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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101421/00027
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Title: CreekLine
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: RT Publishinig, Inc.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date: March 2012
Publication Date: 06-2012
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00101421:00027

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THE CREEKLINESM SERVING THE NORTHWEST ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMMUNITY SINCE 2001 Visit our online edition at www.thecreekline.com MEMBER OF THE RT PUBLISHING GROUP OF COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS What’s InsidePage 3 Whats New Page 4 From the CommissionerPage 5 School District Journal Page 6 The Sheriff ReportsPage 7 Your Vote Counts Page 8 Hopewell Church updatePage 11 Hurricane tips Page 13 Native Sons & DaughtersPage 19 Christs Cupboard Page 20 Thank you, Mr. Ochs! Page 21 JCP CARES backpacksPage 22 Summer Camp & Activities Guide Page 23 Nease math team Page 25 Summer consolidation Page 28 Bartram Trail Rotary Page 29 Fashion Update Page 32 Fishing Report Page 33 Congrats, Rock Hounds!Page 34 SPMS Raiders win Page 36 Gardening Page 38 Farewell Senior Writers Volume 12, Issue 6 June 2012The CreekLine12443 San Jose Boulevard, Ste. 403 Jacksonville,FL 32223Presorted Standard US Postage Paid Callahan, FL 32011 Permit No.4 904.264.KIDS264KIDS.COM CALL OR VISIT US ONLINELOCATED IN JULINGTON CREEK ABOVE BLACKSTONE GRILLE 112 BARTRAM OAKS WALK #203 | JACKSONVILLE, FL | 32259 Now scheduling Summer appointments! The CreekLine’sElection 2012Section coming in our July 2012 issue!To Advertise: LG@RTPublishinginc.com We all know and love the Girl Scouts for their delectable and tempting cookies we can count on annually, but they do so much more for their community than provide adored sweets. Local Girl Scout Troop1146 provides a perfect example of how honorable and rewarding it can be to wear a Girl Scout vest. Girl Scout Troop 1146 of Gateway Council is currently wrapping up their Bronze Service Award project for their local community of Julington It was an introduction that brought back memories of Lawrence Welk on Sunday evening TV. Straight from performing in Downtown Disney and receiving a Superior rating at the Lakeside Jazz Festival,Ž band director and conductor Don Isabelle introduced his Fruit Cove Middle School Jazz Ensemble to the seniors gathered at the Trout Creek Park Pavilion and Senior Center. The seniors gave a resounding round of applause as the “ rst musical piece was announced. The concert began Don Mullinax, a longtime Cunningham Creek resident, wasnt given the Humanitarian of the Year Award by NEFAR last year for no small reason. His service speaks for itself all over St. Johns County. Mullinax retired from years of work in the banking and “ nancial services industry in 2008. He then opened a small realty service business called Commission Express of North Florida. This led to him join the Board of Realtors and one of the largest service organizations in the area called Northeast Florida Girl Scouts serve communityMuch more than just cookiesBy Contributing Writer Written by Jasmine R. Tavernier Girl Scout Troop 1146 at their Bronze Award ceremony.Realtors give back with Ramp It Up programBy Donna KeathleyCreek. The troop of 14 girls, ages 10 and 11, chose to serve the senior citizen community of Westminster Woods on Julington Creek by creating nine bird feeders and “ ve bird houses to adorn their beautiful grounds. In order to earn this highest award for Juniors, each girl in the troop will have dedicated 20 plus service hours to this community project. The troop has also funded the project (by means of those wonderful cookie sales) from providing the wood and other materials to volunteering their time, being that they are responsible to “ ll the feeders weekly for a period of one year. This is the sixth year for Troop 1146 and almost all of the girls have been with me since the beginning. I am so proud of our girls and their achievements, especially obtaining the Bronze Service Award. It has been a true blessing to watch them grow and develop over the years,Ž Sharon Norris, leader of Troop 1146, stated with enthusiasm. The purpose of this project is to get the girls involved in their community and to serve its members. The troop chose Westminster Woods on Julington Creek in order to brighten the lives of the residents by enhancing their surroundings via attracting such beautiful birds as blue jays and robins with their bird feeders and houses. And what a perfect “ t Westminster Woods was. After they had already decided on the project theme and location, the troop learned that Westminster Woods has a working woodshop and resident carpenter, Dick Association of Realtors (NEFAR), which is 5,000 members strong. In 2011 Mullinax was elected vice-chairman of community a airs for NEFAR and ran a task force for their volunteer projects. Seated at this position he saw a request come to the group from the county housing partnership o ce for assistance in constructing wheel chair ramps for local homeowners. Mullinax and his fellow NEFAR members saw this as a win-win opportunity for the group; they service the area by selling homes, so In the MoodŽ with FCMS Jazz Ensemble at Trout Creek Senior CenterBy Karl Kennellwith Glenn Millers classic American Patrol,Ž which with its upbeat theme brought a glimmer to the eyes and broad smiles to the faces of everyone in the audience. You could almost see the memories passing through the minds of the gathered seniors as Isabelle led the ensemble into the 1944 favorite Sentimental JourneyŽ written by Les Brown and Ben Homer. The FCMS Ensemble was invited to perform by Judy Dorazio, Senior Center coordinator for the St. Johns Council on Aging. It was one of the many events and activities that occur each week on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the Trout Creek Senior Center. Isabelle introduced Count Basies Fancy PantsŽ by relating a personal story about how he had called for material from Ramp It Up cont. on page 8 Girl Scouts cont. on page 18 FCMS Jazz Ensemble cont. on page 8

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Page 2, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Call us today to learn about the latest no-downtime cosmetic dermatologic procedures and products our practice has to offer.Aging gracefully has now arrived. Mark S. Cheiken, DO Board Certi“ed Dermatologist Tiffany McMurray, ARNP-BC

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 3 What’s NewCommunity HappeningsDo you have community or club news you would like included in The CreeekLine? Then contact Martie Thompson at: editor@rtpublishinginc.com or 886-4919. At RT Publishing we welcome Letters to the Editor. We request they be no more than 250 words. All letters must include writers name, address, and telephone number. Only the name will be published. E-mail to editor@ rtpublishinginc.com. Anonymously sent letters will not be published.Letters to the Editor policy The CreekLine Community Newspaper is a free monthly publication distributed via bulk mail to homes and businesses in NW St. Johns County. Submission of articles and photographs are received by mail or email, although email to editor@rtpublishinginc.com is preferred. The writers opinions do not necessarily re”ect the opinion of RT Publishing, Inc. Advertising Rates are available by request. RT Publishing, Inc. is not responsible for advertisement content or accuracy of information provided by its advertisers. Nor does RT Publishing, Inc. endorse any of the products or services included in this publication. RT Publishing, Inc. reserves the right to refuse advertisement or copy from any advertiser. All rights are reserved and no portion of this publication may be copied without the express written consent of the publisher. 2012. RT Publishing, Inc. The CreekLine The Ocean Breeze Mandarin NewsLine Players JournalPublisher Rebecca Taus publisher@rtpublishinginc.comEditor Martie Thompson editor@rtpublishinginc.comAdvertising Sales, Linda Gay lg@rtpublishinginc.comGraphic Design, Linda Gomolkagraphics@rtpublishinginc.com RT Publishing, Inc. 12443 San Jose Boulevard Suite 403 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Ph: 904-886-4919 I 9 5 I 2 9 5 S a n J o s e B l v d $10 OFFAny $50 Purchase! simply SUMMERgatheringsWhole Foods Market has the coolest party essentials! Beat the summer heat with the freshest, most flavorful, highest quality organic and natural products on the planet.MakeYOUR BACKYARDthe place forSUMMER HANGOUTSVALID AT WHOLE FOODS MARKET JACKSONVILLE ONLY. NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFER OR TM DISCOUNT CARD. NOT REDEEMABLE FOR CASH OR GIFT CARDS. LIMIT ONE COUPON PER CUSTOMER, PER VISIT. NO COPIES, DUPLICATIONS OR FACSIMILIES WILL BE ACCEPTED. PLU 30675 VALID THROUGH 6/30/12 VOTE 2012 Exercise your freedom! Be an informed voter! Meet the candidates in the July issue of The CreekLine. Special Election section will contain everything you need about voting in the Primary Election. Candidates, make sure you are included: Contact Linda Gay at lg@rtpublishinginc.com or 904-886-4919 today! Please mark your calendar for Saturday, June 16 to participate in a Texas Hold em fundraiser tournament at the Poker Room at St. Johns Greyhound Park to bene“ t the American Cancer Societys Bartram Trail Relay for Life. Check-in and hors doeuvres will begin at 6:00 p.m. with a Texas Hold em lesson at 6:30 p.m. and the start of the tournament at 7:00 p.m. The cost will be $50 for a player ticket, which will include 2500 chips, donation to Relay for Life and food. The cost of the bystander ticket will be $20 and will include donation to Relay for Life and food. There will be re-buys of $20 up to the fourth round of blinds. There will only be 80 player seats available. You must be at least 18 years old to play. For additional information or to sign up, please contact Becky Kimball at 254-7325. United We Guide is a free transportation and information guide for seniors who are interested in the variety of transportation options o ered throughout St. Johns County. Contact the mobility manager at the Council on Aging at 3156505 or email Katie Arnold at karnold@stjohnscoa.com. Bring your gardening questions to the plant clinic at the Bartram Trail Library on Thursday, June 21 2012 from 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon. St. Johns County Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer your plant and lawn questions. We will also accept small soil samples from your vegetable, lawn or shrub areas for free pH testing. The Bartram Trail Library is located at 60 Davis Pond at the entrance to Julington Creek Plantation. Single, divorced, widowed and looking to make new friends? The JCP Singles Network is for adults 40s and up„a great way to meet people, make new friendships and network. If you are interested in joining us and would like more information, please email klandrum” @ comcast.net. A mass Fathers Day Piein-the-FaceŽ Frenzy will be held on Sunday, June 17 at 3:00 p.m. at the Julington Creek Plantation Recreation Center pool. Dads of all ages will have an opportunity to pie their kids right in the face for a Fathers Day never to be forgotten. The cost is $3 per whipped pie on a plate and the public is invited to attend. For further information or to register, please go to www. jcpcdd.org. World Golf Village Toastmasters meets the “ rst and third Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at First Florida Credit Union (entrance in back), located at 1950 County Road 210 West. You are invited to visit the World Golf Village Toastmasters Club. Our members include experienced Toastmasters and those just starting. Together we share the Toastmasters experi-Whats New cont. on page 4 Copies of online coupon are not accepted.

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Page 4, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com From the Commissioner’s DeskBy Contributing Writer Ron Sanchez, County Commissioner, District 2 For this article I am furnishing a report that came from St. Johns County Fire Rescue Operations Chief Kurt M. Kaunath. I certainly cant say it any better. In a two day period in May, St. Johns County Fire Rescue (SJCFR) personnel successfully resuscitated three men who su ered sudden cardiac arrest. Statistics compiled by the American Heart Association (AHA)show that when someones heart suddenly stops beating, they have only a “ ve percent chance of surviving the event. With these three saves,Ž SJCFR all but guaranteed that in 2012 its paramedics will exceed national standards. The three men bene“ ted from a continuum of care that began moments after their hearts stopped. The AHA calls this the Chain of Survival and it begins with immediate recognition of cardiac arrest and activation of the emergency response system (911); early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with an emphasis on chest compressions; rapid de“ brillation (electric shock); e ective advanced life support by trained paramedics; and integrated post-cardiac arrest care. On May 9, a 54-year-old man collapsed in front of a music stage at The Players golf tournament in Ponte Vedra Beach. Bystanders with CPR training immediately began chest compressions until SJCFR personnel stationed at the tournament arrived with an Automated External De“ brillator (AED) and delivered two shocks. After the second shock the man became responsive and was talking with paramedics during transport to Baptist Medical Center Beaches. He was eventually ” own by helicopter to Baptist Medical Center Downtown, where cardiologists diagnosed and treated the blocked coronary artery that caused his arrest. He was discharged from Baptist with no limitations.CPR plus a great county re rescue teamThe following day, May 10, “ re“ ghters were dispatched to a motor vehicle accident in Ponte Vedra Beach. Upon arrival, crews saw employees of an apartment complex performing chest compressions on a 61-year-old FedEx driver who lost control of his truck after su ering sudden cardiac arrest. SJCFR medics administered two shocks with an AED and the mans heart started beating again. E ective advanced life support included therapeutic hypothermia, a groundbreaking treatment in which a cardiac arrest victims body is cooled following resuscitation in order to preserve brain function. The man was transported to Mayo Clinic Hospital for comprehensive post-cardiac arrest care. Within two weeks, he was sitting up in bed and was discharged from Mayo with no restrictions. Also on May 10, a 65-yearold Switzerland man called 911 when he began experiencing chest pain. While on the phone with emergency dispatchers, he said the pain had lessened and he no longer needed emergency medical care. Fortunately, the dispatchers convinced the man to allow paramedics to continue for an evaluation and shortly after the crews arrival, his heart stopped beating. SJCFR medics started CPR and were able to shock the heart back into rhythm. The man was transported to Baptist Medical Center South and then transferred to Baptist downtown where he remains stable in the cardiac unit. Each of these men owe their lives to the quick actions of average citizens, advanced life support from highly trained SJCFR paramedics and excellent post-resuscitation care at area hospitals. These three incidents prove the Chain of Survival works in St. Johns County. Thanks to the citizens that knew CPR, our “ re rescue team and the hospitals!ence in ...a mutually supportive and positive learning environment, where every individual member has the opportunity to develop oral communication and leadership skillsƒand have fun doing it.Ž For more information, please visit www.worldgolfvillage.toastmastersclubs.org. The St. Johns Federated Republican Women invite you to join them the third Monday of every month at 6:30 p.m. at Davidson Realty in World Golf Village. This month our speakers will be Senator John Thrasher, who is running for re-election to the Florida State Senate and Beverly Slough, who is running for Congressional Seat District 6. We value information on GOP candidates and issues so that we are informed voters and citizens. Both men and women are welcome. For more information, please contact Debbie Newton at 910-0290. Are you looking what to do with that extra fruit and vegetable harvest? Or just want to learn more about the basics of canning? Whats the difference between water-bath and pressure canning? The St. Johns County Extension Service and First Coast Technical College are o ering a basic hands-on learning course on home preservation. The Canning Culinary Workshop starts in the classroom, moves to the kitchen and begins the canning process. Participants learn hands-onŽ how to make preserves, jellies, jams and pickles featuring datil peppers, various berries and peaches. Each will receive take home products. The workshop will be held on Thursday, June 21 from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at First Coast Technical College. The cost of $45 includes lunch. Participants must pre-pay and register by June 14. Space is limited with a minimum of 18 people. Please call 547-3461 and ask for Jean Salce. The 210 Community Market was founded by a local residents group, The 210 Community Alliance. The goal of both the founders and the market is to unite the communities along the 210 sector. The market is envisioned to be a town center for neighbors to gather and enjoy the open air atmosphere of a local community market. The market will feature specialty foods as well as artisan crafters and organic fruits and vegetables. We have moved the market to a new location, the Winn Dixie parking lot at 2220 County Road 210. Come out and join us and bring the whole family, including the dog. The market will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. the second Saturday of each month. The North Florida Daylily Society holds its meetings on the second Sunday of each month at 2:15 p.m. at the Orange Park Library, located at 2054 Plain“ eld Avenue, just o Kingsley Boulevard. Daylily experts provide programs ranging from preparing daylilies for planting to how to prepare daylilies for shows. The club membership includes daylily enthusiasts from the Beaches to Middleburg. Guests are welcome to attend. Discover the many varieties of wild owers growing in our area and become familiar with the native plants that attract butter” ies and wildlife to your yard and garden. The public is invited to a free “ eld trip on Thursday, June 21, from 2:00 Whats New cont. from page 3 Whats New cont. on page 6

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 5 School District Journal By Contributing Writer Beverly Slough, Chairman, St. Johns County School Board Your Voice of ReasonPaid by Cyndi Stevenson, Republican for St. Johns County Commission District 1 Come and See Us For Your FREESleep Apnea Consultation! Sleep Apnea Making You Tired?Call Krantz Dental Care Today! Alan M. Krantz, D.D.S.12058 San Jose Boulevard, Suite 102 Mandarin(904) 880-3131KrantzDentalCare.com/sleepapnea Without The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Over 15 Years Legal Experience904-665-0005www.preddylaw.com Christopher M. Thompson, CFP, CRPC Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC1000 Sawgrass Village Dr. Suite 103 Ponte Vedra, FL. 32082 Tel: 904-273-7908 Toll Free: 800-542-2370 Cell: 904-708-3817 Fax: 904-285-0249 christopher.thompson@wellsfargoadvisors.com home.wellsfargoadvisors.com/christopher.thompson Buy A Business John SerbCerti“ed Business Intermediary www.FirstCoastBizBuySell.com Call 904-613-2658 for a Con“dential No-Cost Valuation & Consultation Congratulations to all our 2012 graduates from our seven high schools! On June 1, 2 and 7, we celebrated their success and launched them into their next “ eld of endeavor. Many of our graduates are college/university bound, a good number will serve our country in the military and still more will enter the workforce. I wish each one great success in whatever path they choose to pursue. In spite of the new form of FCAT and the fact that the bar was raised for passing, our students have done very well in this years round of testing. At this writing, not all scores are in, but our district scored “ rst in the state in third, ninth and 10th grade reading, as well as “ rst in the state on the end of course exams in biology, geometry and Algebra 1. We expect similar results as the remainder of the scores are received. I am very proud of the achievement of our students and the wonderful work of their teachers in preparing them to be successful. June always brings shifts in personnel at our schools. This particular year, there have been several changes in leadership in area schools. Cathy Hutchins, the founding principal at Timberlin Creek Elementary, has been reassigned to South The months keep rolling by and the William Bartram Scenic Highway Management Council is keeping up with the ” ow. Our May meeting was, as usual, lively, informative, and productive. Claire Fioriti, chair of the tree planting committee, updated us on their activities … speci“ cally the health and welfare of three trees recently planted at Alpine Groves Park. The trees are doing well thanks to a watering committeeŽ thats keeping the trees well nourished and ” ourishing. By this time next year the trees will be better established and able to thrive on their own. We learned that our eighth annual Bartram Bash in April was successful and planning has begun for next years event. Plans for the annual Old Settlers Reunion in the fall are underway and more fun times for the community at large are coming … stay tuned, you dont want to miss this exciting event! In May I told the William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway Management Council that the Recreation and Parks Department of St. Johns County is planning to build a covered pavilion at Alpine Groves Park. We learned of the plan from Parks Director, Wil Smith, and hell give us speci“ cs at our June 14 meeting. The management council has serious concerns over the planning for this pavilion and anxiously awaits Smiths comments. To learn more about this plan youre welcome to attend. We meet Woods Elementary. Her strong ability to raise student achievement is needed at that school to increase the learning of some of our most struggling students. She will certainly be missed by the Timberlin Creek family, but I am grateful that she has accepted a new challenge in support of our children in the southwest part of the county. Input will be taken from the faculty and parents at the school as to what they would like to see in a new principal. Hutchins replacement will be announced in early June. Randy Kelley, principal at Liberty Pines Academy, is moving to the district o ce to assist in the evaluation and support of principals throughout our county. Assistant Principal Judith Thayer has been appointed to take the principalship at LPA. I was present when the announcement was made to the faculty. Thayer received a standing ovation from the sta I look forward to continued excellence at Liberty Pines. Mary Ford, principal at Mill Creek Elementary, is retiring this year. I appreciate her for the “ ne educator that she is and for the focus that she always demonstrated for the individual child. She will be missed in our district. Input was received from the Mill Creek family on the qualities of a new principal. After considering these qualities, Amanda Riedl has been named as the new principal at Mill Creek. Riedl comes to us from North Kansas City and is a dynamic education leader. We welcome her to the Mill Creek family. In addition to these appointments, Greg Bergamasco, formerly the assistant principal at Ponte Vedra High School, has been named the new principal at Gamble Rogers Middle School, replacing Beverly Gordon, who is retiring. Tina Waldrop, currently the assistant principal at St. Johns Technical High School, will become the new principal at Osceola Elementary School, replacing Nancy Little, who is also retiring. As always, thank you for your support of public education. If I may serve you in any way, please contact me at sloughb@stjohns.k12.” .us.William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway updateBy Contributing Writer Al Abbatiello, alabbat@bellsouth.net at the County Annex, located at 725 Flora Branch Boulevard starting at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 14. Youll also be interested to know a farmers market is being planned for Alpine Groves Park and to begin later this summer, possibly in July. Planning is not yet complete but is likely to be approved by St. Johns County. Well learn more about this planning from Smith at our June meeting. The William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway Management Council leadership thinks the farmers market would be a good event for the NW St. Johns County community in terms of helping build community relationships and the opportunity to increase membership for the William Bartram Scenic Highway organization. Yes, we want and need new members fresh ideas and energy from newcomers will help us keep the Scenic Highway and surrounding area scenic and historic. At our June meeting well be discussing a variety of possible projects to further advance our longer term objectives. Fundraising via available grants, increased membership and educational events in cooperation with schools, corporate/ commercial sponsors will help us complete a planned education series and other worthwhile projects. Visit www.bartramscenichighway.com to sign up for our quarterly newsletter to stay fully informed. On May 22, 2012 we addressed a St. Johns County School Board workshop to inform them of our activities, including a planned education series of lecturesŽ for students. This initiative is expected to help bring greater awareness of the intrinsic resources and history of NW St. Johns County to county students and the community at large. School Superintendent Dr. Joseph Joyner o ered encouragement and the possible assistance of school system curriculum sta at whatever time were ready to present our plan. Thank you Dr. Joyner and Chairman Beverly Slough. If youre a regular reader of these updates Im sure you notice a recurring theme. Were committed and active in the work of preserving, protecting the quality of life along the William Bartram Scenic Highway and look forward to your participation. Join us on June 14 at 6:30 p.m. at the County Annex, located at 725 Flora Branch Boulevard. See you then. International Affairs Discussion Group and Book Club Thurs, June 21  6:30 pm Bartram Trail Branch LibraryThe discussion will be moderated by Joseph Warner, retired U.S. diplomat and adjunct professor of Geography and International Relations. A reading list of suggested books and articles will be available in time to prepare for the discussions. The topic for this month’s discussion: “The Indian Ocean—Area of Opportunities or Threat?” The CreekLineEverybody Gets It. Everybody Reads It.editor@thecreekline.com Tell our advertisers you saw them inThe CreekLineSupport our fine Advertisers!

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Page 6, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com The Sheriff Reports By Contributing Writer David B. Shoar, St. Johns County Sheriff DON'TTRADEYOURYOUTHFUL SKINFORATEMPORARYTAN!LetPVPSbeyourfirstchoiceforanti-agingproductsand rejuvenatingtreatments.ForaFREEskinanalysis,contact ourofficeat 904.273.6200 Bookyourvisitnowandremembertohaveourlicensed AestheticiansorAdvancedRegisteredNursePractitioners matchyouwiththeperfectskincareregimenforyourskin typeandanti-aginggoals.WecarryOBAGI,SkinMedica, SkinCeuticals,LatisseandVIVITE.Microdermabrasion ChemicalPeels IntensePulsedLight-Photofacial FractionalResurfacing MicrolaserPeel ErbiumLaserResurfacing BOTOXCosmetic JuvedermXC Radiesse...andmanymore!www.pvps.com SIXLOCATIONSPonteVedraBeach€Southside€AmeliaIsland€Mandarin€Riverside€St.Augustine Presentthisadandreceive 20%OFFanySunscreenorSPFproduct.*Cannotbecombinedwithanyother discountorspecialoffer.Mustpresent couponattimeofpurchase. OfferexpiresOctober1,2012. DISCOUNTCODE:NE. You Deserve Quality Legal Representation at a Rate You Can Afford 904.379.8486www.myjaxfamilylaw.com Mention this ad for a free consult Sara Beth Frazier, P.L. Tina P. Fernandez, CPA, PLwww.tpfcpa.com 904-287-2195 Over 30 Years Experience Have Con“dence in Your Tax Preparation & Planning. Allow Me to Assist You. Visit www.tpfcpa.com for informative news and Tax Savings Tips. Serving the Accounting Needs of Individuals and Small Businesses by Providing Quality Service at Competitive Rates. Offering investment advisory services as a representative of 0156581-00002-00 Prudential Financial Planning Services, a division of Pruco Securities, LLC. As our schools close for the summer this month and the price of gas continues to rise, many residents will not be traveling elsewhere for vacation. Many will enjoy the 42 miles of beaches St. Johns County has to o er. I would like to pass along some tips in this months column. Never swim alone and if possible swim near a lifeguard. If you or a family member doesnt know how to swim, take lessons. Swim lessons are o ered through the St. Johns County Recreation Department or the local YMCA. Only knowing how to ” oat in the water may compromise your safety during an emergency. Many swimmers panic if they get caught in a rip current. If you or a fellow swimmer “ nds yourself in a rip current, dont “ ght it. Swim parallel with the beach until you are out of the current and then swim towards the shore. Be sure to watch your young children constantly and dont become distracted by talking on your cell phone, reading or taking a nap. Your attention should be focused on your children at all times. Children as well as teenagers should always be aware of their surroundings and if someone tries to take you somewhere, quickly get away while yelling and screaming. Children should try to stay in a group; remember there is safety in numbers. Because our youngsters cannot always look out for themselves, it becomes our responsibility to teach them how. Pay attention to the posted signs on the beach. They are designed for our safety as well as to protect the environment. Be safe on the beach this summerRemember drinking alcohol is not permitted on all St. Johns County beaches. To protect your head and neck, never dive head“ rst into the ocean. Many beaches in this area have coquina rock buried in the water and serious injuries could occur when diving. The American Red Cross adds some additional tips for beach safety. Protect your skin: sunlight contains two kinds of UV rays„UVA increases the risk of skin cancer, skin aging and other skin diseases. UVB causes sunburn and can lead to skin cancer. Limit the amount of direct sunlight you receive between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. and wear a sunscreen with a sun protection factor of at least 15. Drink plenty of water regularly and often even if you do not feel thirsty. Your body needs water to keep cool. Avoid drinks with alcohol or ca eine in them. They can make you feel good brie” y but make the heats e ects on your body worse. This is especially true with beer, which dehydrates the body. Watch for signs of heat stroke, which is life-threatening. The persons temperature control system, which produces sweating to cool the body, stops working. The body temperature can rise so high that brain damage and death may result if the body is not cooled quickly. Signals of heat stroke include hot, red and usually dry skin, but in some cases such as during athletic activity while wearing a helmet, the skin may be moist. Changes in consciousness as well as a rapid, weak pulse and rapid, shallow breathing are also symptoms. Call 9-1-1 and move the person to a cooler place. Quickly cool the body by wrapping wet sheets around the body and fan it. If you have ice packs or cold packs, place them on each of the victims wrists and ankles, in the armpits and on the neck to cool the large blood vessels. Watch for signals of breathing problems and make sure the airway is clear and keep the person lying down. Wear eye protection. Sunglasses are like sunscreen for your eyes and protect against damage that can occur from UV rays. Be sure to wear sunglasses with labels that indicate that they absorb at least 90 percent of UV sunlight. Finally, wear foot protection. Many times, peoples feet can get burned from the sand or cut from glass in the sand. During the summer months, we have a tendency to be complacent by leaving our vehicle doors unlocked and windows open. This is an obvious invitation to criminals to steal our personal items from the inside of the vehicle, especially when using the parking areas near the beach. Remember to always close your windows and lock your doors when you go to the beach. Always remove loose change and valuables from your vehicle. This includes purses, wallets, cell-phones, laptop computers and briefcases. Some of these items could be locked in your trunk and out of sight. Also, park in an area that has people coming and going to the beach. The average criminal does not want to be seen. Remember if you see something suspicious, please contact your local law enforcement agency immediately. I hope that these tips will help you and your family have a fun and safe experience at one of our beautiful beaches. For additional tips on general crime prevention, please go to the St. Johns County Sheri s O ce website at www.sjso.org. There is a world of information available and please feel free to contact me anytime at my email address at dshoar@sjso.org. Thank you. p.m. until 4:00 p.m. at the St. Augustine Shores Wild” ower Meadow located in back of the Riverview Club at 790 Christina Drive in St. Augustine. This lovely meadow is situated on the Intracoastal Waterway and is adjacent to Canopy Oaks Park, a great spot for a relaxing, shady, nature walk. Leaders include Gail Compton, nature columnist; Beverly Fleming, Florida Master Naturalist Instructor and Renee Stambaugh, native plant consultant. Dress for the outdoors, including closed-toed shoes and hat and bring water. This trip is hosted by the Wild” ower Meadow volunteers. For more information, please contact 3929696. The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-7 meets the “ rst Thursday of every month at 7:30 p.m. at the St. Augustine Yacht Club near the St. Augustine Lighthouse. The ” otilla is always looking for new members, particularly those who own aircraft, boats and have radio equipment and skills. If you are interested, please contact Vic Aquino at 460-0243. Adults and teens age 14 and older are invited to attend the Project Lap Blanket crochet group at the Bartram Trail Branch Library on Thursday, June 14, Tuesday, June 19 and Thursday, June 28 from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The group will crochet or knit blankets for cancer patients at area hospitals. All skill levels are welcome. Cant come to any of the meetings? Pick up the crochet Whats New cont. from page 4 Whats New cont. on page 7

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 7 Coming to Julington Creek 2012 3635 Race Track Road, Jacksonville, Florida www.memorialhospitaljax.com B r o k e n Ankl e A s t h m m a A t t a c c c c c k k k k k Bu rn s St i t ches D i s l o c a t e d S h ou l d d e e e e e e r Broke B r o k e en N o o s s s s s s e e e e e e e e e Accidenta l In j u u r r r r r r i i e e e e e e s s s s s 2758 Race Track Rd. in Julington Creek 32259 Plantation Publix Plaza (904) 209-1320www.getpanache.comPanache is proud to welcome Carl Slack to their team. Whats New cont. from page 6 Your Vote Counts!By Contributing Writer Vicky Oakes, Supervisor of Elections, St. Johns CountyApril and May have been busy months for sta at the Elections O ce! The new congressional, senate and house district lines have been approved by the Department of Justice. St. Johns County is now in Congressional District 6, Florida Senate District 6 for the entire county, as well as Florida House Districts 17 and 24. (NW St. Johns County is in the 17th House District.) Due to these changes, combined with the new county commission and school board district lines which were adopted in December 2011, we are in the midst of re-drawing precinct lines, renumbering a few precincts, researching new polling places, co-locating voters to other polling places and trying to make as few changes to impact as few voters as possible. We are also utilizing a new GIS mapping system which allows us to integrate the information gained from the 2010 Census. The data, applied as census blocks, is a major factor in determining precinct lines. Dont be alarmed though, the good news is that a number of precincts and polling places in the northwest have not changed. Some precincts are being re-numbered but many voters will still vote in the same location. We will have fewer polling places due to co-locating small precincts. This process will also allow us to clean up our precinct lines in ways that will improve our services to the voters of this county. My ultimate goal is to make it better for you, the voter. Everything must be completed and approved by the Board of County Commissioners prior to June 4 when candidate qualifying begins. Following board approval, it will take approximately two to three weeks to update our voter registration system and for the information to be made available on our website through the voter lookup or precinct locator. Precinct maps will be available on our website by the time you read this. Stay tuned...keep an eye on our website. You will be hearing more about these changes soon. Our theme for the 2012 elections will be Know Where You Vote Before You Go!Ž In order to avoid any confusion and to help save tax dollars, the mailing of voter information cards has been temporarily suspended until the process of redrawing precinct lines has been completed. All St. Johns County voters will be mailed an updated voter card prior to the August 14 Primary Election which will provide new districts, precinct and polling location information. Whats New? Be sure to check our website often for updates. The State Legislature has placed 11 constitutional amendments on the November General Election Ballot. Its not too early to start reading and becoming familiar with the amendments as some are lengthy and will require research prior to voting. We have also received some good information from the Florida Bar Association regarding Question and Answers about Florida Judges, Judicial Elections and Merit Retention which will also be on the November ballot. Be sure to review the online publication; it will answer many common questions. You can locate links to both of these items under Whats New on the front page of our website (www. votesjc.com). As always, please feel free to contact my o ce any time you have questions or we can be of assistance at 823-2238 or visit www.votesjc.com.pattern at the Reference Desk in the library and crochet the blanket in your spare time. Drop o completed blankets and any yarn youd like to donate during regular library hours. For additional information, please call the Reference Desk at 827-6960. The MOMS Club is a wonderful way to meet other stayat-home and part-time working mothers and is a fun way for your children to socialize with other children. Mothers with children of all ages are welcome. Members for this chapter must live in the 32092 or 32095 zip codes, including all neighborhoods along the 210 corridor. We meet once a month to plan our activities for the month ahead and our meetings and activities are during the day, when stay-at-home mothers need support most. Of course, children are welcome at all of our meetings and activities. The MOMS Club is a wonderful way for you to meet other stay-at-home or part-time working mothers and is a fun way for your children to socialize with others. If you have any questions or would like to get more information to join, please email Holly at sanmoms@gmail.com or check out our website at http:\\sanmomsclub.weebly.com. TOPS (Take O Pounds Sensibly) FL#493, St. Augustine has a weekly meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesdays at the Old Colee Cove Volunteer Fire Station, located at 9105 County Road 13 North (south of Buddy Boys Grocery Store). Weigh in starts at 8:30 a.m. We are a National Weight Loss Organization, fees are low and we have lots of fun, contests and inspiring programs. All are welcome; come and join us! For more information, please contact Sara Weaver at 940-7528 or Bobbi Culbreth at 824-2466.

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Page 8, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com RACHAEL L.BENNETTfor St. JohnsCOUNTY COMMISSIONER Common Sense Solutions Fiscal Conservative Jobs Focused Paid by Rachael L Bennett, Republican, for St. Johns County Commission, District 5.www.RachaelLBennett.comPO Box 840322, Saint Augustine, FL 32080Rachael L Bennett for St. Johns County CommissionerŽ @RachaelLBennett 904.351.6055 Rachael is a conservative Republican, a staunch supporter of property rights, and believes in the importance of individual initiative, the entrepreneurial spirit and free enterprise as the basis of a healthy economic system. As a small business owner, she understands the need to cut government regulations, reduce taxes, limit the size of government, and create a business friendly envi ronment to promote job growth. Vote for Rachael L. Bennett on August 14th! Campaign@RachaelLBennett.com 904-994-7457 Call Me For A FREE Yard Analysis Jimmy WaltersJCP Resident SOLSTICE LAWN CARE, LLC Visit us at: www.solsticelawncare.com No Annual Contract No Locked-In Monthly Fees Guaranteed Service Day Full Service Lawn Program!Our Lawn Maintenance Program Includes: We Also Offer These Additional Services: I have had several inquiries about the status of the church application on Roberts Road. In June 2011, St. Johns County Commission approved a settlement agreement on the Hopewell Church PUD application. This ended two years of defending multiple state and federal lawsuits which resulted from the Board of County Commission denial of the 2008 application. The settlement addressed many issues raised by the public during extensive public hearings. The commercial strip center was eliminated. The size of the church sanctuary and church related uses was reduced by 1/3 or 76,000 square feet. The settlement allows for 20 units of special needs housing, consistent with the propertys Open Rural Zoning. No parking will be allowed on Roberts Road and turn lanes are required. The settlement includes limits on height, scale, density and lighting, all concerns raised by the community. To put this in perspective, the site is about 32 acres of which nearly 30 acres are uplands. That is larger than many shopping centers. A Publix store is about 40,000 square feet.Hopewell Church settlement agreement explainedBy Contributing Writer Cyndi Stevenson, St. Johns County Commissioner, District 1The settlement o ers signi“ cantly greater protections than if the county had won the lawsuit outright. The church had property rights that allowed the construction of a much larger church without Commission approval. No fees were waived in the settlement. On August 17, more than two months after the St. Johns County Commission hearing, the settlement was on Judge Michael Traynors docket. There was no appeal by the church or the Roberts Road community at the court hearing or during the appeal period that followed his action. The judges “ nal order includes a conceptual site plan. There has been no further activity on this site including permit applications since the June 2011 settlement. Another Baptist Church was recently in the news. They have interest in building in St. Johns County on a site southeast of County Road 210 that has frontage on Interstate 95. If you have any questions regarding this or any other county business, please do not hesitate to call me at 209-0300 to make an appointment or my cell at 699-2188.Ramp It Up cont. from page 1what better way to give back? So o and running was the Realtors Ramp It Up program! The St. Johns Housing Partnership has the ability to process the needs and get funding for equipment and materials for wheel chair requests and Mullinax has the volunteers. Mullinax calls out to the local individual real estate o ces to accept assignments when the needs are requested from Bill Lazar at the St. Johns Housing Partnership o ce, such as the call which came in last October for 12 ramps to be completed before Christmas. Each complying o ce sets a work day and their team builds a ramp in a one days time. They love it,Ž says Mullinax. Our crews are pretty much half men and half women. What a great opportunity for groups to have a team building experience doing something for someone else! Just the other day a group on a construction site named their female sta the WoodChicks!Ž According to Mark Rosener, manger of Watson Realtys of“ ce on County Road 210, The Ramp It Up day for our o ce gives us a huge feeling of really doing something special for someone. Whats better than a real hard day of work … real physical work… for all of us? Besides, I love to use a nail gun; its a real powerful feeling!Ž All told for 2011, this service organization constructed 20 custom engineered wheel chair ramps at 20 di erent private residences in St. Johns County for some well-deserving homeowners. Hows that for a Humanitarian of the Year Award recipient and his cohorts? the tunes composer Sammy Nestico and actually received a return call from Nestico. Isabelle keeps Nesticos phone number on his cell phone as a cherished memento. The music during the concert was so stimulating that it swept some of the audience right out of their seats to break into dance at the back of the hall. It was so exciting that Senior Center Director Dorazio also joined in. This experience was so important to me,Ž said band member Madeline Lee, because we were able to share the timeless appreciation of the music with the seniors that they fell in love with in their youth. It really took them back in time.Ž Time may have gone by but the memories were still clear and fresh as many of the seniors were able to remember and add the lyrics to the songs. Visiting the Trout Creek Senior Center in Orangedale and watching the FCMS Jazz Ensemble was an experience which reveled two of the special gems we possess here in NW St Johns County. To learn more about the center, please contact Judy Dorazio at 522-1611. And be sure to keep a spot on your calendar open for attending a concert by the FCMS Jazz Ensemble. It surely will bring back memories of attending a big band concert at the local town coliseum or at least watching the big band shows on Sunday evening in the 60s! FCMS Jazz Ensemble cont. from page 1 Everybody reads The CreekLine! Shouldn’t your ad be included?lg@rtpublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 9 Dr. Levine is dedicated to your family’s health through every stage of life. He has served Julington Creek for more than 12 years and is ready to provide you with a medical home. Services include: Sports/school physicals Immunizations Well visits for adults and children GYN care Coordination of care for chronic conditions (diabetes, hypertension, etc.) On-site lab for all blood drawsFinding the right family doctor just got easier.Same-day acute appointments 287.2794Baptist Primary Care Julington Creek1400 Bishop Estates Road, St. Johns, FL 32259 Donald J. Levine, MD Board-Certified, Family Practice, along with Carol A. Noell, PA-C 13 www.baptistprimarycare.net/levine-md www.maymgt.com MAY Management Services, Inc.Licensed Property ManagementMAY Realty & Resort RentalsLicensed Real Estate Brokerage “Our job is to help Boards of Directors successfully manage their Associations” The Neighborhoods of World Golf Village Tim HutchisonRegional ManagerJulington Creek Plantation 1637 Racetrack Road #206 St. Johns, Florida 32259904-880-8796New Of“ce!Pam Drury Licensed Property ManagerDottie KrinerLicensed Property ManagerRich Curran-Kelley, CAMRegional ManagerDiane HartmanLicensed Property ManagerKathy May“eldLicensed Property ManagerDeborah AlleyLicensed Property ManagerLaura QualantoneLicensed Property Manager904-940-1002 Many know The Wall Street Journal as a bastion of corporate life and the reporting of same. What many dont know is the Journal, now the daily newspaper with the highest paid circulation in the country, has expanding reporting beyond the corporate boardroom. In the April 21, 2012 edition of the Journal, a major section front piece, Rethinking The War On DrugsŽ examines how the current war on drugs simply isnt working and there may be simple solutions right in front of us which satisfy everyone … from law and order advocates to those who say drugs should be legalized. Mark A.R. Kleiman, Jonathan P. Caulkins and Angela Hawken are the authors of this radical piece and they start with looking at the failed war on alcohol. Prohibition didnt work … was, in fact, a spectacular failure … and, as good as many Alcoholics Anonymous programs are, they are not the ultimate answer either. The trio cites some less extreme methods already in use for e ectively treating drunk drivers, one which is already showing great success and one proposed program. The federal tax on alcohol has never risen with in” ation; today it is e ectively down to about a “ fth of its Korean War level in constant-dollar terms. For those who didnt pay atten-Going to counseling for the “ rst time can be stressful, especially deciding who to see. Between licensed counselors, social workers, psychologists, coaches and church counselors, it can be overwhelming. It helps to know what to look for and what questions to ask before making your decision. One of the “ rst questions you might ask is what are the persons quali“ cations for counseling? Education can vary from taking a course or two through a church or school to having a graduate or post-graduate degree from an accredited university program. Credentials can include a certi“ cate from a church or school, certi“ cation from a regional or national organization or licensure from the State of Florida. State licensure means the counselor has met strict requirements for education and experience and is held accountable by Florida law to act ethically and responsibly when working with clients. Next, “ nd out what the person believes about mental and emotional health, what causes problems for people and how problems are solved. Are people generally healthy but strug-Political commentaryNo one is winning the war on drugsBy J. Bruce Richardsontion in history class, the Korean War was fought from 1950 to 1953. The article cites Philip Cook of Duke University suggesting that tripling the tax … from about a dime to about 30 cents a drink … would prevent at least 1,000 homicides and 2,000 motor vehicle fatalities a year, all without any new monies going to criminals, putting anyone else in already expensive jails or having law enforcement mount expensive enforcement programs. For those against any new taxes of any type, this group generally approves of higher taxes on tobacco users, which have soared to unimaginable levels over the past two decades. Tripling the alcohol tax would be helping people selfregulate through economic … not moral or legal … pressure. The Philip Cook approach doesnt work across the board with intentional heavy drinkers, the ones many of us would label professional drunks. The article cites a district court judge in South Dakota who has developed a promising approach. Judge Larry Long created in 2005 what he calls 24/7 Sobriety. The program requires people who commit alcoholrelated crimes (including, but not limited to drunk drivers) to show up twice a day, seven days a week, for Breathalyzer tests as a condition of staying out of jail. If they fail to appear or if the test shows they have been drinking, they go straight to jail for a day. So far, more than 99 percent of the time, they show up as ordered and are sober. They can choose to go to alcohol treatment or go to other programs, but they cannot choose to keep drinking. The South Dakota state attorney generals o ce says some 20,000 people in South Dakota have participated in 24/7 Sobriety and the program has made a huge dent in subsequent arrests for driving under the in” uence. The article goes on to say that by distinguishing sharply between people who use alcohol abusively and the larger group of population who are non-users, 24/7 Sobriety moves past the simple concept of either banning a drug entirely or making it legal in unlimited quantities for adults. These are two examples … one hypothetical and one in real life … which have the ability to produce desired results without high costs to taxpayers or lifealtering negative consequences to users, who at the same time are given a chance to change their behavior on their own, perhaps always the best choice. More in this space next month.J. Bruce Richardson is a longtime journalist and consultant who writes in Jacksonville print publications exclusively for RT Publishing, Inc. He has led projects in Washington as well as Ottawa, Canada and authors an Internet-based transportation column which is read in more than 60 countries. He lives and works in Jacksonville.Choose the counseling professional that is best for youBy Contributing Writer Dr. Jenny Preffer, PhD, LMHC, ACS, RN, North Florida Counseling and Mediation Services, LLCgling with circumstances that overwhelm their current coping skills or do people have varying degrees of diagnosable mental illness that need treatment or cure? Professionals should be able to explain the theory that guides their beliefs about problems and their client work. Family Systems counselors believe that we learn good and bad habits from the family we grew up in and continue to unconsciously use those same practices in our current relationships. Cognitive Behaviorists believe that our thoughts, even subconscious thoughts, drive our actions and by changing our thoughts, we change our behavior. Finally, look at the practice itself. When you call or email for information, how quickly does someone respond to you? Are your questions answered by an administrative person or by the counselor? Through talking or reading on a website, do you have a good sense of who the counselor is before you walk in the door? How many clients does the counselor see in a day? Insurance payments for counseling are often low and counselors may see 10 to 12 clients back-toback each day. Will this provide enough time for the counselor to think about you and your counseling needs? Much of the research shows that the client-counselor relationship is one of the strongest factors in helping people cope with life issues and become emotionally healthier. Take time to ask questions and choose the counseling professional that is best for you. For additional information, please contact jpre er@north” counseling.com. Share your news!editor@thecreekline.com

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Page 10, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Cardiovascular Disease (CAD) and Cholesterol VolunteerThe St. Johns Center for Clinical Research is currently seeking volunteers for a clinical research study evaluating an investigational medication for cholesterol when added to your current statin treatment. You may be eligible if you: such as heart attack, stroke, heart bypass, carotid artery disease or peripheral vascular disease Qualified participants receive compensation for time and travel. For more information call:St. Johns Center for Clinical Research (904) 209-3173 For Appointment Call904-230-0080 NEW LOCATION! 485 State Road 13Suite 3 (Next to Burger King) Dr. Thomas Lahmannwww.julingtoncreekchiro.com Is Back or Neck Pain Impacting Your Life? Dr. Thomas Lahmann Chiropractic PhysicianHumana Beech Street A Proud Participating Provider for Aetna and Blue Cross / Blue Shield United Insurance Plans Accepts All Auto Insurance Julington Creek Chiropractic & Wellness Center P.A.SpineMedTM Spinal Disc DecompressionA Safe and Pain-Free Procedure Designed for Back & Neck pain Non-Surgical, Drug Free Procedures for: Have you ever noticed how government often fails in the management of taxpayer money? We see this happening almost everywhere in government. Maybe it is because government has no incentive to save money when they can just increase your taxes to “ x their mismanagement. What if they operated more like a business? Think what would happen if they forgot about their power to tax and just managed the taxes received at current taxing levels to generate the most services for the least cost without any anticipation to raise taxes for many years. Does that appeal to you … as a JCP taxpayer? The JCP CDD has several departments and programs providing similar services that private businesses provide (i.e., child care, “ tness lessons, a restaurant) and those CDD program o erings require users of those programs to pay extra fees. That system was apparently adopted during the planning of the new recreation center. Fast forward to 2012. Now, only Are you ready to buy an investment property that can give you a good rate on return? Then think long term. The day of ” ipping houses for quick pro“ t is past. For small investors long-term rentals make the most sense. More people than ever are becoming renters which makes owning investment properties very lucrative in todays market. I own and manage 17 rentals in Jacksonville. The following steps are essential to becoming a successful investor in rental properties. € Know your budget. Investment properties that fall in the $20,000 to $50,000 range are the real money makers. To make the best rate of return you should be able to recoup your investment within a two to three year time frame. € Whether you pay cash or you “ nance the property, you should escrow for taxes and insurance and should always have a cushion to fall back on for repairs and to cover any vacancies. € Your budget should factor in remodel time. This is especially true if you have a mortgage on the property since that will come due whether or not you have a tenant in the property. € Do your research. Find the area you are interested in and study the demographics for that area. Find a realtor that you trust to help with your research. € Location is one of the most important things to consider. It is best to keep it close to your home since you can count on things breaking late at night or on weekends. Julington Creek Plantation CDD reportBy Contributing Writer Sam Lansdale, Supervisor, Julington Creek Plantation Community Development Districtone of those programs is budgeted to cover its variable costs. Yes, every department except one requires the taxpayers to subsidize their variable costs. I am not including and dont expect the programs to cover the approximately $2,000,000 or about $250,000 incurred per department in direct overhead cost which includes the payment of the infrastructure bonds, utilities and all general overhead. However, I am sure we can reduce our overhead expenses. I am only suggesting that the user-paidŽ programs generate su cient revenues to at least cover the extra expenses required to provide such services, since the residents do not receive direct bene“ t from those extraŽ services as the users do. It is my opinion that the JCP CDD Board of Supervisors should adopt a measurable plan to reduce operating expenses where currently possible and manage the CDD facilities and programs to prevent future tax increases, all without a reduction in the level of service. Two seats on the CDD Board of Supervisors will be “ lled at this years general election. I am hopeful some candidates will campaign for the CDD to live within its means and run more like a business. We should not expand into more private business ventures to make more money, but rather view taxpayer money as a precious commodity and do everything possible to get the most out of every tax dollar paid the CDD, towards providing the high level of services our residents desire, but at less cost. I know we can. We work for you and I encourage you to attend the Board of Supervisors meetings and voice your concerns or opinions on how we are conducting your business. The next CDD meetings will take place on June 10, 2012, and July 12, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. at the JCP Recreation Center. Feel free to contact me day or night via e-mail or phone (509-4902 or SLansdale@ jcpcdd.org). This article is my opinion and in no way constitutes nor implies District opinion, endorsement, sponsorship or viewpoint. The views expressed may or may not be shared by the other JCP CDD Supervisors.Editors Note: The CreekLine is appreciative that Supervisor Lansdale approached us and offered to write a column for us to share with our readers. The CreekLine is, and has always been, agreeable to publishing columns penned by our elected of“ cials so that they Investing in todays real estate marketBy Contributing Writer Kathy Wiedegreen, Licensed Realtor, Prudential Network Realty€ You must have vision! Our properties are “ xer-uppers and we do most of the work ourselves. Know your own capabilities. Consider the condition of plumbing, roof, electrical, HVAC, etc. Develop a list of licensed contractors who are experts in their “ eld and can pull permits and perform major repairs for you. € Dont over improve. Most renters are looking for a clean, bright and well maintained property. They expect things to work properly and to have a quick and friendly response to their repair needs. Adequate heat and air and bathrooms and kitchens that work properly are very important and will go a long way in keeping your tenants happy. € Have a good attorney and a good accountant. They keep up with current laws and can help you protect your investment. For additional information, please contact kathysellsjax@ gmail.com.The St. Johns County School Board approved the name Palencia Elementary School for the school previously known as Elementary L.Ž Over the last several months, Principal Don Campbell collected input from the public and provided the suggested names to school board members during previous workshops. Palencia Elementary will open for the 2012-2013 school year and is being constructed at 355 Palencia Village Drive. The 738 student school will contain approximately 100,000 square feet and 44 classrooms. Movable walls will open to create exible-sized classroom spaces and enable teachers and paraprofessionals to work cooperatively to facilitate learning for students through a variety of activities. This school will also include state-of-the-art technology and is being built to Green Building Standards. For more information on Palencia Elementary School, visit www-pes.stjohns.k12. .usElementary “L” is named! may communicate directly with our readers, their constituents. Any questions or requests for additional public servant columns may be directed to editor@thecreekline.com. Businessnot as bigas it used to be?Call for a free consultation & well work at increasing your business!The CreekLineLinda Gay 287-4913

