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River weekly news

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Title:
River weekly news
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, FL
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Lorin Arundel and Ken Rasi- Co-Publishers
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2010
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English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )
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United States -- Florida -- Lee -- Fort Myers
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26.64328 x -81.868953

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright River Weekly News. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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FREETake Me Home VOL. 17, NO. 33 AUGUST 17, 2018From the Beaches to the River District downtown Fort Myers Weather and Tides pa ge 28Handmade Onesies Donated Assisted living residents of Shell Point Retirement Community recently gifted handmade onesies to newborn children at Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida. We appreciate when members of our community give back in support of Golisano Childrens Hospital, especially when it is intergenerational, said Carly Majewski, Golisano Childrens Hospital NICU nurse manager. To have Shell Point residents spend time decorating and personalizing these outfits to give to our smallest and most vulnerable patients speaks volumes to their kindness and generosity. Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida, the only pediatric hospital of its kind located between Tampa and Miami, opened a new building just over a year ago at Lee Healths HealthPark Medical Center. The 128-bed, seven-story facility is designed to make children feel like they are in a fun, safe space rather than an institutional setting. The building is filled with bright colors, activities and interactive stationscontinued on page 24 Shell Point residents recently crafted and personally delivered handmade onesies to newborns at Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida photo providedCROW To Host Walk On The Wild Side At Lakes Parkby Jeff LysiakWith the hopes of increasing awareness about the importance of a harmonious relationship between humans living in Southwest Florida and local wildlife, the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) will host an open house-style event Walk on the Wild Side at Lakes Regional Park in Fort Myers on Saturday, August 25 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The familyfriendly event is free and open to the public. According to JoEllen Urasky, CROW operations/business manager, the threehour gala will include presentations on wildlife-related topics, recycled material craft projects and educational encounters with some of CROWs animal ambassadors. One of the primary goals of the friend-raiser is to teach residents, who live off-island and might not be aware of the wildlife hospitals purpose, about their work treating sick and injured wildlife, the latest in conservation medicine and why this is important for the health of our ecosystem and our community. Weve held Walk on the Wild Side in the past, but not since 2012, and never before off-island, said Urasky. So we decided that wed revamp it a little. We found a great space inside Lakes Park and hope it draws a good crowd. Sponsored in part by Lee County Parks and Recreation, Walk on the Wild Side activities will include a self-guided walk around a field, where participants young and old will learn fun and interesting facts about local wildlife. After completing the course, participants will fill out a questionnaire for a chance to win small prizes. Throughout the walk, visitors will stop at stations offering a variety of subjects and activities including: History Learn about the 50-year history of CROW, its staff, volunteer and student programs, membership and mission. The exhibit will feature one of the organizations animal ambassadors and a video chronicling the treatment, rehabilitation and release of several patients. T-shirts and stuffed animals will also be on sale. Rescues At the amphitheater area, CROW staff will offer education on a number of successful animal rescues, with special presentations on Southwest Florida owls and turtles. Tortoises & Turtles In the pavilion, wildlife experts will discuss the differences between tortoises and turtles, plus a craft activity using recycled materials will be offered. Pelicans A member of CROWs staff will discuss the differences between browncontinued on page 31 Wildlife Rehabilitation Manager Breanna Frankel holding Mina, one of CROWs animal ambassadors photo courtesy CROW

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Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now:Rayhill To Forrest Hall, Boom-Time Apartmentsby Gerri Reaves, PhDApartment buildings proliferated in Fort Myers during the 1920s boom. Unlike the towns traditional boardinghouse hotels, they offered the modern conveniences of a simplified urban life, including private baths, kitchenettes, Murphy beds, and sun porches. Pictured in these two historic photos is one example, Rayhill Apartments, which opened in 1926. One of Rayhills notable modern details was the rooftop solar water tank. The two-story 12-unit Mediterranean Revivalist style building demonstrates just how up-and-coming Second Street was during that era. The apartments were located on the south side of Second just east of Park Avenue. Today, that area is the southeast corner of the historic Gardners Park neighborhood, which is slated for redevelopment. Gardners Park, according to the redevelopment plan, is bordered by the river to the north, Fowler Street on the west, Park and Evans Avenue on the east and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard on the south. In fall of 1925, Arthur AE Raymond obtained a construction permit to build a $38,000 apartment house. Both he and his business partner, Joseph W. Hill (thus the name Rayhill), were established Fort Myers businessmen. Raymonds Machine Shop, with a specialty in marine supplies and service, boat building and repairs, was located on the City Dock at the foot of Jackson Street in the early 20th century. One of the historic photos was taken soon after the apartments were constructed; note the lack of mature landscaping. On the photos right is the Raymonds family home. In the circa-1930 photo, Raymond is pictured (left) with his brother and sister-inlaw, Ernest and Helen Burns Raymond. Note that the building has acquired the striped awnings which adorned so many boom-time structures. Raymonds business partner, JW Hill, also dealt in things mechanical. He owned Hill & Company in the 19-teens, one of the towns first gas stations and garages. It was also the towns first Ford dealerships. It was located on Second just west of Fowler, but soon moved to Bay Street and later became Sykes & Hill Co. to add the name of a new partner, Edward H. Sykes. (That dealership moved into a new building at Main and Monroe in 1926, soon evolving into Lee Motors and later Galloway Ford.) In the late 1950s, Rayhill became Van Apartments, but by 1960 was renamed Forrest Hall, renting efficiencies and one-bedroom apartments. It closed in late 1980s. Today, one-way high-speed streets have diminished the natural connection betweencontinued on page 14THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 20182 This photo was taken soon after Rayhill Apartments were built circa 1926 on the south side of Second Street near the foot of Poinsettia Avenue Today, as the Gardners Park Redevelopment Strategy proceeds, the former Rayhill site is vacant photo by Gerri Reaves Details such as the cloche hat, striped awnings and car (left) capture the feel of the boom. Pictured on the west side of the Rayhill Apartments are AE Raymond (left) and his brother and sister-in-law, Ernest and Helen Burns Raymond. photos courtesy SWFL Florida Historical Society PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, call 239-395-1213 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1640 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2, Sanibel FL 33957. FAX number: 239-395-2299. Email: press@islandsunnews.com. Email: ads@islandsunnews.com The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Contributing Writers Jennifer Basey Barbara Cacchione Kay Casperson Suzy Cohen Linda Coin Marcia Feeney Ed Frank Shelley Greggs Tom Hall Marion Hauser, MS, RDRoss Hauser, MD Capt. Matt Mitchell Trinette Nelson J. Brendan Ryan, CLU, ChFC, MSFS Di Saggau Jeanie TinchPublisher Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Bob Petcher Graphic Arts/ Production Ann Ziehl, Manager Amanda Hartman Justin Wilder Reporters Gerri Reaves, PhD Jeff LysiakIndependently Owned And Operated COPYRIGHT 2018 The River Weekly NewsLORKEN Publications, Inc.Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com

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3 THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018Girl Scouts Begin Membership Year With New BadgesGirl Scouts recently announced the release of 30 new badges available exclusively for girls ages 5 to 18 that not only enhance the one-of-a-kind Girl Scout experience, but also address some of societys most pressing needs. The new badges allow girls to explore a variety of timely themes, such as cybersecurity, environmental advocacy, mechanical engineering, robotics, computer science and space exploration. In a safe all-girl space, Girl Scouts develop important soft skills, including confidence and perseverance, as well as hard skills, setting them up for success and preparing them to take action for a better world. Todays youth are more vocal than ever about the change they want to see, said Girl Scouts of Gulfcoast Florida CEO Mary Anne Servian. And Girl Scouts are the most equipped with the skills needed to make a real impact. New programming for girls in grades 6 to 12 includes badges for environmental stewardship, robotics and college exploration, with the addition of two curriculum books, Think Like a Programmer and Think Like an Engineer Girls in grades kindergarten through fifth grade can now earn badges in environmental stewardship, cybersecurity and space science, and girls in grades 4 and 5 can earn additional badges in mechanical engineering. The new badges and curricula enhance Girl Scouts existing program pillars, which include STEM, Outdoor, Life Skills,and Entrepreneurship. Girl Scouts of Gulfcoast Florida, the local Girl Scout council, is holding information events throughout the community, providing an opportunity for parents and girls to learn about all the exciting things Girl Scouts has to offer. Program scholarships are available based on financial need. For an updated list of local events, or for more information about new Girl Scout registration, visit www.gsgcf.org. Camping is part of the Girl Scout experience photos provided Meet new friends at fall recruitment class 8791 Melosia St #8302 Paseo community Fort Myers Stunning split level Santa Monica turnkey townhome; 2013 construction; Florida Native-Local Expert-Realtor SCISvalerie@valerietutor.com yoursanibelhomes.com 239-834-8141Kingsher Real Estate, Inc 2402 Palm Ridge Rd Sanibel FL 33957Paseo!! Southwind Preserve! New Listing! Price Improvement

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THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 20184 Cool moves, cool music, total body, low impact. Dance tness, group exercise, contemporary movement, step aerobics, body sculpting. 2nd Saturday of the month! Ballroom, Latin, Swing. 6 p.m. lesson followed by open dancing. Foxtrot, waltz, rumba, cha-cha, tango, swing, and more! Private lessons, and beginner, intermediate, and advanced group lessons. No partner needed. Boutique-style group exercise and dance studio. Unique classes, friendly and inviting atmosphere.Fitness with Flair @ Royal Palm Square Critical Thinking Series Kicks Off September 6Florida SouthWestern State College (FSW) kicks off its fall Critical Thinking Lecture Series at the FSW Thomas Edison Campus, Building AA-177, on Monday, September 6 at 11 a.m. Dr. Deborah Teed, FSW Dean of the School of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, will present Voices in America: Diversity, Inclusion, and Democracy. The presentation can also be viewed digitally at the FSW Charlotte Campus, Building O, Room 117; the FSW Collier Campus, Building G, Room 109; and the FSW Hendry/Glades Curtis Center, Building A, Room 114. Dr. Teed has spent nearly 20 years in higher education, earning her doctorate in comparative sociology from Florida International University. Prior to joining FSW, Dr. Teed served as associate dean of academic affairs and retention at Pasco-Hernando State College and dean of social sciences and business at South Puget Sound Community College. The FSW Critical Thinking Lecture Series features college and community leaders who discuss how they use critical thinking skills in their profession or focus on critical topics from their area of career or academic interest. The series is free and open to the public. Presentations take place weekly, and the fall series runs September through November. FSW Thomas Edison Campus is located at 8099 College Parkway in Fort Myers. For more information on the FSW Critical Thinking Lecture Series, contact Whitney Rhyne, director of strategic initiatives, at 433-6943 or whitney.rhyne@fsw.edu. Deborah Teed photo provided Community Band To Commence 133rd SeasonThe Lee County Community Band will begin its 133rd season with the first of six monthly concerts at Cape Coral High School on November 11 at 3 p.m. In keeping with tradition for the seasons first concert, Director Richard Bradstreet has selected a program featuring spirited and patriotic American music by American composers and a salute to U.S. military veterans. Programs typically include a mix of energetic marches, Broadway hits, old favorites, patriotic songs and a singalong with emcee and vocalist Norman Jones. The November 11 program includes Big Band Polka, Semper Fidelis, Syncopated Clock, Carousel and The Armed Forces Salute The band will perform six concerts open to the public between November and April. The programs are free of charge, but donations are accepted. Additional concert dates are December 9, January 13, February 10, March 10 and April 7. The November through March concerts will take place the second Sunday of the month; the April concert is set for the first Sunday of the month. An institution in Southwest Florida, the band enjoys a large, loyal, and enthusiastic audience at every concert. Plan to arrive early for best choice of seating. The 50-member adult band rehearses Thursday evenings at St. Michael Lutheran School in Fort Myers; rehearsals usually begin in mid-October. Band members are musicians from all walks of life career musicians, amateurs and folks renewing skills from years past who reside in Lee, Collier, and Charlotte Counties. The band welcomes new members every year. Persons interested in joining may phone John Fenn at 454-6430. Cape Coral High School is located at 2300 Santa Barbara Boulevard in Cape Coral. For more information, visit www. leecountyband.org. The Lee County Community Band under the direction of Director Richard Bradstreet photo provided

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5 THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018 808 SW 15TH AVE., CAPE CORAL Freshwater Canal, Heated Pool $329,900 MLS 218043938 Ron Eck Team 239.849.1997 SOUTHWEST CAPE 12431 COCONUT CREEK CT., FT. MYERS 3 BR, 3.5 BA + Den, Family Room, Pool $649,000 MLS 218038803Linda von Wowern, McMurray & Nette 239.223.3382 COCONUT CREEK 1218 ARCOLA DR., FT. MYERS Remodeled 2 BR, 2 BA + Den $258,000 MLS 218001402Anabelle Miller & Lori Jackson 239.565.0146 BRANDYWINE 11701 OLIVETTI LN. #103, FT. MYERS New 3 BR, 2 BA Condo, 1,394 S.F. $236,980 MLS 218032915Ross Winchel, Koffman Group 239.898.1214 MAJESTIC PALMS 1058 CLARELLEN DR., FT. MYERS River Access, 3 BR, 2 BA, Pool $585,000 MLS 218048513 Cindy Roberts 239.565.9756 TOWN & RIVER 20051 SANIBEL VIEW CIR. #103, FT. MYERS 2 BR, 2 BA, Overlooks San Carlos Preserve$298,900 MLS 218032303 Jason Lomano 239.470.8628 SANIBEL VIEW 880 DEAN WAY, FT. MYERS 3 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car Garage, 1,900+ S.F. $285,000 MLS 218032635 Tina Tusack 239.634.3810 WHISKEY CREEK ESTATES 14111 BRANT POINT CIR. #2303, FT. MYERS 2 BR, 2 BA, 3rd Floor w/Elevator $177,000 MLS 218051235 McMurray & Nette 239.470.4226 HERITAGE COVE 15794 SAN ANTONIO CT., FT. MYERS 4 BR, 3.5 BA + Den, Pool, 3,996 S.F. $600,000 MLS 218051260 Stacey Bohannon 239.464.2157 MCGREGOR WOODS 11701 OLIVETTI LN. #407, FT. MYERS Minutes to Fort Myers Beach $299,421 MLS 218041457Ross Winchel, Koffman Group 239.898.1214 MAJESTIC PALMS 13400 CAUSEWAY PALMS CV., FT. MYERS On-Island Lifestyle, Off-Island Pricing $275,000 MLS 218036804 Scott Allan 239.333.3635 CAUSEWAY KEY 14380 RIVA DEL LAGO DR. #505, FT. MYERS Overlooks Lakes Park $379,000 MLS 218031984 Toni Shoemaker 239.464.3645 RIVA DEL LAGO 405 NW 1ST PL., CAPE CORAL Immaculate & Move-In Ready $207,000 MLS 218049626 Tina Tusack 239.634.3810 NORTHWEST CAPE SHALLOWS 15152 ANCHORAGE WAY, FT. MYERS 3 BR, 2.5 BA, 2,177 S.F. Living Area $749,000 MLS 218026929 McMurray & Nette 239.850.7888 PALM GARDENS 1240 COCONUT DR., FT. MYERS Michelangelo Custom by Stofft Cooney$15,950,000 MLS 218006778 McMurray & Nette 239.850.788815051 PUNTA RASSA RD. #WS02, FT. MYERS Wet Slip 50 x 20 $425,000 MLS 217030648 McMurray & Nette 239.281.4435 SANIBEL HARBOUR YACHT CLUB OPEN 8/19 1:00PM 3:00PM OPEN DAILY 12:00PM 4:00PM OPEN 8/19 1:00PM 3:00PM OPEN 8/18 12:00PM 3:00PM NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW PRICE

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THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 20186 Fort Myers Art: City Acquires Downtown Sculpturesby Tom HallFollowing months of negotiations with Columbian sculptor Edgardo Carmona, the City of Fort Myers has acquired the 23-piece installation of likable characters from Cartagena that were first unveiled in the downtown Fort Myers River District in January of 2016 by JAXI Builders to promote its two-tower Allure luxury condominium project. City council members approved the purchase at their August 6 meeting. While some of the sculptures have stirred their fair share of controversy, most residents, worker and visitors express fondness for the figures, which represent ordinary people not typically featured in modern-day representational sculptures; a simple-minded fisherman, a woman caught in a rainstorm, two drunks on a park bench, men playing chess, a fruit seller, a knife sharpener and others. They represent the commonality of real people, said Carmona of his subjects. The sculptures are now subject to the purview of the citys public art committee, whose first order of business will be to decide whether all 23 pieces should remain where they are or several should be relocated to sites within Fort Myers other five wards. The citys public art collection dates back to August 17, 1913 when the city accepted Dr. Marshall O.Terrys donation of a fountain and horse trough honoring his late wife, Tootie McGregor Terry. The city received its second public artwork in 1926 with James D. Newtons gift of The Spirit of Fort Myers, the Grecian maiden, popularly known as Rachel at the Well, who has now graced the entrance to Edison Park for more than 92 years. The citys collection remained largely static for the next half century, but it experienced a 20-year growth spurt beginning in 1982 when the beautification advisory board commissioned North Fort Myers sculptor Don J. Wilkins to create a series of new fountains (such as Uncommon Friends and The Florida Panthers), outdoor sculptures (including the USCT 2d Regiment Memorial in Centennial Park) and indoor busts (that include the Harborside Collection). With the addition of the 23 Carmona sculptures, the citys public art collection now exceeds 60 artworks. But only a sculpture known as What Dreams May Fly and How They Fly installed by the public art committee in Clemente Park in 2015 is located outside of Ward 4. And that reality has prompted a number of city council members to urge the committee to locate newly-commissioned artworks in the citys other five wards. It therefore came as no surprise when Ward 2 Councilman Johnny B. Streets, Jr. stated during discussion preceding approval of the Carmona purchase that hed like to see some of the sculptures moved to sites within the citys other wards. The sculptures are well-traveled. Before coming to Fort Myers, the installation completed an 18-city European tour with stops in Italy, Germany and France. One piece was even displayed in front of the Eiffel Tower. The public art committee is expected to consider the possibility of breaking up the installation or rotating pieces among each of the citys six wards once a year or more. Cost will be an important factor in the latter regard as each sculpture weighs between 200 and 1,000 pounds. The committee will also discuss whether to include some or all of the Carmona sculptures on Otocast, a free smartphone app that provides narrative and audio recordings explaining specific artworks to the people who visit, live and work in the River District. Most people who encounter Fort Myers outdoor artworks have no idea who made them or what they represent. The citys public art committee hopes to change that equation with the launch of its free Otocast phone app. According to urban planners, economists and public art professionals, people who live and work in communities with a vibrant public art program enjoy more than three dozen interrelated benefits from the art that surrounds them. But these salutatory effects are only fully realized to the extent people are able to interact with the artworks on a physical, intellectual and emotional level. Otocast facilitates a deeper connection with public art by letting viewers in on behind-thescenes stories previously known only to the art insiders who commissioned, made and installed the sculptures, murals and other artworks that dot the urban landscape. In this context, the committee will now consider whether interaction with the installation will be enhanced or undermined by relocating various pieces to the citys other wards. Meetings of the City of Fort Myers Public Art Committee are conducted in the sunshine and are open to the public. They are held on the third Tuesday of each month and begin promptly at 4 p.m. Agendas are posted on the citys website, which also contains videos of past meetings. Tom Hall is both an amateur artist and aspiring novelist who writes art quest thrillers. He is in the final stages of completing his debut novel titled Art Detective. A former tax attorney, he lives in Estero with his fianc and their four cats. One of the 23 sculptures by Edgardo Carmona in the downtown Fort Myers historic district that was recently purchased by the City of Fort Myers photo courtesy www.visitflorida.com Automotive Service That You Can Trust Clean and Comfortable 239-277-10041921 Courtney Drive Fort Myers 33901 OPEN Monday Friday 8am to 5:30pm Saturday 8am to 4pm Sunday Closedwww.LegendaryFL.com service delivered to you of any $25 OffAll Makes and Models both Foreign and Domestic Limit one per customer, no cash value, cannot be combined with any We look forward to earning your business ArtFest Makes Special Call For ArtistsTo support ArtFest Fort Myers We Are Overflowing, a national juried exhibit of sculptures created from repurposed, discarded and cast off materials, organizers are seeking submissions from artists prior to Friday, September 7. The launch of this exhibit will feature the work of one artists high impact artwork a piece that instantly conveys the message of as a country, we are overflowing with trash and recyclables. This commissioned artwork will be displayed for one month in downtown Fort Myers, opening the weekend of ArtFest Fort Myers 2019 on February 2 and 3, and will serve as an official announcement of the upcoming We Are Overflowing 2020 Exhibit, which will include 10 to 12 such re-cycled artworks. The artist proposals (illustration of concept) must be submitted through www. callforentry.org and must incorporate a recycle dumpster, which will be supplied by the City of Fort Myers. The goal is to begin a conversation about what we dispose of is it trash, is it recycleable, is its best use repurposing or reuse? This launch artwork will usher in the We Are Overflowing 2020 Exhibit and will receive significant traditional and social media attention, with the artist stipend of $5,000. For more information, visit www. callforentry.org and search We Are Overflowing 2019 or call 768-3602. ArtFest Fort Myers, the annual juried fine art festival, takes place February 1, 2 and 3, 2019 in the Fort Myers River District. Join the experience with 200 artists from across the county and around the world; the largest high school art exhibit and competition in south Florida and free interactive art experiences for children of all ages. For more information, visit www. artfestfortmyers.com, Facebook, connect on Linkedin or tag #artfestfm.

