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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101421/00020
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Title: CreekLine
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: RT Publishinig, Inc.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date: November 2011
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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THE CREEKLINESM SERVING THE NORTHWEST ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMMUNITY SINCE 2001 Visit our online edition at www.thecreekline.com MEMBER OF THE RT PUBLISHING GROUP OF COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS What’s InsidePage 3 Whats New Page 4 From the CommissionerPage 5 School District Journal Page 6 The Sheriff ReportsPage 7 Veterans Day event Page 8 US Constitution Page 9 Taxing Issues Page 11 JCP CARES food drive Page 15 BTHS Happenings Page 16 BT Newcomers Club Page 21 TCE author visit Page 22 DCE Boosterthon fun runPage 25 FCMS news Page 28 Happy 99th Birthday! Page 29 Faith Corner Page 32 Movie Review Page 35 High School Sports Fishing Report Page 36 Coast Guard update Page 37 JCP tennis team Page 38 Gardening Page 39 Lady Flyers Volume 11, Issue 11November 2011The CreekLine12443 San Jose Boulevard, Ste. 403 Jacksonville,FL 32223Presorted Standard US Postage Paid Callahan, FL 32011 Permit No.4 FREE ONLINE CLASSIFIED ADS Go towww.thecreekline.comand click onFree Classi ed Ads $*$*$* Introductory 1-hour massage session Introductory 1-hour massage session Enhanced 1-hour Introductory aromatherapy massage SAVE UP TO 50% WHEN YOU SCHEDULE YOUR MASSAGE TODAY 3949 57 Franchises Available | MassageEnvy.com | Convenient HoursOpen 7 days. M-F 8am-10pm, Sat 8am-6pm, Sun 10am-6pm **Ranked #1 by Entrepreneur Magazine *Session includes massage and time for consultation and dressing. Prices subject to change. Rates and services may vary by location. Additional local taxes and fees may apply. 2009 Massage Envy Limited, LLC. Three great reasons to see why we’re ranked #1 in massage services.** BARTRAM PARK 13820 St. Augustine Rd Ste 157 Exit #335 off of I95 (904) 262-5585MM#16328 AROMATHERAPY MASSAGE 2011 After recently turning 84, most people dont strike out on a new mission„yet that is exactly what Sarah Bailey has done. She is not sitting idly by resting on her laurels as St. Johns County Commissioner from 1984 to 1992 or having a notable history in Florida State agriculture. She was named the Woman of the Year in Agriculture for the State of Florida in 1993. An avid horsewoman, she has journeyed trails throughout Florida and seen some remarkable scenery. Yet she says, Northeast Florida is blessed with some of Halloween came to Pacetti Bay Middle School (PBMS) in World Golf Village with a special Trick or Treat as a special surprise guest came to teacher Kenneth Ballards sixth grade world history class. The happy shock and surprise couldnt be held back by student Stephanie Mitchell as her mother walked into the class. Her mother, unknown to Stephanie, had just returned from duty in Iraq and Korea. Senior Airman Milette Herring has just completed her last duty tours, after spending 13 years in the United States Air Force. Carrying a large bouquet The Creeks Clash U13 girls premier soccer team is the U14 champions of the 22nd annual Seminole Girls Fall Festival. The tournament was held at the Seminole Soccer Complex in Sanford, Florida over the weekend of October 8-9. The team won two games and tied another to lead them to the championship game against the Florida Soccer Alliance Freedom (FSA) U14 girls. The champion-Sarah Bailey starts new preservation mission; seeks community membersBy Karl Kennellthe most remarkable and special natural features in Florida.Ž Her mission now is to bring public awareness and care to those natural blessings. For years Julington Creek, Durbin Creek, the Peninsula and Twelve Mile Swamp have been under constant pressure from the burgeoning development and growth of both Duval and St. Johns counties. At a recent Third Thursday Lecture hosted by the Mandarin Historical Society at the Mandarin Community Center, she summarized to the audience her new mission to preserve these natural resources.Special Trick or Treat for Pacetti Bay studentBy Karl KennellCreeks Clash U13 girls win back-to-back soccer tournaments Coach Phong Le, Hannah Valenti, Savannah Pitts, Jaelyn Stepter, Bethany Moore, Megan Fallan, Kristine Galang, Hannah Bateh, Meghan Badge and Assistant Coach Kevin Moore. Maggie Larson, Oakley Harrell, Sarah Kronz, Frankie Sefcik, Taylor Hultz, Mallory Dempsey, Alley Bennett. Not pictured: Hannah Vranicarship game was hard fought in the pouring rain, but Creeks Clash shut FSA out to win the tournament with a “ nal score of 1-0. This same team also won the First Coast Labor Day Shootout the weekend of September 3-4, winning all four of their games. The girls scored 11 goals, completely shutting out three of the teams and allowed only one point to be scored against them on a penalty kick. The team is coached by Phong Le and assistant coach Kevin Moore. Congratulations, ladies! Well done! Stephanie Mitchell with her mom, Milette Herring.of ” owers and a balloon with welcome home given to her by the PTSO of Pacetti Middle School, Stephanies mother, MiloŽ as her friends call her, quietly followed PBMS Principal Sue Sparkman into the class. Sparkman then announced that a special visitor had arrived. As Stephanie turned her head to look toward the special visitor, her eyes became big and bright with excitement as she saw her mom. Her grandfather Jerome Glass, himself an Army veteran who served in Vietnam, with his wife Blanche had arranged the surprise Trick or Treat visit. Their surprise treat for their granddaughter was a resounding success„not only was she surprised, but Ballards entire class was excited! The excitement built and ” owed out into She outlined the forces that are attacking these watersheds, things such as septic tanks, aggressive development invasion and extreme recreational activities. Her plan is to gather people together to expand awareness of the problems and develop efforts to pressure these areas and mitigate damage already done. As a result she has formed the Julington-Durbin Creeks Conservation Foundation or J-DCCF. The foundation has the mission of being dedicated to the conservation of its water resources, shore and water habitats, recreational uses, and its surrounding watersheds.Ž This foundation is modeled on a very successful foundation formed in Sanibel-Captiva, Florida. Following their example, Bailey wants to work to identify the problems, create a plan and access resources for preservation. Many grants for preservation go by the wayside for lack of pursuit,Ž she says. She describes herself by saying, Im not a professional but just an individual with a passionate interest in this effort.Ž Sarah Bailey cont on pg. 8 Surprise visit cont on pg. 5

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Page 2, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com of St. Augustine 904.825.0540 www.oastaug.com 3055 CR210W, Suite 110, St. Johns, FL 32259 One Orthopaedic Place, St. Augustine, FL 32086 LET OUR SPORTS MEDICINE TEAM Keep you in the game!JAMES GRIMES, MD JOHN STARK, MD SPECIALIZING IN THE TREATMENT OF SPORTS RELATED INJURIES: FOOT/ANKLE SPRAINS & FRACTURES NECK & BACK INJURIES SHOULDER SEPARATIONS & DISLOCATIONS ELBOW LIGAMENT & TENDON INJURIES HIP INJURIES & GROIN PULLS KNEE CARTILAGE & LIGAMENT TEARS COLLARBONE FRACTURES BURNERS & STINGERS FOR THE TREATMENT OF: No Appointment RequiredSt. Johns Location Clinic Hours: St. Augustine Location Clinic Hours:ALBERT VOLK, MD SINA KASRAEIAN, MD KURTIS HORT, MD ANDREA TRESCOT, MD BRIAN HAYCOOK, MD BETH PEARCE, DPM 5 pm to 9 pm Monday Friday 9 am to 2 pm Saturday 5 pm to 10 pm Monday Friday 9 am to 7 pm Saturday | |

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 3 What’s NewCommunity HappeningsDo you have community or club news you would like included in The CreeekLine? Then contact Martie Thompson at: editor@rtpublishinginc.com or 886-4919. At RT Publishing we welcome Letters to the Editor. We request they be no more than 250 words. All letters must include writers name, address, and telephone number. Only the name will be published. E-mail to editor@ rtpublishinginc.com. Anonymously sent letters will not be published.Letters to the Editor policy RT Publishing, Inc. The CreekLine The Ocean Breeze Mandarin NewsLine Players JournalPublisher Rebecca Taus publisher@rtpublishinginc.comEditor Martie Thompson editor@rtpublishinginc.comAdvertising Sales, Linda Gay lg@rtpublishinginc.comAdvertising Sales, Josh Allen ja@rtpublishinginc.comGraphic Design, Brittany Lehmangraphics@rtpublishinginc.com RT Publishing, Inc. 12443 San Jose Boulevard Suite 403 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Ph: 904-886-4919 The CreekLine Community Newspaper is a free monthly publication distributed via bulk mail to homes and businesses in NW St. Johns County. Submission of articles and photographs are received by mail or email, although email to editor@rtpublishinginc.com is preferred. The writers’ opinions do not necessarily reect the opinion of RT Publishing, Inc. Advertising Rates are available by request. RT Publishing, Inc. is not responsible for advertisement content or accuracy of information provided by its advertisers. Nor does RT Publishing, Inc. endorse any of the products or services included in this publication. RT Publishing, Inc. reserves the right to refuse advertisement or copy from any advertiser. All rights are reserved and no portion of this publication may be copied without the express written consent of the publisher. 2011. Share the flavor, Save the time Good food brings family and friends together, especially at Thanksgiving. Let us do the cooking so you can enjoy a relaxing holiday, spend less time in the kitchen and more time celebrating with your loved ones. Choose from organic, natural, brined or kosher turkeys and variety of decadent sides and pies. With this coupon receivevalid at whole foods market jacksonville only. not valid with any other offer or tm discount card. not redeemable for cash or gift cards. limit one coupon per customer. no copies, duplications or facsimiles will be accepted. PLU 30675 VALID Through November 30, 2011 I-95 I-295 San Jos e Blvd any $50 purchase $10 off www.wholefoodsmarket.com10601 SAN JOSE BL VD JACKSONVILLE, FL 904-288-1100 Order your holiday meal online or in-store Creekside High School Athletic Booster Clubs latest fundraiser, Creeksides Amazing Race and Festival, will be held on Saturday, November 19 beginning at 10:00 a.m. Patterned after the reality show The Amazing Race,Ž the event will feature teams of four completing mental and physical challenges at various locations throughout St. Johns County. The team with the shortest amount of time, at the “ nal check in, possessing all required documents, will be the winner. Each team must have at least one team member 25 years or older to be the designated driver. You may have more than one person on your team 25 years or older but only one designated driver per team. All team members must be high school age or older and they do not need to attend Creekside, but they must have a drivers license or school ID with them at all times during the race. As a clari cation of the article which was published in the Ocbtober 2011 issue of The CreekLine entitled CDDs in St. Johns County mean big dollars and big business,Ž mention was made of the management of Community Development Districts. It was not clearly stated that St. Johns County manages special taxing districts in the county, as opposed to direct management of Community Development Districts by the county. We regret the possible confusion.Clari cation:Cash prizes will be awarded to the “ rst, second and third place teams. Teams are still being formed! The Festival, featuring live music, food, and fun will be held at the school from 2:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m. For more information, please visit www. creeksideknights.com Two high schools join their drama programs together to produce the classic musical, Les Miserables, based on the novel by Victor Hugo and with music by Claude-Michel Schonberg and lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer and Alain Boublil. The musical is produced by special arrangement with Music Theatre International and is rated PG. The Ponte Vedra High School Theatre directed by Randall Adkison and Nease High School Drama directed by Laura Adkison, join a cast of 50 students. Performances will be held at Ponte Vedra High School on November 10, 11 and 12. Evening shows are at 7:00 p.m. on all three nights, and there will be a 1:00 p.m. matinee on Saturday. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased in advance from a cast member and will be sold at the door. Tickets are on sale now for the St. Gerard Campus 29th annual Fashion Show and Silent Auction to be held on Saturday, December 10, 2011 from 12:00 noon to 3:00 p.m. at the Renaissance Hotel and Resort at World Golf Village. Men, women, teens and children will be modeling the latest fashions from Jones New York, Hartstrings, Mens Wearhouse, Panama Hat Company, Saks 5th Avenue … O 5th and Rochelles. There will be a fabulous silent auction featuring cruises, artwork and gift certi“ cates in addition to a $5,000 ra e. A gourmet lunch will be served. Tickets are $35 each. For further information and to purchase tickets, please call 8295516. Corporate sponsorship is welcome. Caring for the CaregiverŽ Family Caregiving Workshop will be held on Friday, November 18 at the David A. Stein Jewish Community Alliance on the Ed Parker Jewish Community Campus, located at 8505 San Jose Boulevard. Caregiving often can be a lonely, exhausting and frustrating role; but it also can be “ lled with delight and satisfaction. This workshop gives family caregivers the practical information they need to help take care of themselves and their loved ones, as well as giving them an opportunity to network with fellow caregivers. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. and the program will be held from 9:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. Complimentary care services are available for loved ones during the workshop. As with all Caring for the CaregiverŽ workshops, attendance at this event is open to anyone, regardless of his or her belief system. To register for the workshop and to request care services, please call 807-1225 by November 15. NAS Jacksonville Skin and Scuba Diving Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the “ rst Wednesday of each month at the Ramada Inn, located at 3130 Hartley Road in Mandarin. The club is open to all divers and those who are interested in diving. For more information, please visit www.nasjaxscubadivers.org or contact the club president, Dave Martin at 413-8773. The MOMS Club of St. Augustine North invites moms and their children living in the 32092 or 32095 zip codes including the County Road 210 corridor to see what all the excitement is about! We meet once a month to plan our activities for the month ahead and our meetings and activities are Whats New cont. on pg 4 Copies of this Online Coupon are not accepted!

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Page 4, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com From the Commissioner’s Desk www.SalonCherChez.com Lic. #MM19595 cherchezinc@att.net Dream Hair Keratin Treatment $225 1st Time Clients: European facial for $55 Salon Tech Keratin smoother $175 Shellac & Axxium Color Gels $25 Manicure & Pedicure with Paraffin $53 California Smooth $200 “WiFi” Products Paul Mitchell Hair Kerocai Luanne, Liz, Rita, David, Jean, Michele, Cindy, Nela, Carmen, Lindsey, Joanne, Elaine, Sherri Cher Chez 10501 5th Anniversary 268-6199 The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Over 15 Years Legal Experience904-665-0005www.preddylaw.com Offering investment advisory services as a representative of 0156581-00002-00 Prudential Financial Planning Services, a division of Pruco Securities, LLC. 3000 Hartley Road, Suite 7Jacksonville FL 32257904.260.3812 www.reburkecpa.com The CPA Never Underestimate the ValueRobert E. Burke, CPA VARSITY INSURANCE, INC. ARE YOUR INSURANCE RATES INCREASING? 268-6365 Working hard to win your insurance business. WE LOVE COMPETITION! Put us in the game!Don’t let “Big Insurance” keep us on the sideline!Serving Mandarin Since 1990 during the day, when at-home mothers need support most. Of course, children are welcome at all of our meetings and activities. Activities are scheduled for almost every weekday of the month and moms may attend as few or as many activities as they like. Some of the activities we have planned are trips to the zoo, beach and pool days, story time at the library and playgroups at members homes and local parks. If you have any questions or would like to get more information to join, please e-mail Jenn at sanmoms@ gmail.com or check out our website at website at http://sanmomsclub.weebly.com.Council on Aging (COA) Care Connection volunteers can help with minor repairs! Over 60? Need a little help “ xing things around the house? Our minor repairs volunteers are ready to assist you. We can replace light bulbs, adjust ceiling fans, install grab bars, replace screens and screen doors and much more. Please call COA Care Connection at 209-3649 and visit our website at www. coasjc.com. Adults and teens age 14 and older are invited to attend Thank you for all who participated in the 2012 county budget process. It was critical for the county commissioners to hear about the priorities of the community and for people in the community to hear each other. In the end, the county adopted a “ scally responsible budget that balanced many needs and values of the community. It also allows the county to move forward with the upgrade to our Emergency Communication System. The budget gap was closed this year by cutting costs and an increase of less than 2 percent in county property taxes after four years of reductions. The county is now approaching the 2004-2005 tax level when adjusted for population. St. Johns County continues to grow despite the economic downturn. We remain a community of choice. Even in this downturn, people choose St. Johns County to live and for their business investment. We have a reputation as a safe community with good schools and an extraordinary quality of life. It was important that the commissioners hear that the 10 percent that goes to things like coastal access, libraries, parks and ball “ elds are important to you in addition to the basic services of courts, roads, drainage and public safety. The combined millage rate set by the county is about 40 percent of countywide property tax bills. Several years ago, the county started building a bridge to a better economic time. Some thought it would last one to two years, others four to “ ve. Throughout this time, the county has stayed ahead By Contributing Writer Cyndi Stevenson, St. Johns County Commissioner, District 1of the game, taking aggressive cost cutting measures during the 2007 budget year and each year thereafter. During the same time, the county has made real progress to streamline our permitting process to be more economically competitive and has continued to invest in essentials like road right of way. The county is focused on diversifying our local economy without jeopardizing our quality of life. It has been a long “ ve years and we still have work to do, but St. Johns County is moving in the right direction. That is good for all of us. Please do not hesitate to contact me at 209-0301. Whats New cont. from pg 3the Project Lap Blanket crochet group at the Bartram Trail Branch Library on Monday, November 14, Tuesday, November 22, and Monday, November 28 from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The group will crochet or knit blankets for cancer patients at area hospitals. All skill levels are welcome. Cant come to any of the meetings? Pick up the crochet pattern at the Reference Desk in the library and crochet the blanket in your spare time. Drop o completed blankets and any yarn youd like to donate during regular library hours. For additional information, please call the Reference Desk at 827-6960. Tickets for Saint Augustine Ballets upcoming production of The Nutcracker are now on sale. This holiday favorite will be performed at Flagler College Auditorium on December 16 and 17 at 7:00 p.m. and on Sunday, December 18 at 2:00p.m. Online tickets are available at www.saintaugustineballet.com or by contacting tickets@saintaugustineballet.com. The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-7 meets the “ rst Thursday of every month 7:30 p.m. at the St. Augustine Yacht Club near the St. Augustine Lighthouse. The ” otilla is always looking for new members, particularly those who own aircraft, boats and have radio equipment and skills. If you are interested, please contact Vic Aquino at 460-0243. We invite everyone to Christmas Remembered,Ž the St. Augustine Garden Clubs 43rd annual Christmas Tour of Homes, to be held on Sunday, December 4 from 12:00 noon until 5:00 p.m. Six beautifully decorated historic homes in downtown St. Augustine will be all decked out for Christmas. Tea and cookies are included as well as shopping at the boutique beginning at 1:00 p.m. at Memorial Presbyterian Church, located at 36 Sevilla Street. Walk to nearby homes on tour or hop on courtesy red train. Tickets cost $20 if purchased prior to the day of the tour or $25 on the day of the event, if still available. Please call 826-0024 for credit card ticket purchases and visit the website www.gardenclubofstaugustine. org for additional information. TOPS (Take O Pounds Sensibly) FL#493, St. Augustine has a weekly meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesdays at the Old Colee Cove Volunteer Fire Station, located at 9105 County Road 13 North (south of Buddy Boys Grocery Store). Weigh in starts at 8:30 a.m. We are a National Weight Loss Organization, fees are low and we have lots of fun, contests and inspiring programs. All are welcome; come and join us! For more information, please contact Sara Weaver at 940-7528 or Bobbi Culbreth at 824-2466. Julington Creek Annual Light ParadeSaturday, Dec. 3 6:30 p.m.Starting at Julington Creek BridgeDon’t miss it!

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 5 School District Journal By Contributing Writer Beverly Slough, Chariman, St. Johns County School Board Oer Expires December 31, 2011 Must present this coupon at time of service. Injectable llers include Juvderm , Juvderm XC, Restylane, Perlane, Prevelle and Radiesse. Minimum Botox treatment is 20 units. Cannot be combined with any other discount or special offer. Limit one per person. No cash value. Offer good only at the PVPS Mandarin location. COUPON CODE: CO 12058 San Jose Boulevard, Suite 102 J (904) 880-3131Alan M. Krantz, D.D.S. Trusted, Comfortable & Affordable Dental Care for the Entire Family Convenient Appointments Before & After Work or School!Emergencies Welcome! Caring & Courteous Staff Sleep Apnea Treatment Low-Radiation Digital X-Rays Zoom! Teeth Whitening Convenient Payment Options Available KrantzDentalCare.comAsk About Our Affordable Dental Plan for Uninsured Patients! As Low as $30/mo. chrisad 2011 y US1 … 1 Mile South of Nease High School Back Pain? Neck Pain?You dont have to suffer!Call: 247-ACHE (2243) Dont let little aches be a Big Pain! The School Board has traded school zoning for voting district determinations. Every 10 years, the lines for voting districts are redrawn, re” ective of the United States Census. The rules require that there be no more than 10 percent deviation between the “ ve County Commission and School Board districts. For the past 20 years, both boards have shared the same district lines. The County Commission and School Board have met in joint session to review the plans presented by our consultant and some plans suggested by the community. Five town hall meetings, one in each district, have been held to solicit public comment. The County Commission plans to vote on its “ nal choice on November 15 and the School Board will select our plan at our December meeting. In all likelihood, the districts will again be identical, facilitating ease of elections and public understanding of the district in which they reside. The district lines will then be in e ect for the next 10 years, until the United States Census is again conducted. Since District 1 has grown so much more than the others, there will be radical changes to the maps this year. You may look at the various plans by going to the Supervisor of Elections website, which is linked on the school district website, www.stjohns.k12.” .us. As you may be aware, the FCAT test was changed last year to re” ect the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards. The test was made more rigorous, but our students rose to the challenge and performed very well. Now the cut scores for the various levels (1-5) are being raised in almost all the grade levels tested. There is one exception: 10th grade reading is being adjusted to make it more equitable. Over time, the cut score for that particular test had risen disproportionately to the rest, necessitating a readjustment to make it line up more equitably with the others. With the increases in most of the levels, our students are again challenged to raise their bar of performance. I anticipate that they will do well, thanks to the excellence in teaching we enjoy. In addition to the adjustment in FCAT scoring levels, Common Core Curriculum is being phased in this year, beginning in kindergarten. These new standards, which will replace the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards, are national benchmarks for student learning. The standards are being developed by a cadre of people from several states. Full implementation will occur in 2014. For more information about the standards, please go to www. commoncore.org. Please help your local school by collecting Box Tops for Education on cereal and other packaging. Each box top is worth 10 cents to the school of your choice and schools realize several thousands of dollars each year from the program. Ford Motor Company is running a promotion to allow schools to earn extra box top credits, so it is especially important for them to collect as many as they can between now and December 1. In addition, our local Ford/ Lincoln dealership, Bozard Ford/ Lincoln, is partnering with our schools to award extra box tops when they reach certain levels of collection. This is an easy way to enhance the programs at our schools. Elementary and middle schools throughout the county are participating. Thank you in advance for clipping the box tops and giving them to the school of your choice. The third annual Veterans The 18th annual edition of St. Augustines famed Nights of Lights will sparkle to life at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, November 19 when the ” ick of a switch will illuminate the oldest citys historic district with the gentle glow of more than three million tiny, white lights. Selected in 2009 by AAA as one of the 12 best places in the United States and Canada to experience holiday cheer and named last year as one of the Top 100 events in the United States by the American Bus Association, the Nights of Lights provides a luminous setting for an exciting agenda of holiday events and fun through January 31. To add to this years excitement, the iconic Bridge of Lions will once again provide an incredible display of lights. For Holiday Nights of Lights return to historic St. Augustinethe past “ ve years, the bridge has been dark during the Nights of Lights due to a complete renovation and re-construction. This year, the bridge and the two new parks at each end will add tens of thousands of lights to the spectacular lighting display. During the nearly 250 years when St. Augustine served as the capital of Spanish La Sunset Celebration will take place on Thursday, November 10, from 5:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. at Veterans Park on Veterans Parkway. I especially invite all our veterans to attend so that a grateful community may thank you for your service. This fun event will include school performances, military displays, a “ lm about POWs, a bounce house and hamburgers and hot dogs. I hope many of you will join us for this important celebration. Thank you, as always, for your support of public education. If I may serve you in any way, please contact me at sloughb@stjohns.k12.” .us. Florida, the residents marked the holiday season with a single white candle burning in a window at each home. Today, the Nights of Lights continues that happy tradition in a grand style that re” ects the citys 446 years of history. For additional information, please visit www.” oridashistoriccoast.com/nights. the school to the extent that the hall outside of the classroom “ lled with teachers and students alike to see the special guest. Principal Sparkman remarked, Stephanie is a sweet girl and an exemplary studentŽ before she declared a shortened school day for Stephanie. Stephanie quickly she gathered her things to spend the day with her mother. When asked how she felt about the surprise Stephanie replied, I was very sad while she was gone.Ž She said of her plans for the day, I want to go shopping with my mom!Ž As grandparents and mom made their way through the on looking crowd, Stephanie continued in a walking hug with her mom. This undoubtedly will be the most memorable Halloween that sixth grader Stephanie Mitchell will have!Surprise visit cont from pg. 1 W W W WWWwww.TheCreekLine.comVisit our website:FOUND: Treasured Photos Found on the northern end of Flora Branch Boulevard in late October: € One 8x10 manila folder containing group family photographs spanning many years. € Also two cards of authenticity for a Jacqueline Kent Collection. Please call cell 828-557-3824 to claim

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Page 6, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com The Sheriff Reports By Contributing Writer David B. Shoar, St. Johns County Sheriff www.maymgt.com MAY Management Services, Inc.Licensed Property ManagementMAY Realty & Resort RentalsLicensed Real Estate Brokerage “Our job is to help Boards of Directors successfully manage their Associations” The Neighborhoods of World Golf Village Tim HutchisonRegional ManagerJulington Creek Plantation 1637 Racetrack Road #206 St. Johns, Florida 32259904-880-8796New Ofce!Jean WrightLicensed Property ManagerDottie KrinerLicensed Property ManagerRich Curran-Kelley, CAMRegional ManagerDiane HartmanLicensed Property ManagerKathy May“eldLicensed Property ManagerDeborah AlleyLicensed Property ManagerLaura QualantoneLicensed Property Manager904-940-1002 Jim Taylor provides TaylorMade Solutions Call me at 904-705-1692 or TaylorMade4You@bellsouth.net to discuss how I can provide Solutions tailor-made for You.Managerial Accounting ServicesOver 30 years experiencePersonal & Business Income Tax PreparationFormer Internal Revenue Agent & Lic. to practice before the IRS Excel Spreadsheet Design, Training, & Support QuickBooks Set-Up, Training & SupportYear End is fast approaching. Call me now to review your QuickBooks setup, financials and year-end payroll & 1099s. Intelligence Led Policing Last month I wrote about crime prevention and how important citizen involvement can be in helping to keep our neighborhoods throughout the county safe. This month I want to share about how our o ce is initiating innovative procedures to more e ectively use our deputies and other resources to prevent crime and become an even more proactive law enforcement agency. Its called Intelligence Led Policing (ILP). It is collecting information from many sources to identify and understand where criminal activity or civil disobedience is most likely to occur and in what time frame and then making command decisions to intervene and eradicate such situations before any harm can happen. It is very much like the business model of risk assessment and risk management. Intelligence Led Policing originated in the United Kingdom and was brought to the United States by Jerry Radcli e, professor and chair of the Department of Criminal Justice at Temple University in Philadelphia where he is also director of the Center of Security and Crime Science. Dr. Radcli e sites a simple scenario to help explain the concept. Deputies are standing by a river and bodies are ” oating down every day. Every day the o cers collect the bodies and call in the crime scene technicians. Following the ILP model they should be going upstream to see who is throwing the bodies in the river. This is a very simple example of ILP, but is conceptually right. Rather than just investigating crimes after they occur, we now have a system to gather information and the tools to analyze what we have to do to prevent them from happening. By the very nature of this initiative I cannot share a great deal of speci“ c information but wish to give you a thumbnail overview. The key to ILP is collecting information that can be analyzed in ways that can lead to putting the best resources in the right place at the right time to prevent a crime or threat to public safety. This is really nothing new. When I was a rookie many years ago, we were putting push pins on a map to identify where crimes had occurred and were able to identify problem areas where our police presence should be increased. Now new technology allows us to gather information from many sources in a central location and use software programs and specially trained personnel to quickly determine areas for intervention. This is incorporated into our continuous process of planning to re” ect community problems and issues. Information sharing between our various divisions, St. Augustine and St. Augustine Beach police, other regional law enforcement and public safety agencies, the FBI and Homeland Security is now policy rather than an informal practice. Here is another example of how the system can work. A couple of convenience store robberies are reported to our o ce and thoroughly investigated. The ILP unit also has data about similar crimes in Clay and Flagler Counties as well as in St. Augustine Beach. The analysts determine a predictable pattern and time frame and the next time cops are waiting to catch a perpetrator red handed. The intelligence we use is gathered from many sources and including from you, our citizens. We need you to report suspicious activity even if you choose to remain anonymous. It may be just the information we need as a piece of the puzzle that will identify and prevent a more serious crime. Our new initiative also has built in safeguards to protect privacy. Intelligence in the context of law enforcement has less to do with the methods of information collection and more to do about how the information is used. The information collected can only become intelligence when it is combined with data from other sources and historical models and then is analyzed by experienced professionals. When properly applied in this way the concept should raise no concern related to civil liberties. Again I thank you for taking the time to read my column and if you have any questions or concerns about St. Johns County law enforcement to please email me at dshoar@ sjso.org. Dear Editor: I want to thank this paper for their commitment to keeping the community current on events and issues. It is a great deal to ask for a free paper that is delivered in our mail boxes each month. Thank you for all you do for our communities. You are currently running a series on CDDs which I read with interest. In the October article by a contributing writer, there was reference to the County managing two Community Development Districts. As a commissioner representing all the citizens in St. Johns County, I wanted to clarify that St. Johns County does not manage any Community Development Districts or CDDs. CDDs are one type of special taxing districts provided for by Florida Statute. The county does have several special taxing districts that were formed by the County at the request of residents. Those Municipal Service Taxing Units or Bene“ t Letter to the EditorUnits, as the case may be, have primarily been used to provide neighborhoods without a formal HOA or CDD a way to upgrade infrastructure. The most common uses of those districts in St. Johns County have been to pave private dirt roads or install street lights. The county does act as the board for those districts to install, maintain and repair infrastructure for neighborhoods that initiated them and fund their operation. Other Special Districts in the county including Soil and Water Conservation, Anastasia Island Mosquito Control, Airport Authority were formed di erently and have the ability to set their own millage rate, budget. Thank you for your consistent work and for serving the communities of NW St. Johns County and helping to keep us informed through contributing writers.Cyndi Stevenson St. Johns County Commissioner, District 1 The CreekLine 886-4919NW St. Johns Countys Community Newspaper Flu PrecautionsThe St. Johns County Health Department offers the following tips to avoid spreading the u: Cough/sneeze into your elbow, sleeve or a disposable tissue. Wash your hands well and often. Stay home if you are sick (at least 24 hours after fever is gone). Take time to get vaccinated! Individuals experiencing cough, fever and fatigue, possibly along with diarrhea and vomiting should contact their health care provider.For more information, please visit www.StJohnsCHD.org

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 7 G RAND OPENING! Southwood Village AT WESTMINSTER WOODS ON JULINGTON CREEK 25 State Road 13, Jacksonville Refreshments will be served. Call 904-287-7300 for more information.Youre Invited!Discover Active Living!Tuesday, November 29, 20112:00PM to 6:00PM What if government was forced to do less with less, instead of doing more with less? Recently, the St. Johns County Commission voted to raise taxes upon its residents. That body has done this at a time when the tax payers are being forced to cope with low property values, underwater mortgages, high foreclosure rates, high unemployment, higher living expenses and no raises. Instead of adjusting tax rates, they could have reduced operating expenses to meet the critical situations of their constituents; however, this body has decided to force taxpayers to accept the countys view of austerity. The JCP CDD should not follow this example. Did you know the shopping center at Race Track Road and Flora Branch Boulevard and certain other businesses in the JCP area also pay CDD assessments? Thats because they are within the JCP CDD boundary. Did you know, for example, that one particular business pays about $200,000 per year in CDD assessments, which happens to be 126 percent higher than their property taxes? There are nearby businesses outside the JCP CDD that pay no such fees. I have often wondered if those fees place businesses within the CDD at a competitive disadvantage and if it a ects the type and amount of businesses from locating to our community, a ecting our nearby shopping options. Do you have an opinion on this topic? I would welcome your comments. At the last CDD meeting some JCP CDD Supervisors suggested increasing CDD employee salaries in 2012. I have suggested we continue to focus on reducing expenses and/or increasing user fees. I submitted a 20 point plan that outlines many di erent ways to reduce expenses, but it has not received much traction. Did you know the CDD general managers salary has increased about 117 percent in six years? In my opinion, many of the CDD personnel are currently adequately paid and have received generous raises and bonuses in recent years. What is your opinion on the salary increases? The JCP CDD still provides a host of activities that may interest you this winter. The tennis sta will be hosting a holiday camp for ages “ ve through 13 and will run two weeks from December 19 through 22 and December 26 through 29 from 9:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. Also, tennis will begin cardio tennis clinics this fall, focusing on movement and agility on Wednesdays from 6:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. and Saturdays from 9:00 a.m. until 10:00 a.m. Salsa and country line dancing classes will continue through November Julington Creek Plantation CDD reportBy Contributing Writer Sam Lansdale, Supervisor, Julington Creek Plantation Community Development Districtand you can join at any time. JCP will be having a Thank a VeteranŽ Ceremony in front of the Recreation Center on November 10 at 7:00 p.m. I encourage you to sign up for free email alerts at www.jcpcdd.org to receive e-mail reminders of upcoming events and programs. We work for you and I encourage you to attend the meetings and voice your concerns or opinions on how we are conducting your business. The next JCP CDD meetings will take place on November 8, 2011 and December 13, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. at the JCP Recreation Center. Feel free to contact me day or night via e-mail (SLansdale@ jcpcdd.org) or phone (509-4902). This article is my opinion and in no way constitutes nor implies District opinion, endorsement, sponsorship or viewpoint. The views expressed may or may not be shared by the other JCP CDD Supervisors. Editors Note: The CreekLine is appreciative that Supervisor Lansdale approached us and o ered to write a column for us to share with our readers. The CreekLine is, and has always been, agreeable to publishing columns penned by our elected o cials so that they may communicate directly with our readers, their constituents. Any questions or requests for additional public servant columns may be directed to editor@ thecreekline.com. Veterans’ Sunset CelebrationVeterans ParkNovember 10• 5:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m.Liberty Pines Academy Chorus Bartram Trail ROTC Color Guard Fruit Cove Middle Jazz Band Key Note Speaker, Brigadier General Joe BalskusDon’t miss this community event! Give Thanks!

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Page 8, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com A bronze statue to commemorate and memorialize the hard work of the K-9 of“ cers and their handlers was dedicated in mid-October at the Memorial Courtyard in front of the St. Johns County Sheri s O ce. The German shepherd named Spirit, as in the spirit of truth, honor and justice, proudly stands guard in front of the Sheri s O ce. Sheri David Shoar Spirit statue dedicated at Sheri s O cethanked those who participated in raising the funds for the statue and especially recognized a St. Johns County man who contributed the lions share of the cost. Joe Montoro was presented an appreciation plaque for his generous contribution. This isnt the “ rst time that Montoro has assisted the Sheri s O ce with his generosity. He was the donor of K-9 Bravo,Ž the Sheri s O ce “ rst bomb detection dog. When he learned that a committee was formed to raise funds for the K-9 recognition project and at the time the committee had raised one “ fth of the monies, he wrote a check for the additional funds in order to purchase the statue. SpiritŽ was delivered earlier this year and when Montoro observed the statue standing proudly in front of the Sheri s O ce, he approached Sheri Shoar with several other ideas that he o ered to fund. A granite slab, with room for 56 names that would recognize all of the Sheri s O ce K-9s, their years of service and their handler, was purchased. The granite slab, containing the 15 names currently being honored was placed next to the statue at the ceremony. The second is when a K-9 retires or is lost in the line-of-duty, the handler will receive an engraved marker to remember his partner. Some of those were honored in October and in the future will be awarded at a ceremony. At the 2009 National Conference on Citizenship, United States Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia was asked if he believed that America should be doing more to increase civic participation. His initial response a blunt NoŽ took the audience by surprise. He followed with a simple and yet profound explanation that America should, instead, do more to increase informed civic participation. Scalia exposed a serious condition in the American citizenry. Simply put, too many people are ill-prepared to adequately ful“ ll the duties as citizens. We too willingly submit, in thought and deed, The need for informed civic participationBy Contributing Writer James A. Lee, Peer Teacher Evaluator, St. Johns County School Districtto the shallow biased rants of television news, talk radio and the blogosphere. Furthermore, we are doing little to rectify this condition. We are satis“ ed being told what to think and how to act without questioning the bully pulpits. I suggest we heed Justice Scalias warning by responding with two simple actions; one, read and two, ask questions. Being constantly overwhelmed with information, though, how do we “ nd time in our busyness to read and to know what information can be trusted? As any good student knows, when the secondary source is questionable, go to the primary source. To this end I commend The CreekLine. Over the next several issues, the editor will be printing sections of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. I encourage you to read it and question it and to question those who tout it for their own interests. Then, discuss it with your family, with your friends and with your colleagues. Sure, I know this sounds corny, but thats the very problem Scalia was exposing. We must stop relying on others to tell us what to think and how to act and to give rebirth to the American democratic spirit of being truly informed, active citizens. She is looking for other individuals who are willing to come forward and help preserve our creeks. She says the plan is for two annual meetings with committees formed to meet on a more regular basis. If you see yourself joining Sarah Bailey as she strikes out on this mission, you can reach Sarah Bailey cont from pg. 1 her by calling 287-1763. She extended an open invitation to come talk with any group that is interested in learning more about the creeks and the Julington-Durbin Creeks Conservation Foundation. After all, what better way to start something than by having a person with years of experience and commitment begin the journey? We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America. Article. I. Section. 1. All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives. Section. 2. The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in each State shall have the Quali“ cations requisite for Electors of the most numerous Branch of the State Legislature. No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the Age of twenty “ ve Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen. Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding Constitution for the United States of Americato the whole Number of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three “ fths of all other Persons [Modi“ ed by Amendment XIV]. The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the “ rst Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct. The Number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each State shall have at Least one Representative; and until such enumeration shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to chuse three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations one, Connecticut “ ve, New-York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight, Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina “ ve, South Carolina “ ve, and Georgia three. When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the Executive Authority thereof shall issue Writs of Election to “ ll such Vacancies. The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other O cers; and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment. Section. 3 The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature thereof [Modi“ ed by Amendment XVII], for six Years; and each Senator shall have one Vote. Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the “ rst Election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three Classes. The Seats of the Senators of the “ rst Class shall be vacated at the Expiration of the second Year, of the second Class at the Expiration of the fourth Year, and of the third Class at the Expiration of the sixth Year, so that one third may be chosen every second Year; and if Vacancies happen by Resignation, or otherwise, during the Recess of the Legislature of any State, the Executive thereof may make temporary Appointments until the next Meeting of the Legislature, which shall then “ ll such Vacancies [Modi“ ed by Amendment XVII]. No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty Years, and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall be chosen. The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no Vote, unless they be equally divided. The Senate shall chuse their other O cers, and also a President pro tempore, in the Absence of the Vice President, or when he shall exercise the O ce of President of the United States. The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments. When sitting for that Purpose, they shall be on Oath or A rmation. When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no Person shall be convicted without the Concurrence of two thirds of the Members present. Judgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from O ce, and disquali“ cation to hold and enjoy any O ce of honor, Trust or Pro“ t under the United States: but the Party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and Punishment, according to Law. Section. 4 The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and such Meeting shall be on the “ rst Monday in December [Modi“ ed by Amendment XX], unless they shall by Law appoint a di erent Day. Section. 5. Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and Quali“ cations of its own Members, and a Majority of each shall constitute a Quorum to do Business; but a smaller Number may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to compel the Attendance of absent Members, in such Manner, and under such Penalties as each House may provide. Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members for disorderly Behaviour, and, with the Concurrence of two thirds, expel a Member. Each House shall keep a Journal of its Proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such Parts as may in their Judgment require Secrecy; and the Yeas and Nays of the Members of either House on any question shall, at the Desire of one “ fth of those Present, be entered on the Journal. Neither House, during the Session of Congress, shall, without the Consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other Place than that in which the two Houses shall be sitting. As a community service, The CreekLine Community Newspaper will be publishing the Constitution for the United States in its entirety over the next several issues. Please check back next month for the continuation.

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 9 i pick paint color. www.pamsatherstudio.com pam sather the right color paint carpet hardwood tile 904.466-0370 watch Pams design segments on First Coast Living11:00 am Dr. Levine is dedicated to your family’s health through every stage of life. He has served Julington Creek for more than 12 years and is ready to provide you with a medical home. Services include: Sports/school physicals Immunizations Well visits for adults and children GYN care Coordination of care for chronic conditions (diabetes, hypertension, etc.) On-site lab for all blood drawsFinding the right family doctor just got easier.Same-day acute appointments 287.2794Baptist Primary Care Julington Creek1400 Bishop Estates Road, St. Johns, FL 32259 Donald J. Levine, MD Board-Certified, Family Practice, along with Carol N. Sims, PA-C 13 www.baptistprimarycare.net/levine-md Flu Vaccine Available Tina P. Fernandez, CPA, PLwww.tpfcpa.com 904-287-2195 Over 30 Years Experience Have Con“dence in Your Tax Preparation & Planning. Allow Me to Assist You. Visit www.tpfcpa.com for informative news and Tax Savings Tips. Serving the Accounting Needs of Individuals and Small Businesses by Providing Quality Service at Competitive Rates. Would you prefer to pay your taxes at your leisure? Would you like to pay your taxes without having to get out of your car? Or at home, in your pajamas? St. Johns County Tax Collector Dennis W. Hollingsworth, CFC, in an e ort to make paying your tax bill as convenient as possible, o ers several di erent options sure to suit the needs, schedules and preferences of all St. Johns County residents. The most tried and true method of payment is the United States mail. Simply place your tax bill with the proper payment (personal check, cashiers check or money order) in the return envelope sent with the bill. Please write your property parcel number on the check and place a “ rst-class stamp on the envelope. With online credit card payment increasing due to convenience, the Tax Collectors o ce o ers an online payment service to residents with Internet access and a credit card. Access the St. Johns County Tax Collectors website, www.sjctax.us and follow the prompts for payment. Please note that a convenience fee is associated with this service. The convenience fee is collected by and transmitted to the credit card companies that Five easy ways to pay your tax billprocess the transaction; this of“ ce does not retain any portion of the fee. Anyone who prefers personalized service is welcome to visit any of the Tax Collectors “ ve o ces. All of the locations are open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. till 5:00 p.m. The St. Augustine main o ce is also open till 6:00 p.m. every Friday. The main o ce in St. Augustine also will be open on Saturday, November 26 from 8:30 a.m. until 12:00 noon. Please note that the branch o ces will be closed on this day. All locations will be closed Thursday, November 24 and Friday, November 25 in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. For your added convenience, we have a drop box for payment by check only on the east side of the St. Augustine location. No cash collected in the drop box or by curbside service, please! As a courtesy to the residents of St. Johns County, the Tax Collector will o er limited curbside service for tax collection at the main o ce location, 4030 Lewis Speedway during the last few days of the four percent discount collection period. Please check our website, www.sjctax.us for the speci“ c dates and times. Beginning Tuesday November 1, St. Johns County property owners found their tax bills in the mailbox as the 2011 tax season began. This includes bills for real estate, tangible personal property, railroad and non ad-valorem assessments. Total taxes to be collected are $342,183,959. This is a decrease of $7,749,804.36 compared to the 2010 tax roll of $379,612,844.53. Although all tax bills become due November 1, 2011, they are payable through March 31, 2012, without incurring a penalty. Property owners have the opportunity to pay their tax bills over the next several months, but the greatest savings can be realized by those who opt to pay their bills in November when they can get a 4 percent discount. The amount of the discount decreases by 1 percent every month until March 2012 when bills must be paid and no discount is applied, per Florida Statute 197. There are various methods of payment available to St. Johns County property owners. The most popular method is the United States mail. There is also an online payment option to property owners with internet service and a credit card. Access the St. Johns County Tax Collector website at www.sjctax.us and follow the prompts for payment. Please note that a convenience fee set by the credit card companies is associated with this service; however, the Tax Collectors o ce does not retain any portion of this fee. Anyone unable to pay their homestead property taxes should contact the St. Johns County Tax Collector as early as possible to determine eligibility for the Homestead Tax Deferral per Chapter 197.253, Florida Statutes. Florida Statute Chapter 197 allows taxpayers to prepay their taxes via an installment payment plan for each tax notice with taxes estimated to be more than $100. Participants enrolled in the 2011 installment plan will receive their third quarterly installment tax bill in December. This option is no longer available for the 2011 taxes unless already enrolled in the installment plan. Application for the 2012 tax year must be made with the Tax Collectors o ce prior to May 1, 2012, with the “ rst payment due no later than June 30, 2012. In addition to the mailings sent to property owners, 39,367 payment notices were sent to mortgage companies with Escrow Accounts totaling $121,558,631.32. If you have an escrow account, you should be receiving an information onlyŽ notice detailing your tax status and stating, This is not a bill-do not payyour bill has been forwarded to your escrow agent.Ž Please note that the Tax Collectors o ce is responsible for collecting, investing and distributing tax revenue. Any questions regarding homestead exemptions and assessment disputes should be addressed to the Property Appraiser. Any questions regarding the individual taxing authorities millage rates listed on your bill should be addressed to those individual authorities. If you have questions, comments or suggestions regarding the operation of the St. Johns County Tax Collectors o ce, please do not hesitate to contact me at taxcollector@sjctax.us.Taxing IssuesBy Contributing Writer Dennis W. Hollingsworth, CFC, St. Johns County Tax Collector Does your partner complain that you snore or does your partner keep you up at night? Do you ever wake up gasping for air at night? Please contact our oce if you are suering from any or all of the following symptoms eBooks for Phones and TabletsŽ Saturday, Nov. 12, 11:30 a.m. You dont need a dedicated eReader to read eBooks! You can use it on multi-function mobile devices such as an iPhone or an iPad. Bring your device with you to learn how to get an eBook from the library onto your device!Computer Classes at the Bartram Trail Branch LibraryeBooks for KindleŽ Saturday, Nov. 12, 10:05 a.m. is class will show you how to get an eBook from the library onto your Kindle device. Bring your Kindle with you! Dont have one but thinking of getting one? Come and watch how easy it is! eBooks for non-Kindle eReadersŽ Saturday, Nov. 12, 10:45 a.m. is class will show you how to get an eBook from the library onto your Nook or whatever other non-Kindle eReader you have. If you have both a laptop and an eReader, please bring both with you. The CreekLine 886-4919

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Page 10, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com e St. Johns Center for Clinical Research is currently seeking volunteers to participate in a 28 week clinical research study evaluating an investigational medications for high cholesterol. You may consider volunteering if you: Volunteers Needed Do you have High Cholesterol? :St. Johns Center for Clinical Research(904) 209-3173MA1110601 ACCREDITEDACCREDITATION ASSOCIATION for AMBULATORYHEALTH CARE EYE CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE & WORLD GOLF VILLAGETHE EYE SURGERY CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE AAAHC 940-9200 T T Governor Rick Scott has been looking … invited or uninvited … into every facet of government in Florida, seeking e ciencies and ways to lessen the impact of government on citizens. Community Development Districts are included in his search for what he feels is a better Florida. The Palm Beach Post daily newspaper has been following Governor Scotts inquiry into a part of Florida government that many Floridians and residents of St. Johns County dont know much about. The Post reports there are 1,633 special districts, including the 39 districts in St. Johns County. Collectively, The Post reports, the districts take in $15.5 billion in taxpayer money each year; that stunning amount has caught the governors eye. Further, the news reports tell us special taxing districts in Florida date to the days of the Florida Land Boom in the 1920s when hospital taxing authorities were “ rst created. CDDs are not a new concept; they just have a new name after the Florida legislature in the past few years placed nearly everything into one general name category. CDDs have been a handy way for real estate developers to create entire new communities, complete with infrastructure and meet pay-for-growth laws in Florida. Once the developers complete a community and turn over the management of the community to either CDDs or homeowners associations (or a combination of both), the developers move on to the next project, leaving the payment for bonds sold for the infrastructure to the CDD residents and any commercial interests which may fall into CDD boundaries. These Third of a seriesGovernor, legislature examining rules and income of CDDsBy J. Bruce Richardsonpayments usually stretch for decades. Most CDDs are governed by elected boards of directors and often the day to day management of the districts is handled either by a paid, professional sta or outsourced to a private company specializing in such services. CDDs are loosely regulated by various state agencies. The governor isnt the only one concerned about CDDs and other taxing districts, which range from huge water management districts to local community districts. Both houses of the Florida legislature are looking at the districts, trying to determine if any tweaking or reduction of present laws is called for to ensure the districts are fully accountable and remain relevant. Republican Senator Mike Bennett of Bradenton has introduced Senate Bill 192, designed to enable the merging of some districts or abolishing those determined to have outlived their usefulness. The bill, if it passes the 2012 legislature session, which starts January 10, 2012 and is then signed by the governor, has these general purposes, as provided by the Florida Senate summary: Special Districts; Revising provisions relating to merger and dissolution procedures for special districts; requiring the merger or dissolution of dependent special districts created by a special act to be e ectuated by the Legislature; providing for the merger or dissolution of inactive special districts by special act without referenda; requiring involuntary dissolution procedures for independent special districts to include referenda; providing for the merger of certain independent special districts by the Legislature; providing procedures and requirements for the voluntary merger of contiguous independent special districts; revising criteria by which special districts are declared inactive by a governing body, etc.Ž A similar Florida House bill, introduced by Representative Matt Caldwell of Lehigh Acres near Fort Myers has similar language: Special Districts; Revises provisions relating to merger and dissolution procedures for special districts; provides for certain merger and dissolution procedures to include referenda; provides that such provisions preempt certain special acts; provides for local governments to assume indebtedness of, and receive title to property owned by, special districts under certain circumstances; deletes provision relating to conditions under which merger of independent special districts or dependent “ re control districts with other special districts is e ective and conditions under which merged district is authorized to increase ad valorem taxes; revises criteria by which special districts are declared inactive by governing body.Ž One notable di erence between the senate and house bills is the house bill provides language for local governments to assume indebtedness of and receive title to property owned by special districts under certain circumstances. This could possibly result in some districts being absorbed into local town or city governments. The Post quoted Jon Costello, the governors top lobbyist on the issue, as telling the House Economic A airs Committee the governors o ce is trying to develop some kind of legislation aimed at tightening the grip on special taxing districts, but, Costello reassured committee members, whatever is proposed will not dramatically change the setting for Floridas current districts. The governor is not looking to take an ax to special districts,Ž The Post directly quoted Costello saying. The Bennett senate measure appears to have bipartisan legislative support; the bill passed the senates Community A airs Committee on a 6-0 vote. Senator Bennett told The Post hes not looking either to change the world of special districts and his bill would shield existing authorities from being abolished by state o cials outside of the legislature. But, the bill would make it easier for neighboring districts to consider merging, to save money or improve e ciency. CDDs and other special districts can only be created by the Florida legislature and regulations for the districts are determined by the legislature. You can follow the progress of both bills through the committee process and the full legislative session by logging on to www.” house.gov and www. ” senate.gov and placing the bill numbers (HB 0107 and SB 192) into the legislation tracker on the respective home pages. The senate bill was referred to the Community A airs and Budget committees; after having passed the Community A airs Committee unanimously, is now in the Budget Subcommittee on Finance and Tax as of press time. The house bill was referred to the Community and Military A airs Subcommittee; Finance and Tax Committee; and Economic A airs Committee. As of press time, no action has been taken on the bill.J. Bruce Richardson, a resident of Jacksonville, has created many successful marketing, advertising, public relations, fund-raising and political campaigns. A former newsroom staffer of the late Jacksonville Journal, Mr. Richardson has an educational background in management and nance..The St. Johns County School District is seeking input on the proposed 2012-2013 school calendars. A survey link is now available on the school district website for community members to provide input on the calendars. Each calendar proposal can be downloaded and printed. Variations in the two versions include di erences in the planning and inservice days and the length of the “ rst Next years school calendar needs community input semester in the second version. The survey link can be accessed at www.stjohns.k12. ” .us under Whats NewŽ on the school district home page. Individuals are encouraged to submit any ideas, suggestions or concerns about the proposed calendars. Input will be gathered through November 13. The “ nal proposed calendar must be approved by the School Board.

