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River weekly news

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Title:
River weekly news
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, FL
Publisher:
Lorin Arundel and Ken Rasi- Co-Publishers
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Copyright Date:
2010
Language:
English

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newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Lee -- Fort Myers
Coordinates:
26.64328 x -81.868953

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright River Weekly News. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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FREETake Me Home VOL. 17, NO. 45 NOVEMBER 9, 2018From the Beaches to the River District downtown Fort Myers A Festive Evening At Theatre Conspiracy by Di SaggauTheatre Conspiracy held its 20th annual New Play Contest fundraiser November 3 at the Alliance for the Arts, and it was a splendid gathering of loyal supporters and actors. The evening began at 7 p.m. with a reception that in cluded a variety of appetizers. The crowd mingled with old and new friends and everyone had a great time. By 8 p.m. we were all seated inside the Foulds Theatre looking forward to actors reading from the three final plays. Artistic Director Bill Taylor welcomed the crowd and told us they had over 600 entries from around the world, including Canada, England and Brazil. The list was then pared down to the final three. They were: Flying by Sheila Cowley of St. Petersburg, Florida; Americas Sexiest Couple by Ken Levine from Los Angeles, California; and Engagement Rules by Rich Orloff from New York. The audience definitely favored the last two plays, which were comedies and had us laughing out loud. The final tally put Engagement Rules at the top of the list. Its about two couples one young, one much older and how they advise and support one another on various subjects, including love, sex and the soul. It will be performed in the near future at Theatre Conspiracy. Taylor told us he also plans to eventually show Americas Sexiest Couple which pleased the crowd. Theatre Conspiracy is in its 25th consecutive season. Taylor told the crowd that Bruce and Janet Bunch, who werecontinued on page 23 From left, Lyn and Jim Yarnes with Renee Burns From left, Vicki Triolo, Vicki Shankland, Judi Braid and Lydia Black photos by Di Saggau by Jeff LysiakOne of the best ways that local foodies can experience samples of some of Sanibel and Captivas most eclectic and delicious cuisine is during Taste of the Islands, the annual fundraiser for the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW). On Sunday, November 11 from 12:30 to 5 p.m., this years lineup of 13 island restaurants will showcase some of their tastiest menu items at Sanibel Community Park. We have an amazing lineup of restaurants this year, said Linda Estep, executive director for CROW. This is a great opportunity for the community to come together to support each other after being hit hard with the effects of red tide this summer. The 37th edition of Taste of the Islands will feature Blue Giraffe, The Bubble Room, The Clam Shack, Doc Fords Rum continued on page 16 Crowds gathered at Sanibel Community Park for last years Taste of the Islands photo by Jeff Lysiak Free Admission For Veterans At The EstatesEdison and Ford Winter Estates is offering free admission to United States veterans and one guest on Veterans Day, November 11 and on Monday, November 12. Free admission includes a self-guided audio tour of the historic homes, gardens, laboratory and museum. To receive free admission, veterans must present a VA identification card or their DD214 papers. Edison and Ford Winter Estates, the internationally known winter home site of Thomas Edison and Henry Ford, is open from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. seven days a week. More than 250,000 visitors walk continued on page 21 Thomas Edisons personal vehicle is one of the antique cars at the estates photo provided Taste Of The Islands This Sunday Veterans Day Sunday, November 11

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 20182 Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: WWI Ends, Influenza Takes Hold by Gerri Reaves, PhDThe biggest news in November 1918 was the Armistice, which ended World War I (WWI), the War to End All Wars. A cease-fire agreement was signed at Germany at Rethondes, France, at 5 a.m. and went into effect six hours later at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month (now called Veterans Day). The war had begun in Europe in August 1914, but the U.S. did not enter it until April 1917 after declaring war on Germany and its allies. Even so, more than 320,000 Americans died, were wounded, taken prisoner, or declared missing. An estimated 9 million people died worldwide. Put those grim statistics against those from another international event that spread misery and death: the 1918 influenza pandemic. Even as the final weeks of WWI were being waged a century ago, the Spanish flu, as it was called, was poised to take center stage in the publics attention. (Note: The epidemic did not originate in Spain.) To put the 1918 pandemic in perspective, consider these statistics from the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC): An estimated 500 million people, about one-third of the worlds population, became infected with the influenza virus. An estimated 50 million people died worldwide, about 675,000 of those in the U.S. The close quarters of WWI troops and their movements helped to spread the virus. In this country, it was first detected in military camps in spring 1918. That was the start of the first of three waves. The second and worst wave, ran from September to November 1918. Fortunately, the influenza outbreak in Fort Myers was not as severe as in many other parts of the country. Nevertheless, there were plenty of infections and some deaths. By early October, Fort Myers was forced to take measures to control the epidemic. Gathering in groups was discouraged because of the fear of contagion. Interestingly enough, it was generally lamented that the outbreak hampered Liberty Loan campaigns in support of the war. The Fort Myers Womans Club, among other organizations, cancelled meetings. By mid-October, the public schools and churches, as well as the Arcade Theatre, closed temporarily as a precaution. The theater reopened several weeks later, announcing that that it had undergone a thorough fumigation with formaldehyde. During the second half of October, cases increased and the Fort Myers Press published announcements about people traveling out of town to the bedsides of flu-stricken loved ones. By the third week of that month, the Press optimistically stated that despite the many cases of flu, there had been no fatalities. Credit was given to the grand climate and local doctors. However, within days, that optimism was proven unwarranted by the deaths of Mrs. RS Gillis of Hoople Street; school teacher Juliette Odom (Mrs. Fred) Menge; DC Dennie, proprietor of the Leon Hotel (from heart complications after influenza); and two-year-old Drane Albert Corbett. By the beginning of November, entire families were sick and helpless. Fortunately, Lee Memorial Hospital had opened in October 1916 -well-timed to offer some comfort during the epidemic. Even though the two-story square building resembling a screened-in Florida porch had only four patient rooms and was somewhat rudimentary, it was reassuring to the community. After all, it was the only hospital the area had had since the long-gone circa-1850 U.S. Army Fort Myers. By October 1917, a new hospital (south) wing had been erected, thus increasing patient load. Volunteer community support could be organized through the hospital. On October 27, the chairman of the Civilian Relief Committee called for volunteer nurses, characterizing the work as a chance to demonstrate ones idea of practical Christianity. Potential volunteers were asked to contact Supt. Edith Davidson at Lee Memorial. A few days later, the call for volunteers was repeated, and anyone who could make soup was asked to contact Mrs. Walter P. Franklin, the mayors wife. The lack of scientific understanding about the virus or how it spread added to the distress. Viruses were not yet discovered and there were no diagnostic tests or vaccines. There were not even antibiotics to treat secondary bacterial infections like pneumonia from which many sufferers died. Prevention consisted mainly of isolation, quarantine, good hygiene, disinfectants and limiting or avoiding public gatherings. Children in some parts of the state wore masks to school to prevent spreading the virus. Phrases such as droplet infection appeared in posters printed by the U.S. Public continued on page 8 Much of the lawn of the former hospital site is now the rear parking area for the Lee County Sheriffs Office, Civil Division photo by Gerri Reaves The first Lee Memorial Hospital opened in October 1916 at Grand and Victoria Avenues. Originally a two-story square building with only four patient rooms and 10 beds, it had added two wings by 1920, as pictured here. Volunteers organized through the hospital aided in the 1918 influenza pandemic. photo courtesy Florida State Archives PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, call 239-395-1213 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1640 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2, Sanibel FL 33957. FAX number: 239-395-2299. Email: press@islandsunnews.com. Email: ads@islandsunnews.com The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Contributing Writers Jennifer Basey Barbara Cacchione Kay Casperson Suzy Cohen Linda Coin Marcia Feeney Ed Frank Shelley Greggs Tom Hall Marion Hauser, MS, RDRoss Hauser, MD Capt. Matt Mitchell Trinette Nelson J. Brendan Ryan, CLU, ChFC, MSFS Di Saggau Jeanie TinchPublisher Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Bob Petcher Graphic Arts/ Production Ann Ziehl, Manager Amanda Hartman Justin Wilder Reporters Gerri Reaves, PhD Jeff LysiakIndependently Owned And Operated COPYRIGHT 2018 The River Weekly NewsLORKEN Publications, Inc.Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com

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3 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018Alliance Campus Enrichment Project BeginsThe Alliance for the Arts has announced the start of its multiphase campus enchainment project planned for the 2.2 acres along McGregor Boulevard. The first phase of this project comes in partnership with the Florida Department of Transportation: an installation of an 8-foot sidewalk, new crosswalks and lighting along the boulevard edge of the campus. The reimagination of the western edge of our campus goes hand in hand with our rapid growth over the last decade. More than a place to play, we see a community hub for discovery and creativity, education and adventure; a place where people, art and imagination meet, said executive director Lydia Black. Were creating a front door for our friends and neighbors to bike, walk and stroll to join us at the Alliance. These updates will help make our community more walkable, livable and accessible. Following the completion of the sidewalk installation, the Alliance and its project partners will begin on the campus centerpiece, the Caloosahatchee Water Wall by internationally acclaimed artist Michael Singer. In addition to being an aesthetic and educational piece, the Caloosahatchee Water Wall is designed to be a storm water run-off filter, using aeration and aquatic vegetation at its base to filter water in the retention basin. Water is pumped up from the retention basin; the water trickles down the trellis and into the regeneration zone. The filtered water re-enters the basin and eventually makes its way out to the Caloosahatchee. Funding for this project has been made possible by The City of Fort Myers, EnSite, Frizzell Family Foundation, Keep Lee County Beautiful, LAT Foundation, The Price Foundation, LCEC, National Endowment of the Arts, Price Foundation, Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, Rotary Club of Fort Myers South, TriCircle Pavers and a host of Alliance donors and members. For more information, visit www. artinlee.org/waterwall or call 939-2787. Signage shows visual details of the enrichment project photo provided Broadway Pops To PerformShell Point Retirement Community will kick off the performing arts program of its 2018-19 Fine and Performing Arts Series with The Golden Years of Broadway at The Village Church auditorium on The Island at Shell Point on Thursday, November 15 at 7 p.m. Join Broadway Pops veterans Jennifer Hope Wills, Sean MacLaughlin and Rob Gallagher, with New York City-based orchestrator and arranger Ryan Shirar, as they bring The Golden Years of Broadway to life. The musical group will include hit songs that set the standards for American musical theater, including Oklahoma! South Pacific, The King & I and The Sound of Music. Tickets are $40 and can be purchased online at www.shellpoint.org/concerts or by phone at 454-2067. Throughout the performance, Broadway Pops will captivate audiences with their entertaining and innovative production and more than 10 hit classics from the 1940s and 1950s era. The Island at Shell Point is located at 15100 Shell Point Boulevard in Fort Myers. Jennifer Hope Wills Sean MacLaughlin Rob Gallagher Ryan Shirar 8791 Melosia St #8302 Paseo community Ft. Myers Elegant split level Santa Monica turnkey townhome; Florida Native-Local Expert-Realtor SCISvalerie@valerietutor.com yoursanibelhomes.com 239-834-8141Kingsher Real Estate, Inc 2402 Palm Ridge Rd Sanibel FL 33957Paseo!! Southwind Preserve!11331 Long Road Ft Myers Turnkey! Turnkey! School Choir To Sing At LuncheonThe Southwest Florida Symphony Society will hear holiday songs and other selections by the Chamber Choir of the North Fort Myers Academy of the Arts at its luncheon on Friday, December 7. The 27 choir members are students at the K-8 Lee County school, under the direction of teacher Stacy McDonald. Principal Dr. Thomas Millins will also add comments about the focus of this unique school. Cost is $25 per person, payable by cash, check or credit card at the door. To reserve, call 666-1230 by Friday, November 30. For more information, call 418-0996 or visit www.swflso.org.

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 20184 Cool moves, cool music, total body, low impact. Dance tness, group exercise, contemporary movement, step aerobics, body sculpting. 2nd Saturday of the month! Ballroom, Latin, Swing. 6 p.m. lesson followed by open dancing. Foxtrot, waltz, rumba, cha-cha, tango, swing, and more! Private lessons, and beginner, intermediate, and advanced group lessons. No partner needed. Boutique-style group exercise and dance studio. Unique classes, friendly and inviting atmosphere.Fitness with Flair @ Royal Palm Square Mastersingers To Open Season This SundayThe Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers Chamber Chorus, under the direction of Artistic Director Jeff Faux, opens the groups 18th season with Shall We Dance, an afternoon of singing and dancing in collaboration with dancers from the M&N Dance Studio. The concert will be held at Sanibel Community Church, located at 1740 Periwinkle Way, on Sunday, November 11 at 3 p.m. Admission is free, and a goodwill offering will be taken during the performance. Music for the performance will include familiar Broadway show tunes, contemporary choral pieces with dance themes, and the Brahms Liebeslieder Waltzes. Dancers from the M&N Dance Studio will accompany many of these numbers with waltzes, tangos and other dances. In addition, there will be a demonstration of dance steps and a time for audience participation. Best known for performances of wellknown masterworks, the Mastersingers also presents innovative concerts like their Night at the Movies, featuring well-known music from films, a concert of three world premiere pieces, or accompanying a screening of Star Wars at Germain Arena. We like to add some different programming to our season schedule. It seemed that combining our talents with dancers was a natural fit. Choral music and dance are unique in that these forms of expression use only the human body to communicate. This concert will combine these two art forms in a unique and fascinating way that will be inspiring and entertaining to our audience, said Faux. Martin Cardoso of the M&N Studio said, This is a wonderful opportunity for us. We dont often get the chance to dance to live music. It should be a great experience for all of us. The singing and dancing will be accompanied by pianists Janet Carter and Judy Richey. Carter is the longtime Mastersingers accompanist having played for the group since its inception. Richey is a teacher at Evangelical Christian School and has worked with many choral ensembles in the area. For more information, visit www. mastersingersfm.com. Mastersingers Chamber Chorus photo provided Providing Custom Interiors to Sanibel & Captiva for 28 years Complimentary In-Home Consultation695 Tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel, FL 33957 coin.decoratingden.com 239.472.6551 Science Museum Day At CenterThe IMAG History & Science Center will host International Science Center and Science Museum Day on Saturday, November 10 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event will begin in the IMAG Theater-in-the-Tank at 11 a.m. with a live science show using Enviroscape, a watershed model demonstration. At 11:30 a.m., there will be a talk sponsored by Ensite and Greenprint, local firms known for their expertise in landscape architecture, design and engineering and urban planning. The talk will focus on sustainable landscape design and practices to minimize negative impact on water quality. This will be followed by a question-and-answer session under the FPL SolarNow Pavilion. Hands-on activities about water quality will be held between 12:30 and 2 p.m. Check out our Backyard Nature exhibit to learn how you can reduce water pollutants starting with your own backyard. International Science Center and Science Museum Day is an annual, global event to illustrate the impact of science museums across the world in education, sustainability, human health and other global matters. This years focus is on Science, a Human Right and global understanding to demonstrate science as a bridge in our local communities as well as internationally. Hogs And Air Dogs WeekendGulf Coast Humane Society (GCHS) is inviting animal lovers and their furry friends to Hogs and Air Dogs, an action-packed weekend at Six Bends Harley-Davidson in Fort Myers from November 9 to 11. The event will have several fun activities for the entire family, including Dock Jumping and Doxie Races, from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. each day. K9 competitors and their handlers will travel to Six Bends Harley-Davidson from around the nation for the National Dock Jumping competition, the activity popularly seen on the Purina Incredible Dog Challenge. The public can also bring their furry athletes to try their dock-jumping skillset. Pre-registration is suggested and available online at www.hogsandairdogs. com, although not required to participate. The goal of the event is to raise funds for GCHS through sponsorship and vendors. There are sponsor levels available to fit a wide array of budgetary and promotional considerations, and all funding will support the no-kill shelter that rescues and cares for more than 1,500 animals in need every year. Sponsorship opportunities include Ultimate Air at $2,000; Big Air $1,000; Splash $500; and Puddle $250. All sponsorship and vendor space are on a first come basis. Visit www.hogsandairdogs.com for more event and sponsorship details.