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 11 Your Voice of ReasonPaid by Cyndi Stevenson, Republican for St. Johns County Commission District 1Dr. Gus J. Gari D.D.S. To Schedule an appointment call287-0033 Getting a Beautiful SmileA beautiful smile has a great aect on you and those around you. If you dont love your smile you may be able to do something about it. Theres no reason to live with gaps in your teeth or with teeth that are discolored, worn, chipped, badly shaped or crooked. A veneer placed on top of your teeth can correct natures mistake or the results of an injury and help you have a beautiful smile. Veneers are thin, custommade shells of porcelain materials designed to cover the front side of teeth. These shells are bonded to the front of the teeth changing their color, shape, size, or length. This is a short process that only take a couple of visits and a few weeks to complete. Your dentist will work with you to achieve the beautiful smile you have always wanted. Before & After front 4 veneers I specialize in helping investors identify and buy good investment properties. I have personally been successful in buying and managing investment properties. Call me today for more information. Kathy Wiedegreen, REALTOR Prudential Network Realty Cell: 904-316-4774 Ofce: 904-260-4300 www.KathySellsJacksonville.com WHY INVEST IN REAL ESTATE? More people than ever are renting Good rate of return on investment Available inventory Prices will never be better Inc.Since 1981 Carpentry 260-4820 Since hurricane season of“ cially began June 1, the St. Johns River Water Management District has added information to its website to assist the public and local governments access resources during severe storm events. The web pages (” oridaswater. com/storm) include links to ” ood statements and warnings, river stage and ” ooding data and local government emergency contacts. Also included are links to the National Weather Service, Florida Division of Emergency Management and the United States Geological Surveys interactive map of current conditions in the state. Floridas many waterways and extensive coastline make the state especially vulnerable to ” oods. When hurricanes and other storms bring high volumes of rain in short periods of time, ” ooding can result. The district works closely with local governments yearround to develop improved ” ood management plans, and to help communities establish and implement strategies to deal with ” oods once they occur. Local governments are the primary entities responsible for implementing state-of-emergency declara-According to the American Cancer Society, excluding cancers of the skin, breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, accounting for more than one in four cancers diagnosed in United States women. To help raise funds to end breast cancer, 44 Jacksonville area It is always sad to see an organization that has contributed so much to our community make the decision to discontinue its activities. On May 10, that is what happened to the North Florida Chapter of The National Society of Arts and Letters. It had all started in 1980, when under the guidance of the late Nancy Strecker, Maggie Reisler and more than 50 supporters from the Jacksonville area, the chapter received its charter and o cially began its inspiring projects supporting the arts and emerging young artists. The national organization was founded in 1944. It sponsors an annual competition rotating through the areas of art, music, literature, drama and dance. The national competition o ers substantial cash awards and recognition. It is preceded by local chapter competitions where a winner is selected to attend and compete on the national level. Local cash awards are also made and the young artists have the opportunity to expose their talent to a broad “ eld of supporters and lovers of the arts. Although this is the prime focus of the organization, its monthly meetings also sponsor lectures and presentations and o er additional support to emerging young artists. And yes, a few of the North Florida chapter winners have gone on to be successful on EncoreA fond farewell!By Betty Swenson Bergmark, Professor Emeritus, Jacksonville UniversityHurricane season tips available in one locationBy Contributing Writer Hank Largin, St. Johns River Water Management Districttions, evacuations and rescue e orts during ” ood-related disasters. Partnerships between the public and government entities are necessary to minimize ” ooding impacts, protect personal property and assist ” ood victims during and after storms. In the event of a tropical storm or hurricane, the district assists local governments by issuing emergency orders that allow for the pumping of water to alleviate ” ooding when public health and safety are at risk. The district also issues emergency orders to authorize repair, replacement or restoration of public and private property. To prepare for hurricane season the public can protect themselves and their property by: € Keeping debris out of storm drains and ditches. € Reporting clogged ditches to local governments. € Cleaning out gutters and extending downspouts at least four feet from the home. € Building up the ground around the home to promote drainage away from the foundation. € Obtaining ” ood insurance through the National Flood Insurance Program.a national level. They include a poet in 1983, a dancer in 1985 and an author in1988. The North Florida Chapter also hosted the national competition in 1995, 2002 and 2006, bringing outstanding talent and guests to our community from all over the country. All this has been going on for more than 30 years, but recently, like many volunteer organizations, it has become increasingly di cult to “ nd ways to attract younger members with the energy and enthusiasm to move forward. And so we lose another wonderful organization! It will be sorely missed. On a more positive note! If you havent already attended a performance by the Ritz Chamber Players, there is still one concert left in the current season. On Wednesday, June 16 their FinaleŽ concert will be presented at Jacoby Symphony Hall at 7:30 p.m. Entitled Of Music, Love and Poetry,Ž it promises inspiration for us all. Fortunately this FinaleŽ is not the end.Ž Plans are in the making for summer presentations as well as the upcoming concerts for 2012 -2013. Guided as usual by Executive and Artistic Director Terrance Patterson, an exciting year is promised. For additional information you can call the Times Union Center for the Performing Arts Box O ce at 354 … 5547 or pull up the website at www. ritzchamberplayers.org.Local franchise and 26.2 with Donna team up to nish breast cancerThe UPS Store locations are teaming up with the 26.2 with Donna’ Foundation. Throughout the year, participating The UPS Store locations will o er on-site registrations for the 2013 26.2 with Donna’ The National Marathon to Finish Breast Cancer, as well as the half marathon and relay, provide in-store support for the foundation and sponsor the silent auction at the 26.2 with Donna Health and Fitness Expo. Most people know someone whose life has been impacted by breast cancer „ a mother, a sister, a friend, a wife,Ž said Doug Nunnery, who owns a The UPS Store franchise location in Saint Johns. We are honored to support Donna and her e orts, founded in Jacksonville and we hope to support her for many years to come.Ž 26.2 with Donna is a private nonpro“ t organization in Northeast Florida whose mission is to produce world-class events dedicated exclusively to raising funds to end breast cancer. Onehundred percent of raised funds and race proceeds for all 26.2 with Donna events go to breast cancer research and care. We are thrilled to have the support of The UPS Store locations here in Jacksonville,Ž said Donna Deegan, founder and event chairman. Their e orts will be a valuable asset as we work towards our goal to “ nish breast cancer.Ž Be sure to see the ad for The UPS Store in this issue of The CreekLine! W W W WWWwww.TheCreekLine.comVisit our website: The CreekLine YOURCommunity Newspapereditor@thecreekline.com

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Page 12, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Fellows of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Full service care of women including: Annual Exams Endometrial Ablation No-incision Tubal Ligation In-office Surgery Advanced Laparoscopic Surgery Robotic Surgery Urinary IncontinenceComplete Obstetric Care, including High Risk PregnancyMenopausal Care Baptist Division 1Dr. Wade Barnes Dr. W. David Boyd Dr. Lindsay DeNicola Foutz Dr. Caron D. Gutovitz Dr. Catherine J. McIntyre Dr. Neil Sager Dr. Mary Ellen Wechter Joette Anderson A.R.N.P. Lisa Rhoad, A.R.N.P. Reagan Thomas, A.R.N.P.904-399-4862 12110 San Jose Boulevard Jacksonville, FL 32223 836 Prudential Drive, Suite 1202 Jacksonville, FL 32207 Nowis the timeto make your move. Conventional and Jumbo Loans USDA Rural Developement Construction to Perm FHA and VA Loans Condo Loans Fixed or Adjustable Rates First Federal offers: All loans subject to credit underwriting and approval. Please contact a mortgage originator for more details on available loan programs. Contact Scott Neeley Stronger...Faster...Better RACE TRACK RDFLORA BRANCH BLVD. SR 13PUBLIX Fred Baldwin, PT, DPT, SCS, ATC, PES and Tobi Baldwin, PT, DPT, MS, OCS, MTC, FAAOMPT Sports Medicine providers for Creeks Athletic Association Soccer. Physical Therapy Sports Performance Pilates Engineering for Kids is proud to announce it has awarded a new franchise to Tricia Pelger of St. Johns. She has already started scheduling Engineering for Kids programs in the North Florida area. Engineering for Kids brings science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), to kids ages four to 14 in a fun and challenging way through classes, camps, workshops, clubs and parties. We are proud to inspire children to build on their natural curiosity by teaching engineering concepts through hands-on learning. Engineering is, after all, one of the fastThe St. Johns County Public Library System is teaming up with the Florida Institute of Certi“ ed Public Accountants to o er another installment of the free Teen Financial Literacy Series. A one-day seminar designed speci“ cally for individuals aged 15 to 20 will be held at each branch of the library between June 26 and August 7. The classes will be taught by the St. Johns River Chapter of the Florida Institute of Certi“ ed Public Accountants. Subjects will include budgeting, saving, personal investing, using credit wisely, avoiding identity theft and other related topics. The Teen Financial Literacy Series is ideal for recent high school graduates, those starting a “ rst job, students heading o to college or any teen who wants to learn about managing money. The St. Johns County Public Library System began o ering this successful program annually since 2008 and the program has served as a model for other Florida libraries. Class sizes are limited, so call each branch to register. Lunch will be provided at each location by the Friends of the Library. All classes are 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (same class repeated at each location) € Saturday, June 23 … Southeast Branch Library, 8276900 € Saturday, June 30 … Main I suspect just about all Jacksonville residents have visited the island with no name, a strip of land that causes cartographers or map-makers dismay. The northern portion of the isle lies in Duval County and the southern most section in St. Johns. Where, youre likely thinking? Im talking about a 100-year-old nearby barrier island that was a peninsula until 1912. At that time a 10-mile channel was dug connecting the San Pablo and Tolomato Rivers. This cut separated the land from the mainland to clear the path for the Intracoastal Waterway, and thus, created an island. Jacksonville locals think of the area as The Beaches but collectively the towns of Mayport (within Jacksonville city limits and primarily a military base), Neptune Beach, Atlantic Beach, Jacksonville Beach (each an incorporated town with its own Jacksonvilles island with no nameBy Contributing Travel Writer Debi Lander, www.bylandersea.communicipal government), Ponte Vedra and Palm Valley (within St. Johns County) form the unnamed mass. Recent discussions to possibly name the strip San Pablo Island were renewed by historians and o cials, but con” icts arise since no legislative body or commission controls the entity. The Beaches area remained very sparsely populated until the end of the 19th century until resorts were developed. Jacksonville Beach was known as RubyŽ (circa 1884) named by W.E. Scull, a railroad surveyor with the Jacksonville and Atlantic Railway Company, for his daughter. By 1885, the railroad and depot were completed and Ruby was transformed into a tent city as crowds of beachgoers arrived with tents. But then the town was renamed Pablo Beach, after the San Pablo River, a name it kept for nearly 30 years before settling on Jacksonville Beach in 1925. A series of luxury hotels were constructed, but the only one that remains is the Casa Marina. The Spanish-Mediterranean Casa Marina stood as the grand dame of its day. Thankfully, it was constructed as a “ reproof building composed of stucco, concrete, tile and an automatic sprinkler system. Hotel guests included the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, John D. Rockefeller and Presidents Harry S. Truman and F.D.R. The Casa Marina Hotel was recognized in 2005 by the National Trust for Historic Preservation as one of the Historic Hotels of America and is now preserved and maintained as one of the prestigious Historic Hotels in America. Atlantic Beach also grew as a resort community around Henry Flaglers large 1901 Continental Hotel and smaller hotels that arose at Mayport. Sadly, the Continental burned to the ground in 1919. Neptune Beach seceded from Jacksonville Beach in 1931 and incorporated as its own town. In 1914 mineral deposits were discovered at Ponte Vedra and although hard to believe, this area became known Mineral City. Following World War I, real estate development erupted and the marketed name was changed to Ponte Vedra Beach. Relations between The Beaches and the Jacksonville city government havent always been easy and locals have threatened to form their own Ocean County.Ž This con” ict diverted when Neptune Beach resident John Delaney was elected mayor of Jacksonville in 1995. However, the year is now 2012 and The Beaches area thrives with well established residential communities and a booming tourist arena, but they still reside on the island with no name. Teen nancial literacy series at St. Johns County Public LibraryLibrary, St. Augustine, 8276940 € Saturday, July 7 … Bartram Trail Branch Library, 8276960 € Saturday, July 21 … Hastings Branch Library, 827-6970 € Saturday, July 28 … Ponte Vedra Beach Branch Library, 827-6950 For more information, visit www.sjcpls.org or contact Library Administration at 827-6925. Calling all future engineers!est growing industries in the world! Engineering for Kids uses hands-on projects to demonstrate a variety of engineering concepts. These projects encourage students to use di erent levels of critical thinking skills and creative problem solving skills. Just as important, the students have fun while learning. Pelger, who has worked as a human resources professional in the corporate world for the past 12 years, is uniquely quali“ ed to run this new franchise. Throughout her career, she has been involved in the facilitation and development of training programs and she appreciates the possibilities discovered from group interaction and learning. Pelger received her MBA from Jacksonville University. She holds a Bachelor of Business Administration in marketing from the University of North Florida. Pelger focuses on shared learning opportunities and enjoys hands-on and interactive activities. Engineering has a creative aspect which immediately piqued her curiosity. By dreaming up imaginative, practical solutions, engineers are changing the world all the time and Pelger is excited to introduce Engineering for Kids to North Florida. Look for their ad in this issue of The CreekLine! Cngrlis!Creekside High School Student Volunteer of the Year Rachel Bu Rachel also placed second in the county. The CreekLineEverybody Gets It. Everybody Reads It.editor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 13 CHESTMOVES FAST. PAINSO SHOULD YOU. Its a fact. The “rst hour of a heart attack is the most critical. The golden hourŽ can make the difference between life and death. If you experience heart attack symptoms, move quickly. Call 911 or go immediately to Baptist Souths Certi“ed Chest Pain Center in the Emergency Center. Growing to serve you better.Expanded Emergency Center at Baptist South. Our newly expanded Emergency Center has more than doubled in size. New Cardiac Cath Lab at Baptist South. Now offering diagnostic cardiac catheterizations, as well as diagnostic and interventional peripheral vascular catheterizations. Conveniently located at Old St. Augustine Road and I-95 The Timucuan Federation Native Sons and Daughters chapter hosted the seventh annual Alexs Lemonade Stand at various Publix Supermarkets throughout Jacksonville. The Native Sons and Daughters (formerly known as Indian Guides/ Indian Princess) manned nearly 20 di erent stores around the area. Native Sons and Daughters is designed to foster one-onone, father-child interaction within a group setting based on a Native American theme. Founded in 2000, Alexs Lemonade Stand Foundation raises funds as well as public awareness to research childhood cancer research and treatments. The Lemonade for Life Native Sons and Daughters host Alexs Lemonade StandBy Contributing Writer Brian Quirkfundraiser “ rst began when a local Jacksonville family, whose daughter battled cancer, decided to raise funds and awareness for the disease. Lina Rak was diagnosed with Stage IV neuroblastoma, an often deadly pediatric cancer, over 10 years ago. Though the Rak family has since moved out of the area, the Native Sons and Daughters continue their mission. More than 200 of our children, ages “ ve through 12, volunteered to assist in this years event. This years contribution raises our programs total donation to Alexs Lemonade to over $60,000. We want to congratulate all of our volunteers and thank our sponsors, Publix Supermarkets and Pepsi. The Timucuan Federation Native Sons and Daughters family designation is derived from the name of one of the principal tribes of the northeast Florida area, the Timucua, Timagoa, Tornoco or Atimuca, whose territory was from about St. Augustine and on to the middle St John River area. The history of the Timucuan tribes begins with the landing of Ponce de Leon near the site of the present St. Augustine in 1513. Children who participate in the present day Native Sons and Daughters not only learn about Native American history and traditions with their fathers, but they also participate in many fun activities such as camp outs and community service events such as the Alexs Lemonade Stand. For more information about Alexs Lemonade Stand and how you can help out, please visit www.alexslemonade.org. If you are interested in getting additional information about our unique Native Sons and Daughters father/child program, please log onto www.timucuan.org. President-elect Steve Carter of Rotary Club of St. Johns presents check for $500 to Kathy Bravo of JCP CARES. This donation will be use to support the Homeless Student Backpack program which provides homeless children a variety of art activities, books, food and other essentials during this dif“ cult time. The Rotary Club of St. Johns meets most Friday mornings from 7:30 a.m. until 8:30 a.m. at the St. Johns Golf and Country Club House (located at County Road 210 and Leo Maguire). Please call Tony Lego at 4011235 with any questions. Come join us in making a difference in our local community. Service above self.

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Page 14, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Receive a.25%Eco-Friendly Rate Discount  Eco-Friendly Auto Loan program effective April 1, 2012 and can be withdra wn at any time without prior notice. Does not apply t o loans already financed with First Florida Credit Union or its divisions. Does not apply to dealer-direct loans. Eligible new or used vehicles are those that have an EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) estimated highway fuel economy of 30 MPG (Miles Per Gallon) or greater, as list ed on www.fueleconomy.gov. Your APR (Annual Percentage Rate) and term may vary based on your creditworthiness and amount financed. ** Advertised APR (Annual Percentage Rate) is effective as of April 1, 2012 and reflects terms up to 48 months. Advertised rate is subject to change at any time without prior notice.‚ For new vehicles only: minimum loan amount $25,000. Other loan terms (up to 72 months) are available for new and used autos. Q ualifications and some restrictions apply.1950 CR 210 W., St. Johns, FL, 32259 (next to St. Johns Forest) www.firstflorida.orgyour wallet, too! Anyone who lives or works in Saint Johns, Duval, Flagler, Clay, Baker, or Nassau County Can Join! S St. rs N St J tf s W. o S w. o J oh or u 0 W to w ke oh ns da o hn F o 210 ext w R 2 (ne s, ore g CR FL st) 3 50 225 19  Eco-Friendly Auto Loan program effective April 1, 2012 and can be withdra wn at any time without prior notice. Does not apply t o loans already financed with First Florida Credit Union or its divisions. Does not apply to dealer-direct loans. Eligible new or used vehicles are those that have an EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) estimated highway fuel economy of 30 MPG (Miles Per Gallon) or greater, as list ed on www.fueleconomy.gov. Your APR (Annual Percentage Rate) and term may vary based on your creditworthiness and amount financed. ** Advertised APR (Annual Percentage Rate) is effective as of April 1, 2012 and reflects terms up to 48 months. Advertised rate is subject to change at any time without prior notice.‚ For new vehicles only: minimum loan amount $25,000. Other loan terms (up to 72 months) are available for new and used autos. Q ualifications and some restrictions apply.1950 CR 210 W., St. Johns, FL, 32259 (next to St. Johns Forest) www.firstflorida.org Your savings federally insured to at least $250,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government AgencyNCUA Other Loan Features € Flexible Repayment Terms … Up to 84 Months‚ € 100% Financing Available € No Application Fee Eco-FriendlyAuto L ans € Save Fuel € Save Money € Save the EnvironmentFor a limited time, at First Florida, youll receive an additional .25% off our already, low rate auto loans when you finance a new or used vehicle that has an EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) estimated highway fuel economy of 30 MPG (Miles Per Gallon) or greater. This Eco-Friendly rate discount applies to refinances, too. So, bring us the fuel-efficient car youve financed elsewhere. Terms Up to 48 Months 2.24%** Rate Discount for Automatic Loan Payments (Available for All Terms) .25% Eco-Friendly Rate Discount (Available for All Terms) .25% Annual Percentage Rate for Terms Up to 48 Months 1.74% Go green and get an even better rate† Annual Percentage Rate As Low As* Better for the environment AND Anyone who lives or works in Saint Johns, Duval, Flagler, Clay, Baker, or Nassau County Can Join! Approval is fast and easy!Stop by; call (904)808-4644 or (800)766-4328, ext. 1; or visit our Web site www.firstflorida.org.

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 15 Are you looking for your Stylist? .....Here they are! Come see them...We look forward to giving you Panache!Front Row: Mariko DeMeyer (Master), Ebony Mosley (Artist), Megan Montgomery (Artist), Lindsey Bick (Artist), Char Trimble (Top Stylist), Hollyann Piety (Artist). Back Row: Kristina Freeman (Artist), Merary Betancourth (Assistant), Blair McKinnerney (Assistant), Paula Snellings (Top Stylist), Carl Slack (Top Stylist), Carolina Torres (Artist) 904-209-13202758 Racetrack Road Publix Plantation Plaza Tues … Fri 9-8 & Sat 9-7$10 Off Any style or serviceexpires 7/31/12 HEARWHAT YOUVE BEEN MISSING No matter how close you are to hitting par, the sounds of a game of golf alone can make an afternoon enjoyable. What round would be complete without the sounds of a strong drive, the ball hitting the bottom of the cup, and of course „ the swing tips from your foursomeƒwhether you asked for them or not. But these simple pleasures can be lost if you suffer from hearing loss. Mandarin Hearing and Balance Center offers an extensive selection of digital hearing devices, backed by our superior level of professionalism and expertise. Call us today so you dont miss one more thing! LINDZEE NUNEZ, MS, CCC-A GLENN W. KNOX, MD, FACS12276 SAN JOSE BLVD., STE 516 JACKSONVILLE, FL 32223904-292-9777 WWW.DOCTORKNOX.COM Limited Time Offer:Offer expires 6/29/12. Some restrictions apply. Not to be combined with any other offers. FREE Hearing Aid Evaluation Dental Arts Family & Cosmetic Dentistry, Inc.163 Hampton Pointe Dr. Suites 1 & 2 St. Augustine, FL 32092 Open Monday Thursday230-5590 frontdesk@jaxdentalarts.comwww.jaxdentalarts.com We welcome new smiles!Dr. Atosa M. KhanMember American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry $99 Special X-rays, Exam & Cleaning (in the absence of gum disease) Uninsured patients only30% OFF Any TreatmentUninsured patients only The Art of a Healthy Smile CR210 I 95 Cimmarone BLVD Hampton Pointe 163 Helping Hands of St. Johns County will meet on Friday, June 29 at 11:00 a.m. at Faith Community Church Community Center on County Road 210 next to Cimarrone. This months If you are willing to spend a little time this summer to help out others, there is an opportunity waiting for you! RSVP of St. Johns County is looking for community members to help out once a week in the following areas: reading program for third graders; activity assistance with the Boys and Girls Club; reading and classroom help with Head Start; and algebra camp for high school and middle school students. Hours are ” exible and even if you are traveling this summer you can help out while you are in town. There are speci“ c needs I am a transplant from England and I had lost touch with all my surviving relatives, in spite of e orts to catch up with them in recent years. A few months ago, the phone rang, and a lady asked for me, saying, You dont know me, but I am your cousin.Ž She is the granddaughter of one of my fathers older brothers, who had emigrated to the United States in the 1920s and we had lost touch a long time ago. My interest in genealogy was awakened when she allowed me to access our family tree, which went back as far as 1570. We hope to meet in person this summer. A few weeks ago, as I was checking out a book on genealogy at the Bartram Trail Library, a librarian asked if I was interested in attending a meeting of the Genealogy Club which meets there each month. I felt somehow compelled to go to my very “ rst one this May. I arrived knowing no one. There were six members present, plus the very helpful Its a small world when studying genealogyYour family history may surprise you!By Contributing Writer Carole Traynham-Vivionlibrarian. The topic was Sharing Your Biggest Finds.Ž The “ rst participant was Gary I., who shared his search for an ancestor from Missouri. I realized that he was referring to Moniteau County, where my husband was born and I asked him if he was talking about Jamestown, a small community (which boasted 299 residents the last time we were there in 2009). Amazingly, Gary was also from Jamestown and after some discussion, it was determined that he and my husband, Noel, are third cousins once removed, on Noels fathers side. We later realized that they were related through Noels mother as well. Garys grandparents farm was located next to Noels grandparents farm where Noel and his parents lived for a few years during his childhood and they knew Garys family. Gary and Noel had not met since Gary was born the year after Noel and his parents moved away. Who would have imagined that a previously unknown relative from a town 1500 miles away would be living just “ ve miles down the road from where we live. I just couldnt wait to get home to announce to my astonished husband that I had found a cousin of whom he was unaware. I am so glad I listened to that little voice within me said You really have to go to that meeting today!ŽSummer volunteer opportunities aboundthat we are hoping to meet this summer,Ž said Cheryl Freeman, RSVP director. Help from community volunteers will go a very long way in meeting our goals. If a person gives just one or two hours per week, it can make all the di erence.Ž If you would like to learn more or have any questions about volunteering in St. Johns County, call RSVP at 547-3945.Helping Hands UpdateBy Contributing Writer Jackie Valyou Helping Hands members at their May 25 meeting with their cereal and milk donation to Celebration Food Bank on Roberts Road.project will be making bows for the groups holiday project, Helping Heroes Families. Members or those interested in coming may bring red, white and blue ribbon, scissors and wire or pipe cleaners to tie the bows. On that evening, with the help of local Boy Scout troops, the group will be serving dinner to the homeless in St. Augustine through Dining with Dignity. Plans are for a barbeque with hot dogs, hamburgers, beans and tossed salad and cupcakes. Anyone interested in donating any of these items may contact jacqphil@aol.com. The Rippers continue to retro“ t clothing for the wounded military through Sew Much Comfort and chairman Sue Fischer can be reached at gsusan@hotmail.com for more information. They will meet at 10:00 a.m. Helping Hands is also coordinating the Fathers Day Barbeque at Trout Creek Senior Center on June 15. This is the fourth year the group has visited with the seniors and served them their special meal. Helping Hands is a volunteer group that meets once a month on the last Friday of the month to do a small project to bene“ t the community. There are no dues, o cers or stress. The group relies solely on donations of goods and services. Membership is always open and members come when they can and do what they can with what was donated. The community has been very supportive and it is much appreciated! Please contact jacqphil@aol.com for more information. Genealogy ClubSaturday, June 9 2:00 pm Bartram Trail Library Genealogy is a very ful lling hobby! For additional information, please call 827-6960. The CreekLineShare your news!editor@thecreekline.com Flag Day June 14

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Page 16, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Grow Stronger, Live longer! Yoga Den Studio First Class Free Celebrating our 10th year! 200 hr Teacher Training 3 week Summer Intensive begins July 9th 9 weekend 2012/2013 begins August 25/26yoga-den.com www.yoga-den.com 268-8330 2929 Plummer Cove Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32223 Located in Mandarin, just south of I-295 across from Walmart Yoga Basics Mind Body Power Yoga Yogalates Teacher Training Lauren Wisenow atBartram Spa & Salon108 Bartram Oaks WalkLocated inside the Spa and Salon at Bartram Walk364-8498 Free Cut & Style on Thursdays!(New Clients Only) We can handle all of the details! We know the ins and outs of the local real estate market and have the knowledge and commitment to meet your needs. If you are looking to buy a home, sell your home, invest in property, or build a new home, let us be your real estate representatives. Contact us today for all of your real estate needs. big and small we sell them allNeed help buying, selling or investing in real estate?Stan & Jan Timbrook REALTORS Dr. Jenny Preer Purposefully limited practice providing the time, energy & attention you deserve North Florida Coaching North Florida Counseling & Mediation Services, LLC (904) 701-8255 www.northcoaching.com www.northcounseling.comCounseling is available for individuals (18+), couples, and families working through various issues. FL Supreme Court Certied Family Mediation Services creates personal solutions for both on-going and potential legal conicts, including child timesharing agreements. Coaching creates strategies and action plans that move you toward your goals. It is for people who want to do something more. I help students (16+) and adults dene educational, career & personal goals and create plans to overcome the obstacles in their way. Licensed Counselor, Family Mediator, Coach Why did Klee have to choose between music and art, why not choose both?Ž asked a “ fth grade student after hearing about Klees life. Then students were asked to guess the title of this painting. Needs Pants!Ž answered one student causing a round of giggles in the classroom. Third grades Henri Rousseau art project is to draw their own tiger by following a step by step progression and recreate Surprised,Ž a tiger caught in a jungles thunderstorm. The teachers pointed out how this gives the students a chance If you develop pregnancyrelated hypertensive disorders or diabetes, you may have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease later in life, according to research in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. We wanted to learn about possible explanations as to why women with pregnancy complications tend to have more heart disease later in life,Ž said Abigail Fraser, M.P.H., Ph.D., School of Social and Community Medicine at the University of Bristol, United Kingdom. Researchers studied 3,416 pregnant women enrolled in the Avon Longitudinal Study Meet the Artist program at LPA intrigues young mindsSubmitted by Stephanie Bradford, Liberty Pines Academyto practice motor skills for cursive writing and spatial awareness. These are examples of how art encourages problem solving and curiosity during Meet the Artist PowerPoint presentations at Liberty Pines Academy. Art is an excellent tool to teach math, social studies, science and other academics as well as developing needed skills. Children learn more e ectively and retain the information when they do something related to the topic or concept they are learning about. Meet the Artist presentations embrace Confucius saying I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.Ž Besides being fun, art provides children a way to express themselves by giving them freedom of choice, feeling and thought and develops their minds, creativity and problem solving abilities. As adults, Sherri Edens and Sandy Blake, co-chairs of LPAs Meet the Artist program, have found that art has opened up new worlds of learning for them too. They will de“ nitely miss LPAs beaming artists when soon they no longer are serving as co-chairs, since their children are in seventh and eighth grades. They are ecstatic that Diana Sarama will be next years chair. She has been decorating the bulletin board with the students artwork and artists information every few weeks and is excited about chairing the program next year. Sarama will need a co-chair along with class volunteers to help educate all of the schools budding artists and continue the artistic fun and education in class. Class volunteers should know that no art knowledge or teaching skills are required, just a willingness to have fun, encourage creativity, read a PowerPoint presentation and lead an art project four times a year. Volunteer and join us in learning about the world around us in the Meet the Artist program. We invite all interested volunteers from any school to come and check out the Power Point presentations at LPAs PTO website at www-lpa. stjohns.k12.” .us/pto/Meet%20 the%20Artist Pregnancy-related complications predict CVD in middle ageBy Contributing Writer Katie Seay, American Heart Associationof Parents and Children in the early 1990s. Among them, 1,002 (29.8 percent) had one pregnancy complication, 175 (5.2 percent) had two and 26 (0.8 percent) had three. The complications included gestational or pregnancy diabetes, hypertensive (or high blood pressure-related) disorders of pregnancy (also known as preeclampsia), preterm delivery, and size of babies at birth (top and bottom 10 percent in weight). Researchers correlated these with cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors measured 18 years later when the women were an average of 48 years old. Researchers then calculated the womens odds of experiencing a cardiovascular event in the next decade using the 10-year CVD Framingham risk score, which includes such factors as age, total and HDL (goodŽ) cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, diabetes and smoking status. They found: € Preeclampsia, gestational diabetes and giving birth to babies small for gestational age were associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Each complication was associated with di erent CVD risk factors. € Gestational diabetes was associated with a 26 percent and preeclampsia 31 percent greater risk of developing heart disease in middle age. € Among women who experienced these pregnancy complications, gestational diabetes was associated with higher levels of fasting glucose and insulin. € Preeclampsia was associated with higher body mass index and larger waist circumference, as well as higher blood pressure, lipids and insulin. € Women who gave birth to babies large for gestational age had larger waist circumference and higher concentrations of blood glucose. Those who had preterm babies had higher blood pressure. Pregnancy may provide an opportunity to identify women at increased risk of heart disease while they are relatively young; thus, it would be useful for medical professionals to have information on pregnancy complications so they can recommend lifestyle changes and any necessary medical intervention sooner,Ž Fraser said. A woman who experiences complications during pregnancy should be proactive and ask her doctor about future CVD risk and steps she should take to modify her risk.Ž The women in the study had not experienced a CVD event, so the researchers couldnt determine whether preeclampsia and/or pregnancy diabetes have separate, independent e ects on future CVD risk. A larger study with longer follow-up could help determine whether pregnancy complications could a ect how the 10-year CVD Framingham risk score is calculated for these women, Fraser said. Furthermore, because the study population was predominantly white, replicating the research with other racial groups will provide additional data on the association between pregnancy complications and CVD risk, she said. Four-Day Work WeekBeginning on Monday, June 11, the St. Johns County School District will operate a four-day workweek, Monday through Thursday. All facilities will function in an energy conservation mode Friday through Sunday. Summer activities will be designed within the MondayThursday workweek and will be completed by Thursday, August 2. The district will return to the normal ve-day workweek beginning on Monday, August 6. Advertise inThe CreekLineIt’s good for business!287-4913LG@rtpublishinginc.com Class of 2012!

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 17 Dr. Mabus of“ce is conveniently located in the Johns Creek Shopping Center. She is a graduate of the St. Vincents Family Medicine residency program and is looking forward to caring for her new Fruit Cove neighbors. Her of“ce offers medical care for: Procedures and screenings: To schedule an appointment call: (904) 450-8120Same day appointments available. Dr. Mabus of“ce is located at: St. Vincents Primary Care Johns Creek Shopping Center 2851 CR 210 W., Ste. 122 St. Johns, FL 32259St. Vincent’s Primary Care would like to welcome Allison Mabus, MD, to our St. Vincent’s HealthCare family. The Fruit Cove Middle School Flyer bands are wrapping up the year on a high note. All pun intended! All bands have improved greatly since the beginning of the year and the skills they have learned will in” uence their academic and personal lives for years to come, whether or not they become professional musicians. The Jazz Ensemble had a remarkable year. They performed at several local venues, the airport, schools, Jacksonville Landing and senior centers. The Downtown Disney show is always a highlight of the year. They scored straight Superiors at the Music Performance Assessments, which is the FCAT for band. They placed “ rst with Superior ratings at the Lakeside Jazz Festival in Port Orange. They had the honor of performing at the Florida Music Educators Association in Tampa. They were one of three middle school jazz groups in the state to play for this group of professionals. Every time they play in front of people, they get a little bit better and are met with the question, Those are middle schoolers?Ž The ultimate con“ rmation of their ability came in the form of an invitation to play the New York City Jazz Festival next year. Although they will probably not be able to attend due to scheduling con” icts with the FCAT, it is such a high honor that our little band would be approached to participate at such an impressive gathering Wind Symphony sounds amazing. They wrapped up the year with performances featuring their MPA selections, music from WickedŽ and The Wizard of OzŽ along with the themes from all three Pirates of the Caribbean.Ž They, too, received straight Superiors at MPA. A large number of these students will be moving on to the music programs in high school. They are more than prepared for the musical opportunities ahead of them. Wind Ensemble is also doing very well. Their end-of-year performance featured their MPA selections, a John Williams trilogy and Cartoon Symphony. They received Excellent ratings at MPA and have progressed nicely over the course of the year. There are also eighth graders in this group, who will also be moving onto high school programs. Symphonic Band has made great strides forward. They wrapped up the year with a program featuring Beatles music and the Theme from Spider Man.Ž They all enjoy this music and have worked hard to perfect it. Many of these students will move into higher level programs next year and we look forward to hearing from them again.End of year FCMS band notesBy Contributing Writer Vicki Barfoot, Fruit Cove Middle School Congratulations to 2011 Bartram Trail High School graduate Adam J. Potts, who graduated from the United States Marine Corps recruit training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina on May 25, 2012. Potts is the son of James W. and Christine S. Potts of Fruit Cove. Beginning Band has really improved since the beginning of the year. Those squeaks and squawks have turned into actual songs! They are even performing a selection, Imperium,Ž which is usually reserved for more advanced groups. This is where the foundation is laid for more challenging programs. Their enthusiasm spills over into their music and results in an enjoyable, high-energy performance. This has been a successful year for the band program here at Fruit Cove. All of the students have advanced and learned new skills. A special thank you to all of the parents who contribute, volunteer and provide transportation to make this program work. There are 420 students in band this year and without the parents support the band program would not be what it is„awesome! Band director Don Isabelle will conduct summer band camps and the information is on his Fruit Cove website. Best wishes to the eighth graders and we look forward to seeing the rest of you next year! Julington Creek kids TRI it!On April 29, The Kids Triathlon was held at UNF and Julington Creek Elementary was there. Thirty-four students participated in the event which included swimming, biking, and running. All of our students nished the race and eight were in the top three of their age groups. Christian Middleton was the top boy nisher of the race as well. The students enjoyed a great experience and raised money for their schools PE department. The total amount of money raised was $340. Way to go Jags!

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Page 18, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com 904-765-2020 www .clayeye.comFind us onFacebook Orange Park: 2023 Professional Ctr Dr. Orange Park, FL 32073 904-272-2020 Mandarin: 11790 San Jose Blvd Jacksonville, FL 32223 904-765-2020 Fleming Island: 1615 CR Rd 220, Ste 140 Fleming Island, FL 32003 904-276-2020Three convenient locations to serve you! SPECIALIZING IN: & Macula S P E C IALIZI NG I N: Celebrating our ONE year Anniversary in Mandarin! 1004 State Road 13( 0.2 mi South JCP entrance ) Richard M. Oglesby, D.V.M.Constanze Goricki, Dr.med.vet287-5570M-F – 8 AM 6 PM Sat 8 AM Noon Greenbriar Animal Hospital We Celebrate The HumanPet Bond ITS HERE!THE K LASER!FINALLY PAIN FREE ...DRUG FREE THERAPY! Reintroduce Your Pet To Activity! www.marienhofkennels.com n h o f k e n ne l l s c o m Marienhof Kennels 287-3934 German Shepherd Puppies Call for availability i h M M M M M M M M M M The Northeast Florida Conservatory Community Orchestra demonstrated versatility and considerable musical talent in its debut concert on May 3 at Westminster Woods. Under the baton of Richard Dickson, president and executive director of the Conservatory, the orchestra played a Panache, a St. Augustine and Julington Creek company with Aveda Lifestyle Store, Salon and Spas, held a cut-athon fundraiser for St. Johns Riverkeeper on April 15 at the Julington Creek salon. The event featured 20 Panache hair stylists who donated their time and expertise with 140 haircuts including style and care consultations, stress relieving treatments, head massages, shampoos and haircuts and blow-dries. The cut-a-thon raised $3,600 which will be donated to St. Johns Riverkeeper with 100 percent of the proceeds going to the local non-pro“ t. St. Johns Riverkeeper works on behalf of the community for clean and healthy waters in the St. Johns River. Panache enjoys giving back to the community and its residents who support us. Each year, Panache holds a large fundraiser and all proceeds are donated to help keep the earth healthy as part of Earth Month,Ž said Panache owner Kristy Weeks. For close to 25 years, Weeks and her team of award winning salon and spa sta members have participated in a wide variety of community service activities to give back to the local area and to worldwide environmental initiatives. Weeks added that she is honored to be able to donate to those in need and to the planet with two highly successful salon and spa locations, and a dedicated team of professionals and supportive customers. Weeks attributes the companys success to Panache salon and spa experts who regularly participate in company and industry events and business courses including specialized training at Avedas salon operations facilities in Orlando, St. Petersburg, Ft. Lauderdale, Tallahassee and Jacksonville. Panache sta members study topics ranging from the top industry benchmarks to working Community orchestra debutsvariety of musical styles from classical to popular. Among the pieces included in the program were two clever compositions ( Jazz Pizzicato and The Waltzing Cat ) by renowned American composer, Leroy Anderson as well as Frescobaldis Toccata (the “ rst piece ever played by the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra). The concert concluded with an exciting arrangement of an all-time favorite, Over the Rainbow, followed by the introduction of orchestra members by section … strings, woodwinds, brass, and percussion. It was noted that the orchestra has the distinction of having two domra players, which is highly unusual and probably unique to any orchestra in the area. The Community Orchestra, Community Concert Band and Jazz Band comprise the three ensemble groups currently sponsored by the Northeast Florida Conservatory, a community school of the arts located in Mandarin. Faculty members are Jacksonville Symphony members and/or college music professors. Be sure to look for their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!Local salon donates $3,600 from cut-athon to St. Johns Riverkeeperwith di erent generations in the workplace to client retention to network promoters, the importance of community service along with current trends and inspirations in salon and spa services. Panache receives annual recognition from its customers as Best Full-Service Salon, Best Day Spa, Best Nail Salon, Massage Therapist and Best Stylist, plus several industry awards which uniquely positions the company as a leading salon and spa business. Weeks is recognized as a leader in the business community and one of the most innovative salon industry professionals in Northeast Florida. Be sure to see their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!Hart, who worked in conjunction with troop leader Norris to arrange the hectic schedule for multiple phases to see the project to fruition. In addition to Hart, residents Jack Botterbush, Dick Bresson and Mike Widman assisted with the project during the months of April and May. We found as much enjoyment as did the Girl scouts during this project. Their enthusiasm and energy was truly contagious. We cant wait to see the look of accomplishment on their faces when the birds appear,Ž Hart shared. The troop has worked on this project in phases over the past three months and is committed to maintaining the bird feeders and bird houses for the next year. The next time you buy Girl Scouts cont. from page 1 your favorite type of Girl Scout cookie, know that you could be funding a community service project similar to this, one that bene“ ts the community in a multitude of ways.

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 19 Finding the right doctor just got easier. Baptist Primary Care is pleased to welcome Lara Church, MD, to its Hilden Road practice. Dr. Church is dedicated to your familys health through every stage of life and ready to provide you with a medical home. Services include: € Well visits for adults, adolescents and children € Care for minor injuries € Coordination of care for chronic conditions (diabetes, hypertension, etc.) € Immunizations Same-day appointments Rashmi Schramm, MD Board-Certified, Family Medicine Lara Church, MD Board-Certified, Family Medicine Erich Schramm, MD Board-Certified, Family Medicine 825-1941Baptist Primary Care Hilden Road 141 Hilden Road Suite 201 Jacksonville, FL 32081 10% O! Mention this ad for 10% discount, or $10 o any service! Does not apply to insurance claimsWe can meet all your glass needs with fast, friendly, free mobile service! www.busybeeglass.com Busy Bee Glass Service, Inc.Services provided: Auto/truck glass replacement Fogged insulated glass replacement Patio door repairs/replacement Call for a free estimate! Thank you to the community for the support of the Letter Carriers Food Drive on Saturday, May 12. Christs Cupboard Community Food Bank, located at 810 Roberts Road in Fruit Cove, received 13,000 pounds of donated food and was assisted by over 50 volunteers. All food collected by the letter carriers in zip code 32259 was donated to the local pantry. A truck was donated by Two Men and a Truck to transport the food from the Postal Distribution Center on Philips Industrial Boulevard to the food bank. Members of Celebration Lutheran Church, along with volunteers from Mandarin United Methodist Church and other community friends worked from 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. Saturday, mov-Clay Eye Physicians and Surgeons has been awarded the prestigious 2011 Angies List Super Service Award, an honor bestowed annually on approximately 5 percent of all the businesses rated on the nations leading provider of consumer reviews on local service companies. Eric King, Clay Eyes practice administrator stated, We believe that quality customer service is what sets Clay Eye apart. Every day we strive for ways to improve and exceed our patients expectations. Were honored that Angies List has recognized us for this award.Ž Only a fraction of the businesses rated on Angies List can claim the sterling customer service record of being a Super Service Award winner because we set a high bar,Ž said Angies List founder Angie Hicks. The fact that Clay Eye can claim Su-Eye physicians group earns coveted Super Service Awardper Service Award status speaks volumes about its dedication to consumers.Ž Angies List Super Service Award winners have met strict eligibility requirements including earning a minimum number of reports, an exemplary rating from their customers and abiding by Angies List operational guidelines. Clay Eye Physicians and Surgeons o ers comprehensive eye care in the following specialties: cataract surgery, cornea surgery, medical retina, diabetic eye disease and macular degeneration, glaucoma surgery, Lasik surgery, cosmetic eye procedures, pediatric ophthalmology and pediatric eye exams. In addition, they o er routine eye exams, contact lenses and boutique eyewear for the entire family. Look for their ad in this issue of The CreekLine We are pleased to announce an award scholarships signing ceremony held last Friday at Nease High school highlighting the following six NJROTC cadets: 1. Charles Reis: Appointment to the United States Naval Academy; 2. Tyler Fugleberg: Appointment to the United States Merchant Marine Academy (playing football); 3. John Snyder: Naval ROTC Scholarship to Virginia Tech (Marine Option); 4. Garrison Wetmore: Naval ROTC Scholarship to Auburn (Marine Option); 5. Manuel Quintanilla: Naval ROTC Scholarship to FSU; and 6. James Zapala: Naval ROTC Scholarship to Jacksonville University. The total amount of paid education for these six cadets is $1,400,000. Pictured are Cadet Fugleberg, Cadet Wetmore, Cadet Quintanilla, Cadet Reis, Cadet Snyder and Cadet Zapala.Nease NJROTC senior cadets awarded scholarships Letter carriers food drive bene ts Christs Cupboard Food BankBy Contributing Writer Lisa Modaffing, sorting and storing the food. Christs Cupboard serves those in need in the surrounding area. The food bank is open Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Food is provided to about 40 families each week. If you are interested in supporting this valuable community resource, please call Celebration Lutheran Church at 230-2496. Advertise inThe CreekLineIt’s good for business!287-4913LG@rtpublishinginc.com

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Page 20, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Julington Creek Animal Walk is a state-of-the-art pet boarding facility for dogs, cats, and exotics providing: Your pet will “ nd a welcoming retreat at our 9-acre, fenced, off-leash dog park featuring a bone-shaped swimming pool and our NE Floridas Premier Luxury Pet Resort, Dog Park and SpaConveniently located next to Julington Creek Animal Hospital Stop by for a tour and receive a coupon for a free daily park pass Aordable small dog luxury oasis. Please call for details. Veterinarian Owned and Operated Terms: Present this coupon at initial consultation to receive $150 o the purchase of an 800 series or Boundary Plus system. Other charges may apply. Not valid on prior sales or with any other oer. Participating dealers only. 2012 Invisible Fence Brand. All Rights Reserved. Steve Ochs and his wife have been coming to Julington Creek Elementary for years to share their love of reading. First grade teacher Dolly Lucas shares, I met Mr. Ochs 14 years ago. I was looking for a guest reader and he was looking for a classroom of excited children. We paired up and he has been the highlight of my Wednesday mornings ever since.Ž Lucas continued that she knew that a particular Wednesday in May would be the last day he would sit in her rocking chair to read, so she asked Principal Michael Story if everyone could make him feel extra special on his last visit. As Mr. Ochs and his wife left the building that day, many students and teachers came out to give him a standing ovation. Many thanks from everyone at Julington Creek Elementary to Mr. Ochs who has been so dedicated to JCE. Lucas concludes, He will always have a special place in our hearts!Ž Julington Creek Elementary thanks Steve Ochs!June is...Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Month Fruits and veggies are essential to good health, reducing your risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and certain forms of cancer. Generally low in calories and high in ber, fruits and vegetables can help you control your weight. PACT Prevention Coalition of St. Johns County, a nonpro“ t organization, is proud to announce the addition of “ ve new members to the board. The new members include Andrea Adzema, Kent Justice, Valerie Frank, Tim Forson and Shirley Menefee. The depth and breadth of our newest board members will help PACT reach its full potential,Ž Coalition Coordinator LeAnn Daddario says. Each one brings their own unique skill set combined with a passion for our youth. They are collectively committed to the prevention of underage drinking and drug abuse in St. Johns County.Ž Adzema has been a pharmacist for CVS for 17 years and is the mother of three children. Justice is a weekend anchor and evening reporter for Channel PACT Prevention Coalition gains new board members4 News in Jacksonville. He has reported for and anchored television news casts since 1996. Frank is the St. Johns County Young Life Area Director. She is also active in the Monique Burr Foundation Young Professionals Group. Forson is the Deputy Superintendent for Operations for the St. Johns County school district. He was born and raised in St. Augustine and loves this community. Menefee is a pharmacist at Flagler Hospital and is a graduate of Florida A and M University. Each new member represents a unique sector of the community and will strengthen PACTs resources to reduce and prevent underage substance abuse in St. Johns County. For more information about PACT Prevention Coalition of St. Johns County call 829-6261 or visit www.pactprevention.org.The CreekLine’sElection 2012Special Section is coming in our July 2012 issue!Candidates, dont be left out!To Advertise: LG@RTPublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 21 Lets face it, in this market it might not make sense to sell if you can rent. And right now, we have a waiting list of people who would love to rent your house. So before you consider putting your home on the market during this competitive time, give us a call to see just how much rental income you can enjoy while you wait for the market to rebound. Well pre-screen and credit-approve tenants, routinely inspect your property to make sure its cared for, schedule and oversee any needed repairs, and even direct-deposit rent into your bank account so you dont have to deal with checks. For more information on this great alternative, call Shelby Heinemann at 904-484-2170. 9049405000 | DavidsonPropertyManagement.comTRUSTED REAL ESTATE ADVISORS.Ž Property Management, Inc. RENT NOW,SELL LATER. The Shoppes of MurabellaAccepting New Patients (904) 826-346952 Tuscan Way Suite 205 St. Augustine, FL 32092 New Location!Mon-Thurs: 8-6:30 Saturday: 9-1 Walk-Ins Welcome The Humane Society of the United States urges residents to keep their pets in mind in preparation for a natural disaster. People can take some simple … but critical … steps to keep their pets safe and healthy in severe weather and possible evacuations. More than 35 million people, many of them pet owners, live in areas threatened by Atlantic hurricanes. More than 60 percent of American households have pets VyStar Credit Union has begun construction on a new branch at 1955 County Road 210 West, just west of Interstate 95 in St. Johns. This full service branch is scheduled to open in late 2012 and will be the 33rd VyStar branch. Brian Corson will serve as Branch Vice President of the 210 branch. Corson has been with VyStar for seven years and most recently held the position of Member Relationship Specialist Supervisor at VyStars Julington Creek branch. We are very enthusiastic about expanding VyStar services to the St. Johns community. A signi cant number of our members have resided in the area for some time and they have encouraged us to open a branch there,Ž said Terry West, VyStar Credit Unions President/CEO. As hurricane season starts, remember to include pets in disaster plansand weathering a major storm requires an evacuation plan that includes our animals,Ž said Niki Dawson, director of disaster services for The HSUS. If it isnt safe for you, it isnt safe for them. If you are ordered to shelter-in-place and not evacuate, bring your pets inside with you and make sure you have adequate supplies.Ž The HSUS Animal Rescue Team has a fully equipped response team to assist communities impacted by a natural disaster. In 2011, The HSUS responded to natural disasters in North Carolina, Vermont, Mississippi, Missouri, Alabama, and North Dakota, helping to care for more than 2,000 displaced animals. AccuWeather forecasters predict an average hurricane season from June to November. Pet owners can reduce their animals chances of being at risk during a disaster by following the suggestions below. Things you can do right now: € Put a collar with visible identi“ cation on your pets, including indoor-only pets. € Keep pictures of your pets on hand for identi“ cation purposes. Ideally, you should also be in the photo. €Create a pet emergency kit and refresh the items every few months. € Talk to your neighbors about how they can help your pets if you are not at home when disaster strikes. € Create a list of hotels that allow pets. Plan on evacuating about 100 miles inland. Pet emergency kits should include: € Minimum of a three-day supply of food in airtight, waterproof containers and drinking water. € Bowls for food and water. € Current photos and physical description of your pets, including details on markings. € Medications, vaccination records and “ rst aid pet supplies. € Comfort items such as a toy and blanket. € Small garbage bags. € For dogs include: leash, harness and a sturdy carrier large enough to use as a sleeping area. € For cats include: litter and litter box and a sturdy carrier large enough for transport and for your cat to use as a temporary apartmentŽ for several days. A Zogby International poll after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast found that 61 percent of pet owners will not evacuate if they cannot bring their pets with them. In 2006, Congress addressed this issue by passing the Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards (PETS) Act, which requires state and local emergency management agencies to make plans that take into account the needs of individuals with pets and service animals in the event of a major disaster or emergency. It is crucial that all pet owners reach out to their local government to understand their communitys existing human and pet evacuation plans. For more tips on preparedness plans that include your pets, visit humanesociety.org/ prepare.

