gone good time at JCP Recreation Center By Contributing Writer Linda DeBlois, Special Events Director, JCP CDDsions on behavior, question and answer sessions, as well as demonstration and individual guidance through new commands. The Socialization class will have a smaller class size and is for those dogs that need extra focus on social skills. Its especially tailored for dogs that may be fearful or aggressive. Obedience training does so much more than teach a dog to follow a couple commands. It teaches and builds communication between an owner and their dog. All classes will be taught by an obedience training and behavior modi“ cation professional. For further information or to register for a class, please visit www.jcpcdd.org. U.S. Coast Guard AuxiliaryVessel Safety Checks2nd Sunday of month 12:00 noon ~ 3:00 p.m. Vilano Boat Ramp and 12:00 noon ~ 2:00 p.m.St. Augustine Lighthouse Park Boat Ramp Tips to get your cars motor runningand coolant system every two years or 30,000 miles. Keeping fresh, clean ” uids in your car will keep your motor running smoothly. Two other things that will are replacing your air “ lter and fuel “ lter frequently. Clean “ lters will help keep dirt out of your fuel injectors, fuel pump and engine. If too much dirt accumulates, it will lead to expensive repairs. You should also change your spark plugs every other year. Worn plugs will cause your engine to mis“ re and waste a lot of gas. Also, check all the belts and hoses in your car for signs of wear, especially the timing belt or timing chain. If that breaks, it can destroy your engine. When you do replace it, replace the water pump too since the procedure for each is the same. You can do many of these things yourself. You do not have to be an ace mechanic or have a lot of experience. You just need the desire, a how to manual and a few tools. Then, when you get your motor running right, you can head on down the highway looking for adventure and be able to handle whatever comes your way. If your car will no longer run on down the highway, please consider donating your car to charity. If you do, it will be picked up fast and free and you will get a tax deduction of at least $500 if you itemize on your federal tax return. The process is easy and there are many charities that can bene“ t from your car donation. For complete details on how to donate car, just go to www.cars4charities.org/.For the fourth year in a row, in an e ort to promote a safe and healthy Halloween for children, Krantz Dental Care will buy back the candy that young trick-ortreaters collect this year. The candy will then be donated to our troops serving overseas. Candy can be brought to Krantz Dental Care at 12058 San Jose Boulevard, Suite 102 from Tuesday, November 1 through Friday, November 4 between 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Krantz Dental Care will pay $1 for each Halloween candy buy back event announcedpound of candy (10 pound limit) brought in. Children can also bring in notes with personal messages to the United States troops that will be included in the shipment. Groups collecting more than 10 pounds must contact the o ce to make arrangements. Everyone wins at this annual event put together by Dr. Alan Krantz and his team at Krantz Dental Care. For more information, please visit www.krantzdentalcare.com. GIVE WHERE YOU LIVE!

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www.thecreekline.com • October 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 25 Oer Expires December 31, 2011 Must present this coupon at time of service. Injectable llers include Juvderm , Juvderm XC, Restylane, Perlane, Prevelle and Radiesse. Minimum Botox treatment is 20 units. Cannot be combined with any other discount or special offer. Limit one per person. No cash value. Offer good only at the PVPS Mandarin location. COUPON CODE: CO Lessons at Music & Artsgive musicians the support and individual instruction needed to help them become the best they can be. We offer lessons for most instruments, including guitar, percussion, brass, woodwind and strings! $5 OFF ANY PURCHASE!*136351* 136351No minimum purchase required. Maximum discount of $5.00. This offer does not apply to rental payments, lessons, shipping and ha ndling charges or any similar processing charges. Coupon offer valid in-store and on in-stock product only. This coupon is non-transferable. No cash value. Not valid with other discounts, prior purchases, clearance items or discontinued items. Coupon may not be applied toward institutional/educator purc hase. One coupon per customer per visit. Certain restrictions apply. Expires 10/31/11. Jacksonville 10991-51 San Jose Boulevard (in Wal-Mart Shopping Center) (904) 292-9705 At Fruit Cove Middle School, students have already settled into a new and exciting school year. This year the school has switched to block scheduling, so the students have three classes, each 105 minutes long, on Blue and Gold days. Most students are happy with the change, especially because they get two nights to do their homework assignments. Fruit Coves enrollment this year is up to an amazing 1,451 students. The school has also expanded the cafeteria and installed 10 new portables. So much has already happened in such a short time since school started. The “ rst school dance was on Friday, September 9. It was a huge success! The students had so much fun dancing with their friends at the luauthemed party to celebrate the beginning of the school year. Also, the football team has had a great start of the season so far and basketball is now underway. September 13 was the sixth This months review belongs to the recently released The Help, a dramatic-historical “ lm, “ lled with humor and drama. The movie begins in Jackson Mississippi, during the 1960s in the heat of the Civil Rights Movement. Eugenia SkeeterŽ Phelan, portrayed by Emma Stone, is a young aspiring writer just returning as an Ole Miss graduate. No husbands and babies for Skeeter, who seems to be a bit di erent when compared to her old friends. She “ nds a job writing for the local paper„a column on how to clean the house and being a genteel southern girl, that job has always been left to someone else: the help. Now Skeeter needs some help and “ nds aid from one of her best friends domestic, Aibileen, played by Viola Davis. She cares for the house and the children, a maid FCMS HappeningsBy Contributing Writer Sarah Jacobs, FCMS Studentgrade open house and September 15 was open house for the seventh and eighth graders. It was so great to have all the parents come out to Fruit Cove and meet their childrens wonderful teachers. The Book Fair was open during the week, and there was also the Club Fair,Ž where students and parents could learn about all the di erent clubs and sporting activities going on at FCMS. For example, Drama Club, cross country, Board Games Club and the new jewelry making club, just to name a few. Our goal at Fruit Cove is to get as many students as possible involved in school activities. Research shows that the more students are involved in school, the less bad choices they will make outside of school. All in all, the school year at Fruit Cove Middle School is o to a great start! There is so much to look forward to in the next few months. Students are very happy to be learning again. Go Flyers!Movie ReviewThe HelpDirected by: Tate Taylor. Starring: Emma Stone, Viola Davis, Bryce Dallas Howard, and Octavia Spencer. Review by T.G. StantonRating: Good Movie, Glad to Have Seen It (4 out of 5) and nanny rolled into one. While writing her daily column, Skeeter has an idea to write a novel from the point of view of the local black women and the work situations and responsibilities they live with. Aibileen and her best friend Minny Jackson, depicted by Octavia Spencer, soon become involved in the writings of this novel in a time where such outspokenness is considered unlawful and dangerous. Trouble brews not only for the Black community but also between Skeeter and her friends who are leaders in the community and also in segregation. Hilly Holbrook, characterized by Bryce Dallas Howard, is such a leader. Her friends are not ready for the change that civil rights bring and they aim to thwart an outcome they know will change the way they live. From the beginning, the “ lm lets you know that in the 1960s slave times were only barely over, where the AfricanAmerican women served the white community and cared for the children of these women in the face of racism and segregation. Opinions and equality were not considered. Tate Taylor has directed a superb “ lm that takes a very trying time, a time that was “ lled with dark and desperate days and lightens it with strong relationships, courage and humor that stand up to the di cult situations. Emma Stone plays a young woman primarily raised by the help her mother employed; this was the woman who nurtured her and taught her to stand on her own two feet. Her dismissal was the turning point that leads to the novel. The movie had excellent characters that showed spirit and courage. Viola Davis is stoic and caring as the granddaughter of a house slave and nanny to a child too often left alone, who as a co-conspirator in this novel, “ nds aspirations of her own. Octavia Spencers character is feisty and mischievous, oppressed at home and in the workplace, who “ nds a new direction with the books publication. The whole community will now have to look at how the rest of the country will see them. The movie was also welldone in costumes, make-up and living conditions for the time period. The only drawback for a better rating is that being a Disney movie, the darker, more truthful aspects of these times were covered over. Players By e Sea eatre & the BTHS eatre Boosters Association proudly present...Salamander Stew … A Metaphysical HalloweenPlus encore performances by BTHS Alumni Jake Rothman, Ashley Pincket and Matt Tompkins, recreating musical performances from Jekyll & HydeSaturday, October 29 € 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.Players By e Sea Mainstage eatre 106 Sixth Street North, Jacksonville Beach, FL 32250 Tickets at the door are $15 per person or contact BTHS eatre Department xela@stjohns.k12. .us or call 547-8340 ext. 22574 for advanced ticket sales Businessnot as bigas it used to be?Call for a free consultation & well work at increasing your business! The CreekLineLinda Gay 287-4913

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Page 26, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com Marion’s of Mandarin904-262-99819735-2 Old St. Augustine Road(next to Hala Caf)Private setting for all customers. Wig maintenance, products, hats and accessories. Under New Ownership!New Hair Stylist available, call for appointment. Wig Boutique P ma a i n Specialized Care for the individual with Alzheimers or similar memory loss.Almost HomeDAYBREAKAdult Day Care Socialization, activities, meals, snacks and personal grooming assistance. Financial Assistance available 731-4002www.almosthomedaybreak.comLicense #9109M–F 7am–6pm Robert Kelsey, M.D.Board Certi“ed Cardiology and Internal Medicine Robert Kelsey, M.D. Now Accepting New Patients 904-827-0078 Open Mondays through Fridays 8:30am – 5pm 1631 Race Track Road Suite 101230-7977Most Insurances AcceptedPediatric Associates of Julington Creek, PAOffering care for Infants, Children & Adolescents Mary Ann Garcia, M.D., FAAP Victor Luz, M.D., FAAP Every parent wants to raise “ nancial geniuses. Weve explored “ nancial responsibility; now lets delve into some practical ways to equip your children, from toddlers to teens, as they learn to value a dollar. Little ones usually dont comprehend moneys value. In the van today, we discussed money-making opportunities. Were gearing up for our family trip and everyone wants some spending money! Andrew, age four, was shocked Id be willing to pay him $1 for an involved job. A whole dollar?!Ž he exclaimed joyfully. That dollar lost its glamour quickly when we discussed how much a snack or souvenir will cost. Still excited, he now understands hell need to work hard to save for a fun trip just like Mom and Dad. Children have limited opportunities to earn money. Encourage them to be creative! Keep a paid jobsŽ list. Dave Ramsey maintains and I agree, that certain chores are a childs contribution to family life and are unpaid. However, I often make a list of extra jobs Im willing to pay for. Allowance. If you say In October, the Jacksonville Symphonys lineup reveals a fascinating variety of American artists and popular music, as well as music of the Americas. On October 13 and 14, The Jacksonville Symphony combines the music of Frank Zappa, Astor Piazzolla and others with choreography. The program Music and DanceŽ features guest dancers from Jacksonville University and Douglas Anderson School of the Arts. The October 13 performance is part Purposeful ParentingThe Value of a Dollar Part 3: Practical ideasBy Allie Olsen, www.gracefullmom.comyoure going to give it, keep your word! You may consider having standards the children must meet in order to receive it. Talk to the neighbors. A responsible child may be hired to walk a neighbors dog, babysit, mow lawns, rake leaves, pull weeds or house sit. Sell something! Neighborhood garage sales are bi-annual in most NW St. Johns County neighborhoods. Allow your child to set up a lemonade stand or join with friends to sell outgrown toys. Now that theyve earned some money, remind your family to Save, Spend and Give.Ž Searching for a practical way to encourage saving? One local dad matched savingsdollar for dollar. Adam Frederick remembers, Dad de“ nitely built into me a desire to save and watch my money closely. It was a lot of fun to watch the account grow.Ž His Dad showed him monthly statements that tracked balance and interest gained every month over the “ ve years he matched savings„until Frederick started working. He built into all of us a lot of “ nancial ideas along the way. He cited Proverbs 22:7 when he taught me to always pay o credit cards at the end of the month and never build debt. Dad was very intentional,Ž Frederick recalls. As your children get closer to adulthood, consider involving them in the family budget. Len Fontenot shared, I sat my kids down and showed them real life. Ive shown them how much comes in, how much goes out on basics, for savings, supplemental retirement and retirement, how much for emergency and how to manage and manipulate credit. My boys learn far better from what I show them as opposed to what I tell them. In other words if you are practicing what you preach show them how the family “ nances work and let real life be the teacher.Ž Practice what you preach. As you train your children in “ nancial responsibility, remember you are writing part of your familys story. Let it be consistent of your values in the rest of life„full of faithfulness and generosity.Symphony o ers exciting fall showsBy Contributing Writer Paul Witkowski, Jacksonville Symphony Orchestraof the innovative Fusion Series, followed by the October 14 performance on the Mayo Clinic Co ee Series.The bedrock of 1950s American pop culture was television. On October 21 and 22, the Symphony pays tribute to that magical decade in The Golden Era of Black and WhiteŽ with hit theme songs and melodies sung by Sharon Wheatley, Farah Alvin and the voices of Chapter Six. The concert is part of the Fidelity National Financial Pops Series.This fall “ nds our “ elds “ lled with kids and families, laughter and cheers, triumphs and the occasional tear, with the spirit of well get them next timeŽ and Victory with Honor. After school, weekends and evenings are busy enjoying football and cheer, fall baseball and softball and watching some of our travel teams and devoted athletes hard at work. The St. Johns Middle School Athletic Association (SJMSAA) football season Kick O on September 1 at Plantation Park was “ lled with middle school teams and families from all over our county and a few schools from Flagler County, brought together in another great afternoon and night o football under the lights. SJMSAA was also part of a historic moment when funds used from such programs as THE PLAYERS Chip in for Youth and the United Way of St. Johns helped to build a multi-purpose “ eld for Richard J. Murray Middle School. For the “ rst time in 41 years, since 1970, when the school was once a high school, football was enjoyed on the Bulldogs home “ eld. Local families and school alumni gathered together to watch this memorable homecoming game. The Bulldogs beat Liberty Pines 32 to 13. But Liberty Pines Academy too enjoyed their own victory, as they are now able to host games on their new home “ eld thanks to a second multi purpose “ eld built by SJMSAA. This fall, SJMSAAs hard work and dedication truly brought back the spirit of pride and hometown feeling to our “ elds and an in living color reminder that if we build it, they will come. Football will continue to go strong at the “ elds all month long in October and will also SJMSAA and CAA League sports newsBy Contributing Writer Jeannie Bastian, CAA and SJMSAA Board Director feature the start of the winter SJMSAA soccer program with tryouts and practices kicking o at the beginning of the month. Watch the SJMSAA.com website for all important SJMSAA dates and events. Fall also ushered in a new season of Creeks Athletic Association (CAA) Pop Warner football and cheer at Plantation Park. Cheer on kids from all ages from the BTHS, CHS and Nease area play in the CFL Pop Warner Football and Cheer fall program. Registration is open for CAA Flag Football and Creeks Girls Lacrosse. Check in to the caaleague.org website to register online and to keep up with all CAA sports, news and announcements. Local youth sports are enjoying the opportunity to participate once again in THE PLAYERS Chip in for Youth fund raiser. For each $40 all day any dayŽ ticket purchased though this special program, $25 goes to the local sports team or organization of your choice. These tickets are specially priced and only available through chipforyouth.com. Day speci“ c grounds tickets will be on sale to the general public for $55. So chip in for youth and save. Contact CAA or SJMSAA for more information. And thats the latest news from the “ eld house.Luck is a dividend of sweat. The more you sweat, the luckier you get.~Ray Kroc Check out our community webpages!www. thecreekline. com Community Calendar High School Football Blog

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www.thecreekline.com • October 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 27 THE PATIENT OR PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE S, EXAMINATIONS OR TREATMENT.Dr. Bruce SamburskyChiropractic PhysicianOver 22 Years of Experience SPECIAL OFFER Must present this ad to receive offer. Not Valid with any other offers. Expires 12/10/11 Sambursky Chiropractic, LLC683-4376 Immediate same day appointments available. Including Saturdays! We are happy to welcome to our oce Jane Moore, Licensed Massage Therapist LIC#0023441 .12421 San Jose Blvd. #300 (just South of Solantic )Serving the Mandarin and Julington Creek area.www.backbonejax.comINITIAL EXAMINATIONONLY $59(NORMAL VALUE $120 VALUE) Stop suering from: Theyre at it again. The Creekside girls varsity volleyball team is showing their strength yet again and 2011 might be the year they go all the way. Its looking good for the girls as they start the season with an impressive seven wins and zero losses. Theyre undefeated and thats not something to sco at. The season is nowhere near close to done, but so far the team has failed to lose. Of their seven total wins, three of those were shut outs, including their game against bitter district rival Bartram Trail. Currently out of the 78 schools classi“ ed under Division 5A in the state of Florida, Creekside is ranked fourth overall. Out of the top “ ve schools on this list, Creekside is “ rst in scoring with 21 points for. The only thing keeping them back from a higher rank is their seven points against, which is the highest out of the top “ ve schools (#5 Merritt Island has had zero points scored against them). The girls are 2-0 in their district after shutting out both Clay and Bartram. Creekside will play both of these teams again before the season is up and another win will put them securely in the lead for the district title. If the team can make it through districts they might have a good shot at the state title. This would be a crowning achievement for a program four years in the making. Many of the seniors currently on the team have been with the coaches now for four years making the team a cohesive veteran unit. Of the 13 girls on the team, six of them are seniors and only two of them are sophomores. With the beginning of a new school year comes the “ rst set of fall sports. From football to volleyball, Nease Panthers have high expectations for their seasons and although some teams havent started with their best foot forward, they are all determined to meet their goals by playing the sport they love. The Nease football team, after their loss against St. Augustine, has a 0-3 record, but the Panthers are not known for getting discouraged. A win against Eagles View for the homecoming game “ nally gave the team their “ rst win in late September. Junior Eric Bach said, Were not starting o great, but well see how it goes; were hoping to get some big wins.Ž The brotherhood of the team Nease Sports RoundupBy Elena Castello, Nease Studentand the love of the game is clearly a huge aspect; the good sportsmanship shows in every game. Head coach Danny Cowgill works the team hard: with Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday practices, a walk-through on Thursdays and the games on Fridays, Nease is de“ nitely set for a good season rest of the season and no one should underestimate the underdogs. The Nease volleyball team has also had a rough start, even before the competitions. After losing eight of their varsity players and their coaching sta the young team now has to work even harder to stick together to try to win districts. But the Nease Panthers should not be disregarded. Determination and talent will get them through the season, as they are 1-1 for district games, with more coming in the next weeks. Varsity sophomore Kelly Costeira shares, We de“ nitely have the motivation and talent to win districts!Ž The Panthers swimming and diving team has one goal in mind: to take as many people as possible to districts. To do this, they must overcome their biggest competition, Bolles; but with the friendship, competitive spirit and talent, Neases swimmers are sure to have an excellent season. The Nease runners have started o the season on the right foot. The race at Ridgeview was excellent for the girls; they won fourth place overall. Mac Reynolds, on the boys team, placed second overall. At the race in Katie Caples, sophomore Alyssa Rodale placed 15th overall and Reynolds again placed second. CHS Sports RoundupBy Grant Piper, CHS StudentHowever in high school sports, experience is a double edged sword. Next year Creekside is going to lose six of their best players to graduation leaving the team with the “ ve current juniors and two current sophomores and the JV team to “ ll in. Many think that this will have to be the year if the Knights want a shot at the state title. Losing that many seniors cant bene“ t the team. But as many think that this will have to be the year, they also think that it will be the year. Its not often that one comes across such a veteran team with a strong coaching sta Coaches Laura Wynn and Megan Bowers have been with the program since the start and have guided these girls, using their extensive coaching histories, to the position theyre in now: undefeated and looking for more. Well all be watching eagerly as the girls continue their season and will hopefully be there at the end when they come home victorious with a state title in hand. If any year is the year, its this one. 2011. Go Knights! 11481 Old St. Augustine Rd #403(across from Lowe’s next to GATE)880-3292Expert Jewelry Repair done on premimses Watch Repair, including Rolex We give CASH for broken/unworn gold. The Goddard School located in Saint Johns believes that the basis for healthy learning is providing all children with active, playful lifestyles enriched with good nutrition. Laura Pinover-Sadler, owner of The Goddard School located in Saint Johns, o ers “ ve tips for parents to help their children develop healthy learning habits: 1. Encourage play. Playing alone and with others not only builds brain development, it also helps children develop social skills and a sense of ethics. The most e ective play is free of evaluation and correction (after all, throwing a ball shouldn't be "right" or "wrong"), while promoting autonomy. 2. Play together. In addition to their ABCs and 123s, preschool children are learning and developing life skills that will shape who they grow into as adults. One of these building blocks is learning to play well with others and accepting one another's di erences. 3. Get adequate sleep and proper nutrition. Your child will do their best if they get to sleep early and eat a healthy breakfast each day before school. A daily diet of junk food is not compatible with learning. It can cause listlessness and hyperactivity, which can impair a child's ability to learn. Skipping breakfast, especially, is a detriment to a child's education.Celebrate playful, healthy learning with ve tips4. Continue year-long education. Routine provides structure, which is often lacking during the summer months when children all too quickly become detached from the lessons they learned throughout the school year. Maintaining a schedule throughout the summer supports an environment that is less of a contrast to the classroom and provides a healthy balance between building skills, play and rest. 5. Turn o the screens. The American Academy of Pediatrics urges parents to avoid television and other electronic media for children two years of age and younger. Time spent in front of a computer, TV, video game or other similar devices can interfere with schoolwork, physical activity, curious exploration, social interaction and play. "Play is the natural way to learn. It helps children learn to solve problems, promotes ” exibility and motivation, teaches regulation of emotions and builds resilience and con“ dence," said Sue Adair, director of education at GSI. "It is also essential to the development of the child's brain, forming the basis of healthy cognitive function and mastery of the child's physical world." Look for The Goddard Schools ad in this issue of The CreekLine! Advertise inThe CreekLineIt’s good for business!886-4919LG@rtpublishinginc.com

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Page 28, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com For Appointment Call904-230-0080 NEW LOCATION! 485 State Road 13Suite 3 (Next to Burger King) Dr. Thomas Lahmannwww.julingtoncreekchiro.com Is Back or Neck Pain Impacting Your Life? Dr. Thomas Lahmann Chiropractic PhysicianHumana Beech Street A Proud Participating Provider for Aetna and Blue Cross / Blue Shield United Insurance Plans Accepts All Auto Insurance Julington Creek Chiropractic & Wellness Center P.A.SpineMedTM Spinal Disc DecompressionA Safe and Pain-Free Procedure Designed for Back & Neck pain Non-Surgical, Drug Free Procedures for: THE FOLLOWING ADS HAVE NOT BEEN SCREENED BY THE SOUTHEASTERN ADVERTISING PUBLISHERS ASSOCIATION (SAPA); Therefore, any discrepancies thereof shall not be the responsibility of the aforementioned association. Your publisher has agreed to participate in this program and run these ads as a service to the Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association.ADOPTIONAre you pregnant? 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Financial aid if quali ed Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)453-6204. REAL ESTATEGEORGIA LAND SALE 69 Acres $995/ acre. Will not divide. Other tracts available, visit our website www.StRegispaper.com 1-478-987-9700 St Regis Paper Co. SAPA ***FREE Foreclosure Listings*** Over 400,000 properties nationwide. LOW Down Payment. Call NOW! 1-800-498-8619 SAPAReal EstateAvailable Now!!! 2-4 Bedroom homes Take Over Payments No Money Down/No Credit Check Call 1-888-269-9192 Stop Renting Lease option to buy Rent to own No money down No credit check 1-877395-0321 ***FREE Foreclosure Listings*** OVER 400,000 properties nationwide. Low down payment. Call now 800-250-2043.VACATION/TRAVELCAVENDER CREEK CABINS Dahlonega, North Georgia Mountains. 1, 2, & 3 Bedroom Cabins with HOT TUBS! Take Virtual Tour at: www.CavenderCreek.com Call NOW! Toll Free 1-866-373-6307 SAPAWanted to BuyWANTED DIABETES TEST STRIPS Any kind/brand. Unexpired up to $18.00. Shipping Paid Hablamos espanol 1-800-2660702 www.selldiabeticstrips.com WANTED: YEARBOOKS $15 each for any high school 1940-1988 not in our collection. yearbookusa@yahoo.com 1-972-7681338. Registration for Ancient City Sports Ladies Flag Football is now open! Calling all women 25 and older, returning teams and individuals looking for team placement! This is a family friendly, recreational, nocontact version of ” ag football for women; no professional players allowed. There are two divisions; SpiceŽ (upper division) and SugarŽ (lower division). Jimed Williams, St. Johns County Recreation and Parks director, will hold a Rules Review and Registration Meeting on Thursday, October 13 at 6:30 p.m. at Veterans Park in the meeting room above the concession stand. This is a mandatory meeting for all coaches who will be on the “ eld during games. This meeting is also strongly encouraged for new players and team captains. For more information, please visit the ACS Ladies Flag website at http://ladies” agfootball.shutter” y.com/ or you may also email the League coordinator, Jamey at ” kumps@bellsouth.net or call Stacie at 588-5831. Registration for Creeks girls lacrosse 2012 starts on October 01. The league is open to girls in kindergarten through eighth grade. This year Creeks Girls Lacrosse will be trying something new„uniforms will be the same as last year. If your child played in the past and her uniform still “ ts, you may opt to keep the uniform and your registration Sports in Briefwill be discounted $25. If you refer a new player, you will receive a $25 credit towards your registration. New player clinics will be held in October, November and December with time and dates to be announced. Early registration (October 1 to November 15) is $125;registration from November 15 to December 31 is $140; and late registration (January 1-31 2012) is $155. Register online at www.creekslax.com/girls. For any questions, comments or concerns, please contact CreeksGirlsLax@ gmail.com. CAA Flag Football is for players age four (as of April 2011) up to the age of 17. Teams will have one scheduled practice during the work week and one scheduled practice during the weekend. Once games have started there will be only one practice held during the work week. The CAA Flag Football season runs from November 2011 through February 2012. Team drafts will be held October 17-18. Games will start December 3 with the “ nal playo s in February 2012. There will be a two week, single elimination tournament during the “ nal two weekends of the season. The referee meeting will be held October 27 and 28 at Veterans Park. For more information and to register online, please visit the CAA Flag Football Website at www.caa” agfootball.org United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, Flotilla 14-07 presents its one-day About Boating Safely program for new and experienced boaters from 7:45 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday, November 5 at the St. Johns River Community College For more information call Vic Aquino at 460-0243About Boating Safely program Need an extra copy of The CreekLine?Visit one of our pickup locations!Thank you to these fine advertisers for providing this convenience to our readers! Memorial Urgent Care Center Mandarin  VyStar Credit Union Julington Creek Branch  The UPS Store Fruit Cove  The UPS Store WGV  Whole Foods Market  Baptist Medical Center South  Bartram Trail LibraryThursday, October 20 • 3 pm Bartram Trail Branch LibraryChildren of all ages are invited! Costumes are encouraged but not required. Sponsored by the Friends of the Library.Children s Magic Show & Trail of Treats • emergency shelter to abused women and their minor children • temporary shelter for rape victims in danger after the crime • individual and group counseling • case management, civil legal representation and court advocacy24 hour crisis hotline: (904) 824-1555 Betty Grif n House of St. Johns County Provides:

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www.thecreekline.com • October 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 29 The CreekLine Marketplace ads!886-4919 Community MarketplaceAttention Small Businesses!!!For just $39 per issue you can reach 23,000+ addresses (min. of 6 issues) Call 886-4919 today! LOCAL Classi eds Massage Therapy Alicia Hunter LMTOnly $50 an hour #MM12329/MA53865 Neuromuscular Therapy ( 904 ) 514 5788www .hunter l mt. c omA New U Massage located in San Jose Office Center, Next to Sonny’s and Ace Hardware $5 OFF with this ad. Help WantedSt. Johns Eye Associats CR210 West. Optometric Technician with great personaltity & strong computer skills. Saturday hours 9-1 pm are a requirement. Please email resume to sjeacontactlens@yahoo.com The UPS Store in Fruit Cove: Part-time Service Associate. Must be 18 or older and able to work weekdays and some Saturdays. Retail experience and working knowledge of MS Of ce Suite preferred; graphics design skills are a big plus. 230-8881. Panache in Julington Creek is interviewing experienced & talented Stylists to join our team. Do you enjoy working in a professional, clean & successful environment? Apply at www.getpanache. com or stop in 2758 Racetrack Road #403 HELP WANTED! If you like music (and other arts) and would like to volunteer to support a non-pro t organization bringing music to the community, please call 374 8639 Join the Baptist South circle of care. Visit e-baptisthealth.com for the most up to date list of job openings. Listings are updated daily and change often. If you have any questions, please call Human Resources at 271.6078. Seeking Licensed Massage Therapist @ A New U Massage(MM12329) Mandarin furnished massage room available NOW. Room rent is $375+ 7% tax ($401.25) a month. Rent can split w/other LMT. Phone: 904-288-0064. Looking for part-time or Full-time people wanting to grow their own business. We train, support and mentor you through your process. 30 years www.allearspetsitting.com (904) 687-9610 Bonded, Insured & Affordable www.axiomphotos.com Aordable family and event photography Call: 904-673-0091 Driveways Concrete Removal Patios Driveway Extension Walkways Brick Inlay FREE ESTIMATES838-1836 Call Today for Free Decorative Trim with Driveway Job! Catering to the needs of the Homeowner. Debbie’s Home Cleaning Services H o m e e rvice s Local, honest, dependable individual offering local area home cleaning services. Call for FREE estimate! “I’ll do the cleaning so you don’t have to!”Home 829-2275Cell 707-9472License No. 42295 Change Your Body Tr ans f o r m Y ou r L i f e. Dont Loose weight. L oose F at. Gain lean muscle.904.3 15 .8280V isit http://nonibaby.tbioactive.com Professional Computer ServicesBusiness & ResidentialFor more details, visit us at:www.itpromise.com I.T. Promise Inc. Computer Services( 904 ) 287-2254 at Fruit Cove287-0601 Housecleaning 207-5674 Klean Spray Pressure Washing 631 273110% OFF1st time customers MB SPORTS your purchase of $25 or more $5 OFF GATORS GEORGIA JAGUARS MUCH FSU LSU STEELERS MUCH ALABAMA GIANTS EAGLES MORE8221-13 Southside Blvd., Jacksonville, Www.shopmbsports.com Corner Southside & Baymeadows 904. 460.2785 x15 www.pmpstjohns.com Full Service Property Management FirmResidential Leasing and Association Management WANTED Moms, Teachers anyone wanting extra money and own your own business with as little as 6 to 20 hours a week. Make $500 to $2500 a month. Call today for more information. Virginia at(904) 386-3993 in business. Up 26% in 2010 and 18% so far this year Call Virginia today for more information. (904) 386 3993. Pet Sitting Company Part time work with pets. Applicant must live in the International Golf Parkway area. Flexible hours. Adult applicants only. Call Robin at 687-9610 Seeking Sitters is looking for reliable and trustworthy babysitters for on-call babysitting jobs. Great contract rate and exible scheduling. Must be 18 yrs or older, have veri able child-care experience and willing to obtain CPR and First Aid certi cation. Apply at www.seekingsitters.com Results-oriented portfolio manager, with experience to manage HOA and condo associations in Duval and St. Johns Counties. FLCAM license and at least 2-3 years of HOA and condominium management experience. In exchange for your expertise and stable work history, we offer competitive pay, a comprehensive health care bene t package, 401k, vacation, and paid holidays. Salary based on experience. Quali ed candidates, please forward resumes to cware@mayresort.com.Services CleaningHouse and Of ce Cleaning House cleaner with over ten years of experience and great references. I am very detailed and ef cient. Have more time to spend with your family and to enjoy yourself and let us help you making your home shine and clean. Call 904-442-0993Real Estate ResidentialTrouble nding the house you want?? Let me nd your dream home! Lexie England, Licensed Realtor. Keller Williams Realty Atlantic Partners. (904) 885-2446 New Classi“ ed Rates!Place your classi ed online today! Online classi ed ads are FREE!www.thecreekline.com FREE ONLINE CLASSIFIED ADSGo towww.thecreekline.comand click onFree Online Classi ed AdsBetty Gri n House Thrift Shoppes are an amazing resource for getting great quality, unique, inexpensive clothing and other household items. Often, the o erings are perfectly good things that somebody else has outgrown or simply grown tired of. More importantly, they directly bene“ t this much needed community organization that provides vital support to people in need across all sectors of St. Johns County. Do good and go shopping! This Halloween are you looking for a costume but are you on a tight budget? Do you want a creative costume that doesnt come from a pre-packaged box that everyone else will have? Betty Gri n House Thrift Shoppes are the place to look for all your Halloween needs. Here are a few example costumes you could put together: Bride: There are many people that give their wedding dresses to thrift shops. This can be a great costume. You can even dress it up with makeup and make yourself the Bride of Frankenstein. Halloween Thrift Shoppe shopping, BGH styleBusiness professional: Grab a briefcase, glasses and look for a womans or mans suite. Its that easy! Flower child/hippie: Look for ” owing skirts and fancy looking tops with beads or other types of decorations. Or you can look for bell-bottomed jeans and a concert tshirt. Another idea is to look for items that have a peace sign on them. Preppie: This is an easy costume to do! Find a button down t-shirt and a pair of khaki pants and a sweater to wrap around your neck. It would be perfect if you found a tennis racket to carry. Ladies could have a skirt just below the knee. Look for shirts that have small patterns on them. The Northwest Thrift Shoppe is located in the Plantation Plaza at 445 S.R. 13 North (corner of Race Track Road and State Road 13) Hours are Monday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. and Sunday, 12:00 noon until 5:00 p.m. Support our ne advertisers!They ensure that The CreekLine arrives in your mailbox each month!886-4919 € sales@thecreekline.com Check out our community webpages!www.thecreekline.com Community Calendar High School Football Blog Work is an important part of your life, but it shouldnt be your whole life. For your familys sake and your own, strike a healthy balance between your career and your personal needs. Here are some tips: € Learn to shut work o These days you can work practically anywhere, anytime. Keep a healthy balance in your busy lifeIt can be a trap, so set a “ rm time of day to stop work and start concentrating on your family and other activities. € Focus on the here and now. When youre working, give it your full attention. And when you stop, dont let worries about work and details about your job occupy your thoughts. This may take some practice, but teach yourself to be in the present at all times. € Find a good non-work activity. If youve got nothing to do after work, youll have a hard time disengaging when you try to stop. Find a hobby to immerse yourself in, or just make an e ort to devote your full attention to your familys needs. (Even then, make an e ort to give yourself some personal time so you dont burn out on responsibility.) € Dont let your job de“ ne your identity. When you describe who you are to people, let your job be only one aspect of your self-portrait. That way, a setback in any one area wont be as damaging to your self-image, and youll be less tempted to ignore other possibilities open to you.