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 11 ( 904 ) 825 9960 In the Winn-Dixie Shopping Center on CR 210 W2220 CR 210 W, Suite 312, St. Johns Florida 32259 Fall Special10% OFFAny dental treatment, including crowns, bridges, partials, veneers, etc. Not valid with other oers. Oer Expires 12/10/11New Patient Special Adults $99 & Children $79Includes dental exam and x-rays, a ”uoride treatment, teeth cleaning and polishing. Not valid with other oers. Oer Expires 12/10/11 Gentle, Caring Dentistry for the Whole Family For Appointment Call904-230-0080 NEW LOCATION! 485 State Road 13Suite 3 (Next to Burger King) Dr. Thomas Lahmannwww.julingtoncreekchiro.com Is Back or Neck Pain Impacting Your Life? Dr. Thomas Lahmann Chiropractic PhysicianHumana Beech Street A Proud Participating Provider for Aetna and Blue Cross / Blue Shield United Insurance Plans Accepts All Auto Insurance Julington Creek Chiropractic & Wellness Center P.A.SpineMedTM Spinal Disc DecompressionA Safe and Pain-Free Procedure Designed for Back & Neck pain Non-Surgical, Drug Free Procedures for: MICHAEL BOYER PAINTING, LLC287-2203 Licensed & Insured #ST-5178 LLC 20%Discount off total amount due for the month of November We Do It ALL!Take an additioinal 20% off the total amount due. For example: 1,300 sq ftregular price $1,600 20% discount you pay only $1,280! JCP CARES will once again be conducting its fall food drive to bene“ t food banks within St. Johns County. Food collected this year will be divided between the Betty Gri n House and Celebration Lutheran Food Pantry. JCP CARES delivers bags from Publix along with ” yers to nearly 5000 homes in the Julington Creek area. Residents are being asked to put non-perishable items in the bags and leave them on the curb for pick up on Saturday, November 19, 2011. In addition, food items will be collected at Liberty Pines Academy, Julington Creek Elementary, Wards Creek Elementary and Fruit Cove Middle School. Donations will also be accepted at the Champions Club in Julington Creek Plantation between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. on November 18, located at the round-about on Durbin Creek Boulevard. Volunteers will sort the items for delivery to the local food banks. Student volunteers can clock volunteer hours while learning “ rst-hand the importance of their community activism. JCP CARES wishes to JCP CARES holds annual food driveBy Contributing Writer Michelle Busbyencourage grocery shoppers to consider shopping at the BOGO … buy one, get one free … bins at the front of the grocery stores. Customers can take advantage of the grocery store promotions, while giving to those in need. During this time of need, please remember: Buy One, Give One Free.ŽFraternal Order Orioles St. Johns River Nest 324, one of the newest clubs in the 101-year-old Fraternal Order Orioles community organization, has donated operating pro“ ts to Pacetti Bay Middle School and St. Josephs Academy. Located near the St. Johns River at 9155 County Road 13, Orioles Nest 324 opened January 14, 2011 and has already grown to a membership of 400. Founded on the principles of community, fraternity and charity, Orioles nests nationwide are open to all adults who wish to apply. St. Johns River Nest 324 is open seven days a week, providing members a place to socialize, enjoy di erent nightly activities, and view a variety of televised sporting events on numerous big-screen TVs. The club is smoke-free and o ers a full bar. Under the organizations charter, pro“ ts from all Ori-New Orioles Nest contributes pro ts to St. Johns County Schoolsole clubs must be donated to charities, which are selected by each local Nest. We wanted a clear focus for our charitable donations, and the educational system seemed to be in great need,Ž says St. Johns River Nest 324 president Jim Laquidara. My wife teaches high school and we have two children in St. Augustine schools and we see teachers buying school supplies with their own money. Our members are very glad that their clubs pro“ ts are going to help out local schools at a time when their budgets are severely strained.Ž St. Johns River Nest 324 encourages local schools to request donations for speci“ c needs. Additional pro“ t donations are already planned for Mill Creek Elementary and Wards Creek Elementary. The club also raises money for other charitable organizations, such as its October 15 BBQ bene“ t for the St. Johns County Police Athletic League. Membership continues to grow at Nest 324, with folks joining from the surrounding area, nearby World Golf Village, St. Augustine, Jacksonville, Palm Coast, Flagler Beach, Green Cove Springs, Putnam County, as well as several snowbirds visiting during the winter. Annual dues for members of St. Johns River Nest 324 are $10. Nest 324 is open Monday through Friday from 4:00 p.m. to 12:00 midnight and Saturday and Sunday from 12:00 noon to 12:00 midnight. The club may sometimes open earlier or close later according to broadcast times of popular sporting events. For additional information, please contact Jim Laquidara at 669-8905.The William Bartram Scenic Highway group enjoyed another planning meeting on October 13, but we missed you. Hope to see you at our next meeting in November. Wed love to hear your ideas to keep our Scenic Highway scenic and be part of our energetic group. The biggest news from the October meeting was the “ nal planning for two events„the Oral History party and Old Settlers Reunion. These events were held on October 15 and 16 respectively. The Oral History party honored the St. Johns County long term residents who recorded and shared recollections of their life, customs, traditions and relationships, growing up in the early days of St. Johns County between the years 1920 and the 1970s. These oral histories now reside at the Bartram Branch of the county library and are available for your enjoyment. They will soon be available at the St. Augustine Historical Society in St. Augustine. At the party we also unveiled a new ten minute video titled Up from the Roots … Remembering Rural St. Johns County.Ž This video presents views depicting life in the early years of St. Johns County we know you will enjoy this review of the early years.Ž Call William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway updateBy Contributing Writer Al Abbatiello, alabbat@bellsouth.netAl Abbatiello (287-5577) to reserve your copy the cost is $5 each. Contributions to the William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway, a 501 (C) (3) organization, are tax deductible. Weve now completed the viewshed analysis originally suggested by county administrator, Mike Wanchick. This analysis will help the county better plan developments / change along State Road 13 while retaining its scenic and historic nature. County sta reviewed the analysis in an earlier meeting, making minor changes and endorsing the end result. The Fall edition of the William Bartram Scenic Highway Newsletter was recently completed and sent to all subscribers. The newsletter gives a summary of news and events along the Scenic Highway and will keep you up to date on happenings in the great NW St. Johns County. Sign up for the newsletter on the website or simply email me: alabbat@ bellsouth.net. In October I mentioned an FDOT project at State Road 16 and State Road 13 that could negatively impact the Scenic Highway. I am discussing this project with county management and will report results in the next issue of The CreekLine. Ra e tickets are still being o ered, courtesy of the Garden Club. Claire Fioriti reports ticket sales have been excellent and a few are still available … call Claire (287-9772) for your ticket ($3 each/ or four for $10). Ra e proceeds will buy trees to be planted on State Road 13 when and where theyre needed. Children’s Art Activity Wednesday, November 30  3 pm If you like art and you’re in 3rd, 4th or 5th grade, come to the Bartram Trail Branch Library to participate in an artist-inspired art activity! Register for St. Johns County Sheriff Department’s....CodeREDwww.sjso.org Be notified of public safety issues by high-speed telephone emergency notification services.

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Page 12, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com ACCREDITEDACCREDITATION ASSOCIATION for AMBULATORYHEALTH CARE EYE CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE & WORLD GOLF VILLAGETHE EYE SURGERY CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE AAAHC 940-9200 T T Buy A Business John SerbCerti“ed Business Intermediary www.FirstCoastBizBuySell.com Call 904-613-2658 for a Con“dential No-Cost Valuation & Consultation We can handle all of the details! We know the ins and outs of the local real estate market and have the knowledge and commitment to meet your needs. If you are looking to buy a home, sell your home, invest in property, or build a new home, let us be your real estate representatives. Contact us today for all of your real estate needs. big and small 2004, An Independently Owned and Operated Member of The Prudential Real Estate Aliates, Inc. Prudential is a service mark of The Prudential Insurance Company of America. Equal Housing Opportunity. All information deemed reliable, but not guaran teed. we sell them allNeed help buying, selling or investing in real estate?Stan & Jan Timbrook REALTORS St. Johns County Tax Collector Dennis W. Hollingsworth, CFC, distributed $4,238,420.88 to the local government and taxing authorities, from unused earned revenue collected during Fiscal Year 2010-2011. The largest portion of this amount, of $4,026,884.15, was presented to the Board of County Commissioners and other taxing authorities at the regular County Commission meeting Tuesday, October 18. This is the 22nd year that the St Johns County Tax Collectors o ce has maintained this level of e ciency, resulting in additional funds for taxing authorities. Since Fiscal Year 2000, the Tax Collector has distributed to taxing authorities more than $41 million in unused earned revenues after meeting their budget requirements. The Florida Statutes refer to these revenues as excess fees. This $4.2 million represents unused revenue the Tax Collectors Tax Collectors o ce presents revenue to County Commissiono ce earned for the taxpayers of St. Johns County that was not expended or used in the operation of the local tax, tag and driver license o ces. The Tax Collectors o ce is self-sustaining, operating from monies regulated by Florida Statutes on commissions from the collection of taxes and fees for the mandated State functions of several agencies. These agencies include the Department of Revenue; the Division of Motor Vehicles; and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The additional revenue also was generated as interest earned from investments, as well as revenue from additional tag and title business the Tax Collector seeks through acquisition of ” eet accounts such as UPS and Ring Power. The Tax Collectors o ce operates independent of the County Commissions budget,Ž Hollingsworth said. We must operate our o ce solely on statutorily established commissions and fees from state and local governments.Ž The unused revenue Hollingsworth has collected over the past year is a result of the tax, tag and driver license o ces operating with frugality and e ciency. Hollingsworth said he is honored to serve the taxpayers of St. Johns County by managing their Tax Collectors o ce in a “ scally responsible manner. Although property tax collection revenue is down, the parcel count in St. Johns County actually has increased,Ž he said. The total amount distributed includes monies that are generated by the o ce and received throughout the year from other State agencies, such as mobile home revenues received from the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles and revenues from Retained Vessel Fees which are distributed weekly by the Tax Collectors o ce.Baptist Health has announced that it made this years InformationWeek 500, an annual listing of the nations most innovative users of business technology, claiming a spot in the top half of the list this year. The 2011 list was revealed September 13 at the exclusive InformationWeek 500 Conference in Dana Point, California. Baptist Health was recognized for its ongoing project, initiated in 2010, to bring an electronic medical record (EMR) to all “ ve of its facilities. The goal is to make patient care safer and improve patient outcomes. This endeavor, which involves installing new infrastructure, implementing software and providing comprehensive training to employees, involves a team of hundreds including information services, physicians and nursing sta as well as external business partners and software providers. Going fully digital is the future of health care,Ž said Roland Garcia, senior vice president and chief information o cer, Baptist Health. Baptist Health is pleased to be recognized among the InformationWeek 500 for our Baptist Health earns ranking in InformationWeek 500Ž initiative to create one electronic medical record throughout our system of four adult hospitals, one childrens hospital, a home health care agency and our network of more than 100 primary care and specialty physician o ces.Ž The federal government has mandated that all healthcare providers put electronic records in place, but Baptist Health was already at the forefront of this new age. Baptist Medical Center South was designed and opened as a fully-digital hospital in 2005. Now, all three of Baptist Healths community hospitals … Baptist South, Baptist Beaches and Baptist Nassau … are fully digital and using an electronic medical record. So are Baptist Home Health Care and many of the o ces within Baptist Primary Care. Baptist Medical Center and Wolfson Childrens Hospital have some EMR functions in place and will become fully digital in 2012, while all other locations are implementing signi“ cant enhancements. InformationWeek annually identi“ es and honors the nations most innovative users of information technology with its Top 500 listing and spotlights the power of innovation in information technology.For 23 years, the InformationWeek 500 has chronicled and honored the most innovative users of business technology,Ž said InformationWeek Editor In Chief Rob Preston. In this day and age however, being innovative isnt enough. Companies and their IT organizations need to innovate faster than ever before to stay a step or two ahead of their customers, partners and competitors.Ž Additional details can be found online at www.informationweek.com/iw500/.The St. Johns River Water Management Districts Governing Board gave “ nal approval in late September to a budget that reduces its property tax revenue by 26 percent for the next “ scal year and lowers taxes for property owners while e ectively funding the agencys core missions and highest priorities. At the public meeting, the board approved a 0.3313 millage rate that will generate $85.3 million in revenue for a $204.7 million budget. The budget also will be funded with prior years state and carryover funds, timber sales, cattle leases, interest earnings and permit fees. The approved budget is 16.4 percent less than the current “ scal year 2010…2011 budget. The new budget year began October 1 and ends September 30, 2012. The budget reduces the property tax rate by 20 percent over the current years millage rate. Under a 0.3313 millage rate „ 33.13 cents for every $1,000 of assessed property value „ the owner of a $200,000 house with a $50,000 homestead exemption will pay $49.70 per year in property taxes to the District. The District has met the challenge of developing a budget that funds our highest priorities, maintains a strong commitment to water resource protection and provides some “ nancial relief to taxpayers,Ž said Governing Board Chairman Leonard Wood of Fernandina Beach. Nearly 38 percent of the budget will provide funding to local cooperators to implement projects in support of water resource and water supply projects and surface water restoration projects. In addition, the budget provides funds for continued water supply planning, District board reduces tax revenues by 26 percentBy Contributing Writer Teresa H. Monson, St. Johns River Water Management Districtincluding water conservation, and minimum ” ows and levels prevention and recovery strategy development. To increase e ciencies and save tax dollars, the District will restructure and consolidate several programs to improve water data collection and analysis. The District will also continue its commitment to sciencebased data collection by funding water quality and quantity trend monitoring to ensure that appropriate data continues to exist on which to make sound scienti“ c decisions. Other highlights of the new budget include a streamlined and enhanced permitting process and a continued responsibility to District land management activities, such as prescribed burns, control of invasive exotic plants, and maintenance and improvements of levees, locks and other structures. Budget reductions were made in contractual services, salaries and bene“ ts, cooperative funding and operating expenses. The complete work plan and budget is available at http://” oridaswater.com/budget/FY20112012budget.pdf.The CreekLineNW St. Johns Countys Community Newspaper!886-4919 FOUND: Treasured Photos Found on the northern end of Flora Branch Boulevard in late October: € One 8x10 manila folder containing group family photographs spanning many years. € Also two cards of authenticity for a Jacqueline Kent Collection. Please call cell 828-557-3824 to claim

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 13 For More Information Call 1-888-410-3789 Brighton BayJacksonvilles Newest Independent Living Community Large Enough To Suit Your Life Small Enough To Know Your StyleAt Brighton Bay, you decide. Enjoy chef prepared meals every day in the company of neighbors like yourself, or go for a pizza and a movie with the grandchildren. Its your choice. Brighton Bay allows you to spend more time doing the things you like with those you love.10061 Sweetwater Parkway, Jacksonville, FL 32256 BrightonBayLiving.com Light fare and desserts provided by local restaurants and a whole new look to chiropractic treatment: thats what Dr. Kenneth Berry has in the works as he plans to celebrate The Village Chiropractic Centers new location and four years serving the World Golf Village and surrounding areas. The grand opening of his new location, which will be held on November 18 from 4:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the centers new facility in the World Golf Village professional complex (across from the old Publix), will also include activities for the whole family, as well as a drawing for a luxury gift basket containing a massage, gift certi“ cates to local restaurants and businesses and more! We are very excited about our new facility,Ž said Dr. Berry. Being able to create a personalized, comfortable facility for our patients has been a fantastic opportunity … one that I believe will allow us to serve the World Golf Village area to an even greater extent.Ž The Village Chiropractic Center, previously located across the street, just down from the old Publix, has been serving the area for four years this month. There, Dr. Berry provided hundreds of free sports physicals, volunteered throughout the community and provided patients with quality chiropractic care. So, when the opportunity arose to create a one-of-a-kind o ce suite … one designed to better serve his patients … Dr. Berry just couldnt pass up the opportunity. The suite was speci“ cally designed to accommodate a number of chiropractic services, including traditional options as well as state-of-the art Pro Adjuster technology, massage, and a hydromassage bed. The Pro Adjuster, the centers most unique feature, helps Dr. Berry analyze a patients spine, adjusts the areas needing attention (through a light, repetitive tapping motion) and then review the progress made … all without any popping or cracking. The Village Chiropractic Center has helped patients from as far away as Georgia, Clay and Flagler Counties … drawing those interested in this e ective and comfortable way to relive pain. In addition to the more traditional treatment of auto accidents, sports injuries and pain relief, the center also treats patients for a variety of symptoms … venturing well beyond back painŽ treatments. According to Dr. Berry, the center helps relieve problems throughout the body … treating ailments that occur in most any joint. In addition to chronic pain, Dr. Berry also utilizes traditional methods Chiropractic center to hold Grand Openingand advanced technologies to treat problems such as ear infections, headaches, TMJ, allergies, fatigue and stress. The center even creates custom orthopedics to help alleviate knee, foot and ankle problems, and o ers a truly physician-monitored diet program for fast and e ective weight-loss through the Chiro HCG program. Non-invasive, successful and cost-e ective … and now in a new facility with state-of-theart technology and hometown comfort … The Village Chiropractic Center de“ nitely has reason to celebrate. Look for their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!A childs diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder can turn a family upside down, emotionally, “ nancially and spiritually. You are caught o guard, left stunned and feeling more vulnerable and out of control than you are comfortable feeling. You are in denial, then grief and sadness, maybe even anger. Then, the mad rush begins as you “ nally move from denial to acceptance of the reality of the situation. You are up until the wee hours of the morning reading and researching every book and article you can get your hands on about autism. You prostrate yourself before God, pleading for complete healing of your precious child or grandchild. You search for answers, causes and “ xes. Oh, how youd like to just make it all better for your little one. You seek out people to talk to who have walked the path before you to glean their wisdom and insight. But, you soon realize why the world of autism is often referred to as a puzzle. No child is alike. Your child or grandchild may exhibit some characteristics common to other children with the diagnosis, but be completely unique in other areas. It is a spectrum and you are hopeful that your child falls on the less severe end of the spectrum. When a child is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, parents and grandparents begin to worry about their childs future„a future time when When a child or grandchild is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorderBy Contributing Writer Stephanie Summers, LMFT, P.Athey might not be around to help. Of course, a childs future need depends greatly on his or her unique pro“ le and level of independence versus dependence. Much progress has been made over the years to greatly improve the level of independence a child with autism spectrum disorder is able to achieve. Early evaluation, diagnosis and intervention increase a childs options for achieving optimal functioning. Parents and grandparents of children with autism spectrum disorder may be vulnerable to stress, anxiety and even depression as they take on the extra demands of caring for their child, transporting to medical, speech and occupational therapy appointments and “ nding the right educational program for their child. It is important for family members and friends to be aware of these stressors in order to provide much needed support. This support can take the form of help with childcare, lending a listening ear or lightening the parents load in any way that may seem to offer assistance. It is not uncommon for parents to feel alone in their situation. Parents and grandparents can bene“ t from seeking assistance from a professional licensed family therapist to provide helpful emotional support and guidance. For additional information, please contact summerssa@ comcast.net. Congratulations to Nease Varsity cheerleaders Adrianna Barranco (Head Captain) and Samantha Burke for being selected this year by Universal Cheer Association (UCA) to perform as an All-American cheerleader in the 85th annual Macys Thanksgiving Day parade! Barranco, a senior and third year varsity cheerleader and Burke, a sophomore and second year varsity cheerleader, were selected by a panel of judges at UCAs cheer camp held this past July. The girls will head to New York City in November for a week lled with sightseeing and rehearsals all leading up to their debut on national television at the beginning of the parade. Nease High School and the community congratulate these young ladies on such a great achievement! Well be watching Thanksgiving morning on NBC! The CreekLineis YOUR Community Newspaper!Send us your community news!editor@thecreekline.com

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Page 14, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com Great Panache gift card packages available... see www.getpanache.com Beautiful Aveda gift sets at fabulous savings....one for them one for you! Give beauty this holiday season and gift with Panache!Now oering Goldwell and Intaglio too! 904-209-1320 2758 Racetrack Road Publix Plantation Plaza Tues … Fri 9-8 & Sat 9-7 461-9552 Anastasia Publix Plaza Mon 12-8, Tues Fri 9-8, Sat 9-7 Scan to see how daily hair repairworks. Message and data rates may apply. TURN HEADS THIS HOLIDAY SEASON ~ SCHEDULE NOW AND LIVE YOUR LIFE WITH PANACHE! SCRAPBOOK 12276 San Jose Blvd Suite 701 Jacksonville, FL 32223 www.enchantedscrapbook.com (904) 647-6772 Come Scrap Your Stories! We c an he l p you preserve your memories! From the beginner to the advan c ed s c rapbooker we have what you need! Lo c ated in the heart of M andarin on San J ose B l vd j ust north of the J u l ington Creek Bridge. Bring in this ad for 5% OFF your entire purchase Con“ dent, excited, and pumped are the words drum majors Drew Booher, Mary Polidan and head drum major Bryan Cespedes use to describe their feelings walking out onto the football “ eld at half-time to start the show leading over 160 students. This year The Power of Creekside (directed by Rick Fowler and assisted by David Renn) has the honor of performing American IdiotŽ by Green Day. The song selection includes American Idiot, Holiday, Extraordinary Girl and Boulevard of Broken Dreams. The band will compete twice this season with the show„Oakleaf High School on October 1 and Fleming Island High School on November 5 for the annual Marching Music Performance Assessment (MPA). This year at the Oakleaf High School competition the Power of Creekside was rewarded “ rst in their division. The Power of Creekside started working on the show in June during a two day rookie camp. Camp is primarily for incoming freshman to learn the ins and outs of marching but all members are encouraged to attend. I like rookie camp because it is two days dedicated to the future and its the time to meet the new members,Ž said senior Brianna Clay. The real fun began in August one week prior school beginning. For four days the full band worked from morning until late afternoon, both outside and in, learning the drill and working on memorizing the music. Its fun if you make it fun,Ž says junior Lauren Phillips. Then school begins! During the “ rst four and a half months of school almost every Tuesday and Thursday the band mainly works on cleaningŽ or making sure the show looks good while playing and marching. For most members of The Power of Timberlin Creek held its seventh annual Fall Carnival on Sunday, October 16. Festivities included in” atable games, bounce houses, an array of carnival games, colored hairspray and tattoos and musical entertainment by DJ Bobby Spencer and the TCE chorus. Burgers, hotdogs and pizza from the grill were complemented by popcorn, sno cones and a sweet treat booth for snacks. At the end of the day, kids crowded the prize booth for their treasures. Families could also participate in a school-wide book swap and had the opportunity to make donations to TCEs Support Fall carnival fun at Timberlin CreekBy Contributing Writer Patricia EdmondsOur Troops project to earn free carnival tickets. Over 500 families attended this years event, marking the largest carnival attendance “ gures since the schools opening. The carnivals success is a tribute to the entire TCE community. Organized by the PTO, it requires tremendous coordination to make the carnival a reality each year. Phyllis Linabury, carnival chairperson, was very appreciative of everyone who came together to make the carnival such a success: I would like to thank the PTO, Principal Hutchins, TCE sta carnival committee, parents and all the teen volunteers who worked so hard to make the day a success. We are also fortunate for the generosity of local businesses such as Publix and Winn Dixie.Ž Linabury concluded, The kids had such a wonderful time. It is a great event to meet fellow TCE families and to bond. We are fortunate to live in a community where family is “ rst and we all help each other out. We do it for the kids.Ž Event proceeds will go towards supplies that the PTO provides annually to the school including art supplies, copy paper and other school necessities. Power in numbers: A look into the Power of CreeksideBy Contributing Writers Olivia Van Housen and Emily Long, CHS Students Drum majors Mary Polidan, Bryan Cespedes and Drew Booher lead The Power of Creekside. Creekside, Tuesday practices are the favorite because its cooler outside and it is like an escape from the workŽ portion of school. These practices improve the show as well as boost the energy and motivation in the members. Marching MPA is quickly approaching, but after marching season, what will the band do? Hit the ground running with the arrival of concert season! Just 11 days after the competition at Oakleaf the band had their fall concert October 11 and it was a great success! After that they get two months to work until their winter concert on December 6 and then more work for Concert MPA on March 3 and their spring concert on May 4. Most band members favor marching season over concert season, but they all can agree there is never a dull moment when you are a part of The Power of Creekside! The Power of Creekside is not just a band; its a family and Friday night you can see all the hard work they have put into the show and all the fun they have together. This year the band is bigger and stronger than ever, so show you support at the next home football game during halftime for the Spirit, Pride and Honor, The Power of Creekside! Lunar PhasesFull: November 10 Last Quarter: November 18 New: November 25 First Quarter: December 2 Visit us online for all the latest high school football highlights! Read our community blogs!www.thecreekline.comYOUR Community Newspaper...available digitally!

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 15 Open Mondays through Fridays 8:30am – 5pm 1631 Race Track Road Suite 101230-7977Most Insurances AcceptedPediatric Associates of Julington Creek, PAOffering care for Infants, Children & Adolescents Mary Ann Garcia, M.D., FAAP Victor Luz, M.D., FAAP Dr. Tod NorthrupBoard Certied Orthopedic SurgeonSPECIALIZING IN Fellowship Trained 904.823.3764 NOW OPEN!!! THE NAME NORTH FLORIDA ATHLETES TRUST TO STAY IN THE GAME 2009 AWARD 450-106 State Road 13 N Publix Center in Fruit CovePh: 230.8881 52 Tuscan Way, #202Publix Center at International Golf Dr. and SR 16 Ph: 940.0055 Senior year may be the best year of your life, but it certainly doesnt start out that way. Along with the usual pressures of starting school again, the fall brings another challenge for seniors: college application season. To help them out, BTHS held a guidance night on October 3 where guidance counselors Andrew Hurley, Rachel Kusher and Linda Howard informed students and their parents about everything they needed to know to complete their applications. Bartram Trail also hosted college representatives during September and October which, according to the guidance counselors, should be the busiest months for seniors. Florida State University, the University of Florida, the University of South Florida, the University of Alabama and George Washington University all sent admissions o cers to speak to students about the daunting and often tedious process of applying for college admission. Its a lot of information to remember, especially since each school has separate requirements. The most important part, counselors stress, is to keep checking the universitys websites and apply early. Colleges can close their admissions before the deadlines if they receive an overwhelming number of applicants and its not uncommon for transcripts to get lost Helping Hands is o and running. If you are interested in doing general volunteer work such as cutting, laminating and assembly, please meet us in the PTO room Thursdays from 12:00 noon until 2:00 p.m. You must be an approved volunteer and children are welcome. This is a great opportunity to help all the teachers be all that they can be! The students have been diligently working on Square One Art and we hope all parents consider purchasing their childs creation. The art, which is transferred to mugs, potholders, tiles, tote bags, plates and more makes great holiday gifts for family and friends while helping the school at the same time. The Wards Creek Elementary PTO would like to extend a big thank you to all businesses and sales reps who participated in the Business Expo/Spooktacular. We appreciate your patronage As the need for skilled culinary professionals grows, now is the time for area restaurants to cultivate tomorrows chefs. Through First Coast Technical Colleges apprenticeship program, your business can provide hands-on culinary expertise in your own kitchen. Only through repetitive practice coupled with education can one truly become pro“ cient in the culinary arts. Apprenticeship gives foodservice employees the opportunity to master skills in the FCTC classroom and on-the-job under the direction of a quali“ ed chef to obtain professional certi“ cation from the American Culinary Federation Education Foundation (ACFEF). I only wish more area restaurants would participate to help the program grow; for Fall at Wards Creek ElementaryBy Contributing Writer Beth McCannand wish you great success! It is hard to believe we are thinking about the Fifth Grade Celebration already! In order to make this special event a success we are accepting donations of water, gift cards, sixth grade appropriate gift bag items, CD-Rs and most importantly committee members. If you are interested in making sure the “ fth graders get an exciting send o to Pacetti Bay Middle School, please contact a board member for more information. We want to thank everyone who purchased Gator Bowl tickets through the PTO. We hope you enjoy the game and appreciate your contribution to the school! BTHS HappeningsScrambling seniors By Devyn Fussman, BTHS Studentin cyberspace. They can also change their admission requirements. Florida State University, for example, had the same essay prompt for years and suddenly changed it for the class of 2012. And that wasnt the only thing that changed. Bright Futures tightened up on its requirements by stating that to receive the Florida Academic Scholars Award, students need 100 service hours (formerly 75) and to receive the Florida Medallion Scholars Award, students need 75 hours (formerly zero). Some of the seniors are rushing to get service hours during their busiest and most stressful year yet. At this rate, they cant afford to get senioritis. Deadlines are fast approaching and colleges are raising their academic standards all the time. Even schools that are supposedly easy to get into are harder now because of the increasingly high number of applicants. Even after students have been accepted, colleges are still keeping track of their grades and attendance records and can revoke their o ers at any time. In addition, seniors need to apply for housing as soon as possible because space is limited. Admissions o cers say that the sooner you apply, the lower your priority number and the better room you get. In other words, everything college related should be done early. If seniors have any questions about colleges or their applications, they can visit the guidance o ce or view the guidance webpage on the BTHS website from home.FCTC invites you to invest in the future of culinary artsBy Contributing Writer Chef Anthony Lowman, CCC, CCE, ACE, First Coast Technical Collegegiving back to the next generation is what we should all strive to do. Available to individuals at least 18 years of age, a highschool graduate or equivalent, the selection, employment and training of apprentices are without discrimination of race, color, religion, national origin or gender. Apprentices gain management and supervisory knowledge; develop basic principles of nutrition, food/beverage composition; understand requirements for proper food handling, sanitation and hygiene; and acquire a professional work ethic necessary for success in the hospitality industry. Apprenticeship takes approximately two years to complete and prepares one for ACF certi“ ed culinarian (CC) or certi“ ed sous chef (CSC) status. Enrollment now accepted. For additional information, please contact Anthony Lowman at 547-3323 or Anthony. Lowman@fctc.edu.got news?editor@thecreekline.com Don’t Just Sit There.... ....waiting for the phone to ring!Call Linda Gay at The CreekLine to let our readers know about YOUR business!886-4919

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Page 16, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com “Concerns about your drinking water?”Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 Years. Straight answers No high pressure. 262 0197 3760 KORI RD. Dog Obedience Training 287-3934 www.marienhofkennels.comGerman Shepherd Puppies Call for availability Marienhof Kennels Marion’s of Mandarin904-262-99819735-2 Old St. Augustine Road(next to Hala Caf)Private setting for all customers. Wig maintenance, products, hats and accessories. Choose a new look for the Holidays!New Hair Stylist available, call for appointment. P ma a in Ch Wig BoutiquePeggy Hawkins, Owner The Bartram Trail Newcomers and Womens Club has several upcoming events happening in November and December. On Thursday, November 10, there will a fashion show at the Dress Barn in the St. Augustine Premium Outlet Mall. If you wish to carpool, meet in the Food Lion parking lot at 9:30 a.m. The fashion show will begin at 10:30 a.m. Lunch will be on your own. There will be shopping for the rest of the afternoon with a 3:00 p.m. departure time. Please contact Char Ahlstrom at 294-2072 for more information. Tuesday, December 6 will be our annual Christmas party and gift exchange. It will be held at the University Club in downtown Jacksonville. The cost will be $25 for members, which includes lunch and entertainment. There is an optional September has certainly been a busy month at St. Johns Technical High School. Tony Boselli kicked o the month, challenging students to create written goals for themselves. He reminded students that goals should be written down somewhere and should not rest in their minds as mere ideas. He spoke of the hard work and dedication required to meet those goals, despite what others may tell them. At the end of his talk, Boselli was gracious Every year my fashion friends call me for guidance in planning their holiday looksŽ and this year they are feeling more anxious than ever as they are watching their pennies. So my famous mantra is now more timely than ever … Go Shopping in your Closet! Also our mode of dressing is more relaxed, making the dress code parameters di erent. The terms Casual Elegant, Dressy Casual and Smart Casual are the explanations identifying proper dress for events on our Holiday calendars. What is this casual thing?Ž one friend asked. With me being a fashionista who is concerned with my appearance, I tried to “ nd the middle ground on this one, so as not to overor under-dress the occasion. To make my point, I went into my own closet to put together some great looking up to date out“ ts for the holidays. So I thought I would share these ideas with you Fashionable Florida Friends (FFFs) to help you get ready early so that you can go to your parties lookin good! First, I love a romantic shirt„not your oxford cloth button down version, but a real lady like number or even an over the top one (which of course I own). Most shirts are comfortable, as they are not as constricting as other garments. Remember to wear them casually chic by letting the tails hang out over your bottoms. Speak-Fashion UpdateStart early … plan great holiday looks now!By Donna Keathley, dkeathley designsing of bottoms, make that part simple so it doesnt compete with the pretty top. My favorite poet ru ed blouse is sleeveless so its really great to wear when entertaining at home. I wear a bling bracelet and great earringsƒmy bottom of choice is my best black jeans. That being said I have worn velvet cu ed shorts with patterned black hosiery as a more formal look with my top. Dont forget that a white blouse means you have the opportunity to wear some really dramatic makeup! Another great casual idea is to layer a thin micro-“ ber black turtleneck under a sleeveless dress. It dresses it down and looks great with opaque hose and little ballet ” ats. A friend of mine and I discovered that when she wore her black cardigan sweater alone with the front buttoned up it served as a wonderful palate for a toned down out“ t … its also a perfect background for your pearls and a pretty holiday pin. If you need to glam it up a bit, here are some easy and inexpensive tips. Lose the ” at shoes; put glam in your step by wearing a great pair of stilettos. Maybe you can splurge for a pair of jeweled heels and put them with a party-ready purse which would make your Little Black Dress (LBD) over the top! Pull out your workday suit; turn it into a nighttime head-turner by adding a sheer blouse or a sequined cami to it. Now make your hair and nail appointments; consider a fancy up-do or a simple French twist for a party ready look. Heres looking at you kid … enjoy another Holiday in Great Style!Bartram Trail Newcomers and Womens Club updateBy Contributing Writer Linda Gomolka, Bartram Trail Newcomers and Womens Club$15 wrapped gift exchange. The deadline for reservations is Wednesday, November 30. Please contact Char Ahlstrom at 294-2072 for more information. Its a Wonderful Christmas,Ž featuring Michael W. Smith with the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra, will take place on Tuesday, December 20 at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are $16 each. Please call Kathy Cosnotti for tickets at 230-3329. The Bartram Trail Newcomers and Womens Club meets the second Tuesday of every month at 9:30 a.m. at the Ramada Inn. Our club is a Newcomers Club as well as a Womens Club. We put no time limits on how long you can be a member with us, whether youre a new arrival or lived here all of your life or if you live within a speci“ c region. Youre welcome to visit three events/activities then we ask that you pay your membership dues and join as a member. In addition to the monthly meetings, the club has a wide variety of interest groups. There are various card groups (bridge and canasta); golf, recipe exchange, special event outings, game day, bunko, Mah Jongg, book clubs, movie and lunch, a hiking group and community volunteer projects. For membership information or to receive a newsletter, contact Vice President of Membership Ellen Brenner at 287-2676 (email: ebbjc@bellsouth.net).St. Johns Technical School updateBy Contributing Writer Tammy Hardin, Success Coach, St. Johns Technical High Schoolenough to sign jerseys and footballs for some of our students and sta On September 22, a past resident returned to speak to our students. Glennette Tilley Turner lived in St. Augustine during the civil unrest of the 60s. Despite the unrest, she recalled wonderful memories and lessons she learned from her father who was president of Florida Normal and Industrial College. Turner signed copies for each of the students in attendance of her new book Fort Mose. That evening, we held our “ rst SAC meeting and open house. Principal King shared the schools vision and direction with parents, including the creation of the new Water Academy. Additionally, we announced the formation of St. Johns Techs “ rst PTO. Thea Lynch will be this years president and has asked that parents to be on the lookout for salmon-colored forms containing membership information. Please join us in supporting and supplementing curriculum and events. After the brief meetings, parents traveled to each of their childs classroom and met with teachers. The National Guard Choices Program is the latest addition to our school. On two extended learning Wednesdays per month, National Guard members will work with APPEX students on decision making skills. Lunar PhasesFull: November 10 Last Quarter: November 18 New: November 25 First Quarter: December 2 The CreekLineSend us your community news!editor@thecreekline.com GIVE WHERE YOU LIVE!

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 17 On Saturday, October 22 the Nease Panther PrideŽ Marching Band hosted their “ rst competition known as the First Coast Marching Invitational (FCMI). Students arrived promptly at 8:00 a.m. to prepare for the long day ahead of them and the day would consist of various responsibilities such as working concessions, directing parking, judge-running, guiding bands and overall keeping order. Surprisingly, the temperature rose from its chilly number of 56 degrees to a mild 71, causing the band kids to thankfully shed their layers. It was a beautiful day to perform. Around 11:00 a.m. the “ rst bands began arriving and the real work started. Those directing parking had their hands full managing long lines of equipment trailers carrying front ensemble instruments such as marimbas, xylophones, vibraphones and auxiliary equipment used for adding speci“ c nuances to the music. There were also trailers devoted to the many props used to enhance themes and these themselves occupied half of a parking lot. These combined with the many cars of parents, band directors and sta kept those working parking busy. As Middleburgs Bronco Band, one of the largest attending arrived, the concessions were swarmed with hungry students dressed in red. Soon after, the preliminary performances started with Warner Christian Academy and proceeded with Fernandina Beach, Orange Park, Trinity Christian, Mandarin, Fleming Island, Middleburg and Paxon. In order for the competition to be a circuit-sponsored event (meaning the competitors could qualify for state championships), it was required that there be “ nals performances. Nease HappeningsNease Band hosts First Coast Marching InvitationalBy Brittany Dirks, Nease StudentHowever, since only eight bands were in attendance, all performed in “ nals competition. In between preliminaries and “ nals, there was an award ceremony (known as retreatŽ). The high o cers of Nease Band, including the drum majors, band captain, drum captains, colorguard captains and brass and woodwind captains, delivered the wellearned trophies to the waiting drum majors of the participating bands. After a short break, “ nals began and the stadium lights came on, giving everything a slight glow that enhanced the overall atmosphere of a show day. At the end of the night, the Nease Panther Pride Band performed their show A Mad New WorldŽ for exhibition only, because it is not permitted for a host to compete at their own competition. It was an impressive performance, one of the best for the band as a whole. Immediately following this was “ nals retreat, Olympic style, which means each member of every band was present on the “ eld and marched onto it to the cadence of Best Overall Percussion, which in this case was Fleming Island. They were also awarded Grand Champion of the Inaugural First Coast Marching Invitational. The night might have been over for the participants, but for Nease, it was far from its conclusion. Every section was assigned a speci“ c area for clean-up and members were not dismissed until they had checked in with their section leaders. Once all responsibilities were taken care of, many students went to Chilis (as is tradition after a home football game) to celebrate a successful “ rst competition and a great performance!Nease Band High Of cers lead the nals retreat at FCMI. Veterans’ Sunset CelebrationThursday, November 10 5:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. Veterans Park, 1332 Veterans ParkwayYoure Invited!

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Page 18, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com Kaylie Headings, a Fruit Cove Middle School student, recently won third place in the grades three through ve animation category for the state-wide Jim Harbin FAME (Florida Association for Media Education) competition. Although Headings is now in middle school, she created her animation in Julington Creek Elementary Schools technology club that is sponsored by Ingrid Grif n, the technology instructor. Her animation is titled The Velociraptor and the Apatosaurus, a retelling of the tortoise and the hare, with dinosaurs! You can view her video at this page at www-jce.stjohns.k12. .us/teachers/technology/Tech_Club_ spring11/FAME/dino.MOV. Let me create the perfect cut and color just for you! 108 Bartram Oaks WalkLocated inside the Spa and Salon at Bartram Walk. 899-1234 www.hairbycarl.com Carl Slack Be ready for Holiday gatherings and photos! k Lindell & Farson, P.A.Attorneys At LawConveniently Located in South Mandarin 12276 San Jose Blvd., Suite 126 Jacksonville, FL 32223-8630904-880-4000 www.lindellfarson.com J. Michael Lindell, Esq.James A. Farson, Esq.Roger K. Gannam, Esq. R. Howard Walton, Esq. Automobile, Motorcycle & Trucking Accidents, Insurance Disputes, & Wrongful Death Complex Business, Real Estate, & Construction Disputes LINDELL &FARSON Lindell & Farson, P.A. 904-880-4000 SeekingA GREATBabysitter?$10 o your 1st Babysitting Event Use Coupon Code Creekline Fourteen St. Johns County seniors have quali“ ed as National Merit Semi“ nalists for 2012. These students placed among the top 1 percent of all students in the country taking the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT)/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test given annually to high school juniors. As 14 of 16,000 semi“ nalists nationwide, they are now eligible to advance to the “ nalist competition to vie for 8,300 scholarships worth more than $34 million to be announced in February. The semi“ nalists are Mitchell Zhang from Bartram Trail High School (BTHS); Cody Chasteen and Dylan Klee from Creekside High School (CHS); Maxine Weiss from Pedro Menendez High School (PMHS); Marissa Galiley, Anthony Janocko, Tia Lewis, Carson Ridenhour, Steven Schwartz, Wenli Shao, Dhiraj Sikaria and Logan Stern from Nease High School (NHS); and Megan Connors and Carson Drain from Ponte Vedra High School (PVHS). Also, NHS students Katie Jackson and Ayana Gibson Sleep apnea is a very dangerous condition that a ects about 10 percent of the population and can take years o your life. If you snore; gasp for air when sleeping; take medication for depression, diabetes or high blood pressure; su er from daytime fatigue; or have acid re” ux, A better option for treating sleep apneaBy Contributing Writer Dr. James Alexander, DMD, Alexander DentalU.S. Coast Guard AuxiliaryVessel Safety Checks2nd Sunday of month 12:00 noon ~ 3:00 p.m. Vilano Boat Ramp and 12:00 noon ~ 2:00 p.m.St. Augustine Lighthouse Park Boat Ramp you might be su ering from this condition. Sleep has an innumerable impact on health, although we are still in the infancy of sleep research and much more has yet to be learned. There are connections between sleep apnea and heart attacks, stroke, diabetes, mental health and even impotence. Sleep deprived driving is also now on the increase, with between 16 percent and 60 percent of accidents estimated to be the result of sleep deprivation, which is well beyond the number of accidents caused by drunk driving. In addition, chronic fatigue from the associated sleep deprivation has the potential to cause everything from poor performance at work to accidents. To be certain, it is a public health concern that will likely garner more attention into the future. For those with sleep problems, diagnosis by a board certi“ ed sleep physician is imperative. A CPAP or continuous positive airway pressure device is the most commonly used method of treating sleep apnea. There are a few downsides to this device because it can be cumbersome and uncomfortable and noisy. In fact, more than half the people that use a CPAP sleep in a separate bedroom from their partner. It is of concern that the majority of those diagnosed and prescribed a CPAP dont wear it. The statistics are startling: it is estimated that 5 percent to 50 percent dont wear it after the “ rst week and 75 percent dont wear it after a year. Alternatives include surgery (results are often subpar and not permanent) and an oral appliance available from a dentist who specializes in helping those with sleep apnea. The most common type of oral appliance works by moving the jaw and tongue forwards thereby opening the airway. Oral appliances are often very e ective and usually covered by medical insurance, so patients can get help without paying out of pocket, beyond any deductible they have. Oral appliances are not a panacea. CPAP is still the recommended treatment for those patients with severe sleep apnea. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends oral appliances for mild to moderate sleep apnea. However, for the severe patient that refuses to wear the CPAP that is collecting dust in the closet, an oral appliance, while not completely eliminating the disease, can have a dramatic and long lasting e ect on quality of life. For additional information, please email info@myalexanderdental.com.Congratulations to National Merit Semi nalistsquali“ ed as National Achievement Scholarship Semi“ nalists recognizing African-American students. In addition to these semi“ nalists, the district had 33 Commended Students who scored among the top 5 percent of all students in the country on the PSAT. They are Erin Grey and Sarah Wiegre e from BTHS; Rachel Bu Mario Diaz, Jaime Gebhardt, Emily Golan, Danielle Krusemark, Brendan McLaughlin, Nicole Navarro, Jennifer Neal, Virginia Pedigo, Monica Resto, Courtney Vale and Jessica Walker from CHS. Also, Sarah Taylor from PMHS; Nolan Alberti, Jordan Bernas, Christina Chase, Graham Hancock, Kathryn Hill, Blake Insel, Caleb Jarriel, Bryce McKenzie, Vivian Nguyen, Liam Rawson, Alex Sengstock, Aaron Skipper, Preston Sluder and Carly Young from NHS; Margaret Egeln, Peter Humbarger and Katelyn Norton from PVHS; Nicholas Dupoux from SAHS. All semi“ nalists and commended students were recognized at the School Board meeting on Tuesday, October 11.