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7 THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018 Providing Custom Interiors to Sanibel & Captiva for 28 years Complimentary In-Home Consultation695 Tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel, FL 33957 coin.decoratingden.com 239.472.6551 Teacher Conservation Grants AvailableThe Ding Darling Wildlife SocietyFriends of the Refuge (DDWS), with JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge, has announced its 13th annual round of teacher conservation grants. Up to $10,000 in grant awards are available to districts, schools and individual teachers in Lee, Charlotte and Collier counties this school year for conservation educationrelated projects. Teachers in the three-county area may apply for grants up to $1,000 each to fund new classroom science projects, promote stewardship, purchase teaching aids, acquire classroom materials, and conduct work projects in their community or beyond. This year, two grants up to $3,000 are also available to schooland district-wide projects. All applicants are invited to submit conservation-related proposals by Friday, October 26. The approved proposals will be awarded this December for projects to be completed by May 2019. Our conservation grants are an important part of the societys mission to educate and create future conservation stewards from our young students of today, said Wendy Kindig, DDWS Environmental Education Committee chair. This year, we are offering two new $3,000 grants to encourage larger creative projects that will touch more students. Plus, we still offer $1,000 grants for teachers with single-class projects or smaller needs. In the past 12 years, DDWS has granted more than $80,300 to local schools for environmental projects. The teacher grants are funded by monies received from the DDWS Conservation Education Endowment Fund established by Jay Ding Darlings grandson, the late Kip Koss. To make a tax-deductible donation in support of the fund, contact DDWS Executive Director Birgie Miller at 472-1100 ext. 4 or director@ dingdarlingsociety.com. For more grant information and an application, visit www.tinyurl.com/ dinggrants or contact Sierra Hoisington at 472-1100 ext. 4 or shois@ dingdarlingsociety.org. Refuge ranger Monica Scroggin, left, leading a tour with Immokalee Middle School for its 2018 grant-funded All Creatures Great & Small project photo providedWorld Premiere At Alliance Theatre Kicks Off SeasonTheatre Conspiracy at the Alliance for the Arts kicks off its 25th consecutive season with a world premiere play entitled Repossessed, which opened August 16 and runs through Sunday, August 26. Performances are Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays with a new 7:30 p.m. start time and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Repossessed by Greg Lam and directed by Stephen Hooper stars Rachel Burttram, Brendan Powers, Lauren Drexler, Joanna Haley, Tamicka Linstead and Patrick Day. The production is the winner of Theatre Conspiracys 19th annual Janet and Bruce Bunch New Play Contest. What would happen to our world if anyone could choose to remix and rewrite their memories and personalities? Rich and Gretchen seem to have the ideal marriage, until they learn that it was manufactured by a mysterious biotech company which installed it into their brains. Because they can no longer afford this service, the company must repossess their lives. Repossessed explores questions of morality and authenticity amidst a world of rapidly changing technology and the ethics that come with it. Greg has created a piece of theatre that will generate conversations about who we are and who should be able to alter those traits that make us, said artistic producing director Bill Taylor. The show is well written and moves quickly. Our audiences will enjoy this world premiere experience. There will be a talk-back with Lam and Taylor after the Saturday, August 18 performance. Talkbacks allow the audience to ask questions and express their thoughts and ideas on issues revealed in the play through the form of meaningful discussion. The opportunity is included with ticket purchase. For theatregoers who are blind, or have moderate to severe vision loss, an audio described performance will take place during the Sunday, August 26 matinee. Call 239-939-2787 to reserve. Theatre lovers can save up to $42 with a season subscription. Season subscriptions range from $115 per person for five shows to $140 per person for all seven shows. Individual tickets to each show are $26, $11 for continued on page 16Toast To Tenacity For Womens SuffrageCelebrate the 98th anniversary of womens right to vote while making new friends and enjoying an uplifting presentation and refreshments at Toast to Tenacity at the Alliance for the Arts on Sunday, August 26 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Honor the courageous women (and some men) behind the passage of the 19th Amendment at this event. Tenacious women from diverse backgrounds persisted for more than 70 years even went to prison and endured other terrible hardships before the movement succeeded. When the 19th Amendment was finally ratified into law on August 26, 1920, suffragists across the nation raised a glass of grape juice since Prohibition was in effect, they skipped the more potent stuff to celebrate its passage. Among the suffragists are many unsung heroes. Hear the whole story, about such heroines as black suffragists Ida B. Wells Barnett and Mary Church Terrell, who were members of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. Although Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony are the names most associated with the movement, they were not alone in their commitment to gender equality. Join Vision 2020, the Fort Myers Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., and Progressive Women of Southwest Florida as they stand together to honor the suffragists of all colors and look to a future of equality with an inspiring program, a grape juice toast, and a wine and cheese reception. Toast to Tenacity special guest is Lee County Supervisor of Elections Tommy Doyle. Attendance is free, but reservations are requested. The Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information and to register, visit www.artinlee.org/tenacity.

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Along The RiverThe downtown Fort Myers River District will again be the scene for Music Walk this Friday, August 17. Restaurants, bars, art galleries and shops will showcase a wide range of music during the evening from 6 to 10 p.m. Expect live jazz and blues to rock, drums and much more. Each month brings new energy to the historic streets of downtown Fort Myers. Visit www.fortmyersriverdistrictalliance. com to learn more. There will be a Captains For Clean Water fundraiser at Millennial Brewing Company this Friday, August 17 from 5 to 8 p.m. Ten percent of total beer sales and 100 percent of a silent auction during the evening will be donated directly to the nonprofit organization whose mission is advancing education, awareness and scientifically supported solutions to restore and protect marine ecosystems and way of life for future generations. There will also be a 50/50 raffle, other raffles, vendor table donations and personal donations that will be paid directly to Captains for Clean Water. Millennial Brewing Company is located at 1811 Royal Palm Avenue in Fort Myers. For more information, call 271-2255. Three nationally recognized professional comedians will take the stage at Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre this Saturday, August 18 when they perform at the 4th annual Laughter Is the Best Medicine Comedy Night to benefit SalusCare, Inc. Professional comedian Michael Palascak returns for the fourth time and will serve as emcee for the evening as well as perform his stand-up comedy routine. Fellow professional comedians Pat McGann and Dwayne Perkins will also perform. Tickets are $150 each, and include heavy hors doeuvres, drinks and the show. They may be purchased at www. saluscarecomedynight.org. Four local celebrities also will perform a five-minute stand-up routine for event attendees who will vote for the best comedic performance. An award also will be presented to the celebrity comic who raises the most money for SalusCare. The local celebrities who will exchange laughs for votes are: Gina Birch, radio-television personality and wine aficionado; Dr. Michael Martin, Florida Gulf Coast University president; Eric Raddatz, Fort Myers Film Festival founder and Florida Weekly presentation editor; and Amy Bennett Williams, The News-Press staff writer. Funds raised at the event will be used to provide SalusCare outpatient psychiatry and therapy to children and adolescents in the area whose families can least afford it. Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre is located at 1380 Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information, contact Vice President of Public Relations Todd Cordisco at 791-1575 or at tcordisco@ saluscareflorida.org. Explore the natural treasures on Fort Myers Beach at a guided walk along the beachfront at Newton Beach Park this Tuesday, August 21 at 9 a.m. Participants should meet under the thatched hut for the free beach walk. Wear sunscreen, appropriate clothing, shoes and hats. Weather permitting. Newton Beach Park is located at 4650 Estero Boulevard on Fort Myers Beach. For more information, call 765-0865 or visit www.moundhouse.org. PACE Center for Girls, Lee County will host an exclusive Girls Night Out shopping experience for fashionistas at its 10th annual Love That Dress! event at Embassy Suites by Hilton this Wednesday, August 22 at 6 p.m. Love That Dress! features shopping, music, silent auctions and cocktails, with all proceeds benefiting PACE programs and services. To commemorate 10 years, special pricing, along with some other surprises, will be revealed at the event. Tickets are $30 in advance of the event and $40 at the door. PACE is also selling VIP passes for $150, allowing shoppers to enjoy early access to the shopping and exclusive access to the VIP Suite Level, which features private dressing areas, specialty auction items, express check-out and complimentary beverages and hors doeuvres. This year also offers the chance to win a two-year lease for a 2018 Infiniti Q50 2.0t Pure, with only 150 tickets for this prize drawing available at $100 each in advance of the event. Those interested in purchasing a ticket can do so directly at the Fort Myers Infiniti dealership and will receive a complimentary VIP admission ticket, while supplies last. Proceeds from Love That Dress! benefit PACE Center for Girls, Lee County, which assists girls ages 11 to 18 who have multiple risk factors impacting their academic achievement, including family income, substance abuse, domestic violence, foster home placement, neglect, grief, incarceration of a family member and physical, emotional or sexual abuse. To purchase tickets, visit www. lovethatdress.org, email allyson.ross@ pacecenter.org or call 425-2366 ext. 2315. Embassy Suites by Hilton is located at 10450 Corkscrew Commons Drive in Estero. For more information on PACE Center for Girls, Lee County, call 425-2366 or visit www.pacecenter.org/ locations/lee. Poetry, music and visual works have a home at the monthly Art and Poetry Networking Event, which will take place next at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center this Thursday, August 23 at 8 p.m. Are you an artist or performer? Gulf Coast Leisure (GCL) features artists, musicians, poets, and more. Join in and register to participate in this months showcase. Cost is $10 to participate. Since 2012, GCL has developed nightlife events, summer celebrations and community outreach by collaborating with local nonprofits. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. Visit www. gclmovement.com for tickets, artist registration and more information. The inventory for Love That Dress! Girls Night Out shopping spree photo provided THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 20188 Fresh ingredients, simplicity, love... the recipe for a treasured dining experience Chef/Owner AJ Black7 Days 5-10 pm 751 Tarpon Bay Road Sanibel Island, FL Reservations Suggested www.iltesoro.net 239-395-4022 FINE ITALIAN CUISINEIL TESORO RISTORANTEinspired by Island Fare in a bistro styleVOTED BEST CHEFBEST OF THE ISLANDS AWARDTASTE OF THE ISLANDS IRON CHEF WINNER AJ BLACKCelebrating Our 10 Year AnniversaryExtensive New Wine List Tasting Menu SUNSET DINING 4:30-6:30 P.M. 3-Course Tasting Starting at $19.95 International Homeless Animals DayGulf Coast Humane Society will host the International Homeless Animals Day (IHAD) at Bell Tower Shops on Saturday, August 18 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The International Society for Animal Rights (ISAR) conceived and commemorated IHAD in 1992. IHAD is a worldwide recognized event observed annually on the third Saturday of August. Each and every year, more and more animal protection organizations and concerned citizens band together to shed light on the tragedy of pet overpopulation and the importance of spaying and neutering. IHAD is established as the one day out of the year where people all come together, publicly united in a mission to win the war on pet overpopulation. GCHS Spay and Neuter Clinic staff will also be on hand to answer any questions about the importance of fixing pets. Spay or neutering a pet is the most effective tool against the battle of pet overpopulation. Attendees of the International Homeless Animals Day can decorate a luminary bag and light it in remembrance of the countless animals euthanized due to pet overpopulation. Bell Tower Shops is located at 13499 South Cleveland Avenue in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www. gulfcoasthumanesociety.org.

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9 THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018 Homebuilders Raise Funds At Backpack EventNeal Communities, Southwest Floridas premier, private homebuilder, recently raised over $18,000 to support the 19th annual Big Backpack Event, Lee Countys biggest back-to-school festival and school supply giveaway, hosted by the Multicultural Centre of Southwest Florida. On Sunday, July 29, 26 volunteers from Neal Communities helped hand out over 1,600 backpacks to support school children between age 5 and 12 from Lee, Collier and Charlotte counties. This year, a line wrapped around North Fort Myers High School. This is the third year that Neal Communities south region, which encompasses Lee and Collier counties, chose to help fund the Big Backpack Event outreach program. In all, Neal Communities has raised over $52,000, with the generous help of a company donation and donations from trade partners, employees, homeowners, family and friends. Every year, our team looks forward to participating in this wonderful community event, said Michael Greenberg, Southwest Florida regional president for Neal Communities. This event gives the children of our future the tools and confidence they need to start the school year off right, and our team takes great pride in giving back to this much-needed regional organization. To date, the popular event has provided more than 32,000 school-aged children in need with free backpacks filled with necessary school supplies. The Multicultural Centre of Southwest Floridas mission is to promote and embrace diversity in the community and support Lee County school children of all cultures start the back-to-school season with confidence and pride. The volunteers with Neal Communities photos provided The crowd during this years Big Backpack Event 1244 Periwinkle Way | Sanibel Island, Florida 33957 | (239) 472-5555ILCIELOSANIBEL.COM A Dynamic Culinary ExperienceIN A CASUAL,ELEGANT SETTING Enjoy a one-of-a-kind Sanibel dining experience featuring Art Deco inspired indoor dining, live piano music nightly and unparalleled service by an approachable team. All meals are prepared daily with sustainable, fresh from Florida fish, produce, grass-finished beef, lamb and free-range chicken. Il Cielo provides the most creative and comprehensive Farm to Fork experience on Sanibel Island.day Sunday, 4:30 to 9pm | Happy Hour Menu, 4:30 to 6pm | Scott McDonald on Piano Tuesday Sunday, pm Serving Sunday Brunch Beginning Decembe r 1 1t h, 11am to 2pm (Excluding Holidays) Contemporary American Cuisine Award Winning DiningVoted Best Fine Dining Four Years in a Row! Voted Best Seafood and Taste of the Taste 1244 Periwinkle Way | Sanibel Island, Florida 33957 | (239) 472-5555ILCIELOSANIBEL.COM A Dynamic Culinary ExperienceIN A CASUAL,ELEGANT SETTINGEnjoy a one-of-a-kind Sanibel dining experience featuring Art Deco inspired indoor dining, live piano music nightly and unparalleled service by an approachable team. All meals are prepared daily with sustainable, fresh from Florida fish, produce, grass-finished beef, lamb and free-range chicken. Il Cielo provides the most creative and comprehensive Farm to Fork experience on Sanibel Island.day Sunday, 4:30 to 9pm | Happy Hour Menu, 4:30 to 6pm | Scott McDonald on Piano Tuesday Sunday, pm Serving Sunday Brunch Beginning Decembe r 1 1t h, 11am to 2pm (Excluding Holidays) Contemporary American Cuisine Award Winning DiningVoted Best Fine Dining Four Years in a Row! Voted Best Seafood and Taste of the Taste 1244 Periwinkle Way | Sanibel Island, Florida 33957 | (239) 472-5555ILCIELOSANIBEL.COM A Dynamic Culinary ExperienceIN A CASUAL,ELEGANT SETTINGEnjoy a one-of-a-kind Sanibel dining experience featuring Art Deco inspired indoor dining, live piano music nightly and unparalleled service by an approachable team. All meals are prepared daily with sustainable, fresh from Florida fish, produce, grass-finished beef, lamb and free-range chicken. Il Cielo provides the most creative and comprehensive Farm to Fork experience on Sanibel Island.day Sunday, 4:30 to 9pm | Happy Hour Menu, 4:30 to 6pm | Scott McDonald on Piano Tuesday Sunday, pm Serving Sunday Brunch Beginning Decembe r 1 1t h, 11am to 2pm (Excluding Holidays) Contemporary American Cuisine Award Winning DiningVoted Best Fine Dining Four Years in a Row! Voted Best Seafood and Taste of the Taste 1244 Periwinkle Way | Sanibel Island, Florida 33957 | (239) 472-5555ILCIELOSANIBEL.COM A Dynamic Culinary ExperienceIN A CASUAL,ELEGANT SETTING Enjoy a one-of-a-kind Sanibel dining experience featuring Art Deco inspired indoor dining, live piano music nightly and unparalleled service by an approachable team. All meals are prepared daily with sustainable, fresh from Florida fish, produce, grass-finished beef, lamb and free-range chicken. Il Cielo provides the most creative and comprehensive Farm to Fork experience on Sanibel Island.day Sunday, 4:30 to 9pm | Happy Hour Menu, 4:30 to 6pm | Scott McDonald on Piano Tuesday Sunday, pm Serving Sunday Brunch Beginning Decembe r 1 1t h, 11am to 2pm (Excluding Holidays) Contemporary American Cuisine Award Winning DiningVoted Best Fine Dining Four Years in a Row! Voted Best Seafood and Taste of the Taste NAMI In Search Of Sponsors For Upcoming WalkNAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Lee, Charlotte and Hendry Counties invites sponsors to partner with them in an effort to raise awareness and funds for mental health via NAMIWalks Southwest Florida, their first annual 5K walk. The walk will begin at the City of Fort Myers Pier on Saturday, September 29 at 7 p.m. The fundraising goal is $75,000. Celebrating its 16th year, NAMIWalks takes place in more than 85 communities across the country to raise money for vital NAMI programs and services that are provided to those in need free of cost. This is the first time it will take place in Southwest Florida, specifically in Fort Myers. Mental health disorders are prevalent in todays busy and stress-filled society. We see it, we hear about it, and many of us live it. We have all been affected by mental illness in one form or another. I have known, worked with, as well as had family members and friends who have had to deal with mental illness. Sometimes it was apparent, sometimes hidden, but just because it cannot be seen on the outside doesnt mean that it doesnt hurt those suffering. The NAMIWalks has been long overdue and there is no better time than now for all of us in Southwest Florida to come together. This walk is a chance to bring us all together to celebrate who we are as a community. With this event, we hope to Fill the Bridge with people that want to help us change the way the world sees mental illness. Lets show our community that we care about one another and our future, and that we are stronger together. No one should ever have to walk through their toughest day alone, saidd Vacharee Howard, NAMI Lee, Charlotte and Hendry Counties executive vice president. Various levels of sponsorship are available for the event including: Kilometer Sponsor, $250; Supporter, $500; Bronze, $1,000; Kick-off Event, $1,500; Silver, $2,500; Gold, $5,000; Major, $7,500; Presenting, $10,000; and Premier, $15,000. Special sponsorship recognition is also available for major donors of goods and services and is dependent on the cash value of the donation. This includes the sponsorship of food and beverages. On Saturday, September 29, check-in will begin promptly at 6 p.m. and various activities for all ages will take place throughout the evening, including activities for those who wish to participate, but not walk. Fundraising walk teams are also encouraged. Register for free at NAMIWalks Southwest Florida at www.namilee.org/ namiwalks_swfl. For more information about NAMIWalks Southwest Florida or details about donating, volunteering, or becoming a sponsor, visit www.namilee. org.

