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River weekly news

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Title:
River weekly news
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, FL
Publisher:
Lorin Arundel and Ken Rasi- Co-Publishers
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Copyright Date:
2010
Language:
English

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newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Lee -- Fort Myers
Coordinates:
26.64328 x -81.868953

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright River Weekly News. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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VOL. 17, NO. 47 NOVEMBER 23, 2018From the Beaches to the River District downtown Fort Myers Weather and Tides pa ge 29Holiday Nights At The Estates Opens This FridayEdison and Ford Winter Estates will kick off the 43rd Holiday Nights celebration with the annual tree lighting ceremony on Friday, November 23 at 6 p.m. This is the first Holiday Nights under the direction of the organizations new CEO, Mike Flanders. The event will offer visitors an impressive light show this year with more lights and new displays and decorations. The popular Liquid Fireworks Waltzing Waters lighted water fountain display will be on site again this year with a state-of-the-art light show choreographed with holiday music. Some of the new displays include two 25-foot lighted steel trees and an 18-foot lighted tree at the Edison fountain. This year, continued on page 18 The homes and gardens are decorated with thousands of lights photo provided The 12th annual Festival of Trees returns to the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center (SBDAC) with entertaining holiday events from November 27 to December 2. There will be trees decorated by local businesses, and a $2 admission fee will help raise money for Goodwill of Southwest Florida and SBDAC. The week of fun will also include Santas Block Party; Painting with a Purpose; Find, Design & Wine; Santas Workshop; and an ugly sweater contest. The 2018 Festival of Trees begins with a Tree Preview Party and Breakthrough continued on page 23 The Fort Myers Miracle tree photo providedHoliday Fun Begins At Festival Of TreesChristmas Stories To Be Parodized At Lab TheaterThe Laboratory Theater of Florida will be presenting holiday classics like Rudolph, Frosty, Scrooge and The Nutcracker during a single play performance, beginning Friday, November 30 at 8 p.m. The zany comedy is called Every Christmas Story Ever Told (And Then Some). In what can best be called a holiday mashup, actors take beloved stories and traditions from around the world and turn them upside-down in this family-friendly show. Other performance dates include continued on page 8 From left, Kayleigh OConnell, Dave Matthew Chesebro and Heather McLemore Johnson photo providedThe Off Broadway Palm Theatre is kicking off the holiday season with Winter Wonderettes, playing now through Christmas Day, December 25. This energetic and glittering holiday revue is the perfect treat to help you groove into the spirit of the season. Its 1968 and the Marvelous Wonderettes are the entertainers at Harpers Hardware Holiday Party. The girls have their holiday harmonies ready continued on page 16 The cast of Winter Wonderettes performing Suzy Snowflake photo provided Holiday Revue At Off Broadway Palm

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 20182 Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: City Incinerating Plant by Gerri Reaves, PhDThis circa-1924 photo shows one of Fort Myerss less picturesque boom-time scenes the city incinerator. While the 1920s is best remembered for MediterraneanRevivalist structures, brick streets and well-designed public spaces, the invisible and less lauded municipal plants and utilities were crucial in putting the boom in the boom. Its all too easy to overlook the engineering that brought water, gas and electricity to the growing city and the systems that cleared away sewage and garbage. Garbage and sewage disposal, after all, lack the aesthetic appeal of fine architecture, river-walks, pleasure piers, parks, public art and beautifully landscaped roads. Mid-decade, city leaders and planners generally agreed that the garbage-disposal system needed upgrading. Not only was it insufficient to deal with growth but it was untidy and the surroundings neglected, to echo the renowned city planner Herbert S. Swan, who was hired to write a 1926 plan for Fort Myers. The historic photo supports that opinion. At that time, Fort Myers streets were swept of refuse after midnight. Three light trucks collected garbage and another collected trash. The waste was disposed of at the municipal incinerator pictured here, which was located on the north side of Anderson Avenue (now Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard/MLK) and east of Evans Avenue and the railroad tracks. Then, as today, citizens preferred that garbage to be out-of-sight and out-of-mind. No one wanted the unsightliness and odors of waste disposal in close proximity to schools and homes. As early as 1923, the incinerator needed repair or reconstruction, thus introducing the idea of moving it farther from the business district. For example, in February 1924, as discussions of building a new incinerator got underway, petitions were circulated demanding that the location be not at the present site but out at the edge of the city. In the case of Fort Myers, that meant pressing east to the edge of what is todays historic Dunbar neighborhood. By late 1926, construction began on a new incinerator. Oddly enough, the new site on the grounds of todays IMAG History & Science Center at Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard (MLK ) and Cranford -wasnt all that far from the former one. A municipal gas plant was also built there, and major improvements didnt stop with that. In 1937, the citys first non-sulphur water plant was built across Anderson from the incinerator seen in the photo. Today, that red-brick building is the Public Works Annex that faces Evans and the railroad tracks. Today, well-kept commercial buildings are located on the former incinerator site. Visit the former sites of the less visible and appreciated historic municipal plants and ponder their roles in making Fort Myers livable. Then visit the following two research centers to learn more about how and where garbage was disposed of in early Fort Myers. The Southwest Florida Historical Society is an all-volunteer, non-profit organization open Wednesday and Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon and Wednesday 4 to 7 p.m. It is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Call 939-4044 or visit www.swflhistoricalsociety.org for more information. The Lee County Black History Society is located at 1936 Henderson Avenue, adjacent to the Williams Academy Museum at Roberto Clemente Park. Hours for the all-volunteer, non-profit organization are Wednesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Saturday by appointment only. For more information, call 332-8778 or visit www.leecountyblackhistorysociety.org. Sources: The Fort Myers Plan by Herbert S. Swan, the Fort Myers Press and the Story of Fort Myers by Karl H. Grismer. Today commercial buildings stand on the former incinerator site just east of the railroad tracks (visible on left) photo by Gerri Reaves City waste was disposed of at this incinerator near Anderson (now MLK Boulevard) and Evans Avenues, pictured circa 1924 photo courtesy Florida State Archives PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, call 239-395-1213 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1640 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2, Sanibel FL 33957. FAX number: 239-395-2299. Email: press@islandsunnews.com. Email: ads@islandsunnews.com The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Contributing Writers Jennifer Basey Barbara Cacchione Kay Casperson Suzy Cohen Linda Coin Marcia Feeney Ed Frank Shelley Greggs Tom Hall Marion Hauser, MS, RDRoss Hauser, MD Capt. Matt Mitchell Trinette Nelson J. Brendan Ryan, CLU, ChFC, MSFS Di Saggau Jeanie TinchPublisher Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Bob Petcher Graphic Arts/ Production Ann Ziehl, Manager Amanda Hartman Justin Wilder Reporters Gerri Reaves, PhD Jeff LysiakIndependently Owned And Operated COPYRIGHT 2018 The River Weekly NewsLORKEN Publications, Inc.Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com

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3 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 Call or reserve online at rffntbrntrfntbrnbrfntbftnftt rffntb nn ntb nnn ntb nnn ntb nnn Location. Location. Shell Point. SLS-3773-18 Island Sun River AD seminars 11.23.18.indd 1 11/7/18 9:35 AM

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 20184 Vegetarian Chef Challenge Winner Honored Lee Healths culinary team celebrated National Vegetarian Awareness Month with the 5th annual Vegetarian Chef Cook-Off at Lee Memorial Hospital on November 12. Evelyn Williams from Gulf Coast Medical Center captured top honors during a grand champion cook-off with Kalvyn Luzarraga from HealthPark Medical Center. Shari OConnor from Cape Coral Hospital and Chris Chrombok from Lee Memorial Hospital were the other two competing chefs. The four chefs traveled to each hospital and prepared plant-based dishes. Tasters at each campus cast their votes for their favorite dish and the top two chefs advanced to the final cook-off. The cook-off coincided with the start of the American Heart Associations Eat Smart Month. During the final cook-off, the chefs had 20 minutes to create a hot entre for the five guest judges using plantbased ingredients. Williams entree of Jamaican jerk cauliflower served with brown rice and green beans bested Luzarragas smoked chickpea wrap with spinach, carrots, cucumber and tahini sauce. Williams also served an almond milk/pineapple/strawberry smoothie in a fresh pineapple. This years judges included Enza LoCascio, RD, clinical dietitian, Lee Health; Nicole Menendez, Lee Heart Walk director, American Heart Association of Southwest Florida; Doug MacGregor, program coordinator, Lee Health Arts in Healthcare; Kathy Reynaert-Randall, certified lifestyle medicine education, CHIP facilitator, trainer and area developer; and Cassie Kirby, RN, MSN, CPHQ, senior program manager, accreditation and quality, Lee Health. The Vegetarian Chef Cook-Off is always a fun and interactive way to introduce people to plant-based food choices, said Larry Altier, Lee Health System director of food and nutrition services. The chefs enjoy this because it allows them to be creative with these healthy ingredients. We hope this annual event inspires people to try to incorporate more plant-based options into their meal choices. Balanced nutrition is a key component of a healthy lifestyle, and a vegetarian diet can help reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes and obesity. Fundraising Sale On Black FridaySavvy holiday shoppers who visit Hope Chest Resale Stores in Bonita Springs, South Fort Myers and North Fort Myers during the annual Black Friday sale will receive 50 percent off most items purchased Friday, November 23 and Saturday, November 24. Hope Chest stores feature designerbrand clothing and accessories, home furnishings, sporting equipment, antiques and unique collectibles. The North Fort Myers Hope Chest store will also offer a special tent sale featuring discounted furniture during the Black Friday blowout. No coupons are necessary for the sale, and some exceptions may apply. Hope Chest Resale stores are open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Proceeds from Hope Chest benefit unfunded programs and services of Hope Healthcare, which provides exceptional care and support to individuals and their loved ones as they fulfill lifes journey. Hope Chest at The Crossings is located at 28520 Bonita Crossings Boulevard. The new Hope Chest in South Fort Myers is located at 14540 South Tamiami Trail, and Hope Chest in North Fort Myers is located at 13821 North Cleveland Ave. For information about volunteer opportunities or donating items to the Hope Chest Resale Stores, call 482-4673 or visit www.hopehcs.org. From left, Kathleen Moore, director of food services at Gulf Coast Medical Center; Larry Altier, system director of food and nutrition services at Lee Health; Evelyn Williams and Kalvyn Luzarraga photo provided 8791 Melosia St #8302 Paseo community Ft. Myers Elegant split level Santa Monica turnkey townhome; Florida Native-Local Expert-Realtor SCISvalerie@valerietutor.com yoursanibelhomes.com 239-834-8141Kingsher Real Estate, Inc 2402 Palm Ridge Rd Sanibel FL 33957Paseo!! Southwind Preserve!11331 Long Road Ft Myers rf Turnkey! Steady Clientele! Turnkey!

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5 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 6576 SAND SPUR LN., FT. MYERS Sunsets & Protected Dockage $725,000 MLS 217070539 Jamie Gates 239.910.2778 TOWN & RIVER ESTATES 4810 GRIFFIN BLVD., FT. MYERS Mediterranean Design by Bud Lawrence$2,895,000 MLS 218006762 McMurray & Nette 239.850.7888 PALMETTO POINT RIVERFRONT 880 DEAN WAY, FT. MYERS 3 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car GA, 1,900+ S.F. $275,000 MLS 218032635Mark Hasson & Tina Tusack 954.696.1524 WHISKEY CREEK ESTATES 875 DEAN WAY, FT. MYERS 2 BR, 2 BA, 1 Car Garage $239,000 218061598Mark Hasson & Tina Tusack 954.696.1524 WHISKEY CREEK ESTATES 13901 BLENHEIM TRAIL RD., S. FT. MYERS Custom Built Executive Home $1,199,900 MLS 217020052 Roger Stening 239.770.4707 ST. CHARLES HARBOUR 961 N. WATERWAY DR., FT. MYERS Wide 125 Canal, Direct Access $724,900 MLS 218057507Stacey Glenn, Team Stacey 239.823.1343 TOWN & RIVER 15120 HARBOUR ISLE DR. #302, FT. MYERS Hidden Gem in S. Fort Myers $625,000 MLS 218032250 Toni Shoemaker 239.464.3645 HARBOUR ISLE Y & R CLUB 1534 COCONUT DR., FT. MYERS Off of Famed McGregor Blvd. $184,000 MLS 217061937 Troy De Mond 239.822.0332 COCONUT GROVE 11701 OLIVETTI LN. #209, FT. MYERS New 2 BR, 2 BA Condo, 1,126 S.F. $190,550 MLS 218033112Ross Winchel, Koffman Group 239.898.1214 MAJESTIC PALMS 4391 LAZIO WAY #301, FT. MYERS 3 BR 2.5 BA Townhome, 1,900+ S.F. $184,900 MLS 218059764Corye Reiter, The Lummis Team 239.273.3722 MATERA 11600 COMPASS POINT DR., FT. MYERS Meticulous, Numerous Upgrades $1,299,000 MLS 218069230 Patti Testa 239.770.5445 GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC 11620 COURT OF PALMS #701, FT. MYERS Panoramic River Views, 9th Floor $669,900 MLS 218047687 Patti Testa 239.770.5445 GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC 12 WINEWOOD CT., FT. MYERS Tucked Away in Heart of Ft. Myers $449,000 MLS 218059505 Troy De Mond 239.822.0332 CARILLON WOODS 15120 ANCHORAGE WAY, FT. MYERS Direct Gulf Access $849,000 MLS 218068397 Jamie Polly 239.850.0487 SHALLOWS 14521 GRANDE CAY CIR. #2906, FT. MYERS 3 BR, 2 BA, 1,845 S.F., 2 Car Garage $249,000 MLS 218072767 Jennifer Fairbanks 239.849.1122 GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC JONATHAN HARBOUR 14860 JONATHAN HARBOUR DR., FT. MYERS 4 BR, 4.3 BA, Gorgeous Bay Views $2,995,000 MLS 218073284 McMurray & Nette 239.850.7888 BAY HARBOUR ESTATES 14221 BAY DR., FT. MYERS Gated w/Only 4 Homesites $2,995,000 MLS 217078021 McMurray & Nette 239.850.788818148 CUTLASS DR., FT. MYERS BEACH Direct Gulf Access, No Bridges $900,000 MLS 218062949Mark Hasson & Tina Tusack 954.696.1524 SIESTA ISLES OPEN DAILY 11:00AM 4:00PM OPEN 11/24 11:30AM 3:00PM OPEN 11/25 11:30AM 3:00PM OPEN 11/25 11:30AM 3:00PM NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW PRICE NEW PRICE

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 20186 Cool moves, cool music, total body, low impact. Dance tness, group exercise, contemporary movement, step aerobics, body sculpting. 2nd Saturday of the month! Ballroom, Latin, Swing. 6 p.m. lesson followed by open dancing. Foxtrot, waltz, rumba, cha-cha, tango, swing, and more! Private lessons, and beginner, intermediate, and advanced group lessons. No partner needed. Boutique-style group exercise and dance studio. Unique classes, friendly and inviting atmosphere.Fitness with Flair @ Royal Palm Square Fort Myers Art: Ghostbird Play Much More Than A Mere Fish Storyby Tom HallBoxes are for what we keep. But delve into playwright Barry Cavins new offering by the same name, and youll discover that boxes are also repositories into which we place ourselves and others. Escaping their confines is never easy. Abandoning the protection of their familiar boundaries is characteristically disquieting. For some, it may be downright unwelcome. These are just some of the themes involved in Ghostbird Theatre Companys recently completed production of Cavins Boxes Are For What We Keep in the screened-in Peace Pavilion at the Happehatchee Center off Corkscrew Road in Estero. Boxes consists of three short plays which enact different versions of the same fable, a simple story about two fish that are caught, held captive and then released. One returns to the sea, but the other chooses to remain in her cage. The versions of this story, as with the Gospels, have their own turns, twists, distortions, amplifications and truths, Ghostbird explained in A Note in their playbill. Boxes, certainly, contain our most precious items, but they also can be prisons, comfortable coffins, hermetic enclosures, all of our own making. As a playwright, Cavins productions are deep, multi-layered, enigmatic affairs. His love of aphorisms is surpassed only by the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. Cavins own role, as he sees it, is to provide food for thought. Some is savory, sumptuous and thoroughly delectable. But most of the thoughts invoked by Cavins plays are tart, acerbic and hard to digest. And then theres that inevitable aftertaste. Cavins stories stay with you long after find your way home. The first fish story of Boxes Are For What We Keep is a case in point. It depicts two hillbilly fisherman by the name of Earl and Otmer, convincingly played by Terry Tincher and Jim Brock. They sit on the bank of a dark lake or river, dangling bright plastic lures from long cane poles, ultimately snaring two creatures that go by the name of Knee and Nose, played by Scott Michael and Katelyn Gravel. It turns out that Knee and Nose can not only speak, they have better command of the English language than their hillbilly captors. Otmer is hungry and wants to fry up and eat the creatures, but Earl pushes their catch into separate display boxes. Earl has a plan for his talking monsters. He intends to make a boatload of money showing off the curiosities to a string of paying customers. To borrow an aphorism from Nietzsche, There are no facts, only interpretations. The box into which we place people is not some objective reality. Labels such as Muslim, immigrant, liberal or conservative are just interpretations shorthand terms that rarely reflect the full measure of the person bearing the moniker weve pinned on them. It is only by getting into the water and swimming with the monster that we can see them as they really are. Cavin incorporates this latter fish story into the fabric of Part 2 of the play through an enthralling poem that Stella Ruiz lyrically relates in her trademark sinuous, syncopated style. But the metaphor is in operation in a different fashion in an exchange that takes place between a couple named Rebekah and Abraham, played by Katelyn Gravel and Jim Brock. Here, we are left with the implication that just as boxes can hold heirlooms and memorabilia, our memories can serve as boxes that bind us together, but also prevent us from seeing what we and our partner have truly become. In the final segment of his trilogy, Cavin places Ruiz in a psychological box as she interacts with her therapist, played by Dan De La Rosa. The optics in this scene are incredibly powerful. Seated behind a backlit screen, all we see is Ruiz silhouette and that of various paper machete puppets created for the show by Caitlin RosolenDeJesus. But its the incisive dialogue and razor-sharp repartee between woman and doctor that overpowers the audience, with Ruiz often turning the table and dissecting, emasculating and verbally castrating her therapist with such surgical precision that Sigmund Freud himself might have been reduced to tears. This final, penultimate scene drives home the point that the boxes we build to hold conceptions of ourselves and others frequently do us more harm than good. They delimit, confine, even imprison us. Yet, they are so familiar and comfortable that we cling to them tenaciously even as they lead or contribute to our ultimate demise. To live, or at least to live fully, we must cast off the boxes that circumscribe our existence. If we dont, we psychologically die. Boxes are for what we keep. But to achieve our full potential, we must be willing to destroy the very boxes we construct. Or to borrow one final aphorism from the old German: If a temple is to be erected, a temple must be destroyed. Of course, this is just a fish story, and as Cavins Abraham said, Why must it mean anything? Ghostbird is the only theater company in the American South devoted to site-specific work. Ever striving to partner with just the right venue for each of its productions, Ghostbird has been recognized as one of the ten best companies in Florida for live theater. Tom Hall is both an amateur artist and aspiring novelist who writes art quest thrillers. He is in the final stages of completing his debut novel titled Art Detective. A former tax attorney, he lives in Estero with his fianc and their four cats. Terry Tincher and Jim Brock play two hillbilly fishermen named Earl and Otmer photo courtesy www.artswfl.com rfnREAL ESTATE EXPERTSW Florida, Fort Myers Beach, Sanibel & Captiva Islands is All About HomeCathie Lewis, RealtorPhone: 239-745-7367 Cathie@AllAboutHome.Life Pfeifer Realty Group