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5 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018 11239 BIENVENIDA CT. #11C, FT. MYERS Superb Residence, Golf Course View $579,900 MLS 218070735 Roger Vaught 310.529.0707 GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC 18548 DEEP PASSAGE LN., FT. MYERS BEACH Large Bayfront Lot, SW Exposure $1,500,000 MLS 217053397 Ed Biddison 239.218.7444 SIESTA ISLES 4223 BAY BEACH LN. #A2, FT. MYERS BEACH 3 BR, 2 BA, Furnished, Estero Bay Views$349,000 MLS 218071956 Tina Tusack 239.634.3810 THE PALMS OF BAY BEACH 11321 LONGWATER CHASE CT., FT. MYERS Partial Lake Views $882,000 MLS 218070851 Patti Testa 239.770.5445 GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC 11340 LONGWATER CHASE CT., FT. MYERS 4 BR, 3.5 BA, Panoramic River Views $2,599,000 MLS 216077439 McMurray & Nette 239.850.7888 GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC 13950 BLENHEIM TRAIL RD., FT. MYERS Gated Community, 24-Hour Security $329,000 MLS 218043225 McMurray & Nette 239.850.7888 ST. CHARLES HARBOUR 7233 SAINT ANNS CT., FT. MYERS 3 BR, 2 BA Stand-Alone Condo $204,900 MLS 218053409 Gary Davis 239.478.6601 PEPPERTREE POINTE 13856 RIVER FOREST DR., FT. MYERS Riverfront, Pool, Large Dock $499,998 MLS 218056441Bradford Bateman, GulfHomePros 239.273.8842 RIVER FOREST 12345 ANGLERS CV., FT. MYERS Rarely Available, Courtyard Pool $425,000 MLS 218006116 Toni Shoemaker 239.464.3645 HARBOUR ISLE Y & R CLUB 1218 ARCOLA DR., FT. MYERS Remodeled, 2 BR, 2 BA + Den $239,900 MLS 218001402 Lori Jackson 239.633.4199 BRANDYWINE 1278 ARCOLA DR., FT. MYERS Corner Unit, Walk to Clubhouse/Pool $219,900 MLS 218056655 Lori Jackson 239.633.4199 BRANDYWINE 11421 LONGWATER CHASE CT., FT. MYERS Custom Estate, 3,876 S.F., Turnkey $1,399,000 MLS 218038285 Jamie Gates 239.910.2778 GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC 1213 HOPEDALE DR., FT. MYERS 3 Bedrooms, 3 Baths, Pool $399,900 MLS 218056942 Cindy Roberts 239.565.9756 TWIN PALM ESTATES 15250 INTRACOASTAL CT., FORT MYERS 3 BR, 2.5 BA + Den, Pool $597,500 MLS 218037903 Roger Stening 239.770.4707 INTRACOASTAL HARBOUR 11701 OLIVETTI LN. #405, FT. MYERS New 3 BR, 2 BA Condo, 1,696 S.F. $307,680 MLS 218033104Ross Winchel, Koffman Group 239.898.1214 MAJESTIC PALMS RIVERFRONT 15111-15119 ANCHORAGE WAY, FT. MYERS 2+ Acres, 265 Seawall $2,495,000 MLS 218037353 McMurray & Nette 239.850.7888 GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC 11330 LONGWATER CHASE CT., FT. MYERS 8,300 S.F., Harbourside Riverfront Home$2,750,000 MLS 217064189 Patti Testa 239.770.54451522 MCGREGOR RESERVE DR., FT. MYERS Pristine Condition, 4,410 S.F. $825,000 MLS 218037200 Elaine Sawyer 239.940.1386 MCGREGOR RESERVE OPEN 11/11 1:00PM 3:00PM OPEN DAILY 10:00AM 5:00PM OPEN 11/11 1:00PM 3:00PM OPEN 11/11 1:00PM 3:00PM OPEN 11/11 1:00PM 4:00PM OPEN 11/11 1:00PM 3:00PM NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW PRICE NEW PRICE

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 20186 Home Base To Hold Veterans Day TelethonMany local residents might not have heard of Home Base, a Red Sox foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital program, but that is about to change thanks to a local media station committing to promoting the nonprofit program on Veterans Day 2018. Waterman Broadcasting will televise the inaugural Home Base Veterans Day Special on their affiliate ABC Channel 7 on Sunday, November 11 from 7 to 8 p.m. This 60-minute, commercial-free television event will focus on Southwest Florida Veterans and Service Members who have benefitted from the support and treatment available at Home Base. These individuals have bravely volunteered to share their story in hopes of educating the community at large about the invisible wounds of war and reducing the stigma surrounding mental health. Waterman Broadcasting is excited to partner with the Red Sox Foundation to help fund the Southwest Florida mission for Home Base, said Steve Pontius, executive vice president and general manager. This is a wonderful way for ABC7 to help serve the veterans who unselfishly served our nation. Though Home Base is headquartered in New England, all funds raised by the Florida Veterans Day broadcast will remain in the community, allowing the program to continue providing life-saving care to a region more than 130,000 veterans call home. Home Bases Southwest Florida Program was created to empower local veterans and warriors to take control of their physical well-being, provide tools to help manage stress and provide complex care for those in need of treatment for the invisible wounds. To date, Home Base has served more than 700 veterans and family members. The Veterans Day broadcast will ensure Home Base is able to continue to have an impact in the Southwest Florida region. Donations will be accepted before, during and following the aired broadcast and can be made by visiting www.homebase.org/ contribute/signature-fundraising-events/ veterans-day-telethon-special or calling 1-866-615-8387. For more information visit www. homebase.org/home-base-southwestflorida or contact Armando Hernandez, CSCS, Home Base Southwest Florida program director at 770-2414 or ahernandez17@mgh.harvard.edu. Fort Myers Art: Sanibel Gallery Hosting Late Artist Retrospective by Tom HallHollis Garland Jeffcoat devoted the major part of her adult life sharing with viewers her visceral experience and unique perception of the beauty of the natural environment in which she lived. When she died on April 28 in Fort Myers at the age of 65, Hollis left behind a trove of elegant, gestural, color-saturated paintings that attest to her genius. And to fulfill Jeffcoats wish that she be remembered for her work, her longtime friend and partner Maureen Watson is curating a retrospective at Sanibels Watson MacRae Gallery in November that will celebrate her life and accomplishments. Hollis Jeffcoat: My Life in Paint will begin with her first painting as a professional in France in 1976 and end with her last painting on Sanibel Island in 2017, posted Maureen Watson in the gallerys online newsletter. Paintings, drawings and prints from her major series will fill the gallery. The opening reception for Hollis Jeffcoat: My Life in Paint takes place on Thursday, November 15 from 5 to 7 p.m. Please join us for this wonderful exhibit, as we remember our beloved Hollis Jeffcoat, Watson added. Watson MacRae Gallery is located in Suite B3 at 2340 Periwinkle Way on Sanibel. For more information, call 4723386 or visit www.watsonmacraegallery. com. An expos of Hollis Jeffcoats work Hollis was a highly accomplished, wellregarded and critically acclaimed abstract expressionist. She lived, worked and taught in France, Canada, New York City and Southwest Florida. Over the course of her illustrious 41-year career, her paintings were the subject of more than 20 solo and nearly four dozen group exhibitions in the United States, Canada and France. During the final years of her life, Jeffcoat explored the relationship between color and sound. A chromesthetic, Hollis saw color every time she heard a sound. Chromesthesia is a subset of synesthesia, a neurological phenomenon in which the stimulation of one sensory or cognitive pathway (such as hearing) leads to automatic, involuntary experiences in a second cognitive pathway (such as sight). Living on Sanibel since 2008, Jeffcoat immersed herself in the islands unique panoply of sounds. She filled her creative soul with the gentle sound of water slapping mangrove knees, evening zephyrs stirring palm fronds and the chirps and calls of reddish egrets, roseate spoonbills and yellow-crowned night herons. For Jeffcoat, water lapping along the shoreline and the warble of native ospreys gave rise to her most intense synesthetic experiences. Because Im so attuned to nature, I see different shades, hues and intensities of green, Hollis once explained. They burst like fireworks across her mental movie screen before morphing like a kaleidoscope or fading as the sound changed, got louder or abruptly ended. Jeffcoat studied at the Kansas City Art Institute and New York Studio School. She also apprenticed for three years with Joan Mitchell in France and took lessons from and taught for local legend Gail Bennett. Soon after she decided to embrace her unique way of experiencing the world, she entered into a groundbreaking collaboration with Peabody, Edward R. Murrow and Emmy Award-winning composer and flutist Kat Epple to create an exhibition titled the Sound of Color. In the final years of her life, Hollis gave herself over to expressing her own highlypersonal reactions to nature-based sounds and the ripples of color they spawned. While Jeffcoats viewers can never experience the precise emotions that gave rise to her deeply evocative compositions, the body of work she leaves behind provides myriad portals of resonance and connectivity. Through the centuries, artists have strived to develop new and important ways of seeing and experiencing our environment. In this regard, Jeffcoats oeuvre affords present and future generations a novel and heretoforeunexplored platform for examining their own relationships with nature, the ecology and the products of their senses, including those of taste and smell. This is Hollis Jeffcoats legacy. Its why her work is sure to endure. Her paintings can be found today in numerous private and corporate collections, as well as the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum, The Morgan Library, The Contemporary Museums of Art in Montreal and Quebec City, and the Pierre Matisse Collection. Tom Hall is both an amateur artist and aspiring novelist who writes art quest thrillers. He is in the final stages of completing his debut novel titled Art Detective. A former tax attorney, he lives in Estero with his fianc and their four cats. Hollis Jeffcoat and Maureen Watson photo courtesy www.artswfl.com www.mastersingersfm.comor call 239-560-9512 FOR FULL SEASON SCHEDULE The Fort Myers SymphonicMASTERSINGERSPRESENTS: SHALL WE DANCESunday, November 11, 2018 3:00pmSanibel Community Church Featuring theMastersingers Chamber Chorusand theM & N Dance Studio Dancers

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7 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018Shelter Supply Drive Deemed A Big SuccessThe Cape Coral Animal Shelter (CCAS) pet supplies drive for animal rescue devastated in the Florida Panhandle was a great success. Local businesses in Cape Coral and Fort Myers donated space for supplies to be collected and the response was overwhelming. Volunteers picked up from six drop off locations in Cape Coral and Fort Myers and then loaded a 15-foot box truck to capacity with dog and cat food, towels, sheets and blankets, cat litter, toys, grooming and cleaning supplies, crates, pet beds and just over $2,000 in cash. Jen Buffington, CCAS fundraising director, and Judy Sowers, CCAS board member, drove the supplies to the humane societies of Leon, Gulf and Walton counties in the Panhandle for distribution. The first stop for delivery was the Alaqua Animal Refuge center which had 300 displaced pets. Next stop was St. Joseph Bay Humane Society which was one of the hardest hit areas within the deliveries by CCAS. Buffington and Sowers described the area homes to be literally inside out. They were in desperate need for donations and working hard to manage the situation. The final stop was Leon County Humane Society where the supplies were distributed to other shelters and the general public in need. The relief efforts were greatly appreciated by the animal facilities as they manage the pets displaced from the devastated areas. CCAS Board President, JoAnn Elardo stated, We are grateful for the community generosity in Cape Coral and Fort Myers during this effort. Businesses and volunteers rallied to make this a success, and we are proud to be able to help even as we are still in the process of building. On November 1, CCAS held a formal ground-breaking ceremony for the building site of the future shelter located at 325 Southwest Second Avenue in Cape Coral. Museum Opens Pop-Up Store At Sanibel Outlets The Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum has opened a seasonal pop-up store at the Sanibel Outlets in Fort Myers, where shoppers can find the museums premier collection of gifts just in time for the holidays. Museum staff will help shoppers find an exquisite piece of jewelry from Congress Jewelers Sealife by Congress collection, the perfect childrens gifts and books, or fine home dcor designed for Florida living. November 25 will be Museum Store Sunday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the pop-up store. More than 700 museum stores representing all 50 states, 10 countries and three continents participate in Museum Store Sunday. During this post-Thanksgiving event, shoppers will receive a 25 percent discount storewide (fine jewelry excluded). The museums pop-up store is open to the public November through April during regular outlet hours, located at 20350 Summerlin Road, between Swim Mart and Maidenform. Phone 437-1502. For more information, contact Gretchen Falk at gfalk@shellmuseum. org or 395-2233. Volunteers load a box truck with pet supplies for the Florida Panhandle photo provided

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 20188 Along The RiverJoin a bird patrol guide during a walk on Bunche Beach this Saturday, November 10 at 7:30 a.m. Provided in cooperation with Lee County Parks and Recreation, the beachfront walk is free with paid parking of $2 per hour (tour is approximately two hours). Participants meet on the beach located in South Fort Myers, off Summerlin Road. Bring binoculars, sun protection, shoes that can get wet, a bottle of drinking water, your curiosity and love of nature. For more information, call 707-3015 or visit www.birdpatrol.org. The Alliance for the Arts will host the Arts & Ends Holiday Sale this Saturday, November 10 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The art sale will also feature activities throughout the day, including interactive art projects and artist demonstrations. Local artists will present and sell hand-crafted items in a wide variety of mediums and styles in the Alliance gallery. The Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information, call 939-2787 or visit www.artinlee.org. The 30th annual Arts for ACT Gala and Fine Art Auction will be held at Hyatt Regency at Coconut Point this Saturday, November 10 from 5 to 10 p.m. Presented by Bill Smith Appliances and Electronics, the popular auction will benefit Abuse Counseling and Treatment, Inc. (ACT). Tickets are $175 each and $1,800 for a reserved table of eight. Guests may purchase tickets by visiting www.artsforact.givesmart.com or by calling 939-2553. Hyatt Regency at Coconut Point is located at 5001 Coconut Drive in Bonita Springs. For more information, visit www.actabuse.com. The Burroughs Home & Gardens will hold its inaugural Brunch on the River: An Inspirational Bridal Expos this Sunday, November 11. The event showcases the venues expansive waterfront views, alongside an array of over 45 wedding professionals and services. Cost of admission is a $5 donation to the Uncommon Friends Foundation that maintains the historic property. Valet parking will be available. The event is for discerning bridal couples who want their upcoming wedding to be both personal and extraordinary. Attendees will meet standout caterers, officiants, photographers, florists and a variety of the most creative and reliable wedding vendors in Southwest Florida. Engaged couples and brides-to-be can pre-register for the showcase at http:// brunchontheriver.planningpod.com. To view the photo gallery and learn more about weddings, tours and other events at the Burroughs Home & Gardens, visit www.burroughshome.com or call 337-0706. The Lee County Community Band will begin its 133rd season with a lively, fun-filled, free concert at Cape Coral High School this Sunday, November 11 at 3 p.m. The 50-member adult band will perform six concerts between November and April. Programs typically include a mix of energetic marches, Broadway hits, old favorites, patriotic songs and a sing-along with emcee and vocalist Norman Jones. Cape Coral High School, which hosts all of the community band concerts, is located at 2300 Santa Barbara Boulevard. For more information, visit www.leecountyband.org. The Seminole Diet is the topic in the second part of a speaker series at the The Mound House on Fort Myers Beach this Tuesday, November 13. Refreshments will be served at 5:30 p.m., with the lecture to follow at 6 p.m. Admission is $5. Brandy Norton, a field technician with the Seminole Tribal Historic Preservation Office, will discuss the conclusions researchers have reached about the diet of this Native American population. Considered tree island people, the prehistoric Seminoles seem to have eaten mostly turtle, fish and snake. Archaeologists examining 19,149 bones from a 2016 excavation in the Okeechobee area also used oral histories of the Seminole people to draw this conclusion. The Mound House is located at 451 Connecticut Street on Fort Myers Beach. For more information, call 765-0865 or go to www.moundhouse.org. A presentation by the SanibelCaptiva Conservation Foundation on the 2018 Water Crisis will be held at the Bailey Homestead Preserve this Thursday, November 15 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10. Speakers will be addressing the red tide in the Gulf, the freshwater toxic blue-green algae in the Caloosahatchee and the devastating effects on marine life and our coastal economy. You will learn about what happened from a scientific, policy and business perspective, the formation and recovery of a dead zone offshore in the Gulf, and steps we can all take to prevent and minimize future disturbances to regional water quality. There will be presentations and a panel discussion with Rae Ann Wessel, SCCF natural resource policy director; Dr. Eric Milbrandt, SCCF marine lab director; James Evans, director of natural resources City of Sanibel; Dr. Rick Bartleson, SCCF research scientist; and Kelly Sloan, SCCF Sea Turtle Program coordinator. For tickets, visit www.sccf.org, click on Resources, then Calendar and follow November 15 link to Eventbrite. Bailey Homestead Preserve is located at 1300 Periwinkle Way on Sanibel. Call SCCF at 472-2329 with any questions. Wedding services at the Burroughs Home will be showcased at the inaugural Brunch on the River: An Inspirational Bridal Expose photo courtesy www.burroughshome.com From page 2Historic DowntownHealth Service, urging the use of handkerchiefs for protection. By June of 1919, influenza had ceased to be a recurring topic in the news. The virus subsided and exited the scene as inexplicably as it had entered it. Walk through downtown and imagine the closing of the Arcade Theatre, churches and schools to prevent the spread of the flu, even as people celebrate the end of a world war. Then learn more about the history of epidemics in Fort Myers and how they were handled at the following two research centers. The Southwest Florida Historical Society is an all-volunteer, non-profit organization open Wednesday and Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon and Wednesday 4 to 7 p.m. It is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Call 939-4044 or visit www.swflhistoricalsociety.org for more information. The Lee County Black History Society is located at 1936 Henderson Avenue, adjacent to the Williams Academy Museum at Roberto Clemente Park. Hours for the all-volunteer, non-profit organization are Wednesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Saturday by appointment only. For more information, call 332-8778 or visit www. leecountyblackhistorysociety.org. Sources: Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society, Fort Myers Press, and www.cdc.gov.

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9 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018 submitted by Marti MaasFun and food were the face of the Homecoming and Fall Festival held at Summit Christian School on October 19. Approximately 200 to 250 family members, children, alumni, teachers and other school supporters swarmed the Westminster Presbyterian Church campus to enjoy the party. This festival is a great communitybuilding event, said Head of School Kyle Mast. Were celebrating the past, present and future of Summit Christian School as we see current families and teachers mingling with alumni, school supporters and church members. The Parent Teacher Fellowship (PTF), led by parent Holly Loucks, organized middle school volunteers for carnival games and parent volunteers for other tasks. Children with faces painted like tigers and butterflies scampered from game to game. The carnival included many games as well as balloon sculptures, a bounce slide and refreshments. The carnival activities happened in the church courtyard and sports field. Inside a campus building, partygoers ate Mission Barbecue, while kids meals were hot dogs and mac and cheese. Also, fall sweets were available for purchase. School board members Jackie Muse and Terri Lee, along with school administrators, coordinated planning with PTF. Lee and Muse focused on notifying alumni and creating a memory lane, displaying old yearbooks and pictures from the past. They also coordinated the dinner from Mission Barbecue and the harvest decorations. Parents, teachers, and school supporters volunteered to make the event successful. Summit Christian School is a ministry of Westminster Presbyterian Church, located at 9065 Ligon Court, near Lexington Country Club and across from Healthpark Hospital. Since its beginning in 1991, Summit Christian School has grown into a pre-school and K-8 program with 127 students, which includes preschool classes at the Sanibel Community Church location. Evans Events thrilled Summit Christian students and families with face-painting and balloon artistry Summit Christian School Students set up carnival games for the Homecoming & Fall Festival. The middle school students raised money for their end of year camp. photos providedSummit Christian School Homecoming And Fall Festival