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Page 30, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com Free Correspondence Courses Self-paced Learning Julington Creek Church of Christ 1630 State Road 13 St. Johns, FL 32259 (904) 230-3332 The conclusion, when all has been heard, is: Fear God and keep His commandments, Because this applies to every person. (Eccl. 12:13) Come to Me, all who are weary and heavyladen, And I will give you rest. (Mt. 11:28, NASB) Just the facts for you not opinions Just the truth for you not “ction Just for you now not someday Order now before its too late !!! Bible Lessons … Relevant to YOU A CONNECTING CHURCH Our Sunday Services Traditional Worship 8:30am Sunday School 9:45am Contemporary Worship 11:00amwww.switzerlandcommunitychurch.org Pumpkin Patch Opens October 10th!!!Open Oct. 10th Nov 1st, Mondays thru Saturdays 10 a.m. 8 p.m.Pumpkins of all sizes are available. Picking out a pumpkin(s) is such a great family event. Don't forget to bring your camera to catch those sweet moments. Come make some memories with your family.210 Community Fall FestivalSaturday, October 29th 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.Come meet your neighbors! Bring the Kids and Join in the FUN! FREE Games, Inflatable's, Petting Zoo & Live Entertainment Pumpkin Patch Craft and Vendor Booths Great FoodCOMMUNITY CENTER 3450 CR 210 West (next to Cimarrone) (904) 287-3223 www.fcctoday.com Blended Worship 9:30 a.m.Contemporary Worship 11:00 a.m.Nursery Care at all services. Youth Sunday School at 9:30 a.m.Childrens Sunday School 9:30 & 11:00 a.m.Reaching Out Offering Christ Living Gods Love(904) 230-2955 Of“cewww.ROLUMC.com R i v e r L ifeo UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Open Hearts Open Minds ~Open Doors The People of the United Methodist Church Join us this October as we celebrate Fall at the River of Pumpkins. The Pumpkin Patch will be open daily from 10:00a.m. until dark.Our Annual FREE FAMILY FALL FESTIVALwill be held Saturday, October 15, 2011 from 10 am until 4 pm! Food, fun, games, and entertainment will be provided FREE of charge!We look forward to you and your family joining us this October! November 4, 5, 6, 2011 Variety of Entertainment all 3 days! All Ages Talent ShowAll proceeds from the Festival will be given to our Church for the growing needs of our Parish & School. 1718-State Road 13, St. Johns, Fl 32259 ~ 3 miles south of Race Track Road. For additional information call: 287-3382Event Sponsor Event Sponsor St Francis In-The-FieldEpiscopal ChurchChristian Formation 9:00am Sunday Service 10:00amChildrens Chapel and Nursery Available895 Palm Valley Rd (1 mile east of US1)615-2130 Faith NewsRiver of Life United Methodist Church will be holding the annual River of Pumpkins Pumpkin Patch beginning on October 1. The patch will be open from 10:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. daily. On Saturday, October 15 River of Life UMC will host a free Family Fall Festival from 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. There will be food, fun, concessions and local entertainment and the entire community is invited! River of Life UMC is located at 2600 Race Track Road. Please visit our website at www. rolumc.com for all of the events and happenings at River of Life. Our Lady of Good Counsel Parish is having their annual Harvest Festival on Sunday, October 23 from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on the church grounds, located at 5950 State Road 16 in St. Augustine. The festival will feature the Filipino Cultural Troupe of St. Augustine at 3:00 p.m. There will also be food, games, crafts, a cash ra e, a country store, a Pumpkin Patch and other entertainment. Come join us under the tent for a fun afternoon! San Juan del Rio announces their annual Garage/Yard sale, to be held on Saturday, October 22 from 8:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. at the church located on State Road 13 in Switzerland. Reserve your location in our parking lot; two parking spaces are available for a donation of $25. Please email sjdrtrunksale@aol.com or call 728-8251 for more information. Come to sell or come to shop; bring your neighbors! Our Lady of Good Counsel Church, located at 5950 State Road 16 (one mile northwest of International Golf Parkway and Pacetti Road in the World Golf Village area) will be holding an Italian Dinner on Sunday, October 16. For a $10 donation you will be able to enjoy an All You Can EatŽ salad bar, plus an All You Can EatŽ dinner consisting of pasta, meat balls and/or Italian sausage. Homemade desserts and various drinks will be available for a donation and a childs portion will be available for $3. Dinner will be served from 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., so come and join us for a delicious homemade pasta good time. Like getting dressed up? Enjoy racking your brain with your friends and family? On Saturday, October 15 at 6:00 p.m. the Nicaragua Mission Project team is hosting the third annual Geneva Trivia Night to raise funds for work with Young Life (Vida Joven) building relationships and sharing the Good News with youth in the city of Estili, Nicaragua. There will also be a costume contest. Tickets may be purchased for a table of eight team members $100 or individually for $15 each. Popcorn and soda will be provided and an optional dinner is available for $8. Items for silent auction will also be displayed for bidding. The event will be held at Geneva Presbyterian Church, located at 1755 State Road 13. For questions, please call Kent and Kris Wehmeier at 230-3653 or email Kris at kriswehmeier@ bellsouth.net. San Juan del Rio Catholic Church and School announces its “ fth annual Fall Festival on November 4, 5 and 6, 2011. Come and enjoy school midway games, JCJ Amusement Rides, food, refreshments, giant ra e, $7,000 in cash prizes, San Juan Cafe, country store, silent auction, Jail and Bail, homemade soup, entertainment all three days, an all ages talent show, Saturday night reverse draw dinner and much more! Join us for fun and fellowship. All proceeds will be given to our church. For additional information, please contact Sal Santapola at saldesanta@gmail.com.Invitethe community to your House of Worshipeditor@thecreekline.com Warning signs of stroke€ Sudden numbness or weak ness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body € Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding € Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes € Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination € Sudden severe headache with no known causeSource: Baptist Medical Center South

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www.thecreekline.com • October 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 31 904-262-SWIM $ Glenmoors Winston Allen, 13time Hawaii Ironman Triathlon nisher and former Long Distance World Champion took the Gold Medal at the 2011, ITU Age Group International Distance Triathlon World Championships held in Beijing, China on September 11, 2011. Allen would speci cally like to thank Mayo Clinic and orthopedic surgeon Cedrick Ortiguera, who performed his knee replacement in 2008. Allen, 81, says that that after 28 years of triathlon competition, hes going into semi-retirement from the sport; however, if his health holds up, he will try for the World Triathlon Championships at age 85. He explains, An aging athletes self-worth is based on his or her last performance!Ž The PV Storm U10 Girls are champions of the Publix Atlanta Cup soccer tournament, held over Labor Day weekend. The team played in the top competitive Cup division, scoring 31 goals and only allowing 1. Currently, the team is ranked third in the state and ninth in the nation. The players are Julie Arciprete, Channing Chappell, Lauren Fryoux, Tori Grambo, Ashlyn Kane, Tatum Loveless, Lillian Mace, Lauren Richter, Delaney Tauzel and Mary Beth Whitlock. The team is coached by Trey and Kathy Clark with the Ponte Vedra Soccer Club. Girls U10 soccer team storms Atlanta!Julington Creek Elementary students and parents created a Walking School Bus and participated in the International Walk To School Day on October 5, 2011. Over 230 schools across the State of Florida participated in the event to promote pedestrian safety and the simple joy of walking or bicycling to school with your friends. Julington Creek Elementary was the rst NW St. Johns County school to participate in the event. Julington Creek Elementary offers many programs that promote tness and walking or bicycling to school is one way for students and parents to have fun exercising together. Contact the JCE PTSO to volunteer for an on-going Walking School Bus and go to www.saferoutestoschool.org to learn about the Walking School Bus program with the Department of Transportation. JCE families create Walking School BusThe 4-H Toxophily (archery) Club presents its second annual Turkey Shoot to raise funds for equipment on Saturday, October 29, 2011 from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon. The event takes place at Ancient City Shooting Range, located at 3150 Agricultural Center Drive in St. Augustine. The shoot is open to all ages and shotguns will be provided. There is no admission fee and the price is two shells for $5. For more information please call 209-0430. The Toxophily Club teaches valuable life skills through the sport of archery to St. Johns County youth ages eight to18. 4-H and all programs and 4-H announces Toxophily Turkey Shoot Fundraiserrelated activities sponsored for or assisted by St. Johns County/ University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences are open to all persons with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or a liations. 4-H is a community of young people across America learning leadership, citizenship and life skills. As one of our nations oldest, yet most current organizations, 4-H is reaching millions of young people with positive youth development opportunities.

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Page 32, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com 33% OFF ( Our Regular Price or any competitor's Regular Price ) BIG GREEN SALE! THE BIGGEST SALE OF PLANT MATERIAL IN FLORIDA CONTRACTORS WELCOME Trout Creek Location at World Golf VillageOVER 45 ACRES OF PLANT MATERIAL WITH HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF S J&NURSERY & LANDSCAPING W o rl d d d Go Go Go Go Go Go Go G G G Go Go Go Go Go l l l lf lf lf lf lf lf lf lf lf lf V i G IN GOD WE TRUST TOTAL LANDSCAPES DESIGN & INSTALLATION SODDING & IRRIGATION DEBRIS REMOVAL Free Estimate & Consultation! 50% OFF All Crepe Myrtles 500 + to Choose FromHuge Inventory To Select From Free sod Are you ready for the holidays? Your oor isnt! Clean up that summer mess.....20% o The only 2 year warranty in the industry! Call Grout Line Solutions today for a free estimate. Serving St. Augustine & Jacksonville since 2005. Grout LineSolutions 904 982 4294 B E F O R E20% OFF A F T E R Tree WorkbyMitch Drake & Sons (904) 703-5040 (904) 287-3819Licensed, Insured & Workmans Comp Over 35 Years Experience Check out our reviews and 5 Star rating at Yellowbook.com! When people think of swimming, images of the Olympics, massive multi-lane pools and Michael Phelps pop into their heads. When Americans watch their Olympians from their home television screens they notice the ” uidity with which these athletes can move through the water and the precision with which they execute their movements. However there is much more to this sport then than occasional As seasons change, so does the “ shing. We are reaching the time of year when a heavy rain or a single cold front can end what was an outstanding year of “ shing on the St. Johns River. Since early spring and now into fall, the river has been consistent in providing us with a variety of “ sh and crustaceans. With an early run of bait “ sh you hoped this was going to be one of those years. There had not been a lot of rain over the winter and the river was already a little bit salty. Red“ sh were beginning to show along with an occasional sea trout or two. That was pretty encouraging for just being late March. As spring progressed the temperatures went up, the rain stayed away and the river got saltier. The bait “ sh became Captain Davids Fishing ReportBy Captain David Lifkamore abundant with “ nger mullet seemingly everywhere. The croaker and yellowmouth were beginning to bite and ” ounder were being caught on docks. Red“ sh were as far south as Palatka and it was only June. By July the lack of rain and extreme temperatures had the river at its saltiest. Shrimp were already being caught almost everywhere. The size and quantities were unusually large for the time of year. All other river “ shing was in full swing. Even blue crabs were “ lling traps daily. All through August and into September the shrimping continued to be phenomenal. Jumbo shrimp became the standard size with buckets being “ lled regularly by daytime and night time shrimpers. Shrimp were so abundant that they were being caught all the way back to the Julington Creek Bridge. And, with all those shrimp came a lot of hungry “ sh, making this a fantastic year to enjoy our St. Johns River and its bounty. As fall progresses the number of opportunities we have left to take advantage of the “ shing in our river will diminish. Every year is di erent, but temperature and rainfall are going to be what decides it. There might be a month or two left or just a few weeks. Whenever it is, we have this year to remember and next year to look forward to. Fishing Report: Weak“ sh in holes, drum around bridges and docks, sea trout on end of docks. Bream anywhere you try. Whether you catch one, some or none, the family time spent “ shing will last a lifetime. Advertise inThe CreekLineIt’s good for business!886-4919LG@rtpublishinginc.comBTHS Sports RoundupBartram swim team strives for victoryBy Jared Freitas, BTHS Student glances at the television screen can reveal, as swimming is both science and sport. For one, athletes are navigating through a medium in which they cannot breathe, meaning they have to be energy e cient to discourage heavy respiration. Add to that the fact that swimmers can burn thousands of calories a day and you get a sport that is as mentally challenging as it is physically. For the Bartram swimmers however, they need not worry about all of those challenges, as they are lead by Coach Robert Bruns, who has entered his 28th year of coaching. Similar to soccer and lacrosse, swimmers have the option of competing on both school and club teams, depending on their availability and future swimming goals. This is a key factor in the sport because there are few o -season opportunities for swimmers to compete in, if they are not on a club team. This is an important distinction according to Coach Bruns. There are two types of swimmers: those who are 12 week swimmers, who are there for the experience and there are the year-round swimmers who want to pursue the sport in college and even the Olympics,Ž Bruns explains. Four years ago in 2007, Bartram had the perfect mix between dedicated 12-week swimmers and year-round club athletes, as they took home the class 2A conference championship, something that the team has yet to accomplish since. Coach Bruns attributed this to the cyclical trend in talent and interest that the sport goes through. Athletes come in waves. Every four years interest in the Olympics peaks and more swimmers dreaming of competing in the Games join and the talent pool increases and then as time moves on this pool shrinks,Ž he said. This cycle may be indicative of the Bears performance this year, as the girls have not won a meet yet, although the boys have accrued a 2-1 record with victories against Creekside and Nease. Senior swimmer Trent Register commented on the boys success in their “ rst few meets, We are a very well-rounded squad. We have no real superstar that dominates all the events, but everyone contributes in their own races and we come together as a team to get the most points that we can.Ž Register also attributed their success to their training schedule, which includes four morning and three afternoon practices a week, one more than last year. We utilize this schedule in order to prepare our athletes for championship meets where preliminaries are held in the morning and the “ nals are run at night,Ž said Coach Bruns. In addition it allows us to work on di erent things each practice, whether it be drills, starts, kicks or working di erent muscles; it makes us more prepared.Ž As noted by both Register and Bruns, this team features a larger number of underclassmen then previous years, which shows that Bartram is at the starting point of one of those cycles. Junior swimmer, Kristen Santarone commented, We lost a lot of seniors last year; however, this team is much more cohesive than in the past two years, which will de“ nitely help us perform in the future,Ž she said. In addition to the swimming races there are also diving events, akin to the “ eld events in track. However due to the limited diving facilities in the area, divers often have to supply their own pool fees and train by themselves away from the team, which makes competing more di cult. The next few weeks will be challenging for Bartram, as they will compete in the district competition against rivals from Ponte Vedra and Fleming Island, both of whom have been successful in the past. For the young Bears, advancing swimmers further in the playo s will be challenging; however, with their superior training and coaching experience they should be prepared for anything. Book Discussion at the Bartram Trail Branch Library!“Still Alice” Monday, October 17 7 pmJoin us for a discussion of this book by Lisa Genova. New members are always welcome!

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www.thecreekline.com • October 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 33 JACKSONVILLE 8206 Philips Hwy 904.731.7877 *Headboard and frame only. Mattress, bedspread, pillows, lamp and nightstand sold separately. NO, YOU'RE NOT DREAMING...YET.$1699The Lago Queen $1699/King $1899 Upholstered in all top-grain leather. Stocked in off-white, brown, light gray and black (shown). Apples and pears may keep strokes away. Thats the conclusion of a Dutch study published in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association in which researchers found that eating a lot of fruits and vegetables with white ” esh may protect against stroke. While previous studies have linked high consumption of fruits and vegetables with lower stroke risk, the researchers prospective work is the “ rst to examine associations of fruits and vegetable color groups with stroke. The color of the edible portion of fruits and vegetables re” ects the presence of bene“ cial phytochemicals such as carotenoids and ” avonoids. Researchers examined the link between fruits and vegetable color group consumption with 10-year stroke incidence in a population-based study of 20,069 adults, with an average age of 41. The participants were free of cardiovascular diseases at the start of the study and completed a 178-item food frequency questionnaire for the previous year. Fruits and vegetables were classi“ ed in four color groups: € Green, including dark leafy vegetables, cabbages and lettuces € Orange/Yellow, which were mostly citrus fruits € Red/Purple, which were mostly red vegetables € White, of which 55 percent were apples and pears During 10 years of followup, 233 strokes were documented. Green, orange/yellow and red/purple fruits and vegetables werent related to stroke. However, the risk of stroke incidence was 52 percent lower for people with a high intake of white fruits and vegetables compared to people with a low intake. Each 25 gram per day increase in white fruits and vegetable consumption was associated with a 9 percent lower risk of stroke. An average apple is 120 grams. To prevent stroke, it may be useful to consume considerable amounts of white fruits and vegetables,Ž said Linda M. Oude Griep, M.Sc., lead author of the study and a postdoctoral fellow in human nutrition at Wageningen University in the Netherlands. For example, eating one apple a day is an easy way to increase white fruits and vegetable intake. However, other fruits and vegetable color groups may protect against other chronic diseases. Therefore, it remains of importance to consume a lot of fruits and vegetables,Ž she explained. Apples and pears are high in dietary “ ber and a ” avonoid called quercetin. In the study, other foods in the white category were bananas, cauli” ower, chicory and cucumber. Potatoes were classi“ ed as a starch. Previous research on the preventive health bene“ ts of fruits and vegetables focused The Creeks Clash U14 girls premier soccer team is the U14 Champion of the 13th annual Melbourne Area Beaches Girls Labor Day Challenge. The team competed at the National Division, which is the highest competitive level in the tournament. Their two wins and one tie record seeded them as number one in their bracket as they entered the “ nal game against Kendall Hammocks Lightning of Miami. The “ rst half of the game was intense and ended without any goals for either team. The second half began with the same intensity, but turned to the Clashs favor in the latter part of the half. With seven minutes left to play, Savannah OSteen was “ nally able to break through Kend-An apple or pear a day may keep strokes awayon the foods unique nutritional value and characteristics, such as the edible part of the plant, color, botanical family and its ability to provide antioxidants. United States federal dietary guidelines include using color to assign nutritional value. The U.S. Preventive Health Services Taskforce recommends selecting each day vegetables from “ ve subgroups: dark green, red/orange, legume, starchy and other vegetables. Before the results are adopted into everyday practice, the “ ndings should be con“ rmed through additional research, Oude Griep said. It may be too early for physicians to advise patients to change their dietary habits based on these initial “ ndings,Ž she said.Creeks Clash U14 girls win Melbourne soccer tournament Coach Nelson Quintanilla, Brooklyn Simonsen, Sydney Ford, Michaela Payne, Austen Hentschel, Taylor Stratton, Alison Murman, Nina Sizemore, Mikaela Brown, Emily Tomasello, Kate Brown, Savannah OSteen, Mia Traylor and Grayson Sheetsalls tough defense, giving the Clash a well deserved goal. Five minutes later a failed attempt by Kendall to score on a corner kick gave the Clash an open opportunity to score another goal. Michaela Payne, the keeper, passed the ball o to Kate Brown who passed Lunar PhasesFull: October 12 Last Quarter: October 20 New: October 26 First Quarter: November 2 it o to Mia Traylor for the teams second goal. The game ended moments later with a “ nal score of 2-0. The team is coached by Nelson Quintanilla and is currently ranked 19th in the state. Congratulations Ladies! Well done!

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Page 34, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com COASTAL ROOFING SYSTEMS “Re-Roofing is our Specialty” Covering Northeast Florida’s Finest Homes With Quality Work and Professional Service Since 1993. f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f Free Estimates! y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y Licensed Insured 460-2815 State Certified Roofing Contractor #CCC057020 A Coastal Building Systems Company. O E M Why are we the best choice when it comes to caring for your vehicle? $ www.Turn9Auto.com (904) 657-8123 209-6190We Need a Home!St. Johns County Pet Adoption Center S T J O H N S C O U N T Y A N I M A L C O N T R O L All adoptions at the Pet Center are $60, which includes neutering/spaying, rabies vaccinations and shots. The Pet Center is located at 130 N. Stratton Road, just off US-1 between County Road 210 and International Golf Parkway. The hours are 9:00-4:00 Monday through Friday and 9:00-12:30 on Saturday. My name is Cleopatra; I am a 4 year old female spayed torti. I am current on all my vaccines and already have a microchip. I am an inside only cat, I get along great with children and dogs but would prefer to be the only cat in the home. My name is Mario; I am an 8 month old Great Dane mix. I am current on all my vaccines but still need to be neutered. I am mostly an inside animal, I am crate trained and house trained; I get along great with other animals and children. The U-11 Creeks Clash Blue team played in the Challenge Sports Melbourne Labor Day Challenge. In pool play, the team won the “ rst two games by the score of 6 to 1 and 8 to 1. For the third game, Creeks Clash Blue played a local team Space Coast United 1 to a tie (2 to 2). After pool play, the team quali“ ed as the second seeded team in the National Division and headed into the Doug Baum, a former zookeeper, maintains a ranch of camels that he hauls to livinghistory events throughout the South. When he ventured to Corinth, Mississippi in 2009, he didnt realize a camel hadnt set a two-toed foot in the city since Old Douglas joined the Confederate camp 150 years earlier. And to everyones delight, Baum delivered Richard, a camel re-enactor to stage the scene of a Civil War encampment. How a 2,000-pound camel came to see action in the War Between the States begs a wisp of whimsy, but remains grounded on Mississippis hallowed battle“ elds. Je erson Davis, Secretary of War in 1852, believed camels tireless reserves, sure-footedness, lack of thirst and the ability to carry heavy loads would enable movement of troops and supplies between California and the western frontier. But, in the 1850s: nary a camel in the nation. Corinth: Footprints of a Confederate camel By Contributing Travel Writer Debi LanderClash boys reach nals at Labor Day tournamentOscar Thomas Aguilar, Brandon Marchand, Aaron Kosik, Brandon McSwigan, Anderson Tucker, and Matthew Wolf, Jackson Brennan, Herbie Steigleman, Jimmy Dwyer, River Guthrie, Sean Smith, Nick Binghi, Zack Hiler, Assistant Coach Oscar Aguilar and Coach Charlie Bentivegnaplayo s. In the semi-“ nals, the boys played very well and won the game 9 to 1. In only their second tournament, the boys reached the “ nals. The U-11 Creeks Clash Blue “ nished the tournament with three wins, one tie and one loss. Coach Charlie Bentivegna and the assistant coaches (Oscar Aguilar and Muir Smith) were proud of the teams play, e ort and sportsmanship. Davis persuaded Congress to establish the United States Camel Corps and sent a procurement expedition to the Middle East. After numerous setbacks, bribes and negotiations, 33 dromedaries set sail, along with “ ve indentured Middle Easterners. Two months later, the “ rst camel caravan batted their long eyelashes at the surprised residents of Indianola, Texas. The enormous creatures trekked many days to reach their quarters at Camp Verde, 60 miles west of San Antonio. However, the Texas Army commander hated the beasts under his command and proclaimed, I would not give one mule for “ ve camels. They smell, upset the horses and mules, spit and have disagreeable personalities.Ž Few Americans at the time or today understand camel rearing and rarely keep the animals as pets. Doug Baums dromedaries are the exception and he lovingly cares for his clan. He admits the creatures are highly sensitive and easily insulted, then adds, They are sweet and gentle. If you treat them with fairness and remember they have motivations of their own„they wont bite or spit.Ž By the late 1850s a hundred humps called Texas home. The beasts proved far superior to horses and mules on the treacherous, rocky slopes. Their feet had tough soles that needed no shoeing, they required little water and could live o the fat stored in their humps, and as a bonus--the mere sight of a camel scared o the Indians. The advent of the Civil War in 1861 radically transformed the mindset and priorities of the entire nation. Camp Verde vacillated under Union and Confederate control and the care and whereabouts of the camels grew lax. Apparently a camel named Old Douglas was stationed in Texas when the war erupted. Baum (having thoroughly researched the subject) believes a soldier simply snuck o with the creature and headed home to Mississippi„a feat which surely turned more than a few heads. Somehow, they made the lengthy trip and Old Douglas was given to Colonel W. H. Moore by 1st Lt. William Hargrove. Moore then assigned Douglas to carry the instruments and supplies of the 43rd Mississippi Volunteer Infantry Regimental Band. Douglass “ rst active service commenced under General Sterling Price in the Iuka Campaign near Corinth. Old Douglas quickly attained legendary status by causing a stampede. However, Douglas endeared himself as a camp favorite, befriending young soldiers who proudly carried their new title, The Camel Regiment.Ž Douglas participated in the 1862 Battle of Corinth, a tragic day that ended with 12,000 casualties. Those soldiers are now remembered by The Grand Illumination, Corinths annual lighting of 12,000 luminaries on the battle“ eld and throughout historic downtown venues. The poignant scene emerges like Arlington Cemetery, rows and rows ablaze in ” ickering candlelight. Visitors are also drawn to the restaging of the encampment. Richard stars in the role of Old Douglas while Baum answers questions about camels in the Confederacy. Baum also appears in Vicksburg, Mississippi as did the Mississippi 43rd. The site saw 35,825 estimated causalities from May 18 to July 4, 1863. During one of the skirmishes, a Union sharpshooter intentionally took down the adored mascot. Old Douglas is honored like other veterans with a marked grave in Vicksburgs Cedar Hill Cemetery. As the 150th anniversary of the Civil War unfolds, numerous stories arise from the battle“ elds: stories of bayonets and bravery, cavalry and civilians, generals and Johnny Reb, but the chronicles recount only one tale of a Confederate camel: Old Douglas, who served his country well. If you go: Grand Illumination and Encampment: November 12-13, 2011, www.corinth.net Old Douglas. Photo courtesy of www.bylandersea.com

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www.thecreekline.com • October 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 35 PRECIOUS GOLD BUYERSWhy us? HOURS: MON FRI 9am-6pm SUNDAY CLOSED IF YOU WANT MORE GREEN FOR YOUR GOLD MAKE US YOUR LAST STOP! BRING IN YOUR UNWANTED GOLD, SILVER, PLATINUM & COINS! 12525 Phillips Hwy. Ste 111Corner of Phillips & Old St. Augustine Rd.Jacksonville, FL 32256 904-647-8879 2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU MORE GREENFOR YOUR GOLD 2245 CR 210 W. #107A1 Mile West of I-95 904-414-9791Precious Gold Buyers $50 MOREthan the Current Gold Rate per ouncePrecious Gold Buyers $5 MOREthan the Current Silver Rate GOLD SILVER PLATINUM COINS Accepting and Selling furniture (living room, dining room, bedroom, etc) Home decor (lamps, rugs, artwork, tchotchke) New items arrive daily. We are ready to accept your entire house, estate, etc. We also oer inventory liquidation service for builders, home and furniture industry businesses, etc. For More Information call: 880 8448 or email us at: EN C O R EDE C O R @b e lls o u th net10830 San Jose Boulevard ( across from Walmart)Visit us online at: www.EncoreDecorFL.comWE OFFER FREE PICKUP SERVICE FOR APPROVED ITEMSHours: Jacksonvilles Largest Upscale Consignment Store H If your yard seems a bit boring, look up! Flowers and shrubs are great garden elements but for real pizzazz go vertical. Vines are an important element in any garden and they are an easy way to add interest to a ho-hum landscape. A beautiful vine in full bloom is a real eye-catcher, the “ rst thing you notice, but even a lush green climber is a great improvement over a plain-Jane wall or fence. Vines are not just attractive, they are also versatile and come in many di erent forms. Some vines are twiners, others are ramblers, creepers or rooters. Some are repeat or long bloomers and others give you one big seasonal splash of color. The most popular vines are perennial ones that are hardy and last for many years, but a really great annual vine, such as Moon” ower (Ipomea alba), deserves to be replanted each year. Perhaps the best and most desirable of them all is Confederate Jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides). An icon of lovely Southern gardens, this climber has it all … hardy lush greenery, delicate white scented ” owers in late spring to early summer, and rapid growth and coverage. Really, you need not read any further. Plant Confederate jasmine anywhere you need to improve the view and you are done. For the rest of us, there are many other vines to choose from depending on your need. Creeping “ g (Ficus pumila) is an evergreen perennial creeper that covers unsightly items such as concrete block rapidly and completely. If it is striking ” owers you GardeningIs your landscape vertically challenged? By Contributing Writer Master Gardener Camille Hunter with Duval County Extension, University of Florida/IFASwant, then plant passionvine. Besides bearing ” owers almost too exotic to be real, the native passionvine (Passi” ora incarnata) also attracts butter” ies, both the black and yellow Zebra Longwing and the orange Gulf Fritillary. Other vines with beautiful ” owers include the pink ” owering Mandevilla (Mandevilla x amabilis) and the beautiful blue” owered Sky Vine (Thunbergia grandi” ora). These are both tender vines that need winter protection or plant them in pots that can be sheltered over winter. A good perennial rambling vine for north Florida is Sweet Autumn clematis (Clematis terni” ora). It blooms here in late summer, producing a lush bounty of fragrant white ” owers visible even at night. Keep the roots shaded and cool and the vine itself in full sun and it will cover a shed in two to three years. Moon” ower vine, mentioned above, is an annual vine that also has scented white ” owers but these are huge, each bloom up to six inches across, as big as a saucer. As its name implies, the ” owers open in late afternoon Confederate Jasmine Mandevillaand stay open until dawn. Plant this near an outdoor area where you frequently sit in the evening hours. There are many other choices, such as rambling Lady Banks roses (Rosa banksiae), striking Bougainvillea (Bougainvillea glabra), yellow-” owered Carolina Jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) and tendrilclimbing cross vine (Bignonia capreolata). Finally, a warning. Beware the beautiful, fragrant, Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica). It is a rampant, extremely invasive plant that runs over woodlots and vanquishes natural areas. This is one vine to avoid completely. United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, Flotilla 14-07 presents its one-day About Boating Safely program for new and experienced boaters from 7:45 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday, November 5 at the St. Johns River Community College For more information call Vic Aquino at 460-0243About Boating Safely program