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Page 22, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com NOW Enrolling for our Summer Camp & Riding Lessons Amy Barnett, Certied Riding Instructor by the American Riding Instructor Association Gingerbread Acres, LLC 12567 Aladdin Rd. Jacksonville, Florida 32223904-654-3561 Jacksonville, FL 11111 San Jose Blvd. 904-220-1212SAVE $100CALL Today Call Today! 260-4866 www.starlightjax.com Star ightGYMNASTICSOur #1 Priority: Your Children Motivating classes for all ages Fun Additional ProgramsBack by popular demand!Summer CampJune 11th – August 10th Conveniently located at the corner of I-295 and San Jose Blvd. 2012-2013 Early Bird Registration$10 OFFApril 23rd – May 25th Transitioning from elementary school to middle school is a challenge for any student. S u m m e r C a m p & Summer Camp & Switzerland Point Middle School begins Student 2 Student programBy Karl KennellImagine how that challenge is when the student moves and then must enter school in the middle of the school year. Switzerland Point Middle School has begun a new program to help with that transition. SPMS is piloting the new program at the middle school level in St. Johns County. The Junior Student 2 Student programs objective is to provide students who are relocating to or from the school with a critical edge for a successful transition. Students from SPMS were selected from various grades to form a team to meet real transition student needs with immediate peer credibility, positive peer relationships and valued information about academicsƒand, not to be forgotten, the very important task of learning just how to “ nd their way around the campus. This team of students provides a forum in which the incoming student can feel quickly welcomed, comfortable and accepted in their new school community. For existing students, the team assists in preparing them for transitioning to another school. The bene“ t of the program for the team members is the con“ dence of becoming leaders in the school. SPMS is the “ rst middle school in St. Johns County to begin this program. The only other school in St. Johns County that is participating in the program is Ponte Vedra High School, which is implementing the high school level program. Recently SPMS sent a team of six students composed of three sixth-graders and three seventhgraders to a two-day training session sponsored by the Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC), which established the Student 2 Student initiative in 2004. It was begun to help military-connected and civilian high school students establish and sustain school-sponsored programs for welcoming new students and too support their transitions. The team from SPMS team returned from the seminar enthused about the task of recruiting and training others. During their training they were involved in three researchbased modules, academics, relationships and one titled Finding the WayŽ which emphasized attention, orientation and appreciation. Megan Fallon, one of the seventh graders chosen for the team, re” ected how she was honored to attend and is excited to help lead this program at SPMS. New students will be assigned a team member to help them gain a feeling of being right at home.Ž SPMS Principal Lisa Kunze said of the program, Were very excited to be given this opportunity and are grateful to have amazing students willing to take the lead and implement this program next year.Ž The Student 2 Student program at SPMS bene“ ts not only students of military families to make their transition, but all students coming into SPMS from another school. Junior Student 2 Student members at Switzerland Point Middle School. Book Discussion at the Bartram Trail Branch Library! Monday, June 18 7 pmThis month’s selection is “The Tender Bar” by J.R. Moehringer. All are welcome to join us for this discussion.

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 23 LEARNING IS ALL AROUND. NOW ENROLLING! The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. Goddard Systems Inc. 2009 License #C07SJ0053 ASK ABOUT OURFLEX’LEARNING PROGRAM 100 Julington Plaza Drive Goddard Systems, Inc. program is AdvancED accredited. This was the ninth year that Julington Creek Elementary second graders each made bunny buddiesŽ to give to children entering Nemours Childrens Clinic. This year we donated 180 bunnies made from dishcloths and ribbons (materials purchased with money given to In its third year of existence, the Nease Math Team ended its 2012 season bringing home six trophies in various divisions. The students participated in a series of four regional and invitational competitions during the spring semester and practiced several times a week (and one all-day Saturday) to prepare for competitions in both team and individual rounds. The students and their divisions that participated were: Jason Cochran, Adam Domingoes, Megan Hinkle and Ashley Plant (Geometry), Zach Anastasiadis, Trevor Bernas, Justin Glinka, Tyler Goldsmith, Alec Short and Turner Street (Algebra 2), Ashley Bushdorf, Dante Castaldo, Tyler Clowe, Aamir Hasan and Lauren Hsu (Precalculus), Luis Buenaventura, Farina KhandaA c t i v i t i e s G u i d e Activities GuideBunny Buddies again donated to NemoursBy Contributing Writer Paula Cervone, Second Grade Teacher, Julington Creek Elementaryus by Wal-Mart of Mandarin). The bunnies are washable, cuddly and each have a poem and note written by the child who created the bunny. We have also enclosed a set of directions so, if washed, the bunny can easily be recreated for the child. For the third year, we collected new and gently used books for the children at Nemours. We were hoping for one to go with each bunny, but ended up with approximately 475 books. The people at Nemours loved the bunnies and books and were thrilled to have something to give the children as they enter a very stressful situation. Parents are disbelieving that they are getting something for nothingŽ and the children do not want to let them go. The second graders are proud of what they have made and are anxious to give them to another child in need. We hope to continue this service again for the next school year, as part of our Character Counts program. Nease High School math team nishes strongdia, Andrew Knuppel and Andri Kokoshi (Statistics), and Alek Abate, Jacob Belcher, Aarathi Devi, Bryce McKenzie, Lindsey Mitchell, Vivian Nguyen, Carson Ridenhour, Steven Schwartz, Matt Short, Preston Sluder, Logan Stern, Michelle Wartenberg and Tony Yin (Calculus). Students worked under the guidance of their team sponsor Maggie Byrns. Florida Mu Alpha Theta has over 150 teams statewide competing in various competitions around Florida. In addition to a successful season, special recognition goes to Logan Stern for earning a $4000 college scholarship from the national Mu Alpha Theta organization. He is one of 25 winners nationwide. Stern will be attending Washington University in St. Louis in the fall. Lunar PhasesLast Quarter: June 11 New: June 19 First Quarter: June 27 Full: July 3

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Page 24, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Race Track Blvd.Flora Branch Blvd. 990 Flora Branch Boulevard St. Johns, Florida 32259 www.theacademyatjulingtoncreek.netLicense#C075J0083 Summer Camp 2012 Please visit our new center and take a personal tour. … ages 5-11 … ages 3-4 … girls ages 7-18904-260-198311502 Columbia Park Dr W Jacksonville, FL 32258www.FirstCoastGymnastics.com Free Trial Class & $5 OFFwith registration Summer CampCall for details. Summer 2012One and Two Week Sessions beginning in July ...W ri t e Aw a y! ...Creative Writing Enrichment Program W ri t e R ig ht ...Writing Academic Bridge ProgramT.N.T. ... Trying Neat Technology" Enrichment ProgramVisit our website or e-mail us for more information...www.l ear nnow i nc.com l ear nnow i nc@y a hoo.com S u m m e r Summer C a m p & Camp & A c t i v i t i e s Activities G u i d e GuideTo help culminate the 20112012 school year, Liberty Pines Academy was excited to hold our annual Wolf Buck Carnival! The purpose of this event is to positively reward students who have earned Wolf Bucks throughout the course of the school year, by being Responsible, Respectful and Ready to learn. LPA uses a positive behavioral management approach which focuses on these 3 RsŽ to de“ ne the positive behaviors that provide a safe learning environment where students are successful. The school year at Wards Creek Elementary has come to a close! The last weeks of school have been “ lled with “ eld trips, celebrations and graduations. The “ rst grade went bowling to celebrate the end of the year while the fourth grade went to Whitney Lab at Marineland to do marine research. There was a trip to a Jacksonville Suns game to celebrate literacy week. The safety patrols went to Sea World and the “ fth graders went to Universal Studios. The chorus and Or groups led by Kim Rose showed o their musical talent to family and friends while James Lees art fair was held in conjunction with the book fair. The “ fth graders had an introduction to everything middle school at Pacetti Bay Middle School. Volunteers made sure the “ fth graders went out in style! The celebration included bounce houses, a DJ, taco bar, talent show, awards and the traditional running the halls. Everyone at Wards Creek wishes the “ fth grade good luck in their new adventure at middle school! The Teacher Talent Show is School is out and the beach is calling! May proved to be an intimidating time for AP and IB students: crammed schedules, studying for hours and trying to divide up the time equally for each test. Sports concluded with teary-eyed banquets as the seniors said their “ nal goodbyes to what most of them had been doing for the past four years with the people they love. The IB seniors “ nished up about a week before the rest of the school; you could hear them cheering as they walked out of the gym from their respective last exams, IB done! IB done!Ž Facebook was exploding with done with IBŽ posts varying from the above short phrase to extensive descriptions of everything they could now do without worrying about homework or studying. Many went to the beach immediately End of school year at LPABy Contributing Writer Stephanie Bradford, Liberty Pines Academy PTOStudents have been taught more about the 3 RsŽ through classroom lessons, modeling and practice. Students have received Wolf Bucks as rewards for displaying Responsible, Respectful and/or Ready to learn behaviors. With their Wolf Bucks, students purchased admission into the Wolf Buck Carnival and enjoyed various foods and activities. The annual Wolf Buck Carnival took place on June 5 and was a day of fun and excitement for all who attended! Students were excited to spend their Wolf Bucks. They enjoyed many games and wonderful treats. Liberty Pines Academy is so proud of all of our students for their many achievements this year! Letter from LPA PTO President Dear Friends and Families of LPA, First and foremost, I would like to extend a huge thank you to all of you for your amazing support this year. It has been my privilege to serve as the PTO president and I would not trade this experience for anything. I have been blessed with the opportunity to meet and work with so many amazing people, including students, parents, business partners, sta administration and fellow PTO board members. None of what the PTO does to support LPA could be done without all of you. You are truly, truly appreciated. I am also excited to announce that, on May 1, the 2012-2013 Executive Committee was voted into o ce and is already hard at work to make sure that the transition into the upcoming school year will be a smooth one. Thank you so much for being willing to volunteer and give of your time. We are looking forward to another great year! Congratulations to the following people: Cathy Richter-President; Karen Taylor-VP of Fundraising; Kim Delaney-VP of Membership and Volunteers; Janine Bowker-Treasurer; Erin GuldenSecretary. Finally, I hope that you all have a wonderful, well-deserved break. Enjoy your summer and thank you, again, for such a memorable year! Sincerely, Erika Williams 2011-2012 LPA PTO President Nease HappeningsBy Brittany Dirks, Nease Studentafter and wallowed in their “ rst day of summer vacation; their last one at home, in fact. Others went home to catch up on the hours of sleep lost to IB and some even stayed at school to hang out with friends and sign yearbooks. The spring sports banquets were a mix of joy and tears as the seasons drew to a close and new student leadership was announced. Hugs went around and more yearbooks signed with loving messages while slideshows played pictures of the season and of seniors from freshman year to now. The fun, successful seasons would be remembered for a long time to come. And when the year ended, seniors walked out with their heads held high and proud, with everyone else waving goodbye. The class of 2013 rose to take their place (literally taking their parking spots when the seniors got out of school before them) and look forward to ruling Nease High School. Wards Creek Update: Summer is here at last!By Contributing Writer Beth McCannalways a big hit; a big congratulations goes out to our winners, the kindergarten teachers who put on a fantastic dancing light show. Other acts included the “ fth grade teachers as the World Golf Village People, hula hooping fourth grade teachers and belly dancing resource and pre-kindergarten teachers, just to name a few. The new PTO board members were announced at the Teacher Talent show: President, Amy Laswell; First Vice President, Tammy Stewart; Second Vice President, Wanda Galison; Treasurer, Lyn Repsher; Recording Secretary, Beth McCann; Corresponding Secretary, Katie Terry; Volunteer Coordinator, Gail Rich; and Parliamentarian, Tracey Manucy. Thank you to all who have volunteered throughout the school year and to our current and future PTO board. Wards Creek needs and relies on volunteers to be the A school that it is. If you are interesting in helping in any way, please contact a board member. Any and all help is greatly appreciated. Have a great summer! S u m m e r C a m p & Summer Camp & A c t i v i t i e s G u i d e Activities Guide B e s u r e t o Be sure to p a t r o n i z e o u r patronize our v a l u e d G u i d e valued Guide a d v e r t i s e r s advertisers!

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 25 2189 State Rd 13, Switzerland287-2883 Its time for a ROAD TRIP!! Seven weeks of summer fun exploring our great nation. We will be travelingŽ from sea to shining sea through music, stories, art, science, cooking, games and PLAY. Accepting campers ages 2-6 First Session: June 18 … 21 then weekly until Last Session: July 30 … August 2 Sessions meet Monday thru Thursday from 9:30am-1pm OR 9:30am-3pmCALL for more info & to registerARE WE THERE YET??? Summer Camp at Living Waters Preschool... KindergartenRegister now for 2012-2013Certied by FLOCS #4939 Reserve your place today! Call 904-374-863911363 San Jose Blvd/Bldg. 200 Jax FL 32223 www.nfconservator.org BAND & STRINGS CAMP: Two Sessions Monday-Thursday, two weeks each Session Session A begins June 18 ending June 28 Time Band Strings 2pm 6pm Session B begins July 16 ending July 26 Time Band Strings 10am2pm THEATRE CAMP: Weeks: June 18, 25, July 9, 16, 23, 30 Thursday & Friday 6-8 pm Ends Thursday August 2 Grades 5 (age 11) thru High School richardadickson@comcast.net Summer Camp 2012 d a a y y y y y y ! ! ! ! ! 9 2pm y! m Aordable Cost! Advance Registration $100 due June 1 NORTHEAST FLORIDACONSERVATORYA non/prot community school of the arts Open Mondays through Fridays 8:30am – 5pm 1631 Race Track Road Suite 101230-7977Most Insurances AcceptedPediatric Associates of Julington Creek, PAOffering care for Infants, Children & Adolescents Mary Ann Garcia, M.D., FAAP Victor Luz, M.D., FAAP 287-6331Psalm 149:3 Let them praise his name in dance, let them sing praises unto Him with the timbrel and harp.ŽNear Foot SolutionsCome Praise the Lord With Your FeetŽSummer ProgramsSummer Dance Program For All Ages Tuesday, June 19th through Thursday, July 26th www.switzerlanddanceschool.com witzerlandance choolBalletT a Hip Ho 904 Call about new women’s self defense summer 6 week course! Inspiring the next generation of engineers! Summer Exploration Camps (Hands-on and full of learning opportunities)904-254-1281NFlorida@EngineeringForKids.net Register online at:www.EngineeringForKids.net/NorthFlorida Engineering For Kids North Florida Beginning on Monday, June 18, the St. Johns County School District will operate from six high schools and one middle school serving as regional centers. St. Johns Technical High School will remain in its permanent location due to scheduled summer programs. All other facilities will function in an energy conservation mode during the time the facility is being cleaned and prepared for the new school year. Each regional high school With Pacetti Bays global focus, the 39 Clues series is a perfect choice for summer reading. Two orphan siblings, Amy and Dan Cahill travel the world in a very dangerous race against the other branches of their families to “ nd all 39 clues. Using math, history, languages, geography, science and logic Dan and Amy collaborate to achieve the goal of becoming the most powerful people in world. Beginning with a journey from Philadelphia to Paris, France in book one and ending on the island where the family originated in book 10, the race is a highly suspenseful adventure with unexpected twists and turns. The 11th book, collaboratively written by four authors, provides a transition to the new series: Cahills vs. Vespers. Once again Amy and Dan, now with the help of their huge network of family members, are in a race against time. Books one through three are available now. Books four through six are in the works, with book four to be released in September. This is a unique series with the large number of authors collaborating to write the books and because of the online interactive component through Scholastics web site it is a unique series. Whew, Insurgent recently hit the shelves and this is one amazing sequel to Divergent Rarely do I like the second book in a series as much as I like the School consolidation announced for summerwill serve as the operation center for the schools that have been assigned to that site. School administrative teams will work in designated areas of the high school. Maintenance managers and custodial sta will work at the schools in their region on a rotating basis. District communication with school sta will be done at the regional site for that school. Summer academic programs, camps and extended school year services will be planned, developed and communicated by each school. Camps and other activities will operate at the regional high school and will be coordinated by administrators at all schools in the region. Sta will return to their regular site on Monday, July 30. Following are the assignments for each NW St. Johns County school: Bartram Trail High School will house Switzerland Point Middle School, Liberty Pines Academy, Timberlin Creek Elementary School and Hickory Creek Elementary School. Creekside High School will house Fruit Cove Middle School, Durbin Creek Elementary School, Julington Creek Elementary School and Cunningham Creek Elementary School. Nease High School will house Pacetti Bay Middle School, Wards Creek Elementary School and Mill Creek Elementary School.Notes from the Pacetti Bay Media CenterBy Contributing Writer Lynn Johnson, NBCT, Library Media Specialist, Pacetti Bay Middle School“ rst one; this is one of those times that I am truly anxious for book three which is due out sometime in the fall. With all of the buzz about The Hunger Games, this series by Roth joins the top of the dystopian “ eld. On my web page there is a link to the list of novels that we have with a multicultural focus. My goal for the summer is to read as many of them as I possibly can. As usual I will be checking out the independent bookstores looking for great new reads. Let me know via email if you “ nd any! Recommendations from Catie Grimes eighth grade students for summer reading include: The Wolves of Mercy Falls series ( Shiver ) by Maggie Stiefvater; What Happened to Goodbye by Sarah Dessen; Cheater by Michael Laser; Kingdom Keepers I-V by Ridley Pearson; the Mortal Instruments series by Casandra Clare; Dark Life series by Kat Falls; Lost Hero and Red Pyramid by Rick Riordan; The Iron Daughte r by Julie Kagawa; I. Q. series by Roland Smith (#3 July 15!); Cate of the Lost Colony by Lisa Klein; The Clique series by Lisi Harrison; The Great and Terrible Beauty by Libby Bray and The Maximum Ride series by James Patterson. Enjoy your summer reading and watch for my new discoveries over the summer!The St. Johns County School Districts (SJCSD) bus routes for the 2012-2013 school year were approved by the School Board at its meeting on May 15. Five new bus routes are being added to accommodate growth in the Durbin Crossing and Nocatee areas as well as an increase in the number of special needs students. The routes are available on-Next years school bus routes available line at www.stjohns.k12.” .us/ depts/transp/routes. Parents without access to computers may visit any of the county public library locations, and sta will assist them in locating the website. By providing this information prior to the end of school, parents are better able to plan and prepare,Ž said SJCSD Director of Transportation Joe Purvis. In early August, postcards will be sent home to the parents of all potential bus riders giving them the bus stop, times and bus number for their students. The Transportation Department will be transporting approximately 18,800 children twice a day when school starts on Monday, August 20.

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Page 26, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com S u m m e r Summer C a m p & Camp & A c t i v i t i e s Activities G u i d e Guide Mark Spivaks Institute & Dance Extension Ballet-Pointe-Jazz-Modern-Contemporary-Lyrical-Pre-School Dance Program ~Summer Program comming up! Check it out!~ Summer Fun Dance Camp 9am-2:30pm, 3 two week sessions Start June 18th thru Aug. 3rd Summer Afternoon classes start June 18th thru June 27th Fall classes starts August 6th Early Registration: June 18th at Mandarin dance extension 4-7 and June 19th at Julington dance extension 4-7 Register now! Exp. 6/30/2012$10 OFFBring in this AdVisit our site for Schedules and Forms | WWW.MARKSPIVAK.COMFruit Cove 287-4619774 N SR 13 Located half mile from PublixJulington Creek 230-7778106 Julington Plaza Corner Race Track Rd. & Flora BranchMandarin 268-35833740 San Jose Place One Block North of Crown PointGYMNASTICS & TUMBLING CLASSES FOR KIDS! 230-6291 / 230-7778 Located in Julington Creek area o Race Track Road Next to:MARK SPIVAKS DANCE EXTENSION ~ Summer Program comming up! Check it out!~ Summer Fun Dance Cam p 9am-2:30pm, 3 two wee k sessions S tart June 1 8 t h t h ru Au g 3 r d Summer Afternoon classes start J une 1 8 t h t h ru June 2 7 t h Fa ll c l asses starts A u g ust 6 th Ear l y Registration: J une 1 8 t h at Man d arin d ance extension 4-7 an d J une 19 th at Ju l in g ton d ance extension 4-7 Re g ister now Visit our site f or Schedules and Form s | WWW.MARK S PIVAK. COM Fru i t Cove 28 7-461 9 774 N S R 13 Located half mile from Publi x Ju l ington Cree k 230 -777 8 106 Julin g ton Plaza Corner Race Trac k R d & F l ora Branc h M an d arin 2 6 8 3 5 83 3740 San Jose Place One Block North of Crown Point GYMNASTICS & TUMBLING CLASSES FOR KIDS 230-6291 / 230-7778 Locate d in Ju l ington Cree k area o Race Track Road Next to : MARK S PIVAK S DAN C E EXTEN S I ON Mathematics Tutor ( 904 ) 307-4858 steven.newton@comcast.net y x m2=x All Levels through CalculusDon’t let your child struggle with Math. ACCREDITEDACCREDITATION ASSOCIATION for AMBULATORYHEALTH CARE EYE CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE & WORLD GOLF VILLAGETHE EYE SURGERY CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE AAAHC 940-9200 T T Fruit Cove Baptist ChurchRegister and pay online at: www.fruitcove.com/sports.php UPWARD FLAG FOOTBALL & CHEERLEADINGGRADES 1 … 8 CO-ED LEAGUES $60 IF PAID BY JULY 23RD, $80 AFTER JULY 23RD SIGN UP NOW FOR Evaluation/Orientation Dates Aug. 2, 4, or 7 (attend one)Practices begin September 4, 2012 Games begin September 29, 2012 The end of the year has “ nally arrived and the majority of BTHS students and faculty are extremely thankful. After 10 long months, they can “ nally have a vacation from getting up early, homework and worst of all, testing. Since early April Bartram has been absolutely swamped with tests. End of course, end of quarter, “ nals (the third week of May for seniors and the “ rst week of June for underclassmen), AP, FCAT„you name it, there was an exam for it. Added to that was the PERT (post-secondary education readiness test) for juniors to determine what classes they would be placed in senior year and to see if they quali“ ed for dual enrollment. It all added up to over six weeks of tests, which meant the media center was closed o to students most of the time because it was being used as an exam location. A junior who wishes to remain anonymous shared, I think all the testing should be Can you believe that the 2011-2012 school year is already coming to an end? This year at Fruit Cove Middle School has been fantastic. As a seventh grader, I have already experienced the nervousness of coming to a new school as a sixth grader and Ive had to be a role model this year to the sixth graders. Next year, Ill have two whole grades looking up to me for advice and how to act. Even though this is a lot of pressure, I cant wait to be at the top of the school, so to speak. On May 15 and 16, the rising sixth graders visited Fruit Cove Middle School to learn about scheduling from the Hickory Creek Elementary School celebrated Teacher Appreciation Week from May 7 through 11. To show appreciation during this special week, teachers and sta were showered with gifts each day by students and their families. The week of festivities kicked o with Massage Monday. Zyra from Massage Renaissance along with Pam and Beth from Therapeutic Massage of Julington Creek spoiled everyone with hand and feet rubs as well as neck, shoulder and back massages. It was an enjoyable day of relaxation. Tastefully Tuesday was a day of treating everyone to desserts and drinks. HCE families brought in an array of homemade goodies and a variety of drinks that were savored by all. On Wednesday, the HCE PTO hosted an o site luncheon at the St. Johns Golf and Country Club. Everyone who BTHS HappeningsAwaiting the end of the year: A test of patience for all at BTHSBy Devyn Fussman, BTHS Studentstopped because it takes away from valuable class time.Ž Its true that students are forced to miss class whenever they are required to take an exam, and subsequently they have to make up any work they missed during the time they were absent, which certainly adds to the workload. And because so many Bartram students are enrolled in several AP classes and are required to take most of the other tests, there were days where nearly entire classes of students would be missing the days lesson. This put more strain on the teachers and students, as the pacing of the classes was disrupted frequently. Underclassmen were given end of course exams in April when the school year ended in June and seniors were still learning new material during their last week of school, just before their “ nal exams. Shortly afterward, seniors were fortunate enough to graduate and escape all that red tape; the underclassmen, however, were not so lucky. Juniors (now rising seniors) will have an especially hard time because not only were they assessed frequently during the actual school year, now they have to spend their summer studying for the SAT and ACT in addition to preparing college applications, summer reading and more. Some AP or honors classes even require big, detailed assignments such as outlining textbooks or writing papers on college-level books. In short, its the unfortunate truth that rising seniors who are good students dont get much of a summer break. Luckily it pays o as they will only have one more year to go until they graduate too and then their summer break will be “ lled with nothing but dorm shopping and time with friends before they “ nally move out and get away from their parents. And the best part? There wont be any tests on what they did last summer.Hickory Creek students and parents show their appreciation By Contributing Writer Laurie Argottattended had a wonderful time enjoying the delicious food while visiting with friends and co-workers. Those who were unable to attend ate a catered lunch brought in from the club. The weeks festivities continued on with Thoughtful Thursday. This day was all about giving gift cards. Gift cards were given as a class or individually to all teachers and sta And to top o the week of appreciation, it ended with Favorite Friday. Students and families brought in their teachers favorite indulgence. Some were showered with chocolates while others were given bath and body items and even gift baskets “ lled with all kinds of goodies. The Hickory Creek Elementary School students and families hope that all their teachers and sta realize how much they are truly appreciated.FCMS HappeningsBy Contributing Writer Sarah Jacobs, Fruit Cove Middle School Studentguidance counselor, behavior expectations from Dean Cole and even toured around the school with National Junior Honor Society (NJHS) members. This helped them get a feel for middle school before they attend it in the fall. They also got a taste from the cafeteria at the end of the day by sampling some ice cream. Everyone was excited to see the future students of Fruit Cove. All in all, everyone should be happy with such a successful year behind us. Now, its time to prepare for the future. On behalf of Fruit Cove Middle School, I wish everyone a very fun and safe summer vacation. See you next year! The CreekLineYOURCommunity Newspaper Send us your news!editor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 27 (904)292-2210 MandarinSouthBusinessCenter12421SanJoseBlvd.€Suite310/320 Jacksonville,FL32223(BetweenSonnysBBQ&Solantic) LorettoRd. NSanJoseBoulevard RaceTrackRd. JulingtonCreek Lessthan1/2mi. fromJulingtonCreek MarinelaM.Nemetz,D.D.S.BoardCertifiedPediatricDentistRobertJ.Nemetz,D.D.S.,M.S.AdultDentistry€Periodontics€Prosthodontics S u m m e r Summer C a m p & Camp & A c t i v i t i e s Activities G u i d e Guide Each Primrose School is a privately owned and operated franchise. Primrose Schools, Balanced Learning, and The Leader in Educat ional Child Care are trademarks of Primrose School Franchising Company. 2012 Primrose School Franchising Company. All rights reserved. Educational Child Care for Infants through Private Pre-Kindergarten and After School Now Enrolling Engage minds and hearts will follow. Proprietary Balanced Learning curriculum Music, Spanish, Computer Technology Ongoing customized student assessment Integrated character development program Dietician-approved meals and snacks provided Primrose School of Julington Creek904.230.2828Primrose School at St. Johns Forest904.824.1100Primrose School of Glen Kernan904.992.9002 Three kindergarten teachers put their heads together to identify meaningful ways to teach “ ve and six year olds appropriate table manners that can be used in the school cafeteria and hopefully at home! For a week, the teachers tied table manners into their weekly theme curriculum and incorporated literature by reading Dinner With Olivia and Mind Your Manners B.B. Wolf. According to Mrs. Ludke, Mrs. Barrs and Mrs. Hatcher, some of the highlights inTeaching manners at Timberlin CreekBy Contributing Writer Tina Perezcluded: € Students made a chart of good manners vs. bad manners. € The students learned how to set a place setting at the table. € The students have been practicing saying things like, please,Ž youre welcomeŽ and thank youŽ all week long. € The students have been practicing asking if they may be excused prior to getting up from the table. € The boys learned how to escort the girls, pull out their chairs and help them to get seated. € After learning about manners and practicing, the students wrote about what good manners they have in their journal. According to Kimberly Ludke, kindergarten teacher at TCE, At the manners tea, they remembered to use quiet voices, put their napkins in their lap and keep their elbows o the table. They also did a great job using their utensils instead of their “ ngers to eat.Ž Way to go, TCE kindergarten students! Flag Day June 14 The Creeks Clash Black U10 girls soccer team took second place at the Nike Champions Cup, held in Apopka the weekend of May 18 through 20. The girls won two out of three games leading them into the “ nals in a very hard fought game against the Ormond Beach Waves. This is the second tournament in a row that the team placed in the “ nals. The team took “ rst place in their U10 division at the Fire and Fury Tournament this past fall. The teams coach is Teresa Librizzi and the assistant coach is Patti Scott. Congratulations to Amber Librizzi, Katelyn Crici, Libbie Jeffries, Isabel Matos, Katie Scott, Jovana Cernatescu, Stephanie Pitts, Callie Beyer and Patti DeBlois. Congratulations Creeks Clash!

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Page 28, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com NOW OPEN IN JACKSONVILLE (904) 239-3671 | www.GulfCoastDerm.comOUR LOCATIONSPanama City | Panama City Beach | Santa Rosa Beach | Ft Walton Beach Navarre | Niceville | Marianna | Bonifay | Port St Joe | Tallahassee Sarasota | Jacksonville | Gulf Breeze | Dothan, ALBrooke Bair, DO Physician SpotlightJACKSONVILLE OFFICE12276 San Jose Blvd., Suite 722 Jacksonville, FL 32223 877.231.DERM (3376) As Creekside seniors pack up and prepare for their college journeys, two local students are getting ready for the experiences of a lifetime. Their destinations? Halfway across the world. Creekside High School student Nicole Viera will spend next school year in Taiwan as a part of Rotary Youth Exchange. Viera will serve as an ambassador for the United States, with a duty to immerse herself in the culture and language of Taiwan and an ultimate goal of eliminating stereotypes and creating a more open-minded world.Ž She will live with host families while in Taiwan, an experience that she believes will be somewhat challenging at “ rst. It might be a bit di cult to communicate in the beginning I dont think Ill be able to speak to anybody in Mandarin right away when I get there,Ž she shared. But to Viera, the bene“ ts of studying abroad are more than worth the challenges. One of the major bene“ ts I see is exposure,Ž Viera The Rotary Club of Bartram Trail recently recognized Ashley West as the Rotary Teacher of the Quarter. The breakfast ceremony held at Westminster Woods was especially signi“ cant as one of her students, Jane Bunn, spoke about how West has been a positive role model to many of her students, as well as an excellent teacher. Creekside High School Principal Randy Johnson presented the award to West based on her stellar performance, leadership in school activities and respect amongst her students and peers. The Rotary Club will honor local teachers on a quarterly basis. The current president, Frank Gwaltney, was pleased to recognize West as the “ rst recipient of the award. He also spoke about the signi“ cance of attracting teachers to our community as St. Johns County schools consistently score top marks in the state of Florida. School Board Rotary Club honors Creekside teacherBy Contributing Writer Michael Andreoni, Rotary Club of Bartram Trailmember Bev Slough was in attendance to show her support. The Rotary Club of Bartram Trail looks forward to honoring another teacher in June, which will be from a local Middle School. The Rotary Club of Bartram Trail is the local chapter of Rotary International. It is a service organization that participates in local and international projects. The members are from the St. Johns area and are leaders in their respective industries. Community sponsors for the award include Bozard Ford and Zaxbys at Bartram Park. The Rotary Club of Bartram Trail meets every Thursday morning 7:30 a.m. at Westminster Woods. For more information about the club or if your business would like to participate in the award recognition, please contact Michael Andreoni at michael.a.andreoni@aexp. com or 654-5602.Randy Johnson, Jane Bunn, Ashley West and Frank GwaltneyCHS HappeningsTwo local Creekside High students prepare to live abroad for a yearBy Rachel Buff, CHS Studentsays. Youre literally throwing yourself into a new country and experiencing it “ rst hand. Its so much more compared to reading books or watching the news.Ž As she waits to embark on this new adventure in August, Viera says she looks forward to opening her mind into a new appreciation of the world and the people who share it.Ž Halley McClure, recent graduate of Douglas Anderson School of the Arts, will be spending next year abroad in Germany after receiving the Congress-Bundestag Vocational Youth Exchange Scholarship. McClure was nationally recognized as one of only 25 students who received the scholarship and the exciting opportunity to work as an intern in Germany for a year. McClure “ rst learned about the Congress-Bundestag program four years ago, while taking after-school German classes at FSCJ. From that point on, her dream was to take a gap year between high school and college to study and learn German through complete immersion. Im really excited for the intensive language classes in Munich at the beginning of the program,Ž McClure shared. I love learning languages and Im grateful for the chance to learn outside of the school setting. Theres no better motivation than being in Munich.Ž The experience of living with host families and traveling independently around Europe will change McClure, she believes. Ill learn more about fostering international diplomacy and Ill be ” uent in another language. Ill gain some work experience, which will hopefully give me some clarity on what Id like to do career-wise. I also think Ill grow more comfortable with being away from home, so the transition to college wont be as di cult,Ž she says. While the two girls will be diving into two very di erent cultures, they both agree the hardest part will be saying good-bye to their families. My moms a total mess. She loves that Im putting myself out there, but shes not ready to let me go,Ž says Nicole. Its scary that my family wont get to know 18-year-old Halley, but Im still excited for the change,Ž says Halley. Despite their worries, Viera and McClure are more than ready to embark on their journeys and embrace the lifechanging opportunities they will encounter.

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 29 Your Voice of ReasonPaid by Cyndi Stevenson, Republican for St. Johns County Commission District 1 450-106 State Road 13 N Publix Center in Fruit CovePh: 230.8881 52 Tuscan Way, #202Publix Center at International Golf Dr. and SR 16 Ph: 940.0055 “Concerns about your drinking water?”Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 Years. Straight answers No high pressure. 262 0197 3760 KORI RD. Lic. #W-32 yo u Call th e W ate r Treatment Compan y J acksonville has trusted for ove r 20 Years S Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 years. Robert Kelsey, M.D.Board Certi“ed Cardiology and Internal Medicine Robert Kelsey, M.D. Now Accepting New Patients 904-827-0078 Animal Medical Clinic at St. Johns2245-102 County Road 210W 904-827-1401 40% OFFYour Pets First Exam NEW CLIENTS ONLY Movie ReviewDark ShadowsDirected by: Tim Burton. Starring: Johnny Depp, Michelle Pfeifer and Eva Green. Review by T.G. StantonRating: Okay, But Could Have Waited for Cable (3 out of 5) This months movie review belongs to the “ lm Dark Shadows a comedy-horror “ lm for teens and adults. The Collins family moves to America in 1752, building their own “ shing empire o the coast of Maine. Their young son Barnabas, played by Johnny Depp, is raised to rule the kingdom, but along the way he steals and breaks the heart of their maid, Angelique Bouchard, portrayed by Eva Green. Only she is much more than just the For us grown up gals, probably no garment selection process is worse than shopping for and wearing a swimsuit. I have a funny story about a shopping trip my sister-in-law and I made with my then 75-yearold mother to buy bathing suits. We had just moved to the beach area and they decided they would wait to shop here for their suits, hoping that the choices would be greater than their area department stores. On The DayŽ we went to a specialty store down in St. Augustine that I found to have real womensŽ bathing suits, which includes a full cut suit with a bra inside. One look at the price and my mother balked and my sister in law quipped back at her telling her that the bathing suits at the local discount store didnt have near enough fabric for their bods! Mother quickly went back into the dressing room and continued trying on.Ž We still laugh about that day; I think my mother still has that $100 suit I local help. A scorned woman can be very dangerous and Angelique is additionally threatening in that she is a witch. Subsequent to her betrayal by Barnabas, she removes her competition and turns him into a vampire, then turns the town of Collinsport against him, having them bury him alive. Here comes 1972 and Barnabas is freed from his captivity. His familys stature and fortunes have dwindled, as Angeliques seem to have grown. The matriarch of the family is performed by Michele Pfei er, as Elizabeth Collins Stoddard. The family is dysfunctional at best, to the point that when Barnabas erupts into their lives it is just natural to allow him to take over. Also, he has a secret that aids in the recovery of their fortune. The current Collins children seem to need some therapy and there is an in-house doctor as well as the need for a nanny, who resembles the past love in Barnabas life. Is there love in his future and the chance for a normal family life? Hardly, and Angelique is only one of the barricades to such happiness. Director Tim Burton has not done justice to the television show and even his usual ability to “ nd a loveable character amidst the gruesome and horri“ c is missing. The portrayal of David Collins by Gulliver McGrath is one of the few bright spots, in addition to the spot that Alice Cooper engages. The music and costumes are enjoyable, but the rest of the movie leaves a lot to be desired. The advertisements led to the feeling this was going to be more of a comedy and less of the gothic darkness of the series. The outcome was more as if Tim Burton could not decide which movie he was doing and directed the actors in the same manner, as the acting by all of these “ ne actors seemed just as confused. The blood and gore did not make it more dramatic, nor did the far from romantic liaisons between Barnabas and Angelique. I really could have waited for the cable release.Fashion UpdateIts that time of the yearƒ.donning the bathing suit!By Donna Keathley, dkeathley designsbought her in the original tote bag! Any suit reveals a lot about the wearers body, but things on that horizon have gotten better. So now maybe we can talk about our least favorite wardrobe piece a little more calmly. Swimwear manufacturers have “ nally listened to the consumer; tankinis, top and bottom separates and underwire support is proof of this. Other little things like Lycra and shopping online have taken a lot of sting out of the bathing suit subject too. Here are some suit websites: Beachbliss.com, Canyonbeachwear.com, Lanebryant.com and Everythingbutwater.com. Be creative when shopping for the perfect cover up. Resort wear and pretty sarongs have their place at the spa and hotel facilities. But we nativesŽ taking a short jaunt to the neighborhood pool or running over to the local beach need cover ups too! My favorite item to pull on over my black bathing suit is a pair of black athletic windŽ shorts. They have an elastic waist and a boy cut leg with a longer hem length. Also an easy to do cover up is a short skirt or shorts in denim. Top these with one of the new peasant tops or halters and you are good to go. A black or white eyelet blouse bought one size larger is a great suit pop over. A short peasant dress with an elastic top or tie slips o and on easily, too. The new knit tank or polo dresses are great to use as a cover up and easy to wear. Make sure your look is pulled together. In thumbing through the summer editions of my fashion magazines, the swimwear models are well coi ed for the beach or pool, wearing their hair in some manner that will look good all day whether it be gelled to the max or pulled into a ponytail. Also, they have on earrings; even a simple hoop looks good with good looking sunglasses. Their sandals are cute whether they are in bright colors or metallicƒ the latest thing being the PVC footwear with beading. But the point here is that they have a lookŽ that some thought has been put intoƒfollow suitŽ so to speak! Remember, every swimsuit wearer is her own harshest critic! Just be glad that the 1960s bathing suit is gone with all its bones, trusses and reinforcement! Have fun in the sun this Summer 2012!P.S. Care of Swim Wear is Important! Never wear the same suit every day. Wash in cool water. Dry away from the sun. The CreekLine YOURCommunity Newspapereditor@thecreekline.com Dispose of unwanted/outdated prescription medication (excluding sharps, medical wastes, nuclear medications or thermometers) St. Johns County Sheriffs Of ce Weekdays excluding holidays 8:00 a.m. ~ 5:00 p.m.Contact: Crime Prevention Deputy Corporal Diana Bryant at 810-6694Operation Medicine Cabinet

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Page 30, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com ATTENTION: ATTENTION: Are You on Medicare with Diabetes? Call Diabetes Care Club today at 866-980-7393 If you have diabetes and are on Medicare you m ight be eligible to have all of your diabetic supplies delivered directly to your door. Call now to see if you qualify for a new talking meter and free home delivery of your diabetic supplies. 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TestStripSearch.com SAPA WANTED DIABETES TEST STRIPSAny Kind/ Brand. Up to $26.00/BoxPrepaid Shipping Label. Hablamos Espaol. 1-800-267-9895. www.SellDiabeticStrips.com Wants to purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201 CA$H PAIDup to $26/Box for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS. Hablamos Espanol. 1-800-371-1136 YEARBOOKS “Up to $15 paid for high school yearbooks1900-1988. yearbookusa@yahoo.com or 972-768-1338.” Reader Advisory: The National Trade Association we belong to has purchased the above classi eds. Determining the value of their service or product is advised by this publication. In order to avoid misunderstandings, some advertisers do not offer employment but rather supply the readers with manuals, directories and other materials designed to help their clients establish mail order selling and other businesses at home. Under NO circumstance should you send any money in advance or give the client your checking, license ID, or credit card numbers. Also beware of ads that claim to guarantee loans regardless of credit and note that if a credit repair company does business only over the phone it is illegal to request any money before delivering its service. All funds are based in US dollars. Toll free numbers may or may not reach Canada. Dispose of unwanted/outdated prescription medication (excluding sharps, medical wastes, nuclear medications or thermometers) St. Johns County Sheriffs Of ce Weekdays excluding holidays 8:00 a.m. ~ 5:00 p.m.Contact: Crime Prevention Deputy Corporal Diana Bryant at 810-6694 There has been increased mosquito-borne disease activity in areas of St. Johns County. Several sentinel chickens have tested positive for West Nile virus. The risk of transmission to humans has been increased. St. Johns County Health Department reminds residents and visitors to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes that may cause mosquito-borne illness. The Anastasia Mosquito Control District and the Health Department continue surveillance and prevention e orts and encourage everyone to take basic precautions to help limit exposure by following the Department of Healths recommendations. To protect yourself from mosquitoes, you should remember to drain and cover.Ž Drain standing water to stop mosquitoes from multiplying: € Drain water from garbage cans, house gutters, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, ” ower pots or any other containers where sprinkler or rain water has collected. € Discard old tires, drums, bottles, cans, pots and pans, broken appliances and other items that arent being used. € Empty and clean birdbaths and pets water bowls at least once or twice a week. € Protect boats and vehicles from rain with tarps that dont accumulate water. € Maintain swimming pools in good condition and appropriately chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use. Cover skin with clothing or repellent: Clothing: Wear shoes, socks, and long pants and long-sleeves. This type of protection may be necessary for people who must work in areas where mosquitoes are present. Repellent: Apply mosquito repellent to bare skin and clothing. Always use repellents according to the label. Repellents with DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus and IR3535 are e ective. Use mosquito netting County issues mosquitoborne illness advisoryto protect children younger than two months old. Cover doors and windows with screens to keep mosquitoes out of your house: Repair broken screening on windows, doors, porches and patios. Tips on Repellent Use € Always read label directions carefully for the approved usage before you apply a repellent. Some repellents are not suitable for children. € Apply insect repellent to exposed skin, or onto clothing, but not under clothing. € In protecting children, read label instructions to be sure the repellent is age-appropriate. According to the CDC, mosquito repellents containing oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under the age of 3 years. DEET is not recommended on children younger than two months old. € Avoid applying repellents to the hands of children. Adults should apply repellent “ rst to their own hands and then transfer it to the childs skin and clothing. € If additional protection is necessary, apply a permethrin repellent directly to your clothing. Again, always follow the manufacturers directions. The Florida Department of Health (DOH) continues to conduct statewide surveillance for mosquito borne illnesses, including West Nile virus infections, Eastern equine encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, malaria, and dengue. Residents of Florida are encouraged to report dead birds to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission web site at http://www.myfwc.com/ bird/. For more information, visit DOHs Environmental Public Health web site at www.doh. state.” .us/Environment/medicine/ arboviral/index.html or call the St. Johns County Health Department at 825-5055.