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7 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 Pre-Registration For Kindergarten Deadline NearsWith 12 business days left to sign up, nearly 800 students have preregistered for kindergarten in the 2019-20 school year. This new program allows parents to turn their paperwork in early and receive a student number for their child so that they can enroll them for school next year online. We are excited so far about the turnout. Its been a steady flow of parents since the beginning, says Soretta Ralph, executive director of student enrollment. We hope to see many more before the pre-registration period ends November 30. Pre-registrations can be taken at any of the following three student enrollment offices, which are open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday: 2855 Colonial Boulevard, Fort Myers 360 Santa Barbara Boulevard, North Cape Coral 1262 Wings Way, Suite 207, Lehigh Acres The student enrollment offices will be closed for Thanksgiving on Thursday, November 23 and Friday, November 24. Students entering kindergarten in August must be 5 years old on or before September 1, 2019. The documents required to pre-register include physical exam (dated within the last year); Florida Certificate of Immunization; proof of address; original birth certificate; social security card (if available); and custody documents (if applicable). Once pre-registered, parents are then advised to tour the elementary schools in their zone. A pre-printed application will be mailed in January allowing parents to go online and rank their schools in order of preference for student enrollment. The first application period will be from January 14, 2019 to March 1, 2019. Parents with questions can email: studentenrollment@leeschools.net. John Gowdy captured top honors in the Master Sculptor Solo Division at the 32nd annual American Sand Sculpting Championship with his sculpture A Tribute to the Wildland Firefighters of California on the beachfront at Wyndham Garden Fort Myers Beach last weekend. Melineige Beauregard took second place with You Make My Heart Burn, while Seveline Beauregard placed third with Dance and Breathe. Melineige Beauregard also seized Sculptors Choice with her artwork. Presented by the Seminole Casino Hotel, the championships will continue with the Advanced Amateur and Doubles Division competitions taking place this week. The 16 Solo Division sculptures will remain standing. Guests are welcome to attend the champiosnhips daily through Sunday, November 25 from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. Activities include: Quick Sand Speed Sand Sculpting An audience-participation show in which two sculptors go head-to-head for a 10-minute sculpting competition, sculpting a subject selected by someone in the audience. Photo Opportunity Sculptures Designed so you can step into the sculpture, become a part of it and have your photo taken. You can also have the sculpture customized by carving family names, dates to make it your very own family vacation photo, Christmas card, souvenir, post card, etc. Kids Zone An area where the kids can practice building their own sand sculptures as well as numerous kids activities. Sand Sculpting Demonstrations and Lessons Learn the Tricks of Master Sculptors. Sand Vendor Village More than 40 vendors from around the country will be offering a great selection of food, beverages, specialty retail and arts and crafts. Admission is just $7 with children age 4 and younger free. Both active and retired military veterans can attend the event any day and receive a $1 off with military ID. Wyndham Garden Fort Myers Beach is located at 6890 Estero Boulevard on Fort Myers Beach. For more information, visit www.fmbsandsculpting.com or the events Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ sandsculptingfestival. John Gowdy with his winning sculpture A Tribute to the Wildland Firefighters of California photo by Shayne Wolfe Sand Sculpting Solo Division Winner

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 20188 Along The RiverThe Cape Coral Animal Shelter (CCAS) and Fathoms Restaurant will host a special holiday Yappy Hour this Friday, November 23 from 5 to 7 p.m. This is an opportunity for pets and their owners to begin the holidays and enjoy an evening of outdoor entertainment. To commemorate the evening, photos of pets with Santa will be available courtesy of Al Larson Photography for a minimal donation to the shelter. Fathoms Restaurant and Bar will be providing beer and wine as a fundraiser for the nonprofit organization to receive all proceeds. CCAS merchandise will be available for sale and a 50/50 raffle will be held during the evening. Attendees at the evening festivities will also enjoy live music. Yappy Hour is an ongoing event held the last Friday of each month. Each month will have a different theme to be enjoyed by attendees with their pets. Fathoms Restaurant is located at 5785 Cape Harbour Drive, Unit 106 in Cape Coral. Holiday Nights at Edison and Ford Winter Estates will not only feature thousands of lights and hundreds of historic decorations during the unique holiday experience from this Friday, November 23 to December 23 and December 26 to 30, it will showcase events from 5:30 to 9 p.m. nightly. There is also an all new nightly show from Liquid Fireworks by Waltzing Waters. This weeks lineup includes tree lighting ceremony and grand opening featuring Santa and Mrs. Claus, live performance by Victorian carolers, live press coverage and Nina Rose Events (baked goods, beer, wine and cocktails) at the Ford Cottage Shoppe this Friday, November 23. Nina Rose Events will also be available this Saturday, November 24. On Sunday, November 25, Lee County Resident Night offers $5 off of adult admission and Family Night, featuring crafts and activities at the Edison Caretakers House. Lee County Resident Night and $5 off of adult admission is also available this Monday, November 26. On Tuesday, November 27, Narrative Coffee Roasters will offer coffee and treats at the Ford Cottage Shoppe. On Thursday, November 29, Millennial Brewing officials will be on location serving locally brewed beer at the Ford Cottage Shoppe. There will also be Cartooning with Santa at the Edison Caretakers Cottage that evening. Edison and Ford Winter Estates is located at 2350 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www.edisonfordwinterestates.org. Laishley Park will host Punta Gordas largest tailgate party this Saturday, November 24 for college footballs Rivalry Weekend. The all-out tailgate party will include megatron monitors, televisions, sports bars, Bud Light Party Deck, disc jockey, food trucks, Hooters girls, corn hole tournaments, yard games and more. Start the day by watching College Gameday starting at 11 a.m. Featured games include Michigan versus Ohio State, Alabama versus Auburn, Florida State versus Florida and many more. The tailgate party is only $5, so bring the family and root for your favorite team in the festive atmosphere. Laishley Park is located at 120 Laishley Court in Punta Gorda. For additional information and directions, call 941-2055566. Community Band Christmas FestivalThe Lee County Community Band will present A Christmas Festival at Cape Coral High School on Sunday, December 9. The free performance is set for 3 p.m. The selections will re-kindle the magic of the season with Twas the Night Before and Sleigh Ride; focus on the sacred nature of Christmas with classic carols and the overture to The Messiah; and get toes a-tapping with Christmas Swings and Caribbean Christmas. Additional concert dates are January 13, February 10, March 10 and April 8, 2019. Programs typically include a mix of spirited marches, Broadway hits, old favorites, seasonal pieces and sing-alongs with emcee and vocalist Norman Jones. Directed by Richard Bradstreet, the 50-member group is comprised of musicians from all walks of life career musicians, amateurs, and folks renewing skills from years past who reside in Lee, Collier, and Charlotte counties. The band welcomes new members every year. Persons interested in joining may call John Fenn at 454-6430. Cape Coral High School is located at 2300 Santa Barbara Boulevard in Cape Coral. For more information, visit www. leecountyband.org. Fall Nationals Car Show At JetBlue ParkThe SWFL Fall Nationals Car Show will be held at Jet Blue Park on Saturday, December 8 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Presented by Roadhouse Automotive Events, the event will have hundreds of show cars, food, music, automotive vendors, swap meet and trophy presentations. General admission is $10; children age 12 and younger and active military amditted free. Free spectator parking. Show car registration is from 7 to 10 a.m. Pre-registration is $20 or $30 at the show. A portion of the proceeds benefit the United Cerebral Palsy organization of Southwest Florida. JetBlue Park is located at 11500 Fenway South Drive in Fort Myers. For more information, go to www. roadhousepromotions.com. Honor Society Member Fort Myers native Allison Jones was recently initiated into The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, the nations oldest and most selective all-discipline collegiate honor society. Jones is pursuing a degree in public relations at Texas State University. From page 1Lab TheaterDecember 1, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 20 and 21 at 8 p.m. as well as matinees on December 9, 16 and 22 at 2 p.m. The cast includes Dave Matthew Chesebro, Heather McLemore Johnson, and Kayleigh OConnell. It is directed by Lauren Miller and assistant directed by Steven Coe. The play is sponsored by CPK Wealth Management. This show is fun for the whole family, said Lab Theater Artistic Director Annette Trossbach. Three actors playing dozens of roles while changing characters and costumes onstage? Its madness and hilarious, full of belly laughs. Director Lauren Miller added, If youve ever wondered what it would be like to take everything you know about the holidays and flip it on its head, this show is what youd get. The theater has new seating. Rows A, B and C are on the floor. Rows D and beyond are on risers. Special shows include Half-Price Preview Night on Thursday, November 29; and Pizza and a Free Show for Teenagers on Sunday, December 2 at 6:30 p.m. Reservations are required. Lab Theater is located at 1634 Woodford Avenue in Fort Myers. Tickets are available online at www. brownpapertickets.com or by calling the box office at 218-0481. For more information, visit www. laboratorytheaterflorida.com. Waltzing Waters at Edison and Ford Winter Estates photo provided Fresh ingredients, simplicity, love... the recipe for a treasured dining experience Chef/Owner AJ Black7 Days 5-10 pm 751 Tarpon Bay Road Sanibel Island, FL Reservations Suggested www.iltesoro.net 239-395-4022 FINE ITALIAN CUISINEIL TESORO RISTORANTEinspired by Island Fare in a bistro styleVOTED BEST CHEFBEST OF THE ISLANDS AWARDTASTE OF THE ISLANDS IRON CHEF WINNER AJ BLACKCelebrating Our 10 Year AnniversaryExtensive New Wine List Tasting Menu SUNSET DINING 4:30-6:30 P.M. 3-Course Tasting Starting at $19.95

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9 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 SHOP THE MUSEUMS PREMIER COLLECTION exquisite jewelry, childrens toys dcorone-stop holiday shopping for all ages!Pop-Up Store located within the Sanibel Outlets between Swim Mart and Maidenform at 239Plus, on November 25th, join us for MUSEUM STORE SUNDAY 25% OFF STORE-WIDE NEW MUSEUM POP-UP STORE NOW OPEN AT THE SANIBEL OUTLETS Book Signings With Local Author Whether you are visiting the Fort Myers area for the first time or have been living there your whole life, the book 100 Things to Do in Fort Myers & Sanibel Before You Die offers a unique look at some of the best activities in the area. Local author Nancy Hamilton put together this guide to showcase some of the unique areas to explore with family and friends. Hamilton grew up exploring the shorelines of Michigan before she traded one sandy shore for another and moved to the Fort Myers area. A Michigan State University journalism graduate, she was lured to Florida by a job at the Naples Daily News. Hamilton worked for many years at the Lee County Visitor & Convention Bureau and The Chamber of Southwest Florida. Currently, she works in the field of public relations and continues to find new discoveries in her own backyard. Hamilton will be signing copies of her book on the following dates: Friday and Saturday, November 30 and December 1, 5:30 p.m., Holiday House at Tarpon Lodge on Pine Island; Wednesday, December 5, 11 a.m., Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre in Fort Myers; Thursday, December 6, 10:30 a.m., Fort Myers Beach Public Library; Thursday, December 13, 9:30 a.m., Book Nook on Fort Myers Beach Wednesday, February 13, 10:30 a.m., Fort Myers Beach Public Library; Tuesday, February 26, 2 p.m., Sanibel Public Library on Sanibel. Nancy Hamilton photo provided image provided Fundraiser To Aid Blessings In A Backpack The fight against childhood hunger just received a major boost. Southwest Florida Childrens Charities Inc. has chosen the local chapter of Blessings in a Backpack as a new beneficiary of the 2019 Southwest Florida Wine & Food Fest. The annual event has raised more than $25 million for children since it began in 2008. Were thrilled to become a part of this cornerstone fundraising endeavor for our community, said Cecilia St. Arnold, executive director of Blessings in a Backpack of Southwest Florida. The need is great, and Southwest Florida Childrens Charities has stepped up to play a vital role in addressing it. More than 60,000 elementary school students in Lee and Collier counties receive free and reduced-price breakfasts and lunches during the week, but the federal program doesnt cover them when school isnt in session. Blessings in a Backpack gives nutritious, kid-friendly, easy-toprepare meals to more than 3,000 local children on Friday afternoons so that they have food for the weekend. A portion of the money raised through the Wine & Food Fest will help Blessings in a Backpack feed more children. The event also benefits Golisano Childrens Hospital and several institutions and organizations focused on the wellbeing of children. The theme of this years Wine & Food Fest is Making Waves: Building Healthy Minds, and the majority of funds will be directed to local childrens mental and behavioral health initiatives. Organizers will partner with the Southwest Florida Community Foundation to allocate the proceeds. The distinguished event is one of the top-grossing wine festivals in the U.S. and is the highest earning annual fundraiser in Lee County. It features elaborate vintner dinners leading up to the Grand Tasting, which brings together gourmet foods from top local chefs and exquisite wine poured by winemakers and winery owners. The Grand Tasting will take place at the Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort & Spa in Bonita Springs on February 24, 2019 at noon. Tickets are available by calling 433-4260. To learn about all the ways you can help feed hungry children, visit www. blessingsinswfl.org.

