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CreekLine
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101421/00029
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Title: CreekLine
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: RT Publishinig, Inc.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date: March 2012
Publication Date: 08-2012
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101421:00029

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THE CREEKLINESM SERVING THE NORTHWEST ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMMUNITY SINCE 2001Visit our online edition at www.thecreekline.comMEMBER OF THE RT PUBLISHING GROUP OF COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS Whats InsidePage 3 Whats New Page 4 From the CommissionerPage 5 School District Journal Page 6 The Sheriff Reports Page 9 Political Commentary Page 11 SJRWMD report Page 14 Encore! Page 15 Spivaks come to AmericaPage 16 Marine Corps League Page 18 Rotary of Bartram TrailPage 20 Porpoises win! Page 21 Boy Scouts serve Page 22 Primary Election sectionPage 25 Voter tips Page 27 Safe boating classes Page 31 Faith News Page 33 Purposeful Parenting Page 36 Back to School Guide Page 38 FCTC evening classes Page 41 Students restore reefs Page 43 Local gymnast Volume 12, Issue 8 August 2012The CreekLine12443 San Jose Boulevard, Ste. 403 Jacksonville,FL 32223Presorted Standard US Postage Paid Callahan, FL 32011 Permit No.4 On Monday, July 16, the Brother Knight of Knights of Columbus Switzerland Council pulled their caravan into the dusty parking lot of the SEA Community Center in Elkton in southern St. Johns County. The cars and trucks were packed full of clothing and food donations from San Juan Del Rio Catholic Church. The delivery was accompanied by a delicious southern summer mealfried chicken, baked beans and coleslaw composed the menu for the evening accompanied by homemade When Diane Timoney, mother of injured United States Army First Lieutenant Ryan Timoney, stepped to the microphone during the second annual All-American Hoedown and Auction, the lively crowd fell silent. She shared the intimate details of May 20, the fateful day her 26-year-old son and his military unit were attacked by an Afghani suicide bomber. For one week in July, three adult chaperones and 19 students ages 13 to 18 participated in the annual Geneva Presbyterian Church summer mission project. The group traveled to the Appalachians in rural Kentucky to provide assistance to those struggling throughout three counties in that coal mining region. They participated in the incredibly well organized Big Creek Mission programassisting with free home repairs, childrens programs and other community outreach e orts. While there, Big Creek Fried chicken and the rest of the storyBy Karl KennellGroup raises funds to help hometown hero By Contributing Writer Claire Diamond Sano Diane Timoney shares details of the day of her sons injury in Afghanistan with attendees at the St. Michaels Soldiers second annual All-American Hoedown and Auction. Photo by Bert Brohman Brother Knight of Knights of Columbus Switzerland Council provided a meal and necessities to the SEA community. Back to School Guide Appearing again in our September Issue! Call 886-4919 to book your next ad!cookies from the Ladies Auxiliary. As the St. Vincent Medical van arrived, residents from the Elkton community wandered in and began looking through the clothing for just the right items they needed. Over 100 residents of the neighborhood came that evening for what has become a welcome monthly social event for the community. The SEA Community Center and the farm worker families of Spud, Elkton and Armstrong (SEA) have become a special monthly outreach for area charities. On the third Monday evening of each month, the St. Vincent Health Unit comes to the community center to provide free check-ups and medical services for the residents of this farm workers community. It is at this humble community center, located next to the First Baptist Church of Armstrong on Armstrong Road just down from the St. Johns County Fairgrounds, that a handful of grandmas, moms and wives/community matriarchs began serving up dinner for the residents of the farming community. It was a dinner of just what they could bring together from their own modest pantries. It is also where Kathy Bravo of JCP CARES became overcome by not only the need she observed on her rst visit, but also by how joyful the community matriarchs were in serving up their modest meal and trying to provide some clothes and personal items for these working men. She has made the SEA community a special project and as a result has signed up charitable groups to each take a month to go down to the SEA Community Center and provide dinner, clothing and personal Area youth on an Appalachian MissionBy Contributing Writer Wendy RichardsMission had its monthly food drive. Feed America trucks deliver bulk products like bread, cabbages, canned fruit and paper products and everyone pulls together to load bags with family portions. Then the cars arrive from as much as an hour away to bene t from the assistance with food and necessities, many cars carrying two families. Volunteers estimated as many as 300 to 350 cars came through that day, with area police having to assist with tra c control. Beyond sel essly helping others in surrounding communities, Big Creek Mission provides mission groups with accommodations and meals in a Christian atmosphere geared towards teens where everyone pitches in to keep things running smoothly. Teens who Two of Ryan Timoneys friends were killed and he was severely wounded. He is now stateside receiving rehabilitation therapy, with a long road ahead to recovery. When Diane Timoney concluded her remarks, there wasnt a dry eye in the house. This was Diane Timoneys rst public speaking engagement since her sons injury and Mission trip cont on pg. 7 Hometown hero cont on pg. 30 SEA community dinners cont on pg. 19

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Page 2, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com Call us today to learn about the latest no-downtime cosmetic dermatologic procedures and products our practice has to offer.Aging gracefully has now arrived. Mark S. Cheiken, DO Board Certied Dermatologist Tiffany McMurray, ARNP-BC

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 3 Whats NewCommunity HappeningsDo you have community or club news you would like included in The CreeekLine? Then contact Martie Thompson at: editor@rtpublishinginc.com or 886-4919. At RT Publishing we welcome Letters to the Editor. We request they be no more than 250 words. All letters must include writers name, address, and telephone number. Only the name will be published. E-mail to editor@ rtpublishinginc.com. Anonymously sent letters will not be published.Letters to the Editor policy The CreekLine Community Newspaper is a free monthly publication distributed via bulk mail to homes and businesses in NW St. Johns County. Submission of articles and photographs are received by mail or email, although email to editor@rtpublishinginc.com is preferred. The writers opinions do not necessarily reect the opinion of RT Publishing, Inc. Advertising Rates are available by request. RT Publishing, Inc. is not responsible for advertisement content or accuracy of information provided by its advertisers. Nor does RT Publishing, Inc. endorse any of the products or services included in this publication. RT Publishing, Inc. reserves the right to refuse advertisement or copy from any advertiser. All rights are reserved and no portion of this publication may be copied without the express written consent of the publisher. 2012. RT Publishing, Inc. The CreekLine The Ocean Breeze Mandarin NewsLine Players JournalPublisher Rebecca Taus publisher@rtpublishinginc.comEditor Martie Thompson editor@rtpublishinginc.comAdvertising Sales, Linda Gay lg@rtpublishinginc.comGraphic Design, Lisa Felegygraphics@rtpublishinginc.com RT Publishing, Inc. 12443 San Jose Boulevard Suite 403 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Ph: 904-886-4919 The Friends of Alpine Park will hold a new member meet and greet on Saturday, September 1, 2012 at Alpine Groves Park. Anyone interested in joining the group is invited to meet at the farmhouse by the river at 9:00 a.m. for a history of the park presented by park naturalist, Beverly Fleming, who will be dressed in period costume. Following that we will have light refreshments while sharing our groups goals and future plans. Please come, step back in time with us and learn the history of the park and then join its futurejoin The Friends of Alpine Park. For additional information, email us at friendsofalpinepark@ gmail.com or visit and like our Facebook page, Friends of Alpine Park. The Marine Corps League, Ancient City Detachment 383, meets on the rst Tuesday of each month at 1900 hours at the St. Augustine Elks Lodge 829, located at 1420 State Road A1A South in St. Augustine. For additional information, please visit mcl 383.org. Soil preparation should be done four to six weeks before planting a production bed, so it is time to plan and prepare for the fall vegetable garden. On Thursday, August 16, the St. Johns Extension O ce will be conducting a class on this topic. It will be held at the St. Johns County Extension Of- ce from 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon. In the class you will learn about amending the garden plot, vegetable varieties to grow for fall and winter and gardening techniques. If you have not had a soil pH analysis done in several years you may also want to bring a soil sample to submit for free testing. You must pre-register for the class. There will be a $5 registration fee or bring three nonperishable food items to donate to the St. Johns County Social Services Division of Health and Human Services Food Closet. To register for the class call 209-0430. Haven Hospice is hosting a grief and loss support group at St. Johns Family Funeral Home every Wednesday from August 1 through September 5. The group meets from 6:00 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. For more information, please contact the local o ce at 810-2377. Research shows that students who consistently meet with mentors have increased attendance, decreased disruptive behavior and/or increased academic achievement. The St. Johns County School District is looking for volunteers who have a bit of time, a listening ear and an encouraging word to help a student become successful in school and in life. Mentors assist in a school setting and meet with a student once a week. Mentor training for the 2012-2013 school year will take place on August 30. This will be held from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon at the Fullerwood Resource Center in St. Augustine. If you are interested in taking part in this opportunity, please call 547-3945 or email freemac@ stjohns.k12. .us. The St. Johns Federated Republican Women (SJFRW) will meet at Romney Victory Headquarters, located at 525 State Road 16 Ste.104, in St. Augustine on Wednesday, August 22 in lieu of August 20. Just drop by anytime between 9:00 a.m. and 9:00 p.m. and make calls to ensure we elect a Republican president. Lunch and dinner will be provided. For more information, please contact Debi Newton at 910-0290. The Nease High School swim team will have their 2012 tryouts on August 13 at the Palencia Pool, located at 1865 North Loop Parkway. Nease is proud to announce our new pool location and new head coach. This will be Whats New cont on pg. 4 Back to School & Back To Business! Now is the time to advertise your . Enrollment for the 2012-2013 school year, Sports, Day Care, Schools, and Back to School Business Specials! The CreekLine of St. Johns County Call today to reserve your ad space! Copies of Online Coupon not accepted

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Page 4, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com From the Commissioners DeskBy Contributing Writer Ron Sanchez, County Commissioner, District 2 Providing excellent patient care is everyones job at Baptist Health. Thats why we are so proud of our recent Magnet redesignation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. This four-year designation is the gold standard of recognition for nursing excellence. It means that our environment encourages nurses, physicians and staff to work collaboratively, shoulderto-shoulder, to improve patient safe ty and outcomes. For details, visit ebaptisthealth.com. Fewer than7percent of hospitals in the nation achieve Magnet recognition for excellence in patient care.BacktoBackForthesecondconsecutivetime, BaptistHealthearnsMagnetstatus. Rosemarie, medical/surgical nurse, and Dr. Namen, pulmonologist, are just two of the many Baptist Health nurses, physicians and staff whose commitment to quality is reflected in our Magnet redesignation. Bring your Digital Photos to LIFE!printmypictureonline.com Our goal is to make your prints as close to the real thing as possible! We print banners, signs, posters, canvases, giclees and more! 919-951-5201 As we approach the beginning of a new scal year and nalize the 2012-2013 annual budget, my fellow commissioners and the St. Johns County administrative sta are taking time to review, update and expand the countys communication e orts. St. Johns County was recently recognized with a 2012 Sunny Award for transparency by the Sunshine Review organization. Of the more than 6,000 entities rated, we were one of only 214 to receive an A grade for providing convenient website access to an array of information regarding county budgets, meetings, public records and taxes. While we are proud of our communication and transparency record and awards, we also understand there is value in periodically assessing our program for potential improvements. In conjunction with this e ort, Im happy to announce the arrival of our new communication manager, Michael Ryan. Well-versed in a variety of communication tools and techniques, he comes to St. Johns County with more than 14 years of experience and an award-winning record of building public-sector communication programs. After settling into his o ce, Ryans rst order of business will be to conduct a complete communication audit of all St. Johns County Board of County Commissioner o ces to outline the organizations current communication e orts. Once our existing program is assessed, a panel of representatives from di erent departments will be assembled to discuss the countys communication needs and how we can augment the e orts to share information with our residents and businesses. The overall goal will be to distribute informative and accurate stories that are of interest to the community in a timely, comprehensive, and consistent manner. Understanding that di erent people receive and process information in di erent ways, we will also pursue the use of a variety of communication tools including traditional media, video content and electronic communication tools. In the future, the awardwinning St. Johns County website will receive more frequent news updates, the GTV bulletin board and programming schedule will be expanded, our email newsletter will be re-launched and we will continue building partnerships with our local media. In addition, we will explore the creation of a mobile application for smartphones, an expanded social media presence and the use of other technology-driven communication. Our county administrator will again write a monthly update of projects and programs and many of our departments, including the library, parks and recreation, and emergency services, will be encouraged to increase communication with their respective audiences and customers. Your St. Johns County Commissioners and sta work diligently to continually provide quality services, programs, and infrastructure. In the upcoming months, we will strive to ensure you have access to an abundance of timely information regarding your community and county government. our rst season our new home pool, Palencia. This will also be our rst season with our new head coach, Susan Lucas. For more information, please visit the Nease High School home athletics page at www.neaseathletics.com. United We Guide is a free transportation and information guide for seniors who are interested in the variety of transportation options o ered throughout St. Johns County. Contact the mobility manager at the Council on Aging at 3156505 or email Katie Arnold at karnold@stjohnscoa.com. World Golf Village Toastmasters meets the rst and third Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at First Florida Credit Union (entrance in back), located at 1950 County Road 210 West. You are invited to visit the World Golf Village Toastmasters Club. Our members include experienced Toastmasters and those just starting. Together we share the Toastmasters experience in ...a mutually supportive and positive learning environment, where every individual member has the opportunity to develop oral communication and leadership skillsand have fun doing it. For more information, please visit www.worldgolfvillage. toastmastersclubs.org. September is National Literacy Month and local organizations are making an e ort to expand their volunteer reading program. Reading Pals are needed in a childcare setting, along with Head Start and kindergarten classes in the St. Johns County School District. By providing just one hour per week, you can get children excited about reading. The rst training session for the school year is on Wednesday, September 5 from 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Training, required background screening (free to volunteers) and support are provided. If you are interested in working with young learners to create excitement for reading, please Whats New cont from pg. 3 Whats New cont on pg. 8Increased communication and transparency Advertise inThe CreekLineIts good for business!287-4913LG@rtpublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 5 School District Journal By Contributing Writer Beverly Slough, Chairman, St. Johns County School Board The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Over 15 Years Legal Experience904-665-0005www.preddylaw.com Offering investment advisory services as a representative of 0156581-00002-00 Prudential Financial Planning Services, a division of Pruco Securities, LLC. Buy A Business John SerbCertied Business Intermediary www.FirstCoastBizBuySell.com Call 904-613-2658 for a Condential No-Cost Valuation & Consultation Protecting What Matters Most www.varsit y insuranceagenc y .co m Find us on Faceboo k Serving Mandarin and Julington Creek Since 1990 268-6365 Is four-peat a word? The St. Johns County School District has been named the number one school district in the state for the fourth year in a row! I am so very proud of the extraordinary instruction of our teachers, coupled with the support that our parents and community give that allows us to continue to reach the pinnacle even in the face of greater rigor and rising cut scores on the testing. Leadership also deserves applause. The School Board, Dr. Joyner, and the district sta along with our principals, have placed strong attention on the achievement of each one of our students. I believe that is the key to our success we focus on each child, keep an eye on his/ her achievement data and make adjustments to his/her instruction to assure that each one is gaining the skills necessary to progress to the next level. I cannot emphasize enough the role that parents play in this process. When you as a parent make certain that your child is reading every day, know and understand where s/he is in terms of grades and academic progress and o er your support to the teacher to assist at home where necessary, the chance of success for your child is exponentially increased. Thank you to the entire team who surrounds our children with love, support, expertise and guidance to help each one to be successful. August 20, the opening day of school, is fast approaching. If you or someone you know has not registered an incoming student, I urge you to do so immediately. In order to meet class size requirements, we must have a rm understanding of how many children will be at each school and in each grade. If you are new to Florida or your child has never been in public school, you will need your childs original birth certi cate, his/her shot record and proof of a physical within the last 12 months, in addition to proof of residence. Please be aware of immunization requirements in our state, especially the additional ones in middle school. This information may be found by accessing the district website: www.stjohns. k12. .us. Please take the time to explore the site as the answers to many questions as well as informative sections are available there. We in St. Johns County Schools are excited about the beginning of a new school year. This year we have three additional members to our family of schools. Palencia Elementary, located at the entrance to the Palencia development on US Highway 1, opens its doors to children for the rst time. Principal Don Campbell has worked hard with the community to begin to develop traditions and expectations. In addition, we welcome two new charter schools, St. Pauls School of Excellence in the Lincolnville area of St. Augustine and St. Augustine Public Montessori School located in the northern part of St. Augustine will welcome students on August 20. For more information on these schools, please see our website under the tab Schools. Volunteers and business partners are always welcome in our schools. These alliances enable our teachers to extend the learning of our children and our schools to have the resources to provide additional learning tools for our students. Every school welcomes volunteers to do everything from assisting in the classroom, making copies, helping in the cafeteria, providing one-on-one tutoring, reading to children and much more. You must rst be cleared through the county before volunteering. Please access the volunteer form on our website and complete it today so that the background screening may be complete before school begins. Beginning last year, volunteer forms must be cleared before parents may interact with our students, even to eat lunch with your child. These requirements are a result of increased safety measures for the protection of all our children. August 14 is the primary election. Two School Board seats are up this cycle. I urge you to examine the new voter registration card you received recently. School Board and County Commission districts were redrawn after the census and you may be in a di erent district than previously. The new districts do not have an impact on County Commission races because these positions are elected countywide and all voters select the representative from all the districts. In contrast, School Board seats are single-member, meaning that only voters in a particular district elect their representative. District 1, which I serve, was drastically reduced, adding many neighborhoods to districts 2 and 4. An example is that all the neighborhoods on the south side of County Road 210 are now in District 2, currently served by Tommy Allen, while they were previously in District Baptist Medical Center Jacksonville and Baptist Medical Center South, which share a license, were ranked No. 1 among metro Jacksonville hospitals in U.S. News & World Reports annual Best Hospitals rankings, which were released this week. The hospitals were also ranked fth in the state. Baptist Medical Center and Baptist South were the only metro Jacksonville hospitals that were nationally ranked. The hospitals were nationally ranked among the nations top 50 hospitals in two specialties gynecology and diabetes/ endocrinology and regionally ranked as high-performing in the following eight specialties: Cancer Gastroenterology Geriatrics Nephrology Neurology & Neurosurgery Orthopedics Pulmonology Urology This years Best Hospitals showcases more than 720 of the nations roughly 5,000 hospitals. Only 148 of the hospitals were nationally ranked in at least one of 16 medical specialties. To be considered for ranking, hospitals had to meet certain requirements for size, technological capabilities, and Medicare volume for certain procedures. The 1,868 hospitals meeting those requirements were scored and ranked by specialty based on: Reputation (32.5 percent of the score) Mortality rate (32.5 percent) Patient safety (5 percent) Care-related factors such as nursing and patient services (30 percent) This accomplishment is a credit to the skills, knowledge and dedication of the physicians, nurses and sta said Michael Mayo, hospital president, Baptist Medical Center Jacksonville. It gives us feedback that we are hitting our marks for excellence. It is a great honor to be recognized for the care we provide patients and families, says Ron Robinson, hospital president, Baptist Medical Center South. Congratulations to the nurses, physicians and sta for this a rmation of their skill and dedication. The U.S. News rankings are a GPS-like aid to help steer patients to hospitals with strong skills in the procedures and medical conditions that present the biggest challenges, said U.S. News Health Rankings Editor Avery Comarow. All of these hospitals are the kinds of medical centers that should be on your list when you need the best care, Comarow said. They are where other hospitals send the toughest cases. The U.S. News rankings were published by U.S. News in collaboration with RTI International, a research organization based in Research Triangle Park, N.C. Highlights of the 2012-13 rankings will appear in the U.S. News Best Hospitals 2013 guidebook, to go on sale in August. The complete rankings and methodology are available at http://health.usnews.com/besthospitals. 1. District 2 is up for election in the current cycle, so those residents will be voting for their representative even though District 1 was just selected last election. In addition, polling places have changed in some instances. Your new registration card will tell you where to vote and identify your district for all races, so it is important to check your new card. It is my honor and privilege to serve you as chairman of the St. Johns County School Board. As always, I am grateful for your support of public education. If I may assist you in any way, please contact me at sloughb@stjohns.k12. .us.Hospitals ranked No. 1 among Metro Jacksonville hospitals Dispose of unwanted/outdated prescription medication (excluding sharps, medical wastes, nuclear medications or thermometers) St. Johns County Sheriffs Of ce Weekdays excluding holidays 8:00 a.m. ~ 5:00 p.m.Contact: Crime Prevention Deputy Corporal Diana Bryant at 810-6694

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Page 6, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com The Sheriff Reports By Contributing Writer David B. Shoar, St. Johns County Sheriff CR210 Small Business Showcase ~ Highlighting various local businesses ~ ~ Win prizes & receive exclusive discounts ~This event will be a goldmine! All of these businesses will be under the same roof but you will leave knowing where to nd all the things you need right here in your community! C R21 0 S m a ll B us i n ess S h o w case Judson Mallini, C FP C LU Financial Planner The Prudential Insurance Company of America 12428 San Jose Blvd, Suite 1 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Office 904-262-0141 Cell Phone 904-476-7758 Judson.Mallini@Prudential.com www.prudential.com/us/judson.mallini I nsurance issued by The Prudential Insurance Company of America and its affiliates. P rudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential F inancial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. F inancial planning and investment advisory services offered through Prudential Financial P lanning Services, a division of Pruco Securities, LLC. 0 221355-00001-00 TOGETHER, LETS MEET YOUR CHALLENGES Sound advice. Comprehensive financial planning. www.maymgt.com MAY Management Services, Inc.Licensed Property ManagementMAY Realty & Resort RentalsLicensed Real Estate Brokerage Our job is to help Boards of Directors successfully manage their Associations The Neighborhoods of World Golf Village Tim HutchisonRegional ManagerJulington Creek Plantation 1637 Racetrack Road #206 St. Johns, Florida 32259904-880-8796New Ofce!Pam Drury Licensed Property ManagerDottie KrinerLicensed Property ManagerRich Curran-Kelley, CAMRegional ManagerKathy MayeldLicensed Property ManagerDeborah AlleyLicensed Property Manager904-940-1002 Laura QualantoneCo-Regional Mgr. You Deserve Quality Legal Representation at a Rate You Can Afford 904.379.8486www.myjaxfamilylaw.com Mention this ad for a free consult Sara Beth Frazier, Esq. This month, I would like to address a topic of concern: fraud against our elderly. Of more than 149,000 registered voters in St. Johns County, nearly 72,000 are currently age 50 or older and over 42,000 are currently age 61 or older according to records obtained from the St. Johns County Supervisor of Elections. As in other parts of the state, with the arrival of the baby boomer generation, we look for St. Johns County to continue to grow our population of senior citizens. Because retired adults between the ages of 65 and 85 control over 70 percent of the nations wealth, according to the National Center on Elder Abuse and many of those people do not realize the true value of their assets, seniors are likely targets of a category of criminal activity referred to as Elder Fraud. Elder fraud can be loosely described as any nancially motivated crime where the perpetrator intentionally misleads or deceives an elderly person in order to gain access to the victims assets for their own use. The problem with the description is that there is really no exact age that makes a person elderly or senior, therefore statistics and instances of this crime are hard to track. In addition to physical age, elder also describes a person in terms of bodily health and ability to function, for example, debilitating memory loss or loss of mobility. Data regarding this crime is di cult to obtain since it is estimated that only one in twenty ve cases ever get reported. If those estimates are reliable, we may have as many as ve million silent victims of elder fraud in the United States every year, surpassed only by the reported cases of elder neglect and physical abuse. Currently there are no national reporting systems in place to record and analyze this abuse. Secondly, we suspect that the crime is very often unreported. Third, the actual de nitions of elder fraud vary and nally, the nature of the crime makes it di cult to detect even by trained professionals. The overwhelming physical and emotional toll of this crime can not be understated. Late in life, our elderly cannot recover in many cases as they could when they were younger and still working. For the victims, destroyed trust in a time of need and isolation, crushed dreams, ruined life savings and sometimes even physical abuse and death can be the results. Typically there is no lone indicator of nancial exploitation; however, there are several recognizable warning signs. Some include a new purported love interest or best friend, a caregiver who seems to demand a lot of control over decisions, sudden changes in mood or behavior such as depression or sadness, signs of neglect, possessions disappearing, inexplicable nancial transactions, ATM usage, checks or credit card transactions including the appearance of suspicious signatures on documents, large purchases of needless home repairs or poor explanations about speci c nancial questions where the elder person does not comprehend nancial arranges that have been made for them. In addition, we get reports regularly that target the elderly of a relative, such as a grandson, that is incarcerated in another country and needs money to bail him out. Oftentimes the victim is so upset they obtain a money order and send it to the suspects without checking with other family members to determine if it is true. If you know of someone that could be a victim of elder fraud or if you suspect it, please report this to your local law enforcement agency or here at the Sheri s O ce. For us in law enforcement, it is essential that we continue to follow-up with the victims of these devastating crimes after the case is closed. At the St. Johns County Sheri s O ce, we are committed to a referral network of community programs and to ensure that our victims advocates remain available to help.St. Johns County Commissioner Ken Bryan will assume the role of chair for the Florida Association of Counties Trust (FACT) on October 1, 2012. FACT is a county risk sharing pool with signi cant di erences from many other local government and commercial insurance programs. An atcost, not for pro t program, this county-owned risk pool provides broad liability coverage developed speci cally for Florida counties. St. Johns County is one of 20 counties that own and manage FACT through an 11 member board of trustees elected by member counties which oversees daily operations. The program has been successful in assisting the county with loss prevention strategies with an overall goal of minimizing risk related costs. FACT delivers unique insurance coverage, claims and litigation management, as well as valuable risk management services for its members. In his role as chair, Commissioner Bryan will be instrumental in leading FACT in meeting its goal of helping counties control costs of loss Elder fraudCommissioner appointed chair of Florida Association of Counties Trust through e ective risk management assistance and maintenance of reasonable and stable liability coverage pricing on an at-cost basis. The CreekLineYour Community Newspaper Everybody Gets It. Everybody Reads It.editor@thecreekline.comWhy wait for the mailman? View our digital edition online at www.thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 7 44 pages 1-4, 7-8, 15-16, 19-26, 29-30, 37-38, 41-44 Dr. Mabus ofce is conveniently located in the Johns Creek Shopping Center. She is a graduate of the St. Vincents Family Medicine residency program and is looking forward to caring for her new Fruit Cove neighbors. Her ofce offers medical care for: Procedures and screenings: To schedule an appointment call: (904) 450-8120Same day appointments available. Dr. Mabus ofce is located at: St. Vincents Primary Care Johns Creek Shopping Center 2851 CR 210 W., Ste. 122 St. Johns, FL 32259St. Vincents Primary Care would like to welcome Allison Mabus, MD, to our St. Vincents HealthCare family. 2758 Race Track Rd. in Julington Creek 32259 Plantation Publix Plaza Fall in love with your hair AGAIN! (904) 209-1320www.getpanache.com 0 4 ) 2 0 9 1 3 2 0 Carl Slack Colorist/Hair StylistThe Allen D. Nease Panther Navy is part of Area 12 NJROTC (Navy Junior ROTC). Each summer, approximately 150 cadets are nominated amongst 61 high schools throughout Georgia and North Florida. The top shelf cadets meet for one week for formal leadership training at the Riverside Military academy in Gainesville, Georgia. The quali- cations to attend this leadership academy include strong academic, athletic and leadership performance. The cadets are divided into two companies, each with ve platoons. For the 2012 Class, Cadets Ashley Cooper, Will Duncan, Jared Heinrich, Tyler Mayben, Christopher Mead, Madison Stenzel and Nicole Thatcher represented Nease High School NJROTC. The weeklong camp begins with intense physical training starting before dawn, preparing them for a physical tness test mid-week, which they must pass or risk being sent home. Throughout the day, cadets attend classes covering integrity in leadership, teamwork, planning, goal setting, loyalty, social etiquette and being a servant leader, among many other facets of leadership. Cadets are required to pass a nal exam at the end of the week in order to graduate from this Academy. Cadets also participate in daily drill practice to reinforce discipline and precision. Two Nease Cadets, Jared Heinrich and Will Duncan, served as platoon commanders for their respective platoons, leading them not only in drill formations but in other various functions at the academy as well. Cadets are expected to keep both their rooms and their uniforms orderly throughout the day and receive scores based on their performance in daily barracks inspections and uniform inspections. These tests instill orderliness, precision, attention to detail and time management, as well as teamwork as cadets must work together to keep their shared rooms neat and clean. Then the platoons are ranked by their cumulative score. Individual cadet scores include the combined scores for uniform inspections, room inspections, class work and exams, and the physical tness test. The cadet with the overall highest combined score from each platoon is named the Platoon Honor Cadet, earns the Cadet Achievement Award. This summer, Cadets Thatcher, Stenzel and Mead each won Platoon Honor Cadet within their respective platoons. Additionally, Cadet Stenzel won the award for highest academic Nease NJROTC Cadets attend leadership academyaverage in Bravo Company and Cadets Heinrich and Mead were tied for highest academic average for Alpha Company. During this summers 2012 Leadership Academy, Nease Cadets once again demonstrated high standards of excellence and commitment in their work, and once again proved the Nease NJROTC Panther Navy truly is A Cut Above.Captain Robert Young, Gunnery Sergeant Duane Hanson, Cadet Will Duncan, Cadet Christopher Mead, Cadet Tyler Mayben, Cadet Ashley Cooper, Cadet Madison Stenzel, Cadet Nicole Thatcher and Cadet Jared Heinrich. Photo by Cyndi Thatcher.resist doing basic chores at home are miraculously found pitching in to do things like mopping oors, doing dishes, restocking paper products in bathrooms and taking out trash on a daily basis. And these are no small tasks because roughly 200 youth and adults are staying at the facility every week throughout the summer. Thats a lot of dishes and paper products! The teens in the Geneva youth group look forward with anticipation to their mission projects, working to pay for each trip through various fundraisers throughout the year. This year, four students from outside of Genevas church family came along so they too could participate in a youth mission project. Adults and students alike came away from the trip to rural Kentucky with an appreciation for all they have, a sense of satisfaction in having made others lives a little better and a strengthened bond of friendship within the group. Its comforting to know that there are youth programs like the one o ered by Geneva Presbyterian Church building teens faith and teaching them through experience that there is much more to life than material belongings, video games and a focus on ones self. It is truly an enriching experience this group looks forward to every year.Mission trip cont from pg. 1

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Page 8, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com FREEHearing Aid EvaluationExpires 7/31/12. Some restrictions apply. Not to be combined with any other oer.What will your summer sound like? y y No two summer memories are alike, but they all have sounds that make them special. Live with hearing loss and you and your loved ones miss too much. Call us today to reconnect to everything beautiful in life its never too late.Glenn W. Knox, MD, FACS 12276 San Jose Blvd., Ste 516 Jacksonville, FL 32223www.doctorknox.com 904-292-9777 Expires 8/31/12. Some restrictions apply. Not to be combined with any other oer. Concerns about your drinking water?Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 Years. Straight answers No high pressure. 262 0197 3760 KORI RD. Lic. #W-32 y o u C all the W ate r T reatmen t C ompany J acksonvill e h as trusted f or over 2 2 0 Years. S Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 years. call RSVP of St. Johns County at 547-3945 or email freemac@ stjohns.k12. .us.Adults and teens age 14 and older are invited to attend the Project Lap Blanket crochet group at the Bartram Trail Branch Library on Tuesday, August 14, Tuesday, August 21 and Tuesday, August 28 from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The group will crochet or knit blankets for cancer patients at area hospitals. All skill levels are welcome. Cant come to any of the meetings? Pick up the crochet pattern at the Reference Desk in the library and crochet the blanket in your spare time. Drop o completed blankets and any yarn youd like to donate during regular library hours. For additional information, please call the Reference Desk at 827-6960. The St. Johns County Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer your lawn and garden questions at the Bartram Trail Branch Library located at 60 Davis Pond Road at the entrance to Julington Creek Plantation. Clinics are for scheduled for Saturday, August 11 and Thursday, August 16 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. You can bring in a soil sample for free pH testing. Instructions on taking a soil sample can be found on the internet. The 210 Community Market was founded by a local residents group, The 210 Community Alliance. The goal of both the founders and the market is to unite the communities along the 210 sector. The market is envisioned to be a town center for neighbors to gather and enjoy the open air atmosphere of a local community market. The market will feature specialty foods as well as artisan crafters and organic fruits and vegetables. We have moved the market to a new location, the Winn Dixie parking lot at 2220 County Road 210. Come out and join us and bring the whole family, including the dog. The market will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. the second Saturday of each month. The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-7 meets the rst Thursday of every month at 7:30 p.m. at the St. Augustine Yacht Club near the St. Augustine Lighthouse. The otilla is always looking for new members, particularly those who own aircraft, boats and have radio equipment and skills. If you are interested, please contact Vic Aquino at 460-0243. Texture with Native Plants is the program on August 16, 2:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. at the St. Johns County Agricultural Center, located at 3125 Agricultural Center Drive in St. Augustine. Enhance your landscape with plants that sway in the summer breezes and calm the senses. If you want to use less water, fertilizer and pest control, native plants can be an excellent choice. Instructors include Gail Compton, nature columnist; Beverly Fleming, Master Gardener and Renee Stambaugh, native plant consultant. The program is free, open to the public and hosted by the St. Johns County Extension Service. For more information, please call 209-0430. The MOMS Club is a wonderful way to meet other stayat-home and part-time working mothers and is a fun way for your children to socialize with other children. Mothers with children of all ages are welcome. Members for this chapter must live in the 32092 or 32095 zip codes, including all neighborhoods along the 210 corridor. We meet once a month to plan our activities for the month ahead. These business meetings are held at 10:00 a.m. on the third Thursday of every month at Faith Community Church on County Road 210. Of course, children are welcome at all of our meetings and activities. Activities are scheduled for almost every weekday of the month and moms may attend as few or as many activities as they like. Some of the activities we have planned are trips to the zoo, beach/pool days, storytime at the library, and playgroups at members homes and local parks. If you have any questions or would like to get more information to join, please email Sarah at sanmoms@gmail.com, check out our website at http:\\ sanmomsclub.weebly.com or drop into our business meeting. TOPS (Take O Pounds Sensibly) FL#493, St. Augustine has a weekly meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesdays at the Old Colee Cove Volunteer Fire Station, located at 9105 County Road 13 North (south of Buddy Boys Grocery Store). Weigh in starts at 8:30 a.m. We are a National Weight Loss Organization, fees are low and we have lots of fun, contests and inspiring programs. All are welcome; come and join us! For more information, please contact Sara Weaver at 940-7528 or Bobbi Culbreth at 824-2466. The NASJAX Skin and Scuba Diving Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the rst Wednesday of every month at the Golden Corral Buffet and Grill, located at 11470 San Jose Boulevard in Mandarin. The club is open to all divers and those who are interested in diving. Single, divorced, widowed and looking to make new friends? The JCP Singles Network is for adults 40s and upa great way to meet people, make new friendships and network. If you are interested in joining us and would like more information, please email klandrum @ comcast.net.Whats New cont from pg. 4 Congratulations to the Julington Creek 18 and up boys baseball team who won the state championship the weekend of June 30 July 1. They are now headed to Alabama for the regional tournament.

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 9 FOR ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMMISSIONISTRICTEPUBLICAN Come and See Us For Your FREESleep Apnea Consultation! Sleep Apnea Making You Tired?Call Krantz Dental Care Today! Alan M. Krantz, D.D.S.12058 San Jose Boulevard, Suite 102 Mandarin(904) 880-3131KrantzDentalCare.com/sleepapnea Without DON'TTRADEYOURYOUTHFUL SKINFORATEMPORARYTAN!LetPVPSbeyourfirstchoiceforanti-agingproductsand rejuvenatingtreatments.ForaFREEskinanalysis,contact ourofficeat 904.273.6200. Bookyourvisitnowandremembertohaveourlicensed AestheticiansorAdvancedRegisteredNursePractitioners matchyouwiththeperfectskincareregimenforyourskin typeandanti-aginggoals.WecarryOBAGI,SkinMedica, SkinCeuticals,LatisseandVIVITE.Microdermabrasion ChemicalPeels IntensePulsedLight-Photofacial FractionalResurfacing MicrolaserPeel ErbiumLaserResurfacing BOTOXCosmetic JuvedermXC Radiesse...andmanymore!www.pvps.com SIXLOCATIONSPonteVedraBeachSouthsideAmeliaIslandMandarinRiversideSt.Augustine Presentthisadandreceive 20%OFFanySunscreenorSPFproduct.*Cannotbecombinedwithanyother discountorspecialoffer.Mustpresent couponattimeofpurchase. OfferexpiresOctober1,2012. DISCOUNTCODE:NE. We represent companies that cover Diabetes, COPD, Previous Cancers, HIV, Heart Attacks, Strokes, Alzheimers and Dementia* T h e S h arp Agenc y L i f e Hea l th and Annuitie s C all Anthon y Shar p toda y at: 9 04-993-448 1 www.N o w A tP eace co m My personal situation: I have a 10-year old and a 15-year old. If my wife and I are killed in an accident tomorrow, here is what the caregiver of our children will receive: 10-year old to 18 = 8 years/$900 month = $86,400 18-22 years $6,000/year for 4 years for college = $24,00015-year old to 18 = 3 years/$900 month = $32,400 18-22 years $6000/year for 4 years for college = $24,000 Total for both children = Can you afford not to inquire? Applies to single & married parents and applies to any number of children.Are you sharp, motivated and teachable? Now hiring! We conclude reporting on The Wall Street Journal article of April 21, 2012, Rethinking The War On Drugs by Mark A.R. Kleiman, Jonathan P. Caulkins and Angela Hawken. Previously, we reviewed new and innovative ways to ght the high cost of prosecuting alcohol-related crime and repeat drug o enders. Substantial progress in suppressing the drug use of arrestees would be a great boon. It would deprive the illicit drug markets of their most valuable customers, which would, in turn, reduce violence in innercity neighborhoods. ... Since the war on drugs started ... three decades ago, the law has found it impossible to stop the ow of illegal drugs. Prices have dropped despite billions of dollars spent on catching drug dealers ... We are long overdue for refocusing antidrug e orts on the central task of protecting public safety and order. David Kennedy of John Jay College in New York City has pioneered two related programs designed to go after the most violent dealers and organizations and to shut down the most violet market areas. His Drug Market Intervention program, rst used in High Point, N.C. ..., focuses on areas where crack house and agrant street-corner dealing generate crime and disorder. ... (T)he police negotiate community support, ... identify all the dealers and make cases against them. Then comes the surprising part: Instead of being arrested, the nonviolent dealers are called in for a meeting ... They are presented with the evidence against them ... and confronted by angry neighbors, clergy and relatives. Each one is then o ered a choice: Stop dealing and get help to turn your life around, or tell it to the judge. The point is not to eliminate the drug supply but to force dealing into a less agrant and socially damaging form: sales in bars or home delivery instead of street-corner transactions. The results have been spectacular, with long-established markets disappearing overnight. Prof. Kennedys other innovation was the Boston Cease re program. In 1996, violent youth gangs engaged in drug dealing and other crimes were brought in by the authorities and given a simple message: If anyone in your gang shoots somebody, we will come down on every member of the gang for all of his illegal activity. Suddenly gang members had a strong reason to enforce nonviolence on one another, and pressure from peers turned out to be more e ective than pressure from police o cers. Youth homicides dropped from two a month before the program started to none in the following two years. ... The U.S. has reached a dead end in trying to ght drug use by treating every o ender as a serious criminal. Blanket drug legalization has some super cial charm it ts nicely into a soundbite or tweet but it cant stand up to serious analysis. The real prospects for reform involve policies rather than slogans. ... This series has shown proven, alternative programs which are more than theories they are practical applications making a di erence in peoples lives. In Florida, we have found success with very tough three strikes and youre out laws and taking away judicial discretion. But, with any absolutes over a period of time, we have found injustice which cancels justice. In the name of justice, in the name of scal responsibility, in the name of morality as a people, we have to start doing something di erent. We elect judges we feel know justice, then hamstring them with mandatory sentences. They become mere technicians rather than wise interpreters of the law. We elect state attorneys expecting them to have and use discretion, but nd them grandstanding and making political rather than judicious decisions. In this election year, it will be critical to elect lawmakers who will look beyond the easy solutions and nd innovative ways to make the places we call home safer and saner. J. Bruce Richardson is a longtime journalist and consultant who writes in Jacksonville print publications exclusively for RT Publishing, Inc. He has led projects in Washington as well as Ottawa, Canada, and authors an Internet-based transportation column which is read in more than 60 countries. He lives and works in Jacksonville.Memorial Hospital has been named a U.S. News and World Report Best Regional Hospital in the publications annual Best Hospitals issue. Memorial Hospital was ranked high-performing, meaning it scored in the top 25 percent of hospitals nationwide, in nine medical specialties: Cardiology and Heart Surgery Diabetes and Endocrinology Gastroenterology Geriatrics Gynecology Nephrology Neurology and Neurosurgery Orthopedics Pulmonology The hospital rankings, said U.S. News Health Rankings editor Avery Comarow, are like a GPS-type aid to help steer patients to hospitals with strong skills in the procedures and medical conditions that present the biggest challenges. All of these hospitals are the kinds of medical centers that should be on your list when you need the best care, said Comarow.U.S. News and World Report takes into account patient survival rates, patient safety rates, technology and patient services o ered. We are very pleased the quality care we provide our patients every day is being recognized by such a well-respected organization, said Memorial president and CEO James OLoughlin. Our entire sta works tirelessly to make sure our patients get the best medical experience possible. This is the latest in a series of independent studies that have given Memorial Hospital positive marks for patient safety. Earlier this month Consumer Reports ranked Memorial in the top 10 percent of hospitals in Florida in terms of patient safety. Just last month Memorial Hospital received positive scores for patient safety by the independent Leapfrog Group. Memorial is also the only hospital in Jacksonville to be named a Top Performer in Key Quality Measures by the Joint Commission.Political CommentaryAngry mobs and peer pressure can be helpfulBy J. Bruce RichardsonLocal hospital ranked high-performing in nine specialties The CreekLine YOURCommunity Newspapereditor@thecreekline.com

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Page 10, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com Attention Smokers AND Ex-Smokers Clinical Research Participants Needed! St. Johns Center for Clinical Research (904) 209-3173 141 Hilden Road, Suite 201 Ponte Vedra, Fl 32081 The Julington Creek Plantation CDD facilities, amenities and programs are the envy of both current and prospective Northeast Florida homeowners. The variety of recreation services and programs both appeal to and bene t many in the JCP community. However, just because we have a great thing going, doesnt mean we cant do it for less cost or look for ways to improve how we provide our services. At the last CDD meeting, discussion took place with regard to proposed cost savings in the proposed 2013 budget. A suggestion was made to budget an increase in the child watch program hourly rate from $3 per hour to $5 per hour which would reduce the tax payer subsidy of this program by approximately $17,000 over the budget year. However, this was met with resistance from the majority of the supervisors as an unreasonable increase. Originally when the child watch program was started, fees paid by the users were supposed to cover the costs to provide the service but that has not happened and now this program is subsidized by the tax payers by approximately $21,000 a year. During the same meeting, a supervisor made a motion to provide a 3 percent increase to all the salaried and hourly sta of the CDD, including temporary and part-time personnel. This was supported by the majority of the board of supervisors and passed. I understand discussions of government employee salary increases and incentive bonuses can be contentious topics. I believe the goal should be for government employees to receive pay, perks and bene ts comparable to some valid benchmark, but the CDD has, in my opinion, failed to determine what is fair or comparable salary ranges. The CDD refuses to perform an accurate and comprehensive salary analysis to evaluate each position based on its job responsibilities and the regional pay scale. If we dont know what a fair salary range is, how can we make decisions on salary increases or bonuses? This is why some residents have questioned the doubling of some employee salaries and the almost 700 percent increase in the salaries budget over the last six years. I believe that CDD operational costs could be better managed by your board of supervisors. We should be closely reviewing how we provide services in order to make improvements and pushing the user-paid programs to generate revenues su cient to at least cover the expenses required to provide such services. This year I presented a plan to the CDD that would further reduce operating costs by approximately $112,000 all without reducing the level of service. If you are interested in reading how we can reduce the budget without reducing the level of service, please feel free to contact me. We work for you and I encourage you to attend the board of supervisors meetings and voice your concerns or opinions on how we are conducting your business. The next CDD meetings will take place on August 21, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. at Fruit Cove Middle School, and September 11, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. at the JCP Recreation Center. Feel free to contact me day or night via email SLansdale@jcpcdd.org or phone 509-4902. This article is my opinion and in no way constitutes nor implies District opinion, endorsement, sponsorship or viewpoint. The views expressed may or may not be shared by the other JCP CDD Supervisors. Editors Note: The CreekLine is, and has always been, agreeable to publishing columns penned by our elected o cials so that they may communicate directly with our readers, their constituents. Any questions or requests for additional public servant columns may be directed to editor@thecreekline.com.Florida has something new speci cally designed for aging drivers. The Florida Guide for Aging Drivers is a handy book available at no cost to senior drivers, compliments of the Florida Safe Mobility for Life Coalition. The Coalition, a group comprised of professionals from 28 organizations, created the guide to give aging drivers a comprehensive resource with the most up-to-date information available. Users will nd safe driving tips, licensing information, lists of resources and community contacts for every county in the state. Basically, the guide o ers just about everything an aging driver needs to be more proactive about staying safe on the road. This book compliments the website www.SafeandMobileSeniors.org and is just the right size for the cars glove box and available through the: Safe Mobility for Life Resource Center 636 West Call Street Tallahassee, FL 32306. Why does Florida need an aging driver guide? Actually, it makes perfect sense when you consider that Florida leads the nation with 18 percent of its population age 65 and older. In fact, by the year 2030, over 27 percent will be over age 65, with half of those 75 or older. Mirroring this growth, an increasing proportion of drivers in Florida are getting older. Currently, nearly 3 million drivers in Florida are over age 65. Most people experience a steady decline in some of the skills needed to safely drive as we get older; however, these changes do not a ect all drivers at the same age or in the same way, says Gail Holley, Florida Department of Transportations Safe Mobility for Life program and research manager. It is important for everyone to understand the impact that aging can have on their driving and learn the warning signs and resources that are available to them so they can make the transition when driving may no longer be a safe option. The guide is designed to help aging drivers strike a balance between safety and the need for independence. The hope is that users of the guide will take the time to consider their driving abilities, take steps to improve their driving skills, explore other transportation options if needed and start making a plan for retirement from driving if it becomes necessary in the future.Angelos Barbershop is now open on San Jose Boulevard south of Interstate 295 in Mandarin. They focus on men and provide traditional barbering services, just as owner Dominic Ruscettas family did years ago. Ruscetta explains, Angelo Ruscetta, my grandfather, was a barber in Italy before moving to America in 1911. He inspired me to create my own barbershop were men can come and feel the classic touch of a professional bar-New traditional barbershop opens in Mandarinber! At Angelos Barbershop, every haircut gets a hot towel neck shave. They o er hot towel face and head shaves. Master barbers are available to welcome you at the door seven days a week. If you want someone who will pay attention to detail and provide real deal barbering services, be sure to visit Angelos Barbershop. Be sure to see their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!Julington Creek Plantation CDD reportBy Contributing Writer Sam Lansdale, Supervisor, Julington Creek Plantation Community Development DistrictFlorida rolls out new guide for senior drivers

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 11 Dr. Levine is dedicated to your familys health through every stage of life. He has served Julington Creek for more than 12 years and is ready to provide you with a medical home. Services include: Sports/school physicals Immunizations Well visits for adults and children GYN care Coordination of care for chronic conditions (diabetes, hypertension, etc.) On-site lab for all blood drawsFinding the right family doctor just got easier.Same-day acute appointments 287.2794Baptist Primary Care Julington Creek1400 Bishop Estates Road, St. Johns, FL 32259 Donald J. Levine, MD Board-Certified, Family Practice, along with Carol A. Noell, PA-C 13www.baptistprimarycare.net/levine-md ( 904 ) 825 9960 In the Winn-Dixie Shopping Center on CR 210 W2220 CR 210 W, Suite 312, St. Johns, Florida 32259 Back to School Special10% OFFAny dental treatment, including crowns, bridges, partials, veneers, etc. Not valid with other oers. Oer Expires 9/15/12New Patient Special Adults $99 & Children $79Includes dental exam and x-rays, a uoride treatment, teeth cleaning and polishing. Not valid with other oers. Oer Expires 9/15/12 Gentle, Caring Dentistry for the Whole FamilyJohn M. Joyner, DMD I specialize in helping investors identify and buy good investment properties. I have personally been successful in buying and managing investment properties. Call me today for more information. Kathy Wiedegreen, REALTOR Prudential Network Realty Cell: 904-316-4774 Ofce: 904-260-4300 www.KathySellsJacksonville.com WHY INVEST IN REAL ESTATE? More people than ever are renting Good rate of return on investment Available inventory Prices will never be better Christopher Thompson, CFP, CRPCVice PresidentInvestment Ocer Direct 904-273-7908 christopher.thompson@wellsfargoadvisors.comInvestment and Insurance Products: NOT FDIC Insured NO Bank Guarantee MAY Lose Value Wells Fargo Advisors is a registered broker-dealer and separate non-bank afliate of Wells Fargo & Company. Member SIPC. Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC. All rights reserved. 0512-1909 [84976-v2] A1507The St. Johns River Water Management District Governing Board approved a tentative budget on July 10 that holds steady on its tax rate and re- ects a budget that will support District core mission priorities and projects. The tentative 0.3313 millage rate would result in $80.1 million in revenue that would be part of a total $120.8 million budget. The budget is also slated to be funded with state, federal and other district sources (including timber sales, cattle leases, interest earnings, permit fees and fund balances). Under a 0.3313 millage rate.13 cents for every $1,000 of assessed property valuethe owner of a $200,000 house with a $50,000 homestead exemption would pay $49.69 in the coming year in property taxes to the district. Additionally, the board approved a revised budgeting method that provides funding to support only the expenditures anticipated during the scal year. The Bartram Trail Newcomers and Womens Club will begin another year of fun activities and friendships with our rst meeting of the year on Tuesday, September 11 at the BlackFinn American Grille in the St. Johns Town Center. The restaurant is located at 4840 Big Island Drive, #05, Jacksonville 32226. Our meeting is open to anyone. This will be a luncheon meeting with the doors opening at 10:45 a.m. Information on entre choices, cost, reservation deadline and where to send a check is on our Facebook page www.facebook.com/BartramTrail.Newcomers.WomensClub. The Bartram Trail Newcomers Club meets the second Tuesday of every month from September to May at various local restaurants for lunch. In addition to the monthly meetings, the club has a wide variety of interest groups. There are various card groups (bridge and canasta), golf, recipe exchange, special event outings, game day (Mexican Train), Bunko, Mah Jongg, book clubs, movie and lunch, a nature walk group and community volunteer projects. For club information, please contact Vice President of Membership Shirley Bodziak. Her email is Shirley@bodziak.com. Members who join before August 31 will pay only $20, saving $5 on their membership fee of $25. To download a membership form, go to www.facebook. com/BartramTrail.Newcomers. WomensClub. We are taking a responsible approach that is more in line with the way we and other taxpayers spend during tighter budget times, said Governing Board Vice Chairman John Miklos of Orlando. By taking a pay-as-we-go approach to project spending, we will budget as we anticipate expenses to occur. Through this process, the district budget for scal year 2012-2013, which begins October 1, will more accurately re ect the work being accomplished on an annual basis. The budget considers the total needs for district priority projects, ensuring that projects are su ciently funded to achieve completion. The proposed budget includes funding for priority restoration projects at Fellsmere Water Management Area and provides funds for continued water supply planning, including water conservation, and minimum ows and levels prevention and recovery strategy projects. The tentative budget also supports the districts assessment of groundwater supplies and re ects a continued commitment to increased use of reclaimed water in the Lower St. Johns River Basin. Public hearings on the tentative budget will be held at 5:05 p.m. on September 11 and 25. Final budget adoption will occur at the September 25 meeting. Ever wish you could get sound legal advice or services but rejected the idea of getting an attorney out of dread for all those seemingly open-ended, billable hours? Thats the very inspiration behind attorney Claudia Kennys newly opened law rm Legalight, located in Palencias Market Street Business Center. Kennys vision with Legalight is to break old legal traditions that intimidate the average person from seeking a lawyer or leave them feeling obligated to pay whatever astronomical fees a high-pro le law rm would charge. Legalight services eliminate the frustration people associate with attorneys that require hefty retainers and by-the-hour billing only and utilizes a xed, at-fee billing whenever possible. Not all legal services are appropriate for a xed at fee, but many, like business services and simple estate planning, can be delivered for a at-rate. On services that do not allow for a at-fee billing rate, Legalight works with the client to provide a ordably priced legal solutions that meet the individual clients speci c needs. For Legalight founder Kenny, necessity truly was the mother of invention. After graduating from the University of Miami with a BA in Business Administration, she and her husband Robert started a technology company, known today as Hyperscreens, LLC in St. Johns County. They were constantly discouraged by the lack of good, reasonably priced legal services available for their company. Kenny saw an opportunity to ll an obvious gap in the legal profession and went back to school at Florida Coastal School of Law to get her law degree. After graduating and passing the bar, she immediately went to work for Legal Aid in St. Johns County to be able to help people in need. Thats when the nal piece of the puzzle fell into place and Kenny envisioned the idea for Legalight. At Legal Aid, Kenny found that they were obligated to only serve those who qualify for the services based on asset-income standards that are restricted to a certain percentage over federal poverty levels. So low-income people could get Legal Aid and wealthier people could pay for the high-end law rms, but that still left small business owners and middle class residents unable to a ord the legal services they needed. Legalight was born out of a desire to ll that gap and meet peoples legal needs e ectively and economically. Be sure to see their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!District board approves tentative budget By Contributing Writer Teresa H. Monson, St. Johns River Water Management DistrictNewcomers and Womens Club announces meetingBy Contributing Writer Linda GomolkaA ordable legal services now available to St. Johns County Tell our advertisers you saw them inThe CreekLine Support our fine Advertisers! The CreekLineEverybody Gets It. Everybody Reads It.editor@thecreekline.com