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Page 36, The CreekLine • October 2011 • www.thecreekline.com VyStar MEMBERSHIP IS OPEN TO ALL PEOPLE WHO LIVE OR WORK IN THE FOLLOWING COUNTIES: JACKSONVILLE & SURROUNDING COUNTIES 904-777-6000 OUTSIDE OF JACKSONVILLE 1-800-445-6289www.vystarcu.org MANDARIN BRANCH 11343 San Jose Blvd. JULINGTON CREEK BRANCH 101 Bartram Oaks Walk (located at the corner of Race Track Road and State Road 13)*All loans subject to credit approval. Certain restrictions apply. New variable APR = Annual Percentage Rate are current as of August 23, 2011. 2011 VyStar Credit UnionPeople have different tastes.Thats why we offer the new VyStar VISA Platinum Options Cards. ALWAYS:NO ANNUAL FEE NO HIDDEN CHARGES LOW RATES PLATINUMPLATINUM CASH BACK PLATINUM REWARDS PLUS 9.10%9.50%9.50% VARIABLE APR*VARIABLE APR* VARIABLE APR* RATES AS LOW AS Introducing VyStars VISA Platinum Options. Theyre different because you are. UPLOADYOU CAN EVENYOUR OWNPHOTO! We never forget that its your money. @OfficialVyStar APPLY TODAY! JPPerry.com 3342 Kori Road Jacksonville, FL 32257904-268-7310



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THE CREEKLINESM SERVING THE NORTHWEST ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMMUNITY SINCE 2001Visit our online edition at www.thecreekline.comMEMBER OF THE RT PUBLISHING GROUP OF COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS Whats InsidePage 3 Whats New Page 4 From the CommissionerPage 5 School District Journal Page 6 The Sheriff Reports Page 8 Wm. Bartram Highway Page 9 Relay for Life Page 11 Girl Scouts celebration Page 13 Halloween in MicanopyPage 15 Newcomers Club Page 17 New Bishop visits BTHS remembers 9/11 Page 19 HCE Carnival Page 20 Pooch Pouches Page 21 National Merit studentsPage 22 Pacetti Bay PTSO Page 24 Community Ed classes Page 26 CAA sports news Page 24 Community Ed classes Page 26 CAA sports news Page 27 High school sports Page 32 Fishing Report Page 35 Gardening Volume 11, Issue 10 October 2011The CreekLine12443 San Jose Boulevard, Ste. 403 Jacksonville,FL 32223Presorted Standard US Postage Paid Callahan, FL 32011 Permit No.4 FREE ONLINE CLASSIFIED ADS Go towww.thecreekline.comand click onFree Classi ed Ads FREE INSTALLATION ($150 Value)Present this coupon at initial consultation to receive Free Installation ($150 Value) with the purchase of a 800 series system. Other Charges may apply. Not valid on prior sales or with any other offers. Participating Dealers only. Call for Details. Hurry! Special Ends 11/10/11. Introducing the smallest, lightest, most technologically advanced computer collar available.The MicroLiteOnly fromCopyright Invisible Fence of the First Coast Attention all marching band fans! Nease High School will host its rst ever marching band competition, the First Coast Marching Invitational (FCMI) on Saturday, October 22. Sanctioned by the Florida Marching Band Coalition (FMBC), the competition is a regional event where high school marching bands will compete with the opportunity to score points to qualify for the state competition to be held in Tampa in NovemIf you are not careful, you just might miss the entrance when driving down Race Track Road. You may recognize it by the annual Pumpkin Patch and Fall Festival. It is the little church in the modular buildings at 2600 Race Track Road. Those modular buildings have been put to good use over the last decade as a sanctuary, childrens classrooms, nursery and o ce. Recently though something special has begun to rise out of the ground at River of Life United Methodist Church. After 10 years, founding Pastor Kim Saal has departed, leaving a legacy of shepherding the church from just a misYee-Haw! On Friday, September 16, Durbin Creek Elementary kicked o their Accelerated Reader (AR) Program for the 2011-2012 school year with some old-time western fun. The stage in the Oasis was turned into a western town, the teachers and students donned cowboy hats and red bandanas and the curtain on stage opened to reveal Principal Sandra McMandon and Assistant Principal Christy Slater in western style garb. There was a new sheri and deputy in town that day and a Durbinstyle showdown was on the horizon. You could hear a pin drop as Sheri McMandon and Deputy Slater paced o drew their books and read as fast as they could to determine the Fastest Reader in the Wild West. They were followed by cowboy and author Bill Mark your calendars for October 22Nease hosts First Coast Marching Invitational band competitionBy Martie Thompson Nease Panther Pride Marching Band performs their show Mad, New Worldber. I am so excited to be a part of the Nease Band Boosters, who are not only focused on the talent of our own band students, but seek to provide opportunities for all band students to showcase their talent as well, stated Carolyn Milian, FCMI coordinator for the Nease Band Boosters, who are supplying volunteers for the event. The Nease Band Boosters have been working busily for the past six months to prepare for this competition. Our plan is to make FCMI as educationally and performance rewarding as possible. Our band parents have been working all summer to make participating bands feel welcome and comfortable. This is a great opportunity to showcase Nease and we hope it will also be a great experience for participating bands, shared Nease Band Director Michael Johnson. The competition will begin with the semi nal round at 1:00 p.m. when each band will have the opportunity to present their show. Unlike at football games where crowd noise is inevitable, performances at marching competitions are the main event, so musical solos and nuances are more easily distinguished. Bands have a time limit to march onto the eld, perform and then leave the eld and the whole competition moves along at a brisk pace. After all bands have competed in the semi nal round, winners of each class (deter-Durbin Creek Reading Round-Up celebrationBy Contributing Writer Chris Cole, AR Committee Co-Chair Fourth grade teacher Matt Ostrowsky, Assistant Principal Christy Slater, Principal Sandra McMandon and real life cowboy Bill Cummins celebrating Reading Round-Up Day at Durbin Creek Cummins who did some fancy rope tricks for the bandana clad students in grades one through ve. At one point, Principal McMandon found herself in a real pickle when she was roped up by Cowboy Bill on stage. The Building a congregation and a new church By Karl Kennell Karen Strok and Pastor Casey Neelysion to a fully charted church in May 2011, as well as planning and starting a new church building. Planning for the building began in 2008 and led to many challenges for Pastor Saal and the congregation. Finally ground has been broken on a new multi-purpose and sanctuary building. Pastor Saal departed, pleased to be leaving the new construction in good hands. On July 1, 2011 new Pastor Casey Neely took over the task of not only seeing the new building gets built but also the task of building the congregation. He is well suited for the job. Pastor Neely became a United Methodist pastor only 10 years ago, rst serving a congregation in Ormond Beach for three years and then moving to Ft. Myers to take over a struggling parish which had declined to 60 mostly senior members. You de nitely can say he is truly a builder. For during the seven years he spent in Ft. Myers he built that modest congre-River of Life cont. on pg 7 FCMI cont. on pg 10 Durbin Creek cont. on pg 16

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Page 2, The CreekLine October 2011 www.thecreekline.com of St. Augustine 904.825.0540 www.oastaug.com3055 CR210W, Suite 110, St. Johns, FL 32259 One Orthopaedic Place, St. Augustine, FL 32086 LET OUR SPORTS MEDICINE TEAMKeep you in the game!JAMES GRIMES, MD JOHN STARK, MD SPECIALIZING IN THE TREATMENT OF SPORTS RELATED INJURIES:FOOT/ANKLE SPRAINS & FRACTURES NECK & BACK INJURIES SHOULDER SEPARATIONS & DISLOCATIONS ELBOW LIGAMENT & TENDON INJURIES HIP INJURIES & GROIN PULLS KNEE CARTILAGE & LIGAMENT TEARS COLLARBONE FRACTURES BURNERS & STINGERS FOR THE TREATMENT OF: No Appointment RequiredSt. Johns Location Clinic Hours: St. Augustine Location Clinic Hours:ALBERT VOLK, MD SINA KASRAEIAN, MD KURTIS HORT, MD ANDREA TRESCOT, MD BRIAN HAYCOOK, MD BETH PEARCE, DPM 5 pm to 9 pm Monday Friday 9 am to 2 pm Saturday 5 pm to 10 pm Monday Friday 9 am to 7 pm Saturday | | American Heart Association Gold Plus certification means that Baptist Medical Center South is among the best in the nation in providing life-saving care in the event of a stroke. Learn more about our Primary Stroke Center at e-baptisthealth.com/stroke. Sudden symptoms? Call 911.Trouble seeing Numbness or weakness of face, arm or leg Confusion, trouble speaking or understanding Trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination Severe headache

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Whats NewCommunity HappeningsDo you have community or club news you would like included in The CreeekLine? Then contact Martie Thompson at: editor@rtpublishinginc.com or 886-4919. At RT Publishing we welcome Letters to the Editor. We request they be no more than 250 words. All letters must include writers name, address, and telephone number. Only the name will be published. E-mail to editor@ rtpublishinginc.com. Anonymously sent letters will not be published.Letters to the Editor policy Fall in Love with Organic Values Fill your pantry without emptying your pocketbook. With value prices every day of the year, our 365 Everyday Value organic products make it easy for you to stock up on the best products for the best price. $15 offany $50 purchase valid at whole foods market jacksonville only. not valid with any other offer or tm discount card. not redeemable for cash or gift cards. limit one coupon per customer. no copies, duplications or facsimiles will be accepted. PLU 30641 VALID 10/1/11 10/31/11 www.wholefoodsmarket.com10601 SAN JOSE BLVD JACKSONVILLE, FL 904-288-1100 I-95 I-295 San Jose Blvd. With this coupon receive RT Publishing, Inc. The CreekLine The Ocean Breeze Mandarin NewsLine Players JournalPublisher Rebecca Taus publisher@rtpublishinginc.comEditor Martie Thompson editor @rtpublishinginc.comAdvertising Sales, Linda Gay lg@rtpublishinginc.comAdvertising Sales, Josh Allen ja@rtpublishinginc.comGraphic Design, Brittany Lehmangraphics@rtpublishinginc.com RT Publishing, Inc. 12443 San Jose Boulevard Suite 403 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Ph: 904-886-4919 The CreekLine Community Newspaper is a free monthly publication distributed via bulk mail to homes and businesses in NW St. Johns County. Submission of articles and photographs are received by mail or email, although email to editor@rtpublishinginc.com is preferred. The writers opinions do not necessarily reect the opinion of RT Publishing, Inc. Advertising Rates are available by request. RT Publishing, Inc. is not responsible for advertisement content or accuracy of information provided by its advertisers. Nor does RT Publishing, Inc. endorse any of the products or services included in this publication. RT Publishing, Inc. reserves the right to refuse advertisement or copy from any advertiser. All rights are reserved and no portion of this publication may be copied without the express written consent of the publisher. 2011. Whats New Cont on pg 4Eight schools in the NW St. Johns School District are joining forces to raise money for the schools. The golf tournament will take place on November 5, 2011 at The Champions Club at Julington Creek starting at 1:30 p.m. Registration is $75 per golfer or $300 per foursome. For more information or to register please contact Debora McCarty at rdmccarty10@comcast.net or visit any of the eight schools websites that are participating in this event (Hickory Creek Elementary, Cunningham Creek Elementary, Timberlin Creek Elementary, Julington Creek Elementary, Switzerland Point Middle School, Fruit Cove Middle School, Bartram Trail High School and Creekside High School). District IV of the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs and the St. Johns County Extension Service will sponsor Gardenfest 2011 on Saturday, October 29 from 9:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. It will be held at the Extension Oce located at 3125 Agricultural Center Road in St. Augustine. The program, presented by outstanding speakers, is chock full of great information for the Florida gardener. Topics include: Alien Invaders, Creepy Crawlies, Blooming Gourds and Dead or Alive Autumn Arrangements. Plants will be available for purchase at bargain prices. The course will count as CEUs for Master Gardeners. Registration is only $10 and morning refreshments and drinks for lunch will be provided. You may bring your own lunch or we will prepare a bag lunch for you for only $5 more. Pre-registration is needed to be assured of lunch. To register or for more information, please call the registrar, Rachel Wilson, at 272-4252 or the event chairman, Art Burnett, at 282-4981. Would you be willing to spend one hour per week to make a dierence in a young persons life? The St. Johns County School District is looking for volunteers who have a little bit of time, a listening ear and an encouraging word to help a student become successful in school and in life. Mentors serve in a school setting and meet with a student once per week. If you are interested in taking part in this exciting opportunity, please call the school districts Volunteer Services Department at 547-3945. 4-H is a youth development program for youth ages 5-18 (as of September 1) that focuses on the development of life skills, citizenship and leadership. 4-H has been around for over 100 years and provides opportunities for youth to use their Head, Heart, Hands and Health to positively develop into competent, caring and contributing citizens. There are 20 dierent 4-H clubs through out St. Johns County and nearly 30 county schools that participate in 4-H in the classroom projects (public speaking and chicken embryology). Club information can be found at: http://stjohns.ifas. u.edu 4-H is a community of young people across America learning leadership, citizenship and life skills. As one of our nations oldest, yet most current organizations, 4-H is reaching millions of young people with positive youth development opportunities. The Switzerland Garden Club will have its October meeting on Thursday, October 13 at 10:00 a.m. Janet Young will speak on Switzerlands early settlers. If you are interested in attending please call 287-9772 for more information. New members are welcome! The Friends of Bartram Trail Library will present a second session of ACT and SAT preparation classes at the library. The ACT class will begin at 5:00 p.m. and the SAT class will begin at 6:30 p.m. All classes will be held on Monday. The class dates are: November 7, November 14, November 21, November 28 and December 5, 2011. Registration is required and class size is limited. Registration closes on October 23, 2011. A donation of $25 for each class series a student takes is requested. Please register via email to btbfol@yahoo.com and include the students name, grade and class selection (ACT or SAT). Plant Clinic at the Bartram Trail Library! St. Johns County Master gardeners will be on hand to answer your plant and lawn questions on Saturday, October 15 and Thursday, October 20 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon at the Bartram Trial Library located at 60 Davis Pond at the entrance to Julington Creek Plantation. We will accept small soil samples from your vegetable, lawn or shrub areas for free pH testing. Adults and teens age 14 and older are invited to attend the Project Lap Blanket crochet group at the Bartram Trail Branch Library on Tuesday, October 18, Monday, October 24 and Monday, October 31 from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The group will crochet or knit blankets for cancer patients at area hospitals. All skill levels are welcome. Cant come to any of the meetings? Pick up the crochet pattern at the Reference Copies of the online coupon ad are not accepted.

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Page 4, The CreekLine October 2011 www.thecreekline.com From the Commissioners DeskBy Contributing Writer Ron Sanchez, County Commissioner, District 2 Offering investment advisory services as a representative of 0156581-00002-00 Prudential Financial Planning Services, a division of Pruco Securities, LLC. ROBERT E. BURKE The CPA Never Underestimate the Value VARSITY INSURANCE, INC. NEED BETTER INSURANCE? 268-6365 Local Independent Agents We work for you not the insurance company.Our name celebrates our love of competition and commitment to excellence.Serving Mandarin Since 1990 Julington Creek PlantationSee what items are for sale. Browse our ads at www.julingtoncreekplantation.org The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Over 15 Years Legal Experience904-665-0005www.preddylaw.com St. Johns County is rich in history and years of economic development. I think all residents may bene t and be interested in knowing the history and development of our County. It can not be put in better words than the summary below, paraphrased from Sidney Johnstons Historic Properties Survey of St. Johns County, Florida, which was commissioned by the county in 2001. St. Johns County, the oldest county in the state, derives its name from Floridas longest river. Called various names since its discovery by French explorer, Jean Ribault, the name San Juan appeared on a map showing the river around 1720. This name was probably derived from the Spanish mission of San Juan del Puerto established on Fort George Island about 1590. The Spanish established St. Augustine in 1565 and their rst settlements in the county were Franciscan missions established to Christianize natives and provide labor and food for St. Augustine. Most of these were along waterways including the St. Johns, Matanzas, and Tolomato Rivers. One of the earliest was the mission at Tocoi, making this place name one of the oldest in Florida. In the late 1600s the Spanish Crown constructed a series of forti cations to increase defense for St. Augustine. Many of these were within the county, including Fort Diego, Fort Picolata, Fort Tocoi and a guardhouse at Twenty Mile (Palm Valley). Only Fort Matanzas remains, though archaeological evidence exists for others. After gaining Florida in 1763, the British Crown sparked development by awarding large land grants. The English also opened one of the nations rst public roads, the Kings Road, running from New Smyrna, through the county and into Georgia. Large plantations producing indigo, rice and other exports developed throughout the region. Settlement was heaviest along the St. Johns River and coastal waterways. Land grants remained a productive strategy after the Spanish resumed control of Florida in 1784. In-migration of Minorcan refugees from the failed New Smyrna colony provided a local farming class. Establishing themselves rst in St. Augustine, Minorcan families soon dispersed across the county, forming small farms and plantations and establishing a rich culture across the region. The United States acquired Florida in 1821 and the Territorial Legislature created St. Johns County assigning St. Augustine as the seat of government. Small settlements appeared along the St. Johns River, many focused on agriculture especially oranges and at Tocoi, the St. Johns Railway was completed into St. Augustine in 1859. During the Civil War, Union troops occupied St. Augustine, gunboats patrolled the St. Johns River and earthworks were established at Picolata which can still be found today. In the 1880s, Henry Flagler spurred St. Augustines growth and population increased in interior regions of the county as agricultural products found a larger market. New settlements with churches and schools appeared in rural areas. The introduction of railroad lines helped spur growth in the rural villages of Elkton, Hastings and Spuds. River settlements at Picolata, Racy Point, Remington Park, Riverdale and Switzerland also experienced steady growth with steamboat wharves attracting commerce. A few wealthy seasonal visitors developed river estates and resorts at Crescent Beach and Summer Haven. Many settlers cultivated citrus providing community names like Orangedale and Fruit Cove, until hard freezes in the 1890s pushed Floridas citrus belt farther south. African-American settlers formed communities at Armstrong, Elkton, Fruit Cove and Hastings, buoyed by employment in agriculture and the burgeoning turpentine industry. Designated as New Augustine, a large ethnic community emerged west of St. Augustine, becoming known as West Augustine which included the beautiful Florida Memorial College campus. Developers platted numerous subdivisions throughout the county during the 1920s land boom, but many were never developed. Ponte Vedra Beach emerged as an exclusive seaside village in the Great Depression, when most other communities continued to depend on agriculture. In cooperation with county landowners and timber companies, the Florida Forest Service installed re watchtowers in the 1940s. Development since World War II has increased with each passing decade into the growth patterns we see today. Though agriculture has remained a steady economic driver and dependable tradition in the middle portions of the county, the main economic activity in the northern half has turned largely to suburban development. Whats New cont from pg 3 Desk in the library and crochet the blanket in your spare time. Drop o completed blankets and any yarn youd like to donate during regular library hours. For additional information, please call the Reference Desk at 8276960. The Nease Panther Pride Band has been selected to host a Florida Marching Band Coalition (FMBC) marching band competition, the First Coast Marching Invitational, at the school on Saturday, October 22. The all day event, featuring approximately 10 bands from Florida will begin with preliminary competition at 1:00 p.m.; nals competition should be concluded at approximately 10:00 p.m. Local middle schools will be performing the National Anthem prior to nals competition and the Nease Panther Pride Band will perform an exhibition of their 2011 show, Mad New World. Concessions will be available and tickets are for sale at the gate. Come out and support the arts in St. Johns County! Julington Creek Plantation Recreation Center invites you to join their Child Watch for their Little Monsters Halloween Party to be held on Saturday, October 29 from 6:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. at the Recreation Center. The cost is $15 per child and children from age three to 10 are invited to attend. Pre-registration is required by Wednesday, October 26. For additional information, please contact mgunther@jcpcdd.org. TOPS (Take O Pounds Sensibly) FL#493, St. Augustine has a weekly meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesdays at the Old Colee Cove Volunteer Fire Station, located at 9105 County Road 13 North (south of Buddy Boys Grocery Store). Weigh in starts at 8:30 a.m. We are a National Weight Loss Organization, fees are low and we have lots of fun, contests and inspiring programs. All are welcome; come and join us! For more information, please contact Sara Weaver at 940-7528 or Bobbi Culbreth at 824-2466. A class on proper tree pruning and maintenance will be hosted by the St. Johns County Extension Service on October 20 from 2:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. at the SJC Agricultural Building Auditorium, located at 3125 Agricultural Center Drive. Chuck Lippi, the City of St. Augustines arborist and one of only eight Board Certi ed Master Arborists in Florida, will o er instruction on keeping the trees in our landscapes beautiful and healthy for generations to come. Lippi will then join a panel discussion with Gail Compton, nature columnist; Beverly Fleming, Master Gardener; and Renee Stambaugh, native plant consultant, regarding proper selection of trees for your landscape. This class is free, open to the public and includes a native plant sale featuring trees and shrubs. For more information, please contact 209-0430 or visit www. nativeplantconsulting.com. Two high schools join their drama programs together to produce the classic musical, Les Miserables, based on the novel by Victor Hugo and with music by Claude-Michel Schonberg and lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer and Alain Boublil. The musical is produced by special arrangement with Music Theatre International and is rated PG. The Ponte Vedra High School Theatre directed by Randall Adkison and Nease High School Drama directed by Laura Adkison, join a cast of 50 students. Performances will be held at Ponte Vedra High School on November 10, 11 and 12. Evening shows are at 7:00 p.m. on all three nights, and there will be a 1:00 p.m. matinee on Saturday. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased in advance from a cast member and will be sold at the door. The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-7 meets the rst Thursday of every month 7:30 p.m. at the St. Augustine Yacht Club near the St. Augustine Lighthouse. The otilla is always looking for new members, particularly those who own aircraft, boats and have radio equipment and skills. If you are interested, please contact Vic Aquino at 460-0243.

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www.thecreekline.com October 2011 The CreekLine, Page 5 School District Journal By Contributing Writer Beverly Slough, Member, St. Johns County School Board Unlimited t raining included. Access to a eet of boats in Jacksonville and St. Augustine as well as over 60 locations across the country. Call us about trade ins.Call today 1-888-684-2214 Aordable Boating Without the Hassle.Located at Julington Creek Marina in Jacksonville and Camachee Cove Yacht Harbour in St. Augustine No Maintenance!No Insurance!No Cleaning!No Storage!www.freedomboatclub.com Music Lessons for All Ages Bob Moore 904-333-2479www.bobmooremusic.com/music_lessons Conveniently located at St. Patricks Episcopal Church Nowis the timeto make your move. Conventional and Jumbo Loans USDA Rural Developement Construction to Perm FHA and VA Loans Condo Loans Fixed or Adjustable Rates First Federal offers: All loans subject to credit underwriting and approval. Please contact a mortgage originator for more details on available loan programs. Contact Scott Neeley Your school board has been extremely busy in the last few weeks. We passed our $427.7 million budget for this year, which saw a very minor decrease in ad valorem taxes. As I mentioned before, we are working with dramatically reduced funding, nearly $19 million, which we have supplemented with monies from our reserves. We have not laid o teachers or reduced programs. In fact, we have hired 239 new teachers because of the Class Size amendment requirements. In addition, we hired 100 new non-instructional personnel. We anticipate that our reserves can stand us in good stead one more year but no longer in the current economic environment. If funding does not increase after that time, we will be forced to look carefully at sta ng and programs to balance our budget. At our September board meeting, we approved two new charter schools. St. Pauls School of Excellence is an elementary school to be located in the Lincolnville area. Its focus is to meet the needs of students who come to school less than prepared to learn. The goal is to work with the students and their families to enhance the skills that they need to be successful. The school is scheduled to open in 2012. The St. Augustine Public Montessori School also plans to open in 2012. It will provide public Montessori instruction to its students. Both schools still have issues that must be resolved as the actual charter is developed. PEACE Schools application was denied due to challenges with nances and the academic performance of its feeder school, ABLE Academy. The board is also in the process of nalizing far-reaching rezoning. Elementary L, which will open in the Palencia area in 2012, will be populated with students from the current Mill Creek zone and possibly some other neighborhoods that are close to the school. In addition, plans are being developed to bring relief to Durbin Creek Elementary, Fruit Cove Middle, Ponte Vedra Palm Valley Rawlings Elementary and R. B. Hunt Elementary. The school board will approve the nal rezoning plans at the November meeting. On October 17, Dr. Joyner will present his annual State of the Schools address. In this report, he highlights the accomplishments for last school year and lays out the goals for the current one. The event will be held at 40 Orange Street, St. Augustine and begins with a reception at 5:30 p.m. followed by the program at 6:30 p.m. I hope many of you will be able to attend this informative meeting. Take the opportunity to remain a lifelong learner by participating in a community education class o ered by our school district. Many di erent topics are addressed from grant writing to art lessons to foreign language. There is even one class entitled The Queens Etiquette. For information on course prices, dates, times, locations and registration, visit www.stjccommunityed.com or call 547-7565 or 547-7503. The second annual Golf Fore Education will take place November 5 at The Champions Club at Julington Creek Plantation. The event bene ts eight of the northwest county schools and features a special prize for a hole in one: a boat donated by North Florida Yacht Sales. Cost is $75 per player or $300 per foursome, which includes greens fee, cart, range balls, meal, prizes and gift bags. To play, make your check payable to Switzerland Point Middle School PTSO or pay with a credit card via PayPal at spmsptso@hotmail.com. All proceeds are divided equally among the eight schools. As always, thank you for your commitment to public education. If I may serve you in any way, please contact me at sloughb@stjohns.k12. .us. Please plan to join Habitat for Humanity as it is preparing for the annual Holiday Gala for Humanity, the highly anticipated event that kicks o the holiday season each year in St. Augustine. All are invited to attend the event which will be held at the River House on Thursday, December 8. Come out and enjoy the 12 Tastes of Christmas, where your favorite restaurants will be o ering food tastings and wine pairings. In its 17th year, the Gala festivities will include lively auctions, live music and dancing.Habitat for Humanity prepares for annual major fundraiserHabitat for Humanity is currently seeking sponsors for this signature event: The Hammer and Holly Sponsorship ($1,000 donation) and the Bolts and Bells Sponsorship ($500 donation). We are proud to announce that the following businesses have already committed to sponsor our annual event: CITI, Bank of America, Marsh Creek Country Club/PARC Group, Womens Council of Realtors St. Augustine Chapter, St. Johns County Board of Realtors and the Clark Family, says Diane Quick, Executive Director. If youre interested in making a donation, becoming an event sponsor, or volunteering, please call Aubrey Mulligan, special events coordinator, at 687-7694. Habitat for Humanitys Gala for Humanity will be held at the River House on Thursday, December 8 from 6:00 p.m. until 10:00 p.m. The ticket price is $55 per person or $100.00 per couple. Please call the Habitat for Humanity o ce today at 826-3252 to reserve your spot.A recent e-mail to CDD Supervisor Sam Lansdale was an appalling attempt to silence him and his right to question JCP CDD operations. Silencing Sam is an attempt to silence the majority of taxpayers. Residents dont want increased assessments caused by lax management of the facility and improper oversight by the CDD Board. Go Sam! Sam was elected with a greater margin over his opponent (60 percent to 40 percent) than the other two winners. Obviously his message resonated better with taxpayers and therefore represents the majority of voters in the 2010 election. Sam asks pertinent questions at CDD meetings and the Board and others should know hes keeping his election promises and should be applauded for his work. Without Sams efforts and tough questions about CDD management and operations we would almost certainly have had increased taxes for 2012. I was involved in the initial ad-hoc committee responsible for the original resident survey leading to the facility we now have. I also served on the CDD Board during the period of nancing, planning, construction and decision making so I know exactly what we have and why we have it. After the facility opened they added sta and bene ts that drove CDD costs higher, including doubling the salary of the General Manager and a tennis pro earning a six gure income. In 2010 it seemed the CDD faced another tax increase when I wrote two editorials (The CreekLine and St. Augustine Record) cautioning residents to wake up to the possibility Letter to the Editorof another increase based on escalating operating costs. This began the wake-up call that continued through this 2011 budget cycle. This is a community recreation facility, not a Country Club. The facility is paid for by all residents including those who never use it some are on xed incomes and others are unemployed. Regardless, all residents are represented by the Board who must always be careful stewards of taxpayer money. If anyone doubts that Sams views represent the majority of residents, we can conduct a professional survey to learn their views. All homeowners were surveyed before this facility was built so why not now? Lets learn the views of the majority rather than make assumptions based on who speaks the loudest at CDD meetings. Are we subsidizing activities for which rates are too low? Are we oversta ed for services o ered? Do we have too many salaried managers? Are we offering bene ts we cant a ord? Is the skate park meeting its budget targets? Fee for service operations should breakeven; if not, fees should rise or services should be discontinued. We have a wonderful facility that surrounding communities envy, but increased assessments will be detrimental considering other communities now advertise no CDD fee. Think about it! Al Abbatiellogot news?editor@thecreekline.com

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Page 6, The CreekLine October 2011 www.thecreekline.com The Sheriff Reports By Contributing Writer David B. Shoar, St. Johns County Sheriff Huntington Learning Centers, Inc. Independently owned and operated.HLC-2011 MANDARIN886 9600BEACHES220 1212 Accredited CITA & SACS Trans-Regional SchoolIndependently owned & operated CLFounded in 1977, Huntington Learning Center is the oldest supplemental education provider in the nation. Our teachers help students of ages and motivation to succeed. Whether your child is struggling in school or simply searching for an enriching academic experience, our program will make a difference.Success in School Tomorrow Begins with Huntington Today. $50CALL TODAYSAVE READING, WRITING MATH, SPELLIING PHONICS, STUDY SKILLS STATE TESTING PREP CONFIDENCE, MOTIVATION, SELF-ESTEEM SAT & ACT PRIVATE TUTORING FORSAT/PSAT/ PREP Trick or Treat 108 Bartram Oaks WalkLocated inside the Spa and Salon at Bartram Walk.899-1234www.hairbycarl.comCarl SlackOrganic Color is NO Trick...... It is a TREAT! Now using Organic, Ammonia Free Hair color. Keeping your Health and Condition of your hair a priority. Call Carl for your TREAT. SCRAPBOOK 12276 San Jose Blvd Suite 701 Jacksonville, FL 32223 www.enchantedscrapbook.com (904) 647-6772 Come Scrap Your Stories! W e can help you preserve your memories! From the beginner to the advanced scrapbooker, we have what you need! Located in the heart of Mandarin on San Jose Blvd just north of the Julington Creek Bridge. Bring in this ad for 5% OFF your entire purchase Oswald ChiropracticAt Bartram Park www.oswaldchiropracticjax.com Exam X-Rays (If Medically Necessary) 1st TreatmentFREE Value $150.00 +* Massage (MA41847) (OUR NO RISK OFFICE POLICY) THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT WHICH IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITH IN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT.904.268.9100 Exp. 11/15/11 October is Crime Prevention Month and crime prevention is an essential function at the St. Johns County Sheri s O ce. We have specially trained deputies, certi ed Crime Prevention Practitioners, dedicated to the mission of crime prevention. One of the most important components of crime prevention is you, as well as your friends and neighbors willingness to extend the eyes and ears of law enforcement to report suspicious activity. You will nd an entire section dedicated to helping strengthen this important partnership on our website at www. sjso.org. The mission of crime prevention is to encourage citizens to protect their homes and businesses against burglaries; to encourage citizen involvement in the reporting of crime; to develop appropriate programming for various interested groups; to Crime prevention and Halloween safetydistribute materials about crime prevention; and to serve as a liaison with community organizations and other interested community groups. Some of the programs our Crime Prevention Unit o ers include Computer and Fraud Crimes, Crimes against the Elderly, Financial Crimes, Home and Business Security Surveys, Identity Theft and establishing an e ective Neighborhood Watch Program. The Crime Prevention section of our website has the contact information you need to arrange for a program or to interact with our specialists. Burglary is likely to be the crime that a ects the most law abiding citizens. There are a few simple things you can do to assist in the event you become a victim. Write down the name brand, model and serial number of all electronic devices, appliances and tools. Take photos of every room in your home to include all furniture and appliances that could also be of use should you have an insurance claim. Be sure to photograph your valuable jewelry as well. Here is another excellent tip from the National Crime Prevention Council. If you have a printer or scanner take all of the important cards and documents you carry in your wallet or purse, such as licenses, credit cards, insurance cards and membership cards. Arrange them on the glass then scan and print both sides on a single sheet of paper. Keep these copies in a safe place such as in a zip lock bag in a secure area. Scanners and printers are available for a very nominal fee at all branches of the St. Johns County Public Library. On a lighter note, law enforcement agencies are also celebrating an important birthday of one of our best known partners in Crime Prevention. McGru the Crime Dog turns 30 years old. When McGru was created by the Ad Council in 1980, the goal was to reach children with crime prevention messages but he quickly became popular with everyone. During the rst two years, even though he didnt have a name, he had his famous tag line Take a bite out of crime. A nationwide contest was launched to give the well-dressed bloodhound some personal identity. Among the most popular suggestions were Sherlock Bones, Sargedog, Keystone Cop Dog and J. Edgar Dog. The winning name McGru was submitted by a New Orleans police o cer. McGru remains so popular he even has his own web page at www.McGru .org. I suggest you log on with your children for an excellent presentation on dealing with a current and serious topic of bullying. I would like to close this month with some Halloween safety tips: Accompany your kids if you dont think theyre old enough to trick-or-treat on their own. If they are old enough to trick-ortreat without an adult, be sure to tell your kids to stay in a group. Designate a route before your kids begin trick-or-treating and emphasize the importance that they stick to it. Have your children trickor-treat in areas where there are a lot of people around. They should also avoid taking shortcuts through alleys and parking lots. Ensure your kids only visit houses with lights on and you might also suggest that the houses they visit have some sort of Halloween decoration on the porch. Make sure your children do not go inside someones house. They can get their candy from the porch. Dress kids in a bright costume so others can see them. Also, have them wear re ective strips or carry a glow stick or ashlight. Ensure your kids costumes are not so long that they can trip over them. Instead of masks, have Gerard E. Masters, III became a Marine at Parris Island, South Carolina on September 16, 2011. He was in the 2nd Battalion, Fox Company Platoon 2072. He earned the rank of Private First Class. He graduated from Bartram Trail High School in 2011 where he was involved in weight lifting and AFJROTC for four years. He is the son of Gerard Masters and Caprice Long. After his leave from boot camp, he will complete Marine Combat Training in Jacksonville, North Carolina and Military Occupational Specialty School for Amphibious Assault Vehicle training at Camp Pendleton in San Diego, California. After his training has been completed, he will attend FSCJ and join his reserve unit Company B, 4th AA Battalion The Iron Gators. Congratulations PFC. Gerard Masters, we thank you for defending this great country that we live in. your children wear make-up so they can see well and, most importantly, check your kids candy before they eat it. Throw out any candy that is not in its original wrapper or looks like it has been tampered with. If you should nd candy that has appeared to have been tampered with, call your local law enforcement agency immediately. I hope we have another safe year for a fun celebration of Halloween in St. Johns County. As always I appreciate your input and feedback. You can contact me at dshoar@sjso.org.