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 31 The CreekLine Marketplace ads!886-4919 Community MarketplaceAttention Small Businesses!!!For just $39 per issue you can reach 23,000+ addresses (min. of 6 issues) Call 886-4919 today! Massage Therapy Alicia Hunter LMTOnly $50 an hour #MM12329/MA53865 Neuromuscular Therapy ( 904 ) 514 5788www .hunter l mt. c omA New U Massage located in San Jose Office Center, Next to Sonny’s and Ace Hardware $5 OFF with this ad. Help WantedSeeking experienced home health aides and CNAs for Comfort Keepers. Be part of our dynamic team providing in-home care services for 10 years to seniors and other adults living in Duval and St. Johns counties. Please apply online at https://comfortkeepers126.hyrell.com Engineering For Kids is looking for part-time, exible, and energetic people to be part of the North Florida team. Go to http://www.engineeringforkids.net/NorthFlorida/NowHiring. html for more information. Looking for an experienced climber with references. Call Mitch @ 703-5040 Davidson Realty is now recruiting new and experienced Realtors. Let us tell you why we're routinely one of the "Best Places to Work in Northeast Florida." Call 904-940-5000 or visit us at www.DavidsonRealtyInc.com. et Sitting Company part time work with pet. Applicant must live in the 32259 area. Flexible hours. Adult applicants only. Call Robin at 687-9610. Chiropractic of ce looking for front desk receptionist. Full time position. Must have computer skills, be a fast learner, very friendly/outgoing, ling, good phone skills. Bruce Sambursky, D.C. fax resume to 683-4378 or email samburskychiro@comcast.net Panache in Julington Creek is interviewing experienced & talented Stylists to join our team. Do you enjoy working in a professional, clean & successful environment? Apply at www.getpanache. com or stop in 2758 Racetrack Road #403 HELP WANTED! If you like music (and other www.allearspetsitting.com (904) 687-9610 Bonded, Insured & Affordable American Classic Lawns“Quality Lawn Maintenance”Mandarin N. St. Johns County707 4468Residential from $30.Commercial Residential Aqua Pro Specialties LLCPRESSURE WASHING 904-704-1388Licensed & Insured COASTAL ROOFING SYSTEMS Re-Roo“ng is our SpecialtyŽCovering Northeast Floridas Finest Homes With Quality Work and Professional Service Since 1993. Sin Sin Sin Si S ce 199 199 9 3. Free Estimates! Licensed Insured 460-2815 State Certified Roofing Contractor #CCC057020 A Coastal Building Systems Company. Professional Computer ServicesBusiness & ResidentialFor more details, visit us at:www.itpromise.com I.T. Promise Inc. Computer Services( 904 ) 287-2254 at Fruit Cove287-0601 Carpets by Jonah.com 904-476-1476 Jonah Jones 3 Year Labor Warranty Housecleaning 207-5674 Use direct mail to bring in new clients. Graphic Design Printing Services Data/Mailing Lists Email Campaigns Ful“llment Social Media ...We can do them all for you.Call Keith 346-3898 x1212276 San Jose Blvd, Ste 115, Jacksonville, FL 32223www.KesslerCreative.com Licensed & Insured631 2731www.kleanspray.com 10% OFF1st time customers Get Rich Slow... Earn Extra Income learning how to operate your own Mini-Ofce Outlet from your computer and phone.Free Training. Flexible Hours. Incredible Incentives.www.reach4more.com Call Caren for a free quote!904-230-6230www.providencetravel.coCruise Ships, Riverboat Cruises, and Train Destinations 904-849-3141Pain relief that comes to you www.RelyOnMobileChiropractic.com Dr. Doug Kines $49 Initial Examination and treatment$29 Follow-up Visits Home Cleaning In business over 13 years 904-568-4996 arts) and would like to volunteer to support a non-pro t organization bringing music to the community, please call 374 8639 Join the Baptist South circle of care. Visit e-baptisthealth.com for the most up to date list of job openings. Listings are updated daily and change often. If you have any questions, please call Human Resources at 271.6078. Seeking Licensed Massage Therapist @ A New U Massage(MM12329) Mandarin furnished massage room available NOW. Room rent is $375+ 7% tax ($401.25) a month. Rent can split w/other LMT. Phone: 904-288-0064. Pre-School and Infant/Toddler Teachers We look for quali ed teachers who love working with children. Give us a call or e-mail your resume! The Academy at Julington Creek: 904-230-8200; sara@theajc.net Pet Sitting Company Part time work with pets. Applicant must live in the International Golf Parkway area. Flexible hours. Adult applicants only. Call Robin at 687-9610. Community Newspaper Sales Person Come join our team. We are a twelve year old local company Location Mandarin Commission Sales A valid driver's license and transportation with proper insurance required Call on local businesses to sell advertising space in our local Community Newspapers Manage existing accounts while developing new business via cold calls Previouse Sales Experience not required Be professional and succinct Have superior written and verbal communication skills Be pro cient with spreadsheet (EXCEL) and word processing (WORD) software Have ability to utilize E-mail. Contact today: publisher@rtpublishinginc.com JOB Finder Looking for a job in NW St.Johns County? Heres w here you can nd one close to home. CLASSIFIED ADS! NOW ONLINE AT www.thecreekline.comFREE Celebrating “10 years of Service” Call904-230-9220 www.comfortkeepers.com/office-126 Your ad could be in the next issue! Call Linda Gay today! 287-4913LG@RTPublishinginc.com The past month has been busy for a certain group of young men in NW St. Johns County. The gentlemen of Boy Scout Troop 280 recently attended a ri” e shooting campout at Camp Shands in Hawthorne, Florida. In April, over 30 scouts attended a special Ri” e Shooting Merit Badge campout at the North Florida BSA campground. During this weekend, the young men honed their ri” e skills, experienced nature hikes on the camp property and worked on many scout skills such as rope lashings, building camp gadgets, using di erent camp stoves and Leave No TraceŽ principles. There were almost three dozen earning their Ri” e Shooting Merit Badge with more scouts and 12 adults shooting for recreation. While earning this badge, scouts can develop their shooting skills while learning safe practices. This special weekend followed two weeks of classroom lessons by our own range masters from Troop 280, Daren Mixon and Scott Greenbaum, as well as guest instructors Phil Horn and John Horn. These gentlemen recently took time out of their schedules to be certi“ ed as o cial BSA Range Masters. Phil Horn was also gracious to give of his time while serving as a third Range master for this Troop 280 on target at Camp ShandsBy Contributing Writer Lisa Leavins weekend, helping some boys who were shooting for the “ rst time. The scouts learned what it means to be creative when, shortly before dinner, rain clouds moved in. They were able to construct a shelter out of a tarp and ropes and in no time, were cooking for and feeding three dozen of their fellow scouts. They were pleased to be able to return to the range after dinner once the weather had cleared. During the day, the scouts and adults used around 3,000 rounds of ammunition safely. Many scouts eagerly look forward to attending a ri” e shooting class during their annual summer camp experience, but we were fortunate enough to perform this as a local troop. Many thanks to our range masters for giving us this opportunity. During the month, there have also been opportunities for the scouts to participate in several other merit badge classes o ered by leadership. While enjoying their local troop campouts, the boys are eagerly planning their summer camp adventure as well. April also brought changes to our charter organization, River of Life UMC on Racetrack Road. The church moved into the new sanctuary on April 22. We thank them for their continued support. Haven Hospice in St. Augustine is kicking o a community-education series next month designed to help people deal with end-of-life issues. Aptly named Its About Livingƒ, the series will include monthly sessions on a variety of subjects related to end-of-life issues and will run until December. The “ rst session, Its About LivingƒFree From Pain, will focus on pain management, myths and fears and will help people focus on the balance between being pain free and participating in life to the fullest. It is scheduled for June 14 and Haven Hospice Regional Medical Director Dr. Neel Karnani will be the speaker All the sessions will be held at The Meeting Room at the Its About Livingƒ community-education seriesPonce de Leon Mall at 2121 US Highway 1 South and will take place from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The complete schedule, including speakers where noted is: July 12: Its About Living ƒ With Memory Loss: Strategies for Success. Deborah Duvall, M.S.W., Social Worker, Haven Hospice August 9: Its About Living ƒ Life Your Way: Communicating Your Needs, Advanced Life Care Planning. Linda Scaz, Ph.D., Director of Community Engagement, Haven Hospice The programs are all free and open to the public. To learn more about the programs, St. Johns County residents can call 810-2377.

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Page 32, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com Faith News www.RiverofLifeUMC.com Babylon will be held nightly at River of Life UMC, July 29 – Aug. 2. We will begin each evening at 6:15p.m. and end at 8:45p.m. Registration will be completed on-line at www.rolumc.com beginning June 1st. Participants must be 3 yrs old (by 3/1/12) through rising 8th grade. A fee of $15.00 per child/$30.00 family max will apply. Join us in our NEW building on Sundays at 9:30am! VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL A CONNECTING CHURCH Our Sunday Services Traditional Worship 8:30am Sunday School 9:45am Contemporary Worship 11:00amwww.switzerlandcommunitychurch.org Sunday Morning 10 am @ Timberlin Creek Elementary School 555 Pine Tree Lane St. Augustine, FL 32092 904-535-5636 S t Looking for a place to belong? We are looking for you. www.familylifefellowshipjax.com St Francis In-The-FieldEpiscopal ChurchChristian Formation 8:45am (September May) Sunday Service 10:00amChildrens Chapel and Nursery Available895 Palm Valley Rd (1 mile east of US1)615-2130 “I want cremation.”$650 Flagler Memorial Cremation Society669-1809 That awkward moment when...Ž My 13 year old sons Facebook friends sure do love this lead in to a funny or embarrassing story. It goes like this: That awkward moment when a stranger at the movies tells you and your brother you make a cute couple. *facepalm* That awkward moment when you realize youre chewing on a borrowed pen. That awkward moment when you ask when shes due but “ nd out shes not pregnant. That awkward moment...Ž is funny, although a bit overused, because we can all relate to doing something stupid and then trying to “ gure out how to make it right. Do we man up and apologize, laugh it o or pretend like we didnt say it? I love to laugh. Believe me when I say I am not one to over-analyze jokes or Facebook posts. But I did start thinking... wheres the line between laughing and disrespecting? As weve ventured into life with teens, Id have to say most of it is very familiar territory. Im teaching my son to honor and respect people. But, honestly, I have some of the same struggles he does! My sophisticatedŽ sallies are still at someone elses expense and I often speak before I think. That awkward moment when you correct your son for disrespect but your own voice is dripping with sarcasm. When children are young, they see parents as their heroes. They look up to us because we love and care for them„and because were taller than they are. I dont think our teens stop lookBabylonŽ Vacation Bible School will be held nightly at River of Life UMC from July 29 through August 2 from 6:15 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. Registration is online at www.rolumc.com beginning June 1. Participants must be three years old (by March 1, 2012 and fully potty trained) through rising eighth grade. A fee of $15 per child ($30 family maximum) will apply for the weeks event. River of Life UMC is located at 2600 Race Track Road in St. Johns. For additional information, please call 230-2955. River of Grace Christian invites you to join us at 6200 State Road 13 North in St. Johns County. We are located between the Shands Bridge and Pacettis Campground on State Road 13. Our Sunday morning begins with a teen Bible study at 9:00 a.m. followed by a Praise and Worship service at 10:00 a.m. We strive to live out our name and be a River of Grace to our community! We love the Lord Jesus and want to share His message of love and hope with everyone. Please come and worship with us soonƒwe would love to have you! St. Francis in-the-Field Episcopal Church is o ering a parents Morning Out program for the 2012-2013 school year. If your child(ren) are between 12 months and four years old they can be enrolled in our program. The program runs on Wednesdays from 8:30 a.m. until 12:00 noon. The children are taught di erent prayers and bible verses and do this while having lots of fun. The goal of the program is to help develop and increase their Christian beliefs while giving parents a few children-free hours. The sta has been highly trained and many of them belong to St. Francis. Please consider having your little one(s) participate in what we believe is a great program. Please contact the church at 615-2130 for more information. Summer is the season for newcomersŽ for the Jewish Federations Shalom Jacksoning up to us. I think they see through the thin veneer of perfection we sometimes apply to our lives and start living more like weve modeled all along. So where is that line between laughing and disrespecting? Making a joke at anothers expense is crossing the line. Luke 6:31 teaches, Do to others as youd have them do to you.Ž Thats pretty straightforward. No extensive discussions on bullying necessary. Just be respectful. Distasteful joking is crossing the line. No, its not something teens do.Ž Its something immature people do and our role as parents is to teach respect. Laughing o bad behavior is crossing the line. Yeah, its embarrassing to admit you acted like a jerk. But its a mark of maturity to apologize and carry on. If youve been married long enough to have children, youve certainly o ended your spouse. Think of what a blessing it will be to your future daughter-inlaw if your son learns now to recognize his mistake, apologize and change! A strong leader leads by example. And a good parent loves their children enough to teach them to do the hard thing„to do whats right. Heres to many more laughs and no more of these: That awkward moment when your parent friendsŽ you on Facebook. Lets teach our children to live in such a way that they have nothing to hide.Purposeful ParentingThat awkward moment...By Allie Olsen Tell our advertisers you saw them inThe CreekLine S u p p o r t o u r f i n e Support our fine A d v e r t i s e r s Advertisers!ville. To acquaint new people with our area, we are planning a couple of casual gatherings for newcomers and anyone else interested in making Jewish connections and learning more about the general community. Our “ rst event will be held on Sunday, June 24 at 7:00 p.m. at the home of Yvonne Cohen, 1194 Cunningham Creek Drive (Fruit Cove area). This is a wonderful opportunity for anyone new to the Jewish community to make connections with their neighbors and “ nd out the latest happenings around town. Cool summer salads and fruits will be served. Please RSVP to Isabel Balotin at 448-5000 x 206 or shalomjax@jewishjacksonville. org. Other socials in di erent areas of the community are planned for July, August and September. Living in the state that is regarded as the Fishing Capital of the WorldŽ presents us with hundreds of di erent types of “ sh and hundreds of more ways to catch them. No matter where you live in Florida, there is an opportunity to “ sh somewhere nearby. One such opportunity that is often overlooked is a deep sea adventure on a party boat. From Mayport to Key West and all the way up to Pensacola, Floridas ports play host to a ” eet of party boats that are waiting to provide you and your family an o shore “ shing trip that all will enjoy. The advantages of “ shing from a party boat are numerous. If you are new to “ shing or have never been, its great way to get started with very little investment. An eight hour trip of “ shing excitement should easily cost less than a theme park Captain Davids Local Fishing ReportBy Captain David Lifkaticket. Bait, tackle, rods and reels and “ shing licenses are all provided along with a knowledgeable crew. Some boats even include food and drink with the price of a ticket. The ride to the “ shing grounds often o ers sights and scenery that can only be seen from a boat. The rising sun over the ocean, the Florida shoreline and the huge variety of marine life such as dolphin, turtles, rays, ” ying “ sh and more add an unexpected pleasure to your day. When you arrive at your destination be ready to hang on. Any time you have bait in the water in the Atlantic Ocean or Gulf of Mexico anything can bite. Grouper, snapper, amberjack, king“ sh, cobia, sea bass and sharks are just a few of the many types of “ sh that could bite your hook. Air conditioned lounges, bathrooms, sun tan and sightseeing decks, “ sh cleaning and more are just some of the conveniences provided on most party boats. Mayport, St. Augustine, New Smyrna, Ponce Inlet, Port Canaveral, Clearwater and Sarasota are all coastal communities that o er party boats within an easy drive from home. Florida o ers lots of “ shing opportunities that should not be overlooked. A deep sea adventure aboard a party boat is one of them. Fishing Report: Weak“ sh biting in deeper holes and channel markers from N.A.S. to Green Cove. Look for croaker bite to increase in the same areas. Whether you catch one, some or none, the family time spent “ shing will last a lifetime. Invitethe community to your House of Worshipeditor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 33 Finding the right doctor just got easier. Baptist Primary Care is pleased to announce that Tessa Ricci, MD, is relocating her practice to the newly opened Bartram Park location. Dr. Ricci is dedicated to your familys health through every stage of life and ready to provide you with a medical home. Services include: € Well visits for adults, adolescents, children and newborns € Womens health services (in cluding paps) € Sports and school physicals € Immunizations for all ages € Care for acute illnesses and minor injuries € Coordination of care for chronic conditions (hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, etc.) € Minor skin procedures Same-day appointments Tessa Ricci, MD Board-Certified, Family Medicine (904) 288-5550Baptist Primary Care Bartram Park 13820 Old St. Augustine Road Suite 1 Jacksonville, FL 32258 KEN BERRY, B.S.N., D.C.319 West Town Place, Suite 7 Located in the WGV Professional Plaza904-940-0361 Serving World Golf Village and surrounding communities for over 4 years WWW.THE VILLAGE CHIROPRACTOR.COM Neck & Back Pain NOW OFFERING SPINAL DECOMPRESSION Free Consultation to see if you are a candidate MM# 21140 When the time came for Ryan Nuckols to think about an Eagle Scout project, he knew just where to turn. He had a passion for baseball and had recently had the opportunity to volunteer as a buddy for a Field of Dreams baseball game. The Field of Dreams is a nonpro“ t baseball league for special needs children in St. Johns County. The league just “ nished their second successful season with six teams. Field of Dreams volunteers immediately knew what they The 2012 Rock Hounds are Creeks Softball Association 10U League Champions once again! This is the third year in a row the Rock Hounds won the league championship, as they also won the 10U championship in 2011 and 8U in 2010. The team also went on to win the City Championship title in a hard fought tournament played on May 12. The Rock Hounds battled in extra innings to overcome a tough opponent in the championship game. Special thanks to the third year sponsor, Governmental Management Services. Congratulations to the players and coaches! Pictured are Coach Todd Sandiford, Coach Steve Binard, Coach Jackie Creamer, Coach Shaughnessy Harms, Natalie King, Sydney Veaughn, Faith Sandiford, Samantha Binard, Madison Lippy, Haley Bradley, Hannah Harms, Grace Williams, Anna Cowling, Sarah Ward, Haley Sandiford, Olivia Creamer, Skylie Shields. Not pictured: Coach John Lippy, Coach Kerry Creamer. Eagle Scout project bene ts Field of Dreamsneeded. The coaches had been storing the baseball equipment in their personal garages, taking the bats, helmets, balls and other equipment back and forth each Saturday. They were in desperate need of a permanent storage shed at the “ eld in Aberdeen. Nuckols researched sheds, building codes and materials and got the idea approved by the Boy Scout organization. The “ rst weekend in May, with the help of a dozen adult and scout volunteers, it was completed and the keys for a brand new shed were turned over to the Field of Dreams. The Field of Dreams was thrilled to “ nally have a home for all their equipment.Rock Hounds do it again! The Julington Creek 12U Sharks All Star team won the Fort Caroline Invitational Tournament in May. The Sharks had to win two games on the “ nal Sunday … they beat Argyle 10-4 in the morning semi “ nal game and then beat Hendricks 9-8 in the championship game. It was not an easy win as Hendricks jumped out to a 6-0 lead after the “ rst inning. The Sharks battled back in the second inning beginning with a three-run home run by Sam Shaffer. Sharks pitcher Alex Wicker settled in and only allowed two more runs in the game. The Sharks tied the game at 8-8 and eventually went ahead 9-8 on a base hit by Josh Schievink. Ryan Peterson came in to pitch the last inning for the Sharks. Ill admit, it didnt look good after the “ rst inning but our kids kept battling until the end and pulled out a well-deserved win,Ž said manager Paul Chouinard. The Sharks will be representing Julington Creek in the state tournament in Ocala during the week of June 21. Pictured are Coach Shane King, Manager Paul Chouinard, Coach Mark Peterson, Jackson Lein, Ethan Renaud, Kyle Chouinard, Ian Craven, Alex Wicker, Daniel Gajewski, Sam Shaffer, Grif“ n King, Ryan Peterson, Andrew Dziwulski, Josh Schievink and Colton Basham Julington Creek 12U Sharks All Star team wins Invitational Everybody reads The CreekLine Shouldn’t your ad be included?lg@rtpublishinginc.com

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Page 34, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com VARSITY INSURANCE, INC. 268-6365 Our name celebrates our love of competition and commitment to excellence.Serving Mandarin Since 1990 www.varsityinsuranceagency.com Call Tim ( 904 ) 599-5250 LAWN & LANDSCAPING NO CONTRACT REQUIRED!/On-Call ServiceLawn Maintenance Package Includes: Precision Mowing, Edging Foliage Trimming Fertilizing Free Estimates References Available Licensed & Insuredgreenfxlawn@yahoo.com WGV Gymnastics recently participated in AAU State Championship in Daytona Beach, Florida. The girls had great success at the meet with scores and placements as follows: Two of the girls were state champions in their divisions and others received second, third and fourth. In level 4, Isabella Storey placed “ rst on beam, second on bars and fourth all-around with a score of 32.35; Chalsea Vickery placed “ rst on bars, second on ” oor, third on vault, sixth on beam and “ rst all-around with a score of 33.25; Angel Capio placed “ rst on bars, third on ” oor, fourth on beam and “ rst all-around with a score of 34.1; and Brianna Yabroudi placed “ rst on ” oor, “ rst on beam, second on bars, third on vault and “ rst all-around with a score of 33.85.The Switzerland Point Raiders nished the regular season at 14-2 to win the regular season title. Then on Friday night, May 4, under the lights at Bartram Trail High School, they capped off their season by winning the St. Johns County team trophy which they will proudly display over the next year. Great pitching, outstanding hitting and a near awless defense helped the Raiders win their rst ever St. Johns County middle school baseball championship. Luis Torres pitched a complete game shut-out over Gamble Rogers Middle School 11-0 in the seminals followed by Jarred Loggerhead Aquatics began their long course season in April. This season runs from April until August. The long course season di ers from short course in that a swimmer swims in a 50 meter pool as opposed to swimming in a 25 yard pool Recently the team has traveled to Daytona, The Bolles School and Fort Meyers for the start of their season. The Julington Creek Loggerheads have shown that the length of the pool will not keep them from breaking team records. During these three meets, a number of Loggerhead Aquatics athletes have broken many of the team records in di erent age groups. On the girls side, 8 and under swimmer Anna Moore broke team records for the 50 and 100 freestyle, 50 and 100 backstroke, 50 breaststroke, 50 butter” y and 200 IM. In the girls 11-12 age group Eleanor Pollitt broke records in the 50 and 100 freestyle, 50 breaststroke and 200 and 400 IM. Megan Arnold did the same in the 400 freestyle, 100 and 200 breaststroke and 200 butter” y. In the girls open age group, Stacey Stan“ eld broke records in the 100, 200 and 400 freestyle, Dani Gordan in the 200 breaststroke and Kathryn Brewer in the 400 IM. On the boys side, 8 and under Nicky Tayag broke the 50 breaststroke and butter” y records and Noah Meyer broke the 100 breaststroke record. For the 10 and under boys, Robbie Rait broke records in the 50 and 100 butter” y, Nate Pollitt in the 50 breaststroke and Michael Morton in the 100 and 400 freestyle. In the 13-14 age group, Ethan Chestang broke the 200 freestyle, 100 butter” y, 200 and 400 IM records, while Brandon Johnson Switzerland Point Raiders win titleDavenport pitching a complete game 7-0 shut-out of Landrum Middle School in the nals. The championship team members are Brady Breedlove, Connor Carter, Jarred Davenport, Caleb Gerald, Anthony, Giangaspro, Jarrett Grant, Matthew Lavender, Blake Marabell, Bert Maxwell, Connor Miller, Drew Reagor, Alec Sanchez, Cade Sapala, Jake Saunders, Brandon Shee, Luis Torres, Chase Wilson, Haeth Wiseman and Jeremy Yost. Head Coach is Curtis Carter along with assistant coaches Greg Breedlave, Cody Breedlove and Michael Saunders. The study hall mentor is Liz Lavender.Gymnastics team brings home hardwareIn level 5 Audrey Strange placed third on beam, third on ” oor and fourth all-around with a score of 33.35 and Josy Paczkowski placed second on bars, third on vault, fourth on ” oor and third all-around with a score of 34.7. In the modi“ ed optional division, Scarlett Ralls placed “ rst on beam, third on ” oor and third all-around with an allaround score of 33.25; Emma Landess scored 8.25 on ” oor, 8.3 on vault, 7.75 on bars and 9.050 on beam with an allaround score of 33.0. Loggerhead Aquatics: continue as long course record breakersBy Contributing Writer Jacalyn Mortonbroke the 50 freestyle record. There is nothing that has a greater in” uence on the quality of childrens sports than the excellence of the coach. The JCLA Swim Club sta consists of professionally trained coaches. They, as member coaches in the American Swimming Coaches Association, have access to the most comprehensive training and certi“ cation program for youth coaches of any sport in the United States. Certi“ ed coaches in USA Swimming programs possess training and experience in the physiology and psychology of adolescent development. The coaching sta provides the assurances that the time spent swimming will be quality time. Loggerhead Aquatics believes that courage and perseverance developed by swimming will prepare the individual for the challenges they will face in life. More information about JCLA can be found at loggerheadaquatics.com.Loggerhead Emma Howell swimming the 50 freestyle. Tell our advertisers you saw them inThe CreekLine Support our fine Advertisers!

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 35 Your Voice of ReasonPaid by Cyndi Stevenson, Republican for St. Johns County Commission District 1 Sambursky Chiropractic, LLCDr. Bruce Sambursky, Chiropractic Physician683-4376 12421 San Jose Blvd. #300 (just South of Solantic )Serving the Mandarin and Julington Creek area. www.backbonejax.com 23 Years Experience Accepting most insurance and Cash paying patients.Immediate same day appointments available. Jane Moore, Licensed Massage Therapist ( LMT # 0023441)Massage Therapist on StaTHE PATIENT OR PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE S, EXAMINATIONS OR TREATMENT. ChiropractorStop suffering from: Open Saturdays $45 $45 $40 $40 $35 $35 $29 $291-Golfer 2-Golfers 3-Golfers 4-Golfers *All rates are per golfer and are subject to 6% sales tax *Coupon must be present to receive the special rate *Valid Monday through Thursday Any me and a er 11am Friday through Sunday *Tee Times may only be made 7 days in advance *Coupon expires September 30, 2012 After all of the races have “ nished, the games played out and the dust has settled, Bartram Trail has done pretty well for itself during the 2011-2012 school year, registering three Final Four appearances, two state runnersup and one state champion. All over the state Bartram has made a name for themselves and is no longer the ” edgling school that would be good in the future, but was just too inexperienced. Well that time has arrived, and the Bears were poised to take it. In the fall, Bartram Trail possessed two state championship contenders in its crosscountry and football teams, both of whom had progressed throughout the past few seasons. Led by a strong base of seniors, both squads stormed through the playo s defeating teams that had previously been dominant; however, the Bears could not overcome state strongholds in football (Se ner Armwood) and in cross country (Belen Jesuit) preventing Bartram from an appearance in the state championship for football and limiting the Bears to state runner-up in cross country. The excitement that coursed through the school during the fall was kept alive throughout the winter months by the girls and boys basketball teams. The boys won the “ rst district championship in more than four years over rival Creekside in stunning fashion, while the girls managed Knights Dance Camp 2012 will be held June 18 through 21. The Creekside Knights Dance Camp provides elite dance training that will inspire and encourage dancers of all abilities and challenge their limits while having lots of fun! Parents are invited to attend a performance and awards ceremony at the end of camp and campers are invited to dance with the Knights Dancers at a CHS home game. The cost is $95, with a $10 discount if you register by June 1, 2012. Brochures may be found at www-chs.stjohns.k12.” .us. Please email Krystina.Nelson@stjohns. k12.” .us with questions.In the “ rst football game of the new year, Nease played their spring game against Providence High School. With very little practice and a new coach, the team did their best. However, it wasnt enough to overcome their opponents. With a score of 51-28, the “ rst game was a loss, but the team is not demoralized. Justin Johnson, Will McCarthy and Justin Lee scored touchdowns. Also, Jared Washington had a pick six, intercepting a pass and running a touchdown. Although this wasnt an ideal start for the “ rst game, with more training from a new head coach, new, more effective plays and a modi“ ed team, things are looking good for Neases 2012-2013 football season.This summer the boys will begin their training. Since there is a new head coach at Nease, they will all have to work hard BTHS Sports RoundupBy Jared Freitas, BTHS Studentto reach the state championship game before having their run ended by perennial state champion Fort Lauderdale Dillard. With springtime arrived more success for the Bears, who again relied on its underclassmen to carry the load. The girls lacrosse team was determined not to have its season be ended by Winter Springs, which it did for the past three years. The Bears were determined to make this season di erent. Similar to past years they remained the top dog in North Florida, having not lost to an area team since 2008. After defeating Creekside in the district championship, the Bears smothered Episcopal 19-4, setting up for a breath-taking match up against area contender Ponte Vedra in the regional semi-“ nal. The Sharks, who played Bartram tough all year, opened up a 7-3 halftime de“ cit and were up 10-5 at one point, when the Bears fought back and managed to tie the game in the closing moments, thanks to a “ ve goal e ort by senior Melissa Coggins. She would total six goals at the end of the night, scoring the game winner in the “ rst period of overtime. That marked the third victory for the Bears over Ponte Vedra this year, winning all three by only a four goal margin. After bowling through Matanzas 19-2 in the regional championship, Bartram became the “ rst school in North Florida history to make it to the Final Four. Always playing as the underdog, BT faced Bishop Moore, a top “ ve-ranked team in the state. Holding a lead for most of the “ rst half, the Bears fell 16-11. A similar story marked the boys track and “ eld teams ascent to glory, as they were considered a state contender thanks to their 4x400 and 4x800 teams led by junior Nick Uruburu and senior Brandon Ballard; however, no one considered them a threat against stronger teams from Gainesville and Miami. Despite this, the Bears kept running, taking the district and region meets with no problem. However, when the Bears reached the championship they knew it was time to prove themselves and show everyone the fruits of their labor. Junior Larry Donald secured “ fth and sixth in the 300 and 110 hurdles respectively, while senior Brandon Ballard “ nished “ fth in the 800 along with junior Marcus Taylor who placed 10th. These e orts bolstered the Bears championship e orts; however, Uruburu led the team with two come-from-behind victories in the 400 and 4x400 races, which secured the Bears a 37-31 victory over Miami Northwestern. The 2011-2012 year has been one of the most successful years in Bartram athletics, despite a smaller talent pool that Bartram has had in past years due to the opening of new schools. This shows that hard work really does pay o Sports in BriefMark your calendars for August 13 through 17, from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon for Cheer Camp at Liberty Pines Academy. Rising kindergarteners through “ fth graders are welcome at this camp, which is sponsored by St. Johns Athletic Academy and hosted by Liberty Pines Academy and local cheerleaders! For additional information, please email Heather Newmans, LPA Cheer Coach, at lpacheer@gmail.com or www-lpa.stjohns.k12.” .us/ to download a brochure.The fourth annual Creekside High School Cheerleading Camp, featuring Head Coach Jamie Godfrey and the varsity cheerleaders, will be held June 25 through June 28 from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon. This camp is open to the “ rst 80 girls who sign up and the cost is $90 if registered by June 1. All campers should be enrolled in kindergarten through “ fth grades during the 2012-13 school year. Every camper can expect interactive and fun instruction from varsity coaches and players focusing on cheers, chants, jumps, stretches and dance. Campers will be invited to perform during halftime at a CHS Knights football game this year. To register, please visit the Creekside High School at website www-cshs.stjohns. k12.” .us and click on athletics; look for the Cheer Camp link. For further information, please email Coach Godfrey at godfrej@stjohns.k12.” .us. Nease Sports RoundupBy Elena Castello, Nease Studentto adapt and work with each other to become the strongest team yet. And even though last season was not the greatest, the boys are ready to dominate this upcoming year. They will work very hard with their new head coach, Shane Mathews, to develop e ective o ensive strategies and work together as a solid team. Mathews played quarterback for the University of Florida and was in the NFL for 14 years, so his experience can only bene“ t the Nease football team. Come out and support our boys next year, with games on Fridays. Not only will you be able to watch a great football game, you will also be able to listen to Neases amazing band; experience a true game with our spirited students; and enjoy food and a great atmosphere. So show your green and gold pride and cheer for the football team!Do you enjoy receiving The CreekLine each month?Then our Advertisers!As a non-subscription publication we rely on our fine advertisers to finance the production of your community newspaper! Be sure to patronize our advertisers and tell them you saw them in The CreekLineNW St. Johns County’s Community NewspaperThank

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Page 36, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com 20% off on all plants and trees 30 gallon crepe myrtles for only $ 50 (10 12 ft. trees) TOTAL LANDSCAPES DESIGN & INSTALLATION SODDING & IRRIGATION Trout Creek Location at World Golf Village WITH HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF PLANTS IN STOCK... S J &NURSERY & LANDSCAPING WorldGolfVil G IN GOD WE TRUST Free sod replacement estimates and landscape estimates! Your onsite Athletic Trainer at each weeks games Right with you through the game... We are Your Community Therapist.Ž Your onsite Athletic Traine r at ea ch week  s g ame s h h h t t h h h St. Johns( 904 ) 429-0290www.atlasphysicaltherapy.comMandarin( 904 ) 292-0195 The drought is still with us as of early May and shows no real signs of lifting. You have been working hard, Im sure, to maintain your yards and gardens. If your soil drains quickly, installing a drip irrigation system for your landscape could be a boon. There are also “ ttings available to convert a conventional system to more e cient methods of delivering water to your plants; there is a good selection at the big box suppliers. Just remember to keep spray coverage for your lawns. Correct zoning allows for watering grass up to twice a week during daylight savings time and landscape watering as needed. Your original installer would surely be glad to help for the less technically-minded among us. Vegetables have particular needs for water in order to supply us with a successful crop. Simple soaker hoses laid along vegetable rows work well. Use a solid feeder hose from the faucet across one end of the plot and attach a soaker hose at right angles for each row. Using a cut-o for each soaker section GardeningSpring into summerBy Contributing Writer Master Gardener Lesley Arrandale with Duval County Extension, University of Florida/IFASwill allow you to adjust ” ow to a row of maturing onions, for instance, ensuring that they mature properly ready for harvest and you will still be able to deliver the right amounts of water to the rest of your rows. This has been a season of change in the vegetable garden. The earlier warm season crops such as tomatoes are maturing well. The real heat lovers like okra, summer peas and sweet potatoes are getting going. When choosing vegetables look for those recommended for northeast Florida, with all its attendant insects and diseases, in table 4 of The Florida Vegetable Gardening Guide (http://edis. ifas.u” .edu/pd les/vh/vh02100. pdf). April was a wonderful month for watching migrating birds. I had the pleasure of hosting a small ” ock of rose-breasted grosbeaks on their way north to breed. The males are more striking than the females, with black and white plumage and the rosy breast after which they are named. The females resemble female red-winged blackbirds, but with the typical heavy bills of seed-eaters. I caught a tantalizing glimpse of just one glorious, male indigo bunting, his iridescent plumage glinting in the sun. Give your regular backyard birds clean water, food and shelter and they can be an endless source of pleasure. Mornings are the ideal time to see honey bees, as well as our native bees, ” oating lightly from ” ower to ” ower. Although many of those ” owers are the wild spiderwort, I am perfectly content with them, but there is a school of thought that brands them weedsŽ rather than native perennials.Ž The other successful native in my yard is Salvia coccinea, a half-hardy perennial which readily volunteers. Both these plants seeds are relished by house “ nches, which are comical to watch as they perch precariously on slender stems, sometimes sliding right o as the stems tilt earthwards under their weight. May was Garden for Wildlife Month,Ž but theres no time like the present. (http://www. nwf.org/Get-Outside/OutdoorActivities/Garden-for-Wildlife. aspx) Creekside High School is honored to announce the following seven students have earned the distinction to participate in the 2013 National Merit Scholarship Program: Drew Booher, Theresa Bottenhorn, Kirk Kathe, Hunter LeBlanc, Mandi Lenoir, Allan Martin and Rachel Paul. These distinguished students will have the opportunity to choose their top two colleges or universities to begin direct communication with admission of cials. Cngrlis Its a story that is tragically all too familiar: two boating families enjoying a Saturday afternoon on the river, clear weather, unobstructed views, then suddenly a shattering collision, injured people in the water, a child drowns. How does it happen? And why, with all of our technology, safety equipment and regulation, does it still happen? One factor remains the popularity of smaller, motorized water craft. According to the Coast Guards 2007 accident data, more than 70 percent of all boating accidents and more than 80 percent of all fatalities involved boats less than 26 feet in length. Open motorboats account for the lions share of those numbers, not only because of their speed but also because United States Coast Guard Auxiliary UpdateUnder-trained anglers boost accident dataContributed by Bob Schultz, United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-7they typically have a low pro“ le in the water. This makes them easier to capsize and harder for other boaters to see. But theres more to accident risk than the size of the boat. Two types of boaters are proving to be a tough sell on safety: the experienced but under-trained operator and the operator who sees the boat as an accessory to another sport, such as hunting or “ shing. For too many of these, safety is still being learned in the School of Hard Knocks. Since 2000, half of all boating accidents on average involved boaters with 100 to 500 hours of experience on the water. This is the operator whose familiarity with boating leads to overcon“ dence. He or she has learned to start, stop and steer, and navigating an open waterway seems a snap compared to navigating the freeway at rush hour. Unlike a car, however, there are no brakes on a boat, no seat belts, no turn signals, the steering is di erent and the rules on the water are di erent from the rules on the road. Accidents can result when boat operators fail to respect those di erences, especially when they speed, take risks and stop being vigilant. And too frequently they do this without the equipment on board … or the training … to deal with an emergency. In 2007, operators with no formal training were involved in 75 percent of all fatal boating accidents. Anglers present a di erent problem. Although those who “ sh and those who water ski have similarly high numbers of accidents, the risk for an angler that a boating accident will prove fatal is 10 times that of someone on skis: 30 percent vs. 3 percent. What accounts for the di erence? Probably the environment in which these activities take place. Skiing is done in open water with three people involved: the boat operator, the lookout and the skier. In open water, additional help for a downed skier can be as close as other boaters or people on or near the shore. Skiing is also more often a warm weather pursuit … again, raising the probability that other boaters will be nearby to help if needed. Most important, the skier is very likely to be wearing a life jacket. Contrast this with the angler: possibly alone in a quiet cove, “ shing during the shoulderŽ seasons when vacationers and crowds of pleasure boaters are absent and too often without a life jacket. Solitude, heavy clothes and no life jacket are a deadly combination if a boat capsizes or someone falls overboard„accidents that contributed to more than 60 percent of boating fatalities in 2007. These two groups … anglers and the experienced but undertrained … remain a major focus of the Coast Guards mission to reduce boating accidents and fatalities. Americas waterways are becoming more and more crowded. Even with the high cost of fuel, there are half again more recreational boats registered with the Coast Guard than there were 25 years ago. This is all the more reason for boaters to seek training in boating skills and emergency measures to ensure the safety of everyone on board.For the third summer in a row at all St. Johns County Public Library System branches, we will be hosting Fun with Flowersƒ for KIDS!Ž workshops sponsored the Friends of the Library and the Garden Club of St. Augustine. Children ages “ ve through 12 are invited to become Bee DetectivesŽ to make-and-takeŽ child-friendly, creative ” oral arrangements Check out Fun with FlowersŽ using food and ” owers. These workshops are generously sponsored the Friends of the Library and the Garden Club of St. Augustine and in collaboration with the St. Johns County Beekeepers Association. Please note: Beekeeper Eric will be bringing a safe, live hive of honeybees to each of the workshops. Registration for this program is now open. Please contact your local branch library for more information. Southeast Branch Library … Friday, June 15 at 1:00 p.m.; 827-6900 Ponte Vedra Beach Branch Library … Saturday, July 14 at 2:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m.; 827-6950 Main Library … Friday, July 20 at 10:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.; 827-6940 Hastings Branch Library … Thursday, July 26 at 1:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m.; 827-6970 Bartram Trail Branch Library … Friday, July 27 at 10:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.; 827-6960 Anastasia Island Branch Library … Saturday, July 28 at 2:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m.; 209-3730 Your ad could be in the next issue! Call Linda Gay today! 287-4913LG@RTPublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 37 Oil Change & Rotation $19.99 $20 Off All Alignments $30 Off any Brake Job Look great this summer and learn how to keep it off! Come join us for Breakfast and Exercise K building not high in sugar Since their schools inception in 2008, the Creekside High School Lady Knights tennis team has experienced considerable success on and o the court. While defendWith the majority of golf courses in Florida owned by memberships, real estate developers and banks, it is quite rare to “ nd a course that is actually family owned and operated. In March, the DiStefano family, originally from Albany, New York, purchased The Golf Club at South Hampton from Crescent Resources of Charlotte, North Carolina. The club is currently being operated by their company, DWA Golf, LLC and the family is playing a very active role in its management. Derek DiStefano, managing partner for DWA Golf shared, The Golf Club at South Hampton is one of the greater Jacksonville and St. Augustine areas most popular golf courses. It is a golf course that has been designed to present every golfer the appropriate risk, o ering encouragement to the novice, while challenging the experienced player. South Hampton is also a golf club that presents very nice, consistent course conditions and is also known for its friendly and outgoing sta .Ž He continued, Our family looks forward to carrying on the tradition that is South Hampton and building on that to make it one of Jacksonvilles premier semi-private golf facilities.Ž DWA Golfs company operating motto is Golf with a sense of family and community.Ž The vision of the company is one that will be focused on being committed to supporting the local communities of Jacksonville and St. Augustine, its organizations, charities and military members. The company is also focused on being one Lady Knights tennis team graduates impressive senior classBy Contributing Writer Elizabeth Ruizing their 2011 title at the 2012 class 2A District Championship, sophomores Amanda Keller and Marisa Ruiz and freshman Savanna Page won in their respective positions and the team went on to the class 2A Regional Championship, losing by just one point to Bolles High School. Keller and Ruiz remained undefeated throughout the 2012 season and advanced for the second consecutive year to represent Creekside in the state “ nals. As accomplished academically as they are athletically, the Creekside girls tennis team carries an impressive 3.8 cumulative GPA in the classroom. The Lady Knights coach, Cheryl Keller, is brought to tears when speaking of the girls graduating, as most of the senior players have been on her team since Creeksides inaugural season. Coach Keller and all of the parents are extremely proud of these young women due to their unrelenting dedication and spirit. Congratulations to the entire Lady Knights team!Photo courtesy of Danielle WalkerLocal golf club now family owned and operatedof the most consumer oriented companies through the use of a website that has been developed to book tee times online and from mobile devices. Additionally, the club now provides wireless internet capabilities throughout the facility. Some of the services and programs currently being offered at South Hampton would include a reduced rate for active duty military members, police and “ re“ ghters. In support of junior golfers, the club allows golfers ages 16 and under the opportunity to play for free with a paying adult on Sundays after 1:00 p.m. The club also o ers a shorter set of familyŽ tees designed to create a very short course for the beginner or novice golfer and multiple three day junior camps scheduled throughout the summer. Be sure to see their ad in this issue of The CreekLine! Julington Creek Baseball 6U recreational T-ball team, the Hooks, had an amazing season and ended Spring 2012 season in “ rst place. The team was made up of 13 boys who each brought hard work, dedication and team spirit to help make the season a success. Congratulations to the Hooks for their undefeated season and a big thank you to the coaches, team moms and parents for a fun and exciting season!

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Page 38, The CreekLine • June 2012 • www.thecreekline.com the entirety of his career and helped lead the JV team to two straight district championships. He also helped Bartram record its “ rst undefeated varsity season this past year, as the team won their “ rst regional championship in school history. Freitas also wrote for the Bartram Blazer school newspaper during his freshman and sophomore years, before he began writing for The CreekLine. He was vice president of publicity for Beta Club, the historian for Mu Alpha Theta (Math National Honor Society) and a member of the National Honor Society. He ran track and “ eld my “ rst two years at Bartram and says that he hopes that through his writing the BTHS Roundup column, he was able to acknowledge the schools student athletes for their accomplishments and bring the community a little bit closer together. Freitas will be attending the University of Florida as a member of the Honors College. He plans to study under the pre-Med track and then attend medical school in order to become a general practitioner.Devyn Fussman BTHS HappeningsDevyn Fussman graduated from Bartram Trail High School where concentrated on creative writing, taking creative writing classes all four years and working as a sta member for three years for BTHSs literary magazine, The Oracle, which is now being sold on Amazon. She was head editor her senior year. Fussman was one of 12 to earn honorable mention from over 900 entrants in a state-wide poetry contest hosted by The Betty Gri n House, called the Day Without Violence.Ž Fussman was also very active in drama and competed in district theater competitions in playwriting and monologue categories and performed in many plays. She was a member of National Honor Society, Book Club and Beta Club and made the deans list all four years. She will be attending Florida State University beginning with the summer term, where she was accepted into FSUs animation program (a division of the College of Motion Picture Arts), one of the most competitive in the country. She hopes to work at FSUs school newspaper, FSView during her freshmen year, because after that shell be moving to West Palm Beach to take animation classes.Grant Piper CHS Sports RoundupGrant Piper graduated Magna Cum Laude from Creekside High School where he was a member of the varsity track and “ eld team for two years. He was also a member of the National Hispanic Honor Society. In the fall, Piper will be attending the University of Florida where he plans to study Political Science for a possible future in politics. Piper, who wrote for The CreekLine for all four of his years at CHS, says he still enjoys writing and plans to continue in the future. Best wishes from all of us at The CreekLine to these graduating seniors!Editors Note: As we say goodbye to this years senior writers, we now have a few student writer positions available for underclassmen. Please contact us at editor@thecreekline.com if you are interested in becoming one of our student writers for next year!With St. Johns County high schools graduation ceremonies upon us, we at The CreekLine “ nd that it is time to say farewell to a truly talented group of senior writers who have penned articles for us, some of them for several years. It has been a pleasure working with these aspiring journalists who have displayed professionalism and a grasp of editorial knowledge well beyond their years. We hope that they have learned and expanded their writing talents as a result of their association with The CreekLine and wish them all the best in their future endeavors!Rachel Bu CHS HappeningsRachel Bu graduated third in her class from Creekside High School, where she maintained an A average as a part of the ASP Program. She was honored as an American Youth Character Awards recipient, a National Merit Commended Student and an AP Scholar with Distinction and received a Best Buy scholarship and a Zonta International scholarship. Bu was a member of the Hispanic Honor Society, National Honor Society, National Art Honor Society, National English Honor Society, International Thespian Society, debate club and Model U.N. and was a varsity tennis letter-recipient for three years. Throughout her high school career, she accumulated more than 1900 community service hours and was named Creekside High School Student Volunteer of the Year and St. Johns County First Runner-up Student Volunteer of the Year. Most of these service hours were acquired through her work with CISV International (Childrens International Summer Villages) where she was co-president of the CISV Jacksonville Junior Branch board this past year. This summer she will attend a CISV youth Seminar Camp in Victoria, Canada. Next fall she will attend the University of Pennsylvania and plans to major in International Relations with an emphasis on human rights and economics. Bu says she hopes to learn as many languages as possible and travel the world to work with human tra cking refugees while helping improve the economies of developing nations. Brittany Dirks Nease HappeningsBrittany Dirks graduated Magna Cum Laude from Nease High School with an International Baccalaureate (IB) diploma. She was a member of National Honor Society and National Hispanic Honor Society. She was very active in the schools band program, both in “ eld guard in the fall season and Winterguard in the indoor winter season in addition to her studies in the IB program. For her senior year, Dirks was captain of Neases varsity Winterguard team, which placed third at the WGI World Championships held in Dayton, Ohio, with a team score of 94.25. She was recognized as an outstanding Winterguard member with a scholarship from the Nease Band Boosters. She plans to attend the University of Central Florida where she will major in English and participate in marching band and Pegasus (Winterguard). She received a Silver Pegasus scholarship from UCF.Jared Freitas BTHS Sports RoundupJared Freitas graduated from Bartram Trail High School where he was a member of the High-Q academic team during Ann Silverness, DVM, CCRT 904-268-0477 Mandarin Landing Animal Hospital & Pet Resort Veterinarian Owned and Operated Pet Resort Large Indoor Suites Family StyleŽ Boarding with Cable TV Sunlit Kitty Condos with a Nature View Romper RoomŽ for playtime and Doggie Daycare Splish-Splash timeŽ Heated Indoor Swimming Pool 50% OFF Your Pets First Exam with Dr. Silverness( 1st Time Clients Only )Not valid with any other oer. Expires 7/10/12 FREE BOARDING Book 2 Nights at our Resort and 3rd Night is FREE! (1st Time Boarders Only)Not valid with any other oer. Expires 7/10/12 Conveniently located one block North of I-295 and San Jose Boulevard Dr. Ann Silverness, DVM, CCRT Book your Summer Boarding Now! Healy Homeworks Call Dan Healy Cell: 904-228-6900 dandeman@comcast.netExcellent References Available We would like to thank all our customers for helping us get established and look forward to working with you again over the next ten years. Celebrating 16 successful years in Mandarin/Fruit Cove Wishing these talented writers all the best!The CreekLines high school writers graduateBy Martie Thompson Congratulationsto the Class of 2012!from your friends atThe CreekLine Prospective student writers:Please email your request, including the column in which you are interested, along with a sample of your work to Editor@TheCreekLine.com for consideration! Don’t Delay!

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www.thecreekline.com • June 2012 • The CreekLine, Page 39 904-262-SWIM Located next to Ace Hardware (Behind Sonny’s) Accepting and Selling furniture (living room, dining room, bedroom, etc) Home decor (lamps, rugs, artwork, tchotchke) New items arrive daily. We are ready to accept your entire house, estate, etc. We also oer inventory liquidation service for builders, home and furniture industry businesses, etc. For More Information call: 880 8448 or email us at: ENCOREDECOR@bellsouth.net10830 San Jose Boulevard ( across from Walmart)Visit us online at: www.EncoreDecorFL.comWE OFFER FREE PICKUP SERVICE FOR APPROVED ITEMSHours: Jacksonvilles Largest Upscale Consignment Store H Tree WorkbyMitch Drake & Sons (904) 703-5040 (904) 287-3819Licensed, Insured & Workmans Comp Over 35 Years Experience Ch ec k o ut o u r re vi ew s a n d 5 Sta r r ati n g at Y e ll ow b oo k .com Boy Scout Troop 280, River of Life Church on Racetrack Road, recently did a 30 mile canoe trip down the Suwannee River. We had 13 scouts, three adults and seven canoes on the three-night excursion. On Friday we camped at the Lime Sink Youth Camp at Suwannee River State Park and enjoyed a big meal of burgers, beans, sweet corn, chips, watermelon and smores. On Saturday morning, we had strong thunderstorms with lightning. We were able to get camp broken down before the storms and we just hung tight in the bathhouses during the storms. We “ nally got onto the river at noon. River levels were excellent and the current was moderate. We had about 30 minutes of sunshine, then got a lengthy rain shower without any lightning in the afternoon, but we paddled through it. We made our 15 miles in about six hours. The skies cleared as we unpacked at Dowling Park River Camp. We had three large elevated tree house type sleeping platforms. The scouts enjoyed their meal of SpagettiosŽ while the adults su eredŽ with steak kabobs. (scouts do their own menu planning). On Sunday we woke to fog. We tried some “ shing and one of the scouts caught a bass. The skies cleared nicely and the temps rose. We came upon an excellent rope swing and most the boys and a couple of signi“ cantly older boys got their “ ll of the rope swing. We had a short prayer service on the water on Sunday morning then made our 10 miles and checked into Lafayette Blue Springs State Park in mid-afternoon. Our campsite was close to the river and had potable water nearby. After we set up camp, we had of time to swim in the spring. There was even an underwater cave. Dinner was chili with kielbasa mixed in. Never enough food for us scouts! Mr. Sorensen baked the adults an awesome corn bread with his bakepacker.Ž JCP CARES, a community charitable organization in NW St. Johns County, conducted an area collection drive to provide Summer FunŽ backpacks to the countys homeless student population, whose number has steadily approached 500. JCP CARES and Austin Outdoors delivered backpacks for each student in the program to the St. Johns County School District Building on Thursday, May 17. This initiative generated more than $15,000 in charitable donations and more than 100 community service hours. With the assistance of MAY Managements sta Summer FunŽ backpacks were “ lled with books, word puzzles and journals to keep the mind active during the summer reprieve, as well as toys and non-perishable food. Backpacks have been tailored to each age group and will be received by the students prior to the last day of school. JCP CARES would also like to thank its business partners, service clubs, area schools and churches, along with its countless volunteers and “ nancial supporters:Troop 280 enjoys Suwannee River canoe trip By Contributing Writer Andrew Morley, Star Scout, Troop 280Monday was an early rise at 7:00 a.m. We broke camp and were on the water by 8:40. Mr. Morley nearly lost his canoe when he pushed it into the river a little too briskly and almost tipped it over and lost all his gear. We made it another “ ve miles to the FL51 bridge, our take-out point, about 10:20 a.m. at Mile 98 above the Gulf of Mexico. There were about 30 miles total for this trip. Mr. Hernandez met us there and helped shuttle us back to Suwannee River State Park to pick up vehicles. Steven did a good job as Senior Patrol Leader for the trip Two scouts earned nicknames: Alec earned Red“ sh,Ž for his “ shing prowess and hair color and Noah earned : Vacuum,Ž for consuming a double Baconater, fries, large shake and anything else within sight at Wendys following the campout. We will continue our canoe trip down the Suwannee River with a “ ve night, 50 mile trip next fall. JCP CARES launches summer initiativeBy Contributing Writer Michelle Busby, JCP CARESBank of St. Augustine Bartram Trail Rotary The CreekLine newspaper Creekside High School Cunningham Creek Elementary Durbin Creek PTO Early Learning Coalition Fruit Cove Baptist Church Fruit Cove Middle School Hugs Across the County JCP swim teams JCP tennis teams Kiwanis Club McDonalds Plum District Ponte Vedra Sunshine Rotary Publix River of Life UMC St. Johns River Water Management District St. Johns Rotary Timberlin Creek Elementary Wards Creek Elementary Williams YMCAThank you for reading The CreekLine!