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Page 12, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com ACCREDITEDACCREDITATION ASSOCIATION for AMBULATORYHEALTH CARE EYE CENTEROF ST. AUGUSTINE & WORLD GOLF VILLAGETHE EYE SURGERY CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE AAAHC 940-9200 T T Clinical and School Psychology Dr. William H. EdeneldOver 40 Years Experience in the Art & Science of Educational Evalution & Psychotherapy 904-287-3887 / 352-816-0406(3/4 mile north of the Julington Creek Bridge) Have you received your new Voter Information Card? Approximately 140,000 registered voters in St. Johns County have been mailed new Voter Information Cards. Currently, 20,000 cards have been returned to the Elections O ce by the United States Postal Service as undeliverable. Voters who have not received their cards or who need to make changes to their voter record are encouraged to update their information on-line at www.votesjc.com, by calling the Elections O ce at 823-2238 or in person at the Supervisor of Elections O ce at 4455 Avenue A, Suite 101 in St. Augustine. Voters are reminded that as a result of the recent redistricting, their voting information has changed. The Supervisor of Elections asks that voters please verify their information before going to vote. The voter information card contains the address, party a liation, polling location and district information. Note: when voting in person a voter information card is not required. The law requires photo and signature ID. Any voter without proper ID can still vote, but is required to vote a provisional ballot. For more elections information, please visit www.votesjc. com or call 823-2238. With so many looking for jobs and the opportunities out there limited, many are considering opening their own business. Working for yourself, setting your own hours and calling the shots are appealing. But what about managing your money? Working for yourself o ers exibility, but it also presents unique nancial challenges. Whether you are currently an independent contractor in todays work force or just considering making the leap to entrepreneur, here are four quick tips to help you plan your nancial future. Manage your cash ow: Its so important to be prepared to deal with periods of uneven cash ow. To ensure you always have money reserves, develop a budget that allows for swings in your income. Determine an average of how much revenue you can count on each month and use that as a base for monthly expenses. During months that you earn more, resist the urge to splurge. Instead, stash away extra cash in an interest-earning savings account or money market account. Also, when setting up your budget, consider paying yourself a set salary and keeping your personal and business cash in separate accounts. These steps alone will greatly simplify your life when tax time rolls around. Keep Uncle Sam happy: As an independent contractor, you should receive a Form 1099-MISC from every organization that pays you $600 or more during the tax year. But, you should also keep your own records on what you receive because the income is taxable whether or not you receive a Form 1099-MISC. Since no taxes are withheld, you will need to calculate the amount you owe. Now is the time to invest in a good tax software program or line up a good tax advisor. The IRS website (www.irs.gov) also has guidelines on calculating quarterly tax payments. Keep in mind, you will also have to pay your own Social Security and Medicare taxes. The good news is that the self-employed enjoy many unique tax breaks. Contributions to retirement plans, health insurance premiums, travel costs and o ce-related expenses may be deductible. Your personal tax advisor can help you determine which deductions are applicable to your business. Prioritize protection planning: When working for yourself, its up to you to provide your own health, disability and life insurance to protect your business and your family. At the very least, you should have enough coverage to protect against potential loss of income due to illness or disability, medical and dental expenses not covered by government health plans, and potential medical expenses while you travel. You may also need to boost your home insurance coverage or purchase liability insurance if you have a home-based business. Your best bet is to speak to a licensed nancial professional or accountant to determine how much coverage you really need. Invest in your future: Its never too soon, or too late for that matter, to start saving for retirement. Fortunately, the government a ords the selfemployed many generous tax breaks when it comes to retirement accounts. There are a number of retirement accounts for business owners, including the traditional IRA, Roth Ira, Keogh plan, Simple-Ira, SEPIRA and the Solo 401(k) Pro t Sharing Account that you can consider. Working for yourself can be both exciting and overwhelming, with many new challenges to face, and an equal number of opportunities. Developing a strategy that will help address your goals for economic security and success is an important step to your success. For additional information, please contact judson.mallini@ prudential.com.One of the most common question presented to me by customers is should I le a claim? My answer is always the same. It depends. Deciding to pay out of pocket or le an insurance claim is not always clear. You purchased insurance for lifes unexpected events, but sometimes you need the advice of your agent to guide you on when to le a claim. An insurance claim is a request to an insurance company to pay a loss. Once reported, the claim initiates an evaluation process to determine if the loss is the responsibility of your insurance company to contractually cover and pay. However, keep in mind the purpose of insurance for consumers is to protect them from nancial disaster, not small expenses. Common sense sets these guidelines. Do le if 1. The loss is large. Experts agree it is not wise to make small claims although the very de nition of small varies. Is it $500? $1,000? It depends on what you can a ord to pay out of pocket. 2. You have not had recent claims. Filing a single claim may have no e ect on your auto or homeowners premiums. (Accident forgiveness) 3. Injuries are involved. If there is a chance someone else in the incident could claim injury, le the claim to protect yourself from an injury lawsuit. In Florida, your own injury bills are payable by your own auto insurance company so if you went to the hospital or received a doctors treatment, I advise to le a claim. 4. You have had the policy with the same company for a few years. Longtime customers who make few or no claims generally will get more leniency then new customers who le claims. Do not le if 1. Your deductible is higher then the value of your claim. Many times it is best to have a damage estimate in hand before calling the insurance company claims o ce. 2. You have had other recent claims and your damage is small. Unfortunately, multiple claims in a short period of time will sometimes trigger rate increases or policy cancellation. Your agent is a valuable resource. A call for help or advice can be a way to eliminate frustration and save money! For additional information, please contact varsity@ fdn.com.Wanted: your updated address Smart money tips for the self-employedBy Contributing Writer Judson Mallini, Financial Planner, CFP, CLU, Prudential Financial Planning ServicesWhen should I le an insurance claim?By Contributing Writer Bob Ebersberger, President, Varsity Insurance Inc Lunar PhasesLast Quarter: August 9 New: August 17 First Quarter: August 24 Full: August 31 Businessnot as bigas it used to be?Call for a free consultation & well work at increasing your business!The CreekLineLinda Gay 287-4913

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 13 Before After Wallace & Gari, D.D.S. Gus J. Gari, D.D.S. 1631 Racetrack Road Suite 104 St. Johns, Florida 32259 904-287-0033 St. Johns(904) 429-0290World Golf VillageNOW OPEN(904) 342-4994www.atlasphysicaltherapy.comMandarin ( 904 ) 292-0195 If you experience any of these symptoms, ask your doctor for a referral to Atlas Physical Therapy. Have you ever leaked (even a little) urine? Animal Medical Clinic at St. Johns2245-102 County Road 210W 904-827-1401 40% OFFYour Pets First Exam NEW CLIENTS ONLY A new concept salon has arrived here in the Mandarin/ NW St. Johns County area. This eclectic world style hair salon has a beautiful photography studio located right inside. What could be better than your stylist doing your hair and make-up; then stepping into a photo shoot for family portraits, senior pictures, pre and post baby pictures or maybe a mother and daughter photo shoot just for fun? This concept came from Anetta Nadolna Wilkerson. Driven by her passion for photography, Wilkersons business has been so successful that she needed to nd a larger space to work her magic behind the camera. In purchasing the photography studio she realized the potential to incorporate her other passions: hair styling and make-up, which she has been doing full time for many years. It just made so much sense to combine both enterprises in one place: the Art n Illusion Salon and Studio. The hair salon is made up of four stylists, a receptionist and a nail technician. All are previously of Paradise Hair Designs and have worked side by side for many years. The response to this new salon and studio has been overwhelmingwhereas people used to plan pictures for special occasions, coordinating hair up-dos and make up with their photo session, now everything is conveniently located in one place. For instance, students getting senior photos have a variety of photographic opportunities including di erent out ts, hairstyles and even make up. Finally, the accessibility of this symbiotic union of artistic talents has resulted in some clients of Art n Illusion simply having pictures taken to upload on Facebook, use for passports or just to give a piece of themselves to a loved one. Be sure to look for their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!University of Georgia alumnus D. Andrew Dill joined his alma mater in a professional capacity as he became its newest director of federal relations, e ective July 30. Dill will replace previous director J. Gri n Doyle, who was promoted to vice president for government relations at UGA in 2011. The director of federal relations position will be based in Washington, D.C., where Dill currently lives. Since April 2011, he has served as General Electric Companys manager of government relations and policy. He started with General Electric in its experienced commercial leadership program in 2009 after working as a regional representative for United States Senator Johnny Isakson from 2007 to 2009. Andrew is an accomplished professional in both the public and private sector as well as a devoted UGA alumnus, said Doyle, to whom Dill will report. His energy, expertise and contacts, along with his experiences with Senator Isakson and General Electric, will give UGA a much greater presence in our nations capital. As director, Dill will be responsible for planning, coordinating and executing university priorities with the federal government that enhance the universitys research, instruction and outreach missions. He is the universitys principal liaison with the Congress, federal departments and agencies, as well as with higher education associations and related advocacy groups. In addition to coordinating UGAs government relations program and assisting with the development and implementation of the universitys federal agenda, Dill will help connect faculty and administrators with key elected and appointed o cials, including coordinating visits for both groups in Washington and Athens. Dill is currently on the executive committee of the UGA Alumni Association Board of Directors. He is chairman of the UGA 40 Under 40, a member of the Georgia State Society and a member of the Leadership Athens class of 2009. Dill graduated with a double major from the UGA Terry College of Business and Check out areas newest concept salon University of Georgia appoints new director of federal relationsSchool of Public and International A airs in 2006. He holds bachelors degrees in risk management and insurance and in political science. He also received a certi cate in organizational leadership while at UGA. Dill is a 2002 graduate of Bartram Trail High School. His mother, Debbie, is a sixth grade math teacher at Fruit Cove Middle School. His father, David, is the vice president of marketing for Gate Petroleum Company. They are long time St. Johns County residents.Members of the Scenic Highway Management Council are presently enjoying the summer but were still moving forward with some of our projects. The project ranking accomplished during our last meeting has helped us move forward to develop scopes of service documents required for us to determine costs and budgets to complete the projects. When reconvening in September, well be geared to make decisions to meet our 2012 objectives. In the July issue of The CreekLine I outlined the priority list of projects were attempting to fund and complete and Im very pleased to say this has created a lot of interest on the part of The CreekLines readers who have asked for membership brochures and/or volunteer their services. This interest is much appreciated and we look forward to growing community interest in our work. Anyone interested in joining the William Bartram Scenic Highway organization to help protect and preserve the intrinsic and historic resources along the scenic highway should request a membership brochure by calling 287-5577 or e-mail alabbat@bellsouth.net Memberships start at $15 for students and seniors. Corporate sponsorships are also available. Our next regular meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. on September 13, 2012 at the County Annex at 725 Flora Branch Boulevard. See you then.William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway updateBy Contributing Writer Al Abbatiello, alabbat@bellsouth.net WWW WWWwww.TheCreekLine.comVisit our website:We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit.~Aristotle Are you a...Small Business?Medium Business?Large Business?Use your advertising dollars wisely!Contact Linda Gay today!287-4913LG@RTPublishinginc.com

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Page 14, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com Fellows of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Full service care of women including: Annual Exams Endometrial Ablation No-incision Tubal Ligation In-office Surgery Advanced Laparoscopic Surgery Robotic Surgery Urinary IncontinenceComplete Obstetric Care, including High Risk PregnancyMenopausal Care Baptist Division 1Dr. Wade Barnes Dr. W. David Boyd Dr. Lindsay DeNicola Foutz Dr. Caron D. Gutovitz Dr. Catherine J. McIntyre Dr. Neil Sager Dr. Mary Ellen Wechter Joette Anderson A.R.N.P. Lisa Rhoad, A.R.N.P. Reagan Thomas, A.R.N.P.904-399-4862 12110 San Jose Boulevard Jacksonville, FL 32223 836 Prudential Drive, Suite 1202 Jacksonville, FL 32207 Nowis the timeto make your move. Conventional and Jumbo Loans USDA Rural Developement Construction to Perm FHA and VA Loans Condo Loans Fixed or Adjustable Rates First Federal offers: All loans subject to credit underwriting and approval. Please contact a mortgage originator for more details on available loan programs. Contact Scott Neeley ~Saturdays~ Alpine Groves Park 10am to 2pmSt. Johns River Farmers Market~Grand Opening Saturday, August 25 ~2060 SR 13, Switzerland, FL 32259 ~info: St.JohnsRiverFarmersMarket@gmail.com & www.facebook/St.JohnsRiverFarmersMarketVendor Info: 904-347-8900Local produce, baked goods, cheese, delicacies, art, crafts, kids activities, live music & more! A medically fragile child has unique needs that require skilled medical attention. This child may need apnea monitoring, oxygen administration, tube feedings, IV medication, tracheostomy care or ventilator management. Whether temporary or short term, this means nancial and time commitment from parents who may have to hire in-home nursing care or otherwise postpone work or studies to stay home full time and attend to these needs. It also usually means social isolation for the child. In Florida, these families have another answer a littleknown solution, which happens to also be 100 percent covered by Medicaid, for those who are eligible. Florida has passed legislation and initiated a Prescribed Pediatric Extended Care program (PPEC) to provide a cost e ective alternative to private duty nursing or institutionalization and reduce the isolation As is always the trend in Jacksonville, musical and theatrical events are limited during the summer. We are fortunate however to have the Alhambra, which continues to o er a variety of theatrical experiences. As many of you know, the Alhambra was saved from extinction in 2009 by Craig Smith, who not only greatly improved the ambience of the gem of a dinner theatre facility, but has also offered some outstanding theatrical presentations accompanied by gourmet meals! On a recent visit, I was brought up to date on what is going on this summer. Currently a family-oriented production of The Wizard of Oz is being presented. What is special about this is the fact that the Alhambra has chosen to share its success by identifying it as a fundraiser for the Northeast Florida Community Hospice. From July 25 to August 19, the theatre will present Jason Petty in Hank and my Honky Tonk Heroes. Taking one back to the beginnings of country music, it will make you smile and make you cry as it retells the story of Hank Williams tragic and too short life. Jason Petty has been acclaimed nationally for his presentation, including ve nominations for the New York best actor award. September 5 to October 7 will see a complete change of pace when the Alhambra features Joyce DeWitt in a drama about a middle-aged couple who appear to be living the ideal life. An unexpected appearance by a former boyfriend turns their lives upside down. October 18 to November 25 will change the mood again when Phantom, a di erent version of Phantom of the PPECs o er a less costly alternative to in-home nursing carethat homebound children may experience. Caregiver Services, Inc. (CSI), a leading provider of caregiving services and Floridas largest nurse registry, has been a pioneer in this program and developed meticulously appointed centers through its CSI-Special Care division to provide medical and therapeutic care in a friendly and nurturing environment. Licensed and regulated by the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA), CSIs PPEC centers are sta ed by highly skilled and quali ed nursing professionals and therapists, and o er up to 12 hours of daily health-focused care and therapy services. Already successfully operating in the southern part of Florida, CSI has opened centrally located centers in Jacksonville, near the downtown Wolfson Childrens Hospital and in Fruit Cove, just south of Mandarin. For the surrounding communities, convenient transportation to and from these centers is available. My grandson has a tracheostomy and a feeding tube and has received specialized attention from the nurses at CSI-Special Care, said Janice Chappell, grandmother and caregiver to a patient. Therapies for my grandson are received right there in the center and the nurses are very attentive. They have actually helped in the progression of my grandsons mobility. I know that I can drop him o in the mornings and be con dent that he is receiving the best care possible. Pediatric physicians are turning to PPECs as solutions for their patients and prescribing their services. The PPECs represent a less costly alternative to in-home care or hospitalization and provide social stimulation and peer interaction in a daycare setting. Our PPECs are not only for medically-complex children who have conditions more chronic in nature. Though we certainly have the skilled sta to manage these conditions, many of our patients require less complex supervision such as apnea monitoring or administration of small amounts of oxygen, routines that are not handled at regular daycares due to liability issues, explained Jane Park, RN, Director of Pediatric Services at CSI. Some of our children simply need three or six-month skilled observation, perhaps because of feeding issues or a failure to thrive. CSIs Fruit Cove PPEC can take children by the hour, by the day, by the week or on a longer-term basis. In addition to Medicaid, Private Pay is also accepted. Many stay-at-home parents nd great comfort in leaving their medically dependent child for the day under the care of skilled, compassionate nursing, while they run errands or have a respite. The PPECs operated by CSI are not only ful lling a much underserved need in the St. Johns and Duval communities. At the Fruit Cove location, they are also fostering better pediatric nursing care. CSI works with local nursing education programs to use the PPEC as part of their pediatric clinical rotation. Our CSI nurses working at the PPEC talk and teach, as they perform their routines, to provide nursing students rotating through our center an in-depth understanding of the care of medically-complex children, stated Park. Look for their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!Encore!The Alhambra brightens summer entertainmentBy Betty Swenson Bergmark, Professor Emeritus, Jacksonville UniversityOpera will be presented. This one is unique in that it begins the story early in the life of the phantom, with many twists along the way. And then of course the holiday season will be celebrated November 28 to December 24 with the presentation of White Christmas, a tradition for more than 20 years at the Alhambra. No description of the programs being o ered would be complete without mention of the superb food one gets to enjoy as part of the celebration. After much consideration, the bu et was eliminated. Plated service at ones table is now the routine. The menu is planned to compliment the current production and includes a choice of two or three salads, three entrees and three desserts. All food is prepared under the supervision of Executive Chef De Juan Roy. You can expect a gourmet meal! For additional information you can call 641-1212 or visit the web at www.alhambrajax. com. Genealogy ClubSat., August 11 2 pm Bartram Trail Library Genealogy is a very ful lling hobby! For additional information, please call 827-6960. The CreekLineNW St. Johns Countys community newspaper Everybody Gets It. Everybody Reads It.editor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 15 Green low impact pest control service Children and pet safe Licensed and InsuredKeiths Pest LLCHave you ever asked yourself, what is worst, the bugs inside my house or the chemicals used to treat them? Keiths Pest offers a Green, Low Impact, organic based pest control service, that includes not only the outside, but the inside also. It is effective and works as well and sometimes better than other pesticides. $25.00 off rst treatment $100.00 off termite treatment FREE Consultation Thousands of northeast Florida girls and boys have danced through the halls of Mark Spivaks Dance Institute and Dance Extension. Many danced as Sugar Plums as years of Nutcracker ballets have been performed in Jacksonville with Mark Spivaks artistic hand involved. How did our area garner such talent as Mark and Alisa Spivak? I had the grand dame assignment this month of getting to sit down with the Spivaks as we relived those years when their long-awaited arrival to the First Coast became a reality. Mark Spivak graduated from the Institute of Culture and Arts in Kiev, Ukraine as a teacher, choreographer and business administrator. Beginning a dancing career at age 12, he had performed throughout the Soviet Union and abroad with the Ukrainian Concert Organization, the Russ Concert Organization and was the principal dancer of the Red Army Ensemble. Alisa Spivak had achieved a degree in gymnastic coaching and physical therapy from the Academy of Physical Culture. Mark and Alisa Spivak married in 1976. Upon Alisa Spivaks insistence, they made application in 1978 to leave the Soviet Union, as her lifetime dream was to live in the United States of America. After giving birth to their rst child, Stacie, she wanted to see this dream come to fruition. Their waiting period of over a year was a tough one with much persistence from the government to change their mind. But ultimately they were released to make application to y to America. So here they came, but to Jacksonville, Florida? Yes, says Mark Spivak. I had a cousin who lived in Jacksonville so here we came; we ew directly to Jacksonville! Mark Spivak continued, My cousin helped us get an apartment in Jacksonville and he had met one of the greatest dancer teachers at that time, Dulce Anaya. He introduced me to Dulce who was born in Cuba and was an immigrant to this country also, so she gave me a few classes to teach and I When the Spivaks came to America!By Donna Keathley 1979 The Spivaks arrive in Jacksonville.was o and running! I needed some money to pay rent and buy a car. Alisa Spivak also hit the ground running; she went to work as a physical therapist for a local physician. So their life in America began, but it was not so easy as neither spoke any English! Mark Spivak remembers that there was no time for speech classes and such. He relied on the International Dance language of French for his communications at work; what he could not say in French he would demonstrate by physically dancing it out. In just a matter of three months the Spivaks opened their own dance school located in the Hendricks Avenue area; that was 22 years ago. They now have two locations in the Julington Creek area and one in Mandarin. They run nine dance oors all at the same time totaling 146 dance classes per week. They also give the community more opportunities to be physically t by leasing out their space for other activities like Jazzercise, Zumba, cheerleading, etc. Alisa Spivak recalls the day that they received their United States citizenship in downtown Jacksonville. It was a really exciting day, it was really big! But I also remember how fast I wanted to get home as I was on the verge of delivering my second child, Andrew, she said as she chuckled. Mark and Alisa Spivak made their last move nine years ago when they moved from Mandarin into Julington Creek Plantation. Jacksonville has been very good to me and Alisa, its the classic American Dream. America helps anyone who helps themselves! Mark Spivak proudly states. Advertise inThe CreekLineIts good for business!287-4913LG@rtpublishinginc.com

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Page 16, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com Accepting and Selling furniture (living room, dining room, bedroom, etc) Home decor (lamps, rugs, artwork, tchotchke) New items arrive daily. We are ready to accept your entire house, estate, etc. We also oer inventory liquidation service for builders, home and furniture industry businesses, etc. For More Information call: 880 8448or email us at: ENCOREDECOR@bellsouth.net10830 San Jose Boulevard ( across from Walmart)Visit us online at: www.EncoreDecorFL.comWE OFFER FREE PICKUP SERVICE FOR APPROVED ITEMSHours: Jacksonvilles Largest Upscale Consignment Store H Helping Hands of St. Johns County will meet on Friday, August 30 at 11:00 a.m. at Faith Community Church Community Center on County Road 210 next to Cimarrone. The Rippers from Sew Much Comfort will meet at 10:00 a.m. This volunteer organization will be working on their holiday project, Helping Heroes Families. This holiday season the group will be adopting several local military families from bases located in the area. Anyone wishing to take a star with a child/ adult name and purchase a small gift is encouraged to take one. The festive red/white and blue bows and stars will have Ammon John Bennion, of Boy Scout Troop 180 sponsored by the Julington Creek congregation of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, recently earned the rank of Eagle Scout, the highest achievement in Boy Scouting. The award was presented to him during a Court of Honor ceremony on Sunday, July 15, 2012.On June 30, Detachment 383 of the Marine Corps League, Oldest City Detachment of St. Augustine made a Hot Dog / Hamburger Landing near St. George Street and Cathedral Place. This is one of many events whereby Detachment 383 raises funds to support the Marine Corps Toys for Tots program, Young Marines, scholarship programs, Canes for Veterans, Marine for Life programs and Wounded Warriors. It must be said, Mission accomplished and the situation was well in hand (and also on a bun). The Detachment wants to thank all of those who stopped by to support this event. Semper Fi!The Marines have landed! Helping Hands updateBy Contributing Writer Jackie ValyouLocal scout earns Eagle Scout AwardBy Contributing Writer Darlene BarringtonFor his Eagle project Bennion designed and built an after-hours donation box for the Haven Hospice Attic store located on Wells Road in Orange Park. Sales of donations from this store bene t those who need help paying for hospice services. Members of his scout troop, along with his family and several friends from the community, worked approximately 150 hours and completed the project on May 28. Zerorez Carpet Cleaning donated use of their trucks and labor to raise funds for materials. Bennion is a 14 year old ninth grader at Creekside High School. Along with scouting, he enjoys basketball, sur ng, rock climbing, reading and gaming. His future plans include college and serving a two year mission for his church. His three older brothers and his father are also Eagle Scouts. age, gender, sizes and interests of person, even pets! The families that will receive these gifts endure long separations from their brave loved ones as they ght to keep our country safe. This is our way of saying thank you. Patriotic trees will be located at Golf Club of South Hampton, First Florida Credit Union, Faith Community Church, St. Johns Golf and Country Club and at the Cascades. All gifts will be distributed by the chaplains at the bases. Any neighborhood association, business, girl or boy scout troop that would like to help by taking a few families are encouraged to contact jacqphil@aol.com. Last year with the help of the community, over 800 Stockings for a Soldier were sent to those ghting in Iraq and Afghanistan. Also on August 30, Helping Hands members will be serving a meal through Dining with Dignity. All food donations for this meal were made possible by the Newcomers Club of North St. Johns. Last month the group with the help of its members, the Knights of Columbus at San Juan Del Rio, Boy Scout Troops 280 and 287 and their leaders, prepared and served a summer barbeque to nearly 100 in St. Augustine. All had a great time and enjoyed a fresh cooked meal. Thanks to all who helped or donated to Helping Hands for this project. Dining with Dignity provides a hot meal 365 days of the year to the homeless in St. Augustine. Helping Hands is a volunteer organization that does a small project for the community once a month. They meet the last Friday of each month at Faith Community Church Community Center. The group is non-denominational and all are welcome. There are no dues, o cers or stress. The group relies solely on donations of goods and services. Members come when they can and do what they can with what is donated. For more information, please contact jacqphil@aol. com.Ladies from Helping Hands presenting new school clothes which members donated for Crookshank Elementary. Pictured are Rachel Johnson, Darlene Barrington, Lorraine Elliott, Sarah Bradley (of First Florida Credit Union which donated the bags), Bailey Benoit (guidance counselor at Crookshank School) and Terri OConnell. Thirty-two children received clothing, shoes, socks, underwear and school supplies.got news?editor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 17 FOR ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMMISSIONISTRICTEPUBLICAN Sambursky Chiropractic, LLCDr. Bruce Sambursky, Chiropractic Physician683-4376 12421 San Jose Blvd. #300 (just South of Solantic )Serving the Mandarin and Julington Creek area. www.backbonejax.com 23 Years Experience Accepting most insurance and Cash paying patients.Immediate same day appointments available. Jane Moore, Licensed Massage Therapist ( LMT # 0023441)Massage Therapist on StaTHE PATIENT OR PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE S, EXAMINATIONS OR TREATMENT. ChiropractorStop suffering from: Open Saturdays Parents of autistic children will soon have a supportive environment in which to share their feelings, ideas and treatment options, thanks to a $1000 Investing In You grant from Community First Credit Union. The grant will help launch The S.T.A.R. group, named for the bene ts the group will bring its members: support, teaching, advocacy and respect. School grades released in early July show that the St. Johns County School District has maintained its ranking as one of the top performing districts in the state. St. Johns County had 16 A schools, seven B schools and two C schools. Eleven elementary schools, four middle schools and the districts only K-8 school were A schools this year. With the constant changes in the criteria, school grades have become a much less reliable measure of school success, said Superintendent Dr. Joseph Joyner. We are much more focused on the growth of each individual child. In spite of these changes, our students met the challenge and I could not be more proud. The 11 elementary schools retaining their A status, include Cunningham Creek Elementary, Durbin Creek Elementary, Hartley Elementary, Hickory Creek Elementary, R. B. Hunt Elementary, Julington Creek Elementary, Mill Creek Elementary, Ocean Palms Elementary, PVPV/Rawlings ElementaBefore those yellow school busses start pulling through our subdivisions her in North Florida we should all execute a plan for a nal ing. This could be a short day trip around our area not an expensive day but a fun one. So I pulled out my favorite planning guide out of the bookcase and I will share some ideas with you. A fun St. Augustine thing to do is to go to the Lightner Museum. A morning can be whiled away in the cool air perusing the artifacts gathered there. Do not miss viewing the antiquated spa area with equipment dating back to 1889 when it rst opened as the Alcazar Casino and Bath Hotel. Then lunch in the pool area is a must.where else can you partake of edibles in a sunken treasure! If museums are your thing go to the Cummer where Tuesdays from 4:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. are free! The Cummer Museum is located at 829 Riverside Avenue in Jacksonville. You could bind this trip together with a Saturday experience at The Lifestyle GuruSummers nal ing!By Joy HartleyNew autism support group to launch through grantCaring for a child with autism is an unknown territory for most parents, said The S.T.A.R. Group creator Liz Zurn. My husband and I felt very alone when our son was diagnosed, but we made a pact that our family would adjust and provide him with the best opportunities to grown and learn. The S.T.A.R. Group will help other families do the same. Zurn has partnered with Little Star Center, a non-pro t school providing education and behavioral services to children diagnosed with autism and other developmental delays, to help her launch the support group. The S.T.A.R. group plans on holding its monthly meetings at Crosswater Community Church in Nocatee beginning this September. The grant will provide educational materials for parents and fund specialized training for childcare volunteers who will attend to the children during the support group meetings. Families with special-needs children have special needs themselves, said John Hirabayashi, CEO of Community First Credit Union. The S.T.A.R. Group will provide these parents with a forum to discuss the challenges that come with raising an autistic child and give them the opportunity to lean on each other for strength. The S.T.A.R. Group is the fth winner of six grants that are available through the 2012 Investing in You campaign. The initiative launched in April inviting anyone with an idea to make the First Coast a better place to participate. The credit union awards $1,000 every two weeks for 90 days, with the last winner being chosen July 13. Semi- nalists are chosen based on which ideas receive the most likes, with a panel selecting the winners that will receive grant funding from Community First. Learn more about The S.T.A.R. Group on the Community First Facebook page, www.Facebook.com/CommunityFirstCreditUnion or www. InvestingInYouContest.com. the Riverside Arts Market just down the street. This would de nitely be a day of ne arts, crafts, live music and good food! If you have never been to the Ponce de Leon Fountain of Youth in St. Augustine there is no excuse not to visit! St. Johns County residents can tour for free. This is a legendary sport where old Ponce landed here in the New World. There are lots of history and Indian artifacts that older children love to see. Another great trip is to spend the day a little south of St. Augustine down ole A1A. Make your rst stop at Marineland for a new hands on marine experience to include swimming with the sh. Then turn left and pull into Washington Oaks State Park for a wonderful shady picnic spot under century old oak trees. Take the nature walk after lunch and see an old cistern, a gorgeous rose garden and beautiful sh ponds. A bonus with your entrance fee (a whopping $7 per car) is that you can park and swim in the ocean across the street in the parks beach area. If vintage shopping is your thing there are many non-pro t groups who have gently used items for sale in their thrift stores. An entire day can be spent lea ng through stores from Beach Boulevard to Clay County. Dont forget the upscale Goodwill shop in Ponte Vedra called the Bluetiqueits fab! Speaking of picnicking, heres my friend Marys great Blonde Brownie recipe. Its easyno mixer neededand everyone loves them! Blonde Brownies 1 cup butter, melted 1 cup packed brown sugar Add 1 egg 1 tsp. vanilla Stir in: tsp. baking power, 1/8 tsp. baking soda, tsp. salt and 1 cup our. Pour mixture into 9x9 greased pan. Sprinkle top with M&Ms, Heath Chips or chocolate chips, Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes. St. Johns County school grades releasedry, Timberlin Creek Elementary and Wards Creek Elementary. The four middle schools with an A status are Fruit Cove Middle, Landrum Middle, Pacetti Bay Middle, and Switzerland Point Middle. Also receiving an A is Liberty Pines Academy (K-8). Schools receiving a B include Ketterlinus Elementary, Mason Elementary, Osceola Elementary, South Woods Elementary, Murray Middle, Sebastian Middle and Gamble Rogers Middle. Schools receiving a C include Crookshank Elementary and The Webster School. The commitment and dedication of our students, teachers, parents, administrators and support sta is evident and I am very appreciative of their hard work, he added. These high marks are proof that our focus remains on outstanding performance and as always we will continue to look for ways to improve. It is gratifying to see that our e orts are re ected in this years grades. High school grades are expected to be released later this year. Liz Zurn, creator of The S.T.A.R. Group, recently accepted a $1,000 grant from Community First Credit Unions Investing in You contest to launch The S.T.A.R. Group, a support group for parents of autistic children. WOW!Shouldnt YOUR ad be in The CreekLine too? 287-4913sales@thecreekline.com

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Page 18, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com For Appointment Call904-230-0080 NEW LOCATION! 485 State Road 13Suite 3 (Next to Burger King) Dr. Thomas Lahmannwww.julingtoncreekchiro.com Is Back or Neck Pain Impacting Your Life? Dr. Thomas Lahmann Chiropractic PhysicianHumana Beech Street A Proud Participating Provider for Aetna and Blue Cross / Blue Shield United Insurance Plans Accepts All Auto Insurance Julington Creek Chiropractic & Wellness Center P.A.SpineMedTM Spinal Disc DecompressionA Safe and Pain-Free Procedure Designed for Back & Neck pain Non-Surgical, Drug Free Procedures for: Healy Homeworks Call Dan Healy Cell: 904-228-6900 dandeman@comcast.netExcellent References Available We would like to thank all our customers for helping us get established and look forward to working with you again over the next ten years. Celebrating 16 successful years in Mandarin/Fruit Cove Tree WorkbyMitch Drake & Sons (904) 703-5040 (904) 287-3819Licensed, Insured & Workmans CompOver 35 Years Experience C heck out our reviews and 5 Star rating at Yellowbook.com Saint Augustine Ballet will be holding auditions for their 2012 production of The Nutcracker at Abellas Studio on Saturday, August 18, 2012. Dancers age eight and up who are currently studying ballet are invited to audition. Auditions are open to all students of ballet regardless of dance studio a liations. Dancers must commit to the weekly rehearsal schedule. Visit www.saintaugustineballet. com for more complete audition information. The Nutcracker performances will take place on Saturday, December 15 at 2:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. A Sunday matinee will be performed on December The members and families of the Rotary Club of Bartram Trail gathered on Saturday, June 30 to celebrate completion of another wonderful Rotary year! Outgoing President Frank Gwaltney passed the gavel to incoming President Thomas Carroll. Pins were exchanged from Past President Jamie Mackey to now Past President Frank Gwaltney with enthusiasm. Gwaltney shared his The number of students in the St. Johns County School District taking Advanced Placement (AP) exams last year increased by 14 percent and the number of exams taken by students increased by 17 percent. Students scoring high enough to qualify for college credit rose by 6 percent. This continues the districts and state trend of in-St. Augustine Ballet announces Nutcracker auditions AP scores and number of students taking exams increasecreasing numbers of test-takers and exams. The AP program enables students to take collegelevel courses while still in high school. In spring 2012, 3,204 St. Johns County high school students took 6,248 AP exams. Of the total number taken, 58.5 percent received a grade high enough to qualify for college credit. The district also saw an increase in the participation of minority groups. There was an 8 percent increase in the number of African-American students taking AP exams and a 10 percent increase in the number of exams they took. In addition, there was a 13 percent increase in the number of Hispanic students taking AP exams and a 23 percent increase in the number of exams they took. Typically, a large increase in the number of tests taken would be accompanied with a drop in scores; however, we continue to increase our success rate, said Superintendent Dr. Joseph Joyner. I am very proud of the number of students taking the AP exams and the number of exams they are taking. We continue to score above the state average both in the number of exams taken and in the amount of students scoring high enough for college credit. These numbers represent the dedication of our students as well as the e orts and vision of our high school principals, guidance counselors and teachers. AP courses taken for college credit by St. Johns County students include Art History; Biology; Calculus AB and BC; Chemistry; English Language and Composition; English Literature and Composition; Environmental Science; European History; Human Geography; Languages including Chinese, French, Latin and Spanish; Macroeconomics; Microeconomics; Music Theory; Physics B; Physics C Electricity and Magnetism; Physics C Mechanics; Psychology; Spanish Literature; Studio Art Drawing and 2-D and 3-D Design, United States Government and Politics, United States History and World History.Rotary Club of Bartram Trail welcomes new board 16 at 2:00 p.m. in the Lewis Auditorium at Flagler College (formerly known as Flagler College Auditorium.) Dancers must wear proper ballet attire: black leotard, pink tights with hair in a bun for females and black pants and a white shirt for males. Auditions for female solos will be done on pointe. All dancers must bring a headshot. Female dancers should also bring a photo in First Arabesque. A non-refundable $25 fee audition will be charged at the time of registration. Please bring cash or make checks out to Saint Augustine Ballet. The Rotary Club of Bartram Trail 2011-12 board: Thomas Carroll, vice president/president elect; Jason Mitchell, secretary; Frank Gwaltney, president; Rick Stobe, treasurer and Amanda Leahy, sergeant at arms.appreciation for an active and committed board throughout the year and Carroll motivated the team to look towards the future and build on a solid foundation of service for our club. Carol Higley was recognized as Rotarian of the Year. Several club service projects for the year bene ted Hastings migrant workers, Mandarin Food Bank, Marine Toys for Tots, PolioPlus Eradication, St. Augustine Youth Services, St. Johns County Homeless Students, St. Johns County teachers, St. Johns County veterans, St. Vincents HealthCare Mobile Outreach and Wags and Whiskers. Club members also host Rotary Youth Exchange Students from around the globe providing them with the opportunity to learn a new language and experience a new culture while living the Rotary motto, Service Above Self, in our community. On behalf of everyone involved with the Rotary Club of Bartram Trail, we would like to thank Gwaltney for a fabulous year and wish Carroll the best as he takes over the reins for 2012-13! The Rotary Club of Bartram Trail meets weekly on Thursday mornings at 7:30 a.m. at Westminster Woods on Julington Creek. For more information, please contact President Thomas Carroll at tfcarrollusmc@gmail. com. Audition results will be available at www.saintaugustineballet.com by Tuesday, August 21. The August 18 rehearsal schedule is as follows: Eight to 10 years old: Registration from 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. You must be eight years old by September 1, 2012. The eight to 10 year old audition ends at 10:30 a.m. 11 years old and up: Registration is from 10:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Dancers must be 11 years old by September 1, 2012. The eleven and up audition ends at 12:30 p.m. Mother Ginger Tumblers: Females should come dressed in leotard and hair pulled back. Boys should wear black shorts and white t-shirt. Registration will take place from 10:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. and the audition time is from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Audition registration forms are available on the website at www.saintaugustineballet.com. If you have additional questions please contact staugballet@ yahoo.com or call 824-1746. The St. Augustine Ballet is a 501(C)3 nonpro t arts organization. Their mission is to o er St. Johns County dancers the unique opportunity to perform in full-length classical ballets productions. St. Augustine Ballet strives to involve community members of all ages in meaningful dance experiences, whether as a participating dancer or audience member. The St. Johns County Education Foundation (SJCEF) has started its two week long school supply donation drive. The Tools 4 Schools drive will run until August 15 with public and internal donation sites located at select businesses and organizations in the community. Tools 4 Schools is an annual school supply drive that aims to o set teachersa classroom costs. During these next few weeks, the public is welcomed to donate new school supplies through the use of collection bins around St. Johns County and neighboring areas. Tools 4 Schools supply drive kicks o Monetary donations are also accepted, which will be used to purchase additional supply items that are of the highest demand. All of the collected supplies will be delivered to The Bailey Group Resource Depot, the new permanent storage facility for all Tools 4 Schools donations. Teachers will go online to submit a supply request for items needed in their classrooms. The orders will be processed and lled through The Bailey Group Resource Depot and then delivered to teachers. The permanent Tools 4 Schools cont. on pg. 28

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 19 Opening October 2012 42 Doctors Village Dr., Saint Johns, FL www.memorialhospitaljax.com Bro k en An kl e Ast hm m a Att a c c c c c k k k k B urns Stitc h e s Dis l oca t e d S h o ul d d e e e e e e r Brok e B r o k e e n N o o s s s s s e e e e e e e e e A cci d enta l In j u u r r r r r r i i e e e e e e s s s s s The Memorial Emergency Care Center will bring round-the-clock, state-of-the-art emergency care to the Julington Creek are a. Located on Race Track Road, the 12 bed, 11,000 square foot facility will be a full-service ER with a dedicated pediatrics area, which makes it a lot dierent than an urgent care center. We will be able to take care of all of your familys emergency medical needs. 904-765-2020 www .clayeye.comFind us onFacebook Orange Park: 2023 Professional Ctr Dr. Orange Park, FL 32073 904-272-2020 Mandarin: 11790 San Jose Blvd Jacksonville, FL 32223 904-765-2020 Fleming Island: 1615 CR Rd 220, Ste 140 Fleming Island, FL 32003 904-276-2020Three convenient locations to serve you! & Macula Family Its that time of year! Girls Inc. of Jacksonvilles Fall Daddy Daughter Dance will be held Saturday, October 20, 2012 from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at the Renaissance Resort at the World Golf Village. Special dads and daughters have enjoyed this extraordinary event for many years and now it has become a tradition in the Northeast region of Florida. Girls Inc. of Jacksonville is proud to be able to o er such a remarkable event to Northeast Florida, said president and CEO of Girls Inc., Beth Hughes Clark. We are thrilled to see how much the event has grown and how it is become a tradition in many families. Girls Inc. is looking forward to hosting over 500 dads (or special men in their lives) and daughters. The event is $80 for each daddy-daughter Girls Inc. announces fall seasons Daddy Daughter Dancecouple and $30 more for any additional daughters. The festivities will include a delicious dinner, DJ, professional photographs, a silent auction and ra e prizes that will make for a sensational night. Im sure I speak for many fathers that were in attendance and say thank you, Girls Inc. for your e orts and we as fathers support your labors in helping our daughters achieve their potential and realize their individual gifts, talents, uniqueness, strengths and beauty that they possess, said Girls Inc. dad, William Jackson. Girls Inc. of Jacksonville is a nonpro t organization that is dedicated to preparing girls, ages ve through 18, to be self-con dent, responsible and well-rounded individuals. All proceeds from this dance will be put back into the programs that Girls Inc. girls bene t from all year round. They deliver the Girls Inc. national curriculum through their Outreach, AfterSchool, Literacy and Summer programs in Northeast Florida. For more information on the Girls Inc. Daddy Daughter Dance, please visit www. girlsincjax.org or call 731-9933. To register for the Fall Daddy Daughter Dance, please visit www.girlsincjax.org.care items. The groups who have committed include Knights of Columbus Switzerland Council, the Ponte Vedra Rotary Clubs, Shepard of the Woods Lutheran Church, Shores United Methodist Church, Bartram Trail Rotary, Switzerland Community Church, Fruit Cove Baptist Church and St. Johns County United Way. On July 16, a special addition to the dinner occurred when over 30 children in Bible studies at the Baptist church joined in to have some fried chicken and of SEA community members select items donated by Brother Knight of Knights of Columbus Switzerland Council.course the delicious homemade cookies. The atmosphere during each of the monthly dinners is a strong a rmation for the charities of their purpose and the joy it brings to others as well as themselves. Now is the time to tell the rest of the story. This fall is a major milestone for this humble little communityestablished in October 5, 1912, it will celebrate its 100th anniversary. To celebrate, the ladies of the SEA Community have prepared a festival of events during October. SEA community dinners cont from pg. 1

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Page 20, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com Julington Creek Animal Walk is a state-of-the-art pet boarding facility for dogs, cats, and exotics providing: Your pet will nd a welcoming retreat at our 9-acre, fenced, off-leash dog park featuring a bone-shaped swimming pool and our NE Floridas Premier Luxury Pet Resort, Dog Park and SpaConveniently located next to Julington Creek Animal Hospital Stop by for a tour and receive a coupon for a free daily park pass Aordable small dog luxury oasis. Please call for details. Veterinarian Owned and Operated We are a locally owned and operated company that is licensed, bonded, and insured. We have over 19 years of combined experience and unlike other companies in the area our owners are not only actively involved with the day to day operations but also work in the eld running our calls on a daily basis. $300.00 off any Trane system installed by September 1st OR NO CHARGE for Service Calls with any repair on any system!The services that we offer are: air conditioning systems systems 1st Choice Heating & Air ConditioningMaking Julington Creeks Comfort Our First Priority 904-288-6955 Rotary International is the worlds oldest and most international service organization, with over 1.2 million members in 32,000 clubs in almost 200 countries. Each year, over 8,000 high school students participate in the Rotary Youth Exchange program worldwide, learning a new language and experiencing a new culture, through the e orts of Rotary volunteers around the globe. Over the past eight years the Rotary Youth Exchange program has had the privilege of sending 49 Bartram and Creekside high school students to study abroad. These students have traveled to Belgium, Brazil, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, Estonia, Finland, France, Congratulations to Head Coach Tracy Reed, Assistant Coach Christie Matlosz, the parent board of directors, the Julington Creek Plantation Club Porpoise swimmers and their families for winning the 2012 St. Johns Summer Swim Leagues Championship Meet on Friday, July 20 and Saturday, July 21 at Cecil Field Aquatic Center. The Porpoises, with 182 swimmers ages ve through 18, competed in 78 events to defeat the seven other teams in the league. It was an exciting couple of days and in the end it was the Porpoises who were victorious. Congratulations to Coach Tracy and the entire Porpoise family for such a fantastic and successful season. Congratulations to the 10u Creeks Crushers All Star team for earning a berth to the Southeast Regionals in North Carolina. They are the 2012 Florida State Champion runners-up! They won rst game 21-6 but lost their second game in a heart breaker and had to enter the losers bracket very early in double elimination play. They dug in deep and won six games in a row, averaging a 13-3 score per game before eventually losing the if game to Winter Springs after beating them 12-4 one game earlier to force a third game on that nal Sunday. Congratulations this group of 10u girls from Creeks Athletic Association!Rotary Club of Bartram Trail proud of Exchange StudentsBy Contributing Writer Carol A. HigleyGermany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Norway, Poland, Switzerland, Thailand and Turkey. Kaylin Burgess, Kendall Hale and Sarah Wiegre e are the Rotary Youth Exchange students sponsored by the Rotary Club of Bartram Trail for the 2012-13 year. Burgess, a rising senior at Bartram, will be spending the next year immersed in the Swiss culture as she heads to Zug, Switzerland. Hale, a recent graduate from Creekside and former vice president of the Creekside Interact Club, is spending her foreign exchange year in Warsaw, Poland. Wiegre e, a 2012 graduate from Bartram, will have the opportunity to put her years of studying the French language to use as she spends next year abroad in Strasbourg, France. We wish them well as they represent Rotary and the United States of America in their respective foreign countries. The other side of this exciting program is that we are also able to introduce students from around the world into our schools and our local community. For more information on Rotary Youth Exchange Florida, please visit www.rye orida.org/. The Rotary Club of Bartram Trail meets weekly on Thursday mornings at 7:30 a.m. at Westminster Woods on Julington Creek. For more information, contact President Thomas Carroll at tfcarrollusmc@gmail. com.Julington Creek Plantation Club Porpoises take championship Congratulations Crushers Everybody reads The CreekLine Shouldnt your ad be included?287-4913

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 21 Why do we have more than 30 full-time agents, many of whom have received the prestigious Star Best in Client Satisfaction award multiple times? Why do we back up those agents with a comprehensive support staff, ready and waiting to do everything it takes? Because trust isnt something youre given, its something you earn. Time and time again, year after year, the team at Davidson Realty has earned that trust from our clientsthrough good markets and bad. Now wed like the chance to earn yours. 904-940-5000 | DavidsonRealtyInc.comTRUSTED REAL ESTATE ADVISORS. TRUSTJust ve little letters but a really big word. Oil Change & Rotation $19.99 $20 Off All Alignments $30 Off any Brake Job09-03-12 On Sunday, July 8 at Palm Beach Gardens, 13 eight-yearold baseball players beat out the home team of Palm Beach Gardens for the state championship title in the Cal Ripken Rookie B Division. Since their rst all star tournament in Atlantic Beach in May, the JCB Venom have been undefeated. In their division, the Venom also won the all star tournaments in Julington Creek, Oakleaf, Ocala state quali er and nally the state tournament in Palm Beach Gardens. From the start, Christian Braum, Coleman Bullard, Daniel Cebulko, Parker Cox, Kyle DeLaGrange, Ben Heisner, Declan Hollobaugh, Luke Kaelin, Kylan McClune, Shane Mc Laughlin, Rees Pinto, Jacob Vermeire and Ian Wolcott worked and played hard each and every game, sometimes coming back from de cits of more than eight runs. Mom, we are state champs! yelled Braum as he hugged his mom while holding the trophy that was half his size. However, even without the trophy, these hardworking boys deserved each and every win as they gave 100 percent at all times and never let the steep competition scare them away. Head Coach Scott McLaughlin said, I cannot digest what these boys have done in the last few months. They have overcome every obstacle thrown their way and beat a great array of quality teams locally and at the state tourney level. Assistant coaches Phil Braum and Bryan Wolcott were instrumental in bringing home the state title as well, along with Tim Cebulko, Gerry Vermeire Honoring the Boy Scout slogan, Do a Good Turn Daily, the 11-year-old scouts from Troop 180, sponsored by the Julington Creek congregation of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, spent one morning in July volunteering at Christs Cupboard Community Food Bank. The boys sorted, checked expiration dates and shelved non-perishable food items. The food pantry, located at 810 Roberts Road in Fruit Cove, serves those in the surrounding area. Pictured are Cade Bedell, Troop Committee member JoAnn Danson, Branson Bennion, Matt Bailey, Assistant Scout Master Clark Bailey and Tyler Danson.Service with a smile 8u Venom brings home Cal Ripken State Championshipand Josh Bullard. For more information on JCB Venom and Julington Creek Baseball, contact Scott McLaughlin at scott.mclaughlin@ubs.com or 540-2598. Campers have fun with arts and crafts at Geneva Presbyterian Churchs recent Vacation Bible School (VBS)