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www.thecreekline.com October 2011 The CreekLine, Page 7 ( 904 ) 825 9960 In the Winn-Dixie Shopping Center on CR 210 W2220 CR 210 W, Suite 312, St. Johns Florida 32259 Fall Special10% OFFAny dental treatment, including crowns, bridges, partials, veneers, etc. Not valid with other oers. Oer Expires 11/17/11New Patient Special Adults $99 & Children $79Includes dental exam and x-rays, a uoride treatment, teeth cleaning and polishing. Not valid with other oers. Oer Expires 11/17/11 Gentle, Caring Dentistry for the Whole Family Welcome to Kids-Go-RoundSt. Johns Premier Childrens Seasonal Consignment Sale Visit www.kidsgoround.org for more information. SALE DATES:Friday, Oct 21 | Pre-Sale Saturday, Oct 22 | 8am 6pm Sunday, Oct 23 | 8am 1pm 1/2 Price Day SALE LOCATION: Julington Creek Publix Shopping C enter. Plantation Plaza (in the old Blockbuster location) 2750 Racetrack Road Jacksonville, FL 32259Ladies......Want to earn money for the items your children no longer use?Is it time to clean out your closets? Accepting new consignors for childrens AND womens items! Vendor spots are still open. Contact information: www.2ndgoround.orgFind us on Facebook (Kids-Go-Round) for coupons and other deals! The business of government on the level of community development districts (CDDs) in St. Johns County is actually big business. Of the 39 CDDs in St. Johns County, 23 of them are either managed or advised by two large commercial companies specializing in such services. Some CDDs split management chores between the companies and inhouse employees. Governmental Management Services works with 17 of the districts and Rizetta and Company, Incorporated, works with six districts. The remaining 16 districts in the county are either under direct management by the county or smaller, similar, private organizations. Information on the web site of Governmental Management Services indicates the company operates throughout Florida and in Tennessee. The company advises CDDs on bond issues, district administration and other things beyond management services. Rizetta and Company has a healthy amount of district business throughout Florida and also extends into Alabama. In addition to managing districts, Rizetta manages bond nancings and community associations. While the various, individual CDDs are under the control of the elected boards of the districts, some CDD day-to-day operations are handled by the private companies for a set cost. Often, these companies appear to have grown out of extraneous services o ered by certi ed public accounting practices, turning into far- ung, free standing large businesses. An interesting aspect of these companies is the functions they provide under contract to CDDs. At times, these companies act as privatized government, performing various services and chores for fees to CDDs. CDDs in St. Johns County associated with Governmental Management Services are: Aberdeen CDD Antigua CDD Brandy Creek CDD Deer eld Preserve Durbin Crossing CDD Heritage Park CDD Isles of Bartram Park CDDSecond of a SeriesCDDs in St. Johns County mean big dollars and big businessBy J. Bruce Richardson Julington Creek Plantation CDD Las Calinas CDD Main Street CDD Moultrie Creek CDD Rivers Edge CDD Sampson Creek CDD Tolomato CDD Treaty Oaks CDD Turnbull Creek CDD Twin Creeks CDD CDDs in St. Johns County associated with Rizetta and Company are: Glen St. John Heritage landing CDD Maderia (Outside City of St. Augustine) Maderia (Inside City of St. Augustine) Northridge Lake CDD Sandy Creek CDD World Commerce CDD Some CDDs, such as Julington Creek Plantation Community Development District, have greater self management, including directly hiring, managing and paying employees. During peak, summer season, the Julington Creek employee count can reach as high as 215 to 230 sta members, many of these being students working part time in recreation areas. During the rest of the year, the employee count averages 130 people, including ve supervisors. Of this smaller group, 24 are considered to be full time and eligible for bene ts such as health care policies and vacation time. Julington Creek Plantation CDD has 5,032 single family homes, 753 multifamily homes, 23 commercial units, two church units and one golf course unit. The original intent of CDDs was for the districts to be ongoing, formal taxing organizations which would relieve community developers the chore of building infrastructure such as roads and some utilities. Many CDDs have grown beyond this initial simple concept into full scale organizations mimicking full municipal governments, but without police, re and paramedic protection. And, some CDDs have created programs which overlap traditional homeowner association provided services, such as recreation features. The State of Florida taxing rules governing CDDs often create interesting and expensive scenarios for non-residential occupants of CDDs. Many people incorrectly believe CDD fees only apply to residential homes. Businesses located in the boundaries of CDDs must pay annual fees, too. Julington Creek Plantation CDD expects a total of $801,994.82 in fees from business this year. Just 23 businesses will split those fees, with the largest going to Publix Supermarkets. Since CDD fees are on top of county levied property taxes, these fees can become burdensome to small businesses. One local small business located inside the CDD, with an identical business at a second location in Jacksonville (Duval County) reports a total tax/CDD assessment of $60,000 in St. Johns County in the Julington Creek Plantation CDD and in Jacksonville, only $25,000. Two churches are located in the Julington Creek Plantation CDD, which, together, pay annual CDD fees of $25,900.94. These same two churches, under traditional state law, pay no property taxes to the county and are exempt from paying sales tax. The typical residential CDD fee in Julington Creek Plantation is $830 for single family homes, and $516 for multi-family homes. These fees do not include homeowner association fees.Your home can look like a model home!Chandler Designs specializes in decorating model homes for the home building industry as well as working with private individuals. I was thrilled to win eight Laurel Awards this year for Best Interior Merchandising from the Northeast Florida Builders Association, says Wendy Chandler, the companys president. It is always such an honor to receive that kind of recognition for your work! Chandler Designs work can be seen in model homes by Lennar Homes, Mattamy Homes and Standard Paci c Homes. Chandler Designs has now opened a retail store on County Road 210 called The Model Home Store. Everyone loves to look at model homes and get inspired, but nding the same great furniture or accessories for your own home that you see in a model can be a challenge, says Chandler. So I decided to open The Model Home Store, where we can help you make your home look like a model home! Its a fabulous boutique store with everything from furniture, accessories and ooring to custom draperies, upholstery and even a baby boutique. The store also sells unique gifts and fashion jewelry. If I dont have what you are looking for in the store, we can sit in my library and go through the dozens of catalog from my suppliers and I can help you nd it, says Chandler. Each month we also have a warehouse sale where we will sell furnishings from model homes that have closed. These items are sold at well below cost and are practically new. Come see what were all about, you wont be disappointed! Be sure to see Chandler Designs ad in this issue of The CreekLine! gation of 60 into 400 members. I owe my success not only to my faith, but to the support of my wife Jessica, he said. Together we are doing Gods work. His task is laid out before him with River of Life currently having a single service on Sundays at 9:30 a.m. with an attendance of 100 to 150, including 20 youth of high school and middle school age along with approximately 25 younger children. Volunteer Youth Coordinator Karen Strok sees those youth as a great foundation for the building of the congregations future. She described how they actively participate in the annual Pumpkin Patch, community Easter Egg Hunt, summer vacation bible study and visits to Westminster Woods where they annually go caroling during Christmas for the residents. Their favorite, though, has to be Move It! which is the new middle school ministry. Each Wednesday they pick up kids attending Fruit Cove Middle school for a eld trip to a surprise destination. Each time they either do a service project or have some fun bowling or knocking a golf ball around a miniature golf course. With a congregation of young parents and their children, Pastor Neely has willing partners in not only celebrating a new building. But he also has an enthusiastic team to help build the congregation. River River of Life cont. from pg 1of Life Church de nitely this year opens a new chapter to the future with the new charter, new pastor and new building. The anticipated completion date for the new building is January 2012. got news?editor@thecreekline.com

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Page 8, The CreekLine October 2011 www.thecreekline.com 12058 San Jose Boulevard, Suite 102 J (904) 880-3131Alan M. Krantz, D.D.S.KrantzDentalCare.com $30/mo. Convenient Appointments Before & After Work or School!Trusted, Comfortable & Affordable Dental Care for the Entire FamilyEmergencies Welcome! Convenient Payment Options Available Ask About Our Affordable Dental Plan for Uninsured Patients! $30/mo. OCTOBER IS FIRE SAFETY MONTH PUBLIC SAFETY FIVES SAVE LIVES UPWARD BASKETBALL & CHEERLEADING $100 REGISTRATION FEE SIGN UP NOW FOR Fruit Cove Baptist Church Im back! You may recall we took some time o from our regular Scenic Highway meetings during the summer, but were now back at it. Our most recent meeting was on September 8 but not at our normal venue seems we were accidentally locked out of the County Annex Building and had to meet in an outdoor location in Julington Creek Plantation. Despite the hardship we had a good meeting and accomplished a good deal. We discussed, in depth, the most recent FDOT/St. Johns County planning to potentially destroy a 200 plus year old oak tree at the corner of State Road 13 and State Road 16 near the Heritage Landing development. FDOT had planned a lane improvement project for northbound tra c onto State Road 13 but St. Johns County asked to include a right turn lane onto State Road 16 to accommodate tra c mostly generated by Heritage Landing. This right turn addition creates a problem take down the tree and a cost to the county of less than $100,000. Other options are to go around the tree at a cost of just under $2 million or do nothing at no cost to the county. Our request to the county is to do nothing. Spare the ancient tree and the trees on the west side of State Road 13. As I see it (backed by fact), this conundrum is the result of county oversight during the approval process of Heritage Landing. Theres more to the story and if interested send an e-mail to alabbat@bellsouth. net. We also discussed planning for the Old Settlers Reunion and Oral History gathering to be held October 16 and 17 at Alpine Groves Park. This is William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway updateBy Contributing Writer Al Abbatiello, alabbat@bellsouth.netour second annual Old Settlers Reunion and invite you attend for some old fashioned fun, music and entertainment. The Oral History gathering is a celebration of participants in our Oral History project wherein these long term residents recorded some of the details of the customs, traditions and relationships in the early days of St. Johns County between the years 1920 into the 1970s. The oral history project started with funding from the grant awarded the William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway Management Council several years ago. A copy of the oral history (recorded and written) now resides at the Bartram Trail Library Branch on Davis Pond Boulevard in Julington Creek Plantation. A copy will also be presented to the St. Augustine Historical Society in St. Augustine in early October Were on target for preparing a long term Strategic Plan, including funding sources at our next meeting on October 13, 2011 at the County Annex and wed love to see you take part in this planning. We have lots to do and need volunteers to help us keep our part of the county scenic and a signi cant point of interest Were still conducting a ra e (courtesy of our local Garden Club); ra e proceeds will buy trees to be planted on State Road 13 when and where theyre needed. Prizes include a homemade quilt, porcelain collectable by Lynn Chase and oil on canvas Seascape by Beverly Fleming. Tickets are $3 each or four for $10. For tickets, please call Claire Fioriti (287-9772) or Al Abbatiello (287-5577). See you on October 13 at 6:30 p.m. The club has been busy as usual these past few months. We are welcoming our incoming exchange student from Poland, Przemyslaw Gorbat. He is attending Bartram Trail High School and is presently living with his rst host family, Bob and Donna Leonard. Our outbound students are also settling into the routines in their new host countries. The Leonards daughter, Christi, is in Brazil and Alayna Mobley is in Hungary. You can read their journal entries at www. rye orida.org. We successfully held our third annual Poker Night last month. We would like to thank EJCON Corporation for their generous support of this event. Also thanks to all our players this year. The American ags at the Julington Creek Bridge on September 11 were courtesy of the Rotary Club of Bartram Trail. They are part of our ongoing ag project where you can get a ag installed in your yard six holidays a year for only $30. An order form and more information are available on our website at www.bartram-Rotary Club of Bartram Trail UpdateBy Contributing Writer Jamie Mackeytrailrotary.org. We invite you to join us on October 15 for our 2011 Fruit Cove Pub Crawl. We will be starting at 4:00 p.m. at Pizza Palace then we are going to Wakame, then across Race Track Road to Brickstone Pizza, back over to Cork and Keg and ending up at Shannons Irish Pub. Starbucks and Tropical Smoothie are there as anytime stops if you need a little help getting through. Ra e prizes will be awarded at Shannons at 8:00 p.m. so be sure to pace yourself and be at the nish line. This years theme is pirates and we have additional prizes for the best dressed pirates. The cost of the event is $30 which will bene t local and international charities of the Rotary Club of Bartram Trail. You will get a souvenir tee shirt and beer mug, as well as a fun evening. We have a maximum of 150 tickets that are available as advance purchase only. Call us at 535-8411 and well meet you to get you your tickets or drop them in the mail to you. The event is sponsored by St. Johns Boat and RV Storage, Air Doctors, D. Brad Hughes PA, Willow House/MaryBeth Murray, SunTrust/The MorleyCarnley Group, Pinch-A-Penny, Sears Carpet and Air Duct Cleaning and the generosity of the participating restaurants. We are also gearing up to participate in the Veterans Day Sunset Celebration on November 10 in Veterans Park. Look for more information as that date approaches and join us as we honor our veterans. The club meets every Thursday morning at Westminster Woods on Julington Creek. Visitors are welcome. Please visit our website or contact club President Frank Gwaltney at 803-9850 for more information about Rotary and our club.

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www.thecreekline.com October 2011 The CreekLine, Page 9 i pick paint color.www.pamsatherstudio.com pam satherthe right color paint carpet hardwood tile904.466-0370 watch Pams design segments on First Coast Living11:00 am Dr. Levine is dedicated to your familys health through every stage of life. He has served Julington Creek for more than 12 years and is ready to provide you with a medical home. Services include: Sports/school physicals Immunizations Well visits for adults and children GYN care Coordination of care for chronic conditions (diabetes, hypertension, etc.) On-site lab for all blood drawsFinding the right family doctor just got easier.Same-day acute appointments 287.2794Baptist Primary Care Julington Creek1400 Bishop Estates Road, St. Johns, FL 32259 Donald J. Levine, MD Board-Certified, Family Practice, along with Carol N. Sims, PA-C 13www.baptistprimarycare.net/levine-md Flu Vaccine Available We can handle all of the details! We know the ins and outs of the local real estate market and have the knowledge and commitment to meet your needs. If you are looking to buy a home, sell your home, invest in property, or build a new home, let us be your real estate representatives. Contact us today for all of your real estate needs. big and small An Independently Owned and Operated Member of The Prudential Real Estate Aliates, Inc. Prudential is a service mark of The Prudential Insurance Company of America. Equal Housing Opportunity. All information deemed reliable, but not guaran teed. we sell them allNeed help buying, selling or investing in real estate?Stan & Jan Timbrook REALTORS Walkers will go around the clock in the battle against cancer when the American Cancer Societys Relay For Life of Bartram Trail gets underway with teams of residents gathering at Bartram Trail High School beginning at 12:00 noon on Saturday, May 5, 2012 with a goal of raising $200,000 in the ght against cancer. Relay For Life events are held overnight as individuals and teams camp out at the Bartram Trail High School track with the goal of keeping at least one team member on the track or pathway at all times throughout the evening. Teams do most of their fundraising prior to the event, but some teams also hold creative fundraisers at their camp sites during Relay. Relay brings together friends, families, busi-Families and friends ght cancer through Relay For Lifenesses, hospitals, schools, faithbased groups . people from all walks of life all aimed at furthering the American Cancer Societys e orts to save lives by helping people stay well, by helping them get well, by nding cures and by ghting back. Relay is a unique opportunity for our community to come together to celebrate people who have battled cancer, remember those weve lost, and ght back against the disease, said Pamela Pearce, Relay For Life of Bartram Trail event chair. Many of the participants are cancer survivors, which serves as a reminder that the Bartram area communities are not immune to this disease and that by participating in Relay, we are joining with the American Cancer Societys e orts to create a world with less cancer and more birthdays. For more information, please visit our website at BartramRelay.com. Funds raised at Relay For Life of Bartram Trail help the American Cancer Society to impact the lives of those touched by cancer within the community. The American Cancer Society invests more than $120 million in cancer research funding each year, and more than $15 million goes to researchers in Florida. Relay For Life still has committee positions open as well. Individuals interested in helping to plan the event in the areas of fundraising and sponsorship, marketing/PR and event activities are asked to contact Laura Petrillo, Community Representative with the American Cancer Society, at 391-3644. To locate a Relay For Life event and nd out how you may get involved, please call 1-800-227-2345 or visit RelayForLife.org.Your JCP CDD facilities, amenities and programs are the envy of both current and prospective Northeast Florida homeowners. The variety of recreation services and programs both appeal to and bene t many in the Julington Creek community. This fall the tness sta will be hosting new Les Mills classes and interactive seminars focusing on health and tness. Also, new group dog training and socialization classes begin and dont forget the Ghoulington Creek Family Halloween Dance which will include a costume contest and parade around the pool. Additional information on these and many more activities can be found at www. jcpcdd.org. I encourage you to sign up for free e-mail alerts at our website to receive e-mail reminders of upcoming events Julington Creek Plantation CDD reportBy Contributing Writer Sam Lansdale, Supervisor, Julington Creek Plantation Community Development Districtand programs. With such a great facility and so many diverse activities available, I am dedicated to ensuring we have superior facilities and services, all without raising assessments. I believe that CDD assessments paid by JCP property owners should be used to pay existing bond indebtedness and pay to keep the core facility, including the grounds, facilities and related equipment (i.e. pools, tennis courts, sportsplex, gym, etc) and basic administrative functions open, well maintained and operating e ciently. Any additional services and programs o ered by the CDD should be user-paid and generate suf- cient revenues to at least cover the extra expenses required to provide such services. Examples include restaurant sales, parties, child care, all teams, all camps, swim lessons, tennis lessons, tness lessons, basketball lessons, skate lessons and any other services provided to select groups. The entire tax base does not receive direct bene t from those extra services as the users do. Due to the publics continued involvement, progress is being made with regard to reducing user-paid department losses and increasing transparency. During the recent budget process the special events department was reorganized towards becoming revenue positive and at the last CDD meeting the swim team department presented a proposal to increase membership to hopefully become revenue positive. The adjustments made in these departments increased revenue projections and/or decreased expense projections, all without a reduction in the level of service. I applaud the e orts made thus far and feel we should encourage additional user-paid departments to follow this lead towards creating a better nancial position, which will help reduce the pressure to raise assessments in the future. With your support, I intend to continue e orts to achieve this outcome. We work for you and I encourage you to attend the meetings and voice your concerns or opinions on how we are conducting your business. The next JCP CDD meetings will take place on October 11, 2011 and November 08, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. at the JCP Recreation Center. Feel free to contact me day or night via email or phone (SLansdale@jcpcdd.org 5094902). This article is my opinion and in no way constitutes nor implies District opinion, endorsement, sponsorship or viewpoint. The views expressed may or may not be shared by the other JCP CDD Supervisors.Editors Note: The CreekLine is appreciative that Supervisor Lansdale approached us and offered to write a column for us to share with our readers. The CreekLine is, and has always been, agreeable to publishing columns penned by our elected of cials so that they may communicate directly with our readers, their constituents. Any questions or requests for additional public servant columns may be directed to editor@ thecreekline.com. A Note from County Commissioner Cyndi Stevenson:Due to the volume of calls and inquiries regarding the county budget, please see following link that should help answer questions about the county budget and scal stewardship.www.sjc .us/District1

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Page 10, The CreekLine October 2011 www.thecreekline.com The foods and drinks we choose affect our overall health, including our gums and teeth. Most people know that sweetened sodas are not good for them. But did you know that non-diet soft drinks contain as much as 11 teaspoons of sugar per serving? Americans drank more than 53 gallons of sodas per person in 2000. Dentist can usually spot a soda drinker due to cavities and white spots in their teeth know as decalcications, which can Oral Health Tip Of The MonthEffect of Sodas on your Teethbe the start of cavities in the tooth. Sodas contain citric and phosphoric acids which are harmful to your teeth. Prolonged exposure to acid can erode the enamel in your teeth causing permanent damage. Other drinks such as gatorade, lemonades,crystal light, diet sodas,etc... are very acidic and can increase the risk of enamel erosion. The easiest way to prevent teeth erosion is to limit eating and drinking between meals, be mindful of the sugary foods and beverages. Dr. Gus J. Gari D.D.S. To Schedule an appointment call287-0033 If you must drink a soda or sugary beverage, drink it all in one sitting instead of sipping throughout the day. Be sure to brush your teeth two to three times a day, especially after meals and before you go to bed. Floss once a day to remove the bacteria and plaque between your teeth. Get to your dentist at least twice a year for a professional examination and cleaning. For more information please contact Dr. Gus Gari 287-0033. ACCREDITEDACCREDITATION ASSOCIATION for AMBULATORYHEALTH CARE EYE CENTEROF ST. AUGUSTINE & WORLD GOLF VILLAGETHE EYE SURGERY CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE AAAHC 940-9200 T T Baptist Health has announced that it made this years InformationWeek 500, an annual listing of the nations most innovative users of business technology, claiming a spot in the top half of the list this year. The 2011 list was revealed September 13 at the exclusive InformationWeek 500 Conference in Dana Point, California. Baptist Health was recognized for its ongoing project, initiated in 2010, to bring an electronic medical record (EMR) to all ve of its facilities. The goal is to make patient care safer and improve patient outcomes. This endeavor, which involves installing new infrastructure, implementing software and providing comprehensive training to employees, involves a team of hundreds including information services, physicians and nursing sta as well as external business partners and software providers. Going fully digital is the future of health care, said Roland Garcia, senior vice president and chief information o cer of Baptist Health. Baptist Health is pleased to be recognized among the InformationWeek 500 for our initiative to create one electronic medical record throughout our system of four adult hospitals, one chilEvery once in a while, I have caught a unique lm presentation at the 5 Points Theatre in the Riverside area. They usually have a very limited run and are not the blockbusters one expects to see in the multi screen venues across town. Rather, they are selected from what might be considered some of the best in lm production. The theatre itself is also unique. Built originally in 1927 and known then as the Riverside Theatre, it was constructed to be able to accommodate live theatre as well as the new lm genre. This was done in case no one wanted to attend the new talkies! I was given to understand that it was also the rst building in the area to be air conditioned! Now the 5 Points Theatre is embarking on another adven-Baptist Health earns ranking in top technology listdrens hospital, a home health care agency and our network of more than 100 primary care and specialty physician o ces. The federal government has mandated that all healthcare providers put electronic records in place, but Baptist Health was already at the forefront of this new age. Baptist Medical Center South was designed and opened as a fully-digital hospital in 2005. Now, all three of Baptist Healths community hospitals Baptist South, Baptist Beaches and Baptist Nassau are fully digital and using an electronic medical record. So are Baptist Home Health Care and many of the o ces within Baptist Primary Care. Baptist Medical Center and Wolfson Childrens Hospital have some EMR functions in place and will become fully digital in 2012, while all other locations are implementing signi cant enhancements. InformationWeek annually identi es and honors the nations most innovative users of information technology with its Top 500 listing and spotlights the power of innovation in information technology. For 23 years, the InformationWeek 500 has chronicled and honored the most innovative users of business technology, said InformationWeek Editor In Chief Rob Preston. In this day and age, however, being innovative isnt enough. Companies and their IT organizations need to innovate faster than ever before to stay a step or two ahead of their customers, partners, and competitors. This years ranking placed special emphasis on those high-octane business technology innovators. Additional details on the InformationWeek 500 can be found online at www.informationweek.com/iw500/.Exciting happenings at 5 Points TheatreBy Betty Swenson Bergmark, Professor Emeritus, Jacksonville Universityture. Mike and Jack Shad, the current owners of the building are leasing it to Tim Massett and his wife and partner for this venture, Shana-David Massett. They plan to return to Jacksonville to reawaken the facility with some renovations that will make this a very special place to enjoy some outstanding movies as well as live productions. The upgrades will include installing a larger screen, comfy seats and acoustic improvements. A full kitchen will also be installed to accommodate seat side service from an expanded menu of house prepared specialties. Add to this some unique brews and wines and where could you nd a better place to watch a movie? All this will take money! A fund drive is underway to raise a minimum of $95,000 needed to achieve these goals. It is o to a great start. Contributions on various levels are available and receive bonus tickets for upcoming events. In the meantime, presentations continue. In addition to specially selected and scheduled movies, 5 Points Theatre is one of the hosts for the Jacksonville Film Festival. Among the many other participants are the Cummer, the San Marco Theatre, MOCA, Theatre Jacksonville and Jacoby Hall. The mission of the Jacksonville Film Festival is to provide entertainment, educational opportunities, programs and events that enrich the arts and the culture of NE Florida, while inspiring a new generation. Membership is available with special bene ts and discounts. The next series of presentations are currently planned for October 13 to 16. The o erings at 5 Points are scheduled for October 15 and will include World Shorts at 10:00 a.m., and Florida Shorts at 12:00 noon, in addition to Breaking and Entering at 2:00 p.m., El Traspatio at 4:00 p.m., Everyday Sunshine at 6:30 p.m., A NY Thing at 9:00 p.m. and I am Bish at 11:00 p.m. All this in addition to regularly scheduled movies! For additional information on the Jacksonville Film Festival, including times, subjects and locations, you can call 8589889 or visit the web at www. jax lmfest.com The 5 Points box o ce can be reached at 359-0047. Advertise inThe CreekLineIts good for business!886-4919LG@rtpublishinginc.com mined by number of wind instruments; basically all band members except for percussion and color guard) plus a certain number of other high scorers, will advance to the nals competition. This is where it really gets exciting as by now it is evening and the bands are thrilled to go all out and perform under the lights. The day ends with a full retreat of nalist bands, similar to the parade of nations in the Olympics. It is a beautiful sight to see hundreds of musicians marching a full loop around the track in unison to a cadence as they make their way to their bands area to await the nal results. Bands are scored on many di erent attributes, including music performance, visual performance, general e ects, auxiliary, percussion and drum majors, with multiple trophies awarded. All bands desire the large Grand Champion award! The event will also include FCMI cont. from pg 1 a joint performance by the Pacetti Bay and Landrum Middle School Bands of the National Anthem prior to the nals competition. Exhibitions by a college band as well as the Nease Panther Pride Marching Band of their show Mad New World are also scheduled. FCMI is a family friendly event and the entire community is invited. It is a great place to spend the day, especially for those families with aspiring marching band students. Delicious concessions are available from a variety of vendors; so come and spend the day enjoying the show! Tickets, which are available the day of the competition at the gate, are $10 and there is a $1 discount for students of all ages wearing their schools band shirt. Dont miss this golden opportunity to experience the thrill of a marching band show right here in northern St. Johns County!