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 201810 Churches/TemplesALL FAITHS UNITARIAN CONGREGATION Sunday 10:30 a.m., 2756 McGregor Boulevard, allfaiths-uc.org, 226-0900. ALL SAINTS BYZANTINE RITE CATHOLIC Sunda y 10:30 a.m. 10291 Bayshore Road, 305-651-0991. ANNUNCIATION GREEK ORTHODOX Sunday 9 and 10 a.m. 8210 Cypress Lake Drive, annunciation.fl.goarch.org, 481-2099. BAT YAM-TEMPLE OF THE ISLANDS Friday Shabbat at 7 p.m. 2050 Periwinkle Way. www.batyam.org 579-0296.BETH SHILOH MESSIANIC SYNAGOGUE Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m. 15675 McGregor Boulevard, 437-3171. BIBLESHARE 10 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Tuesday, 7050 Winkler Rd, Suite 121, www.simplysimple worship.com, 437-8835. BREAD OF LIFE MINISTRIES Sunda y 10:30 a.m. 16581 McGregor Boulevard, 267-3166. CHABAD LUBAVITCH ORTHODOX Friday 6:30 p.m. 5620 Winkler Road, chabadswf.org, 433-7708. CHAPEL OF CYPRESS COVE Sunday 10 a.m. 10200 Cypress Cove Circle, revtedalthouse@aol.com, 850-3943. CHURCH OF THE CROSS Sunday 9:15 and 10:45 a.m. 13500 Freshman Lane, 768-2188. CONGREGATIONAL Sunday 10:30 a.m. 1619 Llewellyn Drive, taecc.com, 334-4978. COVENANT PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 10 a.m. 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937. CYPRESS LAKE BAPTIST Sunday 9:45 and 11 a.m., 7 p.m.; Wednesday 6:30 p.m. 8400 Cypress Lake Drive, 481-5442. CYPRESS LAKE PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 8, 9, 10 and 11 a.m. 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, www.clpc.us, 481-3233. CYPRESS LAKE UNITED METHODIST Sunday 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, 482-1250. FAITH FELLOWSHIP WORLD OUTREACH Sunday 10:30 a.m.,Thursday 7:30 p.m., Friday 7:30 p.m. 6111 South Pointe Boulevard, 278-3638. FAITH UNITED METHODIST Sunday 8:45 and 10:30 a.m. 15690 McGregor Boulevard, 482-2030. FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST Wednesday 12 noon Testimony Service, Sunday 10:30 a.m. 2390 West First Street, christiansciencefortmyers.net, christianscience.com. FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Sunday 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. 13545 American Colony Boulevard, 936-2511. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. 2466 First Street, www.fumcftmyers.org, 332-1152. FORT MYERS CHRISTIAN Sunday 10:30 a.m., 5916 Winkler Road, 437-4330. FORT MYERS CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST; Sunday 10 a.m., 8210 College Parkway, 482-3133. IONA-HOPE EPISCOPAL CONGREGATION Saturday 5 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Tuesday 9:30 a.m.; Wednesday 9:30 a.m. 9650 Gladiolus Drive, 454-4778. JESUS THE WORKER CATHOLIC Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday 8, 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. 881 Nuna Avenue, 481-1143. KINGDOM LIFE Sunday 10:30 a.m. 2154 McGregor Boulevard, 218-8343. LAMB OF GOD Sunday 7:45 and 10 a.m. 19691 Cypress View Drive, lambofgodchurch.net, 267-3525. NEW BEGINNINGS CENTER Friday 6:30 and 7 p.m. 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, nbcministry@embarqmail.com, facebook.com/nbcministry, 656-0416. NEW COVENANT EYES Monthly 9 a.m. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, newcovenanteyes.com, 220-8519. NEW HOPE BAPTIST Sunday 11 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. 16120 San Carlos Boulevard, Unit 10, 985-8503. NEW HOPE PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 10051 Plantation Road, www.newhopefortmyers.org, 274-1230. PEACE COMMUNITY Sunday 10:30 a.m. www. 17671 Pine Ridge Road, peacecommunitychurch.com, 267-7400. PEACE LUTHERAN Sunday 8 and 10 a.m. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@ peaceftmyers.com. 437-2599. REDEEMER LUTHERAN Sunday 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. 3950 Winkler Ext., 274-0143. RIVER OF LIFE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 8, 9:45 and 11:30 a.m. 21580 River Ranch Road, 495-0400. SAMUDRABADRA BUDDHIST CENTER Meditation classes. MeditationInFortMyers. org, 567-9739. SAINT COLUMBKILLE CATHOLIC Monday through Saturday 8 a.m.; Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday 7, 9 and 11 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 12171 Iona Road, 489-3973. ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CATHOLIC Monday through Thursday 6:45 a.m.; Friday 6:45 and 11 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.; Sunday 6:45, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 2157 Cleveland Avenue, 334-2161. SAINT JOHN THE APOSTLE METROPOLITAN Sunday 10 a.m. 3049 McGregor Boulevard, 344-0012. SAINT MICHAEL LUTHERAN Saturday 5:30 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10:45 a.m. 3595 Broadway, 939-1218. SAINT NICHOLAS MONASTERY Sunday 9:30 a.m. 111 Evergreen Road, saintnicholasmonastery.org, 997-2847. ST. VINCENT DE PAUL CATHOLIC Tuesday through Friday 9 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.; Sunday 9 and 11 a.m. 13031 Palm Beach Boulevard, 693-0818. SOUTHWEST BAPTIST Sunday 11 a.m.; Wednesday 6 p.m. 16940 McGregor Boulevard, 454-3336. TEMPLE BETHEL SYNAGOGUE Friday Shabbat 7:30 p.m.; Torah Saturday 9 a.m.; Religious School Wednesday 5:30 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m.16225 Winkler Road, templebethel.com, 433-0018. TEMPLE JUDEA (CONSERVATIVE) Friday 6:30 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. tjswfl. org.14486 A&W Bulb Road, 433-0201. THE NEW CHURCH Sunday 11 a.m. 10811 Sunset Plaza Circle #401, newchurchflorida.com. 481-5535. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST Sunday 10:30 a.m. 13411 Shire Lane, uucfm. org, 561-2700. UNITY OF FORT MYERS Sunday 10 a.m. 11120 Ranchette Road, unityoffortmyers.org, 278-1511. WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. 9065 Ligon Court, 481-2125. WORD OF LIFE Sunday 10 a.m., Wednesday 7 p.m. 2120 Collier Avenue, 274-8881. ZION LUTHERAN Sunday 8, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. 7401 Winkler Road, zionfm.org, 481-4040. Christmas Carol Sing-AlongSt. Peter Lutheran Church will hold a sing-along with special guests Church of God of Prophesy Gospel Choir and Tropical Storm on Tuesday, December 4 at 7:30 p.m. Church of God of Prophesy Gospel Choir has sung in several churches in Lee County as well as outside the Lee County area with great reviews. Formed in Lehigh Acres in 2010 with about 12 members, the group has grown since then to approximately 25 singers. Tropical Storm, a popular mens quartet, will be singing a few Christmas songs from their latest album. Tropical Storm is based in Southwest Florida, formed in 2005. The group has sung at many venues from Punta Gorda to Naples with rave reviews. There will be free admission to the sing-along. Come early for best seats, and refreshments will follow the concert. St. Peter Lutheran Church is located at 3751 Estero Boulevard on Fort Myers Beach. Call 463-4251 for more information. Church of God of Prophesy Gospel Choir photo providedThe Fort Myers Police Athletic League (PAL) boxers competed in the recent USA Boxing 2018 Florida State Champions in Palatka, Florida and captured six state championships and one silver award. Coach Jose Ojeda along with Assistant Coach Rudy Martinez took their team of seven boxers to the competition and all won individual awards along with the team trophy as Best Team of Show and MVP Award in the Junior category. This team has worked very hard to prepare for competition and to come home with all these individual trophies as well as best team is a tribute to their determination and drive, said Coach Ojeda. Awards went to the following boxers in these categories: Danilo Diez, age 15, Junior Open, 132 pounds; Terry Sanders,continued on page 14 From left, Head Coach Jose Ojeda, Danilo Diez, Terry Sanders, Nate Martinez, Josiah Vasquez, Jayden Pozo, Jeremy Pozo and Assistant Coach Rudy Martinez photo providedFort Myers Boxers Win Six Championships

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11 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 Huge Kids Menu Top 5 Breakfast in Florida Southern Living Full Liquor Bar Live Music Outdoor Tropical Dining Happy Hour All Day Long Fresh Seafood & Dinner Specials 239.472.0606 SanibelIslandCow.com Open 7 am 9 pm Open 8 Days a Week 2163 Periwinkle Way Sanibel Island This Week! CROW Case Of The Week: Northern Raccoon by Bob PetcherThe northern raccoon is an intelligent and curious critter. The dexterity of its fingerlike five toes on its front paws is second best among animals to a monkey. The raccoon is known to have the ability to grasp and manipulate food that it finds in the wild. It can also make its way through an unlocked door by using its grip to turn doorknobs and, once inside a home, to open jars if it wishes. Raccoons are known for their mask around their eyes. This black fur feature has been said to help reduce glare and enhance the nocturnal animals excellent night vision. Interestingly, raccoons can run at speeds of up to 15 miles per hour. The male raccoon can also be referred to as a boar, while the female counterpart is named a sow. Juveniles are called kits. It is said that raccoons have adapted so well to urban life that they are now more common in cities than in the country. At CROW, a sub-adult, male northern raccoon was admitted from North Fort Myers after it had gotten itself into quite the predicament. The young raccoon stuck its head in a soup can and could not yank it back out. The can covered the raccoons entire face and was stuck around the base of the widest point of the skull. Only the tips of its ears were sticking out, said Dr. Robin Bast, CROW staff veterinarian. The raccoon was quiet in the cage prior to being examined, likely from exhaustion due to previous attempts to free itself. However, it quickly became stressed when handled since it was unable to see its surroundings and was unable to defend itself. The CROW veterinary team, concerned with the raccoons ability to breathe, immediately used a can opener to remove the bottom of the can. The raccoon was given sedation medication so the team could safely cut the can away, however, as soon as the medication began to take effect, the raccoon relaxed and the can was easily slipped from his head. For the raccoons safety as well as the staffs, we quickly sedated the raccoon with injectable medications, said Dr. Bast. Thankfully, there were no complications. Quick thinking by wildlife rehabilitator Morgan Hester led us to grab a can opener to safely cut an opening so the raccoon could breathe, without accidentally cutting its face in the process. The veterinary staff performed an exam and found the patient to be in great health. He reportedly did not sustain any cuts or injuries from the can. The raccoon was housed at the clinic overnight until he fully recovered from the medication. The next morning, he was returned to the same area he was rescued in North Fort Myers. Luckily, this raccoon had no lacerations or bruising related to the can. It was in good body condition and was otherwise apparently healthy, said Dr. Bast. Curious critters can get themselves into different predicaments. Fortunately, CROW officials have seen it all. Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for wildlife to get tangled up in trash items such as plastics, cans, etc. particularly for raccoons, which are good at scavenging from dumpsters in urban areas, said Dr. Bast. We had an anhinga admitted to the hospital last week that was starving because it had a dryer sheet wrapped around its beak. In years past, Ive also removed a Skippy peanut butter jar from a raccoon and a Gatorade bottle from a skunk. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to P.O. Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www.crowclinic.org. Patient #18-4249 is sedated while its head is stuck inside a Chunky Soup can photo by Brian Bohlman

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 201812 ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. NEW MOTOR SALES REBUILT POWERHEADS FACTORY TRAINED MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISERCourteous Professional Marine Repair Service Dockside Service Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life472-3380 466-3344 Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint PricesDave Doane NEW M O T O R S ALE S REB U ILT P O WERHEA D S FACTORY T R A I N E D MER C U RY MARINER JO HN SO N EVINR U DE S UZUKI YAMAHA O M C I/ O S MER C RU I S E R C ourteous Professional Marine Repair S erv i ce D oc k s i d e S erv i c e S ervin g Sanibel & C aptiva For Li f e Y B t t Yo ur B ottom Yo ur B ot to m Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices C Call on a c es C C ll n Pa in t Pr i es C C i i Call on Paint Prices D ave Doane1 Send Us Your Fish TalesWe would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include a photograph with identification. Email to press@islandsunnews.com or call 395-1213. BOAT RENTALSFishing Cabbage KeyDolphin Watching Captains Available472-5800Jensens Marina Captiva Island CLEAR YOUR GEAR It Catches More Than FishFishing gear can kill birds, reptiles and mammals Cold Front Options by Capt. Matt MitchellLast weeks cold front was the strongest so far this winter. Wind, rain and much cooler morning temperatures than we are used to kept even the most diehard anglers off the water for a few days until conditions improved. As usual, getting back on the water after a major temperature drop feels like youre starting over. Fishing started out a little slow, which was expected, but after just a few days, it rebounded. Finding bait is always the first challenge after a major cooldown. Every winter we wait for a strong enough cold front to push the bait to the warmer, less fluctuating, deep water of the causeway bridges. The deep water around the causeway bridge pilings will soon be the go-to bait spot all winter but, as of now, shiners have been very scattered with either lots of smaller ones coming from out along the beaches or the bigger stuff in smaller umbers being caught while chumming out on the flats. Bringing live shrimp when returning to fishing after a cold front is always a good choice, not only a back up. In the first few days following the cold front, I caught a wide variety of species on shrimp. I could not even get a bite on a shiner until later in the day when water temperatures gradually warmed up. During the coldest period of the day, I like to fish low and slow by putting a live shrimp on a quarter ounce jig head to not only slow it down but to pin it to the bottom. Some days during cold periods, this will draw a strike when nothing else does. A live shrimp on a jig head also works well when thrown in fast-moving current and when its allowed to sweep by the structure. All winter long, this is a great way to fish all of our local passes. On the first few days after the cold front when I struggled to find my clients any kind of decent fishing action, this shrimp on a jig head method kept the rods bent. The variety of fish we caught on live shrimp was crazy, when you found the right rip or eddy in the pass. We caught snook, redfish, black drum, snapper, sheepshead and grouper, Basically everything that swims in our waters eats shrimp. Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions, email captmattmitchell@aol. com. Gary Biltgen with a black drum caught while fishing with Capt. Matt Mitchell photo provided Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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13 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 Plant SmartTailed Brackenby Gerri ReavesTailed bracken (Pteridium aquilinum var. pseudocaudatum) is native throughout the southeastern U.S., as well as parts of the Midwest and New England. A member of the bracken fern family, it is also called eastern or tailed brackenfern, as well as brake fern. In the wild, it grows in dry or sandy pastures, pinewoods and hammocks, and is very adaptable in a landscape setting. This long-lived hardy perennial makes an excellent low-maintenance groundcover. Unlike most ferns, it will grow in drier areas and will endure sun, growing one to three feet tall. Although it prefers partial shade. Its a good choice for shady spots, for example under trees where other species will not grow. It is not salt tolerant. Cattlemen and farmers consider it a pest because it is poisonous for grazing livestock. The erect stalks branch into threes, and the arching triangular fronds are twicedivided with blunt tips and a coarse texture. The stiff fronds are handy for floral arrangements. Rounded leaflets measure about a half-inch long. The spores found on their undersides are spread by the wind. This bracken also spreads sometimes aggressively via creeping hairy rhizomes, or root-like horizontal stems. Very deep roots endow the plant with fire and drought tolerance. Propagate it by division. Tailed bracken has been used for a variety of medicinal and manufacturing purposes. Even though the furry fiddleheads are eaten in some cultures, consumption is not recommended because the plant is carcinogenic. Sources: The Ferns of Florida by Gil Nelson; National Audubon Society Field Guide to Florida by Peter Alden et al.; Native Florida Plants by Robert G. Haehle and Joan Brookwell; www. floridata.com; and www.fnps.org. Plant Smart explores the diverse flora of South Florida. Native tailed bracken makes an excellent low-maintenance groundcover photo by Gerri Reaves EXPERIENCE: HUNDREDS OF SUCCESSFUL LANDSCAPES300 Center Road, Fort Myers FL 33907 PHONE 239.939.9663 FAX 239.939.8504www.NoLawn.com www.AllNative.bizOPEN DAILY: 9 to 5 Mon Sat 10 to 3 SunOUR NURSERY FEATURES OVER 200 SPECIES OF NATIVE PLANTS ON SEVERAL ACRES Buttery Gardens Wildlife/Bird Sanctuaries We also offer landscape design, consultation, installation and maintenance. Providing Custom Interiors to Sanibel & Captiva for 28 years Complimentary In-Home Consultation695 Tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel, FL 33957 coin.decoratingden.com 239.472.6551 Mission BBQ in Fort Myers presented the Fort Myers Police Department (FMPD) with a check for $1,500 for the 2018 Cops & Joggers 5K/Fallen Officers Memorial Foundation. The donation was based on restaurant sales of Hometown Heroes Red Cups. Mission BBQ Community Ambassador Michelle Palladino recently presented the check to FMPD Lt. Jeffery Bernice. The annual Cops & Joggers 5K on October 13 was dedicated to the memory of fallen FMPD officer Adam JobbersMiller and fallen Highlands County Deputy William Gentry. The event was the 11th annual and drew more than 1,000 runners, a record of participants. Michelle Paladino of Mission BBQ and FMPD Lt. Jeffery Bernice photo provided FMPD Receives Donation Check

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 201814 From page 10Boxersage 10, Peewee, 90 pounds; Nate Martinez, age 13, Intermediate, 101 pounds; Josiah Vasquez, age 12, Intermediate, 119 pounds; Jayden Pozo, age 16, Junior Novice, 125 pounds; Jeremy Pozo, age 16, Junior Novice, 132 pounds; Kejuan Saez, age 13, Intermediate, Silver 2nd place; and Danilo Diez, age 15, MVP Award, Junior Category. The Fort Myers PAL program is supervised by Officer Lamar Campbell and is part of Chief Derrick Diggs community engagement initiative. The program is designed to bring sports programs to young children and teenagers that promote strong character and positive life skills through athletic, educational and civic activities. For more information on participation or sponsorship, contact Officer Campbell at 284-0112 or email lcampbell@fmpolice.com. Theater To Host Winter Break CampThis winter break, the Laboratory Theater of Florida is offering a full theater experience camp for students age 9 to 14. The camp will culminate with a performance of Seeing Red by award-winning local playwright Louise Wigglesworth. The camp includes an age-appropriate introduction to all aspects of theater production, from set design, lighting design, props, scene study, improvisation, movement exercises and acting. There are parts for all ages and genders. Each student will take ownership for one aspect of the performance. The camp dates are December 24, 26, 27, 28, 31 and January 2, 3, 4, 7, 8. Morning drop-off will be 8:30 to 9 a.m. with afternoon pick up between 4 to 4:30 p.m. Workshops will be taught by teachers and theater professionals. The camp culminates in a performance for friends and family during camp hours on January 8. Lab Theater is located at 1634 Woodford Avenue in Fort Myers. For more information and registration, parents should email educate@laboratorytheaterflorida. com. Cost for the entire theater experience camp is $300 per student, and scholarships are available. Space is available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Registration forms are available online at www.laboratorytheaterflorida.com. image provided Former TV Intern Wins National Production AwardFormer Lee Schools TV student intern Vince Marcucci has been awarded a National Student Production Award Student Emmy for General Assignment Light News Feature by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS). His assignment title was Teachin & Beachin. Nominees were selected from high school student entries across the country in 23 programming and craft categories. The awards presentation was live-streamed from the Los Angeles campus of Emerson College on Tuesday, October 18 and was hosted by Tom Bergeron, host of ABCs Dancing with the Stars Marcucci, who is now a student at the University of Central Florida, will receive a certificate from NATAS and a crystal pillar award with the Emmy logo that will be presented to the School District of Lee County. More than 200 students were culled from the 19 regional chapters of The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences and selected by industry professionals and university professors to advance to the national competition. Marcucci is the second nationally awarded student from the Lee Schools TV Student Intern Program. Vince Marcucci photo provided Bromeliad Plant Sale In DecemberThe Bromeliad Plant Sale will take place at the Araba Shrine Temple on Saturday, December 1 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Sunday, December 2 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Admission is free. The event is presented by the Caloosahatchee Bromeliad Society. Local growers will be on hand to sell their plants, answer questions and offer growing tips and landscape ideas. Bromeliads of all colors, shapes and sizes will be available, as well as driftwood and gardening supplies. Araba Shrine Temple is located at 2010 Hanson Street. All interested persons are welcome to attend.