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Page 22, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com Janice BequetteAnastasia Mosquito Control Seat 3 www.janicebequette.comPolitical ad approved and paid for by Janice Bequette AMC 3Proven Leadership Proven Fiscal ResponsibilityAdvocate for the environment, health and safety for you, your family, your animals and the visitors to our beautiful County. I ask for your vote Election Day November 6th FOR ST. JOHNS FOR ST. JOHNSDISTRICT 3 DISTRICT 3ELECT ELECTPaid by John R. Ruggeri, Republican, for St. Johns County Commissioner, District 3JOHN R. RUGGERI JOHN R. RUGGERICOUNTY COMMISSIONER COUNTY COMMISSIONER VOTE McCLUREVOTE FOR McCLUREHe will nd new ways of raising revenues through utilities and infrastructure and WILL NOT raise taxes . a promise his competitors will not make!VOTE FOR McCLUREHe will implement local hiring policies to put people back to work while his competitors endorse the same policies from before, bringing in jobs from other regions!VOTE FOR McCLUREHe will implement scal accountability for all departments, just like a successful busines. While his competitors endorse the ever increa ing the budget.VOTE FOR McCLUREHe will NOT give a golden parachute to ANY County employee and will always put this Countys Issues rst, not self proclaimed entitlement!VOTE FOR McCLUREHe will make sure the County can operate like a business, expanding and contracting, creating a more ecient government. Each election cycle we are solicited by prospective candidates with road signs, commercials and interviews as they seek o ces as State Representatives, County Commissioner, United States Congress Representatives and United States Senators. What we are usually lacking is information on the races for the less recognized local boards that oversee the resources we as residents of St. Johns County often take for granted. To help you in making your decisions on the candidates that are seeking positions on these various boards, following is some information about each board. The St. Johns Soil and Water Conservation District (SJSWCD) was begun in 1955 under the authority created by the Soil Conservation Act, Elected local boards are important in this primary electionBy Karl Kennell 2012 Election Dates Polls Open 7 AM 7 PMPrimary Election: August 14, 2012 General Election: November 6, 2012 (Register by October 9, 2012)passed by the Florida Legislature in 1937. SJSWCD was organized to help the landowners and users of St. Johns County to conserve land, water, forests, wildlife and related resources of the county by concerned citizens in St. Johns County. The mission of the board was established to deliver natural resources conservation technology and education to local landowners and users and to promote the wise use of land and best management practices that will conserve, improve and sustain the natural resources of the county. The SJSWCD board of supervisors is a group of elected o cials tasked with the job of addressing the issues that challenge the conserving of the natural resources of the county. It consists of ve supervisors who are non-partisan members. In this election the candidates vying for seats on the board are James Visser and Henry C. Warner for District 3 and running unopposed is Craig Hartwig for District 4. Back in 1955 the impacts on the local resources generally went unnoticed. However today it is di cult to travel anywhere in the county and not observe the challenges facing our natural resources due to growth and technological advancements. These are the observations that make it important that you as an informed voter become familiar with the candidates that are seeking your support to oversee the future of countys natural environment. The St. Augustine Port, Waterway and Beach District was originally established in the late 1930s to ful ll the requirements of local sponsor for the Army Corps of Engineers St. Augustine Inlet project. The district was enabled by the Florida Legislature and approved by a vote of the citizens of the county. The enabling legislation gave the district ad valorem taxing authority as well as a broad range of authority for building warehouses, wharfs, bridges and other structures for the commercial development of the port. The district has title to a number of submerged parcels mostly in and around the St. Augustine harbor area. In 1993 a master plan was established identifying a number of areas that the district should be involved in as to maritime issues. It has become a funding source for a number of important projects, among them: the guide to St. Augustine Waterways, installation and maintenance of channel markers in Salt Run, the harbor patrol in cooperation with the City of St. Augustine Police Department and comprehensive Inlet Management Plan, boat mooring issues, initial studies identifying problems with the Matanzas Bay seawall and repair of the St. Augustine Lighthouse lens. The board is composed of Local boards cont. on pg. 23

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 23 ve at-large commissioners, each serving four-year terms. Election of commissioners occur on staggered election dates, with two commissioners elected for four-year terms in one election year and three commissioners elected for four-year terms the next election year. This year, running in Group 2 are Barry Benjamin and P. Brendan Burke. Running in Group 4 are John Carl Blow, Chuck Hennessey and Robert Kee. If you enjoy the many nautical activities that St. Johns County and St. Augustine have to o er this should be an elected board you should support by becoming familiar with and voting for those who have a direct impact on preserving these amenities. An often overlooked resource in St. Johns County is the Northeast Florida Regional Airport. It is easy to not realize just what an impact it has on our community. The airport is owned and operated by the St. Augustine St. Johns County Airport Authority. In the 1930s the St. Augustine City Commission purchased the initial segments of the current airport location, north of Araquay Park along U.S. Highway 1. As with many other airports, it was taken over by the federal government during the years of World War II for the support of naval aviation activities. Upon the wars end, the facility reverted back to local control. In 1964 a special purpose governmental authority was created by the Florida State Legislature and approved by local voters. At the time, it was named the St. Augustine Airport Authority, but the name has subsequently been changed to the St. Augustine St. Johns County Airport Authority. In addition to the busy activities of Northrop Grumman at the airport, multiple aviation support companies operate from the facility, including several xed-base operators and repair compa-Voter ResponsibilitiesFamiliarize himself or herself with the candidates and issues. Maintain with the of ce of the Supervisor of Elections a current address. Know the location of his or her polling place and its hours of operation. Bring proper identi cation to the polling station. Familiarize himself or herself with the operation of the voting equipment in his or her precinct. Treat precinct workers with courtesy. Respect the privacy of other voters. Report any problems or violation of election laws to the Supervisor of Elections. Ask questions, if needed. Make sure that his or her completed ballot is correct before leaving the polling station. Vote as you please......but please VOTE! Local boards cont. from pg. 22nies. Recently there has been construction of a new general aviation terminal, an air tra c control tower and several new corporate hangers. In addition to these activities the airport plays host to the Aerospace and Science and Aeronautics programs which St. Augustine High School has partnered with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University to o er to 10th and 11th grade students. The airport authoritys board of commissioners is composed of ve elected positions. In the upcoming election, seeking the board seat for Group 4 are Matt Mercer and James S. Werter. Running unopposed for the Group 5 seat is Carl A. Youman. This next district board sometimes confuses with its name. The Anastasia Mosquito Control District (AMCD) comes from a humble beginning to combat one of mans worrisome pests encompassing the whole of St. Johns County. Its mission is to preserve and protect the people from mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases by reducing and controlling mosquito populations through environmentally-friendly and cost e ective integrated pest management methods, thus minimizing the negative impacts on people and other living things. The integrated mosquito management methods currently employed by AMCD are comprehensive and speci cally tailored to safely counter each stage of the mosquito life cycle. These methods currently include: larval and adult mosquito sampling, source reduction, biological control using native or introduced predators and parasite of mosquitoes, larviciding and adulticiding, resistance monitoring, disease surveillance in mosquitoes, birds, horses and humans. And most importantly to AMCD is public education with the goal of educating residents of St. Johns County on mosquito biology, ecology, control and prevention. AMCD o ers public outreach programs and presentations, school, programs, on-site tours and eld trips, community service hours, science fair project assistance and paid internships. The overseeing board is composed of ve members. During this election, Faye Armitage, Vivian Browning and Robert T. Smith are vying for Seat 1. District Seat 3 is being sought by Janice Marie Bequette and Edward Randy Covington. Vying for Seat 5 are Gary Howell, Paul Linser and Vernon Tyrone Stroman, Jr. As you familiarize yourself with the big name candidates and races in the upcoming election, dont overlook these important district races. After all each one of these boards oversees aspects of our local lifestyle that help make St. Johns County a great place to live. Did you know?Registered St. Johns County voters as of August 2, 2012: Republican: 80,134 Democrat: 38,479 Other: 32,043 Total: 150,656Source: www.votesjc.com

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Page 24, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com PRIMARY ELECTION August 14, 2012 OPEN TO ALL REGISTERED VOTERS IN ST JOHNS COUNTY Visit www.votesjc.com to prepare. Conrm your address before voting. If your address has changed, please contact the Elections Ofce at 823-2238 to update your address BEFORE going to vote. Vote your Way: Absentee, Early or Election Day! VOTE BY MAIL~Any registered voter may request a ballot by calling the Elections Ofce at 823-2238 or by visiting our website www.votesjc.com. In order for an absentee ballot to be counted, it must be returned to the Supervisor of Elections Ofce by 7 PM on Election Da y. Voted absentee ballots cannot be turned in at the polls. SIGNATURE UPDATE~Any time there is a change in your signature or identifying mark you must complete a new Florida Voter Registration Application and submit it to the Elections Ofce. If your signature on your voter record and the signature on your absentee ballot do not match, your absentee ballot will not count. EARLY VOTING~Voters may cast their ballot at ANY early voting location. DATES & TIMES~August 4th -11th Saturday Saturday Hours: 8 AM 6 PM (Except Sunday August 5th Hours: 11 AM 5 PM)VOTE on Election Day at Your Precinct Polls are open 7 AM 7 PM. When voting on Election Day you MUST vote at the precinct of your legal residence. REMEMBER As a result of the changes necessitated by redistricting, your precinct number may have changed and you may be voting at a new polling location. ON OUR WEBSITE www.votesjc.comFLORIDA IS A CLOSED PRIMARY STATEUNIVERSAL PRIMARY CONTEST nonpartisan ballot all primary ballots within their respective districts Although Florida is a closed primary state, if all candidates for an ofce have the same party afliation and the winner will have no opposition in the general election, all qualied voters, regardless of party afliation, may vote in the primary election for that ofce. State Attorney County Commission District 3 Voting Assistance/Accessible Voting EquipmenttAll polling places are accessible to persons with disabilities and are equipped with accessible voting equipment with an audio ballot feature. HOW TO MAKE YOUR VOTE COUNTYou must completely ll in the oval for your vote to count. Any other mark may not be read by the scanner. EARLY VOTING LOCATIONS Supervisor of Elections Ofce St. Augustine Beach City Hall Southeast Branch Library Ponte Vedra Branch Library Julington Creek Courthouse Annex Hastings Town Hall REMINDERPlease have current & valid Photo & Signature ID ready when voting. If you dont have proper ID, you must vote a provisional ballot. ARE YOU ELECTION READY? Visitwwwvotesjccomtopr KNOW WHERE TO VOTE BEFORE YOU GOFor additional information visit our website by scanning the QR code with your

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 25 What Alec Believes . For US Congress District 6 A Life of Service . Now Ready to Serve You!Paid for by Alec for Congresswww.alecforcongress.usWhat Alec Has Done . The following tips are provided by the St. Johns County Supervisor of Elections, www. votesjc.com. The date of the Primary Election is Tuesday, August 14, 2012. Registration closed for this election on July 16, 2012. Early voting will occur from August 4, 2012 until August 11, 2012. The date of the General Election is Tuesday, November 6, 2012. Registration for this election will close on October 9, 2012. Early voting will take place from October 27, 2012 until November 3, 2012. Check your voter information. Use the link on the website (www.votesjc.com) to check your voter information, including your voter registration, polling place and absentee ballot status. Registration books close 29 days prior to an election. You must register by this deadline to be eligible to vote in the election. To register you must ll out a Florida Voter Registration Application form and submit it to the Supervisor of Elections O ce. Receive an application by visiting these locations: Supervisor of Elections O ceVoters Bill of RightsVote and have his or her vote accurately counted. Cast a vote if he or she is in line at the of cial closing of the polls in that county. Ask for and receive assistance in voting. Receive up to two replacement ballots if he or she makes a mistake prior to the ballot being cast. An explanation if his or her registration or identity is in question. If his or her registration or identity is in question, cast a provisional ballot. Written instructions to use when voting and upon request, oral instructions in voting from elections of cers. Vote free from coercion or intimidation by elections of cers or any other person. Vote on a voting system that is in working condition and that will allow votes to be accurately cast. St. Johns County voter tips Online at www.votesjc.com Florida Drivers License of- ces Public libraries County governmental o ces Armed Forces Recruitment o ces State agencies that provide public assistance and serve persons with disabilities. Update your voter record. All updates to a voter registration may be made on a Florida Voter Registration Application or by providing information by phone, mail, email, fax or written signed notice that includes your date of birth or Voter ID number. Acceptable forms of identi- cation at the polls: Florida Drivers License Florida ID card United States passport Military ID Student ID Public Assistance ID Retirement Center ID Neighborhood Association ID Debit/Credit card Vote your way: Absentee, Early or Election Day Vote By Mail: Any registered voter may request an absentee ballot by calling the Elections O ce at 823-2238 or by visiting the website www. votesjc.com. It is imperative that your signature be kept current at all times, especially if you vote by absentee ballot. In order for an absentee ballot to count, the Supervisor must compare the signature on a voters record with the signature on the absentee ballot and the two must match, according to section 101.68, F.S. To update your signature, provide the Supervisor of Elections O ce with a Florida Voter Registration Application indicating a signature update. Early Vote: Early voting begins 10 days prior to each election. All eligible, registered voters may cast their ballot at any Early Voting Site. In NW St. Johns County, the early voting site is the Julington Creek Annex Conference Room, located at 725 Flora Branch Boulevard. For more information on dates, times and additional early voting locations, contact the Elections O ce or visit www. votesjc.com. Election Day: Polls are open from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. On Election Day, you must vote in the precinct of your legal residence. Polling locations are listed on your Voter Information Card or check the precinct locator on the website www.votesjc. com. Con rm your address: If it is di erent than the address listed on your voter information card, call the Elections O ce at 823-2238 before going to vote. Be sure to take current, valid photo and signature ID with you when you vote. If you do not have the proper ID, you must vote a provisional ballot. (F.S. 101.043) Sample ballots. Sample ballots will be mailed to all registered voters approximately three weeks prior to each election. They are also posted on the website www.votesjc.com and available prior to each election. Voting System: The Elections System and Software DS200s digital scan tabulators are used to count ballots at each precinct and early voting location. Voters receive a paper ballot, mark their ballot by completing an oval to the left of each of their choices and place it into the DS200 for immediate tabulation. Voters are noti ed of improperly marked ballots and given an opportunity to review their ballot and obtain a replacement when necessary. The Elections O ce also provides touch screen voting which allows persons with disabilities to vote privately. Persons who are visually impaired may access the systems audio feature. One iVotronic is provided at each precinct and early voting site. Absentee ballots are counted on a high speed tabulator at the Elections O ce. Results from early voting, precincts and absentee ballots are combined at the Elections O ce. After the polls close, the election results are released to the public and posted on the website www. votesjc.com. ELECT THE 3 MOSQUITOTEERS AUG 14thSEAT 5 Gary Howell SEAT 3 Randy Covington SEAT 1 Bob Smith SEAT3 EXPERIENCED CONSERVATIVE BUSINESSMEN NO TAX INCREASES SMASHING MOSQUITOES AND FRIENDS OF OBAMA! PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT BY CAMPAIGNS OF BOB SMITH (1) RANDY COVINGTON (3) AND GARY HOWELL (5) FOR AMCD EXPERIENCED CONSERVATIVE BUSINESSMEN NO TAX INCREASES SMASHING MOS Q UITOES AND FRIENDS OF OBAMA

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Page 26, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com Mike DavisA Conservative Businessman A Dedicated Family Man www.ElectMikeDavis.com Mike@ElectMikeDavis.com Political advertisement paid for and approved by Mike Da vis, Republican, for State Representative District 17.One lesson I have learned is to make a living with one hand and give back to my community with the other. I will take my experience as a community leader and career small business owner to Tallahassee to serve a community that has given so much to me. I would be honored to have your support on August 14th. Voters in St. Johns County should have received new voter information cards by mail in the past few weeks. St. Johns County Supervisor of Elections Vicky Oakes said the cards were sent to all registered voters to re ect changes made during the recent redistricting process. Redistricting has a ected The August 14 Primary Election is open to all registered voters in St. Johns County. This is a very important election, as several of our elected o cials will be elected August 14. The State Attorney, County Commissioner-District 3 and School Board Member-District 2 will be elected during the Primary. It is possible that other o ces may also be elected such as School Board Member-District 5 and other Nonpartisan o ces such as Anastasia Mosquito Control District Commissioners, depending upon the turnout and votes cast during the election. County Commissioners are voted on countywide and elected by all voters in the county, but the School Board is di erent. They are single member districts, and are elected only by members of their respective districts. If you reside in District 2 or 5, a School Board race will appear on your ballot in the Primary. Know where you vote before you go! This year, due to redistricting a number of precincts boundaries, precinct numbers and polling places have changed. You should have already received your new voter information card with your districts and election day polling place. Sample ballots are being mailed by household for this election in order to save taxpayer dollars. You should have already received one in the mail. If not, visit our website and use the voter lookup to view yours or print additional sample ballots if needed. Voting on election day is di erent than Early Voting as the law requires you to vote at the precinct of your legal residence when voting on election day. Save time, save money! Check your new voter information card, visit our website www.votesjc.com or call 8232238 to verify your polling place before going to going to vote on election day to ensure New voter information cards sent to all registered St. Johns County voters Your Vote Counts!By Contributing Writer Vicky Oakes, Supervisor of Elections, St. Johns Countyyour reach the correct location. If you have recently moved to St. Johns County and are registered to vote in another county, you simply need to change your address. It is not too late to make the change and participate in the Primary. Address changes are accepted through election day and can be made at the polls; however, I encourage everyone to update your address before going to vote. Voters moving into the county and making addresses changes while early voting or voting at the polls on election day are required to vote a provisional ballot. If you missed the registration deadline for the Primary, you still have time to register and participate in the General Election. Registration books close on October 9 for the General Election. Please see our ad in the this issue of The CreekLine for additional election information and details on early voting. If you have any questions, please call the o ce at 823-2238. We hope your voting experience will be a pleasant one. We look forward to seeing you during early voting or at the polls on election day. Remember Your Vote Counts! every voter of St. Johns County. Florida re-draws its districts for Congress, state Senate and House districts every 10 years. The County Commission and School Board also are required to redraw their district lines. The process ensures that the same number of people live in each district and, as a result, each person is equally represented in our government. District numbers and boundaries have changed. Some precinct boundaries have changed. We have also combined some Its the American way!Primary Election: August 14, 2012 General Election November 6, 2012 ...its your right! polling locations and re-numbered some precincts to better serve you. Voters, please review the information on your new voter information card when you receive it and contact the Supervisor of Elections O ce at 8232238 if any changes are needed. Address changes can also be sent by email to elections@votesjc. com. Name, date of birth and address information are required in the email. Interested voters who dont have their new cards yet but want to know if there are any changes can visit the Supervisor of Elections website at www. votesjc.com and use the Voter Lookup tool. The voter lookup allows a voter to enter their name and date of birth to check their voter status, locate their polling place, view their sample ballot or track the mailing and receipt of their absentee ballot. Once the voters precinct is located, the voter can view the voting districts and their polling place. A voter information card is not required when voting in person. The law requires photo and signature ID to be presented when voting in person. Any voter without proper ID can still vote, but is required to vote a provisional ballot. If you have any questions, visit our website at www.votesjc. com or call us 823-2238. As always, we look forward to serving you.

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 27 Buy One Get One FREE Bottle Brush TreesTREE FARM & NURSERY Free Landscape & Sod Estimates or visit us at www.sjtreefarm.com 1 Gallon $5.99 BOGO FREE 3 Gallon $14.99 2-3 ft BOGO FREE 7 Gallon $39 3-4 ft BOGO FREE 15 Gallon $99 5-6 ft BOGO FREE 30 Gallon $169 8-12ft BOGO FREE 45 Gallon $299 12-14 ft BOGO FREE 65 Gallon $399 16-18 ft BOGO FREE Tina P. Fernandez, CPA, PLwww.tpfcpa.com 904-287-2195 Over 30 Years ExperienceHave Condence in Your Tax Preparation & Planning. Allow Me to Assist You. Visit www.tpfcpa.com for informative news and Tax Savings Tips. Saving the Accounting Needs of Individuals and Small Businesses by Providing Quality Service at Competitive Rates. Dr. Jenny Preer Purposefully limited practice providing the time, energy & attention you deserve North Florida Coaching North Florida Counseling & Mediation Services, LLC (904) 701-8255 www.northcoaching.com www.northcounseling.com Counseling is available for individuals (18+), couples, and families working through various issues. FL Supreme Court Certied Family Mediation Services creates personal solutions for both on-going and potential legal conicts, including child time-sharing agreements. Coaching creates strategies and action plans that move you toward your goals. It is for people who want to do something more. I help students (16+) and adults dene educational, career & personal goals and create plans to overcome the obstacles in their way. Licensed Counselor, Family Mediator, Coach 1004 State Road 13( 0.2 mi South JCP entrance ) Richard M. Oglesby, D.V.M.Constanze Goricki, Dr.med.vet287-5570M-F 8 AM 6 PM Sat 8 AM Noon Greenbriar Animal Hospital We Celebrate The HumanPet Bond ITS HERE!THE K LASER!FINALLY PAIN FREE ...DRUG FREE THERAPY! Reintroduce Your Pet To Activity!(ARA) Why is it that a steak from a restaurant just seems to taste better than what you make at home? Often, its because the chefs in the restaurant know the secrets of great grilling. Steak is a summer staple for many home cooks when the weather permits, but things can go awry if youre not clued in to the secrets of how to prepare a great steak, says John Li, senior vice president of research and development for Outback Steakhouse. As veritable steak experts, and with summer grilling season upon us, we want Flotilla 14-7 of the Coast Guard Auxiliary has announced its public boating course schedule for the remainder of 2012. All courses are o ered at the St. Augustine Campus of St. Johns River State College, 2900 College Drive (o State Road 16) in St. Augustine. About Boating Safely This beginner boating class will give the participant the knowledge needed to obtain The Florida Boaters Card. Many boat insurance companies will o er discounts on boating insurance Secrets to super steaks: Great grilling tips and techniquesUnited States Coast Guard Auxiliary updateCoast Guard Auxiliary announces boating courseBy Contributing Writer Bob Schultz, Flotilla 14-7 Public Affairs Of certo boaters who successfully complete this course. Topics include: Introduction to Boating; Boating Law; Boat Safety Equipment; Safe Boating; Navigation Aids; Boating Problems; Trailering, Storing and Protecting Your Boat; Waterskiing and River Boating. The eight-hour course will be given on September 8 and November 3, 2012. Students must register prior to the classes by contacting Vic Aquino at 460-0243.to help people preparing to try their hands at grilling steak. Li o ers some advice for grilling successful steak meals this summer: Start with the right steak. Build a relationship with your local butcher either at your grocery store or, if youre lucky enough to have one in your neighborhood, the area butcher shop. Learn where they source their meat, if its aged and for how long. Many cuts lend themselves to grilling, but sirloin, let, strip and rib eye remain the most popular. Sirloin and strip steak are usually the best options if youre feeding a large group, as they provide abundant avor and are usually less expensive than other cuts. Prep the grill properly. Once youve got the right meat, ensure your grill is ready to cook it to perfection. Start with a well-cleaned grill and preheat it. If youre using a charcoal grill, wait until the coals are white. For gas grills, use a thermometer. Many newer models have built-in gauges on the lids that indicate when the grill is hot enough to use. Add some seasoning. While the grill is preheating, prep the steak by patting it dry. Removing moisture allows for optimum surface contact with the grill and creates a wonderful seared avor. Rub with the seasoning of your choice; there are many, but keep in mind simple salt and pepper works well if youre starting with an already avorful cut. Get grilling. Once the grill and steak are ready, place the meat on the grill. You can achieve a fancy diamond-shaped grill pattern by rotating the meat 45 degrees when you turn it, but the meat will taste just as good without it. Cooking time will vary depending on the cut of meat and the grill itself. Generally, thinner steaks (about one inch thick) will need about four minutes per side to be rare, ve for medium and seven for well done. Thicker steaks (two inches or more) will need about six minutes per side for rare, eight to 10 for medium and 12 for well done. Let it rest. Overcooking is a sure- re way to dry out steak. As soon as the steak has reached your desired level of wellness, remove it from the grill and let it rest for about ve minutes before you serve or cut it. This allows the juices to set well in the meat before you dig in. Not sure where to start? Try this recipe from Outback Steakhouse: Ingredients: 4 rib eye steaks, 12 to 14 ounces each 4 teaspoons Kosher salt 2 teaspoons coarsely ground black pepper 2 tablespoons vegetable oil Directions: Evenly season each steak with a teaspoon each of salt and pepper. Coat each steak with a half tablespoon of vegetable oil. This may be done up to three hours prior to grilling, storing in the refrigerator. Remove from the refrigerator about 30 minutes before grilling. Start the grill. Place seasoned steaks over the hottest portion of the grill and cook on the rst side about four to ve minutes, rotating 90 degrees after three minutes to achieve restaurant-style cross marks. Turn steaks over and cook for an additional three to four minutes to achieve a mediumrare doneness. Remove from grill and allow to rest for ve minutes before topping and serving. 1. Stay alert: Expect anything to occur when entering a work zone. 2. Pay close attention: Signs and work zone aggers save lives. 3. Turn on your headlights: Workers and other motorists must see you. 4. Dont tailgate: Unexpected stops frequently occur in work zones. 5. Dont speed: Note the posted speed limits in and around the work zone. 6. Keep up with traf c ow: Dedicate your full attention to the roadway and those traveling around you. 7. Dont change lanes in the work zone: The time saved just isnt worth the chance. 8. Minimize distractions: Avoid changing radio stations and using cellular phones while driving in the work zone. 9. Expect the unexpected: Keep an eye out for workers and their equipment. 10. Be patient: Remember, the work zone crew members are working to improve your future ride.Highway Work Zone Safety Tips from the FDOT Dont miss our Back to SchoolSpecial Sectionappearing in this issue of The CreekLine. Check out pages 36-44! Lunar PhasesLast Quarter: August 9 New: August 17 First Quarter: August 24 Full: August 31

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Page 28, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com 904-209-13202758 Racetrack Road Publix Plantation Plaza Tues Fri 9-8 & Sat 9-7 End of Summer Sizzling Specials with Panache (detox, damage or dry) with Haircut (must mention when booking for proper scheduling) A 7-foil highlight that will create a veil, face frame or natural peek a boos. $45.00 inc. blow dry with New Talent or Artist level Stylists @ Julington Creek location (expires 10/1/2012) Call Tim ( 904 ) 599-5250 LAWN & LANDSCAPING NO CONTRACT REQUIRED!/On-Call ServiceLawn Maintenance Package Includes: Precision Mowing, Edging Foliage Trimming Fertilizing Free Estimates References Available Licensed & Insuredgreenfxlawn@yahoo.com Robert Kelsey, M.D.Board Certied Cardiology and Internal Medicine Robert Kelsey, M.D.Now Accepting New Patients 904-827-0078 Gutter Masters, LLC 904.813.4388 Our work is not sub-contracted out. We are fully licensed and insured in Duval, St. Johns and Clay County. www.seamlessgutters-jacksonville.comPeople driving down State Road 16 may have noticed a new church sign going up over the last three months. About 10 parishioners volunteered many of hours of their time over a two week period. Volunteers pictured are Charlie Hunter, Richard Stypula, Larry Rogari, Fr. Guy Noonan, Tony Perillo, Tom Kissell, John Carter and Guy Maltese. Volunteers Richard Young and Keith Kirker are not pictured. Our Lady of Good Counsel was founded in 1875 when the rst parochial buildings in the Mill Creek and Elkton area were built under the guidance of Fr. Stephen Langlade, a native of Le Puy, France. In 1902 the church building was disassembled, moved and rebuilt in Bakersville some three miles south of Mill Creek, on Pacetti Road. At this time, the name of the church was changed to Our Lady of Good Counsel for unknown reasons. In November 1999, the present building on State Road 16 was opened. Until recently, Our Lady of Good Counsel remained a mission church of St. Ambrose, Elkton and the pastor of St. Ambrose served both communities. On July 1, 2008, Our Lady of Good Counsel was given the designation of a parish of the Diocese of St. Augustine. Fr. Guy Noonan was assigned as pastor.Camel riding isnt a popular means of transportation in the United States, but a method Ive always wanted to try. As luck goes, I was blessed with two diverse opportunities within one month. The rst came when I traveled to Jordan and spent two nights in a Bedouin tent camp. The desert at Wadi Rum reigns as an ideal location for a camel trek. Lawrence of Arabia described the landscape with, Travel: Riding camels here and thereBy Contributing Travel Writer Debi Lander, www.bylandersea.comNew sign for local church Digital age dromedaries!red sands that stretch like seas between mountains of crimson sandstone. The rock monoliths sculpted by nature resemble the drippings of candle wax on a monumental scale. On the morning of my ride, owners in long owing robes crossed the dunes and walked alongside their herd. The scene looked like it a sepia-tinted photograph from a history book, except the two Bedouin were talking on cell phones. Okay, I thoughtdigital age dromedaries. They cushed the camels (lowered to a kneeling position) and covered their basic saddles with blankets. Stirrups are not part of a camels gear, so one grips the tufts of hair atop the hump. To get on, I ung one leg over the beast, feeling my yoga class stretches coming into use. I casually shimmied my butt into place and hunkered down. Suddenly, my camel erupted upward nearly tossing me o its back as it leaped to its fore-knees. Then, in a two-stage process, its back legs extended and I was nearly catapulted forward over its head. I then found myself riding at the height that would guarantee a slam dunk into a basketball net. Woo-hoo! The rst few minutes gave me a bumpy, disconcerting ride, as my body jostled to and fro. But soon I began to adapt and enjoy the feel of the gentle compression of my camels hooves into the sandy sea. The view on camelback is spectacular; youre about twice as high as when riding a horse and the desert scenery is gorgeous. Later in the month, I found myself at the Safari Wilderness Ranch in Central Florida. Believe it or not, I mounted a camel here for another ride. They use an easier method to get on and o but honestly its not as much fun nor as hair-raising as my original. Polk County camel riders step up onto a platform at the dromedarys height. Then, riders simply toss a foot over. The camel does not rise or descend. In Florida, the saddles had metal frames which guarantee a secure ride. Once beyond the loading zone, the sensation of riding is identical, except the safari traverses grass instead of sand. While riding through Wilderness Park I saw zebras, lemurs, wart hogs, cattle, deer, antelope and Water Bu alo. Safari Wilderness Ranch is not a zoo or theme park. There are no crowds and no lines; its a natural adventure with guides who explain the herds of exotic game. Safari vehicles tted with shade canopies offer an alternative tour. I highly recommend a trip to Jordan; the country is safe, the people are friendly and the archeological ruins outstanding. A camel ride across the desert is a cherished memory, but I have to admit, a three-Why wait for the mailman? View our digital edition online at www.thecreekline.com hour car ride gave me a similar, close encounter with the humped beasts. If you go: www.jordantours-travel.com/ cms/ or www.SafariWilderness. com. Tools 4 Schools cont. from pg. 18Depot allows Tools 4 Schools to be a year round resource for teachers, instead of just a onetime handout. Tools 4 Schools is the only county-wide supply drive in the area that directly bene ts the teachers and students of the St. Johns County School District, explained Donna Lueders, the executive director of the SJCEF. We are excited about the opportunity to o er supplies for teachers year-round, but need the communitys help to stock our Depot! Numerous businesses around the county and neighboring areas are serving as drop-o locations for the school supplies. These donations will go to all kindergarten through 12th grades and subjects, as well as the schools clinics that currently receive no state funding. A full list of drop-o locations, as well as more information can be found at www. sjcef.com. Just click the Tools 4 Schools button on the left side of the home page. If you are interested in volunteering or being a drop-o location in the future, please email Katy Ho statter at katy.ho statter@ stjohns.k12. .us. Advertise inThe CreekLineIts good for business!287-4913LG@rtpublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 29 Receive a.25%Eco-Friendly Rate Discount Eco-Friendly Auto Loan program effective April 1, 2012 and can be withdra wn at any time without prior notice. Does not apply t o loans already financed with First Florida Credit Union or its divisions. Does not apply to dealer-direct loans. Eligible new or used vehicles are those that have an EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) estimated highway fuel economy of 30 MPG (Miles Per Gallon) or greater, as list ed on www.fueleconomy.gov. Your APR (Annual Percentage Rate) and term may vary based on your creditworthiness and amount financed. ** Advertised APR (Annual Percentage Rate) is effective as of April 1, 2012 and reflects terms up to 48 months. Advertised rate is subject to change at any time without prior notice. For new vehicles only: minimum loan amount $25,000. Other loan terms (up to 72 months) are available for new and used autos. Q ualifications and some restrictions apply.1950 CR 210 W., St. Johns, FL, 32259 (next to St. Johns Forest) www.firstflorida.orgyour wallet, too! Anyone who lives or works in Saint Johns, Duval, Flagler, Clay, Baker, or Nassau County Can Join! S St. rs N St J tf s W. o S w. o J oh or u 0 W to w ke oh ns da o hn F o 210 ext w R 2 (ne s, ore g CR FL st) 3 50 225 19 Eco-Friendly Auto Loan program effective April 1, 2012 and can be withdra wn at any time without prior notice. Does not apply t o loans already financed with First Florida Credit Union or its divisions. Does not apply to dealer-direct loans. Eligible new or used vehicles are those that have an EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) estimated highway fuel economy of 30 MPG (Miles Per Gallon) or greater, as list ed on www.fueleconomy.gov. Your APR (Annual Percentage Rate) and term may vary based on your creditworthiness and amount financed. ** Advertised APR (Annual Percentage Rate) is effective as of April 1, 2012 and reflects terms up to 48 months. Advertised rate is subject to change at any time without prior notice. For new vehicles only: minimum loan amount $25,000. Other loan terms (up to 72 months) are available for new and used autos. Q ualifications and some restrictions apply.1950 CR 210 W., St. Johns, FL, 32259 (next to St. Johns Forest) www.firstflorida.org Your savings federally insured to at least $250,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government AgencyNCUA Other Loan Features Flexible Repayment Terms Up to 84 Months 100% Financing Available No Application FeeEco-FriendlyAuto L ans Save Fuel Save Money Save the EnvironmentFor a limited time, at First Florida, youll receive an additional .25% off our already, low rate auto loans when you finance a new or used vehicle that has an EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) estimated highway fuel economy of 30 MPG (Miles Per Gallon) or greater. This Eco-Friendly rate discount applies to refinances, too. So, bring us the fuel-efficient car youve financed elsewhere. Terms Up to 48 Months 2.24%** Rate Discount for Automatic Loan Payments (Available for All Terms) .25% Eco-Friendly Rate Discount (Available for All Terms) .25% Annual Percentage Rate for Terms Up to 48 Months 1.74% Go green and get an even better rate Annual Percentage Rate As Low As* Better for the environment AND Anyone who lives or works in Saint Johns, Duval, Flagler, Clay, Baker, or Nassau County Can Join! Approval is fast and easy!Stop by; call (904)808-4644 or (800)766-4328, ext. 1; or visit our Web site www.firstflorida.org.

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Page 30, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com The Shoppes of MurabellaAccepting New Patients (904) 826-346952 Tuscan Way Suite 205 St. Augustine, FL 32092 New Location!Mon-Thurs: 8-6:30 Saturday: 9-1 Walk-Ins Welcome Mandarin Landing Animal Hospital & Pet Resort 50% OFF Y our Pet s First Ex am with D r. Si lv erness( 1st Time Clients Only )Not v a l id with any other o er. Ex pires 9 /1 0 /12 FREE BOARDING B ook 2 Nights at our R esort and 3rd Night is F REE! (1st Time Boarders Only)Not v a l id with any other o er. Ex pires 9 /1 0 /1 2 Ann Silverness, DVM Pet Resort Suites F am i ly S t yl e Cable TV Su n l it Kitt y C on d o s R o mp e r R oo m for Spl i sh-Spl a sh ti m e Heated Conveniently located one block North of I-295 and San Jose Boulevard D r. Ann Si lv erness, DV M, CCRT REACH UP. REACH IN. REACH OUT. Service times: Sunday at 10 am Wednesday at 7 pm Cunningham Creek Elementary School REACHJAX.COM After a very lengthy search, St. Patricks Episcopal Church is pleased to welcome Father Mike Snider to our parish and the community of St. Johns. Father Mike comes to us from Christ Episcopal Church of Blue eld, West Virginia, where he was a rector for ve years. Father Mike is married to Church welcomes new worship leaderPenelope (Penny) and they have four sons: Robby, age 10; Eli, age nine; Christopher, age six; and Matthew, age ve. He and his family are excited to join the community. He has been a coach for his sons in coach pitch baseball and Tball and sees the importance of being active in schools and the community as well as serving the parish of St. Patricks. Fr. Mike seeks to nd the passions of the parishioners of St. Patricks and match it to the needs of the St. Johns community. Father Mike and his familys rst Sunday will be September 2. We invite the community to join us in welcoming Fr. Mike and his family and stop by to introduce yourself.Preparing for the fall vegetable garden Soil preparation should be done four to six weeks before planting a production bed, so it is time to plan and prepare for the fall vegetable garden. On Thursday, August 16 the St. Johns Extension Of ce will be conducting a class on this topic. It will be held at the St. Johns County Extension Of ce and run from 10:00 a.m. until noon. In the class you will learn about amending the garden plot, vegetable varieties to grow for fall and winter and gardening techniques. If you have not had a soil pH analysis done in several years you may also want to bring a soil sample to submit for free testing. You must pre-register for the class. There is a $5 registration fee or bring three nonperishable food items to donate to the St. Johns County Social Services Division of Health and Human Services Food Closet. To register for the class, please call 209-0430. Hometown hero cont. from pg. 1 she came to thank the Mandarin/St. Johns community, as well as the volunteers of St. Michaels Soldiers, a ministry of St. Josephs Catholic Church that raises money to send home-sweet-home care packages to deployed military members. Diane Timoney United States Army First Lieutenant Ryan TimoneyHometown hero cont. on pg. 31

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 31 A CONNECTING CHURCH Our Sunday Services Traditional Worship 8:30am Sunday School 9:45am Contemporary Worship 11:00amwww.switzerlandcommunitychurch.org I want cremation.$650Flagler Memorial Cremation Society669-1809 St Francis In-The-FieldEpiscopal ChurchChristian Formation 8:45am (September May) Sunday Service 10:00amChildrens Chapel and Nursery Available895 Palm Valley Rd (1 mile east of US1)615-2130Sunday Morning 10 am @ Timberlin Creek Elementary School 555 Pine Tree Lane St. Augustine, FL 32092 904-535-5636 S t Looking for a place to belong? We are looking for you. www.familylifefellowshipjax.com Fruit Cove Baptist Churchs Military Support Ministry, serving the practical, emotional and spiritual needs of any military wife will be o ering a new Bible study entitled, My so Called Life as a Proverbs 31 Wife by Sara Horn. It will be held on Tuesday mornings at 9:30 a.m., beginning on September 4 in the ROC Room 201. Childcare is provided by reservation. Please call Debbie Stoutamyer at 230-8413 with questions or to register. On August 12 from 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Our Lady of Good Counsel Catholic Church will be having their All You Can Eat Chicken fried chicken dinner. The dinner will include a salad bar, mashed potatoes and gravy, seasoned vegetables, bread and butter. Homemade desserts and beverages will also be available for a donation. The cost of an adult dinner is $10 and a kids dinner (and seven and under) is $4. The church is located at 5950 State Road 16 (one mile northwest of Pacetti Road and World Golf Parkway) in St. Augustine. The dinner is being sponsored by the OLGC Mens Club and the Ladies Guild. All proceeds will go to the future use of the various ministries and continued church development. Please join us on Saturday, August 18, from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. at Vilano Beach in St. Johns County. A free lunch will be served at 12:00 noon. Parking is on the beach. The fee is $5. The Julington Creek congregation of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is hosting the party and providing lunch. Look for the LDS Party signs. If you need more information or have questions, please call the Barringtons at (904) 217-3308. Hope to see you there! Are you troubled by someones drinking? Al-Anon Family Groups can help. Let us share our experience, strength and hope. Join us every Monday night from 8:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. in the First Christian Church of Jacksonville, located at 11924 San Jose Boulevard or visit us at www.jaxafg.org. Single Moms Hope and Help is a Bible Study and support group designed by a single mom for single moms. It encourages you to ourish while in the midst of overwhelming circumstances and begins on September 5. Childcare is provided. Please call Linda Warne at 287-0996 with questions or to register. St. Francis in-the-Field Episcopal Church is o ering a parents Morning Out program for the 2012-2013 school year. If your child(ren) are between 12 months and four years old they can be enrolled in our program. The program runs on Wednesdays from 8:30 a.m. until 12:00 noon. The children are taught di erent prayers and bible verses and do this while having lots of fun. The goal of the program is to help develop and increase their Christian beliefs while giving parents a few children-free hours. The During the week of June 16 through 23, Troop 280 adventured o to summer camp at beautiful Camp Powhatan, nestled in the mountains of Virginia. After a long 10 hour drive from St. Johns, the troop arrived safely and ready to take on the many adventures which included hiking, swimming, shing, rafting and more. At an elevation of 655 meters above sea level, Camp Powhatan is home to a variety of wildlife and many spotted deer, skunks and even a black bear. Scouts attended classes daily, providing them with the opportunity to complete merit badges required for rank advancement. The types of classes o ered included horsemanship, environmental science, emergency preparedness, nature and orienteering (just to name a few). The campsite had tents and cabins. The tents are basically wooden frames that stand up in a triangle formaFaith Newssta has been highly trained and many of them belong to St. Francis. Please consider having your little one(s) participate in what we believe is a great program. Please contact the church at 615-2130 for more information. River of Life UMC, located at 2600 Race Track Road, will be opening its My Morning Out program to the public. With the addition of our new facility, our program is ready to expand. The program will be held on Tuesday and Thursday mornings, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., beginning on September 4. We will follow the St. Johns County 2012-13 school year calendar. Registration begins August 1, 2012. Please call 230-2955 for additional information. River of Grace Christian invites you to join us at 6200 State Road 13 North in St. Boy Scout Troop 280 summer newsBy Contributing Writer Contributing writer Justin Barthel, First Class Scouttion with a canvas tent over the frame. There is a mattress and wooden bedframe which is where the scouts slept. It wasnt as comfortable as it sounds. The cabins are wooden buildings with bunk beds. These were a little more comfortable. Scouts had several opportunities to raise money to pay for all or a portion of their camping expenses and many worked very hard to do this. What better way to live out the Scout Law of thriftiness! At the end of the week parents were ecstatic to see their kids. The troop had a great time at summer camp. The Friday evening after returning, several scouts from Troop 280 also participated in a special community service project. In conjunction with the Helping Hands organization, scouts and parents came together to assist cooking and serving food to the homeless community of downtown St. Augustine. Thanks to Ms. Jackie and the ladies of Helping Hands for allowing us to work with them on this evening. It was a project many of the boys have expressed wishes to repeat again. Troop 280 is a Boy Scout Troop located in the heart of Julington Creek, sponsored by River of Life United Methodist Church on Race Track Road. The troop was founded in 2009 and has grown from ve original members to now over 60. The Scoutmaster is Brian Miller. Sunday Worship 9:30amJohns County. We are located between the Shands Bridge and Pacettis Campground on State Road 13. Our Sunday morning begins with a teen Bible study at 9:00 a.m. followed by a Praise and Worship service at 10:00 a.m. We strive to live out our name and be a River of Grace to our community! We love the Lord Jesus and want to share His message of love and hope with everyone. Please come and worship with us soonwe would love to have you! Grief Share is a faith-based support group at Fruit Cove Baptist Church for those who are grieving the loss of a loved one. This is a 13-week DVD driven program designed to take you from mourning to joy. The program begins on August 29 at 6:15 p.m. and childcare is provided. Please call Cecille Hammond, 230-6221, with questions or to register. thanked the crowd for their prayers, positive thoughts and get-well wishes, even citing the cards from the children at St. Josephs School, where Ryan Timoney attended as a youngster, as a source of comfort and inspiration. The Hoedowns activities included both a live and silent auction. During the live auction, auctioneer Ricky Brooks engaged the crowd in bidding on sports and rock-n-roll memorabilia. One man won the bidding for a New York Jets football, signed by quarterback Mark Sanchez and immediately handed the prize to Diane Timoney for her son. Rock-n-rolls Van Zant brothers, Johnny of Lynyrd Skynyrd and Donny of .38 Special, donated two autographed electric guitars for auction and also sent along another autographed guitar just for Ryan Timoney. Ten percent of the evenings proceeds will aid Ryan Timoney in his recovery. The evening included bluegrass music by One Mandarin Road, The Playing Cards DJs, and line-dancing led by Larry Bass. A bu et of barbequed pork, sausages and chicken with baked beans, green beans, cornon-the-cob, cole slaw and potato salad were catered by Jax Pit BBQ, special events catering and local chef Gerry Ser lippi. The Mandarin and St. Johns communities have been extremely generous in supporting our e orts to serve the deployed men and women of our military forces, said Kathy Signorile, St. Michaels Soldiers founder and president. We are so grateful to the businesses who donated items for our auctions and food for the event. We couldnt do it without them. Our volunteers work tirelessly to ll and ship boxes of goodies to our deployed men and women. When asked what we can send our soldiers, United States Army Specialist Chris Tumlinson loudly told the Hoedown crowd, Snacks! We love snacks. For more information on how you can help or volunteer, please call 599-7855 or visit www.stmichaelssoldiers.orgHometown hero cont. from pg. 30

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Page 32, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com Inc.Since 1981 Carpentry 260-4820 Julington Creek Plantation presentsPublic is Welcome! For more info, see www.jcpcdd.org Floridas Premier Jimmy Buett Tribute Show! Movie ReviewRock of AgesDirected by: Adam Shankman. Starring: Julianne Hough, Diego Boneta, Tom Cruise. Review by T. G. StantonOkay, But Could Have Waited for Cable (3 out of 5) This months movie review belongs to the lm Rock of Ages, a musical lm with comedy and drama for adults and teens. Los Angeles in 1987 was a blast. Big-haired rock and roll bands on any corner in Hollywood were the norm. Young men and women ocked to the city to pursue their dreams. And so, the musical begins. Sherrie Christian, played by Julianne Hough, comes to Hollywood and outside the famed Bourbon Room, a ctional club that has launched and supported rock and roll since its beginning, she is robbed and now in need of a job. She is soon rescued by Drew Boley, performed by Diego Boneta, an aspiring singer dreaming of his chance St. Augustine Flotilla 14-7 of the Coast Guard Auxiliary is encouraging increased boating safety for the 2012 season and beyond through public education courses, Vessel Safety Check stations and public information exhibit booths. Members of the boating public and the public at large should visit one of our booths which will be located throughout the local area, to obtain informational pamphlets, to discuss matters of boating safety and the security of our waterways with our knowledgeable personnel and to sign up for a Safe Boating course. Knowing how a boat handles can help avoid collisions. Ive been piloting boats since before I could walk! Maybe so but no matter how experienced you may be as a boater, its worth paying attention to the handling characteristics of every boat you own or operate. Every boat even boats of the same type, from the same manufacturer handles di erently. Your own boat responds di erently from day to day as a result of weather, current, temperature, load and other factors. The boater who ignores handling characteristics is risking his safety. Coast Guard data show that collision with another vessel is the number one type of recreational boating accident; collision with a xed object is second. If youre interested in the technical factors that in uence handling characteristics things like side force, frictional wake current and drag a review of one of the many boat handling and seamanship publications or the speci cations supplied with your boat, will provide a wealth The St. Johns River seems to be recovering nicely from the heavy rains we received earlier this summer. At one time what looked like a washout for this summers shing and shrimping may have ended up being the correction the river needed after several years of below normal rainfall. Our shing and shrimping forecast is starting to look like what we would expect most years with normal amounts of rain. Usually by late July or early August indicators are in place giving us an idea of what to expect the rest of the summer. What we need to be looking for rst is how the weather has been a ecting the salinity of the river. If the salinity is right, the shrimp should begin to show. Smaller shrimp are common early, gradually getting larger as the season progresses. With the arrival of the shrimp we can expect the croaker bite to catch re all over the river. Yellowmouth trout (weak sh) will be in the deeper holes, with reds under docks and sea trout at the ends of docks. Captain Davids Fishing ReportBy Captain David LifkaCurrently smaller shrimp have begun to show in their usual locations indicating favorable conditions for this summers migration of shrimp. The croakers have been biting strong from downtown Jacksonville to Green Cove Springs. Yellowmouth trout are abundant, reds are under docks and sea trout are at the end of docks. Our indicators are indicating and by all indications we can expect the rest of this summers shrimping and shing to be outstanding again. Fishing Report: Look for all shing to get better as shrimp make their way downstream. Shrimping will continue to improve. Shrimp from docks or shallow water at night with a bright light and shrimp meal. Old Shands Bridge (Orangedale and Green Cove) and County Dock (Mandarin) are open to the public for shrimping. Look for drop-o s and moving water if you are daytime shrimping from a boat. Whether you catch one, some or none, the family time spent shing will last a lifetime. U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary encourages boating safetyBy Contributing Writer Robert A. Schultz, Public Affairs Of cer, United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-7of useful information. But in the meantime, there are simple steps that the United States Coast Guard recommends that every boater including experienced boaters go over as a matter of routine. Drill it in. Whether youve been operating a particular boat for three years or three minutes, its a good idea to try some drills related to boat handling. Pick an open area on a calm day. Practice turning, stopping and reversing course at various speeds and pay attention to your turning radius, stopping distance and maneuverability when the boat has more or less momentum. Later, try the same drills in rougher water, with more wind and with more or less weight in the boat. You may be surprised how much these variables can change the way your boat handles. At a minimum, these drills should be conducted on an annual basis, especially if you live in an area of the country where your boat is stored during the winter. Once your boat has been launched for the summer boating season, take some time to reacquaint yourself with your vessels handling characteristics. A weighty issue. Do you know how much you weigh? Not trying to ask personal questions, but as the boat owner or operator, its important that you know the total weight of the equipment and persons you bring on board and make sure that its within the limits listed on your boats capacity plate (if one is provided). You must take into consideration everything youve taken on board, such as shing gear, a cooler, water (eight pounds per gallon), food and fuel (six pounds per gallon). Exceeding your boats capacity is dangerous and can severely a ect safe handling. Even if youre within the appropriate weight limit for your vessel, that weight must be properly distributed. Power trim and trim tabs are useful tools but its better to carefully balance weight fore and aft, port and starboard, to avoid listing or porpoising both of which make handling a vessel more di cult. NOAA News is good news. Finally, check the weather before you go out and not just to nd out whether or not youll need a sweater. Wind and waves, in particular, can drastically change a boats handling characteristics. Take a few minutes to listen to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) marine forecast on your VHF radio, even if its currently bright and sunny. Youll be much better o making the conscious decision not to pilot your boat in 30-mile-per-hour winds than accidentally nding out youre incapable of it. For further information on NOAA, check out http://www.noaa.gov. Yes, you may be an experienced boater, but even if you were born with tiller in hand, its worth taking a little extra time to make sure youve mastered the handling of this boat on this day under these conditions. for stardom. Through their budding romance, the club is oundering due to the changing music scene throughout the country. Their dreams rely on a sellout performance by Stacee Jaxx, portrayed by Tom Cruise. A hard drinking, womanizing and half-naked star, he is on the downside of his career and looking for a revival. Bumps and roadblocks are thrown in the paths of the budding romance and the success and careers of all involved.Throughout this lm, directed by Adam Shankman, a former dancer and choreographer, the music of the s is the star of the show. The majority of music is sung by the actors themselves and very credible performances are delivered. There are of course energetic and enjoyable dance scenes with most of the music and any action is an excuse to break into song. There is drama in the political movement to denigrate rock and roll; business troubles, career troubles and romance could be on the rocks. The comedy comes in the presented changing morals, attitudes and costumes. The movie is de nitely longer than necessary and the story is simple and uninspired; this has been done before. However, the chosen music is the star and Tom Cruises performance is enough to keep you watching. Who knew he could be a rock and roll star too? Unless you hate the music of the s or are looking for Tolstoy in a movie, you should enjoy this lm. 1. Stay alert: Expect anything to occur when entering a work zone. 2. Pay close attention: Signs and work zone aggers save lives. 3. Turn on your headlights: Workers and other motorists must see you. 4. Dont tailgate: Unexpected stops frequently occur in work zones. 5. Dont speed: Note the posted speed limits in and around the work zone. 6. Keep up with traf c ow: Dedicate your full attention to the roadway and those traveling around you. 7. Dont change lanes in the work zone: The time saved just isnt worth the chance. 8. Minimize distractions: Avoid changing radio stations and using cellular phones while driving in the work zone. 9. Expect the unexpected: Keep an eye out for workers and their equipment. 10. Be patient: Remember, the work zone crew members are working to improve your future ride.Highway Work Zone Safety Tips from the FDOT

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 33 FOR ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMMISSIONISTRICTEPUBLICAN 450-106 State Road 13 N Publix Center in Fruit CovePh: 230.8881 52 Tuscan Way, #202Publix Center at International Golf Dr. and SR 16 Ph: 940.0055 Whether you need a question answered, a problem solved, or a claim reported, my job is to make it happen. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.CALL ME TODAY. Being there is why Im here.P097193.1 State Farm, Home Oce, Bloomington, IL Jim Register Jr, Agent 12058 San Jose Blvd, Suite 302 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Bus: 904-268-5522 www.jimregister.com This summer has been brutal at times, which hardly needs saying. Torrential rains and high temperatures make for less than ideal conditions for gardening. However fall is on the way and its a great time to consider what cool season vegetables youd like to enjoy. For greens and cruciferous vegetables, good choices might be Swiss chard, cabbage, broccoli and that ubiquitous southerner, collards. While none of these are exotic, they are fairly easy to grow and all vegetables can be more valuable straight from the garden as the freshest vegetables are the tastiest. Stirfrying in a little canola oil or steaming lightly, will help retain vitamins. Broccoli can become a cut and come again croponce the main head has been harvested you can look forward to weeks of smaller, tender side shoots, looking just like miniaLuke, our neighbor, just graduated. He was just a skinny little kid (sorry, Luke) when we moved next door. Its already been seven years; hes quite the man and holds a real conversation (with eye contact!) when speaking to me now. We never invited him over for dinner; I always thought itd be a little less busy next week. I dont really know him. Luke, Im sure, doesnt feel slighted. But the realization that he became a man right before our eyes really hit me! Ben, our oldest, will be graduating in ve years. Five years! I swore Id never say this, but... Wow. They sure do grow up fast. The bright side is Im realizing this now. I know the song Cats in the Cradle and how things can turn out when we dont have our priorities right. Thats one reason we decided to homeschoolwe didnt want to be so busy getting ready and going places that we didnt have time to enjoy the ride. After eight years homeschooling, though, I know I have to be intentional to develop a relationship with my kids even when were together 24/7! Its back-to-school time. Most St. Johns County mammas have updated the kids wardrobes, bought school supplies, maybe even pinned new lunch ideas on Pinterest. Id like to encourage you to plan some cant you just stay little time with The North Florida Vendors Association (NFVA) has announced the opening of a new weekly community farmers market in Alpine Groves Park, located at 2060 State Road 13 in NW St. Johns County; the Grand Opening of the St. Johns River Farmers Market is set for Saturday, August 25 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. This area is full of people Farmers, arts and crafts vendors needed for new NW community farmers marketlooking for close-by family entertainment, as well as farmers, artists and artisans looking for a venue for their wares, said NFVA president Arthur Glaser. We plan to provide a Saturday destination-market for the community, in the tradition of the old-time Market Day, which served as a commercial center and gathering place for entertainment, socializing and education. The NFVA is welcoming interest from local farmers, artists, crafters and volunteer organizations seeking exposure. For additional information, please email nfva.org@gmail. com.GardeningLooking forward to fall?By Contributing Writer Master Gardener Lesley Arrandale with Duval County Extension, University of Florida/IFAS Purposeful ParentingThey grow up fast By Allie Olsen, www.gracefullmom.compreschoolers as well as teens. You know what will be most memorable for your family, but in case youre tired of thinking, Ill share a few ideas that are fun and easy on the budget: Sunset picnic at Alpine Groves: Some of our favorite family pictures are from last minute picnics at this park! The playground is cool, but we usually drive past it to the riverfront and pack some balls, bubbles and lots of snacks. Take the littles to the merrygo-round: St. Augustine has plenty of noteworthy attractions, but you cant beat a $1 ride on a carousel! Our friends grab pizza from downtown and make it a cheap, fun family night. For more St. Augustine ideas, check out www.SimplyStAugustine.com Hit up Redbox: Popcorn and a movie may be standard, but what about coordinating your snack with the ick? Some memorable combos weve done are Kung Fu Panda and sushi, Happy Feet and ice cream, Tin Tin and doggie treats. (Thats my hubbys bad humor. Ha!) Relax by the water: Utilize your neighborhood pool or head to the beach. We live in Floridamake the most of these long summer days! Have a good time now. Make some memories you and your kids can look back on in those ve short years! ture broccoli heads. Just dont discard the plants before giving them a chance to develop. The University of Florida is a great source of information on vegetable gardening. Check out http://solutionsforyourlife.com/ hot_topics/lawn_and_garden/ veggie_gardening.html. Fall is also a good time to review your ower and shrub plantings. By August there may be casualties you want to replace and overgrown spring- owering perennials that need dividing. Plan to tackle these tasks when the weather is really cooling down and youll have greater success than trying to do so in the heat of summer. If disease has been the problem, particularly root rot, it might be prudent to replace that plant with one from a di erent family. The disease may be lingering in the soil and could simply attack the replacement For more detailed information on topical gardening, I can recommend the bi-monthly newsletter from our Duval County Extension Service, A New Leaf. (http://duval.ifas.u edu/documents/nleafJulyAugust2012.pdf) The monarch butter ies will be more evident in the weeks to come, as they prepare to migrate south for the winter. If you have plenty of blooms such as pentas, this will lure them into the garden and a bonus for them would be to nd members of the milkweed family on which to lay their eggs. Its always fun for kids and adults! to see the metamorphosis of the caterpillar to butter y. If you are handy you can simply use an old cardboard box with a mesh lid as a caterpillar house. (Or you can buy a ready-made version.) Give it plenty of fresh milkweed to eat and it will very quickly grow and transform into a beautiful green and gold chrysalis. Once that stage is reached the caterpillar within is undergoing its transformation and it wont be many days until the new butter y splits the chrysalis and emerges, wet and crumpled, from its con nes. The wings take several hours to plump up and become functional. Once the monarch is ready to y, carefully shift the box outside and place it near some owers. Remove the lid and watch. Who knows, your hatchling may be one of the millions of monarchs that will make its way to overwinter in Mexico! Photo by Peggy Greb (www.ars.usda. gov) WWW WWWwww.TheCreekLine.comVisit our website: 209-6190I Need a Home! All adoptions are $60, which includes neutering/spaying, rabies vaccinations and shots. The Pet Center is located at 130 N. Stratton Road, just off US-1 between County Road 210 and International Golf Parkway. The hours are 8:004:30 Monday through Friday and 9:00-12:30 on the last Saturday of each month. My name is Kai; I am a 6 month old Boston terrier mix. I am current on all my vaccines but still need to be neutered. I am an inside dog, housetrained and crate trained. I get along great with other animals and children. I know simple commands and still very much a puppy.