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www.thecreekline.com October 2011 The CreekLine, Page 11 CRAFTERS WANTED To reserve a table, please call 904 287-7300 904-209-1320 2758 Racetrack Road Publix Plantation Plaza Tues Fri 9-8 & Sat 9-7 Walk-In Special Never been oered before.No call-in or schedule in advance appointments ....walk in only. Cannot be combined with other oers. Both locations. Take a chance.....walk in and ask....if we have time available your in! (Oer valid October 11 November 15, 2011!) cialist is now at Panache! Now oering Goldwell Hiring talented Stylists461-9552 Concerns about your drinking water?Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 Years. Straight answers No high pressure. 262 0197 3760 KORI RD. Stronger...Faster...Better RACE TRACK RDFLORA BRANCH BLVD. SR 13PUBLIX Fred Baldwin, PT, DPT, SCS, ATC, PES and Tobi Baldwin, PT, DPT, MS, OCS, MTC, FAAOMPTNow oering Mat Pilates classes on Monday 6:30pm, Thursday 10am call for more information and to register. In 2012 Girl Scouts of the USA will mark 100 years of inspiring girls and young women with the ideals of courage, con- dence and character. Millions of active Girl Scouts, volunteers and alumnae will come together to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouting. Will you be one of them? Girl Scout troops from the Creeks Cove Service Unit supporting schools like Hickory Creek Elementary, Cunningham Creek Elementary, Liberty Pines Academy and Timberlin Creek Elementary will kick o the celebrations of the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts on October 22 at Alpine Groves Park by the river from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. This event is open to the public and patches will be distributed to the rst 150 Girl Our Scholastic Book Fair was an incredible success. I would like to extend my heartfelt appreciation to all the volunteers who worked so hard to make it the success it was. A special thank you to Karin Gowens, our library media aide and the three-parent chairwomen, Kim Eichorn, Edith Buonacore and Anja Wells. Every day we sold out of copies of The Strange Case of Origami Yoda, the sequel Darth Paper Strikes Back, The Eleventh Plague, I Pledge Allegiance, Torn, Killer Pizza: The Slice, Alibi Junior High and the new 39 Clues book, The Medusa Plot. The runaway best seller was de nitely Darth Paper Strikes Back. The earlier book from the series is on the Sunshine State Young Readers list for this year. A large number of students had already read it which contributing to the huge sales of Darth Paper. Our actual sales were up $1200 from the past four years. Thank you also, to parents and students for your overwhelming support. The money will be used Retired Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Learning Martha Mickler has been named by Superintendent Joseph Joyner as the Interim Deputy Superintendent for Academic Services for the St. Johns County School District. Mickler will be stepping into this role to ll the opening left by Pam Stewart, who was recently named Public Schools Chancellor by the Florida Department of Education. She will assume her duties on October 17. During her tenure at the SJCSD, Mickler served as assistant principal and then principal of Julington Creek Elementary School. She opened Cunningham Creek Elementary School and served as its principal for six years. While there she received the Commissioner of Educations Outstanding Elementary Principal Achievement Award. In 2001 she was named Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Learning. Mickler most recently served as a member of the Core Planning Team for the districts 20102015 Strategic Plan.Local Girl Scouts kick o 100th anniversary celebration!By Contributing Writer Dbora McCarty, Creeks Cove Service Unit, Girl Scouts of USAScouts coming that day. Juliette Daisy Gordon Low was born on October 31 and it is only be tting that we have a birthday party with cake and presents! We ask the community to bring nonperishable items for our Christs Cupboard food bank as part of our service project. Activities such as face painting, game booths and a not-so-haunted trail will be available for kids of all ages. This is a free event for the community and we hope many will come to share the joy of girl scouting. Girl Scouts will dress up in Halloween costumes and all are welcome to do the same. For more information, please contact Dbora McCarty at rdmccarty10@comcast.net.FCTC announces Pharmacy Technician program Pharmacy Technician, a new program being o ered at First Coast Technical College (FCTC), is designed to meet the workforce needs of area hospitals and retail settings. Curriculum includes medical terminology, pharmaceutical compounding, inventory maintenance, handling of hazardous materials, labeling/ pricing orders, patient records, customer service, IV preparation, data processing automation, sterile techniques and more. Classes are scheduled to begin on October 27 and will be held Tuesday, Wednesday and ursday evenings from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the FCTC St Augustine Campus, 2980 Collins Ave. Financial aid is available for those who qualify. Applications and information are available online at www. fctc.edu, 547-3471 or by email debra.warren@fctc.edu. Notes from Pacetti Bay Middle School Media CenterBy Contributing Writer Lynn Johnson, NBCT, Library Media Specialist, Pacetti Bay Middle Schoolto purchase Otterboxes for our class set of iPad2s and books for classroom curriculum support. In addition to the y o the shelves books at the Scholastic Book Fair there are some outstanding new books. The author of The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Brian Selznick, has once again created an amazing new novel. Of epic size, Wonderstruck is the story of two protagonists set in New York City. The setting of the drawings is 1927 and the story is told during the later 0s. Even though the book has over 600 pages the students are clamoring for this book. The drawings are amazing and it is a wonderful book for anyone who has visited NYC or is going to visit NYC; you will quickly recognize so much of the setting. Watch for the movie, Hugo Cabret; it is due to hit the theaters on November 23. A new branch of the 39 Clues has been released, Cahills vs. Vespers: The Medusa Plot. Book 2 will be out in December. Once again Scholastic Publishers have put together an amazing group of authors that are collaborating on these books. The webpage that ties in to the books is www.the39clues. com. Be sure to check it out. Our Story Hour at PBMS is now o cially on the calendar for the fourth Tuesday of every month! Children who live in our area are welcome to join us for an hour of reading and activities. Our rst book was Truckery Rhymes by Jon Scieszka. It is a fun collection of truck themed Mother Goose rhymes. It doesnt take long for the children to follow the rhythm and beat. Our next Story Hour will be October 25. Please tell your friends and neighbors and join us for a special hour at PBMS. See you then!St. Johns County educator returns from retirementI cannot tell you how appreciative I am that Martha has agreed to come out of retirement to help us out, said Superintendent Joseph Joyner. This gives me a tremendous amount of peace and will allow us to continue to move forward as I take the necessary time for a quality search. I am looking forward to working with the team again, said Martha Mickler. I am very glad to be of assistance during the transition time and support the district. Mickler retired in 2009 after 38 years in education. United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, Flotilla 14-07 presents its one-day About Boating Safely program for new and experienced boaters from 7:45 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday, November 5 at the St. Johns River Community College located on SR 16 For more information call Vic Aquino at 460-0243About Boating Safely program

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Page 12, The CreekLine October 2011 www.thecreekline.com 165 Hampton Point Dr., Suite 3 St. Augustine, FL 32092( 904 ) 429-0290www.atlasphysicaltherapy.com12421 San Jose Blvd., Suite 100 Jacksonville, FL 32223( 904 ) 292-0195 Regain function and return to normal, active lifestyles withASTYM for Soft Tissue dysfunction and repair Diagnosis that respond well to the ASTYM treatment: Disorders locations Without pain, to what matters. Buy A Business John SerbCertied Business Intermediary www.FirstCoastBizBuySell.com Call 904-613-2658 for a Condential No-Cost Valuation & Consultation Tina P. Fernandez, CPA, PLwww.tpfcpa.com 904-287-2195 Over 30 Years ExperienceHave Condence in Your Tax Preparation & Planning. Allow Me to Assist You. Visit www.tpfcpa.com for informative news and Tax Savings Tips. Serving the Accounting Needs of Individuals and Small Businesses by Providing Quality Service at Competitive Rates. 450-106 State Road 13 N Publix Center in Fruit CovePh: 230.8881 52 Tuscan Way, #202Publix Center at International Golf Dr. and SR 16 Ph: 940.0055 Additional fees may apply. Mail Boxes Etc., Inc. is a UPS company. The UPS Store locations are independently owned and operated by franchisees of Mail Boxes Etc., Inc. in the USA and by its master licensee and its franchisees in Canada. Services, pricing and hours of operation may vary by location. Copyright 2011 Mail Boxes Etc., Inc.While you manage your business, well help manage your mail.Who has time to wait for mail? Or worry about it? Not you. Get a mailbox at The UPS Store. Youll have a real street address. Well send you e-mail or text alerts when new mail arrives. And well hold it in a secure location until you pick it up*. Well help with the logistics. So its more convenient for you. Stop by today. Greenbriar Animal HospitalA Professional Veterinary Hospital Offering... We Celebrate The HumanPet Bond ( 0.2 mi South JCP entrance ) vetM-F 8 AM 6 PM Sat 8 AM Noon The Warriors are back in full swing now and what a great year we have ahead! The PTO Family Fun Night was a great success despite a few drops of rain. We had a fantastic turn out and everyone enjoyed the bounce houses, carnival games, cake walk and delicious food. We want to thank all of the volunteers that were part of Family Fun Night; we could not have done it without you! Your help is always appreciated and needed to ensure success at our events. The PTO is currently selling Gator Bowl tickets. You can purchase them through November 11 for just $30; what a great opportunity to see your favorite SEC or Big 10 team play while helping your school raise money at the same time. Calling all business owners and sales reps! Dont miss this opportunity to promote Most parents of collegebound students have probably heard of the SAT Subject Tests (formerly known as Achievement Tests and the SAT II: Subject Tests), but how important are these exams? Do many schools require them? Most importantly, how can your student prepare for them? Here are a few facts about the SAT Subject Tests that you and your teen should know as he or she goes through the college application process: Are the SAT Subject Tests required by all colleges? No. However, many colleges use the Subject Tests for admission and course placement. Some colleges specify the Subject Tests that they require, while others allow the applicant to choose which tests to take. Which United States colleges require the SAT Subject tests? Universities and colleges change their policies on standardized tests often, so be sure to check with the undergraduate admissions o ce at the school of interest. In general, highly The CreekLineis YOUR Community Newspaper! Send us your community news!editor@thecreekline.comAll about SAT Subject TestsContributed by Edgar Gonzalez, Director, Huntington Learning Centerselective colleges tend to require or recommend that students submit scores for one or more Subject Tests. Here are a few examples of various schools policies: Yale University and Duke University require freshmen applicants to take either the ACT (only) or the SAT Reasoning Test and two Subject Tests of their choosing. (At Duke, however, students applying to the Pratt School of Engineering must take one Subject Test in mathematics.) New York University requires applicants to submit scores from two Subject Tests, with the exception of those applying to the Tisch School of the Arts or to music or studio art programs in the Steinhardt of Education. Carleton College recommends, but does not require, that students submit scores from one or more Subject Tests, while Stanford University recommends, but does not require, that students submit scores from at least two Subject Tests. Case Western Reserve University, Trinity University and Emory University do not require the SAT Subject Tests, but encourage students to send such scores if they feel they might strengthen their applications. How many SAT Subject tests are there? There are 20 tests, including: Literature United States History World History Mathematics Level 1 Mathematics Level 2 Biology-Ecological or BiologyMolecular Chemistry Physics Chinese with Listening French French with Listening German German with Listening Spanish Spanish with Listening Modern Hebrew Italian Latin Japanese with Listening Korean with Listening How can students prepare for the SAT Subject Tests? While being knowledgeable in the subject tested is obviously key to success, for some subjects, it is also important that students take the exams at opportune times. For example, students who take one or both of the biology exams should do so shortly after completing their high school biology course, while the material is still fresh in their minds. Language Subject Tests, on the other hand, are for students who have studied a language for two or more years. For more information about the SAT Subject Tests, visit www. collegeboard.com. For additional information, please contact canlearn@aol. com and see Huntington Learning Centers ad in this issue of The CreekLine!Wards Creek updateBy Contributing Writer Beth McCannyour business to Wards Creek Elementary families. The 2011 Business Expo will be held on Thursday, October 13 from 6:30 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The Business Expo will be held in conjunction with the Fall Book Fair and ever popular Spooktacular, story telling by our favorite teachers. Please contact the PTO for information on a booth for your business. Our biggest fund raiser of the year, the Fun Run, will be held Friday, November 4. Look for pledge information to come home with your children in the near future. The CreekLine YOURCommunity Newspapereditor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com October 2011 The CreekLine, Page 13 Lets face it, in this market it might not make sense to sell if you can rent. And right now, we have a waiting list of people who would love to rent your house. So before you consider putting your home on the market during this competitive time, give us a call to see just how much rental income you can enjoy while you wait for the market to rebound. Well pre-screen and creditapprove tenants, routinely inspect your property to make sure its cared for, schedule and oversee any needed repairs, and even direct-deposit rent into your bank account so you dont have to deal with checks. For more information on this great alternative, call Elsie Evans at 904-484-2170. 904-940-5000 | DavidsonPropertyManagement.comTRUSTED REAL ESTATE ADVISORS. Property Management, Inc. RENT NOW,SELL LATER. St. Johns Eye AssociatesSharokh Kapadia, OD FAAO Diane L Kapadia, OD Pauline Thai, OD Lenka Champion, MD Frame Show & Styling Event October 27th From 2pm-7pm50% Off Frameswith purchase of prescription lensesFeaturing frames from Ray-Ban, Tory Burch & Polo by Ralph Lauren Serving Wine & Cheese/Door PrizesINSURANCE & FRAME EXCLUSIONS MAY APPLY CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER DISCOUNTS (904) 287-9137www.visionsource-stjohnseye.com We help you make your home look like a Model Home! 230-6855618 SR 13 NorthAcross From Thrift StoreFriseur Salon Visit Fruit Cove/ Julington Creeks Spacious & Relaxing Salon STATION RENTAL NOW AVAILABLE Call for Monthly Specials Micanopy, Florida is a little town that lays just a hair south of Gainesville, exactly an hour from the First Coast as the crow ies. Buy before I go on to tell you their tale, you have to get straight rst the pronunciation of this town: it is Mick-a-nopee. The general population of Micanopy is approximately 700 folks. But that being said, this town has a huge history both documented and folklore. According to the truth, Micanopy was the rst distinct United States town in Florida. It was originally a Seminole village called Cuscowilla and was visited by the exploring naturalist William Bartram in the late 1700s. Bartram wrote so favorably about the fertile lands in the regions that settlers arrived in the region to ultimately form the town proper. In the mid-1800s, settlement began in earnest after MicanopyA happening place for Halloween!By Donna KeathleySpain ceded the territory with two forts located in the area, rst Fort De ance and then Fort Micanopy. Micanopy was the name of a Seminole Indian Chief and the area was home to some of the bloodiest battles of the Second Seminole Indian War. The little towns main drag called Cholokka Boulevard is home to a very cool historic district with some pretty interesting antique stores. The town has many homes that have been restored and it boasts an array of historic landmarks. The Micanopy Historical Society Museum is the place to start and then you can go antiquing or eat a bite at one of their casual eateries. If you are so inclined, you can stay at one of the two Bed and Breakfast facilities in the area. Folklore has it that in the early 1900s Micanopy was the winter home of wandering gypsies who practiced witchcraft and magical activities. This passed-down version of the towns history gives Micanopy a great background for the celebration of Halloween as we millennium folks know it. Therefore the citizens of Micanopy have perfected this Halloween celebration into a fabulous event called the Micanopy Fall Harvest Festival. Cholokka Boulevard comes alive over Halloween weekend as its the happening place for the fall festival. Its packed with over 200 local and regional artists, crafters and musicians who participate in the festival. The quality of the show and its vendors ranks very high to the buying public. The main stage located mid-way through the event plays host to a variety of good time music throughout the two days of the festival. Also, on Saturday afternoon its the home of the famous old time auction which is enjoyed by all in attendance. This year the 37th annual Micanopy Fall Harvests Festival will be held Saturday, October 29 and Sunday, October 30. Saturdays hours are 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and Sunday 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. Directions to downtown Micanopy: From Gainesville, go south onto Highway 441 to the blinking light where you turn right onto Cholokka Boulevard. Please visit www. micanopyfallfestival.org for more information. Photo courtesy of www.micanopyfallfestival.org.

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Page 14, The CreekLine October 2011 www.thecreekline.com If so, you may be eligible to take part in a clinical research study testing the safety and eects of an investigational drug to treat high fat levels (triglycerides in your blood.) Eligible volunteers must be: Has your doctor told you that your triglycerides are too high?MA1106824 C St. Johns Center for Clinical Research(904) 209-3173 MandarinHearing and Balance Center Mandarin Hearing and Balance Center12276 San Jose Boulevard, Ste 516 Jacksonville, FL 32223 www.doctorknox.com For more than 10 years, Mandarin Hearing and Balance Center has been serving Mandarins hearing needs. With so much amazing technology available, theres never been a better time to try a hearing aid. Isnt it time you regained the joy of hearing? Were here to help www.usa.siemens.com/aquaris YouGotDance.com Learn to Dance Like the Stars! (904)386-6549 Liberty Pines Academy has many exciting things going on and there is something for everyone! Families of LPA gathered on September 27 for Pizza with the Principal. Following the September PTO general meeting and SAC elections, Principal Randy Kelley shared his expectations for parents and sta to assist students in achieving academic excellence. He began by congratulating the students and sta on receiving the grade of A for the 2010-2011 school year. Kelley reviewed the concept of the K-8 school for new families and invited them to become more involved by joining the wolf family as a volunteer and/or PTO parent. Kelley stated, LPA plans to continue developing a culture of leadership among the students which would connect with the 7 Habits of Highly Effective Students. One of the goals is to have the middle grade students become mentors/student interns to model the behaviors for the elementary students. Part of this process began last school year with the implementation of student interns in the classroom, o ce and media center. Students are able to experience real-life work situations and become familiar with common business/educational practices in todays world. By aligning the sta and students through the 7 Habits, Principal Kelley helps provide a win-win atmosphere for learning. Beginning on October 25, LPA will kick-o its annual book fair. This years theme is Reading Takes You to Far Away Places. Books make great gifts for the holidays and there will be lots of books to choose from including many popular titles, Sunshine State books, AR books and themed books (animals, sports, etc.) The 2010-11 school year was a banner year for Timberlin Creek Elementary (TCE). Members of the graduating class of 2011 marked the rst class which had completed their entire elementary education at TCE. The milestone year was made even better when Timberlin Creek achieved an A school rating and was selected to receive both the Five Star Award and the Golden School Award. At the September school board meeting, Principal Catherine Hutchins accepted both awards. We are proud of the accomplishments that our school continues to achieve annually. It could not have happened without the teamwork of our entire Eagle family: students, teachers, parents, support sta and the administration. We will continue to work hard to provide the very best for our students so they continue to grow socially, emotionally and academically, Principal Hutchins remarked. The Golden School Award recognizes schools which have exemplary volunteer programs. To qualify, schools must have: A sta training program on volunteerism in which a minimum of 80 percent of the school sta have participated during the school year. A School Volunteer Coordinator who has been designated to provide leadership for the school volunteer program through recruitment, placement, training and supervision of participants. A total number of hours in volunteer service that equals October at Liberty Pines AcademyBy Contributing Writer Stephanie Bradford, LPA PTOStudents can visit the book fair during school hours the week of October 25. There will be special evening hours (5:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m.) on October 25 during LPAs Night of the Arts. Come and join us for a great night out as we celebrate Leaders Are Out of This World artwork. All grade levels will have artwork on display during this event. Entertainment will be provided by LPA Or Ensemble, LPA Elementary and Middle Chorus and LPA Drama. Performances will begin at 6:00 p.m., so everyone is invited to come early and shop the book fair prior to enjoying the wonderful entertainment. Local business partners of LPAs Partners in Learning will be on hand to showcase their businesses also. Please come out and support these businesses, as they continue to support LPA. The last order for LPA Spirit wear for the 2011-2012 school year is due Friday, October 21. Please visit the Spirit wear tab on the LPA PTO main page to download an order form. Questions can be emailed to LPASpirit@earthlink.net. Remember the weather is changing and now is the time to order your long sleeved shirts and/or hoodies. Are you ready for some college football? LPA PTO is fast approaching its second fundraiser, Gator Bowl. The game will be played on January 2, 2012. Tickets can be purchased October 25 through November 4 at a cost of $30 per ticket. LPA will receive $10 for each ticket sold! If your student is an honor roll student at LPA and you purchase an adult ticket, you receive a free student ticket. Parking passes are available for $25. Come and join the LPA Tailgating fun! Anyone can purchase tickets through LPA PTO; please visit the LPA PTO website for more information. Come out and support our Liberty Pines Academy Middle School sports teams! Come cheer the kids on as they compete with other schools in our area. These kids practice hard each week and would love to have you show your support. Basketball: All games start at 5:30 p.m. October 13: Landrum at LPA October 17: First round of tournament play. Running Team: All meets start at 4:00 p.m. October 13: at Gamble Rogers Middle School October 27: at Fruit Cove Middle School November 2: at Liberty Pines Academy LPA PTO is looking forward to November, as this is the start to a busy time of year. There are holidays quickly approaching, Veterans Day and Thanksgiving break. Please check the LPA PTO website often for updates and information. (wwwlpa.stjohns.k12. .us/pto)Awards cap banner year for Timberlin Creek ElementaryBy Contributing Writer Trish Edmondstwice the number of students enrolled in the school. These hours of volunteer service will be in the areas that support instruction. At TCE, volunteers logged 13,121 hours during the year. This is the sixth time that TCE has received this award. The second commendation, the Five Star School Award, was created by the Commissioners Community Involvement Council and is presented annually to those schools that have shown evidence of exemplary community involvement. This includes business partnerships, family involvement, volunteerism, student community services and school advisory councils. This is the fth year that TCE has received this award. Hutchins stated, What an honor it is to be a Five Star School again this year. This is a result of everyone in our school community working together to meet the criteria set by the state. It truly recognizes our school and the level of community involvement. Indeed we are proud of this honor and look forward to achieving the Five Star status again this year. WOW!Shouldnt YOUR ad be in T he CreekLine too?886-4919sales@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com October 2011 The CreekLine, Page 15 Nicole Sherman, Realtor Janelle Bales, Realtor Cindy Gavin, Realtor Debbie Espinosa, Realtor 904-553-3156 Cell 904-655-9859 Cell 904-465-3397 Cell 904-318-5615 Cell NShermanRealtor@aol.com janellebales@yahoo.com cindygavin@vanguardcb.com despinosa78@att.net nsherman.vanguardcb.com betterwithbales.com CindyGavinTeam.com debbieespinosa.vanguardcb.com Peter OBrien, Realtor Skip Skipper, Realtor Renee Pappy, Realtor Gwen Whittington, Realtor 904-673-1441 Cell 904-945-3724 Cell 904-591-2166 Cell 904-705-5848 Cell peterobrien@comcast.net skipskipper@vanguardcb.com spappy2@comcast.net gwen@vanguardcb.com peterobrien.vanguardcb.com skipskipper.vanguardcb.com rpmovesyou.com gwen.vanguardcb.comColdwell Banker Vanguard Realty 12276 San Jose Blvd. | Jacksonville, FL 32223 All of our listings are onColdwell Banker Vanguard Leading the competition in video marketing. Get your home SOLD. NilShRlt PtOBiRlt JllBlRlt SkiSkiRlt CidGi Rlt RPRlt Grace McCurry, Realtor Cora Hunt, Realtor Dottie Wilson, Realtor 904-910-1942 Cell 904-262-0166 Cell 904-699-3231 Cell gracemccurry@vanguardcb.com coraquality@gmail.com homeagent1@aol.com gracemccurry.vanguardcb.com corahunt.com dottiewilson.vanguardcb.com G MC R lt C H t R lt Dt ti Wi l R lt DbbiEiRlt GWhittitRlt Meet the best of the best.Top Producers of a Top Producing Company Call us for all your real estate needs. Shaggy Chic Spa & Pet Supplies (Both group and private) NOW OPEN!445 State Road 13 Suite 24 In the Food Lion Center230-2827 On Tuesday, November 15 at 11:00 a.m., the Newcomers of North St. Johns will have a special catered luncheon by A1A Ale Works banquet service in their private Sala Menendez dining room. The site for this monthly meeting/luncheon is the main oor of the historic Lightner Museum Building, located at 75 King Street in St. Augustine. The building, formerly the Hotel Alcazar, was built in 1888 in the Spanish Renaissance style. To the left of the front entrance, the dining room boasts 12 foot ceilings, alabaster chandeliers and views of the tropical garden courtyard with its famed stone bridge over the koi pond. The building is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. After the luncheon/meeting, we will walk a half block to the Villa Zorayda Museum, located at 83 King Street, for a one hour docent led tour. The Villa Zorayda was the winter residence of Franklin Smith who in 1883 used poured concrete and crushed coquina stone for its construction. The building is 1/10th the scale of a section of the 12th century Moorish Nease IB students continued their support of Blessings in a Backpack on September 22 by lling backpacks for use by kids in need who are now able to take home a backpack of food each weekend. Nease IB students contributed two large bins full of food as well as $100 during their most recent collection period.Newcomers Club o ers luncheon and tourBy Contributing Writer Marcia Smith, Newcomers of North St. JohnsAlhambra Palace in Granada, Spain. This building began the Moorish Spanish revival of architecture in St. Augustine. Outside, no two windows are the same size. Inside, there are intricate traceries on the walls made of alabaster and plaster that were brought from Spain, tiles over 350 years old from Egypt and Spain, Egyptian artifacts, tropical hardwood furniture, ne antiques and a 2,400 year old Egyptian cat rug made from hairs of ancient cats that roamed the Nile River. In 1933, this property was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Diners need to choose between a blackened Mahi Mahi topped with a Caribbean Creole sauce and served with rice pilaf and fresh vegetable or a Mojitomarinated grilled chicken breast topped with ale Gouda sauce and fried onions and served with roasted garlic mashed potatoes and fresh vegetable. Dessert is Key Lime cheesecake. There will be a cash bar, ra e and door prizes. Lunch with beverage, tax, tip and the tour are all included for $25. Please reserve by November 8, as seating is limited to the rst 80 people. Mail checks to NNSJ, 884 Eagle Point Dr., St. Augustine, FL 32092 and indicate at the bottom of your check your choice of entree. Email Laura at leccpremo@yahoo. com for luncheon information. All women new to the area are invited to come and join Newcomers Club. Please contact Sue at sjaird@comcast.net for membership information. These are two gems worth seeing in St. Augustine. Parking is limited, so please car pool. At the recent Newcomers of North St. Johns fashion show sponsored by Talbots Upscale Outlet are Newcomer models, going up the stairs, Teri OConnell, Donna Walker, Judy Janssen and Ana Maria Wilson. Do you enjoy receiving The CreekLine each month?Then our Advertisers!As a non-subscription publication we rely on our ne advertisers to nance the production of your community newspaper! Be sure to patronize our advertisers and tell them you saw them inThe CreekLineThank

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Page 16, The CreekLine October 2011 www.thecreekline.com Cash on the Spot!Bring your old silver, gold and platinum jewelry and coins to Miriams for instant cash or store credit. Schedule your own Gold Party and make money for you and your friends! On your precious metal sale, bring this ad for anExtra 5% Immediate Cash Miriams is a family owned and operated jewelry store serving Jacksonville for over 30 Years We specialize in new, antique and estate jewelry. W ith gold prices reaching record highs, co unt on the trusted professionals at Miriams Jewelry to deal with you fairly and honestly. Miriams is buying: Interested in hosting a Gold Party for you and your friends? Contact Miriam at the San Marco store or Benji at the Beaches store to schedule your party! San Marco Square Store: Beaches Store: TCL K EN B ERRY B.S.N., D.C.319 West Town Place, Suite 7 Located in the WGV Professional Plaza904-940-0361 Serving World Golf Village and surrounding communities for over 4 years WWW.THE VILLAGE CHIROPRACTOR.COM Neck & Back Pain Join us for Our New Oce Grand Opening Celebration November 18th Prizes and giveaways How can I help my child succeed in school? Is my child getting opportunities to explore areas of potential talent or ability? Is my child developing con dence? Is my child on track with social development? While we cant be sure of how our children will respond to opportunities to build knowledge and self esteem, there are certain experiences that have demonstrated a proven bene t to a childs development and education. Music is one of them. Consistent music education really shows its bene ts as children grow into teens and young adults and prepare for higher education. Standardized test scores, used by colleges to assess a students readiness for a rigorous curriculum, tend to be higher for students with exposure to music performance or music Davidson Realty continued its ongoing efforts to support the Blood Alliance with a blood drive on August 16 at its World Golf Village of ce. Bozard Ford Lincoln Mercury supported the effort by giving away free Quick Lane oil change coupons to all donors. Twenty three units of blood were donated. The Creeks Clash U13 Girls White team won the First Coast Labor Day Shootout, winning all four games played. Playing in their rst tournament together, the girls scored a total of 11 goals while allowing only one. Coach Phong Le did a fantastic job of preparing the girls for success. Great job ladies! Go Clash! Want your kid to go to college? Try music!By Contributing Writers Stacey Osborn, Lesson Coordinator with Logan Lively, Manager, Music and Artsappreciation. SAT scores, for instance, were approximately 60 points higher on verbal and more than 40 points higher on math in one analysis of data in 2001. Additionally, more years of music experience tend to correlate with better test scores. To give middle and high school students an opportunity to ourish when it comes to their musical talents, consider supplementing school band and orchestra rehearsals with private lessons. With oneon-one instruction, students learn new skills, advance more quickly and develop greater con dence in their abilities. Private lessons are most e ective when given at the onset of school to give students the best chance for success in school and out. Music education and appreciation have been shown to bolster students academic performance, con dence, discipline and social interaction. Its never too early to start, and schools and community organizations o er various opportunities to expose your child to music. Whether its group classes for toddlers at a community center, schoolbased band and orchestra programs, or private individual lessons, consistent music appreciation can help childrens development at all stages. Creeks Clash wins Shootout Julington Creek Plantation Recreation CenterCome Join us in Child Watch for our Little Monsters Halloween Party! Saturday, October 29th *SIGN UP A WEEK IN ADVANCE & RECEIVE A $2.00 DISCOUNT! kids cheered with approval. Durbins Accelerated Reader Program consists of the students reading everyday trade books and then taking quizzes on the computer to earn points. The students work towards a class goal and a school goal and they are rewarded every nine weeks if they meet their targets. At the end of the school year, if the Durbin students earn a combined 50,000 points, then Principal McMandon announced at the assembly that she will kiss a real live pig. Stay tuned to see what happens. Durbin Creek cont. from pg 1 The CreekLineis YOUR Community Newspaper! Send us your community news!editor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com October 2011 The CreekLine, Page 17 Race Track Blvd.Flora Branch Blvd. 990 Flora Branch Boulevard St. Johns, Florida 32259License#C075J0083 www.theacademyatjulingtoncreek.net Please visit our center and take a personal tour. Marcia Pozin Executive Director 904-230-8200.Infant thru VPK ( 4 years old ) Before/After School Ages 6 thru 12 Celebrating our 1 st year in Julington Creek! VPK Openings for the 2011-2012 School Year More for your money.... Fall Festival Oct. 27th 6pm 8pm 268-8330www.yoga-den.com 2929 Plummer Cove Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32223Located in Mandarin, just south of I-295, across from Walmart Yoga den Yoga Den Studio First class FREE! with this ad Proudly serving NorthWest St. Johns & Mandarin for over 9 years!Get Started with Yoga Basics 9 Unlimited Classes Free Uniform No Contracts Tiger Martial Arts 904-288-9010 Bully Proof!Self-Awareness Self Defense Safety Awareness On September 20, we were honored by the opportunity to have private interview with the new bishop of the St. Augustine Diocese, the Most Rev. Bishop Filipe J. Estevez and Fr. John Tetlow, pastor of San Juan Del Rio Catholic Church. The occasion for the interview was the annual Diocesan Celebration Mass for the Feast of St. Vincent. Bishop Estevez made a very warm and comfortable impression. His enthusiasm for becoming the shepherd of the St. Augustine Diocese was only eclipsed by how his eyes lit up when the conversation turned to St. Vincent and in particular the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. He had passion in his voice as he described the life of St. Vincent and the saints life in Paris. Later during the Mass in his homily he outlined for the congregation the story. He explained just how important the Society of St. Vincent de Paul is to the metropolitan Jacksonville area. He described all of the local hospitals that the church and society support in the area, the enumerable number of charitable acts the society performs and the thrift stores for the bene t of the needy. The celebrant for the mass, Bishop Estevez, entered the San Del Rio Catholic Church celebrates Feast of St. Vincent By Karl Kennellchurch anked by an honor guard dressed in full regalia from the Knights of Columbus Ave Maria 4th Degree Assembly. Accompanying the Bishop were St. Vincents Council Spiritual Advisor Fr. Joe McDonnell; pastor of SJDR, Fr. John Tetlow; parochial vicar of SJDR, Fr. Tony Ike; Deacon Larry Geinosky, Deacon Je Silvernale, Deacon Stan Boschert and several guest priests. In addition to the large congregation gathered from around the Diocese and SJDR Parish were Ursula Shaw, president of the Jacksonville Saint Vincent de Paul Conference; John Donnelly, president of the SJDR Council; the presidents of the various St. Vincent de Paul Society councils from the Diocese; members of the Bishop Kenny High School St. Vincents Council and most honored guests were the Sisters of the Daughters of Charity. After the Mass a reception was held in the Parish Hall. There Bishop Estevez conducted an annual Commitment Ceremony. The gathered council presidents completely lled the stage side to side. After the ceremony a long line of admirers formed to get their picture taken with the Bishop. There again his charismatic charm glowed. He took time with each guest to exchange conversation and made sure to show a sincere beaming smile when the ash went o When we alone during the interview Bishop Estevez described how St. Vincent reminded him of the story of St. Augustine. He very proudly, towards the ending of the conversation said, Vincentians are special. I doubt there is any other group that does so much good with so little. During the meeting Fr. Tetlow wanted to send out the reminder that the Poor Box in the church is there to help St. Vincents reach out to the poor. After spending time with the Bishop it is little wonder that the congregants of St. Augustine Diocese are excited to welcome their new shepherd, the Most Rev. Bishop Filipe J. Estevez.The skies were overcast on Friday, September 9, as leaders in the St. Johns County community joined Bartram Trail High Schools Class of 2012, AFJROTC, vocal ensemble, current military representatives and school o cials in a touching tribute to the lives lost during the September 11, 2001 attacks. County Commissioner Mark Miner, a 2002 BTHS graduate, recalled how the students at BTHS wanted to bring home the signi cance of the attacks, to honor the fallen and always remember the sacri ces made that day. Along with other former BTHS students, Miner was instrumental in obtaining a piece of the World Trade Center shortly after the disaster. The piece of steel was transformed into the V statue that stands at Bartram today. Miner said that America is a nation of perseverance. When we unite, we can accomplish and we can overcome anything. That is what our monument represents.Barry Craig, BTHS athletic director recalled traveling to New York to retrieve the piece of steel. The portion of steel that was chosen had damage on Bartram Trail remembers historic dayContributed by Belinda Smith, BTHSone side. Construction workers assisting in the clean-up at the World Trade Center site conveyed that the piece of steels damage came from the heat of the re. They said you could take that same piece of steel and drop it from a 100 story building and it would not dent the beam. It gives an idea of what people were against that day.Bob Kirk, a former BTHS teacher and sculptor of the monument, said that he wanted to make something that would last forever and be a memory of the tragic loss of life, but that would also symbolize the strength of Americans. He took the original steel beam from the World Trade Center and carefully designed the memorial that stands in Bartrams courtyard. He intentionally did not clean the dust and ash from the steel beam because of what it represented. Nine years later, the rain has washed the World Trade Center dust and ash into Bartrams soil, he shared. It will always be a part of our campus and our special connection to the lives, events and strength that came from one tragic day in our nations history.