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15 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 Redevelopment Agency Videos Win State AwardThe Fort Myers Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) won a statewide award from the Florida Redevelopment Association (FRA) on October 25 for three 30-second videos created by Main Sail Video Productions, Inc. The award was received at the FRAs annual conference at the Sanibel Harbour Marriott Resort & Spa in Fort Myers. The commercials explain the role the CRA has in rebuilding and redesigning Fort Myers for the future. They accomplished this by showcasing personal accounts of business owners who received CRA assistance. Those included were: Nils Richter, an owner of the Social House restaurant in downtown Fort Myers, who notes how the Fort Myers CRA is very supportive of anyone bringing in a new and unique business by helping business owners navigate how to set up shop in Fort Myers community redevelopment areas, including areas such as licensing, seating and store opening hours. John and Sue Benkert, owners of CPR Tools, a data recovery and security company, who discuss how the Fort Myers CRA made moving their business from Hendry County easy because the CRAs incentive programs are tied directly to the communityand what a nice community Fort Myers is. Joe Bonora, managing director of Aileron Capital Management which is building several projects in Fort Myers including Grand Central, a new apartment complex with retail shops and the new Krispy Kreme on Cleveland Avenue, who states how the Fort Myers CRA was truly instrumental in getting their projects underway, by providing both assistance with the permitting process as well as tax increment incentives that helped the financial numbers work when considering building in a redevelopment area over other parts of the county. Golden Baby Shoe AwardsIndividuals who show outstanding contributions to improving the health and well-being of pregnant women or babies throughout Collier, Glades, Hendry, and Lee counties were recently honored at the the Golden Baby Shoe Awards at Spanish Wells Country Club in Bonita Springs. The event was hosted by the Healthy Start Coalition of Southwest Florida in partnership with the Golisano Childrens Hospital as title sponsor. The Lifetime Achievement Award went to Martin Sherman, Retired MD, Associates in Pediatrics. The Golden Baby Shoe awardees were Tatiana Anaya, LPN, Hendry Regional Medical Center; Denise Drago MD, PCP, Lee Physician Group Pediatrics; Mylai Garofalo, MD, FAAP, Florida Community Health Centers, Inc.; Kelly Linskey-Johnson, MSW, Lee Health, Healthy Start; Selena Lucas, RN, BS, assistant community health nursing director, Florida Department of Health Collier County; Amber Loyson, MD, MacKoul Pediatrics; Anthony Pietroniro, MD, Lee Physician Group Pediatrics; Giomar Veloz, BS, LD/N,CLE, Public Health Nutrition Supervisor, Florida Department of Health, WIC Nutrition Program; and Stephanie Vick, MS, BSN, RN, administrator, Florida Department of Health Collier County For more information, visit www. floridahealth.gov/programs-and-services/ childrens-health/healthy-start. From left, Natalie S. Dunham, Cheryl V. Thornton, Ilene Safron, Michele Hylton-Terry, Leigh Scrabis, Teresa Watkins Brown, Gaile Anthony, Saeed Kazemi, Donna Lovejoy and Brenna Durden photo provided

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 201816 Packed with facts and employing an engaging storytelling style, [Female Pioneers of Fort Myers] both teaches and entertains. Local history buffs and newcomers to history will value Tuthill and Halls research and appreciate the accessible format, too.Gerri Reaves, PhD, author of Legendary Locals of Fort Myers and Fort Myers, Then & Now Available at WWW.AMAZON.COM WWW.EDITORIALRXPRESS.COM ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. Mark OBrien Owner/Agent Trish Barbone Agent Justin Wheeler Agent We are HERE for all your insurance needs Call or e-mail us for more information. Phone: 239-558-5733 E-mail: rabbitrdmgt@gmail.com www.RabbitRoadMgt.com Rabbit Rd. Property Management & Home Watch Company which specializes in managing small county area. We are licensed, insured and bonded with over 20 years of experience. We are also Florida CAM licensed and accredited members of the National Home Watch Association. Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours, and thank you so very much for following my column over the years. In the spirit of the Thanksgiving holiday, allow me to list some of the things that I am thankful for: Im thankful for my family. I have a loving, devoted, smart and very patient wife who has put up with me for over close to 30 years. We started out with nothing to our names save our student loan debt. It seemed as if our adventure had just begun. We have three daughters of whom we couldnt be more proud. While I lost my mother to leukemia a few short years ago, I am thankful for the 11-plus years we had with her since her initial diagnosis. She danced at all of her grandchildrens bar/bat mitzvahs, which is wonderful to reflect upon fondly. Im thankful that Im alive and well. This may sound trite, but some may recall from previous columns that I almost died in a terrible bicycling accident about 15 years ago. I am an avid road cyclist, but on a July afternoon in 2004, a car cut me off while I was enjoying my ride. My helmet saved my life, but I had four skull fractures and problems with my neck and spine. The accident required hospital stays and surgery, but today Im still on the bike and doing well. I am thankful for those motorists who are considerate of us cyclists and beg the rest of you to please watch out for bicyclists both on the bike paths and on the road. Im thankful for my career and the people with whom I work. I truly enjoy what I do for a living. My firm is established in this community, dating back to 1924. My law partners and I get along very well because its more like a family than a firm. We have a loyal and hard-working team one of whom has been with us for over 40 years! My clients are second to none as they are a bunch of friendly, warm and sincere people who have interesting backgrounds and life experiences. Ive learned so very much from many of my clients. Im thankful to live in Southwest Florida. I grew up in Indianapolis but have lived in Florida for more most of my life. The people here are kind and empathetic. While our summers are hot, our temperate winters and ability to enjoy outdoor activity year-round more than make up for it. One of my good friends from Chicago visited a few years ago, and I took him out to dinner. We traveled to a waterfront restaurant via boat instead of the car. He saw dolphins jumping and a wonderful sunset that evening. He couldnt believe that we can do this anytime we want. It made me proud and happy to live here. Finally, Im thankful for this column and the people of Sanibel, Captiva and Fort Myers. I appreciate Lorin Arundel and all of the good folks at the Island Sun/River Weekly News as well as my faithful readers for allowing me to bring you this estate planning column. I will say that it is sometimes a challenge to come up with interesting topics on a weekly basis for years on end. Estate planning isnt the most entertaining of subjects by itself, but Ive received a lot of positive feedback along with appreciation from many whove told me they understand the concepts that Ive tried to highlight over the years. I thank all of you for your continued support; Once again, Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family and loved ones. Be sure to reflect on what treasures exist in your life, especially as we approach the holiday season. 2018 Craig R. Hersch. Learn more at www.sbshlaw.com. Will PowerI Am Truly Thankfulby Craig R. Hersch, Florida Bar Board Certified Wills, Trusts & Estates Attorney; CPA From page 1Broadway Palmand have transformed the hardware store into a winter wonderland. Like every year, Mr. Harper is scheduled to appear as Santa Claus and pass out the employee bonuses, but trouble ensues when Santa turns up missing. The girls keep the party going with lots of laughs and fun at every turn, and a few lucky audience members get to be part of the excitement. The holiday songs include many favorites such as Santa Baby, Santa Claus is Coming to Town, Jingle Bell Rock and Winter Wonderland. Amy McCleary is the director and choreographer of the show. Her recent work with Broadway Palm includes Annie, Mamma Mia and Chicago. Her choreography can also be seen throughout the country in the current national tour of The Wizard of Oz. The cast includes Broadway Palm alumni Melissa Whitworth who was seen as Grace in Annie and Mary Poppins in Mary Poppins, as well as Sarah Mae Banning who starred in last seasons Chicago as Roxie Hart. Making their debuts at Broadway Palm are Sarah Hinrichsen and Lexie Wolf. The Off Broadway Palm is an intimate 100-seat theater, located in the main lobby of Broadway Palm. Performances are Tuesday through Sunday evenings with selected matinees. Ticket prices range from $39 to $59 with group discounts available for parties of 20 or more. Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre is located at 1380 Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information or tickets, call 278-4422, visit www. broadwaypalm.com or stop by the box office.

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17 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 Southwest Floridas Leading Auto & Truck Service Facility239-277-10041921 Courtney Drive Fort Myers 33901 OPEN Monday Friday 8am to 5:30pm Saturday 8am to 4pm Sunday Closedwww.LegendaryFL.com any service that we offer$25 OffLimit one per customer, no cash value, cannot be combined with any We service all makes and models, both foreign and domestic. Highly trained, Professional, 3 year/ 36,000 mile nationwide warranty. Same day service in most cases. State Of Florida MV# 97330 All Makes and Models both Foreign and Domestic Book ReviewWhere The Crawdads Singby Di SaggauFor years, rumors of the Marsh Girl have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. Catherine Kya Clark is a figure of mystery and prejudice in the coastal community in the 1950s and 60s. Six-year-old Kya watches her mama walk out the door, wearing her special alligator shoes and carrying a suitcase. She stares at her mothers back waiting for her to turn and wave. Her mother does neither. Kyas mother was no longer able to endure her drunken husbands beatings. Soon after her four siblings leave. Kya grows up in the care of her sometimes violent father, who eventually disappears, too. Kya replaces all the loss with the one thing that gives her comfort, the wet earth and the marsh. The chapters alternate between Kyas life and something that happened in 1969 when handsome Chase Andrews, star quarterback and town hot shot, is found dead. At first his death is considered an accident, and then it becomes a murder investigation. The locals immediately suspect Kya. As we learn about Kya, we also learn about the investigation by the town sheriff into the murder of Chase and the trial that takes place with Kya at the center. The timelines merge toward the end of the book. Kya has survived over the years by knowing the marsh. She is resourceful and clever. She learns to catch seafood and sell it to her friend Jumpin. He and his wife, Mabel, are the only villagers who show any kindness to her. The older Kya becomes, the more she yearns for companionship. She sees others her age getting together on the beaches of her marsh. She develops a friendship with a boy named Tate, who teaches her to read. Both Tate and Chase play significant roles in her life. Kya, unknown to the community, becomes an accomplished artist and captures the essence and beauty of all the creatures of the wetlands. The book is abundant with descriptive prose and brings the reader straight to the edges of the marsh waters, offering an exquisite experience to a unique place in our natural world. Where The Crawdads Sing begins with a vivid prologue that talks about the differences between a marsh and a swamp. A swamp is about decay and decomposing matter, while a marsh is teeming with life. Kya is familiar with all the life in the marsh. Where the Crawdads Sing is another book I raced through enjoying every page, especially the haunting and unexpected conclusion. image provided School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Readers,We want our kids to be appreciative and not take things for granted, and learning to be grateful can improve kids relationships, ability to empathize and overall happiness. If you are looking for ways to reinforce the importance of gratitude or would like to find other meaningful ways your kids can show appreciation, here are some tips: Set an example Kids learn a lot from watching their parents. Show them what it means to be grateful by offering a genuine thank you! to a waitress who serves your food or a helpful neighbor. Thanking children for doing things that are helpful, even when they are chores like putting away toys, reinforces the behavior and lets them know theyre appreciated. Point out generosity Call attention to it when people, including your kids, do things that go beyond whats expected like helping without being asked, being especially thoughtful, or taking extra time to do something because its important to someone else. Send the message that you will notice if they knock themselves out for you, or for someone else. Have a talk For some kids, especially young children or those who have trouble understanding emotions, it can help to have a talk about how showing appreciation makes other people feel. Try asking your child how he feels when people say thank you to him for doing something nice, and then how he feels when they dont. Going over his own feelings will help him understand how his behavior affects others and make it easier for him to understand the emotional benefits of being grateful. Find fun ways to say thanks There are lots of ways to show gratitude. If your child isnt comfortable talking to strangers or has a hard time expressing herself in writing, work together to come up with a different way for her to show her appreciation. She could try giving a smile or a thumbs up if someone holds the door, or show grandma how much she loves her new coat by drawing a thank you picture or card or sending a smiling selfie. Share the love Encourage kids to think of people who help them, from school personnel to the local firemen, and say thanks with cards or cupcakes. Making them and giving them are fun, and they help kids see how connected we all are. Put things in perspective Talk to your kids about those who are less fortunate. Dont scare them, but dont keep them in the dark either. Understanding that not everyone has the same advantages will help them develop compassion for others and gratitude for their own privileges. Make gratitude part of bedtime When you tuck him in at night, ask your child to tell you three things hes grateful for. Even if hes had a bad day, it will help him and you end each day on a positive note. Give kids credit Be mindful of the fact that your child may have her own way of expressing gratitude, even if it doesnt fit your expectations. Different kids communicate in different ways. For example, your child may be more comfortable giving a hug than a verbal thank you, or might show her appreciation by helping out around the house. Tuning in to your childs unique way of being thankful will let her know that even as shes learning new ways to give back, you see and appreciate the thoughtful person she already is. Adapted from The Child Mind Institute, Parenting Challenges Shelley Greggs is adjunct faculty at Florida SouthWestern State College, where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also a nationally certified school psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail. com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. Continental Womens Club The Continental Womens Club luncheon meeting will be held at The Hideaway Country Club on Monday, December 3 at 11:30 a.m. It will feature a holiday music program presented by the Legends Choraliers, directed by Carolyn Ballou. Cost is $22. Reservations are required by Monday, November 26. The Hideaway Country Club is located at 5670 Trailwinds Drive in Fort Myers. Call 691-7561 for more information.