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All funds are based in US dollars. Toll free numbers may or may not reach Canada. (ARA) You may already know that heart disease is the number one killer in America, and that factors like obesity increase your risk of developing it. But of all the shocking things you knowor believe you knowabout heart disease, heres the statistic that you might nd the most eyeopening: 80 percent of all heart disease is preventable. Its important that everyone understand as much as possible about heart disease prevention, as 80 percent of heart disease can be avoided, says Dr. Martha Grogan, medical editorin-chief of the new book Mayo Clinic Healthy Heart for Life! Heart disease claims the lives of 600,000 Americans each year and another 12.7 million su er from heart attacks. One in three women is diagnosed with heart disease and 50 percent of men are at risk of heart attacks before age 65. Those statistics may make you feel like you, too, are in the cross-hairs for developing heart disease. Some lifestyle changes, however, can help you greatly reduce your risks. In the new book, available now online and in bookstores nationwide, Mayo Clinic experts discuss risk factors for heart disease, how to recognize the symptoms, and what lifestyle steps you can take to help reduce your risk. The catchphrase Eat 5, Move 10, Sleep 8 sums up the approach Mayo experts advocate to minimize heart disease risks. The slogan reminds you to eat ve servings of fruits and vegetables each day, do at least 10 minutes of moderately intense physical exercise daily and get at least eight hours of sleep per night. In addition, Mayo experts say, 10 simple steps can help you minimize your risk of heart Ten steps to conquering heart diseasedisease. Heres a sampling of the steps that youll nd in the clinics new heart healthy book: Eat healthy: Adopt simple dietary changes such as eating at least ve fruits and vegetables each day, switching to whole grains and lean proteins, and eating a healthy breakfast every day. Be active: A sedentary lifestyle is as deadly as smoking, experts say. Exercising just 10 minutes a day can deliver signi cant heart-health bene ts. Have trouble sticking with an exercise plan? Finding something you enjoy doing, whether its playing a sport, running, tai chi, yoga or extreme house cleaning, can help you maintain your commitment to exercising. Sleep well: Sleep deprivation has serious health repercussions, including increasing your risk of heart disease. Conversely, getting adequate sleep can actually have a restorative e ect on the heart. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says sleep deprivation has become a national public health epidemic. Creating a bedtime routine and a relaxing sleep environment can help you get the eight hours of sleep per night that your body needs. Plan for emergencies: A heart emergency can happen at any time, so its important to know the warning signs of a problem. Learn to recognize symptoms of a crisis, and act quickly to get medical help. Enjoy life: A positive attitude, supportive network of family and friends, and good management of your stress not only improve your heart health, they can improve your overall enjoyment of life, as well. In addition to o ering solid advice and the 10 steps to heart health, the Mayo Clinic Healthy Heart for Life! also discusses how the heart functions, what can go wrong, tools for ongoing heart health and tips on how to keep your whole family heart healthy. Following these steps can help you dramatically reduce your risk of heart disease, even though it cant be completely eliminated, Grogan says. If youve done everything in your power to prevent heart disease or live with it as e ectively as possible, then you have, indeed, conquered it. Free PapersWorking For YouDoes your advertising leave you feeling this way?Advertising can be pretty complex. You may not know which way to turn. ere is a sign you can rely on ours. Call us today so that our professionals can make the most of your advertising investment.Insert Your Logo HereAnother sign were working for you. (ARA) While warmer weather brings many opportunities to enjoy outdoor living spaces, it also ushers in unwanted pests like ticks and mosquitoes. A mild winter often triggers an early emergence and larger populations of these insects. Frequent accounts of tick sightings and bites have been documented in many states, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports a steady increase in the prevalence of tick-borne illnesses like Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever each year. About 75 percent of all Enjoy outdoor activities while keeping bugs away reported Lyme disease cases are acquired from ticks picked up during activities in backyards and around the home, according to the CDC website. The site also notes that homeowners can reduce the population of ticks that can cause Lyme disease and the like by 68 to 100 percent with as little as one application of an appropriate outdoor insecticide spray. Another pest-spread illness, West Nile virus, is transmitted through the bites of infected mosquitoes. West Nile Enjoy outdoors cont. on pg. 35

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 35 886-4919The CreekLine Marketplace ads! Community MarketplaceAttention Small Businesses!!!For just $39 per issue you can reach 23,000+ addresses (min. of 6 issues) Call 886-4919 today! Massage TherapyAlicia Hunter LMTOnly $50 an hour #MM12329/MA53865 Neuromuscular Therapy ( 904 ) 514 5788www .hunter l mt. c omA New U Massage located in San Jose Office Center, Next to Sonnys and Ace Hardware$5 OFF with this ad. www.allearspetsitting.com (904) 687-9610 Bonded, Insured & Affordable American Classic LawnsQuality Lawn MaintenanceMandarin N. St. Johns County707 4468Residential from $30.Commercial Residential Aqua Pro Specialties LLCPRESSURE WASHING 904-704-1388Licensed & Insured ALL 24 HR. Mobile Service Re-Roong is our SpecialtyCovering Northeast Floridas Finest HomesWith Quality Work and Professional Service Since 1993. Wit h Q h Q Q ual ua ity Work and and ad Pr P ofe ssi onal Service Si nce e 19 19 9 Free Estimates!460-2815 Insured R R i S i l COASTAL ROOFING SYSTEMS A Coastal Building Systems Company State Certied Roong Contractor # CCC057020 Licensed Driveways Concrete Removal Patios Driveway Extension Walkways PaversCall Today for Free Decorative Trim with Driveway Job! Catering to the needs of the Homeowner FREE ESTIMATES838-1836Professional Computer ServicesBusiness & ResidentialFor more details, visit us at:www.itpromise.com I.T. Promise Inc. Computer Services( 904 ) 287-2254 at Fruit Cove287-0601 Carpets by Jonah.com 904-476-1476 Jonah Jones 3 Year Labor Warranty Housecleaning 207-5674 Licensed & Insured631 2731www.kleanspray.com 10% OFF1st time customers Get Rich Slow... Earn Extra Incomelearning how to operate your own Mini-Ofce Outlet from your computer and phone.Free Training. Flexible Hours. Incredible Incentives.www.reach4more.com Call Caren for a free quote!904-230-6230www.providencetravel.coCruise Ships, Riverboat Cruises, and Train Destinations MimisAll Natural HousecleaningEnvironmentally Safe Products Discount Plans Available Free Estimates 904-392-6306 JOB Finder Looking for a job in NW St.Johns County? Heres where you can nd one close to home. CLASSIFIED ADS! NOW ONLINE AT www.thecreekline.comFREE Help WantedEngineering For Kids is looking for part-time, exible, and energetic people to be part of the North Florida team. Go to http://www.engineeringforkids.net/NorthFlorida/NowHiring. html for more information. Looking for an experienced climber with references. Call Mitch @ 703-5040 Davidson Realty is now recruiting new and experienced Realtors. Let us tell you why were routinely one of the Best Places to Work in Northeast Florida. Call 904-940-5000 or visit us at www.DavidsonRealtyInc.com. Pet Sitting Company part time work with pet. Applicant must live in the 32259 area. Flexible hours. Adult applicants only. Call Robin at 687-9610. Chiropractic of ce looking for front desk receptionist. Full time position. Must have computer skills, be a fast learner, very friendly/outgoing, ling, good phone skills. Bruce Sambursky, D.C. fax resume to 683-4378 or email samburskychiro@comcast.net Panache in Julington Creek is interviewing experienced & talented Stylists to join our team. Do you enjoy working in a professional, clean & successful environment? Apply at www.getpanache. com or stop in 2758 Racetrack Road #403 HELP WANTED! If you like music (and other arts) and would like to volunteer to support a non-pro t organization bringing music to the community, please call 374 8639 Join the Baptist South circle of care. Visit e-baptisthealth.com for the most up to date list of job openings. Listings are updated daily and change often. If you have any questions, please call Human Resources at 271.6078. Seeking Licensed Massage Therapist @ A New U Massage(MM12329) Mandarin furnished massage room available NOW. Room rent is $375+ 7% tax ($401.25) a month. Rent can split w/other LMT. Phone: 904-288-0064. Pre-School and Infant/Toddler Teachers We look for quali ed teachers who love working with children. Give us a call or e-mail your resume! The Academy at Julington Creek: 904-230-8200; sara@theajc.net Pet Sitting Company Part time work with pets. Applicant must live in the International Golf Parkway area. Flexible hours. Adult applicants only. Call Robin at 687-9610. Are you sharp, motivated and teachable? Now hiring. Call 904-993-4481 Kennel job posting: Bartram Trail Veterinary Hospital is seeking a caring, hard-working person for full-time or part-time kennel position. Positive, caring attitude with ability to work independently and as part of team. Responsibilities will include feeding and exercising boarded animals, laundry, bathing animals, cleaning and light maintenance of boarding and hospital areas. Bene ts after 90-day probationary period include pet care, paid holidays, sick/personal time-off and uniforms. Regular weekday off and rotating weekend schedule standard. Fill out an application at the clinic, 6751 State Road 16 St. Augustine or go on-line to BartramTrailVets.com and download an application from the forms and fax it to 904-940-0399 or email it to angelaidlaw@ BartramTrailVets.com A/C Technician & Electircian wanted for Auto Repair Company. Contact Jon at 731-5065. Water Treatment Installer, experienced. For established Water Treatment Company. Bene ts 262-0197 or Fax: 260-6292. PT/FT Insurance billing for Chiropractic of ce. Must have a lot of experience in billing for Chiropractic of ce. Fax resume to 683-4378. Angelos Barbershop We are a mens focused barberhop where every haircut gets a hot towel neck shave. We offer hot towel face and head shaves. Must have expert straight razor skills! 11531 San Jose Boulevard Jacksonville, FL 32223 Ask for Dominic: 904-374-4948 Licensed Property & Casualty Sales Producer (Baptist South Area) Come grow with us! We are looking for a dynamic and talented multi-line producer, with the skills and drive for success. Current 220 license desired 440 license will be given consideration. Commercial/Business Insurance as well as Life/Health/Variable Annuity Licensee and experience will receive high level of consideration. Skills Requirements and Main Responsibilities of Position: Excellent oral and written communication, dependable, detail oriented, ability to multi-task, self-directed, drive, sense of urgency, and professional. Serves customers by selling personal lines P&C, commercial P&C, and life products. Manage relationships and increase customer retention and write new polciies by closing inbound lead oppotunities as well as making outbound sales calls to prospects, while cross-selling to current relationship contacts. Comp plan includes a base salary, monthly production bonuses, as well as monthly and annual incentives plan and earnings will vary based on licensing and results. Contact Deb Eveson at (904) 400-6450 PHONE 121 Financial Credit Union is seeking sales and team-oriented individuals to join our organization. We are currently hiring for the following positions at various locations. We offer competitive bene ts including 401K. Download our application at https://121fcu.org/careers. Send your application and resume to hr@121fcu.org or fax to 904-722-6643. EOE Member Service Representative Tellers Multi-function Aerobics / Pilates / Yoga Instructors, Personal Trainers, Massage Therapists and Aestheticians needed for innovative day spa. Must be licensed and insured. E-mail resume to admin@themonalisadayspa.com or call Rick at (904) 535-5101. Are you sharp, motivated and teachable? Now hiring 904-993-4481 Back to School GuideNow is the time to advertise your . Enrollment for the 2012-2013 school year, Dance, Gymnastics, Karate, Day Care, Schools, and more! The CreekLine of St. Johns County + ( Sa v e 5% on S eptembe r s a d when y ou book both months! Call to da y to r eserv e y our ad space! 904-287-4913 lg@r tpublishinginc .com Time for The CreekLines Annual poses health risks to humans and pets alike during the warm summer months. While incidents of West Nile virus have declined over the past 10 years, the CDC reports it to be an established seasonal epidemic that can cause severe illness and result in permanent neurological damage. The best way to prevent an outbreak of the disease, according to the CDC, is through the use of an integrated pest management (IPM) approach to control both adult mosquitoes and their larvae before they can hatch and mature. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) describes IPM on its website, www. epa.gov, as an e ective and environmentally sensitive approach to pest management that relies on a combination of common-sense practices. The EPA points out that the IPM approach, which takes insects life cycles into consideration as well as currently available pest control methods, is a good way to manage pests economically and with the least health and environmental hazards. In addition to the e orts and community education by organizations like the EPA, there are many simple, preventative steps that individuals can take to ensure their own lawns, gardens and patios are a safe environment for summer fun. Keeping grass cut short and eliminating standing water in and around the home are two easy, e ective ways to reduce the prevalence of menaces like ticks and mosquitoes, says Aaron Hobbs, president of RISE (Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment) a national organization representing the manufacturers, formulators and distributors of pesticide and fertilizer products. The applications of insect repellents and thorough skin checks after spending time outdoors also serve as important safeguards for adults, children and pets. Pesticide and repellent products can provide signi cant protection, and it is important to note that these products are rigorously tested and approved by EPA and your state to ensure they will protect you and your pets from harmful pests, Hobbs continues. Reading pesticide and repellent labels and following directions for proper application and storage are ways to ensure that your outdoor living spaces remain a healthy, pestfree summer haven. To learn more on how to protect your family, friends and pets from insects, rodents and weeds, visit www.DebugTheMyths.com.Enjoy outdoors cont. from pg. 34

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Page 36, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com Back to School Guide Stronger...Faster...Better RACE TRACK RDFLORA BRANCH BLVD. SR 13PUBLIX Fred Baldwin, PT, DPT, SCS, ATC, PES and Tobi Baldwin, PT, DPT, MS, OCS, MTC, FAAOMPT Sports Medicine providers for Creeks Athletic Association Soccer. Physical Therapy Sports Performance Pilates Fall Registration (Across from Zaxbys)academyofdancejax.com (Classes Begin August 27) (ClassesBeginAugust27) MUSIC LESSONS A LIFETIME GIFTPiano Lessons for Children and Adults Professional quality teacher with guaranteed results371-9690 (ARA) Everyone is born with about 100 billion brain cells. We form new connections between these cells throughout life, but the rate is particularly high when were young. Since those connections facilitate thinking and learning, parents who want to help give their children an intellectual edge should consider the brain-healthy choices they make each day. Making the e ort to nurture your childs brain with both proper nutrients and varied experiences, especially when they are young and developing at such a fast rate, is crucial, says speech pathologist Lauren Zimet, founder of Early Insights, LLC and an expert on childhood brain development. The connections in brain circuitry can be enhanced through the environments and activities a child is exposed to, and participates in, as well as the nutrients a child consumes. Zimet o ers ve tips to help parents enhance healthy brain development in their children, positioning them for success in school today and well into their future: 1. Select a rainbow. Its no secret that the bene ts of fresh fruits and vegetables are numerous, but thanks to the results of ongoing research, you can con dently add brain health to that list. Encourage your children to eat a colorful array of produce (organic when possible) each day so they get the antioxidants, vitamins and minerals needed to nourish and protect their growing brains. If your child Liberty Pines Academy PTO is excited to announce our 2012-2013 executive board: Cathy Richter, president; Karen Taylor, vice president of fundraising; Kim Delaney, vice president of membership and volunteers; Janine Bowker, treasurer; and Erin Gulden, secretary. We have many new members on the board this year who are anxious to jump in and help out and many returning members ready to share their experience. Weve been working hard this summer preparing for some great events and fundraisers. This year the LPA-PTO is o ering summer camps to St. Johns County students. We are o ering a basketball camp the week of August 6 through 10. There will be a morning session for rising third through fth graders and an afternoon session for rising sixth through eighth graders. The week of August 13 through 17, we are o ering a cheerleading camp in the morning for kindergarten through fth grade. All camps are $100 per child; for more information, please visit our website (www-lpa. stjohns.k12. .us). Please join us at Wolf Greetings, to be held August 15 through 17. Come meet your childs teacher and while there come by and visit the PTO tables. Well have lots of information and would love to talk to you about our school. You will be able to pick up your pre-ordered spirit wear as well as purchase additional items. If you pre-ordered school supplies these will be available for pick up as well. Entertainment Books are back; however, this year we will be sending them home the second week of school. And as always we will have some great prizes for top sellers and even if you just buy one youre still a winner. You get a book full of coupons and Liberty Pines gets the pro ts! Liberty Pines Academy is pleased to announce their fth annual Fall Gala on October 6, 2012 at St. Johns Golf and Country Club, starting at 6:30 p.m. This years theme is Tailgating for LPA! It will be a fun evening packed with delicious food, fabulous live and silent auction items, including celebrity items. Attire will be country club casual and there will be football fun and games you and your friends will not want to miss. Tickets are available for purchase now and you can purchase tickets at Wolf Greeting for a discount. Join us for a great time and to support Liberty Pines Academy! Childcare will be available during the event. If you Liberty Pines Academy August updateBy Contributing Writer Stephanie Bradford, Liberty Pines Academy PTOare interested in purchasing tickets, donating auction items or helping with this great event, please contact the event chairs: Jennifer Ferguson at jenniferferguson1@gmail.com or 571-7701 or Farrah Orr at orrfamily@litestream.net or 342-3056. Another great project we have been working on this summer is our PTO Discount Card. Our business partner committee has secured 13 local businesses to be a part of this new program. Every LPA family will be receiving a discount card at no cost. The card is valid for the entire school year. If you know a business interested in partnering with LPA either by o ering our families a discount or by being a business partner please contact Christy Beebe at stlouis21@yahoo.com. Finally, kindergarten parents please join us for our annual Tissues and Tea on August 24 at 8:30 a.m. This is a great way to meet other kindergarten parents and nd out all about PTO. Dates to remember: Wolf Greetings: K-2nd: Wednesday, August 15, 5:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 3rd -5th: Thursday, August Five ways to help kids boost their brain power is resistant to eating produce, encourage them to come shopping with you and select something new to try. Kids are more likely to eat what they have selected themselves. 2. Relax the right way. While its true that exercise boosts brain power, its also important to teach children how to relax. Balancing activity with relaxation is important so that kids dont get too stressed, which can impact the brains development and lead to learning and behavior problems. Teaching children early on the bene t of setting goals, working towards those goals and giving their brain and body time to relax are important life skills. When its time to relax, skip the TV and teach your child that taking a walk in nature, reading a book or drawing are great ways to unwind. Deep breathing is also an excellent practice to teach children of all ages. 3. Eat omega-3 brain food. Omega-3 essential fatty acids are critical to a childs brain development. They are called essential because we need them for optimal health. The problem is that our bodies cannot manufacture them and we can only get them from the food we eat or supplements we take. While sh, nuts and seaweed are good omega-3 sources, kids typically dont gobble down these foods. That leaves many parents worried that their kids arent getting enough, and with omega-3 de cits linked to ADHD, dyslexia and other behavioral and Boost brain power cont. on pg. 40 Back to School 2012St. Johns County First Day of School Monday, August 20www.stjohns.k12.fl.us16, 5:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 6th -8th: Friday, August 17, 5:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 20 Tissues and Tea: Friday, August 24 at 8:30 a.m. Now Enrolling for Fall 2012

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 37 Back to School Guide Gymnastics & Tumbling Gti&Tbli Registration Continues Conveniently located in Julington Creek area off Race Track Rd. next toPlease visit www.markspivak.com for schedule & forms. (Click on Tumbling Kids Logo) Bring this ad in and Get$ New Students Only bring in this ad! Durbin Creek Elementary PTO would like to welcome back our explorers to a new school year. Though we have said good bye to many good friends and great teachers, we are starting on an exciting journey. A new year brings new ways to have fun and create lifelong memories, so please join the PTO in our Bingostyle learning game. Each family will receive a Bingo card when they join the PTO. You can complete activities to Welcome back to Durbin Creek Elementary!By Contributing Writer Sheila Caballero, Correspondence Secretary, Durbin Creek PTOJulie Wright and her class of fth graders show off their tie-dye talent at Geneva Presbyterian Churchs VBS held in July. ll your card and rack up exciting prizes. Once lled, your family will be entered to win a great Disney gift basket. The teachers will be playing a form of monopoly called Durbinopoly where they can earn properties to complete a game board of their own. Once lled, they will be entered into a drawing to win an iPad for their classroom. The school year is also packed with new events and some oldies but goodies. We will be having a Family Game Night, a Casino Night (Parents Only), Space Night (old classic) and a new twist on an old favorite Durbin Snow Bowl charity event. Dont miss these events; not only will you be earning a spot on your game boards but you will be enjoying yourself and sharing your times with friends and family. If you would like the dates for these events or any more information about the DCE PTO please visit our website at www.dcepto.org. If you have some suggestions or would like to help with any of these events we would love to hear from you! Lets get our Game on at Durbin Creek!

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Page 38, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com Back to School Guide (904)292-2210 MandarinSouthBusinessCenter12421SanJoseBlvd.Suite310/320 Jacksonville,FL32223(BetweenSonnysBBQ&Solantic) LorettoRd. NSanJoseBoulevard RaceTrackRd. JulingtonCreek Lessthan1/2mi. fromJulingtonCreek MarinelaM.Nemetz,D.D.S.BoardCertifiedPediatricDentistRobertJ.Nemetz,D.D.S.,M.S.AdultDentistryPeriodonticsProsthodontics Now Enrolling for Summer Camp and Fall Riding lessonsAmy Barnett, Certied Riding Instructor by the American Riding Instructor Association Gingerbread Acres, LLC 12567 Aladdin Rd. Jacksonville, Florida 32223904-654-3561 The JCB Sharks All Star team went undefeated in the 12B State Tournament in Ocala Florida and brought home the state championship title. The Sharks opened tournament play with a hard-fought 2-1 victory over Bobby Wiesner, a 10-yearold St. Augustine resident, kicked and punched his way to the rst place podium to become the 2012 AAU USA National Champion in Taekwondo forms and sparring. The national tournament took place from July 2 through July 7 and drew about 2,000 competitors from throughout the United States. After winning gold at nationals in 2010, Wiesner reThe St. Johns County School District has o ered a broad range of Community Education evening courses since 2009, providing opportunities for workforce preparation, personal growth, and lifelong learning at area school sites. This fall, First Coast Technical College will also open their doors for fee-based evening classes covering technical and community interest subjects. Leon Mungin, Community Education coordinator at FCTC, notes that this is a reinvigoration of a program that was on the campus in past years. Because we specialize in technical training, including computers, Julington Creek 12U Sharks are state champions!Orange Park and went on to beat Atlantic Beach 13-0 and then MAA 14-5 to secure the title. Daniel Gajewski, Ethan Renaud and Alex Wicker all pitched great games. Josh Schievink led the team with ve hits followed by Andrew Dziwulski with four hits. Sam Sha er and Ryan Peterson both homered in the tournament. Overall this summer the Sharks went 15-2, winning two local tournaments and the state championship. Congratulations to Coach Shane King, Manager Paul Chouinard, Coach Mark Peterson, Jackson Lein, Josh Schievink, Alex Wicker, Ethan Renaud, Sam Sha er, Daniel Gajewski, Ryan Peterson, Andrew Dziwulski, Ian Craven, Colton Basham, Kyle Chouinard and Gri n King.FCTC joins school district to o er evening classes mechanics and culinary arts, for instance, we have facilities and equipment that is available after our students leave the campus. We also have teachers who want to share their knowledge with a broader audience. Community education is a perfect forum and we are excited to get the classes started, he states. The rst class at FCTC is a free two-hour seminar on Microsoft Power Point program from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. on August 14 in Building A. Enroll on line at www.fctc.edu; class space is limited. A full menu of classes will be available at FCTC and at many St. Johns County School District school locations beginning in August and September. Courses will include photography, basic and advanced computer programs, social networking, acting, yoga, dance, exercise, art, crafts, sewing, Spanish, American Sign Language, bluegrass string band, folk guitar and others. For information on course prices, dates, times, locations and registration, please visit the website www.sjccommunityed. com or call 547-7565 or 5477510. Dont miss this opportunity to strengthen your resume, meet new people and keep learning for life!Wiesner repeats as AAU Taekwondo Championturned to the tournament scene again this year. He quali ed for the 2012 national tournament with rst place nishes at both the Wisconsin State Championship in March and the Florida State Championship in April. An articulate A-student, Wiesner is quick to credit his successes to several area taekwondo instructors including Master Jose Delgado, Master Greg Olipendo, Titus Durojaiye and Shari Toregrossa.Bobby Wiesner displays his championship form. To view your childs school bus route, including pick up and drop off times, please visit the St. Johns County School district website: http://www.stjohns.k12.fl.us/ depts/transp/routes2012~2013 School Bus routes now online! Pencil us in!Our Back to School sectionappears again in the September issue!sales@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 39 Back to School Guide ages 5-11 ages 3-4 girls ages 7-18904-260-198311502-1 Columbia Park Dr W Jacksonville, FL 32258www.FirstCoastGymnastics.com Free Trial Class & $5 OFFwith registration Open Mondays through Fridays 8:30am 5pm 1631 Race Track Road Suite 101230-7977Most Insurances AcceptedPediatric Associates of Julington Creek, PAOffering care for Infants, Children & Adolescents Mary Ann Garcia, M.D., FAAP Victor Luz, M.D., FAAP FCA Baseball Fall TryoutsSaturday, August 18th at the Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville (Jax Suns field) 9U 10U 11U Fo r mo re i nfo r m a t i on cont a ct Ch e n e y Rob i n s on, a t cr ob i n s on@fc a .o rg o r g o to: www.fc a j a xb ase b a ll.o rg The goal for many high school students after they complete high school is to attend college. Grade point average, SAT/ACT scores and extracurricular involvement/leadership are all factors that play a role in a schools decision to admit a student. St. Johns County Schools have ranked above other schools in the state, academically, for August is Childrens Eye Health and Safety Month, and Clay Eye Physicians and Surgeons would like to education the community on prevention. A complete eye exam by an ophthalmologist that you know and trust literally sets the stage for the next 80 years, says Dr. Levine, pediatric ophthalmologist with Clay Eye. Strong vision can be a lifechanger for children. I encourage parents to give your child the best chance for success with an eye exam when theyre ready to start school at four or ve years old. Dr. Levine, who has extensive experience in pediatric ophthalmology, joined the Clay Eye team in July 2011. He is the only pediatric ophthalmologist within the eight physician practice and one of the few pediatric specialists in the region. Hes a resource that parents now have access to right in their own community. The St. Johns County School District is encouraging parents to register kindergarten students and new students to the county and/or the public school system before school starts on August 20. Parents may contact schools at their regular phone number to register their children. The schools are currently operating Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. To be eligible for kindergarten, children must be ve years old on or before September 1 and must reside in St. Johns County. To register for rst grade, children must be six years old on or before September 1 and have successfully completed kindergarten. The childs certi ed birth August is Childrens Eye Health and Safety MonthGood vision is such an important part of a childs development and is the foundation for education. I suggest if there is a concern, that you get an honest opinion from someone with experience. I have over a decade of experience in pediatric ophthalmology and emphasize a strong connection between doctor and child. While I specialize in kids, Im happy to see patients of any age. Clay Eye Physicians and Surgeons o ers comprehensive eye care in the following specialties: cataract surgery, cornea surgery, medical retina, diabetic eye disease and macular degeneration, glaucoma surgery, Lasik surgery, cosmetic eye procedures, pediatric ophthalmology, and pediatric eye exams. In addition, they o er routine eye exams, contact lenses, and boutique eyewear for the entire family. Look for their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!Register your new or kindergarten student early for St. Johns County public schoolscerti cate is required at the time of registration and only the legal name is acceptable on student records. In addition, parents should bring two proofs of residency: current utility bill, lease, and/or mortgage statement. Florida law also requires any student entering a Florida school for the rst time to show proof of certain immunizations and physical examinations. A physical examination that has been performed within one year prior to enrollment in school will be accepted. Physical examinations can be acquired from either a private physician or from the county health department. Parents should visit the individual schools websites for registration information. Additional information on registration and school attendance zones can be obtained from the Student Services O ce at 547-7598.Local business partners with high school to raise scores and raise fundsseveral years and it is the goal of Tutoring Club of St. Johns to keep our schools at the top. Owner/director, Elizabeth Loeser, is a parent and veteran teacher in St. Johns County who understands the process for college admission as well as the di culties associated with funding programs at the schools due to budget cuts. For students, one of the most di cult parts of the college admission process is achieving the SAT scores they need to be competitive among their peers. Preparing for this test is a key to their success. This is a di cult test; and many kids are completely blind-sided the rst time they take it. Tutoring Club of St. Johns is o ering students an opportunity to take this test in a simulated testing environment without the pressure of the score being reported. They then receive a complete analysis of that score, with a personal consultation with the parents to help explain what the scores mean, how the scores are used, and what the student needs to do to completely prepare for this test and be successful. The event will be held at Ponte Vedra High School on September 8 at 9:00 a.m. in the auditorium. Parents pay $35, of which $25 will be donated back to Ponte Vedra High School PTO and Booster Club. All high school students are welcome to attend, with advanced registration. Please call 230-2855 for more information and to reserve your seat.need customers?sales@thecreekline.com Visit the St. Johns County School Districts website for everything you need to know about the upcoming school year! www.stjohns.k12. .us Questions?The rst day of school is Monday, August 20, 2012Get Ready!

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Page 40, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com Back to School Guide Additional Programs Available Great Birthday Parties We are conveniently located at the corner of I-295 and San Jose Blvd.260 4866www.starlightjax.com Star ightGYMNASTICSFall is just around the corner!Register Now for the Best class, day and time. Classes begin on August 6th Our #1 Priority: Your Children! Classes are exciting and motivating! CALL TODAY! FREE TRIAL CLASS Exciting News!SDS is expanding and will be able to accomodate later afternoon classes for all ages.witzerlandance choolBalletT a Hip Ho 904 Come and check us out at our Fall Registration and Annual Supply Day SaleWednesday-Saturday, August 15th, 16th, 17th & 18th 4PM till 8PM 1/4 mile south of Julington Creek Bridge on the left near Vinos Pizzeria OFFERING: The last days of summer are here and school is right around the corner. This summer, while in Virginia, I learned rst-hand of a storm system I had never heard of before, the Derecho. Nothing like a storm to bring on simple living. Trees were down everywhere. Power was out for almost a week. Then of course there was record heat for the area. We hauled water and read. Not much else we could do! I loved reading The Queen of Water by Laura Resau. As I mentioned in last months edition of The CreekLine, it is a global read in October and I hope to participate in the authors video conference. The Queen of Water gives insight to a culture that is not readily found in books for young people and is a ctionalized account of a true story. I found myself unable to stop reading it until I nished because I kept hoping Virginia would be able to break free. Her perseverance and strength was inspirational. I was pleasantly surprised as I read Theodore Boone: The Abduction by John Grisham. I had not been very impressed with his rst one in this series but decided to try this one. I am going to get the third one to read too. My favorite so far has been Robbie Forester and the Outlaws of Sherwood St by Peter Abrahams. I just assumed the protagonist was male from the title and was really surprised to nd out Robbie is female. The story was fast moving and I highly recommend it for any student. I enjoyed reading Reasons to be Happy by Katrina Kittle. Just a fun quick read for girls. I nally read another one of the SSYRA books, A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park. This is another story based on the The St. Johns County Medical Alliance recently awarded academic scholarships to four St. Johns County high school graduates pursuing an education in a medical related eld of study. This year, a total of $3,500 in scholarships were awarded. Rebeca Siguenza, a graduate of Pedro Menendez High School and Rachel Appelo, home schooled, each received $1000. Raj Sikaria, Nease High School and Jared Freitas, Bartram Trail High School, each received $500. Emma Domingoes and Jacob Sambursky, students who received scholarships last year, were each awarded $250 for continuation of their studies. Each year, the St. Johns County Medical Alliance, in St. Johns County Medical Alliance announces 2012 scholars conjunction with the St. Johns County Medical Society, offers academic scholarships to graduating St. Johns County high school seniors pursuing an education in pre-medicine, nursing or allied health. Scholarship applicants are evaluated on academic ability, school involvement and community service. The St. Johns County Medical Alliance is comprised of spouses of St. Johns County physicians. Its purpose is to promote health education, identify and address health-care needs and issues, participate in health-related legislation and provide college scholarships to St. Johns County students. For more information about Jared Freitasthe Medical Alliance, go to www.sjcma.blogspot.com.Notes from the Pacetti Bay Media CenterBy Contributing Writer Lynn Johnson, NBCT, Library Media Specialist, Pacetti Bay Middle Schooltrue life of a Sudanese boy as he grows up. Very eye opening and another opportunity to learn about other cultures. It is short so a very quick read. You cant help but hope he will stay strong and persevere. Last but not least of the ones I have read this summer and recommend is Tasting the Sky: A Palestinian Childhood by Ibtisam Barkat. It is non- ction and reads like ction. It is Ibtisams story through her eyes as a child. It is amazing to me how resilient children are that grow up in the war torn countries. I nd myself re ecting on our freedom here in the United States. I highly recommend the two discoveries I made this summer in my quest to keep Felicity and Miles, my oldest grandchildren reading. They are good choices for any elementary age student. I remembered that The World According to Humphrey by Betty G. Birney had been on the Sunshine State Young Readers list years ago so I picked it up for Felicity. She loves animals and she had it read in a day she loved it so much. This is the same person who was burned out from reading all the SSYRA books for school and hadnt nished a book so far this summer. Now I have ordered the rest of the series and she is o and running as a reader again. My pick for Miles ended up being perfect too: Justin Case: School, Drool and Other Daily Disasters by Rachel Vail. Miles is going into third grade and had just nished reading all of The Diary of a Wimpy Kids books. He was a hard sell but he has asked me to buy the next book in the series. Be sure to keep an eye out for all the new fall releases and keep reading.Boost brain power cont. from pg. 36psychological disorders, many are turning to supplements for their children. Experts agree that the safest, most reliable source of the most important essential fatty acids (EPA and DHA) is a high quality sh oil supplement. 4. Happy brains are hydrated brains. Staying hydrated is important for growing brains and bodies. Water can improve energy, increase mental and physical performance, remove toxins and waste from the body and keep skin healthy and glowing. Based on the trillions of cells in the body that need water to function, most nutritionists agree that children need more, not less H20. To estimate how many ounces of water your child should drink daily, divide his or her weight in half and aim for that number of ounces per day. 5. Be a positive support system early on. Learning is a complex process, but children will be more open to trying new things when they know their parents believe in them. Acknowledging e ort, instead of the outcome, strengthens a childs belief in himself or herself. Teaching goal setting, prioritizing activities and working o of check lists exercises the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in the brain. Experimentation through trial and error is the way the brain learns best. Giving your childs brain what it needs to grow strong can help him or her at school and in all social situations, adds Zimet. Utilizing these tips is a great way to help position your child for success in the coming school year, and beyond. WWW WWWwww.TheCreekLine.comVisit our website: Dont miss our Back to SchoolSpecial Sectionappearing again in the September issue of The CreekLine. Make a note of it! 287-4913

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 41 Back to School Guide Each Primrose School is a privately owned and operated franchise. Primrose Schools, Balanced Learning, and The Leader in Educational Child Care are trademarks of Primrose School Franchising Company. Primrose School Franchising Company. All rights reserved. Educational Child Care for Infants through Private Pre-Kindergarten and After School Now Enrolling Engage minds and hearts will follow.Proprietary Balanced Learning curriculum Music, Spanish, Computer Technology Ongoing customized student assessment Integrated character development program Dietician-approved meals and snacks provided Primrose School of Julington Creek904.230.2828Primrose School at St. Johns Forest904.824.1100Primrose School of Glen Kernan904.992.9002 11531-10 San Jose Blvd. OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK ANGELOS BARBERSHOP (904) 374-4948We offer Traditional Straight Razor shaves by Master Barbers and precision haircuts. Come down and let Angelos be your real deal barbershop. W e offer T raditiona l S trai g h t Mention this Ad for August Special: $11.00 Kids cuts $13.00 Adults Inspiring the next generation of engineers!Fall Classes Available for Ages 4-14(Hands-on and full of learning opportunities)904-254-1281NFlorida@EngineeringForKids.net Register online at:www.EngineeringForKids.net/NorthFlorida Engineering For Kids North Florida St. Johns Technical High Schools Academy of Coastal and Water Resources and summer school students worked this summer in a partnership with Guana Tolomato Matanzas Theres a rst time for everything and for the rst time in history, a Creeks Athletic Association softball team has quali- ed for the Babe Ruth Softball World Series. This August, the Creeks 16U Softball All-Stars will head to North Carolina to compete against other 16U teams from across the country. Thirteen girls from our local area, under the leadership of Manager Tom Borys and Coaches Jason Smith, Russ Monahan, Jon Sotomayor and Julie Lawson, quali ed to compete in the World Series in Wilson, North Carolina, August 9 through 14. Team accomplishments for the season include: History in the making: Team heading to the World Series(Champions) Greatest Show on Dirt Tournament, Orange Park, Florida; (Runner-Up) District Tournament, Jacksonville; (Runner-UP) Creeks Shoot Out Tournament, St. Johns; (Third Place) Florida State Tournament, Ocala, Florida. The players, parents and coaches would like to thank their sponsors, the community and the Creeks family for the ongoing support of their e orts this season. Anyone who would like to support them as they travel to the World Series and compete to earn the championship title may contact Manager/ Head Coach Tom Borys at tborys@homeplacere.com.Academy students restore oyster reefs By Contributing Writer Tammy HardinEstuarine Research Reserve to restore oyster reefs along 1,000 feet of shoreline. Although the entire project will take time to complete, students and community volunteers made an initial deployment of recycled oyster shells from local restaurants on June 28. With Common Core Standards upon us, this restoration project provided students with a total immersion opportunity. Students performed observations, conducted research and analyses in an estuarine environment, utilized scienti c tools and learned how to measure and interpret data. In addition, students wrote about their experiences in a natural environment and re ected on their learning. Academy students are looking forward to continuing the restoration project this upcoming year and are gearing up to collect spartina grass seeds from the Guana Reserve. Once collected, academy students will cultivate the seeds into grass plugs to be used at the restoration site to complete the living shoreline. According to Linda Krepp, academy coordinator, The beauty of the project is that not only does it entail restoring valuable shoreline, but it is a true community e ort in recycling. If any student is interested in the St. John Technical High Schools Academy of Coastal and Water Resources, please contact Linda Krepp at 547-8500. The CreekLineis YOUR Community Newspaper! Send us your community news!editor@thecreekline.com

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Page 42, The CreekLine August 2012 www.thecreekline.com Back to School Guide APPOINTMENT904.264.KIDS264KIDS.COMCALL OR VISITUS ONLINE TO ANSCHEDULE San Jose Blvd. SR 13Bartram Walk Race Track RoadLOCATED ABOVE BLACKSTONE GRILLE 112 BARTRAM OAKS WALK #203 | JACKSONVILLE, FL | 32259 Ra c e T ra c k B l vd.Flora Branch Blv d 990 F l ora Bran c h Bou l evard St. Johns, F l orida 32259 www.thea cademyatju l ingtonc reek.netL i c ense #C 0 7 5J00 8 3 *As measured by the readiness scores posted by the Florida Department of Education at https://vpk.doe.orgInfant through 4 years old-VPK Before and After School for Ages 6 to 12 Fall Enrollment Call for more details.904-230-8200 We offer: The Academy will teach your child to read by age 5 Send your child to the BEST learning center in our area* Our children are more ready for lifetime learning than any other students Two of this years newest members of the Bartram Trail Dance Team (BTDT) started their journey by signing up for Bear Cub Camp as elementary school students. Emily Allen, a rising freshman and new member of BTDT, attended the cub camp as a second grader and after performing with the dance team during the homecoming football game, a dream was born. She decided that night she was going to be a member of BTDT when she got to high school. Allen took dance classes at Mark Spivaks Dance Institute, where she met Kendall Gast, also a rising freshman and BTDT member. The two soon found that in addition to being good friends, they shared a passion for dance and a common dream. They both dreamed about making the BTDT. In middle school the girls tried out and make the North Florida AllStars (NFA) dance team, where they competed in jazz and hip hop. For three years, Allen and Gast danced with the NFA team and took studio classes at Mark Spivaks, each year growing as dancers and learning to handle the demands, pressure and emotion of being on a competitive dance team. Both girls talk about the rush of excitement they felt running out on the eld at halftime, seeing the glare of the lights and the crowds lling the stands and the hush falling over everything right before the music started. One can see the joy ll their faces as they talk about the dance and getting it right and how much fun it was to be surrounded by girls of all ages who love to dance. Of course their smiles get a little bigger and their eyes sparkle as they describe the roar of the crowd as the Bear Cub Camp ran o the eld. It is obvious these girls love to dance, love to perform and love to do that with other girls. This years Bear Cub Camp is Saturday, August 25, 2012 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon at Bartram Trail High School. The performance on the eld is Friday, August 31, 2012 during Bartrams rst home football game. The campers will be broken into two age groups: Bear Cub Camp leads to fulledged BearsBy Contributing Writer Ashley Allenkindergarten through fth grade will meet in the Ninth Grade Cafeteria, Room #N130. The sixth through eighth grades will meet in the Dance Studio (Room #N126). The camp costs $40 per participant and includes t-shirt, poms, participants entry to BTHS varsity football game on August 31, dance instruction by the Bartram Trail Dance Team and a performance youll never forget! Registration at the door will begin at 8:30 a.m. in the ninth grade building. Please contact Coach Lindell with questions at Bartramdance2004@gmail.com. The Bartram Trail Dance Team had a successful season this past year. They placed second in the nation at the NDA national competition in HipHop this past March and won the Innovative Choreography Award. Even more impressive and meaningful, the Bartram Trail Dance Team was chosen out of the entire competition to be the recipient of the 2012 Sportsmanship Award given and presented by NDA for their outstanding Sportsmanship and respect towards the other teams. It is BTDTs goal to not only strive for a winning season, but to represent St. Johns County to the highest degree with their actions. The new team of 15 girls is gearing up for another successful 2012-2013 season.Bartram Trail Dance Team at the 2012 NDA summer camp at Rollins College in Orlando. Back to School 2012St. Johns County First Day of School Monday, August 20 Congratulations to the 8U Creeks Crushers All Star team for earning a berth to the Southeast Regionals in Greenville, North Carolina! They were District 1 champions, defeating Ponte Vedra Beach 25-1 in the championship game. This team of exceptional girls nished third in the 2012 Florida State Championships and earned a berth in the Regional Championships. This group also defeated the eventual state champion team from Longwood 12-3 to claim the Creeks Shootout championship and Ponte Vedra 18-6 to win the title at the Greatest Show on Dirt. Congratulations to this group of 8U girls from Creeks Athletic Association!

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www.thecreekline.com August 2012 The CreekLine, Page 43 LEARNING IS ALL AROUND. NOW ENROLLING!The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. Goddard Systems Inc. 2009 License #C07SJ0053 ASK ABOUT OURFLEXLEARNING PROGRAM 100 Julington Plaza Drive Goddard Systems, Inc. program is AdvancED accredited. Back to School Guide FREE PRENATAL MEET & GREETS Call for an Appointment Today!Three Locations for your Convenience:Ponte Vedra 1102 A1A N, #104 904 273-6533Julington Creek 1633 Race Track Road #103904 287-7000Hodges Blvd.4745 Sutton Pk. Ct. # 801904 743-2100 growing healthydoctorojax.comPlease visit our patient portal for new patient registration: facebook.com/doctorojax twitter.com/drojax Mark SpivaksInstitute & Dance ExtensionJulington Creek230-7778106 Julington PlazaCorner Race Track Road & Flora BranchMandarin 268-3583 3740 San Jose PlaceOne block N. of Crown PointFruit Cove 287-4619774 N SR 13One mile South Julington Creek Bridge Oering Outstanding Dance Instruction For All Ages For 3 Decades! $10.00OFFNew Students Only bring in this ad Fall Schedule Just Began! Registration Continues At Any Location!Visit our Website for Schedules & Forms www.markspivak.com Rachel Reis, a rising senior at Allen D. Nease High School, has made a verbal commitment to compete for Bowling Green State University (BGSU) womens gymnastics team for the Class of 2013. The Division 1 team competes in the MidAmerican Athletic Conference in the Great Lakes region. Reis decision to go to BGSU was driven by a number of factors. Although she received multiple o ers she chose BGSU because she felt the school was a good t for not only gymnastics but academically and socially. Reis said, The reason I picked BGSU was a combination of the coach and the facilities. But the coach was de nitely the main reason; I bonded quickly with Coach Kerrie. Its going to be exciting competing at the college level and being a part of the team. Kerrie Beach, BGSU womens gymnastics head coach, stated, I can tell you that Rachel was chosen out of a large pool because I rmly believe she is the right person to join this team. She will contribute as a gymnast and she will excel in the classroom. I would Local gymnast commits to Bowling Greennot make the o er unless I was sure she is the right t for our program. Reis is the 2012 Senior B uneven bars champion for the State of Florida as well as placing fourth on the uneven bars at the 2012 Region 8 Championship. Region 8 is a highly competitive eight-state region including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. In addition Reis placed second on uneven bars at the 2011 Junior Olympic National Invitational Tournament in Long Beach, California. Although uneven bars is her specialty, Reis is also very accomplished on the balance beam. She placed fourth on that event at the 2011 Region 8 Championship. Reis trains at TNT Gymnastics and Fitness in Jacksonville. Reis is the highestrecruited athlete to come out of TNTs program. BGSU is located in Bowling Green, Ohio. Recruits for the class of 2013 cannot make their commitments binding until National Signing Day in November. Back to School Guide Appearing again in our September Issue! Call 886-4919 to book your next ad! Call today to reserve your ad space! 904-287-4913 lg@rtpublishinginc.com

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2.251.99For 60 MonthsOR For 36 Months%APR*As low as%APR*As low as Lowest Rates Since The 50s Lowest Rates Since The 50s VyStar MEMBERSHIP IS OPEN TO ALL PEOPLE WHO LIVE OR WORK IN THE FOLLOWING COUNTIES: Alachua Baker Bradford Clay Columbia Duval Flagler Gilchrist Hamilton Levy Putnam Marion Nassau St. Johns Suwannee Union Volusia*Annual Percentage Rate (APR) is current as of May 30, 2012 and subject to change. Actual rate may vary and is based on an evaluation of the individuals credit history. All rates and terms are subject to conditions and certain restrictions may apply. **$100 or 12,000 Rewards points offer is only valid on new VyStar auto loans of $10,000 or greater with application date of December 15, 2011 or later and not on refinancing of an existing VyStar auto loan. Cash will be credited to member savings account or Rewards points will be credited to VyStar debit or Platinum Rewards or Platinum Rewards Plus Visa Card accounts within 30 days of loan disbursement. VyStar Credit Union.www.vystarcu.orgChoose your term. Then choose cash back or rewards points. Its entirely up to you. When you get a new auto loan or renance a non-VyStar auto loan, well deposit $100 cash into your VyStar savings account or put 12,000 Rewards Points onto your VyStar debit or credit card. And, of course, there are no fees or hidden costs. Just drive on in to any of our convenient locations or 100+ dealership partners, call, or visit vystarcu.org to apply today. Get A New Auto Loan And A Sweet Deal.JACKSONVILLE & SURROUNDING COUNTIES 904-777-6000 OUTSIDE OF JACKSONVILLE 1-800-445-6289 MANDARIN BRANCH 11343 San Jose Blvd. JULINGTON CREEK BRANCH 101 Bartram Oaks Walk (located at the corner of Race Track Road and State Road 13)12 000$100REWARDS POINTSOR CASH BACK** ** (904) 268-7310www.jpperry.com Having JP Perry shop their insurance... Well, you get the idea! Expect more...Get more! If its Insurance... JP Perry does it better! auto and $1249. Ed had Nationwide auto and $337 with JP Perry. $616 $240 while increasing coverage with J P Perry Greg $568 on his auto insurance when J P Perry shopped for him. Mi ke $1981 Larry had Geico auto and $670. Carl was with $1,494 with J P Perry.