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Page 18, The CreekLine October 2011 www.thecreekline.com Julington Creek Animal Walk is a state-of-the-art pet boarding facility for dogs, cats, and exotics providing: Your pet will nd a welcoming retreat at our 9-acre, fenced, off-leash dog park featuring a bone-shaped swimming pool and our NE Floridas Premier Luxury Pet Resort, Dog Park and SpaConveniently located next to Julington Creek Animal Hospital Stop by for a tour and receive a coupon for a free daily park pass Aordable small dog luxury oasis. Please call for details. Veterinarian Owned and Operated $10 o new students with this ad Helping Hands of St. Johns County will meet on Friday, October 28 at 11:00 a.m. at Faith Community Church Community Center. This months project is Christmas trees for Hospice. The group will be decorating small Christmas trees for patients in Hospice care. This will the third year the group has presented Community Hospice and Peds the beautiful decorated trees. Anyone wishing to donate a small tree (two to three foot) or decorations may contact jacqphil@aol.com or bring them to the meeting on October 28. The Rippers from Sew Much St. Johns County resident Mary Bell long suspected that one room in her three bedroom house was hotter than it should be. Its right next to the garage, said Bell, 63. And it gets more sun. So Bell checked out a JEA Home Energy Evaluation backpack from the Bartram Trail Branch of the St. Johns County Public Library to nd out for sure. She measured the rooms temperature with the bright, yellow thermal thermometer inside the backpack and her worst fears were con rmed. It was indeed ve to six degrees hotter in that room than in the rest of the house, Bell said. Armed with that information, Bell changed the three light bulbs in the rooms ceiling fan. I put in those curly lights, she said. They produce a lot less heat. And she became diligent about using room darkening shades that had been installed during a prior e ort to cool down the room. Bell is one of hundreds of people who are saving money and energy with the JEA Home Energy Evaluation backpacks. The backpacks, made from recycled billboards, are available for checkout from all Jacksonville Public Library branches and from one library in St. Johns County, the Bartram Trail Branch, which services a pocket of JEA customers in Julington Creek. Inside each backpack are NORTHEAST FLORIDAConservatory a c o mm unit y s c hoo l o f the a r ts 1st ANNUAL MUSIC FESTIVALOct. 14 (FRI) B a llr oo m D an c e D e m o & C onse rv ato ry J a zz B and Oct. 15 (SAT)M usi c a ll da y! ( e v e ry 3 0 m inutes ) & V endor M a rk et OPEN HOUSE Oct. 16 (SUN)C onse rv ato ry C omm unit y B and C onc e r t 3PM Jax, Fl 32223 www.nfconservatory.org All Souls Church/ Hartley Rd Helping Hands UpdateBy Contributing Writer Jackie ValyouComfort will meet at 10:00 a.m. on October 28. They are still retro tting clothes for our wounded military and are in need of new size medium t-shirts (good quality), woven boxer shorts (no knits please) and pajama bottoms. These ne men and women have lost limbs and enjoy being in regular clothes vs. hospital garb as they get treatment and rehabilitation. The Stocking for a Soldier project is well underway, thanks to the help of Winn Dixie on County Road 210, First Florida Credit Union, St. Michaels Soldiers and many neighborhood groups and churches. Stockings are still available at Winn Dixie on County Road 210, Our Lady of Angels Catholic bookstore in Mandarin, Cadillac/ Saab dealer in Orange Park and First Florida Credit Union on County Road 210 or by emailing jacqphil@aol.com. They may be returned to any of the above establishments by November 1 so our armed forces in Iraq and Afghanistan get them for Christmas. Members of Helping Hands purchased 250 stockings through a Wal-Mart grant and 300 more were cut and sewn by members. Helping Hands is grateful for the community support it has received from everyone. They are working on making this a happy holiday for our soldiers ghting to keep us safe. Stockings may be lled with snacks or toiletries and have a card and suggested list of items inside or you may go to the website www.stmiachaelssoldiers.com for items needed. Helping Hands is a volunteer organization that meets on the last Friday of each month (except for November and December) at 11:00 a.m. at Faith Community Church Community Center on County Road 210 next to Cimarrone. The group is nondenominational and meets in friendship to do a small project for the community. There are no dues, o cers or stress. The group relies solely on donations of goods and services from the community. Anyone is welcome to join and membership is always open. members come when they can and do what they can. Please contact jacqphil@ aol.com for more information.Helping Hands members Deb Ennis, Jeannie Sturgill, Winn Dixie 210 store manager Greg Blanford, Kathy Signorile of St. Michaels Soldiers and Maria Morrison of First Florida Credit Union kick off the Stockings for a Soldier project.Find out if your home is energy e cientBy Contributing Writer M.C. Finottithe tools homeowners need to conduct a home energy audit, including three kill-a-watt meters, which measure the energy usage of appliances like a refrigerator, a co ee pot or even a sh pump. My daughter measured the energy our co ee pot uses, said Sarah Boren, executive director of Green Team Project, a non-profit dedicated to helping people save money on their energy bills, thereby reducing their environmental footprint. Green Team partnered with JEA to create the backpacks. And my daughter learned that it costs 16-cents a day to use our co ee pot. Thats nothing right? But if you do the math, thats $8.62 a year. Multiply that by all the other small appliances we use at home and it adds up. So by unplugging the co ee pot and other appliances after each use, the savings can be considerable. As for Mary Bell, shes working her way through all the items in the backpack. She has yet to go in her attic to measure her insulation. Im saving that for the very end, Bell said, laughing. I saw a garden snake go up there the other day, so Im not in any hurry. There will be a free, informational meeting on November 3 at 7:00 p.m. at the Recreation Facility at Julington Creek Plantation. The meeting is open to the public and will include a demonstration of all the items inside the JEA HEE backpack. Luck is a dividend of sweat. The more you sweat, the luckier you get.~Ray Kroc

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www.thecreekline.com October 2011 The CreekLine, Page 19 APPOINTMENT904.264.KIDS264KIDS.COMCALL OR VISITUS ONLINE TO ANSCHEDULE San Jose Blvd. SR 13Bartam Walk Race Track RoadLOCATED ABOVE BLACKSTONE GRILLE 112 BARTRAM OAKS WALK #203 | JACKSONVILLE, FL | 32259 Hickory Creek Elementary PTO is happy to invite all to its annual Carnival at the Creek! The Carnival will be open to the public and held on Friday, October 14 from 4:30 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. on campus at Hickory Creek Elementary, located at 235 Hickory Creek Trail o Greenbriar Road. There will be over 20 activity events that family members of all ages can enjoy. Events will include challenge course and bouncy in atables, cake walk, hayrides, face painting and many other games of chance, challenge and luck as well as ra es and treats for all. You may pre-purchase wristbands for $15 by October 10 at the school or $20 at the event with unlimited game play and Fall has arrived at Creekside and the excitement brought with it extends beyond the re-mulching of the palm trees in the courtyard. The school is full of faces and activities, some familiar and some new. Between the homecoming commotion and the college application procrastination, theres a serious need for organization this year. Just in time, its Naviance to the rescue! Naviance is an interactive family connection website that helps guide students as they take important steps towards college and careers. The program, which up until last month was only used by Ponte Vedra High School, features four dimensions geared to the needs of every high school student: course planning, college planning, career planning and success planning. Each student receives a password and has the ability to change his/her online pro le by updating test scores, current courses and GPA. Within the dimension of college planning, students can assemble lists of colleges in which they are interested, rate them based on preference and research important aspects of the schools, such as admissions processes and nancial aid guidelines. Perhaps one of the most CHS HappeningsStudents get organized with NavianceBy Rachel Buff, CHS Studentimpressive features of Naviance is the softwares ability to predict the likelihood of acceptance at certain universities by utilizing information from a students pro le and organizing it into a scattergram graph. While these graphs are not 100 percent accurate, they serve as a great tool to those who wish to see where they stand. Whats unique about the website is that its not just designed for students who plan to attend college after high school. In the career planning dimension, students can take personality tests to discover which career path will t them best and explore a multitude of options. Creeksides Naviance administrator Justin Vogel believes students and parents will embrace Naviance, as it will help them think critically about the future. The sooner you start thinking about college, the more doors you open for yourself, he shares. Naviance will no doubt give students the tools they need to be successful. If you are a CHS student and wish to explore Naviance for yourself, see Justin Vogel to receive your login information and visit connection.naviance. com/creeksidehs.Community invited to Hickory Creek Carnival By Contributing Writer Lisa McGonagle, Hickory Creek Elementary PTOprizes. Children aged three and under are $3. The Carnival at the Creek is sponsored by Hickory Creek Elementarys PTO. Proceeds from this event will go towards funding the schools AR reading program, purchasing teacher supplies, funding in-school educational eld trips, family fun nights and helping hands for the upcoming school year. For further information, please contact Sharmain Powell at sharwane300@ bellsouth. net. Join the carnival fun where everyones a winner if you play and see why Living is good at the Creek. Wish you were here!Call today to advertise in NW St. Johns Countys ORIGINAL Community Newspaper!886-4919 lg@rtpublishinginc.com

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Page 20, The CreekLine October 2011 www.thecreekline.com Conveniently located one block North of I-295 and San Jose Blvd. 50% OFF Your Pets First Exam with Dr. Silverness( 1st Time Clients Only )Not valid with any other oer. Expires 12/31/11 FREE BOARDING Book 2 Nights at our Resort and 3rd Night is FREE! (1st Time Boarders Only)Not valid with any other oer. Expires 12/31/11 Ann Silverness, DVM,CCRTMandarin Landing Animal Hospital & Pet Resort3003 Hartley Road Jacksonville, FL 32257 904-268-0477www.mandarinlandingah.comCIV no longer mandatory for pet boarding Bordatella now done annually Mandarin NewsLine sm GOLD SPONSORS BRONZE SPONSORS $500 FOR BEST IN SHOW Saturday, November 12 (Rain or Shine!)11AM 2PM Riverplace Shopping CenterF or f u rther infor m ation contact R andy T ho m as at 73 5 9 088 ADMISSION 2 CANS OF FOOD FOR MANDARIN FOODBANK Auto Club South DALLAS BRENNEISESILVER SPONSORS CPA PRESENTED BY 15t h An nual M a n d a r i n C h i l i C o o k O f f M an darin Chil i Cook-Off IBERIABANK Axiom Wellness CenterFor the Body and the Person Inside Print, Promo & Design Julington Creek Plantation Presents:Dog Training Classes Starting October 25th at the R ecreation Center Beginner, Advanced and Socialization Classes Oered Professional Obedience Instr u ctor. Non-JCP R esidents Welco m e See www.jcpcdd.org for more info A Ghoul-ington Creek Family Halloween Dance Saturday, October 22ndDance the Monster Mash with your kids! Contests, Prizes, Parade of Costumes and more... Little did the boys know how happy Thumbelina would be when she visited the residents of the Clyde E. Lassen Veterans Nursing Home. Thumbelinas joy was the result of the Pooch Pouches recently made up and delivered to the individual residents of the vets nursing home. Thumbelina, if you havent guessed by now, is one of the dogs that comes to visit the residents to participate in pet therapy with the residents. The boys are members of the Robinson-Savaria Squires Council of San Juan Del Rio Catholic Church. The Pooch Pouch project was one of the planned outreach projects the boys have for the veterans home. Members Salton and DJ Doran, Ben and Josh Dvorak, Chase Eden eld, Cooper Huskey, Coleman Osburn, Alejandro Rodriguez and Perry Minotakis not only had fun putting the Pooch Pouches together, but had an eye opening experience when they made their delivery. As they were escorted by Tim Murphy, activity assistant at the home, from resident to resident they discovered that these veterans had remarkable histories and were just like their grandparents. One of the highlights for the boys was the individual memory cases that each resident has next to their room doors. They were entranced by the displays of photos, memorabilia and medals that each resident has displayed. Led by youth leaders Patrick Doran and Lou Bilello, the boys went from room delivering the plastic bags lled with Did you know that the largest urban re in the Southeast happened right here in Jacksonville, Florida? On May 3, 1901, a small re that started at noon in the LaVilla mattress factory burned for eight long hours. According to Metro Jacksonville, the re swept through 146 city blocks of Jacksonville, destroying over 2,000 buildings, taking seven lives and leaving almost 10,000 people homeless in the process. The Great Fire of 1901 will go down in history as the third largest re disaster to ever take place. The re, which started in the kitchen during lunch, could soon be seen from Savannah, Georgia and the residents of Raleigh, North Carolina could even see the smoke clouds! October is celebrated nationwide as Fire Safety Month. As we remember The Great Fire of 1901, its important to be aware of how fast re can spread. Here are some key resafety tips for you to remember this October: SJDR Squires Circle delivers Pooch Pouches to retired veteransBy Karl Kennelldog biscuits and treats. They caught resident Jack Sorgen in the hall as he made his way back to his room from the weekly pool tournament. The surprise and joy glistened across his face as he was surrounded by the enthusiastic boys. Resident Ginny Roberts probably had the most unique reaction to the unusual gift. Well! she said with determined enthusiasm, I guess Im going to have to start going to pet therapy. When checking later with Leigh Devane, volunteer coordinator at the home, it became apparent that Roberts was true to her word, as Devane described how Roberts made a point to join in the recent pet therapy session speci cally seeking out Thumbelina. The Robinson-Savaria Squires Circle of San Juan Del Rio Catholic Church o ers Catholic boys between the ages of 10 and 17 the opportunity to develop new friendships, enjoy fun activities, serve their parish and community and grow into Catholic leaders. With the support and guidance of the Knights of Columbus Switzerland Council 12664 youth leaders, the Squires run their own organization, elect o cers and share their Catholic faith by helping people in need in their parish and community while enjoying the company of friends in social, family, athletic, cultural, civic and spiritual activities. For more details, please email youth leader Patrick Doran at pmdoran@bellsouth.net.The Great Fire of 1901By Contributing Writer Meghan Bender, Community Programs Manger, Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation Test all of your smoke detectors to be sure they are functioning properly. This includes installing new batteries every six months. Use propane and charcoal grills outdoors; be sure the grill is placed a safe distance away from any building or structure. Make sure you have a working re extinguisher handy in your home. Plan an escape route in case of an emergency; be aware of emergency exit locations. Dont run or hide extension cords underneath carpets or doors, they can overheat and catch re. Dont leave burning candles unattended and always keep them away from linens, bedding, drapes and other ammable materials. Be cautious when using portable heat sources, such as patio or space heaters. Keep combustible materials, including wood, plastics and plants at least three feet away. Next time you are downtown, take a moment to look at the Jacksonville Fire Memorial sculpture that can be found on the Northbank Riverwalk. The memorial was built in 2003 and according to Metro Jacksonville, it is intended to memorialize the great re and the citys rise from devastation. These safety tips are brought to you as part of the prevention-education mission of the Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation. Look for our upcoming articles in our Safety Series.Mural by Joe Puskas donated by Firehouse Subs to the downtown re station. The CreekLineis YOUR Community Newspaper! Send us your community news!editor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com October 2011 The CreekLine, Page 21 (904)292-2210 MandarinSouthBusinessCenter12421SanJoseBlvd.Suite310/320 Jacksonville,FL32223(BetweenSonnysBBQ&Solantic) LorettoRd. NSanJoseBoulevard RaceTrackRd. JulingtonCreek Lessthan1/2mi. fromJulingtonCreek MarinelaM.Nemetz,D.D.S.BoardCertifiedPediatricDentistRobertJ.Nemetz,D.D.S.,M.S.AdultDentistryPeriodonticsProsthodontics Nease High School is proud to recognize its eight National Merit Semi nalists for 2012, all of whom are in the International Baccalaureate (IB) Program: Marissa A. Galiley, Anthony J. Janocko, Tia A. Lewis, Carson L. Ridenhour, Steven L. Schwartz, Wenli Shao, Dhiraj Sikaria and Logan H. Stern. These students scored in the top 1 percent of 1.5 million high school students in the nation who entered the National Merit Program by taking the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test in the fall of their junior year. National Merit Semi nalists will be considered for National Merit Scholarships upon their advancement to nalist Fruit Cove resident Ron Cleveland and Wounded Warriors recently completed the 9/11 American Challenge, from Liberty State Park near the World Trade Center site via Shanksville Pennsylvania and nally to Washington D.C. Participants included survivors, family members and rst responders from 9/11, wounded heroes from the con icts in Iraq and Afghanistan and the general public. According to Cleveland, It was a very great challenge but the nal numbers were 565 miles, 70 miles a day, over eight days, climbing over four mountain ranges for total of over 23,000 feet. He said he will never forget meeting great people along the way, in all the small towns who came out to cheer the riders on and feed them.Nease students earn honorsContributed by Kyle Dresback, Principal, Allen D. Nease High Schoolstanding in the spring. Nease High School is also proud to announce that Katie Jackson, an IB student, has been named a semi nalist in the National Achievement Scholarship Program, an academic competition recognizing outstanding Black American high school students. This program is run concurrently with but operated and funded separately from the National Merit Program. Katie scored in the top 1 percent of all Black Americans participating in this program to achieve this honor. Fourteen Nease IB Program students were also recognized as National Merit Commended Students. These students scored in the top 3 percent of all students who entered the National Merit Program and will become candidates for special scholarships sponsored by corporations and businesses. The National Merit Commended Students are Nolan Alberti, Jordan Bernas, Christina Chase, Graham Hancock, Kathryn Hill, Blake Insel, Caleb Jarriel, Bryce McKenzie, Vivian Nguyen, Liam Rawson, Alex Sengstock, Aaron Skipper, Preston Sluder and Carly Young. Tia A. Lewis, Wenli Shao, Steven L Schwartz; back: Anthony J. Janocko, Logan H. Stern, Dhiraj Sikaria, Carson L. Ridenhour, Marissa A. Galiley A Note from County Commissioner Cyndi Stevenson:Due to the volume of calls and inquiries regarding the county budget, please see following link that should help answer questions about the county budget and scal stewardship.www.sjc .us/District1 Book Discussion at the Bartram Trail Branch Library!Still Alice Monday, October 17 7 pmJoin us for a discussion of this book by Lisa Genova. New members are always welcome!

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Page 22, The CreekLine October 2011 www.thecreekline.com The Shoppes of MurabellaAccepting New Patients (904) 826-346952 Tuscan Way Suite 205 St. Augustine, FL 32092 New Location! MICHAEL BOYER PAINTING, LLC287-2203 Licensed & Insured #ST-5178 LLC 20%Discount off total amount due for the month of October We Do It ALL!Take an additioinal 20% off the total amount due. For example: 1,300 sq ftregular price $1,600 20% discount you pay only $1,280! Marions of Mandarin904-262-99819735-2 Old St. Augustine Road(next to Hala Caf)Private setting for all customers. Wig maintenance, products, hats and accessories. Under New Ownership!New Hair Stylist available, call for appointment.Wig Boutique P ma a a a i n Pacetti Bay Middle School welcomed parents at the Open House held September 13. Parents experienced a fast-paced day in the life of their middle school student as they followed their childs schedule in one and a half hours time. Parents heard a presentation from each teacher and were able to ask questions before moving on to the next class. Informational meetings for the eighth grade eld trip and band were also held that evening. The Scholastic Book Fair was open at Open House giving parents the opportunity to shop with their children. The book fair is always a big hit with the students as they look for more books to add to their home libraries or donate to their teachers classrooms. PTSO volunteers were on hand during Open House to continue the PTSO membership drive and sell newly-styled spirit wear. Thanks to all the families that have joined so far. We appreciate your support. Membership is $15 per family and includes a copy of the school directory, distributed later on in the year. Meetings are held the rst Wednesday of each month at 3:00 p.m. in the PBMS Media Center. All are welcome. More information can be found at www-pbm.stjohns. We are not merely the writersWe are the magicians who can turn just 26 letters of the alphabet into something that will move you to tears. We are the magicians who can turn a simple ink blot into something that people will contemplate era after eraa timeless truth. J.R. Laurent wrote this on the dedication page of Bartram Trails literary magazine, The Oracle. Its certainly something everyone should know, as writing is essential to everything we do. Most of the students at BTHS know about the clubs for sports, music, academics and theater. But The Oracle is a club that nurtures writing. And its not just a club; its PBMS PTSO October updateBy Contributing Writer Sharon Davis, Corresponding Secretary, PBMS PTSOk12. .us/ptso/. All PBMS parents are encouraged to join and participate in the PTSO. The PBMS school directory is a useful resource for the PBMS family and is a great opportunity for area businesses to advertise to the community. We welcome local business participation to make the directory as useful and successful as possible. Businesses can contact Pam Durham at 547-8763 for more information. The PTSO-sponsored Fall Dance was held on September 30. The dance theme was sports and many students were dressed in support of their favorite sports team. The PTSO wishes to thank all those who volunteered or donated food items. Your e orts helped make it a huge success! The PTSO cookie dough fundraiser will run from October 10 through 25. Along with cookie dough, mixed bags, which are colorful reusable bags, will be sold. This joint fundraiser was a huge success last year, raising enough funds to allow the PTSO to purchase a classroom set of iPads for use by all students. We encourage community members to participate to help us surpass last years sales. The cookie dough is delicious and will be delivered November 10, just in time to have around the house for easy holiday baking.PBMS PTSO members Bev Downs and Becky Lawson selling spiritwear.BTHS HappeningsThe Write FutureBy Devyn Fussman, BTHS Studentalso a class, a school publication and a student-run business. Established in 2000, The Oracle is Bartram Trails literary school magazine that publishes submissions from students and is dedicated to supporting the creative arts. Any BTHS student can submit poetry, short ction, art, creative non ction and photography to the magazine and possibly have their work published. We work with all aspects of the arts so that no one is left out. Our creativity is endless, says Elizabeth Moore, assistant head editor. Which is a good thing, as colleges are looking for students with creativity and students who have been published will have more impressive applications than those who have not. Recently they published two years worth of work: a social commentary issue, Oracle Speaks Out and they were also proud to publish their rst book of photography and poetry, Shadows and Light, on Amazon. Their goal for the 20112012 year is to release a book of speculative ction (fantasy, sci- horror, mystery and otherworldly themes) onto the web as well. In addition to being a literary magazine and student-run business, The Oracle is also an advanced creative writing class that counts as honors credit. Mary Mullen, who is also the clubs sponsor, often gives her students unusual assignments to challenge them to think outside the box. She says that writing is one of the most underrated and yet one of the most important arts in the world, and its especially important to incorporate it into the school curriculum. These writers not only work together to create a beautiful magazine, but they also share and critique their own writings and help each other grow as writers. Their love and dedication to writing has made them some of the best writers in the school. Most of them stay on sta for the full three years (a year of a lower-level Creative Writing class is required to join) and improve their writing skills tremendously. To me, its more about the people you get to work with every day, says Jason Agatep, head editor. The Oracle is like a home away from home; were like a family and no ones afraid to be themselves. Watch for contests, ll out submission forms and contact the sta at the BTHS school website and at www.theoraclemagazine.blogspot.com. Businessnot as bigas it used to be?Call for a free consultation & well work at increasing your business!The CreekLineLinda Gay 287-4913

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www.thecreekline.com October 2011 The CreekLine, Page 23 www.maymgt.com MAY Management Services, Inc.Licensed Property ManagementMAY Realty & Resort RentalsLicensed Real Estate Brokerage Our job is to help Boards of Directors successfully manage their Associations The Neighborhoods of World Golf Village Tim HutchisonRegional ManagerJulington Creek Plantation 1637 Racetrack Road #206 St. Johns, Florida 32259904-880-8796New Ofce!Jean WrightLicensed Property ManagerDottie KrinerLicensed Property ManagerRich Curran-Kelley, CAMRegional ManagerDiane HartmanLicensed Property ManagerKathy MayeldLicensed Property ManagerDeborah AlleyLicensed Property ManagerLaura QualantoneLicensed Property Manager904-940-1002 US1 1 Mile South of Nease High School Back Pain? Neck Pain?You dont have to suffer!Call: 247-ACHE (2243) Dont let little aches be a Big Pain! A month into the new school year and the excitement has been worn o like used sand paper. The slow start of the rst week full of paperwork for the parents and very little for the students has given way to hills and mountains of homework that take up the entire evening. But there is at least one good thing to look forward to: homecoming. The hustle and bustle of girls dragging their dates through the mall looking for a tie to match their new dress overwhelms the cashiers and salespeople at department stores and small boutiques throughout the area. Classrooms buzz with he-said/she-said about who asked who and whos wearing what. Its the nice distraction from the boring monotony of school everyone has been waiting for. When October 1 rolled around, giddy Nease girls erupted from schools around the county as the SAT nally ended and they all raced home to settle the nal plans for dinner and after-parties. As they care-My friends always depend on me to summarize the season and melt down all the information from all the September periodicals into a so called Must Have list. This list is the Bible so to speak, if you could only buy two or three things for the upcoming fashionable events you will be attending. The last few years this list has become much more important as we are all watching our purses. I take this assignment seriously and am proud to share it with you Fashionable Florida Friends (FFFs)! So here we go for fall 1s Must Have column. Number one on the agenda is for you to get to the mall and do some serious leg-wear shopping. Yes, Kate Middleton has hit the scene and the trend of hosiery has rained down to the First Coast! Some of my friends call it sheer torture to consider wearing hose in Florida; one boasts of at least a century of naked legs, sans hose, for her. But the fact is any gals legs look better in hose. Its like cosmetics for the leg, but better. I ran into one of my trendy friends just last week and she had on a pair of drop-dead gorgeous hose. I told her, Linda, your legs look fabulous and whatever brand and color that those hose are, write it down for me. She did and I drove straight to the store and bought a three-pack, sharing one pair with another friend on the way home! I swear, I didnt know Linda had such good looking legs till she had those hose on! Peanut Butter Jelly or jam Cereal/Oatmeal Canned Pasta Canned Stew/Chili Canned pasta Soup Canned fruit/veggies Toilet PaperChrists Cupboard Food Pantry Wish ListChrists Cupboard is located at Celebration Lutheran Church, 810 Roberts Road. Call 230-2496 for info! Christs Cupboard serves anyone in need. Hours are 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Tues. and Weds.Fashion UpdateFall 1 must haves!By Donna Keathley, dkeathley designsI am not talking about wearing fuddy duddy old lady hose, but nice, attering ultrasheer pantyhose, black opaque tights and patterned leg wear is in for Fall 1! Todays pantyhose are miles ahead of those we wore to work in the s. The fabric is more comfortable, the elastic is less restricting and they o er toning and shaping bene ts to boot. Look at the re ection of Miss Kate in her pretty dresses with those shiny sheer hose on in her pre-wedding photos. This is what its all about. Then, I also play Miss Manners in the hosiery wear story. There are certain occasions that covered legs are a must. The fact that you have pantyhose on for a job interview is a given; you have to do it! Then the social occasions that be t covered legs, like funerals, weddings, etc. show pure class. The fall opaque legs and textured legs nish a great looking ensemble like nothing else. Nothing else said, go buy a pair of hose, its the rst Must Have. The second best low cost update for your fall wardrobe is the woven scarf. This years version is oblong and made of very handsome fabric; chose one in your color palette and it should go with everything in your closet. Wear the scarf as a wrap or loop it in half around your neck topping o the entire look of your day, whether it be a denim skirt and ballet ats or a pantsuit and heels. If you still have any fashion budget left, buy a blouse or a dress with an asymmetrical neckline. My friend and I were working with her new LBD (little black dress) with the new neckline just last week. We tried many di erent pieces of her jewelry with it and nothing worked; any necklace ruins the lines of the neck. At the end of the day, just a great earring statement was all that little number took to nish the polished look! Now go shopping for these Must Haves and have fun! Nease HappeningsBreak the monotony, please!By Brittany Dirks, Nease Studentfully applied their make-up and slipped into their short dresses, hearts were uttering and beating fast and when they eagerly got into their cars to take pictures at one or another lovely place with trees and interesting architecture, they were nearly shaking with anticipation. Once their parents were satis ed and theyd eaten dinner, hours were spent at the Moroccan Shrine Center dancing the night away. On a more stressful note, seniors anxiety levels are approaching maximum capacity as college application deadlines creep closer and closer. But the inevitable senioritis has started kicking in and there are some who are slacking. Some is a slight understatement, though. Every senior is ghting the slow onset of the mental disorder of extensive proportions. They are all looking towards winter break with eyes full of hope for a relaxing time to unwind. Overall, the student population has settled back into the monotonous rut of school and is desperate for relief already.More students in SJC schools than last yearThe number of students attending St. Johns County Public Schools by the 20-day enrollment count was 31,072, an increase of 909 students over the same time last year. The latest attendance gure represents a 3 percent increase over last years enrollment of 30,163. St. Johns County remains one of the fastest growing school districts in the state, especially during a time when most districts are experiencing declining enrollments. Considering the school district as a whole, middle schools had the largest growth this year with 4.9 percent. High school enrollment increased by 3.1 percent while elementary school enrollment increased by 2.3 percent. Schools with the largest increases for 2011-2012 are Osceola Elementary School (11.6 percent), Pacetti Bay Middle School (10.3 percent), Crookshank Elementary School (9 percent), Liberty Pines Academy and Creekside High School (8.3 percent), Mason Elementary School (7.3 percent), Sebastian and Fruit Cove Middle Schools (7 percent) and R. B. Hunt Elementary (6.6 percent). In addition there are 144 St. Johns Virtual School students, 101 enrolled in high school courses and 43 in K-8 classes. Part of the increase in the student growth rate may be attributed to available housing, the districts academic reputation and the wide variety of educational options for students in St. Johns County. St. Johns County is a desirable place to live and we o er a lot of choices for students, said Tim Forson, Deputy Superintendent for Operations. Our nationally recognized high school academies are just one example of the variety of academic opportunities available to our students. We work closely with teachers and parents to provide the best educational experiences and extracurricular activities for all grade levels. In an e ort to meet Class Size Amendment and growth requirements, Hickory Creek, Mill Creek and Hartley Elementary Schools were recently expanded and an expansion at Osceola Elementary School is nearing completion. Construction has begun on Elementary school L in the Palencia area that will serve students in the north-central area of the county. The Northeast Florida Conservatory will celebrate their rst anniversary with a music festival to be held the weekend of October 14 through 16. The festival will begin with a wine and cheese reception on Friday, October 14 at 7:00 p.m. with a ballroom dance demonstration with music by the Conservatory Jazz Band. Saturday, October 15 will be lled with musical and theatrical performances from 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. Performances include the Jacksonville Suzuki Strings, pianists, vocalists, theatre and a drum line. This festival day will end with a performance by the Conservatory Community Orchestra. There will also be a market show with vendors selling their treasures; food and beverages will be available. Events on Friday and Saturday will be held at the Northeast Florida Conservatory Anniversary celebrated with music festivalof Music on San Jose Boulevard. Festival weekend will conclude with performance by the Conservatory Community Concert Band at 3:00 p.m. on Sunday, October 16 at the All Souls Church on Hartley Road. The Northeast Florida Conservatory is a 501(c)(3) non-pro t organization founded a year ago by the Executive Director Richard Dickson and serves all of Jacksonville and surrounding counties. Programs and music lessons are available for all ages on all instruments. The faculty consists of professional musicians from the Jacksonville Symphony and local colleges. Programs and classes in private lessons, theatre, ensemble/playing, performance and music theory are available. Proceeds from the anniversary music festival will go towards scholarships and nancial assistance.