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 201818 Financial FocusCan You Benefit From An Annuity?by Jennifer BaseyRetirement isnt cheap. You may have heard that you will need 70 percent to 80 percent of your pre-retirement income, but the real figure might even be higher, depending on your circumstances. And retirement isnt short, either you could spend two or three decades as a retiree. Taken together, these factors highlight the need to identify as many sources of retirement income as possible. One of these sources might be an annuity. A fixed annuity is an insurance product that allows you to make a lump-sum investment and can provide insured payments to you for a designated number of years, or for life. A fixed annuity guarantees a rate of interest for a stated period that will be unaffected by market fluctuations. Your principal investment and the specified interest rate are guaranteed based on the claimspaying ability of the issuing company. A fixed annuity offers some key benefits, including the following: No contribution limit No IRS contribution limits apply to non-qualified annuities that is, annuities held outside a tax-advantaged retirement plan, such as a defined benefit pension plan, Section 403(b) plan (TSA) or an IRA. This can be especially valuable if you are already close to retirement age and think you might be short on savings. Tax deferred accumulation The interest you earn is tax deferred and will compound annually, meaning your money may accumulate faster than it would if it were placed in a taxable investment. Earnings will be taxed at your ordinary income rate once you start taking withdrawals, and withdrawals prior to age 59 may be subject to a 10 percent federal tax penalty. (You will want to consult with your tax advisor before withdrawing from your annuity.) Income for life You can take your annuity payout as a lump sum or choose to receive payments for a set number of years, or for the rest of your life. Your income amount will be determined by the value in your contract and your life expectancy. Death benefit If your annuity is still in the accumulation phase at the time of your death (meaning you havent yet begun collecting payments), it might provide a death benefit to the beneficiary youve named. Typically, this lump sum will be the greater of your account balance or the total of all premiums paid, although some annuities provide additional options. Be aware, though, that the death benefit may be taxable. As is the case with all investments, a fixed annuity does have some caveats. Most important, an annuity is a long-term investment if you pull money out within the first several years after your purchase, you likely will face some prohibitive surrender charges. These charges decline each year, typically reaching zero after seven years. Such withdrawals also may be subject to a market value adjustment. One more thing to keep in mind: Different annuities come with different fees, and the higher the fee, the lower your real return will be. Consequently, you will want to compare fees before investing. If a fixed annuity is appropriate for your situation, you may find it can join your other income pools Social Security, 401(k), IRA, etc. to provide you with the resources you need to enjoy the retirement lifestyle youve envisioned. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones financial advisor. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@ edwardjones.com. Is your Estate Plan providing you COMFORT, CONFIDENCE & CLARITY? Attorneys at Law SHEPPARD, BRETT, STEWART, HERSCH, KINSEY & HILL P.A. 9100 College Pointe Court Fort Myers, FL 33919 Phone 239.425.9383 Fax 239.334.3965 www.sbshlaw.com Craig R. HerschFlorida Bar Board Certied Wills, Trusts & Estates Attorney, CPA Will Power Columnist, The Island Sun or a copy of one of our books, visit estateprograms.com For FREE Selecting who should serve as your trustee during your incapacity and, ultimately, after your passing is not as simple as you may think. Learn what characteristics to look for when choosing those who will handle the future of your estate.Craig R. HerschFlorida Bar Board Certi ed Wills, Trusts & Estates Attorney, CPA SELECTING YOUR TRUSTEE online resources Superior InteriorsLet Your Home Flowby Jeanie TinchA natural flow from room to room can assist in creating an atmosphere of ease. When entertaining friends and family, we express our hospitality and warmth of the place we call home. With season soon approaching, its time to get your home ready for guests and socializing with these simple tips. As one enters a house, a wreath or hanging arrangement sets the tone for the ambiance that awaits inside the foyer. As guests step inside, welcome them with the inviting smell of a burning candle, warm lighting and the presence of twinkling mirrors. Add an area rug to add to the cozy feel while doubling as an accommodation to this high traffic area. Moving from the foyer to the living room, people will gravitate to the seats. Ensure that no one is the odd man out, left in the separated chair. Seating arrangements should encourage conversation; face couches, sectionals, and chairs facing each other to aid in the process. The dining room and kitchen are co-hubs for lively conversation. Make them welcoming by layering cloths on the tables and lighting a few more candles. The centerpiece should be lively but not overbearing, as it shouldnt act as a barrier between guests. Most of your guests will be visiting this area, so dont overlook the powder room. These small spaces are often seen as jewel boxes that can be charming and offer luxury items such as scented soap, fresh floral arrangements and plush towels. Make the rest of the rooms feel like home by adding accent pillows, a few extra throws and interesting accessories (perhaps from past adventures) that have a story to share. Jeanie Tinch is an interior designer on Sanibel/Captiva Islands. She can be reached at jeanie@coindecden.com. From page 1Holiday Nightsthanks to a lift sponsorship from Sunbelt Rentals, the lights on the palm trees are strung all the way to the base of the fronds for a magical display that should delight both first-time and return visitors. For children, artist Doug MacGregor will be on site drawing cartoons on November 29, December 6, 13 and 20 from 6 to 8 p.m. Santa and Mrs. Claus will be visiting and making their list on November 23 and 30, and December 2, 9, 16 and 23. Adults and children can explore the Childrens Tree Trail a collection of more than 60 trees decorated with handmade ornaments from Lee County school children. Through December 30, guided Holiday Tradition Tours will be offered at 6 and 7 p.m. every night and Inside-theHomes Holiday Tours will be offered on Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. The museum and the botanic research laboratory will be open nightly until 9 p.m. Live music performances include Victorian carolers and a pianist on select nights. There will be a Holiday Tea with Mina Edison and Clara Ford in the Edison Caretakers House on December 12 at 6 p.m. Mina and Clara will talk about their favorite holiday traditions, while tea, lemonade and cookies are served. After the tea, visitors may stroll the decorated grounds. Space is limited to 30 guests, so registration is required. Tickets for the tea are $15 for members or $25 for nonmembers and include general admission to Holiday Nights. The Ford Cottage Shoppe, Museum Store and Garden Shoppe will be open until 9 p.m. every night and stocked with unique gift items and plants for that hard-to-buy-for loved one on your holiday shopping list. Refreshments will also be available for purchase. Chris-Tel Construction and Bob Dean Supply, Inc. are also Holiday Nights sponsors this year with the fabrication and construction of two new 25-foot lighted steel trees. Chris-Tel is supplying the construction methods and Bob Dean is sponsoring the fabrication of materials. Holiday Nights tickets for adults are $20, teens (age 13 to 19) are $10, children (age 6 to 12) are $2, and Edison Ford members get in free. Guided Holiday Tradition Tours are $30 for adults, teens are $25, children are $18 and $10 for Edison Ford members. Inside-the-Homes Holiday Tours are $50. Lee County residents with identification will receive $5 off Holiday Nights admission every Sunday and Monday. Tickets for a tour and river cruise package are also available and waterfront dining is offered next door at Pinchers Crab Shack. For more information, to purchase tickets or view the nightly schedule, visit www.edisonfordwinterestates.org.

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19 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 De-ionized Water Leaves your Windows Spotless Interior & Exterior Clean Windows, Doors, Frames & Screens Eco Friendly Locally Owned & Operated Residential & Commercial Satisfaction Guaranteed Additional Services Available: De-ionized Window CleaningStarting at$8*per window Pressure Washing (roofs excluded) Maintenance Programs Annual ContractsKeep Your View CRYSTAL CLEAR!Call Today for a Free Estimate239-313-7930Licensed & Insured Residential customers only. Some Restrictions may apply$25 off*$250 min Cleaning November 2018 ONLY! Marketing Firm Adds CoordinatorPushing the Envelope, Inc., a strategic marketing communication firm based in Fort Myers, has hired Annelise Przywara as communication coordinator. In her role, Przywara will be responsible for executing public relations services for the companys varied clientele, including publicity and media relations, event management, copywriting, and more. Przywara holds a bachelor of arts degree in public relations/strategic communication from Wilkes University and is working to earn her masters degree in strategic communication from American University. Annelise Przywara photo provided Life InsuranceImmediate Annuity J. Brendan Ryan, CLU, ChFC, MSFSImmediate or income annuities should have a prominent place in a persons retirement planning. Annuities, which can only be issued by life insurance companies, have two phases: the deferral phase; and the payout phase. In the deferral phase, a person puts money into the policy and leaves it there until a later date. While it is in the annuity, the funds earn interest or investment return. But unlike a certificate of deposit, a savings account or a mutual fund, the gain that is credited to the account is not currently taxed but only taxed when the gain is withdrawn. Then it is taxed as ordinary income. In the payout phase, there are a number of options as to how to receive the funds. Annuities can be funded with a rollover from a qualified plan, another annuity, a life-insurance policy or with a sum of after-tax dollars taken out of savings. A fixed annuity pays a level amount; a variable annuity pays a fluctuating amount depending on the performance of the subaccounts inside the annuity. An income annuity is important in retirement planning because it guarantees income that one cannot possibly outlive. It can also be guaranteed for two lifetimes in a joint annuity. After all, the basic purpose of retirement planning is to be sure one has adequate sources of income for a comfortable retirement and that those sources do not run out before the retiree and, in most cases, retiree and spouse, take their last breath. How can an insurance company do this? By the law of large numbers. Company actuaries can predict that in a large pool of clients, a certain number will die each year though they do not know which ones. And their numbers tell them the incidence of dying for the whole pool over the years. Armed with that information, the insurer can offer guarantees that are backed up with their huge reserves. An income annuity can guarantee for one or two people an income for life that will stop at the end of life (or two lives in the case of a joint annuity). Or, it can guarantee those one or two lifetimes with an extra guarantee. It can guarantee that, even if the one or both of the annuitants die, in no case will payments stop until a total of 10 or 20 years of payments have been made. Or the guarantee could say that even if death of the annuitant(s) causes the payments to stop, if the amount paid out over the years does not equal the amount paid for the annuity, then the difference will be refunded in lump sum or in installments to the named beneficiary. But beware the more guarantees that are built in, the less the monthly payments will be to the annuitant(s). Enough of the abstract discussion. Lets look at a few examples: If a 57-year-old woman pays $100,000 for an immediate fixed annuity that lasts only as long as she lives (life only), she would receive $447 per month for the rest of her life. If she chose to have the income last at least a total of 10 years even if she dies sooner (10-year certain), it would pay $444 per month. For $100,000, a male age 65 could expect to receive $558 per month (life only) or $553 per month (10-year certain). A male age 70 could pay $100,000 for an immediate annuity and get $612 per month (life only) or $586 (10-year certain). J. Brendan Ryan is a Cincinnati insurance agent. He can be reached at jbryanclu@aol.com.

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 201820 Grampys Golf TournamentSanibel Captiva Community Bank will host the 2nd annual Grampys Pro-Am benefiting Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southwest Florida at Fiddlesticks Country Club on Friday, December 7. Registration and breakfast begin at 7 a.m. followed by an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Cocktails, lunch and awards will follow the tournament at 1:30 p.m. Each foursome of Grampys Pro-Am will include a PGA professional. The annual tournament was established 30 years ago by McDonalds owner/operator Fred Frederic, founder of the Fort Myers Ronald McDonald House and chair of the golf committee for 27 years until his passing in August 2015. It was Frederics desire to keep families close by providing a home away from home for families of hospitalized children. Grampys Charities has offered its support and leadership for the foreseeable future, while 100 percent of the event proceeds will benefit Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southwest Florida. At the inaugural Pro-Am in 2017, Grampys Charities raised over $80,000 for Ronald McDonald House Charities. Charity Golf TournamentThe top private club golfers in Southwest Florida will soon square off in a new charity competition. The Coastal Club Classic brings together the two best qualifiers from 36 clubs around the region for a one-day shamble-style golf event to feed hungry children. It begins with a shotgun start at the Club at Olde Cypress in North Naples on May 3. Proceeds from the tournament will benefit the Southwest Florida chapter of Blessings in a Backpack, a nonprofit dedicated to filling the gaps of the free and reduced-price school lunch program. Each player who takes part in qualifying will receive commemorative gear and is asked to make a $100 tax-deductible donation, enough money for the organization to feed one child each weekend of the school year. Were known for our top-flight golf around here, but fewer people are aware of just how many Southwest Florida children go hungry, said Cecilia St. Arnold, executive director of the local Blessings in a Backpack chapter. Were thankful to Scott Fischer Charities for hosting the Coastal Club Classic and designating us as the beneficiary. The event will raise awareness of the magnitude of the hunger crisis as well as the money necessary to address it. More than 60,000 elementary school students in Lee and Collier counties receive free and reduced-price breakfasts and lunches during the week, but the federal program doesnt cover them on the weekends. Blessings in a Backpack gives thousands of those children nutritious kid-friendly, easy-to-prepare meals each Friday afternoon to take home for the weekend. Clubs interested in becoming one of the 36 to participate in the tournament can contact local Blessings in a Backpack Advisory Board member David Teets at 595-8066 or merlin33159@comcast. net. Sponsorship opportunities are also available. For more information on Blessings in a Backpack Southwest Florida, visit www.blessingsinswfl.org. Details about the Coastal Club Classic are at www. coastalclubclassic.com. SPORTS QUIZ 1. In 2017, the Dodgers Cor ey Seager became the fourth player in major-league history to have two three-homer games before his 24th birthday. Name two of the other three to do it. 2. Name thr ee of the four teams managed by Hall of Famer Whitey Herzog. 3. In 2016, Brad Kaaya became the all-time car eer passing yards leader (9,968) at the University of Miami, Florida. Who had been No. 1? 4. When was the last time the W ashington Wizards won an NBA playoff game against the Celtics in Boston? 5. Of the 31 NHL teams, how many ar e based in the U.S.? 6. Since the curr ent World Cup format began in 1986, how many times has at least 10 European mens soccer teams advanced to the round of 16? 7. When T riple Crown winner Justify triumphed in the Preakness in 2018, it put Bob Baffert in a tie for the most wins at that race by a horse trainer (seven). Who else did it seven times? ANSWERS 1. Mookie Betts, Juan Gonzalez and Boog Powell. 2. Texas (1973), California (), Kansas City (-) and St. Louis (-). 3. Ken Dorsey, with 9,565 yards (1999-2002). 4. It was 1982. 5. Twenty-four. 6. Six times (1986, , 2006 and 2018). 7. R. Wyndham Walden (between 1875 and 1888). Son Follows Pioneer MLB Umpire Father In A Different Baseball Roleby Ed FrankThis is the story of a son that followed his father into Major League baseball. But its not your usual like father, like sonstory. Kevin Gregg is the 38-year-old vice-president of media relations for the Boston Red Sox. He joined the Red Sox organization in 2013 as media relations director and was promoted recently to vice president. Now here is the twist to the father-son baseball story: Kevins late father, Eric Gregg, was a Major League umpire for 24 years and just the third African-American umpire in the Major Leagues. He was a prominent umpire during that long tenure and worked the 1989 World Series, All-Star games, postseason championship games and the first night game in Chicagos historic Wrigley Field. In a recent interview, we asked Kevin what influence his dad had on him pursuing sports communication, and did he ever consider his dads umpiring profession? Dad had a great influence on me, he said. But he decided early on that umpiring wasnt for him. Its not a fan-friendly job, and it takes you away from home for long periods of time, sometimes a month, he added. Baseball road trips are usually no longer than 12 days. His father did, however, provide him an early spark for the love of baseball, taking him to spring training and on some road trips when he was just 10 or 11 years old. Now that the waters have cooled after the Red Sox record-setting 108 regular season wins and their march to the World Series championship, the fourth in the last 15 years, he said his off-season days are not as hectic. Now its more like a 9-to-5 job, and Im able to take a few days off. But its a pressure-packed job during the regular season trying to keep the players, the team and the Boston organization happy and keeping everyone in the loop. He said they work hard with the players to develop good media relations skills a practice that begins even down in the Minor Leagues. Its a great stress during the World Series arranging player interviews, he said. A principal task in the off-season is preparing and editing next years voluminous media guide. During the regular season he attends and works every home game and travels with the team to all postseason games. In addition, this past season he traveled to 54 road games. Its a dream job. I love baseball and am proud to work for the Red Sox, he said. He is a graduate of James Madison University where he majored in sports management. Prior to joining the Red Sox, he worked one year in media relations for the Philadelphia 76ers basketball team and six years in the communications department of the Philadelphia Phillies baseball team. There is another very important reason why he loves the Red Sox. It was here where he met his wife, Stephanie, who is the Red Sox senior director of fan services. Their first child, a boy, is due December 12. Perhaps the future holds a third Gregg in Major League baseball. Kevin Gregg photo courtesy Boston Red Sox 239.472.0004Thinking of Selling?The Pfeifer Team has149 Sales This Year!Call Us for a Professional Consultation PRGHomeTeam.com

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21 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 Effortless Hurricane Protection for Your Home rfntbnff frfffrfnrrnrr fr ffr f rffr We Meet or Beat All Competitor's Written Estimates 239.267.5858 www.WindowsPlusLLC.com Of ce@WindowsPlusLLC.com rrnfrStarting at$285* does not include installation CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATECALL US TODAY! SCC131151273 Elite Colleges Target City Of Palms TalentTop-flight recruits committed to Villanova, North Carolina, Arizona, Florida, Auburn, Maryland, Memphis and Virginia Tech will soon play in Fort Myers. The 46th annual Culligan City of Palms Classic features six of the top 25 players in the current ESPN 100 Class of 2019 college basketball recruiting rankings. The event returns this year to Suncoast Credit Union Arena at Florida SouthWestern State College from December 17 to 22. Mike Krzyzewski, Roy Williams and other college basketball luminaries have appeared in the stands over the years for what has become a must-see talent showcase. This years field proves once again why the Culligan City of Palms Classic is the No. 1 high school tournament in America, said John Naylor, tournament executive director. Youd be hardpressed to find this much basketball talent in one place anywhere in the world. Cole Anthony, now at national powerhouse Oak Hill Academy in Mouth of Wilson, Virginia, after an offseason transfer, supplies the brightest star power, along with the duo of Vernon Carey Jr. and Scottie Barnes from defending City of Palms champion University School in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. All three are listed within the top five of their respective recruiting classes in ESPNs rankings. The trio remain uncommitted, but nine players from the ESPN 100 whove chosen elite NCAA schools are also City of Palms-bound. They are: Josh Green, IMG Academy in Bradenton, Florida Arizona Armando Bacot, IMG Academy in Bradenton North Carolina DJ Jeffries, Olive Branch in Olive Branch, Mississippi Memphis Tre Mann, The Villages Charter School in The Villages, Florida Florida Jeremiah Robinson-Earl, IMG Academy in Bradenton Villanova Isaac Okoro, McEachern in Powder Springs, Georgia Auburn Makhi Mitchell, Woodrow Wilson in District Heights, Maryland Maryland Anthony Harris, Paul VI in Fairfax, Virginia Virginia Tech Tyrell Jones, West Oaks Academy in Orlando Auburn The field of teams for this years Culligan City of Palms Classic is just as impressive, with five of the top 10 schools in the Ballislife.com Fab 50 national rankings. Oak Hill is No. 2 on that list, followed by IMG Academy in Bradenton at No. 4, University School in Fort Lauderdale at No. 5, Imhotep Charter School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at No. 7 and Paul VI in Fairfax, Virginia at No. 9. The event begins with free admission to a clash between intracity rivals Fort Myers and Canterbury on Monday, December 17 at 12:30 p.m. Also new this year is the five-game North Law Firm City of Palms Premiere, a one-day showcase featuring five teams from the tournaments 16-team main draw with five more Florida programs in a one-day event on Saturday, December 15 at Lehigh Senior High School. Single-day preferred, reserved and general admission tickets are now on sale. Six-day preferred and reserved packages are also available, and so is a VIP parking pass. For prices and seating information, visit www.cityofpalmsclassic. com, call 1-800-440-7469 or visit the Suncoast Credit Union Arena box office at 13351 FSW Parkway in Fort Myers or the Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall box office at 13350 FSW Parkway in Fort Myers on Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The tournament offers discounted group rates. Call John Naylor at 4891085 for more information. Vernon Carey Jr photo provided