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 19 Dr. Mabus of“ce is conveniently located in the Johns Creek Shopping Center. She is a graduate of the St. Vincents Family Medicine residency program and is looking forward to caring for her new Fruit Cove neighbors. Her of“ce offers medical care for: Procedures and screenings: To schedule an appointment call: (904) 450-8120Same day appointments available. Dr. Mabus of“ce is located at: St. Vincents Primary Care Johns Creek Shopping Center 2851 CR 210 W., Ste. 122 St. Johns, FL 32259St. Vincent’s Primary Care would like to welcome Allison Mabus, MD, to our St. Vincent’s HealthCare family. Conveniently located one block North of I-295 and San Jose Blvd. 50% OFF Your Pets First Exam with Dr. Silverness( 1st Time Clients Only )Not valid with any other oer. Expires 12/31/11 FREE BOARDING Book 2 Nights at our Resort and 3rd Night is FREE! (1st Time Boarders Only)Not valid with any other oer. Expires 12/31/11 Ann Silverness, DVM,CCRT Mandarin Landing Animal Hospital & Pet Resort3003 Hartley Road Jacksonville, FL 32257 904-268-0477 www.mandarinlandingah.comCIV no longer mandatory for pet boarding Bordatella now done annually Ahoy there and Ho Ho Ho! The holiday spirit comes to the creek this time of year. If you peer out your car windows heading north across the Julington Creek Bridge the last couple of weeks in November you can see many CaptainŽ Santas. They are decorating their vessels in hopes of a good clear night and low tides for sailing in the 2011 Christmas on the Creek light parade. The annual holiday event, sponsored by the Julington Creek Prop Club, is scheduled for Saturday, December 3 this year. Commodore George Sample is extending an invitation to any boat owners interested in decorating their boat and joining in for the fun to contact him at gsample335@aol.com for more information. The more the merrier,Ž says Sample. The best decorated boat gets a $300 cash prize while second place gets $200 and third place $100. We expect a great turn out for this years parade, with all the growth at the creek, new restaurants and all, it will be a fun night,Ž adds Sample. Established in 1988, the parade has an estimated 40 powerboats lined up for the event. Boats decked out in all their holiday “ nery motor the parade route which begins at The Marina at Julington Creek, goes underneath the bridges and motors around Bulls Bay, then returns under the bridge and continues down Durbin Creek. Spectators can view it from the Julington Creek Bridge walkways. Homeowners with docks located on the parade route are invited to join in the fun too! Decorated docks can vie for a variety of prizes including cash and goodie bags. Tradition holds that the boaters judge the Christmas on the CreekƒYou are invited!By Donna Keathleydocks. The people along the shores of the creek plan that night for their holiday parties,Ž Sample says. We have people shooting “ reworks over the boats, some docks have as many as 100 folks on them waving and shouting Merry Christmas.Ž The land lubbers have as much fun as the boaters! There is a lot of planning and organizing prep work done before these ships sail. The Prop Club starts in October each year contacting boaters, area merchants and residents gathering donations for the event. Approximately one half of the boats participating in the parade are Prop Club members; the other half of the boats come from all over the area. Boats range in size from 19 feet to 50 feet in length. Ironically the top prize winner last year was a JohnŽ boat light up like a dragon complete with ” ames shooting from his mouth. Some adjustments have to be made to the vessels to help provide the power needed for such a large number of lights. Some boat owners make their presentation a work in progress, adding more decorations each year for an over-the-top e ect. The Prop Club is a social organization of boaters from The Marina at Julington Creek. They meet each month on the second Saturday evening at 7:00 p.m. at the dock; all interested boaters are invited to join for boating information and fun at the creek! Annual dues provide most of the funds for the Christmas on the CreekŽ event. Peanut Butter Jelly or jam Cereal/Oatmeal Canned Pasta Canned Stew/Chili Canned pasta Soup Canned fruit/veggies Toilet PaperChrist’s Cupboard Food Pantry Wish ListChrist’s Cupboard is located at Celebration Lutheran Church, 810 Roberts Road. Call 230-2496 for info! Christ’s Cupboard serves anyone in need. Hours are 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Tues. and Weds.

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Page 20, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com K EN B ERRY B.S.N., D.C.319 West Town Place, Suite 7 Located in the WGV Professional Plaza904-940-0361 Serving World Golf Village and surrounding communities for over 4 years WWW.THE VILLAGE CHIROPRACTOR.COM Neck & Back Pain Join us for Our New Oce Grand Opening Celebration November 18th Prizes and giveaways Accepting and Selling furniture (living room, dining room, bedroom, etc) Home decor (lamps, rugs, artwork, tchotchke) New items arrive daily. We are ready to accept your entire house, estate, etc. We also oer inventory liquidation service for builders, home and furniture industry businesses, etc. F or M ore I nformation call : 880 8448 or email us at : E NCO REDE CO R@ be ll south net10830 San Jose Boulevard ( across from Walmart)Visit us online at: www.EncoreDecorFL.comW E OFFER FREE PICKUP S ER V ICE FOR APPRO V ED ITEM SHours: Jacksonvilles Largest Upscale Consignment Store H October was an exciting month at Pacetti Bay for us in the Media Center. I am the team sponsor for our new Running Club. We have been practicing for weeks. We have a paved narrow track that is a half a mile. The students have been working on conditioning to be able to run two miles in the meets with four other middle schools in St. Johns. The Running Club started out with walking and progressed from walk/ run to run for the two miles. Pace is a di cult concept for students to grasp. We continue to work on this! Our “ rst meet was Thursday, October 20 at Gamble Rogers Middle School. We had a large group of students participate in the meet. The Running Club did a very impressive job handling their “ rst meet. The two mile run was a combination of the track and the trails which On Friday, October 7, 2011, the Nease Sparklers took the “ eld at Nease High School in true style! Wearing their new team uniforms sponsored by Coggin Honda of St. Augustine, the Sparklers cheered on the Panthers during the “ rst quarter of play. Head Captain Adrianna Barranco was elated to see her vision of bringing the Sparkle E ect to Florida come to fruition. The Sparkle E ect is a nonpro“ t organization that helps bring special needs cheer squads to high schools nationwide. The Nease Sparklers is the “ rst team in the state of Florida. The excitement for the team has carried over into the media as the girls were Notes from the Pacetti Bay Media CenterBy Contributing Writer Lynn Johnson, NBCT, Library Media Specialist, Pacetti Bay Middle SchoolNease Sparklers make debut at Panther stadiumBy Contributing Writer Diana Barranco Nease Sparklers and varsity buddies Lily Boone, Adrianna Barranco, Kelsey Schuetzler, Ashleigh Jackson, Gianna Haley, Kelsey Carns, Megan Davis, Blake Price and Kaitlyn Jones Skye Robertson, Caught ya Reading!Ž Sonia, Kelly Jacobson, Taylor, Maddie, Anna, Avery, Colton, Lewis, Josh and Kelsey at Story Hour.was something totally new for them. Ribbons are given to the students who place in the top 12. We had two ribbon winners, Kieran McKee and Xavier Hutchinson. Our top three boys were: #5 Kieran McKee 12:43; #10 Xavier Hutchinson 13:07; and #13 John Jackson. Our top three girls were: Sloane Haines 17:12; Kaitlyn Dean 17:30; and Parker Perrella 18:04. Our next meet will be at Liberty Pines Academy on Wednesday November 2. I have no doubt that they will show improvement. Watch for the picture of the girls in our next issue of The CreekLine. Our October Community Story was so much fun. We had a great crowd of children; the youngest were in kindergarten and the oldest was in fourth grade. Our assistant principal Kelly Jacobson read The Runaway Pumpkin. It was an old favorite of many of the children and we all became very hungry as the story progressed. Thanks to Karin Gowens plans for the story hour we had pumpkin mu ns for a snack. Josh Jacobson read Goodnight Goon, a spoof of the all time favorite Good Night Moon. Of course the favorite book was clearly divided by gender, the boys liked the Goodnight Goon and the girls liked The Runaway Pumpkin. We loved creating the pumpkin from the cutouts that Gowens created for us. Sonia Rameriz, Kelsey Taylor and Josh Jacobson were the student volunteers, helping the children with their pumpkins. Please join us on November 15 at 5:00 p.m. for our next story hour. I am going to add a new feature to our column, Get Caught ReadingŽ which is my new buzz. Early in the school year I snapped a picture of one of our students reading at the bus stop. It is too dark now to read before the bus comes so I will have to catch them here at school. My best one this month is Skye Robertson. He is an avid reader and loves the graphic novels we have here at Pacetti Bay. The favorite graphic novel is the Naruto series. I see Skye reading while in his football gear waiting for his ride home after practice frequently in our parking lot! featured twice on Channel 4 News. The Nease Sparklers consist of four special needs cheerleaders and “ ve buddies from the Nease varsity cheer squad. They have now cheered for two home football games and will be doing two additional appearances in the upcoming months. Look for more information about these remarkable young ladies and the Nease Sparklers soon! What would YOU like to read about each month in The CreekLine?Let us know! editor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 21 (904)292-2210 MandarinSouthBusinessCenter12421SanJoseBlvd.€Suite310/320 Jacksonville,FL32223(BetweenSonnysBBQ&Solantic) LorettoRd. NSanJoseBoulevard RaceTrackRd. JulingtonCreek Lessthan1/2mi. fromJulingtonCreek MarinelaM.Nemetz,D.D.S.BoardCertifiedPediatricDentistRobertJ.Nemetz,D.D.S.,M.S.AdultDentistry€Periodontics€Prosthodontics Author Sharon Draper says, I learned to dream through reading, learned to create dreams through writing and learned to develop dreamers through teaching. I shall always be a dreamer. Come dream with me.Ž The students and faculty at Timberlin Creek Elementary had the pleasure of dreamingŽ with Sharon Draper when she visited the school on October 11. During the visit, Draper gave an energetic presentation to the third, fourth and “ fth grade students. She also met with individual students for photographs and signed copies of her books. In preparation for the visit, many students read Drapers book Out of My Mind, which is a thought-provoking novel about a girl with cerebral palsy. It is one of this years Sunshine State Young Readers Award books for elementary and Engineman Apprentice Mark Stephen Ulbricht, United States Navy, currently stationed on the USS Vicksburg (CG 69) was recently awarded the Navy Sharpshooter Medal, National Defense Ribbon. Ulbricht is a 2008 graduate of Bartram Trail High School who attended Florida State College at Jacksonville. He graduated from Navy Boot Camp at Great Lakes in April 2011 where he was a member of the honor guard. He also graduated from Engineman AŽ School at Great Lakes Naval Training Center. He is the son of CDR Stephen M. Ulbricht, USN (Retired) and Deborah Montana-Ulbricht of St. Johns.Bestselling author visits Timberlin Creek By Contributing Writer Kristen Badger, Media Specialist, Timberlin Creek Elementary School Author Sharon Draper signs one of her books for student Maddie Traylor.middle school students. Sharon Draper has written many other books including “ ve that have won the Coretta Scott King Award and she was a National Teacher of the Year. Her visit truly inspired our students to become better writers, readers and people. Mill Creek Elementary Schools fourth and “ fth grade students were treated to a visit by two special members of the Charles F. Hamblen American Legion Post 37. Ray Blackaby and Aaron Ray shared with the students the rules and art Veterans instruct MCE students on American FlagBy Contributing Writer Kate Dowdie, Technology Teacher, Mill Creek Elementary School Veteran Ray Blackaby instructs fourth grade students Jack Warringer and Jonathan Chapman on the proper way to fold an American ag.of displaying and caring for the American ” ag. Through the use of video, demonstration and student participation, the children were able to learn how to properly fold and store the ” ag, when a ” ag is too old and/or damaged to be displayed and how to dispose of a ” ag that is no longer appropriate for display. These American heroes continue to serve their country by sharing their knowledge and pride with the next generation!

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Page 22, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com Race Track Blvd.Flora Branch Blvd. 990 Flora Branch Boulevard St. Johns, Florida 32259License#C075J0083 www.theacademyatjulingtoncreek.net Please visit our center and take a personal tour. Marcia Pozin Executive Director 904-230-8200.Infant thru VPK ( 4 years old ) Before/After School Ages 6 thru 12 Celebrating our 1 st year in Julington Creek! VPK Openings for the 2011-2012 School Year More for your money.... 165 Hampton Point Dr., Suite 3 St. Augustine, FL 32092( 904 ) 429-0290www.atlasphysicaltherapy.com12421 San Jose Blvd., Suite 100 Jacksonville, FL 32223( 904 ) 292-0195 Your onsite Athletic Trainer at each weeks football games Right with you through the game... We are Your Community Therapist.Ž Your onsite Athletic Trainer at eac h week s football games Greenbriar Animal HospitalA Professional Veterinary Hospital Offering... We Celebrate The HumanPet Bond ( 0.2 mi South JCP entrance ) vetM-F – 8 AM 6 PM Sat 8 AM Noon Contributing to various charities, Newcomers of North St. Johns is a non-pro“ t, social organization. Last year, thousands of coupons were cut out by members and given to the Coups for TroopsŽ program. Approximately $157,000 worth of coupons were sent overseas. Every month the club collects food that then is contributed to a local food bank and during Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the club made a donation to the Susan G. Komen Foundation. For the upcoming meeting on December 13, the club is asking members to donate a new childs book to be given to our St. Johns County libraries. They welcome any new childs book, but for a requested book from the librarys listing, please contact Toni at 940-1343. Bring a new, unwrapped Durbin Creek Explorers were taken on an EPIC adventure with Boosterthon Fun Run this past October 10 through October 19 to help raise money through the PTO. The Boosterthon Fun Run program is a healthy alternative to traditional product sales that raises much-needed funds for our school and many others across America. The nine-day Boosterthon also promotes three speci“ c values during the fun“ lled program: Fitness, Leadership and Character. This years character theme EPIC AdventureŽ is all about teamwork. The students built character by learning the four secrets of good teams: Encourage, Play, Invite and Celebrate. The event kicked-o with a 30-minute school-wide pep ralNewcomers participate in local charitiesBy Contributing Writer Marcia Smith, Newcomers of North St. Johns Newcomers of North St. Johns hosted an auction for their October luncheon/meeting. Members brought items to be auctioned off. Vice-President Johanna Cunningham assisted auctioneer Luman Beasley in showing off this beautiful rug/wall hanging.childs book to the Tuesday, December 13, holiday meeting/luncheon to be held at 11:00 a.m. at Maggianos at St. Johns Town Center. Lunch will be a family-style three course meal and the cost is $25. Reservations are required by December 6. Entertainment will be provided by a talented group of student musicians and singers called OuttaSight, from the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind. Please contact Laura at leccpremo@yahoo.com for more information and dont forget your book!Nease NJROTC cadets William Duncan and Darrow Mead with other outstanding high school students from across the United States took part in a unique program in our nations capital. During the six-day program, the National Youth Leadership Forum on National Security (NYLF/NS): Exploring American Diplomacy, Intelligence and Defense introduced Nease ROTC cadets explore U.S. National Security in Washington DC William Duncanthem to the challenging careers in national security, intelligence, the diplomatic corps and more. The curriculum for the Forum on National Security is based on actual world events. Throughout the program, students used critical thinking, leadership and public speaking skills to tackle the complexity of national decision-making as they examine how the United States plans for peace and prepares for crisis. They employ a crisis decisionmaking process similar to that employed by the nations top policy makers. Students also participated in thought-provoking question and answer sessions with highly respected, internationally recognized civilian policy makers and senior military personnel. In addition, leading institutions opened their doors to Forum on National Security students, where they were educated in diplomacy, international a airs and military strategy. Students explored several government institutions and military installations, including the Pentagon, the United States Department of State, the United States Marine Corps Combat Development Command at Quantico, the Central Intelligence Agency, the United States Naval Academy, a variety of embassies and many others.EPIC adventure hits Durbin Creek ElementaryBy Contributing Writer Jeralyn Forcierly on Monday, October 10 and concluded on Wednesday, October 19 with the Boosterthon Fun Run laps. Over 300 parents attended the Fun Run event to cheer on their children and support the classes. In order to encourage families to PlayŽ and be active, DCE business partner Black Creek Out“ tters donated a beautiful kayak as a special incentive to the families at Durbin for participation. With all the excitement and drive of the students, parents, DCE faculty and donations from parents, family members and friends, Durbin stands to raise almost $42,000 which will go towards some much needed shade structures in the physical education areas and playgrounds! Advertise inThe CreekLineIt’s good for business!886-4919LG@rtpublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 23 APPOINTMENT 904.264.KIDS264KIDS.COM CALL OR VISITUS ONLINE TO ANSCHEDULE San Jose Blvd. SR 13Bartam Walk Race Track RoadLOCATED ABOVE BLACKSTONE GRILLE 112 BARTRAM OAKS WALK #203 | JACKSONVILLE, FL | 32259 De Javu SalonTry us out!Annie, Christinia, Monika & Tammyinvite you to take advantage of these special oers Color Retouch$25 11018 Old St Augustine Rd #122 (Next to Larrys Giant Subs) 268-4911 www.dejavujax.com Lunchtime Peel $25Shampoo & Cut$25 Gift Certicates Available Julington Creek Plantation Presents: Holiday Party? Company Luncheon? Seminar?For a Limited Time Only, Book One Meeting Room, Get the 2nd One FREEŽ (Daytime/Weekday Rentals Only*) Oer expires December 30th, 2011 See www.jcpcdd.org for more info & terms The Pacetti Bay Middle School PTSO Cookie Dough/ Mixed Bag fundraiser sales kicked o on October 10 with Meghan Ryan dressed in a cookie out“ t as she distributed freshly baked cookies from a Mixed Bag to parents in the student pick up line. The fundraiser ended on October 25 with overwhelming support from the community. Cookie dough was distributed on November 10 to students, so if you ordered, you should be receiving them soon. Mixed Bags orders will be sent home with students in time for the holidays. The PTSO wishes to thank Kalisa King for organizing another outstanding PTSO fundraiser, the Sports Dance, held on September 30. The dance was the most popular to date, with over 500 kids in attendance. The gym was decorated with streamers and sports art. Kids were able to strike a pose with their friends at the photo booth which had a backdrop of PBMS sta painted by Emily Warner and Kelsey Taylor. The DJ took requests from the kids and the favorite song by far was the Cupid Shu e, which had the entire gym of kids dancing in time. The PTSO wrapped up their membership drive at the end of September. Thank you to all the families that joined. Congratulations to the homeroom classes with the highest participation rate … Catie Grimes (eighth grade), Joshua Carey (seventh grade) and Della Thompson (sixth grade). These classes were rewarded with an ice cream party for their commitment to PTSO. If you didnt get a chance to join PTSO, its not too late. Membership applications are accepted at any time. Mem-Studies show that teenage drivers are involved in almost 28 percent of all alcohol-related tra c accidents. There are more than 10,000 drunk-driving accidents each year, with thousands of people dead due to the poor choices of few. As much as we hear it (and trust me, we hear it a lot), we teenagers have a hard time wrapping our heads around these numbers. The unfortunate truth is that weve become desensitized … weve seen the news stories, weve read the statistics and weve come to accept these accidents and deaths as a regrettable part of life, bound to never a ect any of us personally. Well, Creekside juniors and seniors experienced a severe change in attitude last month when they received a visit from Renee Napier, mother of Meagan Napier and founder of The Meagan Napier Foundation. In front of a crowd of indi erent teenagers, Napier told the heartwrenching story of her daughters death. Meagan Napier was just 20 years old when she and friend Lisa Jo Dickson were killed by drunk driver Eric Smallridge on May 11, 2002. Smallridge, 24 at the time of the crash, was sentenced to 22 years in prison Fall has Pacetti Bays PTSO in full swingBy Contributing Writer Sharon Davis, Corresponding Secretary, Pacetti Bay Middle School PTSO PTSO Board Members Debbie Adams, Becky Lawson and Karen Town, along with Preston Town showing off Mixed Bagsbership is $15 per family and includes a copy of the school directory. Meetings are held the “ rst Wednesday of each month at 3:00 p.m. in the PBMS Media Center. All are welcome. More information can be found at www-pbm.stjohns.k12.” .us/ ptso/. The student directory is hot o the presses. PTSO wishes to thank all the businesses that published ads in the directory. We appreciate their support of the school. The student directories will distributed in late November. Students are excited this year about being allowed to carry their books and school supplies in cinch bags between classes. PTSO is helping the kids to stay organized by o ering for sale both green and blue cinch bags, so kids can pack items needed for green day and blue day separately. Bags are $7 and can be purchase by completing the spirit wear form available at www-pbm.stjohns.k12.” .us and sending it to school with the student. The PTSO is grateful for the support of the community as we work to raise funds to support programs at PBMS. If you own a business and are interested in partnering with the PTSO or are an individual with fundraising ideas, please contact Debbie Adams dadams2@att.net.CHS HappeningsDrunk driving assembly impacts studentsBy Rachel Buff, CHS Student(11 for each girl). Napier spoke of the suffering she felt immediately following the accident: she spent Mothers Day in a funeral home. In a story marked with eloquence and composure, Napier highlighted her grief and described the strength she gained through the support of friends and family. She opened a window into her life; soon, the audience was sharing in her sorrow, as if they really knew Meagan and Lisa. In videos and descriptions, Napier painted Smallridge as a decent man who simply made a poor choice with dire consequences. Uneasy about the potential loss of yet another life, Napier made a plea to judges in 2006 and had Smallridges sentence reduced to 11 years. Her message of wisdom and understanding rang deep and just as it began to sink in, an unexpected visitor came on to the stage. Eric Smallridge himself, orange jumpsuit-clad, handcu ed and accompanied by two deputies, arrived to tell his story. Smallridge spoke of regret; how one awful decision ruined so many lives, including his. His thoughts were deeply moving, his advocacy of good judgment heartfelt. In the end, he was just an honest guy who had made poor choices and wanted to prevent future tragedies. In an astonishing and inspiring act of forgiveness, Napier hugged her daughters killer. The words and actions of Napier and Smallridge had a profound impact on the audience; silent tears were widespread. These were not just third-party outsiders preaching The destroyed car from the 2002 accident serves as a solemn reminder of the dangers of driving under the in uence. about safety. These were two individuals, whose lives had been turned upside down in an instant, pouring out their hearts in a room full of strangers. When the assembly ended, students were changed. They rose from their seats, dazed and proceeded back to class in silence. Some stayed to view the actual car from the accident, brought by Napier, which served as a quiet memorial to the lives lost. Sincere people with simple words, Napier and Smallridge certainly made an intense impact at Creekside High School that day. Their work will make students think twice about drinking and driving. The Meagan Napier Foundation raises awareness of the dangers of driving under the in” uence and promotes healing and forgiveness. For more information, visit www.themeagannapierfoundation.com.

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Page 24, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com The Shoppes of MurabellaAccepting New Patients (904) 826-346952 Tuscan Way Suite 205 St. Augustine, FL 32092 New Location! Pat WanasNew York trained haircolor specialistSenior colorist in well-known salon in trendy Manhattan area now here in Jacksonville to make you beautiful! 50% off haircut with any color service $10 off women’s cut $5 off men’s cut 904 868 0886 Are you looking for a fun and easy way to give back to Liberty Pines Academy while enjoying a fun family outing? Visit the St. Augustine Amphitheatre on Tuesday, November 29 between 5:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. Bring your family and all your friends, because $2 of ev-Bartram Trail High School ASL Level 3 students teach Sign Language at Cunningham Creek Elementary (CCE) on Tuesday and Thursday mornings each week. The Musical ASL Holiday/Christmas Program will be at CCE on December 8 from 8:45 a.m. until 9:30 a.m.November at Liberty Pines AcademyBy Contributing Writer Stephanie Bradford, Liberty Pines Academy PTOery ice skating ticket sold that night will be given back to LPA. This is St. Augustines only outdoor skating rink! While you are there, show o your skills or try it for the “ rst time and enjoy lots of other Winter Games. Visit www.winterwonderland” orida.com/features. html for more information on St. Augustines Winter Wonderland. The cost is $10 to skate and $2 for skate rental. Reminder that all participants under the age of 18 must have a signed waiver by a parent/ guardian. October was a great month for LPA PTO! The LPA fourth annual Gala OktoberfestŽ was held on Saturday, October 1 at St. Johns Golf and Country Club. Thanks to the support of generous sponsors, parents, teachers, sta and community members, the event, co-chaired by Pam Watt and Heather Lister, far exceeded LPA PTOs goals and brought in nearly $29,000 for LPA! The silent auction was bursting with creative class baskets put together by the amazing parents and teachers of LPA. There was everything from a safety basket, including a complimentary security system, to a house cleaning basket, to Gator and FSU baskets including game tickets. The live auction, hosted by guest auctioneer Brent Martineau, was a hit. There was something for everyone whether it be a Serenata Beach Club Membership, a weeks stay at the beach or in the mountains or golf foursomes at six local golf clubs. The bidding was fast and furious and the winners were not only the top bidders, but the students at LPA. The evening was rounded out with a glow in the dark closest to the pin contest and a super live performance by Seize the Day. Co-chair Heather Lister stated, The overwhelming support for the event and the school shows our community is committed to the success of our public schools. All money earned will go directly to help purchase new technology for classrooms, valuable elective resources, books and media equipment for our media center, and invaluable teacher training.Ž A heart felt thank you to our sponsors SpaMe, Watson Realty-Lisa Menton, St. Johns Golf and Country Club, St. Johns Eye Associates, Orthopaedic Associates of St. Augustine, Taps Bar and Grill, First Florida Credit Union, Magellan Transport Logistics, Publix, WinnDixie and Atlantic Coast Bank. Liberty Pines Academy would like to congratulate our Student Volunteer of the Year, Kaitlin Haines, who received numerous nominations highlighting her enthusiasm, spirit, compassion, intellect and leadership. As a Pre-AP sixth grader, she demonstrates excellent academic achievement by attaining all As and qualifying for the Duke Tip Talent Search via her FCAT scores. Haines was the co-captain of a Relay for Life team, Phriends Phiten Cancer. She led her teammates on several months of creative fundraising and ultimately raising over $11,000 in the “ ght against cancer. Haines is a member of LPAs Ladies Congeniality Club and gave her time to work with the Special Olympics, which she found extremely rewarding. LPA prides itself on students who display the three Rs: Respectful, Responsible and Ready to Learn. Kaitlin Haines exempli“ es all of the qualities and characteristics deserving of the recognition as LPA Student of the Year. Hands down LPA is blessed with some of the best volunteers that are committed to ensuring LPA students have a rich educational experience. Julie Martin is a prime example of this and has proudly been named LPA Volunteer of the Year. Martin helps in our classrooms, cafeteria and our school community at large. Martins commitment to our students shines through her countless hours of service at LPA, which she continues to give with an enthusiastic heart. Martin has impacted many students by volunteering in her childrens classrooms each year. This e ort has included organizing special events, cooking, cleaning, “ ling and working with students. She also volunteers in LPAs Media Center and serves as parent liaison to LPAs Media Reading Committee. All of her e orts in the Media Center have helped to ensure that students at LPA have a world of literature resources at their “ ngertips. Martin has been and continues to be an active member of LPAs PTO and has served on the School Advisory Committee every year. It is easy to recognize her passion for making a di erence not just for one day, but for every day that she possibly can. Liberty Pines Academy congratulates Julie Martin and believes she exhibits true servant leadership in her volunteer e orts. LPA would also like to congratulate our Of the MonthŽ winners for October. Teacher of the month was Diana Hoelle, Volunteer of the Month was Tricia Burford, Student of the Month (kindergarten through fourth grade) was Graison Aberly and Student of the Month (“ fth through eighth grade) was Timmy Plish. Congratulations to each of them! Oktoberfest Co-Chairs Heather List and Pam Watt. Tell our advertisers you saw them in The CreekLine!! Support our fine Advertisers!

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 25 3 DAYS!Friday, Saturday and SundayNovember 18th 20th20% OFF* Everything in the StoreOnly* Excludes: gift cards, optics, Yard-bird Feeder, Garys Birdhouse, sale items & previous purchases. No seed storage please.450 SR 13 at Race Track RdNext door to Publix 230-3242 Anniversary Sale Oswald ChiropracticAt Bartram Park www.oswaldchiropracticjax.com Exam X-Rays (If Medically Necessary) 1st TreatmentFREE Value $150.00 +* Massage (MA41847) (OUR NO RISK OFFICE POLICY) THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT WHICH IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITH IN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT. 904.268.9100 Exp. 11/15/11 Nowis the timeto make your move. Conventional and Jumbo Loans USDA Rural Developement Construction to Perm FHA and VA Loans Condo Loans Fixed or Adjustable Rates First Federal offers: All loans subject to credit underwriting and approval. Please contact a mortgage originator for more details on available loan programs. Contact Scott Neeley Free PapersWorking For You Solid Local Trusted Effective Respected is local community paper is free to our readers. Weve been that way from the beginning. We wont change that even in the toughest of times. But we do improve this paper every issue. We wont stand still as the market changes. Giving readers and advertisers the best value is our goal. Over the years we have become the marketplace for our community. And while other media might be shrinking, we are growing. at growth will continue, hand-in-hand, with our community. Well continue working for you. At Fruit Cove Middle School this year, the sports and clubs are really amazing! The boys and girls basketball teams were undefeated throughout the season and had their championship games last week. The football team is also very successful! The boys and girls soccer teams are just starting up and include very talented players. Cross country began and has three meets in November. Golf starts in the spring and volleyball starts in January. We wish all of the Flyers good luck! Mostly all of the clubs are in full swing as well. The National Junior Honor Society welcomed their new members on Tuesday, October 11. Congratulations to all of the NJHS members! Also, all of the 89 members of Drama Club were so excited to “ nd out that this years show is School House Davidson Realty recently donated equipment worth $1,500 to Allen D. Nease High School. Included in the donation were iPads and an Apple TV for the math department, and camera equipment for the Communications Academy. Davidson Realty supports local schools in the World Golf Village area with contributions to Mill Creek Elementary School, Wards Creek Elementary School, Pacetti Bay Middle School and Allen D. Nease High School. Pictured are Kyle Dresback, principal, Allen D. Nease High School; Lois Harris, PTSO president, Allen D. Nease High School; Sherry Davidson, president, Davidson Realty; Kristen Calhoun, marketing coordinator, Davidson Realty. FCMS UpdateBy Contributing Writer Sarah Jacobs, FCMS StudentRock.Ž Its sure to be a huge success! FCMS had quarter exams and a Veterans Day assembly on November 8 that included music from the band and chorus and speeches from students. The “ rst Battle of the Books meeting will be on November 10 for participating students. The Fruit Cove Wind Symphony will perform for the students at Julington Creek Elementary on November 17. Also, the Science Fair is scheduled for November 15 through 18. And who could forget Thanksgiving break starting on the November 23? Everyone at Fruit Cove is very excited for a busy November. Holiday preparations are already being made! It seems like just yesterday that school started. Fruit Cove is looking forward to another great quarter. Library System announces Food for Fines The St. Johns County Public Library System appreciates the continued support of our patrons and we would like to take this opportunity to give back to the community. Area food banks cannot meet local demand for holiday meals so, beginning Monday, November 14 the Library System will accept non-perishable food items in lieu of overdue library nes. Patrons may bring one sealed, non-expired, non-perishable food item for each $1 overdue ne. This waiver is for library nes only and does not include fees for printing, lost items, nor may it be used for credit against future nes. This project will run through Thursday, December 22, 2011 and all food collected will be given to the Mental Health Food Bank for local distribution. The general public is also encouraged to drop off their contributions at any of our library branches or bookmobile stops. For more information, please visit the Librarys website, www.sjcpls.org or contact Library Administration at 827-6925. Are you shopping for a preschool-aged child this holiday season? Look no further! Children and educators from select Goddard Schools-leaders in early childhood educationhave announced their top toy picks for infants through children six years old for the 2011 holiday shopping season. The Goddard School Toy Test is the only national toy test designed exclusively for children in the preschool age range. After a national call for submissions, Goddard School educators and children evaluated entrants based on a number of criteria, including:Votes are in: Children pick top holiday toys€ Interactive, child-initiated play focus € Creative, social or engaging € Appropriate for infants through children six years of age Our play-based FLEXT Learning Program focuses on the value of playful learning,Ž said Laura Pinover-Sadler, owner of The Goddard School located in Saint Johns. We feel that our Top 10 Toys list will serve as a great resource for parents, grandparents and other family members as they enter the gift-giving season.Ž Top 10 Preschooler-Approved Toys (in alphabetical order): € Animal Sounds Hay Ride (Learning Curve) € Bristle Block Stackadoos (B. Toys by Battat) € Citiblocs Camou” age 100 Piece Set (CitiBlocs) € Citiblocs Little Builders Rattle Blocs (CitiBlocs) € Count Your Chickens!T board game (Peaceable Kingdom) € Elemenosqueeze (B. Toys by Battat) € Hoot Owl Hoot! T board game (Peaceable Kingdom) € Little Shopper Playset (Earlyears) € Sassy Sensory Ball Set (Sassy) € Soft Chime Garden (Lamaze) For more information on the Top 10 Preschooler-Approved Toys, visit www.goddardschools.com/toys.People who are unable to motivate themselves must be content with mediocrity. ~Andrew Carnegie

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Page 26, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com Are you ready for the holidays? Your oor isnt! Clean up that summer mess.....20% o The only 2 year warranty in the industry! Call Grout Line Solutions today for a free estimate. Serving St. Augustine & Jacksonville since 2005. Grout LineSolutions 904 982 4294 20% OFF BEFORE AFTER Stephanie Summers, LMFT, P.A.12412 San Jose Blvd. Suite 402 904-268-9178 www.ssummers.com IntroducingJaneen Herskovitz, MASpecializing in counseling parents of children with special needs, including Autism Spectrum Disorder Robert Kelsey, M.D. Board Certi“ed Cardiology and Internal Medicine Robert Kelsey, M.D. Now Accepting New Patients 904-827-0078 A good Thanksgiving dinner is usually about the turkey. You dont have to be a surgeon to carve one correctly, but proper carving and slicing techniques will ensure you get the most meat from your bird and enable you to present an attractive meal to your family and friends. Follow these simple techniques for successfully carving your holiday turkey: Let your 10-pound-or-bigger turkey stand at room temperature for 10 to 20 minutes after cooking and before slicing. This allows the juices to distribute evenly throughout the turkey. Netting and cooking bags are also easier to remove after waiting.  Slice or carve the turkey on a sanitized cutting surface. The St. Johns County Education Foundation (SJCEF) has announced the Margie Davidson College Scholarship to be provided to a student who has the potential to achieve greatness, but not the “ nancial means. The scholarship will be awarded to one high school senior each year planning to attend a higher learning institution in Florida. I recently decided to check out the Riverside Arts Market for myself. I had heard many good things about it, but wasnt quite sure what to expect. After parking at one of the many business lots on or near Riverside Avenue which are made available on Saturdays for this venture, I made my way to the entrance under the canopy of the Fuller Warren Bridge. My “ rst impression was that it was much more extensive than I had anticipated. In addition to two stages and a Seating TerraceŽ overlooking the St. Johns River, there are more than 100 booths, including a Food Court,Ž Farmers RowŽ and of course many more featuring the work of dozens of artists. The Riverside Arts Market was many years in the making. It was the dream child of Wayne Wood, who had seen a similar project in Portland, Oregon. He developed su cient interest in the community, so that when the Fuller Warren Bridge was rebuilt, space was left to accommodate the venture. It “ nally opened in April of 2009 and is now open every Saturday from March to December, starting at 10:00 a.m. It enjoys as many as 5000 visitors each week! The food vendors come from many areas, including Port St. Lucie, Tampa and Waycross. They bring guaranteed home grown vegetables, home made breads, delicious bakery goods, candy and even fresh meats. EncoreA di erent way to enjoy the artsBy Betty Swenson Bergmark, Professor Emeritus, Jacksonville UniversityThe artists also come from many surrounding areas, and share their creative talents in such areas as pottery, photography, fabric design and jewelry, as well as more traditional art disciplines. In addition, they demonstrate their techniques, sharing the creation of art works as you watch. What a wonderful place to do your holiday shopping and “ nd unique hand made gifts, not to be found anywhere else. But this is not all! As one wanders up and down the aisles, one encounters street performers such as jugglers, magicians, musicians How to carve your turkey successfullyKnives, pans and covers should be sanitized, too. Resanitize boards and knives every 30 minutes. Wear disposable food-handling gloves while carving or frequently wash your hands thoroughly.  Immediately after the 10 to 20 minutes holding time, carve the turkey into major sections (i.e., breasts, thighs, drumsticks and wings).  To serve turkey hot, place sections in pans. Cover with foil or plastic lm to retain heat and moisture and to minimize the possibility of contamination. Hold at 140 degrees or higher in a hot holding device (a cabinet, steam table or bain-arie). Your turkey should be at least 140 degrees when placed in the holding pans. The heating device will only maintain temperature. A maximum holding time of 20 to 30 minutes is recommended.  Slice the sections into serving pieces, arrange them on a plate and add garnish. Enjoy!and other performing artists. In addition there are major scheduled performances on the River Stage where one can relax in the beautifully located Seating Terrace and enjoy a variety of entertainment. During the late summer and early fall, there are also Movies under the StarsŽ starting at sunset, but well have to wait until next year to enjoy that unique entertainment! In the meantime you can plan a wonderful family experience. There are activities for all ages, including a Childrens Creativity Center„and where else would you encounter a juggler as you shop for fresh food, art work or gifts? There is no charge for admission and if you need additional information you can call the parent organization, Riverside/Avondale Preservation at 389-2449 or visit the website at www.riversideartsmarket.com.Margie Davidson scholarship announcedParameters and requirements are currently being developed. For those who wish to contribute to this scholarship, checks should be made payable to the SJCEF and reference Margie Davidson on the memo line. These can be sent to the foundations address at 40 Orange Street, St. Augustine, Florida, 32084, attention Donna Lueders.got news?editor@thecreekline.com Do you know the warning signs of stroke?€ Sudden numbness or weak ness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body € Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding € Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes € Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination € Sudden severe headache with no known causeSource: Baptist Medical Center South Jacksonvilles Only Bridal Consignment Something Borrowed Something BlueNew and Once Worn Gowns and Accessories SELL SHOP ADVERTISE (904)993-6804 Email for information dreamweddingsandhoneymoons@yahoo.com December 2-4, 2011 Why wait for the mailman? View our digital edition online at www.thecreekline.com Book Discussion at the Bartram Trail Branch Library!“At Home” Monday, November 21 7 pmJoin us for a discussion of this book by Bill Bryson. New members are always welcome!

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 27 If you have a home to sell„whether your mortgage is underwater or paid off„let us show you how much of a difference our experience can make. The team at Davidson Realty has been selling homes in Northeast Floridas neighborhoods for years, through good markets and bad. Today, we have more than 30 full-time agents and a comprehensive support staff ready to put that same experience to work for you. 904-940-5000 | DavidsonRealtyInc.comTRUSTED REAL ESTATE ADVISORS.Ž EXPERIENCE THE DIFFERENCEEXPERIENCE CAN MAKE. The Florida Foreign Language Association (FFLA) 42nd annual conference was held in Cocoa Beach from October 13 through 15. Local St. Johns County School District teachers were asked to be presenters at the conference. A local teacher was the recipient of the WERSHOW Award for Excellence in Leadership in the Profession, awarded annually at the FFLA conference to a member who has demonstrated leadership at the regional, state and/or national level, served as a quality educator in his/her own right and promoted the teaching and learning of foreign languages, bilingual bicultural education, and/or English as a second language. The proud recipient is Linda Villadoniga, Creekside High School Spanish teacher, president elect of Florida Educators of Northeast Florida (FLENEF) and secretary of Florida Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese (FAATSP). I am deeply humbled and honored by this award. It is especially meaningful to me because I was nominated by Janet Robles, a colleague for whom I The Ancient City Brass Band brought the sound of music to Mill Creek Elementary School recently, when they performed for the schools second grade classes as part of the schools special WATT Wednesday programming. The musicians not only dazzled the students with their performing skills, they also included a history lesson and MCE students learn about music from local bandBy Contributing Writer Kate Dowdie, Technology Teacher, Mill Creek Elementary School Cliff Newton and Joe Jamerson of the Ancient City Brass Band show second grade students Reese Geary and Jaclyn Madson the proper way to make a sound on a brass instrument.support for the schools ongoing Character Education program. Under the direction of Cli Newton, members of the Ancient City Brass Band are local musicians who volunteered to perform for the students, encouraging music appreciation and education for all the children.Teacher honored at Spanish educators conferencehave a great deal of admiration and respect and then chosen for this tremendous honor by a committee of my peers, some of the best educators in the nation. I will continue to strive to live up to the high standards the award sets forth and continue to advocate in our e orts to provide foreign language opportunities for our students, not only in St. Johns County, but throughout Florida,Ž said Villadoniga. Donna Guzzo and Maria Janet Robles co-presented a workshop on Mexican Muralists. Villadoniga co-presented a workshop on New Generation Assessment for NGSSS. These teachers had the opportunity to attend other workshops. FFLA and/or FLENEF are a must membership for any Spanish educator. They have the sources and tools to enhance your classroom practices, right here in our state and our own backyard,Ž said Guzzo. Donna Guzzo, Linda Gillespie, Maria Janet Robles and Linda Villadoniga at the FFLA conference.Tell our valued advertisers you saw their ad in T h e C r e e k L i n e The CreekLine need customers?sales@thecreekline.com

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Page 28, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com Caring for you. Its what we do.Proudly caring for our community for five years.Drs. Townsend, DeBoer and Romero of Baptist Primary Care St. Johns Forest are backed by 24-hour care at nearby Baptist Medical Center South. Our office is your link to the most preferred health system in our region. Services include: € Sports/school physicals € Immunizations € Well visits for adults and children € Care for minor injuries € Coordination of care for chronic con ditions (diabetes,hypertension,etc.) € Womens health care Same-day appointments Ana M. Romero, MD Board-Certified, Family Medicine Richard Townsend, MD Board-Certified, Family Medicine Matthew DeBoer, DO Board-Certified, Family Medicine 824-4407Baptist Primary Care St. Johns Forest 120 Gateway Circle, Unit 1 Jacksonville, FL 32259 Stronger...Faster...Better RACE TRACK RDFLORA BRANCH BLVD. SR 13PUBLIX Fred Baldwin, PT, DPT, SCS, ATC, PES and Tobi Baldwin, PT, DPT, MS, OCS, MTC, FAAOMPTOne on One treatment sessions with a Board Certied Clinical Specialist Helping Hands of St. Johns County will be meeting on Friday, November 18 at 11:00 a.m. at Faith Community Church Community Center to “ ll Thanksgiving baskets for the Celebration Lutheran Church food bank. An anonymous benefactor has donated 30 $10 turkey gift cards so families can pick their own turkey at Winn Dixie. Helping Hands members are looking for any type of food to add to the food baskets to make the holiday complete. Any canned goods, instant potatoes, macaroni and cheese or stu ng would be appreciated. Food may be dropped o at 1180 Stonehedge Trail or email jacqphil@ aol.com for a convenient time for it to be picked up. The Sew Much Comfort Rippers will meet at 10:00 a.m. before the meeting. Over 800 stockings were distributed throughout the county for soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan and Helping Hands has been busy cutting out and sewing more to meet the demand. Stockings will be available at the St. Johns Golf and Country Club Holiday Vendor night for families to take and “ ll, but they must be returned no later than November 22 so they can reach the soldiers. If you just wish to bring items for the stockings, you may access www.stmichaelssoldiers.com for a list of items needed. The response from the community has been overwhelming and we cannot thank Winn Dixie on County The year 1912 was a banner one for Florida Henry Flagler triumphantly completed his Florida East Coast railroad from Jacksonville to Key West; it was the “ rst full season that University of Floridas football team competed as the Florida Gators; and Bernice Porter“ eld (nee Adams) was born October 17 in the Desoto Sanitorium, which became St. Vincents Hospital four years later when the Sisters of Mercy took it over. On October 17, 2011 members of The Happy Hookers knitting and crocheting charity group from San Juan del Rio Catholic Church in Switzerland gathered at Westminster Woods to celebrate Porter“ elds 99th birthday. Porter“ eld is a rarity; a native Jacksonvillian, growing up in Spring“ eld, graduating from Jackson High School and going on to earn her degree in education at the Florida State College for Women (now Florida State University) in 1934. She met her husband, Miller, on a blind date and they were married in 1934. Bernice Porter eld celebrates 99th birthday at Westminster WoodsBy Contributing Writer Penny LevyThe Porter“ elds enjoyed 70 years of marriage prior to Miller Porter“ elds death in 2004. I have to stay active,Ž Porter“ eld said. This is obvious in her energy and the bounce in her step. She has been a resident at Westminster Woods since 2002. She and her husband were avid golfers and while she no longer plays golf, she walks daily and Bernice Porter eld (in purple) and friends from Westminster WoodsHelping Hands updateBy Contributing Writer Jackie Valyou Brownie Troop 742, who worked on Stockings for a Soldier with Helping Hands.Road 210, First Florida Credit Union on County Road 210, St. Michaels Soldiers and the many organizations, Girl Scout troops, neighborhoods, book clubs, womens clubs and St. Augustine High School, our members and all of you for making this holiday special for our brave military. In addition to the Stocking for A Soldier project, several members entertained our seniors at Trout Creek with a Halloween party. Helping Hands members dressed up in Halloween costumes, visited, served lunch and presented each senior with a special Trick or Treat bag “ lled with goodies. This has become a yearly event that both members and seniors look forward to. At the October meeting, members decorated small Christmas trees which were given to patients at Community Hospice of Northeast Florida. The gaily decorated trees were in a variety of themes and are sure to delight both children and adults. Helping Hands is a non-denominational group that meets once a month at Faith Community Church Community Center on County Road 210 to do a small project for the community. Membership is always open and there are no dues, o cers or stress. Members come when they can and do what they can. The group relies solely on donations of goods and services from the community. Please contact jacqphil@aol.com for more information.she uses her communitys 18hole putting course regularly. As a member of The Happy Hookers, Porter“ eld knits items such as baby blankets for charity. The Happy Hookers meet the third Monday of every month at Westminster Woods. Snookie Netting, the groups leader said, We expect to be celebrating Bernices 100th birthday next year!Ž Happy Thanksgiving!from your friends at The CreekLine!