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Page 24, The CreekLine October 2011 www.thecreekline.com Lindell & Farson, P.A.Attorneys At LawConveniently Located in South Mandarin 12276 San Jose Blvd., Suite 126 Jacksonville, FL 32223-8630904-880-4000 www.lindellfarson.com J. Michael Lindell, Esq.James A. Farson, Esq.Roger K. Gannam, Esq. R. Howard Walton, Esq. Automobile, Motorcycle & Trucking Accidents, Insurance Disputes, & Wrongful Death Complex Business, Real Estate, & Construction Disputes LINDELL &FARSON Lindell & Farson, P.A. 904-880-4000 WESTMINSTER WOODS ON JULINGTON CREEK 12th Annual Fall FestivalSaturday, October 22nd 12:00-4:00pm 25 State Road 13287-7300 W ESTMINSTER W OODS ON J ULINGTON C REEK W ESTMINSTER C OMMUNITIES OF F LORIDA www.WestminsterRetirement.com m m m Saturd 1 1 Jim Taylor provides TaylorMade SolutionsCall me at 904-705-1692 or TaylorMade4You@bellsouth.net to discuss how I can provide Solutions tailor-made for You.Managerial Accounting ServicesOver 25 years experiencePersonal & Business Income Tax PreparationFormer Internal Revenue Agent & Lic. to practice before the IRS QuickBooks Set-Up, Training & Support Call me now to Review your QuickBooks setup and show you how it can simplify your accounting. Excel Spreadsheet Design, Training, & Support Learning is a lifelong process. The St. Johns County School District Community Education program provides evening classes for adults at select schools around the county. Classes have been o ered at R. B. Hunt, Mill Creek, Ocean Palms and Cunningham Creek Elementary Schools, Gamble Rogers Middle School, St. Johns Technical High School and the Fullerwood Center. Teachers come from all walks of life, from retired and working professionals to Wouldnt you love to have a well-behaved dog in time for the holidays? Julington Creek Plantation Recreation Center announces that it will begin o ering dog obedience training classes in the parking lot starting October 25. Classes o ered will include: Beginner, Advanced and Socialization. During each six-week session you can expect discus-If your car has been feeling a little sluggish lately, there are some things you can do to get your motor running right again. First change your oil and lter. Make sure to use the grade of oil that is recommended by the car. Using the wrong grade of oil can reduce the performance of your car and its gas mileage. And, do not rely on the oil light in your car. By the time that light goes on, some damage to your engine may already have been done. So, check your oil often. When you do, also check the brake uid and transmission uid levels. You should ush the brake uid, transmission uid Community Education courses are on-lineempty-nesters to current educators who want to expand their teaching experience. They bring their passion and expertise to the classroom in an informal but educational, and in many cases, entertaining setting. Courses are taught in many areas to meet the needs of retirees and hobbyists to people who want to increase their job skills. They include E-Commerce website design and maintenance, basic computers and Microsoft applications, art, folk guitar, bluegrass string band, karaoke tech, French, Spanish and American Sign Language, etiquette, sewing, writing, photography, landscape design, yoga, Middle Eastern dancing, meditation and more. Classes usually meet one evening per week for one to three hours, depending on the class. Prices range from $7 to $10 per class hour. For more information, log on to www.sjccommunityed. com or call 547-7565 or 547-7503. Have a dog gone good time at JCP Recreation Center By Contributing Writer Linda DeBlois, Special Events Director, JCP CDDsions on behavior, question and answer sessions, as well as demonstration and individual guidance through new commands. The Socialization class will have a smaller class size and is for those dogs that need extra focus on social skills. Its especially tailored for dogs that may be fearful or aggressive. Obedience training does so much more than teach a dog to follow a couple commands. It teaches and builds communication between an owner and their dog. All classes will be taught by an obedience training and behavior modi cation professional. For further information or to register for a class, please visit www.jcpcdd.org. U.S. Coast Guard AuxiliaryVessel Safety Checks2nd Sunday of month 12:00 noon ~ 3:00 p.m. Vilano Boat Ramp and 12:00 noon ~ 2:00 p.m.St. Augustine Lighthouse Park Boat Ramp Tips to get your cars motor runningand coolant system every two years or 30,000 miles. Keeping fresh, clean uids in your car will keep your motor running smoothly. Two other things that will are replacing your air lter and fuel lter frequently. Clean lters will help keep dirt out of your fuel injectors, fuel pump and engine. If too much dirt accumulates, it will lead to expensive repairs. You should also change your spark plugs every other year. Worn plugs will cause your engine to mis re and waste a lot of gas. Also, check all the belts and hoses in your car for signs of wear, especially the timing belt or timing chain. If that breaks, it can destroy your engine. When you do replace it, replace the water pump too since the procedure for each is the same. You can do many of these things yourself. You do not have to be an ace mechanic or have a lot of experience. You just need the desire, a how to manual and a few tools. Then, when you get your motor running right, you can head on down the highway looking for adventure and be able to handle whatever comes your way. If your car will no longer run on down the highway, please consider donating your car to charity. If you do, it will be picked up fast and free and you will get a tax deduction of at least $500 if you itemize on your federal tax return. The process is easy and there are many charities that can bene t from your car donation. For complete details on how to donate car, just go to www.cars4charities.org/.For the fourth year in a row, in an e ort to promote a safe and healthy Halloween for children, Krantz Dental Care will buy back the candy that young trick-ortreaters collect this year. The candy will then be donated to our troops serving overseas. Candy can be brought to Krantz Dental Care at 12058 San Jose Boulevard, Suite 102 from Tuesday, November 1 through Friday, November 4 between 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Krantz Dental Care will pay $1 for each Halloween candy buy back event announcedpound of candy (10 pound limit) brought in. Children can also bring in notes with personal messages to the United States troops that will be included in the shipment. Groups collecting more than 10 pounds must contact the o ce to make arrangements. Everyone wins at this annual event put together by Dr. Alan Krantz and his team at Krantz Dental Care. For more information, please visit www.krantzdentalcare.com. GIVE WHERE YOU LIVE!

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www.thecreekline.com October 2011 The CreekLine, Page 25 Oer Expires December 31, 2011 Must present this coupon at time of service. Injectable llers include Juvderm Juvderm XC, Restylane, Perlane, Prevelle and Radiesse. Minimum Botox treatment is 20 units. Cannot be combined with any other discount or special offer. Limit one per person. No cash value. Offer good only at the PVPS Mandarin location. COUPON CODE: CO Lessons at Music & Artsgive musicians the support and individual instruction needed to help them become the best they can be. We offer lessons for most instruments, including guitar, percussion, brass, woodwind and strings! $5OFF ANY PURCHASE!*136351* 136351No minimum purchase required. Maximum discount of $5.00. This offer does not apply to rental payments, lessons, shipping and handling charges or any similar processing charges. Coupon offer valid in-store and on in-stock product only. This coupon is non-transferable. No cash value. Not valid with other discounts, prior purchases, clearance items or discontinued items. Coupon may not be applied toward institutional/educator purchase. One coupon per customer per visit. Certain restrictions apply. Expires 10/31/11.Jacksonville 10991-51 San Jose Boulevard (in Wal-Mart Shopping Center) (904) 292-9705 At Fruit Cove Middle School, students have already settled into a new and exciting school year. This year the school has switched to block scheduling, so the students have three classes, each 105 minutes long, on Blue and Gold days. Most students are happy with the change, especially because they get two nights to do their homework assignments. Fruit Coves enrollment this year is up to an amazing 1,451 students. The school has also expanded the cafeteria and installed 10 new portables. So much has already happened in such a short time since school started. The rst school dance was on Friday, September 9. It was a huge success! The students had so much fun dancing with their friends at the luauthemed party to celebrate the beginning of the school year. Also, the football team has had a great start of the season so far and basketball is now underway. September 13 was the sixth This months review belongs to the recently released The Help, a dramatic-historical lm, lled with humor and drama. The movie begins in Jackson Mississippi, during the 1960s in the heat of the Civil Rights Movement. Eugenia Skeeter Phelan, portrayed by Emma Stone, is a young aspiring writer just returning as an Ole Miss graduate. No husbands and babies for Skeeter, who seems to be a bit di erent when compared to her old friends. She nds a job writing for the local papera column on how to clean the house and being a genteel southern girl, that job has always been left to someone else: the help. Now Skeeter needs some help and nds aid from one of her best friends domestic, Aibileen, played by Viola Davis. She cares for the house and the children, a maid FCMS HappeningsBy Contributing Writer Sarah Jacobs, FCMS Studentgrade open house and September 15 was open house for the seventh and eighth graders. It was so great to have all the parents come out to Fruit Cove and meet their childrens wonderful teachers. The Book Fair was open during the week, and there was also the Club Fair, where students and parents could learn about all the di erent clubs and sporting activities going on at FCMS. For example, Drama Club, cross country, Board Games Club and the new jewelry making club, just to name a few. Our goal at Fruit Cove is to get as many students as possible involved in school activities. Research shows that the more students are involved in school, the less bad choices they will make outside of school. All in all, the school year at Fruit Cove Middle School is o to a great start! There is so much to look forward to in the next few months. Students are very happy to be learning again. Go Flyers!Movie ReviewThe HelpDirected by: Tate Taylor. Starring: Emma Stone, Viola Davis, Bryce Dallas Howard, and Octavia Spencer. Review by T.G. StantonRating: Good Movie, Glad to Have Seen It (4 out of 5) and nanny rolled into one. While writing her daily column, Skeeter has an idea to write a novel from the point of view of the local black women and the work situations and responsibilities they live with. Aibileen and her best friend Minny Jackson, depicted by Octavia Spencer, soon become involved in the writings of this novel in a time where such outspokenness is considered unlawful and dangerous. Trouble brews not only for the Black community but also between Skeeter and her friends who are leaders in the community and also in segregation. Hilly Holbrook, characterized by Bryce Dallas Howard, is such a leader. Her friends are not ready for the change that civil rights bring and they aim to thwart an outcome they know will change the way they live. From the beginning, the lm lets you know that in the 1960s slave times were only barely over, where the AfricanAmerican women served the white community and cared for the children of these women in the face of racism and segregation. Opinions and equality were not considered. Tate Taylor has directed a superb lm that takes a very trying time, a time that was lled with dark and desperate days and lightens it with strong relationships, courage and humor that stand up to the di cult situations. Emma Stone plays a young woman primarily raised by the help her mother employed; this was the woman who nurtured her and taught her to stand on her own two feet. Her dismissal was the turning point that leads to the novel. The movie had excellent characters that showed spirit and courage. Viola Davis is stoic and caring as the granddaughter of a house slave and nanny to a child too often left alone, who as a co-conspirator in this novel, nds aspirations of her own. Octavia Spencers character is feisty and mischievous, oppressed at home and in the workplace, who nds a new direction with the books publication. The whole community will now have to look at how the rest of the country will see them. The movie was also welldone in costumes, make-up and living conditions for the time period. The only drawback for a better rating is that being a Disney movie, the darker, more truthful aspects of these times were covered over. Players By e Sea eatre & the BTHS eatre Boosters Association proudly present...Salamander Stew A Metaphysical HalloweenPlus encore performances by BTHS Alumni Jake Rothman, Ashley Pincket and Matt Tompkins, recreating musical performances from Jekyll & HydeSaturday, October 29 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.Players By e Sea Mainstage eatre 106 Sixth Street North, Jacksonville Beach, FL 32250 Tickets at the door are $15 per person or contact BTHS eatre Department xela@stjohns.k12. .us or call 547-8340 ext. 22574 for advanced ticket sales Businessnot as bigas it used to be?Call for a free consultation & well work at increasing your business! The CreekLineLinda Gay 287-4913

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Page 26, The CreekLine October 2011 www.thecreekline.com Marions of Mandarin904-262-99819735-2 Old St. Augustine Road(next to Hala Caf)Private setting for all customers. Wig maintenance, products, hats and accessories. Under New Ownership!New Hair Stylist available, call for appointment.Wig Boutique P ma a i n Specialized Care for the individual with Alzheimers or similar memory loss.Almost HomeDAYBREAKAdult Day Care Socialization, activities, meals, snacks and personal grooming assistance. Financial Assistance available 731-4002www.almosthomedaybreak.comLicense #9109MF 7am6pm Robert Kelsey, M.D.Board Certied Cardiology and Internal Medicine Robert Kelsey, M.D.Now Accepting New Patients 904-827-0078 Open Mondays through Fridays 8:30am 5pm 1631 Race Track Road Suite 101230-7977Most Insurances AcceptedPediatric Associates of Julington Creek, PAOffering care for Infants, Children & Adolescents Mary Ann Garcia, M.D., FAAP Victor Luz, M.D., FAAP Every parent wants to raise nancial geniuses. Weve explored nancial responsibility; now lets delve into some practical ways to equip your children, from toddlers to teens, as they learn to value a dollar. Little ones usually dont comprehend moneys value. In the van today, we discussed money-making opportunities. Were gearing up for our family trip and everyone wants some spending money! Andrew, age four, was shocked Id be willing to pay him $1 for an involved job. A whole dollar?! he exclaimed joyfully. That dollar lost its glamour quickly when we discussed how much a snack or souvenir will cost. Still excited, he now understands hell need to work hard to save for a fun trip just like Mom and Dad. Children have limited opportunities to earn money. Encourage them to be creative! Keep a paid jobs list. Dave Ramsey maintains and I agree, that certain chores are a childs contribution to family life and are unpaid. However, I often make a list of extra jobs Im willing to pay for. Allowance. If you say In October, the Jacksonville Symphonys lineup reveals a fascinating variety of American artists and popular music, as well as music of the Americas. On October 13 and 14, The Jacksonville Symphony combines the music of Frank Zappa, Astor Piazzolla and others with choreography. The program Music and Dance features guest dancers from Jacksonville University and Douglas Anderson School of the Arts. The October 13 performance is part Purposeful ParentingThe Value of a Dollar Part 3: Practical ideasBy Allie Olsen, www.gracefullmom.comyoure going to give it, keep your word! You may consider having standards the children must meet in order to receive it. Talk to the neighbors. A responsible child may be hired to walk a neighbors dog, babysit, mow lawns, rake leaves, pull weeds or house sit. Sell something! Neighborhood garage sales are bi-annual in most NW St. Johns County neighborhoods. Allow your child to set up a lemonade stand or join with friends to sell outgrown toys. Now that theyve earned some money, remind your family to Save, Spend and Give. Searching for a practical way to encourage saving? One local dad matched savingsdollar for dollar. Adam Frederick remembers, Dad de nitely built into me a desire to save and watch my money closely. It was a lot of fun to watch the account grow. His Dad showed him monthly statements that tracked balance and interest gained every month over the ve years he matched savingsuntil Frederick started working. He built into all of us a lot of nancial ideas along the way. He cited Proverbs 22:7 when he taught me to always pay o credit cards at the end of the month and never build debt. Dad was very intentional, Frederick recalls. As your children get closer to adulthood, consider involving them in the family budget. Len Fontenot shared, I sat my kids down and showed them real life. Ive shown them how much comes in, how much goes out on basics, for savings, supplemental retirement and retirement, how much for emergency and how to manage and manipulate credit. My boys learn far better from what I show them as opposed to what I tell them. In other words if you are practicing what you preach show them how the family nances work and let real life be the teacher. Practice what you preach. As you train your children in nancial responsibility, remember you are writing part of your familys story. Let it be consistent of your values in the rest of lifefull of faithfulness and generosity.Symphony o ers exciting fall showsBy Contributing Writer Paul Witkowski, Jacksonville Symphony Orchestraof the innovative Fusion Series, followed by the October 14 performance on the Mayo Clinic Co ee Series.The bedrock of 1950s American pop culture was television. On October 21 and 22, the Symphony pays tribute to that magical decade in The Golden Era of Black and White with hit theme songs and melodies sung by Sharon Wheatley, Farah Alvin and the voices of Chapter Six. The concert is part of the Fidelity National Financial Pops Series.This fall nds our elds lled with kids and families, laughter and cheers, triumphs and the occasional tear, with the spirit of well get them next time and Victory with Honor. After school, weekends and evenings are busy enjoying football and cheer, fall baseball and softball and watching some of our travel teams and devoted athletes hard at work. The St. Johns Middle School Athletic Association (SJMSAA) football season Kick O on September 1 at Plantation Park was lled with middle school teams and families from all over our county and a few schools from Flagler County, brought together in another great afternoon and night o football under the lights. SJMSAA was also part of a historic moment when funds used from such programs as THE PLAYERS Chip in for Youth and the United Way of St. Johns helped to build a multi-purpose eld for Richard J. Murray Middle School. For the rst time in 41 years, since 1970, when the school was once a high school, football was enjoyed on the Bulldogs home eld. Local families and school alumni gathered together to watch this memorable homecoming game. The Bulldogs beat Liberty Pines 32 to 13. But Liberty Pines Academy too enjoyed their own victory, as they are now able to host games on their new home eld thanks to a second multi purpose eld built by SJMSAA. This fall, SJMSAAs hard work and dedication truly brought back the spirit of pride and hometown feeling to our elds and an in living color reminder that if we build it, they will come. Football will continue to go strong at the elds all month long in October and will also SJMSAA and CAA League sports newsBy Contributing Writer Jeannie Bastian, CAA and SJMSAA Board Director feature the start of the winter SJMSAA soccer program with tryouts and practices kicking o at the beginning of the month. Watch the SJMSAA.com website for all important SJMSAA dates and events. Fall also ushered in a new season of Creeks Athletic Association (CAA) Pop Warner football and cheer at Plantation Park. Cheer on kids from all ages from the BTHS, CHS and Nease area play in the CFL Pop Warner Football and Cheer fall program. Registration is open for CAA Flag Football and Creeks Girls Lacrosse. Check in to the caaleague.org website to register online and to keep up with all CAA sports, news and announcements. Local youth sports are enjoying the opportunity to participate once again in THE PLAYERS Chip in for Youth fund raiser. For each $40 all day any day ticket purchased though this special program, $25 goes to the local sports team or organization of your choice. These tickets are specially priced and only available through chipforyouth.com. Day speci c grounds tickets will be on sale to the general public for $55. So chip in for youth and save. Contact CAA or SJMSAA for more information. And thats the latest news from the eld house.Luck is a dividend of sweat. The more you sweat, the luckier you get.~Ray Kroc Check out our community webpages!www. thecreekline. com Community Calendar High School Football Blog

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www.thecreekline.com October 2011 The CreekLine, Page 27 THE PATIENT OR PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE S, EXAMINATIONS OR TREATMENT.Dr. Bruce SamburskyChiropractic PhysicianOver 22 Years of Experience SPECIAL OFFER Must present this ad to receive offer. Not Valid with any other offers. Expires 12/10/11 Sambursky Chiropractic, LLC683-4376 Immediate same day appointments available. Including Saturdays! We are happy to welcome to our oce Jane Moore, Licensed Massage Therapist LIC#0023441 .12421 San Jose Blvd. #300 (just South of Solantic )Serving the Mandarin and Julington Creek area.www.backbonejax.comINITIAL EXAMINATIONONLY $59(NORMAL VALUE $120 VALUE)Stop suering from: Theyre at it again. The Creekside girls varsity volleyball team is showing their strength yet again and 2011 might be the year they go all the way. Its looking good for the girls as they start the season with an impressive seven wins and zero losses. Theyre undefeated and thats not something to sco at. The season is nowhere near close to done, but so far the team has failed to lose. Of their seven total wins, three of those were shut outs, including their game against bitter district rival Bartram Trail. Currently out of the 78 schools classi ed under Division 5A in the state of Florida, Creekside is ranked fourth overall. Out of the top ve schools on this list, Creekside is rst in scoring with 21 points for. The only thing keeping them back from a higher rank is their seven points against, which is the highest out of the top ve schools (#5 Merritt Island has had zero points scored against them). The girls are 2-0 in their district after shutting out both Clay and Bartram. Creekside will play both of these teams again before the season is up and another win will put them securely in the lead for the district title. If the team can make it through districts they might have a good shot at the state title. This would be a crowning achievement for a program four years in the making. Many of the seniors currently on the team have been with the coaches now for four years making the team a cohesive veteran unit. Of the 13 girls on the team, six of them are seniors and only two of them are sophomores. With the beginning of a new school year comes the rst set of fall sports. From football to volleyball, Nease Panthers have high expectations for their seasons and although some teams havent started with their best foot forward, they are all determined to meet their goals by playing the sport they love. The Nease football team, after their loss against St. Augustine, has a 0-3 record, but the Panthers are not known for getting discouraged. A win against Eagles View for the homecoming game nally gave the team their rst win in late September. Junior Eric Bach said, Were not starting o great, but well see how it goes; were hoping to get some big wins. The brotherhood of the team Nease Sports RoundupBy Elena Castello, Nease Studentand the love of the game is clearly a huge aspect; the good sportsmanship shows in every game. Head coach Danny Cowgill works the team hard: with Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday practices, a walk-through on Thursdays and the games on Fridays, Nease is de nitely set for a good season rest of the season and no one should underestimate the underdogs. The Nease volleyball team has also had a rough start, even before the competitions. After losing eight of their varsity players and their coaching sta the young team now has to work even harder to stick together to try to win districts. But the Nease Panthers should not be disregarded. Determination and talent will get them through the season, as they are 1-1 for district games, with more coming in the next weeks. Varsity sophomore Kelly Costeira shares, We de nitely have the motivation and talent to win districts! The Panthers swimming and diving team has one goal in mind: to take as many people as possible to districts. To do this, they must overcome their biggest competition, Bolles; but with the friendship, competitive spirit and talent, Neases swimmers are sure to have an excellent season. The Nease runners have started o the season on the right foot. The race at Ridgeview was excellent for the girls; they won fourth place overall. Mac Reynolds, on the boys team, placed second overall. At the race in Katie Caples, sophomore Alyssa Rodale placed 15th overall and Reynolds again placed second. CHS Sports RoundupBy Grant Piper, CHS StudentHowever in high school sports, experience is a double edged sword. Next year Creekside is going to lose six of their best players to graduation leaving the team with the ve current juniors and two current sophomores and the JV team to ll in. Many think that this will have to be the year if the Knights want a shot at the state title. Losing that many seniors cant bene t the team. But as many think that this will have to be the year, they also think that it will be the year. Its not often that one comes across such a veteran team with a strong coaching sta Coaches Laura Wynn and Megan Bowers have been with the program since the start and have guided these girls, using their extensive coaching histories, to the position theyre in now: undefeated and looking for more. Well all be watching eagerly as the girls continue their season and will hopefully be there at the end when they come home victorious with a state title in hand. If any year is the year, its this one. 2011. Go Knights! 11481 Old St. Augustine Rd #403(across from Lowes next to GATE)880-3292Expert Jewelry Repair done on premimses Watch Repair, including Rolex We give CASH for broken/unworn gold. The Goddard School located in Saint Johns believes that the basis for healthy learning is providing all children with active, playful lifestyles enriched with good nutrition. Laura Pinover-Sadler, owner of The Goddard School located in Saint Johns, o ers ve tips for parents to help their children develop healthy learning habits: 1. Encourage play. Playing alone and with others not only builds brain development, it also helps children develop social skills and a sense of ethics. The most e ective play is free of evaluation and correction (after all, throwing a ball shouldn't be "right" or "wrong"), while promoting autonomy. 2. Play together. In addition to their ABCs and 123s, preschool children are learning and developing life skills that will shape who they grow into as adults. One of these building blocks is learning to play well with others and accepting one another's di erences. 3. Get adequate sleep and proper nutrition. Your child will do their best if they get to sleep early and eat a healthy breakfast each day before school. A daily diet of junk food is not compatible with learning. It can cause listlessness and hyperactivity, which can impair a child's ability to learn. Skipping breakfast, especially, is a detriment to a child's education.Celebrate playful, healthy learning with ve tips4. Continue year-long education. Routine provides structure, which is often lacking during the summer months when children all too quickly become detached from the lessons they learned throughout the school year. Maintaining a schedule throughout the summer supports an environment that is less of a contrast to the classroom and provides a healthy balance between building skills, play and rest. 5. Turn o the screens. The American Academy of Pediatrics urges parents to avoid television and other electronic media for children two years of age and younger. Time spent in front of a computer, TV, video game or other similar devices can interfere with schoolwork, physical activity, curious exploration, social interaction and play. "Play is the natural way to learn. It helps children learn to solve problems, promotes exibility and motivation, teaches regulation of emotions and builds resilience and con dence," said Sue Adair, director of education at GSI. "It is also essential to the development of the child's brain, forming the basis of healthy cognitive function and mastery of the child's physical world." Look for The Goddard Schools ad in this issue of The CreekLine! Advertise inThe CreekLineIts good for business!886-4919LG@rtpublishinginc.com

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Financial aid if quali ed Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)453-6204. REAL ESTATEGEORGIA LAND SALE 69 Acres $995/ acre. Will not divide. Other tracts available, visit our website www.StRegispaper.com 1-478-987-9700 St Regis Paper Co. SAPA ***FREE Foreclosure Listings*** Over 400,000 properties nationwide. LOW Down Payment. Call NOW! 1-800-498-8619 SAPAReal EstateAvailable Now!!! 2-4 Bedroom homes Take Over Payments No Money Down/No Credit Check Call 1-888-269-9192 Stop Renting Lease option to buy Rent to own No money down No credit check 1-877395-0321 ***FREE Foreclosure Listings*** OVER 400,000 properties nationwide. Low down payment. Call now 800-250-2043.VACATION/TRAVELCAVENDER CREEK CABINS Dahlonega, North Georgia Mountains. 1, 2, & 3 Bedroom Cabins with HOT TUBS! Take Virtual Tour at: www.CavenderCreek.com Call NOW! Toll Free 1-866-373-6307 SAPAWanted to BuyWANTED DIABETES TEST STRIPS Any kind/brand. Unexpired up to $18.00. Shipping Paid Hablamos espanol 1-800-2660702 www.selldiabeticstrips.com WANTED: YEARBOOKS $15 each for any high school 1940-1988 not in our collection. yearbookusa@yahoo.com 1-972-7681338. Registration for Ancient City Sports Ladies Flag Football is now open! Calling all women 25 and older, returning teams and individuals looking for team placement! This is a family friendly, recreational, nocontact version of ag football for women; no professional players allowed. There are two divisions; Spice (upper division) and Sugar (lower division). Jimed Williams, St. Johns County Recreation and Parks director, will hold a Rules Review and Registration Meeting on Thursday, October 13 at 6:30 p.m. at Veterans Park in the meeting room above the concession stand. This is a mandatory meeting for all coaches who will be on the eld during games. This meeting is also strongly encouraged for new players and team captains. For more information, please visit the ACS Ladies Flag website at http://ladies agfootball.shutter- y.com/ or you may also email the League coordinator, Jamey at kumps@bellsouth.net or call Stacie at 588-5831. Registration for Creeks girls lacrosse 2012 starts on October 01. The league is open to girls in kindergarten through eighth grade. This year Creeks Girls Lacrosse will be trying something newuniforms will be the same as last year. If your child played in the past and her uniform still ts, you may opt to keep the uniform and your registration Sports in Briefwill be discounted $25. If you refer a new player, you will receive a $25 credit towards your registration. New player clinics will be held in October, November and December with time and dates to be announced. Early registration (October 1 to November 15) is $125;registration from November 15 to December 31 is $140; and late registration (January 1-31 2012) is $155. Register online at www.creekslax.com/girls. For any questions, comments or concerns, please contact CreeksGirlsLax@ gmail.com. CAA Flag Football is for players age four (as of April 2011) up to the age of 17. Teams will have one scheduled practice during the work week and one scheduled practice during the weekend. Once games have started there will be only one practice held during the work week. The CAA Flag Football season runs from November 2011 through February 2012. Team drafts will be held October 17-18. Games will start December 3 with the nal playo s in February 2012. There will be a two week, single elimination tournament during the nal two weekends of the season. The referee meeting will be held October 27 and 28 at Veterans Park. For more information and to register online, please visit the CAA Flag Football Website at www.caa agfootball.org United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, Flotilla 14-07 presents its one-day About Boating Safely program for new and experienced boaters from 7:45 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday, November 5 at the St. Johns River Community College For more information call Vic Aquino at 460-0243About Boating Safely program Need an extra copy of The CreekLine?Visit one of our pickup locations!Thank you to these fine advertisers for providing this convenience to our readers! Memorial Urgent Care Center Mandarin VyStar Credit Union Julington Creek Branch The UPS Store Fruit Cove The UPS Store WGV Whole Foods Market Baptist Medical Center South Bartram Trail LibraryThursday, October 20 3 pm Bartram Trail Branch LibraryChildren of all ages are invited! Costumes are encouraged but not required. Sponsored by the Friends of the Library.Childrens Magic Show & Trail of Treats emergency shelter to abused women and their minor children temporary shelter for rape victims in danger after the crime individual and group counseling case management, civil legal representation and court advocacy24 hour crisis hotline: (904) 824-1555 Betty Grif n House of St. Johns County Provides:

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www.thecreekline.com October 2011 The CreekLine, Page 29 The CreekLine Marketplace ads!886-4919 Community MarketplaceAttention Small Businesses!!!For just $39 per issue you can reach 23,000+ addresses (min. of 6 issues) Call 886-4919 today! LOCAL Classi eds Massage TherapyAlicia Hunter LMTOnly $50 an hour #MM12329/MA53865 Neuromuscular Therapy ( 904 ) 514 5788www .hunter l mt. c omA New U Massage located in San Jose Office Center, Next to Sonnys and Ace Hardware$5 OFF with this ad. Help WantedSt. Johns Eye Associats CR210 West. Optometric Technician with great personaltity & strong computer skills. Saturday hours 9-1 pm are a requirement. Please email resume to sjeacontactlens@yahoo.com The UPS Store in Fruit Cove: Part-time Service Associate. Must be 18 or older and able to work weekdays and some Saturdays. Retail experience and working knowledge of MS Of ce Suite preferred; graphics design skills are a big plus. 230-8881. Panache in Julington Creek is interviewing experienced & talented Stylists to join our team. Do you enjoy working in a professional, clean & successful environment? Apply at www.getpanache. com or stop in 2758 Racetrack Road #403 HELP WANTED! If you like music (and other arts) and would like to volunteer to support a non-pro t organization bringing music to the community, please call 374 8639 Join the Baptist South circle of care. Visit e-baptisthealth.com for the most up to date list of job openings. Listings are updated daily and change often. If you have any questions, please call Human Resources at 271.6078. Seeking Licensed Massage Therapist @ A New U Massage(MM12329) Mandarin furnished massage room available NOW. Room rent is $375+ 7% tax ($401.25) a month. Rent can split w/other LMT. Phone: 904-288-0064. Looking for part-time or Full-time people wanting to grow their own business. We train, support and mentor you through your process. 30 years www.allearspetsitting.com (904) 687-9610 Bonded, Insured & Affordable www.axiomphotos.com Aordable family and event photography Call: 904-673-0091 Driveways Concrete Removal Patios Driveway Extension Walkways Brick InlayFREE ESTIMATES838-1836Call Today for Free Decorative Trim with Driveway Job! Catering to the needs of the Homeowner. Debbies Home Cleaning Services H o m e e rvice s Local, honest, dependable individual offering local area home cleaning services. Call for FREE estimate! Ill do the cleaning so you dont have to!Home 829-2275Cell 707-9472License No. 42295 Change Your Body Tr ans f o r m Y ou r L i f e. Dont Loose weight. L oose F at. Gain lean muscle.904.3 15 .8280V isit http://nonibaby.tbioactive.com Professional Computer ServicesBusiness & ResidentialFor more details, visit us at:www.itpromise.com I.T. Promise Inc. Computer Services( 904 ) 287-2254 at Fruit Cove287-0601 Housecleaning 207-5674 Klean Spray Pressure Washing 631 273110% OFF1st time customers MB SPORTS your purchase of $25 or more $5 OFFGATORS GEORGIA JAGUARS MUCH FSU LSU STEELERS MUCH ALABAMA GIANTS EAGLES MORE8221-13 Southside Blvd., Jacksonville, Www.shopmbsports.com Corner Southside & Baymeadows 904. 460.2785 x15 www.pmpstjohns.com Full Service Property Management FirmResidential Leasing and Association Management WANTEDMoms, Teachers anyone wanting extra money and own your own business with as little as 6 to 20 hours a week. Make $500 to $2500 a month.Call today for more information. Virginia at(904) 386-3993 in business. Up 26% in 2010 and 18% so far this year Call Virginia today for more information. (904) 386 3993. Pet Sitting Company Part time work with pets. Applicant must live in the International Golf Parkway area. Flexible hours. Adult applicants only. Call Robin at 687-9610 Seeking Sitters is looking for reliable and trustworthy babysitters for on-call babysitting jobs. Great contract rate and exible scheduling. Must be 18 yrs or older, have veri able child-care experience and willing to obtain CPR and First Aid certi cation. Apply at www.seekingsitters.com Results-oriented portfolio manager, with experience to manage HOA and condo associations in Duval and St. Johns Counties. FLCAM license and at least 2-3 years of HOA and condominium management experience. In exchange for your expertise and stable work history, we offer competitive pay, a comprehensive health care bene t package, 401k, vacation, and paid holidays. Salary based on experience. Quali ed candidates, please forward resumes to cware@mayresort.com.Services CleaningHouse and Of ce Cleaning House cleaner with over ten years of experience and great references. I am very detailed and ef cient. Have more time to spend with your family and to enjoy yourself and let us help you making your home shine and clean. Call 904-442-0993Real Estate ResidentialTrouble nding the house you want?? Let me nd your dream home! Lexie England, Licensed Realtor. Keller Williams Realty Atlantic Partners. (904) 885-2446 New Classi ed Rates!Place your classi ed online today! Online classi ed ads are FREE!www.thecreekline.com FREE ONLINE CLASSIFIED ADSGo towww.thecreekline.comand click onFree Online Classi ed AdsBetty Gri n House Thrift Shoppes are an amazing resource for getting great quality, unique, inexpensive clothing and other household items. Often, the o erings are perfectly good things that somebody else has outgrown or simply grown tired of. More importantly, they directly bene t this much needed community organization that provides vital support to people in need across all sectors of St. Johns County. Do good and go shopping! This Halloween are you looking for a costume but are you on a tight budget? Do you want a creative costume that doesnt come from a pre-packaged box that everyone else will have? Betty Gri n House Thrift Shoppes are the place to look for all your Halloween needs. Here are a few example costumes you could put together: Bride: There are many people that give their wedding dresses to thrift shops. This can be a great costume. You can even dress it up with makeup and make yourself the Bride of Frankenstein. Halloween Thrift Shoppe shopping, BGH styleBusiness professional: Grab a briefcase, glasses and look for a womans or mans suite. Its that easy! Flower child/hippie: Look for owing skirts and fancy looking tops with beads or other types of decorations. Or you can look for bell-bottomed jeans and a concert tshirt. Another idea is to look for items that have a peace sign on them. Preppie: This is an easy costume to do! Find a button down t-shirt and a pair of khaki pants and a sweater to wrap around your neck. It would be perfect if you found a tennis racket to carry. Ladies could have a skirt just below the knee. Look for shirts that have small patterns on them. The Northwest Thrift Shoppe is located in the Plantation Plaza at 445 S.R. 13 North (corner of Race Track Road and State Road 13) Hours are Monday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. and Sunday, 12:00 noon until 5:00 p.m. Support our ne advertisers!They ensure that The CreekLine arrives in your mailbox each month!886-4919 sales@thecreekline.com Check out our community webpages!www.thecreekline.com Community Calendar High School Football Blog Work is an important part of your life, but it shouldnt be your whole life. For your familys sake and your own, strike a healthy balance between your career and your personal needs. Here are some tips: Learn to shut work o These days you can work practically anywhere, anytime. Keep a healthy balance in your busy lifeIt can be a trap, so set a rm time of day to stop work and start concentrating on your family and other activities. Focus on the here and now. When youre working, give it your full attention. And when you stop, dont let worries about work and details about your job occupy your thoughts. This may take some practice, but teach yourself to be in the present at all times. Find a good non-work activity. If youve got nothing to do after work, youll have a hard time disengaging when you try to stop. Find a hobby to immerse yourself in, or just make an e ort to devote your full attention to your familys needs. (Even then, make an e ort to give yourself some personal time so you dont burn out on responsibility.) Dont let your job de ne your identity. When you describe who you are to people, let your job be only one aspect of your self-portrait. That way, a setback in any one area wont be as damaging to your self-image, and youll be less tempted to ignore other possibilities open to you.