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Churches/TemplesALL FAITHS UNITARIAN CONGREGATION Sunday 10:30 a.m., 2756 McGregor Boulevard, allfaiths-uc.org, 226-0900. ALL SAINTS BYZANTINE RITE CATHOLIC Sunda y 10:30 a.m. 10291 Bayshore Road, 305-651-0991. ANNUNCIATION GREEK ORTHODOX Sunday 9 and 10 a.m. 8210 Cypress Lake Drive, annunciation.fl.goarch.org, 481-2099. BAT YAM-TEMPLE OF THE ISLANDS Friday Shabbat at 7 p.m. 2050 Periwinkle Way. www.batyam.org 579-0296.BETH SHILOH MESSIANIC SYNAGOGUE Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m. 15675 McGregor Boulevard, 437-3171. BIBLESHARE 10 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Tuesday, 7050 Winkler Rd, Suite 121, www.simplysimple worship.com, 437-8835. BREAD OF LIFE MINISTRIES Sunda y 10:30 a.m. 16581 McGregor Boulevard, 267-3166. CHABAD LUBAVITCH ORTHODOX Friday 6:30 p.m. 5620 Winkler Road, chabadswf.org, 433-7708. CHAPEL OF CYPRESS COVE Sunday 10 a.m. 10200 Cypress Cove Circle, revtedalthouse@aol.com, 850-3943. CHURCH OF THE CROSS Sunday 9:15 and 10:45 a.m. 13500 Freshman Lane, 768-2188. CONGREGATIONAL Sunday 10:30 a.m. 1619 Llewellyn Drive, taecc.com, 334-4978. COVENANT PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 10 a.m. 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937. CYPRESS LAKE BAPTIST Sunday 9:45 and 11 a.m., 7 p.m.; Wednesday 6:30 p.m. 8400 Cypress Lake Drive, 481-5442. CYPRESS LAKE PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 8, 9, 10 and 11 a.m. 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, www.clpc.us, 481-3233. CYPRESS LAKE UNITED METHODIST Sunday 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, 482-1250. FAITH FELLOWSHIP WORLD OUTREACH Sunday 10:30 a.m.,Thursday 7:30 p.m., Friday 7:30 p.m. 6111 South Pointe Boulevard, 278-3638. FAITH UNITED METHODIST Sunday 8:45 and 10:30 a.m. 15690 McGregor Boulevard, 482-2030. FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST Wednesday 12 noon Testimony Service, Sunday 10:30 a.m. 2390 West First Street, christiansciencefortmyers.net, christianscience.com. FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Sunday 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. 13545 American Colony Boulevard, 936-2511. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. 2466 First Street, www.fumcftmyers.org, 332-1152. FORT MYERS CHRISTIAN Sunday 10:30 a.m., 5916 Winkler Road, 4374330. FORT MYERS CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST; Sunday 10 a.m., 8210 College Parkway, 4823133. IONA-HOPE EPISCOPAL CONGREGATION Saturday 5 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Tuesday 9:30 a.m.; Wednesday 9:30 a.m. 9650 Gladiolus Drive, 454-4778. JESUS THE WORKER CATHOLIC Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday 8, 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. 881 Nuna Avenue, 481-1143. KINGDOM LIFE Sunday 10:30 a.m. 2154 McGregor Boulevard, 218-8343. LAMB OF GOD Sunday 7:45 and 10 a.m. 19691 Cypress View Drive, lambofgodchurch.net, 267-3525. NEW BEGINNINGS CENTER Friday 6:30 and 7 p.m. 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, nbcministry@embarqmail.com, facebook.com/nbcministry, 656-0416. NEW COVENANT EYES Monthly 9 a.m. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, newcovenanteyes.com, 220-8519. NEW HOPE BAPTIST Sunday 11 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. 16120 San Carlos Boulevard, Unit 10, 985-8503. NEW HOPE PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 10051 Plantation Road, www.newhopefortmyers.org, 274-1230. PEACE COMMUNITY Sunday 10:30 a.m. www. 17671 Pine Ridge Road, peacecommunitychurch.com, 2677400. PEACE LUTHERAN Sunday 8 and 10 a.m. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@ peaceftmyers.com. 437-2599. REDEEMER LUTHERAN Sunday 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. 3950 Winkler Ext., 274-0143. RIVER OF LIFE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 8, 9:45 and 11:30 a.m. 21580 River Ranch Road, 495-0400. SAMUDRABADRA BUDDHIST CENTER Meditation classes. MeditationInFortMyers. org, 567-9739. SAINT COLUMBKILLE CATHOLIC Monday through Saturday 8 a.m.; Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday 7, 9 and 11 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 12171 Iona Road, 489-3973. ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CATHOLIC Monday through Thursday 6:45 a.m.; Friday 6:45 and 11 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.; Sunday 6:45, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 2157 Cleveland Avenue, 334-2161. SAINT JOHN THE APOSTLE METROPOLITAN Sunday 10 a.m. 3049 McGregor Boulevard, 344-0012. SAINT MICHAEL LUTHERAN Saturday 5:30 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10:45 a.m. 3595 Broadway, 939-1218. SAINT NICHOLAS MONASTERY Sunday 9:30 a.m. 111 Evergreen Road, saintnicholasmonastery.org, 997-2847. ST. VINCENT DE PAUL CATHOLIC Tuesday through Friday 9 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.; Sunday 9 and 11 a.m. 13031 Palm Beach Boulevard, 693-0818. SOUTHWEST BAPTIST Sunday 11 a.m.; Wednesday 6 p.m. 16940 McGregor Boulevard, 454-3336. TEMPLE BETHEL SYNAGOGUE Friday Shabbat 7:30 p.m.; Torah Saturday 9 a.m.; Religious School Wednesday 5:30 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m.16225 Winkler Road, templebethel.com, 433-0018. TEMPLE JUDEA (CONSERVATIVE) Friday 6:30 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. tjswfl. org.14486 A&W Bulb Road, 433-0201. THE NEW CHURCH Sunday 11 a.m. 10811 Sunset Plaza Circle #401, newchurchflorida.com. 481-5535. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST Sunday 10:30 a.m. 13411 Shire Lane, uucfm. org, 561-2700. UNITY OF FORT MYERS Sunday 10 a.m. 11120 Ranchette Road, unityoffortmyers.org, 278-1511. WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. 9065 Ligon Court, 481-2125. WORD OF LIFE Sunday 10 a.m., Wednesday 7 p.m. 2120 Collier Avenue, 274-8881. ZION LUTHERAN Sunday 8, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. 7401 Winkler Road, zionfm.org, 481-4040. THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 201810 Character Development Program ExpandsGirls on the Run, a national character development program for girls age 8 to 13, has announced that the Girls on the Run of Collier County council has merged with the Girls on the Run of Southwest Florida council. The merger of these two non-profit organizations has created a stronger council through the combination of resources and leadership. Were excited to unite as one group, so that we can serve even more chil dren at sites throughout Collier, Lee, Charlotte and DeSoto counties, said Christine McConnelee, executive dDi rector for the new Girls on the Run of Southwest Florida. Were expanding the number of program sites from 24 in the Spring of 2018 to at least 40 this fall. This added reach and exposure is beneficial for the girls who participate in our program as well as our support ers and sponsors. Girls on the Run provides a 10-week character development program led by trained volunteer coaches who guide and mentor girls through a curriculum focused on teamwork, community ser vice and self-respect. The goal of the program is for participants to develop a stronger sense of identity, greater acceptance of themselves and others, and healthier habits through food choic es and exercise. Girls on the Run of Southwest Florida will serve at least 432 students in the fall. Nearly 40 percent of these children will receive a full or partial scholarship to participate. The Girls on the Run curriculum is available as a volunteer-led, after-school program at elementary schools, middle schools and centers in Collier, Lee, Charlotte and DeSoto counties. Fall enrollment for most sites will begin in August. Programming is made possible through the support of the following annual sponsors: United Healthcare, Build, Beverly Brennan, BKS Yoga, Carolina Catering, Dr. Kelly Malinoski, ML Meade, Suzanne Klym and Neopolitan Family. For more information about enroll ment, becoming a coach, volunteer ing, or sponsoring the program, email davina.hartsfield@girlsontherun.org or visit www.gotrswfl.org. Skylar Sturgis and Lianne Martin cross the finish line at the annual Girls on the Run 5k photo provided Cape Coral Eatery Supports Clean WaterDuring August, Gather restaurant at Tarpon Point Marina will donate 100 percent of the proceeds from sales of a special cocktail and summer shandy to Captains for Clean Water, a nonprofit organization dedicated to pre serving Southwest Florida waterways. Gather is located within T arpon Bay Marina property at 5971 Silver King Boulevard in Cape Coral. For more infor mation, visit www.gathercape.com or call 673-9939. Bonsai Society To Meet At Botanical GardenThe Bonsai Society of Southwest Florida will meet at the Berne Davis Botanical Garden on Saturday, August 18 at 9 a.m. Members will work on finishing and planting on slabs created last month. Society members will also have a Sale or Swap table and raffle. The public is invited; admission and parking are free. Advice will be available on trimming and cultivating bonsai trees. Berne Davis Botanical Garden is located at 2166 Virginia Avenue in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www. bonsaiswfl.org.

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CROW Case Of The Week: Eastern Screech Owl by Bob PetcherThe eastern screech owl ( Megascops asio) can be called a master of disguise. The short, stocky bird is more often heard than seen due to its ability to hide well. Many bird watchers know this species of owl from its trilling or whinnying sounds. Eastern screech owls are either mostly gray or reddish-brown. These colors, coupled with the patterns of complex bands and spots, provide the owl great camouflage against tree bark, usually when napping at the entrance to its home in a tree cavity. At CROW, an adult eastern screech owl was admitted to the hospital from Captiva after it was noted to be hopping around and falling on its face. During the intake exam, veterinarians found the owl to have a complete, open fracture of its left humerus with displacement, but no other injuries. When describing fractures, there are several components used to assess the severity and determine a prognosis. In this screech owls case, there was a complete fracture, meaning that the bone was completely broken. This fracture was also a simple fracture in the sense that there are only two pieces, however, the fracture itself was shaped like a spiral which complicated the fixation, said Dr. Kyle Abbott, CROW veterinary intern. Fractures with multiple pieces are called compound fractures and can be much harder to repair. The other significant thing about this fracture is that it was an open fracture, meaning there were wounds through the skin that led to contamination of the bones. These can be more prone to continued infection, so antibiotics are essential for treatment. Two days after admittance, CROW medical staff performed surgery to place pins to stabilize the fracture. Before the pins could be placed, the displaced ends of the bones were aligned. Once aligned, an intramedullary (IM) was placed with a single cross pin in each piece of the fractured bone. The proper placement of the pins was confirmed using x-rays. They were held in place with a small tube filled with orthodontic resin. A topical antibiotic cream was applied before non-adherent dressing and bandages were placed around the fixations. This surgery was challenging due to the spiral shape of the fracture and because the bones of this screech owl are so small. The surgery went well despite these challenges. A metal pin was placed down the internal shaft of the bone, called an intramedullary pin. This intramedullary pin aligns the pieces of the bone. After this, more pins were placed in each piece of the bone, called cross pins. These cross pins run perpendicular to the intramedullary pin and prevent rotation of the bone pieces, said Dr. Abbott. Once these components are placed, they are connected in a rigid fashion outside of the body. There are many materials that can be used for this. In this patient, we used a rubber tube filled with orthodontic cement to connect the cross pins. This is a type of fracture stabilization called an external fixator, which is commonly used in avian patients. Dr. Abbott said x-rays were also used after pin placement to confirm the pins are located where they need to be prior to stabilizing everything in place. Yet another set of x-rays was taken to ensure the pieces were aligned for healing. The owl was then fitted with a body wrap to secure its wing against its body. The patient is placed in a body wrap for a few days to hold the wing against the body and prevent motion, said Dr. Abbott. This allows for the soft tissue swelling to reduce and for the wounds in the skin to be kept still while healing. After a few days, the body wrap is removed. Nearly two weeks after surgery, the patient is undergoing rehabilitation. Dr. Abbott said, We will continue to assess this screech owl every few days and perform physical therapy on the wing. Right now, physical therapy is going well. Every other week, x-rays will be taken to ensure healing is appropriate. After a few weeks, the fracture should be stable enough to allow for increased activity. Typically, within a couple months, the fracture has stabilized and the patient has regained the strength necessary to be released. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to P.O. Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www. crowclinic.org. Patient #18-3068 reacts to the photographers presence photo by Brian Bohlman RIVER 11 THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018

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Red Tide Is Gradually Pushing Outby Capt. Matt MitchellWhat a difference a week has made for Pine Island Sound and our surrounding waters. Prevailing southeast winds helped push the stench and floating dead fish out into the Gulf. Although there are still areas of small dead fish floating on lines in the sound, the water has generally cleaned up. Fishing is far from back to normal and will take at least a few weeks to hopefully fully recover. I was out on the water for only three charters this week, and it was strange to see almost zero other boats out. Running north at the beginning of the week, we had no problem finding some nonstop mangrove snapper action while targeting deeper structure in the sound. Along with the mangrove snapper, we have also been catching some small gag grouper in these same locations. Water in the northern sound is really clear in places with the bottom being visible in many of locations in up to seven to even eight feet of water. Unfortunately, I still have been unable to locate any shiners so all of my fishing has been with live shrimp which is something totally new for me during this time of year. Luckily, for some reason, the live shrimp over the past week have been larger than our usual summer time bait shrimp. Light gear and terminal tackle has been key to catching fish. As the week progressed, I gradually started working my way back to the south and trying places I had success prior to this red tide. Certain places were really good, while other areas were simply void of any life. Southern Matlacha Pass proved a great area to catch fish while other locations in the southern end of Pine Island Sound remained a dead zone. Running the whole gulf side of Sanibel and coming back in through Blind Pass one day mid-week, I noticed there were very few floating fish out along the beaches though also no bird or bait activity. Once inside Blind Pass as I moved back into the sound, I did spot several large rafts of threadfin herring, which is a great sign that our water quality in this area is getting a whole lot better. It should only be a matter of time before we are back to the daily shiner fishing we are used to. Despite the far from normal conditions we have been dealing with, it just feels good to get out and catch some fish with all of the death we have been dealing with. Even though the fishing is not what it should be, my clients have all been happy catching limits of quality mangrove snapper specially when they have had such low expectations after watching the news. Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions, email captmattmitchell@aol. com. ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. NEW MOTOR SALES REBUILT POWERHEADS FACTORY TRAINED MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISERCourteous Professional Marine Repair Service Dockside Service Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life472-3380 466-3344 Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint PricesDave Doane NEW M O T O R S ALE S REB U ILT P O WERHEA D S FACTORY T R A I N E D MER C U RY MARINER JO HN SO N EVINR U DE S UZUKI YAMAHA O M C I/ O S MER C RU I S E R C ourteous Professional Marine Repair S erv i ce D oc k s i d e S erv i c e S ervin g Sanibel & C aptiva For Li f e Y B t t Yo ur B ottom Yo ur B ot to m Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices C Call on a c es C C ll n Pa in t Pr i es C C i i Call on Paint Prices D ave Doane1 Send Us Your Fish TalesWe would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include a photograph with identification. Email to press@islandsunnews.com or call 395-1213. Gag grouper caught while fishing with Capt. Matt Mitchell this week photo provided THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 201812 BOAT RENTALSFishing Cabbage KeyDolphin Watching Captains Available472-5800Jensens Marina Captiva Island CLEAR YOUR GEAR It Catches More Than FishCast carefully to avoid tangling tackle in mangroves

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Plant SmartWomans Tongueby Gerri ReavesWomans tongue (Albizia lebbeck) is a deciduous tree native to tropical Asia and northern Australia. This member of the pea family was introduced to Florida in 1883 both as an ornamental tree and for agricultural purposes. Other common names include raom tree, soros-tree and Indian siris tree. Decades ago, it was used as a shade tree and recommended for the home landscape. Fast-growing with pretty flowers, it grows as tall as 100 feet. The pale bark is corky and flaky. The tree escaped cultivation, however, and is now listed by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council as a category-I invasive species. The council describes such species as altering native plant communities by displacing native species, changing community structures or ecological functions, or hybridizing with natives. The categorization is based on the documented ecological damage caused. If this tree is in your landscape, consider replacing it with a suitable native tree. The alternate leaves are twice compound, or twice divided, and have a featheror fern-like structure. They are divided into two to five pairs of pinnae, which in turn are divided into three to 10 pairs of oblong leaflets that are an inch or two long. The dull green leaves have paler undersides, and the leaflets fold at night. The trees ornamental value derives not only from the pretty foliage but from the clusters of showy creamy white or greenish flowers with many long stamens. Globular, fragrant and fluffy, they appear on stalks near the stem ends. The tree strongly resembles its pretty relative, mimosa (Albizia julibrissin), or silktree, another category-I invasive in Florida. However, the latter has smaller leaflets and pink flowers. Womans tongues odd common name, as well as the alternative name rattlepod, is inspired by the flat papery seed pods, which remain on the tree for months and rattle in the wind when dry. The narrow oblong pods measure up to a foot long and contain three to 12 flat brown seeds. In other parts of the world, the tree is used for livestock feed, and the wood is used for a variety of purposes. In addition to being invasive, this breaks in strong wind and seedlings tend to take over an area. Sources: Florida Landscape Plants by John V. Watkins and Thomas J. Sheehan, www.cabi.org, www.fleppc.org, and plants.ifas.ufl.edu. Plant Smart explores the diverse flora of South Florida. Seed pods that remain on the tree for months rattle in the wind, inspiring another common name, rattlepod, for this member of the pea family Fast-growing womans tongue was introduced to Florida in 1883 as an ornamental and for agricultural use Invasive womans tongue has twice-divided leaves and clusters of fluffy flowers photos by Gerri Reaves13 THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018 EXPERIENCE: HUNDREDS OF SUCCESSFUL LANDSCAPES300 Center Road, Fort Myers FL 33907 PHONE 239.939.9663 FAX 239.939.8504www.NoLawn.com www.AllNative.bizOPEN DAILY: 9 to 5 Mon Sat 10 to 3 SunOUR NURSERY FEATURES OVER 200 SPECIES OF NATIVE PLANTS ON SEVERAL ACRES Buttery Gardens Wildlife/Bird Sanctuaries We also offer landscape design, consultation, installation and maintenance. Or consider not using any rat poisons at all. Instead, seal all entry points to your home. Help SCCF Bring Back the Barn OwlsSCCF 472-2329 sccf.orgPoisoned rats can kill the eagles, hawks, bobcats and owls that eat them.Tell your pest control professional to NOT use these rat poisons: brodifacoum bromailone difenacoum difethialone Groups Sought For Scarecrows In The Park ContestThe Lakes Park Enrichment Foundation invites the community to participate in its ninth annual Scarecrows in the Park competition during the Lakes Park Fall Festival, planned for October 12 to 28. Local businesses, community members, organizations, elementary, middle and high schools, and youth groups such as Scouts and 4-H can join the contest fun by fashioning custom-made scarecrows to be displayed at Lakes Park during the festival. Proceeds will benefit the Lakes Park Enrichment Foundation, supporting enhancements to the beauty and experience of Lakes Park, including the continued development of the Childrens Garden. Prizes will be awarded in multiple categories by a team of celebrity judges at the Scarecrows VIP Party on Saturday, Ocober. 13. Fall Festival attendees will vote for their favorites in the Peoples Choice competition. Peoples Choice winners will be announced the last week of the festival. Foundation board member and fundraising chair Tara Molloy said the Fall Festival is a longtime family favorite that she has watched grow. Even last years event had over 50,000 visitors, which was amazing considering the park had just reopened days before because of Hurricane Irma, Molloy said. The youth groups and sponsors did an exceptional job, and this years festival should be even bigger and more exciting. Lakes Regional Park is located at 7330 Gladiolus Drive in Fort Myers. Teachers, scout troop leaders, business sponsors, and anyone else interested in participating is encouraged to visit www.lakespark.org or email Foundation Executive Director Erin White at info@ lakespark.org. Those who sign up will be placed on a mailing list for Scarecrowsrelated communications, including official application, sponsor/builder match-ups, deadlines and build schedules as well as and any other related communications.