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 29 A CONNECTING CHURCH Our Sunday Services Traditional Worship 8:30am Sunday School 9:45am Contemporary Worship 11:00amwww.switzerlandcommunitychurch.org The Last NoelŽ Christmas Cantata Worship TimeContemporary 9:30 a.m. Childrens Church, Middle and High School Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Nursery Care AvailableReaching Out Offering Christ Living Gods Love(904) 230-2955 Of“cewww.ROLUMC.com R i v e r L ifeo UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Open Hearts Open Minds ~Open Doors The People of the United Methodist Church “Thank-you!” Our Pumpkin Patch and Fall Festival were a HUGE success! Pastor Caseys new Sermon Series for November: Into the Promise LandThis series of sermons will investigate the journey of Gods people from wandering in the wilderness to entering the promise land in the Old Testament.We will learn insights into the story and reect on some of the parallels between that story and our personal stories. Key ideas: Faith, Hope, Courage, and Trust.We wish all of you a Blessed Thanksgiving. Join us this Christmas Season.Advent begins November 27 St Francis In-The-FieldEpiscopal ChurchChristian Formation 9:00am Sunday Service 10:00amChildrens Chapel and Nursery Available895 Palm Valley Rd (1 mile east of US1)615-2130 Thanksgiving is coming, followed by 32 days full of family, celebration... tradition. Pick up any magazine this month, from Real Simple to Family Fun and youll “ nd articles touting new, better, more. Better decorations, special family moments and recipes promise to revitalize your worn-out Holiday Traditions. New can be fun... but new practices arent traditions yet. While new, better and more always promise glitz, they often add up to holiday stress and clutter instead. Traditions are called traditions precisely because they form a link to the past. One value of tradition is that it is a celebration of sameness, not change.Ž writes Dr. Richard Swenson in The Overload Syndrome. I love creating memories with our family. Ive scoured blogs for new ideas and have multiple Pinterest boards dedicated to the holidays. I guess you could say I have a tradition of developing new traditions. Dr. Swensons insight has brought balance to my insatiable quest for better. There is no remembrance of former things,Ž Ecclesiastes 1:11 warns. Im listening! Slow down and enjoy today, remember the great times past and allow the routine to be a salve to a busy soul instead of being driven to scramble after some Following is an interview with Adam Flynt, lead pastor of The Crossing Church, talking about the upcoming holidays. As things head into the holidays, what are you seeing? I love this time of year, dont you? All the food, music, parties! But it can be tough, too. So many of us want to have that perfect family meal or have Christmas morning go just the way we always imagined. Thats a lot of pressure that can mess with an otherwise perfectly happy family. So what do we do to combat the pressure of perfectionŽ these holidays? Thats the big question isnt it? Why do I feel the need to throw the perfect party? Does going into debt for piles of gifts really make things better? What about all the crazy family dynamics? The typical answer is plan better, budget more and start buying in January. Im all for calendars and Quicken, but what were talking about goes deeper.Meet The Crossing Churchs Adam FlyntFaith Corner: Tell us about what The Crossing is doing to answer that this season? We dont want to just jam everyones iCal with more running around. First, Id encourage families to block out space to simply be together. On November 20, were starting a four part series called Christmas VacationŽ (Im a huge Chevy Chases Christmas Vacation fan) to talk about the pressure of perfection around the holidays. Also, have you heard about the huge Community Christmas Celebration on December 22? What is the Community Christmas Celebration? The evening will have a really fun, meaningful service at 6:30 p.m. at Fruit Cove Middle School. Everyones invited! There will be a great band. There will be childcare for infants-preschoolers. Afterwards there will be free hayrides, giant in” atables, hot chocolate and time to connect with neighbors. Its jokingly called Christmas Eve, Eve, Eve.Ž Checkout www. tccjax.org for all the details. Purposeful ParentingTraditions revised... or notBy Allie Olsenelusive perfection that doesnt even exist. Again in The Overload Syndrome, Dr. Swenson instructs busy Americans to look to routines not to add spice to life, but to add a much needed and pleasurable stability. These routines are called programmed decisions, and they cut down greatly on decision stress.Ž During the busy holiday season, doesnt everyone want to reduce stress?! Look to favorite memories of the past or carefully schedule your holiday to-dos to develop family history. Your Thanksgiving menu and the way you give thanks to God may be your family anchor for the holiday. Outdoor games, family singing, a football game, Grandpas prayer, going through the Black Friday ads, bringing a pie to the “ re station... what makes your Thanksgiving uniquely yours? Tried and true traditions can be meaningful, memorable respites in the busy instability of life. Dr. Swenson suggests that these family memories do more than alleviate the burden of choice and de-clutter schedules. He calls traditions a valuable anchor for the soul.Ž May your soul “ nd rest this holiday season and your thanks be genuine to the One who gives every good and perfect gift (James 1:17). Happy Thanksgiving. Ca ll L inda Gay to reserve your spa c e today. D ire c t L ine: 287-4913 or E-M ai l : l g @ rtpub l ishingin c c om I nvite the Community to Y our Ho l iday E vents A dvertise in T he Cree kL ine D e c ember I ssue C a ll L i n d a G ay to reserve your spa c e to d ay D ire c t L ine: 287-4913 or E-M ai l : l g @ rtpub l ishin g in c c om Peanut Butter Jelly or jam Cereal/Oatmeal Canned Pasta Canned Stew/Chili Canned pasta Soup Canned fruit/veggies Toilet PaperChrist’s Cupboard Food Pantry Wish ListChrist’s Cupboard is located at Celebration Lutheran Church, 810 Roberts Road. Call 230-2496 for info!Christ’s Cupboard serves anyone in need. Hours are 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday

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Page 30, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com Congratulations for reading this adRECEIVERSHIP Most homes and businesses in Mandarin’s 32223 and 32258 zip codes receive this paper. READERSHIP Awesome readership, because our papers are providing what readers need. BUYERS Our readers make buying decisions from our free paper advertising and editorial—people like you .The right choice...here to stay Ask your representative for our complete audit numbers. Local numbers gladly provided.You have heard the daily newspaper numbers... “Layoffs” ... “Less news published” ... “Local is gone” — etc.” Here are some important independently-owned, community paper numbers:98.6% 83.2% 83.2% Circulation audit by Proud Member of THE FOLLOWING ADS HAVE NOT BEEN SCREENED BY THE SOUTHEASTERN ADVERTISING PUBLISHERS ASSOCIATION (SAPA); Therefore, any discrepancies thereof shall not be the responsibility of the aforementioned association. 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Shipping Paid Hablamos espanol 1-800-266-0702 www.selldiabeticstrips.com As of Sunday, November 6, landscape irrigation returned to no more than one day a week across the 18 counties of the St. Johns River Water Management District. Eastern Standard Time began November 6, marking the third year of district wide oneday-per-week watering restrictions during Floridas cooler months. Watering restrictions are designed to allow enough water to maintain healthy landscapes year-round and also to ensure the e cient use of water for landscape irrigation by specifying the days and time of day when watering may occur and the amount of water that may be applied. Conservation is among the most important strategies to help meet Floridas water supply needs for today and the future,Ž said Michael Register, director of the Districts Department of Regulatory Services. The majority of people in our District are doing their part to save water by adhering to the restrictions, recognizing that water conservation can be easy and making a tremendous impact on how much water is conserved. The e cient use of water can save thousands of gallons of water per month and often delivers money savings as well.Ž With more than half of commercial and residential One-day-a-week landscape irrigation resumes in NovemberBy Contributing Writer Teresa H. Monson, St. Johns River Water Management Districtwater use occurring outdoors, mandatory watering restrictions are in place throughout the year within the Districts region to ensure the e cient use of water for lawn and landscape irrigation. Watering wisely promotes healthier lawns and landscapes and conserves Floridas water resources. During the warmer months of daylight saving time, irrigation is allowed up to twice a week. When Eastern Standard Time is in e ect, outdoor irrigation is limited to no more than one day a week on the following schedule: € Saturday at addresses that end in an odd number or have no address € Sunday at addresses that end in an even number € Tuesday at nonresidential addresses € No irrigation is allowed between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. In addition, irrigation is limited to three-quarters of an inch of water per irrigation zone and to no more than one hour per irrigation zone. The restrictions apply to water withdrawn from ground or surface water, from a private well or pump or from a public or private water utility. Irrigation limitations apply to all landscape irrigation not currently regulated by a consumptive use permit, which typically includes residential, commercial and industrial establishments. Golf courses, plant nurseries, agricultural crops, and sports recreational areas generally have consumptive use permits that specify their irrigation limitations. When daylight saving time returns on March 11, 2012, landscape irrigation will return to the two-day-a-week schedule. More details and information about exceptions is available on the Districts watering restrictions web page. Friends of the LibraryBOOK SALESat. Nov. 12 9:30 AM Noon Bartram Trail Branch Library Support our ne advertisers!They ensure that The CreekLine arrives in your mailbox each month!886-4919 € sales@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 31 The CreekLine Marketplace ads!886-4919 Community MarketplaceAttention Small Businesses!!!For just $39 per issue you can reach 23,000+ addresses (min. of 6 issues) Call 886-4919 today! New Classi“ ed Rates!Place your classi ed online today! Online classi ed ads are FREE!www.thecreekline.com LOCAL Classi eds Thank you to these ne advertisers for providing this convenience to our readers !Need an extra copy of The CreekLine?Visit one of our pickup locations! € Memorial Building ~ Mandarin € VyStar Credit Union ~ Julington Creek Branch € The UPS Store ~ Fruit Cove € The UPS Store ~ WGV € JCP Property Owners O ce € Bartram Trail Branch Library € Baptist South Hospital ~ Outpatient Registration Massage Therapy Alicia Hunter LMTOnly $50 an hour #MM12329/MA53865 Neuromuscular Therapy ( 904 ) 514 5788www.hunter l mt. c omA New U Massage located in San Jose Office Center, Next to Sonny’s and Ace Hardware $5 OFF with this ad. Help WantedGraphic Designer Part-Time Position Available – Seeking experienced graphic designer. Familiarity with the following software programs: Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, WORD, Power Point and EXCEL. Must be a very organized “self starter” who can manage deadlines, pleasant phone skills. The preferred candidate will have a strong creative background. Prep-press and agency experience a plus. The ability to take a project from idea to nished concept is a must. Must be able to multi-task and complete projects on deadline. Previous experience in ad design in media or publishing industry preferred. This position is part-time. Contact rt@rtpublishinginc.com St. Johns Eye Associats CR210 West. Optometric Technician with great personaltity & strong computer skills. Saturday hours 9-1 pm are a requirement. Please email resume to sjeacontactlens@yahoo.com The UPS Store in Fruit Cove: Part-time Service Associate. Must be 18 or older and able to work weekdays and some Saturdays. Retail experience and working knowledge of MS Of ce Suite preferred; graphics design skills are a big plus. 230-8881. Panache in Julington Creek is interviewing experienced & talented Stylists to join our team. Do you enjoy working in a professional, clean & successful environment? Apply at www.getpanache. com or stop in 2758 Racetrack Road #403 HELP WANTED! If you like music (and other arts) and would like to volunteer to support a non-pro t organization bringing music to the community, please call 374 8639 Join the Baptist South circle of care. Visit e-baptisthealth.com for the most up to date list of job openings. Listings are updated daily and change often. If you have any questions, please call Human Resources at 271.6078. Seeking Licensed Massage Therapist @ A New U Massage(MM12329) Mandarin furnished massage room available NOW. Room rent is $375+ 7% tax ($401.25) a month. Rent can split w/other LMT. Phone: 904-288-0064. Pet Sitting Company – Part time – work with pets. Applicant must live in the International Golf Parkway area. Flexible hours. Adult applicants only. Call Robin at 687-9610 www.allearspetsitting.com (904) 687-9610 Bonded, Insured & Affordable www.axiomphotos.com Aordable family and event photography Call: 904-673-0091 Debbie’s Home Cleaning Services Home e rvice s Local, honest, dependable individual offering local area home cleaning services. Call for FREE estimate! “I’ll do the cleaning so you don’t have to!”Home 829-2275Cell 707-9472License No. 42295 Change Your Body T ransform Y our L ife. Dont Loose weight. L oose F at. Gain lean muscle.904.3 15 .8280Visit http://nonibaby.tbioactive.com Professional Computer ServicesBusiness & ResidentialFor more details, visit us at:www.itpromise.com I.T. Promise Inc. Computer Services( 904 ) 287-2254 at Fruit Cove287-0601 Housecleaning 207-5674 Klean Spray Pressure Washing 631 273110% OFF1st time customers MB SPORTS your purchase of $25 or more $5 OFF GATORS GEORGIA JAGUARS MUCH FSU LSU STEELERS MUCH ALABAMA GIANTS EAGLES MORE8221-13 Southside Blvd., Jacksonville, Www.shopmbsports.com Corner Southside & Baymeadows FREE ONLINE CLASSIFIED ADSGo towww.thecreekline.comand click onFree Online Classi ed Ads Seeking Sitters is looking for reliable and trustworthy babysitters for on-call babysitting jobs. Great contract rate and exible scheduling. Must be 18 yrs or older, have veri able child-care experience and willing to obtain CPR and First Aid certi cation. Apply at www.seekingsitters.com Chair Rental opening in a busy salon in Mandarin area. Please call Joanne at Cher Chez 268-6199 or 502-6392 Chiropractor’s of ce looking for: Front desk reception, Full time, Must have computer skills, fast learner, Very friendly/outgoing, ling, Good phone skills, Bruce Sambursky, D.C. fax resume to 683-4378 or email samburskychiro@comcast. net Booth renter or commission, De Javu salon, Full service hair skin nails teeth whitening Seeking experienced hair and nail professionals to join our team. Over 2800sf great locationMust be a team player. De Javu salon 11018 old at Augustine Rd 904-463-7799 Www.dejavujax.comO ce Space for Rent1,2, or 3 quiet professional of ces for rent in south Mandarin on San Jose Blvd. $250 to $350 per of ce per month including utilities. For information call (904) 861-5233 or (904) 613-8807.For SaleDining Room Set for sale Ethan Allen Birchwood 9-piece dining room set, Includes glass-door china cabinet, buffet, 6 chairs, 70” rectangular dinning table with 2 additional leaves, 2-sided custom-made table cover, and custom sleeves for leaves. Unique Bisque nish. Excellent condition. All for $3800 or best offer. Call Kathy 612-3493 ServicesINFANT/TODDLER-Care. My Home (JCP) 20 years experience, References available (904) 294-3794. Care PRIVATE MATH TUTOR: Grades 6-12 (all areas), College Algebra & Trigonometry as well. Reasonable rates. Will travel to your location. One half hour free with rst lesson. STATE CERTIFIED ELIGIBLE MATH GRADES 6-12. 20 years experience. Call Karen Alber 904-669-4477.Wanted ItemsConsign your wedding items 904-993-6804 Seventy-“ ve current and former students at The Bolles School earned the designation of AP Scholar by the College Board in recognition of their exceptional achievement on the collegelevel Advanced Placement Program Exams taken in 2011.As a group, 92 percent scored a 3 or higher, with 75 percent receiving scores of 4 or higher, and 44 percent receiving scores of 5. The College Boards Advanced Placement Program o ers students the opportunity to take challenging college-level courses while still in high school, and to receive college credit, advanced placement or both for successful performance on the AP Exams.The College Board recognizes several levels of achievement based on students performance on AP exams. At Bolles, seven students quali“ ed for the National AP Scholar Award by earning an average grade of 4 or higher on all AP Exams taken and grades of 4 or higher on eight or more of these exams. These students are also included among the AP Scholar with Distinction Award recipients. Thirty-one Bolles students quali“ ed for the AP Scholar with Distinction Award by earning an average grade of at least 3.5 on all AP Exams taken and Seventyve Bolles students earn 2011 AP Scholar Awardsgrades of 3 or higher on “ ve or more of these exams. Fifteen students quali“ ed for the AP Scholar with Honor Award by earning an average grade of at least 3.25 on all AP Exams taken, and grades of 3 or higher on four or more of these exams. Twenty-nine students quali“ ed for the AP Scholar Award by completing three or more AP Examinations with grades of 3 or higher. The following list includes Bolles graduates from the class of 2011 as well as students who currently remain enrolled at the School. The current students, who took the exams as juniors, are noted with an asterisk. Now seniors at Bolles, the current students may complete another year of college-level work and possibly earn another AP Scholar Award. The Bolles School 2011 AP ScholarsAP National Scholars Matthew Howell William Leeser Daniel Leichus William Pilcher Ajay Shro Robert Wulbern Nicholas Zakoske AP Scholars with Distinction Claire Alexander Edgar Aranda-Michel Sophia Array Connor Brown Montana Buss Rebecca Chandler Alora Clark Max Fleisher Matthew Howell Jennifer Hum Michal Hyde Lewis Lee William Leeser Daniel Leichus Patrick Murphy William Pilcher Shayne Polley Jessi Ponder Gabrielle Ragazzo *Azeem Rathore Scott Rice Max Rogozinski Eilis Ryan Ajay Shro Ryan Smith Morgan Sutter Alisa White Conor White Robert Wulbern Cen Xu Nicholas Zakoske AP Scholars with Honors Jenna Bartol Jun Hwan Cho Ruth Curry Clements Madison Fox Spencer Joel *Emily Keator Alen Koren Brennen Lutz Geo rey McQueen Paul Numbers Jack Richards Morgan Siewert Jessica Staley Eric Vanden Noort *Ashley Walters *Current studentsCheck out our community webpages!www.thecreekline.com Community Calendar High School Football Blog

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Page 32, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com Grow Stronger, Live longer! Yoga Den Studio First Class Free Group & Private Lessons Don’t miss the 9th Annual Turkey Day Detox! Preregistration required www.yoga-den.com 268-8330 2929 Plummer Cove Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32223 Located in Mandarin, just south of I-295 across from Walmart Yoga Basics Mind Body Power Yoga Yogalates Teacher Training Tree WorkbyMitch Drake & Sons (904) 703-5040 (904) 287-3819Licensed, Insured & Workmans Comp Over 35 Years Experience Check out our reviews and 5 Star rating at Yellowbook.com! This months movie review belongs to the “ lm Real Steel, an action packed science-“ ction “ lm great for kids and adults. Somewhere in the future, robot boxing takes the place of live human boxing as the public searches for greater sensationalism and matches that are more dangerous. Hugh Jackman portrays a down-on-hisluck boxing promoter, Charlie Kenton. While trying to recover from the recent loss of his last robot, he is informed that the son he abandoned has lost his mother. As it happens, his exsister-in-law is seeking custody and happens to have a husband with a heavy wallet. For a price, Charlie agrees to take in his 11-year-old son, Max Kenton, played by Dakota Goyo, for the summer. Charlie tends to go through (NewsUSA) Everyone experiences changes in their eyesight as they age. For many, it means buying reading glasses to read a menu, newspaper or other small print. According to the American Lighting Association (ALA), changing the lighting in your surroundings can go a long way to enhance reading ability and increase comfort. Often, the “ rst thing people notice as they get older is their loss of ability to see distance,Ž notes Terry McGowan, director of engineering and technology for ALA and owner of Lighting Ideas in Cleveland. That happens around age 45 and is called presbyopia. By 60, most people have a “ xed focus optical system and need glasses. After age 60, eye and visual system changes accelerate, so that less light reaches the eye. Therefore, people need more light to see details as they age.Ž Paul Eusterbrock, president of Holkoetter International, a lighting manufacturer that has championed lighting developments and products to help aging eyes, agrees. The main issue is the quality of light,Ž he says. Research shows that a 60-year-old needs twice as much light as a 30-year-old. Most of the commonly found Julington Creek Plantation CDD is o ering two opportunities to spend some quality time with Santa Claus in December. First, on Saturday, December 3 from 10:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m., Santa will be greeting children in the lobby of the JCP Recreation Movie ReviewReal SteelDirected by: Shawn Levy. Starring: Hugh Jackman, Evangeline Lilly and Dakota Goyo. Review by T.G. StantonGood Movie, Glad to Have Seen It (4 out of 5) money like other people go through water in the summer, so, they are soon again in need of a moneymaking robot “ ghter. After searching the robot graveyard, they “ nd one of the early robots and start training what seems to be an unlikely winner. With a little help from gym manager Bailey Tallet, depicted by Evangeline Lilly and a few spare parts left from previous bots, this sparring robot may have a chance. His opponents are newer bigger and stronger, but sometimes tougher is better and sometimes operator technique helps. During all of the action and drama, Charlie also comes to know his son and changes may be in his future. Shawn Levy directed this family action “ lm as a feel good “ lm that has you rooting for the underdog from the beginning Santa Claus is coming soon!By Contributing Writer Linda DeBlois, Special Events Director, Julington Creek Plantation CDDLighting can be your eyes best friend as you agelighting guidelines are written with the 30-year-old user in mind.Ž Is there a magic light bulb that will work for everyone? McGowan and Eusterbrock say no. This may sound strange, but the perfect bulb is whichever one the user “ nds works best for them,Ž McGowan says. Individual vision varies so much „especially as people age„that its di cult to develop lighting recipes that are onesize-“ ts-all.Ž Whether you are old or young, the basic rules of good lighting apply: have su cient illumination with little or no glare and use di used lighting to minimize shadows. If energy savings is a concern, McGowan recommends selecting compact ” uorescent lights (CFLs) and LED bulbs with warm tones (look for 2700-3000K on the box) and a high color-rendering index of 90 or more. For expert advice from a certi“ ed lighting consultant (CLC) or accredited lighting specialist (LS), stop by an ALAmember lighting showroom. They will help you save time, frustration and money. To “ nd a store near you, go to www. americanlightingassoc.com. and throughout. Sometimes that is Charlie, sometimes Max and at other times the robot named Atom. Another feature of this “ lm is the robots that were built in real life and computer generated; they provide the majority of the action. Dakota Goyo holds his own with Hugh Jackman and is endearing as the child who teaches his father not only what he was missing but how to develop responsibility. Hugh Jackman was also a pleasure to see in this new role: con-man promoter, redeemable and teachable, but also a “ ghter who is getting a second chance at being a winner and a father. Multiple other characters add depth and drama to the “ lm. Anyone who ever played Rock em-Sock em Robots will enjoy this “ lm in addition to the emotion evoked from the story. The CreekLineis YOUR Community Newspaper! Send us your community news!editor@thecreekline.com Center to hear holiday wishes and take photos. This is an opportunity to skip the long lines and expense of the local malls. You may take your own photos or purchase a photo package from the JCP photographer. Then, imagine the surprise when Santa Claus knocks at your front door! On weekends in December, Santa will be making special visits to homes throughout Julington Creek Plantation. The Recreation Center will be booking these visits starting November 14. The average stay will be 10 minutes, enough time for Santa to quickly listen to what the children would like for Christmas, have a few pictures taken and then be on his merry way. Each child will receive a special surprise from Santa and the cost is $25 per house. This magical visit promises to be a memory the kids will never forget. For further information or to register for a Santa Home Visit, please go to www.jcpcdd.org.Do you know the warning signs of stroke?€ Sudden numbness or weak ness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body € Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding € Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes € Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination € Sudden severe headache with no known causeSource: Baptist Medical Center South

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 33 Medicare open enrollment is the one time each year to make changes to your insurance plan. During open enrollment, you can compare physicians, hospitals and bene“ts of other plans and switch to a plan that meets your personal healthcare needs. Are you seeing the right doctor? For expert medical care right in your own backyard, consider a University of Florida primary care physician. UF primary care physicians care about the well-being of their patients and take the time to get to know their medical history. UF primary care physicians practice in more than 20 locations across the First Coast. UF primary care physicians have access to hundreds of UF specialist physicians and all the resources of an academic health center. UF primary care practices have received national designation as Patient-Centered Medical Homes. They are the “rst and only health organizations in Northeast Florida, as well as the only academic medical group in Florida, to receive this designation. Important Information about Medicare Open Enrollment www.UFmedicarejax.comUF primary care centers currently accept: WellCare Health Plans 1-888-888-9355 (TTY/TDD: 1-877-247-6272) Aetna Medicare Advantage HMO Plan 1-800-832-2640 (TTY/TDD: 1-888-760-4748) Traditional Medicare 1-800-633-4227 (TTY/TDD: 1-877-486-2048) 2011 Patient-Centered Medical Home MEDICARE OPEN ENROLLMENT ENDS DEC 7, 2011

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Page 34, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com THE PATIENT OR PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE S, EXAMINATIONS OR TREATMENT.Dr. Bruce SamburskyChiropractic PhysicianOver 22 Years of Experience SPECIAL OFFER Must present this ad to receive offer. Not Valid with any other offers. Expires 12/10/11 Sambursky Chiropractic, LLC683-4376 Immediate same day appointments available. Including Saturdays! We are happy to welcome to our oce Jane Moore, Licensed Massage Therapist LIC#0023441 .12421 San Jose Blvd. #300 (just South of Solantic )Serving the Mandarin and Julington Creek area.www.backbonejax.comINITIAL EXAMINATIONONLY $59 (NORMAL VALUE $120 VALUE) Stop suering from: Julington Creek Animal Walk is a state-of-the-art pet boarding facility for dogs, cats, and exotics providing: Your pet will “ nd a welcoming retreat at our 9-acre, fenced, off-leash dog park featuring a bone-shaped swimming pool and our NE Floridas Premier Luxury Pet Resort, Dog Park and SpaConveniently located next to Julington Creek Animal Hospital Stop by for a tour and receive a coupon for a free daily park pass Aordable small dog luxury oasis. Please call for details. Veterinarian Owned and Operated The St. Augustine Art Association recently collected 70 pairs of shoes during a monthlong Steppin Up for KidsŽ Shoe Drive, held in partnership with St. Johns County Communities in Schools. The childrens shoes were donated by gallery visitors who toured Don Trousdells Walk in PeaceŽ exhibit, a collection of paintings and gra ti-style shoes that chronicled the symbolism and history of peace. The athletic shoes will be distributed to students in economically disadvantaged areas of the county. Cash donations amounting to $350, also collected at the Art Association during the drive, will help pay for additional footwear needs. Every fall, we take children of all ages to Wal-Mart to buy them shoes,Ž said Kathy Drake, executive director of Communities in Schools, a non-pro“ t organization. This shoe drive will go a long way to help the families and students that come through our program.Ž Were very grateful to the community for making this effort a success,Ž said Elyse Brady, administrator of the St. Augustine Art Association. Working The third annual Orthopaedic Associates of St. Augustine Golf Tournament was held on Tuesday, October 11 at the St. Johns Golf and Country Club. The tournament, which welcomed 112 golfers, raised $20,000 to bene“ t The Good Samaritan Health Centers Wild” ower Clinic in St. Augustine. Lynnette Horwath, executive director of the Good Samaritan Health Centers, expressed her gratitude at the awards luncheon, This donation of almost $20,000 will cover the cost of clinic operations for over a month. This has a huge impact on a small clinic like ours.Ž The annual golf tournament is just one of many ways in Community steps up for kids in Walk in PeaceŽ exhibitwith a visionary like Don Trousdell who can make change happen through his art is really quite extraordinary.Ž More than 800 people visited Walk in PeaceŽ while it was installed in the Main Gallery of the Art Association. The exhibit, which spawned other community events including a 10th Anniversary 9/11 Tribute and collaborative Peace Pole project, is expected to travel to other venues and museums worldwide. The St. Augustine Art Association, located at 22 Marine Street, is a non-pro“ t arts organization, founded in 1924 to promote art excellence through education, exhibitions and community outreach. For more information, please call 824-2310 or visit www.staaa.org. Elyse Brady, St. Augustine Art Association; Don Trousdell, Walk in PeaceŽ artist, Kathy Drake, Communities in Schools executive director Congratulations to the CFL PW Black Knights Pop Warner Football who won the Jacksonville City Championship on October 29 at First Coast High School. They are playing in regionals in early November in Lake City! Black Knights win championshipWild ower Clinic bene ts from golf tournamentwhich the doctors of Orthopaedic Associates of St. Augustine are committed to giving back to their local community. About the Wild ower Clinic: Good Samaritan Health Centers, Inc., has been providing free medical and dental services to the St. Augustine community since 1998. The Wildower Clinic, a new 1,500 square foot clinic, was recently built to serve the medical and dental needs of the uninsured community of St. Johns County. The clinic serves uninsured county residents with an income at or below 200 percent of Federal Poverty Guidelines. The Wild ower Clinic sees over 2,500 patients annually, many of who have no other option but to go to the Emergency Room. Everybody reads The CreekLine Shouldn’t your ad be included?sales@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 35 33% OFF ( Our Regular Price or any competitor's Regular Price ) BIG GREEN SALE! THE BIGGEST SALE OF PLANT MATERIAL IN FLORIDA CONTRACTORS WELCOME Trout Creek Location at World Golf VillageOVER 45 ACRES OF PLANT MATERIAL WITH HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF S J&NURSERY & LANDSCAPING W orl d d d Go Go Go Go Go Go Go G G G Go Go Go Go Go l l l lf lf lf lf lf lf lf lf lf V i G IN GOD WE TRUST TOTAL LANDSCAPES DESIGN & INSTALLATION SODDING & IRRIGATION DEBRIS REMOVAL Free Estimate & Consultation! 50% OFF All Crepe Myrtles 500 + to Choose FromHuge Inventory To Select From Free sod Barbara Lee Studios All is well in the world of Creekside sports and the horizons are mostly bright. The football and volleyball teams are both having some of the best seasons in school history. The volleyball team just won their conference match against Nease and the football team is challenging long-time rival Ponte Vedra for division supremacy. The varsity football team is holding at a school best 5-1. The Knights have been playing impressive football lately. Their o ense, led by junior Adam Sandin, has been absolutely phenomenal. In just two weeks the Knights put up a total of 88 points, 41 in a 41-31 thriller against Episcopal and 47 in a 47-18 win over Pedro Menendez. In the game against Pedro Menendez, the Knights scored all 47 point in the “ rst half setting a new school record for most points in a single half. The Knights are 2-0 in the district and pending a win against Matanzas in their homecoming Good news„it is o cially fall and the “ shing still remains great in our area of the St. Johns River. From downtown Jacksonville to Green Cove and in between (thats us), those great catches weve experienced most of the year are still to be had. There are plenty of croaker and yellowmouth to be caught in the holes and shell beds, along with sea trout, ” ounder, red“ sh black drum and sheepshead around docks and bridges. Live and dead shrimp is the bait of choice for this “ shing smorgasbord, but cut bait, live “ nger mullet and quartered blue crab will also produce some nice catches. Now is the time to be planning your “ shing trip as seasonal conditions could slow down or even bring to a halt this fabulous “ shing till spring. Fortunately we live along a diverse part of the river that likes to keep on giving. Fishing doesnt end over the winter months here; it just changes. Instead of targeting croaker, trout and reds, we are now heading out for speckled perch (crappie), cat“ sh and stripers. On warmer, milder days expect a decent bream bite along with a largemouth bass or two. Speckled perch along with striped bass can be caught on the coldest of days. Striped bass are also known to often bite best on the ugliest of days. Downtown, Doctors Lake, Buckman, Black Creek and Shands Bridges will be your best bet for stripers. Deep holes around bends in Julington, Durbin and Trout Creeks should be some of the better gathering spots for speckled perch. Save the short sleeve days for bream, cat“ sh and bass, “ shing shallow water, docks and lily pads. Not many people live in With almost three months into the new school year, the fall sports are in full swing at Nease. Many of these sports are on the right track to achieving their goals; whether it is districts, regionals or states, the hard-working Panthers continue striving for success. And the intensity of the teams is something unmatched by any other. The volleyball team has a winning record, 12-8, which is excellent. Taking into account a new coaching sta and the loss of six seniors (from last year), this rebuilding year is going extremely well for the new, young team. Sadie Thurston, a sophomore, energetically thanks, the new coaching sta thats helped us along the way!Ž The team has beaten some of the harder teams, like Creekside and these good victories have boosted the morale of the volleyball girls. For the swimming and diving team, the goal is to take as many people as possible to districts. And they have a good chance of accomplishing that, because there have been no inju-game, will be tied with Ponte Vedra going into their late October game for the district lead. This all however depends on both teams maintaining their current performances, which doesnt seem too hard for the pair to do. The October 28 showdown is expected to be one of the most electrifying in school history. Since both Ponte Vedra and Creekside opened the same year, they fast became inevitable rivals. The rivalry has burned hot for the past three years across all sports, with football, volleyball and lacrosse being the most intense. Last year when the football teams played a brawl broke out on the “ eld between the two and had to be broken up by coaches. This year the game is being held at Ponte Vedra and the winner of the game will most likely win the division. Both teams have put up similar numbers all season making the game on paper look like a close one. Creekside is sure to bring their massive student section to the game taking the edge o the Sharks home “ eld advantage. The last four games of the season are area rivals Matanzas, Ponte Vedra, Nease and “ nally Bartram. The varsity volleyball team is also doing well. Their record is 16-5 but they are 4-0 in the league. They most recently beat Nease for the conference title and have a four game lead over the Bartram Bears who are 1-3 in the league. They are in line to win district title this year. The girls are ranked seventh overall in the state out of 78 schools in the same division. The girls are looking sharp going into the end of the season. Wrestling and soccer have both started their tryouts recently as we gear up for our winter sports. Go Knights!Editors Note: For the most recent football scores and updates, please visit www.thecreekline.com and view our High School Football blog, where our high school writers post game recaps for each of their schools home football games.CHS Sports RoundupBy Grant Piper, CHS StudentCaptain Davids Fishing ReportBy Captain David Lifkaries so far! A lot of the freshmen have potential to make the team excellent, although many seniors will be leaving this year. Districts is coming up soon and the both the boys and girls swim teams are de“ nitely prepared to win. The cross country team is doing incredibly well. There have been no injuries and senior Mac Reynolds has broken the school record-again; with a time of 15:22, hes the fastest runner at our school (5k race). The team had their pre-state race and now hopes to qualify for districts, then regions, then states. The girls and boys of cross country are some of the most determined athletes at Nease and the teamwork and support has been clearly visible throughout the season. The football team at Nease has had a rough start to their season, as their record is 2-5. However, the team still has time to improve their record and the last games of the season will be make-or-break for the team. The pride of the Nease Panthers football, though, has stayed strong and the fans never faltered from cheering them on at the games.Nease Sports RoundupBy Elena Castello, Nease Studentan area where year round “ shing exists without having to drill a hole in the ice. This winter when you feel the urge to escape the house and get outdoors, give the St. Johns or one its tributaries a try and you might be pleasantly surprised. Fishing Report: Croaker and yellowmouth are big and plentiful. Marker 18 and Buckman Bridge should provide plenty of action. Anything goes on docks with live bait. On any day red“ sh, croakers, trout and ” ounder. Fish moving tides. Whether you catch one, some or none, the family time spent “ shing will last a lifetime. Specialized Care for the individual with Alzheimer’s or similar memory loss. Almost HomeDAYBREAKAdult Day Care 731-4002License #9109M–F 7am–6pmwww.almosthomedaybreak.com 3604 Cardinal Point Drive Jacksonville, FL 32257-5581 On November 19, 2011, at 10:15 a.m. in the St. Johns County Main Library, awardwinning writers Je Swesky and Nancy Quatrano will present an interactive workshop about ghostwriting memoirs, at the Ancient City Chapter-Flori-Ghostwriting up close: Writing on contractda Writers Association meeting. The Main Library is located at 1960 North Ponce de Leon Boulevard in St. Augustine. There are many ways to make writing lucrative. Journalists write for hire, as do copywriters for ad and publicity “ rms. And then there is ghostwriting. People from 18 to 100 have fascinating stories to tell. Ghostwriting contracts can vary from no author credit and a paycheck, to payment with full credit for the work. And, as Swesky and Quatrano will reveal, an incredible journey and experience is involved with writing those books for other people. To make it easy to understand, Swesky has developed a checklist-type guide as a handout. This program is presented in partnership with the Friends of the Main Library, St. Johns County and the Ancient City Chapter, Florida Writers Association (ACC-FWA). The ACC-FWA meets the third Saturday of every month at the Main Library. Meetings are free and open to writers of all genres. For more information regarding the local chapter or the FWA organization, please contact the group at accfwa@ gmail.com.

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Page 36, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com Unlimited t raining included. Access to a eet of boats in Jacksonville and St. Augustine as well as over 60 locations across the country. Call us about trade ins.Call today 1-888-684-2214 Aordable Boating Without the Hassle.Located at Julington Creek Marina in Jacksonville and Camachee Cove Yacht Harbour in St. Augustine No Maintenance!No Insurance!No Cleaning!No Storage!www.freedomboatclub.com Dr. Gus J. Gari D.D.S. To Schedule an appointment call287-0033 Teeth enamel discoloration can be caused by staining, aging, or chemical damage to your teeth. Some of the more common causes of teeth discoloration are red wine, coffee, tea, sodas or cigarettes. Teeth whitening can be used to correct discoloration of the teeth by removing the yellow and brown staining that builds up over the years. Teeth whitening is an easy solution with lasting results and minimal steps. The dentist creates a custom mouth tray for the patient before the patient embarks on the teeth whitening regimen at home. The custom tray is a critical component of the treatment. It ensures that the correct amount of whitening solution is used ant that the patients teeth are properly exposed to the whitening solution, without causing damage to the gums. A home whitening session can last for a few hours or you may keep the tray in overnight, it all depends on level of whitening the patient desires. Many patients have their teeth whitened to improve their appearance. Whiter teeth are associated with a youthful and healthier lifestyle. When patients have a brighter smile, they tend to smile more often and are less self-conscious. In addition, a whiter smile tends to minimize the appearance of facial wrinkles, giving a way to a younger and energetic look. A whiter smile gives patients a friendlier appearance and a focus for all to look at. Have a beautiful smile for the holidays !! Call the ofce for our holiday whitening specials for you or a loved one, its a great gift for the holidays.Brighten Your Smile for the Holidays With a quarter of the year already “ nished, the fall sports have begun to wind down, as teams are competing in their district, regional and state playo games. However as the temperature starts to drop and the days begin to shorten, Bartram Trails winter sports season is just heating up. With a disappointing end to their seasons last year, both the boys and girls basketball teams are looking for redemption. On the other hand the girls and boys soccer teams are searching for more success in the playo s, especially against district rival Ponte Vedra. Falling victim to Ponte Vedra for the second straight year in a row, the boys soccer team is looking to end the trend this year despite losing star goal scorer Kevin Murman, who graduated last year. Murman provided the spark for the Bears last year, scoring 30 goals, which catapulted Bartram into the third seed of last years district playo s. However the Bears only lost four seniors last year and are returning the majority of their lineup. Senior Timothy Lasseter commented on this saying, We have a lot of people that have been in the system for a few seasons so our team is not short on experience.Ž This year the Bears will be competing in Class 3A of District 3, their third division change in three years; however, they will be competing with the same district teams, among them Creekside and Ponte Vedra, who both made it to the regional playo s last year. After coming o a trip to the state championship in 2010, the girls soccer team was decimated by graduation and relied on underclassmen to “ ll the ranks last year. The Bears excelled, however, racking up 10 wins during the regular season, including a 2-0 victory over Ponte Vedra who would eventually make it to the state semi“ nals. Although, they were beat by the same team in the district tournament, ending their streak of 10 straight state playo births. The encouraging thing for the Bears is that they will be returning almost all of their starters from last year, including junior Taylor Valentine Vessel Safety Checks (VSC) are o ered (weather permitting) at the following locations and times: Vilano Boat Ramp … Second Sunday of each month from 12:00 noon until 3:00 p.m. St. Augustine Lighthouse Park Boat Ramp … Second Sunday of each month from 12:00 noon until 2:00 p.m. There is no charge for the safety check and it takes from 15 to 20 minutes. The VSC is a complimentary check of your boat conducted by members of the Auxiliary, con“ rming that it meets both federal and state requirements for safety. No citations are issued and the results of the safety check are not reported to any enforcement Durbin Creek Elementary honored business partners at the annual St. Johns County Character Counts Breakfast. Pictured are Kelly Mabry (Tropical Smoothie), Shannon Brougham (121 Financial Credit Union), Ashley Schaefer (PTO co-president), Theresa Ceglio (Accessory Chick), Renee Labaw (guidance counselor), Kasthuri Sriram (Kumon of St. Johns), Sandra McMandon (principal), Kim and Darryl Brown (Champion Martial Arts and Fitness), Brigitte Jones (Thirty-One Gifts) and Tony Paolucci (OnStar Production and Entertainment).United States Coast Guard Auxiliary updateVessel Safety Check schedule for 2011By Contributing Writer Joe McCoy, Public Affairs Of cer, Flotilla 14-7agency. A decal is awarded to display if the vessel has passed the examination along with a West Marine discount coupon for the purchase of safety items. An example of some of the items checked include during a VSC include:Personal Flotation Devices (life jackets) Registration and numbering Navigation lights Ventilation Fire extinguishers Distress signals ( ares, horn, etc.) Battery cover and connections All of these items are currently required by state and federal laws and, if missing or non-operating, can result in a citation if your vessel is inspected by the United States Coast Guard or other law enforcement. The VSC provides a risk-free way to check that your vessel meets the legal minimums and to potentially avoid a citation later. Upon completion of the VSC, you will be informed of potential safety exposures. A successful VSC may result in lowered insurance rates for some boaters. For more information, please visit www.safetyseal.net/, a website devoted exclusively to the VSC program, co-sponsored by the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary and the United States Power Squadrons. BTHS Sports RoundupBartrams winter sports teams ready for action By Jared Freitas, BTHS Studentand senior Ashland Rahn, who led the team in scoring. The boys basketball team did not fare as well last season, only managing to win two games. However, like most of Bartrams other teams, the Bears only graduated one senior and will be returning four of “ ve starters this season. Experience was in short supply during the 2010 season, as the Bears struggled to “ nd their rhythm. Losing leads became a hallmark of Bartrams play a season ago, as the Bears inconsistency led to a number of close losses. In order to add more games to the win total this year, Bartram has been working hard in the o season. This summer we held practices, in addition to playing against local teams,Ž said junior Tyler Irish. Also weve done a fall league this year that we have never done before and have been practicing regularly for six weeks.Ž With all of this preparation, the Bears are looking to make it back to the state playo s, as they are now in a district with only Clay and Creekside as opponents. This change not only a ects both basketball teams but also the softball, baseball and volleyball team. The girls basketball team had high expectations last year, led by an experienced core of seniors who had played for Bartram all four years; however, Bishop Kenny eliminated them from the playo s unexpectedly in the “ rst round. The Bears, who lost to St. Augustine three times last year, will not have to worry about facing them due to the reshu ing in the district, which is good news for the younger team. Senior and only returning starter Allie Mano is optimistic about this season despite the lack of upperclassmen. Weve had a lot of playing time together, which has allowed us to gel and ease the learning curve for our younger players,Ž she said. The Bears are looking to retake their position as the top team in the region and have put in the work during the o season to do so. For Bartram Trail there is plenty of optimism for success; the only thing the Bears must do is execute.

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 37 $5 Burger & Domestic BeerMonday-Friday 2-5pm Texas Hold Em Monday 7-9pm Trivia Night Tuesday 7-9pm LIVE MUSIC!EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHT Julington Creek 904-260-8338 Meet the Pacetti Bay Running Club boys! Watch for the picture of the girls in the Running Club next month. Photo provided by Lynn Johnson.It is tailgating season, which means grill masters are in high demand. Yet each year emergency crews respond to thousands of “ res and emergency calls around the country because of careless grilling. Combining explosive fuels with food, hot metals and large amounts of people can cause a recipe for disaster according to the article, BBQ Safety Tips for the Tailgating Season. Furthermore, last year alone more than 1,800 people required treatment at their local hospital following accidents involving a barbeque according to the article Barbeque and Grilling. Follow these safety tips to ensure your barbequing experience is a win! Use gas, propane and charcoal grills outdoors and always at least 10 feet away from any building or strucJoin us at River House, 179 Marine Street on Sunday evening, November 20 from 5:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. for the Council on Agings annual Christmas on the River.Ž Enjoy festive holiday food and drinks and do some shopping at the silent auction! Community volunteers will model gorgeous evening gowns paired with holiday wreaths beginning at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 per person. For tickets or more information, please contact Becky Yanni at 209-3685 or email at byanni@stjohnscoa.com.Save the date: its Christmas on the RiverŽSafe grilling tips By Contributing Writer Meghan Bender, Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundationture.  Never leave an ignited, hot grill unattended.  Keep grills away from heavy foot traf c, games and activities.  Store lighters and matches away from the grill.  Wear tted clothing when grilling; no frills or strings.  Before starting your grill, be sure all parts are rmly in place and working properly.  Keep a re extinguisher nearby.  Never attempt to move a hot grill.  Always use long-handled utensils to avoid burns and spatters.  Be sure there is nothing obstructing the path of the fuel.These safety tips are brought to you as part of the prevention and education mission of Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation. My name is Barney; I m a 7 month old male Persian. I am already neutered and current on all my vaccines. I am declawed; I get along great with other animals and children. Hi! My name is Henny; I am a 1 year old female hound. I am current on all my vaccines but still need to be spayed. I am very gentle and loving and looking for the right family to take me home!We Need a Home!St. Johns County Pet Adoption Center • 209-6190 All adoptions at the Pet Center are $60, which includes neutering/spaying, rabies vaccinations and shots. The Pet Center is located at 130 N. Stratton Road, just off US-1 between County Road 210 and International Golf Parkway. The hours are 9:00-4:00 Monday through Friday and 9:00-12:30 on Saturday. Save the ta-tas! The Julington Creek womens B1 tennis team recently promoted breast cancer awareness. Pictured are Nina Gregor, Becky Argalas, Janet Gibson, Scott Lefteris, Cathy Klein, Pat Aydelette, Constance Jackson, Stacey McFarlin, Annie Breton, Sylvie Blais, Sandy Dean, Alcira Guzman and Karen Pandol

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Page 38, The CreekLine • November 2011 • www.thecreekline.com 904-262-SWIM $ Located next to Ace Hardware (Behind Sonny’s) Michigans eastern Upper Peninsula makes an ideal getaway from Floridas heat and humidity. That is, if you plan your visit for next summer. Poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow referred to the shore and water blessed area in his famous Song of HiawathaŽ as the Gitchie Gumee by the shining Big-Water-Sea. Today, it remains pristine America. The area has been a favorite summer retreat for Midwestern families since the late 19th century. Fishing enthusiasts descend on Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan for the multitude of choices available at reasonable rates. Kayakers favor Les Chteaux Island, actually 36 islands that form an archipelago, now a nature preserve. Canoeing is popular along the Two-Hearted River and sailing has an en-Exploring the Gitchie GumeeBy Contributing Travel Writer Debi Lander, www.bylandersea.com Photo by Thomas A. Schneiderathusiastic following in the UP. Lighthouse bu s revel with a bounty of sites to visit, more than any other state. Lake Superior shoreline alone boasts 35 of the statewide 116 lighthouses. Despite their guiding lights, the Great Lakes remain treacherous boating grounds. Gordon Lightfoots ballad The Wreck of the Edmund FitzgeraldŽ brought cultural awareness to the 1975 tragedy. Visit the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum to “ nd out more. Tahquamenon Falls State Park (pronounced like phenomenon with a tŽ) includes nearly 50,000 acres in Paradise, Michigan. Yes, the park is located in a town named Paradise. As you might expect, the area is green and gorgeous. Take the scenic three-hour hiking trail from Tahquamenons Lower Falls, actually a series of drops, to the Upper one. Or drive to the Upper Falls entrance and walk to see the 200-foot-wide cascading water. Youll also “ nd the only brewery and pub in any United States state park at the Visitors Center. Both the upper and lower falls present wonderful photo ops; however, even more picturesque are the dramatic cli s at Pictured Rocks. They stand as the centerpiece of the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore Park. The water may be chilly, but scuba fans still enjoy an underwater diving preserve. Mackinac Island remains the areas best known vacation draw with its laid back, no carsŽ policy. A stay at the iconic Grand Hotel, built in 1887, lulls guests back in time as they while away the day on wooden rockers lining the 660-foot front porch, the longest in the world. Hiking and biking around the “ ve and a half-acre island keep guests active or they can utilize horse-drawn carriage transport from some of Mackinacs 500 resident horses. Visitors shouldnt miss riding the waterway through the Soo Locks alongside behemoth tankers and freighters. The boat tour traverses the only connection between Lake Superior and Lake Huron and Ontario, thus providing a major shipping lane for over 90 million tons of cargo each year. The tour also passes by the Canadian city of Sault Ste. Marie. Falls and winters here in Florida might be delightful, but I envy the summertime feel of Michigans Upper Peninsula. By Gitchie Gumee, theyve got sometime special and perhaps you need to think about planning a trip up there. PRECIOUS GOLD BUYERSWhy us? HOURS: MON FRI 9am-6pm SUNDAY CLOSED IF YOU WANT MORE GREEN FOR YOUR GOLD MAKE US YOUR LAST STOP! BRING IN YOUR UNWANTED GOLD, SILVER, PLATINUM & COINS! 12525 Phillips Hwy. Ste 111Corner of Phillips & Old St. Augustine Rd.Jacksonville, FL 32256 904-647-8879 2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU MORE GREENFOR YOUR GOLD 2245 CR 210 W. #107A1 Mile West of I-95 904-414-9791Precious Gold Buyers $50 MOREthan the Current Gold Rate per ouncePrecious Gold Buyers $5 MOREthan the Current Silver Rate GOLD SILVER PLATINUM COINS 3 NEW LOCATION 12525 Philips Hwy.Ste 111J ac ks onvi ll e FL 32256 Corner o f P hi ll ip s & Ol d St A u g u s tine Rd .904-647-8879 2245 CR 210 W.#107A1 M i l e W e s t o f I-95904-414-97912730 State Rd. 16,Unit 106Next to Sonnys BBQ St. Augustine FL 32092904-647-8879 OPENING SOON! HOURS: MON -FRI 9am-6pm There are certain moments in life you dont forget, where time stands still, moments that take your breath away and you realize that anything is possible. One of those moments for several members of the Jaguars organization was at EverBank Field when six-year Luke Akerstrom walked to mid“ eld prior to the October 9 game for the coin toss. Nine months ago, this would not have been possible. I walked into a room at Wolfson Childrens Hospital in January for a short visit with Luke. Someone had alerted the Jaguars that Luke was in the hospital and would probably appreciate a visit and maybe some gifts from the local NFL team. I was happy to oblige on behalf of the club. Luke suffered a 30-minute seizure on December 29 in the back of his parents car that ravaged the left side of his body with what doctors have diagnosed as a rare form of encephalitis. Little did I know, that “ veminute visit would change my life forever and many close to me at the Jaguars while I earned a new best friend in the Six-year old boy reaches new heightsBy Contributing Writer Ryan Robinsonprocess. At the time, Luke was lying in his hospital bed, not able to sit up on his own or communicate, o ering a big smile to me in exchange. I promised him and his family that next time I saw them I would be bringing a Jaguar with me. Jaguars center Brad Meester and his wife, Jamie are parents to four little girls so free time is not an option for their family. Of course, the Meesters made time when told of Lukes situation. One visit by the Meesters has turned into a lifelong friendship. Luke surprised Brad early in training camp following one of the teams practices thanks to an invitation from head coach Jack Del Rio. It had been seven months since he had taken full steps but he was determined to walk again and he was determined to do it in front of the Jaguars.Ž Brad introduced Luke and his family to his teammates and the coaching sta and talked about Lukes daily struggles to regain normalcy in his life. Following his speech, Luke burst out of his fathers arms and walked to Brad. Tears rolled down the faces of many in attendance which included more than 50 friends and family members. After extensive rehab that he still attends weekly, Luke reached another milestone when he recently walked to mid-“ eld.

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www.thecreekline.com • November 2011 • The CreekLine, Page 39 SCAN DESIGN PLUS MARKDOWNS THROUGHOUT THE SHOWROOM!FURNITURETENT SALE I am an organic gardener. My ” ower garden is small but amazing, with something blooming almost year-round. My four-by-four foot cucumber patch produced more than 50 pounds of cucumbers. I have much more success than failure, but it has not always been this way. It has been 20-plus years of trial and error, but in the process I have uncovered what I believe are three truths every gardener should embrace. Truth number one most of us know. You need sun and water to grow things, but to be a successful gardener you also need quality soil. The best way to build up your soil and insure it is rich in nutrients is to add organic matter to it. The best organic matter is homemade compost made from a diversity of organic sources such as leaves, kitchen scraps, grass clippings, weeds (no seeds), straw, shredded paper, egg shells, used co ee grounds including the “ lter„pretty much everything except meats and fats. I produce enough compost to top my small gardens with fresh compost every time I plant. Two to three inches is ideal, but if I dont have enough homemade compost I use other organics to enrich the soil, such as commercial bags of composted manure. If needed, organic fertilizers are also widely available. For more information about producing homemade compost go to www.solutionsforyourlife.com and search composting. Truth number two is remember the KISS rule (Keep It Simple, Silly).Ž Gardening is not a competitive sport. Keep your garden small and plant only things you love. You can grow a lot in a small space if you have good soil and small is easy to maintain. Mix easy-togrow veggies with ” owers and herbs to make pretty, interesting gardens. For example, I have broccoli and red cabbage growing in one three by three foot garden, bordered by colorful nasturtiums, a plant with edible leaves and ” owers. The di erent hues create a pretty picture. I use an organic mulch such as straw or “ ne pine bark (not nuggets) around plants to hold The Lady Flyers team won the 2011 Middle School Championship game by beating Murray Middle School. This is the “ rst year in the history of Fruit Cove GardeningThree things every gardener should know By Contributing Writer Master Gardener Camille Hunter with Duval County Extension, University of Florida/IFASFruit Cove Lady Flyers win championship Scott Clarke (Coach), Nina Mangor, Amanda Kasprzak, Kaitlin Herrera, Jordan Fields, Sydney Amici, Lorea Jackson, Brooke Martinelli, Kate Revels, Sydni Parish, Kathryn Arnett, Brianna Rodriguez, Delaney Rust, Claire Amici, Taylor Allen, Karlina Hill (Coach).Middle School that the Lady Flyers went undefeated. Team captains were Nina Mangor and Amanda Kasprzak. Brianna Rodriguez was the soil moisture and reduce weed problems. Truth number three is about attitude. To be a happy, productive gardener you must think of gardening not as work but as therapy. Nurturing anything is good for you. Visit your garden every day. If possible, have your morning co ee within sight of your garden and soak up the good vibes coming your way. Whenever you feel stressed, pull weeds and talk to your plants while you are doing it. They are patient listeners. Stop and smell the roses, literally. Spending time in the garden should feel good. If instead your garden becomes a source of stress, relax„help is available. The University of Florida Duval County Extension O ce has a garden help line from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. most work days. Call 255-7450 and ask to speak with a Master Gardener. You can also “ nd online help you can trust at the website mentioned above. point guard and MVP. Coaches Karlina Hill and Scott Clarke said, It was a di cult choice to decide who the MVP was going to be as the girls were truly a team and each member made signi“ cant contributions to the team.ŽAmanda Kasprzak scored the most points all season with 64; and Sydney Amici scored 61 points for the season. The Lady Flyers Team was the strongest defensive team in the county allowing their opponents to score the least amount of points against them. Happy Thanksgiving!from your friends at The CreekLine! Peanut Butter Jelly or jam Cereal/Oatmeal Canned Pasta Canned Stew/Chili Canned pasta Soup Canned fruit/veggies Toilet PaperChrist’s Cupboard Food Pantry Wish ListChrist’s Cupboard is located at Celebration Lutheran Church, 810 Roberts Road. Call 230-2496 for info! Christ’s Cupboard serves anyone in need. Hours are 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Tues. and Weds.