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THE CREEKLINESM SERVING THE NORTHWEST ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMMUNITY SINCE 2001Visit our online edition at www.thecreekline.comMEMBER OF THE RT PUBLISHING GROUP OF COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS Whats InsidePage 3 Whats New Page 4 From the CommissionerPage 5 School District Journal Page 6 The Sheriff ReportsPage 7 Your Vote Counts Page 8 Hopewell Church updatePage 11 Hurricane tips Page 13 Native Sons & DaughtersPage 19 Christs Cupboard Page 20 Thank you, Mr. Ochs! Page 21 JCP CARES backpacksPage 22 Summer Camp & Activities Guide Page 23 Nease math team Page 25 Summer consolidation Page 28 Bartram Trail Rotary Page 29 Fashion Update Page 32 Fishing Report Page 33 Congrats, Rock Hounds!Page 34 SPMS Raiders win Page 36 Gardening Page 38 Farewell Senior Writers Volume 12, Issue 6 June 2012The CreekLine12443 San Jose Boulevard, Ste. 403 Jacksonville,FL 32223Presorted Standard US Postage Paid Callahan, FL 32011 Permit No.4 904.264.KIDS264KIDS.COM CALL OR VISIT US ONLINELOCATED IN JULINGTON CREEK ABOVE BLACKSTONE GRILLE 112 BARTRAM OAKS WALK #203 | JACKSONVILLE, FL | 32259 Now scheduling Summer appointments! The CreekLinesElection 2012Section coming in our July 2012 issue!To Advertise: LG@RTPublishinginc.com We all know and love the Girl Scouts for their delectable and tempting cookies we can count on annually, but they do so much more for their community than provide adored sweets. Local Girl Scout Troop1146 provides a perfect example of how honorable and rewarding it can be to wear a Girl Scout vest. Girl Scout Troop 1146 of Gateway Council is currently wrapping up their Bronze Service Award project for their local community of Julington It was an introduction that brought back memories of Lawrence Welk on Sunday evening TV. Straight from performing in Downtown Disney and receiving a Superior rating at the Lakeside Jazz Festival, band director and conductor Don Isabelle introduced his Fruit Cove Middle School Jazz Ensemble to the seniors gathered at the Trout Creek Park Pavilion and Senior Center. The seniors gave a resounding round of applause as the rst musical piece was announced. The concert began Don Mullinax, a longtime Cunningham Creek resident, wasnt given the Humanitarian of the Year Award by NEFAR last year for no small reason. His service speaks for itself all over St. Johns County. Mullinax retired from years of work in the banking and nancial services industry in 2008. He then opened a small realty service business called Commission Express of North Florida. This led to him join the Board of Realtors and one of the largest service organizations in the area called Northeast Florida Girl Scouts serve communityMuch more than just cookiesBy Contributing Writer Written by Jasmine R. Tavernier Girl Scout Troop 1146 at their Bronze Award ceremony.Realtors give back with Ramp It Up programBy Donna KeathleyCreek. The troop of 14 girls, ages 10 and 11, chose to serve the senior citizen community of Westminster Woods on Julington Creek by creating nine bird feeders and ve bird houses to adorn their beautiful grounds. In order to earn this highest award for Juniors, each girl in the troop will have dedicated 20 plus service hours to this community project. The troop has also funded the project (by means of those wonderful cookie sales) from providing the wood and other materials to volunteering their time, being that they are responsible to ll the feeders weekly for a period of one year. This is the sixth year for Troop 1146 and almost all of the girls have been with me since the beginning. I am so proud of our girls and their achievements, especially obtaining the Bronze Service Award. It has been a true blessing to watch them grow and develop over the years, Sharon Norris, leader of Troop 1146, stated with enthusiasm. The purpose of this project is to get the girls involved in their community and to serve its members. The troop chose Westminster Woods on Julington Creek in order to brighten the lives of the residents by enhancing their surroundings via attracting such beautiful birds as blue jays and robins with their bird feeders and houses. And what a perfect t Westminster Woods was. After they had already decided on the project theme and location, the troop learned that Westminster Woods has a working woodshop and resident carpenter, Dick Association of Realtors (NEFAR), which is 5,000 members strong. In 2011 Mullinax was elected vice-chairman of community a airs for NEFAR and ran a task force for their volunteer projects. Seated at this position he saw a request come to the group from the county housing partnership o ce for assistance in constructing wheel chair ramps for local homeowners. Mullinax and his fellow NEFAR members saw this as a win-win opportunity for the group; they service the area by selling homes, so In the Mood with FCMS Jazz Ensemble at Trout Creek Senior CenterBy Karl Kennellwith Glenn Millers classic American Patrol, which with its upbeat theme brought a glimmer to the eyes and broad smiles to the faces of everyone in the audience. You could almost see the memories passing through the minds of the gathered seniors as Isabelle led the ensemble into the 1944 favorite Sentimental Journey written by Les Brown and Ben Homer. The FCMS Ensemble was invited to perform by Judy Dorazio, Senior Center coordinator for the St. Johns Council on Aging. It was one of the many events and activities that occur each week on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the Trout Creek Senior Center. Isabelle introduced Count Basies Fancy Pants by relating a personal story about how he had called for material from Ramp It Up cont. on page 8 Girl Scouts cont. on page 18 FCMS Jazz Ensemble cont. on page 8

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 3 Whats NewCommunity HappeningsDo you have community or club news you would like included in The CreeekLine? Then contact Martie Thompson at: editor@rtpublishinginc.com or 886-4919. At RT Publishing we welcome Letters to the Editor. We request they be no more than 250 words. All letters must include writers name, address, and telephone number. Only the name will be published. E-mail to editor@ rtpublishinginc.com. Anonymously sent letters will not be published.Letters to the Editor policy The CreekLine Community Newspaper is a free monthly publication distributed via bulk mail to homes and businesses in NW St. Johns County. Submission of articles and photographs are received by mail or email, although email to editor@rtpublishinginc.com is preferred. The writers opinions do not necessarily reect the opinion of RT Publishing, Inc. Advertising Rates are available by request. RT Publishing, Inc. is not responsible for advertisement content or accuracy of information provided by its advertisers. Nor does RT Publishing, Inc. endorse any of the products or services included in this publication. RT Publishing, Inc. reserves the right to refuse advertisement or copy from any advertiser. All rights are reserved and no portion of this publication may be copied without the express written consent of the publisher. 2012. RT Publishing, Inc. The CreekLine The Ocean Breeze Mandarin NewsLine Players JournalPublisher Rebecca Taus publisher@rtpublishinginc.comEditor Martie Thompson editor@rtpublishinginc.comAdvertising Sales, Linda Gay lg@rtpublishinginc.comGraphic Design, Linda Gomolkagraphics@rtpublishinginc.com RT Publishing, Inc. 12443 San Jose Boulevard Suite 403 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Ph: 904-886-4919 I 9 5 I 2 9 5 S a n J o s e B l v d $10 OFFAny $50 Purchase! simply SUMMERgatheringsWhole Foods Market has the coolest party essentials! Beat the summer heat with the freshest, most flavorful, highest quality organic and natural products on the planet.MakeYOUR BACKYARDthe place forSUMMER HANGOUTSVALID AT WHOLE FOODS MARKET JACKSONVILLE ONLY. NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFER OR TM DISCOUNT CARD. NOT REDEEMABLE FOR CASH OR GIFT CARDS. LIMIT ONE COUPON PER CUSTOMER, PER VISIT. NO COPIES, DUPLICATIONS OR FACSIMILIES WILL BE ACCEPTED. PLU 30675 VALID THROUGH 6/30/12 VOTE 2012 Exercise your freedom! Be an informed voter! Meet the candidates in the July issue of The CreekLine. Special Election section will contain everything you need about voting in the Primary Election. Candidates, make sure you are included: Contact Linda Gay at lg@rtpublishinginc.com or 904-886-4919 today! Please mark your calendar for Saturday, June 16 to participate in a Texas Hold em fundraiser tournament at the Poker Room at St. Johns Greyhound Park to bene t the American Cancer Societys Bartram Trail Relay for Life. Check-in and hors doeuvres will begin at 6:00 p.m. with a Texas Hold em lesson at 6:30 p.m. and the start of the tournament at 7:00 p.m. The cost will be $50 for a player ticket, which will include 2500 chips, donation to Relay for Life and food. The cost of the bystander ticket will be $20 and will include donation to Relay for Life and food. There will be re-buys of $20 up to the fourth round of blinds. There will only be 80 player seats available. You must be at least 18 years old to play. For additional information or to sign up, please contact Becky Kimball at 254-7325. United We Guide is a free transportation and information guide for seniors who are interested in the variety of transportation options o ered throughout St. Johns County. Contact the mobility manager at the Council on Aging at 3156505 or email Katie Arnold at karnold@stjohnscoa.com. Bring your gardening questions to the plant clinic at the Bartram Trail Library on Thursday, June 21 2012 from 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon. St. Johns County Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer your plant and lawn questions. We will also accept small soil samples from your vegetable, lawn or shrub areas for free pH testing. The Bartram Trail Library is located at 60 Davis Pond at the entrance to Julington Creek Plantation. Single, divorced, widowed and looking to make new friends? The JCP Singles Network is for adults 40s and upa great way to meet people, make new friendships and network. If you are interested in joining us and would like more information, please email klandrum @ comcast.net. A mass Fathers Day Piein-the-Face Frenzy will be held on Sunday, June 17 at 3:00 p.m. at the Julington Creek Plantation Recreation Center pool. Dads of all ages will have an opportunity to pie their kids right in the face for a Fathers Day never to be forgotten. The cost is $3 per whipped pie on a plate and the public is invited to attend. For further information or to register, please go to www. jcpcdd.org. World Golf Village Toastmasters meets the rst and third Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at First Florida Credit Union (entrance in back), located at 1950 County Road 210 West. You are invited to visit the World Golf Village Toastmasters Club. Our members include experienced Toastmasters and those just starting. Together we share the Toastmasters experi-Whats New cont. on page 4 Copies of online coupon are not accepted.

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Page 4, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com From the Commissioners DeskBy Contributing Writer Ron Sanchez, County Commissioner, District 2 For this article I am furnishing a report that came from St. Johns County Fire Rescue Operations Chief Kurt M. Kaunath. I certainly cant say it any better. In a two day period in May, St. Johns County Fire Rescue (SJCFR) personnel successfully resuscitated three men who su ered sudden cardiac arrest. Statistics compiled by the American Heart Association (AHA)show that when someones heart suddenly stops beating, they have only a ve percent chance of surviving the event. With these three saves, SJCFR all but guaranteed that in 2012 its paramedics will exceed national standards. The three men bene ted from a continuum of care that began moments after their hearts stopped. The AHA calls this the Chain of Survival and it begins with immediate recognition of cardiac arrest and activation of the emergency response system (911); early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with an emphasis on chest compressions; rapid de brillation (electric shock); e ective advanced life support by trained paramedics; and integrated post-cardiac arrest care. On May 9, a 54-year-old man collapsed in front of a music stage at The Players golf tournament in Ponte Vedra Beach. Bystanders with CPR training immediately began chest compressions until SJCFR personnel stationed at the tournament arrived with an Automated External De brillator (AED) and delivered two shocks. After the second shock the man became responsive and was talking with paramedics during transport to Baptist Medical Center Beaches. He was eventually own by helicopter to Baptist Medical Center Downtown, where cardiologists diagnosed and treated the blocked coronary artery that caused his arrest. He was discharged from Baptist with no limitations.CPR plus a great county re rescue teamThe following day, May 10, re ghters were dispatched to a motor vehicle accident in Ponte Vedra Beach. Upon arrival, crews saw employees of an apartment complex performing chest compressions on a 61-year-old FedEx driver who lost control of his truck after su ering sudden cardiac arrest. SJCFR medics administered two shocks with an AED and the mans heart started beating again. E ective advanced life support included therapeutic hypothermia, a groundbreaking treatment in which a cardiac arrest victims body is cooled following resuscitation in order to preserve brain function. The man was transported to Mayo Clinic Hospital for comprehensive post-cardiac arrest care. Within two weeks, he was sitting up in bed and was discharged from Mayo with no restrictions. Also on May 10, a 65-yearold Switzerland man called 911 when he began experiencing chest pain. While on the phone with emergency dispatchers, he said the pain had lessened and he no longer needed emergency medical care. Fortunately, the dispatchers convinced the man to allow paramedics to continue for an evaluation and shortly after the crews arrival, his heart stopped beating. SJCFR medics started CPR and were able to shock the heart back into rhythm. The man was transported to Baptist Medical Center South and then transferred to Baptist downtown where he remains stable in the cardiac unit. Each of these men owe their lives to the quick actions of average citizens, advanced life support from highly trained SJCFR paramedics and excellent post-resuscitation care at area hospitals. These three incidents prove the Chain of Survival works in St. Johns County. Thanks to the citizens that knew CPR, our re rescue team and the hospitals!ence in ...a mutually supportive and positive learning environment, where every individual member has the opportunity to develop oral communication and leadership skillsand have fun doing it. For more information, please visit www.worldgolfvillage.toastmastersclubs.org. The St. Johns Federated Republican Women invite you to join them the third Monday of every month at 6:30 p.m. at Davidson Realty in World Golf Village. This month our speakers will be Senator John Thrasher, who is running for re-election to the Florida State Senate and Beverly Slough, who is running for Congressional Seat District 6. We value information on GOP candidates and issues so that we are informed voters and citizens. Both men and women are welcome. For more information, please contact Debbie Newton at 910-0290. Are you looking what to do with that extra fruit and vegetable harvest? Or just want to learn more about the basics of canning? Whats the difference between water-bath and pressure canning? The St. Johns County Extension Service and First Coast Technical College are o ering a basic hands-on learning course on home preservation. The Canning Culinary Workshop starts in the classroom, moves to the kitchen and begins the canning process. Participants learn hands-on how to make preserves, jellies, jams and pickles featuring datil peppers, various berries and peaches. Each will receive take home products. The workshop will be held on Thursday, June 21 from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at First Coast Technical College. The cost of $45 includes lunch. Participants must pre-pay and register by June 14. Space is limited with a minimum of 18 people. Please call 547-3461 and ask for Jean Salce. The 210 Community Market was founded by a local residents group, The 210 Community Alliance. The goal of both the founders and the market is to unite the communities along the 210 sector. The market is envisioned to be a town center for neighbors to gather and enjoy the open air atmosphere of a local community market. The market will feature specialty foods as well as artisan crafters and organic fruits and vegetables. We have moved the market to a new location, the Winn Dixie parking lot at 2220 County Road 210. Come out and join us and bring the whole family, including the dog. The market will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. the second Saturday of each month. The North Florida Daylily Society holds its meetings on the second Sunday of each month at 2:15 p.m. at the Orange Park Library, located at 2054 Plain eld Avenue, just o Kingsley Boulevard. Daylily experts provide programs ranging from preparing daylilies for planting to how to prepare daylilies for shows. The club membership includes daylily enthusiasts from the Beaches to Middleburg. Guests are welcome to attend. Discover the many varieties of wild owers growing in our area and become familiar with the native plants that attract butter ies and wildlife to your yard and garden. The public is invited to a free eld trip on Thursday, June 21, from 2:00 Whats New cont. from page 3 Whats New cont. on page 6

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 5 School District Journal By Contributing Writer Beverly Slough, Chairman, St. Johns County School Board Your Voice of ReasonPaid by Cyndi Stevenson, Republican for St. Johns County Commission District 1 Come and See Us For Your FREESleep Apnea Consultation! Sleep Apnea Making You Tired?Call Krantz Dental Care Today! Alan M. Krantz, D.D.S.12058 San Jose Boulevard, Suite 102 Mandarin(904) 880-3131KrantzDentalCare.com/sleepapnea Without The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Over 15 Years Legal Experience904-665-0005www.preddylaw.com Christopher M. Thompson, CFP, CRPC Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC1000 Sawgrass Village Dr. Suite 103 Ponte Vedra, FL. 32082 Tel: 904-273-7908 Toll Free: 800-542-2370 Cell: 904-708-3817 Fax: 904-285-0249 christopher.thompson@wellsfargoadvisors.com home.wellsfargoadvisors.com/christopher.thompson Buy A Business John SerbCertied Business Intermediary www.FirstCoastBizBuySell.com Call 904-613-2658 for a Condential No-Cost Valuation & Consultation Congratulations to all our 2012 graduates from our seven high schools! On June 1, 2 and 7, we celebrated their success and launched them into their next eld of endeavor. Many of our graduates are college/university bound, a good number will serve our country in the military and still more will enter the workforce. I wish each one great success in whatever path they choose to pursue. In spite of the new form of FCAT and the fact that the bar was raised for passing, our students have done very well in this years round of testing. At this writing, not all scores are in, but our district scored rst in the state in third, ninth and 10th grade reading, as well as rst in the state on the end of course exams in biology, geometry and Algebra 1. We expect similar results as the remainder of the scores are received. I am very proud of the achievement of our students and the wonderful work of their teachers in preparing them to be successful. June always brings shifts in personnel at our schools. This particular year, there have been several changes in leadership in area schools. Cathy Hutchins, the founding principal at Timberlin Creek Elementary, has been reassigned to South The months keep rolling by and the William Bartram Scenic Highway Management Council is keeping up with the ow. Our May meeting was, as usual, lively, informative, and productive. Claire Fioriti, chair of the tree planting committee, updated us on their activities speci cally the health and welfare of three trees recently planted at Alpine Groves Park. The trees are doing well thanks to a watering committee thats keeping the trees well nourished and ourishing. By this time next year the trees will be better established and able to thrive on their own. We learned that our eighth annual Bartram Bash in April was successful and planning has begun for next years event. Plans for the annual Old Settlers Reunion in the fall are underway and more fun times for the community at large are coming stay tuned, you dont want to miss this exciting event! In May I told the William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway Management Council that the Recreation and Parks Department of St. Johns County is planning to build a covered pavilion at Alpine Groves Park. We learned of the plan from Parks Director, Wil Smith, and hell give us speci cs at our June 14 meeting. The management council has serious concerns over the planning for this pavilion and anxiously awaits Smiths comments. To learn more about this plan youre welcome to attend. We meet Woods Elementary. Her strong ability to raise student achievement is needed at that school to increase the learning of some of our most struggling students. She will certainly be missed by the Timberlin Creek family, but I am grateful that she has accepted a new challenge in support of our children in the southwest part of the county. Input will be taken from the faculty and parents at the school as to what they would like to see in a new principal. Hutchins replacement will be announced in early June. Randy Kelley, principal at Liberty Pines Academy, is moving to the district o ce to assist in the evaluation and support of principals throughout our county. Assistant Principal Judith Thayer has been appointed to take the principalship at LPA. I was present when the announcement was made to the faculty. Thayer received a standing ovation from the sta I look forward to continued excellence at Liberty Pines. Mary Ford, principal at Mill Creek Elementary, is retiring this year. I appreciate her for the ne educator that she is and for the focus that she always demonstrated for the individual child. She will be missed in our district. Input was received from the Mill Creek family on the qualities of a new principal. After considering these qualities, Amanda Riedl has been named as the new principal at Mill Creek. Riedl comes to us from North Kansas City and is a dynamic education leader. We welcome her to the Mill Creek family. In addition to these appointments, Greg Bergamasco, formerly the assistant principal at Ponte Vedra High School, has been named the new principal at Gamble Rogers Middle School, replacing Beverly Gordon, who is retiring. Tina Waldrop, currently the assistant principal at St. Johns Technical High School, will become the new principal at Osceola Elementary School, replacing Nancy Little, who is also retiring. As always, thank you for your support of public education. If I may serve you in any way, please contact me at sloughb@stjohns.k12. .us.William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway updateBy Contributing Writer Al Abbatiello, alabbat@bellsouth.net at the County Annex, located at 725 Flora Branch Boulevard starting at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 14. Youll also be interested to know a farmers market is being planned for Alpine Groves Park and to begin later this summer, possibly in July. Planning is not yet complete but is likely to be approved by St. Johns County. Well learn more about this planning from Smith at our June meeting. The William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway Management Council leadership thinks the farmers market would be a good event for the NW St. Johns County community in terms of helping build community relationships and the opportunity to increase membership for the William Bartram Scenic Highway organization. Yes, we want and need new members fresh ideas and energy from newcomers will help us keep the Scenic Highway and surrounding area scenic and historic. At our June meeting well be discussing a variety of possible projects to further advance our longer term objectives. Fundraising via available grants, increased membership and educational events in cooperation with schools, corporate/ commercial sponsors will help us complete a planned education series and other worthwhile projects. Visit www.bartramscenichighway.com to sign up for our quarterly newsletter to stay fully informed. On May 22, 2012 we addressed a St. Johns County School Board workshop to inform them of our activities, including a planned education series of lectures for students. This initiative is expected to help bring greater awareness of the intrinsic resources and history of NW St. Johns County to county students and the community at large. School Superintendent Dr. Joseph Joyner o ered encouragement and the possible assistance of school system curriculum sta at whatever time were ready to present our plan. Thank you Dr. Joyner and Chairman Beverly Slough. If youre a regular reader of these updates Im sure you notice a recurring theme. Were committed and active in the work of preserving, protecting the quality of life along the William Bartram Scenic Highway and look forward to your participation. Join us on June 14 at 6:30 p.m. at the County Annex, located at 725 Flora Branch Boulevard. See you then. International Affairs Discussion Group and Book Club Thurs, June 21 6:30 pm Bartram Trail Branch LibraryThe discussion will be moderated by Joseph Warner, retired U.S. diplomat and adjunct professor of Geography and International Relations. A reading list of suggested books and articles will be available in time to prepare for the discussions. The topic for this months discussion: The Indian OceanArea of Opportunities or Threat? The CreekLineEverybody Gets It. Everybody Reads It.editor@thecreekline.com Tell our advertisers you saw them inThe CreekLineSupport our fine Advertisers!

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Page 6, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com The Sheriff Reports By Contributing Writer David B. Shoar, St. Johns County Sheriff DON'TTRADEYOURYOUTHFUL SKINFORATEMPORARYTAN!LetPVPSbeyourfirstchoiceforanti-agingproductsand rejuvenatingtreatments.ForaFREEskinanalysis,contact ourofficeat 904.273.6200. Bookyourvisitnowandremembertohaveourlicensed AestheticiansorAdvancedRegisteredNursePractitioners matchyouwiththeperfectskincareregimenforyourskin typeandanti-aginggoals.WecarryOBAGI,SkinMedica, SkinCeuticals,LatisseandVIVITE.Microdermabrasion ChemicalPeels IntensePulsedLight-Photofacial FractionalResurfacing MicrolaserPeel ErbiumLaserResurfacing BOTOXCosmetic JuvedermXC Radiesse...andmanymore!www.pvps.com SIXLOCATIONSPonteVedraBeachSouthsideAmeliaIslandMandarinRiversideSt.Augustine Presentthisadandreceive 20%OFFanySunscreenorSPFproduct.*Cannotbecombinedwithanyother discountorspecialoffer.Mustpresent couponattimeofpurchase. OfferexpiresOctober1,2012. DISCOUNTCODE:NE. You Deserve Quality Legal Representation at a Rate You Can Afford 904.379.8486www.myjaxfamilylaw.com Mention this ad for a free consult Sara Beth Frazier, P.L. Tina P. Fernandez, CPA, PLwww.tpfcpa.com 904-287-2195 Over 30 Years ExperienceHave Condence in Your Tax Preparation & Planning. Allow Me to Assist You. Visit www.tpfcpa.com for informative news and Tax Savings Tips. Serving the Accounting Needs of Individuals and Small Businesses by Providing Quality Service at Competitive Rates. Offering investment advisory services as a representative of 0156581-00002-00 Prudential Financial Planning Services, a division of Pruco Securities, LLC. As our schools close for the summer this month and the price of gas continues to rise, many residents will not be traveling elsewhere for vacation. Many will enjoy the 42 miles of beaches St. Johns County has to o er. I would like to pass along some tips in this months column. Never swim alone and if possible swim near a lifeguard. If you or a family member doesnt know how to swim, take lessons. Swim lessons are o ered through the St. Johns County Recreation Department or the local YMCA. Only knowing how to oat in the water may compromise your safety during an emergency. Many swimmers panic if they get caught in a rip current. If you or a fellow swimmer nds yourself in a rip current, dont ght it. Swim parallel with the beach until you are out of the current and then swim towards the shore. Be sure to watch your young children constantly and dont become distracted by talking on your cell phone, reading or taking a nap. Your attention should be focused on your children at all times. Children as well as teenagers should always be aware of their surroundings and if someone tries to take you somewhere, quickly get away while yelling and screaming. Children should try to stay in a group; remember there is safety in numbers. Because our youngsters cannot always look out for themselves, it becomes our responsibility to teach them how. Pay attention to the posted signs on the beach. They are designed for our safety as well as to protect the environment. Be safe on the beach this summerRemember drinking alcohol is not permitted on all St. Johns County beaches. To protect your head and neck, never dive head rst into the ocean. Many beaches in this area have coquina rock buried in the water and serious injuries could occur when diving. The American Red Cross adds some additional tips for beach safety. Protect your skin: sunlight contains two kinds of UV raysUVA increases the risk of skin cancer, skin aging and other skin diseases. UVB causes sunburn and can lead to skin cancer. Limit the amount of direct sunlight you receive between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. and wear a sunscreen with a sun protection factor of at least 15. Drink plenty of water regularly and often even if you do not feel thirsty. Your body needs water to keep cool. Avoid drinks with alcohol or ca eine in them. They can make you feel good brie y but make the heats e ects on your body worse. This is especially true with beer, which dehydrates the body. Watch for signs of heat stroke, which is life-threatening. The persons temperature control system, which produces sweating to cool the body, stops working. The body temperature can rise so high that brain damage and death may result if the body is not cooled quickly. Signals of heat stroke include hot, red and usually dry skin, but in some cases such as during athletic activity while wearing a helmet, the skin may be moist. Changes in consciousness as well as a rapid, weak pulse and rapid, shallow breathing are also symptoms. Call 9-1-1 and move the person to a cooler place. Quickly cool the body by wrapping wet sheets around the body and fan it. If you have ice packs or cold packs, place them on each of the victims wrists and ankles, in the armpits and on the neck to cool the large blood vessels. Watch for signals of breathing problems and make sure the airway is clear and keep the person lying down. Wear eye protection. Sunglasses are like sunscreen for your eyes and protect against damage that can occur from UV rays. Be sure to wear sunglasses with labels that indicate that they absorb at least 90 percent of UV sunlight. Finally, wear foot protection. Many times, peoples feet can get burned from the sand or cut from glass in the sand. During the summer months, we have a tendency to be complacent by leaving our vehicle doors unlocked and windows open. This is an obvious invitation to criminals to steal our personal items from the inside of the vehicle, especially when using the parking areas near the beach. Remember to always close your windows and lock your doors when you go to the beach. Always remove loose change and valuables from your vehicle. This includes purses, wallets, cell-phones, laptop computers and briefcases. Some of these items could be locked in your trunk and out of sight. Also, park in an area that has people coming and going to the beach. The average criminal does not want to be seen. Remember if you see something suspicious, please contact your local law enforcement agency immediately. I hope that these tips will help you and your family have a fun and safe experience at one of our beautiful beaches. For additional tips on general crime prevention, please go to the St. Johns County Sheri s O ce website at www.sjso.org. There is a world of information available and please feel free to contact me anytime at my email address at dshoar@sjso.org. Thank you. p.m. until 4:00 p.m. at the St. Augustine Shores Wild ower Meadow located in back of the Riverview Club at 790 Christina Drive in St. Augustine. This lovely meadow is situated on the Intracoastal Waterway and is adjacent to Canopy Oaks Park, a great spot for a relaxing, shady, nature walk. Leaders include Gail Compton, nature columnist; Beverly Fleming, Florida Master Naturalist Instructor and Renee Stambaugh, native plant consultant. Dress for the outdoors, including closed-toed shoes and hat and bring water. This trip is hosted by the Wild ower Meadow volunteers. For more information, please contact 3929696. The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-7 meets the rst Thursday of every month at 7:30 p.m. at the St. Augustine Yacht Club near the St. Augustine Lighthouse. The otilla is always looking for new members, particularly those who own aircraft, boats and have radio equipment and skills. If you are interested, please contact Vic Aquino at 460-0243. Adults and teens age 14 and older are invited to attend the Project Lap Blanket crochet group at the Bartram Trail Branch Library on Thursday, June 14, Tuesday, June 19 and Thursday, June 28 from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The group will crochet or knit blankets for cancer patients at area hospitals. All skill levels are welcome. Cant come to any of the meetings? Pick up the crochet Whats New cont. from page 4 Whats New cont. on page 7

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 7 Coming to Julington Creek 2012 3635 Race Track Road, Jacksonville, Florida www.memorialhospitaljax.com B r o k e n Ankl e A s t h m m a A tt a c c c c c k k k k k Bu rn s St i t ches D i s l o c a t e d S h ou l d d e e e e e e r Broke B r o k e en N o o s s s s s s e e e e e e e e e Accidenta l In j u u r r r r r r i i e e e e e e s s s s s 2758 Race Track Rd. in Julington Creek 32259 Plantation Publix Plaza (904) 209-1320www.getpanache.comPanache is proud to welcome Carl Slack to their team. Whats New cont. from page 6 Your Vote Counts!By Contributing Writer Vicky Oakes, Supervisor of Elections, St. Johns CountyApril and May have been busy months for sta at the Elections O ce! The new congressional, senate and house district lines have been approved by the Department of Justice. St. Johns County is now in Congressional District 6, Florida Senate District 6 for the entire county, as well as Florida House Districts 17 and 24. (NW St. Johns County is in the 17th House District.) Due to these changes, combined with the new county commission and school board district lines which were adopted in December 2011, we are in the midst of re-drawing precinct lines, renumbering a few precincts, researching new polling places, co-locating voters to other polling places and trying to make as few changes to impact as few voters as possible. We are also utilizing a new GIS mapping system which allows us to integrate the information gained from the 2010 Census. The data, applied as census blocks, is a major factor in determining precinct lines. Dont be alarmed though, the good news is that a number of precincts and polling places in the northwest have not changed. Some precincts are being re-numbered but many voters will still vote in the same location. We will have fewer polling places due to co-locating small precincts. This process will also allow us to clean up our precinct lines in ways that will improve our services to the voters of this county. My ultimate goal is to make it better for you, the voter. Everything must be completed and approved by the Board of County Commissioners prior to June 4 when candidate qualifying begins. Following board approval, it will take approximately two to three weeks to update our voter registration system and for the information to be made available on our website through the voter lookup or precinct locator. Precinct maps will be available on our website by the time you read this. Stay tuned...keep an eye on our website. You will be hearing more about these changes soon. Our theme for the 2012 elections will be Know Where You Vote Before You Go! In order to avoid any confusion and to help save tax dollars, the mailing of voter information cards has been temporarily suspended until the process of redrawing precinct lines has been completed. All St. Johns County voters will be mailed an updated voter card prior to the August 14 Primary Election which will provide new districts, precinct and polling location information. Whats New? Be sure to check our website often for updates. The State Legislature has placed 11 constitutional amendments on the November General Election Ballot. Its not too early to start reading and becoming familiar with the amendments as some are lengthy and will require research prior to voting. We have also received some good information from the Florida Bar Association regarding Question and Answers about Florida Judges, Judicial Elections and Merit Retention which will also be on the November ballot. Be sure to review the online publication; it will answer many common questions. You can locate links to both of these items under Whats New on the front page of our website (www. votesjc.com). As always, please feel free to contact my o ce any time you have questions or we can be of assistance at 823-2238 or visit www.votesjc.com.pattern at the Reference Desk in the library and crochet the blanket in your spare time. Drop o completed blankets and any yarn youd like to donate during regular library hours. For additional information, please call the Reference Desk at 827-6960. The MOMS Club is a wonderful way to meet other stayat-home and part-time working mothers and is a fun way for your children to socialize with other children. Mothers with children of all ages are welcome. Members for this chapter must live in the 32092 or 32095 zip codes, including all neighborhoods along the 210 corridor. We meet once a month to plan our activities for the month ahead and our meetings and activities are during the day, when stay-at-home mothers need support most. Of course, children are welcome at all of our meetings and activities. The MOMS Club is a wonderful way for you to meet other stay-at-home or part-time working mothers and is a fun way for your children to socialize with others. If you have any questions or would like to get more information to join, please email Holly at sanmoms@gmail.com or check out our website at http:\\sanmomsclub.weebly.com. TOPS (Take O Pounds Sensibly) FL#493, St. Augustine has a weekly meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesdays at the Old Colee Cove Volunteer Fire Station, located at 9105 County Road 13 North (south of Buddy Boys Grocery Store). Weigh in starts at 8:30 a.m. We are a National Weight Loss Organization, fees are low and we have lots of fun, contests and inspiring programs. All are welcome; come and join us! For more information, please contact Sara Weaver at 940-7528 or Bobbi Culbreth at 824-2466.

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Page 8, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com RACHAEL L.BENNETTfor St. JohnsCOUNTY COMMISSIONER Common Sense Solutions Fiscal Conservative Jobs Focused Paid by Rachael L Bennett, Republican, for St. Johns County Commission, District 5.www.RachaelLBennett.comPO Box 840322, Saint Augustine, FL 32080Rachael L Bennett for St. Johns County Commissioner @RachaelLBennett 904.351.6055 Rachael is a conservative Republican, a staunch supporter of property rights, and believes in the importance of individual initiative, the entrepreneurial spirit and free enterprise as the basis of a healthy economic system. As a small business owner, she understands the need to cut government regulations, reduce taxes, limit the size of government, and create a business friendly envi ronment to promote job growth. Vote for Rachael L. Bennett on August 14th!Campaign@RachaelLBennett.com 904-994-7457Call Me For A FREE Yard AnalysisJimmy WaltersJCP Resident SOLSTICE LAWN CARE, LLC Visit us at: www.solsticelawncare.com No Annual Contract No Locked-In Monthly Fees Guaranteed Service Day Full Service Lawn Program!Our Lawn Maintenance Program Includes: We Also Offer These Additional Services: I have had several inquiries about the status of the church application on Roberts Road. In June 2011, St. Johns County Commission approved a settlement agreement on the Hopewell Church PUD application. This ended two years of defending multiple state and federal lawsuits which resulted from the Board of County Commission denial of the 2008 application. The settlement addressed many issues raised by the public during extensive public hearings. The commercial strip center was eliminated. The size of the church sanctuary and church related uses was reduced by 1/3 or 76,000 square feet. The settlement allows for 20 units of special needs housing, consistent with the propertys Open Rural Zoning. No parking will be allowed on Roberts Road and turn lanes are required. The settlement includes limits on height, scale, density and lighting, all concerns raised by the community. To put this in perspective, the site is about 32 acres of which nearly 30 acres are uplands. That is larger than many shopping centers. A Publix store is about 40,000 square feet.Hopewell Church settlement agreement explainedBy Contributing Writer Cyndi Stevenson, St. Johns County Commissioner, District 1The settlement o ers signi cantly greater protections than if the county had won the lawsuit outright. The church had property rights that allowed the construction of a much larger church without Commission approval. No fees were waived in the settlement. On August 17, more than two months after the St. Johns County Commission hearing, the settlement was on Judge Michael Traynors docket. There was no appeal by the church or the Roberts Road community at the court hearing or during the appeal period that followed his action. The judges nal order includes a conceptual site plan. There has been no further activity on this site including permit applications since the June 2011 settlement. Another Baptist Church was recently in the news. They have interest in building in St. Johns County on a site southeast of County Road 210 that has frontage on Interstate 95. If you have any questions regarding this or any other county business, please do not hesitate to call me at 209-0300 to make an appointment or my cell at 699-2188.Ramp It Up cont. from page 1what better way to give back? So o and running was the Realtors Ramp It Up program! The St. Johns Housing Partnership has the ability to process the needs and get funding for equipment and materials for wheel chair requests and Mullinax has the volunteers. Mullinax calls out to the local individual real estate o ces to accept assignments when the needs are requested from Bill Lazar at the St. Johns Housing Partnership o ce, such as the call which came in last October for 12 ramps to be completed before Christmas. Each complying o ce sets a work day and their team builds a ramp in a one days time. They love it, says Mullinax. Our crews are pretty much half men and half women. What a great opportunity for groups to have a team building experience doing something for someone else! Just the other day a group on a construction site named their female sta the WoodChicks! According to Mark Rosener, manger of Watson Realtys of- ce on County Road 210, The Ramp It Up day for our o ce gives us a huge feeling of really doing something special for someone. Whats better than a real hard day of work real physical work for all of us? Besides, I love to use a nail gun; its a real powerful feeling! All told for 2011, this service organization constructed 20 custom engineered wheel chair ramps at 20 di erent private residences in St. Johns County for some well-deserving homeowners. Hows that for a Humanitarian of the Year Award recipient and his cohorts? the tunes composer Sammy Nestico and actually received a return call from Nestico. Isabelle keeps Nesticos phone number on his cell phone as a cherished memento. The music during the concert was so stimulating that it swept some of the audience right out of their seats to break into dance at the back of the hall. It was so exciting that Senior Center Director Dorazio also joined in. This experience was so important to me, said band member Madeline Lee, because we were able to share the timeless appreciation of the music with the seniors that they fell in love with in their youth. It really took them back in time. Time may have gone by but the memories were still clear and fresh as many of the seniors were able to remember and add the lyrics to the songs. Visiting the Trout Creek Senior Center in Orangedale and watching the FCMS Jazz Ensemble was an experience which reveled two of the special gems we possess here in NW St Johns County. To learn more about the center, please contact Judy Dorazio at 522-1611. And be sure to keep a spot on your calendar open for attending a concert by the FCMS Jazz Ensemble. It surely will bring back memories of attending a big band concert at the local town coliseum or at least watching the big band shows on Sunday evening in the s! FCMS Jazz Ensemble cont. from page 1 Everybody reads The CreekLine! Shouldnt your ad be included?lg@rtpublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 9 Dr. Levine is dedicated to your familys health through every stage of life. He has served Julington Creek for more than 12 years and is ready to provide you with a medical home. Services include: Sports/school physicals Immunizations Well visits for adults and children GYN care Coordination of care for chronic conditions (diabetes, hypertension, etc.) On-site lab for all blood drawsFinding the right family doctor just got easier.Same-day acute appointments 287.2794Baptist Primary Care Julington Creek1400 Bishop Estates Road, St. Johns, FL 32259 Donald J. Levine, MD Board-Certified, Family Practice, along with Carol A. Noell, PA-C 13www.baptistprimarycare.net/levine-md www.maymgt.com MAY Management Services, Inc.Licensed Property ManagementMAY Realty & Resort RentalsLicensed Real Estate Brokerage Our job is to help Boards of Directors successfully manage their Associations The Neighborhoods of World Golf Village Tim HutchisonRegional ManagerJulington Creek Plantation 1637 Racetrack Road #206 St. Johns, Florida 32259904-880-8796New Ofce!Pam Drury Licensed Property ManagerDottie KrinerLicensed Property ManagerRich Curran-Kelley, CAMRegional ManagerDiane HartmanLicensed Property ManagerKathy MayeldLicensed Property ManagerDeborah AlleyLicensed Property ManagerLaura QualantoneLicensed Property Manager904-940-1002 Many know The Wall Street Journal as a bastion of corporate life and the reporting of same. What many dont know is the Journal, now the daily newspaper with the highest paid circulation in the country, has expanding reporting beyond the corporate boardroom. In the April 21, 2012 edition of the Journal, a major section front piece, Rethinking The War On Drugs examines how the current war on drugs simply isnt working and there may be simple solutions right in front of us which satisfy everyone from law and order advocates to those who say drugs should be legalized. Mark A.R. Kleiman, Jonathan P. Caulkins and Angela Hawken are the authors of this radical piece and they start with looking at the failed war on alcohol. Prohibition didnt work was, in fact, a spectacular failure and, as good as many Alcoholics Anonymous programs are, they are not the ultimate answer either. The trio cites some less extreme methods already in use for e ectively treating drunk drivers, one which is already showing great success and one proposed program. The federal tax on alcohol has never risen with in ation; today it is e ectively down to about a fth of its Korean War level in constant-dollar terms. For those who didnt pay atten-Going to counseling for the rst time can be stressful, especially deciding who to see. Between licensed counselors, social workers, psychologists, coaches and church counselors, it can be overwhelming. It helps to know what to look for and what questions to ask before making your decision. One of the rst questions you might ask is what are the persons quali cations for counseling? Education can vary from taking a course or two through a church or school to having a graduate or post-graduate degree from an accredited university program. Credentials can include a certi cate from a church or school, certi cation from a regional or national organization or licensure from the State of Florida. State licensure means the counselor has met strict requirements for education and experience and is held accountable by Florida law to act ethically and responsibly when working with clients. Next, nd out what the person believes about mental and emotional health, what causes problems for people and how problems are solved. Are people generally healthy but strug-Political commentaryNo one is winning the war on drugsBy J. Bruce Richardsontion in history class, the Korean War was fought from 1950 to 1953. The article cites Philip Cook of Duke University suggesting that tripling the tax from about a dime to about 30 cents a drink would prevent at least 1,000 homicides and 2,000 motor vehicle fatalities a year, all without any new monies going to criminals, putting anyone else in already expensive jails or having law enforcement mount expensive enforcement programs. For those against any new taxes of any type, this group generally approves of higher taxes on tobacco users, which have soared to unimaginable levels over the past two decades. Tripling the alcohol tax would be helping people selfregulate through economic not moral or legal pressure. The Philip Cook approach doesnt work across the board with intentional heavy drinkers, the ones many of us would label professional drunks. The article cites a district court judge in South Dakota who has developed a promising approach. Judge Larry Long created in 2005 what he calls 24/7 Sobriety. The program requires people who commit alcoholrelated crimes (including, but not limited to drunk drivers) to show up twice a day, seven days a week, for Breathalyzer tests as a condition of staying out of jail. If they fail to appear or if the test shows they have been drinking, they go straight to jail for a day. So far, more than 99 percent of the time, they show up as ordered and are sober. They can choose to go to alcohol treatment or go to other programs, but they cannot choose to keep drinking. The South Dakota state attorney generals o ce says some 20,000 people in South Dakota have participated in 24/7 Sobriety and the program has made a huge dent in subsequent arrests for driving under the in uence. The article goes on to say that by distinguishing sharply between people who use alcohol abusively and the larger group of population who are non-users, 24/7 Sobriety moves past the simple concept of either banning a drug entirely or making it legal in unlimited quantities for adults. These are two examples one hypothetical and one in real life which have the ability to produce desired results without high costs to taxpayers or lifealtering negative consequences to users, who at the same time are given a chance to change their behavior on their own, perhaps always the best choice. More in this space next month.J. Bruce Richardson is a longtime journalist and consultant who writes in Jacksonville print publications exclusively for RT Publishing, Inc. He has led projects in Washington as well as Ottawa, Canada and authors an Internet-based transportation column which is read in more than 60 countries. He lives and works in Jacksonville.Choose the counseling professional that is best for youBy Contributing Writer Dr. Jenny Preffer, PhD, LMHC, ACS, RN, North Florida Counseling and Mediation Services, LLCgling with circumstances that overwhelm their current coping skills or do people have varying degrees of diagnosable mental illness that need treatment or cure? Professionals should be able to explain the theory that guides their beliefs about problems and their client work. Family Systems counselors believe that we learn good and bad habits from the family we grew up in and continue to unconsciously use those same practices in our current relationships. Cognitive Behaviorists believe that our thoughts, even subconscious thoughts, drive our actions and by changing our thoughts, we change our behavior. Finally, look at the practice itself. When you call or email for information, how quickly does someone respond to you? Are your questions answered by an administrative person or by the counselor? Through talking or reading on a website, do you have a good sense of who the counselor is before you walk in the door? How many clients does the counselor see in a day? Insurance payments for counseling are often low and counselors may see 10 to 12 clients back-toback each day. Will this provide enough time for the counselor to think about you and your counseling needs? Much of the research shows that the client-counselor relationship is one of the strongest factors in helping people cope with life issues and become emotionally healthier. Take time to ask questions and choose the counseling professional that is best for you. For additional information, please contact jpre er@north counseling.com. Share your news!editor@thecreekline.com

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Page 10, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com Cardiovascular Disease (CAD) and Cholesterol VolunteerThe St. Johns Center for Clinical Research is currently seeking volunteers for a clinical research study evaluating an investigational medication for cholesterol when added to your current statin treatment. You may be eligible if you: such as heart attack, stroke, heart bypass, carotid artery disease or peripheral vascular disease Qualified participants receive compensation for time and travel. For more information call:St. Johns Center for Clinical Research (904) 209-3173 For Appointment Call904-230-0080 NEW LOCATION! 485 State Road 13Suite 3 (Next to Burger King) Dr. Thomas Lahmannwww.julingtoncreekchiro.com Is Back or Neck Pain Impacting Your Life? Dr. Thomas Lahmann Chiropractic PhysicianHumana Beech Street A Proud Participating Provider for Aetna and Blue Cross / Blue Shield United Insurance Plans Accepts All Auto Insurance Julington Creek Chiropractic & Wellness Center P.A.SpineMedTM Spinal Disc DecompressionA Safe and Pain-Free Procedure Designed for Back & Neck pain Non-Surgical, Drug Free Procedures for: Have you ever noticed how government often fails in the management of taxpayer money? We see this happening almost everywhere in government. Maybe it is because government has no incentive to save money when they can just increase your taxes to x their mismanagement. What if they operated more like a business? Think what would happen if they forgot about their power to tax and just managed the taxes received at current taxing levels to generate the most services for the least cost without any anticipation to raise taxes for many years. Does that appeal to you as a JCP taxpayer? The JCP CDD has several departments and programs providing similar services that private businesses provide (i.e., child care, tness lessons, a restaurant) and those CDD program o erings require users of those programs to pay extra fees. That system was apparently adopted during the planning of the new recreation center. Fast forward to 2012. Now, only Are you ready to buy an investment property that can give you a good rate on return? Then think long term. The day of ipping houses for quick pro t is past. For small investors long-term rentals make the most sense. More people than ever are becoming renters which makes owning investment properties very lucrative in todays market. I own and manage 17 rentals in Jacksonville. The following steps are essential to becoming a successful investor in rental properties. Know your budget. Investment properties that fall in the $20,000 to $50,000 range are the real money makers. To make the best rate of return you should be able to recoup your investment within a two to three year time frame. Whether you pay cash or you nance the property, you should escrow for taxes and insurance and should always have a cushion to fall back on for repairs and to cover any vacancies. Your budget should factor in remodel time. This is especially true if you have a mortgage on the property since that will come due whether or not you have a tenant in the property. Do your research. Find the area you are interested in and study the demographics for that area. Find a realtor that you trust to help with your research. Location is one of the most important things to consider. It is best to keep it close to your home since you can count on things breaking late at night or on weekends. Julington Creek Plantation CDD reportBy Contributing Writer Sam Lansdale, Supervisor, Julington Creek Plantation Community Development Districtone of those programs is budgeted to cover its variable costs. Yes, every department except one requires the taxpayers to subsidize their variable costs. I am not including and dont expect the programs to cover the approximately $2,000,000 or about $250,000 incurred per department in direct overhead cost which includes the payment of the infrastructure bonds, utilities and all general overhead. However, I am sure we can reduce our overhead expenses. I am only suggesting that the user-paid programs generate su cient revenues to at least cover the extra expenses required to provide such services, since the residents do not receive direct bene t from those extra services as the users do. It is my opinion that the JCP CDD Board of Supervisors should adopt a measurable plan to reduce operating expenses where currently possible and manage the CDD facilities and programs to prevent future tax increases, all without a reduction in the level of service. Two seats on the CDD Board of Supervisors will be lled at this years general election. I am hopeful some candidates will campaign for the CDD to live within its means and run more like a business. We should not expand into more private business ventures to make more money, but rather view taxpayer money as a precious commodity and do everything possible to get the most out of every tax dollar paid the CDD, towards providing the high level of services our residents desire, but at less cost. I know we can. We work for you and I encourage you to attend the Board of Supervisors meetings and voice your concerns or opinions on how we are conducting your business. The next CDD meetings will take place on June 10, 2012, and July 12, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. at the JCP Recreation Center. Feel free to contact me day or night via e-mail or phone (509-4902 or SLansdale@ jcpcdd.org). This article is my opinion and in no way constitutes nor implies District opinion, endorsement, sponsorship or viewpoint. The views expressed may or may not be shared by the other JCP CDD Supervisors.Editors Note: The CreekLine is appreciative that Supervisor Lansdale approached us and offered to write a column for us to share with our readers. The CreekLine is, and has always been, agreeable to publishing columns penned by our elected of cials so that they Investing in todays real estate marketBy Contributing Writer Kathy Wiedegreen, Licensed Realtor, Prudential Network Realty You must have vision! Our properties are xer-uppers and we do most of the work ourselves. Know your own capabilities. Consider the condition of plumbing, roof, electrical, HVAC, etc. Develop a list of licensed contractors who are experts in their eld and can pull permits and perform major repairs for you. Dont over improve. Most renters are looking for a clean, bright and well maintained property. They expect things to work properly and to have a quick and friendly response to their repair needs. Adequate heat and air and bathrooms and kitchens that work properly are very important and will go a long way in keeping your tenants happy. Have a good attorney and a good accountant. They keep up with current laws and can help you protect your investment. For additional information, please contact kathysellsjax@ gmail.com.The St. Johns County School Board approved the name Palencia Elementary School for the school previously known as Elementary L. Over the last several months, Principal Don Campbell collected input from the public and provided the suggested names to school board members during previous workshops. Palencia Elementary will open for the 2012-2013 school year and is being constructed at 355 Palencia Village Drive. The 738 student school will contain approximately 100,000 square feet and 44 classrooms. Movable walls will open to create exible-sized classroom spaces and enable teachers and paraprofessionals to work cooperatively to facilitate learning for students through a variety of activities. This school will also include state-of-the-art technology and is being built to Green Building Standards. For more information on Palencia Elementary School, visit www-pes.stjohns.k12. .usElementary L is named! may communicate directly with our readers, their constituents. Any questions or requests for additional public servant columns may be directed to editor@thecreekline.com. Businessnot as bigas it used to be?Call for a free consultation & well work at increasing your business!The CreekLineLinda Gay 287-4913