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 201810 Churches/TemplesALL FAITHS UNITARIAN CONGREGATION Sunday 10:30 a.m., 2756 McGregor Boulevard, allfaiths-uc.org, 226-0900. ALL SAINTS BYZANTINE RITE CATHOLIC Sunda y 10:30 a.m. 10291 Bayshore Road, 305-651-0991. ANNUNCIATION GREEK ORTHODOX Sunday 9 and 10 a.m. 8210 Cypress Lake Drive, annunciation.fl.goarch.org, 481-2099. BAT YAM-TEMPLE OF THE ISLANDS Friday Shabbat at 7 p.m. 2050 Periwinkle Way. www.batyam.org 579-0296.BETH SHILOH MESSIANIC SYNAGOGUE Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m. 15675 McGregor Boulevard, 437-3171. BIBLESHARE 10 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Tuesday, 7050 Winkler Rd, Suite 121, www.simplysimple worship.com, 437-8835. BREAD OF LIFE MINISTRIES Sunda y 10:30 a.m. 16581 McGregor Boulevard, 267-3166. CHABAD LUBAVITCH ORTHODOX Friday 6:30 p.m. 5620 Winkler Road, chabadswf.org, 433-7708. CHAPEL OF CYPRESS COVE Sunday 10 a.m. 10200 Cypress Cove Circle, revtedalthouse@aol.com, 850-3943. CHURCH OF THE CROSS Sunday 9:15 and 10:45 a.m. 13500 Freshman Lane, 768-2188. CONGREGATIONAL Sunday 10:30 a.m. 1619 Llewellyn Drive, taecc.com, 334-4978. COVENANT PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 10 a.m. 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937. CYPRESS LAKE BAPTIST Sunday 9:45 and 11 a.m., 7 p.m.; Wednesday 6:30 p.m. 8400 Cypress Lake Drive, 481-5442. CYPRESS LAKE PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 8, 9, 10 and 11 a.m. 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, www.clpc.us, 481-3233. CYPRESS LAKE UNITED METHODIST Sunday 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, 482-1250. FAITH FELLOWSHIP WORLD OUTREACH Sunday 10:30 a.m.,Thursday 7:30 p.m., Friday 7:30 p.m. 6111 South Pointe Boulevard, 278-3638. FAITH UNITED METHODIST Sunday 8:45 and 10:30 a.m. 15690 McGregor Boulevard, 482-2030. FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST Wednesday 12 noon Testimony Service, Sunday 10:30 a.m. 2390 West First Street, christiansciencefortmyers.net, christianscience.com. FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Sunday 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. 13545 American Colony Boulevard, 936-2511. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. 2466 First Street, www.fumcftmyers.org, 332-1152. FORT MYERS CHRISTIAN Sunday 10:30 a.m., 5916 Winkler Road, 437-4330. FORT MYERS CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST; Sunday 10 a.m., 8210 College Parkway, 482-3133. IONA-HOPE EPISCOPAL CONGREGATION Saturday 5 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Tuesday 9:30 a.m.; Wednesday 9:30 a.m. 9650 Gladiolus Drive, 454-4778. JESUS THE WORKER CATHOLIC Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday 8, 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. 881 Nuna Avenue, 481-1143. KINGDOM LIFE Sunday 10:30 a.m. 2154 McGregor Boulevard, 218-8343. LAMB OF GOD Sunday 7:45 and 10 a.m. 19691 Cypress View Drive, lambofgodchurch.net, 267-3525. NEW BEGINNINGS CENTER Friday 6:30 and 7 p.m. 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, nbcministry@embarqmail.com, facebook.com/nbcministry, 656-0416. NEW COVENANT EYES Monthly 9 a.m. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, newcovenanteyes.com, 220-8519. NEW HOPE BAPTIST Sunday 11 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. 16120 San Carlos Boulevard, Unit 10, 985-8503. NEW HOPE PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 10051 Plantation Road, www.newhopefortmyers.org, 274-1230. PEACE COMMUNITY Sunday 10:30 a.m. www. 17671 Pine Ridge Road, peacecommunitychurch.com, 267-7400. PEACE LUTHERAN Sunday 8 and 10 a.m. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@ peaceftmyers.com. 437-2599. REDEEMER LUTHERAN Sunday 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. 3950 Winkler Ext., 274-0143. RIVER OF LIFE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 8, 9:45 and 11:30 a.m. 21580 River Ranch Road, 495-0400. SAMUDRABADRA BUDDHIST CENTER Meditation classes. MeditationInFortMyers. org, 567-9739. SAINT COLUMBKILLE CATHOLIC Monday through Saturday 8 a.m.; Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday 7, 9 and 11 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 12171 Iona Road, 489-3973. ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CATHOLIC Monday through Thursday 6:45 a.m.; Friday 6:45 and 11 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.; Sunday 6:45, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 2157 Cleveland Avenue, 334-2161. SAINT JOHN THE APOSTLE METROPOLITAN Sunday 10 a.m. 3049 McGregor Boulevard, 344-0012. SAINT MICHAEL LUTHERAN Saturday 5:30 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10:45 a.m. 3595 Broadway, 939-1218. SAINT NICHOLAS MONASTERY Sunday 9:30 a.m. 111 Evergreen Road, saintnicholasmonastery.org, 997-2847. ST. VINCENT DE PAUL CATHOLIC Tuesday through Friday 9 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.; Sunday 9 and 11 a.m. 13031 Palm Beach Boulevard, 693-0818. SOUTHWEST BAPTIST Sunday 11 a.m.; Wednesday 6 p.m. 16940 McGregor Boulevard, 454-3336. TEMPLE BETHEL SYNAGOGUE Friday Shabbat 7:30 p.m.; Torah Saturday 9 a.m.; Religious School Wednesday 5:30 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m.16225 Winkler Road, templebethel.com, 433-0018. TEMPLE JUDEA (CONSERVATIVE) Friday 6:30 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. tjswfl. org.14486 A&W Bulb Road, 433-0201. THE NEW CHURCH Sunday 11 a.m. 10811 Sunset Plaza Circle #401, newchurchflorida.com. 481-5535. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST Sunday 10:30 a.m. 13411 Shire Lane, uucfm. org, 561-2700. UNITY OF FORT MYERS Sunday 10 a.m. 11120 Ranchette Road, unityoffortmyers.org, 278-1511. WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. 9065 Ligon Court, 481-2125. WORD OF LIFE Sunday 10 a.m., Wednesday 7 p.m. 2120 Collier Avenue, 274-8881. ZION LUTHERAN Sunday 8, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. 7401 Winkler Road, zionfm.org, 481-4040. Southwest Florida Concert Band To Begin SeasonThe new Southwest Florida Concert Band will present its first concert of the season in the auditorium of South Fort Myers High School on Sunday, November 18 at 2 p.m. The concert will be a salute to veterans and include Armed Forces Salute Leonard Bernsteins America The Blue and the Gray, Appalachian Morning John Philip Sousas The Stars and Stripes Forever and God Bless America as well as a lively Latin number featuring the trumpet section playing Trumpets Ol and a stirring overture called Fantasy on American Sailing Songs This will be the second season of the Southwest Florida Concert Band. As a registered non-profit musical organization the new band traces its roots to the now closed Lehigh Concert Band where for 38 years that band performed in many different capacities to provide concerts and musical groups in Lehigh Acres. The creation of the Southwest Florida Concert Band as Fort Myers newest community concert band fills a niche as a smaller more compact musical group of up to 50 musicians as opposed to the other larger (up to 100 members) groups that perform in this part of Florida. Theseasons line-up includes the Christmas Music for Kids of All Ages and include music from the movies Polar Express and Frozen, Canadian Brass Christmas Suite Leroy Andersons Christmas Festival Hanuka Festival of Lights Christmas From the 50s a Christmas Carol sing-along with the audience and more festive music concluding with the performance of The Night Before Christmas January will feature music from Broadway including Fiddler on the Roof, Oklahoma, Les Miserables, The Phantom of the Opera and also feature Glen Miller in Concert and Gabriels Oboe February will be a program of music by John Williams featuring music from Star Wars, Jurassic Park, Indiana Jones, Schindlers List, Superman and also Sammy Davis in Concert and the trumpet solo Tico Tico South Fort Myers High School is located at 14020 Plantation Road in Fort Myers. For more information on the band, the scholarship program, to listen to our recordings or becoming a member, visit www.swflconcertband. org. The Southwest Florida Concert Band photo by Terri Leach, Sea Terri Photography

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11 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018 CROW Case Of The Week: Bobcat by Bob PetcherThe bobcat ( Lynx rufus) is named for its short, bobbed tail. The fur of the medium-sized cat can be marked with spots or stripes of brown or black As one can tell by its scientific name, the bobcat is closely associated with the lynx. In fact, the two cousins are oftentimes confused for each other. There are differences. A lynx has longer ear tufts than a bobcat, while the bobcat looks a bit more like an overgrown house cat than say a lynx does. A lynx also has larger feet and longer legs than a bobcat, while a bobcat has a more varied diet. Bobcat tails have banding, while lynx tails are completely black at the tip. While the bobcat is adaptable to its habitat, the lynx is more likely to live in the colder climates and traverse through deeper snow due its longer legs. At CROW, an adult female bobcat was admitted from Fort Myers after it was likely hit by a car. The rare patient the clinic has received under three bobcat cases per year over the last five years, and only one other bobcat this year was reported to have blood in its mouth and that its back legs were not working. For the safety of the veterinary staff, the bobcat was sedated prior to being examined. Once the patient was sedated, staff performed an exam and took radiographs. The radiographs revealed a fractured pelvis and some abnormalities in the patients abdomen indicating a diaphragmatic hernia and free gas in the abdomen. This was confirmed using ultrasound. The severe condition of the lungs was from the blunt trauma that was sustained from the car, said Dr. Kyle Abbott, CROW veterinary intern. The amount of bruising (contusions) in the lungs resulted in poor lung function. The diaphragmatic hernia meant there was a large tear in the diaphragm allowing the abdominal organs to enter into the chest and also compromise breathing. The only treatment for a diaphragmatic hernia as large as this one was to perform surgery. The pelvic trauma on its own may have required surgery and, with or without surgery, would require at least six to eight weeks of healing before the bone could be fully healed. CROWs veterinary team prepared to take the bobcat to surgery immediately and placed an IV catheter and intubation tube. During preparations, however, the patients heart rate slowed as the patient went into cardiac arrest. Despite a dose of atropine using the IV catheter, the team was unable to revive the bobcat and it passed away. Atropine is one of many drugs that is administered during CPR to address life-threatening abnormalities in cardiac function, said Dr. Abbott. A drug alone cannot resuscitate a patient, but when used in conjunction with chest compressions and manual respirations, there is a chance the patient can be resuscitated. Unfortunately, despite efforts to resuscitate the bobcat, the injuries were too severe for it to overcome, and the bobcat passed away. The bobcat would not have had even a fighting chance of survival if not for the emergency response nature of a wildlife hospital. The emergency response for this case was essential in giving the bobcat a fighting chance, added Dr. Abbott. The bobcat suffered severe injuries from being hit by a car, which included a diaphragmatic hernia, lung contusions and a fractured pelvis. The emergency response allowed us time to assess the patient prior to intubating the patient under sedation and ventilating with oxygen. This was important as the bobcat was unable to properly breathe with how compromised the lungs were. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to P.O. Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www.crowclinic.org. Patient #18-4142 receiving treatment before succumbing to its many injuries photo by Brian Bohlman

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 201812 ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. NEW MOTOR SALES REBUILT POWERHEADS FACTORY TRAINED MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISERCourteous Professional Marine Repair Service Dockside Service Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life472-3380 466-3344 Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint PricesDave Doane NEW M O T O R S ALE S REB U ILT P O WERHEA D S FACTORY T R A I N E D MER C U RY MARINER JO HN SO N EVINR U DE S UZUKI YAMAHA O M C I/ O S MER C RU I S E R C ourteous Professional Marine Repair S erv i ce D oc k s i d e S erv i c e S ervin g Sanibel & C aptiva For Li f e Y B t t Yo ur B ottom Yo ur B ot to m Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices C Call on a c es C C ll n Pa in t Pr i es C C i i Call on Paint Prices D ave Doane1 Send Us Your Fish TalesWe would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include a photograph with identification. Email to press@islandsunnews.com or call 395-1213. BOAT RENTALSFishing Cabbage KeyDolphin Watching Captains Available472-5800Jensens Marina Captiva Island Fishing gear is hazardous to birds, reptiles and mammals.CLEAR YOUR GEAR It Catches More Than Fish Big Redfish In The Passesby Capt. Matt MitchellAnother week of cooler mornings brought great fishing action and was enjoyed by everyone this week. Big redfish and snook kept clients smiling as the bite at times could only be described as stupid. I dont ever remember such a long period of catching at least one slot-sized snook on just about every trip. Action on redfish has been either really big fish or small fish with really nothing in between. During calm winds or periods of east wind, the action out on the beaches has been nonstop with lots of Spanish mackerel, ladyfish and jacks keeping the rods bent. We still have tarpon and lots of sharks out on the beaches in the same places as the feeding mackerel; its just a matter of getting a calm day. Getting out gulfside and running crab pots for tripletail has been very productive too. Most of these tripletail are on the small side of the new 18-inch minimum, though if you put in your time, you will find some keepers. I have had a few reports of a few real monsters close to the magical 20-pound mark out a little deeper around the Belton Johnson Reef and Paces Place. With so many stone crab pots out, its just a matter of running and looking until you see one sitting under a crab buoy. Live shrimp are hard to beat for bait and, depending on your skill level of casting, you can either free line the shrimp or put it under a float. A trolling motor is an amazing tool for this fishing as these fish, especially the larger ones, can be very spooky at times. Im still catching shiners though I have moved away from throwing nets on the causeway and the beaches and have gotten back to chumming them on shallow grass flats to get the medium-to larger-sized baits. It seems most of the bait on the bridges and beaches right now is on the smaller side. What this small bait lacks in size, it makes up for in sheer numbers as often it only takes one cast to have enough for the days fishing. Ive also been taking hand-picked shrimp as some days the better bite on redfish has come bouncing a live shrimp on a jighead. While out with longtime returning clients from Indiana this week, we had one of the best days of fishing I have experienced in months. We lost count of the big redfish we landed all over 30 inches, along with lots of snook including two of them over 30 inches. We even managed three bonus unexpected keeper black drum up to 22 inches. Hand-picked shrimp rigged on a quarter ounce jighead fished in the passes during the last few hours of the falling tide proved to be the set-up for some of the craziest action I can remember in a long time. Double and even triple hook-ups on all over-the-slot-sized redfish came at times as quickly as you could get a bait in. But when returning later in the day during the low incoming tide, the bite was done. The big redfish of the week on my boat measured 38 inches though I had reports from other captains with redfish as big as 48 inches caught in all of our local passes during the outgoing tide. Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions, email captmattmitchell@aol.com. Kurt from Indiana with a 38-inch redfish caught and released with Capt. Matt Mitchell this week photo provided

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13 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018 Plant SmartAmerican Beautyberry by Gerri ReavesFew native Florida shrubs have such an eye-popping fruit presentation as American beautyberry (Callicarpa americana), with its clusters of shiny magenta berries. Native to the southeastern U.S. and a member of the verbena family, this species thrives throughout the state. The species name is quite apt: Callicarpa means callos or beauty in Greek, and carpos means fruit. Other common names for this fast-growing species include French or American mulberry, sourbush (for the fruits astringency), bunchberry and purple beauty-berry. This plant has it all wildlife friendliness, low maintenance, wind resistance and notable ornamental beauty. More than 40 species of songbirds consume the fleshy fruit, which persists on the stems for months, a boon for migrating birds. Various small mammals and white-tailed deer also eat it. Some sources state that the fruit is not toxic to humans. It is unpalatable but can be made into jelly. It grows five to eight feet tall with an almost equal width, an open form and arching branches. It is very suited to a mass planting or natural garden, where it requires no maintenance. Butterflies and bees are attracted to it, another reason to include it in a natural garden. The shrub is deciduous in northern regions and evergreen in the far south. The opposite aromatic leaves are three to six inches long and oval or elliptical with serrated edges and points at both ends. New leaves and the undersides of old ones are covered with star-shaped hairs. Clusters of four-lobed flowers appear between leaf pairs on the four-sided woody stems. The lavender or pink flowers measure about a sixth of an inch long. They bloom year-round in South Florida, peaking in late spring to summer and followed by clusters of 40 to 50 purple or magenta berries that encircle the stems. Each round berry is about an eighth of an inch across and contains two to four tiny seeds. Give this shrub moist but well-drained soil and full sun for best fruiting. It will grow even in nutrient-poor soil but needs some organic content to do well. It is drought tolerant but intolerant of salt. Propagate it with seeds or cutting, or transplant the self-sown seedlings. A white-fruited variety (var. lacteal) is also available. The shrub has various practical uses, too. Native American tribes used the roots, leaves, and branches medicinally. Its terpenoid content (e.g. callicarpenal and intermedeol) compares to that of the well-known insect repellant DEET. Early twentieth-century farmers benefitted from this insect-repelling by rubbing crushed leaves on their bodies and by applying them beneath harnesses on horses and other animals. Sources: Florida Gardeners Guide by Tom MacCubbin and Georgia B. Tasker; Florida, My Eden by Frederic B. Stresau; Florida Plants for Wildlife by Craig N. Huegel; Floridas Incredible Wild Edibles by Richard J. Deuerling and Peggy S. Lantz; A Gardeners Guide to Floridas Native Plants by Rufino Osorio; Native Florida Plants by Robert G. Haehle and Joan Brookwell; The Shrubs and Woody Vines of Florida by Gil Nelson; Wild Plants for Survival in South Florida by Julia F. Morton; www. edis.ifas.ufl.edu; www.floridata.com; www.fnps.org; www.plants.usda.gov; and www.regionalconservation.org. Plant Smart explores the diverse flora of South Florida. American beautyberrys fruit clusters are an outstanding ornamental feature. Numerous bird species consume the fruit. Tiny lavender-pink flowers appear in the leaf axils photos by Gerri ReavesEstates To Host Garden FestivalEdison and Ford Winter Estates will hold its annual fall Garden Festival on Saturday, November 17 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, November 18 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. More than 40 garden vendors from all over the state of Florida will have exotic and tropical flowering plants and trees for sale. If youre looking for a really unique plant that you dont already have, this is the place to find it, said Debbie Hughes, senior horticulturist with Edison and Ford Winter Estates. I hope everyone will spend the day shopping for plants and enjoying some great music and food with us. The Edison Garden Shoppe will be open and stocked with unusual tropical, native and heritage plants that have been proven to thrive in Southwest Florida. Ceramic flower pots, vegetable and flower seeds, garden art and gardening gift items will also be available. Vendors will be on site with palms, fruit trees, vegetables, bromeliads, hibiscus, butterfly plants, African violets, orchids, air plants, herbs, succulents, cacti and many hard-to-find species. Vendors will also offer garden supplies and gift items, such as mulch, trellises, pottery, cut flowers, hats, jewelry and artwork. The festival will feature live music, Millennial Brewing Company will have a special brew made from Edison Ford citrus, and several food trucks will be on site. There will also be a kids gardening activity for the little gardeners. A limited number of carts will be available, so guests are encouraged to bring a cart or wagon for transporting plants. A designated plant holding tent and loading spot will be offered for anyone needing assistance. Parking and admission to the festival is free. Edison and Ford Winter Estates is located at 2350 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information, call 334-7419 or visit www. edisonfordwinterestates.org. Guided Walk At PreserveCelebrate the Veterans Day holiday early with a free guided history walk at Wild Turkey Strand Preserve on Saturday, November 10 from 8 to 10 a.m. The Conservation 20/20 preserve includes remnant structures from the Buckingham Army Airfield Flexible Gunnery School, a training base operated by the U.S. military in Lee County during World War II. Remnant structures to tour onsite include multiple munitions buildings and an elevated embankment that was used for gunnery training with moving objects to simulate air-to-air combat. Nearly 50,000 acres in Lee County were once used as part of the Buckingham Army Airfield training base. Beginning in 1942, military recruits from across the country were trained at the base as turret gunners assigned to bomber planes flying over the European and Pacific Theaters. The airfield was deactivated in 1945 when the war ended. The two-mile walk will be guided by historian Jim Zbick from the Southwest Florida Military Museum & Library. The tour will take visitors through predominantly pine flatwoods and cypress swamp. A portion of the trail is ADA-accessible. Participants should bring a water bottle, hat, sunscreen and camera and wear closed-toed shoes. The tour will begin at the preserve parking entrance. Parking is free. Reservations are required in advance by contacting Jason Boeckman, Conservation 20/20 coordinator, at 204-1125. Wild Turkey Strand Preserve is located at 11901 Rod & Gun Club Road in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www. conservation2020.org or www.swfmm. org. EXPERIENCE: HUNDREDS OF SUCCESSFUL LANDSCAPES300 Center Road, Fort Myers FL 33907 PHONE 239.939.9663 FAX 239.939.8504www.NoLawn.com www.AllNative.bizOPEN DAILY: 9 to 5 Mon Sat 10 to 3 SunOUR NURSERY FEATURES OVER 200 SPECIES OF NATIVE PLANTS ON SEVERAL ACRES Buttery Gardens Wildlife/Bird Sanctuaries We also offer landscape design, consultation, installation and maintenance.