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THE CREEKLINESM SERVING THE NORTHWEST ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMMUNITY SINCE 2001Visit our online edition at www.thecreekline.comMEMBER OF THE RT PUBLISHING GROUP OF COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS Whats InsidePage 3 Whats New Page 4 From the CommissionerPage 5 School District Journal Page 6 The Sheriff ReportsPage 7 Veterans Day event Page 8 US Constitution Page 9 Taxing Issues Page 11 JCP CARES food drive Page 15 BTHS Happenings Page 16 BT Newcomers Club Page 21 TCE author visit Page 22 DCE Boosterthon fun runPage 25 FCMS news Page 28 Happy 99th Birthday! Page 29 Faith Corner Page 32 Movie Review Page 35 High School Sports Fishing Report Page 36 Coast Guard update Page 37 JCP tennis team Page 38 Gardening Page 39 Lady Flyers Volume 11, Issue 11 November 2011The CreekLine12443 San Jose Boulevard, Ste. 403 Jacksonville,FL 32223Presorted Standard US Postage Paid Callahan, FL 32011 Permit No.4 FREE ONLINE CLASSIFIED ADS Go towww.thecreekline.comand click onFree Classi ed Ads $*$*$* Introductory 1-hour massage session Introductory 1-hour massage session Enhanced 1-hour Introductory aromatherapy massage SAVE UP TO 50% WHEN YOU SCHEDULE YOUR MASSAGE TODAY 39 49 57 Franchises Available | MassageEnvy.com| Convenient HoursOpen 7 days. M-F 8am-10pm, Sat 8am-6pm, Sun 10am-6pm **Ranked #1 by Entrepreneur Magazine *Session includes massage and time for consultation and dressing. Prices subject to change. Rates and services may vary by location. Additional local taxes and fees may apply. Massage Envy Limited, LLC. Three great reasons to see why were ranked #1 in massage services.**BARTRAM PARK 13820 St. Augustine Rd Ste 157 Exit #335 off of I95 (904) 262-5585MM#16328 AROMATHERAPY MASSAGE 2011 After recently turning 84, most people dont strike out on a new missionyet that is exactly what Sarah Bailey has done. She is not sitting idly by resting on her laurels as St. Johns County Commissioner from 1984 to 1992 or having a notable history in Florida State agriculture. She was named the Woman of the Year in Agriculture for the State of Florida in 1993. An avid horsewoman, she has journeyed trails throughout Florida and seen some remarkable scenery. Yet she says, Northeast Florida is blessed with some of Halloween came to Pacetti Bay Middle School (PBMS) in World Golf Village with a special Trick or Treat as a special surprise guest came to teacher Kenneth Ballards sixth grade world history class. The happy shock and surprise couldnt be held back by student Stephanie Mitchell as her mother walked into the class. Her mother, unknown to Stephanie, had just returned from duty in Iraq and Korea. Senior Airman Milette Herring has just completed her last duty tours, after spending 13 years in the United States Air Force. Carrying a large bouquet The Creeks Clash U13 girls premier soccer team is the U14 champions of the 22nd annual Seminole Girls Fall Festival. The tournament was held at the Seminole Soccer Complex in Sanford, Florida over the weekend of October 8-9. The team won two games and tied another to lead them to the championship game against the Florida Soccer Alliance Freedom (FSA) U14 girls. The champion-Sarah Bailey starts new preservation mission; seeks community membersBy Karl Kennellthe most remarkable and special natural features in Florida. Her mission now is to bring public awareness and care to those natural blessings. For years Julington Creek, Durbin Creek, the Peninsula and Twelve Mile Swamp have been under constant pressure from the burgeoning development and growth of both Duval and St. Johns counties. At a recent Third Thursday Lecture hosted by the Mandarin Historical Society at the Mandarin Community Center, she summarized to the audience her new mission to preserve these natural resources.Special Trick or Treat for Pacetti Bay studentBy Karl KennellCreeks Clash U13 girls win back-to-back soccer tournaments Coach Phong Le, Hannah Valenti, Savannah Pitts, Jaelyn Stepter, Bethany Moore, Megan Fallan, Kristine Galang, Hannah Bateh, Meghan Badge and Assistant Coach Kevin Moore. Maggie Larson, Oakley Harrell, Sarah Kronz, Frankie Sefcik, Taylor Hultz, Mallory Dempsey, Alley Bennett. Not pictured: Hannah Vranicarship game was hard fought in the pouring rain, but Creeks Clash shut FSA out to win the tournament with a nal score of 1-0. This same team also won the First Coast Labor Day Shootout the weekend of September 3-4, winning all four of their games. The girls scored 11 goals, completely shutting out three of the teams and allowed only one point to be scored against them on a penalty kick. The team is coached by Phong Le and assistant coach Kevin Moore. Congratulations, ladies! Well done! Stephanie Mitchell with her mom, Milette Herring.of owers and a balloon with welcome home given to her by the PTSO of Pacetti Middle School, Stephanies mother, Milo as her friends call her, quietly followed PBMS Principal Sue Sparkman into the class. Sparkman then announced that a special visitor had arrived. As Stephanie turned her head to look toward the special visitor, her eyes became big and bright with excitement as she saw her mom. Her grandfather Jerome Glass, himself an Army veteran who served in Vietnam, with his wife Blanche had arranged the surprise Trick or Treat visit. Their surprise treat for their granddaughter was a resounding successnot only was she surprised, but Ballards entire class was excited! The excitement built and owed out into She outlined the forces that are attacking these watersheds, things such as septic tanks, aggressive development invasion and extreme recreational activities. Her plan is to gather people together to expand awareness of the problems and develop efforts to pressure these areas and mitigate damage already done. As a result she has formed the Julington-Durbin Creeks Conservation Foundation or J-DCCF. The foundation has the mission of being dedicated to the conservation of its water resources, shore and water habitats, recreational uses, and its surrounding watersheds. This foundation is modeled on a very successful foundation formed in Sanibel-Captiva, Florida. Following their example, Bailey wants to work to identify the problems, create a plan and access resources for preservation. Many grants for preservation go by the wayside for lack of pursuit, she says. She describes herself by saying, Im not a professional but just an individual with a passionate interest in this effort. Sarah Bailey cont on pg. 8 Surprise visit cont on pg. 5

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Page 2, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com of St. Augustine 904.825.0540 www.oastaug.com3055 CR210W, Suite 110, St. Johns, FL 32259 One Orthopaedic Place, St. Augustine, FL 32086 LET OUR SPORTS MEDICINE TEAMKeep you in the game!JAMES GRIMES, MD JOHN STARK, MD SPECIALIZING IN THE TREATMENT OF SPORTS RELATED INJURIES:FOOT/ANKLE SPRAINS & FRACTURES NECK & BACK INJURIES SHOULDER SEPARATIONS & DISLOCATIONS ELBOW LIGAMENT & TENDON INJURIES HIP INJURIES & GROIN PULLS KNEE CARTILAGE & LIGAMENT TEARS COLLARBONE FRACTURES BURNERS & STINGERS FOR THE TREATMENT OF: No Appointment RequiredSt. Johns Location Clinic Hours: St. Augustine Location Clinic Hours:ALBERT VOLK, MD SINA KASRAEIAN, MD KURTIS HORT, MD ANDREA TRESCOT, MD BRIAN HAYCOOK, MD BETH PEARCE, DPM 5 pm to 9 pm Monday Friday 9 am to 2 pm Saturday 5 pm to 10 pm Monday Friday 9 am to 7 pm Saturday | |

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 3 Whats NewCommunity HappeningsDo you have community or club news you would like included in The CreeekLine? Then contact Martie Thompson at: editor@rtpublishinginc.com or 886-4919. At RT Publishing we welcome Letters to the Editor. We request they be no more than 250 words. All letters must include writers name, address, and telephone number. Only the name will be published. E-mail to editor@ rtpublishinginc.com. Anonymously sent letters will not be published.Letters to the Editor policy RT Publishing, Inc. The CreekLine The Ocean Breeze Mandarin NewsLine Players JournalPublisher Rebecca Taus publisher@rtpublishinginc.comEditor Martie Thompson editor@rtpublishinginc.comAdvertising Sales, Linda Gay lg@rtpublishinginc.comAdvertising Sales, Josh Allen ja@rtpublishinginc.comGraphic Design, Brittany Lehmangraphics@rtpublishinginc.com RT Publishing, Inc. 12443 San Jose Boulevard Suite 403 Jacksonville, FL 32223 Ph: 904-886-4919 The CreekLine Community Newspaper is a free monthly publication distributed via bulk mail to homes and businesses in NW St. Johns County. Submission of articles and photographs are received by mail or email, although email to editor@rtpublishinginc.com is preferred. The writers opinions do not necessarily reect the opinion of RT Publishing, Inc. Advertising Rates are available by request. RT Publishing, Inc. is not responsible for advertisement content or accuracy of information provided by its advertisers. Nor does RT Publishing, Inc. endorse any of the products or services included in this publication. RT Publishing, Inc. reserves the right to refuse advertisement or copy from any advertiser. All rights are reserved and no portion of this publication may be copied without the express written consent of the publisher. 2011. Share the flavor, Save the time Good food brings family and friends together, especially at Thanksgiving. Let us do the cooking so you can enjoy a relaxing holiday, spend less time in the kitchen and more time celebrating with your loved ones. Choose from organic, natural, brined or kosher turkeys and variety of decadent sides and pies. With this coupon receivevalid at whole foods market jacksonville only. not valid with any other offer or tm discount card. not redeemable for cash or gift cards. limit one coupon per customer. no copies, duplications or facsimiles will be accepted. PLU 30675 VALID Through November 30, 2011 I-95 I-295 San Jos e Blvd any $50 purchase $10 off www.wholefoodsmarket.com10601 SAN JOSE BL VD JACKSONVILLE, FL 904-288-1100 Order your holiday meal online or in-store Creekside High School Athletic Booster Clubs latest fundraiser, Creeksides Amazing Race and Festival, will be held on Saturday, November 19 beginning at 10:00 a.m. Patterned after the reality show The Amazing Race, the event will feature teams of four completing mental and physical challenges at various locations throughout St. Johns County. The team with the shortest amount of time, at the nal check in, possessing all required documents, will be the winner. Each team must have at least one team member 25 years or older to be the designated driver. You may have more than one person on your team 25 years or older but only one designated driver per team. All team members must be high school age or older and they do not need to attend Creekside, but they must have a drivers license or school ID with them at all times during the race. As a clari cation of the article which was published in the Ocbtober 2011 issue of The CreekLine entitled CDDs in St. Johns County mean big dollars and big business, mention was made of the management of Community Development Districts. It was not clearly stated that St. Johns County manages special taxing districts in the county, as opposed to direct management of Community Development Districts by the county. We regret the possible confusion.Clari cation:Cash prizes will be awarded to the rst, second and third place teams. Teams are still being formed! The Festival, featuring live music, food, and fun will be held at the school from 2:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m. For more information, please visit www. creeksideknights.com Two high schools join their drama programs together to produce the classic musical, Les Miserables, based on the novel by Victor Hugo and with music by Claude-Michel Schonberg and lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer and Alain Boublil. The musical is produced by special arrangement with Music Theatre International and is rated PG. The Ponte Vedra High School Theatre directed by Randall Adkison and Nease High School Drama directed by Laura Adkison, join a cast of 50 students. Performances will be held at Ponte Vedra High School on November 10, 11 and 12. Evening shows are at 7:00 p.m. on all three nights, and there will be a 1:00 p.m. matinee on Saturday. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased in advance from a cast member and will be sold at the door. Tickets are on sale now for the St. Gerard Campus 29th annual Fashion Show and Silent Auction to be held on Saturday, December 10, 2011 from 12:00 noon to 3:00 p.m. at the Renaissance Hotel and Resort at World Golf Village. Men, women, teens and children will be modeling the latest fashions from Jones New York, Hartstrings, Mens Wearhouse, Panama Hat Company, Saks 5th Avenue O 5th and Rochelles. There will be a fabulous silent auction featuring cruises, artwork and gift certi cates in addition to a $5,000 ra e. A gourmet lunch will be served. Tickets are $35 each. For further information and to purchase tickets, please call 8295516. Corporate sponsorship is welcome. Caring for the Caregiver Family Caregiving Workshop will be held on Friday, November 18 at the David A. Stein Jewish Community Alliance on the Ed Parker Jewish Community Campus, located at 8505 San Jose Boulevard. Caregiving often can be a lonely, exhausting and frustrating role; but it also can be lled with delight and satisfaction. This workshop gives family caregivers the practical information they need to help take care of themselves and their loved ones, as well as giving them an opportunity to network with fellow caregivers. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. and the program will be held from 9:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. Complimentary care services are available for loved ones during the workshop. As with all Caring for the Caregiver workshops, attendance at this event is open to anyone, regardless of his or her belief system. To register for the workshop and to request care services, please call 807-1225 by November 15. NAS Jacksonville Skin and Scuba Diving Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the rst Wednesday of each month at the Ramada Inn, located at 3130 Hartley Road in Mandarin. The club is open to all divers and those who are interested in diving. For more information, please visit www.nasjaxscubadivers.org or contact the club president, Dave Martin at 413-8773. The MOMS Club of St. Augustine North invites moms and their children living in the 32092 or 32095 zip codes including the County Road 210 corridor to see what all the excitement is about! We meet once a month to plan our activities for the month ahead and our meetings and activities are Whats New cont. on pg 4 Copies of this Online Coupon are not accepted!

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Page 4, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com From the Commissioners Desk www.SalonCherChez.com Lic. #MM19595 cherchezinc@att.net Dream Hair Keratin Treatment $225 1st Time Clients: European facial for $55 Salon Tech Keratin smoother $175 Shellac & Axxium Color Gels $25 Manicure & Pedicure with Paraffin $53 California Smooth $200 WiFi Products Paul Mitchell Hair Kerocai Luanne, Liz, Rita, David, Jean, Michele, Cindy, Nela, Carmen, Lindsey, Joanne, Elaine, Sherri Cher Chez10501 5th Anniversary !268-6199 The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Over 15 Years Legal Experience904-665-0005www.preddylaw.com Offering investment advisory services as a representative of 0156581-00002-00 Prudential Financial Planning Services, a division of Pruco Securities, LLC. 3000 Hartley Road, Suite 7Jacksonville FL 32257904.260.3812 www.reburkecpa.com The CPA Never Underestimate the ValueRobert E. Burke, CPA VARSITY INSURANCE, INC. ARE YOUR INSURANCE RATES INCREASING? 268-6365Working hard to win your insurance business. WE LOVE COMPETITION! Put us in the game!Dont let Big Insurance keep us on the sideline!Serving Mandarin Since 1990 during the day, when at-home mothers need support most. Of course, children are welcome at all of our meetings and activities. Activities are scheduled for almost every weekday of the month and moms may attend as few or as many activities as they like. Some of the activities we have planned are trips to the zoo, beach and pool days, story time at the library and playgroups at members homes and local parks. If you have any questions or would like to get more information to join, please e-mail Jenn at sanmoms@ gmail.com or check out our website at website at http://sanmomsclub.weebly.com.Council on Aging (COA) Care Connection volunteers can help with minor repairs! Over 60? Need a little help xing things around the house? Our minor repairs volunteers are ready to assist you. We can replace light bulbs, adjust ceiling fans, install grab bars, replace screens and screen doors and much more. Please call COA Care Connection at 209-3649 and visit our website at www. coasjc.com. Adults and teens age 14 and older are invited to attend Thank you for all who participated in the 2012 county budget process. It was critical for the county commissioners to hear about the priorities of the community and for people in the community to hear each other. In the end, the county adopted a scally responsible budget that balanced many needs and values of the community. It also allows the county to move forward with the upgrade to our Emergency Communication System. The budget gap was closed this year by cutting costs and an increase of less than 2 percent in county property taxes after four years of reductions. The county is now approaching the 2004-2005 tax level when adjusted for population. St. Johns County continues to grow despite the economic downturn. We remain a community of choice. Even in this downturn, people choose St. Johns County to live and for their business investment. We have a reputation as a safe community with good schools and an extraordinary quality of life. It was important that the commissioners hear that the 10 percent that goes to things like coastal access, libraries, parks and ball elds are important to you in addition to the basic services of courts, roads, drainage and public safety. The combined millage rate set by the county is about 40 percent of countywide property tax bills. Several years ago, the county started building a bridge to a better economic time. Some thought it would last one to two years, others four to ve. Throughout this time, the county has stayed ahead By Contributing Writer Cyndi Stevenson, St. Johns County Commissioner, District 1of the game, taking aggressive cost cutting measures during the 2007 budget year and each year thereafter. During the same time, the county has made real progress to streamline our permitting process to be more economically competitive and has continued to invest in essentials like road right of way. The county is focused on diversifying our local economy without jeopardizing our quality of life. It has been a long ve years and we still have work to do, but St. Johns County is moving in the right direction. That is good for all of us. Please do not hesitate to contact me at 209-0301. Whats New cont. from pg 3the Project Lap Blanket crochet group at the Bartram Trail Branch Library on Monday, November 14, Tuesday, November 22, and Monday, November 28 from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The group will crochet or knit blankets for cancer patients at area hospitals. All skill levels are welcome. Cant come to any of the meetings? Pick up the crochet pattern at the Reference Desk in the library and crochet the blanket in your spare time. Drop o completed blankets and any yarn youd like to donate during regular library hours. For additional information, please call the Reference Desk at 827-6960. Tickets for Saint Augustine Ballets upcoming production of The Nutcracker are now on sale. This holiday favorite will be performed at Flagler College Auditorium on December 16 and 17 at 7:00 p.m. and on Sunday, December 18 at 2:00p.m. Online tickets are available at www.saintaugustineballet.com or by contacting tickets@saintaugustineballet.com. The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 14-7 meets the rst Thursday of every month 7:30 p.m. at the St. Augustine Yacht Club near the St. Augustine Lighthouse. The otilla is always looking for new members, particularly those who own aircraft, boats and have radio equipment and skills. If you are interested, please contact Vic Aquino at 460-0243. We invite everyone to Christmas Remembered, the St. Augustine Garden Clubs 43rd annual Christmas Tour of Homes, to be held on Sunday, December 4 from 12:00 noon until 5:00 p.m. Six beautifully decorated historic homes in downtown St. Augustine will be all decked out for Christmas. Tea and cookies are included as well as shopping at the boutique beginning at 1:00 p.m. at Memorial Presbyterian Church, located at 36 Sevilla Street. Walk to nearby homes on tour or hop on courtesy red train. Tickets cost $20 if purchased prior to the day of the tour or $25 on the day of the event, if still available. Please call 826-0024 for credit card ticket purchases and visit the website www.gardenclubofstaugustine. org for additional information. TOPS (Take O Pounds Sensibly) FL#493, St. Augustine has a weekly meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesdays at the Old Colee Cove Volunteer Fire Station, located at 9105 County Road 13 North (south of Buddy Boys Grocery Store). Weigh in starts at 8:30 a.m. We are a National Weight Loss Organization, fees are low and we have lots of fun, contests and inspiring programs. All are welcome; come and join us! For more information, please contact Sara Weaver at 940-7528 or Bobbi Culbreth at 824-2466. Julington Creek Annual Light ParadeSaturday, Dec. 3 6:30 p.m.Starting at Julington Creek BridgeDont miss it!

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 5 School District Journal By Contributing Writer Beverly Slough, Chariman, St. Johns County School Board Oer Expires December 31, 2011 Must present this coupon at time of service. Injectable llers include Juvderm Juvderm XC, Restylane, Perlane, Prevelle and Radiesse. Minimum Botox treatment is 20 units. Cannot be combined with any other discount or special offer. Limit one per person. No cash value. Offer good only at the PVPS Mandarin location. COUPON CODE: CO 12058 San Jose Boulevard, Suite 102 J (904) 880-3131Alan M. Krantz, D.D.S. Trusted, Comfortable & Affordable Dental Care for the Entire Family Convenient Appointments Before & After Work or School!Emergencies Welcome! Caring & Courteous Staff Sleep Apnea Treatment Low-Radiation Digital X-Rays Zoom! Teeth Whitening Convenient Payment Options Available KrantzDentalCare.comAsk About Our Affordable Dental Plan for Uninsured Patients! As Low as $30/mo. chrisad 2011 y US1 1 Mile South of Nease High School Back Pain? Neck Pain?You dont have to suffer!Call: 247-ACHE (2243) Dont let little aches be a Big Pain! The School Board has traded school zoning for voting district determinations. Every 10 years, the lines for voting districts are redrawn, re ective of the United States Census. The rules require that there be no more than 10 percent deviation between the ve County Commission and School Board districts. For the past 20 years, both boards have shared the same district lines. The County Commission and School Board have met in joint session to review the plans presented by our consultant and some plans suggested by the community. Five town hall meetings, one in each district, have been held to solicit public comment. The County Commission plans to vote on its nal choice on November 15 and the School Board will select our plan at our December meeting. In all likelihood, the districts will again be identical, facilitating ease of elections and public understanding of the district in which they reside. The district lines will then be in e ect for the next 10 years, until the United States Census is again conducted. Since District 1 has grown so much more than the others, there will be radical changes to the maps this year. You may look at the various plans by going to the Supervisor of Elections website, which is linked on the school district website, www.stjohns.k12. .us. As you may be aware, the FCAT test was changed last year to re ect the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards. The test was made more rigorous, but our students rose to the challenge and performed very well. Now the cut scores for the various levels (1-5) are being raised in almost all the grade levels tested. There is one exception: 10th grade reading is being adjusted to make it more equitable. Over time, the cut score for that particular test had risen disproportionately to the rest, necessitating a readjustment to make it line up more equitably with the others. With the increases in most of the levels, our students are again challenged to raise their bar of performance. I anticipate that they will do well, thanks to the excellence in teaching we enjoy. In addition to the adjustment in FCAT scoring levels, Common Core Curriculum is being phased in this year, beginning in kindergarten. These new standards, which will replace the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards, are national benchmarks for student learning. The standards are being developed by a cadre of people from several states. Full implementation will occur in 2014. For more information about the standards, please go to www. commoncore.org. Please help your local school by collecting Box Tops for Education on cereal and other packaging. Each box top is worth 10 cents to the school of your choice and schools realize several thousands of dollars each year from the program. Ford Motor Company is running a promotion to allow schools to earn extra box top credits, so it is especially important for them to collect as many as they can between now and December 1. In addition, our local Ford/ Lincoln dealership, Bozard Ford/ Lincoln, is partnering with our schools to award extra box tops when they reach certain levels of collection. This is an easy way to enhance the programs at our schools. Elementary and middle schools throughout the county are participating. Thank you in advance for clipping the box tops and giving them to the school of your choice. The third annual Veterans The 18th annual edition of St. Augustines famed Nights of Lights will sparkle to life at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, November 19 when the ick of a switch will illuminate the oldest citys historic district with the gentle glow of more than three million tiny, white lights. Selected in 2009 by AAA as one of the 12 best places in the United States and Canada to experience holiday cheer and named last year as one of the Top 100 events in the United States by the American Bus Association, the Nights of Lights provides a luminous setting for an exciting agenda of holiday events and fun through January 31. To add to this years excitement, the iconic Bridge of Lions will once again provide an incredible display of lights. For Holiday Nights of Lights return to historic St. Augustinethe past ve years, the bridge has been dark during the Nights of Lights due to a complete renovation and re-construction. This year, the bridge and the two new parks at each end will add tens of thousands of lights to the spectacular lighting display. During the nearly 250 years when St. Augustine served as the capital of Spanish La Sunset Celebration will take place on Thursday, November 10, from 5:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. at Veterans Park on Veterans Parkway. I especially invite all our veterans to attend so that a grateful community may thank you for your service. This fun event will include school performances, military displays, a lm about POWs, a bounce house and hamburgers and hot dogs. I hope many of you will join us for this important celebration. Thank you, as always, for your support of public education. If I may serve you in any way, please contact me at sloughb@stjohns.k12. .us. Florida, the residents marked the holiday season with a single white candle burning in a window at each home. Today, the Nights of Lights continues that happy tradition in a grand style that re ects the citys 446 years of history. For additional information, please visit www. oridashistoriccoast.com/nights. the school to the extent that the hall outside of the classroom lled with teachers and students alike to see the special guest. Principal Sparkman remarked, Stephanie is a sweet girl and an exemplary student before she declared a shortened school day for Stephanie. Stephanie quickly she gathered her things to spend the day with her mother. When asked how she felt about the surprise Stephanie replied, I was very sad while she was gone. She said of her plans for the day, I want to go shopping with my mom! As grandparents and mom made their way through the on looking crowd, Stephanie continued in a walking hug with her mom. This undoubtedly will be the most memorable Halloween that sixth grader Stephanie Mitchell will have!Surprise visit cont from pg. 1 WWW WWWwww.TheCreekLine.comVisit our website:FOUND: Treasured Photos Found on the northern end of Flora Branch Boulevard in late October: One 8x10 manila folder containing group family photographs spanning many years. Also two cards of authenticity for a Jacqueline Kent Collection. Please call cell 828-557-3824 to claim

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Page 6, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com The Sheriff Reports By Contributing Writer David B. Shoar, St. Johns County Sheriff www.maymgt.com MAY Management Services, Inc.Licensed Property ManagementMAY Realty & Resort RentalsLicensed Real Estate Brokerage Our job is to help Boards of Directors successfully manage their Associations The Neighborhoods of World Golf Village Tim HutchisonRegional ManagerJulington Creek Plantation 1637 Racetrack Road #206 St. Johns, Florida 32259904-880-8796New Ofce!Jean WrightLicensed Property ManagerDottie KrinerLicensed Property ManagerRich Curran-Kelley, CAMRegional ManagerDiane HartmanLicensed Property ManagerKathy MayeldLicensed Property ManagerDeborah AlleyLicensed Property ManagerLaura QualantoneLicensed Property Manager904-940-1002 Jim Taylor provides TaylorMade SolutionsCall me at 904-705-1692 or TaylorMade4You@bellsouth.net to discuss how I can provide Solutions tailor-made for You.Managerial Accounting ServicesOver 30 years experiencePersonal & Business Income Tax PreparationFormer Internal Revenue Agent & Lic. to practice before the IRS Excel Spreadsheet Design, Training, & Support QuickBooks Set-Up, Training & SupportYear End is fast approaching. Call me now to review your QuickBooks setup, financials and year-end payroll & 1099s. Intelligence Led Policing Last month I wrote about crime prevention and how important citizen involvement can be in helping to keep our neighborhoods throughout the county safe. This month I want to share about how our o ce is initiating innovative procedures to more e ectively use our deputies and other resources to prevent crime and become an even more proactive law enforcement agency. Its called Intelligence Led Policing (ILP). It is collecting information from many sources to identify and understand where criminal activity or civil disobedience is most likely to occur and in what time frame and then making command decisions to intervene and eradicate such situations before any harm can happen. It is very much like the business model of risk assessment and risk management. Intelligence Led Policing originated in the United Kingdom and was brought to the United States by Jerry Radcli e, professor and chair of the Department of Criminal Justice at Temple University in Philadelphia where he is also director of the Center of Security and Crime Science. Dr. Radcli e sites a simple scenario to help explain the concept. Deputies are standing by a river and bodies are oating down every day. Every day the o cers collect the bodies and call in the crime scene technicians. Following the ILP model they should be going upstream to see who is throwing the bodies in the river. This is a very simple example of ILP, but is conceptually right. Rather than just investigating crimes after they occur, we now have a system to gather information and the tools to analyze what we have to do to prevent them from happening. By the very nature of this initiative I cannot share a great deal of speci c information but wish to give you a thumbnail overview. The key to ILP is collecting information that can be analyzed in ways that can lead to putting the best resources in the right place at the right time to prevent a crime or threat to public safety. This is really nothing new. When I was a rookie many years ago, we were putting push pins on a map to identify where crimes had occurred and were able to identify problem areas where our police presence should be increased. Now new technology allows us to gather information from many sources in a central location and use software programs and specially trained personnel to quickly determine areas for intervention. This is incorporated into our continuous process of planning to re ect community problems and issues. Information sharing between our various divisions, St. Augustine and St. Augustine Beach police, other regional law enforcement and public safety agencies, the FBI and Homeland Security is now policy rather than an informal practice. Here is another example of how the system can work. A couple of convenience store robberies are reported to our o ce and thoroughly investigated. The ILP unit also has data about similar crimes in Clay and Flagler Counties as well as in St. Augustine Beach. The analysts determine a predictable pattern and time frame and the next time cops are waiting to catch a perpetrator red handed. The intelligence we use is gathered from many sources and including from you, our citizens. We need you to report suspicious activity even if you choose to remain anonymous. It may be just the information we need as a piece of the puzzle that will identify and prevent a more serious crime. Our new initiative also has built in safeguards to protect privacy. Intelligence in the context of law enforcement has less to do with the methods of information collection and more to do about how the information is used. The information collected can only become intelligence when it is combined with data from other sources and historical models and then is analyzed by experienced professionals. When properly applied in this way the concept should raise no concern related to civil liberties. Again I thank you for taking the time to read my column and if you have any questions or concerns about St. Johns County law enforcement to please email me at dshoar@ sjso.org. Dear Editor: I want to thank this paper for their commitment to keeping the community current on events and issues. It is a great deal to ask for a free paper that is delivered in our mail boxes each month. Thank you for all you do for our communities. You are currently running a series on CDDs which I read with interest. In the October article by a contributing writer, there was reference to the County managing two Community Development Districts. As a commissioner representing all the citizens in St. Johns County, I wanted to clarify that St. Johns County does not manage any Community Development Districts or CDDs. CDDs are one type of special taxing districts provided for by Florida Statute. The county does have several special taxing districts that were formed by the County at the request of residents. Those Municipal Service Taxing Units or Bene t Letter to the EditorUnits, as the case may be, have primarily been used to provide neighborhoods without a formal HOA or CDD a way to upgrade infrastructure. The most common uses of those districts in St. Johns County have been to pave private dirt roads or install street lights. The county does act as the board for those districts to install, maintain and repair infrastructure for neighborhoods that initiated them and fund their operation. Other Special Districts in the county including Soil and Water Conservation, Anastasia Island Mosquito Control, Airport Authority were formed di erently and have the ability to set their own millage rate, budget. Thank you for your consistent work and for serving the communities of NW St. Johns County and helping to keep us informed through contributing writers.Cyndi Stevenson St. Johns County Commissioner, District 1 The CreekLine 886-4919NW St. Johns Countys Community Newspaper Flu PrecautionsThe St. Johns County Health Department offers the following tips to avoid spreading the u: Cough/sneeze into your elbow, sleeve or a disposable tissue. Wash your hands well and often. Stay home if you are sick (at least 24 hours after fever is gone). Take time to get vaccinated! Individuals experiencing cough, fever and fatigue, possibly along with diarrhea and vomiting should contact their health care provider.For more information, please visit www.StJohnsCHD.org

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 7 G RAND OPENING! Southwood Village AT WESTMINSTER WOODS ON JULINGTON CREEK 25 State Road 13, Jacksonville Refreshments will be served. Call 904-287-7300 for more information.Youre Invited!Discover Active Living!Tuesday, November 29, 20112:00PM to 6:00PM What if government was forced to do less with less, instead of doing more with less? Recently, the St. Johns County Commission voted to raise taxes upon its residents. That body has done this at a time when the tax payers are being forced to cope with low property values, underwater mortgages, high foreclosure rates, high unemployment, higher living expenses and no raises. Instead of adjusting tax rates, they could have reduced operating expenses to meet the critical situations of their constituents; however, this body has decided to force taxpayers to accept the countys view of austerity. The JCP CDD should not follow this example. Did you know the shopping center at Race Track Road and Flora Branch Boulevard and certain other businesses in the JCP area also pay CDD assessments? Thats because they are within the JCP CDD boundary. Did you know, for example, that one particular business pays about $200,000 per year in CDD assessments, which happens to be 126 percent higher than their property taxes? There are nearby businesses outside the JCP CDD that pay no such fees. I have often wondered if those fees place businesses within the CDD at a competitive disadvantage and if it a ects the type and amount of businesses from locating to our community, a ecting our nearby shopping options. Do you have an opinion on this topic? I would welcome your comments. At the last CDD meeting some JCP CDD Supervisors suggested increasing CDD employee salaries in 2012. I have suggested we continue to focus on reducing expenses and/or increasing user fees. I submitted a 20 point plan that outlines many di erent ways to reduce expenses, but it has not received much traction. Did you know the CDD general managers salary has increased about 117 percent in six years? In my opinion, many of the CDD personnel are currently adequately paid and have received generous raises and bonuses in recent years. What is your opinion on the salary increases? The JCP CDD still provides a host of activities that may interest you this winter. The tennis sta will be hosting a holiday camp for ages ve through 13 and will run two weeks from December 19 through 22 and December 26 through 29 from 9:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. Also, tennis will begin cardio tennis clinics this fall, focusing on movement and agility on Wednesdays from 6:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. and Saturdays from 9:00 a.m. until 10:00 a.m. Salsa and country line dancing classes will continue through November Julington Creek Plantation CDD reportBy Contributing Writer Sam Lansdale, Supervisor, Julington Creek Plantation Community Development Districtand you can join at any time. JCP will be having a Thank a Veteran Ceremony in front of the Recreation Center on November 10 at 7:00 p.m. I encourage you to sign up for free email alerts at www.jcpcdd.org to receive e-mail reminders of upcoming events and programs. We work for you and I encourage you to attend the meetings and voice your concerns or opinions on how we are conducting your business. The next JCP CDD meetings will take place on November 8, 2011 and December 13, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. at the JCP Recreation Center. Feel free to contact me day or night via e-mail (SLansdale@ jcpcdd.org) or phone (509-4902). This article is my opinion and in no way constitutes nor implies District opinion, endorsement, sponsorship or viewpoint. The views expressed may or may not be shared by the other JCP CDD Supervisors. Editors Note: The CreekLine is appreciative that Supervisor Lansdale approached us and o ered to write a column for us to share with our readers. The CreekLine is, and has always been, agreeable to publishing columns penned by our elected o cials so that they may communicate directly with our readers, their constituents. Any questions or requests for additional public servant columns may be directed to editor@ thecreekline.com. Veterans Sunset CelebrationVeterans ParkNovember 10 5:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m.Liberty Pines Academy Chorus Bartram Trail ROTC Color Guard Fruit Cove Middle Jazz Band Key Note Speaker, Brigadier General Joe BalskusDont miss this community event! Give Thanks!

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Page 8, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com A bronze statue to commemorate and memorialize the hard work of the K-9 of- cers and their handlers was dedicated in mid-October at the Memorial Courtyard in front of the St. Johns County Sheri s O ce. The German shepherd named Spirit, as in the spirit of truth, honor and justice, proudly stands guard in front of the Sheri s O ce. Sheri David Shoar Spirit statue dedicated at Sheri s O cethanked those who participated in raising the funds for the statue and especially recognized a St. Johns County man who contributed the lions share of the cost. Joe Montoro was presented an appreciation plaque for his generous contribution. This isnt the rst time that Montoro has assisted the Sheri s O ce with his generosity. He was the donor of K-9 Bravo, the Sheri s O ce rst bomb detection dog. When he learned that a committee was formed to raise funds for the K-9 recognition project and at the time the committee had raised one fth of the monies, he wrote a check for the additional funds in order to purchase the statue. Spirit was delivered earlier this year and when Montoro observed the statue standing proudly in front of the Sheri s O ce, he approached Sheri Shoar with several other ideas that he o ered to fund. A granite slab, with room for 56 names that would recognize all of the Sheri s O ce K-9s, their years of service and their handler, was purchased. The granite slab, containing the 15 names currently being honored was placed next to the statue at the ceremony. The second is when a K-9 retires or is lost in the line-of-duty, the handler will receive an engraved marker to remember his partner. Some of those were honored in October and in the future will be awarded at a ceremony. At the 2009 National Conference on Citizenship, United States Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia was asked if he believed that America should be doing more to increase civic participation. His initial response a blunt No took the audience by surprise. He followed with a simple and yet profound explanation that America should, instead, do more to increase informed civic participation. Scalia exposed a serious condition in the American citizenry. Simply put, too many people are ill-prepared to adequately ful ll the duties as citizens. We too willingly submit, in thought and deed, The need for informed civic participationBy Contributing Writer James A. Lee, Peer Teacher Evaluator, St. Johns County School Districtto the shallow biased rants of television news, talk radio and the blogosphere. Furthermore, we are doing little to rectify this condition. We are satis ed being told what to think and how to act without questioning the bully pulpits. I suggest we heed Justice Scalias warning by responding with two simple actions; one, read and two, ask questions. Being constantly overwhelmed with information, though, how do we nd time in our busyness to read and to know what information can be trusted? As any good student knows, when the secondary source is questionable, go to the primary source. To this end I commend The CreekLine. Over the next several issues, the editor will be printing sections of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. I encourage you to read it and question it and to question those who tout it for their own interests. Then, discuss it with your family, with your friends and with your colleagues. Sure, I know this sounds corny, but thats the very problem Scalia was exposing. We must stop relying on others to tell us what to think and how to act and to give rebirth to the American democratic spirit of being truly informed, active citizens. She is looking for other individuals who are willing to come forward and help preserve our creeks. She says the plan is for two annual meetings with committees formed to meet on a more regular basis. If you see yourself joining Sarah Bailey as she strikes out on this mission, you can reach Sarah Bailey cont from pg. 1 her by calling 287-1763. She extended an open invitation to come talk with any group that is interested in learning more about the creeks and the Julington-Durbin Creeks Conservation Foundation. After all, what better way to start something than by having a person with years of experience and commitment begin the journey? We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America. Article. I. Section. 1. All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives. Section. 2. The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in each State shall have the Quali cations requisite for Electors of the most numerous Branch of the State Legislature. No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the Age of twenty ve Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen. Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding Constitution for the United States of Americato the whole Number of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three fths of all other Persons [Modi ed by Amendment XIV]. The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the rst Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct. The Number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each State shall have at Least one Representative; and until such enumeration shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to chuse three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations one, Connecticut ve, New-York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight, Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina ve, South Carolina ve, and Georgia three. When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the Executive Authority thereof shall issue Writs of Election to ll such Vacancies. The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other O cers; and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment. Section. 3. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature thereof [Modi ed by Amendment XVII], for six Years; and each Senator shall have one Vote. Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the rst Election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three Classes. The Seats of the Senators of the rst Class shall be vacated at the Expiration of the second Year, of the second Class at the Expiration of the fourth Year, and of the third Class at the Expiration of the sixth Year, so that one third may be chosen every second Year; and if Vacancies happen by Resignation, or otherwise, during the Recess of the Legislature of any State, the Executive thereof may make temporary Appointments until the next Meeting of the Legislature, which shall then ll such Vacancies [Modi ed by Amendment XVII]. No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty Years, and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall be chosen. The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no Vote, unless they be equally divided. The Senate shall chuse their other O cers, and also a President pro tempore, in the Absence of the Vice President, or when he shall exercise the O ce of President of the United States. The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments. When sitting for that Purpose, they shall be on Oath or A rmation. When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no Person shall be convicted without the Concurrence of two thirds of the Members present. Judgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from O ce, and disquali cation to hold and enjoy any O ce of honor, Trust or Pro t under the United States: but the Party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and Punishment, according to Law. Section. 4. The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and such Meeting shall be on the rst Monday in December [Modi ed by Amendment XX], unless they shall by Law appoint a di erent Day. Section. 5. Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and Quali cations of its own Members, and a Majority of each shall constitute a Quorum to do Business; but a smaller Number may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to compel the Attendance of absent Members, in such Manner, and under such Penalties as each House may provide. Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members for disorderly Behaviour, and, with the Concurrence of two thirds, expel a Member. Each House shall keep a Journal of its Proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such Parts as may in their Judgment require Secrecy; and the Yeas and Nays of the Members of either House on any question shall, at the Desire of one fth of those Present, be entered on the Journal. Neither House, during the Session of Congress, shall, without the Consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other Place than that in which the two Houses shall be sitting. As a community service, The CreekLine Community Newspaper will be publishing the Constitution for the United States in its entirety over the next several issues. Please check back next month for the continuation.

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 9 i pick paint color.www.pamsatherstudio.com pam satherthe right color paint carpet hardwood tile904.466-0370 watch Pams design segments on First Coast Living11:00 am Dr. Levine is dedicated to your familys health through every stage of life. He has served Julington Creek for more than 12 years and is ready to provide you with a medical home. Services include: Sports/school physicals Immunizations Well visits for adults and children GYN care Coordination of care for chronic conditions (diabetes, hypertension, etc.) On-site lab for all blood drawsFinding the right family doctor just got easier.Same-day acute appointments 287.2794Baptist Primary Care Julington Creek1400 Bishop Estates Road, St. Johns, FL 32259 Donald J. Levine, MD Board-Certified, Family Practice, along with Carol N. Sims, PA-C 13www.baptistprimarycare.net/levine-md Flu Vaccine Available Tina P. Fernandez, CPA, PLwww.tpfcpa.com 904-287-2195 Over 30 Years ExperienceHave Condence in Your Tax Preparation & Planning. Allow Me to Assist You. Visit www.tpfcpa.com for informative news and Tax Savings Tips. Serving the Accounting Needs of Individuals and Small Businesses by Providing Quality Service at Competitive Rates. Would you prefer to pay your taxes at your leisure? Would you like to pay your taxes without having to get out of your car? Or at home, in your pajamas? St. Johns County Tax Collector Dennis W. Hollingsworth, CFC, in an e ort to make paying your tax bill as convenient as possible, o ers several di erent options sure to suit the needs, schedules and preferences of all St. Johns County residents. The most tried and true method of payment is the United States mail. Simply place your tax bill with the proper payment (personal check, cashiers check or money order) in the return envelope sent with the bill. Please write your property parcel number on the check and place a rst-class stamp on the envelope. With online credit card payment increasing due to convenience, the Tax Collectors o ce o ers an online payment service to residents with Internet access and a credit card. Access the St. Johns County Tax Collectors website, www.sjctax.us and follow the prompts for payment. Please note that a convenience fee is associated with this service. The convenience fee is collected by and transmitted to the credit card companies that Five easy ways to pay your tax billprocess the transaction; this of- ce does not retain any portion of the fee. Anyone who prefers personalized service is welcome to visit any of the Tax Collectors ve o ces. All of the locations are open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. till 5:00 p.m. The St. Augustine main o ce is also open till 6:00 p.m. every Friday. The main o ce in St. Augustine also will be open on Saturday, November 26 from 8:30 a.m. until 12:00 noon. Please note that the branch o ces will be closed on this day. All locations will be closed Thursday, November 24 and Friday, November 25 in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. For your added convenience, we have a drop box for payment by check only on the east side of the St. Augustine location. No cash collected in the drop box or by curbside service, please! As a courtesy to the residents of St. Johns County, the Tax Collector will o er limited curbside service for tax collection at the main o ce location, 4030 Lewis Speedway during the last few days of the four percent discount collection period. Please check our website, www.sjctax.us for the speci c dates and times. Beginning Tuesday November 1, St. Johns County property owners found their tax bills in the mailbox as the 2011 tax season began. This includes bills for real estate, tangible personal property, railroad and non ad-valorem assessments. Total taxes to be collected are $342,183,959. This is a decrease of $7,749,804.36 compared to the 2010 tax roll of $379,612,844.53. Although all tax bills become due November 1, 2011, they are payable through March 31, 2012, without incurring a penalty. Property owners have the opportunity to pay their tax bills over the next several months, but the greatest savings can be realized by those who opt to pay their bills in November when they can get a 4 percent discount. The amount of the discount decreases by 1 percent every month until March 2012 when bills must be paid and no discount is applied, per Florida Statute 197. There are various methods of payment available to St. Johns County property owners. The most popular method is the United States mail. There is also an online payment option to property owners with internet service and a credit card. Access the St. Johns County Tax Collector website at www.sjctax.us and follow the prompts for payment. Please note that a convenience fee set by the credit card companies is associated with this service; however, the Tax Collectors o ce does not retain any portion of this fee. Anyone unable to pay their homestead property taxes should contact the St. Johns County Tax Collector as early as possible to determine eligibility for the Homestead Tax Deferral per Chapter 197.253, Florida Statutes. Florida Statute Chapter 197 allows taxpayers to prepay their taxes via an installment payment plan for each tax notice with taxes estimated to be more than $100. Participants enrolled in the 2011 installment plan will receive their third quarterly installment tax bill in December. This option is no longer available for the 2011 taxes unless already enrolled in the installment plan. Application for the 2012 tax year must be made with the Tax Collectors o ce prior to May 1, 2012, with the rst payment due no later than June 30, 2012. In addition to the mailings sent to property owners, 39,367 payment notices were sent to mortgage companies with Escrow Accounts totaling $121,558,631.32. If you have an escrow account, you should be receiving an information only notice detailing your tax status and stating, This is not a bill-do not payyour bill has been forwarded to your escrow agent. Please note that the Tax Collectors o ce is responsible for collecting, investing and distributing tax revenue. Any questions regarding homestead exemptions and assessment disputes should be addressed to the Property Appraiser. Any questions regarding the individual taxing authorities millage rates listed on your bill should be addressed to those individual authorities. If you have questions, comments or suggestions regarding the operation of the St. Johns County Tax Collectors o ce, please do not hesitate to contact me at taxcollector@sjctax.us.Taxing IssuesBy Contributing Writer Dennis W. Hollingsworth, CFC, St. Johns County Tax Collector Does your partner complain that you snore or does your partner keep you up at night? Do you ever wake up gasping for air at night? Please contact our oce if you are suering from any or all of the following symptoms eBooks for Phones and Tablets Saturday, Nov. 12, 11:30 a.m. You dont need a dedicated eReader to read eBooks! You can use it on multi-function mobile devices such as an iPhone or an iPad. Bring your device with you to learn how to get an eBook from the library onto your device!Computer Classes at the Bartram Trail Branch LibraryeBooks for Kindle Saturday, Nov. 12, 10:05 a.m. is class will show you how to get an eBook from the library onto your Kindle device. Bring your Kindle with you! Dont have one but thinking of getting one? Come and watch how easy it is! eBooks for non-Kindle eReaders Saturday, Nov. 12, 10:45 a.m. is class will show you how to get an eBook from the library onto your Nook or whatever other non-Kindle eReader you have. If you have both a laptop and an eReader, please bring both with you. The CreekLine 886-4919

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Page 10, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com e St. Johns Center for Clinical Research is currently seeking volunteers to participate in a 28 week clinical research study evaluating an investigational medications for high cholesterol. You may consider volunteering if you: Volunteers Needed Do you have High Cholesterol? :St. Johns Center for Clinical Research(904) 209-3173MA1110601 ACCREDITEDACCREDITATION ASSOCIATION for AMBULATORYHEALTH CARE EYE CENTEROF ST. AUGUSTINE & WORLD GOLF VILLAGETHE EYE SURGERY CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE AAAHC 940-9200 T T Governor Rick Scott has been looking invited or uninvited into every facet of government in Florida, seeking e ciencies and ways to lessen the impact of government on citizens. Community Development Districts are included in his search for what he feels is a better Florida. The Palm Beach Post daily newspaper has been following Governor Scotts inquiry into a part of Florida government that many Floridians and residents of St. Johns County dont know much about. The Post reports there are 1,633 special districts, including the 39 districts in St. Johns County. Collectively, The Post reports, the districts take in $15.5 billion in taxpayer money each year; that stunning amount has caught the governors eye. Further, the news reports tell us special taxing districts in Florida date to the days of the Florida Land Boom in the 1920s when hospital taxing authorities were rst created. CDDs are not a new concept; they just have a new name after the Florida legislature in the past few years placed nearly everything into one general name category. CDDs have been a handy way for real estate developers to create entire new communities, complete with infrastructure and meet pay-for-growth laws in Florida. Once the developers complete a community and turn over the management of the community to either CDDs or homeowners associations (or a combination of both), the developers move on to the next project, leaving the payment for bonds sold for the infrastructure to the CDD residents and any commercial interests which may fall into CDD boundaries. These Third of a seriesGovernor, legislature examining rules and income of CDDsBy J. Bruce Richardsonpayments usually stretch for decades. Most CDDs are governed by elected boards of directors and often the day to day management of the districts is handled either by a paid, professional sta or outsourced to a private company specializing in such services. CDDs are loosely regulated by various state agencies. The governor isnt the only one concerned about CDDs and other taxing districts, which range from huge water management districts to local community districts. Both houses of the Florida legislature are looking at the districts, trying to determine if any tweaking or reduction of present laws is called for to ensure the districts are fully accountable and remain relevant. Republican Senator Mike Bennett of Bradenton has introduced Senate Bill 192, designed to enable the merging of some districts or abolishing those determined to have outlived their usefulness. The bill, if it passes the 2012 legislature session, which starts January 10, 2012 and is then signed by the governor, has these general purposes, as provided by the Florida Senate summary: Special Districts; Revising provisions relating to merger and dissolution procedures for special districts; requiring the merger or dissolution of dependent special districts created by a special act to be e ectuated by the Legislature; providing for the merger or dissolution of inactive special districts by special act without referenda; requiring involuntary dissolution procedures for independent special districts to include referenda; providing for the merger of certain independent special districts by the Legislature; providing procedures and requirements for the voluntary merger of contiguous independent special districts; revising criteria by which special districts are declared inactive by a governing body, etc. A similar Florida House bill, introduced by Representative Matt Caldwell of Lehigh Acres near Fort Myers has similar language: Special Districts; Revises provisions relating to merger and dissolution procedures for special districts; provides for certain merger and dissolution procedures to include referenda; provides that such provisions preempt certain special acts; provides for local governments to assume indebtedness of, and receive title to property owned by, special districts under certain circumstances; deletes provision relating to conditions under which merger of independent special districts or dependent re control districts with other special districts is e ective and conditions under which merged district is authorized to increase ad valorem taxes; revises criteria by which special districts are declared inactive by governing body. One notable di erence between the senate and house bills is the house bill provides language for local governments to assume indebtedness of and receive title to property owned by special districts under certain circumstances. This could possibly result in some districts being absorbed into local town or city governments. The Post quoted Jon Costello, the governors top lobbyist on the issue, as telling the House Economic A airs Committee the governors o ce is trying to develop some kind of legislation aimed at tightening the grip on special taxing districts, but, Costello reassured committee members, whatever is proposed will not dramatically change the setting for Floridas current districts. The governor is not looking to take an ax to special districts, The Post directly quoted Costello saying. The Bennett senate measure appears to have bipartisan legislative support; the bill passed the senates Community A airs Committee on a 6-0 vote. Senator Bennett told The Post hes not looking either to change the world of special districts and his bill would shield existing authorities from being abolished by state o cials outside of the legislature. But, the bill would make it easier for neighboring districts to consider merging, to save money or improve e ciency. CDDs and other special districts can only be created by the Florida legislature and regulations for the districts are determined by the legislature. You can follow the progress of both bills through the committee process and the full legislative session by logging on to www. house.gov and www. senate.gov and placing the bill numbers (HB 0107 and SB 192) into the legislation tracker on the respective home pages. The senate bill was referred to the Community A airs and Budget committees; after having passed the Community A airs Committee unanimously, is now in the Budget Subcommittee on Finance and Tax as of press time. The house bill was referred to the Community and Military A airs Subcommittee; Finance and Tax Committee; and Economic A airs Committee. As of press time, no action has been taken on the bill.J. Bruce Richardson, a resident of Jacksonville, has created many successful marketing, advertising, public relations, fund-raising and political campaigns. A former newsroom staffer of the late Jacksonville Journal, Mr. Richardson has an educational background in management and nance..The St. Johns County School District is seeking input on the proposed 2012-2013 school calendars. A survey link is now available on the school district website for community members to provide input on the calendars. Each calendar proposal can be downloaded and printed. Variations in the two versions include di erences in the planning and inservice days and the length of the rst Next years school calendar needs community input semester in the second version. The survey link can be accessed at www.stjohns.k12. .us under Whats New on the school district home page. Individuals are encouraged to submit any ideas, suggestions or concerns about the proposed calendars. Input will be gathered through November 13. The nal proposed calendar must be approved by the School Board.