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THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 201814 Ding Darling Days Returns This OctoberThe 30th annual Ding Darling Days birding and eco-festival is scheduled for the weekend of October 12 to 14 at the JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge on Sanibel. New for this year, Cool Kids Zone on Sunday Family Fun Day will provide activities in the Visitor & Education Center, so families can come in to cool off. It will include puppet shows, story and crafts, DIY nature crafts, face-painting and a selfie photo station. Lets Get Outside Day kicks off the celebration on Friday, October 12 with free admission to Wildlife Drive for cyclists and hikers, and various free and discounted tours and eco-activities. Conservation Art Day follows on Saturday, October 13 with visits from Federal Duck Stamp and Junior Duck Stamp winners, and nature art workshops. Family Fun Day culminates the weekend with free activities on Sunday, October 14. It features all-free refuge tours, live wildlife presentations, archery clinics, hot dogs, live music and kids nature crafts. Because of increasing budget cuts and staff reductions, we are shortening this years eco-festival from one week to three weekend days, said Supervisory Refuge Ranger Toni Westland. The 30th annual Ding Darling Days celebrates the birthday of the refuges namesake, father of the Federal Duck Stamp program and Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist, Jay N. Ding Darling. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Ding Darling Wildlife Society-Friends of the Refuge (DDWS) and Tarpon Bay Explorers, the refuges recreation concession, co-sponsor Ding Darling Days with support from the local community and businesses. Sponsors to date for the 2018 Ding Darling Days include: Roseate Spoonbill Sponsors Docs Ford Sanibel Rum Bar & Grille Great Egret Sponsors Jim and Patty Sprankle Great Blue Heron Sponsors Baileys General Store, Mike and Terry Baldwin, Island Sun, Sanibel Captiva Rotary Club, Sunny Day Guide Reddish Egret Sponsors Casa Ybel Resort, Jerry Edelman and Maryanne Daly, The Gresham Family, Mitchells Sand Castles, Sanibel-Captiva Kiwanis Club Snowy Egret Sponsors John Brennan Visit www.dingdarlingdays.com for updates on events, information on sponsoring Ding Darling Days or to sign up for email update bulletins. Contact Sarah Lathrop at 472-1100, ext. 4, or sarah@dingdarlingsociety.org to become a sponsor. Doc Fords Rum Bar & Grille supports Ding Days every year with a sponsorship at the $5,000 level photos provided Family Fun Day tops off the weekend of October 12 to 14 with free activities in and outside of the Visitor & Education CenterObservatory To Open For SeasonThe James & Barbara Moore Observatory, located on the Florida SouthWestern State College (FSW) Charlotte Campus, opens for the 2018-19 season on Friday, September 7. Observation sessions are held on the first Friday of each month and begin 30 to 45 minutes after dark, outdoors and weather permitting. Sessions are free and open to the public. The 2018-19 schedule of observatory viewing sessions is as follows: September 7; October 5; November 2; December 7; January 4, 2019; February 1, 2019; March 1, 2019; April 5, 2019; and May 3, 2019. Additional observation sessions may be scheduled or changed depending on celestial events. Florida SouthWestern State College (FSW) Charlotte Campus is located at 26300 Airport Road in Punta Gorda. For more information or for a full schedule of observatory events, call 941-637-3518 or 941-637-5652, or visit www.fsw.edu/charlotte/ observatory. From page 2Historic DowntownGardners Park and the main business district. Park Avenue and Fowler, respectively the north and south-bound ramps for the Edison Bridge, make it tricky to access the area by car, much less as a pedestrian or bicyclist. One-way Fowler and Second Streets are used by most motorists merely as the fastest route to circumvent historic downtown on the way to somewhere else. Nevertheless, in the lulls between traffic, the historic neighborhoods quiet coziness can be felt. Charming bungalows and two-story family homes shaded by venerable old trees remind us of the past that the Gardners Park Redevelopment Strategy aims to enhance. Today the site once occupied by an attractive and busy apartment complex is vacant. Walk down to Second and Park and imagine it as a leafy residential neighborhood. Then drop by one of these two research centers to learn more about the apartment-building boom of the 1920s. The Lee County Black History Society is located at 1936 Henderson Avenue, adjacent to the Williams Academy Museum at Roberto Clemente Park. Hours for the all-volunteer, nonprofit organization are Wednesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Saturday by appointment only. For more information, call 332-8778 or visit www. leecountyblackhistorysociety.org. The Southwest Florida Historical Society is an all-volunteer, non-profit organization open Wednesday and Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon and Wednesday 4 to 7 p.m. It is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Call 9394044 or visit www.swflhistoricalsociety. org for more information. Sources: The Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society, the Fort Myers Press and The NewsPres s. The James & Barbara Moore Observatory photo provided

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15 THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018 NEW DAY, NEW ADVENTURE 3075 Sanibel-Captiva Rd. Sanibel, Florida 33957 (239) 395-2233 Open Daily, 10 a.m. p.m. Free with paid Museum admission. ** Preregistration required at ShellMuseum.org/beachwalks Schedules subject to change.SHELLMUSEUM.ORG FRIDAYSStory Time & Craft WEDNESDAYSShell Jewelry SUNDAYSSuper Scavenger Hunt THURSDAYSCollections Tour MONDAYSCollection Connection SATURDAYSMollusk University TUESDAYS Fossil DigExperience a different adventure at the museum Plus, EVERY day: Shell arts & crafts*, Tank Talks*, and Daily Beach walks**AT THE MUSEUM LeeSar/CSF Adds Vice PresidentLeeSar and Cooperative Services of Florida, Inc. (CSF) have named Jeremy Owens as vice president of supply chain logistics. Owens will be responsible for optimizing the supply chain logistics of the distribution center for the members by creating value through operational efficiencies and cost reduction initiatives. He will initially focus on warehousing, transportation, IT and other supply chain logistics solutions to ensure the service line is properly aligned with the organizations strategic goals as it meets the needs of the members. At LeeSar we are deploying strategic imperatives focused on improving member services and reducing costs. To do this effectively, we must have the right talent. Jeremy Owens is an experienced leader that can do the job, said Bob Boswell, president and CEO of LeeSar/CSF. Jeremy has the education, a wellrounded background, and the type of personality we needed. He is the right fit for the type of leadership team we are building. Owens brings more than 20 years of healthcare supply chain operations and leadership experience. He has extensive expertise in the areas of operations, contracting, finance, project management and strategic planning. Owens has an established history of dataand analytics-focused development of innovative solutions for reducing costs while improving quality and clinical outcomes. Since 2006, Owens has been with Steward Health Care (formerly IASIS Healthcare) where he served as the Arizona market director of supply chain and, since 2014, the assistant vice president of supply chain for system. During his tenure, Owens led the facility teams to optimize their supply chain operations, contact utilization, data management and standardization efforts. In addition, Owens worked with Cardinal Health for eight years in a consultant role where he provided operational assessments, transition management and project management for hospital supply chain and pharmacy departments. Owens is a certified materials and resource professional (CMRP) and is engaged with healthcare organizations including the American Hospital Association (AHA) and the Association for Healthcare Resources and Materials Management (AHRMM). Owens has a masters degree in business administration with emphasis on health care management from the University of Phoenix. LeeSar/CSF is currently undergoing a $20 million expansion. The operation runs 24/7 with a dedicated workforce of more than 500 employees. In 1998, Lee Health and Sarasota Memorial Healthcare System developed LeeSar/ CSF as a means to reduce costs for medical goods and services while providing safe, high quality patient care. They have since been joined by Central Florida Health and, most recently, Jupiter Medical Center. Jeremy Owens photo providedWorkshops On Shore-Based Shark FishingThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is gathering public input on shore-based shark fishing. Share your thoughts on the future management of this fishery by attending an upcoming public workshop. Workshops, which begin at 6 p.m., will be held at the following times and locations: August 20: South Daytona, Piggotte Community Center, Reception Hall Room, 504 Big Tree Road August 21: Jacksonville, Jacksonville University, J. Henry Gooding Building Gooding Auditorium, 2800 University Boulevard North August 27: Melbourne, Hilton Melbourne Rialto Place, 200 Rialto Place August 28: West Palm Beach, Palm Beach County, Department of Planning, Zoning & Building The Vista Center, 2300 North Jog Road August 29: Miami, Miami City Hall Commission Main Chambers, 3500 Pan American Drive August 30: Key Colony Beach, City Hall, 600 West Ocean Drive. If you cannot attend an in-person meeting, submit comments online or view an advance copy of the presentation by visiting www.myfwc. com/saltwatercomments. FWC staff is working on a virtual workshop that should be available online in the near future. For more details and updates to these meetings, visit www.myfwc.com/ fishing (click on Saltwater Fishing, Rulemaking and Workshops.)

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THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 201816 RIVER Book ReviewLove And Ruin by Di SaggauPaula McLain, the bestselling author of The Paris Wife returns to the subject of Ernest Hemingway in Love and Ruin This novel is about his passionate, stormy marriage to Martha Gellhorn, a fiercely independent, ambitious young woman who would become one of the greatest war correspondents of the 20th century, reporting on virtually every major conflict for 60 years. Even covering the invasion of Panama at the age of 81. Meeting Hemingway was both the best and worst thing that ever happened to Gellhorn. In 1937, 28-year-old Martha Gellhorn travels alone to Madrid to report on the atrocities of the Spanish Civil War and becomes drawn to the stories of ordinary people caught in the devastating conflict. Its the adventure shes been looking for to prove herself a worthy journalist in a field dominated by men. But she also finds herself, unexpectedly falling in love with Hemingway, a man on his way to becoming a legend. On November 21, 1940 in Cheyenne, Wyoming, she becomes the third Mrs. Hemingway. Martha is independent and ambitious and her career comes first. She is determined not to be an appendage to her famous partner, and her goal is to live my own life, and not anyone elses. However, its hard not to be distracted by the presence of a handsome writer at the top of his game. In the shadow of the impending Second World War, and set against the turbulent backdrops of Madrid and Cuba, Martha and Ernests relationship and their professional careers ignite. I loved reading about Marthas friendship with Eleanor Roosevelt. When Ernest publishes For Whom the Bell Tolls they are no longer equals and Martha must make a choice: surrender to the confining demands of being a famous mans wife or risk losing Ernest by forging a path as her own woman and writer. It is a dilemma that could force her to break his heart, and hers. Love and Ruin captures Gellhorn as a heroine for the ages: a woman who will risk absolutely everything to find her own voice. I consider this is a great book club read. Mine will discuss it soon. image provided School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Readers, Getting a new school year off to a good start can influence childrens attitude, confidence and performance both socially and academically. The transition from summer to school can be difficult for both children and parents. Even children who are eager to return to class must adjust to the greater levels of activity, structure and, for some, pressures associated with school life. The degree of adjustment depends on the child, but parents can help their children (and the rest of the family) manage the increased pace of life by planning ahead, being realistic and maintaining a positive attitude. Here are a few suggestions, from the National Association of School Psychologists, to help ease the transition and promote a successful school experience. The First Weeks: Clear your own schedule To the extent possible, postpone business trips, volunteer meetings and extra projects. You want to be free to help your children acclimate to the school routine and overcome the confusion or anxiety that many children experience at the start of a new school year. Make lunches the night before school Older children should help or make their own. Give them the option to buy lunch in school if they prefer and finances permit. Set alarm clocks Have school-age children set their own alarm clocks to get up in the morning. Praise them for prompt response to morning schedules and bus pickups. Leave plenty of extra time Make sure your children have plenty of time to get up, eat breakfast and get to school. For very young children taking the bus, pin to their shirt or backpack an index card with pertinent information, including their teachers name and bus number, as well as daytime contact information. Prepare for after school Review with your children what to do if they get home after school and you are not there. Be very specific, particularly with young children. Put a note card in their backpack with the name(s) and number(s) of a neighbor who is home during the day as well as a number where you can be reached. If you have not already done so, have your children meet neighbor contacts to reaffirm the backup support personally. Review your childs schoolbooks Talk about what your children will be learning during the year. Share your enthusiasm for the subjects and your confidence in your childrens ability to master the content. Reinforce the natural progression of the learning process that occurs over the school year. Learning skills take time and repetition. Encourage your children to be patient, attentive and positive. Send a brief note to your childs teacher Let the teachers know that you are interested in getting regular feedback on how and what your children are doing in school. Be sure to attend back-to-school night and introduce yourself to the teachers. Find out how they like to communicate with parents (e.g., through notes, e-mail, or phone calls). Convey a sincere desire to be a partner with your childrens teachers to enhance their learning experience. Familiarize yourself with the other school professionals Make an effort to find out who in the school or district can be a resource for you and your children. Learn their roles and how best to access their help if you need them. This can include the principal and front office personnel; school psychologist, counselor, and social worker; the reading specialist, speech therapist, and school nurse; and the after-school activities coordinator. Shelley Greggs is adjunct faculty at Florida SouthWestern State College, where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also a nationally certified school psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. From page 4World Premierestudents or $22 for Alliance members. Other plays during Theatre Conspiracys 2018-19 season include Murderers A Killer Comedy from September 27 to 30 and October 4 to 7; The Elephant Man from November 8 to 11 and 15 to 18; The Agitators from January 17 to 20 and 24 to 27; Marian, or the True Tale of Robin Hood from February 7 to 10 and 14 to 17; Joe Turners Come and Gone from March 1 to 2, 7 to 10 and 14 to 17; and Rancho Mirage from May 9 to 12 and 16 to 19 Theatre Conspriacy is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. To purchase tickets or for more information, drop by or call the box office at 939-2787 or visit www. artinlee.org/theatre. Packed with facts and employing an engaging storytelling style, [Female Pioneers of Fort Myers] both teaches and entertains. Local history buffs and newcomers to history will value Tuthill and Halls research and appreciate the accessible format, too.Gerri Reaves, PhD, author of Legendary Locals of Fort Myers and Fort Myers, Then & Now Available atWWW.AMAZON.COM WWW.EDITORIALRXPRESS.COM

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17 THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018 ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. Mark OBrien Owner/Agent Trish Barbone Agent Justin Wheeler Agent We are HERE for all your insurance needs Housing Authority Appoints Two Board MembersThe Housing Authority of the City of Fort Myers (HACFM) has appointed Meg Geltner and Reverend Dr. Israel Suarez to its board of commissioners. Appointed by the mayor of the City of Fort Myers, the board serves as the governing officers of HACFM. Through formal adoption of policy, they ensure the authoritys purpose and accompanying responsibilities are carried out in as efficient and economical a manner as possible. The seven board members volunteer their services to the authority. Commissioners ensure the authority operates within the law and according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development regulations. Geltner is the executive director of the PACE Center for Girls in Fort Myers, a day school program for at-risk middle and high school girls. She is widely recognized as an accomplished leader, respected for her tireless work in Southwest Florida in the areas of human and social services. She has been a pioneer in the social work profession developing programs including residential and outpatient services for rehabilitation, affordable housing and a primary care clinic. She was instrumental in opening the first respite care center for uninsured patients released from acute care in our local hospital system. Geltner also successfully testified before the Judicial Committee in Tallahassee advocating a change to the Good Samaritan Act allowing health care coverage at no charge throughout the state for primary care clinics serving people experiencing homelessness. Her impact on our community has been awarded through recognition in her work leading the fight to reduce intergenerational poverty to include 2012 Winner of The News Press Hero of the Year; 2007 The Salvation Armys National Award for best program: Primary Care Clinic and Respite Care Center; 2001 Housing & Urban Development Continuum of Care Program: Best Practices for Comprehensive and Distinctive Programming; 2010 Bob Janes Triage Center nationally recognized Best Practices Award; and 2004 Governors Points of Light Award. Suarez is the founder and CEO of the Nations Association Charities on Palm Beach Boulevard in Fort Myers. Nations Association Charities was founded in 1978 by Suarez to save at-risk youth in Southwest Florida through mentoring programs and education. In 1990, Nations Association was recognized as A Point of Light by President George H W Bush. Through the years thousands of young people have graduated from the nonprofits programs learning life skills, personal responsibility and leadership. Suarez received a bachelors degree in theology from Logos Bible College and a doctorate from National Evangelistic University. He has served on the board of directors for Florida Gulf Coast University, Lee Memorial Health System, Lee County Mental Health Center, Lee County Private Industry Council and the Lee County American Red Cross. He is a previous commissioner for the Lee County Housing Development and the Housing Authority of the City of Fort Myers. He has been recognized by the Lee County School Board for Outstanding Service to the Children and Citizens of Lee County in 1991; was named Lee County Citizen of the Year in 1993; received the Key to the City of Fort Myers in 1981; and received the United Nations Prayer for Peace Award in 2016. The HACFM serves as a catalyst for increasing access to safe, affordable housing and to help develop, preserve and revitalize communities through affordable rental housing. The agency is dedicated to empowering families with the means to become as selfsufficient as possible, encouraging and facilitating movement toward financial independence beyond the need for HACFM services, while recognizing the needs and limitations of the mentally and physically disabled, aged and infirmed. For more information, call 344-3220 or visit www.hacfm.org. Meg Getlner photos provided Dr. Israel SuarezPlanned Giving Council Sets 2018-19 MeetingsThe Planned Giving Council of Lee County, Inc, an organization that provides programs presented by expert speakers, symposiums, networking and guidance to professionals involved in all aspects of charitable giving, has announced the 2018-19 luncheon meeting schedule and topics. It is as follows: Thursday, September 27 Ethical Fundraising with Older Adults, sponsored by Cypress Cove Thursday, October 25 The Impact of the New Tax Law on Charitable Giving, sponsored by Hughes, Snell & Co., PA Thursday, November 29 The Five Voices of Leadership Wednesday, December 19 How to Leverage Complex Non-Cash Gifts Thursday, January 17, 2019 Family Philanthropy Thursday, February 28, 2019 The Positive Power of Humor Thursday, March 20, 2019 How to Use Digital Storytelling to Connect with Supporters Thursday, April 25, 2019 Cyber Security for Non-Profits and Organizations Thursday, May 23, 2019 Impact Giving from the Perspective of the Donor June 2019 Annual Symposium Planned Giving Council members are committed to better serving their donors and clients by helping them to make charitable gifts that are well-planned both financially and philanthropically, said Trevor Whitley, president of The Planned Giving Council and partner at Marquis Wealth Management Group. The Planned Giving Council strives to engage all constituents in the charitable gift planning process: planned giving and major gifts professionals, nonprofit managers and trustees, financial and estate planners, trust managers and administrators. All meetings are held at The Blue Coyote Business and Social Club, 9854 Caloosa Yacht and Racquet Drive in Fort Myers. The January joint meeting with the Estate Planning Council will be held at Cypress Lake Country Club. Meetings are held from 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. Networking begins at 11:30 a.m., lunch and program begin at noon. All meetings are free to members. Cost for nonmembers is $30 and includes lunch. Meeting sponsorships are available. Sponsorships allow a business or non-profit to introduce themselves to non-profits, attorneys, CPAs and wealth advisors and distribute brochures and/or promotional items. Sponsors also receive recognition on the Planned Giving Council website, in announcement emails, press releases and social media. For more information, visit plannedgivinglee.org or call 850-0040. For membership information, visit plannedgivinglee.org/how-to-join. For sponsorship information, visit www. plannedgivinglee.org. Call or e-mail us for more information. Phone: 239-558-5733 E-mail: rabbitrdmgt@gmail.com www.RabbitRoadMgt.com Rabbit Rd. Property Management & Home Watch Company which specializes in managing small county area. We are licensed, insured and bonded with over 20 years of experience. We are also Florida CAM licensed and accredited members of the National Home Watch Association.