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 201822 Women in Business, a committee of the Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce, held its Sparkle, Dont Stress monthly networking event at Bell Tower Shops in Fort Myers on Wednesday, November 7. Chamber members set up display and product tables outside Bistro 41 as dozens of chamber members and future members sampled products and learned more about the local businesses. Women in Business is dedicated to helping women achieve their fullest professional and personal potential, and the committee offers a variety of networking and educational programs throughout the year. The nonprofit spotlight for Novembers social event was the Childrens Advocacy Center of Southwest Florida, which has a mission of improving the lives of children and their families through a coordinated response to child abuse and neglect. From left, Jill Turner, Lisa Rizzio and Jessica Walker photos provided Lois Croft and Torunn Labella From left, Sharon Torregrossa, Mel Dell and Barbara Dell Madison Mitchell and Daniela Georgieva Kate Schmiedicke and Marin Asher Fernanda Cugasti and Maria Pelaez Andrew Williams and Judy Williams From left, Mary Murucco, Kelly Ann Talamo and Carrie Moloney From left, Debbie Trent, Angela Remington and Melissa Batovsky From left, Juana Rodriguez, Ildiko Szava, Yvonne Conte, Ann Debonis and Siva McAteerWomen In Business Networking Event

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23 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 rfntb r fntnbt Online: www.NaumannLawPA.com and www.RealtyClosings.comWe provide the personal attention and service that you deserve! FGCU Videographer Debut At FestivalIn less than a year, Jasmine Kettenacker has made her mark on Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU). Her distinct documentary style is unique to FGCU and has changed the way certain video stories are told on campus. One creation recently earned her a Suncoast Regional Emmy nomination alongside her colleague Tim Clark. But before she walks the red carpet in Orlando this December, Kettenacker heads back to her native Missouri for the film festival debut of St. Louis Slam, her short documentary about a womens tackle football team. I thought it would be cool to do a documentary on womens football, Kettenacker said of her film debuting at the St. Louis International Film Festival. I wanted to do this justice and do this right. It shows women doing what they want and not what society expects them to do. Female empowerment has become a theme in Kettenackers work. In fact, her own story fits the bill. In 1998, director Martin Campbell released his film The Mask of Zorro. It received high praise from movie critics and the general public and is considered a box office success. Little did he know, it also inspired a 13-year-old kid from St. Louis to become a filmmaker. I started researching the film and got really interested in how movies are made, Kettenacker said. eventually went to screenwriting camp, but I realized that wasnt for me. I quickly changed to shooting and soon recognized I had a knack for editing. Kettenackers interest in filmmaking grew, and she enrolled at Hollins University, a womens institution in Virginia, as a film major. She discovered her passion for documentary filmmaking, which often revolved around athletic storylines. In 2011, she created a documentary about a boxing program for children that is operated by the St. Louis continued on page 24 Jasmine Kettenacker photo provided Beautifulife:Gratitudeby Kay CaspersonThis is an excellent time of year to discuss gratitude, because everyone is already in the mindset of giving thanks and taking a more in-depth look at all there is in our lives to be grateful for. But what if we took a closer look at the real meaning of gratitude in our lives. Gratitude is so much more than saying the words thank you. Of course, those words are extremely important, but there is so much more to feeling gratitude than just being thankful. As a matter of fact, when you genuinely have a sense of gratitude, it overpowers all other feelings inside. There is an overwhelming sense of gratitude above and beyond thankfulness when something happens in your life that changes it for the better, like having a child or getting married. You can also feel this sense of gratitude when you accomplish something amazing or when youre feeling extremely loved, appreciated or blessed by someone or something in your life and your circumstances change for the better. I teach my children to say thank you every day for things that people do for them, but gratitude is something that cannot be taught, because it is a feeling that we experience when our lives are truly impacted in a good way. So, the question is, how can we experience gratitude more often in our everyday lives? Lets take a closer look at the different areas of your life to find out. People How are your relationships with others? There have been studies that show that having gratitude attracts more positive people into your life and if you encourage this in others, you can strengthen your relationships even more. Goals What do you have yet to accomplish? To ensure that you are heading in the right direction, take a look back at the past and all of the things you have already overcome and achieved. Now, celebrate your accomplishments, and your appreciation and gratitude will shift you into high gear towards the future. Health Being grateful can completely shift your physical and mental health into a more favorable outcome. In fact, there are scientific studies that prove that gratitude can work as well as good medicine can. The power of being grateful will completely change your mindset. Instead of focusing on what you do not have or what you have not done, say the words, I have all that I need or my life is full and flowing with blessings or I am following my hearts path. Then you will start to see how big gratitude can become in your life. There are a few suggestions that I would make in order to keep gratitude in your life every day: Make a list of the things youre grateful for and update it regularly so that you can clearly visualize all of your blessings; Speak positive words of encouragement to yourself about how far you have come and where you have yet to go; Practice kindness to others and find something good to do for someone every day to feel empowered and fulfilled; Surround yourself with people who love you and appreciate who you really are, and encourage you to be all you can be; Pray and give thanks for all of your blessings and you will continue to see them flow freely into your life daily. My affirmation for you this week is: I am allowing my heart and my life to be filled with an overwhelming sense of gratitude today and every day. Kay Casperson is a beauty and lifestyle expert, founder and CEO of Beautifulife by Kay Casperson. She owns resort spas on Sanibel and Captiva islands and manufactures beauty and lifestyle products sold across the country. To stay inspired, visit www. kaycasperson.com or follow on social media @kaycasperson. From page 1Festival Of TreesAwards Ceremony on Tuesday, November 27 from 6 to 9 p.m. Tickets are $50.The festival opens to the public with Find, Design & Wine on Wednesday, November 28 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Get help in designing your ugly sweater. with included supplies. Tickets are $15.Senior Bingo will be held on Thursday, November 29 from 10 to 11 a.m. and again at 1 to 2 p.m. Cost is $10 which includes five cards and bonus goodies. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. For more information, visit www.goodwilltrees.com or call 333-1933.

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 201824 Doctor and DieticianBanned Flavor Additivesby Ross Hauser, MD and Marion Hauser, MS, RDWe always encourage our patients and our readers to eat real food, rather than processed foods. And now there is another reason to do so! In the beginning of October, the Food and Drug Administration officially banned the use of seven different food additives. It will be tough to recognize them on most labels though, since these dangerous additives are only labeled as artificial flavors. However, they are typically added to products to mimic natural mint, citrus and cinnamon flavors. The FDA went forward with this move after both food safety experts and environmentalists brought to light research demonstrating that six of the additives caused cancer in different lab animals. The seventh flavor had already been removed from the FDAs approved list because many manufacturers in the food industry had already stopped using it. The six artificial additives linked to cancer include benzophenone, ethyl acrylate, eugenyl methyl ether, myrcene, pulegone and pyridine. Interestingly, the FDA determined these additives did not pose a public health risk at the low levels of intended use by the food industry, but amended the food additive regulation under something called the Delaney Clause. This law requires that the FDA cannot approve anything that causes cancer to humans or animals at any dose. This wasnt the first time these food additives had seen controversy, as a few companies had sued the FDA for a response back in 2016. Companies have two years to replace these additives and, being that all of these artificial flavorings have natural counterparts, our hope is that these companies will choose to use the natural options. Nonetheless, we continue to advocate eating fresh foods and cooking homemade meals from scratch as much as possible, using fresh, preferably organic foods while avoiding processed foods and ingredients. Eat fresh, live healthy. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Caring Medical Regenerative Medicine Clinics has two locations: one in Oak Park, Illinois, and one in Fort Myers. It was established in 1991 by Ross Hauser, MD, and Marion Hauser, MS, RD. They can be reached at info@caringmedical. com. From page 23VideographerPolice Department. The film Rumble, Young Man, Rumble was her first documentary to debut at the St. Louis International Film Festival. At FGCU, Kettenacker has found ways to meld her passion for documentaries with her work. Much as she does with her work at FGCU, Kettenacker looks back on the St. Louis Slam project with pride. St. Louis Slam premiered November 11 as part of the festivals Doc Shorts: Black Voices showing. To watch the short documentary, visit www.youtube.com/ watch?v=42FvLHkN-EQ. Primary Care Hires Nurse PractitionerHeather Starnes has joined Physicians Primary Care of Southwest Florida as an advanced registered nurse practitioner. Starnes is a graduate of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, where she received her bachelor of science degree in human development and her master of business administration degree in finance/marketing. She also earned her master of science degree as a family nurse practitioner from Simmons College in Boston, Massachusetts. Starnes has more than 25 years of experience in a variety of clinical and business-related healthcare settings as a nurse, healthcare strategist and consultant. She is certified as an advanced registered nurse practitioner and in basic life support, neonatal resuscitation program and as a certified breastfeeding consultant. Starnes is a member of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, Southern Gulf Coast Nurse Practitioner Council, Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing and the Nurse Practice Council of Lee Health. She will assist pediatricians at the Fort Myers office at 9350 Camelot Drive and the Cape Coral office at 1261 Viscaya Parkway. For more information, visit www. ppcswfl.com. Heather Starnes photo provided Local Hospitals Gain Top Grades For SafetyThe Leapfrog Group recently announced its Fall 2018 Hospital Safety Grades, awarding Gulf Coast Medical Center, Cape Coral Hospital and Lee Memorial Hospital with the highest possible score of A. All four Lee Health adult acute care hospitals saw their raw scores improve over their scores from this spring. HealthPark Medical Center retained its B grade, just missing an A grade by .03. In all, Gulf Coast Medical Center saw an increase of 0.3127 for a 3.3532 raw score, Cape Coral Hospital increased 0.2690 for a 3.3180 raw score, Lee Memorial Hospital gained 0.8012 for a 3.1958 raw score and HealthPark Medical Center jumped 0.0419 for its 3.1273 raw score These scores are a testament to the efforts we have taken to reduce hospital-acquired infections and improve overall patient safety throughout the health system. There are safety coaches at every one of our hospitals trained to promote safe practices and empower staff to spot potentially dangerous situations, and we are committed to continuous improvement, said. K. Alex Daneshmand, DO, MBA, vice president, quality and patient safety. To learn more about Leapfrogs Fall 2018 Hospital Safety Grades, visit www.hospitalsafetygrade.org. deaRPharmacistIn Praise Of Pumpkins And Pumpkin Seedsby Suzy Cohen, RPhI love pumpkin spiced lattes and tea pumpkin seeds on my salad and pumpkin soup. Pumpkin pie, mmm! I love all of it. Pumpkins should be eaten because of their taste, plus all their healing benefits. Lets go over the seven most important nutrients found in pumpkins and their seeds. Alpha and Beta Carotene After eating pumpkin, your body converts the alpha carotene into vitamin A to help you maintain vision, a healthy immune system and a strong skeletal system. In a 2011 study, researchers confirmed that high concentrations of alpha carotene are strongly correlated with a reduced risk of all the following: cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and respiratory diseases. Another study found that those with high blood serum levels of alpha carotene were less likely to die from heart disease in their lifetime. This compound is very similar to beta carotene. Squalene This compound promotes both skin and eye health. You might not have heard about squalene, but this antioxidant acts similarly to beta-carotene, and it protects your skin from UV light damage and other forms of potentially dangerous radiation. There is also evidence that the compound is involved in retinal health. As pumpkin seeds are an excellent natural source of squalene, eating them helps with vision and beauty. Vitamin E Pumpkin seeds contain natural vitamin E including gamma tocopherol. Vitamin E protects the outside wall of our fragile cells and protects them from free radical damage. The gamma-tocopherol content of pumpkin seeds is particularly high, at 19 mg per 100-gram serving. Gamma tocopherol, we have recently learned, has powerful cancer protective properties, helping specifically with both colon and prostate cancer. Lignans Perhaps the most interesting and significant of the phytonutrients in pumpkin seeds are lignans. Lignans exhibit anti-estrogenic activity in the body, which help to balance hormones and protect the body against hormone-dependent cancers, like breast cancer. Lignans are also found in flax seed. Magnesium Pumpkin seeds are very high in magnesium, a mineral that half of U.S. adults under age 70 are deficient in. Magnesium is your relaxation mineral, because it induces a calm sensation. Tryptophan Eating pumpkins will make you happy. Theyre high in tryptophan which is an amino acid that converts in your body to the famous mood-boosting serotonin. This neurotransmitter is what SSRI drugs target too. And this is fascinating, a 2012 study found that pumpkin seed consumption was more effective at relieving depression than the prescribed antidepressant imipramine. Beta-cryptoxanthin Betacryptoxanthin is another carotenoid that we transform into vitamin A in the body. There is a study that suggests beta-cryptoxanthin has been found to reduce a persons chance of developing nicotine-induced lung cancer. So if youre a smoker, eat pumpkins! No matter what time of year, you can eat pumpkin seeds or use the oil. I praise pumpkins for their ability to fight inflammation, cancer, aging skin, poor vision, diabetes, lupus, lung issues, rheumatoid and multiple sclerosis. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. SuzyCohen.com. Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 25 Emergency . ............................................... 9 11 Lee County Sheriffs Ofce . .............................. 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol . ................................... 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol . .................................. 278-7100 Poison Control . ................................... 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center . ...................... 1-800-936-5321Ft .. Myers Chamber of Commerce . ......................... 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare . .......................... 4 25-2685 Fort Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce . ................... 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library . ............................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library . ................................ 5 33-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce . ........................ 931-0931 Post Ofce . ..................................... 1 -800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau . ............................ 3 38-3500ARTSAlliance for the Arts . .................................... 9 39-2787 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio . ............................ 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers . ............................... 275-3970 Barbara B .. Mann Performing Arts Hall . ...................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS . .......................................... 3 95-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre . .......................... 2 78-4422 Cultural Park Theatre . ................................... 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light . ................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade . ....................332-4488 Florida West Arts . ...................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers . ...................... 288-2535 Gulf Coast Symphony . .................................. 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres . ..................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic . ................................ 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater . ............................... 472-6862 SW Florida Symphony . .................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy . .................................... 936-3239 Young Artists Awards . ................................... 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAmerican Legion Post #38 . ........................... 2 39-332-1853 Angel Flight . .................................. 1 -877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center . .................................. 731-3535 American Business Women Association . .................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL . .................................... 3 39-8046 Audubon Society . ...................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR . ............................ 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society . ............................ 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus . ................... 1 -855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club . ................................. 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees . .............................. 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists . ................................. 415-2484 Embroiderers Guild of America Sea Grape Chapter . ...... 2 39-267-1990 FM UDC Chapter 2614 United Daughters of the Confederacy . ... 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL . .............................. 561-9164 Garden Club of Cape Coral . .......................... 2 39-257-2654 Horticulture and Tea Society . ............................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society . ................................... 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society . ......................... 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation . ........................ 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees . ......... 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America . ....................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL . ............................. 66 7-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans . ............................ 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy . ....................... 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association . ...................... 5 61-2118 Kiwanis Fort Myers Beach . .................... 7 65-4254 or 454-8090 Kiwanis Fort Myers Edison . .............................. 694-1056 Kiwanis Fort Myers South . ............................... 691-1405 Iona-McGregor . ....................................... 482-0869 Lions Club Fort Myers Beach . ............................. 463-9738 Lions Club Fort Myers High Noon . ......................... 466-4228 Lions Club Estero/South Fort Myers . ....................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County . ......................... 7 68-0417 Organ Transplant Recipients of SW Florida . .................. 247-3073 POLO Club of Lee County . ............................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers . ............................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society . ........................... 472-6940 United Way of Lee County . ............................... 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) . ................... 2 11 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews National Shell Museum . .................... 395-2233 Burroughs Home . ...................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium . ....................... 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates . ............................ 334-7419 Fort Myers Skate Park . .................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium . ................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge . .................. 4 72-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site . ......................... 2 39-992-0311 Langford Kingston Home . ............................ 239-334-2550 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center . .............. 765-8101 Skatium . ............................................. 3 21-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society . ...................... 93 9-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History . ...................... 321-7430 True Tours . .......................................... 94 5-0405 To be listed in calling card email your information to: press@riverweekly. .com PETS OF THE WEEKphotos provided Lee County Domestic Animal ServicesPenny And MojoPenny is a 1-year-old female pit bull mix who arrived at the shelter with spotty hair loss due to Demodex. She was treated for the condition and, after medications, medicated baths, good nutrition, less stress and plenty of TLC, she has been transformed. She even rocked the runway at the Fashion Show at the Fall Pet Fest. Come meet this absolutely delightful volunteer/staff favorite. Adoption fee is $40. Mojo is a 3-year-old male domestic shorthair who has been in foster care after having surgery on a leg. He is now completely healed and is now ready to find his new family. He is an overall quiet, laid-back cat. He likes things simple and quiet. He also loves his cat naps and loves to look out the window, so leave the blinds open. Free adoption for Mojo and other cats through November 30. The shelter is open to the public Monday through Saturday at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers. Adoptions are available 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For information, visit Lee County Domestic Animal Services at www.leegov.com/animalservices or call 533-7387. Penny ID# A757273 Mojo ID# A745380 Haven on Earth Animal LeagueTrixie And DylanHello, my name is Trixie. Im a beautiful 2-year-old female calico with a very sweet personality. I am very mellow and loving and would like a home to call my own. I have been fully vetted and brought up to date on all vaccines. My adoption fee is $55. Hi, Im Dylan. Arent I just adorable? Im only 8 months old, so Im quite the playful kitten. I like other cats and hope I can find a home with another young kitty to play with. Im neutered and up to date on all vaccines. My adoption fee is $100. We are being cared for by Haven on Earth Animal League. For more information, call Diane at 860-833-4472 or email havenonearthanimalleague@yahoo.com. Trixie Dylan PAWS Of SanibelBrava And LucyTwo very unusual and beautiful sisters are up for adoption. One is tortoiseshell cat with white or calico features, while the other is a dilute tortoiseshell. These photos do not do them justice, as they are much more adorable in person. Adopt one, or keep them together and adopt both. They are four and five months old. They come with complete vet check-up, all shots, tests, wormed, treated with flea preventative and spayed. Call Pam at PAWS at 472-4823 to adopt one or both. Sonny And CherThis is Sonny and Cher. Some of you may remember them. Three years ago, four kitties, the momma and three kittens were trapped between the Sunset Beach Resort and Lantana condominium on West Gulf Drive. All were adopted (Lana, Tanner, Sonny and Cher) to lovely people. However, Sonny and Chers mom has reached a time in her life when she feels she must move in with family over on Pine Island. Unfortunately, in addition to her granddaughter being allergic, her son operates a business out of his home that is directly on Pine Island Road and the doors are always opening and closing, so its not safe for kitties. These are very special kitties, and need to be together forever. Call Pam at 472-4823 if you can give these sweethearts a new home. Sonny Cher Brava Lucy PAWS Of SanibelKeep Pets Indoors submitted by Diane Barr, PAWS of SanibelHenrys story; a tale of caution for all pet owners on the islands: My name is Henry. I live on Casa Ybel Road. My grandmother came to bring my sick mom some soup, and I ran out the door. I was only outside 10 minutes before my mom found me, but I was attacked by a horrible monster. The doctor thinks it was a bobcat, but I dont know. I had never seen anything like it before, as this was my first (and last) trip outside. I got away and ran home to my mom. Ive been to many doctors offices, and had surgery, so the doctor could remove what remained of my eye. It hurts bad, but I feel very lucky. Please be extremely careful that your pets dont ever get out the door. It happens a lot when people drop by. You have people working in your house, or you have house guests. Its best to put pets in a room without access to the outside door whenever you think others will be coming and going. If at all possible, never allow your pets access to doors leading outside. Pets that get outside are killed very quickly by predators here on the islands. Do everything you can to protect them. They are counting on you to keep them alive and well. Henry