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 11 ( 904 ) 825 9960 In the Winn-Dixie Shopping Center on CR 210 W2220 CR 210 W, Suite 312, St. Johns Florida 32259 Fall Special10% OFFAny dental treatment, including crowns, bridges, partials, veneers, etc. Not valid with other oers. Oer Expires 12/10/11New Patient Special Adults $99 & Children $79Includes dental exam and x-rays, a uoride treatment, teeth cleaning and polishing. Not valid with other oers. Oer Expires 12/10/11 Gentle, Caring Dentistry for the Whole Family For Appointment Call904-230-0080 NEW LOCATION! 485 State Road 13Suite 3 (Next to Burger King) Dr. Thomas Lahmannwww.julingtoncreekchiro.com Is Back or Neck Pain Impacting Your Life? Dr. Thomas Lahmann Chiropractic PhysicianHumana Beech Street A Proud Participating Provider for Aetna and Blue Cross / Blue Shield United Insurance Plans Accepts All Auto Insurance Julington Creek Chiropractic & Wellness Center P.A.SpineMedTM Spinal Disc DecompressionA Safe and Pain-Free Procedure Designed for Back & Neck pain Non-Surgical, Drug Free Procedures for: MICHAEL BOYER PAINTING, LLC287-2203 Licensed & Insured #ST-5178 LLC 20%Discount off total amount due for the month of November We Do It ALL!Take an additioinal 20% off the total amount due. For example: 1,300 sq ftregular price $1,600 20% discount you pay only $1,280! JCP CARES will once again be conducting its fall food drive to bene t food banks within St. Johns County. Food collected this year will be divided between the Betty Gri n House and Celebration Lutheran Food Pantry. JCP CARES delivers bags from Publix along with yers to nearly 5000 homes in the Julington Creek area. Residents are being asked to put non-perishable items in the bags and leave them on the curb for pick up on Saturday, November 19, 2011. In addition, food items will be collected at Liberty Pines Academy, Julington Creek Elementary, Wards Creek Elementary and Fruit Cove Middle School. Donations will also be accepted at the Champions Club in Julington Creek Plantation between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. on November 18, located at the round-about on Durbin Creek Boulevard. Volunteers will sort the items for delivery to the local food banks. Student volunteers can clock volunteer hours while learning rst-hand the importance of their community activism. JCP CARES wishes to JCP CARES holds annual food driveBy Contributing Writer Michelle Busbyencourage grocery shoppers to consider shopping at the BOGO buy one, get one free bins at the front of the grocery stores. Customers can take advantage of the grocery store promotions, while giving to those in need. During this time of need, please remember: Buy One, Give One Free.Fraternal Order Orioles St. Johns River Nest 324, one of the newest clubs in the 101-year-old Fraternal Order Orioles community organization, has donated operating pro ts to Pacetti Bay Middle School and St. Josephs Academy. Located near the St. Johns River at 9155 County Road 13, Orioles Nest 324 opened January 14, 2011 and has already grown to a membership of 400. Founded on the principles of community, fraternity and charity, Orioles nests nationwide are open to all adults who wish to apply. St. Johns River Nest 324 is open seven days a week, providing members a place to socialize, enjoy di erent nightly activities, and view a variety of televised sporting events on numerous big-screen TVs. The club is smoke-free and o ers a full bar. Under the organizations charter, pro ts from all Ori-New Orioles Nest contributes pro ts to St. Johns County Schoolsole clubs must be donated to charities, which are selected by each local Nest. We wanted a clear focus for our charitable donations, and the educational system seemed to be in great need, says St. Johns River Nest 324 president Jim Laquidara. My wife teaches high school and we have two children in St. Augustine schools and we see teachers buying school supplies with their own money. Our members are very glad that their clubs pro ts are going to help out local schools at a time when their budgets are severely strained. St. Johns River Nest 324 encourages local schools to request donations for speci c needs. Additional pro t donations are already planned for Mill Creek Elementary and Wards Creek Elementary. The club also raises money for other charitable organizations, such as its October 15 BBQ bene t for the St. Johns County Police Athletic League. Membership continues to grow at Nest 324, with folks joining from the surrounding area, nearby World Golf Village, St. Augustine, Jacksonville, Palm Coast, Flagler Beach, Green Cove Springs, Putnam County, as well as several snowbirds visiting during the winter. Annual dues for members of St. Johns River Nest 324 are $10. Nest 324 is open Monday through Friday from 4:00 p.m. to 12:00 midnight and Saturday and Sunday from 12:00 noon to 12:00 midnight. The club may sometimes open earlier or close later according to broadcast times of popular sporting events. For additional information, please contact Jim Laquidara at 669-8905.The William Bartram Scenic Highway group enjoyed another planning meeting on October 13, but we missed you. Hope to see you at our next meeting in November. Wed love to hear your ideas to keep our Scenic Highway scenic and be part of our energetic group. The biggest news from the October meeting was the nal planning for two eventsthe Oral History party and Old Settlers Reunion. These events were held on October 15 and 16 respectively. The Oral History party honored the St. Johns County long term residents who recorded and shared recollections of their life, customs, traditions and relationships, growing up in the early days of St. Johns County between the years 1920 and the 1970s. These oral histories now reside at the Bartram Branch of the county library and are available for your enjoyment. They will soon be available at the St. Augustine Historical Society in St. Augustine. At the party we also unveiled a new ten minute video titled Up from the Roots Remembering Rural St. Johns County. This video presents views depicting life in the early years of St. Johns County we know you will enjoy this review of the early years. Call William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway updateBy Contributing Writer Al Abbatiello, alabbat@bellsouth.netAl Abbatiello (287-5577) to reserve your copy the cost is $5 each. Contributions to the William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway, a 501 (C) (3) organization, are tax deductible. Weve now completed the viewshed analysis originally suggested by county administrator, Mike Wanchick. This analysis will help the county better plan developments / change along State Road 13 while retaining its scenic and historic nature. County sta reviewed the analysis in an earlier meeting, making minor changes and endorsing the end result. The Fall edition of the William Bartram Scenic Highway Newsletter was recently completed and sent to all subscribers. The newsletter gives a summary of news and events along the Scenic Highway and will keep you up to date on happenings in the great NW St. Johns County. Sign up for the newsletter on the website or simply email me: alabbat@ bellsouth.net. In October I mentioned an FDOT project at State Road 16 and State Road 13 that could negatively impact the Scenic Highway. I am discussing this project with county management and will report results in the next issue of The CreekLine. Ra e tickets are still being o ered, courtesy of the Garden Club. Claire Fioriti reports ticket sales have been excellent and a few are still available call Claire (287-9772) for your ticket ($3 each/ or four for $10). Ra e proceeds will buy trees to be planted on State Road 13 when and where theyre needed. Childrens Art Activity Wednesday, November 30 3 pm If you like art and youre in 3rd, 4th or 5th grade, come to the Bartram Trail Branch Library to participate in an artist-inspired art activity! Register for St. Johns County Sheriff Departments....CodeREDwww.sjso.org Be notified of public safety issues by high-speed telephone emergency notification services.

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Page 12, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com ACCREDITEDACCREDITATION ASSOCIATION for AMBULATORYHEALTH CARE EYE CENTEROF ST. AUGUSTINE & WORLD GOLF VILLAGETHE EYE SURGERY CENTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE AAAHC 940-9200 T T Buy A Business John SerbCertied Business Intermediary www.FirstCoastBizBuySell.com Call 904-613-2658 for a Condential No-Cost Valuation & Consultation We can handle all of the details! We know the ins and outs of the local real estate market and have the knowledge and commitment to meet your needs. If you are looking to buy a home, sell your home, invest in property, or build a new home, let us be your real estate representatives. Contact us today for all of your real estate needs. big and small An Independently Owned and Operated Member of The Prudential Real Estate Aliates, Inc. Prudential is a service mark of The Prudential Insurance Company of America. Equal Housing Opportunity. All information deemed reliable, but not guaran teed. we sell them allNeed help buying, selling or investing in real estate?Stan & Jan Timbrook REALTORS St. Johns County Tax Collector Dennis W. Hollingsworth, CFC, distributed $4,238,420.88 to the local government and taxing authorities, from unused earned revenue collected during Fiscal Year 2010-2011. The largest portion of this amount, of $4,026,884.15, was presented to the Board of County Commissioners and other taxing authorities at the regular County Commission meeting Tuesday, October 18. This is the 22nd year that the St Johns County Tax Collectors o ce has maintained this level of e ciency, resulting in additional funds for taxing authorities. Since Fiscal Year 2000, the Tax Collector has distributed to taxing authorities more than $41 million in unused earned revenues after meeting their budget requirements. The Florida Statutes refer to these revenues as excess fees. This $4.2 million represents unused revenue the Tax Collectors Tax Collectors o ce presents revenue to County Commissiono ce earned for the taxpayers of St. Johns County that was not expended or used in the operation of the local tax, tag and driver license o ces. The Tax Collectors o ce is self-sustaining, operating from monies regulated by Florida Statutes on commissions from the collection of taxes and fees for the mandated State functions of several agencies. These agencies include the Department of Revenue; the Division of Motor Vehicles; and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The additional revenue also was generated as interest earned from investments, as well as revenue from additional tag and title business the Tax Collector seeks through acquisition of eet accounts such as UPS and Ring Power. The Tax Collectors o ce operates independent of the County Commissions budget, Hollingsworth said. We must operate our o ce solely on statutorily established commissions and fees from state and local governments. The unused revenue Hollingsworth has collected over the past year is a result of the tax, tag and driver license o ces operating with frugality and e ciency. Hollingsworth said he is honored to serve the taxpayers of St. Johns County by managing their Tax Collectors o ce in a scally responsible manner. Although property tax collection revenue is down, the parcel count in St. Johns County actually has increased, he said. The total amount distributed includes monies that are generated by the o ce and received throughout the year from other State agencies, such as mobile home revenues received from the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles and revenues from Retained Vessel Fees which are distributed weekly by the Tax Collectors o ce.Baptist Health has announced that it made this years InformationWeek 500, an annual listing of the nations most innovative users of business technology, claiming a spot in the top half of the list this year. The 2011 list was revealed September 13 at the exclusive InformationWeek 500 Conference in Dana Point, California. Baptist Health was recognized for its ongoing project, initiated in 2010, to bring an electronic medical record (EMR) to all ve of its facilities. The goal is to make patient care safer and improve patient outcomes. This endeavor, which involves installing new infrastructure, implementing software and providing comprehensive training to employees, involves a team of hundreds including information services, physicians and nursing sta as well as external business partners and software providers. Going fully digital is the future of health care, said Roland Garcia, senior vice president and chief information o cer, Baptist Health. Baptist Health is pleased to be recognized among the InformationWeek 500 for our Baptist Health earns ranking in InformationWeek 500 initiative to create one electronic medical record throughout our system of four adult hospitals, one childrens hospital, a home health care agency and our network of more than 100 primary care and specialty physician o ces. The federal government has mandated that all healthcare providers put electronic records in place, but Baptist Health was already at the forefront of this new age. Baptist Medical Center South was designed and opened as a fully-digital hospital in 2005. Now, all three of Baptist Healths community hospitals Baptist South, Baptist Beaches and Baptist Nassau are fully digital and using an electronic medical record. So are Baptist Home Health Care and many of the o ces within Baptist Primary Care. Baptist Medical Center and Wolfson Childrens Hospital have some EMR functions in place and will become fully digital in 2012, while all other locations are implementing signi cant enhancements. InformationWeek annually identi es and honors the nations most innovative users of information technology with its Top 500 listing and spotlights the power of innovation in information technology.For 23 years, the InformationWeek 500 has chronicled and honored the most innovative users of business technology, said InformationWeek Editor In Chief Rob Preston. In this day and age however, being innovative isnt enough. Companies and their IT organizations need to innovate faster than ever before to stay a step or two ahead of their customers, partners and competitors. Additional details can be found online at www.informationweek.com/iw500/.The St. Johns River Water Management Districts Governing Board gave nal approval in late September to a budget that reduces its property tax revenue by 26 percent for the next scal year and lowers taxes for property owners while e ectively funding the agencys core missions and highest priorities. At the public meeting, the board approved a 0.3313 millage rate that will generate $85.3 million in revenue for a $204.7 million budget. The budget also will be funded with prior years state and carryover funds, timber sales, cattle leases, interest earnings and permit fees. The approved budget is 16.4 percent less than the current scal year 201011 budget. The new budget year began October 1 and ends September 30, 2012. The budget reduces the property tax rate by 20 percent over the current years millage rate. Under a 0.3313 millage rate 33.13 cents for every $1,000 of assessed property value the owner of a $200,000 house with a $50,000 homestead exemption will pay $49.70 per year in property taxes to the District. The District has met the challenge of developing a budget that funds our highest priorities, maintains a strong commitment to water resource protection and provides some nancial relief to taxpayers, said Governing Board Chairman Leonard Wood of Fernandina Beach. Nearly 38 percent of the budget will provide funding to local cooperators to implement projects in support of water resource and water supply projects and surface water restoration projects. In addition, the budget provides funds for continued water supply planning, District board reduces tax revenues by 26 percentBy Contributing Writer Teresa H. Monson, St. Johns River Water Management Districtincluding water conservation, and minimum ows and levels prevention and recovery strategy development. To increase e ciencies and save tax dollars, the District will restructure and consolidate several programs to improve water data collection and analysis. The District will also continue its commitment to sciencebased data collection by funding water quality and quantity trend monitoring to ensure that appropriate data continues to exist on which to make sound scienti c decisions. Other highlights of the new budget include a streamlined and enhanced permitting process and a continued responsibility to District land management activities, such as prescribed burns, control of invasive exotic plants, and maintenance and improvements of levees, locks and other structures. Budget reductions were made in contractual services, salaries and bene ts, cooperative funding and operating expenses. The complete work plan and budget is available at http:// oridaswater.com/budget/FY20112012budget.pdf.The CreekLineNW St. Johns Countys Community Newspaper!886-4919 FOUND: Treasured Photos Found on the northern end of Flora Branch Boulevard in late October: One 8x10 manila folder containing group family photographs spanning many years. Also two cards of authenticity for a Jacqueline Kent Collection. Please call cell 828-557-3824 to claim

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 13 For More Information Call 1-888-410-3789 Brighton BayJacksonvilles Newest Independent Living CommunityLarge Enough To Suit Your Life Small Enough To Know Your StyleAt Brighton Bay, you decide. Enjoy chef prepared meals every day in the company of neighbors like yourself, or go for a pizza and a movie with the grandchildren. Its your choice. Brighton Bay allows you to spend more time doing the things you like with those you love.10061 Sweetwater Parkway, Jacksonville, FL 32256 BrightonBayLiving.com Light fare and desserts provided by local restaurants and a whole new look to chiropractic treatment: thats what Dr. Kenneth Berry has in the works as he plans to celebrate The Village Chiropractic Centers new location and four years serving the World Golf Village and surrounding areas. The grand opening of his new location, which will be held on November 18 from 4:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the centers new facility in the World Golf Village professional complex (across from the old Publix), will also include activities for the whole family, as well as a drawing for a luxury gift basket containing a massage, gift certi cates to local restaurants and businesses and more! We are very excited about our new facility, said Dr. Berry. Being able to create a personalized, comfortable facility for our patients has been a fantastic opportunity one that I believe will allow us to serve the World Golf Village area to an even greater extent. The Village Chiropractic Center, previously located across the street, just down from the old Publix, has been serving the area for four years this month. There, Dr. Berry provided hundreds of free sports physicals, volunteered throughout the community and provided patients with quality chiropractic care. So, when the opportunity arose to create a one-of-a-kind o ce suite one designed to better serve his patients Dr. Berry just couldnt pass up the opportunity. The suite was speci cally designed to accommodate a number of chiropractic services, including traditional options as well as state-of-the art Pro Adjuster technology, massage, and a hydromassage bed. The Pro Adjuster, the centers most unique feature, helps Dr. Berry analyze a patients spine, adjusts the areas needing attention (through a light, repetitive tapping motion) and then review the progress made all without any popping or cracking. The Village Chiropractic Center has helped patients from as far away as Georgia, Clay and Flagler Counties drawing those interested in this e ective and comfortable way to relive pain. In addition to the more traditional treatment of auto accidents, sports injuries and pain relief, the center also treats patients for a variety of symptoms venturing well beyond back pain treatments. According to Dr. Berry, the center helps relieve problems throughout the body treating ailments that occur in most any joint. In addition to chronic pain, Dr. Berry also utilizes traditional methods Chiropractic center to hold Grand Openingand advanced technologies to treat problems such as ear infections, headaches, TMJ, allergies, fatigue and stress. The center even creates custom orthopedics to help alleviate knee, foot and ankle problems, and o ers a truly physician-monitored diet program for fast and e ective weight-loss through the Chiro HCG program. Non-invasive, successful and cost-e ective and now in a new facility with state-of-theart technology and hometown comfort The Village Chiropractic Center de nitely has reason to celebrate. Look for their ad in this issue of The CreekLine!A childs diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder can turn a family upside down, emotionally, nancially and spiritually. You are caught o guard, left stunned and feeling more vulnerable and out of control than you are comfortable feeling. You are in denial, then grief and sadness, maybe even anger. Then, the mad rush begins as you nally move from denial to acceptance of the reality of the situation. You are up until the wee hours of the morning reading and researching every book and article you can get your hands on about autism. You prostrate yourself before God, pleading for complete healing of your precious child or grandchild. You search for answers, causes and xes. Oh, how youd like to just make it all better for your little one. You seek out people to talk to who have walked the path before you to glean their wisdom and insight. But, you soon realize why the world of autism is often referred to as a puzzle. No child is alike. Your child or grandchild may exhibit some characteristics common to other children with the diagnosis, but be completely unique in other areas. It is a spectrum and you are hopeful that your child falls on the less severe end of the spectrum. When a child is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, parents and grandparents begin to worry about their childs futurea future time when When a child or grandchild is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorderBy Contributing Writer Stephanie Summers, LMFT, P.Athey might not be around to help. Of course, a childs future need depends greatly on his or her unique pro le and level of independence versus dependence. Much progress has been made over the years to greatly improve the level of independence a child with autism spectrum disorder is able to achieve. Early evaluation, diagnosis and intervention increase a childs options for achieving optimal functioning. Parents and grandparents of children with autism spectrum disorder may be vulnerable to stress, anxiety and even depression as they take on the extra demands of caring for their child, transporting to medical, speech and occupational therapy appointments and nding the right educational program for their child. It is important for family members and friends to be aware of these stressors in order to provide much needed support. This support can take the form of help with childcare, lending a listening ear or lightening the parents load in any way that may seem to offer assistance. It is not uncommon for parents to feel alone in their situation. Parents and grandparents can bene t from seeking assistance from a professional licensed family therapist to provide helpful emotional support and guidance. For additional information, please contact summerssa@ comcast.net. Congratulations to Nease Varsity cheerleaders Adrianna Barranco (Head Captain) and Samantha Burke for being selected this year by Universal Cheer Association (UCA) to perform as an All-American cheerleader in the 85th annual Macys Thanksgiving Day parade! Barranco, a senior and third year varsity cheerleader and Burke, a sophomore and second year varsity cheerleader, were selected by a panel of judges at UCAs cheer camp held this past July. The girls will head to New York City in November for a week lled with sightseeing and rehearsals all leading up to their debut on national television at the beginning of the parade. Nease High School and the community congratulate these young ladies on such a great achievement! Well be watching Thanksgiving morning on NBC! The CreekLineis YOUR Community Newspaper!Send us your community news!editor@thecreekline.com

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Page 14, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com Great Panache gift card packages available... see www.getpanache.com Beautiful Aveda gift sets at fabulous savings....one for them one for you! Give beauty this holiday season and gift with Panache!Now oering Goldwell and Intaglio too! 904-209-1320 2758 Racetrack Road Publix Plantation Plaza Tues Fri 9-8 & Sat 9-7 461-9552 Anastasia Publix Plaza Mon 12-8, Tues Fri 9-8, Sat 9-7 Scan to see how daily hair repairworks. Message and data rates may apply.TURN HEADS THIS HOLIDAY SEASON ~ SCHEDULE NOW AND LIVE YOUR LIFE WITH PANACHE! SCRAPBOOK 12276 San Jose Blvd Suite 701 Jacksonville, FL 32223 www.enchantedscrapbook.com (904) 647-6772 Come Scrap Your Stories! We c an he l p yo u preserve your memories! From the beginner to the advanc ed s c rapbooker we have what you need! Lo c ated in the heart of M andarin on San J ose B l vd j ust north of the J u l ington Creek Bridge. Bring in this ad for 5% OFF your entire purchase Con dent, excited, and pumped are the words drum majors Drew Booher, Mary Polidan and head drum major Bryan Cespedes use to describe their feelings walking out onto the football eld at half-time to start the show leading over 160 students. This year The Power of Creekside (directed by Rick Fowler and assisted by David Renn) has the honor of performing American Idiot by Green Day. The song selection includes American Idiot, Holiday, Extraordinary Girl and Boulevard of Broken Dreams. The band will compete twice this season with the showOakleaf High School on October 1 and Fleming Island High School on November 5 for the annual Marching Music Performance Assessment (MPA). This year at the Oakleaf High School competition the Power of Creekside was rewarded rst in their division. The Power of Creekside started working on the show in June during a two day rookie camp. Camp is primarily for incoming freshman to learn the ins and outs of marching but all members are encouraged to attend. I like rookie camp because it is two days dedicated to the future and its the time to meet the new members, said senior Brianna Clay. The real fun began in August one week prior school beginning. For four days the full band worked from morning until late afternoon, both outside and in, learning the drill and working on memorizing the music. Its fun if you make it fun, says junior Lauren Phillips. Then school begins! During the rst four and a half months of school almost every Tuesday and Thursday the band mainly works on cleaning or making sure the show looks good while playing and marching. For most members of The Power of Timberlin Creek held its seventh annual Fall Carnival on Sunday, October 16. Festivities included in atable games, bounce houses, an array of carnival games, colored hairspray and tattoos and musical entertainment by DJ Bobby Spencer and the TCE chorus. Burgers, hotdogs and pizza from the grill were complemented by popcorn, sno cones and a sweet treat booth for snacks. At the end of the day, kids crowded the prize booth for their treasures. Families could also participate in a school-wide book swap and had the opportunity to make donations to TCEs Support Fall carnival fun at Timberlin CreekBy Contributing Writer Patricia EdmondsOur Troops project to earn free carnival tickets. Over 500 families attended this years event, marking the largest carnival attendance gures since the schools opening. The carnivals success is a tribute to the entire TCE community. Organized by the PTO, it requires tremendous coordination to make the carnival a reality each year. Phyllis Linabury, carnival chairperson, was very appreciative of everyone who came together to make the carnival such a success: I would like to thank the PTO, Principal Hutchins, TCE sta carnival committee, parents and all the teen volunteers who worked so hard to make the day a success. We are also fortunate for the generosity of local businesses such as Publix and Winn Dixie. Linabury concluded, The kids had such a wonderful time. It is a great event to meet fellow TCE families and to bond. We are fortunate to live in a community where family is rst and we all help each other out. We do it for the kids. Event proceeds will go towards supplies that the PTO provides annually to the school including art supplies, copy paper and other school necessities. Power in numbers: A look into the Power of CreeksideBy Contributing Writers Olivia Van Housen and Emily Long, CHS Students Drum majors Mary Polidan, Bryan Cespedes and Drew Booher lead The Power of Creekside. Creekside, Tuesday practices are the favorite because its cooler outside and it is like an escape from the work portion of school. These practices improve the show as well as boost the energy and motivation in the members. Marching MPA is quickly approaching, but after marching season, what will the band do? Hit the ground running with the arrival of concert season! Just 11 days after the competition at Oakleaf the band had their fall concert October 11 and it was a great success! After that they get two months to work until their winter concert on December 6 and then more work for Concert MPA on March 3 and their spring concert on May 4. Most band members favor marching season over concert season, but they all can agree there is never a dull moment when you are a part of The Power of Creekside! The Power of Creekside is not just a band; its a family and Friday night you can see all the hard work they have put into the show and all the fun they have together. This year the band is bigger and stronger than ever, so show you support at the next home football game during halftime for the Spirit, Pride and Honor, The Power of Creekside! Lunar PhasesFull: November 10 Last Quarter: November 18 New: November 25 First Quarter: December 2 Visit us online for all the latest high school football highlights! Read our community blogs!www.thecreekline.comYOUR Community Newspaper...available digitally!

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 15 Open Mondays through Fridays 8:30am 5pm 1631 Race Track Road Suite 101230-7977Most Insurances AcceptedPediatric Associates of Julington Creek, PAOffering care for Infants, Children & Adolescents Mary Ann Garcia, M.D., FAAP Victor Luz, M.D., FAAP Dr. Tod NorthrupBoard Certied Orthopedic SurgeonSPECIALIZING IN Fellowship Trained 904.823.3764 NOW OPEN!!! THE NAME NORTH FLORIDA ATHLETES TRUST TO STAY IN THE GAME2009 AWARD 450-106 State Road 13 N Publix Center in Fruit CovePh: 230.8881 52 Tuscan Way, #202Publix Center at International Golf Dr. and SR 16 Ph: 940.0055 Senior year may be the best year of your life, but it certainly doesnt start out that way. Along with the usual pressures of starting school again, the fall brings another challenge for seniors: college application season. To help them out, BTHS held a guidance night on October 3 where guidance counselors Andrew Hurley, Rachel Kusher and Linda Howard informed students and their parents about everything they needed to know to complete their applications. Bartram Trail also hosted college representatives during September and October which, according to the guidance counselors, should be the busiest months for seniors. Florida State University, the University of Florida, the University of South Florida, the University of Alabama and George Washington University all sent admissions o cers to speak to students about the daunting and often tedious process of applying for college admission. Its a lot of information to remember, especially since each school has separate requirements. The most important part, counselors stress, is to keep checking the universitys websites and apply early. Colleges can close their admissions before the deadlines if they receive an overwhelming number of applicants and its not uncommon for transcripts to get lost Helping Hands is o and running. If you are interested in doing general volunteer work such as cutting, laminating and assembly, please meet us in the PTO room Thursdays from 12:00 noon until 2:00 p.m. You must be an approved volunteer and children are welcome. This is a great opportunity to help all the teachers be all that they can be! The students have been diligently working on Square One Art and we hope all parents consider purchasing their childs creation. The art, which is transferred to mugs, potholders, tiles, tote bags, plates and more makes great holiday gifts for family and friends while helping the school at the same time. The Wards Creek Elementary PTO would like to extend a big thank you to all businesses and sales reps who participated in the Business Expo/Spooktacular. We appreciate your patronage As the need for skilled culinary professionals grows, now is the time for area restaurants to cultivate tomorrows chefs. Through First Coast Technical Colleges apprenticeship program, your business can provide hands-on culinary expertise in your own kitchen. Only through repetitive practice coupled with education can one truly become pro cient in the culinary arts. Apprenticeship gives foodservice employees the opportunity to master skills in the FCTC classroom and on-the-job under the direction of a quali ed chef to obtain professional certi cation from the American Culinary Federation Education Foundation (ACFEF). I only wish more area restaurants would participate to help the program grow; for Fall at Wards Creek ElementaryBy Contributing Writer Beth McCannand wish you great success! It is hard to believe we are thinking about the Fifth Grade Celebration already! In order to make this special event a success we are accepting donations of water, gift cards, sixth grade appropriate gift bag items, CD-Rs and most importantly committee members. If you are interested in making sure the fth graders get an exciting send o to Pacetti Bay Middle School, please contact a board member for more information. We want to thank everyone who purchased Gator Bowl tickets through the PTO. We hope you enjoy the game and appreciate your contribution to the school! BTHS HappeningsScrambling seniors By Devyn Fussman, BTHS Studentin cyberspace. They can also change their admission requirements. Florida State University, for example, had the same essay prompt for years and suddenly changed it for the class of 2012. And that wasnt the only thing that changed. Bright Futures tightened up on its requirements by stating that to receive the Florida Academic Scholars Award, students need 100 service hours (formerly 75) and to receive the Florida Medallion Scholars Award, students need 75 hours (formerly zero). Some of the seniors are rushing to get service hours during their busiest and most stressful year yet. At this rate, they cant afford to get senioritis. Deadlines are fast approaching and colleges are raising their academic standards all the time. Even schools that are supposedly easy to get into are harder now because of the increasingly high number of applicants. Even after students have been accepted, colleges are still keeping track of their grades and attendance records and can revoke their o ers at any time. In addition, seniors need to apply for housing as soon as possible because space is limited. Admissions o cers say that the sooner you apply, the lower your priority number and the better room you get. In other words, everything college related should be done early. If seniors have any questions about colleges or their applications, they can visit the guidance o ce or view the guidance webpage on the BTHS website from home.FCTC invites you to invest in the future of culinary artsBy Contributing Writer Chef Anthony Lowman, CCC, CCE, ACE, First Coast Technical Collegegiving back to the next generation is what we should all strive to do. Available to individuals at least 18 years of age, a highschool graduate or equivalent, the selection, employment and training of apprentices are without discrimination of race, color, religion, national origin or gender. Apprentices gain management and supervisory knowledge; develop basic principles of nutrition, food/beverage composition; understand requirements for proper food handling, sanitation and hygiene; and acquire a professional work ethic necessary for success in the hospitality industry. Apprenticeship takes approximately two years to complete and prepares one for ACF certi ed culinarian (CC) or certi ed sous chef (CSC) status. Enrollment now accepted. For additional information, please contact Anthony Lowman at 547-3323 or Anthony. Lowman@fctc.edu.got news?editor@thecreekline.com Dont Just Sit There.... ....waiting for the phone to ring!Call Linda Gay at The CreekLine to let our readers know about YOUR business!886-4919

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Page 16, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com Concerns about your drinking water?Call the Water Treatment Company Jacksonville has trusted for over 20 Years. Straight answers No high pressure. 262 0197 3760 KORI RD. Dog Obedience Training 287-3934 www.marienhofkennels.comGerman Shepherd Puppies Call for availability Marienhof Kennels Marions of Mandarin904-262-99819735-2 Old St. Augustine Road(next to Hala Caf)Private setting for all customers. Wig maintenance, products, hats and accessories. Choose a new look for the Holidays!New Hair Stylist available, call for appointment. P ma a in Ch Wig BoutiquePeggy Hawkins, Owner The Bartram Trail Newcomers and Womens Club has several upcoming events happening in November and December. On Thursday, November 10, there will a fashion show at the Dress Barn in the St. Augustine Premium Outlet Mall. If you wish to carpool, meet in the Food Lion parking lot at 9:30 a.m. The fashion show will begin at 10:30 a.m. Lunch will be on your own. There will be shopping for the rest of the afternoon with a 3:00 p.m. departure time. Please contact Char Ahlstrom at 294-2072 for more information. Tuesday, December 6 will be our annual Christmas party and gift exchange. It will be held at the University Club in downtown Jacksonville. The cost will be $25 for members, which includes lunch and entertainment. There is an optional September has certainly been a busy month at St. Johns Technical High School. Tony Boselli kicked o the month, challenging students to create written goals for themselves. He reminded students that goals should be written down somewhere and should not rest in their minds as mere ideas. He spoke of the hard work and dedication required to meet those goals, despite what others may tell them. At the end of his talk, Boselli was gracious Every year my fashion friends call me for guidance in planning their holiday looks and this year they are feeling more anxious than ever as they are watching their pennies. So my famous mantra is now more timely than ever Go Shopping in your Closet! Also our mode of dressing is more relaxed, making the dress code parameters di erent. The terms Casual Elegant, Dressy Casual and Smart Casual are the explanations identifying proper dress for events on our Holiday calendars. What is this casual thing? one friend asked. With me being a fashionista who is concerned with my appearance, I tried to nd the middle ground on this one, so as not to overor under-dress the occasion. To make my point, I went into my own closet to put together some great looking up to date out ts for the holidays. So I thought I would share these ideas with you Fashionable Florida Friends (FFFs) to help you get ready early so that you can go to your parties lookin good! First, I love a romantic shirtnot your oxford cloth button down version, but a real lady like number or even an over the top one (which of course I own). Most shirts are comfortable, as they are not as constricting as other garments. Remember to wear them casually chic by letting the tails hang out over your bottoms. Speak-Fashion UpdateStart early plan great holiday looks now!By Donna Keathley, dkeathley designsing of bottoms, make that part simple so it doesnt compete with the pretty top. My favorite poet ru ed blouse is sleeveless so its really great to wear when entertaining at home. I wear a bling bracelet and great earringsmy bottom of choice is my best black jeans. That being said I have worn velvet cu ed shorts with patterned black hosiery as a more formal look with my top. Dont forget that a white blouse means you have the opportunity to wear some really dramatic makeup! Another great casual idea is to layer a thin micro- ber black turtleneck under a sleeveless dress. It dresses it down and looks great with opaque hose and little ballet ats. A friend of mine and I discovered that when she wore her black cardigan sweater alone with the front buttoned up it served as a wonderful palate for a toned down out t its also a perfect background for your pearls and a pretty holiday pin. If you need to glam it up a bit, here are some easy and inexpensive tips. Lose the at shoes; put glam in your step by wearing a great pair of stilettos. Maybe you can splurge for a pair of jeweled heels and put them with a party-ready purse which would make your Little Black Dress (LBD) over the top! Pull out your workday suit; turn it into a nighttime head-turner by adding a sheer blouse or a sequined cami to it. Now make your hair and nail appointments; consider a fancy up-do or a simple French twist for a party ready look. Heres looking at you kid enjoy another Holiday in Great Style!Bartram Trail Newcomers and Womens Club updateBy Contributing Writer Linda Gomolka, Bartram Trail Newcomers and Womens Club$15 wrapped gift exchange. The deadline for reservations is Wednesday, November 30. Please contact Char Ahlstrom at 294-2072 for more information. Its a Wonderful Christmas, featuring Michael W. Smith with the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra, will take place on Tuesday, December 20 at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are $16 each. Please call Kathy Cosnotti for tickets at 230-3329. The Bartram Trail Newcomers and Womens Club meets the second Tuesday of every month at 9:30 a.m. at the Ramada Inn. Our club is a Newcomers Club as well as a Womens Club. We put no time limits on how long you can be a member with us, whether youre a new arrival or lived here all of your life or if you live within a speci c region. Youre welcome to visit three events/activities then we ask that you pay your membership dues and join as a member. In addition to the monthly meetings, the club has a wide variety of interest groups. There are various card groups (bridge and canasta); golf, recipe exchange, special event outings, game day, bunko, Mah Jongg, book clubs, movie and lunch, a hiking group and community volunteer projects. For membership information or to receive a newsletter, contact Vice President of Membership Ellen Brenner at 287-2676 (email: ebbjc@bellsouth.net).St. Johns Technical School updateBy Contributing Writer Tammy Hardin, Success Coach, St. Johns Technical High Schoolenough to sign jerseys and footballs for some of our students and sta On September 22, a past resident returned to speak to our students. Glennette Tilley Turner lived in St. Augustine during the civil unrest of the s. Despite the unrest, she recalled wonderful memories and lessons she learned from her father who was president of Florida Normal and Industrial College. Turner signed copies for each of the students in attendance of her new book Fort Mose. That evening, we held our rst SAC meeting and open house. Principal King shared the schools vision and direction with parents, including the creation of the new Water Academy. Additionally, we announced the formation of St. Johns Techs rst PTO. Thea Lynch will be this years president and has asked that parents to be on the lookout for salmon-colored forms containing membership information. Please join us in supporting and supplementing curriculum and events. After the brief meetings, parents traveled to each of their childs classroom and met with teachers. The National Guard Choices Program is the latest addition to our school. On two extended learning Wednesdays per month, National Guard members will work with APPEX students on decision making skills. Lunar PhasesFull: November 10 Last Quarter: November 18 New: November 25 First Quarter: December 2 The CreekLineSend us your community news!editor@thecreekline.com GIVE WHERE YOU LIVE!

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 17 On Saturday, October 22 the Nease Panther Pride Marching Band hosted their rst competition known as the First Coast Marching Invitational (FCMI). Students arrived promptly at 8:00 a.m. to prepare for the long day ahead of them and the day would consist of various responsibilities such as working concessions, directing parking, judge-running, guiding bands and overall keeping order. Surprisingly, the temperature rose from its chilly number of 56 degrees to a mild 71, causing the band kids to thankfully shed their layers. It was a beautiful day to perform. Around 11:00 a.m. the rst bands began arriving and the real work started. Those directing parking had their hands full managing long lines of equipment trailers carrying front ensemble instruments such as marimbas, xylophones, vibraphones and auxiliary equipment used for adding speci c nuances to the music. There were also trailers devoted to the many props used to enhance themes and these themselves occupied half of a parking lot. These combined with the many cars of parents, band directors and sta kept those working parking busy. As Middleburgs Bronco Band, one of the largest attending arrived, the concessions were swarmed with hungry students dressed in red. Soon after, the preliminary performances started with Warner Christian Academy and proceeded with Fernandina Beach, Orange Park, Trinity Christian, Mandarin, Fleming Island, Middleburg and Paxon. In order for the competition to be a circuit-sponsored event (meaning the competitors could qualify for state championships), it was required that there be nals performances. Nease HappeningsNease Band hosts First Coast Marching InvitationalBy Brittany Dirks, Nease StudentHowever, since only eight bands were in attendance, all performed in nals competition. In between preliminaries and nals, there was an award ceremony (known as retreat). The high o cers of Nease Band, including the drum majors, band captain, drum captains, colorguard captains and brass and woodwind captains, delivered the wellearned trophies to the waiting drum majors of the participating bands. After a short break, nals began and the stadium lights came on, giving everything a slight glow that enhanced the overall atmosphere of a show day. At the end of the night, the Nease Panther Pride Band performed their show A Mad New World for exhibition only, because it is not permitted for a host to compete at their own competition. It was an impressive performance, one of the best for the band as a whole. Immediately following this was nals retreat, Olympic style, which means each member of every band was present on the eld and marched onto it to the cadence of Best Overall Percussion, which in this case was Fleming Island. They were also awarded Grand Champion of the Inaugural First Coast Marching Invitational. The night might have been over for the participants, but for Nease, it was far from its conclusion. Every section was assigned a speci c area for clean-up and members were not dismissed until they had checked in with their section leaders. Once all responsibilities were taken care of, many students went to Chilis (as is tradition after a home football game) to celebrate a successful rst competition and a great performance!Nease Band High Of cers lead the nals retreat at FCMI. Veterans Sunset CelebrationThursday, November 10 5:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. Veterans Park, 1332 Veterans ParkwayYoure Invited!

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Page 18, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com Kaylie Headings, a Fruit Cove Middle School student, recently won third place in the grades three through ve animation category for the state-wide Jim Harbin FAME (Florida Association for Media Education) competition. Although Headings is now in middle school, she created her animation in Julington Creek Elementary Schools technology club that is sponsored by Ingrid Grif n, the technology instructor. Her animation is titled The Velociraptor and the Apatosaurus, a retelling of the tortoise and the hare, with dinosaurs! You can view her video at this page at www-jce.stjohns.k12. .us/teachers/technology/Tech_Club_ spring11/FAME/dino.MOV. Let me create the perfect cut and color just for you! 108 Bartram Oaks WalkLocated inside the Spa and Salon at Bartram Walk.899-1234www.hairbycarl.comCarl Slack Be ready for Holiday gatherings and photos! k Lindell & Farson, P.A.Attorneys At LawConveniently Located in South Mandarin 12276 San Jose Blvd., Suite 126 Jacksonville, FL 32223-8630904-880-4000 www.lindellfarson.com J. Michael Lindell, Esq.James A. Farson, Esq.Roger K. Gannam, Esq. R. Howard Walton, Esq. Automobile, Motorcycle & Trucking Accidents, Insurance Disputes, & Wrongful Death Complex Business, Real Estate, & Construction Disputes LINDELL &FARSON Lindell & Farson, P.A. 904-880-4000 SeekingA GREATBabysitter?$10 o your 1st Babysitting Event Use Coupon Code Creekline Fourteen St. Johns County seniors have quali ed as National Merit Semi nalists for 2012. These students placed among the top 1 percent of all students in the country taking the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT)/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test given annually to high school juniors. As 14 of 16,000 semi nalists nationwide, they are now eligible to advance to the nalist competition to vie for 8,300 scholarships worth more than $34 million to be announced in February. The semi nalists are Mitchell Zhang from Bartram Trail High School (BTHS); Cody Chasteen and Dylan Klee from Creekside High School (CHS); Maxine Weiss from Pedro Menendez High School (PMHS); Marissa Galiley, Anthony Janocko, Tia Lewis, Carson Ridenhour, Steven Schwartz, Wenli Shao, Dhiraj Sikaria and Logan Stern from Nease High School (NHS); and Megan Connors and Carson Drain from Ponte Vedra High School (PVHS). Also, NHS students Katie Jackson and Ayana Gibson Sleep apnea is a very dangerous condition that a ects about 10 percent of the population and can take years o your life. If you snore; gasp for air when sleeping; take medication for depression, diabetes or high blood pressure; su er from daytime fatigue; or have acid re ux, A better option for treating sleep apneaBy Contributing Writer Dr. James Alexander, DMD, Alexander DentalU.S. Coast Guard AuxiliaryVessel Safety Checks2nd Sunday of month 12:00 noon ~ 3:00 p.m. Vilano Boat Ramp and 12:00 noon ~ 2:00 p.m.St. Augustine Lighthouse Park Boat Ramp you might be su ering from this condition. Sleep has an innumerable impact on health, although we are still in the infancy of sleep research and much more has yet to be learned. There are connections between sleep apnea and heart attacks, stroke, diabetes, mental health and even impotence. Sleep deprived driving is also now on the increase, with between 16 percent and 60 percent of accidents estimated to be the result of sleep deprivation, which is well beyond the number of accidents caused by drunk driving. In addition, chronic fatigue from the associated sleep deprivation has the potential to cause everything from poor performance at work to accidents. To be certain, it is a public health concern that will likely garner more attention into the future. For those with sleep problems, diagnosis by a board certi ed sleep physician is imperative. A CPAP or continuous positive airway pressure device is the most commonly used method of treating sleep apnea. There are a few downsides to this device because it can be cumbersome and uncomfortable and noisy. In fact, more than half the people that use a CPAP sleep in a separate bedroom from their partner. It is of concern that the majority of those diagnosed and prescribed a CPAP dont wear it. The statistics are startling: it is estimated that 5 percent to 50 percent dont wear it after the rst week and 75 percent dont wear it after a year. Alternatives include surgery (results are often subpar and not permanent) and an oral appliance available from a dentist who specializes in helping those with sleep apnea. The most common type of oral appliance works by moving the jaw and tongue forwards thereby opening the airway. Oral appliances are often very e ective and usually covered by medical insurance, so patients can get help without paying out of pocket, beyond any deductible they have. Oral appliances are not a panacea. CPAP is still the recommended treatment for those patients with severe sleep apnea. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends oral appliances for mild to moderate sleep apnea. However, for the severe patient that refuses to wear the CPAP that is collecting dust in the closet, an oral appliance, while not completely eliminating the disease, can have a dramatic and long lasting e ect on quality of life. For additional information, please email info@myalexanderdental.com.Congratulations to National Merit Semi nalistsquali ed as National Achievement Scholarship Semi nalists recognizing African-American students. In addition to these semi- nalists, the district had 33 Commended Students who scored among the top 5 percent of all students in the country on the PSAT. They are Erin Grey and Sarah Wiegre e from BTHS; Rachel Bu Mario Diaz, Jaime Gebhardt, Emily Golan, Danielle Krusemark, Brendan McLaughlin, Nicole Navarro, Jennifer Neal, Virginia Pedigo, Monica Resto, Courtney Vale and Jessica Walker from CHS. Also, Sarah Taylor from PMHS; Nolan Alberti, Jordan Bernas, Christina Chase, Graham Hancock, Kathryn Hill, Blake Insel, Caleb Jarriel, Bryce McKenzie, Vivian Nguyen, Liam Rawson, Alex Sengstock, Aaron Skipper, Preston Sluder and Carly Young from NHS; Margaret Egeln, Peter Humbarger and Katelyn Norton from PVHS; Nicholas Dupoux from SAHS. All semi nalists and commended students were recognized at the School Board meeting on Tuesday, October 11.

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 19 Dr. Mabus ofce is conveniently located in the Johns Creek Shopping Center. She is a graduate of the St. Vincents Family Medicine residency program and is looking forward to caring for her new Fruit Cove neighbors. Her ofce offers medical care for: Procedures and screenings: To schedule an appointment call: (904) 450-8120Same day appointments available. Dr. Mabus ofce is located at: St. Vincents Primary Care Johns Creek Shopping Center 2851 CR 210 W., Ste. 122 St. Johns, FL 32259St. Vincents Primary Care would like to welcome Allison Mabus, MD, to our St. Vincents HealthCare family. Conveniently located one block North of I-295 and San Jose Blvd. 50% OFF Your Pets First Exam with Dr. Silverness( 1st Time Clients Only )Not valid with any other oer. Expires 12/31/11 FREE BOARDING Book 2 Nights at our Resort and 3rd Night is FREE! (1st Time Boarders Only)Not valid with any other oer. Expires 12/31/11 Ann Silverness, DVM,CCRTMandarin Landing Animal Hospital & Pet Resort3003 Hartley Road Jacksonville, FL 32257 904-268-0477www.mandarinlandingah.comCIV no longer mandatory for pet boarding Bordatella now done annually Ahoy there and Ho Ho Ho! The holiday spirit comes to the creek this time of year. If you peer out your car windows heading north across the Julington Creek Bridge the last couple of weeks in November you can see many Captain Santas. They are decorating their vessels in hopes of a good clear night and low tides for sailing in the 2011 Christmas on the Creek light parade. The annual holiday event, sponsored by the Julington Creek Prop Club, is scheduled for Saturday, December 3 this year. Commodore George Sample is extending an invitation to any boat owners interested in decorating their boat and joining in for the fun to contact him at gsample335@aol.com for more information. The more the merrier, says Sample. The best decorated boat gets a $300 cash prize while second place gets $200 and third place $100. We expect a great turn out for this years parade, with all the growth at the creek, new restaurants and all, it will be a fun night, adds Sample. Established in 1988, the parade has an estimated 40 powerboats lined up for the event. Boats decked out in all their holiday nery motor the parade route which begins at The Marina at Julington Creek, goes underneath the bridges and motors around Bulls Bay, then returns under the bridge and continues down Durbin Creek. Spectators can view it from the Julington Creek Bridge walkways. Homeowners with docks located on the parade route are invited to join in the fun too! Decorated docks can vie for a variety of prizes including cash and goodie bags. Tradition holds that the boaters judge the Christmas on the CreekYou are invited!By Donna Keathleydocks. The people along the shores of the creek plan that night for their holiday parties, Sample says. We have people shooting reworks over the boats, some docks have as many as 100 folks on them waving and shouting Merry Christmas. The land lubbers have as much fun as the boaters! There is a lot of planning and organizing prep work done before these ships sail. The Prop Club starts in October each year contacting boaters, area merchants and residents gathering donations for the event. Approximately one half of the boats participating in the parade are Prop Club members; the other half of the boats come from all over the area. Boats range in size from 19 feet to 50 feet in length. Ironically the top prize winner last year was a John boat light up like a dragon complete with ames shooting from his mouth. Some adjustments have to be made to the vessels to help provide the power needed for such a large number of lights. Some boat owners make their presentation a work in progress, adding more decorations each year for an over-the-top e ect. The Prop Club is a social organization of boaters from The Marina at Julington Creek. They meet each month on the second Saturday evening at 7:00 p.m. at the dock; all interested boaters are invited to join for boating information and fun at the creek! Annual dues provide most of the funds for the Christmas on the Creek event. Peanut Butter Jelly or jam Cereal/Oatmeal Canned Pasta Canned Stew/Chili Canned pasta Soup Canned fruit/veggies Toilet PaperChrists Cupboard Food Pantry Wish ListChrists Cupboard is located at Celebration Lutheran Church, 810 Roberts Road. Call 230-2496 for info! Christs Cupboard serves anyone in need. Hours are 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Tues. and Weds.