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THE CREEKLINESM SERVING THE NORTHWEST ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMMUNITY SINCE 2001 Visit our online edition at www.thecreekline.com MEMBER OF THE RT PUBLISHING GROUP OF COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS What’s InsidePage 3 Whats New Page 4 From the CommissionerPage 5 School District Journal Page 6 The Sheriff Reports Page 9 Political Commentary Page 11 SJRWMD report Page 14 Encore! Page 15 Spivaks come to AmericaPage 16 Marine Corps League Page 18 Rotary of Bartram TrailPage 20 Porpoises win! Page 21 Boy Scouts serve Page 22 Primary Election sectionPage 25 Voter tips Page 27 Safe boating classes Page 31 Faith News Page 33 Purposeful Parenting Page 36 Back to School Guide Page 38 FCTC evening classes Page 41 Students restore reefs Page 43 Local gymnast Volume 12, Issue 8August 2012The CreekLine12443 San Jose Boulevard, Ste. 403 Jacksonville,FL 32223Presorted Standard US Postage Paid Callahan, FL 32011 Permit No.4 On Monday, July 16, the Brother Knight of Knights of Columbus Switzerland Council pulled their caravan into the dusty parking lot of the SEA Community Center in Elkton in southern St. Johns County. The cars and trucks were packed full of clothing and food donations from San Juan Del Rio Catholic Church. The delivery was accompanied by a delicious southern summer meal„fried chicken, baked beans and coleslaw composed the menu for the evening accompanied by homemade When Diane Timoney, mother of injured United States Army First Lieutenant Ryan Timoney, stepped to the microphone during the second annual All-American Hoedown and Auction, the lively crowd fell silent. She shared the intimate details of May 20, the fateful day her 26-year-old son and his military unit were attacked by an Afghani suicide bomber. For one week in July, three adult chaperones and 19 students ages 13 to 18 participated in the annual Geneva Presbyterian Church summer mission project. The group traveled to the Appalachians in rural Kentucky to provide assistance to those struggling throughout three counties in that coal mining region. They participated in the incredibly well organized Big Creek Mission program„assisting with free home repairs, childrens programs and other community outreach e orts. While there, Big Creek Fried chicken and the rest of the storyBy Karl KennellGroup raises funds to help hometown hero By Contributing Writer Claire Diamond Sano Diane Timoney shares details of the day of her sons injury in Afghanistan with attendees at the St. Michaels Soldiers second annual All-American Hoedown and Auction. Photo by Bert Brohman Brother Knight of Knights of Columbus Switzerland Council provided a meal and necessities to the SEA community. Back to School Guide Appearing again in our September Issue! Call 886-4919 to book your next ad! cookies from the Ladies Auxiliary. As the St. Vincent Medical van arrived, residents from the Elkton community wandered in and began looking through the clothing for just the right items they needed. Over 100 residents of the neighborhood came that evening for what has become a welcome monthly social event for the community. The SEA Community Center and the farm worker families of Spud, Elkton and Armstrong (SEA) have become a special monthly outreach for area charities. On the third Monday evening of each month, the St. Vincent Health Unit comes to the community center to provide free check-ups and medical services for the residents of this farm workers community. It is at this humble community center, located next to the First Baptist Church of Armstrong on Armstrong Road just down from the St. Johns County Fairgrounds, that a handful of grandmas, moms and wives/community matriarchs began serving up dinner for the residents of the farming community. It was a dinner of just what they could bring together from their own modest pantries. It is also where Kathy Bravo of JCP CARES became overcome by not only the need she observed on her “ rst visit, but also by how joyful the community matriarchs were in serving up their modest meal and trying to provide some clothes and personal items for these working men. She has made the SEA community a special project and as a result has signed up charitable groups to each take a month to go down to the SEA Community Center and provide dinner, clothing and personal Area youth on an Appalachian MissionBy Contributing Writer Wendy RichardsMission had its monthly food drive. Feed America trucks deliver bulk products like bread, cabbages, canned fruit and paper products and everyone pulls together to load bags with family portions. Then the cars arrive from as much as an hour away to bene“ t from the assistance with food and necessities, many cars carrying two families. Volunteers estimated as many as 300 to 350 cars came through that day, with area police having to assist with tra c control. Beyond sel” essly helping others in surrounding communities, Big Creek Mission provides mission groups with accommodations and meals in a Christian atmosphere geared towards teens where everyone pitches in to keep things running smoothly. Teens who Two of Ryan Timoneys friends were killed and he was severely wounded. He is now stateside receiving rehabilitation therapy, with a long road ahead to recovery. When Diane Timoney concluded her remarks, there wasnt a dry eye in the house. This was Diane Timoneys “ rst public speaking engagement since her sons injury and Mission trip cont on pg. 7 Hometown hero cont on pg. 30 SEA community dinners cont on pg. 19

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Page 2, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Call us today to learn about the latest no-downtime cosmetic dermatologic procedures and products our practice has to offer.Aging gracefully has now arrived. Mark S. Cheiken, DO Board Certi“ed Dermatologist Tiffany McMurray, ARNP-BC

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 3 What’s NewCommunity HappeningsDo you have community or club news you would like included in The CreeekLine? Then contact Martie Thompson at: editor@rtpublishinginc.com or 886-4919. At RT Publishing we welcome Letters to the Editor. We request they be no more than 250 words. All letters must include writers name, address, and telephone number. Only the name will be published. E-mail to editor@ rtpublishinginc.com. Anonymously sent letters will not be published.Letters to the Editor policy The CreekLine Community Newspaper is a free monthly publication distributed via bulk mail to homes and businesses in NW St. Johns County. Submission of articles and photographs are received by mail or email, although email to editor@rtpublishinginc.com is preferred. The writers opinions do not necessarily re”ect the opinion of RT Publishing, Inc. Advertising Rates are available by request. RT Publishing, Inc. is not responsible for advertisement content or accuracy of information provided by its advertisers. Nor does RT Publishing, Inc. endorse any of the products or services included in this publication. RT Publishing, Inc. reserves the right to refuse advertisement or copy from any advertiser. All rights are reserved and no portion of this publication may be copied without the express written consent of the publisher. 2012. RT Publishing, Inc. The CreekLine The Ocean Breeze Mandarin NewsLine Players JournalPublisher Rebecca Taus publisher@rtpublishinginc.comEditor Martie Thompson editor@rtpublishinginc.comAdvertising Sales, Linda Gay lg@rtpublishinginc.comGraphic Design, Lisa Felegygraphics@rtpublishinginc.com RT Publishing, Inc. 12443 San Jose Boulevard Suite 403 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Ph: 904-886-4919 The Friends of Alpine Park will hold a new member meet and greet on Saturday, September 1, 2012 at Alpine Groves Park. Anyone interested in joining the group is invited to meet at the farmhouse by the river at 9:00 a.m. for a history of the park presented by park naturalist, Beverly Fleming, who will be dressed in period costume. Following that we will have light refreshments while sharing our groups goals and future plans. Please come, step back in time with us and learn the history of the park and then join its future„join The Friends of Alpine Park. For additional information, email us at friendsofalpinepark@ gmail.com or visit and likeŽ our Facebook page, Friends of Alpine Park.Ž The Marine Corps League, Ancient City Detachment 383, meets on the “ rst Tuesday of each month at 1900 hours at the St. Augustine Elks Lodge 829, located at 1420 State Road A1A South in St. Augustine. For additional information, please visit mcl” 383.org. Soil preparation should be done four to six weeks before planting a production bed, so it is time to plan and prepare for the fall vegetable garden. On Thursday, August 16, the St. Johns Extension O ce will be conducting a class on this topic. It will be held at the St. Johns County Extension Of“ ce from 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon. In the class you will learn about amending the garden plot, vegetable varieties to grow for fall and winter and gardening techniques. If you have not had a soil pH analysis done in several years you may also want to bring a soil sample to submit for free testing. You must pre-register for the class. There will be a $5 registration fee or bring three nonperishable food items to donate to the St. Johns County Social Services Division of Health and Human Services Food Closet. To register for the class call 209-0430. Haven Hospice is hosting a grief and loss support group at St. Johns Family Funeral Home every Wednesday from August 1 through September 5. The group meets from 6:00 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. For more information, please contact the local o ce at 810-2377. Research shows that students who consistently meet with mentors have increased attendance, decreased disruptive behavior and/or increased academic achievement. The St. Johns County School District is looking for volunteers who have a bit of time, a listening ear and an encouraging word to help a student become successful in school and in life. Mentor s assist in a school setting and meet with a student once a week. Mentor training for the 2012-2013 school year will take place on August 30. This will be held from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon at the Fullerwood Resource Center in St. Augustine. If you are interested in taking part in this opportunity, please call 547-3945 or email freemac@ stjohns.k12.” .us. The St. Johns Federated Republican Women (SJFRW) will meet at Romney Victory Headquarters, located at 525 State Road 16 Ste.104, in St. Augustine on Wednesday, August 22 in lieu of August 20. Just drop by anytime between 9:00 a.m. and 9:00 p.m. and make calls to ensure we elect a Republican president. Lunch and dinner will be provided. For more information, please contact Debi Newton at 910-0290. The Nease High School swim team will have their 2012 tryouts on August 13 at the Palencia Pool, located at 1865 North Loop Parkway. Nease is proud to announce our new pool location and new head coach. This will be Whats New cont on pg. 4 Back to School & Back To Business! Now is the time to advertise your . Enrollment for the 2012-2013 school year, Sports, Day Care, Schools, and Back to School Business Specials! The CreekLine of St. Johns County Call today to reserve your ad space! Copies of Online Coupon not accepted

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Page 4, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com From the Commissioner’s DeskBy Contributing Writer Ron Sanchez, County Commissioner, District 2 Providing excellent patient care is everyones job at Baptist Health. Thats why we are so proud of our recent Magnet redesignation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. This four-year designation is the gold standard of recognition for nursing excellence. It means that our environment encourages nurses, physicians and staff to work collaboratively, shoulderto-shoulder, to improve patient safe ty and outcomes. For details, visit ebaptisthealth.com. Fewer than7percent of hospitals in the nation achieve Magnet recognition for excellence in patient care. BacktoBackForthesecondconsecutivetime, BaptistHealthearnsMagnetstatus. Rosemarie, medical/surgical nurse, and Dr. Namen, pulmonologist, are just two of the many Baptist Health nurses, physicians and staff whose commitment to quality is reflected in our Magnet redesignation. Bring your Digital Photos to LIFE!printmypictureonline.com Our goal is to make your prints as close to the real thing as possible! We print banners, signs, posters, canvases, giclees and more! 919-951-5201 As we approach the beginning of a new “ scal year and “ nalize the 2012-2013 annual budget, my fellow commissioners and the St. Johns County administrative sta are taking time to review, update and expand the countys communication e orts. St. Johns County was recently recognized with a 2012 SunnyŽ Award for transparency by the Sunshine Review organization. Of the more than 6,000 entities rated, we were one of only 214 to receive an AŽ grade for providing convenient website access to an array of information regarding county budgets, meetings, public records and taxes. While we are proud of our communication and transparency record and awards, we also understand there is value in periodically assessing our program for potential improvements. In conjunction with this e ort, Im happy to announce the arrival of our new communication manager, Michael Ryan. Well-versed in a variety of communication tools and techniques, he comes to St. Johns County with more than 14 years of experience and an award-winning record of building public-sector communication programs. After settling into his o ce, Ryans “ rst order of business will be to conduct a complete communication audit of all St. Johns County Board of County Commissioner o ces to outline the organizations current communication e orts. Once our existing program is assessed, a panel of representatives from di erent departments will be assembled to discuss the countys communication needs and how we can augment the e orts to share information with our residents and businesses. The overall goal will be to distribute informative and accurate stories that are of interest to the community in a timely, comprehensive, and consistent manner. Understanding that di erent people receive and process information in di erent ways, we will also pursue the use of a variety of communication tools including traditional media, video content and electronic communication tools. In the future, the awardwinning St. Johns County website will receive more frequent news updates, the GTV bulletin board and programming schedule will be expanded, our email newsletter will be re-launched and we will continue building partnerships with our local media. In addition, we will explore the creation of a mobile application for smartphones, an expanded social media presence and the use of other technology-driven communication. Our county administrator will again write a monthly update of projects and programs and many of our departments, including the library, parks and recreation, and emergency services, will be encouraged to increase communication with their respective audiences and customers. Your St. Johns County Commissioners and sta work diligently to continually provide quality services, programs, and infrastructure. In the upcoming months, we will strive to ensure you have access to an abundance of timely information regarding your community and county government. our “ rst season our new home pool, Palencia. This will also be our “ rst season with our new head coach, Susan Lucas. For more information, please visit the Nease High School home athletics page at www.neaseathletics.com. United We Guide is a free transportation and information guide for seniors who are interested in the variety of transportation options o ered throughout St. Johns County. Contact the mobility manager at the Council on Aging at 3156505 or email Katie Arnold at karnold@stjohnscoa.com. World Golf Village Toastmasters meets the “ rst and third Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at First Florida Credit Union (entrance in back), located at 1950 County Road 210 West. You are invited to visit the World Golf Village Toastmasters Club. Our members include experienced Toastmasters and those just starting. Together we share the Toastmasters experience in ...a mutually supportive and positive learning environment, where every individual member has the opportunity to develop oral communication and leadership skillsƒand have fun doing it.Ž For more information, please visit www.worldgolfvillage. toastmastersclubs.org. September is National Literacy Month and local organizations are making an e ort to expand their volunteer reading program. Reading Pals are needed in a childcare setting, along with Head Start and kindergarten classes in the St. Johns County School District. By providing just one hour per week, you can get children excited about reading. The “ rst training session for the school year is on Wednesday, September 5 from 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Training, required background screening (free to volunteers) and support are provided. If you are interested in working with young learners to create excitement for reading, please Whats New cont from pg. 3 Whats New cont on pg. 8Increased communication and transparency Advertise inThe CreekLineIt’s good for business!287-4913LG@rtpublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 5 School District Journal By Contributing Writer Beverly Slough, Chairman, St. Johns County School Board The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Over 15 Years Legal Experience904-665-0005www.preddylaw.com Offering investment advisory services as a representative of 0156581-00002-00 Prudential Financial Planning Services, a division of Pruco Securities, LLC. Buy A Business John SerbCerti“ed Business Intermediary www.FirstCoastBizBuySell.com Call 904-613-2658 for a Con“dential No-Cost Valuation & Consultation Protecting What Matters Most www.varsit y insuranceagenc y .co m Find us on Faceboo k Serving Mandarin and Julington Creek Since 1990 268-6365 Is four-peat a word? The St. Johns County School District has been named the number one school district in the state for the fourth year in a row! I am so very proud of the extraordinary instruction of our teachers, coupled with the support that our parents and community give that allows us to continue to reach the pinnacle even in the face of greater rigor and rising cut scores on the testing. Leadership also deserves applause. The School Board, Dr. Joyner, and the district sta along with our principals, have placed strong attention on the achievement of each one of our students. I believe that is the key to our success … we focus on each child, keep an eye on his/ her achievement data and make adjustments to his/her instruction to assure that each one is gaining the skills necessary to progress to the next level. I cannot emphasize enough the role that parents play in this process. When you as a parent make certain that your child is reading every day, know and understand where s/he is in terms of grades and academic progress and o er your support to the teacher to assist at home where necessary, the chance of success for your child is exponentially increased. Thank you to the entire team who surrounds our children with love, support, expertise and guidance to help each one to be successful. August 20, the opening day of school, is fast approaching. If you or someone you know has not registered an incoming student, I urge you to do so immediately. In order to meet class size requirements, we must have a “ rm understanding of how many children will be at each school and in each grade. If you are new to Florida or your child has never been in public school, you will need your childs original birth certi“ cate, his/her shot record and proof of a physical within the last 12 months, in addition to proof of residence. Please be aware of immunization requirements in our state, especially the additional ones in middle school. This information may be found by accessing the district website: www.stjohns. k12.” .us. Please take the time to explore the site as the answers to many questions as well as informative sections are available there. We in St. Johns County Schools are excited about the beginning of a new school year. This year we have three additional members to our family of schools. Palencia Elementary, located at the entrance to the Palencia development on US Highway 1, opens its doors to children for the “ rst time. Principal Don Campbell has worked hard with the community to begin to develop traditions and expectations. In addition, we welcome two new charter schools, St. Pauls School of Excellence in the Lincolnville area of St. Augustine and St. Augustine Public Montessori School located in the northern part of St. Augustine will welcome students on August 20. For more information on these schools, please see our website under the tab Schools.Ž Volunteers and business partners are always welcome in our schools. These alliances enable our teachers to extend the learning of our children and our schools to have the resources to provide additional learning tools for our students. Every school welcomes volunteers to do everything from assisting in the classroom, making copies, helping in the cafeteria, providing one-on-one tutoring, reading to children and much more. You must “ rst be cleared through the county before volunteering. Please access the volunteer form on our website and complete it today so that the background screening may be complete before school begins. Beginning last year, volunteer forms must be cleared before parents may interact with our students, even to eat lunch with your child. These requirements are a result of increased safety measures for the protection of all our children. August 14 is the primary election. Two School Board seats are up this cycle. I urge you to examine the new voter registration card you received recently. School Board and County Commission districts were redrawn after the census and you may be in a di erent district than previously. The new districts do not have an impact on County Commission races because these positions are elected countywide and all voters select the representative from all the districts. In contrast, School Board seats are single-member, meaning that only voters in a particular district elect their representative. District 1, which I serve, was drastically reduced, adding many neighborhoods to districts 2 and 4. An example is that all the neighborhoods on the south side of County Road 210 are now in District 2, currently served by Tommy Allen, while they were previously in District Baptist Medical Center Jacksonville and Baptist Medical Center South, which share a license, were ranked No. 1 among metro Jacksonville hospitals in U.S. News & World Reports annual Best Hospitals rankings, which were released this week. The hospitals were also ranked “ fth in the state. Baptist Medical Center and Baptist South were the only metro Jacksonville hospitals that were nationally ranked. The hospitals were nationally ranked among the nations top 50 hospitals in two specialties … gynecology and diabetes/ endocrinology … and regionally ranked as high-performing in the following eight specialties: Cancer Gastroenterology Geriatrics Nephrology Neurology & Neurosurgery Orthopedics Pulmonology Urology This years Best Hospitals showcases more than 720 of the nations roughly 5,000 hospitals. Only 148 of the hospitals were nationally ranked in at least one of 16 medical specialties. To be considered for ranking, hospitals had to meet certain requirements for size, technological capabilities, and Medicare volume for certain procedures. The 1,868 hospitals meeting those requirements were scored and ranked by specialty based on: Reputation (32.5 percent of the score) Mortality rate (32.5 percent) Patient safety (5 percent) Care-related factors such as nursing and patient services (30 percent) This accomplishment is a credit to the skills, knowledge and dedication of the physicians, nurses and sta ,Ž said Michael Mayo, hospital president, Baptist Medical Center Jacksonville. It gives us feedback that we are hitting our marks for excellence.Ž It is a great honor to be recognized for the care we provide patients and families,Ž says Ron Robinson, hospital president, Baptist Medical Center South. Congratulations to the nurses, physicians and sta for this a rmation of their skill and dedication.Ž The U.S. News rankings are a GPS-like aid to help steer patients to hospitals with strong skills in the procedures and medical conditions that present the biggest challenges, said U.S. News Health Rankings Editor Avery Comarow. All of these hospitals are the kinds of medical centers that should be on your list when you need the best care,Ž Comarow said. They are where other hospitals send the toughest cases.Ž The U.S. News rankings were published by U.S. News in collaboration with RTI International, a research organization based in Research Triangle Park, N.C. Highlights of the 2012-13 rankings will appear in the U.S. News Best Hospitals 2013 guidebook, to go on sale in August. The complete rankings and methodology are available at http://health.usnews.com/besthospitals. 1. District 2 is up for election in the current cycle, so those residents will be voting for their representative even though District 1 was just selected last election. In addition, polling places have changed in some instances. Your new registration card will tell you where to vote and identify your district for all races, so it is important to check your new card. It is my honor and privilege to serve you as chairman of the St. Johns County School Board. As always, I am grateful for your support of public education. If I may assist you in any way, please contact me at sloughb@stjohns.k12.” .us.Hospitals ranked No. 1 among Metro Jacksonville hospitals Dispose of unwanted/outdated prescription medication (excluding sharps, medical wastes, nuclear medications or thermometers) St. Johns County Sheriffs Of ce Weekdays excluding holidays 8:00 a.m. ~ 5:00 p.m.Contact: Crime Prevention Deputy Corporal Diana Bryant at 810-6694

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Page 6, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com The Sheriff Reports By Contributing Writer David B. Shoar, St. Johns County Sheriff CR210 Small Business Showcase ~ Highlighting various local businesses ~ ~ Win prizes & receive exclusive discounts ~This event will be a goldmine! All of these businesses will be under the same roof but you will leave knowing where to “nd all the things you need right here in your community! C R21 0 S m a ll B us i n ess S h o w case Judson Mallini, C FP C LU Financial Planner The Prudential Insurance Company of America 12428 San Jose Blvd, Suite 1 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Office 904-262-0141 Cell Phone 904-476-7758 Judson.Mallini@Prudential.com www.prudential.com/us/judson.mallini I nsurance issued by The Prudential Insurance Company of America and its affiliates. P rudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential F inancial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. F inancial planning and investment advisory services offered through Prudential Financial P lanning Services, a division of Pruco Securities, LLC. 0 221355-00001-00 TOGETHER, LETS MEET YOUR CHALLENGES Sound advice. Comprehensive financial planning. www.maymgt.com MAY Management Services, Inc.Licensed Property ManagementMAY Realty & Resort RentalsLicensed Real Estate Brokerage “Our job is to help Boards of Directors successfully manage their Associations” The Neighborhoods of World Golf Village Tim HutchisonRegional ManagerJulington Creek Plantation 1637 Racetrack Road #206 St. Johns, Florida 32259904-880-8796New Of“ce!Pam Drury Licensed Property ManagerDottie KrinerLicensed Property ManagerRich Curran-Kelley, CAMRegional ManagerKathy May“eldLicensed Property ManagerDeborah AlleyLicensed Property Manager904-940-1002 Laura QualantoneCo-Regional Mgr. You Deserve Quality Legal Representation at a Rate You Can Afford 904.379.8486www.myjaxfamilylaw.com Mention this ad for a free consult Sara Beth Frazier, Esq. This month, I would like to address a topic of concern: fraud against our elderly. Of more than 149,000 registered voters in St. Johns County, nearly 72,000 are currently age 50 or older and over 42,000 are currently age 61 or older according to records obtained from the St. Johns County Supervisor of Elections. As in other parts of the state, with the arrival of the baby boomerŽ generation, we look for St. Johns County to continue to grow our population of senior citizens. Because retired adults between the ages of 65 and 85 control over 70 percent of the nations wealth, according to the National Center on Elder Abuse and many of those people do not realize the true value of their assets, seniors are likely targets of a category of criminal activity referred to as Elder Fraud.Ž Elder fraud can be loosely described as any “ nancially motivated crime where the perpetrator intentionally misleads or deceives an elderly person in order to gain access to the victims assets for their own use. The problem with the description is that there is really no exact age that makes a person elderlyŽ or senior,Ž therefore statistics and instances of this crime are hard to track. In addition to physical age, elderŽ also describes a person in terms of bodily health and ability to function, for example, debilitating memory loss or loss of mobility. Data regarding this crime is di cult to obtain since it is estimated that only one in twenty “ ve cases ever get reported. If those estimates are reliable, we may have as many as “ ve million silent victimsŽ of elder fraud in the United States every year, surpassed only by the reported cases of elder neglect and physical abuse. Currently there are no national reporting systems in place to record and analyze this abuse. Secondly, we suspect that the crime is very often unreported. Third, the actual de“ nitions of elder fraudŽ vary and “ nally, the nature of the crime makes it di cult to detect even by trained professionals. The overwhelming physical and emotional toll of this crime can not be understated. Late in life, our elderly cannot recover in many cases as they could when they were younger and still working. For the victims, destroyed trust in a time of need and isolation, crushed dreams, ruined life savings and sometimes even physical abuse and death can be the results. Typically there is no lone indicator of “ nancial exploitation; however, there are several recognizable warning signs. Some include a new purported love interest or best friend, a caregiver who seems to demand a lot of control over decisions, sudden changes in mood or behavior such as depression or sadness, signs of neglect, possessions disappearing, inexplicable “ nancial transactions, ATM usage, checks or credit card transactions including the appearance of suspicious signatures on documents, large purchases of needless home repairs or poor explanations about speci“ c “ nancial questions where the elder person does not comprehend “ nancial arranges that have been made for them. In addition, we get reports regularly that target the elderly of a relative, such as a grandson, that is incarcerated in another country and needs money to bail him out. Oftentimes the victim is so upset they obtain a money order and send it to the suspects without checking with other family members to determine if it is true. If you know of someone that could be a victim of elder fraud or if you suspect it, please report this to your local law enforcement agency or here at the Sheri s O ce. For us in law enforcement, it is essential that we continue to follow-up with the victims of these devastating crimes after the case is closed. At the St. Johns County Sheri s O ce, we are committed to a referral network of community programs and to ensure that our victims advocates remain available to help.St. Johns County Commissioner Ken Bryan will assume the role of chair for the Florida Association of Counties Trust (FACT) on October 1, 2012. FACT is a county risk sharing pool with signi“ cant di erences from many other local government and commercial insurance programs. An atcost, not for pro“ t program, this county-owned risk pool provides broad liability coverage developed speci“ cally for Florida counties. St. Johns County is one of 20 counties that own and manage FACT through an 11 member board of trustees elected by member counties which oversees daily operations. The program has been successful in assisting the county with loss prevention strategies with an overall goal of minimizing risk related costs. FACT delivers unique insurance coverage, claims and litigation management, as well as valuable risk management services for its members. In his role as chair, Commissioner Bryan will be instrumental in leading FACT in meeting its goal of helping counties control costs of loss Elder fraudCommissioner appointed chair of Florida Association of Counties Trust through e ective risk management assistance and maintenance of reasonable and stable liability coverage pricing on an at-cost basis. The CreekLineYour Community Newspaper Everybody Gets It. Everybody Reads It.editor@thecreekline.comWhy wait for the mailman? View our digital edition online at www.thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 7 44 pages 1-4, 7-8, 15-16, 19-26, 29-30, 37-38, 41-44 Dr. Mabus of“ce is conveniently located in the Johns Creek Shopping Center. She is a graduate of the St. Vincents Family Medicine residency program and is looking forward to caring for her new Fruit Cove neighbors. Her of“ce offers medical care for: Procedures and screenings: To schedule an appointment call: (904) 450-8120Same day appointments available. Dr. Mabus of“ce is located at: St. Vincents Primary Care Johns Creek Shopping Center 2851 CR 210 W., Ste. 122 St. Johns, FL 32259St. Vincent’s Primary Care would like to welcome Allison Mabus, MD, to our St. Vincent’s HealthCare family. 2758 Race Track Rd. in Julington Creek 32259 Plantation Publix Plaza Fall in love with your hair AGAIN! (904) 209-1320www.getpanache.com 0 4 ) 2 0 9 1 3 2 0 Carl Slack Colorist/Hair StylistThe Allen D. Nease Panther Navy is part of Area 12 NJROTC (Navy Junior ROTC). Each summer, approximately 150 cadets are nominated amongst 61 high schools throughout Georgia and North Florida. The top shelf cadets meet for one week for formal leadership training at the Riverside Military academy in Gainesville, Georgia. The quali“ cations to attend this leadership academy include strong academic, athletic and leadership performance. The cadets are divided into two companies, each with “ ve platoons. For the 2012 Class, Cadets Ashley Cooper, Will Duncan, Jared Heinrich, Tyler Mayben, Christopher Mead, Madison Stenzel and Nicole Thatcher represented Nease High School NJROTC. The weeklong camp begins with intense physical training starting before dawn, preparing them for a physical “ tness test mid-week, which they must pass or risk being sent home. Throughout the day, cadets attend classes covering integrity in leadership, teamwork, planning, goal setting, loyalty, social etiquette and being a servant leader, among many other facets of leadership. Cadets are required to pass a “ nal exam at the end of the week in order to graduate from this Academy. Cadets also participate in daily drill practice to reinforce discipline and precision. Two Nease Cadets, Jared Heinrich and Will Duncan, served as platoon commanders for their respective platoons, leading them not only in drill formations but in other various functions at the academy as well. Cadets are expected to keep both their rooms and their uniforms orderly throughout the day and receive scores based on their performance in daily barracks inspections and uniform inspections. These tests instill orderliness, precision, attention to detail and time management, as well as teamwork as cadets must work together to keep their shared rooms neat and clean. Then the platoons are ranked by their cumulative score. Individual cadet scores include the combined scores for uniform inspections, room inspections, class work and exams, and the physical “ tness test. The cadet with the overall highest combined score from each platoon is named the Platoon Honor Cadet, earns the Cadet Achievement Award. This summer, Cadets Thatcher, Stenzel and Mead each won Platoon Honor Cadet within their respective platoons. Additionally, Cadet Stenzel won the award for highest academic Nease NJROTC Cadets attend leadership academyaverage in Bravo Company and Cadets Heinrich and Mead were tied for highest academic average for Alpha Company. During this summers 2012 Leadership Academy, Nease Cadets once again demonstrated high standards of excellence and commitment in their work, and once again proved the Nease NJROTC Panther Navy truly is A Cut Above.ŽCaptain Robert Young, Gunnery Sergeant Duane Hanson, Cadet Will Duncan, Cadet Christopher Mead, Cadet Tyler Mayben, Cadet Ashley Cooper, Cadet Madison Stenzel, Cadet Nicole Thatcher and Cadet Jared Heinrich. Photo by Cyndi Thatcher.resist doing basic chores at home are miraculously found pitching in to do things like mopping ” oors, doing dishes, restocking paper products in bathrooms and taking out trash on a daily basis. And these are no small tasks because roughly 200 youth and adults are staying at the facility every week throughout the summer. Thats a lot of dishes and paper products! The teens in the Geneva youth group look forward with anticipation to their mission projects, working to pay for each trip through various fundraisers throughout the year. This year, four students from outside of Genevas church family came along so they too could participate in a youth mission project. Adults and students alike came away from the trip to rural Kentucky with an appreciation for all they have, a sense of satisfaction in having made others lives a little better and a strengthened bond of friendship within the group. Its comforting to know that there are youth programs like the one o ered by Geneva Presbyterian Church building teens faith and teaching them through experience that there is much more to life than material belongings, video games and a focus on ones self. It is truly an enriching experience this group looks forward to every year.Mission trip cont from pg. 1

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Page 8, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com FREEHearing Aid EvaluationExpires 7/31/12. Some restrictions apply. Not to be combined with any other oer. What will your summer sound like? y y No two summer memories are alike, but they all have sounds that make them special. Live with hearing loss and you … and your loved ones … miss too much. Call us today to reconnect to everything beautiful in life … its never too late.Glenn W. Knox, MD, FACS 12276 San Jose Blvd., Ste 516 Jacksonville, FL 32223www.doctorknox.com 904-292-9777 Expires 8/31/12. Some restrictions apply. Not to be combined with any other oer. “Concerns about your drinking water?”Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 Years. Straight answers No high pressure. 262 0197 3760 KORI RD. Lic. #W-32 y o u C all the W ate r T reatmen t C ompany J acksonvill e h as trusted f or over 2 2 0 Years. S Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 years. call RSVP of St. Johns County at 547-3945 or email freemac@ stjohns.k12.” .us.Adults and teens age 14 and older are invited to attend the Project Lap Blanket crochet group at the Bartram Trail Branch Library on Tuesday, August 14, Tuesday, August 21 and Tuesday, August 28 from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The group will crochet or knit blankets for cancer patients at area hospitals. All skill levels are welcome. Cant come to any of the meetings? Pick up the crochet pattern at the Reference Desk in the library and crochet the blanket in your spare time. Drop o completed blankets and any yarn youd like to donate during regular library hours. For additional information, please call the Reference Desk at 827-6960. The St. Johns County Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer your lawn and garden questions at the Bartram Trail Branch Library located at 60 Davis Pond Road at the entrance to Julington Creek Plantation. Clinics are for scheduled for Saturday, August 11 and Thursday, August 16 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. You can bring in a soil sample for free pH testing. Instructions on taking a soil sample can be found on the internet. The 210 Community Market was founded by a local residents group, The 210 Community Alliance. The goal of both the founders and the market is to unite the communities along the 210 sector. The market is envisioned to be a town center for neighbors to gather and enjoy the open air atmosphere of a local community market. The market will feature specialty foods as well as artisan crafters and organic fruits and vegetables. We have moved the market to a new location, the Winn Dixie parking lot at 2220 County Road 210. Come out and join us and bring the whole family, including the dog. The market will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. the second Saturday of each month. The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-7 meets the “ rst Thursday of every month at 7:30 p.m. at the St. Augustine Yacht Club near the St. Augustine Lighthouse. The ” otilla is always looking for new members, particularly those who own aircraft, boats and have radio equipment and skills. If you are interested, please contact Vic Aquino at 460-0243. Texture with Native PlantsŽ is the program on August 16, 2:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. at the St. Johns County Agricultural Center, located at 3125 Agricultural Center Drive in St. Augustine. Enhance your landscape with plants that sway in the summer breezes and calm the senses. If you want to use less water, fertilizer and pest control, native plants can be an excellent choice. Instructors include Gail Compton, nature columnist; Beverly Fleming, Master Gardener and Renee Stambaugh, native plant consultant. The program is free, open to the public and hosted by the St. Johns County Extension Service. For more information, please call 209-0430. The MOMS Club is a wonderful way to meet other stayat-home and part-time working mothers and is a fun way for your children to socialize with other children. Mothers with children of all ages are welcome. Members for this chapter must live in the 32092 or 32095 zip codes, including all neighborhoods along the 210 corridor. We meet once a month to plan our activities for the month ahead. These business meetings are held at 10:00 a.m. on the third Thursday of every month at Faith Community Church on County Road 210. Of course, children are welcome at all of our meetings and activities. Activities are scheduled for almost every weekday of the month and moms may attend as few or as many activities as they like. Some of the activities we have planned are trips to the zoo, beach/pool days, storytime at the library, and playgroups at members homes and local parks. If you have any questions or would like to get more information to join, please email Sarah at sanmoms@gmail.com, check out our website at http:\\ sanmomsclub.weebly.com or drop into our business meeting. TOPS (Take O Pounds Sensibly) FL#493, St. Augustine has a weekly meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesdays at the Old Colee Cove Volunteer Fire Station, located at 9105 County Road 13 North (south of Buddy Boys Grocery Store). Weigh in starts at 8:30 a.m. We are a National Weight Loss Organization, fees are low and we have lots of fun, contests and inspiring programs. All are welcome; come and join us! For more information, please contact Sara Weaver at 940-7528 or Bobbi Culbreth at 824-2466. The NASJAX Skin and Scuba Diving Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the “ rst Wednesday of every month at the Golden Corral Buffet and Grill, located at 11470 San Jose Boulevard in Mandarin. The club is open to all divers and those who are interested in diving. Single, divorced, widowed and looking to make new friends? The JCP Singles Network is for adults 40s and up„a great way to meet people, make new friendships and network. If you are interested in joining us and would like more information, please email klandrum” @ comcast.net.Whats New cont from pg. 4 Congratulations to the Julington Creek 18 and up boys baseball team who won the state championship the weekend of June 30 … July 1. They are now headed to Alabama for the regional tournament.

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 9 FOR ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMMISSIONISTRICTEPUBLICAN Come and See Us For Your FREESleep Apnea Consultation! Sleep Apnea Making You Tired?Call Krantz Dental Care Today! Alan M. 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We represent companies that cover Diabetes, COPD, Previous Cancers, HIV, Heart Attacks, Strokes, Alzheimer’s and Dementia* T h e S h arp Agenc y L i f e Hea l th and Annuitie s C all Anthon y Shar p toda y at: 9 04-993-448 1 www.N o w A tP eace co m My personal situation: I have a 10-year old and a 15-year old. If my wife and I are killed in an accident tomorrow, here is what the caregiver of our children will receive: 10-year old to 18 = 8 years/$900 month = $86,400 18-22 years $6,000/year for 4 years for college = $24,00015-year old to 18 = 3 years/$900 month = $32,400 18-22 years $6000/year for 4 years for college = $24,000 Total for both children = Can you afford not to inquire? Applies to single & married parents and applies to any number of children.Are you sharp, motivated and teachable? Now hiring! We conclude reporting on The Wall Street Journal article of April 21, 2012, Rethinking The War On DrugsŽ by Mark A.R. Kleiman, Jonathan P. Caulkins and Angela Hawken. Previously, we reviewed new and innovative ways to “ ght the high cost of prosecuting alcohol-related crime and repeat drug o enders. Substantial progress in suppressing the drug use of arrestees would be a great boon. It would deprive the illicit drug markets of their most valuable customers, which would, in turn, reduce violence in innercity neighborhoods. ... Since the war on drugs started ... three decades ago, the law has found it impossible to stop the ” ow of illegal drugs. Prices have dropped despite billions of dollars spent on catching drug dealers ... We are long overdue for refocusing antidrug e orts on the central task of protecting public safety and order. David Kennedy of John Jay College in New York City has pioneered two related programs designed to go after the most violent dealers and organizations and to shut down the most violet market areas. His Drug Market Intervention program, “ rst used in High Point, N.C. ..., focuses on areas where crack house and ” agrant street-corner dealing generate crime and disorder. ... (T)he police negotiate community support, ... identify all the dealers and make cases against them. Then comes the surprising part: Instead of being arrested, the nonviolent dealers are called in for a meeting ... They are presented with the evidence against them ... and confronted by angry neighbors, clergy and relatives. Each one is then o ered a choice: Stop dealing and get help to turn your life around, or tell it to the judge. The point is not to eliminate the drug supply but to force dealing into a less ” agrant and socially damaging form: sales in bars or home delivery instead of street-corner transactions. The results have been spectacular, with long-established markets disappearing overnight. Prof. Kennedys other innovation was the Boston Cease“ re program. In 1996, violent youth gangs engaged in drug dealing and other crimes were brought in by the authorities and given a simple message: If anyone in your gang shoots somebody, we will come down on every member of the gang for all of his illegal activity. Suddenly gang members had a strong reason to enforce nonviolence on one another, and pressure from peers turned out to be more e ective than pressure from police o cers. Youth homicides dropped from two a month before the program started to none in the following two years. ... The U.S. has reached a dead end in trying to “ ght drug use by treating every o ender as a serious criminal. Blanket drug legalization has some super“ cial charm … it “ ts nicely into a soundbite or tweet … but it cant stand up to serious analysis. The real prospects for reform involve policies rather than slogans. ...Ž This series has shown proven, alternative programs which are more than theories … they are practical applications making a di erence in peoples lives. In Florida, we have found success with very tough three strikes and youre outŽ laws and taking away judicial discretion. But, with any absolutes over a period of time, we have found injustice which cancels justice. In the name of justice, in the name of “ scal responsibility, in the name of morality as a people, we have to start doing something di erent. We elect judges we feel know justice, then hamstring them with mandatory sentences. They become mere technicians rather than wise interpreters of the law. We elect state attorneys expecting them to have and use discretion, but “ nd them grandstanding and making political rather than judicious decisions. In this election year, it will be critical to elect lawmakers who will look beyond the easy solutions and “ nd innovative ways to make the places we call home safer and saner. J. Bruce Richardson is a longtime journalist and consultant who writes in Jacksonville print publications exclusively for RT Publishing, Inc. He has led projects in Washington as well as Ottawa, Canada, and authors an Internet-based transportation column which is read in more than 60 countries. He lives and works in Jacksonville.Memorial Hospital has been named a U.S. News and World Report Best Regional HospitalŽ in the publications annual Best Hospitals issue. Memorial Hospital was ranked high-performing, meaning it scored in the top 25 percent of hospitals nationwide, in nine medical specialties: € Cardiology and Heart Surgery € Diabetes and Endocrinology € Gastroenterology € Geriatrics € Gynecology € Nephrology € Neurology and Neurosurgery € Orthopedics € Pulmonology The hospital rankings, said U.S. News Health Rankings editor Avery Comarow, are like a GPS-type aid to help steer patients to hospitals with strong skills in the procedures and medical conditions that present the biggest challenges. All of these hospitals are the kinds of medical centers that should be on your list when you need the best care,Ž said Comarow.U.S. News and World Report takes into account patient survival rates, patient safety rates, technology and patient services o ered. We are very pleased the quality care we provide our patients every day is being recognized by such a well-respected organization,Ž said Memorial president and CEO James OLoughlin. Our entire sta works tirelessly to make sure our patients get the best medical experience possible.Ž This is the latest in a series of independent studies that have given Memorial Hospital positive marks for patient safety. Earlier this month Consumer Reports ranked Memorial in the top 10 percent of hospitals in Florida in terms of patient safety. Just last month Memorial Hospital received positive scores for patient safety by the independent Leapfrog Group. Memorial is also the only hospital in Jacksonville to be named a Top Performer in Key Quality Measures by the Joint Commission.Political CommentaryAngry mobs and peer pressure can be helpfulBy J. Bruce RichardsonLocal hospital ranked high-performing in nine specialties The CreekLine YOURCommunity Newspapereditor@thecreekline.com

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Page 10, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Attention Smokers AND Ex-Smokers Clinical Research Participants Needed! St. Johns Center for Clinical Research (904) 209-3173 141 Hilden Road, Suite 201 Ponte Vedra, Fl 32081 The Julington Creek Plantation CDD facilities, amenities and programs are the envy of both current and prospective Northeast Florida homeowners. The variety of recreation services and programs both appeal to and bene“ t many in the JCP community. However, just because we have a great thing going, doesnt mean we cant do it for less cost or look for ways to improve how we provide our services. At the last CDD meeting, discussion took place with regard to proposed cost savings in the proposed 2013 budget. A suggestion was made to budget an increase in the child watch program hourly rate from $3 per hour to $5 per hour which would reduce the tax payer subsidy of this program by approximately $17,000 over the budget year. However, this was met with resistance from the majority of the supervisors as an unreasonable increase. Originally when the child watch program was started, fees paid by the users were supposed to cover the costs to provide the service but that has not happened and now this program is subsidized by the tax payers by approximately $21,000 a year. During the same meeting, a supervisor made a motion to provide a 3 percent increase to all the salaried and hourly sta of the CDD, including temporary and part-time personnel. This was supported by the majority of the board of supervisors and passed. I understand discussions of government employee salary increases and incentive bonuses can be contentious topics. I believe the goal should be for government employees to receive pay, perks and bene“ ts comparable to some valid benchmark, but the CDD has, in my opinion, failed to determine what is fair or comparable salary ranges. The CDD refuses to perform an accurate and comprehensive salary analysis to evaluate each position based on its job responsibilities and the regional pay scale. If we dont know what a fair salary range is, how can we make decisions on salary increases or bonuses? This is why some residents have questioned the doubling of some employee salaries and the almost 700 percent increase in the salaries budget over the last six years. I believe that CDD operational costs could be better managed by your board of supervisors. We should be closely reviewing how we provide services in order to make improvements and pushing the user-paidŽ programs to generate revenues su cient to at least cover the expenses required to provide such services. This year I presented a plan to the CDD that would further reduce operating costs by approximately $112,000 all without reducing the level of service. If you are interested in reading how we can reduce the budget without reducing the level of service, please feel free to contact me. We work for you and I encourage you to attend the board of supervisors meetings and voice your concerns or opinions on how we are conducting your business. The next CDD meetings will take place on August 21, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. at Fruit Cove Middle School, and September 11, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. at the JCP Recreation Center. Feel free to contact me day or night via email SLansdale@jcpcdd.org or phone 509-4902. This article is my opinion and in no way constitutes nor implies District opinion, endorsement, sponsorship or viewpoint. The views expressed may or may not be shared by the other JCP CDD Supervisors. Editors Note: The CreekLine is, and has always been, agreeable to publishing columns penned by our elected o cials so that they may communicate directly with our readers, their constituents. Any questions or requests for additional public servant columns may be directed to editor@thecreekline.com.Florida has something new speci“ cally designed for aging drivers. The Florida Guide for Aging Drivers is a handy book available at no cost to senior drivers, compliments of the Florida Safe Mobility for Life Coalition. The Coalition, a group comprised of professionals from 28 organizations, created the guide to give aging drivers a comprehensive resource with the most up-to-date information available. Users will “ nd safe driving tips, licensing information, lists of resources and community contacts for every county in the state. Basically, the guide o ers just about everything an aging driver needs to be more proactive about staying safe on the road. This book compliments the website www.SafeandMobileSeniors.org and is just the right size for the cars glove box and available through the: Safe Mobility for Life Resource Center 636 West Call Street Tallahassee, FL 32306. Why does Florida need an aging driver guide? Actually, it makes perfect sense when you consider that Florida leads the nation with 18 percent of its population age 65 and older. In fact, by the year 2030, over 27 percent will be over age 65, with half of those 75 or older. Mirroring this growth, an increasing proportion of drivers in Florida are getting older. Currently, nearly 3 million drivers in Florida are over age 65. Most people experience a steady decline in some of the skills needed to safely drive as we get older; however, these changes do not a ect all drivers at the same age or in the same way,Ž says Gail Holley, Florida Department of Transportations Safe Mobility for Life program and research manager. It is important for everyone to understand the impact that aging can have on their driving and learn the warning signs and resources that are available to them so they can make the transition when driving may no longer be a safe option.Ž The guide is designed to help aging drivers strike a balance between safety and the need for independence. The hope is that users of the guide will take the time to consider their driving abilities, take steps to improve their driving skills, explore other transportation options if needed and start making a plan for retirement from driving if it becomes necessary in the future.Angelos Barbershop is now open on San Jose Boulevard south of Interstate 295 in Mandarin. They focus on men and provide traditional barbering services, just as owner Dominic Ruscettas family did years ago. Ruscetta explains, Angelo Ruscetta, my grandfather, was a barber in Italy before moving to America in 1911. He inspired me to create my own barbershop were men can come and feel the classic touch of a professional bar-New traditional barbershop opens in Mandarinber!Ž At Angelos Barbershop, every haircut gets a hot towel neck shave. They o er hot towel face and head shaves. Master barbers are available to welcome you at the door seven days a week. If you want someone who will pay attention to detail and provide real deal barbering services, be sure to visit Angelos Barbershop. Be sure to see their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!Julington Creek Plantation CDD reportBy Contributing Writer Sam Lansdale, Supervisor, Julington Creek Plantation Community Development DistrictFlorida rolls out new guide for senior drivers

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 11 Dr. Levine is dedicated to your family’s health through every stage of life. He has served Julington Creek for more than 12 years and is ready to provide you with a medical home. Services include: Sports/school physicals Immunizations Well visits for adults and children GYN care Coordination of care for chronic conditions (diabetes, hypertension, etc.) On-site lab for all blood drawsFinding the right family doctor just got easier.Same-day acute appointments 287.2794Baptist Primary Care Julington Creek1400 Bishop Estates Road, St. Johns, FL 32259 Donald J. Levine, MD Board-Certified, Family Practice, along with Carol A. Noell, PA-C 13 www.baptistprimarycare.net/levine-md ( 904 ) 825 9960 In the Winn-Dixie Shopping Center on CR 210 W2220 CR 210 W, Suite 312, St. Johns, Florida 32259 Back to School Special10% OFFAny dental treatment, including crowns, bridges, partials, veneers, etc. Not valid with other oers. Oer Expires 9/15/12New Patient Special Adults $99 & Children $79Includes dental exam and x-rays, a uoride treatment, teeth cleaning and polishing. Not valid with other oers. Oer Expires 9/15/12 Gentle, Caring Dentistry for the Whole FamilyJohn M. Joyner, DMD I specialize in helping investors identify and buy good investment properties. I have personally been successful in buying and managing investment properties. Call me today for more information. Kathy Wiedegreen, REALTOR Prudential Network Realty Cell: 904-316-4774 Ofce: 904-260-4300 www.KathySellsJacksonville.com WHY INVEST IN REAL ESTATE? More people than ever are renting Good rate of return on investment Available inventory Prices will never be better Christopher Thompson, CFP, CRPCVice PresidentInvestment Ocer Direct 904-273-7908 christopher.thompson@wellsfargoadvisors.comInvestment and Insurance Products: NOT FDIC Insured NO Bank Guarantee MAY Lose Value Wells Fargo Advisors is a registered broker-dealer and separate non-bank af“liate of Wells Fargo & Company. Member SIPC. 2010 Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC. All rights reserved. 0512-1909 [84976-v2] A1507 The St. Johns River Water Management District Governing Board approved a tentative budget on July 10 that holds steady on its tax rate and re” ects a budget that will support District core mission priorities and projects. The tentative 0.3313 millage rate would result in $80.1 million in revenue that would be part of a total $120.8 million budget. The budget is also slated to be funded with state, federal and other district sources (including timber sales, cattle leases, interest earnings, permit fees and fund balances). Under a 0.3313 millage rate„33.13 cents for every $1,000 of assessed property value„the owner of a $200,000 house with a $50,000 homestead exemption would pay $49.69 in the coming year in property taxes to the district. Additionally, the board approved a revised budgeting method that provides funding to support only the expenditures anticipated during the “ scal year. The Bartram Trail Newcomers and Womens Club will begin another year of fun activities and friendships with our “ rst meeting of the year on Tuesday, September 11 at the BlackFinn American Grille in the St. Johns Town Center. The restaurant is located at 4840 Big Island Drive, #05, Jacksonville 32226. Our meeting is open to anyone. This will be a luncheon meeting with the doors opening at 10:45 a.m. Information on entre choices, cost, reservation deadline and where to send a check is on our Facebook page … www.facebook.com/BartramTrail.Newcomers.WomensClub. The Bartram Trail Newcomers Club meets the second Tuesday of every month from September to May at various local restaurants for lunch. In addition to the monthly meetings, the club has a wide variety of interest groups. There are various card groups (bridge and canasta), golf, recipe exchange, special event outings, game day (Mexican Train), Bunko, Mah Jongg, book clubs, movie and lunch, a nature walk group and community volunteer projects. For club information, please contact Vice President of Membership Shirley Bodziak. Her email is Shirley@bodziak.com. Members who join before August 31 will pay only $20, saving $5 on their membership fee of $25. To download a membership form, go to www.facebook. com/BartramTrail.Newcomers. WomensClub. We are taking a responsible approach that is more in line with the way we and other taxpayers spend during tighter budget times,Ž said Governing Board Vice Chairman John Miklos of Orlando. By taking a pay-as-we-go approach to project spending, we will budget as we anticipate expenses to occur.Ž Through this process, the district budget for “ scal year 2012-2013, which begins October 1, will more accurately re” ect the work being accomplished on an annual basis. The budget considers the total needs for district priority projects, ensuring that projects are su ciently funded to achieve completion. The proposed budget includes funding for priority restoration projects at Fellsmere Water Management Area and provides funds for continued water supply planning, including water conservation, and minimum ” ows and levels prevention and recovery strategy projects. The tentative budget also supports the districts assessment of groundwater supplies and re” ects a continued commitment to increased use of reclaimed water in the Lower St. Johns River Basin. Public hearings on the tentative budget will be held at 5:05 p.m. on September 11 and 25. Final budget adoption will occur at the September 25 meeting. Ever wish you could get sound legal advice or services but rejected the idea of getting an attorney out of dread for all those seemingly open-ended, billable hours? Thats the very inspiration behind attorney Claudia Kennys newly opened law “ rm Legalight, located in Palencias Market Street Business Center. Kennys vision with Legalight is to break old legal traditions that intimidate the average person from seeking a lawyer or leave them feeling obligated to pay whatever astronomical fees a high-pro“ le law “ rm would charge. Legalight services eliminate the frustration people associate with attorneys that require hefty retainers and by-the-hour billing only and utilizes a “ xed, ” at-fee billing whenever possible. Not all legal services are appropriate for a “ xed ” at fee, but many, like business services and simple estate planning, can be delivered for a ” at-rate. On services that do not allow for a ” at-fee billing rate, Legalight works with the client to provide a ordably priced legal solutions that meet the individual clients speci“ c needs. For Legalight founder Kenny, necessity truly was the mother of invention. After graduating from the University of Miami with a BA in Business Administration, she and her husband Robert started a technology company, known today as Hyperscreens, LLC in St. Johns County. They were constantly discouraged by the lack of good, reasonably priced legal services available for their company. Kenny saw an opportunity to “ ll an obvious gap in the legal profession and went back to school at Florida Coastal School of Law to get her law degree. After graduating and passing the bar, she immediately went to work for Legal Aid in St. Johns County to be able to help people in need. Thats when the “ nal piece of the puzzle fell into place and Kenny envisioned the idea for Legalight. At Legal Aid, Kenny found that they were obligated to only serve those who qualify for the services based on asset-income standards that are restricted to a certain percentage over federal poverty levels. So low-income people could get Legal Aid and wealthier people could pay for the high-end law “ rms, but that still left small business owners and middle class residents unable to a ord the legal services they needed. Legalight was born out of a desire to “ ll that gap and meet peoples legal needs e ectively and economically. Be sure to see their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!District board approves tentative budget By Contributing Writer Teresa H. Monson, St. Johns River Water Management DistrictNewcomers and Womens Club announces meetingBy Contributing Writer Linda GomolkaA ordable legal services now available to St. Johns County Tell our advertisers you saw them inThe CreekLine Support our fine Advertisers! The CreekLineEverybody Gets It. Everybody Reads It.editor@thecreekline.com