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 201814 Fresh ingredients, simplicity, love... the recipe for a treasured dining experience Chef/Owner AJ Black7 Days 5-10 pm 751 Tarpon Bay Road Sanibel Island, FL Reservations Suggested www.iltesoro.net 239-395-4022 FINE ITALIAN CUISINEIL TESORO RISTORANTEinspired by Island Fare in a bistro styleVOTED BEST CHEFBEST OF THE ISLANDS AWARDTASTE OF THE ISLANDS IRON CHEF WINNER AJ BLACKCelebrating Our 10 Year AnniversaryExtensive New Wine List Tasting Menu SUNSET DINING 4:30-6:30 P.M. 3-Course Tasting Starting at $19.95 Tax Collector Staff Surpasses Fundraising GoalThe staff of the Lee County Tax Collector raised more than $38,000 this year for the United Way of Lee, Hendry, Glades and Okeechobee Counties, surpassing their $30,000 goal. The Tax Collectors Office is once again a United Way Pacesetter organization and received recognition at the October 30 United Way Campaign Kickoff breakfast. The United Way provides vital support to organizations that help so many people in our community, Lee County Tax Collector Larry Hart said. I couldnt be prouder of our staff. Tax Collector employees generated the funds through payroll deductions as well as internal raffles, candy sales, paying a small fee to wear blue jeans to work and other creative initiatives. The $38,320.13 goes toward the United Ways goal of raising an awe-inspiring $10,301,386 in Southwest Florida during its 2018-19 campaign. Hart sits on the local United Way Board of Directors, and hes the chair of Mission United, a United Way initiative to give veterans a single number to dial for access to the services theyre entitled to. As an Air Force veteran and former police chief, Ill always have a special place in my heart for those who served, Hart said. Im so pleased to be able to make their lives better through my work with the United Way. More than 100 agencies and 250 programs receive assistance from the United Way of Lee, Hendry, Glades and Okeechobee Counties. It has raised and distributed more than $167 million since it was established in 1957. Local United Way beneficiaries include the Alvin A. Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center, Partners for Breast Cancer Care, the Harry Chapin Food Bank, the Boys and Girls Clubs and many more. Visit www.leetc.com and check out the Blog page for updates on the tax collectors efforts to give back. Larry Hart photo provided Free Trolley Service Resumes DowntownLeeTrans seasonal downtown trolley service has resumed. The free rides began November 8. Both the Blue and Gold Line trolleys provide free access to and from historic downtown Fort Myers. This allows a hassle-free way to aid in shopping, dining and entertainment the district offers without having to drive and park downtown. The Blue Line runs through downtown Fort Myers. The route loops from the Oasis Condominiums to West First Street and McGregor Boulevard along First Street, then to Rosa Parks Transportation Center, Fowler and Second streets and then returns to the Oasis Condominiums. The Gold Line connects North Fort Myers with downtown Fort Myers. The route runs from Rosa Parks Transportation Center, over the Caloosahatchee Bridge, and then loops back via North Key Drive to Beau Drive and Hancock Bridge Parkway, then back across the bridge, down First Street and returns to Rosa Parks. The seasonal downtown Fort Myers trolley service continues until May 1, 2019. Along with seasonal changes, several additional routes have permanent or seasonal changes. Permanent changes include: Route 20, Rosa Parks Transportation Center to the U-Save Shopping Center loop, will have a permanent route path change due to construction in downtown Fort Myers. Route 40, the Cape Coral Transfer Center to Coralwood Mall loop, will now have the same route path six days a week. Route 590, the North Fort MyersSuncoast Estates loop, will offer a new schedule with minor route changes. Route 595, the North Fort MyersPondella loop, will offer a new schedule with minor route changes. Seasonal changes include: Route 50, Southwest Florida International Airport to Summerlin Square, will offer a new schedule. Route 150, Bonita Grande to Lovers Key in Bonita Springs, will offer a new schedule. Route 600, LinC, Coconut Point Mall to Immokalee Road in Collier County, will now meet with Collier Area Transit (CAT) routes on all trips. All schedule and route changes went into effect on November 8. LeeTran is the public transit provider for Lee County, providing more than three million rides per year. LeeTran operates 26 bus routes during season, 23 bus routes during off-season, a paratransit service called Passport, and an employer vanpool program. For more information, visit www. rideleetran.com.

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15 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018 CHEF PAT SHEERINPassed Hors doeurves: Date Glazed Snake River Pork Belly, Chinese Banana Mustard, Cashews 1st Course: Smoked Skuna Bay Salmon, Everything Spice, Red Onion Yogurt, Titos and Tonic pickled Cucumbers, Buckwheat Nest Poema, Cava Brut Ros, Conca de BarberCHEF ED SURAPassed Hors doeurves: Cauliflower, Gruyere, Black Truffle Soy 2nd Course: Sweet Corn Custard, Edamame, Smoked Peanut, Chili, Shiso Gewrztraminer, Lucien Albrecht, Alsace, France, 2016CHEF PAUL VIRANTPassed Hors doeurves: Chicken Sausage Beignets, fermented Cherry Bomb Aioli 3rd Course: Pompano En Papillote, Spinach, Black Truffle, Celery Root Remoulade Macon Lugny, Louis Jadot, Maconnais and Beaujolis, France, 2016CHEF MELISSA AKINPassed Hors doeurves: Roasted Corn Blini, Avocado Crme Fraiche, Local Caviar 4th Course: Duck Confit Ravioli, Smoked Duck Breast, Foie Gras Ganache, Coffee Sand, Pomegranate-Cranberry Syrup Pinot Noir, Firesteed, Willamette Valley, Oregon, 2015CHEF ANDREW ZIMMERMANPassed Hors doeurves: Pork and Shrimp Shu Mai, Smoked Trout Roe, Sweet Soy 5th Course: Creekstone Farms New York Strip, Wagyu Beef Cheek Pastrami Hash, Fondant Potatoes, Green Peppercorn Sauce Syrah, MontGras, Antu, Chile, 2016PASTRY CHEF LEV DALKE6th Course: Biko Cake, Corn Whipped Panna Cotta, Sesame Nougatine, Puffed Rice, Kabuso Sauce Hakutsuru, Plum Wine

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 201816 Call or e-mail us for more information. Phone: 239-558-5733 E-mail: rabbitrdmgt@gmail.com www.RabbitRoadMgt.com Rabbit Rd. Property Management & Home Watch Company which specializes in managing small county area. We are licensed, insured and bonded with over 20 years of experience. We are also Florida CAM licensed and accredited members of the National Home Watch Association. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. Mark OBrien Owner/Agent Trish Barbone Agent Justin Wheeler Agent We are HERE for all your insurance needs Now that the federal gift and estate tax exemption is over $11 million per person, Ive had some clients inquire whether they still need their revocable trusts, or if any adjustments should be made to their trusts. The short answers are yes and yes. Revocable trusts do more than plan for estate taxes. They keep our affairs private both in the event of our incapacity as well as our death. In todays world of identity theft, thats more important than ever. Revocable trusts also avoid tedious, time consuming and expensive court processes, such as a guardianship in the case of your incapacity or a probate in the event of your death. But lets talk taxes. For those clients whose estates are larger than the current $11.2 million federal exemption, estate tax planning may still play a role. These clients may have a foundational plan consisting of a revocable trust and related pour over will, durable power of attorney, health care surrogate and living will, among others. Moreover, when one has estate tax issues, advanced planning strategies are often considered. But what about those of us below the federal exemption? Theres still tax planning involved, but it is income tax planning. There are a variety of issues at play, including maximizing the step-up in tax cost basis that occurs upon someones death, the income tax consequences to the beneficiaries of IRAs, 401(k)s, and annuities, as well as the collapsed income tax rate structure for testamentary trusts that continue for our spouse, children, grandchildren or other loved ones. When the federal estate tax exemption was lower, it was common for married couples to segregate assets into a husbands trust and a wifes trust. Upon the first spouses passing, those assets were held in a Credit Shelter, Family or Bypass trust, all of which have the common characteristic of being excluded from the surviving spouses estate for federal estate tax purposes. But for those with estates below the threshold, this planning may no longer be appropriate. Generally speaking, the beneficiaries would like to have a step up in tax cost basis not only at the first spouses death but also at the second. Allow me to provide an example. Suppose that Tom and Barbara each have separate revocable trusts, but their combined net worth is lower than the federal estate tax exemption of $11.2 million, and that net worth is unlikely to rise to that level. When Tom dies, the assets in his trust achieve a step up. In other words, the assets are re-valued at the fair market value as of Toms date of death. Any unrealized capital gains that existed the day before Toms death, vanished upon his death. If his trust were to sell all of the assets the day following the death at the then fair market value, the capital gain or loss consequence would only be the difference between the selling price and the date of death value. If Toms trust creates a Credit Shelter, Bypass or Family trust for Barbaras benefit for the rest of her life, hes used his exemption and the assets will not be taxed in Barbaras estate when she dies. But we dont care if those assets are included in Barbaras estate, because she wont have an estate tax. In fact, we generally want the assets included in her estate so that the ultimate beneficiaries upon Barbaras death get another step up in tax cost basis when Barbara dies, eliminating the unrealized capital gains that have accumulated between Toms death and Barbaras death. This requires a major transformation to Tom and Barbaras estate plan. I would venture to say that almost all of the recent estate plans that have come into my office in the last year are set up under the old planning technique, and that the beneficiaries to many families could minimize taxes if the Toms and Barbaras of the world would revisit their estate plans with someone who understands these issues. Space constraints dont allow me to explore other significant income tax opportunities available under the new law. Ill review those further in future columns. Hopefully, your takeaway from todays column is that if you havent revisited your estate plan in the last couple of years, its probably time to do so. Craig R. Hersch. Learn more at www.sbshlaw.com. Will PowerYesterdays Planning Upside Downby Craig R. Hersch, Florida Bar Board Certified Wills, Trusts & Estates Attorney; CPA Walk A Mile In Their Shoes For HomelessnessThe Lee County Homeless Coalition encourages the community to take the Homeless Challenge during Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Month, November 2018, to generate increased community awareness for those living on the streets in Lee County. The 2018 Homeless Challenge will take place on Saturday, November 17 from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. During this event, participants will become familiar with the social services network and methods of everyday survival for those who live on the streets. This challenge will provide participants with an experience that has the power to affect change. The Lee County Homeless Coalition encourages the community to support homeless service providers during Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Month. Recommendations from the Lee County Homeless Coalition include collecting or donating non-perishable food or clothing, volunteering to serve meals at Lee County feeding sites, volunteering professional services to provide aid to the homeless, asking your employer or school to host or sponsor a fundraising event, or donating funds to a non-profit shelter, food pantry or FPLs Care to Share program. To help or learn more, contact Janet Bartos, executive director of the Lee County Homeless Coalition, at 322-6600 or visit www.leehomeless.org. From page 1Taste Of The IslandsBar & Grille, Il Cielo, The Jac Island Bar & Grille, Matzaluna, Sandollar, Sanibel Deli & Coffee Factory, Sanibel Fish House, Shima Japanese Steakhouse, Thistle Lodge and The Timbers. According to event organizers, participating restaurants will offer a mouth-watering array of menu items for $6 in CROW Bucks or less while competing for honors in a variety of categories. Attendees of the Taste cast ballots to decide the winner of the coveted Peoples Choice award. Dishes to be judged (by category) include: Best Appetizer The Clam Shack Clam Strips; Il Cielo Escargot Vol-au-vent; The Jac Island Bar & Grille Pork Belly; Sandollar Bacon Wrapped Scallops with Tropical Fruit Salad; Sanibel Fish House Wasabi Crab Cake; Shima Japanese Steakhouse Tuna Poke Bowl; Thistle Lodge Spicy Tuna Wedge & Parsnip Mashed Potatoes Best Seafood Blue Giraffe Causeway Quesadilla; Il Cielo Scallops with Lemon Grass Vinaigrette; The Jac Island Bar & Grille Grilled Octopus; Sandollar Shrimp & Crab with Bacon Jam & Tomato; Shima Japanese Steakhouse Shima Roll; The Timbers Crunchy Grouper Fingers Best Dessert Doc Fords Rum Bar & Grille Chocolate Banana Bread Pudding with Vanilla Ice Cream & Caramel Sauce; Sanibel Deli & Coffee Factory Apple Crisp with Vanilla Ice Cream; Sanibel Fish House Stuffed Key Lime Cheesecake; Thistle Lodge Florentine & Tropical Fruit Napolean Best Meat Blue Giraffe El Pastor Tacos; Doc Fords Rum Bar & Grille Texas Ribs with Coleslaw; Matzaluna Chicken Picatta over Orzo; Thistle Lodge Short Rib & Gratin; The Timbers Lamb Chop Lollipop Best Vegetarian Il Cielo Vegetable Ravioli with Roasted Pepper Sauce; Matzaluna Zoodle Mediterranean Taste of the Taste will be decided from the above dishes. Admission to Taste of the Islands, which can be purchased online or at the event, is $7 for adults and free for children less than 12 years of age. This years family-friendly event also features live entertainment by Private Stock Band. Inside The Community House, next door to Sanibel Community Park, guests can meet CROWs animal ambassadors and bid on silent auction items.

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17 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018 Is your Estate Plan providing you COMFORT, CONFIDENCE & CLARITY? Attorneys at Law SHEPPARD, BRETT, STEWART, HERSCH, KINSEY & HILL P.A. 9100 College Pointe Court Fort Myers, FL 33919 Phone 239.425.9383 Fax 239.334.3965 www.sbshlaw.com Craig R. HerschFlorida Bar Board Certied Wills, Trusts & Estates Attorney, CPA Will Power Columnist, The Island Sun or a copy of one of our books, visit estateprograms.com For FREE Selecting who should serve as your trustee during your incapacity and, ultimately, after your passing is not as simple as you may think. Learn what characteristics to look for when choosing those who will handle the future of your estate.Craig R. HerschFlorida Bar Board Certi ed Wills, Trusts & Estates Attorney, CPA SELECTING YOUR TRUSTEE online resources Book ReviewThe Forbidden Doorby Di SaggauThe Forbidden Door is Dean Koontzs fourth novel featuring rogue FBI agent Jane Hawk. Fans will remember Hawks background. She was one of the FBIs top agents until she became the nations mostwanted fugitive, a happily married woman before becoming a devastated widow. She has discovered an occult nanotech program being implemented by some of the nations highest leaders. This program turns many people into soulless automatons who are forced to commit suicide, as happened with Hawks husband. The program puts wealth and power into a very few, select hands. Hawk is on a mission to uncover and destroy the operation while protecting her young son Travis, who has been targeted by the programs operators. The media has named her the beautiful monster and too many people believe them. Janes enemies hit back hard. If their best operatives cant outrun her, they mean to bring her to them, using her 5-year-old son. Jane knows theres no underestimating their capabilities, but she must battle her way back across the country to the remote shelter where her boy is safely hidden, for now. One of Koontzs characters is an anxiety-prone latter-day Puritan, while another is an intellectually and physically domineering hulk. The modern Puritan moves nervously from scene to scene, constantly seeking perfection and never finding it, criticizing others to boost his own ego. He compares Hawk to Joan of Arc, but she rejects any likeness to the Maid of Orleans with absolute vehemence. Some of the best scenes in the book involve a plucky 12-year-old girl named Laurie, who is in the clutches of a sadistic, brain-altered female FBI agent. And then there is young Travis, whose emergency Plan B has him and his dogs staying with a kindly, autistic recluse who made millions developing apps. There is nearly always a dog involved in Koontz stories. The Forbidden Door features two gallant German Shepherds, faithful guardians of Travis. He obviously loves dogs because his dog Elsa, a Golden Retreiver, gets equal space in his newsletters. Its a nice touch. As Jane moves resolutely forward, new threats begin to emerge: a growing number of brain-altered victims driven hopelessly, violently insane. With the madness spreading like a virus, the war between Jane and her enemies will become a fight for all their lives, against the lethal terror unleashed from behind the forbidden door. image provided School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Shelley,I read your article on the gifted a couple of weeks ago and was wondering how parents today know if their child is gifted and at what age are they tested? I looked into it for my son when he was in fourth grade, and the school was offering special science classes that he wanted to take. This was a while ago and in a northeastern state. I was required to take him to a private psychologist, and she administered a twoto three-hour test which was quite expensive. My sons scores were high and he got into the talented and gifted program, but I never would have known he was eligible. What are your thoughts? Thank you. Jerry L, Sanibel, Florida Dear Jerry, The federal government does not provide guidance or have requirements for gifted services, thus students encounter a range of services from state to state and even district to district. Gifted education varies widely across the United States. Although Federal law acknowledges that children with gifts and talents have unique needs that are not traditionally offered in regular school settings, it offers no specific provisions, mandates, or requirements for serving these children. Currently, gifted education is a purely local responsibility and is dependent on local leadership. According to the Office of Civil Rights within the U.S. Department of Education, in 2011-12, there were approximately 3.2 million students in public schools in gifted and talented programs. Participation varies widely by state and by demographic subgroup. More needs to be done to ensure quality and equity in access to services. Unfortunately, leaving gifted education up to chance increases variability in the quality of services and creates inequities of access for students in poverty, from racial and ethnic minority groups, English learners, and those with disabilities. In Florida, the Department of Education mandates the identification of, services for and defines a gifted student as one who has superior intellectual development and is capable of high performance, including those with demonstrated achievement and/or potential ability. The state provides some funding to serve these students but not all that is necessary. According to the Lee County Schools website, To be eligible for gifted program services, a student must demonstrate a need for a program, a majority of characteristics of gifted students according to a standard scale or checklist, and superior intellectual development as measured by an intelligence quotient of two standard deviations or more above the mean on an individually administered standardized test of intelligence. A gifted student may also be a member of an under-represented group and meet the criteria specified in the approved school district plan for increasing participation of under-represented groups in gifted programs. The needs of the gifted are unique to the individual. Gifted students have strengths and weaknesses just as other students. A program that provides for their needs is important in helping students develop their abilities. To help meet these needs, Lee County offers a menu of services for the gifted. Students are eligible for gifted services from kindergarten through grade 12. All Lee County schools offer services for gifted students. For more information on gifted children, visit the website of the National Association of Gifted Children at www. ngac.org. Shelley Greggs is adjunct faculty at Florida SouthWestern State College, where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also a nationally certified school psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail. com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. MOAA Dinner MeetingThe next meeting of the Lee Coast Chapter of MOAA (Military Officers Association or America) will be held at Crown Colony Golf and Country Club Monday, November 12 at 5:45 p.m. Guest speaker Ettie Walsh, a 96-yearold former WAVE (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service), worked in Naval Intelligence in Washington, DC during World War II. After her service, she farmed in Mississippi, taught elementary school there and moved to Lee County where she was a substitute teacher. Former, retired or active duty uniformed officers who are interested in joining MOAA should contact Terry Robertson at 352-638-5838 for membership information.