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 26 PUZZLESAnswers on page 29

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 27 FIND AT LEaAST S SIX D DIffFFERENCES BETWEEN PaANElLS SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 29answer on page 31 Wild Turkey Tikka Masala photo courtesy Fresh From FloridaWild Turkey Tikka Masala 2 wild turkey thighs (skin removed) 5 tomatoes, diced small cup bell pepper, diced small onion, diced small 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 cup chicken or vegetable broth 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, minced 3 tablespoons cilantro, roughly chopped cup heavy cream 1 teaspoon curry powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon cumin 1 teaspoon turmeric Oil, for cooking Sea salt and fresh ground pepper, to taste Preheat a large pan to medium-high heat and add 1 teaspoon oil. Season the turkey thighs with salt and pepper and sear on both sides. Remove from pan and set aside. Reduce heat to medium and add 1 teaspoon oil. Saut bell peppers and onion for two minutes, then add garlic and ginger. Saut for one more minute. Stir in tomato paste and mix well. Next add all the dry spices and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the tomatoes (do not drain) and broth, stirring to combine. Place the turkey thighs in the sauce. Bring to a boil then reduce to simmer and cover for two to three hours (cook time will depend on size of turkey thighs). Stir every thirty minutes. Add stock or water if liquid evaporates or gets low. When meat is tender and ready to serve, stir in heavy cream and cilantro. Serve over noodles or rice. Fresh From Florida food fact: Tikka Masala is an Indian dish traditionally served with chicken as the protein. We have adapted this recipe to use wild turkey.