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Page 30, The CreekLine October 2011 www.thecreekline.com Free Correspondence Courses Self-paced Learning Julington Creek Church of Christ 1630 State Road 13 St. Johns, FL 32259 (904) 230-3332 The conclusion, when all has been heard, is: F ear God and keep His commandments, Because this applies to every person. (Eccl. 12:13) Come to Me, all who are weary and heavyladen, And I will give you rest. (Mt. 11:28, NASB) Just the facts for you not opinions Just the truth for you not ction Just for you now, not someday Order now, before its too late!!! Bible Lessons Relevant to YOU A CONNECTING CHURCH Our Sunday Services Traditional Worship 8:30am Sunday School 9:45am Contemporary Worship 11:00amwww.switzerlandcommunitychurch.org Pumpkin Patch Opens October 10th!!!Open Oct. 10th Nov 1st, Mondays thru Saturdays 10 a.m. 8 p.m.Pumpkins of all sizes are available. Picking out a pumpkin(s) is such a great family event. Don't forget to bring your camera to catch those sweet moments. Come make some memories with your family.210 Community Fall FestivalSaturday, October 29th 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.Come meet your neighbors! Bring the Kids and Join in the FUN! FREE Games, Inflatable's, Petting Zoo & Live Entertainment Pumpkin Patch Craft and Vendor Booths Great FoodCOMMUNITY CENTER 3450 CR 210 West (next to Cimarrone) (904) 287-3223 www.fcctoday.com Blended Worship 9:30 a.m.Contemporary Worship 11:00 a.m.Nursery Care at all services. Youth Sunday School at 9:30 a.m.Childrens Sunday School 9:30 & 11:00 a.m.Reaching Out Offering Christ Living Gods Love(904) 230-2955 Ofcewww.ROLUMC.com R i v e r L ifeo UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Open Hearts Open Minds ~Open Doors The People of the United Methodist Church Join us this October as we celebrate Fall at the River of Pumpkins. The Pumpkin Patch will be open daily from 10:00a.m. until dark.Our Annual FREE FAMILY FALL FESTIVALwill be held Saturday, October 15, 2011 from 10 am until 4 pm! Food, fun, games, and entertainment will be provided FREE of charge!We look forward to you and your family joining us this October! November 4, 5, 6, 2011 Variety of Entertainment all 3 days! All Ages Talent ShowAll proceeds from the Festival will be given to our Church for the growing needs of our Parish & School. 1718-State Road 13, St. Johns, Fl 32259 ~ 3 miles south of Race Track Road. For additional information call: 287-3382Event Sponsor Event Sponsor St Francis In-The-FieldEpiscopal ChurchChristian Formation 9:00am Sunday Service 10:00amChildrens Chapel and Nursery Available895 Palm Valley Rd (1 mile east of US1)615-2130 Faith NewsRiver of Life United Methodist Church will be holding the annual River of Pumpkins Pumpkin Patch beginning on October 1. The patch will be open from 10:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. daily. On Saturday, October 15 River of Life UMC will host a free Family Fall Festival from 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. There will be food, fun, concessions and local entertainment and the entire community is invited! River of Life UMC is located at 2600 Race Track Road. Please visit our website at www. rolumc.com for all of the events and happenings at River of Life. Our Lady of Good Counsel Parish is having their annual Harvest Festival on Sunday, October 23 from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on the church grounds, located at 5950 State Road 16 in St. Augustine. The festival will feature the Filipino Cultural Troupe of St. Augustine at 3:00 p.m. There will also be food, games, crafts, a cash ra e, a country store, a Pumpkin Patch and other entertainment. Come join us under the tent for a fun afternoon! San Juan del Rio announces their annual Garage/Yard sale, to be held on Saturday, October 22 from 8:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. at the church located on State Road 13 in Switzerland. Reserve your location in our parking lot; two parking spaces are available for a donation of $25. Please email sjdrtrunksale@aol.com or call 728-8251 for more information. Come to sell or come to shop; bring your neighbors! Our Lady of Good Counsel Church, located at 5950 State Road 16 (one mile northwest of International Golf Parkway and Pacetti Road in the World Golf Village area) will be holding an Italian Dinner on Sunday, October 16. For a $10 donation you will be able to enjoy an All You Can Eat salad bar, plus an All You Can Eat dinner consisting of pasta, meat balls and/or Italian sausage. Homemade desserts and various drinks will be available for a donation and a childs portion will be available for $3. Dinner will be served from 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., so come and join us for a delicious homemade pasta good time. Like getting dressed up? Enjoy racking your brain with your friends and family? On Saturday, October 15 at 6:00 p.m. the Nicaragua Mission Project team is hosting the third annual Geneva Trivia Night to raise funds for work with Young Life (Vida Joven) building relationships and sharing the Good News with youth in the city of Estili, Nicaragua. There will also be a costume contest. Tickets may be purchased for a table of eight team members $100 or individually for $15 each. Popcorn and soda will be provided and an optional dinner is available for $8. Items for silent auction will also be displayed for bidding. The event will be held at Geneva Presbyterian Church, located at 1755 State Road 13. For questions, please call Kent and Kris Wehmeier at 230-3653 or email Kris at kriswehmeier@ bellsouth.net. San Juan del Rio Catholic Church and School announces its fth annual Fall Festival on November 4, 5 and 6, 2011. Come and enjoy school midway games, JCJ Amusement Rides, food, refreshments, giant ra e, $7,000 in cash prizes, San Juan Cafe, country store, silent auction, Jail and Bail, homemade soup, entertainment all three days, an all ages talent show, Saturday night reverse draw dinner and much more! Join us for fun and fellowship. All proceeds will be given to our church. For additional information, please contact Sal Santapola at saldesanta@gmail.com.Invitethe community to your House of Worshipeditor@thecreekline.com Warning signs of stroke Sudden numbness or weak ness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination Sudden severe headache with no known causeSource: Baptist Medical Center South

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www.thecreekline.com October 2011 The CreekLine, Page 31 904-262-SWIM $ Glenmoors Winston Allen, 13time Hawaii Ironman Triathlon nisher and former Long Distance World Champion took the Gold Medal at the 2011, ITU Age Group International Distance Triathlon World Championships held in Beijing, China on September 11, 2011. Allen would speci cally like to thank Mayo Clinic and orthopedic surgeon Cedrick Ortiguera, who performed his knee replacement in 2008. Allen, 81, says that that after 28 years of triathlon competition, hes going into semi-retirement from the sport; however, if his health holds up, he will try for the World Triathlon Championships at age 85. He explains, An aging athletes self-worth is based on his or her last performance! The PV Storm U10 Girls are champions of the Publix Atlanta Cup soccer tournament, held over Labor Day weekend. The team played in the top competitive Cup division, scoring 31 goals and only allowing 1. Currently, the team is ranked third in the state and ninth in the nation. The players are Julie Arciprete, Channing Chappell, Lauren Fryoux, Tori Grambo, Ashlyn Kane, Tatum Loveless, Lillian Mace, Lauren Richter, Delaney Tauzel and Mary Beth Whitlock. The team is coached by Trey and Kathy Clark with the Ponte Vedra Soccer Club. Girls U10 soccer team storms Atlanta!Julington Creek Elementary students and parents created a Walking School Bus and participated in the International Walk To School Day on October 5, 2011. Over 230 schools across the State of Florida participated in the event to promote pedestrian safety and the simple joy of walking or bicycling to school with your friends. Julington Creek Elementary was the rst NW St. Johns County school to participate in the event. Julington Creek Elementary offers many programs that promote tness and walking or bicycling to school is one way for students and parents to have fun exercising together. Contact the JCE PTSO to volunteer for an on-going Walking School Bus and go to www.saferoutestoschool.org to learn about the Walking School Bus program with the Department of Transportation. JCE families create Walking School BusThe 4-H Toxophily (archery) Club presents its second annual Turkey Shoot to raise funds for equipment on Saturday, October 29, 2011 from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon. The event takes place at Ancient City Shooting Range, located at 3150 Agricultural Center Drive in St. Augustine. The shoot is open to all ages and shotguns will be provided. There is no admission fee and the price is two shells for $5. For more information please call 209-0430. The Toxophily Club teaches valuable life skills through the sport of archery to St. Johns County youth ages eight to18. 4-H and all programs and 4-H announces Toxophily Turkey Shoot Fundraiserrelated activities sponsored for or assisted by St. Johns County/ University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences are open to all persons with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or a liations. 4-H is a community of young people across America learning leadership, citizenship and life skills. As one of our nations oldest, yet most current organizations, 4-H is reaching millions of young people with positive youth development opportunities.

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Grout LineSolutions 904 982 4294B E F O R E20% OFF A F T E R Tree WorkbyMitch Drake & Sons (904) 703-5040 (904) 287-3819Licensed, Insured & Workmans CompOver 35 Years Experience Check out our reviews and 5 Star rating at Yellowbook.com! When people think of swimming, images of the Olympics, massive multi-lane pools and Michael Phelps pop into their heads. When Americans watch their Olympians from their home television screens they notice the uidity with which these athletes can move through the water and the precision with which they execute their movements. However there is much more to this sport then than occasional As seasons change, so does the shing. We are reaching the time of year when a heavy rain or a single cold front can end what was an outstanding year of shing on the St. Johns River. Since early spring and now into fall, the river has been consistent in providing us with a variety of sh and crustaceans. With an early run of bait sh you hoped this was going to be one of those years. There had not been a lot of rain over the winter and the river was already a little bit salty. Red sh were beginning to show along with an occasional sea trout or two. That was pretty encouraging for just being late March. As spring progressed the temperatures went up, the rain stayed away and the river got saltier. The bait sh became Captain Davids Fishing ReportBy Captain David Lifkamore abundant with nger mullet seemingly everywhere. The croaker and yellowmouth were beginning to bite and ounder were being caught on docks. Red sh were as far south as Palatka and it was only June. By July the lack of rain and extreme temperatures had the river at its saltiest. Shrimp were already being caught almost everywhere. The size and quantities were unusually large for the time of year. All other river shing was in full swing. Even blue crabs were lling traps daily. All through August and into September the shrimping continued to be phenomenal. Jumbo shrimp became the standard size with buckets being lled regularly by daytime and night time shrimpers. Shrimp were so abundant that they were being caught all the way back to the Julington Creek Bridge. And, with all those shrimp came a lot of hungry sh, making this a fantastic year to enjoy our St. Johns River and its bounty. As fall progresses the number of opportunities we have left to take advantage of the shing in our river will diminish. Every year is di erent, but temperature and rainfall are going to be what decides it. There might be a month or two left or just a few weeks. Whenever it is, we have this year to remember and next year to look forward to. Fishing Report: Weak sh in holes, drum around bridges and docks, sea trout on end of docks. Bream anywhere you try. Whether you catch one, some or none, the family time spent shing will last a lifetime. Advertise inThe CreekLineIts good for business!886-4919LG@rtpublishinginc.comBTHS Sports RoundupBartram swim team strives for victoryBy Jared Freitas, BTHS Student glances at the television screen can reveal, as swimming is both science and sport. For one, athletes are navigating through a medium in which they cannot breathe, meaning they have to be energy e cient to discourage heavy respiration. Add to that the fact that swimmers can burn thousands of calories a day and you get a sport that is as mentally challenging as it is physically. For the Bartram swimmers however, they need not worry about all of those challenges, as they are lead by Coach Robert Bruns, who has entered his 28th year of coaching. Similar to soccer and lacrosse, swimmers have the option of competing on both school and club teams, depending on their availability and future swimming goals. This is a key factor in the sport because there are few o -season opportunities for swimmers to compete in, if they are not on a club team. This is an important distinction according to Coach Bruns. There are two types of swimmers: those who are 12 week swimmers, who are there for the experience and there are the year-round swimmers who want to pursue the sport in college and even the Olympics, Bruns explains. Four years ago in 2007, Bartram had the perfect mix between dedicated 12-week swimmers and year-round club athletes, as they took home the class 2A conference championship, something that the team has yet to accomplish since. Coach Bruns attributed this to the cyclical trend in talent and interest that the sport goes through. Athletes come in waves. Every four years interest in the Olympics peaks and more swimmers dreaming of competing in the Games join and the talent pool increases and then as time moves on this pool shrinks, he said. This cycle may be indicative of the Bears performance this year, as the girls have not won a meet yet, although the boys have accrued a 2-1 record with victories against Creekside and Nease. Senior swimmer Trent Register commented on the boys success in their rst few meets, We are a very well-rounded squad. We have no real superstar that dominates all the events, but everyone contributes in their own races and we come together as a team to get the most points that we can. Register also attributed their success to their training schedule, which includes four morning and three afternoon practices a week, one more than last year. We utilize this schedule in order to prepare our athletes for championship meets where preliminaries are held in the morning and the nals are run at night, said Coach Bruns. In addition it allows us to work on di erent things each practice, whether it be drills, starts, kicks or working di erent muscles; it makes us more prepared. As noted by both Register and Bruns, this team features a larger number of underclassmen then previous years, which shows that Bartram is at the starting point of one of those cycles. Junior swimmer, Kristen Santarone commented, We lost a lot of seniors last year; however, this team is much more cohesive than in the past two years, which will de nitely help us perform in the future, she said. In addition to the swimming races there are also diving events, akin to the eld events in track. However due to the limited diving facilities in the area, divers often have to supply their own pool fees and train by themselves away from the team, which makes competing more di cult. The next few weeks will be challenging for Bartram, as they will compete in the district competition against rivals from Ponte Vedra and Fleming Island, both of whom have been successful in the past. For the young Bears, advancing swimmers further in the playo s will be challenging; however, with their superior training and coaching experience they should be prepared for anything. Book Discussion at the Bartram Trail Branch Library!Still Alice Monday, October 17 7 pmJoin us for a discussion of this book by Lisa Genova. New members are always welcome!

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www.thecreekline.com October 2011 The CreekLine, Page 33 JACKSONVILLE 8206 Philips Hwy 904.731.7877 *Headboard and frame only. Mattress, bedspread, pillows, lamp and nightstand sold separately. NO, YOU'RE NOT DREAMING...YET.$1699The Lago Queen $1699/King $1899 Upholstered in all top-grain leather. Stocked in off-white, brown, light gray and black (shown). Apples and pears may keep strokes away. Thats the conclusion of a Dutch study published in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association in which researchers found that eating a lot of fruits and vegetables with white esh may protect against stroke. While previous studies have linked high consumption of fruits and vegetables with lower stroke risk, the researchers prospective work is the rst to examine associations of fruits and vegetable color groups with stroke. The color of the edible portion of fruits and vegetables re ects the presence of bene cial phytochemicals such as carotenoids and avonoids. Researchers examined the link between fruits and vegetable color group consumption with 10-year stroke incidence in a population-based study of 20,069 adults, with an average age of 41. The participants were free of cardiovascular diseases at the start of the study and completed a 178-item food frequency questionnaire for the previous year. Fruits and vegetables were classi ed in four color groups: Green, including dark leafy vegetables, cabbages and lettuces Orange/Yellow, which were mostly citrus fruits Red/Purple, which were mostly red vegetables White, of which 55 percent were apples and pears During 10 years of followup, 233 strokes were documented. Green, orange/yellow and red/purple fruits and vegetables werent related to stroke. However, the risk of stroke incidence was 52 percent lower for people with a high intake of white fruits and vegetables compared to people with a low intake. Each 25 gram per day increase in white fruits and vegetable consumption was associated with a 9 percent lower risk of stroke. An average apple is 120 grams. To prevent stroke, it may be useful to consume considerable amounts of white fruits and vegetables, said Linda M. Oude Griep, M.Sc., lead author of the study and a postdoctoral fellow in human nutrition at Wageningen University in the Netherlands. For example, eating one apple a day is an easy way to increase white fruits and vegetable intake. However, other fruits and vegetable color groups may protect against other chronic diseases. Therefore, it remains of importance to consume a lot of fruits and vegetables, she explained. Apples and pears are high in dietary ber and a avonoid called quercetin. In the study, other foods in the white category were bananas, cauli ower, chicory and cucumber. Potatoes were classi ed as a starch. Previous research on the preventive health bene ts of fruits and vegetables focused The Creeks Clash U14 girls premier soccer team is the U14 Champion of the 13th annual Melbourne Area Beaches Girls Labor Day Challenge. The team competed at the National Division, which is the highest competitive level in the tournament. Their two wins and one tie record seeded them as number one in their bracket as they entered the nal game against Kendall Hammocks Lightning of Miami. The rst half of the game was intense and ended without any goals for either team. The second half began with the same intensity, but turned to the Clashs favor in the latter part of the half. With seven minutes left to play, Savannah OSteen was nally able to break through Kend-An apple or pear a day may keep strokes awayon the foods unique nutritional value and characteristics, such as the edible part of the plant, color, botanical family and its ability to provide antioxidants. United States federal dietary guidelines include using color to assign nutritional value. The U.S. Preventive Health Services Taskforce recommends selecting each day vegetables from ve subgroups: dark green, red/orange, legume, starchy and other vegetables. Before the results are adopted into everyday practice, the ndings should be con rmed through additional research, Oude Griep said. It may be too early for physicians to advise patients to change their dietary habits based on these initial ndings, she said.Creeks Clash U14 girls win Melbourne soccer tournament Coach Nelson Quintanilla, Brooklyn Simonsen, Sydney Ford, Michaela Payne, Austen Hentschel, Taylor Stratton, Alison Murman, Nina Sizemore, Mikaela Brown, Emily Tomasello, Kate Brown, Savannah OSteen, Mia Traylor and Grayson Sheetsalls tough defense, giving the Clash a well deserved goal. Five minutes later a failed attempt by Kendall to score on a corner kick gave the Clash an open opportunity to score another goal. Michaela Payne, the keeper, passed the ball o to Kate Brown who passed Lunar PhasesFull: October 12 Last Quarter: October 20 New: October 26 First Quarter: November 2 it o to Mia Traylor for the teams second goal. The game ended moments later with a nal score of 2-0. The team is coached by Nelson Quintanilla and is currently ranked 19th in the state. Congratulations Ladies! Well done!

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Page 34, The CreekLine October 2011 www.thecreekline.com COASTAL ROOFING SYSTEMS Re-Roofing is our SpecialtyCovering Northeast Floridas Finest Homes With Quality Work and Professional Service Since 1993. f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f Free Estimates! y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y Licensed Insured 460-2815 State Certified Roofing Contractor #CCC057020 A Coastal Building Systems Company. O E M Why are we the best choice when it comes to caring for your vehicle? $ www.Turn9Auto.com (904) 657-8123 209-6190We Need a Home!St. Johns County Pet Adoption Center S T J O H N S C O U N T Y A N I M A L C O N T R O L All adoptions at the Pet Center are $60, which includes neutering/spaying, rabies vaccinations and shots. The Pet Center is located at 130 N. Stratton Road, just off US-1 between County Road 210 and International Golf Parkway. The hours are 9:00-4:00 Monday through Friday and 9:00-12:30 on Saturday. My name is Cleopatra; I am a 4 year old female spayed torti. I am current on all my vaccines and already have a microchip. I am an inside only cat, I get along great with children and dogs but would prefer to be the only cat in the home. My name is Mario; I am an 8 month old Great Dane mix. I am current on all my vaccines but still need to be neutered. I am mostly an inside animal, I am crate trained and house trained; I get along great with other animals and children. The U-11 Creeks Clash Blue team played in the Challenge Sports Melbourne Labor Day Challenge. In pool play, the team won the rst two games by the score of 6 to 1 and 8 to 1. For the third game, Creeks Clash Blue played a local team Space Coast United 1 to a tie (2 to 2). After pool play, the team quali ed as the second seeded team in the National Division and headed into the Doug Baum, a former zookeeper, maintains a ranch of camels that he hauls to livinghistory events throughout the South. When he ventured to Corinth, Mississippi in 2009, he didnt realize a camel hadnt set a two-toed foot in the city since Old Douglas joined the Confederate camp 150 years earlier. And to everyones delight, Baum delivered Richard, a camel re-enactor to stage the scene of a Civil War encampment. How a 2,000-pound camel came to see action in the War Between the States begs a wisp of whimsy, but remains grounded on Mississippis hallowed battle elds. Je erson Davis, Secretary of War in 1852, believed camels tireless reserves, sure-footedness, lack of thirst and the ability to carry heavy loads would enable movement of troops and supplies between California and the western frontier. But, in the 1850s: nary a camel in the nation. Corinth: Footprints of a Confederate camel By Contributing Travel Writer Debi LanderClash boys reach nals at Labor Day tournamentOscar Thomas Aguilar, Brandon Marchand, Aaron Kosik, Brandon McSwigan, Anderson Tucker, and Matthew Wolf, Jackson Brennan, Herbie Steigleman, Jimmy Dwyer, River Guthrie, Sean Smith, Nick Binghi, Zack Hiler, Assistant Coach Oscar Aguilar and Coach Charlie Bentivegnaplayo s. In the semi- nals, the boys played very well and won the game 9 to 1. In only their second tournament, the boys reached the nals. The U-11 Creeks Clash Blue nished the tournament with three wins, one tie and one loss. Coach Charlie Bentivegna and the assistant coaches (Oscar Aguilar and Muir Smith) were proud of the teams play, e ort and sportsmanship. Davis persuaded Congress to establish the United States Camel Corps and sent a procurement expedition to the Middle East. After numerous setbacks, bribes and negotiations, 33 dromedaries set sail, along with ve indentured Middle Easterners. Two months later, the rst camel caravan batted their long eyelashes at the surprised residents of Indianola, Texas. The enormous creatures trekked many days to reach their quarters at Camp Verde, 60 miles west of San Antonio. However, the Texas Army commander hated the beasts under his command and proclaimed, I would not give one mule for ve camels. They smell, upset the horses and mules, spit and have disagreeable personalities. Few Americans at the time or today understand camel rearing and rarely keep the animals as pets. Doug Baums dromedaries are the exception and he lovingly cares for his clan. He admits the creatures are highly sensitive and easily insulted, then adds, They are sweet and gentle. If you treat them with fairness and remember they have motivations of their ownthey wont bite or spit. By the late 1850s a hundred humps called Texas home. The beasts proved far superior to horses and mules on the treacherous, rocky slopes. Their feet had tough soles that needed no shoeing, they required little water and could live o the fat stored in their humps, and as a bonus--the mere sight of a camel scared o the Indians. The advent of the Civil War in 1861 radically transformed the mindset and priorities of the entire nation. Camp Verde vacillated under Union and Confederate control and the care and whereabouts of the camels grew lax. Apparently a camel named Old Douglas was stationed in Texas when the war erupted. Baum (having thoroughly researched the subject) believes a soldier simply snuck o with the creature and headed home to Mississippia feat which surely turned more than a few heads. Somehow, they made the lengthy trip and Old Douglas was given to Colonel W. H. Moore by 1st Lt. William Hargrove. Moore then assigned Douglas to carry the instruments and supplies of the 43rd Mississippi Volunteer Infantry Regimental Band. Douglass rst active service commenced under General Sterling Price in the Iuka Campaign near Corinth. Old Douglas quickly attained legendary status by causing a stampede. However, Douglas endeared himself as a camp favorite, befriending young soldiers who proudly carried their new title, The Camel Regiment. Douglas participated in the 1862 Battle of Corinth, a tragic day that ended with 12,000 casualties. Those soldiers are now remembered by The Grand Illumination, Corinths annual lighting of 12,000 luminaries on the battle eld and throughout historic downtown venues. The poignant scene emerges like Arlington Cemetery, rows and rows ablaze in ickering candlelight. Visitors are also drawn to the restaging of the encampment. Richard stars in the role of Old Douglas while Baum answers questions about camels in the Confederacy. Baum also appears in Vicksburg, Mississippi as did the Mississippi 43rd. The site saw 35,825 estimated causalities from May 18 to July 4, 1863. During one of the skirmishes, a Union sharpshooter intentionally took down the adored mascot. Old Douglas is honored like other veterans with a marked grave in Vicksburgs Cedar Hill Cemetery. As the 150th anniversary of the Civil War unfolds, numerous stories arise from the battle- elds: stories of bayonets and bravery, cavalry and civilians, generals and Johnny Reb, but the chronicles recount only one tale of a Confederate camel: Old Douglas, who served his country well. If you go: Grand Illumination and Encampment: November 12-13, 2011, www.corinth.net Old Douglas. Photo courtesy of www.bylandersea.com

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www.thecreekline.com October 2011 The CreekLine, Page 35 PRECIOUS GOLD BUYERSWhy us? HOURS: MON FRI 9am-6pm SUNDAY CLOSED IF YOU WANT MORE GREEN FOR YOUR GOLD MAKE US YOUR LAST STOP! BRING IN YOUR UNWANTED GOLD, SILVER, PLATINUM & COINS!12525 Phillips Hwy. Ste 111Corner of Phillips & Old St. Augustine Rd.Jacksonville, FL 32256904-647-8879 2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOUMORE GREENFOR YOUR GOLD2245 CR 210 W. #107A1 Mile West of I-95904-414-9791Precious Gold Buyers $50 MOREthan the Current Gold Rate per ouncePrecious Gold Buyers $5 MOREthan the Current Silver Rate GOLD SILVER PLATINUM COINS Accepting and Selling furniture (living room, dining room, bedroom, etc) Home decor (lamps, rugs, artwork, tchotchke) New items arrive daily. We are ready to accept your entire house, estate, etc. We also oer inventory liquidation service for builders, home and furniture industry businesses, etc. For More Information call: 880 8448or email us at: EN C O R EDEC O R @b e lls o u th .net10830 San Jose Boulevard ( across from Walmart)Visit us online at: www.EncoreDecorFL.comWE OFFER FREE PICKUP SERVICE FOR APPROVED ITEMSHours: Jacksonvilles Largest Upscale Consignment Store H If your yard seems a bit boring, look up! Flowers and shrubs are great garden elements but for real pizzazz go vertical. Vines are an important element in any garden and they are an easy way to add interest to a ho-hum landscape. A beautiful vine in full bloom is a real eye-catcher, the rst thing you notice, but even a lush green climber is a great improvement over a plain-Jane wall or fence. Vines are not just attractive, they are also versatile and come in many di erent forms. Some vines are twiners, others are ramblers, creepers or rooters. Some are repeat or long bloomers and others give you one big seasonal splash of color. The most popular vines are perennial ones that are hardy and last for many years, but a really great annual vine, such as Moon ower (Ipomea alba), deserves to be replanted each year. Perhaps the best and most desirable of them all is Confederate Jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides). An icon of lovely Southern gardens, this climber has it all hardy lush greenery, delicate white scented owers in late spring to early summer, and rapid growth and coverage. Really, you need not read any further. Plant Confederate jasmine anywhere you need to improve the view and you are done. For the rest of us, there are many other vines to choose from depending on your need. Creeping g (Ficus pumila) is an evergreen perennial creeper that covers unsightly items such as concrete block rapidly and completely. If it is striking owers you GardeningIs your landscape vertically challenged? By Contributing Writer Master Gardener Camille Hunter with Duval County Extension, University of Florida/IFASwant, then plant passionvine. Besides bearing owers almost too exotic to be real, the native passionvine (Passi ora incarnata) also attracts butter ies, both the black and yellow Zebra Longwing and the orange Gulf Fritillary. Other vines with beautiful owers include the pink owering Mandevilla (Mandevilla x amabilis) and the beautiful blue- owered Sky Vine (Thunbergia grandi ora). These are both tender vines that need winter protection or plant them in pots that can be sheltered over winter. A good perennial rambling vine for north Florida is Sweet Autumn clematis (Clematis terni ora). It blooms here in late summer, producing a lush bounty of fragrant white owers visible even at night. Keep the roots shaded and cool and the vine itself in full sun and it will cover a shed in two to three years. Moon ower vine, mentioned above, is an annual vine that also has scented white owers but these are huge, each bloom up to six inches across, as big as a saucer. As its name implies, the owers open in late afternoon Confederate Jasmine Mandevillaand stay open until dawn. Plant this near an outdoor area where you frequently sit in the evening hours. There are many other choices, such as rambling Lady Banks roses (Rosa banksiae), striking Bougainvillea (Bougainvillea glabra), yellow- owered Carolina Jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) and tendrilclimbing cross vine (Bignonia capreolata). Finally, a warning. Beware the beautiful, fragrant, Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica). It is a rampant, extremely invasive plant that runs over woodlots and vanquishes natural areas. This is one vine to avoid completely. United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, Flotilla 14-07 presents its one-day About Boating Safely program for new and experienced boaters from 7:45 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday, November 5 at the St. Johns River Community College For more information call Vic Aquino at 460-0243About Boating Safely program

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