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 11 Your Voice of ReasonPaid by Cyndi Stevenson, Republican for St. Johns County Commission District 1Dr. Gus J. Gari D.D.S. To Schedule an appointment call287-0033 Getting a Beautiful SmileA beautiful smile has a great aect on you and those around you. If you dont love your smile you may be able to do something about it. Theres no reason to live with gaps in your teeth or with teeth that are discolored, worn, chipped, badly shaped or crooked. A veneer placed on top of your teeth can correct natures mistake or the results of an injury and help you have a beautiful smile. Veneers are thin, custommade shells of porcelain materials designed to cover the front side of teeth. These shells are bonded to the front of the teeth changing their color, shape, size, or length. This is a short process that only take a couple of visits and a few weeks to complete. Your dentist will work with you to achieve the beautiful smile you have always wanted. Before & After front 4 veneers I specialize in helping investors identify and buy good investment properties. I have personally been successful in buying and managing investment properties. Call me today for more information. Kathy Wiedegreen, REALTOR Prudential Network Realty Cell: 904-316-4774 Ofce: 904-260-4300 www.KathySellsJacksonville.com WHY INVEST IN REAL ESTATE? More people than ever are renting Good rate of return on investment Available inventory Prices will never be better Inc.Since 1981 Carpentry 260-4820 Since hurricane season of- cially began June 1, the St. Johns River Water Management District has added information to its website to assist the public and local governments access resources during severe storm events. The web pages ( oridaswater. com/storm) include links to ood statements and warnings, river stage and ooding data and local government emergency contacts. Also included are links to the National Weather Service, Florida Division of Emergency Management and the United States Geological Surveys interactive map of current conditions in the state. Floridas many waterways and extensive coastline make the state especially vulnerable to oods. When hurricanes and other storms bring high volumes of rain in short periods of time, ooding can result. The district works closely with local governments yearround to develop improved ood management plans, and to help communities establish and implement strategies to deal with oods once they occur. Local governments are the primary entities responsible for implementing state-of-emergency declara-According to the American Cancer Society, excluding cancers of the skin, breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, accounting for more than one in four cancers diagnosed in United States women. To help raise funds to end breast cancer, 44 Jacksonville area It is always sad to see an organization that has contributed so much to our community make the decision to discontinue its activities. On May 10, that is what happened to the North Florida Chapter of The National Society of Arts and Letters. It had all started in 1980, when under the guidance of the late Nancy Strecker, Maggie Reisler and more than 50 supporters from the Jacksonville area, the chapter received its charter and o cially began its inspiring projects supporting the arts and emerging young artists. The national organization was founded in 1944. It sponsors an annual competition rotating through the areas of art, music, literature, drama and dance. The national competition o ers substantial cash awards and recognition. It is preceded by local chapter competitions where a winner is selected to attend and compete on the national level. Local cash awards are also made and the young artists have the opportunity to expose their talent to a broad eld of supporters and lovers of the arts. Although this is the prime focus of the organization, its monthly meetings also sponsor lectures and presentations and o er additional support to emerging young artists. And yes, a few of the North Florida chapter winners have gone on to be successful on EncoreA fond farewell!By Betty Swenson Bergmark, Professor Emeritus, Jacksonville UniversityHurricane season tips available in one locationBy Contributing Writer Hank Largin, St. Johns River Water Management Districttions, evacuations and rescue e orts during ood-related disasters. Partnerships between the public and government entities are necessary to minimize ooding impacts, protect personal property and assist ood victims during and after storms. In the event of a tropical storm or hurricane, the district assists local governments by issuing emergency orders that allow for the pumping of water to alleviate ooding when public health and safety are at risk. The district also issues emergency orders to authorize repair, replacement or restoration of public and private property. To prepare for hurricane season the public can protect themselves and their property by: Keeping debris out of storm drains and ditches. Reporting clogged ditches to local governments. Cleaning out gutters and extending downspouts at least four feet from the home. Building up the ground around the home to promote drainage away from the foundation. Obtaining ood insurance through the National Flood Insurance Program.a national level. They include a poet in 1983, a dancer in 1985 and an author in1988. The North Florida Chapter also hosted the national competition in 1995, 2002 and 2006, bringing outstanding talent and guests to our community from all over the country. All this has been going on for more than 30 years, but recently, like many volunteer organizations, it has become increasingly di cult to nd ways to attract younger members with the energy and enthusiasm to move forward. And so we lose another wonderful organization! It will be sorely missed. On a more positive note! If you havent already attended a performance by the Ritz Chamber Players, there is still one concert left in the current season. On Wednesday, June 16 their Finale concert will be presented at Jacoby Symphony Hall at 7:30 p.m. Entitled Of Music, Love and Poetry, it promises inspiration for us all. Fortunately this Finale is not the end. Plans are in the making for summer presentations as well as the upcoming concerts for 2012 -2013. Guided as usual by Executive and Artistic Director Terrance Patterson, an exciting year is promised. For additional information you can call the Times Union Center for the Performing Arts Box O ce at 354 5547 or pull up the website at www. ritzchamberplayers.org.Local franchise and 26.2 with Donna team up to nish breast cancerThe UPS Store locations are teaming up with the 26.2 with Donna Foundation. Throughout the year, participating The UPS Store locations will o er on-site registrations for the 2013 26.2 with Donna The National Marathon to Finish Breast Cancer, as well as the half marathon and relay, provide in-store support for the foundation and sponsor the silent auction at the 26.2 with Donna Health and Fitness Expo. Most people know someone whose life has been impacted by breast cancer a mother, a sister, a friend, a wife, said Doug Nunnery, who owns a The UPS Store franchise location in Saint Johns. We are honored to support Donna and her e orts, founded in Jacksonville and we hope to support her for many years to come. 26.2 with Donna is a private nonpro t organization in Northeast Florida whose mission is to produce world-class events dedicated exclusively to raising funds to end breast cancer. Onehundred percent of raised funds and race proceeds for all 26.2 with Donna events go to breast cancer research and care. We are thrilled to have the support of The UPS Store locations here in Jacksonville, said Donna Deegan, founder and event chairman. Their e orts will be a valuable asset as we work towards our goal to nish breast cancer. Be sure to see the ad for The UPS Store in this issue of The CreekLine! WWW WWWwww.TheCreekLine.comVisit our website: The CreekLine YOURCommunity Newspapereditor@thecreekline.com

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Page 12, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com Fellows of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Full service care of women including: Annual Exams Endometrial Ablation No-incision Tubal Ligation In-office Surgery Advanced Laparoscopic Surgery Robotic Surgery Urinary IncontinenceComplete Obstetric Care, including High Risk PregnancyMenopausal Care Baptist Division 1Dr. Wade Barnes Dr. W. David Boyd Dr. Lindsay DeNicola Foutz Dr. Caron D. Gutovitz Dr. Catherine J. McIntyre Dr. Neil Sager Dr. Mary Ellen Wechter Joette Anderson A.R.N.P. Lisa Rhoad, A.R.N.P. Reagan Thomas, A.R.N.P.904-399-4862 12110 San Jose Boulevard Jacksonville, FL 32223 836 Prudential Drive, Suite 1202 Jacksonville, FL 32207 Nowis the timeto make your move. Conventional and Jumbo Loans USDA Rural Developement Construction to Perm FHA and VA Loans Condo Loans Fixed or Adjustable Rates First Federal offers: All loans subject to credit underwriting and approval. Please contact a mortgage originator for more details on available loan programs. Contact Scott Neeley Stronger...Faster...Better RACE TRACK RDFLORA BRANCH BLVD. SR 13PUBLIX Fred Baldwin, PT, DPT, SCS, ATC, PES and Tobi Baldwin, PT, DPT, MS, OCS, MTC, FAAOMPT Sports Medicine providers for Creeks Athletic Association Soccer. Physical Therapy Sports Performance Pilates Engineering for Kids is proud to announce it has awarded a new franchise to Tricia Pelger of St. Johns. She has already started scheduling Engineering for Kids programs in the North Florida area. Engineering for Kids brings science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), to kids ages four to 14 in a fun and challenging way through classes, camps, workshops, clubs and parties. We are proud to inspire children to build on their natural curiosity by teaching engineering concepts through hands-on learning. Engineering is, after all, one of the fastThe St. Johns County Public Library System is teaming up with the Florida Institute of Certi ed Public Accountants to o er another installment of the free Teen Financial Literacy Series. A one-day seminar designed speci cally for individuals aged 15 to 20 will be held at each branch of the library between June 26 and August 7. The classes will be taught by the St. Johns River Chapter of the Florida Institute of Certi ed Public Accountants. Subjects will include budgeting, saving, personal investing, using credit wisely, avoiding identity theft and other related topics. The Teen Financial Literacy Series is ideal for recent high school graduates, those starting a rst job, students heading o to college or any teen who wants to learn about managing money. The St. Johns County Public Library System began o ering this successful program annually since 2008 and the program has served as a model for other Florida libraries. Class sizes are limited, so call each branch to register. Lunch will be provided at each location by the Friends of the Library. All classes are 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (same class repeated at each location) Saturday, June 23 Southeast Branch Library, 8276900 Saturday, June 30 Main I suspect just about all Jacksonville residents have visited the island with no name, a strip of land that causes cartographers or map-makers dismay. The northern portion of the isle lies in Duval County and the southern most section in St. Johns. Where, youre likely thinking? Im talking about a 100-year-old nearby barrier island that was a peninsula until 1912. At that time a 10-mile channel was dug connecting the San Pablo and Tolomato Rivers. This cut separated the land from the mainland to clear the path for the Intracoastal Waterway, and thus, created an island. Jacksonville locals think of the area as The Beaches but collectively the towns of Mayport (within Jacksonville city limits and primarily a military base), Neptune Beach, Atlantic Beach, Jacksonville Beach (each an incorporated town with its own Jacksonvilles island with no nameBy Contributing Travel Writer Debi Lander, www.bylandersea.communicipal government), Ponte Vedra and Palm Valley (within St. Johns County) form the unnamed mass. Recent discussions to possibly name the strip San Pablo Island were renewed by historians and o cials, but con icts arise since no legislative body or commission controls the entity. The Beaches area remained very sparsely populated until the end of the 19th century until resorts were developed. Jacksonville Beach was known as Ruby (circa 1884) named by W.E. Scull, a railroad surveyor with the Jacksonville and Atlantic Railway Company, for his daughter. By 1885, the railroad and depot were completed and Ruby was transformed into a tent city as crowds of beachgoers arrived with tents. But then the town was renamed Pablo Beach, after the San Pablo River, a name it kept for nearly 30 years before settling on Jacksonville Beach in 1925. A series of luxury hotels were constructed, but the only one that remains is the Casa Marina. The Spanish-Mediterranean Casa Marina stood as the grand dame of its day. Thankfully, it was constructed as a reproof building composed of stucco, concrete, tile and an automatic sprinkler system. Hotel guests included the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, John D. Rockefeller and Presidents Harry S. Truman and F.D.R. The Casa Marina Hotel was recognized in 2005 by the National Trust for Historic Preservation as one of the Historic Hotels of America and is now preserved and maintained as one of the prestigious Historic Hotels in America. Atlantic Beach also grew as a resort community around Henry Flaglers large 1901 Continental Hotel and smaller hotels that arose at Mayport. Sadly, the Continental burned to the ground in 1919. Neptune Beach seceded from Jacksonville Beach in 1931 and incorporated as its own town. In 1914 mineral deposits were discovered at Ponte Vedra and although hard to believe, this area became known Mineral City. Following World War I, real estate development erupted and the marketed name was changed to Ponte Vedra Beach. Relations between The Beaches and the Jacksonville city government havent always been easy and locals have threatened to form their own Ocean County. This con ict diverted when Neptune Beach resident John Delaney was elected mayor of Jacksonville in 1995. However, the year is now 2012 and The Beaches area thrives with well established residential communities and a booming tourist arena, but they still reside on the island with no name. Teen nancial literacy series at St. Johns County Public LibraryLibrary, St. Augustine, 8276940 Saturday, July 7 Bartram Trail Branch Library, 8276960 Saturday, July 21 Hastings Branch Library, 827-6970 Saturday, July 28 Ponte Vedra Beach Branch Library, 827-6950 For more information, visit www.sjcpls.org or contact Library Administration at 827-6925. Calling all future engineers!est growing industries in the world! Engineering for Kids uses hands-on projects to demonstrate a variety of engineering concepts. These projects encourage students to use di erent levels of critical thinking skills and creative problem solving skills. Just as important, the students have fun while learning. Pelger, who has worked as a human resources professional in the corporate world for the past 12 years, is uniquely quali- ed to run this new franchise. Throughout her career, she has been involved in the facilitation and development of training programs and she appreciates the possibilities discovered from group interaction and learning. Pelger received her MBA from Jacksonville University. She holds a Bachelor of Business Administration in marketing from the University of North Florida. Pelger focuses on shared learning opportunities and enjoys hands-on and interactive activities. Engineering has a creative aspect which immediately piqued her curiosity. By dreaming up imaginative, practical solutions, engineers are changing the world all the time and Pelger is excited to introduce Engineering for Kids to North Florida. Look for their ad in this issue of The CreekLine! Cngrlis!Creekside High School Student Volunteer of the Year Rachel Bu Rachel also placed second in the county. The CreekLineEverybody Gets It. Everybody Reads It.editor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 13 CHESTMOVES FAST.PAINSO SHOULD YOU.Its a fact. The rst hour of a heart attack is the most critical. The golden hour can make the difference between life and death. If you experience heart attack symptoms, move quickly. Call 911 or go immediately to Baptist Souths Certied Chest Pain Center in the Emergency Center. Growing to serve you better.Expanded Emergency Center at Baptist South. Our newly expanded Emergency Center has more than doubled in size. New Cardiac Cath Lab at Baptist South. Now offering diagnostic cardiac catheterizations, as well as diagnostic and interventional peripheral vascular catheterizations. Conveniently located at Old St. Augustine Road and I-95 The Timucuan Federation Native Sons and Daughters chapter hosted the seventh annual Alexs Lemonade Stand at various Publix Supermarkets throughout Jacksonville. The Native Sons and Daughters (formerly known as Indian Guides/ Indian Princess) manned nearly 20 di erent stores around the area. Native Sons and Daughters is designed to foster one-onone, father-child interaction within a group setting based on a Native American theme. Founded in 2000, Alexs Lemonade Stand Foundation raises funds as well as public awareness to research childhood cancer research and treatments. The Lemonade for Life Native Sons and Daughters host Alexs Lemonade StandBy Contributing Writer Brian Quirkfundraiser rst began when a local Jacksonville family, whose daughter battled cancer, decided to raise funds and awareness for the disease. Lina Rak was diagnosed with Stage IV neuroblastoma, an often deadly pediatric cancer, over 10 years ago. Though the Rak family has since moved out of the area, the Native Sons and Daughters continue their mission. More than 200 of our children, ages ve through 12, volunteered to assist in this years event. This years contribution raises our programs total donation to Alexs Lemonade to over $60,000. We want to congratulate all of our volunteers and thank our sponsors, Publix Supermarkets and Pepsi. The Timucuan Federation Native Sons and Daughters family designation is derived from the name of one of the principal tribes of the northeast Florida area, the Timucua, Timagoa, Tornoco or Atimuca, whose territory was from about St. Augustine and on to the middle St John River area. The history of the Timucuan tribes begins with the landing of Ponce de Leon near the site of the present St. Augustine in 1513. Children who participate in the present day Native Sons and Daughters not only learn about Native American history and traditions with their fathers, but they also participate in many fun activities such as camp outs and community service events such as the Alexs Lemonade Stand. For more information about Alexs Lemonade Stand and how you can help out, please visit www.alexslemonade.org. If you are interested in getting additional information about our unique Native Sons and Daughters father/child program, please log onto www.timucuan.org. President-elect Steve Carter of Rotary Club of St. Johns presents check for $500 to Kathy Bravo of JCP CARES. This donation will be use to support the Homeless Student Backpack program which provides homeless children a variety of art activities, books, food and other essentials during this dif cult time. The Rotary Club of St. Johns meets most Friday mornings from 7:30 a.m. until 8:30 a.m. at the St. Johns Golf and Country Club House (located at County Road 210 and Leo Maguire). Please call Tony Lego at 4011235 with any questions. Come join us in making a difference in our local community. Service above self.

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Page 14, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com Receive a.25%Eco-Friendly Rate Discount Eco-Friendly Auto Loan program effective April 1, 2012 and can be withdra wn at any time without prior notice. Does not apply t o loans already financed with First Florida Credit Union or its divisions. Does not apply to dealer-direct loans. Eligible new or used vehicles are those that have an EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) estimated highway fuel economy of 30 MPG (Miles Per Gallon) or greater, as list ed on www.fueleconomy.gov. Your APR (Annual Percentage Rate) and term may vary based on your creditworthiness and amount financed. ** Advertised APR (Annual Percentage Rate) is effective as of April 1, 2012 and reflects terms up to 48 months. Advertised rate is subject to change at any time without prior notice. For new vehicles only: minimum loan amount $25,000. Other loan terms (up to 72 months) are available for new and used autos. Q ualifications and some restrictions apply.1950 CR 210 W., St. Johns, FL, 32259 (next to St. Johns Forest) www.firstflorida.orgyour wallet, too! Anyone who lives or works in Saint Johns, Duval, Flagler, Clay, Baker, or Nassau County Can Join! S St. rs N St J tf s W. o S w. o J oh or u 0 W to w ke oh ns da o hn F o 210 ext w R 2 (ne s, ore g CR FL st) 3 50 225 19 Eco-Friendly Auto Loan program effective April 1, 2012 and can be withdra wn at any time without prior notice. Does not apply t o loans already financed with First Florida Credit Union or its divisions. Does not apply to dealer-direct loans. Eligible new or used vehicles are those that have an EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) estimated highway fuel economy of 30 MPG (Miles Per Gallon) or greater, as list ed on www.fueleconomy.gov. Your APR (Annual Percentage Rate) and term may vary based on your creditworthiness and amount financed. ** Advertised APR (Annual Percentage Rate) is effective as of April 1, 2012 and reflects terms up to 48 months. Advertised rate is subject to change at any time without prior notice. For new vehicles only: minimum loan amount $25,000. Other loan terms (up to 72 months) are available for new and used autos. Q ualifications and some restrictions apply.1950 CR 210 W., St. Johns, FL, 32259 (next to St. Johns Forest) www.firstflorida.org Your savings federally insured to at least $250,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government AgencyNCUA Other Loan Features Flexible Repayment Terms Up to 84 Months 100% Financing Available No Application FeeEco-FriendlyAuto L ans Save Fuel Save Money Save the EnvironmentFor a limited time, at First Florida, youll receive an additional .25% off our already, low rate auto loans when you finance a new or used vehicle that has an EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) estimated highway fuel economy of 30 MPG (Miles Per Gallon) or greater. This Eco-Friendly rate discount applies to refinances, too. So, bring us the fuel-efficient car youve financed elsewhere. Terms Up to 48 Months 2.24%** Rate Discount for Automatic Loan Payments (Available for All Terms) .25% Eco-Friendly Rate Discount (Available for All Terms) .25% Annual Percentage Rate for Terms Up to 48 Months 1.74% Go green and get an even better rate Annual Percentage Rate As Low As* Better for the environment AND Anyone who lives or works in Saint Johns, Duval, Flagler, Clay, Baker, or Nassau County Can Join! Approval is fast and easy!Stop by; call (904)808-4644 or (800)766-4328, ext. 1; or visit our Web site www.firstflorida.org.

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 15 Are you looking for your Stylist? .....Here they are! Come see them...We look forward to giving you Panache!Front Row: Mariko DeMeyer (Master), Ebony Mosley (Artist), Megan Montgomery (Artist), Lindsey Bick (Artist), Char Trimble (Top Stylist), Hollyann Piety (Artist). Back Row: Kristina Freeman (Artist), Merary Betancourth (Assistant), Blair McKinnerney (Assistant), Paula Snellings (Top Stylist), Carl Slack (Top Stylist), Carolina Torres (Artist) 904-209-13202758 Racetrack Road Publix Plantation Plaza Tues Fri 9-8 & Sat 9-7$10 Off Any style or serviceexpires 7/31/12 HEARWHAT YOUVE BEEN MISSINGNo matter how close you are to hitting par, the sounds of a game of golf alone can make an afternoon enjoyable. What round would be complete without the sounds of a strong drive, the ball hitting the bottom of the cup, and of course the swing tips from your foursomewhether you asked for them or not. But these simple pleasures can be lost if you suffer from hearing loss. Mandarin Hearing and Balance Center offers an extensive selection of digital hearing devices, backed by our superior level of professionalism and expertise. Call us today so you dont miss one more thing! LINDZEE NUNEZ, MS, CCC-A GLENN W. KNOX, MD, FACS12276 SAN JOSE BLVD., STE 516 JACKSONVILLE, FL 32223904-292-9777 WWW.DOCTORKNOX.COM Limited Time Offer:Offer expires 6/29/12. Some restrictions apply. Not to be combined with any other offers. FREE Hearing Aid Evaluation Dental Arts Family & Cosmetic Dentistry, Inc.163 Hampton Pointe Dr. Suites 1 & 2 St. Augustine, FL 32092 Open Monday Thursday230-5590 frontdesk@jaxdentalarts.comwww.jaxdentalarts.com We welcome new smiles!Dr. Atosa M. KhanMember American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry $99 Special X-rays, Exam & Cleaning (in the absence of gum disease) Uninsured patients only30% OFF Any TreatmentUninsured patients onlyThe Art of a Healthy Smile CR210 I 95 Cimmarone BLVD Hampton Pointe 163 Helping Hands of St. Johns County will meet on Friday, June 29 at 11:00 a.m. at Faith Community Church Community Center on County Road 210 next to Cimarrone. This months If you are willing to spend a little time this summer to help out others, there is an opportunity waiting for you! RSVP of St. Johns County is looking for community members to help out once a week in the following areas: reading program for third graders; activity assistance with the Boys and Girls Club; reading and classroom help with Head Start; and algebra camp for high school and middle school students. Hours are exible and even if you are traveling this summer you can help out while you are in town. There are speci c needs I am a transplant from England and I had lost touch with all my surviving relatives, in spite of e orts to catch up with them in recent years. A few months ago, the phone rang, and a lady asked for me, saying, You dont know me, but I am your cousin. She is the granddaughter of one of my fathers older brothers, who had emigrated to the United States in the 1920s and we had lost touch a long time ago. My interest in genealogy was awakened when she allowed me to access our family tree, which went back as far as 1570. We hope to meet in person this summer. A few weeks ago, as I was checking out a book on genealogy at the Bartram Trail Library, a librarian asked if I was interested in attending a meeting of the Genealogy Club which meets there each month. I felt somehow compelled to go to my very rst one this May. I arrived knowing no one. There were six members present, plus the very helpful Its a small world when studying genealogyYour family history may surprise you!By Contributing Writer Carole Traynham-Vivionlibrarian. The topic was Sharing Your Biggest Finds. The rst participant was Gary I., who shared his search for an ancestor from Missouri. I realized that he was referring to Moniteau County, where my husband was born and I asked him if he was talking about Jamestown, a small community (which boasted 299 residents the last time we were there in 2009). Amazingly, Gary was also from Jamestown and after some discussion, it was determined that he and my husband, Noel, are third cousins once removed, on Noels fathers side. We later realized that they were related through Noels mother as well. Garys grandparents farm was located next to Noels grandparents farm where Noel and his parents lived for a few years during his childhood and they knew Garys family. Gary and Noel had not met since Gary was born the year after Noel and his parents moved away. Who would have imagined that a previously unknown relative from a town 1500 miles away would be living just ve miles down the road from where we live. I just couldnt wait to get home to announce to my astonished husband that I had found a cousin of whom he was unaware. I am so glad I listened to that little voice within me said You really have to go to that meeting today!Summer volunteer opportunities aboundthat we are hoping to meet this summer, said Cheryl Freeman, RSVP director. Help from community volunteers will go a very long way in meeting our goals. If a person gives just one or two hours per week, it can make all the di erence. If you would like to learn more or have any questions about volunteering in St. Johns County, call RSVP at 547-3945.Helping Hands UpdateBy Contributing Writer Jackie Valyou Helping Hands members at their May 25 meeting with their cereal and milk donation to Celebration Food Bank on Roberts Road.project will be making bows for the groups holiday project, Helping Heroes Families. Members or those interested in coming may bring red, white and blue ribbon, scissors and wire or pipe cleaners to tie the bows. On that evening, with the help of local Boy Scout troops, the group will be serving dinner to the homeless in St. Augustine through Dining with Dignity. Plans are for a barbeque with hot dogs, hamburgers, beans and tossed salad and cupcakes. Anyone interested in donating any of these items may contact jacqphil@aol.com. The Rippers continue to retro t clothing for the wounded military through Sew Much Comfort and chairman Sue Fischer can be reached at gsusan@hotmail.com for more information. They will meet at 10:00 a.m. Helping Hands is also coordinating the Fathers Day Barbeque at Trout Creek Senior Center on June 15. This is the fourth year the group has visited with the seniors and served them their special meal. Helping Hands is a volunteer group that meets once a month on the last Friday of the month to do a small project to bene t the community. There are no dues, o cers or stress. The group relies solely on donations of goods and services. Membership is always open and members come when they can and do what they can with what was donated. The community has been very supportive and it is much appreciated! Please contact jacqphil@aol.com for more information. Genealogy ClubSaturday, June 9 2:00 pm Bartram Trail Library Genealogy is a very ful lling hobby! For additional information, please call 827-6960. The CreekLineShare your news!editor@thecreekline.com Flag Day June 14

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Page 16, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com Grow Stronger, Live longer! Yoga Den Studio First Class Free Celebrating our 10th year! 200 hr Teacher Training 3 week Summer Intensive begins July 9th9 weekend 2012/2013 begins August 25/26yoga-den.com www.yoga-den.com 268-8330 2929 Plummer Cove Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32223 Located in Mandarin, just south of I-295 across from Walmart Yoga Basics Mind Body Power Yoga Yogalates Teacher TrainingLauren Wisenow atBartram Spa & Salon108 Bartram Oaks WalkLocated inside the Spa and Salon at Bartram Walk364-8498 Free Cut & Style on Thursdays!(New Clients Only) We can handle all of the details! We know the ins and outs of the local real estate market and have the knowledge and commitment to meet your needs. If you are looking to buy a home, sell your home, invest in property, or build a new home, let us be your real estate representatives. Contact us today for all of your real estate needs. big and small we sell them allNeed help buying, selling or investing in real estate?Stan & Jan Timbrook REALTORS Dr. Jenny Preer Purposefully limited practice providing the time, energy & attention you deserve North Florida Coaching North Florida Counseling & Mediation Services, LLC (904) 701-8255 www.northcoaching.com www.northcounseling.comCounseling is available for individuals (18+), couples, and families working through various issues. FL Supreme Court Certied Family Mediation Services creates personal solutions for both on-going and potential legal conicts, including child timesharing agreements. Coaching creates strategies and action plans that move you toward your goals. It is for people who want to do something more. I help students (16+) and adults dene educational, career & personal goals and create plans to overcome the obstacles in their way. Licensed Counselor, Family Mediator, Coach Why did Klee have to choose between music and art, why not choose both? asked a fth grade student after hearing about Klees life. Then students were asked to guess the title of this painting. Needs Pants! answered one student causing a round of giggles in the classroom. Third grades Henri Rousseau art project is to draw their own tiger by following a step by step progression and recreate Surprised, a tiger caught in a jungles thunderstorm. The teachers pointed out how this gives the students a chance If you develop pregnancyrelated hypertensive disorders or diabetes, you may have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease later in life, according to research in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. We wanted to learn about possible explanations as to why women with pregnancy complications tend to have more heart disease later in life, said Abigail Fraser, M.P.H., Ph.D., School of Social and Community Medicine at the University of Bristol, United Kingdom. Researchers studied 3,416 pregnant women enrolled in the Avon Longitudinal Study Meet the Artist program at LPA intrigues young mindsSubmitted by Stephanie Bradford, Liberty Pines Academyto practice motor skills for cursive writing and spatial awareness. These are examples of how art encourages problem solving and curiosity during Meet the Artist PowerPoint presentations at Liberty Pines Academy. Art is an excellent tool to teach math, social studies, science and other academics as well as developing needed skills. Children learn more e ectively and retain the information when they do something related to the topic or concept they are learning about. Meet the Artist presentations embrace Confucius saying I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand. Besides being fun, art provides children a way to express themselves by giving them freedom of choice, feeling and thought and develops their minds, creativity and problem solving abilities. As adults, Sherri Edens and Sandy Blake, co-chairs of LPAs Meet the Artist program, have found that art has opened up new worlds of learning for them too. They will de nitely miss LPAs beaming artists when soon they no longer are serving as co-chairs, since their children are in seventh and eighth grades. They are ecstatic that Diana Sarama will be next years chair. She has been decorating the bulletin board with the students artwork and artists information every few weeks and is excited about chairing the program next year. Sarama will need a co-chair along with class volunteers to help educate all of the schools budding artists and continue the artistic fun and education in class. Class volunteers should know that no art knowledge or teaching skills are required, just a willingness to have fun, encourage creativity, read a PowerPoint presentation and lead an art project four times a year. Volunteer and join us in learning about the world around us in the Meet the Artist program. We invite all interested volunteers from any school to come and check out the Power Point presentations at LPAs PTO website at www-lpa. stjohns.k12. .us/pto/Meet%20 the%20Artist Pregnancy-related complications predict CVD in middle ageBy Contributing Writer Katie Seay, American Heart Associationof Parents and Children in the early 1990s. Among them, 1,002 (29.8 percent) had one pregnancy complication, 175 (5.2 percent) had two and 26 (0.8 percent) had three. The complications included gestational or pregnancy diabetes, hypertensive (or high blood pressure-related) disorders of pregnancy (also known as preeclampsia), preterm delivery, and size of babies at birth (top and bottom 10 percent in weight). Researchers correlated these with cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors measured 18 years later when the women were an average of 48 years old. Researchers then calculated the womens odds of experiencing a cardiovascular event in the next decade using the 10-year CVD Framingham risk score, which includes such factors as age, total and HDL (good) cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, diabetes and smoking status. They found: Preeclampsia, gestational diabetes and giving birth to babies small for gestational age were associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Each complication was associated with di erent CVD risk factors. Gestational diabetes was associated with a 26 percent and preeclampsia 31 percent greater risk of developing heart disease in middle age. Among women who experienced these pregnancy complications, gestational diabetes was associated with higher levels of fasting glucose and insulin. Preeclampsia was associated with higher body mass index and larger waist circumference, as well as higher blood pressure, lipids and insulin. Women who gave birth to babies large for gestational age had larger waist circumference and higher concentrations of blood glucose. Those who had preterm babies had higher blood pressure. Pregnancy may provide an opportunity to identify women at increased risk of heart disease while they are relatively young; thus, it would be useful for medical professionals to have information on pregnancy complications so they can recommend lifestyle changes and any necessary medical intervention sooner, Fraser said. A woman who experiences complications during pregnancy should be proactive and ask her doctor about future CVD risk and steps she should take to modify her risk. The women in the study had not experienced a CVD event, so the researchers couldnt determine whether preeclampsia and/or pregnancy diabetes have separate, independent e ects on future CVD risk. A larger study with longer follow-up could help determine whether pregnancy complications could a ect how the 10-year CVD Framingham risk score is calculated for these women, Fraser said. Furthermore, because the study population was predominantly white, replicating the research with other racial groups will provide additional data on the association between pregnancy complications and CVD risk, she said. Four-Day Work WeekBeginning on Monday, June 11, the St. Johns County School District will operate a four-day workweek, Monday through Thursday. All facilities will function in an energy conservation mode Friday through Sunday. Summer activities will be designed within the MondayThursday workweek and will be completed by Thursday, August 2. The district will return to the normal ve-day workweek beginning on Monday, August 6. Advertise inThe CreekLineIts good for business!287-4913LG@rtpublishinginc.com Class of 2012!

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 17 Dr. Mabus ofce is conveniently located in the Johns Creek Shopping Center. She is a graduate of the St. Vincents Family Medicine residency program and is looking forward to caring for her new Fruit Cove neighbors. Her ofce offers medical care for: Procedures and screenings: To schedule an appointment call: (904) 450-8120Same day appointments available. Dr. Mabus ofce is located at: St. Vincents Primary Care Johns Creek Shopping Center 2851 CR 210 W., Ste. 122 St. Johns, FL 32259St. Vincents Primary Care would like to welcome Allison Mabus, MD, to our St. Vincents HealthCare family. The Fruit Cove Middle School Flyer bands are wrapping up the year on a high note. All pun intended! All bands have improved greatly since the beginning of the year and the skills they have learned will in uence their academic and personal lives for years to come, whether or not they become professional musicians. The Jazz Ensemble had a remarkable year. They performed at several local venues, the airport, schools, Jacksonville Landing and senior centers. The Downtown Disney show is always a highlight of the year. They scored straight Superiors at the Music Performance Assessments, which is the FCAT for band. They placed rst with Superior ratings at the Lakeside Jazz Festival in Port Orange. They had the honor of performing at the Florida Music Educators Association in Tampa. They were one of three middle school jazz groups in the state to play for this group of professionals. Every time they play in front of people, they get a little bit better and are met with the question, Those are middle schoolers? The ultimate con rmation of their ability came in the form of an invitation to play the New York City Jazz Festival next year. Although they will probably not be able to attend due to scheduling con icts with the FCAT, it is such a high honor that our little band would be approached to participate at such an impressive gathering Wind Symphony sounds amazing. They wrapped up the year with performances featuring their MPA selections, music from Wicked and The Wizard of Oz along with the themes from all three Pirates of the Caribbean. They, too, received straight Superiors at MPA. A large number of these students will be moving on to the music programs in high school. They are more than prepared for the musical opportunities ahead of them. Wind Ensemble is also doing very well. Their end-of-year performance featured their MPA selections, a John Williams trilogy and Cartoon Symphony. They received Excellent ratings at MPA and have progressed nicely over the course of the year. There are also eighth graders in this group, who will also be moving onto high school programs. Symphonic Band has made great strides forward. They wrapped up the year with a program featuring Beatles music and the Theme from Spider Man. They all enjoy this music and have worked hard to perfect it. Many of these students will move into higher level programs next year and we look forward to hearing from them again.End of year FCMS band notesBy Contributing Writer Vicki Barfoot, Fruit Cove Middle School Congratulations to 2011 Bartram Trail High School graduate Adam J. Potts, who graduated from the United States Marine Corps recruit training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina on May 25, 2012. Potts is the son of James W. and Christine S. Potts of Fruit Cove. Beginning Band has really improved since the beginning of the year. Those squeaks and squawks have turned into actual songs! They are even performing a selection, Imperium, which is usually reserved for more advanced groups. This is where the foundation is laid for more challenging programs. Their enthusiasm spills over into their music and results in an enjoyable, high-energy performance. This has been a successful year for the band program here at Fruit Cove. All of the students have advanced and learned new skills. A special thank you to all of the parents who contribute, volunteer and provide transportation to make this program work. There are 420 students in band this year and without the parents support the band program would not be what it isawesome! Band director Don Isabelle will conduct summer band camps and the information is on his Fruit Cove website. Best wishes to the eighth graders and we look forward to seeing the rest of you next year! Julington Creek kids TRI it!On April 29, The Kids Triathlon was held at UNF and Julington Creek Elementary was there. Thirty-four students participated in the event which included swimming, biking, and running. All of our students nished the race and eight were in the top three of their age groups. Christian Middleton was the top boy nisher of the race as well. The students enjoyed a great experience and raised money for their schools PE department. The total amount of money raised was $340. Way to go Jags!

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Page 18, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com 904-765-2020 www .clayeye.comFind us onFacebook Orange Park: 2023 Professional Ctr Dr. Orange Park, FL 32073 904-272-2020 Mandarin: 11790 San Jose Blvd Jacksonville, FL 32223 904-765-2020 Fleming Island: 1615 CR Rd 220, Ste 140 Fleming Island, FL 32003 904-276-2020Three convenient locations to serve you! SPECIALIZING IN: & Macula S P E C IALIZI NG I N: Celebrating our ONE year Anniversary in Mandarin! 1004 State Road 13( 0.2 mi South JCP entrance ) Richard M. Oglesby, D.V.M.Constanze Goricki, Dr.med.vet287-5570M-F 8 AM 6 PM Sat 8 AM Noon Greenbriar Animal Hospital We Celebrate The HumanPet Bond ITS HERE!THE K LASER!FINALLY PAIN FREE ...DRUG FREE THERAPY! Reintroduce Your Pet To Activity! www.marienhofkennels.com n h o f k e n ne l l s c o m Marienhof Kennels 287-3934 German Shepherd Puppies Call for availability i h M M M M M M M M M M The Northeast Florida Conservatory Community Orchestra demonstrated versatility and considerable musical talent in its debut concert on May 3 at Westminster Woods. Under the baton of Richard Dickson, president and executive director of the Conservatory, the orchestra played a Panache, a St. Augustine and Julington Creek company with Aveda Lifestyle Store, Salon and Spas, held a cut-athon fundraiser for St. Johns Riverkeeper on April 15 at the Julington Creek salon. The event featured 20 Panache hair stylists who donated their time and expertise with 140 haircuts including style and care consultations, stress relieving treatments, head massages, shampoos and haircuts and blow-dries. The cut-a-thon raised $3,600 which will be donated to St. Johns Riverkeeper with 100 percent of the proceeds going to the local non-pro t. St. Johns Riverkeeper works on behalf of the community for clean and healthy waters in the St. Johns River. Panache enjoys giving back to the community and its residents who support us. Each year, Panache holds a large fundraiser and all proceeds are donated to help keep the earth healthy as part of Earth Month, said Panache owner Kristy Weeks. For close to 25 years, Weeks and her team of award winning salon and spa sta members have participated in a wide variety of community service activities to give back to the local area and to worldwide environmental initiatives. Weeks added that she is honored to be able to donate to those in need and to the planet with two highly successful salon and spa locations, and a dedicated team of professionals and supportive customers. Weeks attributes the companys success to Panache salon and spa experts who regularly participate in company and industry events and business courses including specialized training at Avedas salon operations facilities in Orlando, St. Petersburg, Ft. Lauderdale, Tallahassee and Jacksonville. Panache sta members study topics ranging from the top industry benchmarks to working Community orchestra debutsvariety of musical styles from classical to popular. Among the pieces included in the program were two clever compositions (Jazz Pizzicato and The Waltzing Cat) by renowned American composer, Leroy Anderson as well as Frescobaldis Toccata (the rst piece ever played by the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra). The concert concluded with an exciting arrangement of an all-time favorite, Over the Rainbow, followed by the introduction of orchestra members by section strings, woodwinds, brass, and percussion. It was noted that the orchestra has the distinction of having two domra players, which is highly unusual and probably unique to any orchestra in the area. The Community Orchestra, Community Concert Band and Jazz Band comprise the three ensemble groups currently sponsored by the Northeast Florida Conservatory, a community school of the arts located in Mandarin. Faculty members are Jacksonville Symphony members and/or college music professors. Be sure to look for their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!Local salon donates $3,600 from cut-athon to St. Johns Riverkeeperwith di erent generations in the workplace to client retention to network promoters, the importance of community service along with current trends and inspirations in salon and spa services. Panache receives annual recognition from its customers as Best Full-Service Salon, Best Day Spa, Best Nail Salon, Massage Therapist and Best Stylist, plus several industry awards which uniquely positions the company as a leading salon and spa business. Weeks is recognized as a leader in the business community and one of the most innovative salon industry professionals in Northeast Florida. Be sure to see their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!Hart, who worked in conjunction with troop leader Norris to arrange the hectic schedule for multiple phases to see the project to fruition. In addition to Hart, residents Jack Botterbush, Dick Bresson and Mike Widman assisted with the project during the months of April and May. We found as much enjoyment as did the Girl scouts during this project. Their enthusiasm and energy was truly contagious. We cant wait to see the look of accomplishment on their faces when the birds appear, Hart shared. The troop has worked on this project in phases over the past three months and is committed to maintaining the bird feeders and bird houses for the next year. The next time you buy Girl Scouts cont. from page 1 your favorite type of Girl Scout cookie, know that you could be funding a community service project similar to this, one that bene ts the community in a multitude of ways.

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 19 Finding the right doctor just got easier.Baptist Primary Care is pleased to welcome Lara Church, MD, to its Hilden Road practice. Dr Church is dedicated to your familys health through every stage of life and ready to provide you with a medical home. Services include: Well visits for adults, adolescents and children Care for minor injuries Coordination of care for chronic conditions (diabetes, hyper tension, etc.) ImmunizationsSame-day appointments Rashmi Schramm, MD Board-Certified, Family Medicine Lara Church, MD Board-Certified, Family Medicine Erich Schramm, MD Board-Certified, Family Medicine 825-1941Baptist Primary Care Hilden Road141 Hilden Road Suite 201 Jacksonville, FL 32081 10% O! Mention this ad for 10% discount, or $10 o any service! Does not apply to insurance claimsWe can meet all your glass needs with fast, friendly, free mobile service! www.busybeeglass.com Busy Bee Glass Service, Inc.Services provided: Auto/truck glass replacement Fogged insulated glass replacement Patio door repairs/replacement Call for a free estimate! Thank you to the community for the support of the Letter Carriers Food Drive on Saturday, May 12. Christs Cupboard Community Food Bank, located at 810 Roberts Road in Fruit Cove, received 13,000 pounds of donated food and was assisted by over 50 volunteers. All food collected by the letter carriers in zip code 32259 was donated to the local pantry. A truck was donated by Two Men and a Truck to transport the food from the Postal Distribution Center on Philips Industrial Boulevard to the food bank. Members of Celebration Lutheran Church, along with volunteers from Mandarin United Methodist Church and other community friends worked from 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. Saturday, mov-Clay Eye Physicians and Surgeons has been awarded the prestigious 2011 Angies List Super Service Award, an honor bestowed annually on approximately 5 percent of all the businesses rated on the nations leading provider of consumer reviews on local service companies. Eric King, Clay Eyes practice administrator stated, We believe that quality customer service is what sets Clay Eye apart. Every day we strive for ways to improve and exceed our patients expectations. Were honored that Angies List has recognized us for this award. Only a fraction of the businesses rated on Angies List can claim the sterling customer service record of being a Super Service Award winner because we set a high bar, said Angies List founder Angie Hicks. The fact that Clay Eye can claim Su-Eye physicians group earns coveted Super Service Awardper Service Award status speaks volumes about its dedication to consumers. Angies List Super Service Award winners have met strict eligibility requirements including earning a minimum number of reports, an exemplary rating from their customers and abiding by Angies List operational guidelines. Clay Eye Physicians and Surgeons o ers comprehensive eye care in the following specialties: cataract surgery, cornea surgery, medical retina, diabetic eye disease and macular degeneration, glaucoma surgery, Lasik surgery, cosmetic eye procedures, pediatric ophthalmology and pediatric eye exams. In addition, they o er routine eye exams, contact lenses and boutique eyewear for the entire family. Look for their ad in this issue of The CreekLine! We are pleased to announce an award scholarships signing ceremony held last Friday at Nease High school highlighting the following six NJROTC cadets: 1. Charles Reis: Appointment to the United States Naval Academy; 2. Tyler Fugleberg: Appointment to the United States Merchant Marine Academy (playing football); 3. John Snyder: Naval ROTC Scholarship to Virginia Tech (Marine Option); 4. Garrison Wetmore: Naval ROTC Scholarship to Auburn (Marine Option); 5. Manuel Quintanilla: Naval ROTC Scholarship to FSU; and 6. James Zapala: Naval ROTC Scholarship to Jacksonville University. The total amount of paid education for these six cadets is $1,400,000. Pictured are Cadet Fugleberg, Cadet Wetmore, Cadet Quintanilla, Cadet Reis, Cadet Snyder and Cadet Zapala.Nease NJROTC senior cadets awarded scholarships Letter carriers food drive bene ts Christs Cupboard Food BankBy Contributing Writer Lisa Modaffing, sorting and storing the food. Christs Cupboard serves those in need in the surrounding area. The food bank is open Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Food is provided to about 40 families each week. If you are interested in supporting this valuable community resource, please call Celebration Lutheran Church at 230-2496. Advertise inThe CreekLineIts good for business!287-4913LG@rtpublishinginc.com

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Page 20, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com Julington Creek Animal Walk is a state-of-the-art pet boarding facility for dogs, cats, and exotics providing: Your pet will nd a welcoming retreat at our 9-acre, fenced, off-leash dog park featuring a bone-shaped swimming pool and our NE Floridas Premier Luxury Pet Resort, Dog Park and SpaConveniently located next to Julington Creek Animal Hospital Stop by for a tour and receive a coupon for a free daily park pass Aordable small dog luxury oasis. Please call for details. Veterinarian Owned and Operated Terms: Present this coupon at initial consultation to receive $150 o the purchase of an 800 series or Boundary Plus system. Other charges may apply. Not valid on prior sales or with any other oer. Participating dealers only. 2012 Invisible Fence Brand. All Rights Reserved. Steve Ochs and his wife have been coming to Julington Creek Elementary for years to share their love of reading. First grade teacher Dolly Lucas shares, I met Mr. Ochs 14 years ago. I was looking for a guest reader and he was looking for a classroom of excited children. We paired up and he has been the highlight of my Wednesday mornings ever since. Lucas continued that she knew that a particular Wednesday in May would be the last day he would sit in her rocking chair to read, so she asked Principal Michael Story if everyone could make him feel extra special on his last visit. As Mr. Ochs and his wife left the building that day, many students and teachers came out to give him a standing ovation. Many thanks from everyone at Julington Creek Elementary to Mr. Ochs who has been so dedicated to JCE. Lucas concludes, He will always have a special place in our hearts! Julington Creek Elementary thanks Steve Ochs!June is...Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Month Fruits and veggies are essential to good health, reducing your risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and certain forms of cancer. Generally low in calories and high in ber, fruits and vegetables can help you control your weight. PACT Prevention Coalition of St. Johns County, a nonpro t organization, is proud to announce the addition of ve new members to the board. The new members include Andrea Adzema, Kent Justice, Valerie Frank, Tim Forson and Shirley Menefee. The depth and breadth of our newest board members will help PACT reach its full potential, Coalition Coordinator LeAnn Daddario says. Each one brings their own unique skill set combined with a passion for our youth. They are collectively committed to the prevention of underage drinking and drug abuse in St. Johns County. Adzema has been a pharmacist for CVS for 17 years and is the mother of three children. Justice is a weekend anchor and evening reporter for Channel PACT Prevention Coalition gains new board members4 News in Jacksonville. He has reported for and anchored television news casts since 1996. Frank is the St. Johns County Young Life Area Director. She is also active in the Monique Burr Foundation Young Professionals Group. Forson is the Deputy Superintendent for Operations for the St. Johns County school district. He was born and raised in St. Augustine and loves this community. Menefee is a pharmacist at Flagler Hospital and is a graduate of Florida A and M University. Each new member represents a unique sector of the community and will strengthen PACTs resources to reduce and prevent underage substance abuse in St. Johns County. For more information about PACT Prevention Coalition of St. Johns County call 829-6261 or visit www.pactprevention.org.The CreekLinesElection 2012Special Section is coming in our July 2012 issue!Candidates, dont be left out!To Advertise: LG@RTPublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 21 Lets face it, in this market it might not make sense to sell if you can rent. And right now, we have a waiting list of people who would love to rent your house. So before you consider putting your home on the market during this competitive time, give us a call to see just how much rental income you can enjoy while you wait for the market to rebound. Well pre-screen and credit-approve tenants, routinely inspect your property to make sure its cared for, schedule and oversee any needed repairs, and even direct-deposit rent into your bank account so you dont have to deal with checks. For more information on this great alternative, call Shelby Heinemann at 904-484-2170. 9049405000 | DavidsonPropertyManagement.comTRUSTED REAL ESTATE ADVISORS. Property Management, Inc. RENT NOW,SELL LATER. The Shoppes of MurabellaAccepting New Patients (904) 826-346952 Tuscan Way Suite 205 St. Augustine, FL 32092 New Location!Mon-Thurs: 8-6:30 Saturday: 9-1 Walk-Ins Welcome The Humane Society of the United States urges residents to keep their pets in mind in preparation for a natural disaster. People can take some simple but critical steps to keep their pets safe and healthy in severe weather and possible evacuations. More than 35 million people, many of them pet owners, live in areas threatened by Atlantic hurricanes. More than 60 percent of American households have pets VyStar Credit Union has begun construction on a new branch at 1955 County Road 210 West, just west of Interstate 95 in St. Johns. This full service branch is scheduled to open in late 2012 and will be the 33rd VyStar branch. Brian Corson will serve as Branch Vice President of the 210 branch. Corson has been with VyStar for seven years and most recently held the position of Member Relationship Specialist Supervisor at VyStars Julington Creek branch. We are very enthusiastic about expanding VyStar services to the St. Johns community. A signi cant number of our members have resided in the area for some time and they have encouraged us to open a branch there, said Terry West, VyStar Credit Unions President/CEO. As hurricane season starts, remember to include pets in disaster plansand weathering a major storm requires an evacuation plan that includes our animals, said Niki Dawson, director of disaster services for The HSUS. If it isnt safe for you, it isnt safe for them. If you are ordered to shelter-in-place and not evacuate, bring your pets inside with you and make sure you have adequate supplies. The HSUS Animal Rescue Team has a fully equipped response team to assist communities impacted by a natural disaster. In 2011, The HSUS responded to natural disasters in North Carolina, Vermont, Mississippi, Missouri, Alabama, and North Dakota, helping to care for more than 2,000 displaced animals. AccuWeather forecasters predict an average hurricane season from June to November. Pet owners can reduce their animals chances of being at risk during a disaster by following the suggestions below. Things you can do right now: Put a collar with visible identi cation on your pets, including indoor-only pets. Keep pictures of your pets on hand for identi cation purposes. Ideally, you should also be in the photo. Create a pet emergency kit and refresh the items every few months. Talk to your neighbors about how they can help your pets if you are not at home when disaster strikes. Create a list of hotels that allow pets. Plan on evacuating about 100 miles inland. Pet emergency kits should include: Minimum of a three-day supply of food in airtight, waterproof containers and drinking water. Bowls for food and water. Current photos and physical description of your pets, including details on markings. Medications, vaccination records and rst aid pet supplies. Comfort items such as a toy and blanket. Small garbage bags. For dogs include: leash, harness and a sturdy carrier large enough to use as a sleeping area. For cats include: litter and litter box and a sturdy carrier large enough for transport and for your cat to use as a temporary apartment for several days. A Zogby International poll after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast found that 61 percent of pet owners will not evacuate if they cannot bring their pets with them. In 2006, Congress addressed this issue by passing the Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards (PETS) Act, which requires state and local emergency management agencies to make plans that take into account the needs of individuals with pets and service animals in the event of a major disaster or emergency. It is crucial that all pet owners reach out to their local government to understand their communitys existing human and pet evacuation plans. For more tips on preparedness plans that include your pets, visit humanesociety.org/ prepare.