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Page 20, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com K EN B ERRY B.S.N., D.C.319 West Town Place, Suite 7 Located in the WGV Professional Plaza904-940-0361 Serving World Golf Village and surrounding communities for over 4 years WWW.THE VILLAGE CHIROPRACTOR.COM Neck & Back Pain Join us for Our New Oce Grand Opening Celebration November 18th Prizes and giveaways Accepting and Selling furniture (living room, dining room, bedroom, etc) Home decor (lamps, rugs, artwork, tchotchke) New items arrive daily. We are ready to accept your entire house, estate, etc. We also oer inventory liquidation service for builders, home and furniture industry businesses, etc. F or M ore I nformation call : 880 8448or email us at : E NCOREDE CO R@ be ll south .net10830 San Jose Boulevard ( across from Walmart)Visit us online at: www.EncoreDecorFL.comW E OFFER FREE PICKUP S ER V ICE FOR APPRO V ED ITEMSHours: Jacksonvilles Largest Upscale Consignment Store H October was an exciting month at Pacetti Bay for us in the Media Center. I am the team sponsor for our new Running Club. We have been practicing for weeks. We have a paved narrow track that is a half a mile. The students have been working on conditioning to be able to run two miles in the meets with four other middle schools in St. Johns. The Running Club started out with walking and progressed from walk/ run to run for the two miles. Pace is a di cult concept for students to grasp. We continue to work on this! Our rst meet was Thursday, October 20 at Gamble Rogers Middle School. We had a large group of students participate in the meet. The Running Club did a very impressive job handling their rst meet. The two mile run was a combination of the track and the trails which On Friday, October 7, 2011, the Nease Sparklers took the eld at Nease High School in true style! Wearing their new team uniforms sponsored by Coggin Honda of St. Augustine, the Sparklers cheered on the Panthers during the rst quarter of play. Head Captain Adrianna Barranco was elated to see her vision of bringing the Sparkle E ect to Florida come to fruition. The Sparkle E ect is a nonpro t organization that helps bring special needs cheer squads to high schools nationwide. The Nease Sparklers is the rst team in the state of Florida. The excitement for the team has carried over into the media as the girls were Notes from the Pacetti Bay Media CenterBy Contributing Writer Lynn Johnson, NBCT, Library Media Specialist, Pacetti Bay Middle SchoolNease Sparklers make debut at Panther stadiumBy Contributing Writer Diana Barranco Nease Sparklers and varsity buddies Lily Boone, Adrianna Barranco, Kelsey Schuetzler, Ashleigh Jackson, Gianna Haley, Kelsey Carns, Megan Davis, Blake Price and Kaitlyn Jones Skye Robertson, Caught ya Reading! Sonia, Kelly Jacobson, Taylor, Maddie, Anna, Avery, Colton, Lewis, Josh and Kelsey at Story Hour.was something totally new for them. Ribbons are given to the students who place in the top 12. We had two ribbon winners, Kieran McKee and Xavier Hutchinson. Our top three boys were: #5 Kieran McKee 12:43; #10 Xavier Hutchinson 13:07; and #13 John Jackson. Our top three girls were: Sloane Haines 17:12; Kaitlyn Dean 17:30; and Parker Perrella 18:04. Our next meet will be at Liberty Pines Academy on Wednesday November 2. I have no doubt that they will show improvement. Watch for the picture of the girls in our next issue of The CreekLine. Our October Community Story was so much fun. We had a great crowd of children; the youngest were in kindergarten and the oldest was in fourth grade. Our assistant principal Kelly Jacobson read The Runaway Pumpkin. It was an old favorite of many of the children and we all became very hungry as the story progressed. Thanks to Karin Gowens plans for the story hour we had pumpkin mu ns for a snack. Josh Jacobson read Goodnight Goon, a spoof of the all time favorite Good Night Moon. Of course the favorite book was clearly divided by gender, the boys liked the Goodnight Goon and the girls liked The Runaway Pumpkin. We loved creating the pumpkin from the cutouts that Gowens created for us. Sonia Rameriz, Kelsey Taylor and Josh Jacobson were the student volunteers, helping the children with their pumpkins. Please join us on November 15 at 5:00 p.m. for our next story hour. I am going to add a new feature to our column, Get Caught Reading which is my new buzz. Early in the school year I snapped a picture of one of our students reading at the bus stop. It is too dark now to read before the bus comes so I will have to catch them here at school. My best one this month is Skye Robertson. He is an avid reader and loves the graphic novels we have here at Pacetti Bay. The favorite graphic novel is the Naruto series. I see Skye reading while in his football gear waiting for his ride home after practice frequently in our parking lot! featured twice on Channel 4 News. The Nease Sparklers consist of four special needs cheerleaders and ve buddies from the Nease varsity cheer squad. They have now cheered for two home football games and will be doing two additional appearances in the upcoming months. Look for more information about these remarkable young ladies and the Nease Sparklers soon! What would YOU like to read about each month in The CreekLine?Let us know! editor@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 21 (904)292-2210 MandarinSouthBusinessCenter12421SanJoseBlvd.Suite310/320 Jacksonville,FL32223(BetweenSonnysBBQ&Solantic) LorettoRd. NSanJoseBoulevard RaceTrackRd. JulingtonCreek Lessthan1/2mi. fromJulingtonCreek MarinelaM.Nemetz,D.D.S.BoardCertifiedPediatricDentistRobertJ.Nemetz,D.D.S.,M.S.AdultDentistryPeriodonticsProsthodontics Author Sharon Draper says, I learned to dream through reading, learned to create dreams through writing and learned to develop dreamers through teaching. I shall always be a dreamer. Come dream with me. The students and faculty at Timberlin Creek Elementary had the pleasure of dreaming with Sharon Draper when she visited the school on October 11. During the visit, Draper gave an energetic presentation to the third, fourth and fth grade students. She also met with individual students for photographs and signed copies of her books. In preparation for the visit, many students read Drapers book Out of My Mind, which is a thought-provoking novel about a girl with cerebral palsy. It is one of this years Sunshine State Young Readers Award books for elementary and Engineman Apprentice Mark Stephen Ulbricht, United States Navy, currently stationed on the USS Vicksburg (CG 69) was recently awarded the Navy Sharpshooter Medal, National Defense Ribbon. Ulbricht is a 2008 graduate of Bartram Trail High School who attended Florida State College at Jacksonville. He graduated from Navy Boot Camp at Great Lakes in April 2011 where he was a member of the honor guard. He also graduated from Engineman A School at Great Lakes Naval Training Center. He is the son of CDR Stephen M. Ulbricht, USN (Retired) and Deborah Montana-Ulbricht of St. Johns.Bestselling author visits Timberlin Creek By Contributing Writer Kristen Badger, Media Specialist, Timberlin Creek Elementary School Author Sharon Draper signs one of her books for student Maddie Traylor.middle school students. Sharon Draper has written many other books including ve that have won the Coretta Scott King Award and she was a National Teacher of the Year. Her visit truly inspired our students to become better writers, readers and people. Mill Creek Elementary Schools fourth and fth grade students were treated to a visit by two special members of the Charles F. Hamblen American Legion Post 37. Ray Blackaby and Aaron Ray shared with the students the rules and art Veterans instruct MCE students on American FlagBy Contributing Writer Kate Dowdie, Technology Teacher, Mill Creek Elementary School Veteran Ray Blackaby instructs fourth grade students Jack Warringer and Jonathan Chapman on the proper way to fold an American ag.of displaying and caring for the American ag. Through the use of video, demonstration and student participation, the children were able to learn how to properly fold and store the ag, when a ag is too old and/or damaged to be displayed and how to dispose of a ag that is no longer appropriate for display. These American heroes continue to serve their country by sharing their knowledge and pride with the next generation!

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Page 22, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com Race Track Blvd.Flora Branch Blvd. 990 Flora Branch Boulevard St. Johns, Florida 32259License#C075J0083 www.theacademyatjulingtoncreek.net Please visit our center and take a personal tour. Marcia Pozin Executive Director 904-230-8200.Infant thru VPK ( 4 years old ) Before/After School Ages 6 thru 12 Celebrating our 1 st year in Julington Creek! VPK Openings for the 2011-2012 School Year More for your money.... 165 Hampton Point Dr., Suite 3 St. Augustine, FL 32092( 904 ) 429-0290www.atlasphysicaltherapy.com12421 San Jose Blvd., Suite 100 Jacksonville, FL 32223( 904 ) 292-0195 Your onsite Athletic Trainer at each weeks football games Right with you through the game... We are Your Community Therapist. Your onsite Athletic Trainer at eac h week s football games Greenbriar Animal HospitalA Professional Veterinary Hospital Offering... We Celebrate The HumanPet Bond ( 0.2 mi South JCP entrance ) vetM-F 8 AM 6 PM Sat 8 AM Noon Contributing to various charities, Newcomers of North St. Johns is a non-pro t, social organization. Last year, thousands of coupons were cut out by members and given to the Coups for Troops program. Approximately $157,000 worth of coupons were sent overseas. Every month the club collects food that then is contributed to a local food bank and during Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the club made a donation to the Susan G. Komen Foundation. For the upcoming meeting on December 13, the club is asking members to donate a new childs book to be given to our St. Johns County libraries. They welcome any new childs book, but for a requested book from the librarys listing, please contact Toni at 940-1343. Bring a new, unwrapped Durbin Creek Explorers were taken on an EPIC adventure with Boosterthon Fun Run this past October 10 through October 19 to help raise money through the PTO. The Boosterthon Fun Run program is a healthy alternative to traditional product sales that raises much-needed funds for our school and many others across America. The nine-day Boosterthon also promotes three speci c values during the fun- lled program: Fitness, Leadership and Character. This years character theme EPIC Adventure is all about teamwork. The students built character by learning the four secrets of good teams: Encourage, Play, Invite and Celebrate. The event kicked-o with a 30-minute school-wide pep ralNewcomers participate in local charitiesBy Contributing Writer Marcia Smith, Newcomers of North St. Johns Newcomers of North St. Johns hosted an auction for their October luncheon/meeting. Members brought items to be auctioned off. Vice-President Johanna Cunningham assisted auctioneer Luman Beasley in showing off this beautiful rug/wall hanging.childs book to the Tuesday, December 13, holiday meeting/luncheon to be held at 11:00 a.m. at Maggianos at St. Johns Town Center. Lunch will be a family-style three course meal and the cost is $25. Reservations are required by December 6. Entertainment will be provided by a talented group of student musicians and singers called OuttaSight, from the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind. Please contact Laura at leccpremo@yahoo.com for more information and dont forget your book!Nease NJROTC cadets William Duncan and Darrow Mead with other outstanding high school students from across the United States took part in a unique program in our nations capital. During the six-day program, the National Youth Leadership Forum on National Security (NYLF/NS): Exploring American Diplomacy, Intelligence and Defense introduced Nease ROTC cadets explore U.S. National Security in Washington DC William Duncanthem to the challenging careers in national security, intelligence, the diplomatic corps and more. The curriculum for the Forum on National Security is based on actual world events. Throughout the program, students used critical thinking, leadership and public speaking skills to tackle the complexity of national decision-making as they examine how the United States plans for peace and prepares for crisis. They employ a crisis decisionmaking process similar to that employed by the nations top policy makers. Students also participated in thought-provoking question and answer sessions with highly respected, internationally recognized civilian policy makers and senior military personnel. In addition, leading institutions opened their doors to Forum on National Security students, where they were educated in diplomacy, international a airs and military strategy. Students explored several government institutions and military installations, including the Pentagon, the United States Department of State, the United States Marine Corps Combat Development Command at Quantico, the Central Intelligence Agency, the United States Naval Academy, a variety of embassies and many others.EPIC adventure hits Durbin Creek ElementaryBy Contributing Writer Jeralyn Forcierly on Monday, October 10 and concluded on Wednesday, October 19 with the Boosterthon Fun Run laps. Over 300 parents attended the Fun Run event to cheer on their children and support the classes. In order to encourage families to Play and be active, DCE business partner Black Creek Out tters donated a beautiful kayak as a special incentive to the families at Durbin for participation. With all the excitement and drive of the students, parents, DCE faculty and donations from parents, family members and friends, Durbin stands to raise almost $42,000 which will go towards some much needed shade structures in the physical education areas and playgrounds! Advertise inThe CreekLineIts good for business!886-4919LG@rtpublishinginc.com

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 23 APPOINTMENT904.264.KIDS264KIDS.COMCALL OR VISITUS ONLINE TO ANSCHEDULE San Jose Blvd. SR 13Bartam Walk Race Track RoadLOCATED ABOVE BLACKSTONE GRILLE 112 BARTRAM OAKS WALK #203 | JACKSONVILLE, FL | 32259 De Javu SalonTry us out!Annie, Christinia, Monika & Tammyinvite you to take advantage of these special oersColor Retouch$25 11018 Old St Augustine Rd #122 (Next to Larrys Giant Subs) 268-4911 www.dejavujax.com Lunchtime Peel $25Shampoo & Cut$25 Gift Certicates Available Julington Creek Plantation Presents:Holiday Party? Company Luncheon? Seminar?For a Limited Time Only, Book One Meeting Room, Get the 2nd One FREE (Daytime/Weekday Rentals Only*) Oer expires December 30th, 2011 See www.jcpcdd.org for more info & terms The Pacetti Bay Middle School PTSO Cookie Dough/ Mixed Bag fundraiser sales kicked o on October 10 with Meghan Ryan dressed in a cookie out t as she distributed freshly baked cookies from a Mixed Bag to parents in the student pick up line. The fundraiser ended on October 25 with overwhelming support from the community. Cookie dough was distributed on November 10 to students, so if you ordered, you should be receiving them soon. Mixed Bags orders will be sent home with students in time for the holidays. The PTSO wishes to thank Kalisa King for organizing another outstanding PTSO fundraiser, the Sports Dance, held on September 30. The dance was the most popular to date, with over 500 kids in attendance. The gym was decorated with streamers and sports art. Kids were able to strike a pose with their friends at the photo booth which had a backdrop of PBMS sta painted by Emily Warner and Kelsey Taylor. The DJ took requests from the kids and the favorite song by far was the Cupid Shu e, which had the entire gym of kids dancing in time. The PTSO wrapped up their membership drive at the end of September. Thank you to all the families that joined. Congratulations to the homeroom classes with the highest participation rate Catie Grimes (eighth grade), Joshua Carey (seventh grade) and Della Thompson (sixth grade). These classes were rewarded with an ice cream party for their commitment to PTSO. If you didnt get a chance to join PTSO, its not too late. Membership applications are accepted at any time. Mem-Studies show that teenage drivers are involved in almost 28 percent of all alcohol-related tra c accidents. There are more than 10,000 drunk-driving accidents each year, with thousands of people dead due to the poor choices of few. As much as we hear it (and trust me, we hear it a lot), we teenagers have a hard time wrapping our heads around these numbers. The unfortunate truth is that weve become desensitized weve seen the news stories, weve read the statistics and weve come to accept these accidents and deaths as a regrettable part of life, bound to never a ect any of us personally. Well, Creekside juniors and seniors experienced a severe change in attitude last month when they received a visit from Renee Napier, mother of Meagan Napier and founder of The Meagan Napier Foundation. In front of a crowd of indi erent teenagers, Napier told the heartwrenching story of her daughters death. Meagan Napier was just 20 years old when she and friend Lisa Jo Dickson were killed by drunk driver Eric Smallridge on May 11, 2002. Smallridge, 24 at the time of the crash, was sentenced to 22 years in prison Fall has Pacetti Bays PTSO in full swingBy Contributing Writer Sharon Davis, Corresponding Secretary, Pacetti Bay Middle School PTSO PTSO Board Members Debbie Adams, Becky Lawson and Karen Town, along with Preston Town showing off Mixed Bagsbership is $15 per family and includes a copy of the school directory. Meetings are held the rst Wednesday of each month at 3:00 p.m. in the PBMS Media Center. All are welcome. More information can be found at www-pbm.stjohns.k12. .us/ ptso/. The student directory is hot o the presses. PTSO wishes to thank all the businesses that published ads in the directory. We appreciate their support of the school. The student directories will distributed in late November. Students are excited this year about being allowed to carry their books and school supplies in cinch bags between classes. PTSO is helping the kids to stay organized by o ering for sale both green and blue cinch bags, so kids can pack items needed for green day and blue day separately. Bags are $7 and can be purchase by completing the spirit wear form available at www-pbm.stjohns.k12. .us and sending it to school with the student. The PTSO is grateful for the support of the community as we work to raise funds to support programs at PBMS. If you own a business and are interested in partnering with the PTSO or are an individual with fundraising ideas, please contact Debbie Adams dadams2@att.net.CHS HappeningsDrunk driving assembly impacts studentsBy Rachel Buff, CHS Student(11 for each girl). Napier spoke of the suffering she felt immediately following the accident: she spent Mothers Day in a funeral home. In a story marked with eloquence and composure, Napier highlighted her grief and described the strength she gained through the support of friends and family. She opened a window into her life; soon, the audience was sharing in her sorrow, as if they really knew Meagan and Lisa. In videos and descriptions, Napier painted Smallridge as a decent man who simply made a poor choice with dire consequences. Uneasy about the potential loss of yet another life, Napier made a plea to judges in 2006 and had Smallridges sentence reduced to 11 years. Her message of wisdom and understanding rang deep and just as it began to sink in, an unexpected visitor came on to the stage. Eric Smallridge himself, orange jumpsuit-clad, handcu ed and accompanied by two deputies, arrived to tell his story. Smallridge spoke of regret; how one awful decision ruined so many lives, including his. His thoughts were deeply moving, his advocacy of good judgment heartfelt. In the end, he was just an honest guy who had made poor choices and wanted to prevent future tragedies. In an astonishing and inspiring act of forgiveness, Napier hugged her daughters killer. The words and actions of Napier and Smallridge had a profound impact on the audience; silent tears were widespread. These were not just third-party outsiders preaching The destroyed car from the 2002 accident serves as a solemn reminder of the dangers of driving under the in uence. about safety. These were two individuals, whose lives had been turned upside down in an instant, pouring out their hearts in a room full of strangers. When the assembly ended, students were changed. They rose from their seats, dazed and proceeded back to class in silence. Some stayed to view the actual car from the accident, brought by Napier, which served as a quiet memorial to the lives lost. Sincere people with simple words, Napier and Smallridge certainly made an intense impact at Creekside High School that day. Their work will make students think twice about drinking and driving. The Meagan Napier Foundation raises awareness of the dangers of driving under the in uence and promotes healing and forgiveness. For more information, visit www.themeagannapierfoundation.com.

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Page 24, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com The Shoppes of MurabellaAccepting New Patients (904) 826-346952 Tuscan Way Suite 205 St. Augustine, FL 32092 New Location! Pat WanasNew York trained haircolor specialistSenior colorist in well-known salon in trendy Manhattan area now here in Jacksonville to make you beautiful! 50% off haircut with any color service $10 off womens cut $5 off mens cut 904 868 0886 Are you looking for a fun and easy way to give back to Liberty Pines Academy while enjoying a fun family outing? Visit the St. Augustine Amphitheatre on Tuesday, November 29 between 5:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. Bring your family and all your friends, because $2 of ev-Bartram Trail High School ASL Level 3 students teach Sign Language at Cunningham Creek Elementary (CCE) on Tuesday and Thursday mornings each week. The Musical ASL Holiday/Christmas Program will be at CCE on December 8 from 8:45 a.m. until 9:30 a.m.November at Liberty Pines AcademyBy Contributing Writer Stephanie Bradford, Liberty Pines Academy PTOery ice skating ticket sold that night will be given back to LPA. This is St. Augustines only outdoor skating rink! While you are there, show o your skills or try it for the rst time and enjoy lots of other Winter Games. Visit www.winterwonderland orida.com/features. html for more information on St. Augustines Winter Wonderland. The cost is $10 to skate and $2 for skate rental. Reminder that all participants under the age of 18 must have a signed waiver by a parent/ guardian. October was a great month for LPA PTO! The LPA fourth annual Gala Oktoberfest was held on Saturday, October 1 at St. Johns Golf and Country Club. Thanks to the support of generous sponsors, parents, teachers, sta and community members, the event, co-chaired by Pam Watt and Heather Lister, far exceeded LPA PTOs goals and brought in nearly $29,000 for LPA! The silent auction was bursting with creative class baskets put together by the amazing parents and teachers of LPA. There was everything from a safety basket, including a complimentary security system, to a house cleaning basket, to Gator and FSU baskets including game tickets. The live auction, hosted by guest auctioneer Brent Martineau, was a hit. There was something for everyone whether it be a Serenata Beach Club Membership, a weeks stay at the beach or in the mountains or golf foursomes at six local golf clubs. The bidding was fast and furious and the winners were not only the top bidders, but the students at LPA. The evening was rounded out with a glow in the dark closest to the pin contest and a super live performance by Seize the Day. Co-chair Heather Lister stated, The overwhelming support for the event and the school shows our community is committed to the success of our public schools. All money earned will go directly to help purchase new technology for classrooms, valuable elective resources, books and media equipment for our media center, and invaluable teacher training. A heart felt thank you to our sponsors SpaMe, Watson Realty-Lisa Menton, St. Johns Golf and Country Club, St. Johns Eye Associates, Orthopaedic Associates of St. Augustine, Taps Bar and Grill, First Florida Credit Union, Magellan Transport Logistics, Publix, WinnDixie and Atlantic Coast Bank. Liberty Pines Academy would like to congratulate our Student Volunteer of the Year, Kaitlin Haines, who received numerous nominations highlighting her enthusiasm, spirit, compassion, intellect and leadership. As a Pre-AP sixth grader, she demonstrates excellent academic achievement by attaining all As and qualifying for the Duke Tip Talent Search via her FCAT scores. Haines was the co-captain of a Relay for Life team, Phriends Phiten Cancer. She led her teammates on several months of creative fundraising and ultimately raising over $11,000 in the ght against cancer. Haines is a member of LPAs Ladies Congeniality Club and gave her time to work with the Special Olympics, which she found extremely rewarding. LPA prides itself on students who display the three Rs: Respectful, Responsible and Ready to Learn. Kaitlin Haines exempli es all of the qualities and characteristics deserving of the recognition as LPA Student of the Year. Hands down LPA is blessed with some of the best volunteers that are committed to ensuring LPA students have a rich educational experience. Julie Martin is a prime example of this and has proudly been named LPA Volunteer of the Year. Martin helps in our classrooms, cafeteria and our school community at large. Martins commitment to our students shines through her countless hours of service at LPA, which she continues to give with an enthusiastic heart. Martin has impacted many students by volunteering in her childrens classrooms each year. This e ort has included organizing special events, cooking, cleaning, ling and working with students. She also volunteers in LPAs Media Center and serves as parent liaison to LPAs Media Reading Committee. All of her e orts in the Media Center have helped to ensure that students at LPA have a world of literature resources at their ngertips. Martin has been and continues to be an active member of LPAs PTO and has served on the School Advisory Committee every year. It is easy to recognize her passion for making a di erence not just for one day, but for every day that she possibly can. Liberty Pines Academy congratulates Julie Martin and believes she exhibits true servant leadership in her volunteer e orts. LPA would also like to congratulate our Of the Month winners for October. Teacher of the month was Diana Hoelle, Volunteer of the Month was Tricia Burford, Student of the Month (kindergarten through fourth grade) was Graison Aberly and Student of the Month ( fth through eighth grade) was Timmy Plish. Congratulations to each of them! Oktoberfest Co-Chairs Heather List and Pam Watt. Tell our advertisers you saw them in The CreekLine!! Support our fine Advertisers!

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 25 3 DAYS!Friday, Saturday and SundayNovember 18th 20th20% OFF* Everything in the StoreOnly* Excludes: gift cards, optics, Yard-bird Feeder, Garys Birdhouse, sale items & previous purchases. No seed storage please.450 SR 13 at Race Track RdNext door to Publix 230-3242 Anniversary Sale Oswald ChiropracticAt Bartram Park www.oswaldchiropracticjax.com Exam X-Rays (If Medically Necessary) 1st TreatmentFREE Value $150.00 +* Massage (MA41847) (OUR NO RISK OFFICE POLICY) THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT WHICH IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITH IN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT.904.268.9100 Exp. 11/15/11 Nowis the timeto make your move. Conventional and Jumbo Loans USDA Rural Developement Construction to Perm FHA and VA Loans Condo Loans Fixed or Adjustable Rates First Federal offers: All loans subject to credit underwriting and approval. Please contact a mortgage originator for more details on available loan programs. Contact Scott Neeley Free PapersWorking For You Solid Local Trusted Effective Respected is local community paper is free to our readers. Weve been that way from the beginning. We wont change that even in the toughest of times. But we do improve this paper every issue. We wont stand still as the market changes. Giving readers and advertisers the best value is our goal. Over the years we have become the marketplace for our community. And while other media might be shrinking, we are growing. at growth will continue, hand-in-hand, with our community. Well continue working for you. At Fruit Cove Middle School this year, the sports and clubs are really amazing! The boys and girls basketball teams were undefeated throughout the season and had their championship games last week. The football team is also very successful! The boys and girls soccer teams are just starting up and include very talented players. Cross country began and has three meets in November. Golf starts in the spring and volleyball starts in January. We wish all of the Flyers good luck! Mostly all of the clubs are in full swing as well. The National Junior Honor Society welcomed their new members on Tuesday, October 11. Congratulations to all of the NJHS members! Also, all of the 89 members of Drama Club were so excited to nd out that this years show is School House Davidson Realty recently donated equipment worth $1,500 to Allen D. Nease High School. Included in the donation were iPads and an Apple TV for the math department, and camera equipment for the Communications Academy. Davidson Realty supports local schools in the World Golf Village area with contributions to Mill Creek Elementary School, Wards Creek Elementary School, Pacetti Bay Middle School and Allen D. Nease High School. Pictured are Kyle Dresback, principal, Allen D. Nease High School; Lois Harris, PTSO president, Allen D. Nease High School; Sherry Davidson, president, Davidson Realty; Kristen Calhoun, marketing coordinator, Davidson Realty. FCMS UpdateBy Contributing Writer Sarah Jacobs, FCMS StudentRock. Its sure to be a huge success! FCMS had quarter exams and a Veterans Day assembly on November 8 that included music from the band and chorus and speeches from students. The rst Battle of the Books meeting will be on November 10 for participating students. The Fruit Cove Wind Symphony will perform for the students at Julington Creek Elementary on November 17. Also, the Science Fair is scheduled for November 15 through 18. And who could forget Thanksgiving break starting on the November 23? Everyone at Fruit Cove is very excited for a busy November. Holiday preparations are already being made! It seems like just yesterday that school started. Fruit Cove is looking forward to another great quarter. Library System announces Food for Fines The St. Johns County Public Library System appreciates the continued support of our patrons and we would like to take this opportunity to give back to the community. Area food banks cannot meet local demand for holiday meals so, beginning Monday, November 14 the Library System will accept non-perishable food items in lieu of overdue library nes. Patrons may bring one sealed, non-expired, non-perishable food item for each $1 overdue ne. This waiver is for library nes only and does not include fees for printing, lost items, nor may it be used for credit against future nes. This project will run through Thursday, December 22, 2011 and all food collected will be given to the Mental Health Food Bank for local distribution. The general public is also encouraged to drop off their contributions at any of our library branches or bookmobile stops. For more information, please visit the Librarys website, www.sjcpls.org or contact Library Administration at 827-6925. Are you shopping for a preschool-aged child this holiday season? Look no further! Children and educators from select Goddard Schools-leaders in early childhood educationhave announced their top toy picks for infants through children six years old for the 2011 holiday shopping season. The Goddard School Toy Test is the only national toy test designed exclusively for children in the preschool age range. After a national call for submissions, Goddard School educators and children evaluated entrants based on a number of criteria, including:Votes are in: Children pick top holiday toys Interactive, child-initiated play focus Creative, social or engaging Appropriate for infants through children six years of age Our play-based FLEXT Learning Program focuses on the value of playful learning, said Laura Pinover-Sadler, owner of The Goddard School located in Saint Johns. We feel that our Top 10 Toys list will serve as a great resource for parents, grandparents and other family members as they enter the gift-giving season. Top 10 Preschooler-Approved Toys (in alphabetical order): Animal Sounds Hay Ride (Learning Curve) Bristle Block Stackadoos (B. Toys by Battat) Citiblocs Camou age 100 Piece Set (CitiBlocs) Citiblocs Little Builders Rattle Blocs (CitiBlocs) Count Your Chickens!T board game (Peaceable Kingdom) Elemenosqueeze (B. Toys by Battat) Hoot Owl Hoot! T board game (Peaceable Kingdom) Little Shopper Playset (Earlyears) Sassy Sensory Ball Set (Sassy) Soft Chime Garden (Lamaze) For more information on the Top 10 Preschooler-Approved Toys, visit www.goddardschools.com/toys.People who are unable to motivate themselves must be content with mediocrity. ~Andrew Carnegie

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Page 26, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com Are you ready for the holidays? Your oor isnt! Clean up that summer mess.....20% o The only 2 year warranty in the industry! Call Grout Line Solutions today for a free estimate. Serving St. Augustine & Jacksonville since 2005. Grout LineSolutions 904 982 429420% OFF BEFORE AFTER Stephanie Summers, LMFT, P.A.12412 San Jose Blvd. Suite 402 904-268-9178 www.ssummers.com IntroducingJaneen Herskovitz, MASpecializing in counseling parents of children with special needs, including Autism Spectrum Disorder Robert Kelsey, M.D. Board Certied Cardiology and Internal Medicine Robert Kelsey, M.D.Now Accepting New Patients 904-827-0078 A good Thanksgiving dinner is usually about the turkey. You dont have to be a surgeon to carve one correctly, but proper carving and slicing techniques will ensure you get the most meat from your bird and enable you to present an attractive meal to your family and friends. Follow these simple techniques for successfully carving your holiday turkey: Let your 10-pound-or-bigger turkey stand at room temperature for 10 to 20 minutes after cooking and before slicing. This allows the juices to distribute evenly throughout the turkey. Netting and cooking bags are also easier to remove after waiting. Slice or carve the turkey on a sanitized cutting surface. The St. Johns County Education Foundation (SJCEF) has announced the Margie Davidson College Scholarship to be provided to a student who has the potential to achieve greatness, but not the nancial means. The scholarship will be awarded to one high school senior each year planning to attend a higher learning institution in Florida. I recently decided to check out the Riverside Arts Market for myself. I had heard many good things about it, but wasnt quite sure what to expect. After parking at one of the many business lots on or near Riverside Avenue which are made available on Saturdays for this venture, I made my way to the entrance under the canopy of the Fuller Warren Bridge. My rst impression was that it was much more extensive than I had anticipated. In addition to two stages and a Seating Terrace overlooking the St. Johns River, there are more than 100 booths, including a Food Court, Farmers Row and of course many more featuring the work of dozens of artists. The Riverside Arts Market was many years in the making. It was the dream child of Wayne Wood, who had seen a similar project in Portland, Oregon. He developed su cient interest in the community, so that when the Fuller Warren Bridge was rebuilt, space was left to accommodate the venture. It nally opened in April of 2009 and is now open every Saturday from March to December, starting at 10:00 a.m. It enjoys as many as 5000 visitors each week! The food vendors come from many areas, including Port St. Lucie, Tampa and Waycross. They bring guaranteed home grown vegetables, home made breads, delicious bakery goods, candy and even fresh meats. EncoreA di erent way to enjoy the artsBy Betty Swenson Bergmark, Professor Emeritus, Jacksonville UniversityThe artists also come from many surrounding areas, and share their creative talents in such areas as pottery, photography, fabric design and jewelry, as well as more traditional art disciplines. In addition, they demonstrate their techniques, sharing the creation of art works as you watch. What a wonderful place to do your holiday shopping and nd unique hand made gifts, not to be found anywhere else. But this is not all! As one wanders up and down the aisles, one encounters street performers such as jugglers, magicians, musicians How to carve your turkey successfullyKnives, pans and covers should be sanitized, too. Resanitize boards and knives every 30 minutes. Wear disposable food-handling gloves while carving or frequently wash your hands thoroughly. Immediately after the 10 to 20 minutes holding time, carve the turkey into major sections (i.e., breasts, thighs, drumsticks and wings). To serve turkey hot, place sections in pans. Cover with foil or plastic lm to retain heat and moisture and to minimize the possibility of contamination. Hold at 140 degrees or higher in a hot holding device (a cabinet, steam table or bain-arie). Your turkey should be at least 140 degrees when placed in the holding pans. The heating device will only maintain temperature. A maximum holding time of 20 to 30 minutes is recommended. Slice the sections into serving pieces, arrange them on a plate and add garnish. Enjoy!and other performing artists. In addition there are major scheduled performances on the River Stage where one can relax in the beautifully located Seating Terrace and enjoy a variety of entertainment. During the late summer and early fall, there are also Movies under the Stars starting at sunset, but well have to wait until next year to enjoy that unique entertainment! In the meantime you can plan a wonderful family experience. There are activities for all ages, including a Childrens Creativity Centerand where else would you encounter a juggler as you shop for fresh food, art work or gifts? There is no charge for admission and if you need additional information you can call the parent organization, Riverside/Avondale Preservation at 389-2449 or visit the website at www.riversideartsmarket.com.Margie Davidson scholarship announcedParameters and requirements are currently being developed. For those who wish to contribute to this scholarship, checks should be made payable to the SJCEF and reference Margie Davidson on the memo line. These can be sent to the foundations address at 40 Orange Street, St. Augustine, Florida, 32084, attention Donna Lueders.got news?editor@thecreekline.com Do you know the warning signs of stroke? Sudden numbness or weak ness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination Sudden severe headache with no known causeSource: Baptist Medical Center South Jacksonvilles Only Bridal Consignment Something Borrowed Something BlueNew and Once Worn Gowns and Accessories SELL SHOP ADVERTISE (904)993-6804 Email for information dreamweddingsandhoneymoons@yahoo.com December 2-4, 2011 Why wait for the mailman? View our digital edition online at www.thecreekline.com Book Discussion at the Bartram Trail Branch Library!At Home Monday, November 21 7 pmJoin us for a discussion of this book by Bill Bryson. New members are always welcome!

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 27 If you have a home to sellwhether your mortgage is underwater or paid offlet us show you how much of a difference our experience can make. The team at Davidson Realty has been selling homes in Northeast Floridas neighborhoods for years, through good markets and bad. Today, we have more than 30 full-time agents and a comprehensive support staff ready to put that same experience to work for you. 904-940-5000 | DavidsonRealtyInc.comTRUSTED REAL ESTATE ADVISORS. EXPERIENCE THE DIFFERENCEEXPERIENCE CAN MAKE. The Florida Foreign Language Association (FFLA) 42nd annual conference was held in Cocoa Beach from October 13 through 15. Local St. Johns County School District teachers were asked to be presenters at the conference. A local teacher was the recipient of the WERSHOW Award for Excellence in Leadership in the Profession, awarded annually at the FFLA conference to a member who has demonstrated leadership at the regional, state and/or national level, served as a quality educator in his/her own right and promoted the teaching and learning of foreign languages, bilingual bicultural education, and/or English as a second language. The proud recipient is Linda Villadoniga, Creekside High School Spanish teacher, president elect of Florida Educators of Northeast Florida (FLENEF) and secretary of Florida Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese (FAATSP). I am deeply humbled and honored by this award. It is especially meaningful to me because I was nominated by Janet Robles, a colleague for whom I The Ancient City Brass Band brought the sound of music to Mill Creek Elementary School recently, when they performed for the schools second grade classes as part of the schools special WATT Wednesday programming. The musicians not only dazzled the students with their performing skills, they also included a history lesson and MCE students learn about music from local bandBy Contributing Writer Kate Dowdie, Technology Teacher, Mill Creek Elementary School Cliff Newton and Joe Jamerson of the Ancient City Brass Band show second grade students Reese Geary and Jaclyn Madson the proper way to make a sound on a brass instrument.support for the schools ongoing Character Education program. Under the direction of Cli Newton, members of the Ancient City Brass Band are local musicians who volunteered to perform for the students, encouraging music appreciation and education for all the children.Teacher honored at Spanish educators conferencehave a great deal of admiration and respect and then chosen for this tremendous honor by a committee of my peers, some of the best educators in the nation. I will continue to strive to live up to the high standards the award sets forth and continue to advocate in our e orts to provide foreign language opportunities for our students, not only in St. Johns County, but throughout Florida, said Villadoniga. Donna Guzzo and Maria Janet Robles co-presented a workshop on Mexican Muralists. Villadoniga co-presented a workshop on New Generation Assessment for NGSSS. These teachers had the opportunity to attend other workshops. FFLA and/or FLENEF are a must membership for any Spanish educator. They have the sources and tools to enhance your classroom practices, right here in our state and our own backyard, said Guzzo. Donna Guzzo, Linda Gillespie, Maria Janet Robles and Linda Villadoniga at the FFLA conference.Tell our valued advertisers you saw their ad in The CreekLine The CreekLine need customers?sales@thecreekline.com

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Page 28, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com Caring for you. Its what we do.Proudly caring for our community for five years.Drs. Townsend, DeBoer and Romero of Baptist Primary Care St. Johns Forest are backed by 24-hour care at nearby Baptist Medical Center South. Our of fice is your link to the most preferred health system in our region. Services include: Sports/school physicals Immunizations Well visits for adults and children Care for minor injuries Coordination of care for chronic con ditions (diabetes, hypertension,etc.) Womens health careSame-day appointments Ana M. Romero, MD Board-Certified, Family Medicine Richard Townsend, MD Board-Certified, Family Medicine Matthew DeBoer, DO Board-Certified, Family Medicine 824-4407Baptist Primary Care St. Johns Forest120 Gateway Circle, Unit 1 Jacksonville, FL 32259 Stronger...Faster...Better RACE TRACK RDFLORA BRANCH BLVD. SR 13PUBLIX Fred Baldwin, PT, DPT, SCS, ATC, PES and Tobi Baldwin, PT, DPT, MS, OCS, MTC, FAAOMPTOne on One treatment sessions with a Board Certied Clinical Specialist Helping Hands of St. Johns County will be meeting on Friday, November 18 at 11:00 a.m. at Faith Community Church Community Center to ll Thanksgiving baskets for the Celebration Lutheran Church food bank. An anonymous benefactor has donated 30 $10 turkey gift cards so families can pick their own turkey at Winn Dixie. Helping Hands members are looking for any type of food to add to the food baskets to make the holiday complete. Any canned goods, instant potatoes, macaroni and cheese or stu ng would be appreciated. Food may be dropped o at 1180 Stonehedge Trail or email jacqphil@ aol.com for a convenient time for it to be picked up. The Sew Much Comfort Rippers will meet at 10:00 a.m. before the meeting. Over 800 stockings were distributed throughout the county for soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan and Helping Hands has been busy cutting out and sewing more to meet the demand. Stockings will be available at the St. Johns Golf and Country Club Holiday Vendor night for families to take and ll, but they must be returned no later than November 22 so they can reach the soldiers. If you just wish to bring items for the stockings, you may access www.stmichaelssoldiers.com for a list of items needed. The response from the community has been overwhelming and we cannot thank Winn Dixie on County The year 1912 was a banner one for Florida Henry Flagler triumphantly completed his Florida East Coast railroad from Jacksonville to Key West; it was the rst full season that University of Floridas football team competed as the Florida Gators; and Bernice Porter eld (nee Adams) was born October 17 in the Desoto Sanitorium, which became St. Vincents Hospital four years later when the Sisters of Mercy took it over. On October 17, 2011 members of The Happy Hookers knitting and crocheting charity group from San Juan del Rio Catholic Church in Switzerland gathered at Westminster Woods to celebrate Porter elds 99th birthday. Porter eld is a rarity; a native Jacksonvillian, growing up in Spring eld, graduating from Jackson High School and going on to earn her degree in education at the Florida State College for Women (now Florida State University) in 1934. She met her husband, Miller, on a blind date and they were married in 1934. Bernice Porter eld celebrates 99th birthday at Westminster WoodsBy Contributing Writer Penny LevyThe Porter elds enjoyed 70 years of marriage prior to Miller Porter elds death in 2004. I have to stay active, Porter eld said. This is obvious in her energy and the bounce in her step. She has been a resident at Westminster Woods since 2002. She and her husband were avid golfers and while she no longer plays golf, she walks daily and Bernice Porter eld (in purple) and friends from Westminster WoodsHelping Hands updateBy Contributing Writer Jackie Valyou Brownie Troop 742, who worked on Stockings for a Soldier with Helping Hands.Road 210, First Florida Credit Union on County Road 210, St. Michaels Soldiers and the many organizations, Girl Scout troops, neighborhoods, book clubs, womens clubs and St. Augustine High School, our members and all of you for making this holiday special for our brave military. In addition to the Stocking for A Soldier project, several members entertained our seniors at Trout Creek with a Halloween party. Helping Hands members dressed up in Halloween costumes, visited, served lunch and presented each senior with a special Trick or Treat bag lled with goodies. This has become a yearly event that both members and seniors look forward to. At the October meeting, members decorated small Christmas trees which were given to patients at Community Hospice of Northeast Florida. The gaily decorated trees were in a variety of themes and are sure to delight both children and adults. Helping Hands is a non-denominational group that meets once a month at Faith Community Church Community Center on County Road 210 to do a small project for the community. Membership is always open and there are no dues, o cers or stress. Members come when they can and do what they can. The group relies solely on donations of goods and services from the community. Please contact jacqphil@aol.com for more information.she uses her communitys 18hole putting course regularly. As a member of The Happy Hookers, Porter eld knits items such as baby blankets for charity. The Happy Hookers meet the third Monday of every month at Westminster Woods. Snookie Netting, the groups leader said, We expect to be celebrating Bernices 100th birthday next year! Happy Thanksgiving!from your friends at The CreekLine!