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THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 201818 Financial FocusConsider These Financial Tips For Single Womenby Jennifer BaseyIf youre a single woman, most of your financial challenges and aspirations may resemble those of single men. Men and women face the same economic stress factors of modern life, and both groups have similar financial goals, such as the ability to retire comfortably. But women still face specific obstacles. You need to be aware of these challenges and do everything you can to overcome them. For example, women still face a wage gap. In 2017, women earned 82 percent of what men earned, according to the Pew Research Center. However, the wage gap narrows among younger workers, and may even disappear for highly educated women, especially those in the STEM fields science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Another financial concern for women is connected to their role as caregivers. Women spend an average of 12 years out of the workforce to care for children, elderly relatives and even friends, according to an estimate by the Social Security Administration. Other studies report different figures, but all the evidence points to women being the ones who take time off from work to care for loved ones. This means fewer contributions to Social Security, 401(k)s and other retirement plans. Faced with these and other issues, what can you do to help yourself move toward your important goals? Consider these steps: Develop good financial habits Establishing good financial habits can pay off for you throughout your lifetime. These habits can include maintaining a budget, keeping your debts under control and putting aside some money for a rainy day. Take advantage of available opportunities If you work for an organization that offers a 401(k) or similar plan, contribute as much as you think you can afford. At the very least, put in enough to earn your employers matching contribution, if one is offered. And every time your salary goes up, increase the amount you invest in your plan. Also, think about opening an IRA, which, like a 401(k), can offer taxadvantaged investment opportunities. If you have children, youll also want to explore college savings vehicles, such as a 529 plan. Educate yourself about investing and get professional advice Some people think investing is just too complex and mysterious to be understandable. Yet, with patience and a willingness to learn, you can become quite knowledgeable about how to invest, what youre investing in and what forces affect the investment world. And to help you create an investment strategy thats appropriate for your goals, risk tolerance and time horizon, you may also want to work with a financial professional. Discuss financial issues with your future spouse If you get married or remarried, youll want to discuss financial issues with your new spouse. Specifically, youll want to answer questions such as these: What assets and debts do each of you bring to the marriage? Do you plan to merge your finances or keep them separate? Are your investment styles compatible? Do you have similar long-term goals? You and your new spouse dont need identical views on every financial topic, but you both need to be willing to work together to advance your common interests. Ultimately, you have a lot of control over your own financial future. And making informed choices can help make that future a bright one. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones financial advisor. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@ edwardjones.com. Superior InteriorsComplete A Room: Window Treatmentsby Marcia FeeneyUsing blinds in windows may offer a sense of privacy from the neighborhood, but window treatments can provide extra comfort and bring style and sophistication into a home. Not only a functional factor, window treatments are an accessory that can completely transform a room, giving it more depth, character and coziness. Window treatments offer the perfect opportunity to express personal style and make a room feel more complete. Choosing the right option for windows takes time, thought and effort. You cant just throw sheers into any room, and you certainly shouldnt opt for honeycomb shades as your only option around the house. To complete each room with a set of window treatments, one needs to consider each rooms theme, purpose, style and level of required privacy. Before dressing windows in any standard option, consider the following in choosing the perfect treatments. Rushing to the store and purchasing a set of window treatments solely for the way they look is strongly discouraged. Assess all windows in your house and make treatment decisions based on the purpose of each room. All the spaces in a home are meant for something different, and that means youll need to explore different types of window treatments as well. For instance, you likely want the bedroom to be dark and dimly lit since its made for resting, so a set of roomdarkening curtains make most sense. A room that thrives off natural light, such as the home office or living room, can use a beautiful set of sheers. In the bathroom, where you need privacy and solitude, honeycomb shades, which block little light but offer total privacy, are a viable option. The style and color of treatments should complement the rooms existing theme. If youre a fan of pattern and texture, this is an opportunity to go wild and make a statement. On the opposite side of the spectrum, choose a neutrally toned set of window treatments to balance the room out. Keep in mind that you also need to purchase curtain rods and should be mindful of style there, as well. This is a simple task that can make or break your desired outcome. Choosing a set of window treatments based on the purpose and character of each room in your home seems like a simple task, but it can be difficult to complement your space correctly. Have no fear, you dont have to take care of this statement-making task on your own. A design professional can lend a helping hand. Marcia Feeney is an interior designer on Sanibel/Captiva Islands. She can be reached at marcia@coindecden.com. Vice President Of Compliance And Internal AuditJeffrey Pigott has joined Lee Health as vice president of compliance and internal audit. In his new role, Pigott is responsible for oversight of regulatory compliance and internal auditing for the health system. Pigott has more than 20 years of audit, compliance, financial and accounting experience for large organizations, including health care. Were thrilled to bring Jeffrey on board. He brings extensive compliance experience with large organizations and an excellent history of driving performance and accountability within those companies, said Larry Antonucci, MD, MBA, Lee Health president and CEO. Pigott most recently served as the corporate compliance officer and director of internal audit for Huntsville Hospital Health System in Huntsville, Alabama, where he was responsible for directing the internal audit services, corporate compliance and organizational performance improvement. Huntsville Hospital Health System is the third largest publically owned health system in the nation with more than 1,800 beds and 14,000 employees serving patients in northern Alabama and southern Tennessee. Before that, Pigott served as audit director for CHAN Healthcare Auditors for clients based in Cincinnati, Ohio and Knoxville, Tennessee. The company provides internal audit services to nonprofit health care organizations; audits more than 20 healthcare networks at nearly 400 U.S. hospitals. Pigott has a master of business administration from the University of Detroit Mercy in Detroit, Michigan. He is also a certified internal auditor (CIA), certified fraud examiner (CFE), certified in healthcare compliance (CHC) and certified in healthcare privacy compliance (CHPC). Jeff Pigott photo provided Deadline Nears For Community Business AwardThe 24th annual Southwest Florida Blue Chip Community Business Award application deadline is fast approaching. Coordinated and sponsored by McGriff Insurance Services and BB&T Bank, the Blue Chip Community Business Award recognizes successful, small businesses in Lee, Collier, or Charlotte County that have overcome adversity to achieve success. Applications must be submitted by Tuesday, September 4. Independent judges will pick the honoree once all applications have been collected. Businesses can nominate themselves or be nominated by a third party. To qualify, the for-profit business must have been in operation for at least three years under the same ownership with principal office located in Lee, Collier or Charlotte County, employ five to 400 people and have overcome adversity to achieve success. The award ceremony will take place on Thursday, November 1 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort and Spa, 5001 Coconut Road, in Bonita Springs. To submit an application, contact Stacey Mercado at 433-7189 or smercado@mcgriffinsurance.com.

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19 THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018 Slate Of Officers Appointed For 2018-19 TermThe Uncommon Friends Foundation recently held its annual board of directors retreat at Babcock Ranch and named its slate of officers for 2018-19. Marilyn Stout, Cape Coral City Council member for District 3, was named president; Caryn Smith, CEO of Driven by Design LLC and Driven to Eat LLC dba Moody River Grill, was named vice president; Kerri Goldsmith, CFP, CRPS, financial planner, HBKS Wealth Advisors, became treasurer; Carlos Kelly, stockholder at Henderson, Franklin, Starnes & Holt, PA, was named secretary; and Helena Dabrowski, director of finance, Sunshine Ace Hardware, became immediate past president. Twenty-eight board members, foundation staff and meeting facilitators attended the full-day annual retreat held at The Hatchery at Babcock Ranch to review the past year and make plans for the future. Dr. Eric Dent led the program on ethics. New board members Gary Eskin of Eskin Business Solutions and Jarrett Eady, chairman of the Lee County Black History Society and a director of diversity and inclusion and AVID district director of Lee County Schools, moderated breakout sessions during the day. Craig Randall, PhD, and assistant professor of management at Florida Gulf Coast University, was also assisting with breakout sessions. A speakers program is under development to complement the organizations ethics agenda, a mainstay of its mission. Uncommon Friends Foundation is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization established in 1993 and dedicated to lifelong character building among todays youth and business leaders. It is located at Burroughs Home & Gardens at 2505 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. For more information, visit www.uncommonfriends.org or contact Executive Director Jennifer Nelson at 337-9503. Carlos A. Kelly photos provided Kerri Goldsmith Marilyn Stout Helena Dabrowski Caryn Smith The Uncommon Friends Foundation is closing nominations for its 2018 Business Ethics Award on Saturday, September 1. Finalists will be announced in advance and honored at a special business ethics luncheon hosted by Florida Gulf Coast Universitys Lutgert School of Business and the Uncommon Friends Foundation on Tuesday, October 23. The recipient of the Business Ethics Award will be announced at the annual Uncommon Evening on Thursday, November 8 at the historic Burroughs Home & Gardens in Fort Myers. Companies that have already submitted nominations for 2018 are asked to call 337-9503 and confirm that their nomination has been received and is on file. Businesses in Lee, Charlotte, Collier, Hendry and Glades counties who consistently demonstrate a system-wide commitment to high ethical business practices are eligible to apply. Businesses can nominate themselves or be nominated by a third party. The online nomination form and guidelines are available at www. uncommonfriends.org. From left, Dr. Eric Dent, Brian Rist, Samantha Scott and Jennifer Nelson. Scott, president of Pushing the Envelope, Inc., the 2017 Business Ethics Award winner, accepted the award. photo provided Bonita Chamber Awards Two ScholarshipsThe Bonita Springs Area Chamber of Commerce Foundation recently announced the two winners of its annual Ralph A. Richardson Scholarship were Elia Angeles and Zachary Clark, both 2018 graduates of Estero High School. We are honored to have the opportunity to continue to support our future workforce through scholarships from the Ralph A. Richardson endowment, said Foundation President and CEO Tiffany Esposito. Our communitys future economic success is dependent upon the bright young minds of people like Elia and Zachary, and we are thrilled to support them in their higher education attainment. Angeles will attend Florida Gulf Coast University in the fall and would like to become a Lee County elementary school teacher upon graduation. In high school, she held leadership roles with JROTC and volunteered her time with both New Horizons and students with special needs. Clark will attend the University of Florida in the fall and would like to start his own business. He graduated from Estero High Schools Cambridge/AICE program, and participated in many student organizations, including the Environmental Club. To support the chamber foundations mission, purchase a ticket for the September 12 Stock Your Cellar Wine Tasting Fundraiser at Bonita Bay Club. Event proceeds will support the Bonita Chamber Foundations programs, and tickets can be purchased by visiting www. bonitaspringschamber.com or by calling 992-2943. Marketing Firm Earns EndorsementPriority Marketing, a certified Google Partner, recently earned a Google endorsement for mobile advertising, its third company certification awarded through Google Ads (formerly Google AdWords). The trio of certifications from Google offers independent verification that Priority Marketing possesses expertise in basic and advanced concepts in digital advertising, which includes creating, managing, measuring and optimizing ad campaigns across Google to generate the highest and most qualified conversions for its clients. Individually, our digital specialists and web developers have achieved the highest level of industry certifications and specializations, so when you combine their talents into one digital team, were well-equipped to manage the diverse digital needs of our clients, said Teri Hansen, APR, president and creative director of Priority Marketing. Technology can be one of our clients biggest allies, and as the digital world continues to evolve, its incredibly important that our team stays on top of the latest trends in digital advertising, marketing and design. Members of Priority Marketings digital team maintain individual Google certifications in search advertising, mobile advertising, video advertising, display advertising, Google Analytics IQ, mobile sites and digital sales. Last Call For Business Ethics Award Nominations

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Two Thrilling Events For The Ages During The Past Weekendby Ed FrankFrom the Mississippi River to the Land of the Ozarks, and from the shores of Chicagos Lake Michigan to the plains of the Midwest, they are still reverberating from last Sundays thunderous screaming over two thrilling sports events. If you missed the national telecasts of the 100th PGA Golf Tournament and Sunday nights Chicago Cubs-Washington Nationals baseball game, you missed two long-remembered contests for the ages. Chicagos ancient Wrigley Field 104 years old has seen many historic games; Babe Ruths called home run shot in Game Three of the 1932 World Series, and Gabby Hartnetts Homer in the Gloamin in 1938 to mention just a couple. But rookie David Botes pinch hit two-out, two-strike grand slam homer in the bottom of the ninth inning to lift the Cubs to a 4-3 win over the Nationals certainly earns him a page in the Chicago Cubs-Wrigley Field history books. Old Wrigley still must be shaking from the sell-out crowd of more than 41,000 that witnessed the historic home run. To find a walk-off grand slam with two outs and two strikes you have to go all the way back to 1988 when Baltimore Catcher Chris Holles did the same thing. But remember, Bote did it as a rookie and a pinch hitter. Its the kind of thing little boys dream of when playing sandlot baseball. Now lets switch 300 miles south of Chicago to the Bellerive Country Club in St Louis, site of last weeks 100th PGA Golf Championship. Huge crowds in sweltering heat packed every fairway, and while the muscular, 28-year-old Brooks Koepka dazzled the galleries with his booming drives in winning his third Major title, it was clearly the Tiger Woods show as the fans hooted and hollered his every shot. When Woods drained a long birdie putt on the final hole Sunday to secure a secondplace finish, the roar from the tens of thousands lining the fairway and 18th green must have echoed into the hills and valleys far beyond Bellerive. Thats not to say that Koepkas march to the title, two strokes better than Tiger, wasnt appreciated by the galleries. But in many ways he appeared to play second fiddle to the Tiger show just as it was in June when he won his second U.S. Open title that was headlined by Phil Mickelsons amateurish antics in stopping a runaway putt from rolling off the 13th green at Shinnecock Golf Club in South Hampton, New York. Koepka became only the fifth player to win the U. S. Open and the PGA in the same year. His 264 total also set a new PGA scoring record. And Tigers blistering 64 was his lowest final round in any of his majors. As the media has been reporting all week, Tiger is clearly back despite falling just short last Sunday. His five top-10 finishes this year says it all. We should mention that his second-place finish in the PGA earned him a $1,188,000 paycheck. Koepka pocketed $1,980,000. There was another important note of history to last weeks PGA at Bellerive. It was the site of the WGC American Express Championship in 2001. On the morning of September 11, 2001, many of the pros, including Woods, were playing practice rounds when word spread of the terrorist attacks. The tournament was cancelled and most had to scramble to find transportation home due to the disruption of airline schedules. Many who played this past weekend at Bellerive have lingering memories of that day. RIVER THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 201820 SPORTS QUIZ 1. Ichiro Suzuki became the oldest player since 1900 to start a game in center field (43 years, 246 days) when he did so for the Marlins in 2017. Who had held the post1900 record? 2. In 1996, two players on the same National League team each hit 40 or mor e home runs, and each had more homers than walks. Name either player. 3. How many years was it befor e 2016 that the University of Colorado football team played in a bowl game? 4. Name the first African-American to be inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame as a player. 5. Since the Pr esidents Trophy was created in 1985-86 to recognize the NHLs best regular-season team each year, how many times has the winner gone on to win the Stanley Cup? 6. Which female athlete has won the most medals in the W inter Olympics Games? 7. In 2018, Moriya and Ariya Jutanugar n became the second set of siblings to each win on the LPGA Tour. Who was the first set? ANSWERS 1. Bostons Rickey Henderson (43 years, 211 days), in 2002. 2. Andres Galarraga and Vinny Castilla of the Colorado Rockies. 3. Nine years (2007). 4. Boston Celtics great Bill Russell, in 1975. 5. Eight times (out of 32). 6. Marit Bjoergen of Norway, with 15 medals. 7. Annika and Charlotta Sorenstam, in 2000. Registration Open For Galloway Captiva Triathlon The annual Galloway Captiva Triathlon will be held Saturday and Sunday, September 15 and 16. The sprint triathlon is held at South Seas Island Resort on Captiva Island. It is a family friendly fitness weekend with more than 850 adults and 225 child competitors. The first day includes children fun races: children ages 6 to 8 and 9 to 10 will complete a 100-yard swim, 1.5-mile bike and .5-mile run, while the age 11 to 13 racers face a 200yard swim, three-mile bike and a one-mile run. The next day, adults will swim .25 miles, bike 10 miles and run 3.1 miles. Elite amateur athletes (who posted qualifying times at a USAT sanctioned event) will be sent off first in their own wave. The triathlon, which is sanctioned by USA Triathlon, is organized by Southwest Florida Events. A portion of the proceeds raised at the triathlon will go towards supporting Community Cooperatives Growing Healthy Kids Programs, providing emergency food for more than 6,000 local children and their families each school year with mobile food pantries. The program helps reduce child hunger and improves health and academic outcomes while providing support for Lee County children and families in need. For registration and more information, visit www.captivatri.org or Facebook under Captiva Tri. Golf Benefit For Hope HealthcareGolf Fore Hope, a golf tournament to benefit Hope Healthcares Parkinson Program, is scheduled for Saturday, October 13 at The Golf Club at Magnolia Landing, 3501 Avenida Del Vera Boulevard in North Fort Myers. The scramble format tournament will begin with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start and will include 18 holes of golf. Afterwards, golfers will enjoy a cookout lunch featuring prizes, raffles and more. Cost for individual golfers is $75 each; four-golfer teams are $300. The event is limited to 25 teams. From movement classes and educational events, to support meetings for patients and caregivers, the Hope Parkinson Program serves an important need in our community, said event coordinator Martin Haas. Since exercise has proven benefits for those with Parkinsons, this tournament is a great way to exercise and show our support for this amazing organization. Golf Fore Hope is sponsored by entech Business IT Solutions, Dino DeGrande and Alita Parody. For more information on registration and hole sponsorships, contact Martin Haas at 229-1000 or martin@entechus. com. Hope Healthcare is a not-for-profit health care organization dedicated to providing care and comfort to every individual and their loved ones as they fulfill lifes journey. For more information, call 482-4673 or visit www.hopehcs.org. 239.472.0004 Community, Service, Leadership, Expertise, Integrity, Results PRGHomeTeam.com Pfeifer Realty Group Is Your Home Team!Eric PfeiferBroker, Owner