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Page 12, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com ACCREDITEDACCREDITATION ASSOCIATION for AMBULATORYHEALTH CARE EYE CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE & WORLD GOLF VILLAGETHE EYE SURGERY CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE AAAHC 940-9200 T T Clinical and School Psychology Dr. William H. Edeneld “Over 40 Years Experience in the Art & Science of Educational Evalution & Psychotherapy” 904-287-3887 / 352-816-0406(3/4 mile north of the Julington Creek Bridge) Have you received your new Voter Information Card? Approximately 140,000 registered voters in St. Johns County have been mailed new Voter Information Cards. Currently, 20,000 cards have been returned to the Elections O ce by the United States Postal Service as undeliverable. Voters who have not received their cards or who need to make changes to their voter record are encouraged to update their information on-line at www.votesjc.com, by calling the Elections O ce at 823-2238 or in person at the Supervisor of Elections O ce at 4455 Avenue A, Suite 101 in St. Augustine. Voters are reminded that as a result of the recent redistricting, their voting information has changed. The Supervisor of Elections asks that voters please verify their information before going to vote. The voter information card contains the address, party a liation, polling location and district information. Note: when voting in person a voter information card is not required. The law requires photo and signature ID. Any voter without proper ID can still vote, but is required to vote a provisional ballot. For more elections information, please visit www.votesjc. com or call 823-2238. With so many looking for jobs and the opportunities out there limited, many are considering opening their own business. Working for yourself, setting your own hours and calling the shots are appealing. But what about managing your money? Working for yourself o ers ” exibility, but it also presents unique “ nancial challenges. Whether you are currently an independent contractor in todays work force or just considering making the leap to entrepreneur, here are four quick tips to help you plan your “ nancial future. Manage your cash ” ow: Its so important to be prepared to deal with periods of uneven cash ” ow. To ensure you always have money reserves, develop a budget that allows for swings in your income. Determine an average of how much revenue you can count on each month and use that as a base for monthly expenses. During months that you earn more, resist the urge to splurge. Instead, stash away extra cash in an interest-earning savings account or money market account. Also, when setting up your budget, consider paying yourself a set salary and keeping your personal and business cash in separate accounts. These steps alone will greatly simplify your life when tax time rolls around. Keep Uncle Sam happy: As an independent contractor, you should receive a Form 1099-MISC from every organization that pays you $600 or more during the tax year. But, you should also keep your own records on what you receive because the income is taxable whether or not you receive a Form 1099-MISC. Since no taxes are withheld, you will need to calculate the amount you owe. Now is the time to invest in a good tax software program or line up a good tax advisor. The IRS website (www.irs.gov) also has guidelines on calculating quarterly tax payments. Keep in mind, you will also have to pay your own Social Security and Medicare taxes. The good news is that the self-employed enjoy many unique tax breaks. Contributions to retirement plans, health insurance premiums, travel costs and o ce-related expenses may be deductible. Your personal tax advisor can help you determine which deductions are applicable to your business. Prioritize protection planning: When working for yourself, its up to you to provide your own health, disability and life insurance to protect your business and your family. At the very least, you should have enough coverage to protect against potential loss of income due to illness or disability, medical and dental expenses not covered by government health plans, and potential medical expenses while you travel. You may also need to boost your home insurance coverage or purchase liability insurance if you have a home-based business. Your best bet is to speak to a licensed “ nancial professional or accountant to determine how much coverage you really need. Invest in your future: Its never too soon, or too late for that matter, to start saving for retirement. Fortunately, the government a ords the selfemployed many generous tax breaks when it comes to retirement accounts. There are a number of retirement accounts for business owners, including the traditional IRA, Roth Ira, Keogh plan, Simple-Ira, SEPIRA and the Solo 401(k) Pro“ t Sharing Account that you can consider. Working for yourself can be both exciting and overwhelming, with many new challenges to face, and an equal number of opportunities. Developing a strategy that will help address your goals for economic security and success is an important step to your success. For additional information, please contact judson.mallini@ prudential.com.One of the most common question presented to me by customers is should I “ le a claim? My answer is always the same. It depends. Deciding to pay out of pocket or “ le an insurance claim is not always clear. You purchased insurance for lifes unexpected events, but sometimes you need the advice of your agent to guide you on when to “ le a claim. An insurance claim is a request to an insurance company to pay a loss. Once reported, the claim initiates an evaluation process to determine if the loss is the responsibility of your insurance company to contractually cover and pay. However, keep in mind the purpose of insurance for consumers is to protect them from “ nancial disaster, not small expenses. Common sense sets these guidelines. Do “ le if ƒ 1. The loss is large. Experts agree it is not wise to make small claims although the very de“ nition of smallŽ varies. Is it $500? $1,000? It depends on what you can a ord to pay out of pocket. 2. You have not had recent claims. Filing a single claim may have no e ect on your auto or homeowners premiums. (Accident forgiveness) 3. Injuries are involved. If there is a chance someone else in the incident could claim injury, “ le the claim to protect yourself from an injury lawsuit. In Florida, your own injury bills are payable by your own auto insurance company so if you went to the hospital or received a doctors treatment, I advise to “ le a claim. 4. You have had the policy with the same company for a few years. Longtime customers who make few or no claims generally will get more leniency then new customers who “ le claims. Do not “ le ifƒ 1. Your deductible is higher then the value of your claim. Many times it is best to have a damage estimate in hand before calling the insurance company claims o ce. 2. You have had other recent claims and your damage is small. Unfortunately, multiple claims in a short period of time will sometimes trigger rate increases or policy cancellation. Your agent is a valuable resource. A call for help or advice can be a way to eliminate frustration and save money! For additional information, please contact varsity@ fdn.com.Wanted: your updated addressƒ Smart money tips for the self-employedBy Contributing Writer Judson Mallini, Financial Planner, CFP, CLU, Prudential Financial Planning ServicesWhen should I le an insurance claim?By Contributing Writer Bob Ebersberger, President, Varsity Insurance Inc Lunar PhasesLast Quarter: August 9 New: August 17 First Quarter: August 24 Full: August 31 Businessnot as bigas it used to be?Call for a free consultation & we’ll work at increasing your business!The CreekLineLinda Gay 287-4913

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 13 Before After Wallace & Gari, D.D.S. Gus J. Gari, D.D.S. 1631 Racetrack Road Suite 104 St. Johns, Florida 32259 904-287-0033 St. Johns(904) 429-0290World Golf VillageNOW OPEN(904) 342-4994www.atlasphysicaltherapy.comMandarin ( 904 ) 292-0195 If you experience any of these symptoms, ask your doctor for a referral to Atlas Physical Therapy. Have you ever leaked (even a little) urine? Animal Medical Clinic at St. Johns2245-102 County Road 210W 904-827-1401 40% OFFYour Pets First Exam NEW CLIENTS ONLY A new concept salon has arrived here in the Mandarin/ NW St. Johns County area. This eclectic world style hair salon has a beautiful photography studio located right inside. What could be better than your stylist doing your hair and make-up; then stepping into a photo shoot for family portraits, senior pictures, pre and post baby pictures or maybe a mother and daughter photo shoot just for fun? This concept came from Anetta Nadolna Wilkerson. Driven by her passion for photography, Wilkersons business has been so successful that she needed to “ nd a larger space to work her magic behind the camera. In purchasing the photography studio she realized the potential to incorporate her other passions: hair styling and make-up, which she has been doing full time for many years. It just made so much sense to combine both enterprises in one place: the Art n Illusion Salon and Studio. The hair salon is made up of four stylists, a receptionist and a nail technician. All are previously of Paradise Hair Designs and have worked side by side for many years. The response to this new salon and studio has been overwhelming„whereas people used to plan pictures for special occasions, coordinating hair up-dos and make up with their photo session, now everything is conveniently located in one place. For instance, students getting senior photos have a variety of photographic opportunities including di erent out“ ts, hairstyles and even make up. Finally, the accessibility of this symbiotic union of artistic talents has resulted in some clients of Art n Illusion simply having pictures taken to upload on Facebook, use for passports or just to give a piece of themselves to a loved one. Be sure to look for their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!University of Georgia alumnus D. Andrew Dill joined his alma mater in a professional capacity as he became its newest director of federal relations, e ective July 30. Dill will replace previous director J. Gri n Doyle, who was promoted to vice president for government relations at UGA in 2011. The director of federal relations position will be based in Washington, D.C., where Dill currently lives. Since April 2011, he has served as General Electric Companys manager of government relations and policy. He started with General Electric in its experienced commercial leadership program in 2009 after working as a regional representative for United States Senator Johnny Isakson from 2007 to 2009. Andrew is an accomplished professional in both the public and private sector as well as a devoted UGA alumnus,Ž said Doyle, to whom Dill will report. His energy, expertise and contacts, along with his experiences with Senator Isakson and General Electric, will give UGA a much greater presence in our nations capital.Ž As director, Dill will be responsible for planning, coordinating and executing university priorities with the federal government that enhance the universitys research, instruction and outreach missions. He is the universitys principal liaison with the Congress, federal departments and agencies, as well as with higher education associations and related advocacy groups. In addition to coordinating UGAs government relations program and assisting with the development and implementation of the universitys federal agenda, Dill will help connect faculty and administrators with key elected and appointed o cials, including coordinating visits for both groups in Washington and Athens. Dill is currently on the executive committee of the UGA Alumni Association Board of Directors. He is chairman of the UGA 40 Under 40, a member of the Georgia State Society and a member of the Leadership Athens class of 2009. Dill graduated with a double major from the UGA Terry College of Business and Check out areas newest concept salon University of Georgia appoints new director of federal relationsSchool of Public and International A airs in 2006. He holds bachelors degrees in risk management and insurance and in political science. He also received a certi“ cate in organizational leadership while at UGA. Dill is a 2002 graduate of Bartram Trail High School. His mother, Debbie, is a sixth grade math teacher at Fruit Cove Middle School. His father, David, is the vice president of marketing for Gate Petroleum Company. They are long time St. Johns County residents.Members of the Scenic Highway Management Council are presently enjoying the summer but were still moving forward with some of our projects. The project ranking accomplished during our last meeting has helped us move forward to develop scopes of serviceŽ documents required for us to determine costs and budgets to complete the projects. When reconvening in September, well be geared to make decisions to meet our 2012 objectives. In the July issue of The CreekLine I outlined the priority list of projects were attempting to fund and complete and Im very pleased to say this has created a lot of interest on the part of The CreekLines readers who have asked for membership brochures and/or volunteer their services. This interest is much appreciated and we look forward to growing community interest in our work. Anyone interested in joining the William Bartram Scenic Highway organization to help protect and preserve the intrinsic and historic resources along the scenic highway should request a membership brochure by calling 287-5577 or e-mail alabbat@bellsouth.net Memberships start at $15 for students and seniors. Corporate sponsorships are also available. Our next regular meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. on September 13, 2012 at the County Annex at 725 Flora Branch Boulevard. See you then.William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway updateBy Contributing Writer Al Abbatiello, alabbat@bellsouth.net W W W WWWwww.TheCreekLine.comVisit our website:We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit.~Aristotle Are you a...Small Business?Medium Business?Large Business?Use your advertising dollars wisely!Contact Linda Gay today!287-4913LG@RTPublishinginc.com

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Page 14, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Fellows of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Full service care of women including: Annual Exams Endometrial Ablation No-incision Tubal Ligation In-office Surgery Advanced Laparoscopic Surgery Robotic Surgery Urinary IncontinenceComplete Obstetric Care, including High Risk PregnancyMenopausal Care Baptist Division 1Dr. Wade Barnes Dr. W. David Boyd Dr. Lindsay DeNicola Foutz Dr. Caron D. Gutovitz Dr. Catherine J. McIntyre Dr. Neil Sager Dr. Mary Ellen Wechter Joette Anderson A.R.N.P. Lisa Rhoad, A.R.N.P. Reagan Thomas, A.R.N.P.904-399-4862 12110 San Jose Boulevard Jacksonville, FL 32223 836 Prudential Drive, Suite 1202 Jacksonville, FL 32207 Nowis the timeto make your move. Conventional and Jumbo Loans USDA Rural Developement Construction to Perm FHA and VA Loans Condo Loans Fixed or Adjustable Rates First Federal offers: All loans subject to credit underwriting and approval. Please contact a mortgage originator for more details on available loan programs. Contact Scott Neeley ~Saturdays~ Alpine Groves Park 10am to 2pm St. Johns River Farmers Market ~Grand Opening Saturday, August 25 ~2060 SR 13, Switzerland, FL 32259 ~info: St.JohnsRiverFarmersMarket@gmail.com & www.facebook/St.JohnsRiverFarmersMarketVendor Info: 904-347-8900Local produce, baked goods, cheese, delicacies, art, crafts, kids activities, live music & more! A medically fragile child has unique needs that require skilled medical attention. This child may need apnea monitoring, oxygen administration, tube feedings, IV medication, tracheostomy care or ventilator management. Whether temporary or short term, this means “ nancial and time commitment from parents who may have to hire in-home nursing care or otherwise postpone work or studies to stay home full time and attend to these needs. It also usually means social isolation for the child. In Florida, these families have another answer … a littleknown solution, which happens to also be 100 percent covered by Medicaid, for those who are eligible. Florida has passed legislation and initiated a Prescribed Pediatric Extended Care program (PPEC) to provide a cost e ective alternative to private duty nursing or institutionalization and reduce the isolation As is always the trend in Jacksonville, musical and theatrical events are limited during the summer. We are fortunate however to have the Alhambra, which continues to o er a variety of theatrical experiences. As many of you know, the Alhambra was saved from extinction in 2009 by Craig Smith, who not only greatly improved the ambience of the gem of a dinner theatre facility, but has also offered some outstanding theatrical presentations accompanied by gourmet meals! On a recent visit, I was brought up to date on what is going on this summer. Currently a family-oriented production of The Wizard of OzŽ is being presented. What is special about this is the fact that the Alhambra has chosen to share its success by identifying it as a fundraiser for the Northeast Florida Community Hospice. From July 25 to August 19, the theatre will present Jason Petty in Hank and my Honky Tonk Heroes.Ž Taking one back to the beginnings of country music, it will make you smile and make you cry as it retells the story of Hank Williams tragic and too short life. Jason Petty has been acclaimed nationally for his presentation, including “ ve nominations for the New York best actorŽ award. September 5 to October 7 will see a complete change of pace when the Alhambra features Joyce DeWitt in a drama about a middle-aged couple who appear to be living the ideal life. An unexpected appearance by a former boyfriend turns their lives upside down. October 18 to November 25 will change the mood again when Phantom,Ž a di erent version of Phantom of the PPECs o er a less costly alternative to in-home nursing carethat homebound children may experience. Caregiver Services, Inc. (CSI), a leading provider of caregiving services and Floridas largest nurse registry, has been a pioneer in this program and developed meticulously appointed centers through its CSI-Special Care division to provide medical and therapeutic care in a friendly and nurturing environment. Licensed and regulated by the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA), CSIs PPEC centers are sta ed by highly skilled and quali“ ed nursing professionals and therapists, and o er up to 12 hours of daily health-focused care and therapy services. Already successfully operating in the southern part of Florida, CSI has opened centrally located centers in Jacksonville, near the downtown Wolfson Childrens Hospital and in Fruit Cove, just south of Mandarin. For the surrounding communities, convenient transportation to and from these centers is available. My grandson has a tracheostomy and a feeding tube and has received specialized attention from the nurses at CSI-Special Care,Ž said Janice Chappell, grandmother and caregiver to a patient. Therapies for my grandson are received right there in the center and the nurses are very attentive. They have actually helped in the progression of my grandsons mobility. I know that I can drop him o in the mornings and be con“ dent that he is receiving the best care possible.Ž Pediatric physicians are turning to PPECs as solutions for their patients and prescribing their services. The PPECs represent a less costly alternative to in-home care or hospitalization and provide social stimulation and peer interaction in a daycare setting. Our PPECs are not only for medically-complex children who have conditions more chronic in nature. Though we certainly have the skilled sta to manage these conditions, many of our patients require less complex supervision such as apnea monitoring or administration of small amounts of oxygen, routines that are not handled at regular daycares due to liability issues,Ž explained Jane Park, RN, Director of Pediatric Services at CSI. Some of our children simply need three or six-month skilled observation, perhaps because of feeding issues or a failure to thrive.Ž CSIs Fruit Cove PPEC can take children by the hour, by the day, by the week or on a longer-term basis. In addition to Medicaid, Private Pay is also accepted. Many stay-at-home parents “ nd great comfort in leaving their medically dependent child for the day under the care of skilled, compassionate nursing, while they run errands or have a respite. The PPECs operated by CSI are not only ful“ lling a much underserved need in the St. Johns and Duval communities. At the Fruit Cove location, they are also fostering better pediatric nursing care. CSI works with local nursing education programs to use the PPEC as part of their pediatric clinical rotation. Our CSI nurses working at the PPEC talk and teach, as they perform their routines, to provide nursing students rotating through our center an in-depth understanding of the care of medically-complex children,Ž stated Park. Look for their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!Encore!The Alhambra brightens summer entertainmentBy Betty Swenson Bergmark, Professor Emeritus, Jacksonville UniversityOperaŽ will be presented. This one is unique in that it begins the story early in the life of the phantom, with many twists along the way. And then of course the holiday season will be celebrated November 28 to December 24 with the presentation of White Christmas,Ž a tradition for more than 20 years at the Alhambra. No description of the programs being o ered would be complete without mention of the superb food one gets to enjoy as part of the celebration. After much consideration, the bu et was eliminated. Plated serviceŽ at ones table is now the routine. The menu is planned to compliment the current production and includes a choice of two or three salads, three entrees and three desserts. All food is prepared under the supervision of Executive Chef De Juan Roy. You can expect a gourmet meal! For additional information you can call 641-1212 or visit the web at www.alhambrajax. com. Genealogy ClubSat., August 11 € 2 pm Bartram Trail Library Genealogy is a very ful lling hobby! For additional information, please call 827-6960. The CreekLineNW St. Johns County’s community newspaper Everybody Gets It. Everybody Reads It.editor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 15 Green low impact pest control service Children and pet safe Licensed and InsuredKeith’s Pest LLCHave you ever asked yourself, what is worst, the bugs inside my house or the chemicals used to treat them? Keiths Pest offers a Green, Low Impact, organic based pest control service, that includes not only the outside, but the inside also. It is effective and works as well and sometimes better than other pesticides. $25.00 off “rst treatment $100.00 off termite treatment FREE Consultation Thousands of northeast Florida girls and boys have danced through the halls of Mark Spivaks Dance Institute and Dance Extension. Many danced as Sugar Plums as years of Nutcracker ballets have been performed in Jacksonville with Mark Spivaks artistic hand involved. How did our area garner such talent as Mark and Alisa Spivak? I had the grand dameŽ assignment this month of getting to sit down with the Spivaks as we relived those years when their long-awaited arrival to the First Coast became a reality. Mark Spivak graduated from the Institute of Culture and Arts in Kiev, Ukraine as a teacher, choreographer and business administrator. Beginning a dancing career at age 12, he had performed throughout the Soviet Union and abroad with the Ukrainian Concert Organization, the Russ Concert Organization and was the principal dancer of the Red Army Ensemble. Alisa Spivak had achieved a degree in gymnastic coaching and physical therapy from the Academy of Physical Culture. Mark and Alisa Spivak married in 1976. Upon Alisa Spivaks insistence, they made application in 1978 to leave the Soviet Union, as her lifetime dream was to live in the United States of America. After giving birth to their “ rst child, Stacie, she wanted to see this dream come to fruition. Their waiting period of over a year was a tough one with much persistence from the government to change their mind. But ultimately they were released to make application to ” y to America. So here they came, but to Jacksonville, Florida? Yes,Ž says Mark Spivak. I had a cousin who lived in Jacksonville so here we came; we ” ew directly to Jacksonville!Ž Mark Spivak continued, My cousin helped us get an apartment in Jacksonville and he had met one of the greatest dancer teachers at that time, Dulce Anaya. He introduced me to Dulce who was born in Cuba and was an immigrant to this country also, so she gave me a few classes to teach and I When the Spivaks came to America!By Donna Keathley 1979 The Spivaks arrive in Jacksonville.was o and running! I needed some money to pay rent and buy a car.Ž Alisa Spivak also hit the ground running; she went to work as a physical therapist for a local physician. So their life in America began, but it was not so easy as neither spoke any English! Mark Spivak remembers that there was no time for speech classes and such. He relied on the International Dance language of French for his communications at work; what he could not say in French he would demonstrate by physically dancing it out. In just a matter of three months the Spivaks opened their own dance school located in the Hendricks Avenue area; that was 22 years ago. They now have two locations in the Julington Creek area and one in Mandarin. They run nine dance ” oors all at the same time totaling 146 dance classes per week. They also give the community more opportunities to be physically “ t by leasing out their space for other activities like Jazzercise, Zumba, cheerleading, etc. Alisa Spivak recalls the day that they received their United States citizenship in downtown Jacksonville. It was a really exciting day, it was really big! But I also remember how fast I wanted to get home as I was on the verge of delivering my second child, Andrew,Ž she said as she chuckled. Mark and Alisa Spivak made their last move nine years ago when they moved from Mandarin into Julington Creek Plantation. Jacksonville has been very good to me and Alisa, its the classic American Dream. America helps anyone who helps themselves!Ž Mark Spivak proudly states. Advertise inThe CreekLineIt’s good for business!287-4913LG@rtpublishinginc.com

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Page 16, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Accepting and Selling furniture (living room, dining room, bedroom, etc) Home decor (lamps, rugs, artwork, tchotchke) New items arrive daily. We are ready to accept your entire house, estate, etc. We also oer inventory liquidation service for builders, home and furniture industry businesses, etc. For More Information call: 880 8448 or email us at: ENCOREDECOR@bellsouth.net10830 San Jose Boulevard ( across from Walmart)Visit us online at: www.EncoreDecorFL.comWE OFFER FREE PICKUP SERVICE FOR APPROVED ITEMSHours: Jacksonvilles Largest Upscale Consignment Store H Helping Hands of St. Johns County will meet on Friday, August 30 at 11:00 a.m. at Faith Community Church Community Center on County Road 210 next to Cimarrone. The Rippers from Sew Much Comfort will meet at 10:00 a.m. This volunteer organization will be working on their holiday project, Helping Heroes Families. This holiday season the group will be adopting several local military families from bases located in the area. Anyone wishing to take a star with a child/ adult name and purchase a small gift is encouraged to take one. The festive red/white and blue bows and stars will have Ammon John Bennion, of Boy Scout Troop 180 sponsored by the Julington Creek congregation of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, recently earned the rank of Eagle Scout, the highest achievement in Boy Scouting. The award was presented to him during a Court of Honor ceremony on Sunday, July 15, 2012.On June 30, Detachment 383 of the Marine Corps League, Oldest City DetachmentŽ of St. Augustine made a Hot Dog / Hamburger LandingŽ near St. George Street and Cathedral Place. This is one of many events whereby Detachment 383 raises funds to support the Marine Corps Toys for Tots program, Young Marines, scholarship programs, Canes for Veterans, Marine for Life programs and Wounded Warriors. It must be said, Mission accomplished and the situation was well in handŽ (and also on a bun). The Detachment wants to thank all of those who stopped by to support this event. Semper Fi!The Marines have landed! Helping Hands updateBy Contributing Writer Jackie ValyouLocal scout earns Eagle Scout AwardBy Contributing Writer Darlene BarringtonFor his Eagle project Bennion designed and built an after-hours donation box for the Haven Hospice Attic store located on Wells Road in Orange Park. Sales of donations from this store bene“ t those who need help paying for hospice services. Members of his scout troop, along with his family and several friends from the community, worked approximately 150 hours and completed the project on May 28. Zerorez Carpet Cleaning donated use of their trucks and labor to raise funds for materials. Bennion is a 14 year old ninth grader at Creekside High School. Along with scouting, he enjoys basketball, sur“ ng, rock climbing, reading and gaming. His future plans include college and serving a two year mission for his church. His three older brothers and his father are also Eagle Scouts. age, gender, sizes and interests of person, even pets! The families that will receive these gifts endure long separations from their brave loved ones as they “ ght to keep our country safe. This is our way of saying thank you. Patriotic trees will be located at Golf Club of South Hampton, First Florida Credit Union, Faith Community Church, St. Johns Golf and Country Club and at the Cascades. All gifts will be distributed by the chaplains at the bases. Any neighborhood association, business, girl or boy scout troop that would like to help by taking a few families are encouraged to contact jacqphil@aol.com. Last year with the help of the community, over 800 Stockings for a Soldier were sent to those “ ghting in Iraq and Afghanistan. Also on August 30, Helping Hands members will be serving a meal through Dining with Dignity. All food donations for this meal were made possible by the Newcomers Club of North St. Johns. Last month the group with the help of its members, the Knights of Columbus at San Juan Del Rio, Boy Scout Troops 280 and 287 and their leaders, prepared and served a summer barbeque to nearly 100 in St. Augustine. All had a great time and enjoyed a fresh cooked meal. Thanks to all who helped or donated to Helping Hands for this project. Dining with Dignity provides a hot meal 365 days of the year to the homeless in St. Augustine. Helping Hands is a volunteer organization that does a small project for the community once a month. They meet the last Friday of each month at Faith Community Church Community Center. The group is non-denominational and all are welcome. There are no dues, o cers or stress. The group relies solely on donations of goods and services. Members come when they can and do what they can with what is donated. For more information, please contact jacqphil@aol. com.Ladies from Helping Hands presenting new school clothes which members donated for Crookshank Elementary. Pictured are Rachel Johnson, Darlene Barrington, Lorraine Elliott, Sarah Bradley (of First Florida Credit Union which donated the bags), Bailey Benoit (guidance counselor at Crookshank School) and Terri OConnell. Thirty-two children received clothing, shoes, socks, underwear and school supplies.got news?editor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 17 FOR ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMMISSIONISTRICTEPUBLICAN Sambursky Chiropractic, LLCDr. Bruce Sambursky, Chiropractic Physician683-4376 12421 San Jose Blvd. #300 (just South of Solantic )Serving the Mandarin and Julington Creek area. www.backbonejax.com 23 Years Experience Accepting most insurance and Cash paying patients.Immediate same day appointments available. Jane Moore, Licensed Massage Therapist ( LMT # 0023441)Massage Therapist on StaTHE PATIENT OR PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE S, EXAMINATIONS OR TREATMENT. ChiropractorStop suffering from: Open Saturdays Parents of autistic children will soon have a supportive environment in which to share their feelings, ideas and treatment options, thanks to a $1000 Investing In You grant from Community First Credit Union. The grant will help launch The S.T.A.R. group, named for the bene“ ts the group will bring its members: support, teaching, advocacy and respect. School grades released in early July show that the St. Johns County School District has maintained its ranking as one of the top performing districts in the state. St. Johns County had 16 AŽ schools, seven BŽ schools and two CŽ schools. Eleven elementary schools, four middle schools and the districts only K-8 school were AŽ schools this year. With the constant changes in the criteria, school grades have become a much less reliable measure of school success,Ž said Superintendent Dr. Joseph Joyner. We are much more focused on the growth of each individual child. In spite of these changes, our students met the challenge and I could not be more proud.Ž The 11 elementary schools retaining their AŽ status, include Cunningham Creek Elementary, Durbin Creek Elementary, Hartley Elementary, Hickory Creek Elementary, R. B. Hunt Elementary, Julington Creek Elementary, Mill Creek Elementary, Ocean Palms Elementary, PVPV/Rawlings ElementaBefore those yellow school busses start pulling through our subdivisions her in North Florida we should all execute a plan for a “ nal ” ing.Ž This could be a short day trip around our area … not an expensive day but a fun one. So I pulled out my favorite planning guide out of the bookcase and I will share some ideas with you. A fun St. Augustine thing to do is to go to the Lightner Museum. A morning can be whiled away in the cool air perusing the artifacts gathered there. Do not miss viewing the antiquated spaŽ area with equipment dating back to 1889 when it “ rst opened as the Alcazar Casino and Bath Hotel. Then lunch in the pool area is a mustƒ.where else can you partake of edibles in a sunken treasure! If museums are your thingŽ go to the Cummer where Tuesdays from 4:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. are free! The Cummer Museum is located at 829 Riverside Avenue in Jacksonville. You could bind this trip together with a Saturday experience at The Lifestyle GuruSummers nal ing!By Joy HartleyNew autism support group to launch through grantCaring for a child with autism is an unknown territory for most parents,Ž said The S.T.A.R. Group creator Liz Zurn. My husband and I felt very alone when our son was diagnosed, but we made a pact that our family would adjust and provide him with the best opportunities to grown and learn. The S.T.A.R. Group will help other families do the same.Ž Zurn has partnered with Little Star Center, a non-pro“ t school providing education and behavioral services to children diagnosed with autism and other developmental delays, to help her launch the support group. The S.T.A.R. group plans on holding its monthly meetings at Crosswater Community Church in Nocatee beginning this September. The grant will provide educational materials for parents and fund specialized training for childcare volunteers who will attend to the children during the support group meetings. Families with special-needs children have special needs themselves,Ž said John Hirabayashi, CEO of Community First Credit Union. The S.T.A.R. Group will provide these parents with a forum to discuss the challenges that come with raising an autistic child and give them the opportunity to lean on each other for strength.Ž The S.T.A.R. Group is the “ fth winner of six grants that are available through the 2012 Investing in You campaign. The initiative launched in April inviting anyone with an idea to make the First Coast a better place to participate. The credit union awards $1,000 every two weeks for 90 days, with the last winner being chosen July 13. Semi-“ nalists are chosen based on which ideas receive the most likes,Ž with a panel selecting the winners that will receive grant funding from Community First. Learn more about The S.T.A.R. Group on the Community First Facebook page, www.Facebook.com/CommunityFirstCreditUnion or www. InvestingInYouContest.com. the Riverside Arts Market just down the street. This would de“ nitely be a day of “ ne arts, crafts, live music and good food! If you have never been to the Ponce de Leon Fountain of Youth in St. Augustine there is no excuse not to visit! St. Johns County residents can tour for free. This is a legendary sport where old Ponce landed here in the New World. There are lots of history and Indian artifacts that older children love to see. Another great trip is to spend the day a little south of St. Augustine down ole A1A. Make your “ rst stop at Marineland for a new hands onŽ marine experience to include swimming with the “ sh. Then turn left and pull into Washington Oaks State Park for a wonderful shady picnic spot under century old oak trees. Take the nature walk after lunch and see an old cistern, a gorgeous rose garden and beautiful “ sh ponds. A bonus with your entrance fee (a whopping $7 per car) is that you can park and swim in the ocean across the street in the parks beach area. If vintage shopping is your thing there are many non-pro“ t groups who have gently used items for sale in their thrift stores. An entire day can be spent lea“ ng through stores from Beach Boulevard to Clay County. Dont forget the upscaleŽ Goodwill shop in Ponte Vedra called the Bluetique„its fab! Speaking of picnicking, heres my friend Marys great Blonde Brownie recipe. Its easy„no mixer needed„and everyone loves them! Blonde Brownies 1 cup butter, melted 1 cup packed brown sugar Add 1 egg 1 tsp. vanilla Stir in: tsp. baking power, 1/8 tsp. baking soda, tsp. salt and 1 cup ” our. Pour mixture into 9x9 greased pan. Sprinkle top with M&Ms, Heath Chips or chocolate chips, Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes. St. Johns County school grades releasedry, Timberlin Creek Elementary and Wards Creek Elementary. The four middle schools with an AŽ status are Fruit Cove Middle, Landrum Middle, Pacetti Bay Middle, and Switzerland Point Middle. Also receiving an AŽ is Liberty Pines Academy (K-8). Schools receiving a BŽ include Ketterlinus Elementary, Mason Elementary, Osceola Elementary, South Woods Elementary, Murray Middle, Sebastian Middle and Gamble Rogers Middle. Schools receiving a CŽ include Crookshank Elementary and The Webster School. The commitment and dedication of our students, teachers, parents, administrators and support sta is evident and I am very appreciative of their hard work,Ž he added. These high marks are proof that our focus remains on outstanding performance and as always we will continue to look for ways to improve. It is gratifying to see that our e orts are re” ected in this years grades.Ž High school grades are expected to be released later this year. Liz Zurn, creator of The S.T.A.R. Group, recently accepted a $1,000 grant from Community First Credit Unions Investing in You contest to launch The S.T.A.R. Group, a support group for parents of autistic children. WOW!Shouldnt YOUR ad be in The CreekLine too? 287-4913sales@thecreekline.com

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Page 18, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com For Appointment Call904-230-0080 NEW LOCATION! 485 State Road 13Suite 3 (Next to Burger King) Dr. Thomas Lahmannwww.julingtoncreekchiro.com Is Back or Neck Pain Impacting Your Life? Dr. Thomas Lahmann Chiropractic PhysicianHumana Beech Street A Proud Participating Provider for Aetna and Blue Cross / Blue Shield United Insurance Plans Accepts All Auto Insurance Julington Creek Chiropractic & Wellness Center P.A.SpineMedTM Spinal Disc DecompressionA Safe and Pain-Free Procedure Designed for Back & Neck pain Non-Surgical, Drug Free Procedures for: Healy Homeworks Call Dan Healy Cell: 904-228-6900 dandeman@comcast.netExcellent References Available We would like to thank all our customers for helping us get established and look forward to working with you again over the next ten years. Celebrating 16 successful years in Mandarin/Fruit Cove Tree WorkbyMitch Drake & Sons (904) 703-5040 (904) 287-3819Licensed, Insured & Workmans Comp Over 35 Years Experience C heck out our reviews and 5 Star rating at Yellowbook.com Saint Augustine Ballet will be holding auditions for their 2012 production of The Nutcracker at Abellas Studio on Saturday, August 18, 2012. Dancers age eight and up who are currently studying ballet are invited to audition. Auditions are open to all students of ballet regardless of dance studio a liations. Dancers must commit to the weekly rehearsal schedule. Visit www.saintaugustineballet. com for more complete audition information. The Nutcracker performances will take place on Saturday, December 15 at 2:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. A Sunday matinee will be performed on December The members and families of the Rotary Club of Bartram Trail gathered on Saturday, June 30 to celebrate completion of another wonderful Rotary year! Outgoing President Frank Gwaltney passed the gavelŽ to incoming President Thomas Carroll. Pins were exchanged from Past President Jamie Mackey to now Past President Frank Gwaltney with enthusiasm. Gwaltney shared his The number of students in the St. Johns County School District taking Advanced Placement (AP) exams last year increased by 14 percent and the number of exams taken by students increased by 17 percent. Students scoring high enough to qualify for college credit rose by 6 percent. This continues the districts and state trend of in-St. Augustine Ballet announces Nutcracker auditions AP scores and number of students taking exams increasecreasing numbers of test-takers and exams. The AP program enables students to take collegelevel courses while still in high school. In spring 2012, 3,204 St. Johns County high school students took 6,248 AP exams. Of the total number taken, 58.5 percent received a grade high enough to qualify for college credit. The district also saw an increase in the participation of minority groups. There was an 8 percent increase in the number of African-American students taking AP exams and a 10 percent increase in the number of exams they took. In addition, there was a 13 percent increase in the number of Hispanic students taking AP exams and a 23 percent increase in the number of exams they took. Typically, a large increase in the number of tests taken would be accompanied with a drop in scores; however, we continue to increase our success rate,Ž said Superintendent Dr. Joseph Joyner. I am very proud of the number of students taking the AP exams and the number of exams they are taking. We continue to score above the state average both in the number of exams taken and in the amount of students scoring high enough for college credit. These numbers represent the dedication of our students as well as the e orts and vision of our high school principals, guidance counselors and teachers.Ž AP courses taken for college credit by St. Johns County students include Art History; Biology; Calculus AB and BC; Chemistry; English Language and Composition; English Literature and Composition; Environmental Science; European History; Human Geography; Languages including Chinese, French, Latin and Spanish; Macroeconomics; Microeconomics; Music Theory; Physics B; Physics C Electricity and Magnetism; Physics C Mechanics; Psychology; Spanish Literature; Studio Art Drawing and 2-D and 3-D Design, United States Government and Politics, United States History and World History.Rotary Club of Bartram Trail welcomes new board 16 at 2:00 p.m. in the Lewis Auditorium at Flagler College (formerly known as Flagler College Auditorium.) Dancers must wear proper ballet attire: black leotard, pink tights with hair in a bun for females and black pants and a white shirt for males. Auditions for female solos will be done on pointe. All dancers must bring a headshot. Female dancers should also bring a photo in First Arabesque. A non-refundable $25 fee audition will be charged at the time of registration. Please bring cash or make checks out to Saint Augustine Ballet. The Rotary Club of Bartram Trail 2011-12 board: Thomas Carroll, vice president/president elect; Jason Mitchell, secretary; Frank Gwaltney, president; Rick Stobe, treasurer and Amanda Leahy, sergeant at arms.appreciation for an active and committed board throughout the year and Carroll motivated the team to look towards the future and build on a solid foundation of service for our club. Carol Higley was recognized as Rotarian of the Year. Several club service projects for the year bene“ ted Hastings migrant workers, Mandarin Food Bank, Marine Toys for Tots, PolioPlus Eradication, St. Augustine Youth Services, St. Johns County Homeless Students, St. Johns County teachers, St. Johns County veterans, St. Vincents HealthCare Mobile Outreach and Wags and Whiskers. Club members also host Rotary Youth Exchange Students from around the globe providing them with the opportunity to learn a new language and experience a new culture while living the Rotary motto, Service Above Self, in our community. On behalf of everyone involved with the Rotary Club of Bartram Trail, we would like to thank Gwaltney for a fabulous year and wish Carroll the best as he takes over the reins for 2012-13! The Rotary Club of Bartram Trail meets weekly on Thursday mornings at 7:30 a.m. at Westminster Woods on Julington Creek. For more information, please contact President Thomas Carroll at tfcarrollusmc@gmail. com. Audition results will be available at www.saintaugustineballet.com by Tuesday, August 21. The August 18 rehearsal schedule is as follows: € Eight to 10 years old: Registration from 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. You must be eight years old by September 1, 2012. The eight to 10 year old audition ends at 10:30 a.m. € 11 years old and up: Registration is from 10:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Dancers must be 11 years old by September 1, 2012. The eleven and up audition ends at 12:30 p.m. € Mother Ginger Tumblers: Females should come dressed in leotard and hair pulled back. Boys should wear black shorts and white t-shirt. Registration will take place from 10:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. and the audition time is from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Audition registration forms are available on the website at www.saintaugustineballet.com. If you have additional questions please contact staugballet@ yahoo.com or call 824-1746. The St. Augustine Ballet is a 501(C)3 nonpro“ t arts organization. Their mission is to o er St. Johns County dancers the unique opportunity to perform in full-length classical ballets productions. St. Augustine Ballet strives to involve community members of all ages in meaningful dance experiences, whether as a participating dancer or audience member. The St. Johns County Education Foundation (SJCEF) has started its two week long school supply donation drive. The Tools 4 Schools drive will run until August 15 with public and internal donation sites located at select businesses and organizations in the community. Tools 4 Schools is an annual school supply drive that aims to o set teachersa classroom costs. During these next few weeks, the public is welcomed to donate new school supplies through the use of collection bins around St. Johns County and neighboring areas. Tools 4 SchoolsŽ supply drive kicks o Monetary donations are also accepted, which will be used to purchase additional supply items that are of the highest demand. All of the collected supplies will be delivered to The Bailey Group Resource Depot, the new permanent storage facility for all Tools 4 Schools donations. Teachers will go online to submit a supply request for items needed in their classrooms. The orders will be processed and “ lled through The Bailey Group Resource Depot and then delivered to teachers. The permanent Tools 4 Schools cont. on pg. 28

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 19 Opening October 2012 42 Doctors Village Dr., Saint Johns, FL www.memorialhospitaljax.com Bro k en An kl e Ast hm m a At t a c c c c c k k k k B urns Stitc h e s Dis l oca t e d S h o u l d d e e e e e e r Brok e B r o k e e n N o o s s s s s e e e e e e e e e A cci d enta l In j u u r r r r r r i i e e e e e e s s s s s The Memorial Emergency Care Center will bring round-the-clock, state-of-the-art emergency care to the Julington Creek are a. Located on Race Track Road, the 12 bed, 11,000 square foot facility will be a full-service ER with a dedicated pediatrics area, which makes it a lot dierent than an urgent care center. We will be able to take care of all of your familys emergency medical needs. 904-765-2020 www .clayeye.comFind us onFacebook Orange Park: 2023 Professional Ctr Dr. Orange Park, FL 32073 904-272-2020 Mandarin: 11790 San Jose Blvd Jacksonville, FL 32223 904-765-2020 Fleming Island: 1615 CR Rd 220, Ste 140 Fleming Island, FL 32003 904-276-2020Three convenient locations to serve you! & Macula Family Its that time of year! Girls Inc. of Jacksonvilles Fall Daddy Daughter Dance will be held Saturday, October 20, 2012 from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at the Renaissance Resort at the World Golf Village. Special dads and daughters have enjoyed this extraordinary event for many years and now it has become a tradition in the Northeast region of Florida. Girls Inc. of Jacksonville is proud to be able to o er such a remarkable event to Northeast Florida,Ž said president and CEO of Girls Inc., Beth Hughes Clark. We are thrilled to see how much the event has grown and how it is become a tradition in many families.Ž Girls Inc. is looking forward to hosting over 500 dads (or special men in their lives) and daughters. The event is $80 for each daddy-daughter Girls Inc. announces fall seasons Daddy Daughter Dancecouple and $30 more for any additional daughters. The festivities will include a delicious dinner, DJ, professional photographs, a silent auction and ra e prizes that will make for a sensational night. Im sure I speak for many fathers that were in attendance and say thank you, Girls Inc. for your e orts and we as fathers support your labors in helping our daughters achieve their potential and realize their individual gifts, talents, uniqueness, strengths and beauty that they possess,Ž said Girls Inc. dad, William Jackson. Girls Inc. of Jacksonville is a nonpro“ t organization that is dedicated to preparing girls, ages “ ve through 18, to be self-con“ dent, responsible and well-rounded individuals. All proceeds from this dance will be put back into the programs that Girls Inc. girls bene“ t from all year round. They deliver the Girls Inc. national curriculum through their Outreach, AfterSchool, Literacy and Summer programs in Northeast Florida. For more information on the Girls Inc. Daddy Daughter Dance, please visit www. girlsincjax.org or call 731-9933. To register for the Fall Daddy Daughter Dance, please visit www.girlsincjax.org.care items. The groups who have committed include Knights of Columbus Switzerland Council, the Ponte Vedra Rotary Clubs, Shepard of the Woods Lutheran Church, Shores United Methodist Church, Bartram Trail Rotary, Switzerland Community Church, Fruit Cove Baptist Church and St. Johns County United Way. On July 16, a special addition to the dinner occurred when over 30 children in Bible studies at the Baptist church joined in to have some fried chicken and of SEA community members select items donated by Brother Knight of Knights of Columbus Switzerland Council.course the delicious homemade cookies. The atmosphere during each of the monthly dinners is a strong a rmation for the charities of their purpose and the joy it brings to others as well as themselves. Now is the time to tell the rest of the story. This fall is a major milestone for this humble little community„established in October 5, 1912, it will celebrate its 100th anniversary. To celebrate, the ladies of the SEA Community have prepared a festival of events during October. SEA community dinners cont from pg. 1

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Page 20, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Julington Creek Animal Walk is a state-of-the-art pet boarding facility for dogs, cats, and exotics providing: Your pet will “ nd a welcoming retreat at our 9-acre, fenced, off-leash dog park featuring a bone-shaped swimming pool and our NE Floridas Premier Luxury Pet Resort, Dog Park and SpaConveniently located next to Julington Creek Animal Hospital Stop by for a tour and receive a coupon for a free daily park pass Aordable small dog luxury oasis. Please call for details. Veterinarian Owned and Operated We are a locally owned and operated company that is licensed, bonded, and insured. We have over 19 years of combined experience and unlike other companies in the area our owners are not only actively involved with the day to day operations but also work in the “eld running our calls on a daily basis. $300.00 off any Trane system installed by September 1st OR NO CHARGE for Service Calls with any repair on any system!The services that we offer are: air conditioning systems systems 1st Choice Heating & Air ConditioningMaking Julington Creeks Comfort Our First Priority 904-288-6955 Rotary International is the worlds oldest and most international service organization, with over 1.2 million members in 32,000 clubs in almost 200 countries. Each year, over 8,000 high school students participate in the Rotary Youth Exchange program worldwide, learning a new language and experiencing a new culture, through the e orts of Rotary volunteers around the globe. Over the past eight years the Rotary Youth Exchange program has had the privilege of sending 49 Bartram and Creekside high school students to study abroad. These students have traveled to Belgium, Brazil, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, Estonia, Finland, France, Congratulations to Head Coach Tracy Reed, Assistant Coach Christie Matlosz, the parent board of directors, the Julington Creek Plantation Club Porpoise swimmers and their families for winning the 2012 St. Johns Summer Swim Leagues Championship Meet on Friday, July 20 and Saturday, July 21 at Cecil Field Aquatic Center. The Porpoises, with 182 swimmers ages ve through 18, competed in 78 events to defeat the seven other teams in the league. It was an exciting couple of days and in the end it was the Porpoises who were victorious. Congratulations to Coach Tracy and the entire Porpoise family for such a fantastic and successful season. Congratulations to the 10u Creeks Crushers All Star team for earning a berth to the Southeast Regionals in North Carolina. They are the 2012 Florida State Champion runners-up! They won “ rst game 21-6 but lost their second game in a heart breaker and had to enter the losers bracket very early in double elimination play. They dug in deep and won six games in a row, averaging a 13-3 score per game before eventually losing the ifŽ game to Winter Springs after beating them 12-4 one game earlier to force a third game on that “ nal Sunday. Congratulations this group of 10u girls from Creeks Athletic Association!Rotary Club of Bartram Trail proud of Exchange StudentsBy Contributing Writer Carol A. HigleyGermany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Norway, Poland, Switzerland, Thailand and Turkey. Kaylin Burgess, Kendall Hale and Sarah Wiegre e are the Rotary Youth Exchange students sponsored by the Rotary Club of Bartram Trail for the 2012-13 year. Burgess, a rising senior at Bartram, will be spending the next year immersed in the Swiss culture as she heads to Zug, Switzerland. Hale, a recent graduate from Creekside and former vice president of the Creekside Interact Club, is spending her foreign exchange year in Warsaw, Poland. Wiegre e, a 2012 graduate from Bartram, will have the opportunity to put her years of studying the French language to use as she spends next year abroad in Strasbourg, France. We wish them well as they represent Rotary and the United States of America in their respective foreign countries. The other side of this exciting program is that we are also able to introduce students from around the world into our schools and our local community. For more information on Rotary Youth Exchange Florida, please visit www.rye” orida.org/. The Rotary Club of Bartram Trail meets weekly on Thursday mornings at 7:30 a.m. at Westminster Woods on Julington Creek. For more information, contact President Thomas Carroll at tfcarrollusmc@gmail. com.Julington Creek Plantation Club Porpoises take championship Congratulations Crushers Everybody reads The CreekLine Shouldn’t your ad be included?287-4913

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 21 Why do we have more than 30 full-time agents, many of whom have received the prestigious 5 Star Best in Client SatisfactionŽ award multiple times? Why do we back up those agents with a comprehensive support staff, ready and waiting to do everything it takes? Because trust isnt something youre given, its something you earn. Time and time again, year after year, the team at Davidson Realty has earned that trust from our clients„through good markets and bad. Now wed like the chance to earn yours. 904-940-5000 | DavidsonRealtyInc.comTRUSTED REAL ESTATE ADVISORS.Ž TRUSTJust “ve little letters but a really big word. Oil Change & Rotation $19.99 $20 Off All Alignments $30 Off any Brake Job09-03-12 On Sunday, July 8 at Palm Beach Gardens, 13 eight-yearold baseball players beat out the home team of Palm Beach Gardens for the state championship title in the Cal Ripken Rookie B Division. Since their “ rst all star tournament in Atlantic Beach in May, the JCB Venom have been undefeated. In their division, the Venom also won the all star tournaments in Julington Creek, Oakleaf, Ocala state quali“ er and “ nally the state tournament in Palm Beach Gardens. From the start, Christian Braum, Coleman Bullard, Daniel Cebulko, Parker Cox, Kyle DeLaGrange, Ben Heisner, Declan Hollobaugh, Luke Kaelin, Kylan McClune, Shane Mc Laughlin, Rees Pinto, Jacob Vermeire and Ian Wolcott worked and played hard each and every game, sometimes coming back from de“ cits of more than eight runs. Mom, we are state champs!Ž yelled Braum as he hugged his mom while holding the trophy that was half his size. However, even without the trophy, these hardworking boys deserved each and every win as they gave 100 percent at all times and never let the steep competition scare them away. Head Coach Scott McLaughlin said,  I cannot digest what these boys have done in the last few months. They have overcome every obstacle thrown their way and beat a great array of quality teams locally and at the state tourney level.Ž Assistant coaches Phil Braum and Bryan Wolcott were instrumental in bringing home the state title as well, along with Tim Cebulko, Gerry Vermeire Honoring the Boy Scout slogan, Do a Good Turn Daily,Ž the 11-year-old scouts from Troop 180, sponsored by the Julington Creek congregation of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, spent one morning in July volunteering at Christs Cupboard Community Food Bank. The boys sorted, checked expiration dates and shelved non-perishable food items. The food pantry, located at 810 Roberts Road in Fruit Cove, serves those in the surrounding area. Pictured are Cade Bedell, Troop Committee member JoAnn Danson, Branson Bennion, Matt Bailey, Assistant Scout Master Clark Bailey and Tyler Danson.Service with a smile 8u Venom brings home Cal Ripken State Championshipand Josh Bullard. For more information on JCB Venom and Julington Creek Baseball, contact Scott McLaughlin at scott.mclaughlin@ubs.com or 540-2598. Campers have fun with arts and crafts at Geneva Presbyterian Churchs recent Vacation Bible School (VBS)