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Page 22, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com NOW Enrolling for our Summer Camp & Riding LessonsAmy Barnett, Certied Riding Instructor by the American Riding Instructor Association Gingerbread Acres, LLC 12567 Aladdin Rd. Jacksonville, Florida 32223904-654-3561 Jacksonville, FL 11111 San Jose Blvd. 904-220-1212SAVE $100CALL Today Call Today! 260-4866 www.starlightjax.com Star ightGYMNASTICSOur #1 Priority: Your Children Motivating classes for all ages Fun Additional ProgramsBack by popular demand!Summer CampJune 11th August 10thConveniently located at the corner of I-295 and San Jose Blvd.2012-2013 Early Bird Registration$10 OFFApril 23rd May 25th Transitioning from elementary school to middle school is a challenge for any student. Summer Camp & Summer Camp & Switzerland Point Middle School begins Student 2 Student programBy Karl KennellImagine how that challenge is when the student moves and then must enter school in the middle of the school year. Switzerland Point Middle School has begun a new program to help with that transition. SPMS is piloting the new program at the middle school level in St. Johns County. The Junior Student 2 Student programs objective is to provide students who are relocating to or from the school with a critical edge for a successful transition. Students from SPMS were selected from various grades to form a team to meet real transition student needs with immediate peer credibility, positive peer relationships and valued information about academicsand, not to be forgotten, the very important task of learning just how to nd their way around the campus. This team of students provides a forum in which the incoming student can feel quickly welcomed, comfortable and accepted in their new school community. For existing students, the team assists in preparing them for transitioning to another school. The bene t of the program for the team members is the con dence of becoming leaders in the school. SPMS is the rst middle school in St. Johns County to begin this program. The only other school in St. Johns County that is participating in the program is Ponte Vedra High School, which is implementing the high school level program. Recently SPMS sent a team of six students composed of three sixth-graders and three seventhgraders to a two-day training session sponsored by the Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC), which established the Student 2 Student initiative in 2004. It was begun to help military-connected and civilian high school students establish and sustain school-sponsored programs for welcoming new students and too support their transitions. The team from SPMS team returned from the seminar enthused about the task of recruiting and training others. During their training they were involved in three researchbased modules, academics, relationships and one titled Finding the Way which emphasized attention, orientation and appreciation. Megan Fallon, one of the seventh graders chosen for the team, re ected how she was honored to attend and is excited to help lead this program at SPMS. New students will be assigned a team member to help them gain a feeling of being right at home. SPMS Principal Lisa Kunze said of the program, Were very excited to be given this opportunity and are grateful to have amazing students willing to take the lead and implement this program next year. The Student 2 Student program at SPMS bene ts not only students of military families to make their transition, but all students coming into SPMS from another school. Junior Student 2 Student members at Switzerland Point Middle School. Book Discussion at the Bartram Trail Branch Library! Monday, June 18 7 pmThis months selection is The Tender Bar by J.R. Moehringer. All are welcome to join us for this discussion.

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 23 LEARNING IS ALL AROUND. NOW ENROLLING!The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. Goddard Systems Inc. 2009 License #C07SJ0053 ASK ABOUT OURFLEXLEARNING PROGRAM 100 Julington Plaza Drive Goddard Systems, Inc. program is AdvancED accredited. This was the ninth year that Julington Creek Elementary second graders each made bunny buddies to give to children entering Nemours Childrens Clinic. This year we donated 180 bunnies made from dishcloths and ribbons (materials purchased with money given to In its third year of existence, the Nease Math Team ended its 2012 season bringing home six trophies in various divisions. The students participated in a series of four regional and invitational competitions during the spring semester and practiced several times a week (and one all-day Saturday) to prepare for competitions in both team and individual rounds. The students and their divisions that participated were: Jason Cochran, Adam Domingoes, Megan Hinkle and Ashley Plant (Geometry), Zach Anastasiadis, Trevor Bernas, Justin Glinka, Tyler Goldsmith, Alec Short and Turner Street (Algebra 2), Ashley Bushdorf, Dante Castaldo, Tyler Clowe, Aamir Hasan and Lauren Hsu (Precalculus), Luis Buenaventura, Farina KhandaActivities Guide Activities GuideBunny Buddies again donated to NemoursBy Contributing Writer Paula Cervone, Second Grade Teacher, Julington Creek Elementaryus by Wal-Mart of Mandarin). The bunnies are washable, cuddly and each have a poem and note written by the child who created the bunny. We have also enclosed a set of directions so, if washed, the bunny can easily be recreated for the child. For the third year, we collected new and gently used books for the children at Nemours. We were hoping for one to go with each bunny, but ended up with approximately 475 books. The people at Nemours loved the bunnies and books and were thrilled to have something to give the children as they enter a very stressful situation. Parents are disbelieving that they are getting something for nothing and the children do not want to let them go. The second graders are proud of what they have made and are anxious to give them to another child in need. We hope to continue this service again for the next school year, as part of our Character Counts program. Nease High School math team nishes strongdia, Andrew Knuppel and Andri Kokoshi (Statistics), and Alek Abate, Jacob Belcher, Aarathi Devi, Bryce McKenzie, Lindsey Mitchell, Vivian Nguyen, Carson Ridenhour, Steven Schwartz, Matt Short, Preston Sluder, Logan Stern, Michelle Wartenberg and Tony Yin (Calculus). Students worked under the guidance of their team sponsor Maggie Byrns. Florida Mu Alpha Theta has over 150 teams statewide competing in various competitions around Florida. In addition to a successful season, special recognition goes to Logan Stern for earning a $4000 college scholarship from the national Mu Alpha Theta organization. He is one of 25 winners nationwide. Stern will be attending Washington University in St. Louis in the fall. Lunar PhasesLast Quarter: June 11 New: June 19 First Quarter: June 27 Full: July 3

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Page 24, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com Race Track Blvd.Flora Branch Blvd. 990 Flora Branch Boulevard St. Johns, Florida 32259 www.theacademyatjulingtoncreek.netLicense#C075J0083 Summer Camp 2012 Please visit our new center and take a personal tour. ages 5-11 ages 3-4 girls ages 7-18904-260-198311502 Columbia Park Dr W Jacksonville, FL 32258www.FirstCoastGymnastics.com Free Trial Class & $5 OFFwith registration Summer CampCall for details. Summer 2012One and Two Week Sessions beginning in July ...W rit e Aw a y! ...Creative Writing Enrichment Program W rit e R ight ...Writing Academic Bridge ProgramT.N.T. ..."Trying Neat Technology" Enrichment ProgramVisit our website or e-mail us for more information...www.l earnnowinc.com learnnowinc@y ahoo.com Summer Summer Camp & Camp & Activities Activities Guide GuideTo help culminate the 20112012 school year, Liberty Pines Academy was excited to hold our annual Wolf Buck Carnival! The purpose of this event is to positively reward students who have earned Wolf Bucks throughout the course of the school year, by being Responsible, Respectful and Ready to learn. LPA uses a positive behavioral management approach which focuses on these Rs to de ne the positive behaviors that provide a safe learning environment where students are successful. The school year at Wards Creek Elementary has come to a close! The last weeks of school have been lled with eld trips, celebrations and graduations. The rst grade went bowling to celebrate the end of the year while the fourth grade went to Whitney Lab at Marineland to do marine research. There was a trip to a Jacksonville Suns game to celebrate literacy week. The safety patrols went to Sea World and the fth graders went to Universal Studios. The chorus and Or groups led by Kim Rose showed o their musical talent to family and friends while James Lees art fair was held in conjunction with the book fair. The fth graders had an introduction to everything middle school at Pacetti Bay Middle School. Volunteers made sure the fth graders went out in style! The celebration included bounce houses, a DJ, taco bar, talent show, awards and the traditional running the halls. Everyone at Wards Creek wishes the fth grade good luck in their new adventure at middle school! The Teacher Talent Show is School is out and the beach is calling! May proved to be an intimidating time for AP and IB students: crammed schedules, studying for hours and trying to divide up the time equally for each test. Sports concluded with teary-eyed banquets as the seniors said their nal goodbyes to what most of them had been doing for the past four years with the people they love. The IB seniors nished up about a week before the rest of the school; you could hear them cheering as they walked out of the gym from their respective last exams, IB done! IB done! Facebook was exploding with done with IB posts varying from the above short phrase to extensive descriptions of everything they could now do without worrying about homework or studying. Many went to the beach immediately End of school year at LPABy Contributing Writer Stephanie Bradford, Liberty Pines Academy PTOStudents have been taught more about the Rs through classroom lessons, modeling and practice. Students have received Wolf Bucks as rewards for displaying Responsible, Respectful and/or Ready to learn behaviors. With their Wolf Bucks, students purchased admission into the Wolf Buck Carnival and enjoyed various foods and activities. The annual Wolf Buck Carnival took place on June 5 and was a day of fun and excitement for all who attended! Students were excited to spend their Wolf Bucks. They enjoyed many games and wonderful treats. Liberty Pines Academy is so proud of all of our students for their many achievements this year! Letter from LPA PTO President Dear Friends and Families of LPA, First and foremost, I would like to extend a huge thank you to all of you for your amazing support this year. It has been my privilege to serve as the PTO president and I would not trade this experience for anything. I have been blessed with the opportunity to meet and work with so many amazing people, including students, parents, business partners, sta administration and fellow PTO board members. None of what the PTO does to support LPA could be done without all of you. You are truly, truly appreciated. I am also excited to announce that, on May 1, the 2012-2013 Executive Committee was voted into o ce and is already hard at work to make sure that the transition into the upcoming school year will be a smooth one. Thank you so much for being willing to volunteer and give of your time. We are looking forward to another great year! Congratulations to the following people: Cathy Richter-President; Karen Taylor-VP of Fundraising; Kim Delaney-VP of Membership and Volunteers; Janine Bowker-Treasurer; Erin GuldenSecretary. Finally, I hope that you all have a wonderful, well-deserved break. Enjoy your summer and thank you, again, for such a memorable year! Sincerely, Erika Williams 2011-2012 LPA PTO President Nease HappeningsBy Brittany Dirks, Nease Studentafter and wallowed in their rst day of summer vacation; their last one at home, in fact. Others went home to catch up on the hours of sleep lost to IB and some even stayed at school to hang out with friends and sign yearbooks. The spring sports banquets were a mix of joy and tears as the seasons drew to a close and new student leadership was announced. Hugs went around and more yearbooks signed with loving messages while slideshows played pictures of the season and of seniors from freshman year to now. The fun, successful seasons would be remembered for a long time to come. And when the year ended, seniors walked out with their heads held high and proud, with everyone else waving goodbye. The class of 2013 rose to take their place (literally taking their parking spots when the seniors got out of school before them) and look forward to ruling Nease High School. Wards Creek Update: Summer is here at last!By Contributing Writer Beth McCannalways a big hit; a big congratulations goes out to our winners, the kindergarten teachers who put on a fantastic dancing light show. Other acts included the fth grade teachers as the World Golf Village People, hula hooping fourth grade teachers and belly dancing resource and pre-kindergarten teachers, just to name a few. The new PTO board members were announced at the Teacher Talent show: President, Amy Laswell; First Vice President, Tammy Stewart; Second Vice President, Wanda Galison; Treasurer, Lyn Repsher; Recording Secretary, Beth McCann; Corresponding Secretary, Katie Terry; Volunteer Coordinator, Gail Rich; and Parliamentarian, Tracey Manucy. Thank you to all who have volunteered throughout the school year and to our current and future PTO board. Wards Creek needs and relies on volunteers to be the A school that it is. If you are interesting in helping in any way, please contact a board member. Any and all help is greatly appreciated. Have a great summer! Summer Camp & Summer Camp & Activities Guide Activities Guide Be sure to Be sure to patronize our patronize our valued Guide valued Guide advertisers! advertisers!

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 25 2189 State Rd 13, Switzerland287-2883 Its time for a ROAD TRIP!! Seven weeks of summer fun exploring our great nation. We will be traveling from sea to shining sea through music, stories, art, science, cooking, games and PLAY. Accepting campers ages 2-6 First Session: June 18 21 then weekly until Last Session: July 30 August 2 Sessions meet Monday thru Thursday from 9:30am-1pm OR 9:30am-3pmCALL for more info & to registerARE WE THERE YET??? Summer Camp at Living Waters Preschool... KindergartenRegister now for 2012-2013Certied by FLOCS #4939 Reserve your place today! Call 904-374-863911363 San Jose Blvd/Bldg. 200 Jax FL 32223 www.nfconservator.org BAND & STRINGS CAMP: Two Sessions Monday-Thursday, two weeks each Session Session A begins June 18 ending June 28 Time Band Strings 2pm 6pm Session B begins July 16 ending July 26 Time Band Strings 10am2pm THEATRE CAMP: Weeks: June 18, 25, July 9, 16, 23, 30 Thursday & Friday 6-8 pm Ends Thursday August 2 Grades 5 (age 11) thru High Schoolrichardadickson@comcast.netSummer Camp 2012 d a a y y y y y y ! ! ! ! ! 9 2pm y! m Aordable Cost! Advance Registration $100 due June 1 NORTHEAST FLORIDACONSERVATORYA non/prot community school of the arts Open Mondays through Fridays 8:30am 5pm 1631 Race Track Road Suite 101230-7977Most Insurances AcceptedPediatric Associates of Julington Creek, PAOffering care for Infants, Children & Adolescents Mary Ann Garcia, M.D., FAAP Victor Luz, M.D., FAAP 287-6331Psalm 149:3 Let them praise his name in dance, let them sing praises unto Him with the timbrel and harp.Near Foot SolutionsCome Praise the Lord With Your FeetSummer ProgramsSummer Dance Program For All Ages Tuesday, June 19th through Thursday, July 26th www.switzerlanddanceschool.com witzerlandance choolBalletT a Hip Ho 904 Call about new womens self defense summer 6 week course! Inspiring the next generation of engineers! Summer Exploration Camps (Hands-on and full of learning opportunities)904-254-1281NFlorida@EngineeringForKids.net Register online at:www.EngineeringForKids.net/NorthFlorida Engineering For Kids North Florida Beginning on Monday, June 18, the St. Johns County School District will operate from six high schools and one middle school serving as regional centers. St. Johns Technical High School will remain in its permanent location due to scheduled summer programs. All other facilities will function in an energy conservation mode during the time the facility is being cleaned and prepared for the new school year. Each regional high school With Pacetti Bays global focus, the 39 Clues series is a perfect choice for summer reading. Two orphan siblings, Amy and Dan Cahill travel the world in a very dangerous race against the other branches of their families to nd all 39 clues. Using math, history, languages, geography, science and logic Dan and Amy collaborate to achieve the goal of becoming the most powerful people in world. Beginning with a journey from Philadelphia to Paris, France in book one and ending on the island where the family originated in book 10, the race is a highly suspenseful adventure with unexpected twists and turns. The 11th book, collaboratively written by four authors, provides a transition to the new series: Cahills vs. Vespers. Once again Amy and Dan, now with the help of their huge network of family members, are in a race against time. Books one through three are available now. Books four through six are in the works, with book four to be released in September. This is a unique series with the large number of authors collaborating to write the books and because of the online interactive component through Scholastics web site it is a unique series. Whew, Insurgent recently hit the shelves and this is one amazing sequel to Divergent. Rarely do I like the second book in a series as much as I like the School consolidation announced for summerwill serve as the operation center for the schools that have been assigned to that site. School administrative teams will work in designated areas of the high school. Maintenance managers and custodial sta will work at the schools in their region on a rotating basis. District communication with school sta will be done at the regional site for that school. Summer academic programs, camps and extended school year services will be planned, developed and communicated by each school. Camps and other activities will operate at the regional high school and will be coordinated by administrators at all schools in the region. Sta will return to their regular site on Monday, July 30. Following are the assignments for each NW St. Johns County school: Bartram Trail High School will house Switzerland Point Middle School, Liberty Pines Academy, Timberlin Creek Elementary School and Hickory Creek Elementary School. Creekside High School will house Fruit Cove Middle School, Durbin Creek Elementary School, Julington Creek Elementary School and Cunningham Creek Elementary School. Nease High School will house Pacetti Bay Middle School, Wards Creek Elementary School and Mill Creek Elementary School.Notes from the Pacetti Bay Media CenterBy Contributing Writer Lynn Johnson, NBCT, Library Media Specialist, Pacetti Bay Middle School rst one; this is one of those times that I am truly anxious for book three which is due out sometime in the fall. With all of the buzz about The Hunger Games, this series by Roth joins the top of the dystopian eld. On my web page there is a link to the list of novels that we have with a multicultural focus. My goal for the summer is to read as many of them as I possibly can. As usual I will be checking out the independent bookstores looking for great new reads. Let me know via email if you nd any! Recommendations from Catie Grimes eighth grade students for summer reading include: The Wolves of Mercy Falls series (Shiver) by Maggie Stiefvater; What Happened to Goodbye by Sarah Dessen; Cheater by Michael Laser; Kingdom Keepers I-V by Ridley Pearson; the Mortal Instruments series by Casandra Clare; Dark Life series by Kat Falls; Lost Hero and Red Pyramid by Rick Riordan; The Iron Daughter by Julie Kagawa; I. Q. series by Roland Smith (#3 July 15!); Cate of the Lost Colony by Lisa Klein; The Clique series by Lisi Harrison; The Great and Terrible Beauty by Libby Bray and The Maximum Ride series by James Patterson. Enjoy your summer reading and watch for my new discoveries over the summer!The St. Johns County School Districts (SJCSD) bus routes for the 2012-2013 school year were approved by the School Board at its meeting on May 15. Five new bus routes are being added to accommodate growth in the Durbin Crossing and Nocatee areas as well as an increase in the number of special needs students. The routes are available on-Next years school bus routes available line at www.stjohns.k12. .us/ depts/transp/routes. Parents without access to computers may visit any of the county public library locations, and sta will assist them in locating the website. By providing this information prior to the end of school, parents are better able to plan and prepare, said SJCSD Director of Transportation Joe Purvis. In early August, postcards will be sent home to the parents of all potential bus riders giving them the bus stop, times and bus number for their students. The Transportation Department will be transporting approximately 18,800 children twice a day when school starts on Monday, August 20.

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Page 26, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com Summer Summer Camp & Camp & Activities Activities Guide Guide Mark Spivaks Institute & Dance Extension Ballet-Pointe-Jazz-Modern-Contemporary-Lyrical-Pre-School Dance Program ~Summer Program comming up! Check it out!~ Summer Fun Dance Camp 9am-2:30pm, 3 two week sessions Start June 18th thru Aug. 3rd Summer Afternoon classes start June 18th thru June 27th Fall classes starts August 6th Early Registration: June 18th at Mandarin dance extension 4-7 and June 19th at Julington dance extension 4-7 Register now! Exp. 6/30/2012$10 OFFBring in this AdVisit our site for Schedules and Forms | WWW.MARKSPIVAK.COMFruit Cove 287-4619774 N SR 13 Located half mile from PublixJulington Creek 230-7778106 Julington Plaza Corner Race Track Rd. & Flora BranchMandarin 268-35833740 San Jose Place One Block North of Crown PointGYMNASTICS & TUMBLING CLASSES FOR KIDS! 230-6291 / 230-7778 Located in Julington Creek area o Race Track Road Next to:MARK SPIVAKS DANCE EXTENSION ~ Summer Program comming up! Check it out!~ Summer Fun Dance Cam p 9am-2:30pm, 3 two wee k sessions S tart June 1 8 t h t h ru Au g 3 r d Summer Afternoon classes start J une 1 8 t h t h ru June 2 7 t h Fa ll c l asses starts A u g ust 6 th Ear l y Registration: J une 1 8 t h at Man d arin d ance extension 4-7 an d J une 19 th at Ju l in g ton d ance extension 4-7 Re g ister now Visit our site f or Schedules and Form s | WWW.MARK S PIVAK. COM Fru i t Cove 28 7-461 9 774 N S R 13 Located half mile from Publi x Ju l ington Cree k 230 -777 8 106 Julin g ton Plaza Corner Race Trac k R d & F l ora Branc h M an d arin 2 6 8 3 5 83 3740 San Jose Place One Block North of Crown Point GYMNASTICS & TUMBLING CLASSES FOR KIDS 230-6291 / 230-7778 Locate d in Ju l ington Cree k area o Race Track Road Next to : MARK S PIVAK S DAN C E EXTEN S I ON Mathematics Tutor ( 904 ) 307-4858 steven.newton@comcast.net y x m2=x All Levels through CalculusDont let your child struggle with Math. ACCREDITEDACCREDITATION ASSOCIATION for AMBULATORYHEALTH CARE EYE CENTEROF ST. AUGUSTINE & WORLD GOLF VILLAGETHE EYE SURGERY CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE AAAHC 940-9200 T T Fruit Cove Baptist ChurchRegister and pay online at: www.fruitcove.com/sports.php UPWARD FLAG FOOTBALL & CHEERLEADINGGRADES 1 8 CO-ED LEAGUES $60 IF PAID BY JULY 23RD, $80 AFTER JULY 23RD SIGN UP NOW FOR Evaluation/Orientation Dates Aug. 2, 4, or 7 (attend one)Practices begin September 4, 2012 Games begin September 29, 2012 The end of the year has nally arrived and the majority of BTHS students and faculty are extremely thankful. After 10 long months, they can nally have a vacation from getting up early, homework and worst of all, testing. Since early April Bartram has been absolutely swamped with tests. End of course, end of quarter, nals (the third week of May for seniors and the rst week of June for underclassmen), AP, FCATyou name it, there was an exam for it. Added to that was the PERT (post-secondary education readiness test) for juniors to determine what classes they would be placed in senior year and to see if they quali ed for dual enrollment. It all added up to over six weeks of tests, which meant the media center was closed o to students most of the time because it was being used as an exam location. A junior who wishes to remain anonymous shared, I think all the testing should be Can you believe that the 2011-2012 school year is already coming to an end? This year at Fruit Cove Middle School has been fantastic. As a seventh grader, I have already experienced the nervousness of coming to a new school as a sixth grader and Ive had to be a role model this year to the sixth graders. Next year, Ill have two whole grades looking up to me for advice and how to act. Even though this is a lot of pressure, I cant wait to be at the top of the school, so to speak. On May 15 and 16, the rising sixth graders visited Fruit Cove Middle School to learn about scheduling from the Hickory Creek Elementary School celebrated Teacher Appreciation Week from May 7 through 11. To show appreciation during this special week, teachers and sta were showered with gifts each day by students and their families. The week of festivities kicked o with Massage Monday. Zyra from Massage Renaissance along with Pam and Beth from Therapeutic Massage of Julington Creek spoiled everyone with hand and feet rubs as well as neck, shoulder and back massages. It was an enjoyable day of relaxation. Tastefully Tuesday was a day of treating everyone to desserts and drinks. HCE families brought in an array of homemade goodies and a variety of drinks that were savored by all. On Wednesday, the HCE PTO hosted an o site luncheon at the St. Johns Golf and Country Club. Everyone who BTHS HappeningsAwaiting the end of the year: A test of patience for all at BTHSBy Devyn Fussman, BTHS Studentstopped because it takes away from valuable class time. Its true that students are forced to miss class whenever they are required to take an exam, and subsequently they have to make up any work they missed during the time they were absent, which certainly adds to the workload. And because so many Bartram students are enrolled in several AP classes and are required to take most of the other tests, there were days where nearly entire classes of students would be missing the days lesson. This put more strain on the teachers and students, as the pacing of the classes was disrupted frequently. Underclassmen were given end of course exams in April when the school year ended in June and seniors were still learning new material during their last week of school, just before their nal exams. Shortly afterward, seniors were fortunate enough to graduate and escape all that red tape; the underclassmen, however, were not so lucky. Juniors (now rising seniors) will have an especially hard time because not only were they assessed frequently during the actual school year, now they have to spend their summer studying for the SAT and ACT in addition to preparing college applications, summer reading and more. Some AP or honors classes even require big, detailed assignments such as outlining textbooks or writing papers on college-level books. In short, its the unfortunate truth that rising seniors who are good students dont get much of a summer break. Luckily it pays o as they will only have one more year to go until they graduate too and then their summer break will be lled with nothing but dorm shopping and time with friends before they nally move out and get away from their parents. And the best part? There wont be any tests on what they did last summer.Hickory Creek students and parents show their appreciation By Contributing Writer Laurie Argottattended had a wonderful time enjoying the delicious food while visiting with friends and co-workers. Those who were unable to attend ate a catered lunch brought in from the club. The weeks festivities continued on with Thoughtful Thursday. This day was all about giving gift cards. Gift cards were given as a class or individually to all teachers and sta And to top o the week of appreciation, it ended with Favorite Friday. Students and families brought in their teachers favorite indulgence. Some were showered with chocolates while others were given bath and body items and even gift baskets lled with all kinds of goodies. The Hickory Creek Elementary School students and families hope that all their teachers and sta realize how much they are truly appreciated.FCMS HappeningsBy Contributing Writer Sarah Jacobs, Fruit Cove Middle School Studentguidance counselor, behavior expectations from Dean Cole and even toured around the school with National Junior Honor Society (NJHS) members. This helped them get a feel for middle school before they attend it in the fall. They also got a taste from the cafeteria at the end of the day by sampling some ice cream. Everyone was excited to see the future students of Fruit Cove. All in all, everyone should be happy with such a successful year behind us. Now, its time to prepare for the future. On behalf of Fruit Cove Middle School, I wish everyone a very fun and safe summer vacation. See you next year! The CreekLineYOURCommunity Newspaper Send us your news!editor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 27 (904)292-2210 MandarinSouthBusinessCenter12421SanJoseBlvd.Suite310/320 Jacksonville,FL32223(BetweenSonnysBBQ&Solantic) LorettoRd. NSanJoseBoulevard RaceTrackRd. JulingtonCreek Lessthan1/2mi. fromJulingtonCreek MarinelaM.Nemetz,D.D.S.BoardCertifiedPediatricDentistRobertJ.Nemetz,D.D.S.,M.S.AdultDentistryPeriodonticsProsthodontics Summer Summer Camp & Camp & Activities Activities Guide Guide Each Primrose School is a privately owned and operated franchise. Primrose Schools, Balanced Learning, and The Leader in Educational Child Care are trademarks of Primrose School Franchising Company. Primrose School Franchising Company. All rights reserved. Educational Child Care for Infants through Private Pre-Kindergarten and After School Now Enrolling Engage minds and hearts will follow.Proprietary Balanced Learning curriculum Music, Spanish, Computer Technology Ongoing customized student assessment Integrated character development program Dietician-approved meals and snacks provided Primrose School of Julington Creek904.230.2828Primrose School at St. Johns Forest904.824.1100Primrose School of Glen Kernan904.992.9002 Three kindergarten teachers put their heads together to identify meaningful ways to teach ve and six year olds appropriate table manners that can be used in the school cafeteria and hopefully at home! For a week, the teachers tied table manners into their weekly theme curriculum and incorporated literature by reading Dinner With Olivia and Mind Your Manners B.B. Wolf. According to Mrs. Ludke, Mrs. Barrs and Mrs. Hatcher, some of the highlights inTeaching manners at Timberlin CreekBy Contributing Writer Tina Perezcluded: Students made a chart of good manners vs. bad manners. The students learned how to set a place setting at the table. The students have been practicing saying things like, please, youre welcome and thank you all week long. The students have been practicing asking if they may be excused prior to getting up from the table. The boys learned how to escort the girls, pull out their chairs and help them to get seated. After learning about manners and practicing, the students wrote about what good manners they have in their journal. According to Kimberly Ludke, kindergarten teacher at TCE, At the manners tea, they remembered to use quiet voices, put their napkins in their lap and keep their elbows o the table. They also did a great job using their utensils instead of their ngers to eat. Way to go, TCE kindergarten students! Flag Day June 14 The Creeks Clash Black U10 girls soccer team took second place at the Nike Champions Cup, held in Apopka the weekend of May 18 through 20. The girls won two out of three games leading them into the nals in a very hard fought game against the Ormond Beach Waves. This is the second tournament in a row that the team placed in the nals. The team took rst place in their U10 division at the Fire and Fury Tournament this past fall. The teams coach is Teresa Librizzi and the assistant coach is Patti Scott. Congratulations to Amber Librizzi, Katelyn Crici, Libbie Jeffries, Isabel Matos, Katie Scott, Jovana Cernatescu, Stephanie Pitts, Callie Beyer and Patti DeBlois. Congratulations Creeks Clash!

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Page 28, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com NOW OPEN IN JACKSONVILLE (904) 239-3671 | www.GulfCoastDerm.comOUR LOCATIONSPanama City | Panama City Beach | Santa Rosa Beach | Ft Walton Beach Navarre | Niceville | Marianna | Bonifay | Port St Joe | Tallahassee Sarasota | Jacksonville | Gulf Breeze | Dothan, ALBrooke Bair, DO Physician SpotlightJACKSONVILLE OFFICE12276 San Jose Blvd., Suite 722 Jacksonville, FL 32223 877.231.DERM (3376) As Creekside seniors pack up and prepare for their college journeys, two local students are getting ready for the experiences of a lifetime. Their destinations? Halfway across the world. Creekside High School student Nicole Viera will spend next school year in Taiwan as a part of Rotary Youth Exchange. Viera will serve as an ambassador for the United States, with a duty to immerse herself in the culture and language of Taiwan and an ultimate goal of eliminating stereotypes and creating a more open-minded world. She will live with host families while in Taiwan, an experience that she believes will be somewhat challenging at rst. It might be a bit di cult to communicate in the beginning I dont think Ill be able to speak to anybody in Mandarin right away when I get there, she shared. But to Viera, the bene ts of studying abroad are more than worth the challenges. One of the major bene ts I see is exposure, Viera The Rotary Club of Bartram Trail recently recognized Ashley West as the Rotary Teacher of the Quarter. The breakfast ceremony held at Westminster Woods was especially signi cant as one of her students, Jane Bunn, spoke about how West has been a positive role model to many of her students, as well as an excellent teacher. Creekside High School Principal Randy Johnson presented the award to West based on her stellar performance, leadership in school activities and respect amongst her students and peers. The Rotary Club will honor local teachers on a quarterly basis. The current president, Frank Gwaltney, was pleased to recognize West as the rst recipient of the award. He also spoke about the signi cance of attracting teachers to our community as St. Johns County schools consistently score top marks in the state of Florida. School Board Rotary Club honors Creekside teacherBy Contributing Writer Michael Andreoni, Rotary Club of Bartram Trailmember Bev Slough was in attendance to show her support. The Rotary Club of Bartram Trail looks forward to honoring another teacher in June, which will be from a local Middle School. The Rotary Club of Bartram Trail is the local chapter of Rotary International. It is a service organization that participates in local and international projects. The members are from the St. Johns area and are leaders in their respective industries. Community sponsors for the award include Bozard Ford and Zaxbys at Bartram Park. The Rotary Club of Bartram Trail meets every Thursday morning 7:30 a.m. at Westminster Woods. For more information about the club or if your business would like to participate in the award recognition, please contact Michael Andreoni at michael.a.andreoni@aexp. com or 654-5602.Randy Johnson, Jane Bunn, Ashley West and Frank GwaltneyCHS HappeningsTwo local Creekside High students prepare to live abroad for a yearBy Rachel Buff, CHS Studentsays. Youre literally throwing yourself into a new country and experiencing it rst hand. Its so much more compared to reading books or watching the news. As she waits to embark on this new adventure in August, Viera says she looks forward to opening her mind into a new appreciation of the world and the people who share it. Halley McClure, recent graduate of Douglas Anderson School of the Arts, will be spending next year abroad in Germany after receiving the Congress-Bundestag Vocational Youth Exchange Scholarship. McClure was nationally recognized as one of only 25 students who received the scholarship and the exciting opportunity to work as an intern in Germany for a year. McClure rst learned about the Congress-Bundestag program four years ago, while taking after-school German classes at FSCJ. From that point on, her dream was to take a gap year between high school and college to study and learn German through complete immersion. Im really excited for the intensive language classes in Munich at the beginning of the program, McClure shared. I love learning languages and Im grateful for the chance to learn outside of the school setting. Theres no better motivation than being in Munich. The experience of living with host families and traveling independently around Europe will change McClure, she believes. Ill learn more about fostering international diplomacy and Ill be uent in another language. Ill gain some work experience, which will hopefully give me some clarity on what Id like to do career-wise. I also think Ill grow more comfortable with being away from home, so the transition to college wont be as di cult, she says. While the two girls will be diving into two very di erent cultures, they both agree the hardest part will be saying good-bye to their families. My moms a total mess. She loves that Im putting myself out there, but shes not ready to let me go, says Nicole. Its scary that my family wont get to know 18-year-old Halley, but Im still excited for the change, says Halley. Despite their worries, Viera and McClure are more than ready to embark on their journeys and embrace the lifechanging opportunities they will encounter.

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 29 Your Voice of ReasonPaid by Cyndi Stevenson, Republican for St. Johns County Commission District 1 450-106 State Road 13 N Publix Center in Fruit CovePh: 230.8881 52 Tuscan Way, #202Publix Center at International Golf Dr. and SR 16 Ph: 940.0055 Concerns about your drinking water?Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 Years. Straight answers No high pressure. 262 0197 3760 KORI RD. Lic. #W-32 yo u Call th e W ate r Treatment Compan y J acksonville has trusted for ove r 20 Years S Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 years. Robert Kelsey, M.D.Board Certied Cardiology and Internal Medicine Robert Kelsey, M.D.Now Accepting New Patients 904-827-0078 Animal Medical Clinic at St. Johns2245-102 County Road 210W 904-827-1401 40% OFFYour Pets First Exam NEW CLIENTS ONLY Movie ReviewDark ShadowsDirected by: Tim Burton. Starring: Johnny Depp, Michelle Pfeifer and Eva Green. Review by T.G. StantonRating: Okay, But Could Have Waited for Cable (3 out of 5) This months movie review belongs to the lm Dark Shadows, a comedy-horror lm for teens and adults. The Collins family moves to America in 1752, building their own shing empire o the coast of Maine. Their young son Barnabas, played by Johnny Depp, is raised to rule the kingdom, but along the way he steals and breaks the heart of their maid, Angelique Bouchard, portrayed by Eva Green. Only she is much more than just the For us grown up gals, probably no garment selection process is worse than shopping for and wearing a swimsuit. I have a funny story about a shopping trip my sister-in-law and I made with my then 75-yearold mother to buy bathing suits. We had just moved to the beach area and they decided they would wait to shop here for their suits, hoping that the choices would be greater than their area department stores. On The Day we went to a specialty store down in St. Augustine that I found to have real womens bathing suits, which includes a full cut suit with a bra inside. One look at the price and my mother balked and my sister in law quipped back at her telling her that the bathing suits at the local discount store didnt have near enough fabric for their bods! Mother quickly went back into the dressing room and continued trying on. We still laugh about that day; I think my mother still has that $100 suit I local help. A scorned woman can be very dangerous and Angelique is additionally threatening in that she is a witch. Subsequent to her betrayal by Barnabas, she removes her competition and turns him into a vampire, then turns the town of Collinsport against him, having them bury him alive. Here comes 1972 and Barnabas is freed from his captivity. His familys stature and fortunes have dwindled, as Angeliques seem to have grown. The matriarch of the family is performed by Michele Pfei er, as Elizabeth Collins Stoddard. The family is dysfunctional at best, to the point that when Barnabas erupts into their lives it is just natural to allow him to take over. Also, he has a secret that aids in the recovery of their fortune. The current Collins children seem to need some therapy and there is an in-house doctor as well as the need for a nanny, who resembles the past love in Barnabas life. Is there love in his future and the chance for a normal family life? Hardly, and Angelique is only one of the barricades to such happiness. Director Tim Burton has not done justice to the television show and even his usual ability to nd a loveable character amidst the gruesome and horri c is missing. The portrayal of David Collins by Gulliver McGrath is one of the few bright spots, in addition to the spot that Alice Cooper engages. The music and costumes are enjoyable, but the rest of the movie leaves a lot to be desired. The advertisements led to the feeling this was going to be more of a comedy and less of the gothic darkness of the series. The outcome was more as if Tim Burton could not decide which movie he was doing and directed the actors in the same manner, as the acting by all of these ne actors seemed just as confused. The blood and gore did not make it more dramatic, nor did the far from romantic liaisons between Barnabas and Angelique. I really could have waited for the cable release.Fashion UpdateIts that time of the year.donning the bathing suit!By Donna Keathley, dkeathley designsbought her in the original tote bag! Any suit reveals a lot about the wearers body, but things on that horizon have gotten better. So now maybe we can talk about our least favorite wardrobe piece a little more calmly. Swimwear manufacturers have nally listened to the consumer; tankinis, top and bottom separates and underwire support is proof of this. Other little things like Lycra and shopping online have taken a lot of sting out of the bathing suit subject too. Here are some suit websites: Beachbliss.com, Canyonbeachwear.com, Lanebryant.com and Everythingbutwater.com. Be creative when shopping for the perfect cover up. Resort wear and pretty sarongs have their place at the spa and hotel facilities. But we natives taking a short jaunt to the neighborhood pool or running over to the local beach need cover ups too! My favorite item to pull on over my black bathing suit is a pair of black athletic wind shorts. They have an elastic waist and a boy cut leg with a longer hem length. Also an easy to do cover up is a short skirt or shorts in denim. Top these with one of the new peasant tops or halters and you are good to go. A black or white eyelet blouse bought one size larger is a great suit pop over. A short peasant dress with an elastic top or tie slips o and on easily, too. The new knit tank or polo dresses are great to use as a cover up and easy to wear. Make sure your look is pulled together. In thumbing through the summer editions of my fashion magazines, the swimwear models are well coi ed for the beach or pool, wearing their hair in some manner that will look good all day whether it be gelled to the max or pulled into a ponytail. Also, they have on earrings; even a simple hoop looks good with good looking sunglasses. Their sandals are cute whether they are in bright colors or metallic the latest thing being the PVC footwear with beading. But the point here is that they have a look that some thought has been put intofollow suit so to speak! Remember, every swimsuit wearer is her own harshest critic! Just be glad that the 1960s bathing suit is gone with all its bones, trusses and reinforcement! Have fun in the sun this Summer 2012!P.S. Care of Swim Wear is Important! Never wear the same suit every day. Wash in cool water. Dry away from the sun. The CreekLine YOURCommunity Newspapereditor@thecreekline.com Dispose of unwanted/outdated prescription medication (excluding sharps, medical wastes, nuclear medications or thermometers) St. Johns County Sheriffs Of ce Weekdays excluding holidays 8:00 a.m. ~ 5:00 p.m.Contact: Crime Prevention Deputy Corporal Diana Bryant at 810-6694Operation Medicine Cabinet

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Up to $26.00/BoxPrepaid Shipping Label. Hablamos Espaol. 1-800-267-9895. www.SellDiabeticStrips.com Wants to purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201 CA$H PAIDup to $26/Box for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS. Hablamos Espanol. 1-800-371-1136 YEARBOOKS Up to $15 paid for high school yearbooks1900-1988. yearbookusa@yahoo.com or 972-768-1338. Reader Advisory: The National Trade Association we belong to has purchased the above classi eds. Determining the value of their service or product is advised by this publication. In order to avoid misunderstandings, some advertisers do not offer employment but rather supply the readers with manuals, directories and other materials designed to help their clients establish mail order selling and other businesses at home. Under NO circumstance should you send any money in advance or give the client your checking, license ID, or credit card numbers. Also beware of ads that claim to guarantee loans regardless of credit and note that if a credit repair company does business only over the phone it is illegal to request any money before delivering its service. All funds are based in US dollars. Toll free numbers may or may not reach Canada. Dispose of unwanted/outdated prescription medication (excluding sharps, medical wastes, nuclear medications or thermometers) St. Johns County Sheriffs Of ce Weekdays excluding holidays 8:00 a.m. ~ 5:00 p.m.Contact: Crime Prevention Deputy Corporal Diana Bryant at 810-6694 There has been increased mosquito-borne disease activity in areas of St. Johns County. Several sentinel chickens have tested positive for West Nile virus. The risk of transmission to humans has been increased. St. Johns County Health Department reminds residents and visitors to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes that may cause mosquito-borne illness. The Anastasia Mosquito Control District and the Health Department continue surveillance and prevention e orts and encourage everyone to take basic precautions to help limit exposure by following the Department of Healths recommendations. To protect yourself from mosquitoes, you should remember to drain and cover. Drain standing water to stop mosquitoes from multiplying: Drain water from garbage cans, house gutters, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, ower pots or any other containers where sprinkler or rain water has collected. Discard old tires, drums, bottles, cans, pots and pans, broken appliances and other items that arent being used. Empty and clean birdbaths and pets water bowls at least once or twice a week. Protect boats and vehicles from rain with tarps that dont accumulate water. Maintain swimming pools in good condition and appropriately chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use. Cover skin with clothing or repellent: Clothing: Wear shoes, socks, and long pants and long-sleeves. This type of protection may be necessary for people who must work in areas where mosquitoes are present. Repellent: Apply mosquito repellent to bare skin and clothing. Always use repellents according to the label. Repellents with DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus and IR3535 are e ective. Use mosquito netting County issues mosquitoborne illness advisoryto protect children younger than two months old. Cover doors and windows with screens to keep mosquitoes out of your house: Repair broken screening on windows, doors, porches and patios. Tips on Repellent Use Always read label directions carefully for the approved usage before you apply a repellent. Some repellents are not suitable for children. Apply insect repellent to exposed skin, or onto clothing, but not under clothing. In protecting children, read label instructions to be sure the repellent is age-appropriate. According to the CDC, mosquito repellents containing oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under the age of 3 years. DEET is not recommended on children younger than two months old. Avoid applying repellents to the hands of children. Adults should apply repellent rst to their own hands and then transfer it to the childs skin and clothing. If additional protection is necessary, apply a permethrin repellent directly to your clothing. Again, always follow the manufacturers directions. The Florida Department of Health (DOH) continues to conduct statewide surveillance for mosquito borne illnesses, including West Nile virus infections, Eastern equine encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, malaria, and dengue. Residents of Florida are encouraged to report dead birds to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission web site at http://www.myfwc.com/ bird/. For more information, visit DOHs Environmental Public Health web site at www.doh. state. .us/Environment/medicine/ arboviral/index.html or call the St. Johns County Health Department at 825-5055.