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 201818 Superior InteriorsChange With The Seasonsby Trinette NelsonThe newly arrived holiday season has taken over nearly all aspects of retail life. It can be tempting to grab the festive decorations that consume the aisles and catalogs. A seasonal update can freshen up both homes and lives, but dont be limited to schemes that will be outdated in a few months. Seasonal enhancements and accessories added to existing furniture can bring a space into the holiday spirit that will continue to add warmth and coziness until the spring months arrive. Slipcovers are often overlooked as a means of transforming spaces, but they bring different upholstery looks to various settings. Custom slipcovers are a luxury available to enhance any upholstery frame and give it new personality. Hues of gold, deep greens, plums and bronze add the comfort of more temperate weather to a previously summer-based room. Not only does this transition a space into the events of fall, it also carries over into the winter months, and on through the New Year. Lighting is a go-to for changing the mood of a home throughout the calendar year. The stark brightness of the summer months can be combated with the help of lamp shades; these also have the power to bring warm, golden tones to warm any room. Tables seem to be a constant focal point of the holiday season; people tend to gather around a laid-out feast to commemorate their experiences with family and friends. Flowers are timeless centerpieces, but the platform can be spiced up with a decorative bowl or an arrangement of candles. The bowl can be filled with festive ornaments, such as miniature gourds or pumpkins for fall and gold and silver items for winter. A display of a scented, rustic potpourri of natures beauty can also lead to a welcoming environment. Candles, coupled with valued crystal mounted on mantels, act as accessories and functional contributors to the festive atmosphere. An artful and unexpected addition to a tablescape could also include a collection of small framed photos or sculptural figurines positioned within floral accents. Use your imagination and bring out some of your treasured keepsakes for your guests to enjoy. Trinette Nelson is an interior designer on Sanibel/Captiva Islands and can be reached at linda@coindecden. com. Financial FocusUnderstanding Risk Tolerance For Successby Jennifer BaseyTo succeed as an investor, you might think you need to know about the economy, interest rates and the fundamentals of companies in which youd like to invest. And all of these things are indeed important. But its most essential to know yourself. Specifically, you need to know how much risk you are willing to tolerate to achieve your goals. Of course, youve lived with yourself your entire life, so you probably have a pretty good idea of your likes and dislikes and what makes you comfortable or uncomfortable. But investing can be a different story. Initially, you may believe you have a high tolerance for risk, but if the financial markets drop sharply, and you see that youve sustained some sizable losses (at least on paper you havent really lost anything until you sell investments for less than what you paid for them), how will you feel? If you find yourself constantly fretting over these losses, perhaps even losing sleep over them, you might realize your risk tolerance is not as high as you thought. In this case, you may need to scale back the part of your portfolio devoted to growth in favor of a more balanced approach. On the other hand, if you believe yourself to have a low risk tolerance, and you start off investing in a conservative manner, you may indeed to minimize short-term losses but you also might find yourself frustrated over the slow growth of your portfolio. So you may decide that being highly risk-averse carries its own risk the risk of not making enough progress to achieve your long-term financial goals. To reduce this risk, you may need to tilt your portfolio somewhat toward more growth opportunities. In short, you may have to invest for a while before you truly understand your response to risk. But even then, dont get too locked in to one approach because your risk tolerance may evolve over time. When you are first starting out in your career, and for many years after, you are probably investing primarily to accumulate assets for retirement. Consequently, you may need to include a relatively high proportion of growth-oriented vehicles, such as stocks, in your portfolio. While stock prices will always fluctuate, you will have many years, perhaps decades, to overcome short-term losses, so you can possibly afford to take on a greater risk level in exchange for the potentially higher returns offered by stocks and stock-based investments. However, things can change once you reach retirement. At this stage of your life, your overall investment focus may shift from accumulation to income. This means you will need to start selling some investments to boost your cash flow and you wont want to sell when prices are down. (Remember the first rule of investing: Buy low and sell high.) To help avoid these fire sales, you may want to adjust your investment mix by adding more income-producing vehicles and reducing your holdings in growth-oriented ones. By doing so, you will be lowering your overall risk level. Keep in mind, though, that even in retirement, you will need some exposure to growth investments to help you stay ahead of inflation. Become familiar with your own risk tolerance it can play a big role in your investment decisions. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones financial advisor. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@ edwardjones.com. Legacy Fund Awards $30K To Help WomenThe Womens Legacy Fund (WLF) of the Southwest Florida Community Foundation recently presented their 2018 grant check to the Career Pipeline for Women in Health Care program, a program focused on enrolling women in underserved and underemployed communities in health science education programs at the two Lee County technical colleges, Fort Myers Technical College and Cape Coral Technical College. The 2018 contributors to the Womens Legacy Fund voted in the spring to design a multi-year grant process in which a three-year partnership would form with an organization that would satisfy the chosen cause area: Increase access and attainment to educational opportunities for women and girls. This inaugural year for the funds first three-year grant and partnership is the largest grant to date at $30,000. The grant will provide gap funding for qualified female CNA and MA students after other sources of funding have been applied to program costs. The Womens Legacy Fund is a group of women who combine their contributions in this collective philanthropy initiative to foster the immersion of women in philanthropy and develop the regions next philanthropic leaders. Since its inception, the WLF has been able to provide more than $200,000 in grants to benefit people and communities in Southwest Florida, including this years grant of $30,000. Currently, the fund has $860,670 in endowment that will continue to help fund local issues now and in the future. For more information or to become a contributor, visit www,floridacommunity. com/womens-legacy-fund. From left, Lisa Wright, Karen Benson, Renee Porter Medley, Connie Lizak, Rusty Brown and Sarah Owen photo provided Foreclosure And Tax Deed Sale Process WorkshopEducate yourself about the foreclosure and tax deed sale process during a free workshop at Fort Myers Regional Library on Wednesday, November 14 from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. The workshop will offer tools on researching, where to locate the auction calendar and how to make a deposit and place a bid. Also, learn what happens after the sale. The workshop is presented by the Lee County Clerk of Courts and Attorney Gregory W. Goetz, Esq of Goetz & Goetz Attorneys at Law, who volunteers his time to answer legal questions during the workshop. Reservations are not required but seating is limited Fort Myers Regional Library is located at 2450 First Street in Fort Myers. For more information, email rmiller@leeclerk. org. Republican WomenLee County Supervisor of Election Tommy Doyle will be the featured speaker at the monthly Fort Myers Republican Womens luncheon at The Helm Club in The Landings on Tuesday, November 13. A social hour begins at 11:15 a.m., followed by the noon lunch and the business meeting and program. Cost is $20. Doyle will discuss lessons learned from the 2018 elections and how veterans are being assured their votes are counted. JROTC cadets from Oasis High School will serve as the color guard. A questionand-answer session will be held following Doyles presentation. The Helm Club in The Landings is located at 4420 Flagship Drive in Fort Myers. For more information and reservations, contact Tina Laurie at 489-4701.

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19 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018 Effortless Hurricane Protection for Your Home rfntbnff frfffrfnrrnrr fr ffr f rffr We Meet or Beat All Competitor's Written Estimates 239.267.5858 www.WindowsPlusLLC.com Of ce@WindowsPlusLLC.com rrnfrStarting at$285* does not include installation CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATECALL US TODAY! SCC131151273 United Way Campaign For 2018-19 LaunchedMore than 800 people celebrated the Kick Off of the United Way of Lee, Hendry, Glades, and Okeechobees 2018-19 Campaign at the Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall recently. The enthusiastic crowd cheered the announcement of the winner of a two-year lease on a Scanlon Acura and the total of $6,355,425 raised toward the $10,301,386 goal. We thank everyone for coming out this morning and helping to get this years campaign off to such a great start. Its wonderful to see such a large turnout. By your attendance it is easy to see that we have all come together to make sure that United Way and the United Way network of partner agencies continues to be there for our community, providing critical services to those in need, said United Way Board Chair David Fry. Over the past 62 years our United Way has raised and distributed over $166 million dollars and has helped our communitys social service network change the lives of countless numbers of people in our community. Fry congratulates and thanked 201718 campaign chairs Beth Hendry and John Clinger who led United Way to its first ever $10 million dollar goal. Under their leadership, we not only met the goal, but exceeded the goal and raised $10,000,133, a 4-percent increase over the prior year, said Fry. This marked the 25th consecutive year that our United has either met or exceeded its goal. Members of the local Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts carried the flags and led the Pledge of Allegiance. Leanora Holloway from the Quality Life Centers Teen Program sang God Bless America, and Major Timothy Gilliam of The Salvation Army gave the invocation. Rachel Pierce and Clay Miller, NBC-2 morning anchors and emcees, called the final five contestants up to the stage for the drawing for a two-year lease on a new Acura from the John Scanlon Auto Group. The winner was Joanne Lashey of Henderson, Franklin, Starnes and Holt, PA. The car drawing was an incentive for the donors to the 2017-18 Campaign. Everyone who gave $240 or more to last years campaign was entered into the random drawing. United Way Campaign Chairs Linda Doggett of Lee Clerk of Courts and Robert Shearman of Henderson, Franklin, Starnes, and Holt, talked about the campaign and the campaign theme: The Power of U. This years campaign goal is $10.3 million. For that ambitious goal to be met, it is going to take a collective effort, Doggett said. One persons gift, united with many, can make a stronger community for all of us. The Power of U is the power of United Way. Shearman added, The Power of U is more than just a logo. It is more than just a slogan. It is about people. Its about community. Its about keeping 92 percent of every dollar raised right here in Lee, Hendry, Glades, and Okeechobee counties. The Power of U is about our networks. Its about 96 agencies serving the people of our community. Helping children who are hungry, families that may be in crisis, helping our veterans find jobs and supporting our seniors. The Power of U is truly the Power of All of Us. United Way Pacesetter Chairs Cindy Hawkins of Wiltshire Whitley, Richardson, and English, and Peter Dulac of Enterprise Holdings announced the Pacesetter results that represents 62 percent of the goal, the highest dollar amount ever reported at Kick Off. Publix again broke the $1 million mark by raising the most of any of the Pacesetter Companies with $1,770,301. The remaining top 10 Pacesetter companies include: 2. Bonita Bay Group with $500,230; 3. Chicos FAS with $250,000; 4. FineMark National Bank & Trust with $210,530; 5. LCEC with $209,003; 6. Enterprise Holdings with $208,038; 7. Lee Health with $197,154; 8. Lee County School District with $153,485; 9. McGriff Insurance Services with $110,961; and 10. Lee Board of County Commissioners with $108,000 All money raised in the United Way Campaign stays in the local community to help support the local human service network of partner agencies. For more information, call 433-2000 or visit www. unitedwaylee.org. Campaign Co-Chairs Linda Doggett and Robert Shearman with the thermometer showing 62 percent of the United Way goal achieved photo provided

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 201820 Two Big Season-Ending Professional Golf Tournaments Return This Yearby Ed FrankIts that time of the year again when many of the worlds top men and women golfers come to our area for two seasonending tournaments that draw huge crowds and provide big pay-offs to the winners. CME Group Tour Championship This brings the worlds best 72 women golfers to the Tiburon Golf Club in Naples next weekend for this unique event, with a $500,000 check to the winner of the Tournament Championship title. In addition, $1 million goes to the champion of the Race to the CME globe a season-long points qualifying format based on performances of every LPGA tour event. The final entry field of 72 will not be determined until the conclusion of this weekends Blue Bay tournament on the Hainah Island in China. In 2017, Floridas Lexi Thompson won the $1 million Race to the CME Globe and Ariya Jutanugarn was the CME Group Tour Champion taking home the $500,000 winners purse. After the reset of points following this weekends tournament in China, the players in the top five positions will be eligible to win the CME Globe with a win of the CME Tour Championship, and the players in the top 12 positions will have a mathematical chance to win the CME Globe. Yes, its both a complicated and exciting format. QBE Shootout This marks the 30th year of Greg Normans Shark Shootout that has been known by several names as the prime tournament sponsor changed. Despite the name changes, Hall of Famer Greg Norman has hosted each of the tournaments. This years shootout also returns to the Tiburon Golf Club in Naples from December 5 to 9 where 12 two-person teams compete for the $3.4 million purse. This years field includes 12 of the top 50 ranked players in the world who have won 13 PGA tournaments this year. Four past champions, including one winning team, also are in the field. Defending champions Sean OHair and Steve Stricker will attempt to become the first team to win back-to-back shootouts since 2004. Kevin Chappell and Kevin Kinser will be a team for the third straight year, and Tony Finau and Lexi Thompson are paired together for the second year in a row. The QBE shootout is the only PGA Tour event to have a female professional competing in each of the last three years. The remaining field for this years shootout is: Billy HorschelBrandt Snedeker; Harold Varner IIIBubba Watson; Byrson DeChambeauKevin Na; Patton KizzireDavis Love III; Pat PerezKyle Stanley; Emiliano GrilloGrame McDowell; Charley Huffman Gary Woodland; Charles Howell IIILuke List; Luke DonaldAndrew Landry. In announcing the field, Norman said, In the last four years, the champions have had to execute on the final hole to win the title, and with this field and these teams, it should continue to be a very close contest right to the end again this year. The shootout will feature a scramble format in the first round, a modified alternate shot format the second day and a final round four-ball for the Sunday final round. CureSearch for Childrens Cancer is the tournaments primary charitable beneficiary. Since 1989, the shootout has raised more than $13 million for charitable causes. SPORTS QUIZ 1. In 2017, Cincinnatis Scooter Gennett became the second player since 1901 with four home runs and at least 10 RBIs in a game. Who was the other? 2. In the 1960s, thr ee San Francisco Giants combined to win the National League home run title in seven seasons. Name the three. 3. When was the last time befor e 2014-16 that the University of Tennessees football team won three consecutive bowl games? 4. Name the last NBA team befor e the Cleveland Cavaliers in 2016 and 2017 to win their first seven playoff games in consecutive seasons. 5. Patrick Kane set a r ecord for the U.S. mens hockey team at the Ice Hockey World Championships in 2018 by tallying a total of 20 points. Who had held the record? 6. Jocelyne Lamour eux-Davidson set a womens hockey record at the 2018 Winter Games for fastest back-to-back goals in Olympic history (six seconds). Who had held the mark? 7. Who was the last mens golf major championship winner befor e Francesco Molinari in 2018 (British Open) to play the final two rounds without going over par on a hole? ANSWERS 1. St. Louis Mark Whiten, who had four home runs and 12 RBIs in a game in 1993. 2. Orlando Cepeda (1961), Willie Mays (, ) and Willie McCovey (, ). 3. It was the 1994-96 seasons. 4. The Minneapolis Lakers in 1949 and 1950. 5. Richard Roberge, with 16 points in 1962. 6. Canadas Caroline Ouellette scored goals 16 seconds apart in 2006. 7. Steve Elkington, at the 1995 PGA Championship.Red Sox Online Auction Funds ScholarshipsAs part of its continuing community outreach efforts, the Red Sox Foundation has created a two-week online auction to help fund scholarships for local high school students. Now through November 18 at 8 p.m., fans can access the online auction at www. redsox.com/fenwaysouthauction. A total of 30 unique items are available and range from experiences, autographed memorabilia and travel packages. Some highlights of this years auction include: Watching a 2019 Red Sox Spring Training Game in a suite with Boston Red Sox Hall of Famer Tim Wakefield; throwing out a ceremonial first pitch at a 2019 Red Sox game at Fenway Park along with four tickets to that game; a three-day, two-night stay at the Drury Inn in Fort Myers along with a $300 Hertz gift card, four front row, behind-the-dugout seats to a 2019 Spring Training game at JetBlue Park as well as four grandstand seats to the following game and VIP Pregame Tour, $100 gift card to Seasons 52 and $100 to Iguana Mia; autographed memorabilia by Chris Sale, David Ortiz, JD Martinez, Mookie Betts and Dustin Pedroia; and a threeday, two-night escape to the JW Marco Island Marriott including a wave runner tour for two and a round of golf for four at Eagle Creek Country Club Each year, the Lee County Red Sox Scholarship awards a $5,000 college scholarship to one deserving student from each of the 13 public high schools in Lee County. In the past six years the Red Sox Foundation has raised more than $260,000 for local nonprofits and scholarships. For more information, visit www. redsoxfoundation.org. Veterans Resource FairHodges University will host a Veterans Resource Fair and Family Day on its Naples campus on Saturday, November 17 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event, which is sponsored by Wounded Warriors of Collier County, is free and open to the public. We value our veterans for their service to our country, said Dr. John Meyer, president, Hodges University. This event is a day of family fun for them, their families and the community. We are proud to offer a variety of resources and services, which they can learn more about during this event. The event will also feature familyfriendly activities, including a petting zoo, swamp buggy, armored vehicles and an inflatable obstacle course. Food vendors will also be onsite. Hodges University is located at 2647 Professional Circle in Naples. For more information, call 938-7833. 239.472.0004Thinking of Selling?The Pfeifer Team has147 Sales This Year!Call Us for a Professional Consultation PRGHomeTeam.com