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21 THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018 Wine Festival Grant To Benefit Grieving ChildrenValeries House has received a second grant in the amount of $75,000 from the Naples Children & Education Foundation (NCEF) that manages proceeds from the Naples Winter Wine Festival (NWWF). Valeries House provides children and their families who have experienced the death of a loved one a safe place to share and experience support with others who are also grieving, while moving through the healing process. The Naples Children & Education Foundation grant funding provides Collier County youth with arts, music and group therapy to help them identify, express and process grief, to become mentally healthy, stable and successful in school and life in addition to focusing on school outreach through the Valeries House Schools Awareness Program. Were again humbled by this great honor and show of confidence from the Naples Children & Education Foundation, said Angela Melvin, CEO and founder of Valeries House. This award is going to help us grow our grief support services in Collier County to support additional children near where their families live and work. The Naples Children & Education Foundation, the founding organization of the Naples Winter Wine Festival, is improving the educational, emotional, and health outcomes of underprivileged and at-risk children. Through its annual grants and strategic initiatives, NCEF has impacted over 45 of the most effective nonprofits in the community, providing more than 200,000 children with the services and resources they need to excel. The Naples Winter Wine Festival is one one of the worlds most prestigious charity wine auctions, Since its inaugural event in 2001, NWWF has raised more than $176 million, making a profound difference in the lives of thousands of children. Angela Melvin photo provided County Officials Provide Update On Water QualityEfforts to mitigate waterquality issues throughout Lee County continue under the leadership of the Lee Board of County Commissioners with county staff, contracted vendors and several state entities, including the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Florida Department of Health. At its regularly scheduled August 7 meeting, the board took the following actions: Voted unanimously to ask for federal resources. The boards resolution urges President Trump to recognize a major disaster exists in Lee County because of the high concentration and prolonged presence of harmful red tide in the Gulf of Mexico and harmful blue-green algal blooms in the Caloosahatchee River and surrounding waters. Heard from mayors and representatives of the countys six municipalities, who adopted their own State of Local Emergency. Extended the existing county State of Local Emergency for blue-green algae and issued a second State of Local Emergency for red tide. The board at its August 21 meeting is anticipated to approve several agenda items that will use Tourist Development Tax reserve funds for beach cleanup and marketing (read more under Coastal update). Waterway update (blue-green algae): The county has also created a test program to remove the blue-green algae from some of its most impacted waterways using a $700,000 grant from the state Department of Environmental Protection. It will remove, process, treat and dispose of harmful algae blooms from select test sites in unincorporated Lee County and affected municipalities, most notably Cape Coral. Lee County has mobilized AECOM, one of the nations largest construction and engineering firms with expertise in environmental cleanup, under a state contract for emergency cleanup deployments. Crews recently worked near the Clipper Bay condos in Cape Coral, north of Cape Coral Bridge and just east of Del Prado Boulevard. The amount of slurry pulled from Lee County waterways as of August 10 totals at an estimated 17 tankers at 5,000 gallons each for a total of 85,000 gallons. Recovered material will begin processing for disposal this weekend. The material will be processed at the site of the North Lee County Reverse Osmosis Plant. The algae/water mix collected is tested to assist and verify treatment methods being deployed to meet stateimposed water-quality standards. This is a pilot program. County staff is in contact daily with the state DEP and the contractor. We continue to refine the process and evaluate the results. Coastal update (red tide and red-drift algae): Lee County Parks & Recreation staff has been cleaning county beaches, parks and boat ramps affected by the red tide fish kill. The county has hired CrowderGulf, a debris-removal contractor, to assist in cleaning the beaches and shorelines, using both on-land and boat operations. Areas cleaned on land this past week included Boca Grande; Sanibel Causeway Islands; Fort Myers Beach (including Access 40 north to Crescent Beach, Lynn Hall Park and Bowditch Point Park); and Bonita Beach. Areas cleaned by boat this week included Captiva Island bayside (South Seas to Tween Waters); Upper Captiva / Safety Harbor canal; and Pine Islands southern canals in St. James City. Public fish waste dumpsters remain in place until further notice. Note: The City of Sanibel, Town of Fort Myers Beach and Captiva Erosion Prevention District continue their clean-up efforts in their areas. The Lee County Tourist Development Council met Thursday. Actions taken include votes on the following recommendations to the board to approve: Funding necessary to cover emergency beach clean-up expenses through the end of fiscal year, which ends September 30. Up to $1 million for a marketing campaign to launch after current conditions improve. Purchase of two Surf Rake ($61,000 each) machines for beach and shoreline cleanup. Note: All requests would be funded from existing tourist tax funds. Tallahassee representatives of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission met with Lee Countys senior leadership team Wednesday to discuss red tide and blue-green algae. The Lee County Visitor & Convention Bureau participated in a statewide conference call Thursday with Visit Florida, the Florida Department of Health, Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission and MOTE Marine Laboratory and Aquarium regarding the red tide bloom affecting six counties along the Gulf of Mexico. VISIT FLORIDA is working with county tourism industry partners, state agencies and other stakeholders to mitigate the red tides effects from a visitor perspective, and will communicate with visitors when the beaches are clear and back to normal. In addition, VISIT FLORIDA presented an action plan to ensure partners, stakeholders and consumers are armed with updated information as they work together to manage and minimize the impacts of red tide. For more information, visit www. leegov.com/waterqualityinfo.

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THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 201822 Summer Camp At Shell Point Was Fun For AllMore than 40 children, ages 5 to 12, recently attended Shell Point Summer Splash, a weeklong Vacation Bible School program created for the children and grandchildren of Shell Point employees and residents. A joint effort between Shell Point Retirement Community and The Village Church at Shell Point, this free, five-day summer program was designed to provide children with a fun-filled week of indoor and outdoor recreational activities, Bible lessons and team games. This is our first time hosting a Vacation Bible School at Shell Point, and we couldnt be more thankful for all of the wonderful volunteers who helped make it possible, said Laura Slack, director of resident life at Shell Point Retirement Community. It has given both residents and campers an opportunity to learn from one another and explore all of the resort-style amenities that surround our community. Throughout the week, campers were treated to boat rides, nature tours, golf lessons with Shell Point golf professionals, a Sub-Zero ice cream tutorial and obstacle courses. Lee County Sheriffs Department and the Iona-McGregor Fire Department also stopped by for some demonstrations and a chance for the kids to tour the inside of their vehicles. On the final day of camp, Shell Point residents and employees filled The Village Church for a musical performance and dance routine put on by the children. Clapping hands and cheerful sounds were heard throughout the auditorium as the program came to an end. We are already looking forward to next years summer camp and so are our residents, Slack said. Shell Point Summer Splash has definitely made waves across campus. Shell Point Summer Splash attendees listen during the program Shell Points golf instructors hit the course to teach children the fundamentals of the game photos provided Members of the Iona-McGregor Fire Department gave a demonstration and let campers use the fire hose Campers brushed up on their shuffleboard skills with resident Vicki Waterstradt during a day of outdoor activities and yard games Shell Point resident Carol Ashley, left, taught campers dance moves from her days as a professional ballroom dancer

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23 THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018 United Way Elects 2018-19 Board MembersEleven new board members were elected at the recent United Way of Lee, Hendry, Glades, and Okeechobee annual meeting. Joining the existing United Way Board of Directors are the following: Julian Agollari, Publix Bob Beville, Waterman Broadcasting Gary Brooks, Bonita Bay Community Gary Bryant, I WILL Mentorship Foundation Michael Collins, Collins Vision Peter Dulac, Enterprise Holdings Wane Herzog, Costco Victoria Loyola, Markham Norton Mosteller Wright & Co. Scott Nygaard, Lee Health Dan OBerski, Trinity Commercial Group David Oliver, Chicos FAS All money raised in the United Way Campaign stays in the local community to help support the local human service network. United Way partner agencies and initiatives like Alvin A. Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center, Childrens Advocacy Center, Harry Chapin Food Bank, ACT, LARC, and United Way 211 serve a diverse range of needs in the community, such as nurturing children and youth, strengthening families and meeting critical needs such as helping the elderly and disabled live independently, and empowering communities by bringing health and human services to neighborhoods. In addition to raising funds for human service organizations in our community, the United Way promotes partnerships and collaborations among agencies and initiatives, helping them to work together focusing on issues and solutions that continue to improve lives. The United Way of Lee, Hendry, Glades, and Okeechobee has raised and distributed over $167 million since it was established in 1957. For more information, call United Way at 4332000 or visit www.unitedwaylee.org. Julian Agollari Gary Brooks Michael Collins Wane Herzog Dan OBerski Dr. Scott Nygaard Bob Beville Gary Bryant Peter Dulac Victoria Loyola David OliverHaven Of Hope Founder To Climb MountainChildren growing up without parents in impoverished nations face a challenge as imposing as any mountain. Haven of Hope International founder Alice Skaff plans to climb to the 19,341-foot summit of Mount Kilimanjaro in October to bring awareness to the plight of orphans, raise money for Haven of Hopes partner orphanages and inspire others to undertake their own climb for the Klimbing for Kids cause. Im going to make it to the top. I have no doubt, said Skaff, who turned 54 this year. But as Im training, Im just thinking of these kids and the climb that they have just to succeed in life. This is nothing compared to their climb. An alarming 99.5 percent of children in orphanages around the world are never adopted. Orphanages turn out 10.5 million young adults each year, many without the life and vocational skills they need to survive on their own. Of those 10.5 million, 60 percent return to a life of poverty, and 10 percent take their own life. Haven of Hope seeks to enhance the impact of orphanages, many of which have struggled to properly care for children, by providing sustainable programs that will meet the complex needs of the children. The nonprofit organization has developed a model at its flagship orphanage in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, that encourages children to think big, dream bigger and gives them the tools they need to pursue those dreams. Now, through the Klimbing for Kids initiative, Haven of Hope is focused on answering the call of more than 60 other orphanages that have requested more than the rudimentary aid the organization is currently able to give them. We want to help other orphanages do more for the kids they serve, Skaff said. We cant do that unless people get involved and help us raise awareness about the orphan crisis thats going on, and donate to the cause so that we can go help these kids. Skaff has set a goal of raising $175,000, symbolizing the 175,000 feet of trail shell need to walk to get to the top of Kilimanjaro. Supporters can donate amounts based on the number of steps they take on walks, hikes or at the gym, and they can share the news of their own climb while challenging friends on social media with the hashtag #KlimbingForKids. Gyms can also get involved by challenging other gyms to see which of them can donate the most steps to Klimbing for Kids. The same goes for companies, church groups and civic clubs. Sponsorship opportunities and for more information, visit www.havenofhopeintl. org/2018/05/climbing-to-raise-funds. Alice Skaff photo provided Health Group Adds Board MemberHope Healthcares board of directors recently announced Lori Shaffer, senior vice president at Chicos FAS, as a new board member. Shaffer joined the company in 1998 and has held numerous leadership roles of increasing responsibility, including director of merchandising and vice president controller. In 2008, she assumed responsibility for the Chicos FAS outlet business and has been instrumental in driving growth of that division. Loris expertise is a great complement to our board, said Hope Healthcare President and CEO Samira K. Beckwith. We welcome her insights as we remain dedicated to serving the most vulnerable in our community despite decreasing reimbursement and increasing needs. Shaffer, a Fort Myers resident who also serves on Chicos corporate giving board, joins current Hope Healthcare board members including Noreen DiPlacido, a Florida licensed health care risk manager with nearly 25 years of experience in the medical field; Joe Gammons, principal at Office Furniture & Design Concepts; Tom Giles, founder, president and CEO of Avalon Engineering; Rev. Dr. Tim Halverson, pastor and head of staff at Faith Presbyterian Church in Cape Coral; Larry Hart, tax collector for the state of Florida; West McCann, president, The Naples Trust Company; Sandy Stilwell, owner and CEO of Stilwell Enterprises and Restaurant Group; and Trudi K. Williams, CEO of TKW Consulting. The boards officers include Chairman Bo Turbeville, vice president of Accent Business Products; Vice-Chair Jerry Nichols, a specialist for Employee Benefits Planning with Brown & Brown Benefits and a Northwestern Mutual Financial Representative; Treasurer Charles Idelson, principal founder of Investors Security Trust Company; and past Chair Sandy Robinson, former president of Northern Trusts Fort Myers office. The not-for-profit is led by Beckwith, its president and CEO. Board members serve three-year terms and contribute their expertise, time, talent and resources to advancing Hopes mission of providing exceptional care and support to every individual and their loved ones as they fulfill lifes journey. For more information, call 482-4673 or visit www.hopehcs.org. Lori Shaffer photo provided

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RIVER deaRPharmacistUnless You Are Allergic, Mangoes Are Magnificentby Suzy Cohen, RPhDear Readers:Mangoes are one of the most popular fruits around the world. The first thing I want you to know is that the peel of the fruit is a common cause for dermatitis for some of you. It contains the same compound found in poison ivy, oak and sumac which is called urushiol, which the plant uses as its own defense mechanism. Mango fruit contain many different antioxidants, some of which you might recognize like Vitamin A, Vitamin C, copper, potassium and magnesium. Eating it regularly could provide some protection against a wide range of physiological disorders, infection and pain. Here are some things that mangoes can do to improve your health: 1. Reduce Blood Sugar Researchers fed mice some freeze-dried mango meal, then gave the other half of the mice a medication for diabetes called Rosiglitazone (Avandia). Mangoes worked as well at reducing blood sugar as prescription drugs. 2. Reduce Pain and Inflammation Like most other fruits, mango contains a class of compounds called polyphenols. These are known to be hugely beneficial, particularly for their anti-inflammatory properties. When you reduce inflammation, you naturally reduce pain too. 3. Relieve Constipation Eating more fiber can make a big difference, and mangoes (like all fruits and vegetables) gives you a jump start on that by providing a lot of natural fiber. But it stands apart from other fruits due to the way mangiferin and other compounds that reduce intestinal inflammation. A recent study showed that eating one mango each day improved constipation symptoms much more than taking an equivalent amount of dietary fiber. 4. Protect Your GI Tract Tons of research has focused on the gut microbiome (the mix of bacteria in the gut) in the past few years. We know that probiotics can have a positive influence, but who thinks of mangoes?! The research I read shows that mice fed a diet rich in mango showed dramatic alterations in their gut bacteria. It helps to normalize your gut flora. 5. Protects Your Brain Mango leaf extract has even been shown to protect the brain. In mice exposed to cadmium, a toxic heavy metal that causes serious brain damage, mango leaf extract was shown to protect the brain. If youre not allergic to mangoes, add them to your salads and smoothies. Please be 100 percent sure you are not allergic to this delicious fruit, because again, the skin/peel, stem and leaves impart urushiol, which is also found in poison ivy. It doesnt impact everyone. In fact, Im not allergic at all to mangoes, but for some, the reaction can cause your lips and tongue, or the skin around your lips and chin, to itch and burn. It can cause full-on anaphylaxis. So I just want you to be warned that mangoes, like many tropical fruits, can cause a problem, and sometimes its a new onset allergy. If youre not sensitive, enjoy them as often as you can. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. SuzyCohen.com. THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 201824 Doctor and DieticianStrengthen Your Glutesby Ross Hauser, MD and Marion Hauser, MS, RDDid you know your gluteus minimus, medius and maximus are the largest and strongest muscles in your body? They are very important muscles that help with everyday movements, such as sitting, standing, walking, balancing and climbing stairs. Since they are pretty much involved in just about everything we do, keeping them strong is essential. Strong glutes can decrease your risk of injury to the low back, knee, groin, and hamstrings. Does your low back ache occasionally? The source just may be weak butt muscles causing back strain. Weak glutes can also cause an imbalance in the hip, leading to the abnormal tracking of the kneecap and knee pain. Additionally, weak glutes contribute to pulled groin and hamstring muscles, as well as poor balance. Do your glutes need some work? Squats are a wonderful exercise to add to your workout for glute strengthening. A few other good glute strengthening exercises include standing or quadruped hip extensions, clamshells, bridges, step ups, hip thrusts, and single-leg stands on a flat surface or a Bosu ball. Demonstrations of these exercises are easily found online or ask a trainer to show you. Pick a few favorites and try two sets of 10 repetitions three to four times a week. Including aerobic exercise in your weekly routine for 30 minutes five days per week helps to strengthen the glutes while burning fat too. Try adding an incline to treadmill workouts for an even greater butt strengthening boost. For athletes, strengthening the glutes helps improve sports performance. But for those who arent athletes, strong glutes are still very important because they simply make life easier. Want better posture or be able to climb stairs more easily? Try strengthening your glutes. Having strong glute muscles is fundamental for proper execution of so many daily tasks and mobility. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Caring Medical Regenerative Medicine Clinics has two locations: one in Oak Park, Illinois, and one in Fort Myers. It was established in 1991 by Ross Hauser, MD, and Marion Hauser, MS, RD. They can be reached at info@ caringmedical.com. Pilot Program For Degree SeekersFlorida Gulf Coast University is keeping its commitment to offer more educational opportunities for working adults in Charlotte County with the launch of a pilot degree-completion program. The program, known as FGCU Complete, enables people with a year-and-a-half or more of college credit to pursue an FGCU bachelors degree. The FGCU Complete Charlotte County pilot starts in October. We are enthusiastic about expanding our presence in Charlotte County and enhancing our service to its citizens, said FGCU President Mike Martin. The completer program, to be offered in collaboration with Florida SouthWestern State College, will, we believe, meet a real local need while serving as a model for similar applications elsewhere in the region. It could also serve as a platform for offering more comprehensive undergraduate and graduate programs. Three degree programs are part of FGCU Complete: bachelor of arts in integrated studies, bachelor of arts in interdisciplinary entrepreneurship studies, and bachelor of science in resort and hospitality management. These three degrees are ideally aligned with Southwest Florida workforce needs. Furthermore, the multidisciplinary approach of these degrees which combines courses across programs provides flexibility and adaptability wellsuited to adult learners unique academic and professional needs, making these majors perfect for degree-completion, said Dr. Paul Thornton, executive director of continuing education at FGCU. The Charlotte County pilot courses will be offered in eight-week terms instead of the traditional 16-week semester at FGCU. Beginning in the spring of 2019, FGCU Complete will formally launch across Lee, Collier, Hendry, Charlotte and Glades counties. FGCU Complete is pending approval of The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. Our overarching objective is to provide adults, especially working adults, a means to expand their horizons and be more productive members of the local workforce, Martin added. Students interested in the Charlotte County pilot program are invited to attend an information session at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, August 29, in the FGCU Herald County Centre at 117 Herald Court in Punta Gorda. For more information, contact FGCUs Office of Continuing Education at 7454700 or email fgcucomplete@fgcu.edu. From page 1Onesies Donatedfor both patients and visitors. The Shell Point project is part of the assisted living Giving Back program series, which connects assisted living residents with ways to participate in community and social involvement initiatives that benefit local nonprofit organizations. Few activities offer as much happiness and fulfillment as using our time and efforts to help when needed, said Amanda Pendergast, assisted living activities leader at Shell Point. Many of our residents have worked with children in the past and were passionate about continuing that admirable work. Some of the hand decorated onesies Shell Point resident David Ammerman decorates a newborn onesie