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 31 The CreekLine Marketplace ads!886-4919 Community MarketplaceAttention Small Businesses!!!For just $39 per issue you can reach 23,000+ addresses (min. of 6 issues) Call 886-4919 today! Massage TherapyAlicia Hunter LMTOnly $50 an hour #MM12329/MA53865 Neuromuscular Therapy ( 904 ) 514 5788www .hunter l mt. c omA New U Massage located in San Jose Office Center, Next to Sonnys and Ace Hardware$5 OFF with this ad. Help WantedSeeking experienced home health aides and CNAs for Comfort Keepers. Be part of our dynamic team providing in-home care services for 10 years to seniors and other adults living in Duval and St. Johns counties. Please apply online at https://comfortkeepers126.hyrell.com Engineering For Kids is looking for part-time, exible, and energetic people to be part of the North Florida team. Go to http://www.engineeringforkids.net/NorthFlorida/NowHiring. html for more information. Looking for an experienced climber with references. Call Mitch @ 703-5040 Davidson Realty is now recruiting new and experienced Realtors. Let us tell you why were routinely one of the Best Places to Work in Northeast Florida. Call 904-940-5000 or visit us at www.DavidsonRealtyInc.com. et Sitting Company part time work with pet. Applicant must live in the 32259 area. Flexible hours. Adult applicants only. Call Robin at 687-9610. Chiropractic of ce looking for front desk receptionist. Full time position. Must have computer skills, be a fast learner, very friendly/outgoing, ling, good phone skills. Bruce Sambursky, D.C. fax resume to 683-4378 or email samburskychiro@comcast.net Panache in Julington Creek is interviewing experienced & talented Stylists to join our team. Do you enjoy working in a professional, clean & successful environment? Apply at www.getpanache. com or stop in 2758 Racetrack Road #403 HELP WANTED! If you like music (and other www.allearspetsitting.com (904) 687-9610 Bonded, Insured & Affordable American Classic LawnsQuality Lawn MaintenanceMandarin N. St. Johns County707 4468Residential from $30.Commercial Residential Aqua Pro Specialties LLCPRESSURE WASHING 904-704-1388Licensed & Insured COASTAL ROOFING SYSTEMSRe-Roong is our SpecialtyCovering Northeast Floridas Finest Homes With Quality Work and Professional Service Since 1993. Sin Sin Sin Si S ce 199 199 9 3. Free Estimates! Licensed Insured 460-2815 State Certified Roofing Contractor #CCC057020 A Coastal Building Systems Company. Professional Computer ServicesBusiness & ResidentialFor more details, visit us at:www.itpromise.com I.T. Promise Inc. Computer Services( 904 ) 287-2254 at Fruit Cove287-0601 Carpets by Jonah.com 904-476-1476 Jonah Jones 3 Year Labor Warranty Housecleaning 207-5674 Use direct mail to bring in new clients. Graphic Design Printing Services Data/Mailing Lists Email Campaigns Fulllment Social Media ...We can do them all for you.Call Keith 346-3898 x1212276 San Jose Blvd, Ste 115, Jacksonville, FL 32223www.KesslerCreative.com Licensed & Insured631 2731www.kleanspray.com 10% OFF1st time customers Get Rich Slow... Earn Extra Incomelearning how to operate your own Mini-Ofce Outlet from your computer and phone.Free Training. Flexible Hours. Incredible Incentives.www.reach4more.com Call Caren for a free quote!904-230-6230www.providencetravel.coCruise Ships, Riverboat Cruises, and Train Destinations 904-849-3141Pain relief that comes to you www.RelyOnMobileChiropractic.com Dr. Doug Kines $49 Initial Examination and treatment$29 Follow-up Visits Home Cleaning In business over 13 years 904-568-4996 arts) and would like to volunteer to support a non-pro t organization bringing music to the community, please call 374 8639 Join the Baptist South circle of care. Visit e-baptisthealth.com for the most up to date list of job openings. Listings are updated daily and change often. If you have any questions, please call Human Resources at 271.6078. Seeking Licensed Massage Therapist @ A New U Massage(MM12329) Mandarin furnished massage room available NOW. Room rent is $375+ 7% tax ($401.25) a month. Rent can split w/other LMT. Phone: 904-288-0064. Pre-School and Infant/Toddler Teachers We look for quali ed teachers who love working with children. Give us a call or e-mail your resume! The Academy at Julington Creek: 904-230-8200; sara@theajc.net Pet Sitting Company Part time work with pets. Applicant must live in the International Golf Parkway area. Flexible hours. Adult applicants only. Call Robin at 687-9610. Community Newspaper Sales Person Come join our team. We are a twelve year old local company Location Mandarin Commission Sales A valid drivers license and transportation with proper insurance required Call on local businesses to sell advertising space in our local Community Newspapers Manage existing accounts while developing new business via cold calls Previouse Sales Experience not required Be professional and succinct Have superior written and verbal communication skills Be pro cient with spreadsheet (EXCEL) and word processing (WORD) software Have ability to utilize E-mail. Contact today: publisher@rtpublishinginc.com JOB Finder Looking for a job in NW St.Johns County? Heres where you can nd one close to home. CLASSIFIED ADS! NOW ONLINE AT www.thecreekline.comFREE Celebrating 10 years of Service Call904-230-9220 www.comfortkeepers.com/office-126 Your ad could be in the next issue! Call Linda Gay today! 287-4913LG@RTPublishinginc.com The past month has been busy for a certain group of young men in NW St. Johns County. The gentlemen of Boy Scout Troop 280 recently attended a ri e shooting campout at Camp Shands in Hawthorne, Florida. In April, over 30 scouts attended a special Ri e Shooting Merit Badge campout at the North Florida BSA campground. During this weekend, the young men honed their ri e skills, experienced nature hikes on the camp property and worked on many scout skills such as rope lashings, building camp gadgets, using di erent camp stoves and Leave No Trace principles. There were almost three dozen earning their Ri e Shooting Merit Badge with more scouts and 12 adults shooting for recreation. While earning this badge, scouts can develop their shooting skills while learning safe practices. This special weekend followed two weeks of classroom lessons by our own range masters from Troop 280, Daren Mixon and Scott Greenbaum, as well as guest instructors Phil Horn and John Horn. These gentlemen recently took time out of their schedules to be certi ed as o cial BSA Range Masters. Phil Horn was also gracious to give of his time while serving as a third Range master for this Troop 280 on target at Camp ShandsBy Contributing Writer Lisa Leavins weekend, helping some boys who were shooting for the rst time. The scouts learned what it means to be creative when, shortly before dinner, rain clouds moved in. They were able to construct a shelter out of a tarp and ropes and in no time, were cooking for and feeding three dozen of their fellow scouts. They were pleased to be able to return to the range after dinner once the weather had cleared. During the day, the scouts and adults used around 3,000 rounds of ammunition safely. Many scouts eagerly look forward to attending a ri e shooting class during their annual summer camp experience, but we were fortunate enough to perform this as a local troop. Many thanks to our range masters for giving us this opportunity. During the month, there have also been opportunities for the scouts to participate in several other merit badge classes o ered by leadership. While enjoying their local troop campouts, the boys are eagerly planning their summer camp adventure as well. April also brought changes to our charter organization, River of Life UMC on Racetrack Road. The church moved into the new sanctuary on April 22. We thank them for their continued support. Haven Hospice in St. Augustine is kicking o a community-education series next month designed to help people deal with end-of-life issues. Aptly named Its About Living, the series will include monthly sessions on a variety of subjects related to end-of-life issues and will run until December. The rst session, Its About LivingFree From Pain, will focus on pain management, myths and fears and will help people focus on the balance between being pain free and participating in life to the fullest. It is scheduled for June 14 and Haven Hospice Regional Medical Director Dr. Neel Karnani will be the speaker All the sessions will be held at The Meeting Room at the Its About Living community-education seriesPonce de Leon Mall at 2121 US Highway 1 South and will take place from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The complete schedule, including speakers where noted is: July 12: Its About Living With Memory Loss: Strategies for Success. Deborah Duvall, M.S.W., Social Worker, Haven Hospice August 9: Its About Living Life Your Way: Communicating Your Needs, Advanced Life Care Planning. Linda Scaz, Ph.D., Director of Community Engagement, Haven Hospice The programs are all free and open to the public. To learn more about the programs, St. Johns County residents can call 810-2377.

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Page 32, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com Faith News www.RiverofLifeUMC.comBabylon will be held nightly at River of Life UMC, July 29 Aug. 2. We will begin each evening at 6:15p.m. and end at 8:45p.m. Registration will be completed on-line at www.rolumc.com beginning June 1st. Participants must be 3 yrs old (by 3/1/12) through rising 8th grade. A fee of $15.00 per child/$30.00 family max will apply. Join us in our NEW building on Sundays at 9:30am! VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL A CONNECTING CHURCH Our Sunday Services Traditional Worship 8:30am Sunday School 9:45am Contemporary Worship 11:00amwww.switzerlandcommunitychurch.org Sunday Morning 10 am @ Timberlin Creek Elementary School 555 Pine Tree Lane St. Augustine, FL 32092 904-535-5636 S t Looking for a place to belong? We are looking for you. www.familylifefellowshipjax.com St Francis In-The-FieldEpiscopal ChurchChristian Formation 8:45am (September May) Sunday Service 10:00amChildrens Chapel and Nursery Available895 Palm Valley Rd (1 mile east of US1)615-2130 I want cremation.$650Flagler Memorial Cremation Society669-1809 That awkward moment when... My 13 year old sons Facebook friends sure do love this lead in to a funny or embarrassing story. It goes like this: That awkward moment when a stranger at the movies tells you and your brother you make a cute couple. *facepalm* That awkward moment when you realize youre chewing on a borrowed pen. That awkward moment when you ask when shes due but nd out shes not pregnant. That awkward moment... is funny, although a bit overused, because we can all relate to doing something stupid and then trying to gure out how to make it right. Do we man up and apologize, laugh it o or pretend like we didnt say it? I love to laugh. Believe me when I say I am not one to over-analyze jokes or Facebook posts. But I did start thinking... wheres the line between laughing and disrespecting? As weve ventured into life with teens, Id have to say most of it is very familiar territory. Im teaching my son to honor and respect people. But, honestly, I have some of the same struggles he does! My sophisticated sallies are still at someone elses expense and I often speak before I think. That awkward moment when you correct your son for disrespect but your own voice is dripping with sarcasm. When children are young, they see parents as their heroes. They look up to us because we love and care for themand because were taller than they are. I dont think our teens stop lookBabylon Vacation Bible School will be held nightly at River of Life UMC from July 29 through August 2 from 6:15 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. Registration is online at www.rolumc.com beginning June 1. Participants must be three years old (by March 1, 2012 and fully potty trained) through rising eighth grade. A fee of $15 per child ($30 family maximum) will apply for the weeks event. River of Life UMC is located at 2600 Race Track Road in St. Johns. For additional information, please call 230-2955. River of Grace Christian invites you to join us at 6200 State Road 13 North in St. Johns County. We are located between the Shands Bridge and Pacettis Campground on State Road 13. Our Sunday morning begins with a teen Bible study at 9:00 a.m. followed by a Praise and Worship service at 10:00 a.m. We strive to live out our name and be a River of Grace to our community! We love the Lord Jesus and want to share His message of love and hope with everyone. Please come and worship with us soonwe would love to have you! St. Francis in-the-Field Episcopal Church is o ering a parents Morning Out program for the 2012-2013 school year. If your child(ren) are between 12 months and four years old they can be enrolled in our program. The program runs on Wednesdays from 8:30 a.m. until 12:00 noon. The children are taught di erent prayers and bible verses and do this while having lots of fun. The goal of the program is to help develop and increase their Christian beliefs while giving parents a few children-free hours. The sta has been highly trained and many of them belong to St. Francis. Please consider having your little one(s) participate in what we believe is a great program. Please contact the church at 615-2130 for more information. Summer is the season for newcomers for the Jewish Federations Shalom Jacksoning up to us. I think they see through the thin veneer of perfection we sometimes apply to our lives and start living more like weve modeled all along. So where is that line between laughing and disrespecting? Making a joke at anothers expense is crossing the line. Luke 6:31 teaches, Do to others as youd have them do to you. Thats pretty straightforward. No extensive discussions on bullying necessary. Just be respectful. Distasteful joking is crossing the line. No, its not something teens do. Its something immature people do and our role as parents is to teach respect. Laughing o bad behavior is crossing the line. Yeah, its embarrassing to admit you acted like a jerk. But its a mark of maturity to apologize and carry on. If youve been married long enough to have children, youve certainly o ended your spouse. Think of what a blessing it will be to your future daughter-inlaw if your son learns now to recognize his mistake, apologize and change! A strong leader leads by example. And a good parent loves their children enough to teach them to do the hard thingto do whats right. Heres to many more laughs and no more of these: That awkward moment when your parent friends you on Facebook. Lets teach our children to live in such a way that they have nothing to hide.Purposeful ParentingThat awkward moment...By Allie Olsen Tell our advertisers you saw them inThe CreekLine Support our fine Support our fine Advertisers! Advertisers!ville. To acquaint new people with our area, we are planning a couple of casual gatherings for newcomers and anyone else interested in making Jewish connections and learning more about the general community. Our rst event will be held on Sunday, June 24 at 7:00 p.m. at the home of Yvonne Cohen, 1194 Cunningham Creek Drive (Fruit Cove area). This is a wonderful opportunity for anyone new to the Jewish community to make connections with their neighbors and nd out the latest happenings around town. Cool summer salads and fruits will be served. Please RSVP to Isabel Balotin at 448-5000 x 206 or shalomjax@jewishjacksonville. org. Other socials in di erent areas of the community are planned for July, August and September. Living in the state that is regarded as the Fishing Capital of the World presents us with hundreds of di erent types of sh and hundreds of more ways to catch them. No matter where you live in Florida, there is an opportunity to sh somewhere nearby. One such opportunity that is often overlooked is a deep sea adventure on a party boat. From Mayport to Key West and all the way up to Pensacola, Floridas ports play host to a eet of party boats that are waiting to provide you and your family an o shore shing trip that all will enjoy. The advantages of shing from a party boat are numerous. If you are new to shing or have never been, its great way to get started with very little investment. An eight hour trip of shing excitement should easily cost less than a theme park Captain Davids Local Fishing ReportBy Captain David Lifkaticket. Bait, tackle, rods and reels and shing licenses are all provided along with a knowledgeable crew. Some boats even include food and drink with the price of a ticket. The ride to the shing grounds often o ers sights and scenery that can only be seen from a boat. The rising sun over the ocean, the Florida shoreline and the huge variety of marine life such as dolphin, turtles, rays, ying sh and more add an unexpected pleasure to your day. When you arrive at your destination be ready to hang on. Any time you have bait in the water in the Atlantic Ocean or Gulf of Mexico anything can bite. Grouper, snapper, amberjack, king sh, cobia, sea bass and sharks are just a few of the many types of sh that could bite your hook. Air conditioned lounges, bathrooms, sun tan and sightseeing decks, sh cleaning and more are just some of the conveniences provided on most party boats. Mayport, St. Augustine, New Smyrna, Ponce Inlet, Port Canaveral, Clearwater and Sarasota are all coastal communities that o er party boats within an easy drive from home. Florida o ers lots of shing opportunities that should not be overlooked. A deep sea adventure aboard a party boat is one of them. Fishing Report: Weak sh biting in deeper holes and channel markers from N.A.S. to Green Cove. Look for croaker bite to increase in the same areas. Whether you catch one, some or none, the family time spent shing will last a lifetime. Invitethe community to your House of Worshipeditor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 33 Finding the right doctor just got easier.Baptist Primary Care is pleased to announce that Tessa Ricci, MD, is relocating her practice to the newly opened Bar tram Park location. Dr. Ricci is dedicated to your familys health through every stage of life and ready to provide you with a medical home. Services include: Well visits for adults, adolescents, children and newborns W omens health services (in cluding paps) Sports and school physicals Immunizations for all ages Care for acute illnesses and minor injuries Coordination of care for chronic conditions (hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, etc.) Minor skin proceduresSame-day appointments Tessa Ricci, MD Board-Certified, Family Medicine (904) 288-5550Baptist Primary Care Bartram Park13820 Old St. Augustine Road Suite 1 Jacksonville, FL 32258 KEN BERRY, B.S.N., D.C.319 West Town Place, Suite 7 Located in the WGV Professional Plaza904-940-0361 Serving World Golf Village and surrounding communities for over 4 years WWW.THE VILLAGE CHIROPRACTOR.COM Neck & Back Pain NOW OFFERING SPINAL DECOMPRESSION Free Consultation to see if you are a candidate MM# 21140 When the time came for Ryan Nuckols to think about an Eagle Scout project, he knew just where to turn. He had a passion for baseball and had recently had the opportunity to volunteer as a buddy for a Field of Dreams baseball game. The Field of Dreams is a nonpro t baseball league for special needs children in St. Johns County. The league just nished their second successful season with six teams. Field of Dreams volunteers immediately knew what they The 2012 Rock Hounds are Creeks Softball Association 10U League Champions once again! This is the third year in a row the Rock Hounds won the league championship, as they also won the 10U championship in 2011 and 8U in 2010. The team also went on to win the City Championship title in a hard fought tournament played on May 12. The Rock Hounds battled in extra innings to overcome a tough opponent in the championship game. Special thanks to the third year sponsor, Governmental Management Services. Congratulations to the players and coaches! Pictured are Coach Todd Sandiford, Coach Steve Binard, Coach Jackie Creamer, Coach Shaughnessy Harms, Natalie King, Sydney Veaughn, Faith Sandiford, Samantha Binard, Madison Lippy, Haley Bradley, Hannah Harms, Grace Williams, Anna Cowling, Sarah Ward, Haley Sandiford, Olivia Creamer, Skylie Shields. Not pictured: Coach John Lippy, Coach Kerry Creamer. Eagle Scout project bene ts Field of Dreamsneeded. The coaches had been storing the baseball equipment in their personal garages, taking the bats, helmets, balls and other equipment back and forth each Saturday. They were in desperate need of a permanent storage shed at the eld in Aberdeen. Nuckols researched sheds, building codes and materials and got the idea approved by the Boy Scout organization. The rst weekend in May, with the help of a dozen adult and scout volunteers, it was completed and the keys for a brand new shed were turned over to the Field of Dreams. The Field of Dreams was thrilled to nally have a home for all their equipment.Rock Hounds do it again! The Julington Creek 12U Sharks All Star team won the Fort Caroline Invitational Tournament in May. The Sharks had to win two games on the nal Sunday they beat Argyle 10-4 in the morning semi nal game and then beat Hendricks 9-8 in the championship game. It was not an easy win as Hendricks jumped out to a 6-0 lead after the rst inning. The Sharks battled back in the second inning beginning with a three-run home run by Sam Shaffer. Sharks pitcher Alex Wicker settled in and only allowed two more runs in the game. The Sharks tied the game at 8-8 and eventually went ahead 9-8 on a base hit by Josh Schievink. Ryan Peterson came in to pitch the last inning for the Sharks. Ill admit, it didnt look good after the rst inning but our kids kept battling until the end and pulled out a well-deserved win, said manager Paul Chouinard. The Sharks will be representing Julington Creek in the state tournament in Ocala during the week of June 21. Pictured are Coach Shane King, Manager Paul Chouinard, Coach Mark Peterson, Jackson Lein, Ethan Renaud, Kyle Chouinard, Ian Craven, Alex Wicker, Daniel Gajewski, Sam Shaffer, Grif n King, Ryan Peterson, Andrew Dziwulski, Josh Schievink and Colton Basham Julington Creek 12U Sharks All Star team wins Invitational Everybody reads The CreekLine Shouldnt your ad be included?lg@rtpublishinginc.com

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Page 34, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com VARSITY INSURANCE, INC. 268-6365 Our name celebrates our love of competition and commitment to excellence.Serving Mandarin Since 1990 www.varsityinsuranceagency.com Call Tim ( 904 ) 599-5250 LAWN & LANDSCAPING NO CONTRACT REQUIRED!/On-Call ServiceLawn Maintenance Package Includes: Precision Mowing, Edging Foliage Trimming Fertilizing Free Estimates References Available Licensed & Insuredgreenfxlawn@yahoo.com WGV Gymnastics recently participated in AAU State Championship in Daytona Beach, Florida. The girls had great success at the meet with scores and placements as follows: Two of the girls were state champions in their divisions and others received second, third and fourth. In level 4, Isabella Storey placed rst on beam, second on bars and fourth all-around with a score of 32.35; Chalsea Vickery placed rst on bars, second on oor, third on vault, sixth on beam and rst all-around with a score of 33.25; Angel Capio placed rst on bars, third on oor, fourth on beam and rst all-around with a score of 34.1; and Brianna Yabroudi placed rst on oor, rst on beam, second on bars, third on vault and rst all-around with a score of 33.85.The Switzerland Point Raiders nished the regular season at 14-2 to win the regular season title. Then on Friday night, May 4, under the lights at Bartram Trail High School, they capped off their season by winning the St. Johns County team trophy which they will proudly display over the next year. Great pitching, outstanding hitting and a near awless defense helped the Raiders win their rst ever St. Johns County middle school baseball championship. Luis Torres pitched a complete game shut-out over Gamble Rogers Middle School 11-0 in the seminals followed by Jarred Loggerhead Aquatics began their long course season in April. This season runs from April until August. The long course season di ers from short course in that a swimmer swims in a 50 meter pool as opposed to swimming in a 25 yard pool Recently the team has traveled to Daytona, The Bolles School and Fort Meyers for the start of their season. The Julington Creek Loggerheads have shown that the length of the pool will not keep them from breaking team records. During these three meets, a number of Loggerhead Aquatics athletes have broken many of the team records in di erent age groups. On the girls side, 8 and under swimmer Anna Moore broke team records for the 50 and 100 freestyle, 50 and 100 backstroke, 50 breaststroke, 50 butter y and 200 IM. In the girls 11-12 age group Eleanor Pollitt broke records in the 50 and 100 freestyle, 50 breaststroke and 200 and 400 IM. Megan Arnold did the same in the 400 freestyle, 100 and 200 breaststroke and 200 butter y. In the girls open age group, Stacey Stan eld broke records in the 100, 200 and 400 freestyle, Dani Gordan in the 200 breaststroke and Kathryn Brewer in the 400 IM. On the boys side, 8 and under Nicky Tayag broke the 50 breaststroke and butter y records and Noah Meyer broke the 100 breaststroke record. For the 10 and under boys, Robbie Rait broke records in the 50 and 100 butter y, Nate Pollitt in the 50 breaststroke and Michael Morton in the 100 and 400 freestyle. In the 13-14 age group, Ethan Chestang broke the 200 freestyle, 100 butter y, 200 and 400 IM records, while Brandon Johnson Switzerland Point Raiders win titleDavenport pitching a complete game 7-0 shut-out of Landrum Middle School in the nals. The championship team members are Brady Breedlove, Connor Carter, Jarred Davenport, Caleb Gerald, Anthony, Giangaspro, Jarrett Grant, Matthew Lavender, Blake Marabell, Bert Maxwell, Connor Miller, Drew Reagor, Alec Sanchez, Cade Sapala, Jake Saunders, Brandon Shee, Luis Torres, Chase Wilson, Haeth Wiseman and Jeremy Yost. Head Coach is Curtis Carter along with assistant coaches Greg Breedlave, Cody Breedlove and Michael Saunders. The study hall mentor is Liz Lavender.Gymnastics team brings home hardwareIn level 5 Audrey Strange placed third on beam, third on oor and fourth all-around with a score of 33.35 and Josy Paczkowski placed second on bars, third on vault, fourth on oor and third all-around with a score of 34.7. In the modi ed optional division, Scarlett Ralls placed rst on beam, third on oor and third all-around with an allaround score of 33.25; Emma Landess scored 8.25 on oor, 8.3 on vault, 7.75 on bars and 9.050 on beam with an allaround score of 33.0. Loggerhead Aquatics: continue as long course record breakersBy Contributing Writer Jacalyn Mortonbroke the 50 freestyle record. There is nothing that has a greater in uence on the quality of childrens sports than the excellence of the coach. The JCLA Swim Club sta consists of professionally trained coaches. They, as member coaches in the American Swimming Coaches Association, have access to the most comprehensive training and certi cation program for youth coaches of any sport in the United States. Certi ed coaches in USA Swimming programs possess training and experience in the physiology and psychology of adolescent development. The coaching sta provides the assurances that the time spent swimming will be quality time. Loggerhead Aquatics believes that courage and perseverance developed by swimming will prepare the individual for the challenges they will face in life. More information about JCLA can be found at loggerheadaquatics.com.Loggerhead Emma Howell swimming the 50 freestyle. Tell our advertisers you saw them inThe CreekLine Support our fine Advertisers!

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 35 Your Voice of ReasonPaid by Cyndi Stevenson, Republican for St. Johns County Commission District 1 Sambursky Chiropractic, LLCDr. Bruce Sambursky, Chiropractic Physician683-4376 12421 San Jose Blvd. #300 (just South of Solantic )Serving the Mandarin and Julington Creek area. www.backbonejax.com 23 Years Experience Accepting most insurance and Cash paying patients.Immediate same day appointments available. Jane Moore, Licensed Massage Therapist ( LMT # 0023441)Massage Therapist on StaTHE PATIENT OR PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE S, EXAMINATIONS OR TREATMENT. ChiropractorStop suffering from: Open Saturdays $45 $45 $40 $40 $35 $35 $29 $291-Golfer 2-Golfers 3-Golfers 4-Golfers *All rates are per golfer and are subject to 6% sales tax *Coupon must be present to receive the special rate *Valid Monday through Thursday Any me and a er 11am Friday through Sunday *Tee Times may only be made 7 days in advance *Coupon expires September 30, 2012 After all of the races have nished, the games played out and the dust has settled, Bartram Trail has done pretty well for itself during the 2011-2012 school year, registering three Final Four appearances, two state runnersup and one state champion. All over the state Bartram has made a name for themselves and is no longer the edgling school that would be good in the future, but was just too inexperienced. Well that time has arrived, and the Bears were poised to take it. In the fall, Bartram Trail possessed two state championship contenders in its crosscountry and football teams, both of whom had progressed throughout the past few seasons. Led by a strong base of seniors, both squads stormed through the playo s defeating teams that had previously been dominant; however, the Bears could not overcome state strongholds in football (Se ner Armwood) and in cross country (Belen Jesuit) preventing Bartram from an appearance in the state championship for football and limiting the Bears to state runner-up in cross country. The excitement that coursed through the school during the fall was kept alive throughout the winter months by the girls and boys basketball teams. The boys won the rst district championship in more than four years over rival Creekside in stunning fashion, while the girls managed Knights Dance Camp 2012 will be held June 18 through 21. The Creekside Knights Dance Camp provides elite dance training that will inspire and encourage dancers of all abilities and challenge their limits while having lots of fun! Parents are invited to attend a performance and awards ceremony at the end of camp and campers are invited to dance with the Knights Dancers at a CHS home game. The cost is $95, with a $10 discount if you register by June 1, 2012. Brochures may be found at www-chs.stjohns.k12. .us. Please email Krystina.Nelson@stjohns. k12. .us with questions.In the rst football game of the new year, Nease played their spring game against Providence High School. With very little practice and a new coach, the team did their best. However, it wasnt enough to overcome their opponents. With a score of 51-28, the rst game was a loss, but the team is not demoralized. Justin Johnson, Will McCarthy and Justin Lee scored touchdowns. Also, Jared Washington had a pick six, intercepting a pass and running a touchdown. Although this wasnt an ideal start for the rst game, with more training from a new head coach, new, more effective plays and a modi ed team, things are looking good for Neases 2012-2013 football season.This summer the boys will begin their training. Since there is a new head coach at Nease, they will all have to work hard BTHS Sports RoundupBy Jared Freitas, BTHS Studentto reach the state championship game before having their run ended by perennial state champion Fort Lauderdale Dillard. With springtime arrived more success for the Bears, who again relied on its underclassmen to carry the load. The girls lacrosse team was determined not to have its season be ended by Winter Springs, which it did for the past three years. The Bears were determined to make this season di erent. Similar to past years they remained the top dog in North Florida, having not lost to an area team since 2008. After defeating Creekside in the district championship, the Bears smothered Episcopal 19-4, setting up for a breath-taking match up against area contender Ponte Vedra in the regional semi- nal. The Sharks, who played Bartram tough all year, opened up a 7-3 halftime de cit and were up 10-5 at one point, when the Bears fought back and managed to tie the game in the closing moments, thanks to a ve goal e ort by senior Melissa Coggins. She would total six goals at the end of the night, scoring the game winner in the rst period of overtime. That marked the third victory for the Bears over Ponte Vedra this year, winning all three by only a four goal margin. After bowling through Matanzas 19-2 in the regional championship, Bartram became the rst school in North Florida history to make it to the Final Four. Always playing as the underdog, BT faced Bishop Moore, a top ve-ranked team in the state. Holding a lead for most of the rst half, the Bears fell 16-11. A similar story marked the boys track and eld teams ascent to glory, as they were considered a state contender thanks to their 4x400 and 4x800 teams led by junior Nick Uruburu and senior Brandon Ballard; however, no one considered them a threat against stronger teams from Gainesville and Miami. Despite this, the Bears kept running, taking the district and region meets with no problem. However, when the Bears reached the championship they knew it was time to prove themselves and show everyone the fruits of their labor. Junior Larry Donald secured fth and sixth in the 300 and 110 hurdles respectively, while senior Brandon Ballard nished fth in the 800 along with junior Marcus Taylor who placed 10th. These e orts bolstered the Bears championship e orts; however, Uruburu led the team with two come-from-behind victories in the 400 and 4x400 races, which secured the Bears a 37-31 victory over Miami Northwestern. The 2011-2012 year has been one of the most successful years in Bartram athletics, despite a smaller talent pool that Bartram has had in past years due to the opening of new schools. This shows that hard work really does pay o Sports in BriefMark your calendars for August 13 through 17, from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon for Cheer Camp at Liberty Pines Academy. Rising kindergarteners through fth graders are welcome at this camp, which is sponsored by St. Johns Athletic Academy and hosted by Liberty Pines Academy and local cheerleaders! For additional information, please email Heather Newmans, LPA Cheer Coach, at lpacheer@gmail.com or www-lpa.stjohns.k12. .us/ to download a brochure.The fourth annual Creekside High School Cheerleading Camp, featuring Head Coach Jamie Godfrey and the varsity cheerleaders, will be held June 25 through June 28 from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon. This camp is open to the rst 80 girls who sign up and the cost is $90 if registered by June 1. All campers should be enrolled in kindergarten through fth grades during the 2012-13 school year. Every camper can expect interactive and fun instruction from varsity coaches and players focusing on cheers, chants, jumps, stretches and dance. Campers will be invited to perform during halftime at a CHS Knights football game this year. To register, please visit the Creekside High School at website www-cshs.stjohns. k12. .us and click on athletics; look for the Cheer Camp link. For further information, please email Coach Godfrey at godfrej@stjohns.k12. .us. Nease Sports RoundupBy Elena Castello, Nease Studentto adapt and work with each other to become the strongest team yet. And even though last season was not the greatest, the boys are ready to dominate this upcoming year. They will work very hard with their new head coach, Shane Mathews, to develop e ective o ensive strategies and work together as a solid team. Mathews played quarterback for the University of Florida and was in the NFL for 14 years, so his experience can only bene t the Nease football team. Come out and support our boys next year, with games on Fridays. Not only will you be able to watch a great football game, you will also be able to listen to Neases amazing band; experience a true game with our spirited students; and enjoy food and a great atmosphere. So show your green and gold pride and cheer for the football team!Do you enjoy receiving The CreekLine each month?Then our Advertisers!As a non-subscription publication we rely on our fine advertisers to finance the production of your community newspaper! Be sure to patronize our advertisers and tell them you saw them in The CreekLineNW St. Johns Countys Community NewspaperThank

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Page 36, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com 20% off on all plants and trees 30 gallon crepe myrtles for only $ 50 (10 12 ft. trees)TOTAL LANDSCAPES DESIGN & INSTALLATION SODDING & IRRIGATION Trout Creek Location at World Golf Village WITH HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF PLANTS IN STOCK... S J &NURSERY & LANDSCAPING WorldGolfVil G IN GOD WE TRUST Free sod replacement estimates and landscape estimates! Your onsite Athletic Trainer at each weeks games Right with you through the game... We are Your Community Therapist. Your onsite Athletic Traine r at ea ch week s g ame s h h h t t h h h St. Johns( 904 ) 429-0290www.atlasphysicaltherapy.comMandarin( 904 ) 292-0195 The drought is still with us as of early May and shows no real signs of lifting. You have been working hard, Im sure, to maintain your yards and gardens. If your soil drains quickly, installing a drip irrigation system for your landscape could be a boon. There are also ttings available to convert a conventional system to more e cient methods of delivering water to your plants; there is a good selection at the big box suppliers. Just remember to keep spray coverage for your lawns. Correct zoning allows for watering grass up to twice a week during daylight savings time and landscape watering as needed. Your original installer would surely be glad to help for the less technically-minded among us. Vegetables have particular needs for water in order to supply us with a successful crop. Simple soaker hoses laid along vegetable rows work well. Use a solid feeder hose from the faucet across one end of the plot and attach a soaker hose at right angles for each row. Using a cut-o for each soaker section GardeningSpring into summerBy Contributing Writer Master Gardener Lesley Arrandale with Duval County Extension, University of Florida/IFASwill allow you to adjust ow to a row of maturing onions, for instance, ensuring that they mature properly ready for harvest and you will still be able to deliver the right amounts of water to the rest of your rows. This has been a season of change in the vegetable garden. The earlier warm season crops such as tomatoes are maturing well. The real heat lovers like okra, summer peas and sweet potatoes are getting going. When choosing vegetables look for those recommended for northeast Florida, with all its attendant insects and diseases, in table 4 of The Florida Vegetable Gardening Guide (http://edis. ifas.u .edu/pd les/vh/vh02100. pdf). April was a wonderful month for watching migrating birds. I had the pleasure of hosting a small ock of rose-breasted grosbeaks on their way north to breed. The males are more striking than the females, with black and white plumage and the rosy breast after which they are named. The females resemble female red-winged blackbirds, but with the typical heavy bills of seed-eaters. I caught a tantalizing glimpse of just one glorious, male indigo bunting, his iridescent plumage glinting in the sun. Give your regular backyard birds clean water, food and shelter and they can be an endless source of pleasure. Mornings are the ideal time to see honey bees, as well as our native bees, oating lightly from ower to ower. Although many of those owers are the wild spiderwort, I am perfectly content with them, but there is a school of thought that brands them weeds rather than native perennials. The other successful native in my yard is Salvia coccinea, a half-hardy perennial which readily volunteers. Both these plants seeds are relished by house nches, which are comical to watch as they perch precariously on slender stems, sometimes sliding right o as the stems tilt earthwards under their weight. May was Garden for Wildlife Month, but theres no time like the present. (http://www. nwf.org/Get-Outside/OutdoorActivities/Garden-for-Wildlife. aspx) Creekside High School is honored to announce the following seven students have earned the distinction to participate in the 2013 National Merit Scholarship Program: Drew Booher, Theresa Bottenhorn, Kirk Kathe, Hunter LeBlanc, Mandi Lenoir, Allan Martin and Rachel Paul. These distinguished students will have the opportunity to choose their top two colleges or universities to begin direct communication with admission of cials. Cngrlis Its a story that is tragically all too familiar: two boating families enjoying a Saturday afternoon on the river, clear weather, unobstructed views, then suddenly a shattering collision, injured people in the water, a child drowns. How does it happen? And why, with all of our technology, safety equipment and regulation, does it still happen? One factor remains the popularity of smaller, motorized water craft. According to the Coast Guards 2007 accident data, more than 70 percent of all boating accidents and more than 80 percent of all fatalities involved boats less than 26 feet in length. Open motorboats account for the lions share of those numbers, not only because of their speed but also because United States Coast Guard Auxiliary UpdateUnder-trained anglers boost accident dataContributed by Bob Schultz, United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-7they typically have a low pro le in the water. This makes them easier to capsize and harder for other boaters to see. But theres more to accident risk than the size of the boat. Two types of boaters are proving to be a tough sell on safety: the experienced but under-trained operator and the operator who sees the boat as an accessory to another sport, such as hunting or shing. For too many of these, safety is still being learned in the School of Hard Knocks. Since 2000, half of all boating accidents on average involved boaters with 100 to 500 hours of experience on the water. This is the operator whose familiarity with boating leads to overcon dence. He or she has learned to start, stop and steer, and navigating an open waterway seems a snap compared to navigating the freeway at rush hour. Unlike a car, however, there are no brakes on a boat, no seat belts, no turn signals, the steering is di erent and the rules on the water are di erent from the rules on the road. Accidents can result when boat operators fail to respect those di erences, especially when they speed, take risks and stop being vigilant. And too frequently they do this without the equipment on board or the training to deal with an emergency. In 2007, operators with no formal training were involved in 75 percent of all fatal boating accidents. Anglers present a di erent problem. Although those who sh and those who water ski have similarly high numbers of accidents, the risk for an angler that a boating accident will prove fatal is 10 times that of someone on skis: 30 percent vs. 3 percent. What accounts for the di erence? Probably the environment in which these activities take place. Skiing is done in open water with three people involved: the boat operator, the lookout and the skier. In open water, additional help for a downed skier can be as close as other boaters or people on or near the shore. Skiing is also more often a warm weather pursuit again, raising the probability that other boaters will be nearby to help if needed. Most important, the skier is very likely to be wearing a life jacket. Contrast this with the angler: possibly alone in a quiet cove, shing during the shoulder seasons when vacationers and crowds of pleasure boaters are absent and too often without a life jacket. Solitude, heavy clothes and no life jacket are a deadly combination if a boat capsizes or someone falls overboardaccidents that contributed to more than 60 percent of boating fatalities in 2007. These two groups anglers and the experienced but undertrained remain a major focus of the Coast Guards mission to reduce boating accidents and fatalities. Americas waterways are becoming more and more crowded. Even with the high cost of fuel, there are half again more recreational boats registered with the Coast Guard than there were 25 years ago. This is all the more reason for boaters to seek training in boating skills and emergency measures to ensure the safety of everyone on board.For the third summer in a row at all St. Johns County Public Library System branches, we will be hosting Fun with Flowers for KIDS! workshops sponsored the Friends of the Library and the Garden Club of St. Augustine. Children ages ve through 12 are invited to become Bee Detectives to make-and-take child-friendly, creative oral arrangements Check out Fun with Flowers using food and owers. These workshops are generously sponsored the Friends of the Library and the Garden Club of St. Augustine and in collaboration with the St. Johns County Beekeepers Association. Please note: Beekeeper Eric will be bringing a safe, live hive of honeybees to each of the workshops. Registration for this program is now open. Please contact your local branch library for more information. Southeast Branch Library Friday, June 15 at 1:00 p.m.; 827-6900 Ponte Vedra Beach Branch Library Saturday, July 14 at 2:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m.; 827-6950 Main Library Friday, July 20 at 10:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.; 827-6940 Hastings Branch Library Thursday, July 26 at 1:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m.; 827-6970 Bartram Trail Branch Library Friday, July 27 at 10:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.; 827-6960 Anastasia Island Branch Library Saturday, July 28 at 2:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m.; 209-3730 Your ad could be in the next issue! Call Linda Gay today! 287-4913LG@RTPublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 37 Oil Change & Rotation $19.99 $20 Off All Alignments $30 Off any Brake Job Look great this summer and learn how to keep it off! Come join us for Breakfast and Exercise K building not high in sugar Since their schools inception in 2008, the Creekside High School Lady Knights tennis team has experienced considerable success on and o the court. While defendWith the majority of golf courses in Florida owned by memberships, real estate developers and banks, it is quite rare to nd a course that is actually family owned and operated. In March, the DiStefano family, originally from Albany, New York, purchased The Golf Club at South Hampton from Crescent Resources of Charlotte, North Carolina. The club is currently being operated by their company, DWA Golf, LLC and the family is playing a very active role in its management. Derek DiStefano, managing partner for DWA Golf shared, The Golf Club at South Hampton is one of the greater Jacksonville and St. Augustine areas most popular golf courses. It is a golf course that has been designed to present every golfer the appropriate risk, o ering encouragement to the novice, while challenging the experienced player. South Hampton is also a golf club that presents very nice, consistent course conditions and is also known for its friendly and outgoing sta He continued, Our family looks forward to carrying on the tradition that is South Hampton and building on that to make it one of Jacksonvilles premier semi-private golf facilities. DWA Golfs company operating motto is Golf with a sense of family and community. The vision of the company is one that will be focused on being committed to supporting the local communities of Jacksonville and St. Augustine, its organizations, charities and military members. The company is also focused on being one Lady Knights tennis team graduates impressive senior classBy Contributing Writer Elizabeth Ruizing their 2011 title at the 2012 class 2A District Championship, sophomores Amanda Keller and Marisa Ruiz and freshman Savanna Page won in their respective positions and the team went on to the class 2A Regional Championship, losing by just one point to Bolles High School. Keller and Ruiz remained undefeated throughout the 2012 season and advanced for the second consecutive year to represent Creekside in the state nals. As accomplished academically as they are athletically, the Creekside girls tennis team carries an impressive 3.8 cumulative GPA in the classroom. The Lady Knights coach, Cheryl Keller, is brought to tears when speaking of the girls graduating, as most of the senior players have been on her team since Creeksides inaugural season. Coach Keller and all of the parents are extremely proud of these young women due to their unrelenting dedication and spirit. Congratulations to the entire Lady Knights team!Photo courtesy of Danielle WalkerLocal golf club now family owned and operatedof the most consumer oriented companies through the use of a website that has been developed to book tee times online and from mobile devices. Additionally, the club now provides wireless internet capabilities throughout the facility. Some of the services and programs currently being offered at South Hampton would include a reduced rate for active duty military members, police and re ghters. In support of junior golfers, the club allows golfers ages 16 and under the opportunity to play for free with a paying adult on Sundays after 1:00 p.m. The club also o ers a shorter set of family tees designed to create a very short course for the beginner or novice golfer and multiple three day junior camps scheduled throughout the summer. Be sure to see their ad in this issue of The CreekLine! Julington Creek Baseball 6U recreational T-ball team, the Hooks, had an amazing season and ended Spring 2012 season in rst place. The team was made up of 13 boys who each brought hard work, dedication and team spirit to help make the season a success. Congratulations to the Hooks for their undefeated season and a big thank you to the coaches, team moms and parents for a fun and exciting season!

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Page 38, The CreekLine June 2012 www.thecreekline.com the entirety of his career and helped lead the JV team to two straight district championships. He also helped Bartram record its rst undefeated varsity season this past year, as the team won their rst regional championship in school history. Freitas also wrote for the Bartram Blazer school newspaper during his freshman and sophomore years, before he began writing for The CreekLine. He was vice president of publicity for Beta Club, the historian for Mu Alpha Theta (Math National Honor Society) and a member of the National Honor Society. He ran track and eld my rst two years at Bartram and says that he hopes that through his writing the BTHS Roundup column, he was able to acknowledge the schools student athletes for their accomplishments and bring the community a little bit closer together. Freitas will be attending the University of Florida as a member of the Honors College. He plans to study under the pre-Med track and then attend medical school in order to become a general practitioner.Devyn Fussman BTHS HappeningsDevyn Fussman graduated from Bartram Trail High School where concentrated on creative writing, taking creative writing classes all four years and working as a sta member for three years for BTHSs literary magazine, The Oracle, which is now being sold on Amazon. She was head editor her senior year. Fussman was one of 12 to earn honorable mention from over 900 entrants in a state-wide poetry contest hosted by The Betty Gri n House, called the Day Without Violence. Fussman was also very active in drama and competed in district theater competitions in playwriting and monologue categories and performed in many plays. She was a member of National Honor Society, Book Club and Beta Club and made the deans list all four years. She will be attending Florida State University beginning with the summer term, where she was accepted into FSUs animation program (a division of the College of Motion Picture Arts), one of the most competitive in the country. She hopes to work at FSUs school newspaper, FSView during her freshmen year, because after that shell be moving to West Palm Beach to take animation classes.Grant Piper CHS Sports RoundupGrant Piper graduated Magna Cum Laude from Creekside High School where he was a member of the varsity track and eld team for two years. He was also a member of the National Hispanic Honor Society. In the fall, Piper will be attending the University of Florida where he plans to study Political Science for a possible future in politics. Piper, who wrote for The CreekLine for all four of his years at CHS, says he still enjoys writing and plans to continue in the future. Best wishes from all of us at The CreekLine to these graduating seniors!Editors Note: As we say goodbye to this years senior writers, we now have a few student writer positions available for underclassmen. Please contact us at editor@thecreekline.com if you are interested in becoming one of our student writers for next year!With St. Johns County high schools graduation ceremonies upon us, we at The CreekLine nd that it is time to say farewell to a truly talented group of senior writers who have penned articles for us, some of them for several years. It has been a pleasure working with these aspiring journalists who have displayed professionalism and a grasp of editorial knowledge well beyond their years. We hope that they have learned and expanded their writing talents as a result of their association with The CreekLine and wish them all the best in their future endeavors!Rachel Bu CHS HappeningsRachel Bu graduated third in her class from Creekside High School, where she maintained an A average as a part of the ASP Program. She was honored as an American Youth Character Awards recipient, a National Merit Commended Student and an AP Scholar with Distinction and received a Best Buy scholarship and a Zonta International scholarship. Bu was a member of the Hispanic Honor Society, National Honor Society, National Art Honor Society, National English Honor Society, International Thespian Society, debate club and Model U.N. and was a varsity tennis letter-recipient for three years. Throughout her high school career, she accumulated more than 1900 community service hours and was named Creekside High School Student Volunteer of the Year and St. Johns County First Runner-up Student Volunteer of the Year. Most of these service hours were acquired through her work with CISV International (Childrens International Summer Villages) where she was co-president of the CISV Jacksonville Junior Branch board this past year. This summer she will attend a CISV youth Seminar Camp in Victoria, Canada. Next fall she will attend the University of Pennsylvania and plans to major in International Relations with an emphasis on human rights and economics. Bu says she hopes to learn as many languages as possible and travel the world to work with human tra cking refugees while helping improve the economies of developing nations. Brittany Dirks Nease HappeningsBrittany Dirks graduated Magna Cum Laude from Nease High School with an International Baccalaureate (IB) diploma. She was a member of National Honor Society and National Hispanic Honor Society. She was very active in the schools band program, both in eld guard in the fall season and Winterguard in the indoor winter season in addition to her studies in the IB program. For her senior year, Dirks was captain of Neases varsity Winterguard team, which placed third at the WGI World Championships held in Dayton, Ohio, with a team score of 94.25. She was recognized as an outstanding Winterguard member with a scholarship from the Nease Band Boosters. She plans to attend the University of Central Florida where she will major in English and participate in marching band and Pegasus (Winterguard). She received a Silver Pegasus scholarship from UCF.Jared Freitas BTHS Sports RoundupJared Freitas graduated from Bartram Trail High School where he was a member of the High-Q academic team during Ann Silverness, DVM, CCRT 904-268-0477 Mandarin Landing Animal Hospital & Pet Resort Veterinarian Owned and Operated Pet Resort Large Indoor Suites Family Style Boarding with Cable TV Sunlit Kitty Condos with a Nature View Romper Room for playtime and Doggie Daycare Splish-Splash time Heated Indoor Swimming Pool 50% OFF Your Pets First Exam with Dr. Silverness( 1st Time Clients Only )Not valid with any other oer. Expires 7/10/12 FREE BOARDING Book 2 Nights at our Resort and 3rd Night is FREE! (1st Time Boarders Only)Not valid with any other oer. Expires 7/10/12Conveniently located one block North of I-295 and San Jose Boulevard Dr. Ann Silverness, DVM, CCRT Book your Summer Boarding Now! Healy Homeworks Call Dan Healy Cell: 904-228-6900 dandeman@comcast.netExcellent References Available We would like to thank all our customers for helping us get established and look forward to working with you again over the next ten years. Celebrating 16 successful years in Mandarin/Fruit Cove Wishing these talented writers all the best!The CreekLines high school writers graduateBy Martie Thompson Congratulationsto the Class of 2012!from your friends atThe CreekLine Prospective student writers:Please email your request, including the column in which you are interested, along with a sample of your work to Editor@TheCreekLine.com for consideration! Dont Delay!

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www.thecreekline.com June 2012 The CreekLine, Page 39 904-262-SWIM Located next to Ace Hardware (Behind Sonnys) Accepting and Selling furniture (living room, dining room, bedroom, etc) Home decor (lamps, rugs, artwork, tchotchke) New items arrive daily. We are ready to accept your entire house, estate, etc. We also oer inventory liquidation service for builders, home and furniture industry businesses, etc. For More Information call: 880 8448or email us at: ENCOREDECOR@bellsouth.net10830 San Jose Boulevard ( across from Walmart)Visit us online at: www.EncoreDecorFL.comWE OFFER FREE PICKUP SERVICE FOR APPROVED ITEMSHours: Jacksonvilles Largest Upscale Consignment Store H Tree WorkbyMitch Drake & Sons (904) 703-5040 (904) 287-3819Licensed, Insured & Workmans CompOver 35 Years Experience Ch ec k o ut o u r re vi ew s a n d 5 Sta r r ati n g at Y e ll ow b ook .com Boy Scout Troop 280, River of Life Church on Racetrack Road, recently did a 30 mile canoe trip down the Suwannee River. We had 13 scouts, three adults and seven canoes on the three-night excursion. On Friday we camped at the Lime Sink Youth Camp at Suwannee River State Park and enjoyed a big meal of burgers, beans, sweet corn, chips, watermelon and smores. On Saturday morning, we had strong thunderstorms with lightning. We were able to get camp broken down before the storms and we just hung tight in the bathhouses during the storms. We nally got onto the river at noon. River levels were excellent and the current was moderate. We had about 30 minutes of sunshine, then got a lengthy rain shower without any lightning in the afternoon, but we paddled through it. We made our 15 miles in about six hours. The skies cleared as we unpacked at Dowling Park River Camp. We had three large elevated tree house type sleeping platforms. The scouts enjoyed their meal of Spagettios while the adults su ered with steak kabobs. (scouts do their own menu planning). On Sunday we woke to fog. We tried some shing and one of the scouts caught a bass. The skies cleared nicely and the temps rose. We came upon an excellent rope swing and most the boys and a couple of signi cantly older boys got their ll of the rope swing. We had a short prayer service on the water on Sunday morning then made our 10 miles and checked into Lafayette Blue Springs State Park in mid-afternoon. Our campsite was close to the river and had potable water nearby. After we set up camp, we had of time to swim in the spring. There was even an underwater cave. Dinner was chili with kielbasa mixed in. Never enough food for us scouts! Mr. Sorensen baked the adults an awesome corn bread with his bakepacker. JCP CARES, a community charitable organization in NW St. Johns County, conducted an area collection drive to provide Summer Fun backpacks to the countys homeless student population, whose number has steadily approached 500. JCP CARES and Austin Outdoors delivered backpacks for each student in the program to the St. Johns County School District Building on Thursday, May 17. This initiative generated more than $15,000 in charitable donations and more than 100 community service hours. With the assistance of MAY Managements sta Summer Fun backpacks were lled with books, word puzzles and journals to keep the mind active during the summer reprieve, as well as toys and non-perishable food. Backpacks have been tailored to each age group and will be received by the students prior to the last day of school. JCP CARES would also like to thank its business partners, service clubs, area schools and churches, along with its countless volunteers and nancial supporters:Troop 280 enjoys Suwannee River canoe trip By Contributing Writer Andrew Morley, Star Scout, Troop 280Monday was an early rise at 7:00 a.m. We broke camp and were on the water by 8:40. Mr. Morley nearly lost his canoe when he pushed it into the river a little too briskly and almost tipped it over and lost all his gear. We made it another ve miles to the FL51 bridge, our take-out point, about 10:20 a.m. at Mile 98 above the Gulf of Mexico. There were about 30 miles total for this trip. Mr. Hernandez met us there and helped shuttle us back to Suwannee River State Park to pick up vehicles. Steven did a good job as Senior Patrol Leader for the trip Two scouts earned nicknames: Alec earned Red sh, for his shing prowess and hair color and Noah earned : Vacuum, for consuming a double Baconater, fries, large shake and anything else within sight at Wendys following the campout. We will continue our canoe trip down the Suwannee River with a ve night, 50 mile trip next fall. JCP CARES launches summer initiativeBy Contributing Writer Michelle Busby, JCP CARESBank of St. Augustine Bartram Trail Rotary The CreekLine newspaper Creekside High School Cunningham Creek Elementary Durbin Creek PTO Early Learning Coalition Fruit Cove Baptist Church Fruit Cove Middle School Hugs Across the County JCP swim teams JCP tennis teams Kiwanis Club McDonalds Plum District Ponte Vedra Sunshine Rotary Publix River of Life UMC St. Johns River Water Management District St. Johns Rotary Timberlin Creek Elementary Wards Creek Elementary Williams YMCAThank you for reading The CreekLine!

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