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21 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018 Automotive Service That You Can Trust Clean and Comfortable 239-277-10041921 Courtney Drive Fort Myers 33901 OPEN Monday Friday 8am to 5:30pm Saturday 8am to 4pm Sunday Closedwww.LegendaryFL.com service delivered to you of any $25 OffAll Makes and Models both Foreign and Domestic Limit one per customer, no cash value, cannot be combined with any We look forward to earning your business Cypress Cove at HealthPark Florida and Shell Point Retirement Community recently hosted a partnership program to introduce selected and interested Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) students to career opportunities within Southwest Floridas senior living communities. The first-of-its-kind joint program was the brainchild of Lee FP President Doug Dodson, whose organization oversees development of the Cypress Cove Life Care Community, and by Shell Point President Martin Schappell. Sen Lizbeth Benaquisto, R-Fort Myers, 27th District, a leading supporter of senior living development in Southwest Florida, was among those leaders meeting with and explaining to prospective FGCU graduates the short and long-term opportunities for them within this region. What better place, she indicated, than to draw students from area educational institutions. Our local universities are really top in the state in health sciences and administration education. So (this) was an opportunity to show some of these students the gems in senior living that are near and available to them. Sen. Lizbeth Benaquisto (R-Fort Myers, 27th District), front right, joins students from FGCU and administrators of Cypress Cove and FGCU in a visit Friday photo provided FGCU Breaks Ground On New CenterFlorida Gulf Coast University is expanding access to mental and behavioral healthcare for underserved populations in Southwest Florida. The university officially broke ground Tuesday on its Student and Community Counseling Center. The 27,000-square-foot facility will feature a community counseling clinic. The buildings new clinic creates improved access to group counseling, psychoeducation and counseling services to Southwest Floridas underserved populations, including children, adolescents and families, at little or no cost to them. This training facility will be staffed by advanced graduate student interns under the supervision of licensed faculty supervisors. The Student and Community Counseling Center will serve as the hub that uniquely integrates the universitys academics through our counseling department in Marieb College of health and human services and the services through our counseling and psychological services (CAPS), said Robbie Roepstorff, vice chair of the FGCU Board of Trustees. It is a great example of successfully blending the classroom and the community. Vital to the construction of this facility was a gift by David and Alise Bartley, who came to FGCU with the intention of creating a community counseling clinic. If theres a more relentless person on behalf of this project anywhere, I cant find her because Alise Bartley has taken that position, said FGCU President Mike Martin. That passion is expressed in so many ways. This is going to be a tribute and a legacy that you can take pride in long after the many years we all get to serve here. Alise Bartley, who is currently a visiting professor in the FGCU counseling department, said, Integral to the DNA of the community counseling center is our desire to support the Southwest Florida community in times of need, whether its through direct counseling and consultation services, training, collaboration, outreach or prevention. Bartley announced that the fee for services for community members will be $25 per hour or whatever you make an hour, whichever is the least. CAPS will relocate to the new facility. The department is the principal behavioral health counseling service for FGCUs 15,000 students. CAPS provides four distinct functions on campus: direct counseling and therapy services; training; consultation and collaboration; and outreach and prevention. The Office of Adaptive Services will also be housed in the three-story building. The offices mission is to enhance access for students, faculty, staff and guests with disabilities by providing effective reasonable accommodations through educating the campus community and promoting equal access and opportunity. President Martin noted that the project could not have happened without the work of numerous members of the campus and greater community. Also present at the groundbreaking ceremony was Jeff Muddell of the Lee Health Foundation. I think everyone in this community is even more acutely aware of the mental health needs, many of which are going unaddressed, said Muddell. Its going to take FGCU and so many community partners to meet the demand of this community. Lee Health is very excited about finding ways to partner with this counseling center, to bring up counselors and clinicians develop them right here in this community so they can serve and take care of the patients in this community. The Student and Community Counseling Center is slated to open in the fall of 2019 and is expected to cost $8 million to construct. FGCU President Mike Martin, center, and other dignitaries breaking ground on the Student and Community Counseling Center on October 30 photo provided Local Retirement Communities Host Student Career ProgramFrom page 1Estatesthrough the location each year from all around the globe. The organization has received many awards, including the National Stewardship Award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the National Garden Clubs Historic Preservation Award. The property is an official project of Save Americas Treasures, a Florida Historic Landmark and a National Register Historic Site. The Edison Botanic Laboratory is a National Historic Chemical Landmark. Edison and Ford Winter Estates is located at 2350 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www.edisonfordwinterestates.org or call 334-7419.

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 201822 Arts On Tap Fundraiser Raises Over $40,000On October 20, the Alliance for the Arts welcomed more than 300 artists, arts supporters, beer lovers and cultural philanthropists to its Arts On Tap fundraiser. Arts On Tap, now in its second year, is a taste of creativity in the Alliance gallery, featuring the craft of local brewers. The event rasied over $40,000. All funds directly support the Alliances mission to transform lives and improve the community through the arts. Since 1975, the Alliances year-round schedule of events have become a staple for the community through engaging gallery exhibitions, inspiring art classes from fine art life drawing to the art of beer-making and stimulating theatre productions that range from the classics to the cutting edge. Proceeds support a creative hub that spurs and supports self-expression, access and equity, imagination, and individuality by connecting community through the arts. Partygoers enjoyed live entertainment from musician Matty Jollie as well as unlimited tastings from participating breweries and restaurants, the Dia de los Muertos juried exhibit, twisted pub games, a silent auction and a raffle. Participating crafters include Big Blue Brewing, Bury Me Brewing, Coastal Dayz Brewery, Eight Foot Brewing, Fort Myers Brewing Company, Momentum Brewhouse, Palm City Brewing, Point Ybel Brewing Company and Scottys Bierwerks and culinary creations from Cristofs, Judi Mae Cookies, Pretzel Crips, Smallcakes Fort Myers and University Grill. The event was sponsored by Briers CPA, Custom Packaging and Products, The Dorcey Law Firm, EnSite, GMA Architects & Planners, HBKS Wealth Advisors, Priority Business Solutions, Sanibel Captiva Community Bank and Seminole Casino Hotel. Dislandys Acosta Bravo and Rich Bravo Keara Trummel and Bob Coleman Matty Jollie From left, Cantrella Canady, Sonya McCarter, Nancy Gibbson, Sandra Dixion and Lydia Black From left, Cesar Aguilera, Cheryl McDunnah Logan, Dale Ocasio and Stephanie Davis From left, Pierce Augustenborg, Lexi Augustenborg, Lee Golden, Michelle Golden, Sara Fitzpatrick, W. Jeffrey Mudgett photos provided From left, Ian Keith, Melissa Vogt and Jordan Veit

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23 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018 Local Homeless Veterans Group Gains AssistanceThe Lee County Tax Collectors Office continued its support for Hearts and Homes for Veterans Inc. with a recent $500 check presentation to former Army Sgt. Maj. David Santini, director of the Fort Myers-based nonprofit that supports homeless veterans and their families. As an Air Force veteran, this is an issue that hits home for me, Tax Collector Larry Hart said. We have a responsibility to these people who have sacrificed so much to protect our freedom. Our staff understands this and goes the extra mile to make sure veterans in need have the necessities of life. The Tax Collectors Office has raised more than $5,000 for the organization over the past four years through the efforts of staff, whove conducted candy and bracelet sales, and the kindness of Tax Collector customers, many of whom have donated their change to the fundraising initiative. Hearts and Homes for Veterans interacts with 30 to 40 veterans every week, providing service on four tiers. The first step is getting veterans in homes. The second is to make an empty house a home. The third part involves keeping veterans in their homes through financial support. The final goal is to encourage veterans whove received assistance to help other veterans in need. The organization is one of about a dozen nonprofits the Lee County Tax Collector staff supports through various initiatives throughout the year. Giving back is at the core of what we do here at the Tax Collectors Office, Hart said. We want the whole community to know weve got your back. Visit www.leetc.com to see all of the services the Lee County Tax Collector provides. Hearts and Homes for Veterans Inc. Director David Santini, a former Army sergeant major, accepts a check on behalf of the organization from Lee County Tax Collector employee Michelle Shayer. photo provided From page 1Theatre Conspiracyin attendance, are special benefactors of the theater. He said, in their honor from here on out, its The Bruce and Janet Bunch New Play Award. The audience gave the couple a standing ovation for their generosity. Now playing at Theatre Conspiracy is The Elephant Man which opened November 8. For tickets, call 939-2787, visit www.artinlee.org/theatre or stop by the Alliance for the Arts, located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. From left, Roberta Malcolm, Cantrella Canady and Anne Dodd From left, Alan and Edina Lessack with Cheryl and Barry Fulmer Ronald Treaseh and Lyn Bruner photos by Di Saggau From left, Michelle Pescatrice, Nancy Antonio and Joel Pescatrice

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 201824 Beautifulife:Fall In Loveby Kay CaspersonAre you in love... with your life? What do you love about fall? The word fall means many things to me. Fall is a time to embrace change and to look forward to a clean, crisp smell in the air and in our surroundings. It is a time for weather changes, new colors in the leaves and changes in nature. Fall can also be a fun time for wardrobe changes and altering our everyday routines. No matter where you live, I know for sure, we all look forward to bringing out those sweatshirts and cozy sweaters. There is no better time than now to reflect on the things you love about your life and also the things that you want to make better or different. The warm hues of fall bring a beautiful feeling of comfort and calm. I cant think of a better, more relaxing thing to do than to snuggle up in my comfy sweatshirt and a blanket, and watch a favorite movie or the football team Im rooting for that day. I encourage you to embrace this time to fall in love with your life all over again and to reflect on the beautiful things you have accomplished, but also have yet to do. Make a list of the areas in your life that are heading in the right direction and working out great for you. Then, also make a list of the things that might not be going as planned and that you may need to change direction on or create a new plan for. This can be an excellent time to make those much-needed repairs on your home, look into a new hairstyle or get a whole new look. Start to think about decorating for the holidays, bring out the throw blankets and focus on a project you have been putting off. The most important thing that fall reminds me of is that it is a new season for many things... love, life, health, family, friendships, projects, work, visitors, clients and many new success stories. Take this time to embrace it and do whatever it takes to fall in love with your beautiful life all over again. My affirmation for you this week is: I will embrace this time to make any changes needed to fall in love with my life today and every day. Kay Casperson is a beauty and lifestyle expert, founder and CEO of Beautifulife by Kay Casperson. She owns resort spas on Sanibel and Captiva islands and manufactures beauty and lifestyle products sold across the country. To stay inspired, visit www.kaycasperson.com or follow on social media @kaycasperson. Doctor and DieticianNordic Dietby Ross Hauser, MD and Marion Hauser, MS, RDHave you heard of the Nordic diet? Its taken from traditional Nordic meals of Denmark, Finland, Norway, Iceland, Sweden and Greenland and consists mainly of fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples, pears and root vegetables. Like the popular Mediterranean diet, the Nordic diet leans towards more fruits, vegetables and organic food intake. This plant-leaning nutrition style encourages whole grains rather than processed, sugary foods. Meals are homecooked, with an emphasis on food from the sea, lakes and wild countryside, and consist of less meat. Dark, dense rye bread is a popular Nordic food that is rich in fiber. Whole grain rye appears to help normalize glucose levels and provide tumor inhibition in prostate cancer. Berries are common too, playing a healthy role as an antioxidant source that helps keep arteries healthy and flexible, which may decrease blood pressure levels. The long coastlines provide rich sources of fish, with herring and mackerel being traditional Nordic foods. The omega-3 fatty acid content may lower the incidence of heart arrhythmias, lower triglycerides and lessen plaque buildup. Beans and peas are a major source of complex carbs in the Nordic diet and are a great protein source, which can replace some of the calories from red meat. They also have lots of nutrients like riboflavin, B6, calcium, zinc and iron. What about the results? Does the incidence of chronic disease decrease by following the Nordic diet? Some studies say it does. For instance, the consumption of whole grain rye bread was associated with a lower mortality in men. Following a traditional Nordic diet may also decrease cholesterol levels and insulin sensitivity. While more specific benefits of the Nordic diet are still being evaluated, we know eating fresh, whole foods, while avoiding processed and sugary foods, is a healthy way to go overall. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Caring Medical Regenerative Medicine Clinics has two locations: one in Oak Park, Illinois, and one in Fort Myers. It was established in 1991 by Ross Hauser, MD, and Marion Hauser, MS, RD. They can be reached at info@ caringmedical.com. HealthPark Earns Baby-Friendly DesignationHealthPark Medical Center recently gained international recognition when it was named a Designated Baby-Friendly birth facility from Baby-Friendly USA. It joins Cape Coral Hospital and Gulf Coast Medical Center as the third Lee Health hospital to earn this title. The hospital experience is critical for mothers who intend to breastfeed, and earning a Baby-Friendly designation is validation for the exceptional work our team does to support breastfeeding moms and babies. We must support new mothers immediately after birth to help them establish breastfeeding early. This gives infants the best and healthiest start in life, said Carol Lawrence, supervisor of perinatal practice, education, research, and lactation at HealthPark Medical Center. Baby-Friendly USA, Inc. is the United States authority for the implementation of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI), a global program sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Childrens Fund (UNICEF). The initiative encourages and recognizes hospitals and birthing centers that offer an optimal level of care for breastfeeding mothers and their babies. To learn more about the BabyFriendly Hospital Initiative, visit www. babyfriendlyusa.org. deaRPharmacistHealth Benefits Of White Sageby Suzy Cohen, RPhDear Readers: White sage is known botanically as Salvia apiana and can be purchased in a bundle. You can also drink it as a tea. This plant has impressive medicinal properties and is used in many wellness rituals. I think some people mistakenly assume you can get high off it, but you cant. I also want to emphasize this is a medicinal herb for everyone its not just for new agers and its benefits were put on Earth for all to utilize. Sage is just like every other herbal remedy youve heard of. You can take herbs as a dietary supplement (think ginger, echinacea or dandelion) you can drink tea from the plant (think chamomile or coffee), or you can apply an herb as a compress (think of calendula). You can distill plants and inhale their essential oils, (think of lavender or peppermint). Its all medicine. Im just giving you a new way to extract the medicine from a plant, by burning it, and this practice is referred to as smudging. Here are five benefits of white sage: 1. Treats sinus infections You can inhale the aroma given off a burning white sage bundle for a few minutes, or you can drink it as a tea. However you do it, its the compound called eucalyptol also known as 1,8-cineole that, when inhaled, reduces painful sinus inflammation. It may kill the associated pathogens too. Thats pretty amazing considering the side effects of prescribed antibiotics and antihistamines. 2. Calms a sore throat Sage leaf tea is a proven strategy for alleviating a sore throat, at least according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Plant Guide. Sage tea as you know will reduce mucous secretions of the sinuses, throat and lungs. 3. Relieves menstrual pain White sage tea might provide relief from menstrual period cramps and possibly some symptoms of menopause like sweating and hot flashes. This benefit occurs because sage contains phytoestrogens, which are plant-derived estrogens. 4. Provides cleansing energy Sage is kind of like an eraser, it will help remove the days burdens and ease emotional suffering. It may help with mild anxiety or depression. Smudging is the quickest way because, when you inhale, the compounds go straight to your bloodstream and brain. Just FYI, the practice of burning herbs (aka smudging) is a non-religious one. Youre just burning plant leaves rather than swallowing the supplement. If youd like, you can certainly pray while you burn the medicine. 5. Cleans the air Burning the embers of sage (aka smudging) in a room is helpful if someone is sick. My tip is designed to clean a room where someone has been coughing or sneezing from pneumonia, or influenza, for example and you desire to clear the air space of these germs so you dont catch it too. If you work in nursing homes, clinics or hospitals, you might want to go home and smudge yourself to help deter infection from pathogens that hitched a ride on your clothes. Research has found that burning sage for an hour reduced the levels of bacteria in the air by 94 percent, and this benefit lasted for 24 hours. If you dont want to burn it, drinking sage tea is an option. You can make your own white sage tea, or buy a commercially prepared form at health food stores and online. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. SuzyCohen.com.