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THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018 25 Emergency . ............................................... 9 11 Lee County Sheriffs Ofce . .............................. 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol . ................................... 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol . .................................. 278-7100 Poison Control . ................................... 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center . ...................... 1-800-936-5321Ft .. Myers Chamber of Commerce . ......................... 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare . .......................... 4 25-2685 Fort Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce . ................... 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library . ............................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library . ................................ 5 33-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce . ........................ 931-0931 Post Ofce . ..................................... 1 -800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau . ............................ 3 38-3500ARTSAlliance for the Arts . .................................... 9 39-2787 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio . ............................ 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers . ............................... 275-3970 Barbara B .. Mann Performing Arts Hall . ...................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS . .......................................... 3 95-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre . .......................... 2 78-4422 Cultural Park Theatre . ................................... 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light . ................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade . ....................332-4488 Florida West Arts . ...................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers . ...................... 288-2535 Gulf Coast Symphony . .................................. 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres . ..................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic . ................................ 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater . ............................... 472-6862 SW Florida Symphony . .................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy . .................................... 936-3239 Young Artists Awards . ................................... 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAmerican Legion Post #38 . ........................... 2 39-332-1853 Angel Flight . .................................. 1 -877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center . .................................. 731-3535 American Business Women Association . .................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL . .................................... 3 39-8046 Audubon Society . ...................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR . ............................ 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society . ............................ 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus . ................... 1 -855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club . ................................. 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees . .............................. 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists . ................................. 415-2484 Embroiderers Guild of America Sea Grape Chapter . ...... 2 39-267-1990 FM UDC Chapter 2614 United Daughters of the Confederacy . ... 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL . .............................. 561-9164 Garden Club of Cape Coral . .......................... 2 39-257-2654 Horticulture and Tea Society . ............................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society . ................................... 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society . ......................... 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation . ........................ 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees . ......... 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America . ....................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL . ............................. 66 7-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans . ............................ 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy . ....................... 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association . ...................... 5 61-2118 Kiwanis Fort Myers Beach . .................... 7 65-4254 or 454-8090 Kiwanis Fort Myers Edison . .............................. 694-1056 Kiwanis Fort Myers South . ............................... 691-1405 Iona-McGregor . ....................................... 482-0869 Lions Club Fort Myers Beach . ............................. 463-9738 Lions Club Fort Myers High Noon . ......................... 466-4228 Lions Club Estero/South Fort Myers . ....................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County . ......................... 7 68-0417 Organ Transplant Recipients of SW Florida . .................. 247-3073 POLO Club of Lee County . ............................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers . ............................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society . ........................... 472-6940 United Way of Lee County . ............................... 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) . ................... 2 11 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews National Shell Museum . .................... 395-2233 Burroughs Home . ...................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium . ....................... 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates . ............................ 334-7419 Fort Myers Skate Park . .................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium . ................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge . .................. 4 72-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site . ......................... 2 39-992-0311 Langford Kingston Home . ............................ 239-334-2550 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center . .............. 765-8101 Skatium . ............................................. 3 21-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society . ...................... 93 9-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History . ...................... 321-7430 True Tours . .......................................... 94 5-0405 To be listed in calling card email your information to: press@riverweekly. .com PETS OF THE WEEKphotos provided PAWS Of SanibelMatilda And CapieHi, my name is Matilda. My foster mom calls me Tilly for short. Im about 11 months old and was lost in the area of East Lake Road, off Casa Ybel late last Friday night, August 3. Some kind people took me in for the remainder of the night. On Saturday morning, the lady from PAWS took me over to Coral Veterinary Clinic in Fort Myers to have them look me over. I have been combo tested (negative), had FVRCP and Rabies immunizations and was treated for fleas. I did not have a microchip. If PAWS cant find my people, I will be available for adoption in about two weeks. If I am your kitty, or you know who my people are, please call Pam at PAWS at 472-4823. You can also call if youre interested in meeting me and perhaps giving me a new forever home if my people cant be located. Hello, Im Capie. I was just born on June 2, so Im only 9 weeks old. Some great kids on vacation at South Seas Island Resort on Captiva found me on the side of the road on July 9 and took me to PAWS. I was very tiny back then. Ive been going to the vet for checkups and immunizations, etc. Im now up to 2 pounds, 7 ounces. Im told that Im a pretty handsome guy. My fur is kind of blue/gray, and I have interesting eyes and eyebrows. I love to run and chase golf balls and climb on cat trees. I would be very happy if someone would adopt me and take me to my forever home. Call Pam at PAWS at 472-4823 and come meet me. Matilda Capie Haven on Earth Animal LeagueCharlie Brown And PaigeHi! Im Charlie Brown. I am a handsome, 4-yearold male tabby with a very sweet personality. I am looking for a quiet home with someone who wants to give me lots of affection. Im currently living with a foster family. I have been fully vetted and brought up to date on all vaccines. My adoption fee is $75. Hello, Im Paige. I am a beautiful, calico female kitty, not even 2 years old. I am very affectionate, and I even get along with friendly dogs. I have been fully vetted and brought up to date on all vaccines. I tested positive for FIV, but Im told that I can still live a long, happy life once I find my forever home. I am currently staying with a foster mom and am not real crazy about the other cats in the house, so I would like to be an only cat. My adoption fee is $75. We are being cared for by Haven on Earth Animal League. For more information, call Diane at 860-833-4472 or email havenonearthanimalleague@yahoo.com. Charlie Brown Paige Lee County Domestic Animal ServicesYara And Mr. RobinsonHello, my name is Yara. I am a 5-year-old female hound mix with a beautiful brindle color and the sweetest eyes that you can look into and see a forever friend. I have a delightful attitude which makes me a wonderful companion. I did well in playgroup and would love to have another canine friend at home. Once you meet me, you are sure to fall instantly in love. My adoption fee is $75. Hi, Im Mr. Robinson. I am a 3-month-old male domestic shorthair kitten. I have an alluring white color with an adorable pink nose. Kittens love to play so having plenty of toys will keep me entertained. With the two-for-one special, you can take home a feline friend for me to always have a friend to play with. My adoption fee is $10. Adoption fees will be reduced for the entire month to just $10 each day for a different cat-egory: Manly Mondays all male cats; Tabby Tuesdays all tabby cats; Woman Wednesdays all female cats; Tuxedo Thursdays all black and white cats; Flashy Fridays highlighting long-term residents; and Stately Saturdays all senior cats. The adoption package includes spay or neuter, microchip, up-to-date vaccinations, county license and a 10-day health guarantee. That package is valued at $500. The team of volunteers and staff are waiting to introduce a new family member to their forever home. Stop by the adoption center 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers. Visit www.leelostpets.com to see pets available for adoption. Make sure you check the website to be sure pets are still available. The shelter is open to the public Monday through Saturday at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers. Adoptions are available 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For information, visit Lee County Domestic Animal Services at www.leegov.com/animalservices or call 533-7387. Yara ID# A747898 Mr. Robinson ID# A744625

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THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018 26 PUZZLESAnswers on page 29

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THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018 27 FIND AT LEaAST S SIX D DIffFFERENCES BETWEEN PaANElLS SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 29 answer on page 29Mushrooms Stuffed With Feta And Spinach 8 ounces bacon slices 1 cup chopped onion 1 10-ounce package chopped frozen spinach, thawed, squeezed dry 4 ounces feta cheese, crumbled (about cup) 4 ounces cream cheese, room temperature teaspoon dried crushed red pepper 2 pounds button mushrooms stemmed, (about 48; each about 1 inches diameter) Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Cook bacon in heavy, large skillet until crisp, about 8 minutes. Transfer bacon to paper towels to drain. Coarsely crumble bacon. Discard all but cup plus 2 teaspoons bacon fat (adding olive oil if necessary to equal that amount). Heat 2 teaspoons reserved bacon fat in heavy medium skillet over medium heat. Add chopped onion and saut until tender, about 5 minutes. Transfer to medium bowl and cool; mix in bacon, spinach, feta, cream cheese, and crushed red pepper. Season filling to taste with salt and pepper. Line 2 large rimmed baking sheets with foil. Toss mushrooms and reserved cup bacon fat in large bowl to coat. Sprinkle mushrooms with salt and pepper. Place mushrooms, rounded side down, in single layer on prepared baking sheets. Bake mushrooms until centers fill with liquid, about 25 minutes. Turn mushrooms over. Bake mushrooms until brown and liquid evaporates, about 20 minutes longer. Turn mushrooms over again. Spoon 1 heaping teaspoon filling into each mushroom cavity. (Filled mushrooms can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate.) Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Bake mushrooms until heated through, about 10 minutes. Transfer mushrooms to platter and serve warm. Yield About 48. Mushrooms Stuffed With Feta And Spinach p hoto courtesy Fresh From Florida

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To learn about the benets of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor42 Barkley Circle, Suite 1 Fort Myers, FL 33907 239-931-4543GENERAL CONTRACTOR N C R CGC1517615www.dbrowngc.com239-593-1998 A BBB Accredited Business with an +A Rating FISHING CHARTERLight Tackle Sport Fishing Tarpon Snook Redsh & More CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.comCLEANING SERVICES Jennifer Watson(239) 810-6293 Residential & Commercial Construction Clean Up Interior Windows Home Watch ELECTRICAL 204-B Waldo Avenue, Lehigh Acres, FL 33971generator@jteelectricinc.comBrady J. ReesGenerator and Service ExpertT | 239-368-9511 C | 239-980-1596 Lee, Collier, Hendry, Charlotte, Sarasota CountiesLic.# EC-13002460 SERVICE RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL REMODEL BUILDING & REMODELING PROFESSIONAL BUILDING & REMODELINGYour Assurance Of Quality SEE OUR WEBs S ITE www.DevereauxHomes.comClick On oO UR woWO RK Call For Consult 239-945-1002 HOME SERVICES P.O. BoOX 1050 SANIbBEL FLoORIDA 33957WWW.IsSLANDHoOMEsSERVICE.CoOM INfoFO@IsSLANDHoOMEsSERVICE.CoOMp P Ho O NE: (239) 472-5247 C CELL: (239) 229-6366JUERGEN SCHREYEROWNERYYARD SERVICE TREE SERVICE PooOOL SERVICEHHoOME WWAt TCH CCLEANING SERVICE ISLAND HOME SERVICE TREE TRIMMING, ARBORIST Licensed, insured, workers compensation Arbor Specialist Since 1995 Tree Trimming Tree Removal Stump Grinding239-910-3256info@treewest@gmail.comwww.treewestorida.comP.O. Box 564, Sanibel, FL 33957Tell A FriendHOME WATCH 239-558-5733 rabbitrdmgt@gmail.com www.RabbitRoadMgt.comRabbit Rd. Home Watch Service Home Watch Service based on Sanibel Island. We are licensed, insured, bonded and members of the National Home Watch Association. SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 88 Low: 78 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 77 THURSDAYMost ly Sunny High: 89 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:58 am12:47 pm7:28 pmNone Sat6:43 am12:03 am9:20 pm2:09 pm Sun7:38 am12:45 am11:12 pm3:28 pm Mon8:42 am1:42 amNone4:35 pm Tue12:26 am2:56 am9:49 am5:30 pm Wed1:11 am4:06 am10:49 am6:16 pm Thu1:43 am5:02 am11:39 am6:54 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri6:14 am12:02 am6:59 pm12:44 pm Sat6:48 am12:38 am7:45 pm1:41 pm Sun7:22 am1:19 am8:33 pm2:39 pm Mon7:57 am2:08 am9:29 pm3:36 pm Tue8:35 am2:57 am10:51 pm4:38 pm Wed9:40 am3:50 amNone5:48 pm Thu12:49 am5:15 am11:28 am6:50 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:03 am12:49 pm6:33 pmNone Sat5:48 am12:05 am8:25 pm2:11 pm Sun6:43 am12:47 am10:17 pm3:30 pm Mon7:47 am1:44 am11:31 pm4:37 pm Tue8:54 am2:58 amNone5:32 pm Wed12:16 am4:08 am9:54 am6:18 pm Thu12:48 am5:04 am10:44 am6:56 pm Day High Low High Low Fri8:08 am2:44 am9:38 pm4:03 pm Sat8:53 am3:19 am11:30 pm5:25 pm Sun9:48 am4:01 amNone6:44 pm Mon1:22 am4:58 am10:52 am7:51 pm Tue2:36 am6:12 am11:59 am8:46 pm Wed3:21 am7:22 am12:59 pm9:32 pm Thu3:53 am8:18 am1:49 pm10:10 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 88 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 SATURDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 81 FRIDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 Island Sun Weather Outlook Aug. 17, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 88 Low: 78 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 77 THURSDAYMost ly Sunny High: 89 Low: 79 Day High Low High Low Fri5:58 am12:47 pm7:28 pmNone Sat6:43 am12:03 am9:20 pm2:09 pm Sun7:38 am12:45 am11:12 pm3:28 pm Mon8:42 am1:42 amNone4:35 pm Tue12:26 am2:56 am9:49 am5:30 pm Wed1:11 am4:06 am10:49 am6:16 pm Thu1:43 am5:02 am11:39 am6:54 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri6:14 am12:02 am6:59 pm12:44 pm Sat6:48 am12:38 am7:45 pm1:41 pm Sun7:22 am1:19 am8:33 pm2:39 pm Mon7:57 am2:08 am9:29 pm3:36 pm Tue8:35 am2:57 am10:51 pm4:38 pm Wed9:40 am3:50 amNone5:48 pm Thu12:49 am5:15 am11:28 am6:50 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:03 am12:49 pm6:33 pmNone Sat5:48 am12:05 am8:25 pm2:11 pm Sun6:43 am12:47 am10:17 pm3:30 pm Mon7:47 am1:44 am11:31 pm4:37 pm Tue8:54 am2:58 amNone5:32 pm Wed12:16 am4:08 am9:54 am6:18 pm Thu12:48 am5:04 am10:44 am6:56 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:08 am2:44 am9:38 pm4:03 pm Sat8:53 am3:19 am11:30 pm5:25 pm Sun9:48 am4:01 amNone6:44 pm Mon1:22 am4:58 am10:52 am7:51 pm Tue2:36 am6:12 am11:59 am8:46 pm Wed3:21 am7:22 am12:59 pm9:32 pm Thu3:53 am8:18 am1:49 pm10:10 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 88 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 SATURDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 81 FRIDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 Island Sun Weather Outlook Aug. 17, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 88 Low: 78 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 77 THURSDAYMost ly Sunny High: 89 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:58 am12:47 pm7:28 pmNone Sat6:43 am12:03 am9:20 pm2:09 pm Sun7:38 am12:45 am11:12 pm3:28 pm Mon8:42 am1:42 amNone4:35 pm Tue12:26 am2:56 am9:49 am5:30 pm Wed1:11 am4:06 am10:49 am6:16 pm Thu1:43 am5:02 am11:39 am6:54 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri6:14 am12:02 am6:59 pm12:44 pm Sat6:48 am12:38 am7:45 pm1:41 pm Sun7:22 am1:19 am8:33 pm2:39 pm Mon7:57 am2:08 am9:29 pm3:36 pm Tue8:35 am2:57 am10:51 pm4:38 pm Wed9:40 am3:50 amNone5:48 pm Thu12:49 am5:15 am11:28 am6:50 pm Day High Low High Low Fri5:03 am12:49 pm6:33 pmNone Sat5:48 am12:05 am8:25 pm2:11 pm Sun6:43 am12:47 am10:17 pm3:30 pm Mon7:47 am1:44 am11:31 pm4:37 pm Tue8:54 am2:58 amNone5:32 pm Wed12:16 am4:08 am9:54 am6:18 pm Thu12:48 am5:04 am10:44 am6:56 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:08 am2:44 am9:38 pm4:03 pm Sat8:53 am3:19 am11:30 pm5:25 pm Sun9:48 am4:01 amNone6:44 pm Mon1:22 am4:58 am10:52 am7:51 pm Tue2:36 am6:12 am11:59 am8:46 pm Wed3:21 am7:22 am12:59 pm9:32 pm Thu3:53 am8:18 am1:49 pm10:10 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 88 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 SATURDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 81 FRIDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 Island Sun Weather Outlook Aug. 17, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 88 Low: 78 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 77 THURSDAYMost ly Sunny High: 89 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:58 am12:47 pm7:28 pmNone Sat6:43 am12:03 am9:20 pm2:09 pm Sun7:38 am12:45 am11:12 pm3:28 pm Mon8:42 am1:42 amNone4:35 pm Tue12:26 am2:56 am9:49 am5:30 pm Wed1:11 am4:06 am10:49 am6:16 pm Thu1:43 am5:02 am11:39 am6:54 pm Day High Low High Low Fri6:14 am12:02 am6:59 pm12:44 pm Sat6:48 am12:38 am7:45 pm1:41 pm Sun7:22 am1:19 am8:33 pm2:39 pm Mon7:57 am2:08 am9:29 pm3:36 pm Tue8:35 am2:57 am10:51 pm4:38 pm Wed9:40 am3:50 amNone5:48 pm Thu12:49 am5:15 am11:28 am6:50 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:03 am12:49 pm6:33 pmNone Sat5:48 am12:05 am8:25 pm2:11 pm Sun6:43 am12:47 am10:17 pm3:30 pm Mon7:47 am1:44 am11:31 pm4:37 pm Tue8:54 am2:58 amNone5:32 pm Wed12:16 am4:08 am9:54 am6:18 pm Thu12:48 am5:04 am10:44 am6:56 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:08 am2:44 am9:38 pm4:03 pm Sat8:53 am3:19 am11:30 pm5:25 pm Sun9:48 am4:01 amNone6:44 pm Mon1:22 am4:58 am10:52 am7:51 pm Tue2:36 am6:12 am11:59 am8:46 pm Wed3:21 am7:22 am12:59 pm9:32 pm Thu3:53 am8:18 am1:49 pm10:10 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 88 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 SATURDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 81 FRIDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 Island Sun Weather Outlook Aug. 17, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 88 Low: 78 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 77 THURSDAYMost ly Sunny High: 89 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:58 am12:47 pm7:28 pmNone Sat6:43 am12:03 am9:20 pm2:09 pm Sun7:38 am12:45 am11:12 pm3:28 pm Mon8:42 am1:42 amNone4:35 pm Tue12:26 am2:56 am9:49 am5:30 pm Wed1:11 am4:06 am10:49 am6:16 pm Thu1:43 am5:02 am11:39 am6:54 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri6:14 am12:02 am6:59 pm12:44 pm Sat6:48 am12:38 am7:45 pm1:41 pm Sun7:22 am1:19 am8:33 pm2:39 pm Mon7:57 am2:08 am9:29 pm3:36 pm Tue8:35 am2:57 am10:51 pm4:38 pm Wed9:40 am3:50 amNone5:48 pm Thu12:49 am5:15 am11:28 am6:50 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:03 am12:49 pm6:33 pmNone Sat5:48 am12:05 am8:25 pm2:11 pm Sun6:43 am12:47 am10:17 pm3:30 pm Mon7:47 am1:44 am11:31 pm4:37 pm Tue8:54 am2:58 amNone5:32 pm Wed12:16 am4:08 am9:54 am6:18 pm Thu12:48 am5:04 am10:44 am6:56 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:08 am2:44 am9:38 pm4:03 pm Sat8:53 am3:19 am11:30 pm5:25 pm Sun9:48 am4:01 amNone6:44 pm Mon1:22 am4:58 am10:52 am7:51 pm Tue2:36 am6:12 am11:59 am8:46 pm Wed3:21 am7:22 am12:59 pm9:32 pm Thu3:53 am8:18 am1:49 pm10:10 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 88 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 SATURDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 81 FRIDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 Island Sun Weather Outlook Aug. 17, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 88 Low: 78 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 77 THURSDAYMost ly Sunny High: 89 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:58 am12:47 pm7:28 pmNone Sat6:43 am12:03 am9:20 pm2:09 pm Sun7:38 am12:45 am11:12 pm3:28 pm Mon8:42 am1:42 amNone4:35 pm Tue12:26 am2:56 am9:49 am5:30 pm Wed1:11 am4:06 am10:49 am6:16 pm Thu1:43 am5:02 am11:39 am6:54 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri6:14 am12:02 am6:59 pm12:44 pm Sat6:48 am12:38 am7:45 pm1:41 pm Sun7:22 am1:19 am8:33 pm2:39 pm Mon7:57 am2:08 am9:29 pm3:36 pm Tue8:35 am2:57 am10:51 pm4:38 pm Wed9:40 am3:50 amNone5:48 pm Thu12:49 am5:15 am11:28 am6:50 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:03 am12:49 pm6:33 pmNone Sat5:48 am12:05 am8:25 pm2:11 pm Sun6:43 am12:47 am10:17 pm3:30 pm Mon7:47 am1:44 am11:31 pm4:37 pm Tue8:54 am2:58 amNone5:32 pm Wed12:16 am4:08 am9:54 am6:18 pm Thu12:48 am5:04 am10:44 am6:56 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:08 am2:44 am9:38 pm4:03 pm Sat8:53 am3:19 am11:30 pm5:25 pm Sun9:48 am4:01 amNone6:44 pm Mon1:22 am4:58 am10:52 am7:51 pm Tue2:36 am6:12 am11:59 am8:46 pm Wed3:21 am7:22 am12:59 pm9:32 pm Thu3:53 am8:18 am1:49 pm10:10 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 88 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 SATURDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 81 FRIDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 Island Sun Weather Outlook Aug. 17, 2018 7-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 88 Low: 78 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 77 THURSDAYMost ly Sunny High: 89 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:58 am12:47 pm7:28 pmNone Sat6:43 am12:03 am9:20 pm2:09 pm Sun7:38 am12:45 am11:12 pm3:28 pm Mon8:42 am1:42 amNone4:35 pm Tue12:26 am2:56 am9:49 am5:30 pm Wed1:11 am4:06 am10:49 am6:16 pm Thu1:43 am5:02 am11:39 am6:54 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri6:14 am12:02 am6:59 pm12:44 pm Sat6:48 am12:38 am7:45 pm1:41 pm Sun7:22 am1:19 am8:33 pm2:39 pm Mon7:57 am2:08 am9:29 pm3:36 pm Tue8:35 am2:57 am10:51 pm4:38 pm Wed9:40 am3:50 amNone5:48 pm Thu12:49 am5:15 am11:28 am6:50 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:03 am12:49 pm6:33 pmNone Sat5:48 am12:05 am8:25 pm2:11 pm Sun6:43 am12:47 am10:17 pm3:30 pm Mon7:47 am1:44 am11:31 pm4:37 pm Tue8:54 am2:58 amNone5:32 pm Wed12:16 am4:08 am9:54 am6:18 pm Thu12:48 am5:04 am10:44 am6:56 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:08 am2:44 am9:38 pm4:03 pm Sat8:53 am3:19 am11:30 pm5:25 pm Sun9:48 am4:01 amNone6:44 pm Mon1:22 am4:58 am10:52 am7:51 pm Tue2:36 am6:12 am11:59 am8:46 pm Wed3:21 am7:22 am12:59 pm9:32 pm Thu3:53 am8:18 am1:49 pm10:10 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 88 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 SATURDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 81 FRIDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 Island Sun Weather Outlook Aug. 17, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 88 Low: 78 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 77 THURSDAYMost ly Sunny High: 89 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:58 am12:47 pm7:28 pmNone Sat6:43 am12:03 am9:20 pm2:09 pm Sun7:38 am12:45 am11:12 pm3:28 pm Mon8:42 am1:42 amNone4:35 pm Tue12:26 am2:56 am9:49 am5:30 pm Wed1:11 am4:06 am10:49 am6:16 pm Thu1:43 am5:02 am11:39 am6:54 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri6:14 am12:02 am6:59 pm12:44 pm Sat6:48 am12:38 am7:45 pm1:41 pm Sun7:22 am1:19 am8:33 pm2:39 pm Mon7:57 am2:08 am9:29 pm3:36 pm Tue8:35 am2:57 am10:51 pm4:38 pm Wed9:40 am3:50 amNone5:48 pm Thu12:49 am5:15 am11:28 am6:50 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:03 am12:49 pm6:33 pmNone Sat5:48 am12:05 am8:25 pm2:11 pm Sun6:43 am12:47 am10:17 pm3:30 pm Mon7:47 am1:44 am11:31 pm4:37 pm Tue8:54 am2:58 amNone5:32 pm Wed12:16 am4:08 am9:54 am6:18 pm Thu12:48 am5:04 am10:44 am6:56 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:08 am2:44 am9:38 pm4:03 pm Sat8:53 am3:19 am11:30 pm5:25 pm Sun9:48 am4:01 amNone6:44 pm Mon1:22 am4:58 am10:52 am7:51 pm Tue2:36 am6:12 am11:59 am8:46 pm Wed3:21 am7:22 am12:59 pm9:32 pm Thu3:53 am8:18 am1:49 pm10:10 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 88 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 SATURDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 81 FRIDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 Island Sun Weather Outlook Aug. 17, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 88 Low: 78 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 77 THURSDAYMost ly Sunny High: 89 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:58 am12:47 pm7:28 pmNone Sat6:43 am12:03 am9:20 pm2:09 pm Sun7:38 am12:45 am11:12 pm3:28 pm Mon8:42 am1:42 amNone4:35 pm Tue12:26 am2:56 am9:49 am5:30 pm Wed1:11 am4:06 am10:49 am6:16 pm Thu1:43 am5:02 am11:39 am6:54 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri6:14 am12:02 am6:59 pm12:44 pm Sat6:48 am12:38 am7:45 pm1:41 pm Sun7:22 am1:19 am8:33 pm2:39 pm Mon7:57 am2:08 am9:29 pm3:36 pm Tue8:35 am2:57 am10:51 pm4:38 pm Wed9:40 am3:50 amNone5:48 pm Thu12:49 am5:15 am11:28 am6:50 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:03 am12:49 pm6:33 pmNone Sat5:48 am12:05 am8:25 pm2:11 pm Sun6:43 am12:47 am10:17 pm3:30 pm Mon7:47 am1:44 am11:31 pm4:37 pm Tue8:54 am2:58 amNone5:32 pm Wed12:16 am4:08 am9:54 am6:18 pm Thu12:48 am5:04 am10:44 am6:56 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:08 am2:44 am9:38 pm4:03 pm Sat8:53 am3:19 am11:30 pm5:25 pm Sun9:48 am4:01 amNone6:44 pm Mon1:22 am4:58 am10:52 am7:51 pm Tue2:36 am6:12 am11:59 am8:46 pm Wed3:21 am7:22 am12:59 pm9:32 pm Thu3:53 am8:18 am1:49 pm10:10 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 88 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 SATURDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 81 FRIDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 Island Sun Weather Outlook Aug. 17, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 88 Low: 78 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 77 THURSDAYMost ly Sunny High: 89 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:58 am12:47 pm7:28 pmNone Sat6:43 am12:03 am9:20 pm2:09 pm Sun7:38 am12:45 am11:12 pm3:28 pm Mon8:42 am1:42 amNone4:35 pm Tue12:26 am2:56 am9:49 am5:30 pm Wed1:11 am4:06 am10:49 am6:16 pm Thu1:43 am5:02 am11:39 am6:54 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri6:14 am12:02 am6:59 pm12:44 pm Sat6:48 am12:38 am7:45 pm1:41 pm Sun7:22 am1:19 am8:33 pm2:39 pm Mon7:57 am2:08 am9:29 pm3:36 pm Tue8:35 am2:57 am10:51 pm4:38 pm Wed9:40 am3:50 amNone5:48 pm Thu12:49 am5:15 am11:28 am6:50 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:03 am12:49 pm6:33 pmNone Sat5:48 am12:05 am8:25 pm2:11 pm Sun6:43 am12:47 am10:17 pm3:30 pm Mon7:47 am1:44 am11:31 pm4:37 pm Tue8:54 am2:58 amNone5:32 pm Wed12:16 am4:08 am9:54 am6:18 pm Thu12:48 am5:04 am10:44 am6:56 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:08 am2:44 am9:38 pm4:03 pm Sat8:53 am3:19 am11:30 pm5:25 pm Sun9:48 am4:01 amNone6:44 pm Mon1:22 am4:58 am10:52 am7:51 pm Tue2:36 am6:12 am11:59 am8:46 pm Wed3:21 am7:22 am12:59 pm9:32 pm Thu3:53 am8:18 am1:49 pm10:10 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 88 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 SATURDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 81 FRIDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 Island Sun Weather Outlook Aug. 17, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 88 Low: 78 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 77 THURSDAYMost ly Sunny High: 89 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:58 am12:47 pm7:28 pmNone Sat6:43 am12:03 am9:20 pm2:09 pm Sun7:38 am12:45 am11:12 pm3:28 pm Mon8:42 am1:42 amNone4:35 pm Tue12:26 am2:56 am9:49 am5:30 pm Wed1:11 am4:06 am10:49 am6:16 pm Thu1:43 am5:02 am11:39 am6:54 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri6:14 am12:02 am6:59 pm12:44 pm Sat6:48 am12:38 am7:45 pm1:41 pm Sun7:22 am1:19 am8:33 pm2:39 pm Mon7:57 am2:08 am9:29 pm3:36 pm Tue8:35 am2:57 am10:51 pm4:38 pm Wed9:40 am3:50 amNone5:48 pm Thu12:49 am5:15 am11:28 am6:50 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri5:03 am12:49 pm6:33 pmNone Sat5:48 am12:05 am8:25 pm2:11 pm Sun6:43 am12:47 am10:17 pm3:30 pm Mon7:47 am1:44 am11:31 pm4:37 pm Tue8:54 am2:58 amNone5:32 pm Wed12:16 am4:08 am9:54 am6:18 pm Thu12:48 am5:04 am10:44 am6:56 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:08 am2:44 am9:38 pm4:03 pm Sat8:53 am3:19 am11:30 pm5:25 pm Sun9:48 am4:01 amNone6:44 pm Mon1:22 am4:58 am10:52 am7:51 pm Tue2:36 am6:12 am11:59 am8:46 pm Wed3:21 am7:22 am12:59 pm9:32 pm Thu3:53 am8:18 am1:49 pm10:10 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 88 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 SATURDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 81 FRIDAYSunny High: 89 Low: 79 Island Sun Weather Outlook Aug. 17, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides