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Page 22, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Janice BequetteAnastasia Mosquito Control Seat 3 www.janicebequette.comPolitical ad approved and paid for by Janice Bequette AMC 3 Proven Leadership Proven Fiscal ResponsibilityAdvocate for the environment, health and safety for you, your family, your animals and the visitors to our beautiful County. I ask for your vote Election Day November 6th FOR ST. JOHNS FOR ST. JOHNSDISTRICT 3 DISTRICT 3ELECT ELECTPaid by John R. Ruggeri, Republican, for St. Johns County Commissioner, District 3JOHN R. RUGGERI JOHN R. RUGGERICOUNTY COMMISSIONER COUNTY COMMISSIONER VOTE McCLUREVOTE FOR McCLURE He will nd new ways of raising revenues through utilities and infrastructure and WILL NOT raise taxes . a promise his competitors will not make! VOTE FOR McCLURE He will implement local hiring policies to put people back to work while his competitors endorse the same policies from before, bringing in jobs from other regions! VOTE FOR McCLURE He will implement scal accountability for all departments, just like a successful busines. While his competitors endorse the ever increa ing the budget. VOTE FOR McCLURE He will NOT give a golden parachute to ANY County employee and will always put this Countys Issues rst, not self proclaimed entitlement! VOTE FOR McCLURE He will make sure the County can operate like a business, expanding and contracting, creating a more ecient government. Each election cycle we are solicited by prospective candidates with road signs, commercials and interviews as they seek o ces as State Representatives, County Commissioner, United States Congress Representatives and United States Senators. What we are usually lacking is information on the races for the less recognized local boards that oversee the resources we as residents of St. Johns County often take for granted. To help you in making your decisions on the candidates that are seeking positions on these various boards, following is some information about each board. The St. Johns Soil and Water Conservation District (SJSWCD) was begun in 1955 under the authority created by the Soil Conservation Act, Elected local boards are important in this primary electionBy Karl Kennell 2012 Election Dates Polls Open 7 AM … 7 PMPrimary Election: August 14, 2012 General Election: November 6, 2012 (Register by October 9, 2012)passed by the Florida Legislature in 1937. SJSWCD was organized to help the landowners and users of St. Johns County to conserve land, water, forests, wildlife and related resources of the county by concerned citizens in St. Johns County. The mission of the board was established to deliver natural resources conservation technology and education to local landowners and users and to promote the wise use of land and best management practices that will conserve, improve and sustain the natural resources of the county. The SJSWCD board of supervisors is a group of elected o cials tasked with the job of addressing the issues that challenge the conserving of the natural resources of the county. It consists of “ ve supervisors who are non-partisan members. In this election the candidates vying for seats on the board are James Visser and Henry C. Warner for District 3 and running unopposed is Craig Hartwig for District 4. Back in 1955 the impacts on the local resources generally went unnoticed. However today it is di cult to travel anywhere in the county and not observe the challenges facing our natural resources due to growth and technological advancements. These are the observations that make it important that you as an informed voter become familiar with the candidates that are seeking your support to oversee the future of countys natural environment. The St. Augustine Port, Waterway and Beach District was originally established in the late 1930s to ful“ ll the requirements of local sponsor for the Army Corps of Engineers St. Augustine Inlet project. The district was enabled by the Florida Legislature and approved by a vote of the citizens of the county. The enabling legislation gave the district ad valorem taxing authority as well as a broad range of authority for building warehouses, wharfs, bridges and other structures for the commercial development of the port. The district has title to a number of submerged parcels mostly in and around the St. Augustine harbor area. In 1993 a master plan was established identifying a number of areas that the district should be involved in as to maritime issues. It has become a funding source for a number of important projects, among them: the guide to St. Augustine Waterways, installation and maintenance of channel markers in Salt Run, the harbor patrol in cooperation with the City of St. Augustine Police Department and comprehensive Inlet Management Plan, boat mooring issues, initial studies identifying problems with the Matanzas Bay seawall and repair of the St. Augustine Lighthouse lens. The board is composed of Local boards cont. on pg. 23

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 23 “ ve at-large commissioners, each serving four-year terms. Election of commissioners occur on staggered election dates, with two commissioners elected for four-year terms in one election year and three commissioners elected for four-year terms the next election year. This year, running in Group 2 are Barry Benjamin and P. Brendan Burke. Running in Group 4 are John Carl Blow, Chuck Hennessey and Robert Kee. If you enjoy the many nautical activities that St. Johns County and St. Augustine have to o er this should be an elected board you should support by becoming familiar with and voting for those who have a direct impact on preserving these amenities. An often overlooked resource in St. Johns County is the Northeast Florida Regional Airport. It is easy to not realize just what an impact it has on our community. The airport is owned and operated by the St. Augustine … St. Johns County Airport Authority. In the 1930s the St. Augustine City Commission purchased the initial segments of the current airport location, north of Araquay Park along U.S. Highway 1. As with many other airports, it was taken over by the federal government during the years of World War II for the support of naval aviation activities. Upon the wars end, the facility reverted back to local control. In 1964 a special purpose governmental authority was created by the Florida State Legislature and approved by local voters. At the time, it was named the St. Augustine Airport Authority, but the name has subsequently been changed to the St. Augustine … St. Johns County Airport Authority. In addition to the busy activities of Northrop Grumman at the airport, multiple aviation support companies operate from the facility, including several “ xed-base operators and repair compa-Voter ResponsibilitiesFamiliarize himself or herself with the candidates and issues. Maintain with the of ce of the Supervisor of Elections a current address. Know the location of his or her polling place and its hours of operation. Bring proper identi cation to the polling station. Familiarize himself or herself with the operation of the voting equipment in his or her precinct. Treat precinct workers with courtesy. Respect the privacy of other voters. Report any problems or violation of election laws to the Supervisor of Elections. Ask questions, if needed. Make sure that his or her completed ballot is correct before leaving the polling station. Vote as you please......but please VOTE! Local boards cont. from pg. 22nies. Recently there has been construction of a new general aviation terminal, an air tra c control tower and several new corporate hangers. In addition to these activities the airport plays host to the Aerospace and Science and Aeronautics programs which St. Augustine High School has partnered with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University to o er to 10th and 11th grade students. The airport authoritys board of commissioners is composed of “ ve elected positions. In the upcoming election, seeking the board seat for Group 4 are Matt Mercer and James S. Werter. Running unopposed for the Group 5 seat is Carl A. Youman. This next district board sometimes confuses with its name. The Anastasia Mosquito Control District (AMCD) comes from a humble beginning to combat one of mans worrisome pests encompassing the whole of St. Johns County. Its mission is to preserve and protect the people from mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases by reducing and controlling mosquito populations through environmentally-friendly and cost e ective integrated pest management methods, thus minimizing the negative impacts on people and other living things. The integrated mosquito management methods currently employed by AMCD are comprehensive and speci“ cally tailored to safely counter each stage of the mosquito life cycle. These methods currently include: larval and adult mosquito sampling, source reduction, biological control using native or introduced predators and parasite of mosquitoes, larviciding and adulticiding, resistance monitoring, disease surveillance in mosquitoes, birds, horses and humans. And most importantly to AMCD is public education with the goal of educating residents of St. Johns County on mosquito biology, ecology, control and prevention. AMCD o ers public outreach programs and presentations, school, programs, on-site tours and “ eld trips, community service hours, science fair project assistance and paid internships. The overseeing board is composed of “ ve members. During this election, Faye Armitage, Vivian Browning and Robert T. Smith are vying for Seat 1. District Seat 3 is being sought by Janice Marie Bequette and Edward Randy Covington. Vying for Seat 5 are Gary Howell, Paul Linser and Vernon Tyrone Stroman, Jr. As you familiarize yourself with the big name candidates and races in the upcoming election, dont overlook these important district races. After all each one of these boards oversees aspects of our local lifestyle that help make St. Johns County a great place to live. Did you know?Registered St. Johns County voters as of August 2, 2012: Republican: 80,134 Democrat: 38,479 Other: 32,043 Total: 150,656Source: www.votesjc.com

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Page 24, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com PRIMARY ELECTION August 14, 2012 OPEN TO ALL REGISTERED VOTERS IN ST JOHNS COUNTY Visit www.votesjc.com to prepare. Con“rm your address before voting. If your address has changed, please contact the Elections Of“ce at 823-2238 to update your address BEFORE going to vote. Vote your Way: Absentee, Early or Election Day! VOTE BY MAIL ~Any registered voter may request a ballot by calling the Elections Of“ce at 823-2238 or by visiting our website www.votesjc.com. In order for an absentee ballot to be counted, it must be returned to the Supervisor of Elections Of“ce by 7 PM on Election Da y. Voted absentee ballots cannot be turned in at the polls. SIGNATURE UPDATE ~Any time there is a change in your signature or identifying markŽ you must complete a new Florida Voter Registration Application and submit it to the Elections Of“ce. If your signature on your voter record and the signature o n your absentee ballot do not match, your absentee ballot will not count. EARLY VOTING ~Voters may cast their ballot at ANY early voting location. DATES & TIMES~August 4th -11th Saturday … Saturday Hours: 8 AM … 6 PM (Except Sunday August 5th Hours: 11 AM … 5 PM)VOTE on Election Day at Your Precinct … Polls are open 7 AM … 7 PM. When voting on Election Day you MUST vote at the precinct of your legal residence. REMEMBER … As a result of the changes necessitated by redistricting, your precinct number may have changed and you may be voting at a new polling location. ON OUR WEBSITE www.votesjc.comFLORIDA IS A CLOSED PRIMARY STATEUNIVERSAL PRIMARY CONTEST nonpartisan ballot all primary ballots within their respective districts Although Florida is a closed primary state, if all candidates for an of“ce have the same party af“liation and the winner will have no opposition in the general election, all quali“ed voters, regardless of party af“liation, may vote in the primary election for that of“ce. State Attorney County Commission District 3 Voting Assistance/Accessible Voting Equipment tAll polling places are accessible to persons with disabilities and are equipped with accessible voting equipment with an audio ballot feature. HOW TO MAKE YOUR VOTE COUNT You must completely “ll in the oval for your vote to count. Any other mark may not be read by the scanner. EARLY VOTING LOCATIONS Supervisor of Elections Of“ce St. Augustine Beach City Hall Southeast Branch Library Ponte Vedra Branch Library Julington Creek Courthouse Annex Hastings Town Hall REMINDER Please have current & valid Photo & Signature ID ready when voting. If you dont have proper ID, you must vote a provisional ballot. ARE YOU ELECTION READY? Visitwwwvotesjccomtopr KNOW WHERE TO VOTE BEFORE YOU GO For additional information visit our website by scanning the QR code with your

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 25 What Alec Believes . For US Congress District 6 A Life of Service . Now Ready to Serve You!Paid for by Alec for Congress www.alecforcongress.usWhat Alec Has Done . The following tips are provided by the St. Johns County Supervisor of Elections, www. votesjc.com. The date of the Primary Election is Tuesday, August 14, 2012. Registration closed for this election on July 16, 2012. Early voting will occur from August 4, 2012 until August 11, 2012. The date of the General Election is Tuesday, November 6, 2012. Registration for this election will close on October 9, 2012. Early voting will take place from October 27, 2012 until November 3, 2012. Check your voter information. Use the link on the website (www.votesjc.com) to check your voter information, including your voter registration, polling place and absentee ballot status. Registration books close 29 days prior to an election. You must register by this deadline to be eligible to vote in the election. To register you must “ ll out a Florida Voter Registration Application form and submit it to the Supervisor of Elections O ce. Receive an application by visiting these locations: € Supervisor of Elections O ceVoter’s Bill of RightsVote and have his or her vote accurately counted. Cast a vote if he or she is in line at the of cial closing of the polls in that county. Ask for and receive assistance in voting. Receive up to two replacement ballots if he or she makes a mistake prior to the ballot being cast. An explanation if his or her registration or identity is in question. If his or her registration or identity is in question, cast a provisional ballot. Written instructions to use when voting and upon request, oral instructions in voting from elections of cers. Vote free from coercion or intimidation by elections of cers or any other person. Vote on a voting system that is in working condition and that will allow votes to be accurately cast. St. Johns County voter tips€ Online at www.votesjc.com € Florida Drivers License of“ ces € Public libraries € County governmental o ces € Armed Forces Recruitment o ces € State agencies that provide public assistance and serve persons with disabilities. Update your voter record. All updates to a voter registration may be made on a Florida Voter Registration Application or by providing information by phone, mail, email, fax or written signed notice that includes your date of birth or Voter ID number. Acceptable forms of identi“ cation at the polls: € Florida Drivers License € Florida ID card € United States passport € Military ID € Student ID € Public Assistance ID € Retirement Center ID € Neighborhood Association ID € Debit/Credit card Vote your way: Absentee, Early or Election Day Vote By Mail: Any registered voter may request an absentee ballot by calling the Elections O ce at 823-2238 or by visiting the website www. votesjc.com. It is imperative that your signature be kept current at all times, especially if you vote by absentee ballot. In order for an absentee ballot to count, the Supervisor must compare the signature on a voters record with the signature on the absentee ballot and the two must match, according to section 101.68, F.S. To update your signature, provide the Supervisor of Elections O ce with a Florida Voter Registration Application indicating a signature update. Early Vote: Early voting begins 10 days prior to each election. All eligible, registered voters may cast their ballot at any Early Voting Site. In NW St. Johns County, the early voting site is the Julington Creek Annex … Conference Room, located at 725 Flora Branch Boulevard. For more information on dates, times and additional early voting locations, contact the Elections O ce or visit www. votesjc.com. Election Day: Polls are open from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. On Election Day, you must vote in the precinct of your legal residence. Polling locations are listed on your Voter Information Card or check the precinct locator on the website www.votesjc. com. Con“ rm your address: If it is di erent than the address listed on your voter information card, call the Elections O ce at 823-2238 before going to vote. Be sure to take current, valid photo and signature ID with you when you vote. If you do not have the proper ID, you must vote a provisional ballot. (F.S. 101.043) Sample ballots. Sample ballots will be mailed to all registered voters approximately three weeks prior to each election. They are also posted on the website www.votesjc.com and available prior to each election. Voting System: The Elections System and Software DS200s digital scan tabulators are used to count ballots at each precinct and early voting location. Voters receive a paper ballot, mark their ballot by completing an oval to the left of each of their choices and place it into the DS200 for immediate tabulation. Voters are noti“ ed of improperly marked ballots and given an opportunity to review their ballot and obtain a replacement when necessary. The Elections O ce also provides touch screen voting which allows persons with disabilities to vote privately. Persons who are visually impaired may access the systems audio feature. One iVotronic is provided at each precinct and early voting site. Absentee ballots are counted on a high speed tabulator at the Elections O ce. Results from early voting, precincts and absentee ballots are combined at the Elections O ce. After the polls close, the election results are released to the public and posted on the website www. votesjc.com. ELECT THE 3 MOSQUITOTEERS AUG 14th SEAT 5 Gary Howell SEAT 3 Randy Covington SEAT 1 Bob Smith SEAT3 EXPERIENCED CONSERVATIVE BUSINESSMEN NO TAX INCREASES SMASHING MOSQUITOES AND FRIENDS OF OBAMA! PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT BY CAMPAIGNS OF BOB SMITH (1) RANDY COVINGTON (3) AND GARY HOWELL (5) FOR AMCD EXPERIENCED CONSERVATIVE BUSINESSMEN NO TAX INCREASES SMASHING MOS Q UITOES AND FRIENDS OF OBAMA

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Page 26, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Mike DavisA Conservative Businessman A Dedicated Family Man www.ElectMikeDavis.com Mike@ElectMikeDavis.com Political advertisement paid for and approved by Mike Da vis, Republican, for State Representative District 17.One lesson I have learned is to make a living with one hand and give back to my community with the other. I will take my experience as a community leader and career small business owner to Tallahassee to serve a community that has given so much to me. I would be honored to have your support on August 14th.Ž Voters in St. Johns County should have received new voter information cards by mail in the past few weeks. St. Johns County Supervisor of Elections Vicky Oakes said the cards were sent to all registered voters to re” ect changes made during the recent redistricting process. Redistricting has a ected The August 14 Primary Election is open to all registered voters in St. Johns County. This is a very important election, as several of our elected o cials will be elected August 14. The State Attorney, County Commissioner-District 3 and School Board Member-District 2 will be elected during the Primary. It is possible that other o ces may also be elected such as School Board Member-District 5 and other Nonpartisan o ces such as Anastasia Mosquito Control District Commissioners, depending upon the turnout and votes cast during the election. County Commissioners are voted on countywide and elected by all voters in the county, but the School Board is di erent. They are single member districts, and are elected only by members of their respective districts. If you reside in District 2 or 5, a School Board race will appear on your ballot in the Primary. Know where you vote before you go! This year, due to redistricting a number of precincts boundaries, precinct numbers and polling places have changed. You should have already received your new voter information card with your districts and election day polling place. Sample ballots are being mailed by household for this election in order to save taxpayer dollars. You should have already received one in the mail. If not, visit our website and use the voter lookup to view yours or print additional sample ballots if needed. Voting on election day is di erent than Early Voting as the law requires you to vote at the precinct of your legal residence when voting on election day. Save time, save money! Check your new voter information card, visit our website www.votesjc.com or call 8232238 to verify your polling place before going to going to vote on election day to ensure New voter information cards sent to all registered St. Johns County voters Your Vote Counts!By Contributing Writer Vicky Oakes, Supervisor of Elections, St. Johns Countyyour reach the correct location. If you have recently moved to St. Johns County and are registered to vote in another county, you simply need to change your address. It is not too late to make the change and participate in the Primary. Address changes are accepted through election day and can be made at the polls; however, I encourage everyone to update your address before going to vote. Voters moving into the county and making addresses changes while early voting or voting at the polls on election day are required to vote a provisional ballot. If you missed the registration deadline for the Primary, you still have time to register and participate in the General Election. Registration books close on October 9 for the General Election. Please see our ad in the this issue of The CreekLine for additional election information and details on early voting. If you have any questions, please call the o ce at 823-2238. We hope your voting experience will be a pleasant one. We look forward to seeing you during early voting or at the polls on election day. Remember … Your Vote Counts! every voter of St. Johns County. Florida re-draws its districts for Congress, state Senate and House districts every 10 years. The County Commission and School Board also are required to redraw their district lines. The process ensures that the same number of people live in each district and, as a result, each person is equally represented in our government. District numbers and boundaries have changed. Some precinct boundaries have changed. We have also combined some It’s the American way!Primary Election: August 14, 2012 General Election November 6, 2012 ...it’s your right! polling locations and re-numbered some precincts to better serve you. Voters, please review the information on your new voter information card when you receive it and contact the Supervisor of Elections O ce at 8232238 if any changes are needed. Address changes can also be sent by email to elections@votesjc. com. Name, date of birth and address information are required in the email. Interested voters who dont have their new cards yet but want to know if there are any changes can visit the Supervisor of Elections website at www. votesjc.com and use the Voter Lookup tool. The voter lookup allows a voter to enter their name and date of birth to check their voter status, locate their polling place, view their sample ballot or track the mailing and receipt of their absentee ballot. Once the voters precinct is located, the voter can view the voting districts and their polling place. A voter information card is not required when voting in person. The law requires photo and signature ID to be presented when voting in person. Any voter without proper ID can still vote, but is required to vote a provisional ballot. If you have any questions, visit our website at www.votesjc. com or call us 823-2238. As always, we look forward to serving you.

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 27 Buy One Get One FREE Bottle Brush Trees TREE FARM & NURSERY Free Landscape & Sod Estimates or visit us at www.sjtreefarm.com 1 Gallon $5.99 BOGO FREE 3 Gallon $14.99 2-3 ft BOGO FREE 7 Gallon $39 3-4 ft BOGO FREE 15 Gallon $99 5-6 ft BOGO FREE 30 Gallon $169 8-12ft BOGO FREE 45 Gallon $299 12-14 ft BOGO FREE 65 Gallon $399 16-18 ft BOGO FREE Tina P. Fernandez, CPA, PLwww.tpfcpa.com 904-287-2195 Over 30 Years Experience Have Condence in Your Tax Preparation & Planning. Allow Me to Assist You. Visit www.tpfcpa.com for informative news and Tax Savings Tips. Saving the Accounting Needs of Individuals and Small Businesses by Providing Quality Service at Competitive Rates. Dr. Jenny Preer Purposefully limited practice providing the time, energy & attention you deserve North Florida Coaching North Florida Counseling & Mediation Services, LLC (904) 701-8255 www.northcoaching.com www.northcounseling.com Counseling is available for individuals (18+), couples, and families working through various issues. FL Supreme Court Certied Family Mediation Services creates personal solutions for both on-going and potential legal conicts, including child time-sharing agreements. Coaching creates strategies and action plans that move you toward your goals. It is for people who want to do something more. I help students (16+) and adults dene educational, career & personal goals and create plans to overcome the obstacles in their way. Licensed Counselor, Family Mediator, Coach 1004 State Road 13( 0.2 mi South JCP entrance ) Richard M. Oglesby, D.V.M.Constanze Goricki, Dr.med.vet287-5570M-F – 8 AM 6 PM Sat 8 AM Noon Greenbriar Animal Hospital We Celebrate The HumanPet Bond ITS HERE!THE K LASER!FINALLY PAIN FREE ...DRUG FREE THERAPY! Reintroduce Your Pet To Activity! (ARA) Why is it that a steak from a restaurant just seems to taste better than what you make at home? Often, its because the chefs in the restaurant know the secrets of great grilling. Steak is a summer staple for many home cooks when the weather permits, but things can go awry if youre not clued in to the secrets of how to prepare a great steak,Ž says John Li, senior vice president of research and development for Outback Steakhouse. As veritable steak experts, and with summer grilling season upon us, we want Flotilla 14-7 of the Coast Guard Auxiliary has announced its public boating course schedule for the remainder of 2012. All courses are o ered at the St. Augustine Campus of St. Johns River State College, 2900 College Drive (o State Road 16) in St. Augustine. About Boating Safely … This beginner boating class will give the participant the knowledge needed to obtain The Florida Boaters Card. Many boat insurance companies will o er discounts on boating insurance Secrets to super steaks: Great grilling tips and techniquesUnited States Coast Guard Auxiliary updateCoast Guard Auxiliary announces boating courseBy Contributing Writer Bob Schultz, Flotilla 14-7 Public Affairs Of certo boaters who successfully complete this course. Topics include: Introduction to Boating; Boating Law; Boat Safety Equipment; Safe Boating; Navigation Aids; Boating Problems; Trailering, Storing and Protecting Your Boat; Waterskiing and River Boating. The eight-hour course will be given on September 8 and November 3, 2012. Students must register prior to the classes by contacting Vic Aquino at 460-0243.to help people preparing to try their hands at grilling steak.Ž Li o ers some advice for grilling successful steak meals this summer: € Start with the right steak. Build a relationship with your local butcher either at your grocery store or, if youre lucky enough to have one in your neighborhood, the area butcher shop. Learn where they source their meat, if its aged and for how long. Many cuts lend themselves to grilling, but sirloin, “ let, strip and rib eye remain the most popular. Sirloin and strip steak are usually the best options if youre feeding a large group, as they provide abundant ” avor and are usually less expensive than other cuts. € Prep the grill properly. Once youve got the right meat, ensure your grill is ready to cook it to perfection. Start with a well-cleaned grill and preheat it. If youre using a charcoal grill, wait until the coals are white. For gas grills, use a thermometer. Many newer models have built-in gauges on the lids that indicate when the grill is hot enough to use. € Add some seasoning. While the grill is preheating, prep the steak by patting it dry. Removing moisture allows for optimum surface contact with the grill and creates a wonderful seared ” avor. Rub with the seasoning of your choice; there are many, but keep in mind simple salt and pepper works well if youre starting with an already ” avorful cut. € Get grilling. Once the grill and steak are ready, place the meat on the grill. You can achieve a fancy diamond-shaped grill pattern by rotating the meat 45 degrees when you turn it, but the meat will taste just as good without it. Cooking time will vary depending on the cut of meat and the grill itself. Generally, thinner steaks (about one inch thick) will need about four minutes per side to be rare, “ ve for medium and seven for well done. Thicker steaks (two inches or more) will need about six minutes per side for rare, eight to 10 for medium and 12 for well done. € Let it rest. Overcooking is a sure-“ re way to dry out steak. As soon as the steak has reached your desired level of wellness, remove it from the grill and let it rest for about “ ve minutes before you serve or cut it. This allows the juices to set well in the meat before you dig in. Not sure where to start? Try this recipe from Outback Steakhouse: Ingredients: 4 rib eye steaks, 12 to 14 ounces each 4 teaspoons Kosher salt 2 teaspoons coarsely ground black pepper 2 tablespoons vegetable oil Directions: Evenly season each steak with a teaspoon each of salt and pepper. Coat each steak with a half tablespoon of vegetable oil. This may be done up to three hours prior to grilling, storing in the refrigerator. Remove from the refrigerator about 30 minutes before grilling. Start the grill. Place seasoned steaks over the hottest portion of the grill and cook on the “ rst side about four to “ ve minutes, rotating 90 degrees after three minutes to achieve restaurant-style cross marks.Ž Turn steaks over and cook for an additional three to four minutes to achieve a mediumrare doneness. Remove from grill and allow to rest for “ ve minutes before topping and serving. 1. Stay alert: Expect anything to occur when entering a work zone. 2. Pay close attention: Signs and work zone aggers save lives. 3. Turn on your headlights: Workers and other motorists must see you. 4. Don't tailgate: Unexpected stops frequently occur in work zones. 5. Don't speed: Note the posted speed limits in and around the work zone. 6. Keep up with traf c ow: Dedicate your full attention to the roadway and those traveling around you. 7. Don't change lanes in the work zone: The time saved just isn't worth the chance. 8. Minimize distractions: Avoid changing radio stations and using cellular phones while driving in the work zone. 9. Expect the unexpected: Keep an eye out for workers and their equipment. 10. Be patient: Remember, the work zone crew members are working to improve your future ride.Highway Work Zone Safety Tips from the FDOT Don t miss our Back to SchoolSpecial Sectionappearing in this issue of The CreekLine. Check out pages 36-44! Lunar PhasesLast Quarter: August 9 New: August 17 First Quarter: August 24 Full: August 31

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Page 28, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com 904-209-13202758 Racetrack Road Publix Plantation Plaza Tues … Fri 9-8 & Sat 9-7 End of Summer Sizzling Specials with Panache (detox, damage or dry) with Haircut (must mention when booking for proper scheduling) A 7-foil highlight that will create a veil, face frame or natural peek a boos. $45.00 inc. blow dry with New TalentŽ or ArtistŽ level Stylists @ Julington Creek location (expires 10/1/2012) Call Tim ( 904 ) 599-5250 LAWN & LANDSCAPING NO CONTRACT REQUIRED!/On-Call ServiceLawn Maintenance Package Includes: Precision Mowing, Edging Foliage Trimming Fertilizing Free Estimates References Available Licensed & Insuredgreenfxlawn@yahoo.com Robert Kelsey, M.D.Board Certi“ed Cardiology and Internal Medicine Robert Kelsey, M.D. Now Accepting New Patients 904-827-0078 Gutter Masters, LLC 904.813.4388 Our work is not sub-contracted out. We are fully licensed and insured in Duval, St. Johns and Clay County. www.seamlessgutters-jacksonville.com People driving down State Road 16 may have noticed a new church sign going up over the last three months. About 10 parishioners volunteered many of hours of their time over a two week period. Volunteers pictured are Charlie Hunter, Richard Stypula, Larry Rogari, Fr. Guy Noonan, Tony Perillo, Tom Kissell, John Carter and Guy Maltese. Volunteers Richard Young and Keith Kirker are not pictured. Our Lady of Good Counsel was founded in 1875 when the rst parochial buildings in the Mill Creek and Elkton area were built under the guidance of Fr. Stephen Langlade, a native of Le Puy, France. In 1902 the church building was disassembled, moved and rebuilt in Bakersville some three miles south of Mill Creek, on Pacetti Road. At this time, the name of the church was changed to Our Lady of Good Counsel for unknown reasons. In November 1999, the present building on State Road 16 was opened. Until recently, Our Lady of Good Counsel remained a mission church of St. Ambrose, Elkton and the pastor of St. Ambrose served both communities. On July 1, 2008, Our Lady of Good Counsel was given the designation of a parish of the Diocese of St. Augustine. Fr. Guy Noonan was assigned as pastor.Camel riding isnt a popular means of transportation in the United States, but a method Ive always wanted to try. As luck goes, I was blessed with two diverse opportunities within one month. The “ rst came when I traveled to Jordan and spent two nights in a Bedouin tent camp. The desert at Wadi Rum reigns as an ideal location for a camel trek. Lawrence of Arabia described the landscape with, Travel: Riding camels here and thereBy Contributing Travel Writer Debi Lander, www.bylandersea.comNew sign for local church Digital age dromedaries!red sands that stretch like seas between mountains of crimson sandstone. The rock monoliths sculpted by nature resemble the drippings of candle wax on a monumental scale.Ž On the morning of my ride, owners in long ” owing robes crossed the dunes and walked alongside their herd. The scene looked like it a sepia-tinted photograph from a history book, except the two Bedouin were talking on cell phones. Okay, I thought„digital age dromedaries. They cushed the camels (lowered to a kneeling position) and covered their basic saddles with blankets. Stirrups are not part of a camels gear, so one grips the tufts of hair atop the hump. To get on, I ” ung one leg over the beast, feeling my yoga class stretches coming into use. I casually shimmied my butt into place and hunkered down. Suddenly, my camel erupted upward nearly tossing me o its back as it leaped to its fore-knees. Then, in a two-stage process, its back legs extended and I was nearly catapulted forward over its head. I then found myself riding at the height that would guarantee a slam dunk into a basketball net. Woo-hoo! The “ rst few minutes gave me a bumpy, disconcerting ride, as my body jostled to and fro. But soon I began to adapt and enjoy the feel of the gentle compression of my camels hooves into the sandy sea. The view on camelback is spectacular; youre about twice as high as when riding a horse and the desert scenery is gorgeous. Later in the month, I found myself at the Safari Wilderness Ranch in Central Florida. Believe it or not, I mounted a camel here for another ride. They use an easier method to get on and o but honestly its not as much fun nor as hair-raising as my original. Polk County camel riders step up onto a platform at the dromedarys height. Then, riders simply toss a foot over. The camel does not rise or descend. In Florida, the saddles had metal frames which guarantee a secure ride. Once beyond the loading zone, the sensation of riding is identical, except the safari traverses grass instead of sand. While riding through Wilderness Park I saw zebras, lemurs, wart hogs, cattle, deer, antelope and Water Bu alo. Safari Wilderness Ranch is not a zoo or theme park. There are no crowds and no lines; its a natural adventure with guides who explain the herds of exotic game. Safari vehicles “ tted with shade canopies offer an alternative tour. I highly recommend a trip to Jordan; the country is safe, the people are friendly and the archeological ruins outstanding. A camel ride across the desert is a cherished memory, but I have to admit, a three-Why wait for the mailman? View our digital edition online at www.thecreekline.com hour car ride gave me a similar, close encounter with the humped beasts. If you go: www.jordantours-travel.com/ cms/ or www.SafariWilderness. com. Tools 4 Schools cont. from pg. 18Depot allows Tools 4 Schools to be a year round resource for teachers, instead of just a onetime handout. Tools 4 Schools is the only county-wide supply drive in the area that directly bene“ ts the teachers and students of the St. Johns County School District,Ž explained Donna Lueders, the executive director of the SJCEF. We are excited about the opportunity to o er supplies for teachers year-round, but need the communitys help to stock our Depot!Ž Numerous businesses around the county and neighboring areas are serving as drop-o locations for the school supplies. These donations will go to all kindergarten through 12th grades and subjects, as well as the schools clinics that currently receive no state funding. A full list of drop-o locations, as well as more information can be found at www. sjcef.com. Just click the Tools 4 Schools button on the left side of the home page. If you are interested in volunteering or being a drop-o location in the future, please email Katy Ho statter at katy.ho statter@ stjohns.k12.” .us. Advertise inThe CreekLineIt’s good for business!287-4913LG@rtpublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 29 Receive a.25%Eco-Friendly Rate Discount  Eco-Friendly Auto Loan program effective April 1, 2012 and can be withdra wn at any time without prior notice. Does not apply t o loans already financed with First Florida Credit Union or its divisions. Does not apply to dealer-direct loans. Eligible new or used vehicles are those that have an EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) estimated highway fuel economy of 30 MPG (Miles Per Gallon) or greater, as list ed on www.fueleconomy.gov. Your APR (Annual Percentage Rate) and term may vary based on your creditworthiness and amount financed. ** Advertised APR (Annual Percentage Rate) is effective as of April 1, 2012 and reflects terms up to 48 months. Advertised rate is subject to change at any time without prior notice.‚ For new vehicles only: minimum loan amount $25,000. Other loan terms (up to 72 months) are available for new and used autos. Q ualifications and some restrictions apply.1950 CR 210 W., St. Johns, FL, 32259 (next to St. Johns Forest) www.firstflorida.orgyour wallet, too! Anyone who lives or works in Saint Johns, Duval, Flagler, Clay, Baker, or Nassau County Can Join! S St. rs N St J tf s W. o S w. o J oh or u 0 W to w ke oh ns da o hn F o 210 ext w R 2 (ne s, ore g CR FL st) 3 50 225 19  Eco-Friendly Auto Loan program effective April 1, 2012 and can be withdra wn at any time without prior notice. Does not apply t o loans already financed with First Florida Credit Union or its divisions. Does not apply to dealer-direct loans. Eligible new or used vehicles are those that have an EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) estimated highway fuel economy of 30 MPG (Miles Per Gallon) or greater, as list ed on www.fueleconomy.gov. Your APR (Annual Percentage Rate) and term may vary based on your creditworthiness and amount financed. ** Advertised APR (Annual Percentage Rate) is effective as of April 1, 2012 and reflects terms up to 48 months. Advertised rate is subject to change at any time without prior notice.‚ For new vehicles only: minimum loan amount $25,000. Other loan terms (up to 72 months) are available for new and used autos. Q ualifications and some restrictions apply.1950 CR 210 W., St. Johns, FL, 32259 (next to St. Johns Forest) www.firstflorida.org Your savings federally insured to at least $250,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government AgencyNCUA Other Loan Features € Flexible Repayment Terms … Up to 84 Months‚ € 100% Financing Available € No Application Fee Eco-FriendlyAuto L ans € Save Fuel € Save Money € Save the EnvironmentFor a limited time, at First Florida, youll receive an additional .25% off our already, low rate auto loans when you finance a new or used vehicle that has an EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) estimated highway fuel economy of 30 MPG (Miles Per Gallon) or greater. This Eco-Friendly rate discount applies to refinances, too. So, bring us the fuel-efficient car youve financed elsewhere. Terms Up to 48 Months 2.24%** Rate Discount for Automatic Loan Payments (Available for All Terms) .25% Eco-Friendly Rate Discount (Available for All Terms) .25% Annual Percentage Rate for Terms Up to 48 Months 1.74% Go green and get an even better rate† Annual Percentage Rate As Low As* Better for the environment AND Anyone who lives or works in Saint Johns, Duval, Flagler, Clay, Baker, or Nassau County Can Join! Approval is fast and easy!Stop by; call (904)808-4644 or (800)766-4328, ext. 1; or visit our Web site www.firstflorida.org.

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Page 30, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com The Shoppes of MurabellaAccepting New Patients (904) 826-346952 Tuscan Way Suite 205 St. Augustine, FL 32092 New Location!Mon-Thurs: 8-6:30 Saturday: 9-1 Walk-Ins Welcome Mandarin Landing Animal Hospital & Pet Resort 50% OFF Y our Pet  s First Ex am with D r. Si lv erness( 1st Time Clients Only )Not v a l id with any other o er. Ex pires 9 /1 0 /12 FREE BOARDING B ook 2 Nights at our R esort and 3rd Night is F REE! (1st Time Boarders Only)Not v a l id with any other o er. Ex pires 9 /1 0 /1 2 Ann Silverness, DVM Pet Resort Suites F a m i ly S t yl e Ž Cable TV Su n l it K itt y C on d o s R o mp e r R oo mŽ for Spl i sh-Spl a sh ti m e Ž Heated Conveniently located one block North of I-295 and San Jose Boulevard D r. Ann Si lv erness, DV M, CCRT REACH UP. REACH IN. REACH OUT. Service times: Sunday at 10 am Wednesday at 7 pm Cunningham Creek Elementary School REACHJAX.COM After a very lengthy search, St. Patricks Episcopal Church is pleased to welcome Father Mike Snider to our parish and the community of St. Johns. Father Mike comes to us from Christ Episcopal Church of Blue“ eld, West Virginia, where he was a rector for “ ve years. Father Mike is married to Church welcomes new worship leaderPenelope (Penny) and they have four sons: Robby, age 10; Eli, age nine; Christopher, age six; and Matthew, age “ ve. He and his family are excited to join the community. He has been a coach for his sons in coach pitch baseball and Tball and sees the importance of being active in schools and the community as well as serving the parish of St. Patricks. Fr. Mike seeks to “ nd the passions of the parishioners of St. Patricks and match it to the needs of the St. Johns community. Father Mike and his familys “ rst Sunday will be September 2. We invite the community to join us in welcoming Fr. Mike and his family and stop by to introduce yourself.Preparing for the fall vegetable garden Soil preparation should be done four to six weeks before planting a production bed, so it is time to plan and prepare for the fall vegetable garden. On Thursday, August 16 the St. Johns Extension Of ce will be conducting a class on this topic. It will be held at the St. Johns County Extension Of ce and run from 10:00 a.m. until noon. In the class you will learn about amending the garden plot, vegetable varieties to grow for fall and winter and gardening techniques. If you have not had a soil pH analysis done in several years you may also want to bring a soil sample to submit for free testing. You must pre-register for the class. There is a $5 registration fee or bring three nonperishable food items to donate to the St. Johns County Social Services Division of Health and Human Services Food Closet. To register for the class, please call 209-0430. Hometown hero cont. from pg. 1 she came to thank the Mandarin/St. Johns community, as well as the volunteers of St. Michaels Soldiers, a ministry of St. Josephs Catholic Church that raises money to send home-sweet-homeŽ care packages to deployed military members. Diane Timoney United States Army First Lieutenant Ryan TimoneyHometown hero cont. on pg. 31

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 31 A CONNECTING CHURCH Our Sunday Services Traditional Worship 8:30am Sunday School 9:45am Contemporary Worship 11:00amwww.switzerlandcommunitychurch.org “I want cremation.”$650 Flagler Memorial Cremation Society669-1809 St Francis In-The-FieldEpiscopal ChurchChristian Formation 8:45am (September May) Sunday Service 10:00amChildrens Chapel and Nursery Available895 Palm Valley Rd (1 mile east of US1)615-2130Sunday Morning 10 am @ Timberlin Creek Elementary School 555 Pine Tree Lane St. Augustine, FL 32092 904-535-5636 S t Looking for a place to belong? We are looking for you. www.familylifefellowshipjax.com Fruit Cove Baptist Churchs Military Support Ministry, serving the practical, emotional and spiritual needs of any military wife will be o ering a new Bible study entitled, My so Called Life as a Proverbs 31 WifeŽ by Sara Horn. It will be held on Tuesday mornings at 9:30 a.m., beginning on September 4 in the ROC Room 201. Childcare is provided by reservation. Please call Debbie Stoutamyer at 230-8413 with questions or to register. On August 12 from 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Our Lady of Good Counsel Catholic Church will be having their All You Can Eat ChickenŽ fried chicken dinner. The dinner will include a salad bar, mashed potatoes and gravy, seasoned vegetables, bread and butter. Homemade desserts and beverages will also be available for a donation. The cost of an adult dinner is $10 and a kids dinner (and seven and under) is $4. The church is located at 5950 State Road 16 (one mile northwest of Pacetti Road and World Golf Parkway) in St. Augustine. The dinner is being sponsored by the OLGC Mens Club and the Ladies Guild. All proceeds will go to the future use of the various ministries and continued church development. Please join us on Saturday, August 18, from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. at Vilano Beach in St. Johns County. A free lunch will be served at 12:00 noon. Parking is on the beach. The fee is $5. The Julington Creek congregation of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is hosting the party and providing lunch. Look for the LDS PartyŽ signs. If you need more information or have questions, please call the Barringtons at (904) 217-3308. Hope to see you there! Are you troubled by someones drinking? Al-Anon Family Groups can help. Let us share our experience, strength and hope. Join us every Monday night from 8:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. in the First Christian Church of Jacksonville, located at 11924 San Jose Boulevard or visit us at www.jaxafg.org. Single Moms Hope and Help is a Bible Study and support group designed by a single mom for single moms. It encourages you to ” ourish while in the midst of overwhelming circumstances and begins on September 5. Childcare is provided. Please call Linda Warne at 287-0996 with questions or to register. St. Francis in-the-Field Episcopal Church is o ering a parents Morning Out program for the 2012-2013 school year. If your child(ren) are between 12 months and four years old they can be enrolled in our program. The program runs on Wednesdays from 8:30 a.m. until 12:00 noon. The children are taught di erent prayers and bible verses and do this while having lots of fun. The goal of the program is to help develop and increase their Christian beliefs while giving parents a few children-free hours. The During the week of June 16 through 23, Troop 280 adventured o to summer camp at beautiful Camp Powhatan, nestled in the mountains of Virginia. After a long 10 hour drive from St. Johns, the troop arrived safely and ready to take on the many adventures which included hiking, swimming, “ shing, rafting and more. At an elevation of 655 meters above sea level, Camp Powhatan is home to a variety of wildlife and many spotted deer, skunks and even a black bear. Scouts attended classes daily, providing them with the opportunity to complete merit badges required for rank advancement. The types of classes o ered included horsemanship, environmental science, emergency preparedness, nature and orienteering (just to name a few). The campsite had tents and cabins. The tents are basically wooden frames that stand up in a triangle formaFaith Newssta has been highly trained and many of them belong to St. Francis. Please consider having your little one(s) participate in what we believe is a great program. Please contact the church at 615-2130 for more information. River of Life UMC, located at 2600 Race Track Road, will be opening its My Morning Out program to the public. With the addition of our new facility, our program is ready to expand. The program will be held on Tuesday and Thursday mornings, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., beginning on September 4. We will follow the St. Johns County 2012-13 school year calendar. Registration begins August 1, 2012. Please call 230-2955 for additional information. River of Grace Christian invites you to join us at 6200 State Road 13 North in St. Boy Scout Troop 280 summer newsBy Contributing Writer Contributing writer Justin Barthel, First Class Scouttion with a canvas tent over the frame. There is a mattress and wooden bedframe which is where the scouts slept. It wasnt as comfortable as it sounds. The cabins are wooden buildings with bunk beds. These were a little more comfortable. Scouts had several opportunities to raise money to pay for all or a portion of their camping expenses and many worked very hard to do this. What better way to live out the Scout Law of thriftiness! At the end of the week parents were ecstatic to see their kids. The troop had a great time at summer camp. The Friday evening after returning, several scouts from Troop 280 also participated in a special community service project. In conjunction with the Helping Hands organization, scouts and parents came together to assist cooking and serving food to the homeless community of downtown St. Augustine. Thanks to Ms. Jackie and the ladies of Helping Hands for allowing us to work with them on this evening. It was a project many of the boys have expressed wishes to repeat again. Troop 280 is a Boy Scout Troop located in the heart of Julington Creek, sponsored by River of Life United Methodist Church on Race Track Road. The troop was founded in 2009 and has grown from “ ve original members to now over 60. The Scoutmaster is Brian Miller. Sunday Worship 9:30am Johns County. We are located between the Shands Bridge and Pacettis Campground on State Road 13. Our Sunday morning begins with a teen Bible study at 9:00 a.m. followed by a Praise and Worship service at 10:00 a.m. We strive to live out our name and be a River of Grace to our community! We love the Lord Jesus and want to share His message of love and hope with everyone. Please come and worship with us soonƒwe would love to have you! Grief Share is a faith-based support group at Fruit Cove Baptist Church for those who are grieving the loss of a loved one. This is a 13-week DVD driven program designed to take you from mourning to joy. The program begins on August 29 at 6:15 p.m. and childcare is provided. Please call Cecille Hammond, 230-6221, with questions or to register. thanked the crowd for their prayers, positive thoughts and get-well wishes, even citing the cards from the children at St. Josephs School, where Ryan Timoney attended as a youngster, as a source of comfort and inspiration. The Hoedowns activities included both a live and silent auction. During the live auction, auctioneer Ricky Brooks engaged the crowd in bidding on sports and rock-n-roll memorabilia. One man won the bidding for a New York Jets football, signed by quarterback Mark Sanchez and immediately handed the prize to Diane Timoney for her son. Rock-n-rolls Van Zant brothers, Johnny of Lynyrd Skynyrd and Donny of .38 Special, donated two autographed electric guitars for auction and also sent along another autographed guitar just for Ryan Timoney. Ten percent of the evenings proceeds will aid Ryan Timoney in his recovery. The evening included bluegrass music by One Mandarin Road, The Playing Cards DJs, and line-dancing led by Larry Bass. A bu et of barbequed pork, sausages and chicken with baked beans, green beans, cornon-the-cob, cole slaw and potato salad were catered by Jax Pit BBQ, special events catering and local chef Gerry Ser“ lippi. The Mandarin and St. Johns communities have been extremely generous in supporting our e orts to serve the deployed men and women of our military forces,Ž said Kathy Signorile, St. Michaels Soldiers founder and president. We are so grateful to the businesses who donated items for our auctions and food for the event. We couldnt do it without them. Our volunteers work tirelessly to “ ll and ship boxes of goodies to our deployed men and women.Ž When asked what we can send our soldiers, United States Army Specialist Chris Tumlinson loudly told the Hoedown crowd, Snacks! We love snacks.Ž For more information on how you can help or volunteer, please call 599-7855 or visit www.stmichaelssoldiers.orgHometown hero cont. from pg. 30

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Page 32, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Inc.Since 1981 Carpentry 260-4820 Julington Creek Plantation presentsƒPublic is Welcome! For more info, see www.jcpcdd.org Floridas Premier Jimmy Buett Tribute Show! Movie ReviewRock of AgesDirected by: Adam Shankman. Starring: Julianne Hough, Diego Boneta, Tom Cruise. Review by T. G. StantonOkay, But Could Have Waited for Cable (3 out of 5) This months movie review belongs to the “ lm Rock of Ages, a musical “ lm with comedy and drama for adults and teens. Los Angeles in 1987 was a blast. Big-haired rock and roll bands on any corner in Hollywood were the norm. Young men and women ” ocked to the city to pursue their dreams. And so, the musical begins. Sherrie Christian, played by Julianne Hough, comes to Hollywood and outside the famed Bourbon Room, a “ ctional club that has launched and supported rock and roll since its beginning, she is robbed and now in need of a job. She is soon rescued by Drew Boley, performed by Diego Boneta, an aspiring singer dreaming of his chance St. Augustine Flotilla 14-7 of the Coast Guard Auxiliary is encouraging increased boating safety for the 2012 season and beyond through public education courses, Vessel Safety Check stations and public information exhibit booths. Members of the boating public and the public at large should visit one of our booths which will be located throughout the local area, to obtain informational pamphlets, to discuss matters of boating safety and the security of our waterways with our knowledgeable personnel and to sign up for a Safe Boating course. Knowing how a boat handles can help avoid collisions. Ive been piloting boats since before I could walk!Ž Maybe so … but no matter how experienced you may be as a boater, its worth paying attention to the handling characteristics of every boat you own or operate. Every boat … even boats of the same type, from the same manufacturer … handles di erently. Your own boat responds di erently from day to day as a result of weather, current, temperature, load and other factors. The boater who ignores handling characteristics is risking his safety. Coast Guard data show that collision with another vesselŽ is the number one type of recreational boating accident; collision with a “ xed objectŽ is second. If youre interested in the technical factors that in” uence handling characteristics … things like side force, frictional wake current and drag … a review of one of the many boat handling and seamanship publications or the speci“ cations supplied with your boat, will provide a wealth The St. Johns River seems to be recovering nicely from the heavy rains we received earlier this summer. At one time what looked like a washout for this summers “ shing and shrimping may have ended up being the correction the river needed after several years of below normal rainfall. Our “ shing and shrimping forecast is starting to look like what we would expect most years with normal amounts of rain. Usually by late July or early August indicators are in place giving us an idea of what to expect the rest of the summer. What we need to be looking for “ rst is how the weather has been a ecting the salinity of the river. If the salinity is right, the shrimp should begin to show. Smaller shrimp are common early, gradually getting larger as the season progresses. With the arrival of the shrimp we can expect the croaker bite to catch “ re all over the river. Yellowmouth trout (weak“ sh) will be in the deeper holes, with reds under docks and sea trout at the ends of docks. Captain Davids Fishing ReportBy Captain David LifkaCurrently smaller shrimp have begun to show in their usual locations indicating favorable conditions for this summers migration of shrimp. The croakers have been biting strong from downtown Jacksonville to Green Cove Springs. Yellowmouth trout are abundant, reds are under docks and sea trout are at the end of docks. Our indicators are indicating and by all indications we can expect the rest of this summers shrimping and “ shing to be outstanding again. Fishing Report: Look for all “ shing to get better as shrimp make their way downstream. Shrimping will continue to improve. Shrimp from docks or shallow water at night with a bright light and shrimp meal. Old Shands Bridge (Orangedale and Green Cove) and County Dock (Mandarin) are open to the public for shrimping. Look for drop-o s and moving water if you are daytime shrimping from a boat. Whether you catch one, some or none, the family time spent “ shing will last a lifetime. U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary encourages boating safetyBy Contributing Writer Robert A. Schultz, Public Affairs Of cer, United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-7of useful information. But in the meantime, there are simple steps that the United States Coast Guard recommends that every boater … including experienced boaters … go over as a matter of routine. Drill it in. Whether youve been operating a particular boat for three years or three minutes, its a good idea to try some drills related to boat handling. Pick an open area on a calm day. Practice turning, stopping and reversing course at various speeds and pay attention to your turning radius, stopping distance and maneuverability when the boat has more or less momentum. Later, try the same drills in rougher water, with more wind and with more or less weight in the boat. You may be surprised how much these variables can change the way your boat handles. At a minimum, these drills should be conducted on an annual basis, especially if you live in an area of the country where your boat is stored during the winter. Once your boat has been launched for the summer boating season, take some time to reacquaint yourself with your vessels handling characteristics. A weighty issue. Do you know how much you weigh? Not trying to ask personal questions, but as the boat owner or operator, its important that you know the total weight of the equipment and persons you bring on board and make sure that its within the limits listed on your boats capacity plate (if one is provided). You must take into consideration everything youve taken on board, such as “ shing gear, a cooler, water (eight pounds per gallon), food and fuel (six pounds per gallon). Exceeding your boats capacity is dangerous and can severely a ect safe handling. Even if youre within the appropriate weight limit for your vessel, that weight must be properly distributed. Power trim and trim tabs are useful tools … but its better to carefully balance weight fore and aft, port and starboard, to avoid listing or porpoisingŽ … both of which make handling a vessel more di cult. NOAA News is good news. Finally, check the weather before you go out … and not just to “ nd out whether or not youll need a sweater. Wind and waves, in particular, can drastically change a boats handling characteristics. Take a few minutes to listen to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) marine forecast on your VHF radio, even if its currently bright and sunny. Youll be much better o making the conscious decision not to pilot your boat in 30-mile-per-hour winds than accidentally “ nding out youre incapable of it. For further information on NOAA, check out http://www.noaa.gov. Yes, you may be an experienced boater, but even if you were born with tiller in hand, its worth taking a little extra time to make sure youve mastered the handling of this boat on this day under these conditions. for stardom. Through their budding romance, the club is ” oundering due to the changing music scene throughout the country. Their dreams rely on a sellout performance by Stacee Jaxx, portrayed by Tom Cruise. A hard drinking, womanizing and half-naked star, he is on the downside of his career and looking for a revival. Bumps and roadblocks are thrown in the paths of the budding romance and the success and careers of all involved.Throughout this “ lm, directed by Adam Shankman, a former dancer and choreographer, the music of the 80s is the star of the show. The majority of music is sung by the actors themselves and very credible performances are delivered. There are of course energetic and enjoyable dance scenes with most of the music and any action is an excuse to break into song. There is drama in the political movement to denigrate rock and roll; business troubles, career troubles and romance could be on the rocks. The comedy comes in the presented changing morals, attitudes and costumes. The movie is de“ nitely longer than necessary and the story is simple and uninspired; this has been done before. However, the chosen music is the star and Tom Cruises performance is enough to keep you watching. Who knew he could be a rock and roll star too? Unless you hate the music of the 80s or are looking for Tolstoy in a movie, you should enjoy this “ lm. 1. Stay alert: Expect anything to occur when entering a work zone. 2. Pay close attention: Signs and work zone aggers save lives. 3. Turn on your headlights: Workers and other motorists must see you. 4. Don’t tailgate: Unexpected stops frequently occur in work zones. 5. Don’t speed: Note the posted speed limits in and around the work zone. 6. Keep up with traf c ow: Dedicate your full attention to the roadway and those traveling around you. 7. Don’t change lanes in the work zone: The time saved just isn't worth the chance. 8. Minimize distractions: Avoid changing radio stations and using cellular phones while driving in the work zone. 9. Expect the unexpected: Keep an eye out for workers and their equipment. 10. Be patient: Remember, the work zone crew members are working to improve your future ride.Highway Work Zone Safety Tips from the FDOT

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 33 FOR ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMMISSIONISTRICTEPUBLICAN 450-106 State Road 13 N Publix Center in Fruit CovePh: 230.8881 52 Tuscan Way, #202Publix Center at International Golf Dr. and SR 16 Ph: 940.0055 Whether you need a question answered, a problem solved, or a claim reported, my job is to make it happen. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.CALL ME TODAY. Being there is why Im here. P097193.1 State Farm, Home Oce, Bloomington, IL Jim Register Jr, Agent 12058 San Jose Blvd, Suite 302 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Bus: 904-268-5522 www.jimregister.com This summer has been brutal at times, which hardly needs saying. Torrential rains and high temperatures make for less than ideal conditions for gardening. However … fall is on the way and its a great time to consider what cool season vegetables youd like to enjoy. For greens and cruciferous vegetables, good choices might be Swiss chard, cabbage, broccoli and that ubiquitous southerner, collards. While none of these are exotic, they are fairly easy to grow and all vegetables can be more valuable straight from the garden as the freshest vegetables are the tastiest. Stirfrying in a little canola oil or steaming lightly, will help retain vitamins. Broccoli can become a cut and come again crop„once the main head has been harvested you can look forward to weeks of smaller, tender side shoots, looking just like miniaLuke, our neighbor, just graduated. He was just a skinny little kid (sorry, Luke) when we moved next door. Its already been seven years; hes quite the man and holds a real conversation (with eye contact!) when speaking to me now. We never invited him over for dinner; I always thought itd be a little less busy next week.Ž I dont really know him. Luke, Im sure, doesnt feel slighted. But the realization that he became a man right before our eyes really hit me! Ben, our oldest, will be graduating in “ ve years. Five years! I swore Id never say this, but... Wow. They sure do grow up fast. The bright side is Im realizing this now. I know the song Cats in the Cradle and how things can turn out when we dont have our priorities right. Thats one reason we decided to homeschool„we didnt want to be so busy getting ready and going places that we didnt have time to enjoy the ride. After eight years homeschooling, though, I know I have to be intentional to develop a relationship with my kids even when were together 24/7! Its back-to-school time. Most St. Johns County mammas have updated the kids wardrobes, bought school supplies, maybe even pinned new lunch ideas on Pinterest. Id like to encourage you to plan some cant you just stay littleŽ time with The North Florida Vendors Association (NFVA) has announced the opening of a new weekly community farmers market in Alpine Groves Park, located at 2060 State Road 13 in NW St. Johns County; the Grand Opening of the St. Johns River Farmers Market is set for Saturday, August 25 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. This area is full of people Farmers, arts and crafts vendors needed for new NW community farmers marketlooking for close-by family entertainment, as well as farmers, artists and artisans looking for a venue for their wares,Ž said NFVA president Arthur Glaser. We plan to provide a Saturday destination-market for the community, in the tradition of the old-time Market Day, which served as a commercial center and gathering place for entertainment, socializing and education.Ž The NFVA is welcoming interest from local farmers, artists, crafters and volunteer organizations seeking exposure. For additional information, please email nfva.org@gmail. com.GardeningLooking forward to fall?By Contributing Writer Master Gardener Lesley Arrandale with Duval County Extension, University of Florida/IFAS Purposeful ParentingThey grow up fast By Allie Olsen, www.gracefullmom.compreschoolers as well as teens. You know what will be most memorable for your family, but in case youre tired of thinking, Ill share a few ideas that are fun and easy on the budget: Sunset picnic at Alpine Groves: Some of our favorite family pictures are from last minute picnics at this park! The playground is cool, but we usually drive past it to the riverfront and pack some balls, bubbles and lots of snacks. Take the littles to the merrygo-round: St. Augustine has plenty of noteworthy attractions, but you cant beat a $1 ride on a carousel! Our friends grab pizza from downtown and make it a cheap, fun family night. For more St. Augustine ideas, check out www.SimplyStAugustine.com Hit up Redbox: Popcorn and a movie may be standard, but what about coordinating your snack with the ” ick? Some memorable combos weve done are Kung Fu Panda and sushi, Happy Feet and ice cream, Tin Tin and doggie treats. (Thats my hubbys bad humor. Ha!) Relax by the water: Utilize your neighborhood pool or head to the beach. We live in Florida„make the most of these long summer days! Have a good time now. Make some memories you and your kids can look back on in those “ ve short years! ture broccoli heads. Just dont discard the plants before giving them a chance to develop. The University of Florida is a great source of information on vegetable gardening. Check out http://solutionsforyourlife.com/ hot_topics/lawn_and_garden/ veggie_gardening.html. Fall is also a good time to review your ” ower and shrub plantings. By August there may be casualties you want to replace and overgrown spring” owering perennials that need dividing. Plan to tackle these tasks when the weather is really cooling down and youll have greater success than trying to do so in the heat of summer. If disease has been the problem, particularly root rot, it might be prudent to replace that plant with one from a di erent family. The disease may be lingering in the soil and could simply attack the replacement For more detailed information on topical gardening, I can recommend the bi-monthly newsletter from our Duval County Extension Service, A New Leaf.Ž (http://duval.ifas.u” edu/documents/nleafJulyAugust2012.pdf) The monarch butter” ies will be more evident in the weeks to come, as they prepare to migrate south for the winter. If you have plenty of blooms such as pentas, this will lure them into the garden and a bonus for them would be to “ nd members of the milkweed family on which to lay their eggs. Its always fun for kids … and adults! … to see the metamorphosis of the caterpillar to butter” y. If you are handy you can simply use an old cardboard box with a mesh lid as a caterpillar house. (Or you can buy a ready-made version.) Give it plenty of fresh milkweed to eat and it will very quickly grow and transform into a beautiful green and gold chrysalis. Once that stage is reached the caterpillar within is undergoing its transformation and it wont be many days until the new butter” y splits the chrysalis and emerges, wet and crumpled, from its con“ nes. The wings take several hours to plump up and become functional. Once the monarch is ready to ” y, carefully shift the box outside and place it near some ” owers. Remove the lid and watch. Who knows, your hatchling may be one of the millions of monarchs that will make its way to overwinter in Mexico! Photo by Peggy Greb (www.ars.usda. gov) W W W WWWwww.TheCreekLine.comVisit our website: 209-6190I Need a Home! All adoptions are $60, which includes neutering/spaying, rabies vaccinations and shots. The Pet Center is located at 130 N. Stratton Road, just off US-1 between County Road 210 and International Golf Parkway. The hours are 8:004:30 Monday through Friday and 9:00-12:30 on the last Saturday of each month. My name is Kai; I am a 6 month old Boston terrier mix. I am current on all my vaccines but still need to be neutered. I am an inside dog, housetrained and crate trained. I get along great with other animals and children. I know simple commands and still very much a puppy.