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018 25 Emergency . ............................................... 9 11 Lee County Sheriffs Ofce . .............................. 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol . ................................... 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol . .................................. 278-7100 Poison Control . ................................... 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center . ...................... 1-800-936-5321Ft .. Myers Chamber of Commerce . ......................... 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare . .......................... 4 25-2685 Fort Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce . ................... 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library . ............................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library . ................................ 5 33-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce . ........................ 931-0931 Post Ofce . ..................................... 1 -800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau . ............................ 3 38-3500ARTSAlliance for the Arts . .................................... 9 39-2787 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio . ............................ 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers . ............................... 275-3970 Barbara B .. Mann Performing Arts Hall . ...................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS . .......................................... 3 95-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre . .......................... 2 78-4422 Cultural Park Theatre . ................................... 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light . ................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade . ....................332-4488 Florida West Arts . ...................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers . ...................... 288-2535 Gulf Coast Symphony . .................................. 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres . ..................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic . ................................ 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater . ............................... 472-6862 SW Florida Symphony . .................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy . .................................... 936-3239 Young Artists Awards . ................................... 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAmerican Legion Post #38 . ........................... 2 39-332-1853 Angel Flight . .................................. 1 -877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center . .................................. 731-3535 American Business Women Association . .................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL . .................................... 3 39-8046 Audubon Society . ...................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR . ............................ 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society . ............................ 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus . ................... 1 -855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club . ................................. 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees . .............................. 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists . ................................. 415-2484 Embroiderers Guild of America Sea Grape Chapter . ...... 2 39-267-1990 FM UDC Chapter 2614 United Daughters of the Confederacy . ... 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL . .............................. 561-9164 Garden Club of Cape Coral . .......................... 2 39-257-2654 Horticulture and Tea Society . ............................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society . ................................... 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society . ......................... 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation . ........................ 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees . ......... 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America . ....................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL . ............................. 66 7-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans . ............................ 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy . ....................... 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association . ...................... 5 61-2118 Kiwanis Fort Myers Beach . .................... 7 65-4254 or 454-8090 Kiwanis Fort Myers Edison . .............................. 694-1056 Kiwanis Fort Myers South . ............................... 691-1405 Iona-McGregor . ....................................... 482-0869 Lions Club Fort Myers Beach . ............................. 463-9738 Lions Club Fort Myers High Noon . ......................... 466-4228 Lions Club Estero/South Fort Myers . ....................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County . ......................... 7 68-0417 Organ Transplant Recipients of SW Florida . .................. 247-3073 POLO Club of Lee County . ............................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers . ............................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society . ........................... 472-6940 United Way of Lee County . ............................... 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) . ................... 2 11 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews National Shell Museum . .................... 395-2233 Burroughs Home . ...................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium . ....................... 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates . ............................ 334-7419 Fort Myers Skate Park . .................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium . ................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge . .................. 4 72-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site . ......................... 2 39-992-0311 Langford Kingston Home . ............................ 239-334-2550 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center . .............. 765-8101 Skatium . ............................................. 3 21-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society . ...................... 93 9-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History . ...................... 321-7430 True Tours . .......................................... 94 5-0405 To be listed in calling card email your information to: press@riverweekly. .com PETS OF THE WEEKphotos provided Haven on Earth Animal LeagueSiamese And DylanHi! Im a beautiful 12-year-old male Siamese cat named Siamese. I am a very sweet kitty and am in need of a new home as my human can no longer keep me. I am looking for a quiet home with someone who wants to give me lots of affection. I have been fully vetted and brought up to date on all vaccines. My adoption fee is $75. Hello, Im Dylan. Arent I just adorable? Im only 8 months old, so Im quite the playful kitten. I like other cats and hope I can find a home with another young kitty to play with. Im neutered and up to date on all vaccines. My adoption fee is $100. To find out more about me, call Diane at 860-833-4472 or email Haven on Earth Animal League at www.havenon earthanimalleague@yahoo. com. W e are being cared for by Haven on Earth Animal League. For more information, call Diane at 860-833-4472 or email havenonearthanimalleague@yahoo.com. Siamese Dylan PAWS Of SanibelBrava And LucyTwo very unusual and beautiful sisters are up for adoption. One is tortoiseshell cat with white or calico features, while the other is a dilute tortoiseshell. These photos do not do them justice, as they are much more adorable in person. Adopt one, or keep them together and adopt both. They are four and five months old. They come with complete vet check-up, all shots, tests, wormed, treated with flea preventative and spayed. Call Pam at PAWS at 472-4823 to adopt one or both. Sonny And CherThis is Sonny and Cher. Some of you may remember them. Three years ago, four kitties, the momma and three kittens were trapped between the Sunset Beach Resort and Lantana condominium on West Gulf Drive. All were adopted (Lana, Tanner, Sonny and Cher) to lovely people. However, Sonny and Chers mom has reached a time in her life when she feels she must move in with family over on Pine Island. Unfortunately, in addition to her granddaughter being allergic, her son operates a business out of his home that is directly on Pine Island Road and the doors are always opening and closing, so its not safe for kitties. These are very special kitties, and need to be together forever. Call Pam at 472-4823 if you can give these sweethearts a new home. Sonny Cher Brava Lucy Lee County Domestic Animal ServicesBlondie And Betty Hello, my name is Blondie, and I am a 10-year-old female chihuahua pocket-sized senior pet. Although I am blind, I will come right to you when you call me and can navigate my way around quite well. My adoption fee is $25. Hi, Im Betty. Im a 6-month-old female domestic shorthair. I love everybody. I am is a bundle of love that likes to play and run around and rub up against the brush on my cattery door. Stop by and meet me today. My adoption fee is $10, and you can adopt me and get another kitty for free. Fall in Love with your new best friend during LCDAS fall promotion that enables those interested to adopt a dog age 5 months or older for just $40, and cats for $10 throughout the month of November. Although fees are reduced, the adoption package still includes spay or neuter surgery, ageappropriate vaccinations, flea treatment, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, heartworm test for dogs age 6 months and older, Lee County license for pets 3 months or older, microchip ID and a 10-day health guarantee. The adoption package is valued at more than $500. For more information, call 533-7387 (LEEPETS) or visit www.leelostpets.com. Also visit our Facebook page or Instagram @leeanimalservicesThe shelter is open to the public Monday through Saturday at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers. Adoptions are available 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For information, visit Lee County Domestic Animal Services at www. leegov.com/animalservices or call 533-7387. Blondie ID# A757662 Betty ID# A752154

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018 26 PUZZLESAnswers on page 29

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018 27 FIND AT LEaAST S SIX D DIffFFERENCES BETWEEN PaANElLS SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 29answer on page 31 Zucchini Chocolate Cake photo courtesy Fresh From FloridaZucchini Chocolate Cake 1 small zucchini, grated (do not squeeze out water content) 1 small squash, grated (do not squeeze out water content) 1 cup all-purpose unbleached flour cup 100 percent unsweetened cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking soda teaspoon sea salt cup unsalted butter, softened cup light brown sugar cup oil 2 eggs, room temperature 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract 1 cup mini semi-sweet chocolate chips Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a large bowl sift together the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, and salt. Next add softened butter, oil, eggs, brown sugar, vanilla and mix until blended (batter will appear dry). Fold in cup of mini chocolate chips and the grated squash and zucchini until combined (do not overmix). Pour batter into buttered 9x9 loaf pan and sprinkle remaining chocolate chips on top. Bake for 50 minutes, remove from oven and allow to cool slightly. Serve warm or room temperature. Chef tip: this recipe can also be baked in muffin tins.

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORYTHE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018 28 CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the benets of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor42 Barkley Circle, Suite 1 Fort Myers, FL 33907 239-931-4543GENERAL CONTRACTOR N C R CGC1517615www.dbrowngc.com239-593-1998 A BBB Accredited Business with an +A Rating HOME SERVICES P.O. BoOX 1050 SANIbBEL FLoORIDA 33957WWW.IsSLANDHoOMEsSERVICE.CoOM INfoFO@IsSLANDHoOMEsSERVICE.CoOMp P Ho O NE: (239) 472-5247 C CELL: (239) 229-6366JUERGEN SCHREYEROWNERYYARD SERVICE TREE SERVICE PooOOL SERVICEHHoOME WWAt TCH CCLEANING SERVICE ISLAND HOME SERVICE TREE TRIMMING, ARBORIST Licensed, insured, workers compensation Arbor Specialist Since 1995 Tree Trimming Tree Removal Stump Grinding239-910-3256info@treewest@gmail.comwww.treewestorida.comP.O. Box 564, Sanibel, FL 33957Tell A FriendHOME WATCH 239-558-5733 rabbitrdmgt@gmail.com www.RabbitRoadMgt.comRabbit Rd. Home Watch Service Home Watch Service based on Sanibel Island. We are licensed, insured, bonded and members of the National Home Watch Association. ELECTRICAL 204-B Waldo Avenue, Lehigh Acres, FL 33971generator@jteelectricinc.comBrady J. ReesGenerator and Service ExpertT | 239-368-9511 C | 239-980-1596 Lee, Collier, Hendry, Charlotte, Sarasota CountiesLic.# EC-13002460 SERVICE RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL REMODEL WINDOW CLEANING Residential-Commercial-New ConstructionLICENSED and INSURED JCCPCLEANING@AOL.COM/jccpwindowcleaning.comJccp Window and Cleaning Service, LLC P.O. BOX 1084, SANIBEL FL 33957 JC Window Cleaning407-902-7845 239-203-5913Juan PenalozaROCK, MULCH, PLANTS rock, mulch, plants Landscape Nursery & Supply 239-337-7256 gulfcoastlandscapenursery.com South Fort Myers FISHING CHARTERLight Tackle Sport Fishing Tarpon Snook Redsh & More CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.comCLEANING SERVICES Jennifer Watson(239) 810-6293 Residential & Commercial Construction Clean Up Interior Windows Home Watch CONTRACTOR Bathrooms Kitchens Lanai Enclosures Windows Screen Rooms Decks Railings Safety Tubs Doors Add a Room or Garage Outdoor Kitchens Storm Shutters and Much More $500. OFF WITH AD cbc1261010239-936-0836Family owned, 40 Years Local Surfside Home Improvements Aluminum & Remodeling