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THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018 29 KING CROSSWORD SUPER CROSSWORD MAGIC MAZE SUDOKU PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF AUGUST 20, 2018Aries (March 21 to April 19) Impatience with those who dont keep up with you can cause resistance, which, in turn, can lead to more delays. Best to be helpful and supportive if you want results. Taurus (April 20 to May 20) A surprise announcement from a colleague could put you on the defensive. Gather your facts and respond. Youll soon find the situation shifting in your favor. Gemini (May 21 to June 20) Time spent away from a project pays off with a new awareness of options you hadnt considered before. Weigh them carefully before deciding which to choose. Cancer (June 21 to July 22) Consider confronting that personal conflict while theres still time to work things out. A delay can cause more problems. A longtime colleague might offer to mediate. Leo (July 23 to August 22) Some emerging matters could impede the Lions progress in completing an important project. Best advice: Deal with them now, before they can create costly delays. Virgo (August 23 to September 22) Your aspect continues to favor an expanding vista. This could be a good time to make a career move, and taking an out-of-town job could be a good way to do it. Libra (September 23 to October 22) Disruptive family disputes need to be settled so that everyone can move on. Avoid assuming this burden alone, though. Ask for -no, demand -help with this problem. Scorpio (October 23 to November 21) Patience is called for as you await word on an important workplace situation. A personal circumstance, however, could benefit by your taking immediate action. Sagittarius (November 22 to December 21) Dont lose confidence in yourself. Those doubters are likely to back off if you demand they show solid proof why they think your ideas wont work. Capricorn (December 22 to January 19) A temporary setback might cause the usually sure-footed Goat some unsettling moments. But keep going. The path ahead gets easier as you move forward. Aquarius (January 20 to February 18) Theres welcome news from the workplace. There also could be good news involving a relationship that has long held a special meaning for you. Pisces (February 19 to March 20) You might still need to cut some lingering ties to a situation that no longer has the appeal it once held. In the meantime, you can start to explore other opportunities. Born This Week: Your sense of whats right can inspire others if you remember not to push too hard to make your case. Moderation works best for you. On Aug. 24, 1814, during the War of 1812, British forces overwhelm American militiamen and march unopposed into Washington, D.C. Most congressmen and officials had already fled. The British officers dined that night at the deserted White House as the British troops began setting the city aflame. On Aug. 25, 1835, the first in a series of six articles announcing the discovery of life on the moon appears in the New York Sun newspaper. The Great Moon Hoax described evidence of life forms including unicorns and winged humanoids resembling bats. On Aug. 20, 1911, a dispatcher in The New York Times office sends the first telegram around the world via commercial service. The message was relayed by 16 different operators and came back to the original dispatcher 16.5 minutes later. On Aug. 23, 1904, Harold Weed of Canastota, New York, is issued U.S. Patent No. 768,495 for his Grip-Tread for Pneumatic Tires, a nonskid tire chain to be used on automobiles in order to increase traction on slick roads. He drew inspiration from the habit of local motorists who wrapped rope around their tires. On Aug. 26, 1959, the British Motor Corporation launches its newest car, the small, affordable $800 Mark I Mini. The diminutive Mini went on to become one of the best-selling British cars in history. On Aug. 21, 1987, Dirty Dancing, starring Patrick Swayze, opens in theaters. The film was a surprise box-office hit and turned Swayze into a Hollywood star. On Aug. 22, 1992, in the second day of a standoff at Randy Weavers remote Idaho cabin atop Ruby Ridge, an FBI sharpshooter wounds Weaver and Kevin Harris, and then kills Weavers wife, Vicki, who was in a doorway holding her infant daughter. It was 18th-century French writer Sebastien Nicolas de Chamfort who made the following sage observation: Conscience is a dog that does not stop us from passing but that we cannot prevent from barking. You might be surprised to learn that famed British author Aldous Huxley, best-known for his dystopian novel Brave New World, was a consultant on Disneys 1951 animated film version of Alice in Wonderland. If you bring to mind an image of John Lennon, more likely than not youll see him in your minds eye wearing a pair of round spectacles. In July 2007, a single pair of those iconic glasses was sold at auction for a whopping $2 million. The tongue of the alligator is fastened to the jaw all the way around. Thats why youll never see a gator stick out its tongue. You might be surprised to learn that the kilt originated not in Scotland, but in France. You probably know that certain species of snakes can grow to enormous size, with the longest specimens reaching upward of 30 feet in length and the heaviest weighing more than 400 pounds. Kind of makes you wonder what these monstrous serpents eat -and you might be surprised. According to reports, a pet python named Houdini swallowed a queen-size electric blanket. Even more amazingly, after a two-hour operation, the snake lived! Those who track radio statistics say Led Zeppelins Stairway to Heaven is the most-requested song in the United States and this despite the fact that it was never released as a single on this side of the Atlantic. Theres no secret about success. Did you ever know a successful man who didnt tell you about it? Kin Hubbard SCRAMBLERS TRIVIA TEST 1. Fededrico Fellini 2. Tanzania 3. War 4. The B-52s 5. 42 6. 17th century 7. 1957 8. Scorpion 9. Cave 10. Four. TRIVIA ANSWERS 1. Movies : Who directed the movie La Dolce Vita? 2. Geography : Where is the famous Olduvai Gorge located? 3. Mythology : Tyr was a Norse god of what? 4. MUSIC : What pop group sang Love Shack? 5. Pr esidents: How old was Theodore Roosevelt when he was inaugurated? 6. Science : In what century was Isaac Newton born? 7. History : When was the last year the Dodgers played in Brooklyn? 8. General Knowledge : What is the symbol of the zodiac sign Scorpio? 9. Language : What does the Greek prefix speleo mean? 10. Measur ements: How many bottles of champagne are in a jeroboam? STRANGE BUT TRUE THIS WEEK IN HISTORY THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

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THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018 30 www.islandsunnews.com PLACE CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED To advertise in the Island Sun and The River Weekly News Call 395-1213 REAL ESTATEGARCIA REAL ESTATE AND CONSULTINGRICHARD J. GARCIA, GRI, BROKER239-472-5147garciaonsanibel.com 4/29 TFN COMMERCIAL RENTALWONDERFUL RENTAL IN POPULAR LOCATION ON SANIBEL 8/5 TFN COMMERCIAL UNIT FOR RENT 7/13 TFN VACATION RENTAL 1/26 TFN Island VacationsMillion $ Views Await You! 239-472-72771-888-451-72771/4 TFN CLOSE TO BOWMANS BEACH 6/29 9/14 SEASONAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTALSANIBEL ANNUAL RENTAL 7/27 TFN ANNUAL RENTAL SANIBEL 8/3 8/24 A+ ANNUAL RENTALS ON SANIBEL! 8/10 TFN PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT 3/2 TFN PUBLIC SERVICE BOATS CANOES KAYAKSDOCKAGE 1/4 TFN LOST BLACK CAT 8/17 TFN LOST AND FOUND SERVICES OFFEREDROGER NODRUFF ELECTRIC 4/20 TFN SCARNATO LAWN SERVICE 1/25 TFN 239-896-6789 4/13 TFN JC WINDOW CLEANING 8/17 TFN HELP WANTEDJERRYS FOODS SERVERS & BARISTAS 5/6 TFN FRONT DESK RECEPTIONIST 8/3 TFN HANDY-MAN PAINTER LIGHT CARPENTRY 8/17 TFN SERVICES OFFEREDHELLES CLEANING SERVICES 1/4 TFN ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL8/17 TFN472-6747Gulf Beach Properties, Inc. SANIBEL EAST END COTTAGE 8/10 8/17 ANNUAL RENTAL ON SANIBEL 8/17 TFN CALOOSA SHORES 8/17 9/7 ANNUAL HOUSE RENTAL SANIBEL 8/17 8/24 Landing a big fish from the beach can be hard on the fish. Dragging a fish up onto the sand if youre going to release it is not an option as it usually damages or kills the fish. Hold the fish in the water while you unhook it if youre going to release it. The less you can touch a fish before release the better for the fish. If you want a picture with the fish, support it as you lift it out of the water and do it quickly. Before releasing, revive the fish while holding it in the water; moving it slowly back and forth so water goes over its gills. The fish will let you know when its ready to swim off. Florida just recently changed the regulations on fishing from shore. Florida residents as well as out of state visitors need a fishing license to fish from shore. Shore Fishing: Don't Harm The Fishby Capt. Matt Mitchell

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THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 2018 31 Top 10 Real Estate SalesCourtesy of Royal Shell Real EstateFrom page 1CROWand white pelicans, plus a craft activity using recycled materials will be offered. Floridas Furry Friends A special presentation on animals found throughout the Sunshine State, plus a craft activity using recycled materials will be offered. Additional encounters with live animals and members of CROWs veterinary team, along with some wildlife-related games for kids, are also planned. We think its gonna be a really fun time, teaching people how to coexist with animals and, if theyre found sick or injured, what to do, added Urasky. Itll be a fun day for the whole family. Lakes Regional Park is located at 7330 Gladiolus Drive in Fort Myers. Parking fees will apply. For additional information, visit www.crowclinic.org. Bonita Chamber Awards Two ScholarshipsThe Bonita Springs Area Chamber of Commerce Foundation recently announced the two winners of its annual Ralph A. Richardson Scholarship were Elia Angeles and Zachary Clark, both 2018 graduates of Estero High School. We are honored to have the opportunity to continue to support our future workforce through scholarships from the Ralph A. Richardson endowment, said Foundation President and CEO Tiffany Esposito. Our communitys future economic success is dependent upon the bright young minds of people like Elia and Zachary, and we are thrilled to support them in their higher education attainment. Angeles will attend Florida Gulf Coast University in the fall and would like to become a Lee County elementary school teacher upon graduation. In high school, she held leadership roles with JROTC and volunteered her time with both New Horizons and students with special needs. Clark will attend the University of Florida in the fall and would like to start his own business. He graduated from Estero High Schools Cambridge/AICE program, and participated in many student organizations, including the Environmental Club. To support the chamber foundations mission, purchase a ticket for the September 12 Stock Your Cellar Wine Tasting Fundraiser at Bonita Bay Club. Event proceeds will support the Bonita Chamber Foundations programs, and tickets can be purchased by visiting www. bonitaspringschamber.com or by calling 992-2943. Signs That Kids Are Being Bullied And What To DoMore than 43 percent of teens report being bullied online; additionally, teens are more than twice as likely to tell their peers about bullying than they are to tell parents or other adults, one study found. Victims of bullying and other early trauma often carry emotional scars into adulthood, Dr. Nelson, author of the bestselling book The Emotion Code, explains in a short video at www.youtube.com/ watch?v=qcRV6FAFjRM. Many kids who are victimized by bullying dont ask for help because they are afraid of being seen as weak or a tattletale, or fear backlash from the bully or rejection by friends, Dr. Nelson said. As a result, parents are often the last ones to know. Twelve warning signs parents should watch for: 1. Emotional upset, anxiety and depression 2. Frequent headaches and stomach aches 3. Faking illness 4. Unexplainable injuries 5. Changes in eating habits 6. Poor sleep/frequent nightmares 7. A drop in school performance 8. Not wanting to go to school 9. Sudden loss of friends 10. Avoidance of social situations 11. Low self-esteem 12. Self-destructive behaviors including self-harm, running away, or talking about suicide Dr. Nelson explains why some kids become bullies and others can become targets of bullying. He can share how parents can talk with their children to uncover and heal the emotional trauma of bullying, as well as other steps and when to take them. Take necessary action with the school and/or the bullies parents to assure the childs safety, Dr. Nelson said. Help the child to know that he or she is valued and that it is safe to communicate with you as a parent or a counselor. Hortoons Subdivision City Year BuiltSquare FootageListing Price Selling Price Days On Market Edgewater Fort Myers 1997 4,677 $1,799,000 $1,680,000 175 Costa AmalfiMiromar Lakes 2013 3,986 $1,799,000 $1,750,000 96 Cape Coral Cape Coral 2014 3,285 $1,199,000 $1,165,000 43 Cape Coral Cape Coral 2006 3,728 $1,150,000 $1,100,000 15 Sunset Captiva Captiva 1980 1,440 $989,000 $925,000 124 Cape Coral Cape Coral 1999 3,361 $800,000 $775,000 3 York Manor Fort Myers 1996 3,600 $799,000 $770,800 172 Cape Coral Cape Coral 1991 2,395 $749,900 $737,500 14 The Dunes Sanibel 1978 2,000 $749,900 $740,000 2 Ginger Pointe Estero 2001 2,635 $679,000 $660,000 140

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THE RIVER AUGUST 17, 201832