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 29 A CONNECTING CHURCH Our Sunday Services Traditional Worship 8:30am Sunday School 9:45am Contemporary Worship 11:00amwww.switzerlandcommunitychurch.org The Last Noel Christmas Cantata Worship TimeContemporary 9:30 a.m. Childrens Church, Middle and High School Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Nursery Care AvailableReaching Out Offering Christ Living Gods Love(904) 230-2955 Ofcewww.ROLUMC.com R i v e r L ifeo UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Open Hearts Open Minds ~Open Doors The People of the United Methodist Church Thank-you! Our Pumpkin Patch and Fall Festival were a HUGE success! Pastor Caseys new Sermon Series for November: Into the Promise LandThis series of sermons will investigate the journey of Gods people from wandering in the wilderness to entering the promise land in the Old Testament.We will learn insights into the story and reect on some of the parallels between that story and our personal stories. Key ideas: Faith, Hope, Courage, and Trust.We wish all of you a Blessed Thanksgiving. Join us this Christmas Season.Advent begins November 27 St Francis In-The-FieldEpiscopal ChurchChristian Formation 9:00am Sunday Service 10:00amChildrens Chapel and Nursery Available895 Palm Valley Rd (1 mile east of US1)615-2130 Thanksgiving is coming, followed by 32 days full of family, celebration... tradition. Pick up any magazine this month, from Real Simple to Family Fun and youll nd articles touting new, better, more. Better decorations, special family moments and recipes promise to revitalize your worn-out Holiday Traditions. New can be fun... but new practices arent traditions yet. While new, better and more always promise glitz, they often add up to holiday stress and clutter instead. Traditions are called traditions precisely because they form a link to the past. One value of tradition is that it is a celebration of sameness, not change. writes Dr. Richard Swenson in The Overload Syndrome. I love creating memories with our family. Ive scoured blogs for new ideas and have multiple Pinterest boards dedicated to the holidays. I guess you could say I have a tradition of developing new traditions. Dr. Swensons insight has brought balance to my insatiable quest for better. There is no remembrance of former things, Ecclesiastes 1:11 warns. Im listening! Slow down and enjoy today, remember the great times past and allow the routine to be a salve to a busy soul instead of being driven to scramble after some Following is an interview with Adam Flynt, lead pastor of The Crossing Church, talking about the upcoming holidays. As things head into the holidays, what are you seeing? I love this time of year, dont you? All the food, music, parties! But it can be tough, too. So many of us want to have that perfect family meal or have Christmas morning go just the way we always imagined. Thats a lot of pressure that can mess with an otherwise perfectly happy family. So what do we do to combat the pressure of perfection these holidays? Thats the big question isnt it? Why do I feel the need to throw the perfect party? Does going into debt for piles of gifts really make things better? What about all the crazy family dynamics? The typical answer is plan better, budget more and start buying in January. Im all for calendars and Quicken, but what were talking about goes deeper.Meet The Crossing Churchs Adam FlyntFaith Corner: Tell us about what The Crossing is doing to answer that this season? We dont want to just jam everyones iCal with more running around. First, Id encourage families to block out space to simply be together. On November 20, were starting a four part series called Christmas Vacation (Im a huge Chevy Chases Christmas Vacation fan) to talk about the pressure of perfection around the holidays. Also, have you heard about the huge Community Christmas Celebration on December 22? What is the Community Christmas Celebration? The evening will have a really fun, meaningful service at 6:30 p.m. at Fruit Cove Middle School. Everyones invited! There will be a great band. There will be childcare for infants-preschoolers. Afterwards there will be free hayrides, giant in atables, hot chocolate and time to connect with neighbors. Its jokingly called Christmas Eve, Eve, Eve. Checkout www. tccjax.org for all the details. Purposeful ParentingTraditions revised... or notBy Allie Olsenelusive perfection that doesnt even exist. Again in The Overload Syndrome, Dr. Swenson instructs busy Americans to look to routines not to add spice to life, but to add a much needed and pleasurable stability. These routines are called programmed decisions, and they cut down greatly on decision stress. During the busy holiday season, doesnt everyone want to reduce stress?! Look to favorite memories of the past or carefully schedule your holiday to-dos to develop family history. Your Thanksgiving menu and the way you give thanks to God may be your family anchor for the holiday. Outdoor games, family singing, a football game, Grandpas prayer, going through the Black Friday ads, bringing a pie to the re station... what makes your Thanksgiving uniquely yours? Tried and true traditions can be meaningful, memorable respites in the busy instability of life. Dr. Swenson suggests that these family memories do more than alleviate the burden of choice and de-clutter schedules. He calls traditions a valuable anchor for the soul. May your soul nd rest this holiday season and your thanks be genuine to the One who gives every good and perfect gift (James 1:17). Happy Thanksgiving. Ca ll Linda Gay to reserve your spac e today. Direc t Line: 287-4913 or E-M ail: lg@rtpublishinginc .c om I nvite the Community to Y our Holiday E vents A dvertise in T he Cree kLine D ec ember Issue C all Linda G ay to reserve your spac e to day D irec t Line: 287-4913 or E-M ail: l g @rtpublishin g inc .c om Peanut Butter Jelly or jam Cereal/Oatmeal Canned Pasta Canned Stew/Chili Canned pasta Soup Canned fruit/veggies Toilet PaperChrists Cupboard Food Pantry Wish ListChrists Cupboard is located at Celebration Lutheran Church, 810 Roberts Road. Call 230-2496 for info!Christs Cupboard serves anyone in need. Hours are 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday

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Page 30, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com Congratulations for reading this adRECEIVERSHIP Most homes and businesses in Mandarins 32223 and 32258 zip codes receive this paper. READERSHIP Awesome readership, because our papers are providing what readers need. BUYERS Our readers make buying decisions from our free paper advertising and editorialpeople like you.The right choice...here to stay Ask your representative for our complete audit numbers. Local numbers gladly provided.You have heard the daily newspaper numbers... Layoffs ... Less news published ... Local is gone etc. Here are some important independently-owned, community paper numbers:98.6% 83.2% 83.2% Circulation audit by Proud Member of THE FOLLOWING ADS HAVE NOT BEEN SCREENED BY THE SOUTHEASTERN ADVERTISING PUBLISHERS ASSOCIATION (SAPA); Therefore, any discrepancies thereof shall not be the responsibility of the aforementioned association. Your publisher has agreed to participate in this program and run these ads as a service to the Southeastern Advertising Publishers Association. ADOPTION Pregnant? Childless couple offers love/ nancial security. Stay-at-home Mom/devoted Dad. Expenses Paid. www.adoption-is-love.com Lorraine & Daniel. 1.866.944.4847. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? We can help you! Housing, nancial and medical assistance available. Choose adoptive family involved in adoption plans. Call 24/7. Forever Blessed Adoptions. 1-800-568-4594 (Void in IL, IN) PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call Us First! Living Expenses, Housing, Medical and continued support afterwards. Choose Adoptive Family of Your Choice. Call 24/7. ADOPT CONNECT 1-866-743-9212. A UNIQUE ADOPTIONS, LET US HELP! PERSONALIZED ADOPTION PLANS. FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE, HOUSING, RELOCATION AND MORE. GIVING THE GIFT OF LIFE? YOU DESERVE THE BEST. CALL US FIRST! 1-888-637-8200. 24 hour HOTLINE. ADOPTIONBirthmother, your feelings matter! 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Kim 1-888-883-8835. www.cash4diabeticsupplies.com (Free 6 months web hosting: 1-888-924-2082) (Free trial efax paperless fax: 1-888-652-3759) (Allstate Auto Insurance quote, Save 45%+, Free quote: 1-888-8533655) (Satellite TV, Free Installation, Free DVR, Free HD receivers; Local Channels, For special offers call: 1-888-925-6796) (Home Security Monitoring, Free $850 Security System: 1-888-653-3786) PERSONALS Stressed About 2012? Relax & Party with It Just Doesnt Matter by Ziffels Hogbalm. E-Novel available at Amazon/i-books. 1-306-292-9648. REAL ESTATE 20 ACRES to live on ONLY $99/month, $0 Down. No credit checks, Money Back Guarantee, Owner Financing. Near growing El Paso, Texas. Beautiful mountain views! Free Color Brochure. Call 1-800-843-7537. www.sunsetranches.com. ***FREE Foreclosure Listings*** Over 400,000 properties nationwide. LOW Down Payment. 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Shipping Paid Hablamos espanol 1-800-266-0702 www.selldiabeticstrips.com As of Sunday, November 6, landscape irrigation returned to no more than one day a week across the 18 counties of the St. Johns River Water Management District. Eastern Standard Time began November 6, marking the third year of district wide oneday-per-week watering restrictions during Floridas cooler months. Watering restrictions are designed to allow enough water to maintain healthy landscapes year-round and also to ensure the e cient use of water for landscape irrigation by specifying the days and time of day when watering may occur and the amount of water that may be applied. Conservation is among the most important strategies to help meet Floridas water supply needs for today and the future, said Michael Register, director of the Districts Department of Regulatory Services. The majority of people in our District are doing their part to save water by adhering to the restrictions, recognizing that water conservation can be easy and making a tremendous impact on how much water is conserved. The e cient use of water can save thousands of gallons of water per month and often delivers money savings as well. With more than half of commercial and residential One-day-a-week landscape irrigation resumes in NovemberBy Contributing Writer Teresa H. Monson, St. Johns River Water Management Districtwater use occurring outdoors, mandatory watering restrictions are in place throughout the year within the Districts region to ensure the e cient use of water for lawn and landscape irrigation. Watering wisely promotes healthier lawns and landscapes and conserves Floridas water resources. During the warmer months of daylight saving time, irrigation is allowed up to twice a week. When Eastern Standard Time is in e ect, outdoor irrigation is limited to no more than one day a week on the following schedule: Saturday at addresses that end in an odd number or have no address Sunday at addresses that end in an even number Tuesday at nonresidential addresses No irrigation is allowed between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. In addition, irrigation is limited to three-quarters of an inch of water per irrigation zone and to no more than one hour per irrigation zone. The restrictions apply to water withdrawn from ground or surface water, from a private well or pump or from a public or private water utility. Irrigation limitations apply to all landscape irrigation not currently regulated by a consumptive use permit, which typically includes residential, commercial and industrial establishments. Golf courses, plant nurseries, agricultural crops, and sports recreational areas generally have consumptive use permits that specify their irrigation limitations. When daylight saving time returns on March 11, 2012, landscape irrigation will return to the two-day-a-week schedule. More details and information about exceptions is available on the Districts watering restrictions web page. Friends of the LibraryBOOK SALESat. Nov. 12 9:30 AM Noon Bartram Trail Branch Library Support our ne advertisers!They ensure that The CreekLine arrives in your mailbox each month!886-4919 sales@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 31 The CreekLine Marketplace ads!886-4919 Community MarketplaceAttention Small Businesses!!!For just $39 per issue you can reach 23,000+ addresses (min. of 6 issues) Call 886-4919 today! New Classi ed Rates!Place your classi ed online today! Online classi ed ads are FREE!www.thecreekline.com LOCAL Classi eds Thank you to these ne advertisers for providing this convenience to our readers !Need an extra copy of The CreekLine?Visit one of our pickup locations! Memorial Building ~ Mandarin VyStar Credit Union ~ Julington Creek Branch The UPS Store ~ Fruit Cove The UPS Store ~ WGV JCP Property Owners O ce Bartram Trail Branch Library Baptist South Hospital ~ Outpatient Registration Massage TherapyAlicia Hunter LMTOnly $50 an hour #MM12329/MA53865 Neuromuscular Therapy ( 904 ) 514 5788www.hunter l mt. c omA New U Massage located in San Jose Office Center, Next to Sonnys and Ace Hardware$5 OFF with this ad. Help WantedGraphic Designer Part-Time Position Available Seeking experienced graphic designer. Familiarity with the following software programs: Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, WORD, Power Point and EXCEL. Must be a very organized self starter who can manage deadlines, pleasant phone skills. The preferred candidate will have a strong creative background. Prep-press and agency experience a plus. The ability to take a project from idea to nished concept is a must. Must be able to multi-task and complete projects on deadline. Previous experience in ad design in media or publishing industry preferred. This position is part-time. Contact rt@rtpublishinginc.com St. Johns Eye Associats CR210 West. Optometric Technician with great personaltity & strong computer skills. Saturday hours 9-1 pm are a requirement. Please email resume to sjeacontactlens@yahoo.com The UPS Store in Fruit Cove: Part-time Service Associate. Must be 18 or older and able to work weekdays and some Saturdays. Retail experience and working knowledge of MS Of ce Suite preferred; graphics design skills are a big plus. 230-8881. Panache in Julington Creek is interviewing experienced & talented Stylists to join our team. Do you enjoy working in a professional, clean & successful environment? Apply at www.getpanache. com or stop in 2758 Racetrack Road #403 HELP WANTED! If you like music (and other arts) and would like to volunteer to support a non-pro t organization bringing music to the community, please call 374 8639 Join the Baptist South circle of care. Visit e-baptisthealth.com for the most up to date list of job openings. Listings are updated daily and change often. If you have any questions, please call Human Resources at 271.6078. Seeking Licensed Massage Therapist @ A New U Massage(MM12329) Mandarin furnished massage room available NOW. Room rent is $375+ 7% tax ($401.25) a month. Rent can split w/other LMT. Phone: 904-288-0064. Pet Sitting Company Part time work with pets. Applicant must live in the International Golf Parkway area. Flexible hours. Adult applicants only. Call Robin at 687-9610 www.allearspetsitting.com (904) 687-9610 Bonded, Insured & Affordable www.axiomphotos.com Aordable family and event photography Call: 904-673-0091 Debbies Home Cleaning Services Home e rvice s Local, honest, dependable individual offering local area home cleaning services. Call for FREE estimate! Ill do the cleaning so you dont have to!Home 829-2275Cell 707-9472License No. 42295 Change Your Body T ransform Y our L ife. Dont Loose weight. L oose F at. Gain lean muscle.904.3 15 .8280Visit http://nonibaby.tbioactive.com Professional Computer ServicesBusiness & ResidentialFor more details, visit us at:www.itpromise.com I.T. Promise Inc. Computer Services( 904 ) 287-2254 at Fruit Cove287-0601 Housecleaning 207-5674 Klean Spray Pressure Washing 631 273110% OFF1st time customers MB SPORTS your purchase of $25 or more $5 OFFGATORS GEORGIA JAGUARS MUCH FSU LSU STEELERS MUCH ALABAMA GIANTS EAGLES MORE8221-13 Southside Blvd., Jacksonville, Www.shopmbsports.com Corner Southside & Baymeadows FREE ONLINE CLASSIFIED ADSGo towww.thecreekline.comand click onFree Online Classi ed Ads Seeking Sitters is looking for reliable and trustworthy babysitters for on-call babysitting jobs. Great contract rate and exible scheduling. Must be 18 yrs or older, have veri able child-care experience and willing to obtain CPR and First Aid certi cation. Apply at www.seekingsitters.com Chair Rental opening in a busy salon in Mandarin area. Please call Joanne at Cher Chez 268-6199 or 502-6392 Chiropractors of ce looking for: Front desk reception, Full time, Must have computer skills, fast learner, Very friendly/outgoing, ling, Good phone skills, Bruce Sambursky, D.C. fax resume to 683-4378 or email samburskychiro@comcast. net Booth renter or commission, De Javu salon, Full service hair skin nails teeth whitening Seeking experienced hair and nail professionals to join our team. Over 2800sf great locationMust be a team player. De Javu salon 11018 old at Augustine Rd 904-463-7799 Www.dejavujax.comO ce Space for Rent1,2, or 3 quiet professional of ces for rent in south Mandarin on San Jose Blvd. $250 to $350 per of ce per month including utilities. For information call (904) 861-5233 or (904) 613-8807.For SaleDining Room Set for sale Ethan Allen Birchwood 9-piece dining room set, Includes glass-door china cabinet, buffet, 6 chairs, 70 rectangular dinning table with 2 additional leaves, 2-sided custom-made table cover, and custom sleeves for leaves. Unique Bisque nish. Excellent condition. All for $3800 or best offer. Call Kathy 612-3493 ServicesINFANT/TODDLER-Care. My Home (JCP) 20 years experience, References available (904) 294-3794. Care PRIVATE MATH TUTOR: Grades 6-12 (all areas), College Algebra & Trigonometry as well. Reasonable rates. Will travel to your location. One half hour free with rst lesson. STATE CERTIFIED ELIGIBLE MATH GRADES 6-12. 20 years experience. Call Karen Alber 904-669-4477.Wanted ItemsConsign your wedding items 904-993-6804 Seventy- ve current and former students at The Bolles School earned the designation of AP Scholar by the College Board in recognition of their exceptional achievement on the collegelevel Advanced Placement Program Exams taken in 2011.As a group, 92 percent scored a 3 or higher, with 75 percent receiving scores of 4 or higher, and 44 percent receiving scores of 5. The College Boards Advanced Placement Program o ers students the opportunity to take challenging college-level courses while still in high school, and to receive college credit, advanced placement or both for successful performance on the AP Exams.The College Board recognizes several levels of achievement based on students performance on AP exams. At Bolles, seven students quali ed for the National AP Scholar Award by earning an average grade of 4 or higher on all AP Exams taken and grades of 4 or higher on eight or more of these exams. These students are also included among the AP Scholar with Distinction Award recipients. Thirty-one Bolles students quali ed for the AP Scholar with Distinction Award by earning an average grade of at least 3.5 on all AP Exams taken and Seventyve Bolles students earn 2011 AP Scholar Awardsgrades of 3 or higher on ve or more of these exams. Fifteen students quali- ed for the AP Scholar with Honor Award by earning an average grade of at least 3.25 on all AP Exams taken, and grades of 3 or higher on four or more of these exams. Twenty-nine students quali ed for the AP Scholar Award by completing three or more AP Examinations with grades of 3 or higher. The following list includes Bolles graduates from the class of 2011 as well as students who currently remain enrolled at the School. The current students, who took the exams as juniors, are noted with an asterisk. Now seniors at Bolles, the current students may complete another year of college-level work and possibly earn another AP Scholar Award. The Bolles School 2011 AP ScholarsAP National Scholars Matthew Howell William Leeser Daniel Leichus William Pilcher Ajay Shro Robert Wulbern Nicholas Zakoske AP Scholars with Distinction Claire Alexander Edgar Aranda-Michel Sophia Array Connor Brown Montana Buss Rebecca Chandler Alora Clark Max Fleisher Matthew Howell Jennifer Hum Michal Hyde Lewis Lee William Leeser Daniel Leichus Patrick Murphy William Pilcher Shayne Polley Jessi Ponder Gabrielle Ragazzo *Azeem Rathore Scott Rice Max Rogozinski Eilis Ryan Ajay Shro Ryan Smith Morgan Sutter Alisa White Conor White Robert Wulbern Cen Xu Nicholas Zakoske AP Scholars with Honors Jenna Bartol Jun Hwan Cho Ruth Curry Clements Madison Fox Spencer Joel *Emily Keator Alen Koren Brennen Lutz Geo rey McQueen Paul Numbers Jack Richards Morgan Siewert Jessica Staley Eric Vanden Noort *Ashley Walters *Current studentsCheck out our community webpages!www.thecreekline.com Community Calendar High School Football Blog

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Page 32, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com Grow Stronger, Live longer! Yoga Den Studio First Class Free Group & Private Lessons Dont miss the 9th Annual Turkey Day Detox! Preregistration required www.yoga-den.com 268-8330 2929 Plummer Cove Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32223 Located in Mandarin, just south of I-295 across from Walmart Yoga Basics Mind Body Power Yoga Yogalates Teacher Training Tree WorkbyMitch Drake & Sons (904) 703-5040 (904) 287-3819Licensed, Insured & Workmans CompOver 35 Years Experience Check out our reviews and 5 Star rating at Yellowbook.com! This months movie review belongs to the lm Real Steel, an action packed science- ction lm great for kids and adults. Somewhere in the future, robot boxing takes the place of live human boxing as the public searches for greater sensationalism and matches that are more dangerous. Hugh Jackman portrays a down-on-hisluck boxing promoter, Charlie Kenton. While trying to recover from the recent loss of his last robot, he is informed that the son he abandoned has lost his mother. As it happens, his exsister-in-law is seeking custody and happens to have a husband with a heavy wallet. For a price, Charlie agrees to take in his 11-year-old son, Max Kenton, played by Dakota Goyo, for the summer. Charlie tends to go through (NewsUSA) Everyone experiences changes in their eyesight as they age. For many, it means buying reading glasses to read a menu, newspaper or other small print. According to the American Lighting Association (ALA), changing the lighting in your surroundings can go a long way to enhance reading ability and increase comfort. Often, the rst thing people notice as they get older is their loss of ability to see distance, notes Terry McGowan, director of engineering and technology for ALA and owner of Lighting Ideas in Cleveland. That happens around age 45 and is called presbyopia. By 60, most people have a xed focus optical system and need glasses. After age 60, eye and visual system changes accelerate, so that less light reaches the eye. Therefore, people need more light to see details as they age. Paul Eusterbrock, president of Holkoetter International, a lighting manufacturer that has championed lighting developments and products to help aging eyes, agrees. The main issue is the quality of light, he says. Research shows that a 60-year-old needs twice as much light as a 30-year-old. Most of the commonly found Julington Creek Plantation CDD is o ering two opportunities to spend some quality time with Santa Claus in December. First, on Saturday, December 3 from 10:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m., Santa will be greeting children in the lobby of the JCP Recreation Movie ReviewReal SteelDirected by: Shawn Levy. Starring: Hugh Jackman, Evangeline Lilly and Dakota Goyo. Review by T.G. StantonGood Movie, Glad to Have Seen It (4 out of 5) money like other people go through water in the summer, so, they are soon again in need of a moneymaking robot ghter. After searching the robot graveyard, they nd one of the early robots and start training what seems to be an unlikely winner. With a little help from gym manager Bailey Tallet, depicted by Evangeline Lilly and a few spare parts left from previous bots, this sparring robot may have a chance. His opponents are newer bigger and stronger, but sometimes tougher is better and sometimes operator technique helps. During all of the action and drama, Charlie also comes to know his son and changes may be in his future. Shawn Levy directed this family action lm as a feel good lm that has you rooting for the underdog from the beginning Santa Claus is coming soon!By Contributing Writer Linda DeBlois, Special Events Director, Julington Creek Plantation CDDLighting can be your eyes best friend as you agelighting guidelines are written with the 30-year-old user in mind. Is there a magic light bulb that will work for everyone? McGowan and Eusterbrock say no. This may sound strange, but the perfect bulb is whichever one the user nds works best for them, McGowan says. Individual vision varies so much especially as people agethat its di cult to develop lighting recipes that are onesize- ts-all. Whether you are old or young, the basic rules of good lighting apply: have su cient illumination with little or no glare and use di used lighting to minimize shadows. If energy savings is a concern, McGowan recommends selecting compact uorescent lights (CFLs) and LED bulbs with warm tones (look for 2700-3000K on the box) and a high color-rendering index of 90 or more. For expert advice from a certi ed lighting consultant (CLC) or accredited lighting specialist (LS), stop by an ALAmember lighting showroom. They will help you save time, frustration and money. To nd a store near you, go to www. americanlightingassoc.com. and throughout. Sometimes that is Charlie, sometimes Max and at other times the robot named Atom. Another feature of this lm is the robots that were built in real life and computer generated; they provide the majority of the action. Dakota Goyo holds his own with Hugh Jackman and is endearing as the child who teaches his father not only what he was missing but how to develop responsibility. Hugh Jackman was also a pleasure to see in this new role: con-man promoter, redeemable and teachable, but also a ghter who is getting a second chance at being a winner and a father. Multiple other characters add depth and drama to the lm. Anyone who ever played Rock em-Sock em Robots will enjoy this lm in addition to the emotion evoked from the story. The CreekLineis YOUR Community Newspaper! Send us your community news!editor@thecreekline.com Center to hear holiday wishes and take photos. This is an opportunity to skip the long lines and expense of the local malls. You may take your own photos or purchase a photo package from the JCP photographer. Then, imagine the surprise when Santa Claus knocks at your front door! On weekends in December, Santa will be making special visits to homes throughout Julington Creek Plantation. The Recreation Center will be booking these visits starting November 14. The average stay will be 10 minutes, enough time for Santa to quickly listen to what the children would like for Christmas, have a few pictures taken and then be on his merry way. Each child will receive a special surprise from Santa and the cost is $25 per house. This magical visit promises to be a memory the kids will never forget. For further information or to register for a Santa Home Visit, please go to www.jcpcdd.org.Do you know the warning signs of stroke? Sudden numbness or weak ness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination Sudden severe headache with no known causeSource: Baptist Medical Center South

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 33 Medicare open enrollment is the one time each year to make changes to your insurance plan. During open enrollment, you can compare physicians, hospitals and benets of other plans and switch to a plan that meets your personal healthcare needs.Are you seeing the right doctor?For expert medical care right in your own backyard, consider a University of Florida primary care physician. UF primary care physicians care about the well-being of their patients and t ake the time to get to know their medical history. UF primary care physicians practice in more than 20 locations acr oss the First Coast. UF primary care physicians have access to hundreds of UF specialis t physicians and all the resources of an academic health center. UF primary care practices have received national designation as P atient-Centered Medical Homes. They are the rst and only health organizations in Northeast Florida, as well as the only academic medical group in Florida, to receive this designation. Important Information about Medicare Open Enrollment www.UFmedicarejax.comUF primary care centers currently accept:WellCare Health Plans 1-888-888-9355 (TTY/TDD: 1-877-247-6272) Aetna Medicare Advantage HMO Plan 1-800-832-2640 (TTY/TDD: 1-888-760-4748) Traditional Medicare 1-800-633-4227 (TTY/TDD: 1-877-486-2048) 2011 Patient-Centered Medical Home MEDICARE OPEN ENROLLMENT ENDS DEC 7, 2011

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Page 34, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com THE PATIENT OR PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE S, EXAMINATIONS OR TREATMENT.Dr. Bruce SamburskyChiropractic PhysicianOver 22 Years of Experience SPECIAL OFFER Must present this ad to receive offer. Not Valid with any other offers. Expires 12/10/11 Sambursky Chiropractic, LLC683-4376 Immediate same day appointments available. Including Saturdays! We are happy to welcome to our oce Jane Moore, Licensed Massage Therapist LIC#0023441 .12421 San Jose Blvd. #300 (just South of Solantic )Serving the Mandarin and Julington Creek area.www.backbonejax.comINITIAL EXAMINATIONONLY $59(NORMAL VALUE $120 VALUE)Stop suering from: Julington Creek Animal Walk is a state-of-the-art pet boarding facility for dogs, cats, and exotics providing: Your pet will nd a welcoming retreat at our 9-acre, fenced, off-leash dog park featuring a bone-shaped swimming pool and our NE Floridas Premier Luxury Pet Resort, Dog Park and SpaConveniently located next to Julington Creek Animal Hospital Stop by for a tour and receive a coupon for a free daily park pass Aordable small dog luxury oasis. Please call for details. Veterinarian Owned and Operated The St. Augustine Art Association recently collected 70 pairs of shoes during a monthlong Steppin Up for Kids Shoe Drive, held in partnership with St. Johns County Communities in Schools. The childrens shoes were donated by gallery visitors who toured Don Trousdells Walk in Peace exhibit, a collection of paintings and gra ti-style shoes that chronicled the symbolism and history of peace. The athletic shoes will be distributed to students in economically disadvantaged areas of the county. Cash donations amounting to $350, also collected at the Art Association during the drive, will help pay for additional footwear needs. Every fall, we take children of all ages to Wal-Mart to buy them shoes, said Kathy Drake, executive director of Communities in Schools, a non-pro t organization. This shoe drive will go a long way to help the families and students that come through our program. Were very grateful to the community for making this effort a success, said Elyse Brady, administrator of the St. Augustine Art Association. Working The third annual Orthopaedic Associates of St. Augustine Golf Tournament was held on Tuesday, October 11 at the St. Johns Golf and Country Club. The tournament, which welcomed 112 golfers, raised $20,000 to bene t The Good Samaritan Health Centers Wild- ower Clinic in St. Augustine. Lynnette Horwath, executive director of the Good Samaritan Health Centers, expressed her gratitude at the awards luncheon, This donation of almost $20,000 will cover the cost of clinic operations for over a month. This has a huge impact on a small clinic like ours. The annual golf tournament is just one of many ways in Community steps up for kids in Walk in Peace exhibitwith a visionary like Don Trousdell who can make change happen through his art is really quite extraordinary. More than 800 people visited Walk in Peace while it was installed in the Main Gallery of the Art Association. The exhibit, which spawned other community events including a 10th Anniversary 9/11 Tribute and collaborative Peace Pole project, is expected to travel to other venues and museums worldwide. The St. Augustine Art Association, located at 22 Marine Street, is a non-pro t arts organization, founded in 1924 to promote art excellence through education, exhibitions and community outreach. For more information, please call 824-2310 or visit www.staaa.org. Elyse Brady, St. Augustine Art Association; Don Trousdell, Walk in Peace artist, Kathy Drake, Communities in Schools executive director Congratulations to the CFL PW Black Knights Pop Warner Football who won the Jacksonville City Championship on October 29 at First Coast High School. They are playing in regionals in early November in Lake City! Black Knights win championshipWild ower Clinic bene ts from golf tournamentwhich the doctors of Orthopaedic Associates of St. Augustine are committed to giving back to their local community. About the Wild ower Clinic: Good Samaritan Health Centers, Inc., has been providing free medical and dental services to the St. Augustine community since 1998. The Wildower Clinic, a new 1,500 square foot clinic, was recently built to serve the medical and dental needs of the uninsured community of St. Johns County. The clinic serves uninsured county residents with an income at or below 200 percent of Federal Poverty Guidelines. The Wild ower Clinic sees over 2,500 patients annually, many of who have no other option but to go to the Emergency Room. Everybody reads The CreekLine Shouldnt your ad be included?sales@thecreekline.com

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 35 33% OFF ( Our Regular Price or any competitor's Regular Price ) BIG GREEN SALE! THE BIGGEST SALE OF PLANT MATERIAL IN FLORIDA CONTRACTORS WELCOME Trout Creek Location at World Golf VillageOVER 45 ACRES OF PLANT MATERIAL WITH HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF S J&NURSERY & LANDSCAPING W orl d d d Go Go Go Go Go Go Go G G G Go Go Go Go Go l l l lf lf lf lf lf lf lf lf lf V i G IN GOD WE TRUST TOTAL LANDSCAPES DESIGN & INSTALLATION SODDING & IRRIGATION DEBRIS REMOVAL Free Estimate & Consultation! 50% OFF All Crepe Myrtles 500 + to Choose FromHuge Inventory To Select From Free sod Barbara Lee Studios All is well in the world of Creekside sports and the horizons are mostly bright. The football and volleyball teams are both having some of the best seasons in school history. The volleyball team just won their conference match against Nease and the football team is challenging long-time rival Ponte Vedra for division supremacy. The varsity football team is holding at a school best 5-1. The Knights have been playing impressive football lately. Their o ense, led by junior Adam Sandin, has been absolutely phenomenal. In just two weeks the Knights put up a total of 88 points, 41 in a 41-31 thriller against Episcopal and 47 in a 47-18 win over Pedro Menendez. In the game against Pedro Menendez, the Knights scored all 47 point in the rst half setting a new school record for most points in a single half. The Knights are 2-0 in the district and pending a win against Matanzas in their homecoming Good newsit is o cially fall and the shing still remains great in our area of the St. Johns River. From downtown Jacksonville to Green Cove and in between (thats us), those great catches weve experienced most of the year are still to be had. There are plenty of croaker and yellowmouth to be caught in the holes and shell beds, along with sea trout, ounder, red sh black drum and sheepshead around docks and bridges. Live and dead shrimp is the bait of choice for this shing smorgasbord, but cut bait, live nger mullet and quartered blue crab will also produce some nice catches. Now is the time to be planning your shing trip as seasonal conditions could slow down or even bring to a halt this fabulous shing till spring. Fortunately we live along a diverse part of the river that likes to keep on giving. Fishing doesnt end over the winter months here; it just changes. Instead of targeting croaker, trout and reds, we are now heading out for speckled perch (crappie), cat sh and stripers. On warmer, milder days expect a decent bream bite along with a largemouth bass or two. Speckled perch along with striped bass can be caught on the coldest of days. Striped bass are also known to often bite best on the ugliest of days. Downtown, Doctors Lake, Buckman, Black Creek and Shands Bridges will be your best bet for stripers. Deep holes around bends in Julington, Durbin and Trout Creeks should be some of the better gathering spots for speckled perch. Save the short sleeve days for bream, cat sh and bass, shing shallow water, docks and lily pads. Not many people live in With almost three months into the new school year, the fall sports are in full swing at Nease. Many of these sports are on the right track to achieving their goals; whether it is districts, regionals or states, the hard-working Panthers continue striving for success. And the intensity of the teams is something unmatched by any other. The volleyball team has a winning record, 12-8, which is excellent. Taking into account a new coaching sta and the loss of six seniors (from last year), this rebuilding year is going extremely well for the new, young team. Sadie Thurston, a sophomore, energetically thanks, the new coaching sta thats helped us along the way! The team has beaten some of the harder teams, like Creekside and these good victories have boosted the morale of the volleyball girls. For the swimming and diving team, the goal is to take as many people as possible to districts. And they have a good chance of accomplishing that, because there have been no inju-game, will be tied with Ponte Vedra going into their late October game for the district lead. This all however depends on both teams maintaining their current performances, which doesnt seem too hard for the pair to do. The October 28 showdown is expected to be one of the most electrifying in school history. Since both Ponte Vedra and Creekside opened the same year, they fast became inevitable rivals. The rivalry has burned hot for the past three years across all sports, with football, volleyball and lacrosse being the most intense. Last year when the football teams played a brawl broke out on the eld between the two and had to be broken up by coaches. This year the game is being held at Ponte Vedra and the winner of the game will most likely win the division. Both teams have put up similar numbers all season making the game on paper look like a close one. Creekside is sure to bring their massive student section to the game taking the edge o the Sharks home eld advantage. The last four games of the season are area rivals Matanzas, Ponte Vedra, Nease and nally Bartram. The varsity volleyball team is also doing well. Their record is 16-5 but they are 4-0 in the league. They most recently beat Nease for the conference title and have a four game lead over the Bartram Bears who are 1-3 in the league. They are in line to win district title this year. The girls are ranked seventh overall in the state out of 78 schools in the same division. The girls are looking sharp going into the end of the season. Wrestling and soccer have both started their tryouts recently as we gear up for our winter sports. Go Knights!Editors Note: For the most recent football scores and updates, please visit www.thecreekline.com and view our High School Football blog, where our high school writers post game recaps for each of their schools home football games.CHS Sports RoundupBy Grant Piper, CHS StudentCaptain Davids Fishing ReportBy Captain David Lifkaries so far! A lot of the freshmen have potential to make the team excellent, although many seniors will be leaving this year. Districts is coming up soon and the both the boys and girls swim teams are de nitely prepared to win. The cross country team is doing incredibly well. There have been no injuries and senior Mac Reynolds has broken the school record-again; with a time of 15:22, hes the fastest runner at our school (5k race). The team had their pre-state race and now hopes to qualify for districts, then regions, then states. The girls and boys of cross country are some of the most determined athletes at Nease and the teamwork and support has been clearly visible throughout the season. The football team at Nease has had a rough start to their season, as their record is 2-5. However, the team still has time to improve their record and the last games of the season will be make-or-break for the team. The pride of the Nease Panthers football, though, has stayed strong and the fans never faltered from cheering them on at the games.Nease Sports RoundupBy Elena Castello, Nease Studentan area where year round shing exists without having to drill a hole in the ice. This winter when you feel the urge to escape the house and get outdoors, give the St. Johns or one its tributaries a try and you might be pleasantly surprised. Fishing Report: Croaker and yellowmouth are big and plentiful. Marker 18 and Buckman Bridge should provide plenty of action. Anything goes on docks with live bait. On any day red sh, croakers, trout and ounder. Fish moving tides. Whether you catch one, some or none, the family time spent shing will last a lifetime. Specialized Care for the individual with Alzheimers or similar memory loss. Almost HomeDAYBREAKAdult Day Care 731-4002License #9109MF 7am6pmwww.almosthomedaybreak.com 3604 Cardinal Point Drive Jacksonville, FL 32257-5581 On November 19, 2011, at 10:15 a.m. in the St. Johns County Main Library, awardwinning writers Je Swesky and Nancy Quatrano will present an interactive workshop about ghostwriting memoirs, at the Ancient City Chapter-Flori-Ghostwriting up close: Writing on contractda Writers Association meeting. The Main Library is located at 1960 North Ponce de Leon Boulevard in St. Augustine. There are many ways to make writing lucrative. Journalists write for hire, as do copywriters for ad and publicity rms. And then there is ghostwriting. People from 18 to 100 have fascinating stories to tell. Ghostwriting contracts can vary from no author credit and a paycheck, to payment with full credit for the work. And, as Swesky and Quatrano will reveal, an incredible journey and experience is involved with writing those books for other people. To make it easy to understand, Swesky has developed a checklist-type guide as a handout. This program is presented in partnership with the Friends of the Main Library, St. Johns County and the Ancient City Chapter, Florida Writers Association (ACC-FWA). The ACC-FWA meets the third Saturday of every month at the Main Library. Meetings are free and open to writers of all genres. For more information regarding the local chapter or the FWA organization, please contact the group at accfwa@ gmail.com.

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Page 36, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com Unlimited t raining included. Access to a eet of boats in Jacksonville and St. Augustine as well as over 60 locations across the country. Call us about trade ins.Call today 1-888-684-2214 Aordable Boating Without the Hassle.Located at Julington Creek Marina in Jacksonville and Camachee Cove Yacht Harbour in St. Augustine No Maintenance!No Insurance!No Cleaning!No Storage!www.freedomboatclub.comDr. Gus J. Gari D.D.S. To Schedule an appointment call287-0033 Teeth enamel discoloration can be caused by staining, aging, or chemical damage to your teeth. Some of the more common causes of teeth discoloration are red wine, coffee, tea, sodas or cigarettes. Teeth whitening can be used to correct discoloration of the teeth by removing the yellow and brown staining that builds up over the years. Teeth whitening is an easy solution with lasting results and minimal steps. The dentist creates a custom mouth tray for the patient before the patient embarks on the teeth whitening regimen at home. The custom tray is a critical component of the treatment. It ensures that the correct amount of whitening solution is used ant that the patients teeth are properly exposed to the whitening solution, without causing damage to the gums. A home whitening session can last for a few hours or you may keep the tray in overnight, it all depends on level of whitening the patient desires. Many patients have their teeth whitened to improve their appearance. Whiter teeth are associated with a youthful and healthier lifestyle. When patients have a brighter smile, they tend to smile more often and are less self-conscious. In addition, a whiter smile tends to minimize the appearance of facial wrinkles, giving a way to a younger and energetic look. A whiter smile gives patients a friendlier appearance and a focus for all to look at. Have a beautiful smile for the holidays !! Call the ofce for our holiday whitening specials for you or a loved one, its a great gift for the holidays.Brighten Your Smile for the Holidays With a quarter of the year already nished, the fall sports have begun to wind down, as teams are competing in their district, regional and state playo games. However as the temperature starts to drop and the days begin to shorten, Bartram Trails winter sports season is just heating up. With a disappointing end to their seasons last year, both the boys and girls basketball teams are looking for redemption. On the other hand the girls and boys soccer teams are searching for more success in the playo s, especially against district rival Ponte Vedra. Falling victim to Ponte Vedra for the second straight year in a row, the boys soccer team is looking to end the trend this year despite losing star goal scorer Kevin Murman, who graduated last year. Murman provided the spark for the Bears last year, scoring 30 goals, which catapulted Bartram into the third seed of last years district playo s. However the Bears only lost four seniors last year and are returning the majority of their lineup. Senior Timothy Lasseter commented on this saying, We have a lot of people that have been in the system for a few seasons so our team is not short on experience. This year the Bears will be competing in Class 3A of District 3, their third division change in three years; however, they will be competing with the same district teams, among them Creekside and Ponte Vedra, who both made it to the regional playo s last year. After coming o a trip to the state championship in 2010, the girls soccer team was decimated by graduation and relied on underclassmen to ll the ranks last year. The Bears excelled, however, racking up 10 wins during the regular season, including a 2-0 victory over Ponte Vedra who would eventually make it to the state semi nals. Although, they were beat by the same team in the district tournament, ending their streak of 10 straight state playo births. The encouraging thing for the Bears is that they will be returning almost all of their starters from last year, including junior Taylor Valentine Vessel Safety Checks (VSC) are o ered (weather permitting) at the following locations and times: Vilano Boat Ramp Second Sunday of each month from 12:00 noon until 3:00 p.m. St. Augustine Lighthouse Park Boat Ramp Second Sunday of each month from 12:00 noon until 2:00 p.m. There is no charge for the safety check and it takes from 15 to 20 minutes. The VSC is a complimentary check of your boat conducted by members of the Auxiliary, con rming that it meets both federal and state requirements for safety. No citations are issued and the results of the safety check are not reported to any enforcement Durbin Creek Elementary honored business partners at the annual St. Johns County Character Counts Breakfast. Pictured are Kelly Mabry (Tropical Smoothie), Shannon Brougham (121 Financial Credit Union), Ashley Schaefer (PTO co-president), Theresa Ceglio (Accessory Chick), Renee Labaw (guidance counselor), Kasthuri Sriram (Kumon of St. Johns), Sandra McMandon (principal), Kim and Darryl Brown (Champion Martial Arts and Fitness), Brigitte Jones (Thirty-One Gifts) and Tony Paolucci (OnStar Production and Entertainment).United States Coast Guard Auxiliary updateVessel Safety Check schedule for 2011By Contributing Writer Joe McCoy, Public Affairs Of cer, Flotilla 14-7agency. A decal is awarded to display if the vessel has passed the examination along with a West Marine discount coupon for the purchase of safety items. An example of some of the items checked include during a VSC include:Personal Flotation Devices (life jackets) Registration and numbering Navigation lights Ventilation Fire extinguishers Distress signals ( ares, horn, etc.) Battery cover and connections All of these items are currently required by state and federal laws and, if missing or non-operating, can result in a citation if your vessel is inspected by the United States Coast Guard or other law enforcement. The VSC provides a risk-free way to check that your vessel meets the legal minimums and to potentially avoid a citation later. Upon completion of the VSC, you will be informed of potential safety exposures. A successful VSC may result in lowered insurance rates for some boaters. For more information, please visit www.safetyseal.net/, a website devoted exclusively to the VSC program, co-sponsored by the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary and the United States Power Squadrons. BTHS Sports RoundupBartrams winter sports teams ready for action By Jared Freitas, BTHS Studentand senior Ashland Rahn, who led the team in scoring. The boys basketball team did not fare as well last season, only managing to win two games. However, like most of Bartrams other teams, the Bears only graduated one senior and will be returning four of ve starters this season. Experience was in short supply during the 2010 season, as the Bears struggled to nd their rhythm. Losing leads became a hallmark of Bartrams play a season ago, as the Bears inconsistency led to a number of close losses. In order to add more games to the win total this year, Bartram has been working hard in the o season. This summer we held practices, in addition to playing against local teams, said junior Tyler Irish. Also weve done a fall league this year that we have never done before and have been practicing regularly for six weeks. With all of this preparation, the Bears are looking to make it back to the state playo s, as they are now in a district with only Clay and Creekside as opponents. This change not only a ects both basketball teams but also the softball, baseball and volleyball team. The girls basketball team had high expectations last year, led by an experienced core of seniors who had played for Bartram all four years; however, Bishop Kenny eliminated them from the playo s unexpectedly in the rst round. The Bears, who lost to St. Augustine three times last year, will not have to worry about facing them due to the reshu ing in the district, which is good news for the younger team. Senior and only returning starter Allie Mano is optimistic about this season despite the lack of upperclassmen. Weve had a lot of playing time together, which has allowed us to gel and ease the learning curve for our younger players, she said. The Bears are looking to retake their position as the top team in the region and have put in the work during the o season to do so. For Bartram Trail there is plenty of optimism for success; the only thing the Bears must do is execute.

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 37 $5 Burger & Domestic BeerMonday-Friday 2-5pmTexas Hold Em Monday 7-9pm Trivia Night Tuesday 7-9pm LIVE MUSIC!EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHT Julington Creek 904-260-8338 Meet the Pacetti Bay Running Club boys! Watch for the picture of the girls in the Running Club next month. Photo provided by Lynn Johnson.It is tailgating season, which means grill masters are in high demand. Yet each year emergency crews respond to thousands of res and emergency calls around the country because of careless grilling. Combining explosive fuels with food, hot metals and large amounts of people can cause a recipe for disaster according to the article, BBQ Safety Tips for the Tailgating Season. Furthermore, last year alone more than 1,800 people required treatment at their local hospital following accidents involving a barbeque according to the article Barbeque and Grilling. Follow these safety tips to ensure your barbequing experience is a win! Use gas, propane and charcoal grills outdoors and always at least 10 feet away from any building or strucJoin us at River House, 179 Marine Street on Sunday evening, November 20 from 5:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. for the Council on Agings annual Christmas on the River. Enjoy festive holiday food and drinks and do some shopping at the silent auction! Community volunteers will model gorgeous evening gowns paired with holiday wreaths beginning at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 per person. For tickets or more information, please contact Becky Yanni at 209-3685 or email at byanni@stjohnscoa.com.Save the date: its Christmas on the RiverSafe grilling tips By Contributing Writer Meghan Bender, Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundationture. Never leave an ignited, hot grill unattended. Keep grills away from heavy foot traf c, games and activities. Store lighters and matches away from the grill. Wear tted clothing when grilling; no frills or strings. Before starting your grill, be sure all parts are rmly in place and working properly. Keep a re extinguisher nearby. Never attempt to move a hot grill. Always use long-handled utensils to avoid burns and spatters. Be sure there is nothing obstructing the path of the fuel.These safety tips are brought to you as part of the prevention and education mission of Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation. My name is Barney; I m a 7 month old male Persian. I am already neutered and current on all my vaccines. I am declawed; I get along great with other animals and children. Hi! My name is Henny; I am a 1 year old female hound. I am current on all my vaccines but still need to be spayed. I am very gentle and loving and looking for the right family to take me home!We Need a Home!St. Johns County Pet Adoption Center 209-6190 All adoptions at the Pet Center are $60, which includes neutering/spaying, rabies vaccinations and shots. The Pet Center is located at 130 N. Stratton Road, just off US-1 between County Road 210 and International Golf Parkway. The hours are 9:00-4:00 Monday through Friday and 9:00-12:30 on Saturday. Save the ta-tas! The Julington Creek womens B1 tennis team recently promoted breast cancer awareness. Pictured are Nina Gregor, Becky Argalas, Janet Gibson, Scott Lefteris, Cathy Klein, Pat Aydelette, Constance Jackson, Stacey McFarlin, Annie Breton, Sylvie Blais, Sandy Dean, Alcira Guzman and Karen Pandol

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Page 38, The CreekLine November 2011 www.thecreekline.com 904-262-SWIM $ Located next to Ace Hardware (Behind Sonnys) Michigans eastern Upper Peninsula makes an ideal getaway from Floridas heat and humidity. That is, if you plan your visit for next summer. Poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow referred to the shore and water blessed area in his famous Song of Hiawatha as the Gitchie Gumee by the shining Big-Water-Sea. Today, it remains pristine America. The area has been a favorite summer retreat for Midwestern families since the late 19th century. Fishing enthusiasts descend on Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan for the multitude of choices available at reasonable rates. Kayakers favor Les Chteaux Island, actually 36 islands that form an archipelago, now a nature preserve. Canoeing is popular along the Two-Hearted River and sailing has an en-Exploring the Gitchie GumeeBy Contributing Travel Writer Debi Lander, www.bylandersea.com Photo by Thomas A. Schneiderathusiastic following in the UP. Lighthouse bu s revel with a bounty of sites to visit, more than any other state. Lake Superior shoreline alone boasts 35 of the statewide 116 lighthouses. Despite their guiding lights, the Great Lakes remain treacherous boating grounds. Gordon Lightfoots ballad The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald brought cultural awareness to the 1975 tragedy. Visit the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum to nd out more. Tahquamenon Falls State Park (pronounced like phenomenon with a t) includes nearly 50,000 acres in Paradise, Michigan. Yes, the park is located in a town named Paradise. As you might expect, the area is green and gorgeous. Take the scenic three-hour hiking trail from Tahquamenons Lower Falls, actually a series of drops, to the Upper one. Or drive to the Upper Falls entrance and walk to see the 200-foot-wide cascading water. Youll also nd the only brewery and pub in any United States state park at the Visitors Center. Both the upper and lower falls present wonderful photo ops; however, even more picturesque are the dramatic cli s at Pictured Rocks. They stand as the centerpiece of the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore Park. The water may be chilly, but scuba fans still enjoy an underwater diving preserve. Mackinac Island remains the areas best known vacation draw with its laid back, no cars policy. A stay at the iconic Grand Hotel, built in 1887, lulls guests back in time as they while away the day on wooden rockers lining the 660-foot front porch, the longest in the world. Hiking and biking around the ve and a half-acre island keep guests active or they can utilize horse-drawn carriage transport from some of Mackinacs 500 resident horses. Visitors shouldnt miss riding the waterway through the Soo Locks alongside behemoth tankers and freighters. The boat tour traverses the only connection between Lake Superior and Lake Huron and Ontario, thus providing a major shipping lane for over 90 million tons of cargo each year. The tour also passes by the Canadian city of Sault Ste. Marie. Falls and winters here in Florida might be delightful, but I envy the summertime feel of Michigans Upper Peninsula. By Gitchie Gumee, theyve got sometime special and perhaps you need to think about planning a trip up there. PRECIOUS GOLD BUYERSWhy us? HOURS: MON FRI 9am-6pm SUNDAY CLOSED IF YOU WANT MORE GREEN FOR YOUR GOLD MAKE US YOUR LAST STOP! BRING IN YOUR UNWANTED GOLD, SILVER, PLATINUM & COINS!12525 Phillips Hwy. Ste 111Corner of Phillips & Old St. Augustine Rd.Jacksonville, FL 32256904-647-8879 2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOUMORE GREENFOR YOUR GOLD2245 CR 210 W. #107A1 Mile West of I-95904-414-9791Precious Gold Buyers $50 MOREthan the Current Gold Rate per ouncePrecious Gold Buyers $5 MOREthan the Current Silver Rate GOLD SILVER PLATINUM COINS 3 NEW LOCATION12525 Philips Hwy.Ste 111Jacksonville FL 32256 Corner of P hillips & Old St. A ugustine Rd .904-647-8879 2245 CR 210 W.#107A1 M ile W est of I-95904-414-97912730 State Rd. 16,Unit 106Next to Sonnys BBQ St. Augustine FL 32092904-647-8879 OPENING SOON! HOURS: MON -FRI 9am-6pm There are certain moments in life you dont forget, where time stands still, moments that take your breath away and you realize that anything is possible. One of those moments for several members of the Jaguars organization was at EverBank Field when six-year Luke Akerstrom walked to mid eld prior to the October 9 game for the coin toss. Nine months ago, this would not have been possible. I walked into a room at Wolfson Childrens Hospital in January for a short visit with Luke. Someone had alerted the Jaguars that Luke was in the hospital and would probably appreciate a visit and maybe some gifts from the local NFL team. I was happy to oblige on behalf of the club. Luke suffered a 30-minute seizure on December 29 in the back of his parents car that ravaged the left side of his body with what doctors have diagnosed as a rare form of encephalitis. Little did I know, that veminute visit would change my life forever and many close to me at the Jaguars while I earned a new best friend in the Six-year old boy reaches new heightsBy Contributing Writer Ryan Robinsonprocess. At the time, Luke was lying in his hospital bed, not able to sit up on his own or communicate, o ering a big smile to me in exchange. I promised him and his family that next time I saw them I would be bringing a Jaguar with me. Jaguars center Brad Meester and his wife, Jamie are parents to four little girls so free time is not an option for their family. Of course, the Meesters made time when told of Lukes situation. One visit by the Meesters has turned into a lifelong friendship. Luke surprised Brad early in training camp following one of the teams practices thanks to an invitation from head coach Jack Del Rio. It had been seven months since he had taken full steps but he was determined to walk again and he was determined to do it in front of the Jaguars. Brad introduced Luke and his family to his teammates and the coaching sta and talked about Lukes daily struggles to regain normalcy in his life. Following his speech, Luke burst out of his fathers arms and walked to Brad. Tears rolled down the faces of many in attendance which included more than 50 friends and family members. After extensive rehab that he still attends weekly, Luke reached another milestone when he recently walked to mid- eld.

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www.thecreekline.com November 2011 The CreekLine, Page 39 SCANDESIGN PLUS MARKDOWNS THROUGHOUT THE SHOWROOM!FURNITURETENT SALE I am an organic gardener. My ower garden is small but amazing, with something blooming almost year-round. My four-by-four foot cucumber patch produced more than 50 pounds of cucumbers. I have much more success than failure, but it has not always been this way. It has been 20-plus years of trial and error, but in the process I have uncovered what I believe are three truths every gardener should embrace. Truth number one most of us know. You need sun and water to grow things, but to be a successful gardener you also need quality soil. The best way to build up your soil and insure it is rich in nutrients is to add organic matter to it. The best organic matter is homemade compost made from a diversity of organic sources such as leaves, kitchen scraps, grass clippings, weeds (no seeds), straw, shredded paper, egg shells, used co ee grounds including the lterpretty much everything except meats and fats. I produce enough compost to top my small gardens with fresh compost every time I plant. Two to three inches is ideal, but if I dont have enough homemade compost I use other organics to enrich the soil, such as commercial bags of composted manure. If needed, organic fertilizers are also widely available. For more information about producing homemade compost go to www.solutionsforyourlife.com and search composting. Truth number two is remember the KISS rule (Keep It Simple, Silly). Gardening is not a competitive sport. Keep your garden small and plant only things you love. You can grow a lot in a small space if you have good soil and small is easy to maintain. Mix easy-togrow veggies with owers and herbs to make pretty, interesting gardens. For example, I have broccoli and red cabbage growing in one three by three foot garden, bordered by colorful nasturtiums, a plant with edible leaves and owers. The di erent hues create a pretty picture. I use an organic mulch such as straw or ne pine bark (not nuggets) around plants to hold The Lady Flyers team won the 2011 Middle School Championship game by beating Murray Middle School. This is the rst year in the history of Fruit Cove GardeningThree things every gardener should know By Contributing Writer Master Gardener Camille Hunter with Duval County Extension, University of Florida/IFASFruit Cove Lady Flyers win championship Scott Clarke (Coach), Nina Mangor, Amanda Kasprzak, Kaitlin Herrera, Jordan Fields, Sydney Amici, Lorea Jackson, Brooke Martinelli, Kate Revels, Sydni Parish, Kathryn Arnett, Brianna Rodriguez, Delaney Rust, Claire Amici, Taylor Allen, Karlina Hill (Coach).Middle School that the Lady Flyers went undefeated. Team captains were Nina Mangor and Amanda Kasprzak. Brianna Rodriguez was the soil moisture and reduce weed problems. Truth number three is about attitude. To be a happy, productive gardener you must think of gardening not as work but as therapy. Nurturing anything is good for you. Visit your garden every day. If possible, have your morning co ee within sight of your garden and soak up the good vibes coming your way. Whenever you feel stressed, pull weeds and talk to your plants while you are doing it. They are patient listeners. Stop and smell the roses, literally. Spending time in the garden should feel good. If instead your garden becomes a source of stress, relaxhelp is available. The University of Florida Duval County Extension O ce has a garden help line from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. most work days. Call 255-7450 and ask to speak with a Master Gardener. You can also nd online help you can trust at the website mentioned above. point guard and MVP. Coaches Karlina Hill and Scott Clarke said, It was a di cult choice to decide who the MVP was going to be as the girls were truly a team and each member made signi cant contributions to the team.Amanda Kasprzak scored the most points all season with 64; and Sydney Amici scored 61 points for the season. The Lady Flyers Team was the strongest defensive team in the county allowing their opponents to score the least amount of points against them. Happy Thanksgiving!from your friends at The CreekLine! Peanut Butter Jelly or jam Cereal/Oatmeal Canned Pasta Canned Stew/Chili Canned pasta Soup Canned fruit/veggies Toilet PaperChrists Cupboard Food Pantry Wish ListChrists Cupboard is located at Celebration Lutheran Church, 810 Roberts Road. Call 230-2496 for info! Christs Cupboard serves anyone in need. Hours are 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Tues. and Weds.

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