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 29 KING CROSSWORD SUPER CROSSWORD MAGIC MAZE SUDOKU PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF NOVEMBER 26, 2018Aries (March 21 to April 19) A project benefits from your organizational skills that get it up and running. Your success leaves a highly favorable impression. Dont be surprised if you get some positive feedback soon. Taurus (April 20 to May 20) Spend time on practical matters through the end of the week. Then begin shifting your focus to more-artistic pursuits. Resist being overly self-critical. Just allow yourself to feel free to create. Gemini (May 21 To June 20) Restarting those creative projects you had set aside for a while will help provide a much-needed soothing balance to your hectic life. Besides, it will be like meeting old friends again. Cancer (June 21 to July 22) A change in plans could make it tough to keep a commitment. But stay with it. Youll get an A-plus for making the effort to do whats right and not taking the easy way out by running off. Leo (July 23 to August 22) The Lions enthusiasm for a workplace policy review is admirable. But be sure you know who is really behind the resistance to change before pointing your finger at the wrong person. Virgo (August 23 to September 22) You can expect to have to do a lot of work through midweek. Devote the rest of the week to checking your holiday plans in case some need to be adjusted to accommodate changes. Libra (September 23 to October 22) Try to avoid signing on the dotted line in the early part of the week. You need time to study issues that werent fully explored. Later in the week might be more favorable for decision-making. Scorpio (October 23 to November 21) A new development could snarl travel schedules or other holiday-linked projects. Some flexibility might be called for to deal with the problems before they get too far out of hand. Sagittarius (November 22 to December 21) Relatives seek your advice on a matter youd rather not be involved in. If so, use that sage Sagittarian tact to decline the offer, so that no ones feelings are needlessly hurt. Capricorn (December 22 to January 19) A shift in planning direction might help you speed up your progress toward achieving that long-planned goal. Trusted colleagues are ready to offer some valuable support. Aquarius (January 20 to February 18) An unexpected demand for settlement of an old loan could create some pre-holiday anxiety. But you might not really owe it. Check your records thoroughly before remitting payment. Pisces (February 19 to March 20) Its a good time to get into the social swim and enjoy some well-earned fun and games with those closest to you before you have to resume more serious activities next week. Born This Week: Your ability to sense the needs of others makes you a wise counselor for those seeking help with their problems. It was 20th-century American singer and songwriter Bobbie Gentry who made the following sage observation: Euphemism is a euphemism for lying. In a match between a 200-pound mountain lion and a 20-pound porcupine, the lion is likely to be the loser and probably will die if it tried to take a bite of the desired prey. The next time youre annoyed by a bad case of the hiccups, consider poor Charles Osborne. In 1922, when he was 28 years old, Mr. Osborne got the hiccups. For the next 68 years, he continued to hiccup, finally stopping in 1990, one year before his death at the age of 97. Marilyn Monroes iconic film Some Like It Hot (which in 2000 was named the greatest American comedy film of all time by the American Film Institute) originally was titled Not Tonight, Josephine! At one time the Catholic Church considered it sinful to eat a hot dog. For a nation based on a foundation of democracy, the U.S. certainly has a lot of states (that were originally colonies, of course) named for British royalty or nobility. The state of Virginia, for instance, was named for Queen Elizabeth I, known as the Virgin Queen; and Georgia was named in honor of King George II. King Charles II got both North and South Carolina, while the Duke of York and Albany later King James II was honored when the state of New York was named. Even France got in on the action: When explorer Robert de la Salle claimed a large chunk of territory for France in 1682, he named it Louisiana, after King Louis XIV. It is frequently the tragedy of the great artist, as it is of the great scientist, that he frightens the ordinary man. Loren Eiseley TRIVIA TEST 1. Ronald Reagan 2. The Irish Sea 3. Afrikaners 4. Manhattan 5. None. The state is divided into 64 parishes 6. 16 7. A pup 8. Archie 9. Kilo 10. David and Bathsheba. TRIVIA ANSWERS 1. U.S. Pr esidents: Which presidents Secret Service code name was Rawhide? 2. Geography : What body of water separates Ireland from England? 3. History : What are the descendants of Dutch settlers in South Africa called? 4. Food & Drink : What is the name of a drink that mixes rye whisky, sweet vermouth, a dash of bitters and a maraschino cherry? 5. U.S. States : How many counties does the state of Louisiana have? 6. Games : How many pieces per side are in a game of chess? 7. Animal Kingdom: What is a young bat called? 8. Comics : Which long-running comic-book series features characters called Jughead, Veronica and Betty? 9. Language : What is the international radio code word for the letter K? 10. Bible : Who were King Solomons parents? STRANGE BUT TRUE THOUGHT FOR THE DAY SUNDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 69 TUESDAYC loudy High: 79 Low: 66 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:07 pm6:53 amNone5:48 pm Sat12:08 am7:37 am3:02 pm6:16 pm Sun12:45 am8:26 am4:05 pm6:45 pm Mon1:28 am9:20 am5:17 pm7:22 pm Tue2:17 am10:19 am6:35 pm8:21 pm Wed3:15 am11:21 am7:34 pm10:11 pm Thu4:31 am12:24 pm8:13 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:27 pm7:13 amNone6:47 pm Sat12:11 am7:57 am2:19 pm7:27 pm Sun12:37 am8:43 am3:16 pm8:09 pm Mon1:12 am9:29 am4:11 pm8:54 pm Tue1:59 am10:16 am5:05 pm9:42 pm Wed3:04 am11:10 am6:01 pm10:46 pm Thu4:40 am12:17 pm6:56 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:12 pm6:55 am11:13 pm5:50 pm Sat2:07 pm7:39 am11:50 pm6:18 pm Sun3:10 pm8:28 amNone6:47 pm Mon12:33 am9:22 am4:22 pm7:24 pm Tue1:22 am10:21 am5:40 pm8:23 pm Wed2:20 am11:23 am6:39 pm10:13 pm Thu3:36 am12:26 pm7:18 pmNone Day High Low High Low Fri1:45 am10:09 am4:17 pm9:04 pm Sat2:18 am10:53 am5:12 pm9:32 pm Sun2:55 am11:42 am6:15 pm10:01 pm Mon3:38 am12:36 pm7:27 pm10:38 pm Tue4:27 am1:35 pm8:45 pm11:37 pm Wed5:25 am2:37 pm9:44 pmNone Thu6:41 am1:27 am10:23 pm3:40 pm WEDNESDAYMostly Sunny High: 82 Low: 70 MONDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 67 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 23, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 69 TUESDAYC loudy High: 79 Low: 66 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 71 Day High Low High Low Fri2:07 pm6:53 amNone5:48 pm Sat12:08 am7:37 am3:02 pm6:16 pm Sun12:45 am8:26 am4:05 pm6:45 pm Mon1:28 am9:20 am5:17 pm7:22 pm Tue2:17 am10:19 am6:35 pm8:21 pm Wed3:15 am11:21 am7:34 pm10:11 pm Thu4:31 am12:24 pm8:13 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:27 pm7:13 amNone6:47 pm Sat12:11 am7:57 am2:19 pm7:27 pm Sun12:37 am8:43 am3:16 pm8:09 pm Mon1:12 am9:29 am4:11 pm8:54 pm Tue1:59 am10:16 am5:05 pm9:42 pm Wed3:04 am11:10 am6:01 pm10:46 pm Thu4:40 am12:17 pm6:56 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:12 pm6:55 am11:13 pm5:50 pm Sat2:07 pm7:39 am11:50 pm6:18 pm Sun3:10 pm8:28 amNone6:47 pm Mon12:33 am9:22 am4:22 pm7:24 pm Tue1:22 am10:21 am5:40 pm8:23 pm Wed2:20 am11:23 am6:39 pm10:13 pm Thu3:36 am12:26 pm7:18 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:45 am10:09 am4:17 pm9:04 pm Sat2:18 am10:53 am5:12 pm9:32 pm Sun2:55 am11:42 am6:15 pm10:01 pm Mon3:38 am12:36 pm7:27 pm10:38 pm Tue4:27 am1:35 pm8:45 pm11:37 pm Wed5:25 am2:37 pm9:44 pmNone Thu6:41 am1:27 am10:23 pm3:40 pm WEDNESDAYMostly Sunny High: 82 Low: 70 MONDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 67 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 23, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 69 TUESDAYC loudy High: 79 Low: 66 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:07 pm6:53 amNone5:48 pm Sat12:08 am7:37 am3:02 pm6:16 pm Sun12:45 am8:26 am4:05 pm6:45 pm Mon1:28 am9:20 am5:17 pm7:22 pm Tue2:17 am10:19 am6:35 pm8:21 pm Wed3:15 am11:21 am7:34 pm10:11 pm Thu4:31 am12:24 pm8:13 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:27 pm7:13 amNone6:47 pm Sat12:11 am7:57 am2:19 pm7:27 pm Sun12:37 am8:43 am3:16 pm8:09 pm Mon1:12 am9:29 am4:11 pm8:54 pm Tue1:59 am10:16 am5:05 pm9:42 pm Wed3:04 am11:10 am6:01 pm10:46 pm Thu4:40 am12:17 pm6:56 pmNone Day High Low High Low Fri1:12 pm6:55 am11:13 pm5:50 pm Sat2:07 pm7:39 am11:50 pm6:18 pm Sun3:10 pm8:28 amNone6:47 pm Mon12:33 am9:22 am4:22 pm7:24 pm Tue1:22 am10:21 am5:40 pm8:23 pm Wed2:20 am11:23 am6:39 pm10:13 pm Thu3:36 am12:26 pm7:18 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:45 am10:09 am4:17 pm9:04 pm Sat2:18 am10:53 am5:12 pm9:32 pm Sun2:55 am11:42 am6:15 pm10:01 pm Mon3:38 am12:36 pm7:27 pm10:38 pm Tue4:27 am1:35 pm8:45 pm11:37 pm Wed5:25 am2:37 pm9:44 pmNone Thu6:41 am1:27 am10:23 pm3:40 pm WEDNESDAYMostly Sunny High: 82 Low: 70 MONDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 67 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 23, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 69 TUESDAYC loudy High: 79 Low: 66 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:07 pm6:53 amNone5:48 pm Sat12:08 am7:37 am3:02 pm6:16 pm Sun12:45 am8:26 am4:05 pm6:45 pm Mon1:28 am9:20 am5:17 pm7:22 pm Tue2:17 am10:19 am6:35 pm8:21 pm Wed3:15 am11:21 am7:34 pm10:11 pm Thu4:31 am12:24 pm8:13 pmNone Day High Low High Low Fri1:27 pm7:13 amNone6:47 pm Sat12:11 am7:57 am2:19 pm7:27 pm Sun12:37 am8:43 am3:16 pm8:09 pm Mon1:12 am9:29 am4:11 pm8:54 pm Tue1:59 am10:16 am5:05 pm9:42 pm Wed3:04 am11:10 am6:01 pm10:46 pm Thu4:40 am12:17 pm6:56 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:12 pm6:55 am11:13 pm5:50 pm Sat2:07 pm7:39 am11:50 pm6:18 pm Sun3:10 pm8:28 amNone6:47 pm Mon12:33 am9:22 am4:22 pm7:24 pm Tue1:22 am10:21 am5:40 pm8:23 pm Wed2:20 am11:23 am6:39 pm10:13 pm Thu3:36 am12:26 pm7:18 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:45 am10:09 am4:17 pm9:04 pm Sat2:18 am10:53 am5:12 pm9:32 pm Sun2:55 am11:42 am6:15 pm10:01 pm Mon3:38 am12:36 pm7:27 pm10:38 pm Tue4:27 am1:35 pm8:45 pm11:37 pm Wed5:25 am2:37 pm9:44 pmNone Thu6:41 am1:27 am10:23 pm3:40 pm WEDNESDAYMostly Sunny High: 82 Low: 70 MONDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 67 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 23, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 69 TUESDAYC loudy High: 79 Low: 66 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:07 pm6:53 amNone5:48 pm Sat12:08 am7:37 am3:02 pm6:16 pm Sun12:45 am8:26 am4:05 pm6:45 pm Mon1:28 am9:20 am5:17 pm7:22 pm Tue2:17 am10:19 am6:35 pm8:21 pm Wed3:15 am11:21 am7:34 pm10:11 pm Thu4:31 am12:24 pm8:13 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:27 pm7:13 amNone6:47 pm Sat12:11 am7:57 am2:19 pm7:27 pm Sun12:37 am8:43 am3:16 pm8:09 pm Mon1:12 am9:29 am4:11 pm8:54 pm Tue1:59 am10:16 am5:05 pm9:42 pm Wed3:04 am11:10 am6:01 pm10:46 pm Thu4:40 am12:17 pm6:56 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:12 pm6:55 am11:13 pm5:50 pm Sat2:07 pm7:39 am11:50 pm6:18 pm Sun3:10 pm8:28 amNone6:47 pm Mon12:33 am9:22 am4:22 pm7:24 pm Tue1:22 am10:21 am5:40 pm8:23 pm Wed2:20 am11:23 am6:39 pm10:13 pm Thu3:36 am12:26 pm7:18 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:45 am10:09 am4:17 pm9:04 pm Sat2:18 am10:53 am5:12 pm9:32 pm Sun2:55 am11:42 am6:15 pm10:01 pm Mon3:38 am12:36 pm7:27 pm10:38 pm Tue4:27 am1:35 pm8:45 pm11:37 pm Wed5:25 am2:37 pm9:44 pmNone Thu6:41 am1:27 am10:23 pm3:40 pm WEDNESDAYMostly Sunny High: 82 Low: 70 MONDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 67 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 23, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 69 TUESDAYC loudy High: 79 Low: 66 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:07 pm6:53 amNone5:48 pm Sat12:08 am7:37 am3:02 pm6:16 pm Sun12:45 am8:26 am4:05 pm6:45 pm Mon1:28 am9:20 am5:17 pm7:22 pm Tue2:17 am10:19 am6:35 pm8:21 pm Wed3:15 am11:21 am7:34 pm10:11 pm Thu4:31 am12:24 pm8:13 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:27 pm7:13 amNone6:47 pm Sat12:11 am7:57 am2:19 pm7:27 pm Sun12:37 am8:43 am3:16 pm8:09 pm Mon1:12 am9:29 am4:11 pm8:54 pm Tue1:59 am10:16 am5:05 pm9:42 pm Wed3:04 am11:10 am6:01 pm10:46 pm Thu4:40 am12:17 pm6:56 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:12 pm6:55 am11:13 pm5:50 pm Sat2:07 pm7:39 am11:50 pm6:18 pm Sun3:10 pm8:28 amNone6:47 pm Mon12:33 am9:22 am4:22 pm7:24 pm Tue1:22 am10:21 am5:40 pm8:23 pm Wed2:20 am11:23 am6:39 pm10:13 pm Thu3:36 am12:26 pm7:18 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:45 am10:09 am4:17 pm9:04 pm Sat2:18 am10:53 am5:12 pm9:32 pm Sun2:55 am11:42 am6:15 pm10:01 pm Mon3:38 am12:36 pm7:27 pm10:38 pm Tue4:27 am1:35 pm8:45 pm11:37 pm Wed5:25 am2:37 pm9:44 pmNone Thu6:41 am1:27 am10:23 pm3:40 pm WEDNESDAYMostly Sunny High: 82 Low: 70 MONDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 67 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 23, 2018 7-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 69 TUESDAYC loudy High: 79 Low: 66 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:07 pm6:53 amNone5:48 pm Sat12:08 am7:37 am3:02 pm6:16 pm Sun12:45 am8:26 am4:05 pm6:45 pm Mon1:28 am9:20 am5:17 pm7:22 pm Tue2:17 am10:19 am6:35 pm8:21 pm Wed3:15 am11:21 am7:34 pm10:11 pm Thu4:31 am12:24 pm8:13 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:27 pm7:13 amNone6:47 pm Sat12:11 am7:57 am2:19 pm7:27 pm Sun12:37 am8:43 am3:16 pm8:09 pm Mon1:12 am9:29 am4:11 pm8:54 pm Tue1:59 am10:16 am5:05 pm9:42 pm Wed3:04 am11:10 am6:01 pm10:46 pm Thu4:40 am12:17 pm6:56 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:12 pm6:55 am11:13 pm5:50 pm Sat2:07 pm7:39 am11:50 pm6:18 pm Sun3:10 pm8:28 amNone6:47 pm Mon12:33 am9:22 am4:22 pm7:24 pm Tue1:22 am10:21 am5:40 pm8:23 pm Wed2:20 am11:23 am6:39 pm10:13 pm Thu3:36 am12:26 pm7:18 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:45 am10:09 am4:17 pm9:04 pm Sat2:18 am10:53 am5:12 pm9:32 pm Sun2:55 am11:42 am6:15 pm10:01 pm Mon3:38 am12:36 pm7:27 pm10:38 pm Tue4:27 am1:35 pm8:45 pm11:37 pm Wed5:25 am2:37 pm9:44 pmNone Thu6:41 am1:27 am10:23 pm3:40 pm WEDNESDAYMostly Sunny High: 82 Low: 70 MONDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 67 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 23, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 69 TUESDAYC loudy High: 79 Low: 66 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:07 pm6:53 amNone5:48 pm Sat12:08 am7:37 am3:02 pm6:16 pm Sun12:45 am8:26 am4:05 pm6:45 pm Mon1:28 am9:20 am5:17 pm7:22 pm Tue2:17 am10:19 am6:35 pm8:21 pm Wed3:15 am11:21 am7:34 pm10:11 pm Thu4:31 am12:24 pm8:13 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:27 pm7:13 amNone6:47 pm Sat12:11 am7:57 am2:19 pm7:27 pm Sun12:37 am8:43 am3:16 pm8:09 pm Mon1:12 am9:29 am4:11 pm8:54 pm Tue1:59 am10:16 am5:05 pm9:42 pm Wed3:04 am11:10 am6:01 pm10:46 pm Thu4:40 am12:17 pm6:56 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:12 pm6:55 am11:13 pm5:50 pm Sat2:07 pm7:39 am11:50 pm6:18 pm Sun3:10 pm8:28 amNone6:47 pm Mon12:33 am9:22 am4:22 pm7:24 pm Tue1:22 am10:21 am5:40 pm8:23 pm Wed2:20 am11:23 am6:39 pm10:13 pm Thu3:36 am12:26 pm7:18 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:45 am10:09 am4:17 pm9:04 pm Sat2:18 am10:53 am5:12 pm9:32 pm Sun2:55 am11:42 am6:15 pm10:01 pm Mon3:38 am12:36 pm7:27 pm10:38 pm Tue4:27 am1:35 pm8:45 pm11:37 pm Wed5:25 am2:37 pm9:44 pmNone Thu6:41 am1:27 am10:23 pm3:40 pm WEDNESDAYMostly Sunny High: 82 Low: 70 MONDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 67 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 23, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 69 TUESDAYC loudy High: 79 Low: 66 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:07 pm6:53 amNone5:48 pm Sat12:08 am7:37 am3:02 pm6:16 pm Sun12:45 am8:26 am4:05 pm6:45 pm Mon1:28 am9:20 am5:17 pm7:22 pm Tue2:17 am10:19 am6:35 pm8:21 pm Wed3:15 am11:21 am7:34 pm10:11 pm Thu4:31 am12:24 pm8:13 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:27 pm7:13 amNone6:47 pm Sat12:11 am7:57 am2:19 pm7:27 pm Sun12:37 am8:43 am3:16 pm8:09 pm Mon1:12 am9:29 am4:11 pm8:54 pm Tue1:59 am10:16 am5:05 pm9:42 pm Wed3:04 am11:10 am6:01 pm10:46 pm Thu4:40 am12:17 pm6:56 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:12 pm6:55 am11:13 pm5:50 pm Sat2:07 pm7:39 am11:50 pm6:18 pm Sun3:10 pm8:28 amNone6:47 pm Mon12:33 am9:22 am4:22 pm7:24 pm Tue1:22 am10:21 am5:40 pm8:23 pm Wed2:20 am11:23 am6:39 pm10:13 pm Thu3:36 am12:26 pm7:18 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:45 am10:09 am4:17 pm9:04 pm Sat2:18 am10:53 am5:12 pm9:32 pm Sun2:55 am11:42 am6:15 pm10:01 pm Mon3:38 am12:36 pm7:27 pm10:38 pm Tue4:27 am1:35 pm8:45 pm11:37 pm Wed5:25 am2:37 pm9:44 pmNone Thu6:41 am1:27 am10:23 pm3:40 pm WEDNESDAYMostly Sunny High: 82 Low: 70 MONDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 67 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 23, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 69 TUESDAYC loudy High: 79 Low: 66 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:07 pm6:53 amNone5:48 pm Sat12:08 am7:37 am3:02 pm6:16 pm Sun12:45 am8:26 am4:05 pm6:45 pm Mon1:28 am9:20 am5:17 pm7:22 pm Tue2:17 am10:19 am6:35 pm8:21 pm Wed3:15 am11:21 am7:34 pm10:11 pm Thu4:31 am12:24 pm8:13 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:27 pm7:13 amNone6:47 pm Sat12:11 am7:57 am2:19 pm7:27 pm Sun12:37 am8:43 am3:16 pm8:09 pm Mon1:12 am9:29 am4:11 pm8:54 pm Tue1:59 am10:16 am5:05 pm9:42 pm Wed3:04 am11:10 am6:01 pm10:46 pm Thu4:40 am12:17 pm6:56 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:12 pm6:55 am11:13 pm5:50 pm Sat2:07 pm7:39 am11:50 pm6:18 pm Sun3:10 pm8:28 amNone6:47 pm Mon12:33 am9:22 am4:22 pm7:24 pm Tue1:22 am10:21 am5:40 pm8:23 pm Wed2:20 am11:23 am6:39 pm10:13 pm Thu3:36 am12:26 pm7:18 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:45 am10:09 am4:17 pm9:04 pm Sat2:18 am10:53 am5:12 pm9:32 pm Sun2:55 am11:42 am6:15 pm10:01 pm Mon3:38 am12:36 pm7:27 pm10:38 pm Tue4:27 am1:35 pm8:45 pm11:37 pm Wed5:25 am2:37 pm9:44 pmNone Thu6:41 am1:27 am10:23 pm3:40 pm WEDNESDAYMostly Sunny High: 82 Low: 70 MONDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 67 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 23, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 69 TUESDAYC loudy High: 79 Low: 66 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:07 pm6:53 amNone5:48 pm Sat12:08 am7:37 am3:02 pm6:16 pm Sun12:45 am8:26 am4:05 pm6:45 pm Mon1:28 am9:20 am5:17 pm7:22 pm Tue2:17 am10:19 am6:35 pm8:21 pm Wed3:15 am11:21 am7:34 pm10:11 pm Thu4:31 am12:24 pm8:13 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:27 pm7:13 amNone6:47 pm Sat12:11 am7:57 am2:19 pm7:27 pm Sun12:37 am8:43 am3:16 pm8:09 pm Mon1:12 am9:29 am4:11 pm8:54 pm Tue1:59 am10:16 am5:05 pm9:42 pm Wed3:04 am11:10 am6:01 pm10:46 pm Thu4:40 am12:17 pm6:56 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:12 pm6:55 am11:13 pm5:50 pm Sat2:07 pm7:39 am11:50 pm6:18 pm Sun3:10 pm8:28 amNone6:47 pm Mon12:33 am9:22 am4:22 pm7:24 pm Tue1:22 am10:21 am5:40 pm8:23 pm Wed2:20 am11:23 am6:39 pm10:13 pm Thu3:36 am12:26 pm7:18 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri1:45 am10:09 am4:17 pm9:04 pm Sat2:18 am10:53 am5:12 pm9:32 pm Sun2:55 am11:42 am6:15 pm10:01 pm Mon3:38 am12:36 pm7:27 pm10:38 pm Tue4:27 am1:35 pm8:45 pm11:37 pm Wed5:25 am2:37 pm9:44 pmNone Thu6:41 am1:27 am10:23 pm3:40 pm WEDNESDAYMostly Sunny High: 82 Low: 70 MONDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 68 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 67 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 23, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 30 www.islandsunnews.com PLACE CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED REAL ESTATEGARCIA REAL ESTATE AND CONSULTINGRICHARD J. GARCIA, GRI, BROKER239-472-5147garciaonsanibel.com 4/29 TFN COMMERCIAL RENTALWONDERFUL RENTAL IN POPULAR LOCATION ON SANIBEL 8/5 TFN COMMERCIAL UNIT FOR RENT 7/13 TFN OFFICE SPACE IN DESIRABLE TREE TOPS CENTER 10/12 11/30 SERVICES OFFEREDROGER NODRUFF ELECTRIC 4/20 TFN HELP WANTEDFAMILY OFFICE SERVICES ASSOCIATE Job Description: Job Responsibilities: 11/16 11/23 GARAGE SALEYARD SALE 11/16 11/23 HELP WANTEDJERRYS FOODS SERVERS & BARISTAS 5/6 TFN SANIBEL PUBLIC LIBRARYLIBRARY TECHNOLOGY ASSISTANT 11/9 11/30 PART TIME DATA/CONFIRMATION PROCESSOR 11/9 TFN OCCASIONAL CLEANING HELP NEEDED 11/23 TFN SERVICES OFFEREDSCARNATO LAWN SERVICE 1/25 TFN HELLES CLEANING SERVICES 1/4 TFN PROFESSIONAL CAR WASH & WAX & DETAIL BY HAND 10/12 TFN 239-896-6789 4/13 TFN ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTALSANIBEL 472-6747Gulf Beach Properties, Inc. 11/2 TFNROOMMATE WANTED 10/26 TFN SANIBEL DUNES ANNUAL RENTAL 11/23 TFN ANNUAL RENTALANNUAL RENTAL ON SANIBEL 10/19 TFN SANIBEL ISLAND ANNUAL RENTALS 11/9 TFN SANIBEL SEASONAL RENTAL AVAILABLE FEBRUARY, MARCH & APRIL, 2019 11/23 TFN SEASONAL RENTAL VACATION RENTAL 1/26 TFN Island VacationsMillion $ Views Await You! 239-472-72771-888-451-72771/4 TFN ADORABLE BEACH COTTAGE 11/23 11/30

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 2018 31 Top 10 Real Estate SalesCourtesy of Royal Shell Real Estate SCRAMBLERS Art League EventsArt League of Fort Myers (ALFM) will be holding a Community Art Montage during Art Walk on Friday, December 7 from 6 to 9 p.m. The public is invited to help paint, draw and apply whatever to the leagues mixed media canvas. Each person adds a little of what art means to them. The final piece will be displayed in various locations around Fort Myers. The Art League of Fort Myers will also be hosting a two-show reception on Friday titled Holiday Arts and Artist of the Month Jana Smith. Members will also hold Open Studio on Wednesdays from 9:30 a.m. to noon. Learn about and sign up for classes. Art League of Fort Myers is located at 1451 Monroe Street in downtown Fort Myers. For more information, visit www.artleagueoffortmyers.org or call 275-3970. Animal Shelter Gains Guidestar Platinum LevelCape Coral Animal Shelter (CCAS) recently earned the 2018 Platinum GuideStar Nonprofit Profile Seal of Transparency, the highest level of recognition offered by GuideStar, the worlds largest source of nonprofit information. We are excited to convey Cape Coral Animal Shelters results in a user-friendly and highly visual manner, said Board President JoAnn Elardo. Our organizations foundation is based on being transparent about our work. By updating our GuideStar Nonprofit Profile to the platinum level, we can now easily share a wealth of up-to-date organizational metrics with our supporters as well as GuideStars immense online audience, which includes donors, grantmakers, our peers and the media. To reach the platinum level, CCAS added extensive information to its nonprofit profile on GuideStar: basic contact and organizational information; in-depth financial information; qualitative information about goals, strategies and capabilities; and quantitative information about results and progress toward its mission. By taking the time to provide this information, CCAS has demonstrated its commitment to transparency and to giving donors and funders meaningful data about the organization. Leftover Cooking Oil DisposalLee County Solid Waste Division officials would like to remind residents of the countys cooking oil recycling program. While many families deep fry turkey over the holidays, disposing of the leftover cooking oil does not have to be a challenge. Residents may deliver liquid cooking oils at no charge to the Household Hazardous Waste Facility located at 6441 Topaz Court from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 8 a.m. to noon on the first Saturday of each month. Transport used oils or grease in sealed, unbreakable, leak-proof containers. This service is available year-round. Never pour cooking oil and grease down the kitchens drain. This causes costly problems for a homes plumbing and the countys sewer plants. In addition, do not dispose of cooking oil in regular garbage collection. This may cause spillage on roadways and make it unsafe for your neighbors and collection crews. Lee County Solid Waste administrative offices will be closed for the Thanksgiving holiday on Thursday, November 22 and Friday, November 23 and will reopen on Monday, November 26. For more information about recycling and waste disposal, contact Lee County Solid Waste at 533-8000 or visit www. leegov.com/solidwaste. Hortoons Subdivision City Year BuiltSquare FootageListing Price Selling Price Days On Market Carolands Bonita Springs 2001 4,695 $2,749,000 $2,450,000 273 Laurel Oaks At West Bay Club Estero 2007 5,071 $1,795,000 $1,705,000 48 Cape Coral Cape Coral 2018 2,900 $1,694,000 $1,625,000 259 Sunset Captiva Captiva 1979 2,218 $1,049,000 $950,000 307 Beachview Country Club Estates Sanibel 1984 2,265 $969,000 $935,000 14 Glenview At Shadow Wood Estero 2002 3,021 $935,000 $870,000 4 Cape Coral Cape Coral 2018 2,653 $899,000 $865,000 34 Cape Coral Cape Coral 2018 2,427 $868,000 $800,000 94 San Carlos Estates Bonita Springs 2016 2,347 $749,900 $720,000 148 Siesta Isles Fort Myers Beach 1985 1,901 $734,000 $670,000 267

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 23, 201832