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All funds are based in US dollars. Toll free numbers may or may not reach Canada. (ARA) You may already know that heart disease is the number one killer in America, and that factors like obesity increase your risk of developing it. But of all the shocking things you know„or believe you know„about heart disease, heres the statistic that you might “ nd the most eyeopening: 80 percent of all heart disease is preventable. Its important that everyone understand as much as possible about heart disease prevention, as 80 percent of heart disease can be avoided,Ž says Dr. Martha Grogan, medical editorin-chief of the new book Mayo Clinic Healthy Heart for Life!Ž Heart disease claims the lives of 600,000 Americans each year and another 12.7 million su er from heart attacks. One in three women is diagnosed with heart disease and 50 percent of men are at risk of heart attacks before age 65. Those statistics may make you feel like you, too, are in the cross-hairs for developing heart disease. Some lifestyle changes, however, can help you greatly reduce your risks. In the new book, available now online and in bookstores nationwide, Mayo Clinic experts discuss risk factors for heart disease, how to recognize the symptoms, and what lifestyle steps you can take to help reduce your risk. The catchphrase Eat 5, Move 10, Sleep 8Ž sums up the approach Mayo experts advocate to minimize heart disease risks. The slogan reminds you to eat “ ve servings of fruits and vegetables each day, do at least 10 minutes of moderately intense physical exercise daily and get at least eight hours of sleep per night. In addition, Mayo experts say, 10 simple steps can help you minimize your risk of heart Ten steps to conquering heart diseasedisease. Heres a sampling of the steps that youll “ nd in the clinics new heart healthy book: € Eat healthy: Adopt simple dietary changes such as eating at least “ ve fruits and vegetables each day, switching to whole grains and lean proteins, and eating a healthy breakfast every day. € Be active: A sedentary lifestyle is as deadly as smoking, experts say. Exercising just 10 minutes a day can deliver signi“ cant heart-health bene“ ts. Have trouble sticking with an exercise plan? Finding something you enjoy doing, whether its playing a sport, running, tai chi, yoga or extreme house cleaning, can help you maintain your commitment to exercising. € Sleep well: Sleep deprivation has serious health repercussions, including increasing your risk of heart disease. Conversely, getting adequate sleep can actually have a restorative e ect on the heart. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says sleep deprivation has become a national public health epidemic. Creating a bedtime routine and a relaxing sleep environment can help you get the eight hours of sleep per night that your body needs. € Plan for emergencies: A heart emergency can happen at any time, so its important to know the warning signs of a problem. Learn to recognize symptoms of a crisis, and act quickly to get medical help. € Enjoy life: A positive attitude, supportive network of family and friends, and good management of your stress not only improve your heart health, they can improve your overall enjoyment of life, as well. In addition to o ering solid advice and the 10 steps to heart health, the Mayo Clinic Healthy Heart for Life!Ž also discusses how the heart functions, what can go wrong, tools for ongoing heart health and tips on how to keep your whole family heart healthy. Following these steps can help you dramatically reduce your risk of heart disease, even though it cant be completely eliminated,Ž Grogan says. If youve done everything in your power to prevent heart disease or live with it as e ectively as possible, then you have, indeed, conquered it.Ž Free PapersWorking For YouDoes your advertising leave you feeling this way?Advertising can be pretty complex. You may not know which way to turn. ere is a sign you can rely on „ ours. Call us today so that our professionals can make the most of your advertising investment.Insert Your Logo HereAnother sign were working for you. (ARA) While warmer weather brings many opportunities to enjoy outdoor living spaces, it also ushers in unwanted pests like ticks and mosquitoes. A mild winter often triggers an early emergence and larger populations of these insects. Frequent accounts of tick sightings and bites have been documented in many states, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports a steady increase in the prevalence of tick-borne illnesses like Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever each year. About 75 percent of all Enjoy outdoor activities while keeping bugs away reported Lyme disease cases are acquired from ticks picked up during activities in backyards and around the home, according to the CDC website. The site also notes that homeowners can reduce the population of ticks that can cause Lyme disease and the like by 68 to 100 percent with as little as one application of an appropriate outdoor insecticide spray. Another pest-spread illness, West Nile virus, is transmitted through the bites of infected mosquitoes. West Nile Enjoy outdoors cont. on pg. 35

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 35 886-4919The CreekLine Marketplace ads! Community MarketplaceAttention Small Businesses!!!For just $39 per issue you can reach 23,000+ addresses (min. of 6 issues) Call 886-4919 today! Massage Therapy Alicia Hunter LMTOnly $50 an hour #MM12329/MA53865 Neuromuscular Therapy ( 904 ) 514 5788www .hunter l mt. c omA New U Massage located in San Jose Office Center, Next to Sonny’s and Ace Hardware $5 OFF with this ad. www.allearspetsitting.com (904) 687-9610 Bonded, Insured & Affordable American Classic Lawns“Quality Lawn Maintenance”Mandarin N. St. Johns County707 4468Residential from $30.Commercial Residential Aqua Pro Specialties LLCPRESSURE WASHING 904-704-1388Licensed & Insured ALL 24 HR. Mobile Service Re-Roo“ng is our SpecialtyŽCovering Northeast Floridas Finest HomesWith Quality Work and Professional Service Since 1993. Wit h Q h Q Q ual ua ity Work and and ad Pr P ofe ssi onal Service Si nce e 19 19 9 Free Estimates!460-2815 … Insured …  R R “ i S i l Ž COASTAL ROOFING SYSTEMS A Coastal Building Systems Company State Certied Roong Contractor # CCC057020 … Licensed … … … Driveways Concrete Removal Patios Driveway Extension Walkways PaversCall Today for Free Decorative Trim with Driveway Job! Catering to the needs of the Homeowner FREE ESTIMATES838-1836 Professional Computer ServicesBusiness & ResidentialFor more details, visit us at:www.itpromise.com I.T. Promise Inc. Computer Services( 904 ) 287-2254 at Fruit Cove287-0601 Carpets by Jonah.com 904-476-1476 Jonah Jones 3 Year Labor Warranty Housecleaning 207-5674 Licensed & Insured631 2731www.kleanspray.com 10% OFF1st time customers Get Rich Slow... Earn Extra Income learning how to operate your own Mini-Ofce Outlet from your computer and phone.Free Training. Flexible Hours. Incredible Incentives.www.reach4more.com Call Caren for a free quote!904-230-6230www.providencetravel.coCruise Ships, Riverboat Cruises, and Train Destinations MimisAll Natural HousecleaningEnvironmentally Safe Products Discount Plans Available Free Estimates 904-392-6306 JOB Finder Looking for a job in NW St.Johns County? Heres w here you can nd one close to home. CLASSIFIED ADS! NOW ONLINE AT www.thecreekline.comFREE Help WantedEngineering For Kids is looking for part-time, exible, and energetic people to be part of the North Florida team. Go to http://www.engineeringforkids.net/NorthFlorida/NowHiring. html for more information. Looking for an experienced climber with references. Call Mitch @ 703-5040 Davidson Realty is now recruiting new and experienced Realtors. Let us tell you why we're routinely one of the "Best Places to Work in Northeast Florida." Call 904-940-5000 or visit us at www.DavidsonRealtyInc.com. Pet Sitting Company part time work with pet. Applicant must live in the 32259 area. Flexible hours. Adult applicants only. Call Robin at 687-9610. Chiropractic of ce looking for front desk receptionist. Full time position. Must have computer skills, be a fast learner, very friendly/outgoing, ling, good phone skills. Bruce Sambursky, D.C. fax resume to 683-4378 or email samburskychiro@comcast.net Panache in Julington Creek is interviewing experienced & talented Stylists to join our team. Do you enjoy working in a professional, clean & successful environment? Apply at www.getpanache. com or stop in 2758 Racetrack Road #403 HELP WANTED! If you like music (and other arts) and would like to volunteer to support a non-pro t organization bringing music to the community, please call 374 8639 Join the Baptist South circle of care. Visit e-baptisthealth.com for the most up to date list of job openings. Listings are updated daily and change often. If you have any questions, please call Human Resources at 271.6078. Seeking Licensed Massage Therapist @ A New U Massage(MM12329) Mandarin furnished massage room available NOW. Room rent is $375+ 7% tax ($401.25) a month. Rent can split w/other LMT. Phone: 904-288-0064. Pre-School and Infant/Toddler Teachers We look for quali ed teachers who love working with children. Give us a call or e-mail your resume! The Academy at Julington Creek: 904-230-8200; sara@theajc.net Pet Sitting Company Part time work with pets. Applicant must live in the International Golf Parkway area. Flexible hours. Adult applicants only. Call Robin at 687-9610. Are you sharp, motivated and teachable? Now hiring. Call 904-993-4481 Kennel job posting: Bartram Trail Veterinary Hospital is seeking a caring, hard-working person for full-time or part-time kennel position. Positive, caring attitude with ability to work independently and as part of team. Responsibilities will include feeding and exercising boarded animals, laundry, bathing animals, cleaning and light maintenance of boarding and hospital areas. Bene ts after 90-day probationary period include pet care, paid holidays, sick/personal time-off and uniforms. Regular weekday off and rotating weekend schedule standard. Fill out an application at the clinic, 6751 State Road 16 St. Augustine or go on-line to BartramTrailVets.com and download an application from the forms and fax it to 904-940-0399 or email it to angelaidlaw@ BartramTrailVets.com A/C Technician & Electircian wanted for Auto Repair Company. Contact Jon at 731-5065. Water Treatment Installer, experienced. For established Water Treatment Company. Bene ts 262-0197 or Fax: 260-6292. PT/FT Insurance billing for Chiropractic of ce. Must have a lot of experience in billing for Chiropractic of ce. Fax resume to 683-4378. Angelo's Barbershop We are a men's focused barberhop where every haircut gets a hot towel neck shave. We offer hot towel face and head shaves. Must have expert straight razor skills! 11531 San Jose Boulevard Jacksonville, FL 32223 Ask for Dominic: 904-374-4948 Licensed Property & Casualty Sales Producer (Baptist South Area) Come grow with us! We are looking for a dynamic and talented multi-line producer, with the skills and drive for success. Current 220 license desired 440 license will be given consideration. Commercial/Business Insurance as well as Life/Health/Variable Annuity Licensee and experience will receive high level of consideration. Skills Requirements and Main Responsibilities of Position: Excellent oral and written communication, dependable, detail oriented, ability to multi-task, self-directed, drive, sense of urgency, and professional. Serves customers by selling personal lines P&C, commercial P&C, and life products. Manage relationships and increase customer retention and write new polciies by closing inbound lead oppotunities as well as making outbound sales calls to prospects, while cross-selling to current relationship contacts. Comp plan includes a base salary, monthly production bonuses, as well as monthly and annual incentives plan and earnings will vary based on licensing and results. Contact Deb Eveson at (904) 400-6450 PHONE 121 Financial Credit Union is seeking sales and team-oriented individuals to join our organization. We are currently hiring for the following positions at various locations. We offer competitive bene ts including 401K. Download our application at https://121fcu.org/careers. Send your application and resume to hr@121fcu.org or fax to 904-722-6643. EOE Member Service Representative Tellers Multi-function Aerobics / Pilates / Yoga Instructors, Personal Trainers, Massage Therapists and Aestheticians needed for innovative day spa. Must be licensed and insured. E-mail resume to admin@themonalisadayspa.com or call Rick at (904) 535-5101. Are you sharp, motivated and teachable? Now hiring 904-993-4481 Back to School Guide Now is the time to advertise your . Enrollment for the 2012-2013 school year, Dance, Gymnastics, Karate, Day Care, Schools, and more! The CreekLine of St. Johns County + ( Sa v e 5% on Septembe r s a d when y ou book both months! Call to d a y to r ese rv e y ou r a d space! 904-287-4913 lg@ r tpublishinginc.com Time for The CreekLine’s Annual poses health risks to humans and pets alike during the warm summer months. While incidents of West Nile virus have declined over the past 10 years, the CDC reports it to be an established seasonal epidemic that can cause severe illness and result in permanent neurological damage. The best way to prevent an outbreak of the disease, according to the CDC, is through the use of an integrated pest management (IPM) approach to control both adult mosquitoes and their larvae before they can hatch and mature. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) describes IPM on its website, www. epa.gov, as an e ective and environmentally sensitive approach to pest management that relies on a combination of common-sense practices.Ž The EPA points out that the IPM approach, which takes insects life cycles into consideration as well as currently available pest control methods, is a good way to manage pests economically and with the least health and environmental hazards. In addition to the e orts and community education by organizations like the EPA, there are many simple, preventative steps that individuals can take to ensure their own lawns, gardens and patios are a safe environment for summer fun. Keeping grass cut short and eliminating standing water in and around the home are two easy, e ective ways to reduce the prevalence of menaces like ticks and mosquitoes,Ž says Aaron Hobbs, president of RISE (Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment) a national organization representing the manufacturers, formulators and distributors of pesticide and fertilizer products. The applications of insect repellents and thorough skin checks after spending time outdoors also serve as important safeguards for adults, children and pets. Pesticide and repellent products can provide signi“ cant protection, and it is important to note that these products are rigorously tested and approved by EPA and your state to ensure they will protect you and your pets from harmful pests,Ž Hobbs continues. Reading pesticide and repellent labels and following directions for proper application and storage are ways to ensure that your outdoor living spaces remain a healthy, pestfree summer haven. To learn more on how to protect your family, friends and pets from insects, rodents and weeds, visit www.DebugTheMyths.com.Enjoy outdoors cont. from pg. 34

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Page 36, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Back to School Guide Stronger...Faster...Better RACE TRACK RDFLORA BRANCH BLVD. SR 13PUBLIX Fred Baldwin, PT, DPT, SCS, ATC, PES and Tobi Baldwin, PT, DPT, MS, OCS, MTC, FAAOMPT Sports Medicine providers for Creeks Athletic Association Soccer. Physical Therapy Sports Performance Pilates Fall Registration (Across from Zaxbys)academyofdancejax.com (Classes Begin August 27) (ClassesBeginAugust27) MUSIC LESSONS A LIFETIME GIFTPiano Lessons for Children and Adults Professional quality teacher with guaranteed results371-9690 (ARA) Everyone is born with about 100 billion brain cells. We form new connections between these cells throughout life, but the rate is particularly high when were young. Since those connections facilitate thinking and learning, parents who want to help give their children an intellectual edge should consider the brain-healthy choices they make each day. Making the e ort to nurture your childs brain with both proper nutrients and varied experiences, especially when they are young and developing at such a fast rate, is crucial,Ž says speech pathologist Lauren Zimet, founder of Early Insights, LLC and an expert on childhood brain development. The connections in brain circuitry can be enhanced through the environments and activities a child is exposed to, and participates in, as well as the nutrients a child consumes.Ž Zimet o ers “ ve tips to help parents enhance healthy brain development in their children, positioning them for success in school today and well into their future: 1. Select a rainbow. Its no secret that the bene“ ts of fresh fruits and vegetables are numerous, but thanks to the results of ongoing research, you can con“ dently add brain health to that list. Encourage your children to eat a colorful array of produce (organic when possible) each day so they get the antioxidants, vitamins and minerals needed to nourish and protect their growing brains. If your child Liberty Pines Academy PTO is excited to announce our 2012-2013 executive board: Cathy Richter, president; Karen Taylor, vice president of fundraising; Kim Delaney, vice president of membership and volunteers; Janine Bowker, treasurer; and Erin Gulden, secretary. We have many new members on the board this year who are anxious to jump in and help out and many returning members ready to share their experience. Weve been working hard this summer preparing for some great events and fundraisers. This year the LPA-PTO is o ering summer camps to St. Johns County students. We are o ering a basketball camp the week of August 6 through 10. There will be a morning session for rising third through “ fth graders and an afternoon session for rising sixth through eighth graders. The week of August 13 through 17, we are o ering a cheerleading camp in the morning for kindergarten through “ fth grade. All camps are $100 per child; for more information, please visit our website (www-lpa. stjohns.k12.” .us). Please join us at Wolf Greetings, to be held August 15 through 17. Come meet your childs teacher and while there come by and visit the PTO tables. Well have lots of information and would love to talk to you about our school. You will be able to pick up your pre-ordered spirit wear as well as purchase additional items. If you pre-ordered school supplies these will be available for pick up as well. Entertainment Books are back; however, this year we will be sending them home the second week of school. And as always we will have some great prizes for top sellers and even if you just buy one youre still a winner. You get a book full of coupons and Liberty Pines gets the pro“ ts! Liberty Pines Academy is pleased to announce their “ fth annual Fall Gala on October 6, 2012 at St. Johns Golf and Country Club, starting at 6:30 p.m. This years theme is Tailgating for LPA!Ž It will be a fun evening packed with delicious food, fabulous live and silent auction items, including celebrity items. Attire will be country club casual and there will be football fun and games you and your friends will not want to miss. Tickets are available for purchase now and you can purchase tickets at Wolf Greeting for a discount. Join us for a great time and to support Liberty Pines Academy! Childcare will be available during the event. If you Liberty Pines Academy August updateBy Contributing Writer Stephanie Bradford, Liberty Pines Academy PTOare interested in purchasing tickets, donating auction items or helping with this great event, please contact the event chairs: Jennifer Ferguson at jenniferferguson1@gmail.com or 571-7701 or Farrah Orr at orrfamily@litestream.net or 342-3056. Another great project we have been working on this summer is our PTO Discount Card. Our business partner committee has secured 13 local businesses to be a part of this new program. Every LPA family will be receiving a discount card at no cost. The card is valid for the entire school year. If you know a business interested in partnering with LPA either by o ering our families a discount or by being a business partner please contact Christy Beebe at stlouis21@yahoo.com. Finally, kindergarten parents … please join us for our annual Tissues and Tea on August 24 at 8:30 a.m. This is a great way to meet other kindergarten parents and “ nd out all about PTO. Dates to remember: Wolf Greetings: K-2nd: Wednesday, August 15, 5:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 3rd -5th: Thursday, August Five ways to help kids boost their brain power is resistant to eating produce, encourage them to come shopping with you and select something new to try. Kids are more likely to eat what they have selected themselves. 2. Relax the right way. While its true that exercise boosts brain power, its also important to teach children how to relax. Balancing activity with relaxation is important so that kids dont get too stressed, which can impact the brains development and lead to learning and behavior problems. Teaching children early on the bene“ t of setting goals, working towards those goals and giving their brain and body time to relax are important life skills. When its time to relax, skip the TV and teach your child that taking a walk in nature, reading a book or drawing are great ways to unwind. Deep breathing is also an excellent practice to teach children of all ages. 3. Eat omega-3 brain food. Omega-3 essential fatty acids are critical to a childs brain development. They are called essentialŽ because we need them for optimal health. The problem is that our bodies cannot manufacture them and we can only get them from the food we eat or supplements we take. While “ sh, nuts and seaweed are good omega-3 sources, kids typically dont gobble down these foods. That leaves many parents worried that their kids arent getting enough, and with omega-3 de“ cits linked to ADHD, dyslexia and other behavioral and Boost brain power cont. on pg. 40 Back to School 2012St. Johns County First Day of School Monday, August 20www.stjohns.k12.fl.us16, 5:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 6th -8th: Friday, August 17, 5:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. First Day of School for Students: Monday, August 20 Tissues and Tea: Friday, August 24 at 8:30 a.m. Now Enrolling for Fall 2012

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 37 Back to School Guide Gymnastics & Tumbling Gti&Tbli Registration Continues Conveniently located in Julington Creek area off Race Track Rd. next toPlease visit www.markspivak.com for schedule & forms. (Click on Tumbling Kids Logo) Bring this ad in and Get$ New Students Only bring in this ad! Durbin Creek Elementary PTO would like to welcome back our explorers to a new school year. Though we have said good bye to many good friends and great teachers, we are starting on an exciting journey. A new year brings new ways to have fun and create lifelong memories, so please join the PTO in our Bingostyle learning game. Each family will receive a Bingo card when they join the PTO. You can complete activities to Welcome back to Durbin Creek Elementary!By Contributing Writer Sheila Caballero, Correspondence Secretary, Durbin Creek PTOJulie Wright and her class of fth graders show off their tie-dye talent at Geneva Presbyterian Churchs VBS held in July.“ ll your card and rack up exciting prizes. Once “ lled, your family will be entered to win a great Disney gift basket. The teachers will be playing a form of monopoly called DurbinopolyŽ where they can earn properties to complete a game board of their own. Once “ lled, they will be entered into a drawing to win an iPad for their classroom. The school year is also packed with new events and some oldies but goodies. We will be having a Family Game Night, a Casino Night (Parents Only), Space Night (old classic) and a new twist on an old favorite Durbin Snow Bowl charity event. Dont miss these events; not only will you be earning a spot on your game boards but you will be enjoying yourself and sharing your times with friends and family. If you would like the dates for these events or any more information about the DCE PTO please visit our website at www.dcepto.org. If you have some suggestions or would like to help with any of these events we would love to hear from you! Lets get our Game on at Durbin Creek!

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Page 38, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Back to School Guide (904)292-2210 MandarinSouthBusinessCenter12421SanJoseBlvd.€Suite310/320 Jacksonville,FL32223(BetweenSonnysBBQ&Solantic) LorettoRd. NSanJoseBoulevard RaceTrackRd. JulingtonCreek Lessthan1/2mi. fromJulingtonCreek MarinelaM.Nemetz,D.D.S.BoardCertifiedPediatricDentistRobertJ.Nemetz,D.D.S.,M.S.AdultDentistry€Periodontics€Prosthodontics Now Enrolling for Summer Camp and Fall Riding lessons Amy Barnett, Certied Riding Instructor by the American Riding Instructor Association Gingerbread Acres, LLC 12567 Aladdin Rd. Jacksonville, Florida 32223904-654-3561 The JCB Sharks All Star team went undefeated in the 12B State Tournament in Ocala Florida and brought home the state championship title. The Sharks opened tournament play with a hard-fought 2-1 victory over Bobby Wiesner, a 10-yearold St. Augustine resident, kicked and punched his way to the “ rst place podium to become the 2012 AAU USA National Champion in Taekwondo forms and sparring. The national tournament took place from July 2 through July 7 and drew about 2,000 competitors from throughout the United States. After winning gold at nationals in 2010, Wiesner reThe St. Johns County School District has o ered a broad range of Community Education evening courses since 2009, providing opportunities for workforce preparation, personal growth, and lifelong learning at area school sites. This fall, First Coast Technical College will also open their doors for fee-based evening classes covering technical and community interest subjects. Leon Mungin, Community Education coordinator at FCTC, notes that this is a reinvigoration of a program that was on the campus in past years. Because we specialize in technical training, including computers, Julington Creek 12U Sharks are state champions!Orange Park and went on to beat Atlantic Beach 13-0 and then MAA 14-5 to secure the title. Daniel Gajewski, Ethan Renaud and Alex Wicker all pitched great games. Josh Schievink led the team with “ ve hits followed by Andrew Dziwulski with four hits. Sam Sha er and Ryan Peterson both homered in the tournament. Overall this summer the Sharks went 15-2, winning two local tournaments and the state championship. Congratulations to Coach Shane King, Manager Paul Chouinard, Coach Mark Peterson, Jackson Lein, Josh Schievink, Alex Wicker, Ethan Renaud, Sam Sha er, Daniel Gajewski, Ryan Peterson, Andrew Dziwulski, Ian Craven, Colton Basham, Kyle Chouinard and Gri n King.FCTC joins school district to o er evening classes mechanics and culinary arts, for instance, we have facilities and equipment that is available after our students leave the campus. We also have teachers who want to share their knowledge with a broader audience. Community education is a perfect forum and we are excited to get the classes started,Ž he states. The “ rst class at FCTC is a free two-hour seminar on Microsoft Power Point program from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. on August 14 in Building A. Enroll on line at www.fctc.edu; class space is limited. A full menu of classes will be available at FCTC and at many St. Johns County School District school locations beginning in August and September. Courses will include photography, basic and advanced computer programs, social networking, acting, yoga, dance, exercise, art, crafts, sewing, Spanish, American Sign Language, bluegrass string band, folk guitar and others. For information on course prices, dates, times, locations and registration, please visit the website www.sjccommunityed. com or call 547-7565 or 5477510. Dont miss this opportunity to strengthen your resume, meet new people and keep learning for life!Wiesner repeats as AAU Taekwondo Championturned to the tournament scene again this year. He quali“ ed for the 2012 national tournament with “ rst place “ nishes at both the Wisconsin State Championship in March and the Florida State Championship in April. An articulate A-student, Wiesner is quick to credit his successes to several area taekwondo instructors including Master Jose Delgado, Master Greg Olipendo, Titus Durojaiye and Shari Toregrossa.Bobby Wiesner displays his championship form. To view your child’s school bus route, including pick up and drop off times, please visit the St. Johns County School district website: http://www.stjohns.k12.fl.us/ depts/transp/routes2012~2013 School Bus routes now online! Pencil us in!Our Back to School sectionappears again in the September issue!sales@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 39 Back to School Guide … ages 5-11 … ages 3-4 … girls ages 7-18904-260-198311502-1 Columbia Park Dr W Jacksonville, FL 32258www.FirstCoastGymnastics.com Free Trial Class & $5 OFFwith registration Open Mondays through Fridays 8:30am – 5pm 1631 Race Track Road Suite 101230-7977Most Insurances AcceptedPediatric Associates of Julington Creek, PAOffering care for Infants, Children & Adolescents Mary Ann Garcia, M.D., FAAP Victor Luz, M.D., FAAP FCA Baseball Fall Tryouts Saturday, August 18th at the Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville (Jax Suns field) 9U 10U 11U Fo r mo re i nfo r m a t i on cont a ct Ch e n e y Rob i n s on, a t c r ob i n s on@fc a .o rg o r g o to: www.fc a j a xb ase b a ll.o rg The goal for many high school students after they complete high school is to attend college. Grade point average, SAT/ACT scores and extracurricular involvement/leadership are all factors that play a role in a schools decision to admit a student. St. Johns County Schools have ranked above other schools in the state, academically, for August is Childrens Eye Health and Safety Month, and Clay Eye Physicians and Surgeons would like to education the community on prevention. A complete eye exam by an ophthalmologist that you know and trust literally sets the stage for the next 80 years,Ž says Dr. Levine, pediatric ophthalmologist with Clay Eye. Strong vision can be a lifechanger for children. I encourage parents to give your child the best chance for success with an eye exam when theyre ready to start school at four or “ ve years old.Ž Dr. Levine, who has extensive experience in pediatric ophthalmology, joined the Clay Eye team in July 2011. He is the only pediatric ophthalmologist within the eight physician practice and one of the few pediatric specialists in the region. Hes a resource that parents now have access to right in their own community. The St. Johns County School District is encouraging parents to register kindergarten students and new students to the county and/or the public school system before school starts on August 20. Parents may contact schools at their regular phone number to register their children. The schools are currently operating Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. To be eligible for kindergarten, children must be “ ve years old on or before September 1 and must reside in St. Johns County. To register for “ rst grade, children must be six years old on or before September 1 and have successfully completed kindergarten. The childs certi“ ed birth August is Childrens Eye Health and Safety MonthGood vision is such an important part of a childs development and is the foundation for education. I suggest if there is a concern, that you get an honest opinion from someone with experience. I have over a decade of experience in pediatric ophthalmology and emphasize a strong connection between doctor and child. While I specialize in kids, Im happy to see patients of any age.Ž Clay Eye Physicians and Surgeons o ers comprehensive eye care in the following specialties: cataract surgery, cornea surgery, medical retina, diabetic eye disease and macular degeneration, glaucoma surgery, Lasik surgery, cosmetic eye procedures, pediatric ophthalmology, and pediatric eye exams. In addition, they o er routine eye exams, contact lenses, and boutique eyewear for the entire family. Look for their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!Register your new or kindergarten student early for St. Johns County public schoolscerti“ cate is required at the time of registration and only the legal name is acceptable on student records. In addition, parents should bring two proofs of residency: current utility bill, lease, and/or mortgage statement. Florida law also requires any student entering a Florida school for the “ rst time to show proof of certain immunizations and physical examinations. A physical examination that has been performed within one year prior to enrollment in school will be accepted. Physical examinations can be acquired from either a private physician or from the county health department. Parents should visit the individual schools websites for registration information. Additional information on registration and school attendance zones can be obtained from the Student Services O ce at 547-7598.Local business partners with high school to raise scores and raise fundsseveral years and it is the goal of Tutoring Club of St. Johns to keep our schools at the top. Owner/director, Elizabeth Loeser, is a parent and veteran teacher in St. Johns County who understands the process for college admission as well as the di culties associated with funding programs at the schools due to budget cuts. For students, one of the most di cult parts of the college admission process is achieving the SAT scores they need to be competitive among their peers. Preparing for this test is a key to their success. This is a di cult test; and many kids are completely blind-sided the “ rst time they take it. Tutoring Club of St. Johns is o ering students an opportunity to take this test in a simulated testing environment without the pressure of the score being reported. They then receive a complete analysis of that score, with a personal consultation with the parents to help explain what the scores mean, how the scores are used, and what the student needs to do to completely prepare for this test and be successful. The event will be held at Ponte Vedra High School on September 8 at 9:00 a.m. in the auditorium. Parents pay $35, of which $25 will be donated back to Ponte Vedra High School PTO and Booster Club. All high school students are welcome to attend, with advanced registration. Please call 230-2855 for more information and to reserve your seat.need customers?sales@thecreekline.com Visit the St. Johns County School Districts website for everything you need to know about the upcoming school year! www.stjohns.k12. .us Questions?The rst day of school is Monday, August 20, 2012Get Ready!

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Page 40, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Back to School Guide Additional Programs Available Great Birthday Parties We are conveniently located at the corner of I-295 and San Jose Blvd.260 4866www.starlightjax.com Star ightGYMNASTICS Fall is just around the corner!Register Now for the Best class, day and time. Classes begin on August 6th Our #1 Priority: Your Children! Classes are exciting and motivating! CALL TODAY! FREE TRIAL CLASS Exciting News!SDS is expanding and will be able to accomodate later afternoon classes for all ages. witzerlandance choolBalletT a Hip Ho 904 Come and check us out at our Fall Registration and Annual Supply Day SaleWednesday-Saturday, August 15th, 16th, 17th & 18th 4PM till 8PM 1/4 mile south of Julington Creek Bridge on the left near Vino’s Pizzeria OFFERING: The last days of summer are here and school is right around the corner. This summer, while in Virginia, I learned “ rst-hand of a storm system I had never heard of before, the Derecho. Nothing like a storm to bring on simple living. Trees were down everywhere. Power was out for almost a week. Then of course there was record heat for the area. We hauled water and read. Not much else we could do! I loved reading The Queen of Water by Laura Resau. As I mentioned in last months edition of The CreekLine it is a global read in October and I hope to participate in the authors video conference. The Queen of Water gives insight to a culture that is not readily found in books for young people and is a “ ctionalized account of a true story. I found myself unable to stop reading it until I “ nished because I kept hoping Virginia would be able to break free. Her perseverance and strength was inspirational. I was pleasantly surprised as I read Theodore Boone: The Abduction by John Grisham. I had not been very impressed with his “ rst one in this series but decided to try this one. I am going to get the third one to read too. My favorite so far has been Robbie Forester and the Outlaws of Sherwood St by Peter Abrahams. I just assumed the protagonist was male from the title and was really surprised to “ nd out Robbie is female. The story was fast moving and I highly recommend it for any student. I enjoyed reading Reasons to be Happy by Katrina Kittle. Just a fun quick read for girls. I “ nally read another one of the SSYRA books, A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park. This is another story based on the The St. Johns County Medical Alliance recently awarded academic scholarships to four St. Johns County high school graduates pursuing an education in a medical related “ eld of study. This year, a total of $3,500 in scholarships were awarded. Rebeca Siguenza, a graduate of Pedro Menendez High School and Rachel Appelo, home schooled, each received $1000. Raj Sikaria, Nease High School and Jared Freitas, Bartram Trail High School, each received $500. Emma Domingoes and Jacob Sambursky, students who received scholarships last year, were each awarded $250 for continuation of their studies. Each year, the St. Johns County Medical Alliance, in St. Johns County Medical Alliance announces 2012 scholars conjunction with the St. Johns County Medical Society, offers academic scholarships to graduating St. Johns County high school seniors pursuing an education in pre-medicine, nursing or allied health. Scholarship applicants are evaluated on academic ability, school involvement and community service. The St. Johns County Medical Alliance is comprised of spouses of St. Johns County physicians. Its purpose is to promote health education, identify and address health-care needs and issues, participate in health-related legislation and provide college scholarships to St. Johns County students. For more information about Jared Freitasthe Medical Alliance, go to www.sjcma.blogspot.com.Notes from the Pacetti Bay Media CenterBy Contributing Writer Lynn Johnson, NBCT, Library Media Specialist, Pacetti Bay Middle Schooltrue life of a Sudanese boy as he grows up. Very eye opening and another opportunity to learn about other cultures. It is short so a very quick read. You cant help but hope he will stay strong and persevere. Last but not least of the ones I have read this summer and recommend is Tasting the Sky: A Palestinian Childhood by Ibtisam Barkat. It is non-“ ction and reads like “ ction. It is Ibtisams story through her eyes as a child. It is amazing to me how resilient children are that grow up in the war torn countries. I “ nd myself re” ecting on our freedom here in the United States. I highly recommend the two discoveries I made this summer in my quest to keep Felicity and Miles, my oldest grandchildren reading. They are good choices for any elementary age student. I remembered that The World According to Humphrey by Betty G. Birney had been on the Sunshine State Young Readers list years ago so I picked it up for Felicity. She loves animals and she had it read in a day she loved it so much. This is the same person who was burned out from reading all the SSYRA books for school and hadnt “ nished a book so far this summer. Now I have ordered the rest of the series and she is o and running as a reader again. My pick for Miles ended up being perfect too: Justin Case: School, Drool and Other Daily Disasters by Rachel Vail. Miles is going into third grade and had just “ nished reading all of T he Diary of a Wimpy Kids books. He was a hard sell but he has asked me to buy the next book in the series. Be sure to keep an eye out for all the new fall releases and keep reading.Boost brain power cont. from pg. 36psychological disorders, many are turning to supplements for their children. Experts agree that the safest, most reliable source of the most important essential fatty acids (EPA and DHA) is a high quality “ sh oil supplement. 4. Happy brains are hydrated brains. Staying hydrated is important for growing brains and bodies. Water can improve energy, increase mental and physical performance, remove toxins and waste from the body and keep skin healthy and glowing. Based on the trillions of cells in the body that need water to function, most nutritionists agree that children need more, not less H20. To estimate how many ounces of water your child should drink daily, divide his or her weight in half and aim for that number of ounces per day. 5. Be a positive support system early on. Learning is a complex process, but children will be more open to trying new things when they know their parents believe in them. Acknowledging e ort, instead of the outcome, strengthens a childs belief in himself or herself. Teaching goal setting, prioritizing activities and working o of check lists exercises the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in the brain. Experimentation through trial and error is the way the brain learns best. Giving your childs brain what it needs to grow strong can help him or her at school and in all social situations,Ž adds Zimet. Utilizing these tips is a great way to help position your child for success in the coming school year, and beyond.Ž W W W WWWwww.TheCreekLine.comVisit our website: Don t miss our Back to SchoolSpecial Sectionappearing again in the September issue of The CreekLine. Make a note of it! 287-4913

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 41 Back to School Guide Each Primrose School is a privately owned and operated franchise. Primrose Schools, Balanced Learning, and The Leader in Educat ional Child Care are trademarks of Primrose School Franchising Company. 2012 Primrose School Franchising Company. All rights reserved. Educational Child Care for Infants through Private Pre-Kindergarten and After School Now Enrolling Engage minds and hearts will follow. Proprietary Balanced Learning curriculum Music, Spanish, Computer Technology Ongoing customized student assessment Integrated character development program Dietician-approved meals and snacks provided Primrose School of Julington Creek904.230.2828Primrose School at St. Johns Forest904.824.1100Primrose School of Glen Kernan904.992.9002 11531-10 San Jose Blvd. OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK ANGELOS BARBERSHOP (904) 374-4948We offer Traditional Straight Razor shaves by Master Barbers and precision haircuts. Come down and let Angelo’s be your real deal barbershop. W e offer T raditiona l S trai g h t Mention this Ad for August Special: $11.00 Kids cuts $13.00 Adults Inspiring the next generation of engineers! Fall Classes Available for Ages 4-14 (Hands-on and full of learning opportunities) 904-254-1281 NFlorida@EngineeringForKids.net Register online at:www.EngineeringForKids.net/NorthFlorida Engineering For Kids North Florida St. Johns Technical High Schools Academy of Coastal and Water Resources and summer school students worked this summer in a partnership with Guana Tolomato Matanzas Theres a “ rst time for everything and for the “ rst time in history, a Creeks Athletic Association softball team has quali“ ed for the Babe Ruth Softball World Series. This August, the Creeks 16U Softball All-Stars will head to North Carolina to compete against other 16U teams from across the country. Thirteen girls from our local area, under the leadership of Manager Tom Borys and Coaches Jason Smith, Russ Monahan, Jon Sotomayor and Julie Lawson, quali“ ed to compete in the World Series in Wilson, North Carolina, August 9 through 14. Team accomplishments for the season include: History in the making: Team heading to the World Series(Champions) Greatest Show on Dirt Tournament, Orange Park, Florida; (Runner-Up) District Tournament, Jacksonville; (Runner-UP) Creeks Shoot Out Tournament, St. Johns; (Third Place) Florida State Tournament, Ocala, Florida. The players, parents and coaches would like to thank their sponsors, the community and the Creeks family for the ongoing support of their e orts this season. Anyone who would like to support them as they travel to the World Series and compete to earn the championship title may contact Manager/ Head Coach Tom Borys at tborys@homeplacere.com.Academy students restore oyster reefs By Contributing Writer Tammy HardinEstuarine Research Reserve to restore oyster reefs along 1,000 feet of shoreline. Although the entire project will take time to complete, students and community volunteers made an initial deployment of recycled oyster shells from local restaurants on June 28. With Common Core Standards upon us, this restoration project provided students with a total immersion opportunity. Students performed observations, conducted research and analyses in an estuarine environment, utilized scienti“ c tools and learned how to measure and interpret data. In addition, students wrote about their experiences in a natural environment and re” ected on their learning. Academy students are looking forward to continuing the restoration project this upcoming year and are gearing up to collect spartina grass seeds from the Guana Reserve. Once collected, academy students will cultivate the seeds into grass plugs to be used at the restoration site to complete the living shoreline. According to Linda Krepp, academy coordinator, The beauty of the project is that not only does it entail restoring valuable shoreline, but it is a true community e ort in recycling.Ž If any student is interested in the St. John Technical High Schools Academy of Coastal and Water Resources, please contact Linda Krepp at 547-8500. The CreekLineis YOUR Community Newspaper! Send us your community news!editor@thecreekline.com

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Page 42, The CreekLine • August 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Back to School Guide APPOINTMENT 904.264.KIDS264KIDS.COM CALL OR VISITUS ONLINE TO ANSCHEDULE San Jose Blvd. SR 13Bartram Walk Race Track RoadLOCATED ABOVE BLACKSTONE GRILLE 112 BARTRAM OAKS WALK #203 | JACKSONVILLE, FL | 32259 Ra c e T ra c k B l vd.Flora Branch Blv d 990 F l ora Bran c h Bou l evard St. Johns, F l orida 32259 www.thea c ademyatju l ington c reek.netL i c ense #C 0 7 5J00 8 3 *As measured by the readiness scores posted by the Florida Department of Education at https://vpk.”doe.orgInfant through 4 years old-VPK Before and After School for Ages 6 to 12 Fall Enrollment Call for more details.904-230-8200 We offer: The Academy will teach your child to read by age 5 Send your child to the BEST learning center in our area* Our children are more ready for lifetime learning than any other students Two of this years newest members of the Bartram Trail Dance Team (BTDT) started their journey by signing up for Bear Cub Camp as elementary school students. Emily Allen, a rising freshman and new member of BTDT, attended the cub camp as a second grader and after performing with the dance team during the homecoming football game, a dream was born. She decided that night she was going to be a member of BTDT when she got to high school. Allen took dance classes at Mark Spivaks Dance Institute, where she met Kendall Gast, also a rising freshman and BTDT member. The two soon found that in addition to being good friends, they shared a passion for dance and a common dream. They both dreamed about making the BTDT. In middle school the girls tried out and make the North Florida AllStars (NFA) dance team, where they competed in jazz and hip hop. For three years, Allen and Gast danced with the NFA team and took studio classes at Mark Spivaks, each year growing as dancers and learning to handle the demands, pressure and emotion of being on a competitive dance team. Both girls talk about the rush of excitement they felt running out on the “ eld at halftime, seeing the glare of the lights and the crowds “ lling the stands and the hush falling over everything right before the music started. One can see the joy “ ll their faces as they talk about the dance and getting it right and how much fun it was to be surrounded by girls of all ages who love to dance. Of course their smiles get a little bigger and their eyes sparkle as they describe the roar of the crowd as the Bear Cub Camp ran o the “ eld. It is obvious these girls love to dance, love to perform and love to do that with other girls. This years Bear Cub Camp is Saturday, August 25, 2012 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon at Bartram Trail High School. The performance on the “ eld is Friday, August 31, 2012 during Bartrams “ rst home football game. The campers will be broken into two age groups: Bear Cub Camp leads to fulledged BearsBy Contributing Writer Ashley Allenkindergarten through “ fth grade will meet in the Ninth Grade Cafeteria, Room #N130. The sixth through eighth grades will meet in the Dance Studio (Room #N126). The camp costs $40 per participant and includes t-shirt, poms, participants entry to BTHS varsity football game on August 31, dance instruction by the Bartram Trail Dance Team and a performance youll never forget! Registration at the door will begin at 8:30 a.m. in the ninth grade building. Please contact Coach Lindell with questions at Bartramdance2004@gmail.com. The Bartram Trail Dance Team had a successful season this past year. They placed second in the nation at the NDA national competition in HipHop this past March and won the Innovative Choreography Award. Even more impressive and meaningful, the Bartram Trail Dance Team was chosen out of the entire competition to be the recipient of the 2012 Sportsmanship Award given and presented by NDA for their outstanding Sportsmanship and respect towards the other teams. It is BTDTs goal to not only strive for a winning season, but to represent St. Johns County to the highest degree with their actions. The new team of 15 girls is gearing up for another successful 2012-2013 season.Bartram Trail Dance Team at the 2012 NDA summer camp at Rollins College in Orlando. Back to School 2012St. Johns County First Day of School Monday, August 20 Congratulations to the 8U Creeks Crushers All Star team for earning a berth to the Southeast Regionals in Greenville, North Carolina! They were District 1 champions, defeating Ponte Vedra Beach 25-1 in the championship game. This team of exceptional girls nished third in the 2012 Florida State Championships and earned a berth in the Regional Championships. This group also defeated the eventual state champion team from Longwood 12-3 to claim the Creeks Shootout championship and Ponte Vedra 18-6 to win the title at the Greatest Show on Dirt. Congratulations to this group of 8U girls from Creeks Athletic Association!

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www.thecreekline.com • August 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 43 LEARNING IS ALL AROUND. NOW ENROLLING! The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. Goddard Systems Inc. 2009 License #C07SJ0053 ASK ABOUT OURFLEX’LEARNING PROGRAM 100 Julington Plaza Drive Goddard Systems, Inc. program is AdvancED accredited. Back to School Guide FREE PRENATAL MEET & GREETS Call for an Appointment Today!Three Locations for your Convenience: Ponte Vedra 1102 A1A N, #104 904 273-6533Julington Creek 1633 Race Track Road #103904 287-7000Hodges Blvd.4745 Sutton Pk. Ct. # 801904 743-2100 growing healthydoctorojax.comPlease visit our patient portal for new patient registration: facebook.com/doctorojax twitter.com/drojax Mark SpivaksInstitute & Dance ExtensionJulington Creek230-7778106 Julington PlazaCorner Race Track Road & Flora BranchMandarin 268-3583 3740 San Jose PlaceOne block N. of Crown PointFruit Cove 287-4619774 N SR 13One mile South Julington Creek Bridge Oering Outstanding Dance Instruction For All Ages For 3 Decades! $10.00OFFNew Students Only bring in this ad Fall Schedule Just Began! Registration Continues At Any Location!Visit our Website for Schedules & Forms www.markspivak.com Rachel Reis, a rising senior at Allen D. Nease High School, has made a verbal commitment to compete for Bowling Green State University (BGSU) womens gymnastics team for the Class of 2013. The Division 1 team competes in the MidAmerican Athletic Conference in the Great Lakes region. Reis decision to go to BGSU was driven by a number of factors. Although she received multiple o ers she chose BGSU because she felt the school was a good “ t for not only gymnastics but academically and socially. Reis said, The reason I picked BGSU was a combination of the coach and the facilities. But the coach was de“ nitely the main reason; I bonded quickly with Coach Kerrie. Its going to be exciting competing at the college level and being a part of the team.Ž Kerrie Beach, BGSU womens gymnastics head coach, stated, I can tell you that Rachel was chosen out of a large pool because I “ rmly believe she is the right person to join this team. She will contribute as a gymnast and she will excel in the classroom. I would Local gymnast commits to Bowling Greennot make the o er unless I was sure she is the right “ t for our program.Ž Reis is the 2012 Senior B uneven bars champion for the State of Florida as well as placing fourth on the uneven bars at the 2012 Region 8 Championship. Region 8 is a highly competitive eight-state region including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. In addition Reis placed second on uneven bars at the 2011 Junior Olympic National Invitational Tournament in Long Beach, California. Although uneven bars is her specialty, Reis is also very accomplished on the balance beam. She placed fourth on that event at the 2011 Region 8 Championship. Reis trains at TNT Gymnastics and Fitness in Jacksonville. Reis is the highestrecruited athlete to come out of TNTs program. BGSU is located in Bowling Green, Ohio. Recruits for the class of 2013 cannot make their commitments binding until National Signing Day in November. Back to School Guide Appearing again in our September Issue! Call 886-4919 to book your next ad! Call today to reserve your ad space! 904-287-4913 lg@rtpublishinginc.com

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