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018 29 KING CROSSWORD SUPER CROSSWORD MAGIC MAZE SUDOKU PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF NOVEMBER 12, 2018Aries (March 21 to April 19) Keep your feelings to yourself as you work through an awkward circumstance. Complaining is useless, and also unwise since your words could come back to haunt you. Taurus (April 20 to May 20) A sudden flash of Bovine practicality shows you how you might be able to turn your artistic pursuits into a profitable venture. A spouse or partner offers some sage advice. Gemini (May 21 to June 20) Be prepared with several Plan Bs that you might have to use as backups just in case you encounter some troublesome complications with your carefully constructed schedule. Cancer (June 21 to July 22) You might think youll never have a free moment again with the demands of the workplace piling on. Cheer up. The pressure eases as holiday time nears. An old friend brings good news. Leo (July 23 to August 22) Your Leonine pride might make it difficult to offer an apology to a co-worker you unintentionally offended. But a quick and sincere Im sorry could prevent problems down the line. Virgo (August 23 to September 22) This is a good time to tackle those backed-up chores that have kept you from moving into other, potentially more worthwhile projects. A personal matter needs your attention. Libra (September 23 to October 22) You usually have no problem rushing to the defense of someone you perceive as being treated unjustly. But perceptions could be deceiving this week. Check the facts before you act. Scorpio (October 23 to November 21) Before you point fingers at who might be to blame for the unexpected change in your plans, take a few moments to reflect on how this turn of events might be a blessing in disguise. Sagittarius (November 22 to December 21) You seek out advice in the first part of the week. But be careful not to let counsel from others overshadow your own sense of perception. Things become clearer by the weeks end. Capricorn (December 22 to January 19) The trusted colleagues you relied on earlier continue to offer support with your project. But you take more control, and by the weeks end, you should be in full command. Aquarius (January 20 to February 18) Rely on your practical side while exploring investment possibilities. Caution is still your watchword in these matters. Your social life takes a gratifying turn by the weeks end. Pisces (February 19 to March 20) An already confusing situation appears to grow murkier during the first part of the week. But it all starts to clear by the weeks end. Plan to spend the weekend with someone special. Born This Week: You have a passion for life that inspires others to follow your example. You could be a motivational speaker. It was civil-rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. who made the following sage observation: Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. Everyone knows that a sophomore is someone in his or her second year of high school or college. Most people dont realize, though, that the word is derived from the Greek words sophos, which means wise, and moros, which means stupid. Have you ever tried to hum while holding your nose? It cant be done. The creator of the ubiquitous smiley face earned a grand total of $45 for his creative effort. If youre a pet owner, you probably know that the epidemic of obesity is not limited to humans; many pets are overweight, too. You might be surprised to learn, though, that some pet owners choose to deal with the problem in a way that we usually associate only with people: liposuction. Yes, you can get cosmetic surgery for your pets. If you hear the word Bilbo you might think of a famously adventurous hobbit, but a bilbo is also a finely tempered Spanish sword. A recent study by scientist Karl Berg suggests that an adult green-rumped parrotlet, a tiny bird native to Venezuela, will name its babies, assigning each a particular series of peeps to identify it. Not only that, other parrotlets then learn to associate that exact series of peeps with that particular bird, and actually use the sounds to get that birds attention. In the original version of the Grimm Brothers fairy tale Cinderella, doves peck out the stepsisters eyes at Cinderellas wedding. Life is not a spectacle or a feast; it is a predicament. -George Santayana TRIVIA TEST 1. Theodore Roosevelt 2. Addis Ababa 3. South Dakota 4. Fear of thunder and lightning 5. Hamlet 6. 16th century 7. Roy Orbison 8. Babe Ruth 9. Crossword puzzle 10. Color blindness. TRIVIA ANSWERS 1. U.S. Pr esidents: Who was the only U.S. president born on the island of Manhattan? 2. Geography : What is the capital of Ethiopia? 3. U.S. States : Which state is home to Mount Rushmore? 4. Psychology : What fear is represented by the condition astraphobia? 5. Literatur e: Which of Shakespeares plays produced the line, Neither a borrower nor a lender be? 6. Food & Drink : In which century was tea introduced to Europe? 7. Movies : Who sang the title song to the movie Pretty Woman? 8. Famous Quotations : What baseball great once said, Never let the fear of striking out keep you from playing the game? 9. Games : What kind of word puzzle was introduced December 21, 1913 in the New York World? 10. Medical : What is a more common name for the condition called achromatopsia? STRANGE BUT TRUE THOUGHT FOR THE DAY rock, mulch, SUNDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 72 TUESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 70 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 82 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:29 am7:49 am3:07 pm6:38 pm Sat12:57 am8:29 am3:57 pm7:02 pm Sun1:29 am9:12 am4:55 pm7:32 pm Mon2:05 am10:00 am6:06 pm8:12 pm Tue2:48 am10:54 am7:19 pm9:25 pm Wed3:42 am11:53 am8:11 pm11:22 pm Thu4:57 am12:53 pm8:46 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:48 am8:11 am2:33 pm8:05 pm Sat1:10 am8:50 am3:17 pm8:37 pm Sun1:32 am9:28 am4:00 pm9:06 pm Mon2:02 am10:06 am4:43 pm9:29 pm Tue2:44 am10:45 am5:30 pm9:52 pm Wed3:32 am11:35 am6:22 pm10:24 pm Thu4:25 am12:43 pm7:15 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:12 pm7:51 amNone6:40 pm Sat12:02 am8:31 am3:02 pm7:04 pm Sun12:34 am9:14 am4:00 pm7:34 pm Mon1:10 am10:02 am5:11 pm8:14 pm Tue1:53 am10:56 am6:24 pm9:27 pm Wed2:47 am11:55 am7:16 pm11:24 pm Thu4:02 am12:55 pm7:51 pmNone Day High Low High Low Fri2:39 am11:05 am5:17 pm9:54 pm Sat3:07 am11:45 am6:07 pm10:18 pm Sun3:39 am12:28 pm7:05 pm10:48 pm Mon4:15 am1:16 pm8:16 pm11:28 pm Tue4:58 am2:10 pm9:29 pmNone Wed5:52 am12:41 am10:21 pm3:09 pm Thu7:07 am2:38 am10:56 pm4:09 pm WEDNESDAYPartly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 73 MONDAYSunny High: 74 Low: 67 SATURDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 74 FRIDAYMost ly Sunny High: 82 Low: 75 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 9, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 72 TUESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 70 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 82 Low: 71 Day High Low High Low Fri12:29 am7:49 am3:07 pm6:38 pm Sat12:57 am8:29 am3:57 pm7:02 pm Sun1:29 am9:12 am4:55 pm7:32 pm Mon2:05 am10:00 am6:06 pm8:12 pm Tue2:48 am10:54 am7:19 pm9:25 pm Wed3:42 am11:53 am8:11 pm11:22 pm Thu4:57 am12:53 pm8:46 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:48 am8:11 am2:33 pm8:05 pm Sat1:10 am8:50 am3:17 pm8:37 pm Sun1:32 am9:28 am4:00 pm9:06 pm Mon2:02 am10:06 am4:43 pm9:29 pm Tue2:44 am10:45 am5:30 pm9:52 pm Wed3:32 am11:35 am6:22 pm10:24 pm Thu4:25 am12:43 pm7:15 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:12 pm7:51 amNone6:40 pm Sat12:02 am8:31 am3:02 pm7:04 pm Sun12:34 am9:14 am4:00 pm7:34 pm Mon1:10 am10:02 am5:11 pm8:14 pm Tue1:53 am10:56 am6:24 pm9:27 pm Wed2:47 am11:55 am7:16 pm11:24 pm Thu4:02 am12:55 pm7:51 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:39 am11:05 am5:17 pm9:54 pm Sat3:07 am11:45 am6:07 pm10:18 pm Sun3:39 am12:28 pm7:05 pm10:48 pm Mon4:15 am1:16 pm8:16 pm11:28 pm Tue4:58 am2:10 pm9:29 pmNone Wed5:52 am12:41 am10:21 pm3:09 pm Thu7:07 am2:38 am10:56 pm4:09 pm WEDNESDAYPartly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 73 MONDAYSunny High: 74 Low: 67 SATURDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 74 FRIDAYMost ly Sunny High: 82 Low: 75 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 9, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 72 TUESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 70 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 82 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:29 am7:49 am3:07 pm6:38 pm Sat12:57 am8:29 am3:57 pm7:02 pm Sun1:29 am9:12 am4:55 pm7:32 pm Mon2:05 am10:00 am6:06 pm8:12 pm Tue2:48 am10:54 am7:19 pm9:25 pm Wed3:42 am11:53 am8:11 pm11:22 pm Thu4:57 am12:53 pm8:46 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:48 am8:11 am2:33 pm8:05 pm Sat1:10 am8:50 am3:17 pm8:37 pm Sun1:32 am9:28 am4:00 pm9:06 pm Mon2:02 am10:06 am4:43 pm9:29 pm Tue2:44 am10:45 am5:30 pm9:52 pm Wed3:32 am11:35 am6:22 pm10:24 pm Thu4:25 am12:43 pm7:15 pmNone Day High Low High Low Fri2:12 pm7:51 amNone6:40 pm Sat12:02 am8:31 am3:02 pm7:04 pm Sun12:34 am9:14 am4:00 pm7:34 pm Mon1:10 am10:02 am5:11 pm8:14 pm Tue1:53 am10:56 am6:24 pm9:27 pm Wed2:47 am11:55 am7:16 pm11:24 pm Thu4:02 am12:55 pm7:51 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:39 am11:05 am5:17 pm9:54 pm Sat3:07 am11:45 am6:07 pm10:18 pm Sun3:39 am12:28 pm7:05 pm10:48 pm Mon4:15 am1:16 pm8:16 pm11:28 pm Tue4:58 am2:10 pm9:29 pmNone Wed5:52 am12:41 am10:21 pm3:09 pm Thu7:07 am2:38 am10:56 pm4:09 pm WEDNESDAYPartly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 73 MONDAYSunny High: 74 Low: 67 SATURDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 74 FRIDAYMost ly Sunny High: 82 Low: 75 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 9, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 72 TUESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 70 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 82 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:29 am7:49 am3:07 pm6:38 pm Sat12:57 am8:29 am3:57 pm7:02 pm Sun1:29 am9:12 am4:55 pm7:32 pm Mon2:05 am10:00 am6:06 pm8:12 pm Tue2:48 am10:54 am7:19 pm9:25 pm Wed3:42 am11:53 am8:11 pm11:22 pm Thu4:57 am12:53 pm8:46 pmNone Day High Low High Low Fri12:48 am8:11 am2:33 pm8:05 pm Sat1:10 am8:50 am3:17 pm8:37 pm Sun1:32 am9:28 am4:00 pm9:06 pm Mon2:02 am10:06 am4:43 pm9:29 pm Tue2:44 am10:45 am5:30 pm9:52 pm Wed3:32 am11:35 am6:22 pm10:24 pm Thu4:25 am12:43 pm7:15 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:12 pm7:51 amNone6:40 pm Sat12:02 am8:31 am3:02 pm7:04 pm Sun12:34 am9:14 am4:00 pm7:34 pm Mon1:10 am10:02 am5:11 pm8:14 pm Tue1:53 am10:56 am6:24 pm9:27 pm Wed2:47 am11:55 am7:16 pm11:24 pm Thu4:02 am12:55 pm7:51 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:39 am11:05 am5:17 pm9:54 pm Sat3:07 am11:45 am6:07 pm10:18 pm Sun3:39 am12:28 pm7:05 pm10:48 pm Mon4:15 am1:16 pm8:16 pm11:28 pm Tue4:58 am2:10 pm9:29 pmNone Wed5:52 am12:41 am10:21 pm3:09 pm Thu7:07 am2:38 am10:56 pm4:09 pm WEDNESDAYPartly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 73 MONDAYSunny High: 74 Low: 67 SATURDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 74 FRIDAYMost ly Sunny High: 82 Low: 75 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 9, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 72 TUESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 70 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 82 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:29 am7:49 am3:07 pm6:38 pm Sat12:57 am8:29 am3:57 pm7:02 pm Sun1:29 am9:12 am4:55 pm7:32 pm Mon2:05 am10:00 am6:06 pm8:12 pm Tue2:48 am10:54 am7:19 pm9:25 pm Wed3:42 am11:53 am8:11 pm11:22 pm Thu4:57 am12:53 pm8:46 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:48 am8:11 am2:33 pm8:05 pm Sat1:10 am8:50 am3:17 pm8:37 pm Sun1:32 am9:28 am4:00 pm9:06 pm Mon2:02 am10:06 am4:43 pm9:29 pm Tue2:44 am10:45 am5:30 pm9:52 pm Wed3:32 am11:35 am6:22 pm10:24 pm Thu4:25 am12:43 pm7:15 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:12 pm7:51 amNone6:40 pm Sat12:02 am8:31 am3:02 pm7:04 pm Sun12:34 am9:14 am4:00 pm7:34 pm Mon1:10 am10:02 am5:11 pm8:14 pm Tue1:53 am10:56 am6:24 pm9:27 pm Wed2:47 am11:55 am7:16 pm11:24 pm Thu4:02 am12:55 pm7:51 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:39 am11:05 am5:17 pm9:54 pm Sat3:07 am11:45 am6:07 pm10:18 pm Sun3:39 am12:28 pm7:05 pm10:48 pm Mon4:15 am1:16 pm8:16 pm11:28 pm Tue4:58 am2:10 pm9:29 pmNone Wed5:52 am12:41 am10:21 pm3:09 pm Thu7:07 am2:38 am10:56 pm4:09 pm WEDNESDAYPartly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 73 MONDAYSunny High: 74 Low: 67 SATURDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 74 FRIDAYMost ly Sunny High: 82 Low: 75 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 9, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 72 TUESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 70 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 82 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:29 am7:49 am3:07 pm6:38 pm Sat12:57 am8:29 am3:57 pm7:02 pm Sun1:29 am9:12 am4:55 pm7:32 pm Mon2:05 am10:00 am6:06 pm8:12 pm Tue2:48 am10:54 am7:19 pm9:25 pm Wed3:42 am11:53 am8:11 pm11:22 pm Thu4:57 am12:53 pm8:46 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:48 am8:11 am2:33 pm8:05 pm Sat1:10 am8:50 am3:17 pm8:37 pm Sun1:32 am9:28 am4:00 pm9:06 pm Mon2:02 am10:06 am4:43 pm9:29 pm Tue2:44 am10:45 am5:30 pm9:52 pm Wed3:32 am11:35 am6:22 pm10:24 pm Thu4:25 am12:43 pm7:15 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:12 pm7:51 amNone6:40 pm Sat12:02 am8:31 am3:02 pm7:04 pm Sun12:34 am9:14 am4:00 pm7:34 pm Mon1:10 am10:02 am5:11 pm8:14 pm Tue1:53 am10:56 am6:24 pm9:27 pm Wed2:47 am11:55 am7:16 pm11:24 pm Thu4:02 am12:55 pm7:51 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:39 am11:05 am5:17 pm9:54 pm Sat3:07 am11:45 am6:07 pm10:18 pm Sun3:39 am12:28 pm7:05 pm10:48 pm Mon4:15 am1:16 pm8:16 pm11:28 pm Tue4:58 am2:10 pm9:29 pmNone Wed5:52 am12:41 am10:21 pm3:09 pm Thu7:07 am2:38 am10:56 pm4:09 pm WEDNESDAYPartly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 73 MONDAYSunny High: 74 Low: 67 SATURDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 74 FRIDAYMost ly Sunny High: 82 Low: 75 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 9, 2018 7-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 72 TUESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 70 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 82 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:29 am7:49 am3:07 pm6:38 pm Sat12:57 am8:29 am3:57 pm7:02 pm Sun1:29 am9:12 am4:55 pm7:32 pm Mon2:05 am10:00 am6:06 pm8:12 pm Tue2:48 am10:54 am7:19 pm9:25 pm Wed3:42 am11:53 am8:11 pm11:22 pm Thu4:57 am12:53 pm8:46 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:48 am8:11 am2:33 pm8:05 pm Sat1:10 am8:50 am3:17 pm8:37 pm Sun1:32 am9:28 am4:00 pm9:06 pm Mon2:02 am10:06 am4:43 pm9:29 pm Tue2:44 am10:45 am5:30 pm9:52 pm Wed3:32 am11:35 am6:22 pm10:24 pm Thu4:25 am12:43 pm7:15 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:12 pm7:51 amNone6:40 pm Sat12:02 am8:31 am3:02 pm7:04 pm Sun12:34 am9:14 am4:00 pm7:34 pm Mon1:10 am10:02 am5:11 pm8:14 pm Tue1:53 am10:56 am6:24 pm9:27 pm Wed2:47 am11:55 am7:16 pm11:24 pm Thu4:02 am12:55 pm7:51 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:39 am11:05 am5:17 pm9:54 pm Sat3:07 am11:45 am6:07 pm10:18 pm Sun3:39 am12:28 pm7:05 pm10:48 pm Mon4:15 am1:16 pm8:16 pm11:28 pm Tue4:58 am2:10 pm9:29 pmNone Wed5:52 am12:41 am10:21 pm3:09 pm Thu7:07 am2:38 am10:56 pm4:09 pm WEDNESDAYPartly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 73 MONDAYSunny High: 74 Low: 67 SATURDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 74 FRIDAYMost ly Sunny High: 82 Low: 75 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 9, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 72 TUESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 70 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 82 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:29 am7:49 am3:07 pm6:38 pm Sat12:57 am8:29 am3:57 pm7:02 pm Sun1:29 am9:12 am4:55 pm7:32 pm Mon2:05 am10:00 am6:06 pm8:12 pm Tue2:48 am10:54 am7:19 pm9:25 pm Wed3:42 am11:53 am8:11 pm11:22 pm Thu4:57 am12:53 pm8:46 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:48 am8:11 am2:33 pm8:05 pm Sat1:10 am8:50 am3:17 pm8:37 pm Sun1:32 am9:28 am4:00 pm9:06 pm Mon2:02 am10:06 am4:43 pm9:29 pm Tue2:44 am10:45 am5:30 pm9:52 pm Wed3:32 am11:35 am6:22 pm10:24 pm Thu4:25 am12:43 pm7:15 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:12 pm7:51 amNone6:40 pm Sat12:02 am8:31 am3:02 pm7:04 pm Sun12:34 am9:14 am4:00 pm7:34 pm Mon1:10 am10:02 am5:11 pm8:14 pm Tue1:53 am10:56 am6:24 pm9:27 pm Wed2:47 am11:55 am7:16 pm11:24 pm Thu4:02 am12:55 pm7:51 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:39 am11:05 am5:17 pm9:54 pm Sat3:07 am11:45 am6:07 pm10:18 pm Sun3:39 am12:28 pm7:05 pm10:48 pm Mon4:15 am1:16 pm8:16 pm11:28 pm Tue4:58 am2:10 pm9:29 pmNone Wed5:52 am12:41 am10:21 pm3:09 pm Thu7:07 am2:38 am10:56 pm4:09 pm WEDNESDAYPartly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 73 MONDAYSunny High: 74 Low: 67 SATURDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 74 FRIDAYMost ly Sunny High: 82 Low: 75 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 9, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 72 TUESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 70 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 82 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:29 am7:49 am3:07 pm6:38 pm Sat12:57 am8:29 am3:57 pm7:02 pm Sun1:29 am9:12 am4:55 pm7:32 pm Mon2:05 am10:00 am6:06 pm8:12 pm Tue2:48 am10:54 am7:19 pm9:25 pm Wed3:42 am11:53 am8:11 pm11:22 pm Thu4:57 am12:53 pm8:46 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:48 am8:11 am2:33 pm8:05 pm Sat1:10 am8:50 am3:17 pm8:37 pm Sun1:32 am9:28 am4:00 pm9:06 pm Mon2:02 am10:06 am4:43 pm9:29 pm Tue2:44 am10:45 am5:30 pm9:52 pm Wed3:32 am11:35 am6:22 pm10:24 pm Thu4:25 am12:43 pm7:15 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:12 pm7:51 amNone6:40 pm Sat12:02 am8:31 am3:02 pm7:04 pm Sun12:34 am9:14 am4:00 pm7:34 pm Mon1:10 am10:02 am5:11 pm8:14 pm Tue1:53 am10:56 am6:24 pm9:27 pm Wed2:47 am11:55 am7:16 pm11:24 pm Thu4:02 am12:55 pm7:51 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:39 am11:05 am5:17 pm9:54 pm Sat3:07 am11:45 am6:07 pm10:18 pm Sun3:39 am12:28 pm7:05 pm10:48 pm Mon4:15 am1:16 pm8:16 pm11:28 pm Tue4:58 am2:10 pm9:29 pmNone Wed5:52 am12:41 am10:21 pm3:09 pm Thu7:07 am2:38 am10:56 pm4:09 pm WEDNESDAYPartly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 73 MONDAYSunny High: 74 Low: 67 SATURDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 74 FRIDAYMost ly Sunny High: 82 Low: 75 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 9, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 72 TUESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 70 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 82 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:29 am7:49 am3:07 pm6:38 pm Sat12:57 am8:29 am3:57 pm7:02 pm Sun1:29 am9:12 am4:55 pm7:32 pm Mon2:05 am10:00 am6:06 pm8:12 pm Tue2:48 am10:54 am7:19 pm9:25 pm Wed3:42 am11:53 am8:11 pm11:22 pm Thu4:57 am12:53 pm8:46 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:48 am8:11 am2:33 pm8:05 pm Sat1:10 am8:50 am3:17 pm8:37 pm Sun1:32 am9:28 am4:00 pm9:06 pm Mon2:02 am10:06 am4:43 pm9:29 pm Tue2:44 am10:45 am5:30 pm9:52 pm Wed3:32 am11:35 am6:22 pm10:24 pm Thu4:25 am12:43 pm7:15 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:12 pm7:51 amNone6:40 pm Sat12:02 am8:31 am3:02 pm7:04 pm Sun12:34 am9:14 am4:00 pm7:34 pm Mon1:10 am10:02 am5:11 pm8:14 pm Tue1:53 am10:56 am6:24 pm9:27 pm Wed2:47 am11:55 am7:16 pm11:24 pm Thu4:02 am12:55 pm7:51 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:39 am11:05 am5:17 pm9:54 pm Sat3:07 am11:45 am6:07 pm10:18 pm Sun3:39 am12:28 pm7:05 pm10:48 pm Mon4:15 am1:16 pm8:16 pm11:28 pm Tue4:58 am2:10 pm9:29 pmNone Wed5:52 am12:41 am10:21 pm3:09 pm Thu7:07 am2:38 am10:56 pm4:09 pm WEDNESDAYPartly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 73 MONDAYSunny High: 74 Low: 67 SATURDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 74 FRIDAYMost ly Sunny High: 82 Low: 75 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 9, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 72 TUESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 70 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 82 Low: 71 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:29 am7:49 am3:07 pm6:38 pm Sat12:57 am8:29 am3:57 pm7:02 pm Sun1:29 am9:12 am4:55 pm7:32 pm Mon2:05 am10:00 am6:06 pm8:12 pm Tue2:48 am10:54 am7:19 pm9:25 pm Wed3:42 am11:53 am8:11 pm11:22 pm Thu4:57 am12:53 pm8:46 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:48 am8:11 am2:33 pm8:05 pm Sat1:10 am8:50 am3:17 pm8:37 pm Sun1:32 am9:28 am4:00 pm9:06 pm Mon2:02 am10:06 am4:43 pm9:29 pm Tue2:44 am10:45 am5:30 pm9:52 pm Wed3:32 am11:35 am6:22 pm10:24 pm Thu4:25 am12:43 pm7:15 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:12 pm7:51 amNone6:40 pm Sat12:02 am8:31 am3:02 pm7:04 pm Sun12:34 am9:14 am4:00 pm7:34 pm Mon1:10 am10:02 am5:11 pm8:14 pm Tue1:53 am10:56 am6:24 pm9:27 pm Wed2:47 am11:55 am7:16 pm11:24 pm Thu4:02 am12:55 pm7:51 pmNone Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:39 am11:05 am5:17 pm9:54 pm Sat3:07 am11:45 am6:07 pm10:18 pm Sun3:39 am12:28 pm7:05 pm10:48 pm Mon4:15 am1:16 pm8:16 pm11:28 pm Tue4:58 am2:10 pm9:29 pmNone Wed5:52 am12:41 am10:21 pm3:09 pm Thu7:07 am2:38 am10:56 pm4:09 pm WEDNESDAYPartly Cloudy High: 80 Low: 73 MONDAYSunny High: 74 Low: 67 SATURDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 74 FRIDAYMost ly Sunny High: 82 Low: 75 Island Sun Weather Outlook Nov. 9, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018 30 www.islandsunnews.com PLACE CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED REAL ESTATEGARCIA REAL ESTATE AND CONSULTINGRICHARD J. GARCIA, GRI, BROKER239-472-5147garciaonsanibel.com 4/29 TFN COMMERCIAL RENTALWONDERFUL RENTAL IN POPULAR LOCATION ON SANIBEL 8/5 TFN COMMERCIAL UNIT FOR RENT 7/13 TFN OFFICE SPACE IN DESIRABLE TREE TOPS CENTER 10/12 11/30 SCARNATO LAWN SERVICE 1/25 TFN SERVICES OFFEREDHELLES CLEANING SERVICES 1/4 TFN ROGER NODRUFF ELECTRIC 4/20 TFN ANNUAL RENTALANNUAL RENTAL ON SANIBEL 10/19 TFN ROOMMATE WANTED 10/26 TFN ANNUAL RENTALSANIBEL 472-6747Gulf Beach Properties, Inc. 11/2 TFNJUST OFF ISLAND 11/2 11/9 SANIBEL ISLAND ANNUAL RENTALS 11/9 TFN SERVICES OFFEREDPROFESSIONAL CAR WASH & WAX & DETAIL BY HAND 10/12 TFN 239-896-6789 4/13 TFN IN HOME CARE 10/26 11/9 OFFICE ASSISTANT PT 10/19 11/9 JERRYS FOODS SERVERS & BARISTAS 5/6 TFN HELP WANTEDSANIBEL PUBLIC LIBRARYLIBRARY TECHNOLOGY ASSISTANT 11/9 11/30 BOATS CANOES KAYAKSDOCKAGE 11/2 TFN 2001 GRADY WHITE 208 ADVENTURE 11/2 TFN HELP WANTEDPART TIME RETAIL SALES 11/2 11/16 PART TIME DATA/CONFIRMATION PROCESSOR 11/9 TFN YARD SALE DOWNSIZING 11/9 11/9 GARAGE SALEMOVING SALE 11/9 11/16 VACATION RENTAL 1/26 TFN Island VacationsMillion $ Views Await You! 239-472-72771-888-451-72771/4 TFN SNOWBIRD RENTAL AVAILABLE 10/26 11/9 SEASONAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTALSANIBEL ANNUAL RENTAL 7/27 TFN WEST END OF SANIBEL 11/9 11/9

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 2018 31 Top 10 Real Estate SalesCourtesy of Royal Shell Real Estate SCRAMBLERS Subdivision City Year BuiltSquare FootageListing Price Selling Price Days On Market Fort Myers Fort Myers 2017 9,219 $7,777,777 $7,000,000 1 Metes And Bounds Sanibel 1975 2,366 $1,949,000 $1,800,000 403 Town And River Fort Myers 2017 2,704 $1,350,000 $1,247,500 26 Cape Coral Cape Coral 2008 3,564 $1,100,000 $990,000 194 Lakemont Bonita Springs 1993 3,399 $1,098,500 $1,000,000 385 Edgewater Fort Myers 1998 2,746 $924,900 $885,000 28 Fort Myers Fort Myers 2005 2,400 $899,000 $879,900 13 Bonita Beach Bonita Springs 1980 1,643 $849,000 $803,500 68 Corkscrew Shores Estero 2016 4,185 $799,999 $780,000 32 Lexington Country ClubFort Myers 1999 3,100 $739,900 $730,000 0Fair At Fenway South ReturnsThe Fair at Fenway South returns to JetBlue Park from November 9 to 11 and again on November 15 through 18. It will run from 5 to 11:30 p.m. on Fridays and from 1 to 11:30 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. Returning for 2018 is the Pirates of the Caribbean Show, where guests can see pirates walk a high-wire plank, and fair favorite and award-winning Illusionist Lance Gifford, who will continue to amaze fairgoers with his fast-paced and highly entertaining magical illusion show. There will also be a new horse show, racing pigs and more. On Friday and Saturday nights at 10 p.m., the Las Vegas hypnotist show will make believers of the audience, as the hypnotist persuades a man to dance like Beyonc, convinces fairgoers its sunny at night and more. The fair also features Cowtown USA Educational Exhibit where attendees may pet and feed dozens of farm animals and numerous demonstrations each day. These attractions as well as live entertainment and shows are free with fair admission. Admission to the fair is as low as $1 on Thursday, November 15 and just $4 per person at other times with a two-for-one admission discount available at www.fairatfenway.com. Pay-One-Price unlimited ride wristbands are also available at a discount through the website before the start of the fair for $20 each. Vendor space and sponsorships are available. A portion of the proceeds from the fair will benefit the Jordan Schuman Foundation for Kindness. Attendees can stop by Jordans Wishing Well and drop a wish into the well. JetBlue Park is located at 11500 Fenway South Drive in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www. fairatfenway.com. A Ferris wheel pictured at sunset at a previous Fair at Fenway South photo provided Hortoons To advertise in the Island Sun and The River Weekly News Call 395-1213

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 9, 201832